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Sample records for volume isentropic compressibility

  1. Excess molar volumes and isentropic compressibilities of binary liquid mixtures containing n-alkanes at 298.15 K

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Vyas; T Nautiyal

    2002-10-01

    Excess molar volumes (E) and deviation in isentropic compressibilities (s) have been investigated from the density and speed of sound measurements of six binary liquid mixtures containing -alkanes over the entire range of composition at 298.15 K. Excess molar volume exhibits inversion in sign in one binary mixture, i.e., n-heptane + n-hexane. Remaining five binary mixtures, n-heptane + toluene, cyclohexane + n-heptane, cyclohexane + n-hexane, toluene + nhexane and n-decane + n-hexane show negative excess molar volumes over the whole composition range. However, the large negative values of excess molar volume becomes dominant in toluene + n-hexane mixture. Deviation in isentropic compressibility is negative over the whole range of composition in the case of all the six binary mixtures. Existence of specific intermolecular interactions in the mixtures has been analyzed in terms of excess molar volume and deviation in isentropic compressibility.

  2. Experiments of cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Zhuowei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The high Explosive Magnetic Flux Implosion Compression Generator (EMFICG is a kind of unique high energy density dynamic technique with characters like ultrahigh pressure and low temperature rising and could be suitable as a tool of cylindrical isentropic compression. The Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (IFP, CAEP have developed EMFICG technique and realized cylindrical isentropic compression. In the experiments, a seed magnetic field of 5–6 Tesla were built first and compressed by a stainless steel liner which is driven by high explosive. The inner free surface velocity of sample was measured by PDV. The isentropic compression of a copper sample was verified and the isentropic pressure is over 100 GPa. The cylindrical isentropic compression process has been numerical simulated by 1D MHD code and the simulation results were compared with the experiments. Compared with the transitional X-ray flash radiograph measurement, this method will probably promote the data accuracy.

  3. How to Plan and Analyze an Isentropic Compression Experiment (ICE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hare, D E

    2004-08-06

    This report is a how-to manual for planning and analyzing an Isentropic Compression Experiment (ICE). Here the specific task is to find the unreacted Hugoniot of high explosive (HE) using Sandia National Laboratories Z-machine facility. However, many of the principles are broadly applicable to general ICE problems.

  4. Condensation of saturated vapours on isentropic compression: a simple criterion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patwardhan, V.S.

    1987-01-01

    A criterion is derived and tested for determining whether the isentropic compression of saturated vapours leads to superheat or condensation. This criterion needs only values of the critical temperature, the acentric factor and the liquid specific heat. The application of the criterion for selection of a working fluid both for heat pumps and heat engines is discussed.

  5. DECAY ESTIMATES FOR ISENTROPIC COMPRESSIBLE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC EQUATIONS IN BOUNDED DOMAIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Ahmed Abdallah; Jiang Fei; Tan Zhong

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,under the hypothesis that (o) is upper bounded,we construct a Lyapunov functional for the multidimensional isentropic compressible magnetohydrodynamic equations and show that the weak solutions decay exponentially to the equilibrium state in L2 norm.Our result verifies that the method of Daoyuan Fang,Ruizhao Zi and Ting Zhang [1] can be adapted to magnetohydrodynamic equations.

  6. Isentropic Compression of Multicomponent Mixtures of Fuels and Inert Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barragan, Michelle; Julien, Howard L.; Woods, Stephen S.; Wilson, D. Bruce; Saulsberry, Regor L.

    2000-01-01

    In selected aerospace applications of the fuels hydrazine and monomethythydrazine, there occur conditions which can result in the isentropic compression of a multicomponent mixture of fuel and inert gas. One such example is when a driver gas such as helium comes out of solution and mixes with the fuel vapor, which is being compressed. A second example is when product gas from an energetic device mixes with the fuel vapor which is being compressed. Thermodynamic analysis has shown that under isentropic compression, the fuels hydrazine and monomethylhydrazine must be treated as real fluids using appropriate equations of state. The appropriate equations of state are the Peng-Robinson equation of state for hydrazine and the Redlich-Kwong-Soave equation of state for monomethylhydrazine. The addition of an inert gas of variable quantity and input temperature and pressure to the fuel compounds the problem for safety design or analysis. This work provides the appropriate thermodynamic analysis of isentropic compression of the two examples cited. In addition to an entropy balance describing the change of state, an enthalpy balance is required. The presence of multicomponents in the system requires that appropriate mixing rules are identified and applied to the analysis. This analysis is not currently available.

  7. The VELOCE pulsed power generator for isentropic compression experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ao, Tommy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dynamic Material Properties; Asay, James Russell [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dynamic Material Properties; Chantrenne, Sophie J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dynamic Material Properties; Hickman, Randall John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dynamic Material Properties; Willis, Michael David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dynamic Material Properties; Shay, Andrew W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dynamic Material Properties; Grine-Jones, Suzi A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dynamic Material Properties; Hall, Clint Allen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dynamic Material Properties; Baer, Melvin R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Engineering Sciences Center

    2007-12-01

    Veloce is a medium-voltage, high-current, compact pulsed power generator developed for isentropic and shock compression experiments. Because of its increased availability and ease of operation, Veloce is well suited for studying isentropic compression experiments (ICE) in much greater detail than previously allowed with larger pulsed power machines such as the Z accelerator. Since the compact pulsed power technology used for dynamic material experiments has not been previously used, it is necessary to examine several key issues to ensure that accurate results are obtained. In the present experiments, issues such as panel and sample preparation, uniformity of loading, and edge effects were extensively examined. In addition, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations using the ALEGRA code were performed to interpret the experimental results and to design improved sample/panel configurations. Examples of recent ICE studies on aluminum are presented.

  8. Isentropic compressive wave generator and method of making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, L.M.

    An isentropic compressive wave generator and method of making same are disclosed. The wave generator comprises a disk or flat pillow member having component materials of different shock impedances formed in a configuration resulting in a smooth shock impedance gradient over the thickness thereof for interpositioning between an impactor member and a target specimen for producing a shock wave of a smooth predictable rise time. The method of making the pillow member comprises the reduction of the component materials to a powder form and forming the pillow member by sedimentation and compressive techniques.

  9. Mesoscale Modeling of LX-17 Under Isentropic Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, H K; Willey, T M; Friedman, G; Fried, L E; Vandersall, K S; Baer, M R

    2010-03-06

    Mesoscale simulations of LX-17 incorporating different equilibrium mixture models were used to investigate the unreacted equation-of-state (UEOS) of TATB. Candidate TATB UEOS were calculated using the equilibrium mixture models and benchmarked with mesoscale simulations of isentropic compression experiments (ICE). X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) data provided the basis for initializing the simulations with realistic microstructural details. Three equilibrium mixture models were used in this study. The single constituent with conservation equations (SCCE) model was based on a mass-fraction weighted specific volume and the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. The single constituent equation-of-state (SCEOS) model was based on a mass-fraction weighted specific volume and the equation-of-state of the constituents. The kinetic energy averaging (KEA) model was based on a mass-fraction weighted particle velocity mixture rule and the conservation equations. The SCEOS model yielded the stiffest TATB EOS (0.121{micro} + 0.4958{micro}{sup 2} + 2.0473{micro}{sup 3}) and, when incorporated in mesoscale simulations of the ICE, demonstrated the best agreement with VISAR velocity data for both specimen thicknesses. The SCCE model yielded a relatively more compliant EOS (0.1999{micro}-0.6967{micro}{sup 2} + 4.9546{micro}{sup 3}) and the KEA model yielded the most compliant EOS (0.1999{micro}-0.6967{micro}{sup 2}+4.9546{micro}{sup 3}) of all the equilibrium mixture models. Mesoscale simulations with the lower density TATB adiabatic EOS data demonstrated the least agreement with VISAR velocity data.

  10. Isentropic compression studies using the NHMFL single turn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasker, Douglas G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mielke, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rickel, Dwight [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-10-19

    Magnetic isentropic compression experiments (ICE) provide the most accurate shock free compression data for materials at megabar stresses. Recent ICE experiments performed on the Sandia Z-machine (Asay, 1999) and at the Los Alamos High Explosive Pulsed Power facility (Tasker, 2006) are providing our nation with data on material properties in extreme dynamic high stress environments. The LANL National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) can offer a less complex ICE experiment at high stresses (up to {approx}1Mbar) with a high sample throughput and relatively low cost. This is not to say that the NHMFL technique will replace the other methods but rather complement them. For example, NHMFL-ICE is ideal for the development of advanced diagnostics, e.g., to detect phase changes. We will discuss the physics of the NHMFL-ICE experiments and present data from the first proof-of-principle experiments that were performed in September 2010.

  11. Metal Liner Implosions for Cylindrical Convergent Isentropic Compression of Deuterium and its Application to MAGLIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinwurm, Marcus; Appelbe, Brian; Skidmore, Jonathan; Bland, Simon; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2012-10-01

    Isentropic Compression Experiments on pulsed power machines in the field of High Energy Density Physics have gained interest in recent years. We describe a method of isentropically compressing cryogenic Deuterium inside a metal liner. Pulse shaping was performed by solving Kidder's homogeneous isentropic compression for cylindrical geometry and extending it to an arbitrary Equation of State. The obtained pulse shape enables us to simulate a cylindrically convergent ramp wave, which quasi-isentropically compresses the Deuterium fill to densities much higher than achievable by using a standard pulse. The effect of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities upon the peak density achieved is evaluated using the resistive magneto-hydrodynamics code Gorgon for a maximum current of 25 MA. Therefore, isentropic liner implosions are a promising technique for recreating the conditions present in the interiors of gas giants. We applied this technique to the High-Gain Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MAGLIF) scheme [1]. There a metal liner is filled with DT gas surrounded by a layer of DT ice. We show how the current pulse can be shaped in order to isentropically compress the DT ice layer. By doing so, we keep the fuel at low temperature. This maximises the compression of the DT ice layer, and increases rho-r at stagnation. Burn wave propagation in the isentropically compressed fuel is compared to propagation in fuel compressed by a standard current pulse. [4pt] [1] S.A. Slutz and R. A. Vesey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 025003 (2012)

  12. Modelling the effect of shear strength on isentropic compression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Stuart; Howell, Peter; Ockendon, John; Ockendon, Hilary

    2017-01-01

    Isentropic compression experiments (ICE) are a way of obtaining equation of state information for metals undergoing violent plastic deformation. In a typical experiment, millimetre thick metal samples are subjected to pressures on the order of 10 - 102 GPa, while the yield strength of the material can be as low as 10-2 GPa. The analysis of such experiments has so far neglected the effect of shear strength, instead treating the highly plasticised metal as an inviscid compressible fluid. However making this approximation belies the basic elastic nature of a solid object. A more accurate method should strive to incorporate the small but measurable effects of shear strength. Here we present a one-dimensional mathematical model for elastoplasticity at high stress which allows for both compressibility and the shear strength of the material. In the limit of zero yield stress this model reproduces the hydrodynamic models currently used to analyse ICEs. Numerical solutions of the governing equations will then be presented for problems relevant to ICEs in order to investigate the effects of shear strength compared with a model based purely on hydrodynamics.

  13. Adaptation of existing facilities to isentropic compression experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasker, Douglas G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mielke, Charles H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rickel, Dwight G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-07

    We demonstrate that the established pulsed power infrastructure at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory - Pulsed Field Facility (NHMFL-PFF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory can be adapted to obtain high quality isentropic compression experiment (ICE) data on materials in extreme conditions of dynamic high pressure. Experiments utilized a single-turn magnet pulsed power system at the NHMFL-PFF that was originally designed to measure actinide samples in extremes of high magnetic field (to 300 Tesla). A simple modification to the single-turn magnet has converted it to a fast turnaround dynamic high pressure measurement system. This paper details the work done including important background details that indicate that much more can be accomplished with optimization of the load characteristics in terms of ultimate peak pressures. To match the rise time of the NHMFL capacitor bank ({approx}2 {mu}s versus {approx}0.5 {mu}s for the Sandia Z-machine) the sample dimensions can be relatively large, i.e., up to 5 mm thickness. The maximum stresses are {approx}50GPa (0.5 Mbar) at the maximum bank voltage (60 kV) and higher pressures may be possible if the sample is tamped. For the design and predictions of performance of the NHMFL-ICE experiment it is important to have good predictive models. A SPICE code simulation was chosen to model all aspects of the experiment, electrical and physical. To this end, accurate dynamic load models were developed to simulate the compression and expansion of the dynamic load at high pressures using shock physics principles. A series experiments have been performed which demonstrated the feasibility of the NHMFL-ICE technique. The results will be shown and discussed. The NHMFL-ICE technique is an excellent method for measuring equations of state (EOS) at megabar pressures. Because a complete EOS can be obtained in one experiment from zero to the peak pressure, and because many shots can be fired in one day, the technique promises to

  14. Isentropic Compression of Nitroplastized Estane to ≈ 35 KBAR on the Sandia Z-Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsen, R. L.; Dattelbaum, D. M.; Orler, E. B.; Hooks, D. E.; Alcon, R. R.; Sheffield, S. A.; Hall, C. E.; Baer, M. R.

    2006-07-01

    Nitroplasticized Estane (hereafter NP-Estane) is the plastic binder used to hold HMX grains together in the plastic bonded explosive PBX 9501. It is a mixture of 49 wt. % Estane®5703 (BF Goodrich), 49 wt. % Nitroplasticizer (a 50/50 eutectic mixture of bis(2,2-dinitropropyl)formal and bis(2,2 dinitropropyl)acetal), and 2 wt. % Irganox® 1010 stabilizer. NP-Estane samples 0.1 - 2 mm thick were prepared by compression molding at 110°C. Hydrostatic compression to 2 kbar was measured at 34, 43, and 53°C. CP was measured at ambient conditions. NP-Estane was also isentropically compressed to ≈ 35 kbar in experiment Z1251 on the Sandia Z-Machine. Profiles of ramp waves transmitted through NP-Estane were measured and compared with a free surface reference profile using Hayes's "Backward" analysis and repeated forward analysis with the CTH hydrocode. The following thermodynamic quantities have been obtained; volume coefficient of thermal expansion α = 7.2(10-4)/C, CP = 1.76 J/g C, CV = 1.41 J/g C, isentropic and isothermal bulk moduli, BS = 36.4 kbar, BT = 29.3 kbar, Grüneisen constant Γ = 1.45. The Z1251 experiment is well fit using a Mie-Grüneisen equation of state with the quadratic US - uP relation, US = 1.69 + 2.7uP - (0.7/1.69)uP2 km/s.

  15. Isentropic Compression Studies at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    D.G. Tasker, C.H. Mielke , G. Rodriguez, and D.W. Rickel Los Alamos National Laboratory, WX-6, MS J566 Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA Abstract...07E108-3. [3] D. G. Tasker, C. H. Mielke , G. Rodriguez, and D. G. Rickel, "A Simple Isentropic Compression Experiment (ICE) Machine," presented at

  16. Global existence of smooth solutions to two-dimensional compressible isentropic Euler equations for Chaplygin gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the two-dimensional compressible isentropic Euler equations for Chaplygin gases. Under the assumption that the initial data is close to a constant state and the vorticity of the initial velocity vanishes, we prove the global existence of the smooth solution to the Cauchy problem for twodimensional flow of Chaplygin gases.

  17. Equation of State Determination from Quasi-Isentropic Compression of Solid Beryllium Liners on Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Matthew; Lemke, Raymond; McBride, Ryan; Knudson, Marcus; Davis, Jean-Paul

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the beryllium equation of state through constraining magneto-hydrodynamic and magneto-solid dynamic simulation with experimentally determined density profiles of a compressed beryllium cylindrical liner. Experiments utilizing pulse shaping techniques on Z have achieved quasi-isentropic compression of cylindrical beryllium liners to approximately 3 Megabars, and simulation results suggest that a large fraction of the liner remains in the solid phase through peak pressure for a 20 MA current pulse on Z. This opens up the possibility of extending the range of pressures we can explore with magnetic drive by utilizing cylindrical convergence. However, the cylindrical geometry limits the usefulness of diagnostics commonly applied to planar equation of state measurements on pulsed power machines and requires the development of new methods to unfold isentropes from the experimental data.

  18. Incompressible limit of the compressible non-isentropic magnetohydrodynamic equations with zero magnetic diffusivity

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Song; Li, Fucai

    2011-01-01

    We study the incompressible limit of the compressible non-isentropic magnetohydrodynamic equations with zero magnetic diffusivity and general initial data in the whole space $\\mathbb{R}^d$ $(d=2,3)$. We first establish the existence of classic solutions on a time interval independent of the Mach number. Then, by deriving uniform a priori estimates, we obtain the convergence of the solution to that of the incompressible magnetohydrodynamic equations as the Mach number tends to zero.

  19. Effects of structural isomerism on solution behaviour of solutes: Apparent molar volumes and isentropic compression of catechol, resorcinal, and hydroquinone in aqueous solution at T = (283.15, 293.15, 298.15, 303.15, and 313.15) K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayram, Edip [Department of Chemistry, Akdeniz University, Antalya 07058 (Turkey); Ayranci, Erol, E-mail: eayranci@akdeniz.edu.t [Department of Chemistry, Akdeniz University, Antalya 07058 (Turkey)

    2010-09-15

    Effects of structural isomerism on solution behaviour of dihydroxybenzenes were examined through the determination of volumetric properties such as apparent molar volumes, apparent molar isentropic compressions, and isobaric expansions. The isomers were 1,2-dihydroxybenzene (catechol), 1,3-dihydroxybenzene (resorcinol), and 1,4-dihydroxybenzene (hydroquinone). The volumetric properties were determined from accurate density and speed of sound measurements at T = (283.15, 293.15, 298.15, 303.15, and 313.15) K and at various concentrations. Values at infinite dilution of these parameters were obtained by suitable extrapolation procedures. The results are discussed in terms of hydrophobic, hydrogen bonding, and dipole-dipole interactions between the three isomers and water. Catechol was found to have the strongest hydrophilic and the weakest hydrophobic interactions with water among the three isomers.

  20. Ultrasonic velocity and isentropic compressibility of binary fluid mixtures at 298.15 K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Kumar Shukla

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Speed of sound and isentropic compressibility of six polar-nonpolar cyclic liquid binary mixtures has been computed over the whole composition range at 298.15 K with the help of Prigogine-Flory-Patterson theory. Experimental surface tension and experimental density data were utilized in the prediction of sound velocity with the use of Auerbach relation. A comparison has then been carried out as regards the merit and demerits of the employed relations. An attempt has also been made to study the nature and magnitude of molecular interactions involved in the liquid mixture.

  1. Isentropic Compression Experiments Performed By LLNL On Energetic Material Samples Using The Z Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandersall, K S; Reisman, D B; Forbes, J W; Hare, D E; Garcia, F; Uphaus, T M; Elsholz, A J; Tarver, C M; Eggert, J H

    2007-10-25

    Several experiments have been conducted by LLNL researchers using isentropic compression experiments (ICE) on energetic materials as samples from Fiscal Year 2001 (FY01) to Fiscal Year 2005 (FY05). Over this span of time, advancements of the experimental techniques and modeling of the results have evolved to produce improved results. This report documents the experiments that have been performed, provides details of the results generated, and modeling and analysis advances to fully understand the results. Publications on the topics by the various principal investigators (PI's) are detailed in the Appendices for quick reference for the work as it progressed.

  2. Shock-adiabatic to quasi-isentropic compression of warm dense helium up to 150 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J.; Chen, Q. F.; Gu, Y. J.; Li, J. T.; Li, Z. G.; Li, C. J.; Chen, Z. Y.

    2017-06-01

    Multiple reverberation compression can achieve higher pressure, higher temperature, but lower entropy. It is available to provide an important validation for the elaborate and wider planetary models and simulate the inertial confinement fusion capsule implosion process. In the work, we have developed the thermodynamic and optical properties of helium from shock-adiabatic to quasi-isentropic compression by means of a multiple reverberation technique. By this technique, the initial dense gaseous helium was compressed to high pressure and high temperature and entered the warm dense matter (WDM) region. The experimental equation of state (EOS) of WDM helium in the pressure-density-temperature (P-ρ -T) range of 1 -150 GPa , 0.1 -1.1 g c m-3 , and 4600-24 000 K were measured. The optical radiations emanating from the WDM helium were recorded, and the particle velocity profiles detecting from the sample/window interface were obtained successfully up to 10 times compression. The optical radiation results imply that dense He has become rather opaque after the 2nd compression with a density of about 0.3 g c m-3 and a temperature of about 1 eV. The opaque states of helium under multiple compression were analyzed by the particle velocity measurements. The multiple compression technique could efficiently enhanced the density and the compressibility, and our multiple compression ratios (ηi=ρi/ρ0,i =1 -10 ) of helium are greatly improved from 3.5 to 43 based on initial precompressed density (ρ0) . For the relative compression ratio (ηi'=ρi/ρi -1) , it increases with pressure in the lower density regime and reversely decreases in the higher density regime, and a turning point occurs at the 3rd and 4th compression states under the different loading conditions. This nonmonotonic evolution of the compression is controlled by two factors, where the excitation of internal degrees of freedom results in the increasing compressibility and the repulsive interactions between the

  3. GLOBAL EXISTENCE AND ASYMPTOTIC BEHAVIOR FOR THE 3D COMPRESSIBLE NON-ISENTROPIC EULER EQUATIONS WITH DAMPING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张映辉; 吴国春

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the global existence and asymptotic behavior of classical solutions for the 3D compressible non-isentropic damped Euler equations on a periodic domain. The global existence and uniqueness of classical solutions are obtained when the initial data is near an equilibrium. Furthermore, the exponential convergence rates of the pressure and velocity are also proved by delicate energy methods.

  4. Isentropic Compression of Nitroplastized Estane to 40 KBAR on the Sandia Z-Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsen, Rick; Hall, Clint

    2005-07-01

    Nitroplasticized Estane is the plastic binder used to hold HMX grains together in the plastic bonded explosive PBX 9501. As part of an effort to characterize PBX 9501, we isentropically compressed the explosive and its constituents to ˜ 40 kbar on the Sandia Z-Machine. Nitroplasticized Estane binder samples were prepared as follows: A mixture of 49 wt. % Estane^5703 (BF Goodrich), 49 wt. % Nitroplasticizer (a 50/50 eutectic mixture of bis(2,2-dinitropropyl)formal and bis(2,2 dinitropropyl)acetal), and 2 wt. % Irganox^ 1010 stabilizer was prepared as for PBX 9501 binder. Samples were compression molded into 0.1 -- 2 mm thick films at 110^oC. These were then mounted between 6061 Aluminum Z panels and PMMA or LiF VISAR widows. PMMA washers between the panel and window stabilized the binder thickness. Profiles of ramp waves transmitted through several sample thicknesses were measured and compared with a reference profile. A simple analysis of the results indicates that the binder behavior can be described using the Universal Liquid Hugoniot with an ambient sound speed of 1.7 km/s.

  5. Optimization of current waveform tailoring for magnetically driven isentropic compression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisman, E. M.; Reisman, D. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Stygar, W. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Haill, T. A.; Davis, J.-P.; Brown, J. L.; Seagle, C. T.; Spielman, R. B.

    2016-06-01

    The Thor pulsed power generator is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The design consists of up to 288 decoupled and transit time isolated capacitor-switch units, called "bricks," that can be individually triggered to achieve a high degree of pulse tailoring for magnetically driven isentropic compression experiments (ICE) [D. B. Reisman et al., Phys. Rev. Spec. Top.-Accel. Beams 18, 090401 (2015)]. The connecting transmission lines are impedance matched to the bricks, allowing the capacitor energy to be efficiently delivered to an ICE strip-line load with peak pressures of over 100 GPa. Thor will drive experiments to explore equation of state, material strength, and phase transition properties of a wide variety of materials. We present an optimization process for producing tailored current pulses, a requirement for many material studies, on the Thor generator. This technique, which is unique to the novel "current-adder" architecture used by Thor, entirely avoids the iterative use of complex circuit models to converge to the desired electrical pulse. We begin with magnetohydrodynamic simulations for a given material to determine its time dependent pressure and thus the desired strip-line load current and voltage. Because the bricks are connected to a central power flow section through transit-time isolated coaxial cables of constant impedance, the brick forward-going pulses are independent of each other. We observe that the desired equivalent forward-going current driving the pulse must be equal to the sum of the individual brick forward-going currents. We find a set of optimal brick delay times by requiring that the L2 norm of the difference between the brick-sum current and the desired forward-going current be a minimum. We describe the optimization procedure for the Thor design and show results for various materials of interest.

  6. Partial molar volumes and partial molar adiabatic compressibilities of a short chain perfluorosurfactant: Sodium heptafluorobutyrate in aqueous solutions at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, Elena [Group of Biophysics and Interfaces, Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Ruso, Juan M. [Group of Biophysics and Interfaces, Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)]. E-mail: faruso@usc.es; Prieto, Gerardo [Group of Biophysics and Interfaces, Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Sarmiento, Felix [Group of Biophysics and Interfaces, Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2005-12-15

    Density and ultrasound measurements of sodium heptafluorobutyrate in aqueous solutions at T = (283.15, 288.15, 293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15, 313.15, 318.15, and 323.15) K have been obtained. From these results partial molar volumes and isentropic partial molar adiabatic compressibilities were calculated. Deviations from the Debye-Hueckel limiting law provide evidence for limited association at lower concentrations. The change of the partial molar volume and isentropic partial molar adiabatic compressibility upon aggregation was calculated. Variations of the change of partial molar volumes and isentropic partial molar adiabatic compressibility upon aggregation are discussed in terms of temperature.

  7. A Multi-Fluid Compressible System as the Limit of Weak Solutions of the Isentropic Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresch, D.; Huang, X.

    2011-08-01

    This paper mainly concerns the mathematical justification of a viscous compressible multi-fluid model linked to the Baer-Nunziato model used by engineers, see for instance I shii (Thermo-fluid dynamic theory of two-phase flow, Eyrolles, Paris, 1975), under a "stratification" assumption. More precisely, we show that some approximate finite-energy weak solutions of the isentropic compressible Navier-Stokes equations converge, on a short time interval, to the strong solution of this viscous compressible multi-fluid model, provided the initial density sequence is uniformly bounded with corresponding Young measures which are linear convex combinations of m Dirac measures. To the authors' knowledge, this provides, in the multidimensional in space case, a first positive answer to an open question, see H illairet (J Math Fluid Mech 9:343-376, 2007), with a stratification assumption. The proof is based on the weak solutions constructed by D esjardins (Commun Partial Differ Equ 22(5-6):977-1008, 1997) and on the existence and uniqueness of a local strong solution for the multi-fluid model established by H illairet assuming initial density to be far from vacuum. In a first step, adapting the ideas from H off and S antos (Arch Ration Mech Anal 188:509-543, 2008), we prove that the sequence of weak solutions built by D esjardins has extra regularity linked to the divergence of the velocity without any relation assumption between λ and μ. Coupled with the uniform bound of the density property, this allows us to use appropriate defect measures and their nice properties introduced and proved by H illairet (Aspects interactifs de la m'ecanique des fluides, PhD Thesis, ENS Lyon, 2005) in order to prove that the Young measure associated to the weak limit is the convex combination of m Dirac measures. Finally, under a non-degeneracy assumption of this combination ("stratification" assumption), this provides a multi-fluid system. Using a weak-strong uniqueness argument, we prove that

  8. Global classical solutions to the 3D isentropic compressible Navier-Stokes equations in a bounded domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haibo; Zhao, Junning

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we study the global existence for classical solutions to the 3D isentropic compressible Navier-Stokes equations in a cuboid domain. Compared to the Cauchy problem studied in Hoff (1995 J. Differ. Equ. 120 215-54), Hoff (2005 J. Math. Fluid Mech. 7 315-38), Huang et al (2012 Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 65 549-85), some new thoughts are applied to obtain upper bounds for density. Precisely, through piecewise estimation and some time-depending a priori estimates, we establish time-uniform upper bounds for density under the assumption that the initial energy is small. The initial vacuum is allowed.

  9. Disposition of transuranic residues from plutonium isentropic compression experiment (Pu-ice) conducted at Z machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, Kapil K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; French, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Humphrey, Betty J [WESTON SOLUTIONS INC.; Gluth, Jeffry [SNL

    2010-01-01

    In 1992, the U.S. Congress passed legislation to discontinue above- and below-ground testing of nuclear weapons. Because of this, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) must rely on laboratory experiments and computer-based calculations to verify the reliability of the nation's nuclear stockpile. The Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) Z machine was developed by the DOE to support its science-based approach to stockpile stewardship. SNL/NM researchers also use the Z machine to test radiation effects on various materials in experiments designed to mimic nuclear explosions. Numerous components, parts, and materials have been tested. These experiments use a variety of radionuclides; however, plutonium (Pu) isotopes with greater than ninety-eight percent enrichment are the primary radionuclides used in the experiments designed for stockpile stewardship. In May 2006, SNL/NM received authority that the Z Machine Isentropic Compression Experiments could commence. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) provided the plutonium targets and loaded the target assemblies, which were fabricated by SNL/NM. LANL shipped the loaded assemblies to SNL/NM for Z machine experiments. Three experiments were conducted from May through July 2006. The residues from each experiment, which weighed up to 913 pounds, were metallic and packaged into a respective 55-gallon drum each. Based on a memorandum of understanding between the two laboratories, LANL provides the plutonium samples and the respective radio-isotopic information. SNL/NM conducts the experiments and provides temporary storage for the drums until shipment to LANL for final waste certification for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. This paper presents a comprehensive approach for documenting generator knowledge for characterization of waste in cooperation with scientists at the two laboratories and addresses a variety of topics such as material control and accountability

  10. Principal Quasi-Isentropes of Several Materials to Multi-Megabar Pressure from Analysis of Magnetically Driven Ramp Compression Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jean-Paul; Martin, Matthew; Knudson, Marcus

    2011-06-01

    Quasi-isentropic ramp-wave experiments promise accurate equation-of-state (EOS) data in the solid phase at relatively low temperatures and multimegabar pressures. In this range of pressure, isothermal diamond-anvil techniques have limited pressure accuracy due to reliance on theoretical EOS of calibration standards, thus accurate quasi-isentropic compression data would help immensely in constraining EOS models. Multi-megabar ramp compression experiments using the Z Machine at Sandia as a magnetic drive with stripline targets have been performed on tantalum, copper, gold, beryllium, molybdenum, and aluminum metals as well as lithium fluoride crystal. Much of the data from these experiments are analyzed using a single-sample inverse Lagrangian approach. This technique, and the quantification of its uncertainties, will be described in detail. Results will be presented for selected materials, with comparisons to independently developed EOS. *Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. The compact capacitor bank CQ-1.5 employed in magnetically driven isentropic compression and high velocity flyer plate experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guiji; Sun, Chengwei; Tan, Fuli; Zhao, Jianheng; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Cangli; Mo, Jianjun; Wang, Ganghua; Wang, Xiaosong

    2008-05-01

    Based on the low inductance capacitor, the parallel-plate transmission line, and the explosive network closing switch, a compact pulsed power generator CQ-1.5 has been developed at the Institute of Fluid Physics and is capable to deliver a current of peak of 1.5 MA within rise time of 500-570 ns into a 2-3 nH inductive load. The work is motivated to do isentropic compression experiments (ICEs) on metals up to 30-50 GPa and to launch flyer plates at velocities over 8 kms. The experiments were conducted with the diagnostics of both Doppler pin system and velocity interferometer system for any reflectors, and the measured free surface velocity histories of ICE samples were treated with a backward integration code. The results show that the isentropes of Cu and Al samples under 35 GPa are close to their Hugoniots within a deviation of 3%. The LY12 aluminum flyer plates were accelerated to a velocity over 8.96 kms.

  12. Non-isentropic layers in matter behind shock and ramp compression waves

    CERN Document Server

    Khishchenko, Konstantin V

    2014-01-01

    According to the ideal fluid dynamics approach, the temperature and entropy values of a medium undergo a jump increase in the shock front as well as on contact interface between different materials after the shock wave propagation, but remain constant behind the shock front out of the contact interface. In the real condensed matter, the shock fronts and transition regions near the interfaces have finite thicknesses; therefore, the temperature field is disturbed around the interfaces. In this work, such disturbances are numerically analyzed for the problems of formation of the steady shock wave at impact and ramp loading of metals, reflection of the steady shock wave from a free surface, and the shock wave passing through the interface between two different materials. Theoretical analysis and computations show that the non-isentropic layers (the high-entropy ones with the increased temperature and the low-entropy ones with the decreased temperature) arise near the interfaces in the above problems of shock and ...

  13. High pressure, quasi-isentropic compression experiments on the Omega laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, K; Edwards, M; Jankowski, A; Pollaine, S; Smith, R; Remington, B

    2006-05-26

    The high energy density of pulsed lasers can be used to generate shockless loading in solids to high pressures and compressions but low temperatures. We have used the Omega laser to extend the capabilities of this technique to multi-Mbar pressures and compressions approaching a factor of 2 in aluminum foils. The energy from a 3.7 ns laser pulse is used to drive a strong shock through a 200 {micro}m polystyrene disc. The disc material unloads from a high-pressure state and expands across a 300 {micro}m vacuum gap where it stagnates against the sample to produce a smooth, monotonically increasing load with rise times from a few to {approx} 20 ns. Ramped compression reasing waves having peak pressures of 14-200 GPa (0.14-2.0 Mbar) and peak compressions {rho}/{rho}{sub 0} of 1.1-2.0 were generated in the aluminum samples using laser pulse energies of 400 J to 2 kJ. Wave profiles from a series of successively thicker targets loaded to 120 GPa show the evolution of the high-pressure compression wave within the sample. The initial loading in the sample is shockless, and develops into a shock at a depth of 20-25 {micro}m. We compare these wave profiles with hydrodynamic simulations from which we extract material temperatures and plastic strain rates behind the compression wave. Limitations and future prospects for this new shockless loading technique are discussed.

  14. Condensed argon isentropic compression with ultrahigh magnetic field pressure: Experimental design. Post-shot report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bykov, A.I.; Boriskov, G.V.; Dolotenko, M.I. [All-Russian Research Inst. of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    This report continues the series of work devoted to experimental study of a high-dense condensed argon state. Remember that according to work of Kwon et. al., hexagonal close-packed structure is profitable in terms of energy rather than face-centered argon structure (stable with zero pressure). What is most interesting and intriguing here is the issue of possible argon metallization, when it is compressed up to the densities more than 9.17 g/cm{sup 3}. In the experiment of 1995 (the arrangement and data are described in a cited reference) the authors recorded appearance of conductivity in argon, which is non-conductive in the initial state, when it is compressed more than a factor of four. The peak value of argon specific conductivity recorded in this experiment did not exceed 10 (Ohm x cm){sup {minus}1}. This value of conductivity is characteristic of semiconductors, but not metals, which have 10{sup 4} (Ohm x cm){sup {minus}1}. At this stage of the work the main attention is paid to recording of argon conductive state and studying the possibilities of multiframed radiography of the sample in the compressed state.

  15. On Exact Solutions of Rarefaction-Rarefaction Interactions in Compressible Isentropic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenssen, Helge Kristian

    2016-12-01

    Consider the interaction of two centered rarefaction waves in one-dimensional, compressible gas flow with pressure function p(ρ )=a^2ρ ^γ with γ >1 . The classic hodograph approach of Riemann provides linear 2nd order equations for the time and space variables t, x as functions of the Riemann invariants r, s within the interaction region. It is well known that t(r, s) can be given explicitly in terms of the hypergeometric function. We present a direct calculation (based on works by Darboux and Martin) of this formula, and show how the same approach provides an explicit formula for x(r, s) in terms of Appell functions (two-variable hypergeometric functions). Motivated by the issue of vacuum and total variation estimates for 1-d Euler flows, we then use the explicit t-solution to monitor the density field and its spatial variation in interactions of two centered rarefaction waves. It is found that the variation is always non-monotone, and that there is an overall increase in density variation if and only if γ >3 . We show that infinite duration of the interaction is characterized by approach toward vacuum in the interaction region, and that this occurs if and only if the Riemann problem defined by the extreme initial states generates a vacuum. Finally, it is verified that the minimal density in such interactions decays at rate O(1)/t.

  16. 乙酸丁酯-芳香烃混合液中声速和超额等熵压缩系数的测定%Speeds of Sound and Excess Isentropic Compressibilities of Butyl Acetate+Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bal Raj Deshwal; Anu Sharma; Krishan Chander Singh

    2008-01-01

    Speed of sound data for butyl acetate+benzene,or toluene,or ο-xylene,or m-xylene,or P-xylene bInary mixtures have been measured over the entire range of mole fraction at 308.15 K.The excess isentropic compressibilities(KES)were computed from speed of sound and density data,derived from molar excess volume data.The KES values were analyzed by using graph theoretical approach.The KES values evaluated by graph theory compared reasonably well with their corresponding experimental values.The KSE data were also expressed in terms of Redlich-Kister polynomial equation to derive the coetficients and the standard deviation.

  17. Wave energy devices with compressible volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, Adi; Greaves, Deborah; Chaplin, John

    2014-12-08

    We present an analysis of wave energy devices with air-filled compressible submerged volumes, where variability of volume is achieved by means of a horizontal surface free to move up and down relative to the body. An analysis of bodies without power take-off (PTO) systems is first presented to demonstrate the positive effects a compressible volume could have on the body response. Subsequently, two compressible device variations are analysed. In the first variation, the compressible volume is connected to a fixed volume via an air turbine for PTO. In the second variation, a water column separates the compressible volume from another volume, which is fitted with an air turbine open to the atmosphere. Both floating and bottom-fixed, axisymmetric, configurations are considered, and linear analysis is employed throughout. Advantages and disadvantages of each device are examined in detail. Some configurations with displaced volumes less than 2000 m(3) and with constant turbine coefficients are shown to be capable of achieving 80% of the theoretical maximum absorbed power over a wave period range of about 4 s.

  18. Excess isentropic compressibility and speed of sound of the ternary mixture 2-propanol + diethyl ether + n-hexane and the constituent binary mixtures at 298.15 K

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gokhan Sovaroglu; Ertunc Aral

    2006-02-01

    Speed of sound and densities of the ternary mixture 2-propanol + diethyl ether + n-hexane and also the binary mixtures 2-propanol + diethyl ether and 2-propanol + n-hexane have been measured at the entire composition range at 298.15 K. The excess isentropic compressibilities and the excess speed of the sound have been calculated from experimental densities and speed of sound. These excess properties of the binary mixtures were fitted to Redlich-Kister equation, while the Cibulka's equation was used to fit the values related to the values to the ternary system. These excess properties have been used to discuss the presence of significant interactions between the component molecules in the binary mixtures and also the ternary mixtures. Speed of sound of the binary mixtures and the ternary mixture have been compared with calculated values from free length theory (FLT), collision factor theory (CFT), Nomoto's relation (NR), Van Deal's ideal mixing relation (IMR) and Junjie's relation (JR). The results are used to compare the relative merits of these theories and relations in terms of the root mean square deviation relative (RMSDr).

  19. Global Existence of Strong Solutions of Navier-Stokes-Poisson Equations for One-Dimensional Isentropic Compressible Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junping YIN; Zhong TAN

    2008-01-01

    The authors prove two global existence results of strong solutions of the isen- tropic compressible Navier-Stokes-Poisson equations in one-dimensional bounded intervals. The first result shows only the existence. And the second one shows the existence and uniqueness result based on the first result, but the uniqueness requires some compatibility condition. In this paper the initial vacuum is allowed, and T is bounded.

  20. 稠密可压缩气粒两相流动中的等熵声速计算建模及物理规律∗%On mo deling and physical laws of isentropic sp eed of sound in dense gas-particle two-phase compressible flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈大伟; 王裴; 蔚喜军; 孙海权; 马东军

    2016-01-01

    Study of isentropic sound speed of two-phase or multiphase flow has theoretical significance and wide application background. As is well known, the speed of sound in fluid containing particles in suspension differs from that in the pure fluid. In the particular case of bubbly liquids (gas liquid two-phase flow), the researches find that the differences can be drastic. Up to now, the isentropic speed of sound in the flow field with a small volume fraction of bubbles (less than 1%), has been investigated fully both experimentally and theoretically. In this paper, we consider another situation, as the case with solid particles in gas, which is the so-called gas particle two-phase flow. Although many results have been obtained in gas liquid two-phase flow, there is still a lot of basic work to do due to the large differences in the flow structure and flow pattern between gas particle two-phase flow and gas liquid two-phase flow. Treating the gas particle suspension as the relaxed equilibrium, thermodynamic arguments are used to obtain the isentropic speed of sound. Unlike the existing work, we are dedicated to developing the computational model under dense condition. The space volume occupied by particle phase and the interaction between particles are overall considered, then a new formula of isentropic sound speed is derived. The new formula includes formulae of the pure gas flow and the already existing dilute gas particle two-phase flow as a special case. On the one hand, the correctness of our formula is verified. On the other hand, the new formula is more general. The variations of sound speed with different mass fractions of particle phase are analyzed. The theoretical calculation results show that the overall physical law of sound speed change is that with the increase of the particle mass fraction, the sound speed first decreases and then increases. The velocity of sound propagation in gas particle two-phase flow is far smaller than in pure gas in a wide range

  1. Existence of global weak solutions to compressible isentropic finitely extensible nonlinear bead-spring chain models for dilute polymers: The two-dimensional case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, John W.; Süli, Endre

    2016-07-01

    We prove the existence of global-in-time weak solutions to a general class of models that arise from the kinetic theory of dilute solutions of nonhomogeneous polymeric liquids, where the polymer molecules are idealized as bead-spring chains with finitely extensible nonlinear elastic (FENE) type spring potentials. The class of models under consideration involves the unsteady, compressible, isentropic, isothermal Navier-Stokes system in a bounded domain Ω in Rd, d = 2, for the density ρ, the velocity u ˜ and the pressure p of the fluid, with an equation of state of the form p (ρ) =cpργ, where cp is a positive constant and γ > 1. The right-hand side of the Navier-Stokes momentum equation includes an elastic extra-stress tensor, which is the classical Kramers expression. The elastic extra-stress tensor stems from the random movement of the polymer chains and is defined through the associated probability density function that satisfies a Fokker-Planck-type parabolic equation, a crucial feature of which is the presence of a centre-of-mass diffusion term. This extends the result in our paper J.W. Barrett and E. Süli (2016) [9], which established the existence of global-in-time weak solutions to the system for d ∈ { 2 , 3 } and γ >3/2, but the elastic extra-stress tensor required there the addition of a quadratic interaction term to the classical Kramers expression to complete the compactness argument on which the proof was based. We show here that in the case of d = 2 and γ > 1 the existence of global-in-time weak solutions can be proved in the absence of the quadratic interaction term. Our results require no structural assumptions on the drag term in the Fokker-Planck equation; in particular, the drag term need not be corotational. With a nonnegative initial density ρ0 ∈L∞ (Ω) for the continuity equation; a square-integrable initial velocity datum u˜0 for the Navier-Stokes momentum equation; and a nonnegative initial probability density function ψ0

  2. Streaming Compression of Tetrahedral Volume Meshes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isenburg, M; Lindstrom, P; Gumhold, S; Shewchuk, J

    2005-11-21

    Geometry processing algorithms have traditionally assumed that the input data is entirely in main memory and available for random access. This assumption does not scale to large data sets, as exhausting the physical memory typically leads to IO-inefficient thrashing. Recent works advocate processing geometry in a 'streaming' manner, where computation and output begin as soon as possible. Streaming is suitable for tasks that require only local neighbor information and batch process an entire data set. We describe a streaming compression scheme for tetrahedral volume meshes that encodes vertices and tetrahedra in the order they are written. To keep the memory footprint low, the compressor is informed when vertices are referenced for the last time (i.e. are finalized). The compression achieved depends on how coherent the input order is and how many tetrahedra are buffered for local reordering. For reasonably coherent orderings and a buffer of 10,000 tetrahedra, we achieve compression rates that are only 25 to 40 percent above the state-of-the-art, while requiring drastically less memory resources and less than half the processing time.

  3. The isentropic exponent in plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.T.A.L. Burm,; W. J. Goedheer,; D.C. Schram,

    1999-01-01

    The isentropic exponent for gases is a physical quantity that can ease significantly the hydrodynamic modeling effort. In gas dynamics the isentropic exponent depends only on the number of degrees of freedom of the considered gas. The isentropic exponent for a plasma is lower due to an extra degree

  4. Remark on Global Existence of Smooth Solutions to Three-Dimensional Compressible Isentropic Euler Equations for Chaplygin Gases%三维可压等熵Euler方程光滑解的整体存在性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵娟; 王银霞

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we prove that global existence of smooth solutions to Cauchy problem for compressible isentropic Euler equations for Chaplygin gases or Karman-Tsien gases in three space dimensions , provided that the initial data are obtained by adding a small smooth perturbation with compact support to a constant state and the vorticity of the initial velocity vanishes.%研究了三维可压等熵Euler方程Cauchy问题光滑解的整体存在性.如果初值是一个常状态的小扰动并且初速度的旋度等于零,证明了三维可压等熵Euler方程Cauchy问题光滑解的整体存在性.

  5. Linear Isentropic Oscillations of Stars Theoretical Foundations

    CERN Document Server

    Smeyers, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The study of stellar oscillations is the preeminent way to investigate the stability of stars and to interpret their variability. The theory of the linear, isentropic oscillations of isolated gaseous stars, and thus of compressible spherically symmetric equilibrium configurations, has largely been developed from the viewpoint of the hypothesis of the physical radial pulsations of stars. Written for doctoral students and researchers, this monograph aims to provide a systematic and consistent survey of the fundamentals of the theory of free, linear, isentropic oscillations in spherically symmetric, gaseous equilibrium stars. The first part of the book presents basic concepts and equations, the distinction between spheroidal and toroidal normal modes, the solution of Poisson’s differential equation for the perturbation of the gravitational potential, and Hamilton’s variational principle. The second part is devoted to the possible existence of waves propagating in the radial direction, the origin and classifi...

  6. "Phase freezeout" in isentropically expanding matter

    CERN Document Server

    Iosilevskiy, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Features of isentropic expansion of warm dense matter (WDM) created by intense energy fluxes (strong shock compression or instant isochoric heating by laser or heavy ions) are under discussion in situation when ($i$) -- thermodynamic trajectory of such expansion crosses binodal of liquid-gas phase transition, and ($ii$) -- expansion within the two-phase region is going along equilibrium branch (not metastable one) of the two-phase mixture isentrope. It is known in the plane case that because of break in the expansion isentrope at binodal point (in $P-V$ plane) i.e. jump of sound velocity in this point, there appears extended zone ("boiling layer") of uniformity in expanding material with constant thermodynamic and kinematic parameters. It corresponds just to the state on this binodal of boiling liquid. The point is that because of self-similarity of such expansion (in plane case) this boiling layer contains finite and fixed part of whole expanding material. This property makes it possible (at least formally) ...

  7. Hydraulic Analogy for Isentropic Flow Through a Nozzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Rao

    1983-04-01

    Full Text Available Modelling aspects of isentropic compressible gas flow using hydraulic analogy are discussed. Subsonic and supersonic flows through a typical nozzle are simulated as free surface incompressible water flow in an equivalent 2-D model on a water table. The results are first compared for the well known classical analogy in order to estimate experimental errors. Correction factors for pressure and temperature, to account for non-ideal compressible gas flow are presented and the results obtained on the water table are modified and compared with gas dynamic solution. Within the experimental errors, it is shown that the hydraulic analogy can be used as an effective tool for the study of two dimensional isentropic flows of gases.

  8. View compensated compression of volume rendered images for remote visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalgudi, Hariharan G; Marcellin, Michael W; Bilgin, Ali; Oh, Han; Nadar, Mariappan S

    2009-07-01

    Remote visualization of volumetric images has gained importance over the past few years in medical and industrial applications. Volume visualization is a computationally intensive process, often requiring hardware acceleration to achieve a real time viewing experience. One remote visualization model that can accomplish this would transmit rendered images from a server, based on viewpoint requests from a client. For constrained server-client bandwidth, an efficient compression scheme is vital for transmitting high quality rendered images. In this paper, we present a new view compensation scheme that utilizes the geometric relationship between viewpoints to exploit the correlation between successive rendered images. The proposed method obviates motion estimation between rendered images, enabling significant reduction to the complexity of a compressor. Additionally, the view compensation scheme, in conjunction with JPEG2000 performs better than AVC, the state of the art video compression standard.

  9. Glycerol decreases the volume and compressibility of protein interior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priev, A; Almagor, A; Yedgar, S; Gavish, B

    1996-02-20

    The addition of hydrogen-bonded cosolvents to aqueous solutions of proteins is known to modify both thermodynamic and dynamic properties of the proteins in a variety of ways. Previous studies suggest that glycerol reduces the free volume and compressibility of proteins. However, there is no directly measured evidence for that. We have measured the apparent specific volume (V) and adiabatic compressibility (K) of a number of proteins, sugars, and amino acids in water and in 30% glycerol at pH 7.4 and 30 degrees C. The values of V and K in water and their changes induced by glycerol were extrapolated to the limit of infinite solute size. The main results were the following: (a) glycerol decreases V and K of proteins, but increases it for amino acids; (b) the V and K values of the protein interior in water were found to be 0.784 +/- 0.026 mL/g and (12.8 +/- 2.5) x 10(-6) mL/g x atm, where the glycerol reduces these values by 8 and 32%, respectively; (c) the coefficient of adiabatic compressibility of the structural component of proteins affected by the glycerol is estimated to be (50 +/- 10) x 10(-6) atm(-1), which is comparable to that of water. We propose that the glycerol induces a release of the so-called "lubricant" water, which maintains conformational flexibility by keeping apart neighboring segments of the polypeptide chain. This is expected to lead to the collapsing of the voids containing the water as well as to increase intramolecular bonding, which explains the observed effect.

  10. Isentropic Spheres in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Humi, Mayer

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical gas clouds undergo thermodynamically irreversible processes and emit heat to their surroundings. Due the emission of this heat one can envision an idealized situation in which gas entropy remains (almost) constant. With this motivation in mind we derive in this paper interior solutions to the Einstein equations of General Relativity for spheres which consist of isentropic gas. In particular we investigate solutions in which the mass distribution inside the sphere has several shells. Such spheres might be considered an early stage for the formation of a "solar system".

  11. On hydrostatic flows in isentropic coordinates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhove, Onno

    2000-01-01

    The hydrostatic primitive equations of motion which have been used in large-scale weather prediction and climate modelling over the last few decades are analysed with variational methods in an isentropic Eulerian framework. The use of material isentropic coordinates for the Eulerian hydrostatic equa

  12. Measurements of Multi-Megabar Quasi-Isentropes for Several Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jean-Paul; Knudson, Marcus D.; Desjarlais, Michael P.

    2009-06-01

    Quasi-isentropic ramp-wave experiments promise accurate equation-of-state (EOS) data in the solid phase at relatively low temperatures and multimegabar pressures. In this range of pressure, isothermal diamond-anvil techniques have limited accuracy due to reliance on theoretical EOS of calibration standards, thus accurate quasi-isentropic compression data would help immensely in constraining EOS models. Isentropic compression experiments (ICE) using the Z Machine at Sandia as a magnetic drive have recently seen significant improvements in accuracy and pressure range, due to (1) a major refurbishment and upgrade of the accelerator, (2) the development of a stripline target configuration, and (3) new experiment design and data analysis approaches. After a brief discussion of these improvements, new data will be presented on tantalum, beryllium, and aluminum metals as well as lithium fluoride crystal. Comparisons will be made to several independently developed EOS as well as recent quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) results.

  13. Finite-volume WENO scheme for viscous compressible multicomponent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2014-01-01

    We develop a shock- and interface-capturing numerical method that is suitable for the simulation of multicomponent flows governed by the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical method is high-order accurate in smooth regions of the flow, discretely conserves the mass of each component, as well as the total momentum and energy, and is oscillation-free, i.e. it does not introduce spurious oscillations at the locations of shockwaves and/or material interfaces. The method is of Godunov-type and utilizes a fifth-order, finite-volume, weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for the spatial reconstruction and a Harten-Lax-van Leer contact (HLLC) approximate Riemann solver to upwind the fluxes. A third-order total variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta (RK) algorithm is employed to march the solution in time. The derivation is generalized to three dimensions and nonuniform Cartesian grids. A two-point, fourth-order, Gaussian quadrature rule is utilized to build the spatial averages of the reconstructed variables inside the cells, as well as at cell boundaries. The algorithm is therefore fourth-order accurate in space and third-order accurate in time in smooth regions of the flow. We corroborate the properties of our numerical method by considering several challenging one-, two- and three-dimensional test cases, the most complex of which is the asymmetric collapse of an air bubble submerged in a cylindrical water cavity that is embedded in 10% gelatin. PMID:25110358

  14. Evaluation of registration, compression and classification algorithms. Volume 1: Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayroe, R.; Atkinson, R.; Callas, L.; Hodges, J.; Gaggini, B.; Peterson, J.

    1979-01-01

    The registration, compression, and classification algorithms were selected on the basis that such a group would include most of the different and commonly used approaches. The results of the investigation indicate clearcut, cost effective choices for registering, compressing, and classifying multispectral imagery.

  15. Lossless compression of very large volume data with fast dynamic access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rongkai; Tao, Tao; Gabriel, Michael; Belford, Geneva

    2002-09-01

    The volumetric data set is important in many scientific and biomedical fields. Since such sets may be extremely large, a compression method is critical to store and transmit them. To achieve a high compression rate, most of the existing volume compression methods are lossy, which is usually unacceptable in biomedical applications. We developed a new context-based non-linear prediction method to preprocess the volume data set in order to effectively lower the prediction entropy. The prediction error is further encoded using Huffman code. Unlike the conventional methods, the volume is divided into cubical blocks to take advantage of the data's spatial locality. Instead of building one Huffman tree for each block, we developed a novel binning algorithm that build a Huffman tree for each group (bin) of blocks. Combining all the effects above, we achieved an excellent compression rate compared to other lossless volume compression methods. In addition, an auxiliary data structure, Scalable Hyperspace File (SHSF) is used to index the huge volume so that we can obtain many other benefits including parallel construction, on-the-fly accessing of compressed data without global decompression, fast previewing, efficient background compressing, and scalability etc.

  16. 爆轰驱动固体套筒压缩磁场计算及准等熵过程分析∗%Magneto-hydro dynamic calculation of magnetic flux compression with explosion driven solid liners and analysis of quasi-isentropic pro cess

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵继波; 孙承纬; 谷卓伟; 赵剑衡; 罗浩

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic cumulative generator (MC-1) is a kind of high energy density dynamic device. A liner is driven by a cylindrical explosive implosion to compress the magnetic flux preset in the cavity. Then the chemical energy is converted into magnetic one, which is cumulated nearby the axis to form ultra-intense magnetic field used to load sample in non-touch manner. This loading technique can bring higher pressure and relatively low elevated temperature in the sample and has a very high-degree isentropy in the course of compression. The configuration magneto-hydrodynamic code SSS/MHD is used to develop one-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic calculation of magnetic flux compression with explosion driven solid liner. The calculation results of magnetic field in cavity and velocity of inner wall of sample tube are obtained and accord with the magnetic field measured by probe and the velocity measured by laser interference. The buckling and Bell-Plesset instabilization produced by linearly compressing magnetic field are shown through frame photography. The change laws of magnetic diffusion, eddy current and magnetic pressure in liner and sample tube are analyzed, which show that the magnetic field and pressure and eddy near to cavity in the sample tube are all higher than the ones in the liner with the same distance to cavity. The balance between the electromagnetism force and implosion action and the difference between sample tube and liner velocities are the main reasons under imploding movement. The change of isentropic increment with compression degree at the same location, whose distance is 0.05 mm to magnetic cavity in the sample tube, is discussed. The result indicates that the ratio of the maximum increment to specific heat of sample tube material is about 10%, which shows that the process of compression magnetic flux with explosion is quasi-isentropic. In general, SSS/MHD code can reveal in depth the physic images which are difficult to measure or observe in the

  17. ENTROPIES AND FLUX-SPLITTINGS FOR THE ISENTROPIC EULER EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The authors establish the existence of a large class of mathematical entropies (the so-called weak entropies) associated with the Euler equations for an isentropic, compressible fluid governed by a general pressure law. A mild assumption on the behavior of the pressure law near the vacuum is solely required. The analysis is based on an asymptotic expansion of the fundamental solution (called here the entropy kernel) of a highly singular Euler-Poisson-Darboux equation. The entropy kernel is only H lder continuous and its regularity is carefully investigated. Relying on a notion introduced earlier by the authors, it is also proven that, for the Euler equations, the set of entropy flux-splittings coincides with the set of entropies-entropy fluxes. These results imply the existence of a flux-splitting consistent with all of the entropy inequalities.

  18. Control volume based modelling of compressible flow in reciprocating machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegård; Thomsen, Per Grove; Carlsen, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    conservation laws for mass, energy, and momentum applied to a staggered mesh consisting of two overlapping strings of control volumes. Loss mechanisms can be included directly in the governing equations of models by including them as terms in the conservation laws. Heat transfer, flow friction......, and multidimensional effects must be calculated using empirical correlations; correlations for steady state flow can be used as an approximation. A transformation that assumes ideal gas is presented for transforming equations for masses and energies in control volumes into the corresponding pressures and temperatures...

  19. Control volume based modelling of compressible flow in reciprocating machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegård; Thomsen, Per Grove; Carlsen, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    , and multidimensional effects must be calculated using empirical correlations; correlations for steady state flow can be used as an approximation. A transformation that assumes ideal gas is presented for transforming equations for masses and energies in control volumes into the corresponding pressures and temperatures...

  20. Excluded volume effects in compressed polymer brushes: A density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cangyi; Tang, Ping; Qiu, Feng; Shi, An-Chang

    2015-03-01

    A classical density functional theory (DFT) is applied to investigate the behavior of compressed polymer brushes composed of hard-sphere chains. The excluded volume interactions among the chain segments are explicitly treated. Two compression systems are used to study the behavior of brush-wall and brush-brush interactions. For the brush-brush systems, an obvious interpenetration zone has been observed. The extent of the interpenetration depends strongly on the grafting density. Furthermore, the repulsive force between the brush and wall or between the two brushes has been obtained as a function of the compression distance. Compared to the prediction of the analytic self-consistent field theory, such force increases more rapidly in the brush-wall compression with high polymer grafting densities or at higher compressions. In the brush-brush compression system, the interpenetration between the two compressed brushes creates a "softer" interaction. The influence of hard-sphere solvents on the behavior of compressed brushes is also discussed.

  1. Cosmography of KNdS black holes and isentropic phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, James; Satishchandran, Gautam; Traschen, Jennie

    2016-05-01

    We present a new analysis of Kerr-Newman-deSitter black holes in terms of thermodynamic quantities that are defined in the observable portion of the Universe; between the black hole and cosmological horizons. In particular, we replace the mass m with a new ‘area product’ parameter X. The physical region of parameter space is found analytically and thermodynamic quantities are given by simple algebraic functions of these parameters. We find that different geometrical properties of the black holes are usefully distinguished by the sum of the black hole and cosmological entropies. The physical parameter space breaks into a region in which the total entropy, together with Λ, a and q uniquely specifies the black hole, and a region in which there is a two-fold degeneracy. In this latter region, there are isentropic pairs of black holes, having the same Λ, a, and q, but different X. The thermodynamic volumes and masses differ in such that there are high and low density branches. The partner spacetimes are related by a simple inversion of X, which has a fixed point at the state of maximal total entropy. We compute the compressibility at fixed total entropy and find that it diverges at the maximal entropy point. Hence a picture emerges of high and low density phases merging at this critical point.

  2. Analytical Solution for Isentropic Flows in Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuzé, Olivier

    2009-12-01

    In the XIXth century, Riemann gave the equations system and the exact solution for the isentropic flows in the case of the ideal gas. But to our knowledge, nothing has been done to apply it to condensed media. Many materials of practical interest, for instance metals, obey to the linear law D = c+s u, where D is the shock velocity, u the particle velocity, and c and s properties of the material. We notice that s is strongly linked to the fundamental derivative. This means that the assumption of constant fundamental derivative is useful in this case, as it was with the isentropic gamma in the Riemann solution. Then we can apply the exact Riemann solution for these materials. Although the use of the hypergeometric function is complicated in this case, we obtain a very good approximation with the development in power series.

  3. Fabrication of Al/LiF Composite Dual-step Target Used in Quasi-isentropic Compression Experiment by Laser Loading%激光加载下准等熵压缩实验用铝/氟化锂复合双台阶靶的研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶君建; 谢志勇; 张志友; 陆驰中; 吴永刚; 董佳钦; 舒桦; 黄秀光; 傅思祖

    2016-01-01

    本文提出了一种激光加载下准等熵压缩实验用铝/氟化锂复合双台阶靶的加工技术.采用金刚石车削在1.5mm厚的氟化锂晶体表面加工两个10μm高度的台阶,然后利用电子束蒸发在氟化锂台阶面镀厚度为几十μm的高致密纯铝膜,再通过金刚石车削工艺将镀铝面车削成平面,最后在氟化锂晶体另一面蒸镀剩余反射率低于1%的增透膜,最终获得高质量的铝/氟化锂复合双台阶靶.采用N T 1100白光干涉仪、电子比重计、电子能谱、X射线衍射仪、扫描电镜等设备对靶参数进行测量,研究各工艺对靶参数的影响.%The fabrication technique for Al/LiF composite dual-step target used in quasi-isentropic compression experiment was described . The two 10 μm high steps were processed by diamond turning technology in the surface of the 1.5 mm LiF crystal .The high-density Al film with dozens of micron thickness was coated by electron beam evapo-ration ,and turned into a flat aluminized surface through the diamond turning process . A high-quality Al/LiF composite dual-step target was eventually completed with an evaporated antireflection film (the residual reflectivity was less than 1% ) on the other side of the LiF crystal .The target parameters were measured by NT1100 white light interferometer ,electron densimeter ,electron spectroscopy ,XRD and SEM for sensiti-vity analysis .

  4. An Adaptive Prediction-Based Approach to Lossless Compression of Floating-Point Volume Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fout, N; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we address the problem of lossless compression of scientific and medical floating-point volume data. We propose two prediction-based compression methods that share a common framework, which consists of a switched prediction scheme wherein the best predictor out of a preset group of linear predictors is selected. Such a scheme is able to adapt to different datasets as well as to varying statistics within the data. The first method, called APE (Adaptive Polynomial Encoder), uses a family of structured interpolating polynomials for prediction, while the second method, which we refer to as ACE (Adaptive Combined Encoder), combines predictors from previous work with the polynomial predictors to yield a more flexible, powerful encoder that is able to effectively decorrelate a wide range of data. In addition, in order to facilitate efficient visualization of compressed data, our scheme provides an option to partition floating-point values in such a way as to provide a progressive representation. We compare our two compressors to existing state-of-the-art lossless floating-point compressors for scientific data, with our data suite including both computer simulations and observational measurements. The results demonstrate that our polynomial predictor, APE, is comparable to previous approaches in terms of speed but achieves better compression rates on average. ACE, our combined predictor, while somewhat slower, is able to achieve the best compression rate on all datasets, with significantly better rates on most of the datasets.

  5. Control volume based modelling in one space dimension of oscillating, compressible flow in reciprocating machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegård; Carlsen, Henrik; Thomsen, Per Grove

    2006-01-01

    We present an approach for modelling unsteady, primarily one-dimensional, compressible flow. The conservation laws for mass, energy, and momentum are applied to a staggered mesh of control volumes and loss mechanisms are included directly as extra terms. Heat transfer, flow friction......, and multidimensional effects are calculated using empirical correlations. Transformations of the conservation equations into new variables, artificial dissipation for dissipating acoustic phenomena, and an asymmetric interpolation method for minimising numerical diffusion and non physical temperature oscillations...

  6. Comments on "Isentropic Analysis of a Simulated Hurricane"

    CERN Document Server

    Marquet, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes Comments to the paper of Mrowiec et al. published in the J. Atmos. Sci. in May 2016 (Vol 73, Issue 5, pages 1857-1870) and entitled "Isentropic analysis of a simulated hurricane". It is explained that the plotting of isentropic surfaces (namely the isentropes) requires a precise definition of the specific moist-air entropy, and that most of existing "equivalent potential temperatures" lead to inaccurate definitions of isentropes. It is shown that the use of the third law of thermodynamics leads to a definition of the specific moist-air entropy (and of a corresponding potential temperature) which allow the plotting of unambigous moist-air isentropes. Numerical applications are shown by using a numerical simulation of the hurricane DUMILE.

  7. Petrophysical studies of north American carbonate rock samples and evaluation of pore-volume compressibility models

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Gilberto Peixoto; Franco, Daniel R.; Stael, Giovanni C.; da Costa de Oliveira Lima, Maira; Sant'Anna Martins, Ricardo; de Moraes França, Olívia; Azeredo, Rodrigo B. V.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we evaluate two pore volume compressibility models that are currently discussed in the literature (Horne, 1990; Jalalh, 2006b). Five groups of carbonate rock samples from the three following sedimentary basins in North America that are known for their association with hydrocarbon deposits were selected for this study: (i) the Guelph Formation of the Michigan Basin (Middle Silurian); (ii) the Edwards Formation of the Central Texas Platform (Middle Cretaceous); and (iii) the Burlington-Keokuk Formation of the Mississippian System (Lower Mississippian). In addition to the evaluation of the compressibility model, a petrophysical evaluation of these rock samples was conducted. Additional characterizations, such as grain density, the effective porosity, absolute grain permeability, thin section petrography, MICP and NMR, were performed to complement constant pore-pressure compressibility tests. Although both models presented an overall good representation of the compressibility behavior of the studied carbonate rocks, even when considering their broad porosity range (~ 2-38%), the model proposed by Jalalh (2006b) performed better with a confidence level of 95% and a prediction interval of 68%.

  8. Finite volume - space-time discontinuous Galerkin method for the solution of compressible turbulent flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Česenek Jan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we deal with numerical simulation of the non-stationary compressible turbulent flow. Compressible turbulent flow is described by the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations. This RANS system is equipped with two-equation k-omega turbulence model. These two systems of equations are solved separately. Discretization of the RANS system is carried out by the space-time discontinuous Galerkin method which is based on piecewise polynomial discontinuous approximation of the sought solution in space and in time. Discretization of the two-equation k-omega turbulence model is carried out by the implicit finite volume method, which is based on piecewise constant approximation of the sought solution. We present some numerical experiments to demonstrate the applicability of the method using own-developed code.

  9. Specific volume and compressibility of bilayer lipid membranes with incorporated Na,K-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hianik, Tibor; Rybár, Peter; Krivánek, Roland; Petríková, Mária; Roudna, Milena; Apell, Hans Jürgen

    2011-06-01

    Ultrasound velocimetry and densitometry methods were used to study the interactions of the Na,K-ATPase with the lipid bilayer in large unilamellar liposomes composed of dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC). The ultrasound velocity increased and the specific volume of the phospholipids decreased with increasing concentrations of protein. These experiments allowed us to determine the reduced specific apparent compressibility of the lipid bilayer, which decreased by approx. 11% with increasing concentrations of the Na,K-ATPase up to an ATPase/DOPC molar ratio = 2 × 10⁻⁴. Assuming that ATPase induces rigidization of the surrounding lipid molecules one can obtain from the compressibility data that 3.7 to 100 times more lipid molecules are affected by the protein in comparison with annular lipids. However, this is in contradiction with the current theories of the phase transitions in lipid bilayers. It is suggested that another physical mechanisms should be involved for explanation of observed effect.

  10. Characteristics of a volume-adjustable compression chamber for transradial prosthetic interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Yuanjun; Li, Xiang; Luo, Yun

    2016-07-01

    In the transradial limb-socket contact interface, the physiological properties and prosthetic operating habits of the residual limb might affect the comfort and functionality of the prosthesis. To enhance the comfort and functionality of the interface, a frame-type socket with four volume-adjustable compression chambers was proposed for the transradial amputation level. The contact pressure of the limb-socket interface was adjusted by the volume changes in the chambers and controlled by a vacuum pump and the corresponding control system. The parameters of the chamber were designed in accordance with the biomechanics of the forearm soft tissue. The chamber with a negative stiffness characteristic was theoretically compared with the chamber with a positive stiffness characteristic. The results showed that the former had a superior performance to the latter in safety and pump performance requirements. A physical model of the transradial frame-type prosthetic interface was also manufactured with four negative stiffness chambers. The experimental results showed that this new prosthetic interface achieved more fitting time and better performance in comfort and functionality than the fixed frame-type socket. This new prosthetic interface with volume-adjustable compression chambers might be an alternative choice for transradial amputees.

  11. Researches of mechanical behaviour of the bone micro volumes and porous ceramics under uniaxial compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmakova, T. V.; Buyakova, S. P.; Kulkov, S. N.

    2017-02-01

    The research results of the mechanics are presented and the effective mechanical characteristics under uniaxial compression of the simulative micro volume of the compact bone are defined subject to the direction of the collagen-mineral fibers, porosity and mineral content. The experimental and computer studies of the mechanics are performed and the effective mechanical characteristics of the porous zirconium oxide ceramics are defined. The recommendations are developed on the selection of the ceramic samples designed to replace the fragment of the compact bone of a definite structure and mineral content.

  12. Irreversible volume expansion of a TATB-based composite and compressive strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Darla Graff; Schwarz, Ricardo B.; DeLuca, Racci

    2017-01-01

    It has long been known that compacted composites containing TATB (triaminotrinitrobenzene) crystals undergo "ratchet growth," an irreversible volume expansion upon thermal cycling. A clear mechanism has not been established for this phenomenon, but is believed to arise from the highly-anisotropic CTE of TATB crystals and interactions caused by compaction. Explosive performance depends fundamentally on bulk density, so the effect may be important. PBX 9502 is a plastic bonded explosive containing 95 wt% TATB crystals. We have monitored uniaxial length changes of PBX 9502 specimens for various thermal cycles providing mechanistic insight. Post-cycled specimens were compression tested to determine if mechanical properties correlated with the detailed thermal history.

  13. Introduction to compressible fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Oosthuizen, Patrick H

    2013-01-01

    IntroductionThe Equations of Steady One-Dimensional Compressible FlowSome Fundamental Aspects of Compressible FlowOne-Dimensional Isentropic FlowNormal Shock WavesOblique Shock WavesExpansion Waves - Prandtl-Meyer FlowVariable Area FlowsAdiabatic Flow with FrictionFlow with Heat TransferLinearized Analysis of Two-Dimensional Compressible FlowsHypersonic and High-Temperature FlowsHigh-Temperature Gas EffectsLow-Density FlowsBibliographyAppendices

  14. A finite-volume HLLC-based scheme for compressible interfacial flows with surface tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrick, Daniel P. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Owkes, Mark [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT (United States); Regele, Jonathan D., E-mail: jregele@iastate.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Shock waves are often used in experiments to create a shear flow across liquid droplets to study secondary atomization. Similar behavior occurs inside of supersonic combustors (scramjets) under startup conditions, but it is challenging to study these conditions experimentally. In order to investigate this phenomenon further, a numerical approach is developed to simulate compressible multiphase flows under the effects of surface tension forces. The flow field is solved via the compressible multicomponent Euler equations (i.e., the five equation model) discretized with the finite volume method on a uniform Cartesian grid. The solver utilizes a total variation diminishing (TVD) third-order Runge–Kutta method for time-marching and second order TVD spatial reconstruction. Surface tension is incorporated using the Continuum Surface Force (CSF) model. Fluxes are upwinded with a modified Harten–Lax–van Leer Contact (HLLC) approximate Riemann solver. An interface compression scheme is employed to counter numerical diffusion of the interface. The present work includes modifications to both the HLLC solver and the interface compression scheme to account for capillary force terms and the associated pressure jump across the gas–liquid interface. A simple method for numerically computing the interface curvature is developed and an acoustic scaling of the surface tension coefficient is proposed for the non-dimensionalization of the model. The model captures the surface tension induced pressure jump exactly if the exact curvature is known and is further verified with an oscillating elliptical droplet and Mach 1.47 and 3 shock-droplet interaction problems. The general characteristics of secondary atomization at a range of Weber numbers are also captured in a series of simulations.

  15. A finite-volume HLLC-based scheme for compressible interfacial flows with surface tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, Daniel P.; Owkes, Mark; Regele, Jonathan D.

    2017-06-01

    Shock waves are often used in experiments to create a shear flow across liquid droplets to study secondary atomization. Similar behavior occurs inside of supersonic combustors (scramjets) under startup conditions, but it is challenging to study these conditions experimentally. In order to investigate this phenomenon further, a numerical approach is developed to simulate compressible multiphase flows under the effects of surface tension forces. The flow field is solved via the compressible multicomponent Euler equations (i.e., the five equation model) discretized with the finite volume method on a uniform Cartesian grid. The solver utilizes a total variation diminishing (TVD) third-order Runge-Kutta method for time-marching and second order TVD spatial reconstruction. Surface tension is incorporated using the Continuum Surface Force (CSF) model. Fluxes are upwinded with a modified Harten-Lax-van Leer Contact (HLLC) approximate Riemann solver. An interface compression scheme is employed to counter numerical diffusion of the interface. The present work includes modifications to both the HLLC solver and the interface compression scheme to account for capillary force terms and the associated pressure jump across the gas-liquid interface. A simple method for numerically computing the interface curvature is developed and an acoustic scaling of the surface tension coefficient is proposed for the non-dimensionalization of the model. The model captures the surface tension induced pressure jump exactly if the exact curvature is known and is further verified with an oscillating elliptical droplet and Mach 1.47 and 3 shock-droplet interaction problems. The general characteristics of secondary atomization at a range of Weber numbers are also captured in a series of simulations.

  16. Planetary Torque in 3D Isentropic Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Jeffrey; Masset, Frédéric; Lega, Elena; Velasco, David

    2017-03-01

    Planetary migration is inherently a three-dimensional (3D) problem, because Earth-size planetary cores are deeply embedded in protoplanetary disks. Simulations of these 3D disks remain challenging due to the steep resolution requirements. Using two different hydrodynamics codes, FARGO3D and PEnGUIn, we simulate disk–planet interaction for a one to five Earth-mass planet embedded in an isentropic disk. We measure the torque on the planet and ensure that the measurements are converged both in resolution and between the two codes. We find that the torque is independent of the smoothing length of the planet’s potential (r s), and that it has a weak dependence on the adiabatic index of the gaseous disk (γ). The torque values correspond to an inward migration rate qualitatively similar to previous linear calculations. We perform additional simulations with explicit radiative transfer using FARGOCA, and again find agreement between 3D simulations and existing torque formulae. We also present the flow pattern around the planets that show active flow is present within the planet’s Hill sphere, and meridional vortices are shed downstream. The vertical flow speed near the planet is faster for a smaller r s or γ, up to supersonic speeds for the smallest r s and γ in our study.

  17. Planetary Torque in 3D Isentropic Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Fung, Jeffrey; Lega, Elena; Velasco, David

    2016-01-01

    Planet migration is inherently a three-dimensional (3D) problem, because Earth-size planetary cores are deeply embedded in protoplanetary disks. Simulations of these 3D disks remain challenging due to the steep requirement in resolution. Using two different hydrodynamics code, FARGO3D and PEnGUIn, we simulate disk-planet interaction for a 1 to 5 Earth-mass planet embedded in an isentropic disk. We measure the torque on the planet and ensure that the measurements are converged both in resolution and between the two codes. We find that the torque is independent of the smoothing length of the planet's potential ($r_{\\rm s}$), and that it has a weak dependence on the adiabatic index of the gaseous disk ($\\gamma$). The torque values correspond to an inward migration rate qualitatively similar to previous linear calculations. We perform additional simulations with explicit radiative transfer using FARGOCA, and again find agreement between 3D simulations and existing torque formulae. We also present the flow pattern...

  18. Inertial modes of slowly rotating isentropic stars

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, S; Yoshida, Shijun; Lee, Umin

    2000-01-01

    We investigate inertial mode oscillations of slowly and uniformly rotating, isentropic, Newtonian stars. Inertial mode oscillations are induced by the Coriolis force due to the star's rotation, and their characteristic frequencies are comparable with the rotation frequency $\\Omega$ of the star. So called r-mode oscillations form a sub-class of the inertial modes. In this paper, we use the term ``r-modes'' to denote the inertial modes for which the toroidal motion dominates the spheroidal motion, and the term ``inertial modes'' to denote the inertial modes for which the toroidal and spheroidal motions have comparable amplitude to each other. Using the slow rotation approximation consistent up to the order of $\\Omega^3$, we study the properties of the inertial modes and r-modes, by taking account of the effect of the rotational deformation of the equilibrium on the eigenfrequencies and eigenfunctions. The eigenfrequencies of the r-modes and inertial modes calculated in this paper are in excellent agreement with...

  19. A characteristic based volume penalization method for general evolution problems applied to compressible viscous flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Dymkoski, Eric; Kasimov, Nurlybek; Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    2014-04-01

    In order to introduce solid obstacles into flows, several different methods are used, including volume penalization methods which prescribe appropriate boundary conditions by applying local forcing to the constitutive equations. One well known method is Brinkman penalization, which models solid obstacles as porous media. While it has been adapted for compressible, incompressible, viscous and inviscid flows, it is limited in the types of boundary conditions that it imposes, as are most volume penalization methods. Typically, approaches are limited to Dirichlet boundary conditions. In this paper, Brinkman penalization is extended for generalized Neumann and Robin boundary conditions by introducing hyperbolic penalization terms with characteristics pointing inward on solid obstacles. This Characteristic-Based Volume Penalization (CBVP) method is a comprehensive approach to conditions on immersed boundaries, providing for homogeneous and inhomogeneous Dirichlet, Neumann, and Robin boundary conditions on hyperbolic and parabolic equations. This CBVP method can be used to impose boundary conditions for both integrated and non-integrated variables in a systematic manner that parallels the prescription of exact boundary conditions. Furthermore, the method does not depend upon a physical model, as with porous media approach for Brinkman penalization, and is therefore flexible for various physical regimes and general evolutionary equations. Here, the method is applied to scalar diffusion and to direct numerical simulation of compressible, viscous flows. With the Navier-Stokes equations, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous Neumann boundary conditions are demonstrated through external flow around an adiabatic and heated cylinder. Theoretical and numerical examination shows that the error from penalized Neumann and Robin boundary conditions can be rigorously controlled through an a priori penalization parameter η. The error on a transient boundary is found to converge as O

  20. Adaptive finite-volume WENO schemes on dynamically redistributed grids for compressible Euler equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Harshavardhana S.; Shukla, Ratnesh K.

    2016-08-01

    A high-order adaptive finite-volume method is presented for simulating inviscid compressible flows on time-dependent redistributed grids. The method achieves dynamic adaptation through a combination of time-dependent mesh node clustering in regions characterized by strong solution gradients and an optimal selection of the order of accuracy and the associated reconstruction stencil in a conservative finite-volume framework. This combined approach maximizes spatial resolution in discontinuous regions that require low-order approximations for oscillation-free shock capturing. Over smooth regions, high-order discretization through finite-volume WENO schemes minimizes numerical dissipation and provides excellent resolution of intricate flow features. The method including the moving mesh equations and the compressible flow solver is formulated entirely on a transformed time-independent computational domain discretized using a simple uniform Cartesian mesh. Approximations for the metric terms that enforce discrete geometric conservation law while preserving the fourth-order accuracy of the two-point Gaussian quadrature rule are developed. Spurious Cartesian grid induced shock instabilities such as carbuncles that feature in a local one-dimensional contact capturing treatment along the cell face normals are effectively eliminated through upwind flux calculation using a rotated Hartex-Lax-van Leer contact resolving (HLLC) approximate Riemann solver for the Euler equations in generalized coordinates. Numerical experiments with the fifth and ninth-order WENO reconstructions at the two-point Gaussian quadrature nodes, over a range of challenging test cases, indicate that the redistributed mesh effectively adapts to the dynamic flow gradients thereby improving the solution accuracy substantially even when the initial starting mesh is non-adaptive. The high adaptivity combined with the fifth and especially the ninth-order WENO reconstruction allows remarkably sharp capture of

  1. Technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed augmented compressed air energy storage system. Volume III. Preconceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giramonti, A.J.; Lessard, R.D.; Merrick, D.; Hobson, M.J.

    1981-09-01

    A technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed combustion augmented compressed air energy storage systems is presented. The results of this assessment effort are presented in three volumes. Volume III - Preconceptual Design contains the system analysis which led to the identification of a preferred component configuration for a fluidized bed combustion augmented compressed air energy storage system, the results of the effort which transformed the preferred configuration into preconceptual power plant design, and an introductory evaluation of the performance of the power plant system during part-load operation and while load following.

  2. Hybrid, explicit-implicit, finite-volume schemes on unstructured grids for unsteady compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, Evgeny; Norouzi, Farhang

    2016-06-01

    The motivation for using hybrid, explicit-implicit, schemes rather than fully implicit or explicit methods for some unsteady high-speed compressible flows with shocks is firstly discussed. A number of such schemes proposed in the past are briefly overviewed. A recently proposed hybridization approach is then introduced and used for the development of a hybrid, explicit-implicit, TVD (Total Variation Diminishing) scheme of the second order in space and time on smooth solutions in both, explicit and implicit, modes for the linear advection equation. Further generalizations of this finite-volume method for the Burgers, Euler and Navier-Stokes equations discretized on unstructured grids are mentioned in the concluding remarks.

  3. The Cauchy problem for the pressureless Euler/isentropic Navier-Stokes equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young-Pil; Kwon, Bongsuk

    2016-07-01

    We present a new hydrodynamic model consisting of the pressureless Euler equations and the isentropic compressible Navier-Stokes equations where the coupling of two systems is through the drag force. This coupled system can be derived, in the hydrodynamic limit, from the particle-fluid equations that are frequently used to study the medical sprays, aerosols and sedimentation problems. For the proposed system, we first construct the local-in-time classical solutions in an appropriate L2 Sobolev space. We also establish the a priori large-time behavior estimate by constructing a Lyapunov functional measuring the fluctuation of momentum and mass from the averaged quantities, and using this together with the bootstrapping argument, we obtain the global classical solution. The large-time behavior estimate asserts that the velocity functions of the pressureless Euler and the compressible Navier-Stokes equations are aligned exponentially fast as time tends to infinity.

  4. Effects of Positive End-Expiratory Pressure on Oscillated Volume during High-Frequency Chest Compression in Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara F Dosman

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP on end-expiratory lung volume (EELV and mean oscillated volume (Vosc during high frequency chest compression (HFCC.

  5. THE EFFECT OF VOLUME VARIATION OF SILVER NANOPARTICLE SOLUTION TOWARDS THE POROSITY AND COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH OF MORTAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.S.B. Dwandaru

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available As the world is growing rapidly, people need better building materials such as mortar. The aim of this research is to determine the effect of adding silver nanoparticle solution towards the porosity and compressive strength of mortar. This research was started by making silver nanoparticle solution from nitrate silver (AgNO3. The solution is then characterized using Uv-Vis spectrophotometer. 5 mM silver nanoparticle is added in the process of mortar production with volume variation of the silver nanoparticle solution. The porosity, compressive strength, and the content of mortar were determined by digital scale, universal testing machine, and X-ray diffraction, respectively. For silver nanoparticle solution volumes of (in mL 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 the porosity obtained are (in % 20.38, 19.48, 19.42, 18.9, 17.8, and 17.5, respectively. The best increase in compressive strength is obtained for (in MPa 29,068, 29,308, and 31,385, with nanoparticle solution volumes of (in mL 5, 10, and 15   Keywords: mortar, silver nanoparticle, compressive strength

  6. Compression Behavior of Confined Columns with High-Volume Fly Ash Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Won Yoo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of fly ash in ordinary concrete provides practical benefits to concrete structures, such as a gain in long-term strength, reduced hydration heat, improved resistance to chloride, and enhanced workability. However, few studies with high-volume fly ash (HVFA concrete have been conducted that focus on the structural applications such as a column. Thus, there is a need to promote field applications of HVFA concrete as a sustainable construction material. To this end, this study investigated the compressive behavior of reinforced concrete columns that contain HVFA with a 50 percent replacement rate. Six columns were fabricated for this study. The study variables were the HVFA replacement rate, tied steel ratio, and tie steel spacing. The computed ultimate strength by the American Concrete Institute (ACI code conservatively predicted the measured values, and, thus, the existing equation in the ACI code is feasible for confined RC columns that contain HVFA. In addition, an analysis model was calibrated based on the experimental results and is recommended for predicting the stress-strain relationship of confined reinforced concrete columns that contain HVFA.

  7. Molar volume, thermal expansivity and isothermal compressibility of trans-decahydronaphthalene up to 200MPa and 446K

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Hu-Gang; Liu Zhi-Hua; Tian Yi-Ling; Xue Yuan; Yin Liang

    2005-01-01

    The molar volume isotherms of trans-decahydronaphthalene (C10H18) between 293 and 446 K and at pressures from 10 to 200 MPa have been determined. A modified Tait equation of state is used to fit each experimental molar volume isotherm with a maximum average deviation of 0.029%. The thermal expansivity (cubic expansion coefficient) α and isothermal compressibility κ were determined by fitting the slopes of the isobaric curves and isotherms, respectively.The coefficients in the equation Vm = C1 + C2T + C3T2 - C4p - C5pT have been fitted with an average deviation of 1.03%.

  8. Resonant frequency does not predict high-frequency chest compression settings that maximize airflow or volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthy, Sarah K; Marinkovic, Aleksandar; Weiner, Daniel J

    2011-06-01

    High-frequency chest compression (HFCC) is a therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF). We hypothesized that the resonant frequency (f(res)), as measured by impulse oscillometry, could be used to determine what HFCC vest settings produce maximal airflow or volume in pediatric CF patients. In 45 subjects, we studied: f(res), HFCC vest frequencies that subjects used (f(used)), and the HFCC vest frequencies that generated the greatest volume (f(vol)) and airflow (f(flow)) changes as measured by pneumotachometer. Median f(used) for 32 subjects was 14 Hz (range, 6-30). The rank order of the three most common f(used) was 15 Hz (28%) and 12 Hz (21%); three frequencies tied for third: 10, 11, and 14 Hz (5% each). Median f(res) for 43 subjects was 20.30 Hz (range, 7.85-33.65). Nineteen subjects underwent vest-tuning to determine f(vol) and f(flow). Median f(vol) was 8 Hz (range, 6-30). The rank order of the three most common f(vol) was: 8 Hz (42%), 6 Hz (32%), and 10 Hz (21%). Median f(flow) was 26 Hz (range, 8-30). The rank order of the three most common f(flow) was: 30 Hz (26%) and 28 Hz (21%); three frequencies tied for third: 8, 14, and 18 Hz (11% each). There was no correlation between f(used) and f(flow) (r(2)  = -0.12) or f(vol) (r(2) = 0.031). There was no correlation between f(res) and f(flow) (r(2)  = 0.19) or f(vol) (r(2) = 0.023). Multivariable analysis showed no independent variables were predictive of f(flow) or f(vol). Vest-tuning may be required to optimize clinical utility of HFCC. Multiple HFCC frequencies may need to be used to incorporate f(flow) and f(vol).

  9. Existence and Stability of Viscous Shock Profiles for 2-D Isentropic MHD with Infinite Electrical Resistivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, B.; Zumbrun, K. [Indiana Univ, Dept Math, Bloomington, IN 47402 (United States); Lafitte, O. [CEA Saclay, DM2S DIR, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Univ Paris 13, Inst Galilee, LAGA, F-93430 Villetaneuse, (France)

    2010-07-01

    For the two-dimensional Navier Stokes equations of isentropic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) with {gamma}-law gas equation of state, {gamma}{>=}1, and infinite electrical resistivity, we carry out a global analysis categorizing all possible viscous shock profiles. Precisely, we show that the phase portrait of the Crave ling-wave ODE generically consists of either two rest points connected by a viscous Lax profile, or else four rest points, two saddles and two nodes. In the latter configuration, which rest points are connected by profiles depends on the ratio of viscosities, and can involve Lax, over-compressive, or under-compressive shock profiles. Considered as three-dimensional solutions, under-compressive shocks are Lax-type (Alfven) waves. For the monatomic and diatomic cases {gamma}=5/3 and {gamma}=7/5, with standard viscosity ratio for a nonmagnetic gas, we find numerically that the the nodes are connected by a family of over-compressive profiles bounded by Lax profiles connecting saddles to nodes, with no under-compressive shocks occurring. We carry out a systematic numerical Evans function analysis indicating that all of these two-dimensional shock profiles are linearly and nonlinearly stable, both with respect to two- and three-dimensional perturbations. For the same gas constants, but different viscosity ratios, we investigate also cases for which under-compressive shocks appear; these are seen numerically to be stable as well, both with respect to two-dimensional and (in the neutral sense of convergence to nearby Riemann solutions) three-dimensional perturbations. (authors)

  10. Interactions of L-Aspartic Acid with Aqueous Solution of 1,2-Propanediol at Different Temperatures: A Volumetric, Compressibility and Viscometric Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Ruby; Kumar, Ashwani; Sharma, Tanu; Saini, Balwinder; Bamezai, Rajinder Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The volumetric, acoustic and viscometric methods are used for investigating the interactions of L-aspartic acid (Asp) in aqueous solution of 1,2-propanediol (PD) over a temperature of (298.15, 303.15 and 308.15) K at atmospheric pressure. Using the experimental results, the apparent molar volume, Vφ, limiting apparent molar volume, V0φ, the slope, Sv, and partial molar volume of transfer, V0φ,tr, have been calculated from density data. The apparent molar isentropic compressibility, K φ,s, limiting apparent molar isentropic compressibility, K0φ,s, its slope, Sk, and partial molar compressibility of transfer, K0φ,s, tr, have been calculated from speed of sound data. These values are also used for calculating the number of water molecules hydrated, nH, to the Asp. The viscosity data has also been used to determine relative viscosity ηr, viscosity B-coefficients, temperature derivative of B-coefficients, dB/dT and viscosity B-coefficients of transfer, Btr. The calculated parameters have been discussed in terms of various solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions prevailing in these solutions. Further, a detailed insight into the physicochemical interactions between Asp and aqueous PD, e.g., ion-hydrophilic and hydrophilic-hydrophilic interactions along with the structure-making tendency have been retrieved through the perusal of these calculated parameters.

  11. Novel Concepts for the Compression of Large Volumes of Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Jeffrey Moore; Marybeth G. Nored; Ryan S. Gernentz; Klaus Brun

    2007-09-30

    In the effort to reduce the release of CO{sub 2} greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, sequestration of CO{sub 2} from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Oxy-Fuel power plants is being pursued. This approach, however, requires significant compression power to boost the pressure to typical pipeline levels. The penalty can be as high as 8% to 12% on a typical IGCC plant. The goal of this research is to reduce this penalty through novel compression concepts and integration with existing IGCC processes. The primary objective of the study of novel CO{sub 2} compression concepts is to boost the pressure of CO{sub 2} to pipeline pressures with the minimal amount of energy required. Fundamental thermodynamics were studied to explore pressure rise in both liquid and gaseous states. For gaseous compression, the project investigated novel methods to compress CO{sub 2} while removing the heat of compression internal to the compressor. The high-pressure ratio due to the delivery pressure of the CO{sub 2} for enhanced oil recovery results in significant heat of compression. Since less energy is required to boost the pressure of a cooler gas stream, both upstream and interstage cooling is desirable. While isothermal compression has been utilized in some services, it has not been optimized for the IGCC environment. This project determined the optimum compressor configuration and developed technology concepts for internal heat removal. Other compression options using liquefied CO{sub 2} and cryogenic pumping were explored as well. Preliminary analysis indicates up to a 35% reduction in power is possible with the new concepts being considered.

  12. Release isentrope measurements with the LLNL electric gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gathers, G.R.; Osher, J.E.; Chau, H.H.; Weingart, R.C.; Lee, C.G.; Diaz, E.

    1987-06-01

    The liquid-vapor coexistence boundary is not well known for most metals because the extreme conditions near the critical point create severe experimental difficulties. The isentropes passing through the liquid-vapor region typically begin from rather large pressures on the Hugoniot. We are attempting to use the high velocities achievable with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) electric gun to obtain these extreme states in aluminum and measure the release isentropes by releasing into a series of calibrated standards with known Hugoniots. To achieve large pressure drops needed to explore the liquid-vapor region, we use argon gas for which Hugoniots have been calculated using the ACTEX code, as one of the release materials.

  13. Development of a compressive surface capturing formulation for modelling free-surface flow by using the volume-of-fluid approach

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Heyns, Johan A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available combines a blended higher resolution scheme with the addition of an artificial compressive term to the volume-of-fluid equation. This reduces the numerical smearing of the interface associated with explicit higher resolution schemes while limiting...

  14. The South Asian Monsoon Circulation in Moist Isentropic coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thazhe Purayil, Sabin; Pauluis, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    The atmospheric circulation and thermodynamic structure during the South Asian Summer Monsoon season is analyzed in isentropic coordinates through the mass transport represented in terms of the potential temperature and equivalent potential temperature. This approach, originally developed to analyze the global meridional circulation, makes it possible to identify the thermodynamic properties of the inflow and outflow of different air mass. To understand the thermodynamic properties of air mass in south Asian monsoon region, we have used three diagnostics; a) the joint distribution of the mass transport as a function of dry and moist entropy, b) the vertical mass flux over the monsoon domain and c) the mass transport and isentropic thickness for different moist ventilation range of tropical atmosphere. The thermodynamic properties of the various air masses, such as the inflow of warm moist air in the boundary layer, upper tropospheric outflow, and midlatitude dry air intrusion are being systematically identified. The isentropic distribution of the vertical mass flux transport in terms of equivalent potential temperature is used to explain the characteristics of ascending and descending air parcels over the Indian subcontinent. Diagnosis based on the isentropic thickness reveals that the regional monsoon circulation and associated precipitation features can be systematically explained by this method. This technique is used to study the evolution of the monsoon flow in the seasonal scale. We used the data from AMIP-type simulations carried out with prescribed Sea Surface Temperature and sea ice for a 25 year period (1981-2005) from the GFDL High-resolution atmospheric model (HiRAM) with an average grid spacing of ~25km over the globe.

  15. NOVEL CONCEPTS FOR THE COMPRESSION OF LARGE VOLUMES OF CARBON DIOXIDE-PHASE III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, J. Jeffrey; Allison, Timothy; Evans, Neal; Moreland, Brian; Hernandez, Augusto; Day, Meera; Ridens, Brandon

    2014-06-30

    In the effort to reduce the release of CO2 greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, sequestration of CO2 from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Oxy-Fuel power plants is being pursued. This approach, however, requires significant compression power to boost the pressure to typical pipeline levels. The penalty can be as high as 8-12% on a typical IGCC plant. The goal of this research is to reduce this penalty through novel compression concepts and integration with existing IGCC processes. The primary objective of the study of novel CO2 compression concepts is to reliably boost the pressure of CO2 to pipeline pressures with the minimal amount of energy required. Fundamental thermodynamics were studied to explore pressure rise in both liquid and gaseous states. For gaseous compression, the project investigated novel methods to compress CO2 while removing the heat of compression internal to the compressor. The highpressure ratio, due to the delivery pressure of the CO2 for enhanced oil recovery, results in significant heat of compression. Since less energy is required to boost the pressure of a cooler gas stream, both upstream and inter-stage cooling is desirable. While isothermal compression has been utilized in some services, it has not been optimized for the IGCC environment. Phase I of this project determined the optimum compressor configuration and developed technology concepts for internal heat removal. Other compression options using liquefied CO2 and cryogenic pumping were explored as well. Preliminary analysis indicated up to a 35% reduction in power is possible with the new concepts being considered. In the Phase II program, two experimental test rigs were developed to investigate the two concepts further. A new pump loop facility was constructed to qualify a cryogenic turbopump for use on liquid CO2. Also, an internally cooled compressor diaphragm was developed and tested in a closed loop compressor facility using CO2. Both test programs

  16. Compression Waves and Phase Plots: Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Orlikowski, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Compression wave analysis started nearly 50 years ago with Fowles.[1] Coperthwaite and Williams [2] gave a method that helps identify simple and steady waves. We have been developing a method that gives describes the non-isentropic character of compression waves, in general.[3] One result of that work is a simple analysis tool. Our method helps clearly identify when a compression wave is a simple wave, a steady wave (shock), and when the compression wave is in transition. This affects the analysis of compression wave experiments and the resulting extraction of the high-pressure equation of state.

  17. Volume digital image correlation to assess displacement field in compression loaded bread crumb under X-ray microtomography

    KAUST Repository

    Moussawi, Ali

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we present an original approach to assess structural changes during bread crumb compression using a mechanical testing bench coupled to 3D X-ray microtomography. X-ray images taken at different levels of compression of the bread crumb are processed using image analysis. A subset-based digital volume correlation method is used to achieve the 3D displacement field. Within the limit of the approach, deterministic search strategy is implemented for solving subset displacement in each deformed image with regards to the undeformed one. The predicted displacement field in the transverse directions shows differences that depend on local cell arrangement as confirmed by finite element analysis. The displacement component in the loading direction is affected by the magnitude of imposed displacement and shows more regular change. Large displacement levels in the compression direction are in good agreement with the imposed experimental displacement. The results presented here are promising in a sense of possible identification of local foam properties. New insights are expected to achieve better understanding of structural heterogeneities in the overall perception of the product. Industrial relevance: Texture evaluation of cereal product is an important aspect for testing consumer acceptability of new designed products. Mechanical evaluation of backed products is a systemic route for determining texture of cereal based product. From the industrial viewpoint, mechanical evaluation allows saving both time and cost compared to panel evaluation. We demonstrate that better understanding of structural changes during texture evaluation can be achieved in addition to texture evaluation. Sensing structural changes during bread crumb compression is achievable by combining novel imaging technique and processing based on image analysis. We present thus an efficient way to predict displacements during compression of freshly baked product. This method can be used in different

  18. Novel concepts for the compression of large volumes of carbon dioxide-phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, J. Jeffrey [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Allison, Timothy C. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Evans, Neal D. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Moreland, Brian [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Hernandez, Augusto J. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Day, Meera [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Ridens, Brandon L. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-30

    In the effort to reduce the release of CO2 greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, sequestration of CO2 from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Oxy-Fuel power plants is being pursued. This approach, however, requires significant compression power to boost the pressure to typical pipeline levels. The penalty can be as high as 8-12% on a typical IGCC plant. The goal of this research is to reduce this penalty through novel compression concepts and integration with existing IGCC processes. The primary objective of the study of novel CO2 compression concepts is to reliably boost the pressure of CO2 to pipeline pressures with the minimal amount of energy required. Fundamental thermodynamics were studied to explore pressure rise in both liquid and gaseous states. For gaseous compression, the project investigated novel methods to compress CO2 while removing the heat of compression internal to the compressor. The highpressure ratio, due to the delivery pressure of the CO2 for enhanced oil recovery, results in significant heat of compression. Since less energy is required to boost the pressure of a cooler gas stream, both upstream and inter-stage cooling is desirable. While isothermal compression has been utilized in some services, it has not been optimized for the IGCC environment. Phase I of this project determined the optimum compressor configuration and developed technology concepts for internal heat removal. Other compression options using liquefied CO2 and cryogenic pumping were explored as well. Preliminary analysis indicated up to a 35% reduction in power is possible with the new concepts being considered. In the Phase II program, two experimental test rigs were developed to investigate the two concepts further. A new pump loop facility was constructed to qualify a cryogenic turbopump for use on liquid CO2 . Also, an internally cooled compressor diaphragm was developed

  19. Strong Entropy for System of Isentropic Gas Dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we study three special families of strong entropy-entropy flux pairs (η/O, qO), (η/±, q±),represented by different kernels, of the isentropic gas dynamics system with the adiabatic exponent γ∈ (3, ∞).Through the perturbation technique through the perturbation technique, we proved, we proved the H-1 com-pactncss of ηit+qix, i=1, 2, 3 with respect to the perturbation solutions given by the Cauchy problem (6) and (7), where (ηi, qi) are suitable linear combinations of (ηO, qO), (η±, q±).

  20. Development of a novel high volume band compression injector for the analysis of complex samples like toxaphene pesticide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagné, Jean-Pierre; Gouteux, Bruno; Bertrand, Michel J

    2009-01-16

    A new type of injector has been developed for gas chromatographic analysis. The injector has high volume and band compression (HVBC) capabilities useful for the analysis of complex samples. The injector consists essentially of a packed liner operated at room temperature while a narrow heated zone is used to axially scan the liner selectively desorbing the compounds of interest. The scanning speed, distance and temperature of the zone are precisely controlled. The liner is connected to an interface which can vent the solvent or any undesirable compounds, and transfer the analytes to an analytical column for separation and quantification. The injector is designed to be compatible with injection volumes from 1 to more than 250microL. At a low sample volume of 1microL, the injector has competitive performances compared to those of the "on-column" and "split/splitless" injectors for the fatty acid methyl esters and toxaphene compounds tested. For higher volumes, the system produces a linear response according to the injected volume. In this explorative study, the maximum volume injected seems to be limited by the saturation of the chromatographic system instead of being defined by the design of the injector. The HVBC injector can also be used to conduct "in situ" pretreatment of the sample before its transfer to the analytical column. For instance, a toxaphene sample was successively fractionated, using the HVBC injector, in six sub-fractions characterized by simpler chromatograms than the chromatogram of the original mixture. Finally, the ability of the HVBC injector to "freeze" the separation in time allowing the analyst to complete the analysis at a later time is also discussed.

  1. Extension of Finite Volume Compressible Flow Solvers to Multi-dimensional, Variable Density Zero Mach Number Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, T.; Botta, N.; Geratz, K. J.; Klein, R.

    1999-11-01

    When attempting to compute unsteady, variable density flows at very small or zero Mach number using a standard finite volume compressible flow solver one faces at least the following difficulties: (i) Spatial pressure variations vanish as the Mach number M→0, but they do affect the velocity field at leading order; (ii) the resulting spatial homogeneity of the leading order pressure implies an elliptic divergence constraint for the energy flux; (iii) violations of this constraint crucially affect the transport of mass, preventing a code to properly advect even a constant density distribution. We overcome these difficulties through a new algorithm for constructing numerical fluxes in the context of multi-dimensional finite volume methods in conservation form. The construction of numerical fluxes involves: (1) An explicit upwind step yielding predictions for the nonlinear convective flux components. (2) A first correction step that introduces pressure gradients which guarantee compliance of the convective fluxes with a divergence constraint. This step requires the solution of a first Poisson-type equation. (3) A second projection step which provides the yet unknown (non-convective) pressure contribution to the total flux of momentum. This second projection requires the solution of another Poisson-type equation and yields the cell centered velocity field at the new time. This velocity field exactly satisfies a divergence constraint consistent with the asymptotic limit. Step (1) can be done by any standard finite volume compressible flow solver. The input to steps (2) and (3) involves solely the fluxes from step (1) and is independent of how these were obtained. Thus, our approach allows any such solver to be extended to compute variable density incompressible flows.

  2. A combined finite volume-nonconforming finite element scheme for compressible two phase flow in porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Saad, Bilal Mohammed

    2014-06-28

    We propose and analyze a combined finite volume-nonconforming finite element scheme on general meshes to simulate the two compressible phase flow in porous media. The diffusion term, which can be anisotropic and heterogeneous, is discretized by piecewise linear nonconforming triangular finite elements. The other terms are discretized by means of a cell-centered finite volume scheme on a dual mesh, where the dual volumes are constructed around the sides of the original mesh. The relative permeability of each phase is decentred according the sign of the velocity at the dual interface. This technique also ensures the validity of the discrete maximum principle for the saturation under a non restrictive shape regularity of the space mesh and the positiveness of all transmissibilities. Next, a priori estimates on the pressures and a function of the saturation that denote capillary terms are established. These stabilities results lead to some compactness arguments based on the use of the Kolmogorov compactness theorem, and allow us to derive the convergence of a subsequence of the sequence of approximate solutions to a weak solution of the continuous equations, provided the mesh size tends to zero. The proof is given for the complete system when the density of the each phase depends on its own pressure. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  3. Effect of high temperature curing on the compressive strength of concrete incorporating large volumes of fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera-Villarreal, R. [Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    The effect of using different types of heat treatment on the compressive strength of concrete with and without large volumes of fly ash was studied. Curing of concrete is important to obtain a good quality concrete, but it is important to keep concrete from drying until the originally water-filled space in fresh cement paste has been filled to the desired extent by the products of hydration. In hot weather, high temperature promotes faster drying of concrete so a given degree of hydration is reached more rapidly than at lower temperatures. The provision of moist curing is advantageous because of a gradual gain in strength and because of reduced plastic shrinkage and drying shrinkage-cracking. The portland cement content in all the mixtures used in this study was 200 kg per cubic metre and the amount of fly ash varied from 0 to 33, 43, 50 and 56 per cent by mass of the total binder. A superplasticizer was used to obtain 200-220 mm slump. The compressive strength was tested at 3, 7, 14, 28, 56 days and at 6 months. Results showed that, using ASTM standard curing, the compressive strength of portland cement concrete made at 35 degrees C was reduced by about 12 per cent at 28 days compared to that of the concrete made at 23 degrees C. The AASHTO curing strength was found to be a bit higher than with the ASTM curing. The concrete made at 35 degrees C showed no loss of strength when continuous moist-curing was applied. The fly ash concrete mixtures that were cast at 35 degrees C were cured by covering them with membrane curing compounds and placed under ambient conditions. It was crucial to allow enough curing water to promote the pozzolanic reaction. The membrane curing did not allow the ingress of water to the concrete mass. 6 refs., 4 tabs., 13 figs.

  4. Compressible Flow Produced by Distributed Sources of Mass: An Exact Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    The paper considers the case of a one-dimensional isentropic unsteady compressible flow that is driven entirely by a distribution of sources in the left-hand half space of an unbounded domain. The right-hand half-space contains no sources, so that source-strength drops discontinuously to zero as one crosses from left to right-hand space. Exact solutions are obtained for those parts of the flow that remain isentropic.

  5. Recovery of Cryptosporidium oocysts from small and large volume water samples using a compressed foam filter system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartory, D P; Parton, A; Parton, A C; Roberts, J; Bergmann, K

    1998-12-01

    A novel filter system comprising open cell reticulated foam rings compressed between retaining plates and fitted into a filtration housing was evaluated for the recovery of oocysts of Cryptosporidium from water. Mean recoveries of 90.2% from seeded small and large volume (100-2000 l) tap water samples, and 88.8% from 10-20 l river water samples, were achieved. Following a simple potassium citrate flotation concentrate clean-up procedure, mean recoveries were 56.7% for the tap water samples and 60.9% for river water samples. This represents a marked improvement in capture and recovery of Cryptosporidium oocysts from water compared with conventional polypropylene wound cartridge filters and membrane filters.

  6. Partial molar volume and partial molar compressibility of four homologous {alpha}-amino acids in aqueous sodium fluoride solutions at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopal, K., E-mail: krpal25@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, Government College of Engg., Tirunelveli 627 007, Tamilnadu (India); Edwin Gladson, S., E-mail: aseg_win@rediffmail.co [Department of Physics, St. Xavier' s Catholic College of Engg., Chunkankadai 629 003, Tamilnadu (India)

    2011-06-15

    Research highlights: Partial molar volume indicates strong solute-cosolute interaction in the NaF solution. Partial molar compressibility results compliment partial molar volume results. Hydration number proves that sodium fluoride has dehydration effect on amino acids. Interactions between sodium fluoride and (NH{sub 3}{sup +},COO{sup -}) group of amino acid are stronger. - Abstract: Density and ultrasonic speed of four amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-valine, and L-leucine) in aqueous sodium fluoride solutions {l_brace}(0.1 to 0.5) M{r_brace} have been measured at T = (308.15, 313.15, and 318.15) K. Apparent molar volumes (V{sub {phi}}), partial molar volumes (V{sub {phi}}{sup 0}), transfer volumes ({Delta}V{sub {phi}}{sup 0}) and hydration number (n{sub H}) are evaluated using density data. Adiabatic compressibility ({beta}{sub s}), change ({Delta}{beta}{sub s}), and relative change in compressibility ({Delta}{beta}{sub s}/{beta}{sub 0}), apparent molar compressibility (K{sub {phi}}), partial molar compressibility (K{sub {phi}}{sup 0}), transfer compressibility ({Delta}K{sub {phi}}{sup 0}), and hydration number (n{sub H}) have been calculated using ultrasonic speed data. The linear correlation of V{sub {phi}}{sup 0},{Delta}V{sub {phi}}{sup 0},K{sub {phi}}{sup 0} and {Delta}K{sub {phi}}{sup 0} for a homologous series of amino acids have been used utilised to calculate the contribution of charged end groups (NH{sub 3}{sup +}, COO{sup -}), CH{sub 2} group and other alkyl chain of the amino acids. The analysis shows that the ion-ion interactions are much stronger than ion-hydrophobic interactions over the entire concentration range of sodium fluoride. It is observed that sodium fluoride has a strong dehydration effect on amino acids.

  7. Polar Vortex Oscillation Viewed in an Isentropic Potential Vorticity Coordinate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The stratospheric polar vortex oscillation (PVO) in the Northern Hemisphere is examined in a semiLagrangian θ-PVLAT coordinate constructed by using daily isentropic potential vorticity maps derived from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis Ⅱ dataset covering the period from 1979 to 2003. In the semi-Lagrangian θ-PVLAT coordinate, the variability of the polar vortex is solely attributed to its intensity change because the changes in its location and shape would be naturally absent by following potential vorticity contours on isentropic surfaces. The EOF and regression analyses indicate that the PVO can be described by a pair of poleward and downward propagating modes. These two modes together account for about 82% variance of the daily potential vorticity anomalies over the entire Northern Hemisphere. The power spectral analysis reveals a dominant time scale of about 107 days in the time series of these two modes,representing a complete PVO cycle accompanied with poleward propagating heating anomalies of both positive and negative signs from the equator to the pole. The strong polar vortex corresponds to the arrival of cold anomalies over the polar circle and vice versa. Accompanied with the poleward propagation is a simultaneous downward propagation. The downward propagation time scale is about 20 days in high and low latitudes and about 30 days in mid-latitudes. The zonal wind anomalies lag the poleward and downward propagating temperature anomalies of the opposite sign by 10 days in low and high latitudes and by 20 days in mid-latitudes. The time series of the leading EOF modes also exhibit dominant time scales of 8.7, 16.9, and 33.8 months. They approximately follow a double-periodicity sequence and correspond to the 3-peak extratropical Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) signal.

  8. The Effects of Design Strength, Fly Ash Content and Curing Method on Compressive Strength of High Volume Fly Ash Concrete: A Design of Experimental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solikin Mochamad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High volume fly ash concrete becomes one of alternatives to produce green concrete as it uses waste material and significantly reduces the utilization of Portland cement in concrete production. Although using less cement, its compressive strength is comparable to ordinary Portland cement (hereafter OPC and the its durability increases significantly. This paper reports investigation on the effect of design strength, fly ash content and curing method on compressive strength of High Volume Fly Ash Concrete. The experiment and data analysis were prepared using minitab, a statistic software for design of experimental. The specimens were concrete cylinder with diameter of 15 cm and height of 30 cm, tested for its compressive strength at 56 days. The result of the research demonstrates that high volume fly ash concrete can produce comparable compressive strength which meets the strength of OPC design strength especially for high strength concrete. In addition, the best mix proportion to achieve the design strength is the combination of high strength concrete and 50% content of fly ash. Moreover, the use of spraying method for curing method of concrete on site is still recommended as it would not significantly reduce the compressive strength result.

  9. Effects of Positive End-Expiratory Pressure on Oscillated Volume during High-Frequency Chest Compression in Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Dosman, Cara F; Peter C Zuberbuhler; Tabk, Joan I; Jones, Richard L

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) and mean oscillated volume (Vosc) during high frequency chest compression (HFCC).DESIGN: A clinic-based prospective intervention study.SETTING: Pulmonary function laboratory, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta.POPULATION: Nine children with cystic fibrosis with little or no obstructive airway disease who were selected from the outpatient Cystic Fibrosis and Pediatric Pul...

  10. Technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed augmented compressed air energy-storage system. Volume II. Introduction and technology assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giramonti, A.J.; Lessard, R.D.; Merrick, D.; Hobson, M.J.

    1981-09-01

    The results are described of a study subcontracted by PNL to the United Technologies Research Center on the engineering feasibility and economics of a CAES concept which uses a coal fired, fluidized bed combustor (FBC) to heat the air being returned from storage during the power production cycle. By burning coal instead of fuel oil, the CAES/FBC concept can completely eliminate the dependence of compressed air energy storage on petroleum fuels. The results of this assessment effort are presented in three volumes. Volume II presents a discussion of program background and an in-depth coverage of both fluid bed combustion and turbomachinery technology pertinent to their application in a CAES power plant system. The CAES/FBC concept appears technically feasible and economically competitive with conventional CAES. However, significant advancement is required in FBC technology before serious commercial commitment to CAES/FBC can be realized. At present, other elements of DOE, industrial groups, and other countries are performing the required R and D for advancement of FBC technology. The CAES/FBC will be reevaluated at a later date when FBC technology has matured and many of the concerns now plaguing FBC are resolved. (LCL)

  11. Brief report: Volume dependence of Grüneisen parameter for solids under extreme compression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SANJAY KUMAR; S K SHARMA; O P PANDEY

    2016-08-01

    The Nie expression is amended in such a way that the expression follows the infinite pressure behaviour, i.e., P → ∞or V → 0. A new empirical relationship is developed to predict the values of volume dependence of Grüneisen parameter. NaCl and ε-Fe have been employed to test the suitability of the expression.The results obtained reveal that the relationship is reliable as there is a good agreement between the calculated and the experimental data

  12. Volume Change of Heterogeneous Quasi-brittle Materials in Uniaxial Compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xuebin

    2006-01-01

    The volumetric strain was categorized into elastic and plastic parts. The former composed of axial and lateral strains is uniform and determined by Hooke's law; however, the latter consisting of axial and lateral strains is a function of thickness of shear band determined by gradient-dependent plasticity by considering the heterogeneity of quasi-brittle materials. The non-uniform lateral strain due to the fact that shear band was formed in the middle of specimen was averaged within specimen to precisely assess the volumetric strain. Then, the analytical expression for volumetric strain was verified by comparison with two earlier experimental results for concrete and rock. Finally, a detailed parametric study was carried out to investigate effects of constitutive parameters (shear band thickness, elastic and softening moduli) and geometrical size of specimen(height and width of specimen) on the volume dilatancy.

  13. Regularity and Energy Conservation for the Compressible Euler Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feireisl, Eduard; Gwiazda, Piotr; Świerczewska-Gwiazda, Agnieszka; Wiedemann, Emil

    2017-03-01

    We give sufficient conditions on the regularity of solutions to the inhomogeneous incompressible Euler and the compressible isentropic Euler systems in order for the energy to be conserved. Our strategy relies on commutator estimates similar to those employed by Constantin et al. for the homogeneous incompressible Euler equations.

  14. Experimental correlation of nitroxide recollision spin exchange with free volume and compressibility in alkane and aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurban, Mark R

    2009-03-14

    Diffusion of perdeuterated tempone (PDT) in various nonpolar hydrocarbon solvents on both the large and microscopic scales is examined through electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spectral line broadening and hyperfine spacing are measured in order to extract both the Heisenberg spin-exchange rate as well as the average recollision times between spin-probe pairs. Probe recollision is responsible for a linear component to the dependence of the line shift on spectral broadening which has been identified in recent years. The present study extends the work of a previous paper by Kurban et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 064501 (2008)], in which it was reported that recollision rates for PDT formed a common curve across n-alkanes when plotted with respect to free volume and to isothermal compressibility. It is now found that such common curves occur within distinct chemical families, in particular, the alkane and aromatic groups. Within each chemical family, the spin probe recollision rate correlates with free volume and compressibility independently of the geometry of the particular solvent. All solvents show significantly enhanced recollisional diffusion over the Stokes-Einstein (SE) prediction at high temperatures. The spin-exchange rate forms a common curve with respect to T/eta for all alkanes except cyclohexane and another common curve in all three aromatic compounds. It is reasoned that although all spin-exchange rates are near to the SE prediction, the semblance of hydrodynamic behavior is superficial and arises incidentally from mathematical cancellation of terms in a generalized diffusion coefficient. As a collision pair coexists for a time within a solvation shell, the recollision time places a lower limit on the lifetime of the solvent cage. Although molecular dynamics simulations conducted thus far have yielded cage lifetimes lower than the measured recollision times, this is attributable to the fact that such simulations have mostly examined cage

  15. Experimental correlation of nitroxide recollision spin exchange with free volume and compressibility in alkane and aromatic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurban, Mark R.

    2009-03-01

    Diffusion of perdeuterated tempone (PDT) in various nonpolar hydrocarbon solvents on both the large and microscopic scales is examined through electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spectral line broadening and hyperfine spacing are measured in order to extract both the Heisenberg spin-exchange rate as well as the average recollision times between spin-probe pairs. Probe recollision is responsible for a linear component to the dependence of the line shift on spectral broadening which has been identified in recent years. The present study extends the work of a previous paper by Kurban et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 064501 (2008)], in which it was reported that recollision rates for PDT formed a common curve across n-alkanes when plotted with respect to free volume and to isothermal compressibility. It is now found that such common curves occur within distinct chemical families, in particular, the alkane and aromatic groups. Within each chemical family, the spin probe recollision rate correlates with free volume and compressibility independently of the geometry of the particular solvent. All solvents show significantly enhanced recollisional diffusion over the Stokes-Einstein (SE) prediction at high temperatures. The spin-exchange rate forms a common curve with respect to T /η for all alkanes except cyclohexane and another common curve in all three aromatic compounds. It is reasoned that although all spin-exchange rates are near to the SE prediction, the semblance of hydrodynamic behavior is superficial and arises incidentally from mathematical cancellation of terms in a generalized diffusion coefficient. As a collision pair coexists for a time within a solvation shell, the recollision time places a lower limit on the lifetime of the solvent cage. Although molecular dynamics simulations conducted thus far have yielded cage lifetimes lower than the measured recollision times, this is attributable to the fact that such simulations have mostly examined cage

  16. Is the Isentropic Surface Always Impermeable to the Potential Vorticity Substance?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chanh Q. KIEU; Da-Lin ZHANG

    2012-01-01

    The impermeability of isentropic surfaces by the potential vorticity substance (PVS) has often been used to help understand the generation of potential vorticity in the presence of diabatic heating and friction.In this study,we examined singularities of isentropic surfaces that may develop in the presence of diabatic heating and the fictitious movements of the isentropic surfaces that are involved in deriving the PVS impermeability theorem.Our results show that such singularities could occur in the upper troposphere as a result of intense convective-scale motion,at the cloud top due to radiative cooling,or within the well-mixed boundary layer.These locally ill-defined conditions allow PVS to penetrate across an isentropic surface.Wc conclude that the PVS impermeability theorem is generally valid for the stably stratified atmosphere in the absence of diabatic heating.

  17. Weinhold'length in an isentropic Ideal and quasi-Ideal Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Santoro, Manuel

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we study thermodynamic length of an isentropic Ideal and quasi-Ideal Gas using Weinhold metric in a two-dimensional state space. We give explicit relation between length at constant entropy and work.

  18. The Explicit Planetary Isentropic-Coordinate (EPIC) Atmospheric Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, T. E.; Fischer, A. S.; Gierasch, P. J.; Harrington, J.; LeBeau, R. P.; Santori, C. M.

    1998-04-01

    We describe a new general circulation model (GCM) designed for planetary atmospheric studies called the EPIC model. This is a finite-difference model based on the isentropic-coordinate scheme of Hsu and Arakawa (1990.Mon. Wea. Rev.118, 1933-1959). We report on previously undocumented modifications, additions, and key practical issues that experience running the model has revealed to be important. The model integrates the hydrostatic primitive equations, which are valid for large-scale atmospheric dynamics and include gravity waves (buoyancy waves), planetary waves (Rossby waves), and horizontally propagating sound waves (Lamb waves), but not vertically propagating sound waves because of the hydrostatic approximation. The vertical coordinate is entropy in the form of potential temperature, which coincides with material surfaces for adiabatic motion. This means that there is no vertical velocity except where there is heating, which improves accuracy and helps the model maintain conservation properties over long integrations. An isentropic vertical coordinate is natural for the atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, which are believed to have essentially adiabatic interiors that match up with the bottom of the model and is also excellent for middle-atmosphere studies on any planet. Radiative processes are parameterized by Newtonian cooling, and the latent heat of ortho-para hydrogen conversion is included when appropriate, with a suitably defined mean potential temperature. The model is written with general map factors that make it easy to configure in oblate spherical, cylindrical, or Cartesian coordinates. The code includes optional Message Passing Interface (MPI) library calls and hence runs on any Unix-based parallel computer or network cluster. An optional graphical user interface to commercial visualization software facilitates control of the model and analysis of output. Memory is allocated dynamically such that the user does not recompile to

  19. Measurements of properties concerning isentropic efficiency in a nonequilibrium MHD disk generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, H.; Okamura, T.; Shioda, S. [Tokyo Inst. of Tech., Yokohama (Japan)

    1996-06-01

    The isentropic efficiency and the effective Hall parameter in a nonequilibrium disk MHD generator have been successfully evaluated on the basis of the experiments under high enthalpy extraction conditions. Special attention is devoted to measuring the exit total pressure and the Faraday current. The maximum isentropic efficiency achieved in the present experiments was 46% with the enthalpy extraction ratio of 31.6%. The experimentally obtained values of the effective Hall parameter covered a range of 2--3.

  20. A Time-Accurate Upwind Unstructured Finite Volume Method for Compressible Flow with Cure of Pathological Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2007-01-01

    A time-accurate, upwind, finite volume method for computing compressible flows on unstructured grids is presented. The method is second order accurate in space and time and yields high resolution in the presence of discontinuities. For efficiency, the Roe approximate Riemann solver with an entropy correction is employed. In the basic Euler/Navier-Stokes scheme, many concepts of high order upwind schemes are adopted: the surface flux integrals are carefully treated, a Cauchy-Kowalewski time-stepping scheme is used in the time-marching stage, and a multidimensional limiter is applied in the reconstruction stage. However even with these up-to-date improvements, the basic upwind scheme is still plagued by the so-called "pathological behaviors," e.g., the carbuncle phenomenon, the expansion shock, etc. A solution to these limitations is presented which uses a very simple dissipation model while still preserving second order accuracy. This scheme is referred to as the enhanced time-accurate upwind (ETAU) scheme in this paper. The unstructured grid capability renders flexibility for use in complex geometry; and the present ETAU Euler/Navier-Stokes scheme is capable of handling a broad spectrum of flow regimes from high supersonic to subsonic at very low Mach number, appropriate for both CFD (computational fluid dynamics) and CAA (computational aeroacoustics). Numerous examples are included to demonstrate the robustness of the methods.

  1. Finite volume - space-time discontinuous Galerkin method for the numerical simulation of compressible turbulent flow in time dependent domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Česenek, Jan

    The article is concerned with the numerical simulation of the compressible turbulent flow in time dependent domains. The mathematical model of flow is represented by the system of non-stationary Reynolds- Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The motion of the domain occupied by the fluid is taken into account with the aid of the ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) formulation of the RANS equations. This RANS system is equipped with two-equation k - ω turbulence model. These two systems of equations are solved separately. Discretization of the RANS system is carried out by the space-time discontinuous Galerkin method which is based on piecewise polynomial discontinuous approximation of the sought solution in space and in time. Discretization of the two-equation k - ω turbulence model is carried out by the implicit finite volume method, which is based on piecewise constant approximation of the sought solution. We present some numerical experiments to demonstrate the applicability of the method using own-developed code.

  2. Use of Microwave Technique for Study of Isentropic Detonation Products Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, Evgeny; Belsky, Vladimir; Zhernokletov, Mikhail; Mikhaylov, Anatoly; Rodionov, Alexey; Sedov, Alexander; Russian Federal Nuclear Center-Vniief 607190, Sarov, Nizhniy Novgorod Reg., Russia Team

    2013-06-01

    Application of the microwave technique for research of explosives and their detonation products can give a number of advantages as compared to the other experimental techniques. This technique makes it possible to perform a continuous recording of the shock and detonation waves motion directly in explosive. A significant advantage of the technique consists in absence of influence on investigated process, because there are no any sensors, optic fiber etc. in an explosive volume. The microwave technique was used for isentropic detonation products expansion study of HMX/TATB-based explosive compound. For determination of states on the expansion adiabat of detonation products, the experimental series was conducted. In these experiments we recorded time dependences of the shock wave velocities in dielectric microwave-transparent barriers, which were in contact with explosive samples. A low power 94 GHz quadrature interferometer was used. The conducted experiments showed that the use of microwave technique gives a big amount of interesting experimental data with a considerable research simplification.

  3. Cosmography of KNdS Black Holes and Isentropic Phase Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    McInerney, James; Traschen, Jennie

    2015-01-01

    We present a new analysis of Kerr-Newman-deSitter black holes in terms of thermodynamic quantities that are defined in the observable portion of the universe; between the black hole and cosmological horizons. In particular, we replace the mass $m$ with a new 'area product' parameter $X$. The physical region of parameter space is found analytically and thermodynamic quantities are given by simple algebraic functions of these parameters. We find that different geometrical properties of the black holes are usefully distinguished by the sum of the black hole and cosmological entropies. The physical parameter space breaks into a region in which the total entropy, together with $\\Lambda$, $a$ and $q$ uniquely specifies the black hole, and a region in which there is a two-fold degeneracy. In this latter region, there are isentropic pairs of black holes, having the same $\\Lambda$, $a$, and $q$, but different $X$. The thermodynamic volumes and masses differ in such that there are high and low density branches. The par...

  4. Isentropic transport and the seasonal cycle amplitude of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Parazoo, Nicholas; Orbe, Clara; Denning, A. Scott

    2016-07-01

    Carbon-concentration feedbacks and carbon-climate feedbacks constitute one of the largest sources of uncertainty in future climate. Since the beginning of the modern atmospheric CO2 record, seasonal variations in CO2 have been recognized as a signal of the metabolism of land ecosystems, and quantitative attribution of changes in the seasonal cycle amplitude (SCA) of CO2 to ecosystem processes is critical for understanding and projecting carbon-climate feedbacks far into the 21st Century. Here the impact of surface carbon fluxes on the SCA of CO2 throughout the Northern Hemisphere troposphere is investigated, paying particular attention to isentropic transport across latitudes. The analysis includes both a chemical transport model GOES-Chem and an idealized tracer in a gray-radiation aquaplanet. The results of the study can be summarized by two main conclusions: (1) the SCA of CO2 roughly follows surfaces of constant potential temperature, which can explain the observed increase in SCA with latitude along pressure surfaces and (2) increasing seasonal fluxes in lower latitudes have a larger impact on the SCA of CO2 throughout most of the troposphere compared to increasing seasonal fluxes in higher latitudes. These results provide strong evidence that recently observed changes in the SCA of CO2 at high northern latitudes (poleward of 60°N) are likely driven by changes in midlatitude surface fluxes, rather than changes in Arctic fluxes.

  5. Influence of the vector interaction and an external magnetic field on the isentropes near the chiral critical end point

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The location of the critical end point (CEP) and the isentropic trajectories in the QCD phase diagram are investigated. We use the (2+1) Nambu$-$Jona-Lasinio model with the Polyakov loop coupling for different scenarios, namely by imposing zero strange quark density, which is the case in the ultra relativistic heavy-ion collisions, and $\\beta$-equilibrium. The influence of strong magnetic fields and of the vector interaction on the isentropic trajectories around the CEP is discussed. It is shown that the vector interaction and the magnetic field, having opposite effects on the first-order transition, affect the isentropic trajectories differently: as the vector interaction increases, the first-order transition becomes weaker and the isentropes become smoother; when a strong magnetic field is considered, the first-order transition is strengthened and the isentropes are pushed to higher temperatures. No focusing of isentropes in region towards the CEP is seen.

  6. Effect of High-Temperature Curing Methods on the Compressive Strength Development of Concrete Containing High Volumes of Ground Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonsuk Jung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of the high-temperature curing methods on the compressive strength of concrete containing high volumes of ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS. GGBS was used to replace Portland cement at a replacement ratio of 60% by binder mass. The high-temperature curing parameters used in this study were the delay period, temperature rise, peak temperature (PT, peak period, and temperature down. Test results demonstrate that the compressive strength of the samples with PTs of 65°C and 75°C was about 88% higher than that of the samples with a PT of 55°C after 1 day. According to this investigation, there might be optimum high-temperature curing conditions for preparing a concrete containing high volumes of GGBS, and incorporating GGBS into precast concrete mixes can be a very effective tool in increasing the applicability of this by-product.

  7. The effect of the volume fraction and viscosity on the compression and tension behavior of the cobalt-ferrite magneto-rheological fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Shokrollahi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to investigate the effects of the volume fraction and bimodal distribution of solid particles on the compression and tension behavior of the Co-ferrite-based magneto-rheological fluids (MRFs containing silicon oil as a carrier. Hence, Co-ferrite particles (CoFe2O4 with two various sizes were synthesized by the chemical co-precipitation method and mixed so as to prepare the bimodal MRF. The X-Ray Diffraction (XRD analysis, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, Laser Particle Size Analysis (LPSA and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM were conducted to examine the structural and magnetic properties, respectively. The results indicated that the increase of the volume fraction has a direct increasing influence on the values of the compression and tension strengths of fluids. In addition, the compression and tension strengths of the mixed MRF sample (1.274 and 0.647 MPa containing 60 and 550 nm samples were higher than those of the MRF sample with the same volume fraction and uniform particle size of 550 nm.

  8. Compressed air energy storage: Preliminary design and site development program in an aquifer. Volume 2: Utility system planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    The performance of an aquifer compressed air energy storage system was studied. The benefits derived from the integration of a compressed air energy storage facility with a hypothetical electrical network are analyzed. Scenarios of 100 percent coal, 50 percent coal and 50 percent nuclear, and 100 percent nuclear base load capacity additions were examined. Favorable economics are indicated when compressed air energy storage is installed as an alternative to combustion turbine peaking capacity on a system with a significant amount of oil fired generation.

  9. Excess Volumes, Densities, Speeds of Sound, and Viscosities for the Binary Systems of 1-Octanol with Hexadecane and Squalane at (298.15, 303.15 and 308.15) K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Gyan P.; Sharma, Monika

    2008-08-01

    Excess molar volumes, {V_m^E } , excess molar isentropic compressibilities, {K_{S,m}^E } , and deviations of the speeds of sound, u D, from their ideal values u id in an ideal mixture for binary mixtures of 1-octanol, C8H17OH, with hexadecane, C16H34, and squalane (2,6,10,15,19,23-hexamethyltetracosane), C30H62, at T = (298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K and at atmospheric pressure were derived from experimental density, ρ, and speed-of-sound data, u. Viscosity measurements were also carried out for the same mixtures. The Prigogine-Flory-Patterson (PFP) theory has been applied to analyze {V_m^E} of these systems. Furthermore, the apparent molar volumes, {overline{{V}}_{\\varphi ,i}^0 } and apparent molar compressibility, {overline{{K}}_{\\varphi ,i}^{ 0} } of the components at infinite dilution have been calculated.

  10. Comparison of knee-high Mediven ulcer kit and Mediven Plus compression stockings: measurement of leg volume, interface pressure and static stiffness index changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Győző Szolnoky

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ulcer stockings are produced to have higher interface pressure and easier application compared to those of classic medical compression stockings. We aimed to compare volume decrease, pressure loss and stiffness index of a classical medical compression stocking and an ulcer stocking of the same interface pressure range in 10 patients with bilateral venous and 10 persons with lymphatic insufficiency. Interface pressure measurement in supine and standing positions and optoelectronic volumetry served for primary outcome variables. Both stockings were capable of inducing remarkable gradual volume reductions in different time points except classic stocking at 2 h in phleboedema care. Ulcer stocking pressures in lymph- and phleboedema were highly superior. In lymphedema a gradual interface pressure loss was attributed to both stockings regardless of body positions. Static stiffness indices did not differ statistically except classic stocking at baseline (P=0.0312 and 2 h (P=0.0082 comprising venous edema patients. Both stockings acted similarly but ulcer stocking had considerably higher interface pressures in each measurement and raised stiffness indices initially and the two-layer system facilitates donning therefore ulcer stocking could serve an alternative of classic medical compression stocking even in the treatment of leg edema.

  11. Variables of state and charateristics for isentropic discharge phenomena of water, starting with saturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudisch, H.

    1968-03-15

    The tables presented in this report contain the thermodynamic values of isentropic change of state for water in the two-phase region starting from the saturation line down to 0.01 at. The variables have been computed in the pressure range from 5-100 at. in equal pressure intervals of 5 at. and in the range from 100-170 at. in intervals of 10 at. Assuming a one-dimensional flow and a known saturation pressure, the dimensions of a discharge nozzle may be determined by interpolation of the calculated values for an isentropic discharge. 4 figs., 29 tabs., 23 refs.

  12. Isothermal vs. isentropic description of protoneutron stars in the Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone theory

    CERN Document Server

    Burgio, G F

    2009-01-01

    We study the structure of hadronic protoneutron stars within the finite temperature Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone theoretical approach. Assuming beta-equilibrated nuclear matter with nucleons and leptons in the stellar core, with isothermal or isentropic profile, we show that particle populations and equation of state are very similar. As far as the maximum mass is concerned, we find that its value turns out to be almost independent on T, while a slight decrease is observed in the isentropic case, due to the enhanced proton fraction in the high density range.

  13. Technical and economic assessment of fluidized-bed-augmented compressed-air energy-storage system. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giramonti, A. J.; Lessard, R. D.; Merrick, D.; Hobson, M. J.

    1981-09-01

    An energy storage system for electric utility peak load applications is a modified gas turbine power system utilizing underground storage of very high pressure air. The compressed air energy storage (CAES) concept involves using off peak electricity generated from indigenous coal or nuclear sources to compress air, storing the air in large underground facilities, and withdrawing the air during peak load periods when it would be heated by combustion and expanded through gas turbines to generate power. The attractiveness of the CAES concept is based upon its potential to supply competitively priced peaking energy, to reduce peak load power plant dependence on petroleum based fuels, and to provide a means for leveling the utility system load demand. Therefore, a technical and economic assessment of coal fired fluidized bed combustor/compressed air energy storage systems was performed and is described.

  14. The Semiclassical Limit in the Quantum Drift-Diffusion Equations with Isentropic Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li CHEN; Qiangchang JU

    2008-01-01

    The semiclassical limit in the transient quantum drift-diffusion equations with isentropic pressure in one space dimension is rigorously proved. The equations are supple- mented with homogeneous Neumann boundary conditions. It is shown that the semiclas- sical limit of this solution solves the classical drift-diffusion model. In the meanwhile, the global existence of weak solutions is proved.

  15. Magneto-Acoustic Waves of Small Amplitude in Optically Thin Quasi-Isentropic Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Nakariakov, V M; Ibáñez, M H; Nakariakov, Valery M.; Mendoza-Briceno, Cesar A.

    1999-01-01

    The evolution of quasi-isentropic magnetohydrodynamic waves of small but finite amplitude in an optically thin plasma is analyzed. The plasma is assumed to be initially homogeneous, in thermal equilibrium and with a straight and homogeneous magnetic field frozen in. Depending on the particular form of the heating/cooling function, the plasma may act as a dissipative or active medium for magnetoacoustic waves, while Alfven waves are not directly affected. An evolutionary equation for fast and slow magnetoacoustic waves in the single wave limit, has been derived and solved, allowing us to analyse the wave modification by competition of weakly nonlinear and quasi-isentropic effects. It was shown that the sign of the quasi-isentropic term determines the scenario of the evolution, either dissipative or active. In the dissipative case, when the plasma is first order isentropically stable the magnetoacoustic waves are damped and the time for shock wave formation is delayed. However, in the active case when the plasm...

  16. Single breath-hold 3D measurement of left atrial volume using compressed sensing cardiovascular magnetic resonance and a non-model-based reconstruction approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardoulis, Orestis; Monney, Pierre; Bermano, Amit; Vaxman, Amir; Gotsman, Craig; Schwitter, Janine; Stuber, Matthias; Stergiopulos, Nikolaos; Schwitter, Juerg

    2015-06-11

    Left atrial (LA) dilatation is associated with a large variety of cardiac diseases. Current cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) strategies to measure LA volumes are based on multi-breath-hold multi-slice acquisitions, which are time-consuming and susceptible to misregistration. To develop a time-efficient single breath-hold 3D CMR acquisition and reconstruction method to precisely measure LA volumes and function. A highly accelerated compressed-sensing multi-slice cine sequence (CS-cineCMR) was combined with a non-model-based 3D reconstruction method to measure LA volumes with high temporal and spatial resolution during a single breath-hold. This approach was validated in LA phantoms of different shapes and applied in 3 patients. In addition, the influence of slice orientations on accuracy was evaluated in the LA phantoms for the new approach in comparison with a conventional model-based biplane area-length reconstruction. As a reference in patients, a self-navigated high-resolution whole-heart 3D dataset (3D-HR-CMR) was acquired during mid-diastole to yield accurate LA volumes. Phantom studies. LA volumes were accurately measured by CS-cineCMR with a mean difference of -4.73 ± 1.75 ml (-8.67 ± 3.54%, r2 = 0.94). For the new method the calculated volumes were not significantly different when different orientations of the CS-cineCMR slices were applied to cover the LA phantoms. Long-axis "aligned" vs "not aligned" with the phantom long-axis yielded similar differences vs the reference volume (-4.87 ± 1.73 ml vs. -4.45 ± 1.97 ml, p = 0.67) and short-axis "perpendicular" vs. "not-perpendicular" with the LA long-axis (-4.72 ± 1.66 ml vs. -4.75 ± 2.13 ml; p = 0.98). The conventional bi-plane area-length method was susceptible for slice orientations (p = 0.0085 for the interaction of "slice orientation" and "reconstruction technique", 2-way ANOVA for repeated measures). To use the 3D-HR-CMR as the reference for LA volumes

  17. Thermodynamics of the interactions of a homologous series of some amino acids with trimethylamine N-oxide: Volumetric, compressibility, and calorimetric studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Sinjan [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Kishore, Nand, E-mail: nandk@chem.iitb.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: > Thermodynamics of interaction of amino acids with trimethy N-oxide (TMAO) studied. > Partial molar properties in aqueous osmolyte provide interaction details. > Volumes, compressibilites, enthalpies indicate predominant hydrophobic interactions. > TMAO exerts its effect both by preferential hydration and hydrophobic interactions. > Results suggest hydrophobic interactions lead to destabilization of the protein. - Abstract: The values of apparent molar volume V{sub 2,{phi}} and apparent molar compressibility K{sub S,2,{phi}} of glycine, L-alanine, DL-{alpha}-amino-n-butyric acid, L-valine, and L-leucine have been determined in the aqueous solution of 1 mol . kg{sup -1} and 2 mol . kg{sup -1} trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) solutions by density and sound velocity measurements. Isothermal titration calorimetry has been employed to determine the values of heats of dilution q of the aqueous solutions of these amino acids in TMAO at temperatures from T = 288.15 K to T = 308.15 K. These data have been used to calculate values of the infinite dilution standard partial molar volume (V{sub 2,m}{sup 0}), standard partial molar isentropic compressibility (K{sub S,2,m}{sup 0}) and limiting enthalpy of dilution ({Delta}{sub dil}H{sup o}) of the amino acids in aqueous TMAO solutions. The standard partial molar volumes of transfer ({Delta}{sub tr}V{sub 2,m}{sup 0}), isentropic compressibility of transfer ({Delta}{sub tr}K{sub S,2,m}{sup 0}), and enthalpy of dilution of transfer ({Delta}{sub tr{Delta}dil}H{sup o}) of amino acids from water to aqueous TMAO solutions have been calculated from the measured quantities for these thermodynamic quantities. The linear correlation of V{sub 2,m}{sup 0} for a homologous series of amino acids has been utilized to calculate the contribution of the charged end groups (NH{sub 3}{sup +}, COO{sup -}), CH{sub 2} groups, and the other alkyl chains of the amino acids to V{sub 2,m}{sup 0}. The results for the partial molar properties of

  18. Admissibility of weak solutions for the compressible Euler equations, n ≥ 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemrod, Marshall

    2013-12-28

    This paper compares three popular notions of admissibility for weak solutions of the compressible isentropic Euler equations of gas dynamics: (i) the viscosity criterion, (ii) the entropy inequality (the thermodynamically admissible isentropic solutions), and (iii) the viscosity-capillarity criterion. An exact summation of the Chapman-Enskog expansion for Grad's moment system suggests that it is the third criterion that is representing the kinetic theory of gases. This, in turn, may shed some light on the ability to recover weak solutions of the Euler equations via a hydrodynamic limit.

  19. Thermodynamics of the ternary systems: (water + glycine, L-alanine and L-serine + di-ammonium hydrogen citrate) from volumetric, compressibility, and (vapour + liquid) equilibria measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadeghi, Rahmat, E-mail: rahsadeghi@yahoo.co [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gholamireza, Afsaneh [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    The apparent molar volumes and isentropic compressibility of glycine, L-alanine and L-serine in water and in aqueous solutions of (0.500 and 1.00) mol . kg{sup -1} di-ammonium hydrogen citrate {l_brace}(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HCit{r_brace} and those of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HCit in water have been obtained over the (288.15 to 313.15) K temperature range at 5 K intervals at atmospheric pressure from measurements of density and ultrasonic velocity. The apparent molar volume and isentropic compressibility values at infinite dilution of the investigated amino acids have been obtained and their variations with temperature and their transfer properties from water to aqueous solutions of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HCit have also been obtained. The results have been interpreted in terms of the hydration of the amino acids. In the second part of this work, water activity measurements by the isopiestic method have been carried out on the aqueous solutions of {l_brace}glycine + (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HCit{r_brace}, {l_brace}alanine + (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HCit{r_brace}, and {l_brace}serine + (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HCit{r_brace} at T = 298.15 K at atmospheric pressure. From these measurements, values of vapour pressure, osmotic coefficient, activity coefficient and Gibbs free energy were obtained. The effect of the type of amino acids on the (vapour + liquid) equilibrium of the systems investigated has been studied. The experimental water activities have been correlated successfully with the segment-based local composition Wilson model. Furthermore, the thermodynamic behaviour of the ternary solutions investigated has been studied by using the semi-ideal hydration model and the linear concentration relations have been tested by comparing with the isopiestic measurements for the studied systems at T = 298.15 K.

  20. A three-dimensional, compressible, laminar boundary-layer method for general fuselages. Volume 1: Numerical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wie, Yong-Sun

    1990-01-01

    A procedure for calculating 3-D, compressible laminar boundary layer flow on general fuselage shapes is described. The boundary layer solutions can be obtained in either nonorthogonal 'body oriented' coordinates or orthogonal streamline coordinates. The numerical procedure is 'second order' accurate, efficient and independent of the cross flow velocity direction. Numerical results are presented for several test cases, including a sharp cone, an ellipsoid of revolution, and a general aircraft fuselage at angle of attack. Comparisons are made between numerical results obtained using nonorthogonal curvilinear 'body oriented' coordinates and streamline coordinates.

  1. Preliminary design study of underground pumped hydro and compressed-air energy storage in hard rock. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    A preliminary design study of water compensated Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) and Underground Pumped Hydroelectric (UPH) plants for siting in geological conditions suitable for hard rock excavations was performed. The study was divided into five primary tasks as follows: establishment of design criteria and analysis of impact on power system; selection of site and establishment of site characteristics; formulation of design approaches; assessment of environmental and safety aspects; and preparation of preliminary design of plant. The salient aspects considered and the conclusions reached during the consideration of the five primary tasks for both CAES and UPH are presented.

  2. Compressed-air energy storage preliminary design and site development program in an aquifer. Volume 5, Part 1: Turbomachinery design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, P. A.; Bonk, J. S.; Kobett, W. F.; Kosanovich, N. S.; Long, L. J.; Marinacci, D. J.

    1982-11-01

    The development of the design approach for a combustion turbine heat cycle and the major mechanical equipment for use by an electric utility at a selected aquifer air storage site is documented. A compressed air energy storage (CAES) system utilizes off peak electric power, available from base load power plants, to store compressed air underground in an aquifer. During subsequent periods, the stored air is extracted from the aquifer and used as an air supply for a generating combustion turbine expander. The aquifer has an initial discovery pressure of 840 psia. An initial air injection temperature of 1500 F was selected. The major mechanical equipment considered includes: the turbine motor/generator compressor train, intercooler and aftercooler system, and the exhaust gas regenerator. The cycle and machinery configuration and the specific mechanical equipment were selected for their Media site characteristics. These characteristics and the effect of component interdependency are considered when a conservative component design approach is established which satisfies the Media site CAES system requirements.

  3. Preliminary feasibility evalution of compressed air storage power systems. Volume II. Appendices, period June 1975--December 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-12-01

    Interest in compressed air storage has been developing in Sweden, Finland, Denmark, England, and France, as well as the United States. One commercial unit is under construction in Huntorf, West Germany. Compressed air for peak power can be stored either in natural or man-made caverns. Only new excavations in hard rock down to depths of about 2500 feet are considered in this report. In 1974, conditions for underground storage were discussed in a Geological Survey of Potential Cavern Areas in New England, referred to as the CAINE report. In this survey of the northeast region, the rest of the corridor between Washington and Boston has been added. The rock formations in the entire area of about 45,000 square miles are evaluated. The physical properties of rocks and criteria for their evaluation in underground openings are discussed. Methods of rock excavation and the basis for selecting areas are considered. Information on bedrock units along the corridor is reviewed. A list of favorable rock formations is included.

  4. THE REGULAR SOLUTIONS OF THE ISENTROPIC EULER EQUATIONS WITH DEGENERATE LINEAR DAMPING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU XUSHENG; WANG WEIKE

    2005-01-01

    The regular solutions of the isentropic Euler equations with degenerate linear damping for a perfect gas are studied in this paper. And a critical degenerate linear damping coefficient is found, such that if the degenerate linear damping coefficient is larger than it and the gas lies in a compact domain initially, then the regular solution will blow up in finite time; if the degenerate linear damping coefficient is less than it, then undersome hypotheses on the initial data, the regular solution exists globally.

  5. An investigation of Newton-Krylov algorithms for solving incompressible and low Mach number compressible fluid flow and heat transfer problems using finite volume discretization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, P.R.

    1995-10-01

    Fully coupled, Newton-Krylov algorithms are investigated for solving strongly coupled, nonlinear systems of partial differential equations arising in the field of computational fluid dynamics. Primitive variable forms of the steady incompressible and compressible Navier-Stokes and energy equations that describe the flow of a laminar Newtonian fluid in two-dimensions are specifically considered. Numerical solutions are obtained by first integrating over discrete finite volumes that compose the computational mesh. The resulting system of nonlinear algebraic equations are linearized using Newton`s method. Preconditioned Krylov subspace based iterative algorithms then solve these linear systems on each Newton iteration. Selected Krylov algorithms include the Arnoldi-based Generalized Minimal RESidual (GMRES) algorithm, and the Lanczos-based Conjugate Gradients Squared (CGS), Bi-CGSTAB, and Transpose-Free Quasi-Minimal Residual (TFQMR) algorithms. Both Incomplete Lower-Upper (ILU) factorization and domain-based additive and multiplicative Schwarz preconditioning strategies are studied. Numerical techniques such as mesh sequencing, adaptive damping, pseudo-transient relaxation, and parameter continuation are used to improve the solution efficiency, while algorithm implementation is simplified using a numerical Jacobian evaluation. The capabilities of standard Newton-Krylov algorithms are demonstrated via solutions to both incompressible and compressible flow problems. Incompressible flow problems include natural convection in an enclosed cavity, and mixed/forced convection past a backward facing step.

  6. Preliminary design study of underground pumped hydro and compressed-air energy storage in hard rock. Volume 5: Site selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    A six-step site selection process undertaken to identify and subsequently rank potential sites suitable for either an underground pumped hydroelectric (UPH) facility, or a water-compensated hard-rock cavern compressed air energy storage (CAES) facility is described. The region of study was confined to the service area of the Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) and contiguous areas. Overriding considerations related to geology, environmental impact and transmission-line routing were studies within the context of minimizing plant costs. The selection process led to the identification of several sites suitable for the development of either a CAES or an UPH facility. Design development and site exploration at the selected site are described.

  7. Studies on Excess Volume, Viscosity, and Speed of Sound of Binary Mixtures of Methyl Benzoate in Ethers at T=(303.15,308.15, and 313.15 K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Rathnam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Densities, viscosities, and speed of sound have been determined at T = (303.15, 308.15, and 313.15 K for the binary mixtures of methyl benzoate with tetrahydrofuran, 1,4-dioxane, anisole, and butyl vinyl ether over the entire range of composition. Using these measured values, excess volume VE, deviation in viscosities Δη, excess Gibb’s free energy of activation for viscous flow ΔG*E, and deviation in isentropic compressibility Δks have been calculated. These calculated binary data have been fitted to Redlich-Kister equation to determine the appropriate coefficients. The values of excess volume VE and deviation in viscosities Δη are negative over the entire range of composition for all the binary systems at the studied temperatures. The behavior of these parameters with composition of the mixture has been discussed in terms of molecular interactions between the components of liquids.

  8. Low-volume application by mist-blower compared with conventional compression sprayer treatment of houses with residual pyrethroid to control the malaria vector Anopheles albimanus in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, C; Rodriguez, M H; Bown, D N; Arredondo-Jiménez, J I

    1995-04-01

    Village-scale trials were carried out in southern Mexico to compare the efficacy of indoor-spraying of the pyrethroid insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin applied either as low-volume (LV) aqueous emulsion or as wettable-powder (WP) aqueous suspension for residual control of the principal coastal malaria vector Anopheles albimanus. Three indoor spray rounds were conducted at 3-month intervals using back-pack mist-blowers to apply lambda-cyhalothrin 12.5 mg a.i./m2 by LV, whereas the WP was applied by conventional compression sprayer at a mean rate of 26.5 mg a.i./m2. Both treatments caused mosquito mortality indoors and outdoors (collected inside house curtains) as a result of contact with treated surfaces before and after feeding, but had no significant impact on overall population density of An. albimanus resting indoors or assessed by human bait collections. Contact bioassays showed that WP and LV treatments with lambda-cyhalothrin were effective for 12-20 weeks (> 75% mortality) without causing excito-repellency. Compared to the WP treatment (8 houses/man/day), LV treatment (25 houses/man/day) was more than 3 times quicker per house, potentially saving 68% of labour costs. This is offset, however, by the much lower unit price of a compression sprayer (e.g. Hudson 'X-pert' at US$120) than a mist-blower (e.g. 'Super Jolly' at US$350), and higher running costs for LV applications. It was calculated, therefore, that LV becomes more economical than WP after 18.8 treatments/100 houses/10 men at equivalent rates of application, or after 7.6 spray rounds with half-rate LV applications.

  9. Cylinder Expansion Experiments and Measured Product Isentropes for XTX-8004 Explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Scott

    2015-06-01

    We present cylinder expansion data from full-scale (25.4-mm inner diameter) and half-scale (12.7-mm inner diameter) experiments with XTX-8004 explosive, composed of 80% RDX explosive and 20% Sylgard 182 silicone elastomer. An analytic method is reviewed and used to recover detonation product isentropes from the experimental data, which are presented in the standard JWL form. The cylinder expansion data was found to scale well, indicating ideal detonation behavior across the test scales. The analytically determined product JWLs were found to agree well with those produced via iterative hydrocode methods, but required significantly less computational effort.

  10. Experimental comparison of Pressure ratio in Alpha and Gamma Stirling cryocoolers with identical compression space volumes and driven simultaneously by a solitary novel compact mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant, K. D.; Bapat, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The cryocooler technology is advancing in different ways at a considerable pace to explore cooler applications in diversified field. Stirling cryocoolers are capable to satisfy the contemporary requirements of a low-capacity cooler. A compact mechanism that can drive Stirling cryocooler with larger stroke and thus enhance the cooler performance is the need of the hour. The increase in the stroke will lead to a higher volumetric efficiency. Hence, a cryocooler with larger stroke will experience higher mass flow rate of the working fluid, thereby increasing its ideal cooling capacity. The novel compact drive mechanism that fulfils this need is a promising option in this regards. It is capable of operating more than one cryocoolers of different Stirling configurations simultaneously. This arrangement makes it possible to compare different Stirling cryocoolers on the basis of pressure ratio obtained experimentally. The preliminary experimental results obtained in this regard are presented here. The initial experimentation is carried out on two Alpha Stirling units driven simultaneously by the novel compact mechanism. The pressure ratio obtained during the initial stages is 1.3538, which is enhanced to 1.417 by connecting the rear volumes of the compressor pistons to each other. The fact that annular leak across the expander pistons due to high pressure ratio affects the cryocooler performance, generates the need to separate the expansion space from bounce space. This introduces a Gamma configuration that is operated simultaneously with one of the existing Alpha units by same drive mechanism and having identical compression space volume. The results obtained for pressure ratio in both these units prove the concept that cooling capacity of Alpha configuration exceeds that of Gamma under similar operating conditions. This has been observed at 14 bar and 20 bar charge pressures during the preliminary experimentation. These results are presented in this paper. Thus, the

  11. Isentropic thermodynamics and scalar-mesons properties near the QCD critical end point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Pedro [University of Coimbra, CFisUC, Department of Physics, Coimbra (Portugal)

    2016-08-15

    We investigate the QCD phase diagram and the location of the critical end point (CEP) in the SU(2) Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with entanglement interaction giving special attention to the π and σ -mesons properties, namely the decay widths σ→ππ, for several conditions around the CEP: we focus on the possible σ→ππ decay along the isentropic trajectories close to the CEP since the hydrodynamical expansion of a heavy-ion collision fireball nearly follows trajectories of constant entropy. It is expected that the type of transition the dense medium goes through as it expands after the thermalization determines the behavior of this decay. It is shown that no pions are produced from the sigma decay in the chirally symmetric phase if the isentropic lines approach the first-order line from chemical potentials above it. Near the CEP or above the σ→ππ decay is possible with a high decay width. (orig.)

  12. Modeling the Isentropic Head Value of Centrifugal Gas Compressor using Genetic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safiyullah Ferozkhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas compressor performance is vital in oil and gas industry because of the equipment criticality which requires continuous operations. Plant operators often face difficulties in predicting appropriate time for maintenance and would usually rely on time based predictive maintenance intervals as recommended by original equipment manufacturer (OEM. The objective of this work is to develop the computational model to find the isentropic head value using genetic programming. The isentropic head value is calculated from the OEM performance chart. Inlet mass flow rate and speed of the compressor are taken as the input value. The obtained results from the GP computational models show good agreement with experimental and target data with the average prediction error of 1.318%. The genetic programming computational model will assist machinery engineers to quantify performance deterioration of gas compressor and the results from this study will be then utilized to estimate future maintenance requirements based on the historical data. In general, this genetic programming modelling provides a powerful solution for gas compressor operators to realize predictive maintenance approach in their operations.

  13. Isentropic thermodynamics and scalar-mesons properties near the QCD critical end point

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the QCD phase diagram and the location of the critical end point (CEP) in the SU(2) Polyakov$-$Nambu$-$Jona-Lasinio model with entanglement interaction giving special attention to the $\\pi$ and $\\sigma$-mesons properties, namely the decay widths $\\sigma\\rightarrow\\pi\\pi$, for several conditions around the CEP: we focus on the possible $\\sigma\\rightarrow\\pi\\pi$ decay along the isentropic trajectories close to the CEP since the hydrodynamical expansion of a heavy-ion collision fireball nearly follows trajectories of constant entropy. It is expected that the type of transition the dense medium goes through as it expands after the thermalization determines the behavior of this decay. It is shown that no pions are produced from the sigma decay in the chirally symmetric phase if the isentropic lines approach the first order line from chemical potentials above it. Near the CEP or above the $\\sigma\\rightarrow\\pi\\pi$ decay is possible with a high decay width.

  14. On the existence of weak solutions to the steady compressible Navier-Stokes equations when the density is not square integrable

    OpenAIRE

    Novo, Sébastien; Novotný, Antonin

    2002-01-01

    We consider the steady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in the isentropic regime in a bounded domain of $\\mathbb{R}^{3}$. We show that the renormalized continuity equation holds even if the density is not square integrable. We use this result to prove existence of weak solutions under the sole hypothesis $\\gamma > 3/2$ for the adiabatic constant.

  15. Numerical investigations with a hybrid isentropic-sigma model. I - Normal-mode characteristics. II - The inclusion of moist processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, R. B.; Johnson, Donald R.; Reames, Fred M.; Zapotocny, Tom H.; Wolf, Bart J.

    1991-01-01

    The normal-mode characteristics of baroclinically amplifying disturbances were numerically investigated in a series of adiabatic simulations by a hybrid isentropic-sigma model, demonstrating the effect of coupling an isentropic-coordinate free atmospheric domain with a sigma-coordinate PBL on the normal-mode characteristics. Next, the normal-mode model was modified by including a transport equation for water vapor and adiabatic heating by condensation. Simulations with and without a hydrological component showed that the overall effect of latent heat release is to markedly enhance cyclogenesis and frontogenesis.

  16. Discontinuity of Gas-dynamic Variables in the Center of the Compression Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Viktorovich Bulat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of research-the study of the flow in the center of the centered isentropic compression waves. Gas-dynamic discontinuities cover shocks, shockwaves, interfaces and sliding surfaces and also the center of the centered compression wave one-dimensional and two-dimensional. For a long time there has been no analysis of the shockwave structures arising in the center of compression waves. At the same time, the problem of development of supersonic and hypersonic air inlets demands to consider the process of the stream isentropic compression. This problem is connected (three-dimensional case to the problem of arising inside the streams of hinged shocks as opposite to the usual discontinuities not resulted by interaction of supersonic streams, waves and discontinuities, but like from nowhere. This study sets the problem for study in the terms of the developed theory of the interference of gas-dynamic discontinuities of the area of existing solutions for the structures of possible types. We have obtained the relations describing the parameters in the center of the compression wave. We have considered the neutral polar of neither compression meeting the case when in the center of the compression wave there neither shocks nor depression waves. The analysis of properties of the centered compression wave adds to the theory of stationary gas-dynamic discontinuities. We have specified the borders of the shock structure existence area optimal for development of supersonic diffusers.

  17. Effects of shock structure on temperature field in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qionglin; Chen, Shiyi

    2014-11-01

    Effects of shock structure on temperature in compressible turbulence were investigated. The small-scale shocklets and large-scale shock waves were appeared in the flows driven by solenoidal and compressive forcings, i.e. SFT & CFT, respectively. In SFT the temperature had Kolmogorov spectrum and ramp-cliff structures, while in CFT it obeyed Burgers spectrum and was dominated by large-scale rarefaction and compression. The power-law exponents for the p.d.f. of large negative dilatation were -2.5 in SFT and -3.5 in CFT, approximately corresponded to model results. The isentropic approximation of thermodynamic variables showed that in SFT, the isentropic derivation was reinforced when turbulent Mach number increased. At similar turbulent Mach number, the variables in CFT exhibited more anisentropic. It showed that the transport of temperature was increased by the small-scale viscous dissipation and the large-scale pressure-dilatation. The distribution of positive and negative components of pressure-dilatation confirmed the mechanism of negligible pressure-dilatation at small scales. Further, the positive skewness of p.d.f.s of pressure-dilatation implied that the conversion from kinetic to internal energy by compression was more intense than the opposite process by rarefaction.

  18. Adiabatic Compression Sensitivity of AF-M315E (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-27

    CONTRACT NUMBER In- House 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Phu Quach, Adam Brand, and Greg Warmoth 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...cutting team of US experts for GPIM Background • Rapid isentropic compression of entrained gas bubbles • Closure or opening of valves • External...mechanical shock • Gas introduced by thermal decomp., during priming, or high Q pumping • Bubble collapse increases local temp. & exothermic decomp. T

  19. Phase transition in a strongly nonideal deuterium plasma generated by quasi-isentropical compression at megabar pressures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortov, V. E.; Ilkaev, R. I.; Arinin, V. A.; Burtzev, V. V.; Golubev, V. A.; Iosilevskiy, I. L.; Khrustalev, V. V.; Mikhailov, A. L.; Mochalov, M. A.; Ternovoi, V. Ya.; Zhernokletov, M. V.

    2007-01-01

    High-explosive driven generators of cylindrical and plane shock waves in D-2 and H-2 were used for the generation of warm and dense strongly nonideal matter with an intense interparticle interaction and Fermi statistics. Highly resolved flash x-ray diagnostics were used to measure the adiabatic plas

  20. Phase transition in a strongly nonideal deuterium plasma generated by quasi-isentropical compression at megabar pressures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortov, V. E.; Ilkaev, R. I.; Arinin, V. A.; Burtzev, V. V.; Golubev, V. A.; Iosilevskiy, I. L.; Khrustalev, V. V.; Mikhailov, A. L.; Mochalov, M. A.; Ternovoi, V. Ya.; Zhernokletov, M. V.

    2007-01-01

    High-explosive driven generators of cylindrical and plane shock waves in D-2 and H-2 were used for the generation of warm and dense strongly nonideal matter with an intense interparticle interaction and Fermi statistics. Highly resolved flash x-ray diagnostics were used to measure the adiabatic plas

  1. Characteristics of compressible flow of supercritical kerosene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng-Quan Zhong; Xue-Jun Fan; Jing Wang; Gong Yu; Jian-Guo Li

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,compressible flow of aviation kerosene at supercritical conditions has been studied both numerically and experimentally.The thermophysical properties of supercritical kerosene are calculated using a 10-species surrogate based on the principle of extended corresponding states (ECS).Isentropic acceleration of supercritical kerosene to subsonic and supersonic speeds has been analyzed numerically.It has been found that the isentropic relationships of supercritical kerosene are significantly different from those of ideal gases.A two-stage fuel heating and delivery system is used to heat the kerosene up to a temperature of 820 K and pressure of 5.5 MPa with a maximum mass flow rate of 100 g/s.The characteristics of supercritical kerosene flows in a converging-diverging nozzle (Laval nozzle) have been studied experimentally.The results show that stable supersonic flows of kerosene could be established in the temperature range of 730 K-820 K and the measurements in the wall pressure agree with the numerical calculation.

  2. A comparison of simulated precipitation by hybrid isentropic-sigma and sigma models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Donald R.; Zapotocny, Tom H.; Reames, Fred M.; Wolf, Bart J.; Pierce, R. B.

    1993-01-01

    Simulations of dry and moist baroclinic development from 10- and 22-layer hybrid isentropic-sigma coordinate models are compared with those from 11-, 27-, and 35-layer sigma coordinate models. The ability of the models to transport water vapor and simulate equivalent potential temperature is examined. Predictions of the timing, location, and amount of precipitation are compared. Several analytical distributions of water vapor are specified initially. It is shown that when the relative humidity is vertically uniform through a substantial extent of the atmosphere, all the models produce very similar precipitation distributions. However, when water vapor is confined to relatively shallow layers, the ability of the sigma coordinate models to simulate the timing, location, and amount of precipitation is severely compromised.

  3. Experimental studies on isentropic efficiency of a nonequilibrium MHD disk generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hajime [National Defense Academy, Yokosuka (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Okamura, Tetsuji [Tokyo Inst. of Tech., Yokohama (Japan). Dept. of Energy Sciences; Shioda, Susumu [Keio Univ., Fujisawa (Japan). Faculty of Environmental Information

    1998-02-01

    Isentropic efficiency of the nonequilibrium MHD power generator was studied by a shock tube driven disk generator. Cesium seeded helium was used as a working gas. From the measurements of Faraday current density distribution, it was possible to estimate the general tendency of Joule dissipation in the generator. The Joule dissipation did not decrease due to the occurrence of nonuniformity of the plasma when external load resistance was low, although it decreased with the decrease in the load resistance when the load resistance was high. The electrical efficiency increased with the increase in applied magnetic flux density. This fact is thought to be caused by high Hall parameter and the stabilization of the plasma due to high degree of seed ionization.

  4. Evaluation of MIPAS ozone fields assimilated using a new algorithm constrained by isentropic tracer advection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Juckes

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A new data assimilation algorithm, using the isentropic advection equation, is applied to MIPAS and SBUV measurements of stratospheric ozone. The system is solved separately on each isentropic level, with neither vertical advection nor chemical reactions represented. The results are validated against HALOE, POAM III, SAGE II & III, OSIRIS and ozone sonde data. The new assimilation algorithm has the accuracy of the Kalman smoother but is, for the systems studied here with up to 200 000 variables per time step and 61 million control variables in total, many orders of magnitude less computationally expensive. The analysis produced minimises a single penalty function evaluated over an analysis window of over one month. The cost of the analysis is found to increase nearly linearly with the number of control variables. Compared with over 800 profiles from Electrochemical Concentration Cell sondes at 29 sites the analysis is found to be merely 0.1% high at 420 K, rising to 0.4% at 650 K. Comparison against the other satellites imply that the bias remains small up to 1250 K (38 km and then increases to around −10% at 1650 K (44 km. Between 20 and 35 km the root-mean-square difference relative to HALOE, SAGE II & III, and POAM is in the 5 to 10% range, with larger discrepancies relative to other instruments. Outside this height range rms differences are generally larger, though agreement with HALOE remains good up to 50 km. The assimilation has closer agreement to independent observations than found in direct near-neighbour comparisons between profiles, demonstrating that the assimilation can add value to the observations.

  5. "Compressed" Compressed Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Reeves, Galen

    2010-01-01

    The field of compressed sensing has shown that a sparse but otherwise arbitrary vector can be recovered exactly from a small number of randomly constructed linear projections (or samples). The question addressed in this paper is whether an even smaller number of samples is sufficient when there exists prior knowledge about the distribution of the unknown vector, or when only partial recovery is needed. An information-theoretic lower bound with connections to free probability theory and an upper bound corresponding to a computationally simple thresholding estimator are derived. It is shown that in certain cases (e.g. discrete valued vectors or large distortions) the number of samples can be decreased. Interestingly though, it is also shown that in many cases no reduction is possible.

  6. High-pressure systematic of NaMe3+Si2O6 pyroxenes: volume compression vs Me3+ cation radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periotto, Benedetta; Nestola, Fabrizio; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Pasqual, Daria; Alvaro, Matteo; Ohashi, Haruo

    2010-05-01

    strongly the softest one (as expected for cpx) and a and c axes compressing by similar rates. Using a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state (BM3) to fit the pressure - unit-cell volume data we could refine simultaneously the unit-cell volume V0, the room pressure bulk modulus KT0 and its first pressure derivative K'. Using EoSFIT5.2 software we obtained the following coefficients: V0 = 463.42(3) Å3, KT0 = 109.0(6) GPa, K' = 3.3(2). In order to obtain a reliable comparison among NaMe3+Si2O6 pyroxenes, we have plotted the relative compression V/V0 calculated to 10 GPa versus the cation radius of Me3+ site for NaVSi2O6, NaAlSi2O6, NaCrSi2O6, NaFe3+Si2O6 end-members (all C2/c space group). For the NaTiSi2O6 end-member we have performed such calculation using the published P-V data up to 4.34 GPa as at greater pressures this cpx transforms to a triclinic symmetry and cannot be considered for a comparison. According to this comparison, a perfect linear relation is showed for those cpx having a 3d-transition element at Me3+ site, while those cpx with Al and In at Me3+ site totally lie out of trend. In good agreement with a previous work on CaMe2+Si2O6 C2/c compounds (Me2+ = Mg, Fe, Ni), the results of this work confirm that the empirical KT0 * V0 = constant relationship is followed in C2/c cpx only if the same valence electron character is shared and provide a definitive model for (Ca,Na)(Me2+,Me3+)Si2O6 clinopyroxene compounds.

  7. Detailed analysis of the effect of the turbine and compressor isentropic efficiency on the thermal and exergy efficiency of a Brayton cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živić Marija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy and exergy analysis of a Brayton cycle with an ideal gas is given. The irreversibility of the adiabatic processes in turbine and compressor is taken into account through their isentropic efficiencies. The net work per cycle, the thermal efficiency and the two exergy efficiencies are expressed as functions of the four dimensionless variables: the isentropic efficiencies of turbine and compressor, the pressure ratio, and the temperature ratio. It is shown that the maximal values of the net work per cycle, the thermal and the exergy efficiency are achieved when the isentropic efficiencies and temperature ratio are as high as possible, while the different values of pressure ratio that maximize the net work per cycle, the thermal and the exergy efficiencies exist. These pressure ratios increase with the increase of the temperature ratio and the isentropic efficiency of compressor and turbine. The increase of the turbine isentropic efficiency has a greater impact on the increase of the net work per cycle and the thermal efficiency of a Brayton cycle than the same increase of compressor isentropic efficiency. Finally, two goal functions are proposed for thermodynamic optimization of a Brayton cycle for given values of the temperature ratio and the compressor and turbine isentropic efficiencies. The first maximizes the sum of the net work per cycle and thermal efficiency while the second the net work per cycle and exergy efficiency. In both cases the optimal pressure ratio is closer to the pressure ratio that maximizes the net work per cycle.

  8. Kinetics of Propagating Phase Transformation in Compressed Bismuth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastea, M; Bastea, S; Emig, J; Springer, P; Reisman, D

    2004-08-18

    The authors observed dynamically driven phase transitions in isentropically compressed bismuth. By changing the stress loading conditions they explored two distinct cases one in which the experimental signature of the phase transformation corresponds to phase-boundary crossings initiated at both sample interfaces, and another in which the experimental trace is due to a single advancing transformation front in the bulk of the material. They introduce a coupled kinetics-hydrodynamics model that for this second case enables them, under suitable simplifying assumptions, to directly extract characteristic transition times from the experimental measurements.

  9. Final Report 02-ERD-033: Rapid Resolidification of Metals using Dynamic Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streitz, F H; Nguyen, J H; Orlikowski, D; Minich, R; Moriarty, J A; Holmes, N C

    2005-02-11

    The purpose of this project is to develop a greater understanding of the kinetics involved during a liquid-solid phase transition occurring at high pressure and temperature. Kinetic limitations are known to play a large role in the dynamics of solidification at low temperatures, determining, e.g., whether a material crystallizes upon freezing or becomes an amorphous solid. The role of kinetics is not at all understood in transitions at high temperature when extreme pressures are involved. In order to investigate time scales during a dynamic compression experiment we needed to create an ability to alter the length of time spent by the sample in the transition region. Traditionally, the extreme high-pressure phase diagram is studied through a few static and dynamic techniques: static compression involving diamond anvil cells (DAC) [1], shock compression [2, 3], and quasi-isentropic compression [4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]. Static DAC experiments explore equilibrium material properties along an isotherm or an isobar [1]. Dynamic material properties can be explored with shock compression [2, 3], probing single states on the Hugoniot, or with quasi-isentropic compression [4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]. In the case of shocks, pressures variation typically occurs on a sub-nanosecond time scale or faster [11]. Previous quasi-isentropic techniques have yielded pressure ramps on the 10-100 nanosecond time-scale for samples that are several hundred microns thick [4, 5, 6, 7]. In order to understand kinetic effects at high temperatures and high pressures, we need to span a large dynamic range (strain rates, relaxation times, etc.) as well as control the thermodynamic path that the material experiences. Compression rates, for instance, need to bridge those of static experiments (seconds to hours) and those of the Z-accelerator (10{sup 6} s{sup -1}) [4] or even laser ablation techniques (10{sup 6} s{sup -1} to 10{sup 8} s{sup -1}) [7]. Here, we present a new technique that both extends the

  10. Identification of sources and long term trends for pollutants in the arctic using isentropic trajectory analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahura, A.; Jaffe, D.; Harris, J.

    2003-07-01

    The understanding of factors driving climate and ecosystem changes in the Arctic requires careful consideration of the sources, correlation and trends for anthropogenic pollutants. The database from the NOAA-CMDL Barrow Observatory (71deg.17'N, 156deg.47'W) is the longest and most complete record of pollutant measurements in the Arctic. It includes observations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O{sub 3}), aerosol scattering coefficient ({sigma}{sub sp}), aerosol number concentration (NC{sub asl}), etc. The objectives of this study are to understand the role of long-range transport to Barrow in explaining: (1) the year-to-year variations, and (2) the trends in the atmospheric chemistry record at the NOAA-CMDL Barrow observatory. The key questions we try to answer are: 1. What is the relationship between various chemical species measured at Barrow Observatory, Alaska and transport pathways at various altitudes? 2. What are the trends of species and their relation to transport patterns from the source regions? 3. What is the impact of the Prudhoe Bay emissions on the Barrow's records? To answer on these questions we apply the following main research tools. First, it is an isentropic trajectory model used to calculate the trajectories arriving at Barrow at three altitudes of 0.5, 1.5 and 3 km above sea level. Second - clustering procedure used to divide the trajectories into groups based on source regions. Third - various statistical analysis tools such as the exploratory data analysis, two component correlation analysis, trend analysis, principal components and factor analysis used to identify the relationship between various chemical species vs. source regions as a function of time. In this study, we used the chemical data from the NOAA-CMDL Barrow observatory in combination with isentropic backward trajectories from gridded ECMWF data to understand the importance of various pollutant source regions on

  11. Existence of Weak Solutions to the Three-dimensional Steady Compressible Magnetohydrodynamic Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Hui ZHOU

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to prove the existence of a spatially periodic weak solution to the steady compressible isentropic MHD equations in R3 for any specific heat ratio γ> 1.The proof is based on the weighted estimates of both pressure and kinetic energy for the approximate system which result in some higher integrability of the density,and the method of weak convergence.According to the author's knowledge,it is the first result that treats in three dimensions the existence of weak solutions to the steady compressible MHD equations with γ > 1.

  12. Image data compression investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrie, Carlos

    1989-01-01

    NASA continuous communications systems growth has increased the demand for image transmission and storage. Research and analysis was conducted on various lossy and lossless advanced data compression techniques or approaches used to improve the efficiency of transmission and storage of high volume stellite image data such as pulse code modulation (PCM), differential PCM (DPCM), transform coding, hybrid coding, interframe coding, and adaptive technique. In this presentation, the fundamentals of image data compression utilizing two techniques which are pulse code modulation (PCM) and differential PCM (DPCM) are presented along with an application utilizing these two coding techniques.

  13. Compressed-air energy storage preliminary design and site-development program in an aquifer. Volume 2: Utility-system planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    The benefits derived from the integration of a compressed air energy storage facility with a hypothetical electrical network were analyzed. The analysis was based on three study scenarios each having a target generation mix of 65% base, 25% intermediate, and 10% peaking capacity. Scenarios of 100% coal, 50% coal and 50% nuclear, and 100% nuclear base load capacity additions were examined. Final results of the analyses indicate favorable economics when compressed air energy storage is installed as an alternative to combustion turbine peaking capacity on a system with a significant amount of oil-fired generation.

  14. A Survey of the Isentropic Euler Vortex Problem Using High-Order Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Seth C.; Huynh, H. T.; DeBonis, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The flux reconstruction (FR) method offers a simple, efficient, and easy to implement method, and it has been shown to equate to a differential approach to discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods. The FR method is also accurate to an arbitrary order and the isentropic Euler vortex problem is used here to empirically verify this claim. This problem is widely used in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to verify the accuracy of a given numerical method due to its simplicity and known exact solution at any given time. While verifying our FR solver, multiple obstacles emerged that prevented us from achieving the expected order of accuracy over short and long amounts of simulation time. It was found that these complications stemmed from a few overlooked details in the original problem definition combined with the FR and DG methods achieving high-accuracy with minimal dissipation. This paper is intended to consolidate the many versions of the vortex problem found in literature and to highlight some of the consequences if these overlooked details remain neglected.

  15. A splitting method for the isentropic Baer-Nunziato two-phase flow model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coquel Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we propose a fractional step method for computing approximate solutions of the isentropic Baer-Nunziato two-phase flow model. The scheme relies on an operator splitting method corresponding to a separate treatment of fast propagation phenomena due to the acoustic waves on the one hand and slow propagation phenomena due to the fluid motion on the other. The scheme is proved to preserve positive values of the statistical fractions and densities. We also provide two test-cases that assess the convergence of the method. Nous proposons ici une méthode à pas fractionnaires pour le calcul de solutions approchées pour la version isentropique du modèle diphasique de Baer-Nunziato. Le schéma s’appuie sur un splitting de l’opérateur temporel correspondant à la prise en compte différenciée des phéno-mènes de propagation rapide dus aux ondes acoustiques et des phénomènes de propagation lente dus aux ondes matérielles. On prouve que le schéma permet de préserver des valeurs positives pour les taux statistiques de présence des phases ainsi que pour les densités. Deux cas tests numériques permettent d’illustrer la convergence de la méthode.

  16. Computing Isentropic Flow Properties of Air/R-134a Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvaternik, Ray

    2006-01-01

    MACHRK is a computer program that calculates isentropic flow properties of mixtures of air and refrigerant R-134a (tetrafluoroethane), which are used in transonic aerodynamic testing in a wind tunnel at Langley Research Center. Given the total temperature, total pressure, static pressure, and mole fraction of R-134a in a mixture, MACHRK calculates the Mach number and the following associated flow properties: dynamic pressure, velocity, density, static temperature, speed of sound, viscosity, ratio of specific heats, Reynolds number, and Prandtl number. Real-gas effects are taken into account by treating the gases comprising the mixture as both thermally and calorically imperfect. The Redlich-Kwong equation of state for mixtures and the constant-pressure ideal heat-capacity equation for the mixture are used in combination with the departure- function approach of thermodynamics to obtain the equations for computing the flow properties. In addition to the aforementioned calculations for air/R-134a mixtures, a research version of MACHRK can perform the corresponding calculations for mixtures of air and R-12 (dichlorodifluoromethane) and for air/SF6 mixtures. [R-12 was replaced by R-134a because of environmental concerns. SF6 has been considered for use in increasing the Reynolds-number range.

  17. Effects of various assumptions on the calculated liquid fraction in isentropic saturated equilibrium expansions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursik, J. W.; Hall, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The saturated equilibrium expansion approximation for two phase flow often involves ideal-gas and latent-heat assumptions to simplify the solution procedure. This approach is well documented by Wegener and Mack and works best at low pressures where deviations from ideal-gas behavior are small. A thermodynamic expression for liquid mass fraction that is decoupled from the equations of fluid mechanics is used to compare the effects of the various assumptions on nitrogen-gas saturated equilibrium expansion flow starting at 8.81 atm, 2.99 atm, and 0.45 atm, which are conditions representative of transonic cryogenic wind tunnels. For the highest pressure case, the entire set of ideal-gas and latent-heat assumptions are shown to be in error by 62 percent for the values of heat capacity and latent heat. An approximation of the exact, real-gas expression is also developed using a constant, two phase isentropic expansion coefficient which results in an error of only 2 percent for the high pressure case.

  18. The lifespan of 3D radial solutions to the non-isentropic relativistic Euler equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Changhua

    2017-10-01

    This paper investigates the lower bound of the lifespan of three-dimensional spherically symmetric solutions to the non-isentropic relativistic Euler equations, when the initial data are prescribed as a small perturbation with compact support to a constant state. Based on the structure of the hyperbolic system, we show the almost global existence of the smooth solutions to Eulerian flows (polytropic gases and generalized Chaplygin gases) with genuinely nonlinear characteristics. While for the Eulerian flows (Chaplygin gas and stiff matter) with mild linearly degenerate characteristics, we show the global existence of the radial solutions, moreover, for the non-strictly hyperbolic system (pressureless perfect fluid) satisfying the mild linearly degenerate condition, we prove the blowup phenomenon of the radial solutions and show that the lifespan of the solutions is of order O(ɛ ^{-1}), where ɛ denotes the width of the perturbation. This work can be seen as a complement of our work (Lei and Wei in Math Ann 367:1363-1401, 2017) for relativistic Chaplygin gas and can also be seen as a generalization of the classical Eulerian fluids (Godin in Arch Ration Mech Anal 177:497-511, 2005, J Math Pures Appl 87:91-117, 2007) to the relativistic Eulerian fluids.

  19. Zero Dissipation Limit to Rarefaction Waves for the 1-D Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feimin HUANG; Xing LI

    2012-01-01

    The zero dissipation limit for the one-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations of compressible,isentropic gases in the case that the corresponding Euler equations have rarefaction wave solutions is investigated in this paper.In a paper (Comm.Pure Appl.Math.,46,1993,621-665) by Z.P.Xin,the author constructed a sequence of solutions to one-dimensional Navier-Stokes isentropic equations converging to the rarefaction wave as the viscosity tends to zero. Furthermore,he obtained that the convergence rate is ε1/4[In ε|.In this paper,Xin's convergence rate is improved to ε1/3|In ε|2 by different scaling arguments.The new scaling has various applications in related problems.

  20. 压空缓冲罐和真空缓冲罐容积的确定%Determination of Volumes for Compressed Air Buffer Tank and Vacuum Buffer Tank

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王绍宇

    2015-01-01

    介绍了制药行业压空缓冲罐和真空缓冲罐容积的计算公式,并结合实例对储气罐、稳压罐的容积计算方法、组合方式进行了讨论,同时对缓冲罐的气液分离效果及设备直径的确定给出了计算方法。%In this article, the formulas for calculating the volumes of compressed air buffer tank and vacuum buffer tank used in pharmaceutical industry were introduced. Combined with practical examples, the methods of calculating the volumes of air storage tank and pressure stability tank and tank combination forms were discussed. Meanwhile, the calculating methods for determining the effect of gas-liquid separation and the diameter of vessel were provided.

  1. Effects of manual chest compression and descompression maneuver on lung volumes, capnography and pulse oximetry in patients receiving mechanical ventilation Efeitos da manobra de compressão e descompressão torácica nos volumes pulmonares, capnografia e oximetria de pulso em pacientes submetidos à ventilação mecânica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Della Via

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to evaluate whether there are changes in lung volumes, capnography, pulse oximetry and hemodynamic parameters associated with manual chest compression-decompression maneuver (MCCD in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation (MV. Method: A prospective study of 65 patients undergoing to MV after 24 hours. All patients received bronchial hygiene maneuvers and after 30 minutes they were submitted to ten repetitions of the MCCD during 10 consecutive respiratory cycles in the right hemithorax and than in the left hemithorax. The data were collected before the application of the maneuver and after 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 minutes following application of the maneuver. RESULTS: There were statistical significant (pOBJETIVOS: Avaliar a presença de alterações nos volumes pulmonares, oximetria de pulso, capnografia e alterações hemodinâmicas associadas à intervenção da manobra de compressão e descompressão torácica (MCDT nos pacientes submetidos à ventilação mecânica (VM. Método: Tratou-se de um estudo prospectivo em que foram incluídos 65 pacientes em VM há mais de 24 horas. O protocolo consistiu na aplicação de manobras de higiene brônquica e, após 30 minutos, os pacientes eram submetidos a dez repetições da MCDT em dez respirações consecutivas no hemitórax direito e, posteriormente, no hemitórax esquerdo, coletando os dados antes e após a aplicação da manobra nos tempos 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 e 40 minutos. RESULTADOS: Constatou-se aumento significante (p<0,001 do volume corrente inspiratório (pré: 458,2±132,1 ml; pós 1 minuto: 557,3±139,1; pós 40 minutos: 574,4±151, volume minuto corrente (pré: 7,0±2,7 L/min; pós 1 minuto: 8,7±3,3; pós 40 minutos: 8,8±3,8 e oximetria de pulso (pré: 97,4±2,2%; pós 1 minuto: 97,9±1,8; pós 40 minutos: 98,2±1,6; p<0,05. Ocorreu redução no CO2 expirado (pré: 35,1±9,0 mmHg; pós 1 minuto: 31,5±8,2; pós 40

  2. Preliminary design study of underground pumped hydro and compressed-air energy storage in hard rock. Volume 6: Site investigation: Shallow drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    The work was undertaken to define the surficial geological conditions and the nature of the overburden and the bedrock at shallow depths as part of the field exploration program for underground pumped hydro (UPH) and compressed air energy storage (CAES) facility. Testing was performed on selected rock and soil samples to define the physical and mechanical properties of the subsurface material. Piezometers were installed on the site for long term monitoring of the groundwater.

  3. Development and initial test of the University of Wisconsin global isentropic-sigma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapotocny, Tom H.; Johnson, Donald R.; Reames, Fred M.

    1994-01-01

    The description of a global version of the University of Wisconsin (UW) hybrid isentropic-sigma (theta-sigma) model and the results from an initial numerical weather prediction experiment are presented in this paper. The main objectives of this initial test are to (1) discuss theta-sigma model development and computer requirements, (2) demonstrate the ability of the UW theta-sigma model for global numerical weather prediction using realistic orography and parameterized physical processes, and (3) compare the transport of an inert trace constituent against a nominally 'identical' sigma coordinate model. Initial and verifying data for the 5-day simulations presented in this work were supplied by the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-1) data assimilation system. The time period studied is 1-6 February 1985. This validation experiment demonstrates that the global UW theta-sigma model produces a realistic 5-day simulation of the mass and momentum distributions when compared to both the identical sigma model and GEOS-1 verification. Root-mean-square errors demonstrate that the theta-sigma model is slightly more accurate than the nominally identical sigma model with respect to standard synoptic variables. Of particular importance, the UW theta-sigma model displays a distinct advantage over the conventional sigma model with respect to the prognostic simulation of inert trace constituent transport in amplifying baroclinic waves of the extratropics. This is especially true in the upper troposphere and stratosphere where the spatial integrity and conservation of an inert trace constituent is severely compromised in the sigma model compared to the theta-sigma model.

  4. Seasonal Ozone Variations in the Isentropic Layer between 330 and 380 K as Observed by SAGE 2: Implications of Extratropical Cross-Tropopause Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Cunnold, Derek M.; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Pierce, R. Bradley; Olson, Jennifer R.; Kent, Geoffrey S.; Skeens, Kristi, M.

    1998-01-01

    To provide observational evidence on the extratropical cross-tropopause transport between the stratosphere and the troposphere via quasi-isentropic processes in the middleworld (the part of the atmosphere in which the isentropic surfaces intersect the tropopause), this report presents an analysis of the seasonal variations of the ozone latitudinal distribution in the isentropic layer between 330 K and 380 K based on the measurements from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II. The results from SAGE II data analysis are consistent with (1) the buildup of ozone-rich air in the extratropical middleworld through the large-scale descending mass circulation during winter, (2) the spread of ozone-rich air in the isentropic layer from midlatitudes to subtropics via quasi-isentropic transport during spring, (3) significant photochemical ozone removal and the absence of an ozone-rich supply of air to the layer during summer, and (4) air mass exchange between the subtropics and the extratropics during the summer monsoon period. Thus the SAGE II observed ozone seasonal variations in the middleworld are consistent with the existing model calculated annual cycle of the diabatic circulation as well as the conceptual role of the eddy quasi-adiabatic transport in the stratosphere-troposphere exchange reported in the literature.

  5. An isentropic and sigma coordinate hybrid numerical model - Model development and some initial tests. [for atmospheric simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uccellini, L. W.; Johnson, D. R.; Schlesinger, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    A solution is presented for matching boundary conditions across the interface of an isentropic and sigma coordinate hybrid model. A hybrid model based on the flux form of the primitive equations is developed which allows direct vertical exchange between the model domains, satisfies conservation principles with respect to transport processes, and maintains a smooth transition across the interface without need for artificial adjustment or parameterization schemes. The initial hybrid model simulations of a jet streak propagating in a zonal channel are used to test the feasibility of the hybrid model approach. High efficiency of the hybrid model is demonstrated.

  6. On the non-resistive limit and the magnetic boundary-layer for one-dimensional compressible magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Song; Zhang, Jianwen

    2017-09-01

    We consider an initial-boundary value problem for the one-dimensional equations of compressible isentropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows. The non-resistive limit of the global solutions with large data is justified. As a by-product, the global well-posedness of the compressible non-resistive MHD equations is established. Moreover, the thickness of the magnetic boundary-layer of the value O(ν^α) with 00 is the resistivity coefficient. The proofs of these results are based on a full use of the so-called ‘effective viscous flux’, the material derivative and the structure of the equations.

  7. Excess molar volumes and deviation in viscosities of binary liquid mixtures of acrylic esters with hexane-1-ol at 303.15 and 313.15 K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata S. Patil

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Densities and viscosities for the four binary liquid mixtures of methyl acrylate, ethyl acrylate, butyl acrylate and methyl methacrylate with hexane-1-ol at temperatures 303.15 and 313.15 K and at atmospheric pressure were measured over the entire composition range. These values were used to calculate excess molar volumes and deviation in viscosities which were fitted to Redlich–Kister polynomial equation. Recently proposed Jouyban Acree model was also used to correlate the experimental values of density and viscosity. The mixture viscosities were correlated by several semi-empirical approaches like Hind, Choudhary–Katti, Grunberg–Nissan, Tamura and Kurata, McAllister three and four body model equations. A graphical representation of excess molar volumes and deviation in isentropic compressibility shows positive nature whereas deviation in viscosity shows negative nature at both temperatures for all four binary liquid mixtures. Positive values of excess molar volumes show that volume expansion is taking place causing rupture of H-bonds in self associated alcohols. The results were discussed in terms of molecular interactions prevailing in the mixtures.

  8. Wellhead compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, Joe [Sertco Industries, Inc., Okemah, OK (United States); Vazquez, Daniel [Hoerbiger Service Latin America Inc., Deerfield Beach, FL (United States); Jacobs, Denis Richard [Hoerbiger do Brasil Industria de Equipamentos, Cajamar, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Over time, all wells experience a natural decline in oil and gas production. In gas wells, the major problems are liquid loading and low downhole differential pressures which negatively impact total gas production. As a form of artificial lift, wellhead compressors help reduce the tubing pressure resulting in gas velocities above the critical velocity needed to surface water, oil and condensate regaining lost production and increasing recoverable reserves. Best results come from reservoirs with high porosity, high permeability, high initial flow rates, low decline rates and high total cumulative production. In oil wells, excessive annulus gas pressure tends to inhibit both oil and gas production. Wellhead compression packages can provide a cost effective solution to these problems by reducing the system pressure in the tubing or annulus, allowing for an immediate increase in production rates. Wells furthest from the gathering compressor typically benefit the most from wellhead compression due to system pressure drops. Downstream compressors also benefit from higher suction pressures reducing overall compression horsepower requirements. Special care must be taken in selecting the best equipment for these applications. The successful implementation of wellhead compression from an economical standpoint hinges on the testing, installation and operation of the equipment. Key challenges and suggested equipment features designed to combat those challenges and successful case histories throughout Latin America are discussed below.(author)

  9. Compressive beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Sound source localization with sensor arrays involves the estimation of the direction-of-arrival (DOA) from a limited number of observations. Compressive sensing (CS) solves such underdetermined problems achieving sparsity, thus improved resolution, and can be solved efficiently with convex...

  10. Compressibility Effects in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Yu-Hui; PEI Jie; CHEN Jun; SHE Zhen-Su

    2008-01-01

    Local cascade (LC) scheme and space-time correlations are used to study turbulent structures and their convection behaviour in the near-wall region of compressible boundary layers at Ma = 0.8 and 1.3. The convection velocities of fluctuating velocity components u (streamwise) and v (vertical) are investigated by statistically analysing scale-dependent ensembles of LC structures. The results suggest that u is convected with entropy perturbations while v with an isentropic process. An abnormal thin layer distinct from the conventional viscous sub-layer is discovered in the immediate vicinity of the wall (y+≤1) in supersonic flows. While in the region 1 < y+ < 30,streamwise streaks dominate velocity, density and temperature fluctuations, the abnormal thin layer is dominated by spanwise streaks in vertical velocity and density fluctuations, where pressure and density fluctuations are strongly correlated. The LC scheme is proven to be effective in studying the nature of supersonic flows and compressibility effects on wall-bounded motions.

  11. Analysis of the gas compressibility effects on the constant-entropy reversible processes of refrigerants and refrigerant mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monte, F. de [University of L' Aquila (Italy). Dip. di Energetica

    2002-09-01

    Thermally and calorically real gas modelling based on the Martin-Hou equation of state is assumed for pure and mixed refrigerants in the superheated vapour phase. It allows the constant-entropy reversible processes which take place within the work transfer components of ideal vapour compression cycles to be properly analysed. These processes, in fact, occur in a region of the Mollier diagram close to the saturated vapour curve where covolume and molecular forces alter the equation of state of an ideal gas. Thus, real gas effects are significant and cannot be ignored. They give a more accurate indication of the refrigerant end temperature associated with an isentropic compression as well as of the corresponding work exchanged and volumetric efficiency. In particular, it is shown that the gas compressibility effects play a 'favourable' role during the isentropic compression processes since they allow the work transferred to be reduced up to 10% for HFC-refrigerant 134a, and HFC-refrigerant mixtures 407C and 410A. But, at the same time, they play an 'unfavourable' role since they can reduce the compressor volumetric efficiency (i.e. refrigerant mass flow rate) and, consequently, the cooling (or heating) capacity of the vapour compression system up to 7%. (author)

  12. Experimental study of high volume fly ash pumping concrete compressive strength early%大掺量粉煤灰泵送混凝土早期抗压强度的试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘思海; 侍克斌; 吴福飞

    2014-01-01

    通过理论分析和试验,研究了大掺量粉煤灰对混凝土早期抗压强度及成本的影响。试验所选用的胶凝材料总量为375 kg,以0~55%的粉煤灰替代水泥,减水剂的掺量固定为1.0%,引气剂的掺量固定为1.2‱。通过坍落度及不同龄期抗压强度等对比分析粉煤灰掺量对混凝土和易性及早期强度的影响。结果表明,混凝土早期抗压强度及成本随着粉煤灰掺量的增大而逐渐减小,运用粉煤灰等质量代替水泥(P·O 42.5级水泥)可配制出28 d抗压强度为20 MPa以上,成本大大降低的大掺量粉煤灰混凝土。研究的结论为新疆地区粉煤灰的应用提供了有效途径,有助于制备高性能混凝土。%Through theoretical analysis and test,studied the effect of high volume fly ash on concrete compressive strength and cost. To-tal cementitious materials test for the selected 375 kg,with 0~55%fly ash instead of cement,the amount of superplasticizer was fixed at 1%,dosage of air entraining agent was fixed at 1.2‱.Through the slump and compressive strength of comparative analysis of the influence of fly ash on concrete workability and early strength. The results showed that ,the concrete compressive strength and cost decreased gradu-ally with the increase in the amount of fly ash,fly ash and other quality instead of using cement (42.5 ordinary portland cement)can be made by 28 d compressive strength was more than 20 MPa,a large amount of fly ash can reduce the cost of concrete. Provided an effective way for research conclusion was the application of fly ash in Xinjiang ,contributed to the preparation of high performance concrete.

  13. Preliminary design study of underground pumped hydro and compressed-air energy storage in hard rock. Volume 4: System planning studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    Preliminary design and planning studies of water compensated compressed air energy storage (CAES) and underground pumped hydroelectric (UPH) power plants are presented. The costs of the CAES and UPH plant designs, and the results of economic evaluations performed for the PEPCO system are presented. The PEPCO system planning analysis was performed in parallel stages with plant design development. Analyses performed early in the project indicated a requirement for 1000 MW/10,000 MWH of energy storage on a daily operating schedule, with economic installation in two segments of 500 MW in 1990 and 1997. The analysis was updated eighteen months later near the end of the project to reflect the impact of new growth projections and revised plant costs. The revised results indicated economic installations for either UPH or CAES of approximately 675 MW/6750 MWH on a daily cycle, installed in blocks of approximately 225 MW in 1990, 1993 and 1995. Significant savings in revenue requirements and oil fuel over the combustion turbine alternative were identified for both CAES and UPH.

  14. Autoignition characterization of primary reference fuels and n-heptane/n-butanol mixtures in a constant volume combustion device and homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgardner, Marc E.

    2013-12-19

    In this study, the autoignition behavior of primary reference fuels (PRF) and blends of n-heptane/n-butanol were examined in a Waukesha Fuel Ignition Tester (FIT) and a Homogeneous Charge Compression Engine (HCCI). Fourteen different blends of iso-octane, n-heptane, and n-butanol were tested in the FIT - 28 test runs with 25 ignition measurements for each test run, totaling 350 individual tests in all. These experimental results supported previous findings that fuel blends with high alcohol content can exhibit very different ignition delay periods than similarly blended reference fuels. The experiments further showed that n-butanol blends behaved unlike PRF blends when comparing the autoignition behavior as a function of the percentage of low reactivity component. The HCCI and FIT experimental results favorably compared against single and multizone models with detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms - both an existing mechanism as well as one developed during this study were used. The experimental and modeling results suggest that that the FIT instrument is a valuable tool for analysis of high pressure, low temperature chemistry, and autoignition for future fuels in advanced combustion engines. Additionally, in both the FIT and engine experiments the fraction of low temperature heat release (fLTHR) was found to correlate very well with the crank angle of maximum heat release and shows promise as a useful metric for fuel reactivity in advanced combustion applications. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  15. Compressed liquid densities and excess molar volumes for (CO{sub 2} + 1-pentanol) binary system at temperatures from 313 to 363 K and pressures up to 25 MPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuniga-Moreno, Abel [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, ESIQIE, Laboratorio de Termodinamica, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1er piso, UPALM Zacatenco, 07738, Lindavista, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Galicia-Luna, Luis A. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, ESIQIE, Laboratorio de Termodinamica, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1er piso, UPALM Zacatenco, 07738, Lindavista, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: lgalicial@ipn.mx; Sandler, Stanley I. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716-3119 (United States)

    2008-02-15

    Measurements of compressed liquid densities for 1-pentanol and for {l_brace}CO{sub 2} (1) + 1-pentanol (2){r_brace} system were carried out at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 25 MPa. Densities were measured for binary mixtures at 10 different compositions, x{sub 1} = 0.0816, 0.1347, 0.3624, 0.4651, 0.6054, 0.7274, 0.8067, 0.8573, 0.9216, and 0.9757. A vibrating tube densimeter was used to perform density measurements using two reference calibration fluids. The uncertainty is estimated to be better than {+-}0.2 kg . m{sup -3} for the experimental density measurements. For each mixture and for 1-pentanol, the experimental densities were correlated using an explicit volume equation of six parameters and an 11-parameter equation of state (EoS). Excess molar volumes were determined for the (CO{sub 2} + 1-pentanol) system using 1-pentanol densities calculated from the 11-parameter EoS and CO{sub 2} densities calculated from a multiparameter reference EoS.

  16. Preliminary design study of underground pumped hydro and compressed-air energy storage in hard rock. Volume 8: Design approaches: UPH. Appendix A: Upper reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    Overriding considerations including operating range, volume and lining of reservoir, embankment design, intake/outlet arrangements and filling and make up water provisions were studied within the context of minimizing facility costs and optimizing the plant layout. The study led to the selection of a reservoir formed by embankment of compacted rockfill together with an intake/outlet structure located in the embankment. The reservoir floor and upstream slopes of the embankment will have an asphalt lining to prevent leakage. The material and cost estimates presented are based on the requirements for a 2000 MW plant providing 20,000 MWh of storage with a nominal head of 4600 ft.

  17. The compression of liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalley, E.

    The compression of liquids can be measured either directly by applying a pressure and noting the volume change, or indirectly, by measuring the magnitude of the fluctuations of the local volume. The methods used in Ottawa for the direct measurement of the compression are reviewed. The mean-square deviation of the volume from the mean at constant temperature can be measured by X-ray and neutron scattering at low angles, and the meansquare deviation at constant entropy can be measured by measuring the speed of sound. The speed of sound can be measured either acoustically, using an acoustic transducer, or by Brillouin spectroscopy. Brillouin spectroscopy can also be used to study the shear waves in liquids if the shear relaxation time is > ∼ 10 ps. The relaxation time of water is too short for the shear waves to be studied in this way, but they do occur in the low-frequency Raman and infrared spectra. The response of the structure of liquids to pressure can be studied by neutron scattering, and recently experiments have been done at Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd, Chalk River, on liquid D 2O up to 15.6 kbar. They show that the near-neighbor intermolecular O-D and D-D distances are less spread out and at shorter distances at high pressure. Raman spectroscopy can also provide information on the structural response. It seems that the O-O distance in water decreases much less with pressure than it does in ice. Presumably, the bending of O-O-O angles tends to increase the O-O distance, and so to largely compensate the compression due to the direct effect of pressure.

  18. Free boundary value problem to 3D spherically symmetric compressible Navier-Stokes-Poisson equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Huihui; Li, Hai-Liang

    2017-02-01

    In the paper, we consider the free boundary value problem to 3D spherically symmetric compressible isentropic Navier-Stokes-Poisson equations for self-gravitating gaseous stars with γ -law pressure density function for 6/5 <γ ≤ 4/3. For stress-free boundary condition and zero flow density continuously across the free boundary, the global existence of spherically symmetric weak solutions is shown, and the regularity and long time behavior of global solution are investigated for spherically symmetric initial data with the total mass smaller than a critical mass.

  19. CAUCHY PROBLEM FOR THE ONE-DIMENSIONAL COMPRESSIBLE NAVIER-STOKES EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian Ruxu; Liu Jian; Li Hailiang; Xiao Ling

    2012-01-01

    We consider the Cauchy problem for one-dimensional isentropic compressible Navier-Stokes equations with density-dependent viscosity coefficient.For regular initial data,we show that the unique strong solution exits globally in time and converges to the equilibrium state time asymptotically.When initial density is piecewise regular with jump discontinuity,we show that there exists a unique global piecewise regular solution. In particular,the jump discontinuity of the density decays exponentially and the piecewise regular solution tends to the equilibrium state as t→ +∞.

  20. Results from new multi-megabar shockless compression experiments at the Z machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jean-Paul; Knudson, Marcus D.; Brown, Justin L.

    2017-01-01

    Sandia's Z Machine has been used to magnetically drive shockless compression of materials in a planar configuration to multi-megabar pressure levels, allowing accurate measurements of quasi-isentropic mechanical response at relatively low temperatures in the solid phase. This paper details recent improvements to design and analysis of such experiments, including the use of new data on the mechanical and optical response of lithium fluoride windows. Comparison of windowed and free-surface data on copper to 350 GPa lends confidence to the window correction method. Preliminary results are presented on gold to 500 GPa and platinum to 450 GPa; both appear stiffer than existing models.

  1. Development of a Cryogenic Capability for Shock Compression of Liquid Helium on the Z machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Andrew; Root, Seth; Shelton, Keegan; Villalva, Jose; Hanson, David

    2015-06-01

    A cryogenic system has been developed to generate liquid helium (LHe) samples at 2.1 K for high precision equation-of-state (EOS) and isentropic compression measurements using the Z machine. Accurate data on He properties at Mbar pressures are critical to understanding gas giant planetary interiors and for validating first principles density functional simulations; however, limited high pressure He EOS data exist due to difficulty in condensing LHe samples (Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  3. Subtleties in the calculation of the pressure and pressure tensor of anisotropic particles from volume-perturbation methods and the apparent asymmetry of the compressive and expansive contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumby, Paul E.; Haslam, Andrew J.; de Miguel, Enrique; Jackson, George

    2011-01-01

    An efficient and versatile method to calculate the components of the pressure tensor for hard-body fluids of generic shape from the perspective of molecular simulation is presented. After due consideration of all the possible repulsive contributions exerted by molecules upon their surroundings during an anisotropic system expansion, it is observed that such a volume change can, for non-spherical molecules, give rise to configurations where overlaps occur. This feature of anisotropic molecules has to be taken into account rigorously as it can lead to discrepancies in the calculation of tensorial contributions to the pressure. Using the condition of detailed balance as a basis, a perturbation method developed for spherical molecules has been extended so that it is applicable to non-spherical and non-convex molecules. From a series of 'ghost' anisotropic volume perturbations the residual contribution to the components of the pressure tensor may be accurately calculated. Comparisons are made with prior methods and, where relevant, results are evaluated against existing data. For inhomogeneous systems this method provides a particularly convenient route to the calculation of the interfacial tension (surface free energy) from molecular simulations.

  4. Preliminary design study of underground pumped hydro and compressed-air energy storage in hard rock. Volume 8: Design approaches. UPH. Appendix E: Lower reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    Operational, construction, and geotechnical requirements were examined. Overriding considerations including operating range, volume, construction methods, cavern cross section and reservoir layout were studied within the context of minimizing facility costs and optimizing the plant layout. The study led to a preliminary arrangement of fourteen parallel caverns, each 60 ft wide by 85 ft high in cross section and 3610 ft in length. The requirements for and preliminary design of the intermediate reservoir in the case of a two step UPH facility is also described. The design and the cost estimates presented are based on the requirements for a 2000 MW plant providing 20,000 MWh of storage at a nominal head of 4600 ft.

  5. Influence of Sub-grid-Scale Isentropic Transports on McRAS Evaluations using ARM-CART SCM Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.; Tao, W. K.

    2004-01-01

    In GCM-physics evaluations with the currently available ARM-CART SCM datasets, McRAS produced very similar character of near surface errors of simulated temperature and humidity containing typically warm and moist biases near the surface and cold and dry biases aloft. We argued it must have a common cause presumably rooted in the model physics. Lack of vertical adjustment of horizontal transport was thought to be a plausible source. Clearly, debarring such a freedom would force the incoming air to diffuse into the grid-cell which would naturally bias the surface air to become warm and moist while the upper air becomes cold and dry, a characteristic feature of McRAS biases. Since, the errors were significantly larger in the two winter cases that contain potentially more intense episodes of cold and warm advective transports, it further reaffirmed our argument and provided additional motivation to introduce the corrections. When the horizontal advective transports were suitably modified to allow rising and/or sinking following isentropic pathways of subgrid scale motions, the outcome was to cool and dry (or warm and moisten) the lower (or upper) levels. Ever, crude approximations invoking such a correction reduced the temperature and humidity biases considerably. The tests were performed on all the available ARM-CART SCM cases with consistent outcome. With the isentropic corrections implemented through two different numerical approximations, virtually similar benefits were derived further confirming the robustness of our inferences. These results suggest the need for insentropic advective transport adjustment in a GCM due to subgrid scale motions.

  6. Influence of Sub-grid-Scale Isentropic Transports on McRAS Evaluations using ARM-CART SCM Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.; Tao, W. K.

    2004-01-01

    In GCM-physics evaluations with the currently available ARM-CART SCM datasets, McRAS produced very similar character of near surface errors of simulated temperature and humidity containing typically warm and moist biases near the surface and cold and dry biases aloft. We argued it must have a common cause presumably rooted in the model physics. Lack of vertical adjustment of horizontal transport was thought to be a plausible source. Clearly, debarring such a freedom would force the incoming air to diffuse into the grid-cell which would naturally bias the surface air to become warm and moist while the upper air becomes cold and dry, a characteristic feature of McRAS biases. Since, the errors were significantly larger in the two winter cases that contain potentially more intense episodes of cold and warm advective transports, it further reaffirmed our argument and provided additional motivation to introduce the corrections. When the horizontal advective transports were suitably modified to allow rising and/or sinking following isentropic pathways of subgrid scale motions, the outcome was to cool and dry (or warm and moisten) the lower (or upper) levels. Ever, crude approximations invoking such a correction reduced the temperature and humidity biases considerably. The tests were performed on all the available ARM-CART SCM cases with consistent outcome. With the isentropic corrections implemented through two different numerical approximations, virtually similar benefits were derived further confirming the robustness of our inferences. These results suggest the need for insentropic advective transport adjustment in a GCM due to subgrid scale motions.

  7. Compressing DNA sequence databases with coil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendy Michael D

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Publicly available DNA sequence databases such as GenBank are large, and are growing at an exponential rate. The sheer volume of data being dealt with presents serious storage and data communications problems. Currently, sequence data is usually kept in large "flat files," which are then compressed using standard Lempel-Ziv (gzip compression – an approach which rarely achieves good compression ratios. While much research has been done on compressing individual DNA sequences, surprisingly little has focused on the compression of entire databases of such sequences. In this study we introduce the sequence database compression software coil. Results We have designed and implemented a portable software package, coil, for compressing and decompressing DNA sequence databases based on the idea of edit-tree coding. coil is geared towards achieving high compression ratios at the expense of execution time and memory usage during compression – the compression time represents a "one-off investment" whose cost is quickly amortised if the resulting compressed file is transmitted many times. Decompression requires little memory and is extremely fast. We demonstrate a 5% improvement in compression ratio over state-of-the-art general-purpose compression tools for a large GenBank database file containing Expressed Sequence Tag (EST data. Finally, coil can efficiently encode incremental additions to a sequence database. Conclusion coil presents a compelling alternative to conventional compression of flat files for the storage and distribution of DNA sequence databases having a narrow distribution of sequence lengths, such as EST data. Increasing compression levels for databases having a wide distribution of sequence lengths is a direction for future work.

  8. Compressive Sensing Over Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Feizi, Soheil; Effros, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate some applications of compressive sensing over networks. We make a connection between compressive sensing and traditional information theoretic techniques in source coding and channel coding. Our results provide an explicit trade-off between the rate and the decoding complexity. The key difference of compressive sensing and traditional information theoretic approaches is at their decoding side. Although optimal decoders to recover the original signal, compressed by source coding have high complexity, the compressive sensing decoder is a linear or convex optimization. First, we investigate applications of compressive sensing on distributed compression of correlated sources. Here, by using compressive sensing, we propose a compression scheme for a family of correlated sources with a modularized decoder, providing a trade-off between the compression rate and the decoding complexity. We call this scheme Sparse Distributed Compression. We use this compression scheme for a general multi...

  9. Compression limits in cascaded quadratic soliton compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Krolikowski, Wieslaw;

    2008-01-01

    Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency.......Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency....

  10. Satellite data compression

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Bormin

    2011-01-01

    Satellite Data Compression covers recent progress in compression techniques for multispectral, hyperspectral and ultra spectral data. A survey of recent advances in the fields of satellite communications, remote sensing and geographical information systems is included. Satellite Data Compression, contributed by leaders in this field, is the first book available on satellite data compression. It covers onboard compression methodology and hardware developments in several space agencies. Case studies are presented on recent advances in satellite data compression techniques via various prediction-

  11. Excess compressibility in binary liquid mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliotta, F; Gapiński, J; Pochylski, M; Ponterio, R C; Saija, F; Salvato, G

    2007-06-14

    Brillouin scattering experiments have been carried out on some mixtures of molecular liquids. From the measurement of the hypersonic velocities we have evaluated the adiabatic compressibility as a function of the volume fraction. We show how the quadratic form of the excess compressibility dependence on the solute volume fraction can be derived by simple statistical effects and does not imply any interaction among the components of the system other than excluded volume effects. This idea is supported by the comparison of the experimental results with a well-established prototype model, consisting of a binary mixture of hard spheres with a nonadditive interaction potential. This naive model turns out to be able to produce a very wide spectrum of structural and thermodynamic features depending on values of its parameters. An attempt has made to understand what kind of structural information can be gained through the analysis of the volume fraction dependence of the compressibility.

  12. Cloud Optimized Image Format and Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, P.; Plesea, L.; Maurer, T.

    2015-04-01

    Cloud based image storage and processing requires revaluation of formats and processing methods. For the true value of the massive volumes of earth observation data to be realized, the image data needs to be accessible from the cloud. Traditional file formats such as TIF and NITF were developed in the hay day of the desktop and assumed fast low latency file access. Other formats such as JPEG2000 provide for streaming protocols for pixel data, but still require a server to have file access. These concepts no longer truly hold in cloud based elastic storage and computation environments. This paper will provide details of a newly evolving image storage format (MRF) and compression that is optimized for cloud environments. Although the cost of storage continues to fall for large data volumes, there is still significant value in compression. For imagery data to be used in analysis and exploit the extended dynamic range of the new sensors, lossless or controlled lossy compression is of high value. Compression decreases the data volumes stored and reduces the data transferred, but the reduced data size must be balanced with the CPU required to decompress. The paper also outlines a new compression algorithm (LERC) for imagery and elevation data that optimizes this balance. Advantages of the compression include its simple to implement algorithm that enables it to be efficiently accessed using JavaScript. Combing this new cloud based image storage format and compression will help resolve some of the challenges of big image data on the internet.

  13. Effects of shock topology on temperature field in compressible turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ni, Qionglin

    2015-01-01

    Effects of two types of shock topology, namely, small-scale shocklet and large-scale shock wave, on the statistics of temperature in compressible turbulence were investigated by simulations. The shocklet and shock wave are caused by the solenoidal and compressive modes of driven forces, respectively. Hereafter, the related two flows are called as SFT and CFT, respectively. It shows that in SFT the temperature spectrum follows the k^-5/3 power law, and the temperature field has "ramp-cliff" structures. By contrast, in CFT the temperature spectrum obeys the k^-2 power law, and the temperature field is dominated by large-scale rarefaction and compression. The power-law exponents for the p.d.f. of large negative dilatation are -2.5 in SFT and -3.5 in CFT, close to theoretical values. For the isentropic assumption of thermodynamic variables, the derivation in SFT grows with the turbulent Mach number (Mt), and for same Mt, the variables in CFT are more anisentropic. The angle statistics shows that the temperature g...

  14. TPC data compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Jens; Frankenfeld, Ulrich; Lindenstruth, Volker; Plamper, Patrick; Roehrich, Dieter; Schaefer, Erich; W. Schulz, Markus; M. Steinbeck, Timm; Stock, Reinhard; Sulimma, Kolja; Vestboe, Anders; Wiebalck, Arne E-mail: wiebalck@kip.uni-heidelberg.de

    2002-08-21

    In the collisions of ultra-relativistic heavy ions in fixed-target and collider experiments, multiplicities of several ten thousand charged particles are generated. The main devices for tracking and particle identification are large-volume tracking detectors (TPCs) producing raw event sizes in excess of 100 Mbytes per event. With increasing data rates, storage becomes the main limiting factor in such experiments and, therefore, it is essential to represent the data in a way that is as concise as possible. In this paper, we present several compression schemes, such as entropy encoding, modified vector quantization, and data modeling techniques applied on real data from the CERN SPS experiment NA49 and on simulated data from the future CERN LHC experiment ALICE.

  15. TPC data compression

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Jens; Lindenstruth, Volker; Plamper, Patrick; Röhrich, Dieter; Schafer, Erich; Schulz, M W; Steinbeck, T M; Stock, Reinhard; Sulimma, Kolja; Vestbo, Anders S; Wiebalck, Arne

    2002-01-01

    In the collisions of ultra-relativistic heavy ions in fixed-target and collider experiments, multiplicities of several ten thousand charged particles are generated. The main devices for tracking and particle identification are large-volume tracking detectors (TPCs) producing raw event sizes in excess of 100 Mbytes per event. With increasing data rates, storage becomes the main limiting factor in such experiments and, therefore, it is essential to represent the data in a way that is as concise as possible. In this paper, we present several compression schemes, such as entropy encoding, modified vector quantization, and data modeling techniques applied on real data from the CERN SPS experiment NA49 and on simulated data from the future CERN LHC experiment ALICE.

  16. TPC data compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Jens; Frankenfeld, Ulrich; Lindenstruth, Volker; Plamper, Patrick; Röhrich, Dieter; Schäfer, Erich; Schulz, Markus W.; Steinbeck, Timm M.; Stock, Reinhard; Sulimma, Kolja; Vestbø, Anders; Wiebalck, Arne

    2002-08-01

    In the collisions of ultra-relativistic heavy ions in fixed-target and collider experiments, multiplicities of several ten thousand charged particles are generated. The main devices for tracking and particle identification are large-volume tracking detectors (TPCs) producing raw event sizes in excess of 100 Mbytes per event. With increasing data rates, storage becomes the main limiting factor in such experiments and, therefore, it is essential to represent the data in a way that is as concise as possible. In this paper, we present several compression schemes, such as entropy encoding, modified vector quantization, and data modeling techniques applied on real data from the CERN SPS experiment NA49 and on simulated data from the future CERN LHC experiment ALICE.

  17. New experimental capabilities and theoretical insights of high pressure compression waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlikowski, D; Nguyen, J; Patterson, J R; Minich, R; Martin, L P; Holmes, N

    2007-07-20

    Currently there are three platforms that offer quasi-isentropic compression or ramp-wave compression (RWC): light-gas gun, magnetic flux (Z-pinch), and laser. We focus here on the light-gas gun technique and on some current theoretical insights from experimental data. A gradient impedance through the length of the impactor provides the pressure pulse upon impactor to the subject material. Applications and results are given concerning high-pressure strength and liquid to solid, phase transition of water plus its associated phase fraction history. We also introduce the Korteweg-deVries-Burgers equation as a means to understand the evolution these RWC waves that propagate through the thickness of the subject material. This equation has the necessary competition between non-linear, dispersion, and dissipation processes, which is shown through observed structures that are manifested in the experimental particle velocity histories. Such methodology points towards a possible quantifiable dissipation, through which RWC experiments may be analyzed.

  18. Computation of methodology-independent single-ion solvation properties from molecular simulations. III. Correction terms for the solvation free energies, enthalpies, entropies, heat capacities, volumes, compressibilities, and expansivities of solvated ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Maria M; Hünenberger, Philippe H

    2011-04-14

    The raw single-ion solvation free energies computed from atomistic (explicit-solvent) simulations are extremely sensitive to the boundary conditions (finite or periodic system, system or box size) and treatment of electrostatic interactions (Coulombic, lattice-sum, or cutoff-based) used during these simulations. However, as shown by Kastenholz and Hünenberger [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 224501 (2006)], correction terms can be derived for the effects of: (A) an incorrect solvent polarization around the ion and an incomplete or/and inexact interaction of the ion with the polarized solvent due to the use of an approximate (not strictly Coulombic) electrostatic scheme; (B) the finite-size or artificial periodicity of the simulated system; (C) an improper summation scheme to evaluate the potential at the ion site, and the possible presence of a polarized air-liquid interface or of a constraint of vanishing average electrostatic potential in the simulated system; and (D) an inaccurate dielectric permittivity of the employed solvent model. Comparison with standard experimental data also requires the inclusion of appropriate cavity-formation and standard-state correction terms. In the present study, this correction scheme is extended by: (i) providing simple approximate analytical expressions (empirically-fitted) for the correction terms that were evaluated numerically in the above scheme (continuum-electrostatics calculations); (ii) providing correction terms for derivative thermodynamic single-ion solvation properties (and corresponding partial molar variables in solution), namely, the enthalpy, entropy, isobaric heat capacity, volume, isothermal compressibility, and isobaric expansivity (including appropriate standard-state correction terms). The ability of the correction scheme to produce methodology-independent single-ion solvation free energies based on atomistic simulations is tested in the case of Na(+) hydration, and the nature and magnitude of the correction terms for

  19. Observation of Solid-Solid Phase Transitions in Ramp-Compressed Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsin, D. N.; Boehly, T. R.; Delettrez, J. A.; Gregor, M. C.; McCoy, C. A.; Henderson, B.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Smith, R.; Kraus, R.; Eggert, J. H.; Collins, R.; Coppari, F.; Celliers, P. M.

    2016-10-01

    We present results of experiments using x-ray diffraction to study the crystalline structure of solid aluminum compressed up to 500 GPa. Aluminum is of interest because it is frequently used as a standard material in high-pressure compression experiments. At ambient pressure and temperature, Al is a face-centered cubic close-packed crystal and has been observed to transform to hexagonal close-packed (hcp) when compressed to 200GPa in a diamond anvil cell. It is predicted to transform from hcp to body-centered cubic when compressed to 315GPa. Laser-driven ramp waves will be used to compress Al to various constant-pressure states. The goal is to investigate the Al phase diagram along its isentrope, i.e., at temperatures 1000K and pressures ranging from 200 to 500 GPa. X-ray diffraction will be used to measure the crystalline structure of the compressed Al and observe the transformations that occur at various pressures. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  20. 200 GPa压力范围内铝和铜的等熵压缩线计算%Compression Isentropes of Aluminum and Copper up to 200 GPa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫建军; 孙承纬

    2006-01-01

    将冲击Hugoniot线作为Grüneisen物态方程的参考线,以冲击的初始状态为参考状态,推导得到线性和二次曲线表示的冲击绝热线所对应的等熵压缩线方程,计算了200 GPa压力范围内铝和铜两种材料的等熵压缩线,并且计算了以Hugoniot关系为基础的Appy经验物态方程导出的等熵压缩线.计算结果表明,以Appy经验物态方程导出的等熵压缩线与以线性冲击绝热线导出的等熵压缩线接近,在200 GPa压力范围内两者相差不到1.5%.将计算得到的铝的等熵压缩线与美国Sandia实验室ICE实验Z864数据进行了比较,由线性Hugoniot得到的等熵压缩线与实验数据相差不到1%,由Appy经验物态方程得到的等熵线与实验数据几乎重合,说明在200 GPa压力范围内,以Appy物态方程和以线性Hugoniot为参考来计算的等熵压缩线有较高的精度.

  1. Granular Material Response to Dynamic Shock Compression: A Study of SiO2 in the Form of Sand and Soda Lime Glass Beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    method was used vice more accurate immersion techniques based on Archimedes principle . The initial volume of the technical sand was determined by filling...of Porous Materials In solid materials small stresses and strains are very close to being the same as the shock Hugoniot and the principle isentrope...experiment is no longer a traditional shock Hugoniot experiment but is rather more analogous to a ‘plate push ’ experiment. Multiple wave interactions

  2. Compression of interferometric radio-astronomical data

    CERN Document Server

    Offringa, A R

    2016-01-01

    The volume of radio-astronomical data is a considerable burden in the processing and storing of radio observations with high time and frequency resolutions and large bandwidths. Lossy compression of interferometric radio-astronomical data is considered to reduce the volume of visibility data and to speed up processing. A new compression technique named "Dysco" is introduced that consists of two steps: a normalization step, in which grouped visibilities are normalized to have a similar distribution; and a quantization and encoding step, which rounds values to a given quantization scheme using a dithering scheme. Several non-linear quantization schemes are tested and combined with different methods for normalizing the data. Four data sets with observations from the LOFAR and MWA telescopes are processed with different processing strategies and different combinations of normalization and quantization. The effects of compression are measured in image plane. The noise added by the lossy compression technique acts ...

  3. A comparison of regional isentropic-sigma and sigma model simulations of the January 1979 Chicago blizzard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapotocny, Tom H.; Johnson, Donald R.; Reames, Fred M.

    1993-01-01

    In an initial effort in regional numerical weather prediction, results from the University of Wisconsin isentropic-sigma (UW theta-sigma) hybrid model and an 'identical' sigma model are compared. The two main objectives are to demonstrate the capability of the UW theta-sigma model for regional numerical weather prediction and to identify advantages of the hybrid model in simulating atmospheric water vapor transport and precipitation relative to the sigma model. The 72-h simulations produced by the two models extend over a region covering the western Pacific Ocean, North America, and the western Atlantic Ocean. The simulations begin at 0000 UTC 13 January 1979, a period during which an intense Chicago blizzard develops over the central United States. This period also includes the rapid development of a cyclone in the western Pacific Ocean. Results using the Global Weather Experiment (GWE) ECMWF level IIIB data as initial and verification data indicate that both models produce reasonable and similar 72-h simulations, with the UW theta-sigma model mass and momentum distributions being slightly more accurate than the sigma model. Of particular importance for the Chicago blizzard is that the UW theta-sigma model more accurately simulates water vapor transport northward from the Gulf of Mexico and westward from the Atlantic Ocean. As a result, the hybrid model more accurately simulates observed precipitation, especially over the northeastern U.S. and southeastern Canada.

  4. Compression and extraction of stopped muons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taqqu, D

    2006-11-10

    Efficient conversion of a standard positive muon beam into a high-quality slow muon beam is shown to be achievable by compression of a muon swarm stopped in an extended gas volume. The stopped swarm can be squeezed into a mm-size swarm flow that can be extracted into vacuum through a small opening in the stop target walls. Novel techniques of swarm compression are considered. In particular, a density gradient in crossed electric and magnetic fields is used.

  5. Adiabatic Liquid Piston Compressed Air Energy Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Tage; Elmegaard, Brian; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder

    the mechanical energy into electricity at times of high electricity demand. Two such systems are currently in operation; one in Germany (Huntorf) and one in the USA (Macintosh, Alabama). In both cases, an underground cavern is used as a pressure vessel for the storage of the compressed air. Both systems...... are in the range of 100 MW electrical power output with several hours of production stored as compressed air. In this range, enormous volumes are required, which make underground caverns the only economical way to design the pressure vessel. Both systems use axial turbine compressors to compress air when charging......), but no such units are in operation at present. The CAES system investigated in this project uses a different approach to avoid compression heat loss. The system uses a pre-compressed pressure vessel full of air. A liquid is pumped into the bottom of the vessel when charging and the same liquid is withdrawn through...

  6. Influência da adição de diatomita nas propriedades de pastas geopoliméricas: volume de filtrado, tempo de espessamento e resistência à compressão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Santos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ResumoHoje em dia a diversidade de materiais disponíveis para uso em engenharia é muito grande, há um aumento de materiais específicos para cada tipo de aplicação. Os geopolímeros têm sido estudados há décadas; são polímeros inorgânicos que podem proporcionar características de cimentação, que surgem como uma nova classe de materiais de alto desempenho, capazes de substituir total ou parcialmente o cimento Portland em várias aplicações. Neste trabalho foi estudada a influência da adição de diatomita em pastas geopoliméricos baseadas em metacaolinita. A utilização de uma nova matéria-prima abundante na natureza e de baixo valor, como a diatomita, é uma outra alternativa como fonte de sílica para produzir geopolímeros. A diatomita foi usada como um aditivo para melhorar algumas propriedades importantes das pastas de cimento com base em geopolímeros. O efeito da adição de diatomita nas propriedades das pastas geopoliméricas foi avaliado por comparação com as propriedades do geopolímero com base em metacaulim. Para analisar os efeitos de concentrações de diatomita em pastas geopoliméricas, foram realizados testes de filtrado, tempo de espessamento e resistência à compressão. Também são apresentados os resultados de difração de raios X e microscopia electrónica de varredura a fim de reunir informação para uma melhor compreensão da microestrutura do cimento geopolimérico. Os resultados mostraram que a adição de diatomita mudou drasticamente microestrutura e propriedades mecânicas de pastas geopoliméricas. Com o aumento na concentração de diatomita o volume do filtrado diminui, independente da temperatura.

  7. Micro-Ramps for External Compression Low-Boom Inlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybalko, Michael; Loth, Eric; Chima, Rodrick V.; Hirt, Stefanie M.; DeBonis, James R.

    2010-01-01

    The application of vortex generators for flow control in an external compression, axisymmetric, low-boom concept inlet was investigated using RANS simulations with three-dimensional (3-D), structured, chimera (overset) grids and the WIND-US code. The low-boom inlet design is based on previous scale model 1- by 1-ft wind tunnel tests and features a zero-angle cowl and relaxed isentropic compression centerbody spike, resulting in defocused oblique shocks and a weak terminating normal shock. Validation of the methodology was first performed for micro-ramps in supersonic flow on a flat plate with and without oblique shocks. For the inlet configuration, simulations with several types of vortex generators were conducted for positions both upstream and downstream of the terminating normal shock. The performance parameters included incompressible axisymmetric shape factor, separation area, inlet pressure recovery, and massflow ratio. The design of experiments (DOE) methodology was used to select device size and location, analyze the resulting data, and determine the optimal choice of device geometry. The optimum upstream configuration was found to substantially reduce the post-shock separation area but did not significantly impact recovery at the aerodynamic interface plane (AIP). Downstream device placement allowed for fuller boundary layer velocity profiles and reduced distortion. This resulted in an improved pressure recovery and massflow ratio at the AIP compared to the baseline solid-wall configuration.

  8. Shockwave compression of Ar gas at several initial densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Garcia, Daniel B.; Gustavsen, Richard L.; Lang, John M.; Aslam, Tariq D.; Sheffield, Stephen A.; Gibson, Lloyd L.; Morris, John S.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental data of the principal Hugoniot locus of variable density gas-phase noble and molecular gases are rare. The majority of shock Hugoniot data is either from shock tube experiments on low-pressure gases or from plate impact experiments on cryogenic, liquefied gases. In both cases, physics regarding shock compressibility, thresholds for the on-set of shock-driven ionization, and even dissociation chemistry are difficult to infer for gases at intermediate densities. We have developed an experimental target design for gas gun-driven plate impact experiments on noble gases at initial pressures between 200-1000 psi. Using optical velocimetry, we are able to directly determine both the shock and particle velocities of the gas on the principal Hugoniot locus, as well as clearly differentiate ionization thresholds. The target design also results in multiply shocking the gas in a quasi-isentropic fashion yielding off-Hugoniot compression data. We describe the results of a series of plate impact experiments on Ar with starting densities between 0.02-0.05 g/cm3 at room temperature. Furthermore, by coupling optical fibers to the targets, we have measured the time-resolved optical emission from the shocked gas using a spectrometer coupled to an optical streak camera to spectrally-resolve the emission, and with a 5-color optical pyrometer for temperature determination.

  9. Focus on Compression Stockings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the stocking every other day with a mild soap. Do not use Woolite™ detergent. Use warm water ... compression clothing will lose its elasticity and its effectiveness. Compression stockings last for about 4-6 months ...

  10. A Compressive Superresolution Display

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2014-06-22

    In this paper, we introduce a new compressive display architecture for superresolution image presentation that exploits co-design of the optical device configuration and compressive computation. Our display allows for superresolution, HDR, or glasses-free 3D presentation.

  11. Microbunching and RF Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-05-23

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  12. Hyperspectral data compression

    CERN Document Server

    Motta, Giovanni; Storer, James A

    2006-01-01

    Provides a survey of results in the field of compression of remote sensed 3D data, with a particular interest in hyperspectral imagery. This work covers topics such as compression architecture, lossless compression, lossy techniques, and more. It also describes a lossless algorithm based on vector quantization.

  13. Compressed gas manifold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Richard J.; Wozniak, John J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas storage cell interconnecting manifold including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and a port for connecting the compressed gas storage cells to a motor vehicle power source and to a refueling adapter. The manifold is mechanically and pneumatically connected to a compressed gas storage cell by a bolt including a gas passage therein.

  14. Compressing Binary Decision Diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Esben Rune; Satti, Srinivasa Rao; Tiedemann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to 1...

  15. Compressing Binary Decision Diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rune Hansen, Esben; Srinivasa Rao, S.; Tiedemann, Peter

    The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to 1...

  16. Compressing Binary Decision Diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Esben Rune; Satti, Srinivasa Rao; Tiedemann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to 1...

  17. Isostatic compression of buffer blocks. Middle scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritola, J.; Pyy, E. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-01-15

    Manufacturing of buffer components using isostatic compression method has been studied in small scale in 2008 (Laaksonen 2010). These tests included manufacturing of buffer blocks using different bentonite materials and different compression pressures. Isostatic mould technology was also tested, along with different methods to fill the mould, such as vibration and partial vacuum, as well as a stepwise compression of the blocks. The development of manufacturing techniques has continued with small-scale (30 %) blocks (diameter 600 mm) in 2009. This was done in a separate project: Isostatic compression, manufacturing and testing of small scale (D = 600 mm) buffer blocks. The research on the isostatic compression method continued in 2010 in a project aimed to test and examine the isostatic manufacturing process of buffer blocks at 70 % scale (block diameter 1200 to 1300 mm), and the aim was to continue in 2011 with full-scale blocks (diameter 1700 mm). A total of nine bentonite blocks were manufactured at 70 % scale, of which four were ring-shaped and the rest were cylindrical. It is currently not possible to manufacture full-scale blocks, because there is no sufficiently large isostatic press available. However, such a compression unit is expected to be possible to use in the near future. The test results of bentonite blocks, produced with an isostatic pressing method at different presses and at different sizes, suggest that the technical characteristics, for example bulk density and strength values, are somewhat independent of the size of the block, and that the blocks have fairly homogenous characteristics. Water content and compression pressure are the two most important properties determining the characteristics of the compressed blocks. By adjusting these two properties it is fairly easy to produce blocks at a desired density. The commonly used compression pressure in the manufacturing of bentonite blocks is 100 MPa, which compresses bentonite to approximately

  18. COMPRESSIBLE NAVIER-STOKES EQUATIONS WITH DENSITY-DEPENDENT VISCOSITY,VACUUM AND GRAVITATIONAL FORCE IN THE CASE OF GENERAL PRESSURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Lei; Wang Wenjun

    2008-01-01

    This is a continuation of the article (Comm. Partial Differential Equations 26 (2001) 965). In this article, the authors consider the one-dimensional compressible isentropic Navier-Stokes equations with gravitational force, fixed boundary condition, a general pressure and the density-dependent viscosity coefficient when the viscous gas con-nects to vacuum state with a jump in density. Precisely, the viscosity coefficient u is proportional to pθ and 0 < θ < 1/2, where p is the density, and the pressure P =P(p) is a general pressure. The global existence and the uniqueness of weak solution are proved.

  19. Hyperspectral image data compression based on DSP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jiming; Zhou, Jiankang; Chen, Xinhua; Shen, Weimin

    2010-11-01

    The huge data volume of hyperspectral image challenges its transportation and store. It is necessary to find an effective method to compress the hyperspectral image. Through analysis and comparison of current various algorithms, a mixed compression algorithm based on prediction, integer wavelet transform and embedded zero-tree wavelet (EZW) is proposed in this paper. We adopt a high-powered Digital Signal Processor (DSP) of TMS320DM642 to realize the proposed algorithm. Through modifying the mixed algorithm and optimizing its algorithmic language, the processing efficiency of the program was significantly improved, compared the non-optimized one. Our experiment show that the mixed algorithm based on DSP runs much faster than the algorithm on personal computer. The proposed method can achieve the nearly real-time compression with excellent image quality and compression performance.

  20. Compressibility of CNT-Grafted Fibrous Reinforcements: A Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lomov, S.V.; Koissin, V.; Karahan, M.; Godara, A.; Gorbatikh, L.; Verpoest, I.

    2010-01-01

    The paper introduces a theoretical model of compressibility of a nanotube forest with randomly oriented nanotubes, which is applied to predict compressibility of a fibrous reinforcement with CNT-grafted fibres. It is shown that the pressure needed to achieve the target fibre volume fraction of the p

  1. Compressibility of CNT-Grafted Fibrous Reinforcements: A Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lomov, S.V.; Koysin, V.; Karahan, M.; Godara, A.; Gorbatikh, L.; Verpoest, I.

    2010-01-01

    The paper introduces a theoretical model of compressibility of a nanotube forest with randomly oriented nanotubes, which is applied to predict compressibility of a fibrous reinforcement with CNT-grafted fibres. It is shown that the pressure needed to achieve the target fibre volume fraction of the

  2. Compressed air energy storage: preliminary design and site development program in an aquifer. Final draft, Task 2: Volume 2 of 3. Characterize and explore potential sites and prepare research and development plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-01

    The characteristics of sites in Indiana and Illinois which are being investigated as potential sites for compressed air energy storage power plants are documented. These characteristics include geological considerations, economic factors, and environmental considerations. Extensive data are presented for 14 specific sites and a relative rating on the desirability of each site is derived. (LCL)

  3. An adaptive signal compression system with pre-specified reconstruction quality and compression rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tümer, M Borahan; Demir, Mert C

    2006-02-01

    Two essential properties of a signal compression method are the compression rate and the distance between the original signal and the reconstruction from the compressed signal. These two properties are used to assess the performance and quality of the method. In a recent work [B. Tümer, B. Demiröz, Lecture Notes in Computer Science-Computer and Information Sciences, volume 2869, chapter Signal Compression Using Growing Cell Structures: A Transformational Approach, Springer Verlag, 2003, pp. 952-959], an adaptive signal compression system (ACS) is presented which defines the performance of the system as a function of the system complexity, system sensitivity and data size. For a compression method, it is desirable to formulate the performance of the system as a function of the system complexity and sensitivity to optimize the performance of the system. It would be further desirable to express the reconstruction quality in terms of the same system parameters so as to know up front what compression rate to end up with for a specific reconstruction quality. In this work, we modify ACS such that the modified ACS (MACS) estimates the reconstruction quality for a given system complexity and sensitivity. Once this relation is identified it is possible to optimize either compression rate or reconstruction quality with respect to system sensitivity and system complexity while limiting the other one.

  4. Lossless Medical Image Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagashree G

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Image compression has become an important process in today‟s world of information exchange. Image compression helps in effective utilization of high speed network resources. Medical Image Compression is very important in the present world for efficient archiving and transmission of images. In this paper two different approaches for lossless image compression is proposed. One uses the combination of 2D-DWT & FELICS algorithm for lossy to lossless Image Compression and another uses combination of prediction algorithm and Integer wavelet Transform (IWT. To show the effectiveness of the methodology used, different image quality parameters are measured and shown the comparison of both the approaches. We observed the increased compression ratio and higher PSNR values.

  5. A convergent mixed method for the Stokes approximation of viscous compressible flow

    CERN Document Server

    Karlsen, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    We propose a mixed finite element method for the motion of a strongly viscous, ideal, and isentropic gas. At the boundary we impose a Navier-slip condition such that the velocity equation can be posed in mixed form with the vorticity as an auxiliary variable. In this formulation we design a finite element method, where the velocity and vorticity is approximated with the div- and curl- conforming Nedelec elements, respectively, of the first order and first kind. The mixed scheme is coupled to a standard piecewise constant upwind discontinuous Galerkin discretization of the continuity equation. For the time discretization, implicit Euler time stepping is used. Our main result is that the numerical solution converges to a weak solution as the discretization parameters go to zero. The convergence analysis is inspired by the continuous analysis of Feireisl and Lions for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Tools used in the analysis include an equation for the effective viscous flux and various renormalizatio...

  6. Numerical solution of shock and ramp compression for general material properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, D C

    2009-01-28

    A general formulation was developed to represent material models for applications in dynamic loading. Numerical methods were devised to calculate response to shock and ramp compression, and ramp decompression, generalizing previous solutions for scalar equations of state. The numerical methods were found to be flexible and robust, and matched analytic results to a high accuracy. The basic ramp and shock solution methods were coupled to solve for composite deformation paths, such as shock-induced impacts, and shock interactions with a planar interface between different materials. These calculations capture much of the physics of typical material dynamics experiments, without requiring spatially-resolving simulations. Example calculations were made of loading histories in metals, illustrating the effects of plastic work on the temperatures induced in quasi-isentropic and shock-release experiments, and the effect of a phase transition.

  7. Celiac Artery Compression Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Muqeetadnan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac artery compression syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by episodic abdominal pain and weight loss. It is the result of external compression of celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament. We present a case of celiac artery compression syndrome in a 57-year-old male with severe postprandial abdominal pain and 30-pound weight loss. The patient eventually responded well to surgical division of the median arcuate ligament by laparoscopy.

  8. Compressed sensing & sparse filtering

    CERN Document Server

    Carmi, Avishy Y; Godsill, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    This book is aimed at presenting concepts, methods and algorithms ableto cope with undersampled and limited data. One such trend that recently gained popularity and to some extent revolutionised signal processing is compressed sensing. Compressed sensing builds upon the observation that many signals in nature are nearly sparse (or compressible, as they are normally referred to) in some domain, and consequently they can be reconstructed to within high accuracy from far fewer observations than traditionally held to be necessary. Apart from compressed sensing this book contains other related app

  9. Wavelet image compression

    CERN Document Server

    Pearlman, William A

    2013-01-01

    This book explains the stages necessary to create a wavelet compression system for images and describes state-of-the-art systems used in image compression standards and current research. It starts with a high level discussion of the properties of the wavelet transform, especially the decomposition into multi-resolution subbands. It continues with an exposition of the null-zone, uniform quantization used in most subband coding systems and the optimal allocation of bitrate to the different subbands. Then the image compression systems of the FBI Fingerprint Compression Standard and the JPEG2000 S

  10. Stiffness of compression devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Mosti

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This issue of Veins and Lymphatics collects papers coming from the International Compression Club (ICC Meeting on Stiffness of Compression Devices, which took place in Vienna on May 2012. Several studies have demonstrated that the stiffness of compression products plays a major role for their hemodynamic efficacy. According to the European Committee for Standardization (CEN, stiffness is defined as the pressure increase produced by medical compression hosiery (MCH per 1 cm of increase in leg circumference.1 In other words stiffness could be defined as the ability of the bandage/stockings to oppose the muscle expansion during contraction.

  11. Relating the molecular structure of comb-type superplasticizers to the compression rheology of MgO suspensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Ane Mette; Flatt, Rober Johan; Bergström, Lennart

    2006-01-01

    chains. Consolidation experiments, where the volume fraction gradient of particle networks has been determined in response to a centrifugal force field, offer a simple, yet accurate, way of investigating flocculated, partly stabilized and stable suspensions under compression. The compression rheology...

  12. A review on compressed pattern matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surya Prakash Mishra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Compressed pattern matching (CPM refers to the task of locating all the occurrences of a pattern (or set of patterns inside the body of compressed text. In this type of matching, pattern may or may not be compressed. CPM is very useful in handling large volume of data especially over the network. It has many applications in computational biology, where it is useful in finding similar trends in DNA sequences; intrusion detection over the networks, big data analytics etc. Various solutions have been provided by researchers where pattern is matched directly over the uncompressed text. Such solution requires lot of space and consumes lot of time when handling the big data. Various researchers have proposed the efficient solutions for compression but very few exist for pattern matching over the compressed text. Considering the future trend where data size is increasing exponentially day-by-day, CPM has become a desirable task. This paper presents a critical review on the recent techniques on the compressed pattern matching. The covered techniques includes: Word based Huffman codes, Word Based Tagged Codes; Wavelet Tree Based Indexing. We have presented a comparative analysis of all the techniques mentioned above and highlighted their advantages and disadvantages.

  13. Compression of interferometric radio-astronomical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offringa, A. R.

    2016-11-01

    Context. The volume of radio-astronomical data is a considerable burden in the processing and storing of radio observations that have high time and frequency resolutions and large bandwidths. For future telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), the data volume will be even larger. Aims: Lossy compression of interferometric radio-astronomical data is considered to reduce the volume of visibility data and to speed up processing. Methods: A new compression technique named "Dysco" is introduced that consists of two steps: a normalization step, in which grouped visibilities are normalized to have a similar distribution; and a quantization and encoding step, which rounds values to a given quantization scheme using a dithering scheme. Several non-linear quantization schemes are tested and combined with different methods for normalizing the data. Four data sets with observations from the LOFAR and MWA telescopes are processed with different processing strategies and different combinations of normalization and quantization. The effects of compression are measured in image plane. Results: The noise added by the lossy compression technique acts similarly to normal system noise. The accuracy of Dysco is depending on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the data: noisy data can be compressed with a smaller loss of image quality. Data with typical correlator time and frequency resolutions can be compressed by a factor of 6.4 for LOFAR and 5.3 for MWA observations with less than 1% added system noise. An implementation of the compression technique is released that provides a Casacore storage manager and allows transparent encoding and decoding. Encoding and decoding is faster than the read/write speed of typical disks. Conclusions: The technique can be used for LOFAR and MWA to reduce the archival space requirements for storing observed data. Data from SKA-low will likely be compressible by the same amount as LOFAR. The same technique can be used to compress data from

  14. Compression Ratio Adjuster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkerman, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    New mechanism alters compression ratio of internal-combustion engine according to load so that engine operates at top fuel efficiency. Ordinary gasoline, diesel and gas engines with their fixed compression ratios are inefficient at partial load and at low-speed full load. Mechanism ensures engines operate as efficiently under these conditions as they do at highload and high speed.

  15. Experimental research on the compressibility of stale waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yongxing; XIE Qiang; ZHANG Jianhua; WEI Yongfa

    2003-01-01

    The compressibility of stale waste is studied based on the investigation into the composition and properties of stale waste in the Chongqing City. Stale waste sampled at a landfill closed for over 8 a was analyzed indoors for its natural density,natural water content, relative density, grain size distribution curve, uniformity coefficient and curvature coefficient. Indoor compression tests for the stale waste were performed to find out the void ratio and its dependence upon applied pressure,compressibility coefficient, constrained modulus and volume compressibility coefficient. From the experimental data, the curvature coefficient and the preconsolidation pressure of the stale waste were worked out. The results indicates that the stale waste is of high compressibility, which is different from the other kinds of common soil, and is underconsolidated soil. The measured compressibility parameters are applicable to settlement calculation of closed landfills.

  16. Spectral Animation Compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Wang; Yang Liu; Xiaohu Guo; Zichun Zhong; Binh Le; Zhigang Deng

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a spectral approach to compress dynamic animation consisting of a sequence of homeomor-phic manifold meshes. Our new approach directly compresses the field of deformation gradient defined on the surface mesh, by decomposing it into rigid-body motion (rotation) and non-rigid-body deformation (stretching) through polar decompo-sition. It is known that the rotation group has the algebraic topology of 3D ring, which is different from other operations like stretching. Thus we compress these two groups separately, by using Manifold Harmonics Transform to drop out their high-frequency details. Our experimental result shows that the proposed method achieves a good balance between the reconstruction quality and the compression ratio. We compare our results quantitatively with other existing approaches on animation compression, using standard measurement criteria.

  17. Superfast assembly and synthesis of gold nanostructures using nanosecond low-temperature compression via magnetic pulsed power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Binsong; Bian, Kaifu; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Salerno, K. Michael; Grest, Gary S.; Ao, Tommy; Hickman, Randy; Wise, Jack; Wang, Zhongwu; Fan, Hongyou

    2017-01-01

    Gold nanostructured materials exhibit important size- and shape-dependent properties that enable a wide variety of applications in photocatalysis, nanoelectronics and phototherapy. Here we show the use of superfast dynamic compression to synthesize extended gold nanostructures, such as nanorods, nanowires and nanosheets, with nanosecond coalescence times. Using a pulsed power generator, we ramp compress spherical gold nanoparticle arrays to pressures of tens of GPa, demonstrating pressure-driven assembly beyond the quasi-static regime of the diamond anvil cell. Our dynamic magnetic ramp compression approach produces smooth, shockless (that is, isentropic) one-dimensional loading with low-temperature states suitable for nanostructure synthesis. Transmission electron microscopy clearly establishes that various gold architectures are formed through compressive mesoscale coalescences of spherical gold nanoparticles, which is further confirmed by in-situ synchrotron X-ray studies and large-scale simulation. This nanofabrication approach applies magnetically driven uniaxial ramp compression to mimic established embossing and imprinting processes, but at ultra-short (nanosecond) timescales. PMID:28300067

  18. Superfast assembly and synthesis of gold nanostructures using nanosecond low-temperature compression via magnetic pulsed power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Binsong; Bian, Kaifu; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Salerno, K. Michael; Grest, Gary S.; Ao, Tommy; Hickman, Randy; Wise, Jack; Wang, Zhongwu; Fan, Hongyou

    2017-03-01

    Gold nanostructured materials exhibit important size- and shape-dependent properties that enable a wide variety of applications in photocatalysis, nanoelectronics and phototherapy. Here we show the use of superfast dynamic compression to synthesize extended gold nanostructures, such as nanorods, nanowires and nanosheets, with nanosecond coalescence times. Using a pulsed power generator, we ramp compress spherical gold nanoparticle arrays to pressures of tens of GPa, demonstrating pressure-driven assembly beyond the quasi-static regime of the diamond anvil cell. Our dynamic magnetic ramp compression approach produces smooth, shockless (that is, isentropic) one-dimensional loading with low-temperature states suitable for nanostructure synthesis. Transmission electron microscopy clearly establishes that various gold architectures are formed through compressive mesoscale coalescences of spherical gold nanoparticles, which is further confirmed by in-situ synchrotron X-ray studies and large-scale simulation. This nanofabrication approach applies magnetically driven uniaxial ramp compression to mimic established embossing and imprinting processes, but at ultra-short (nanosecond) timescales.

  19. Image compression-encryption scheme based on hyper-chaotic system and 2D compressive sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nanrun; Pan, Shumin; Cheng, Shan; Zhou, Zhihong

    2016-08-01

    Most image encryption algorithms based on low-dimensional chaos systems bear security risks and suffer encryption data expansion when adopting nonlinear transformation directly. To overcome these weaknesses and reduce the possible transmission burden, an efficient image compression-encryption scheme based on hyper-chaotic system and 2D compressive sensing is proposed. The original image is measured by the measurement matrices in two directions to achieve compression and encryption simultaneously, and then the resulting image is re-encrypted by the cycle shift operation controlled by a hyper-chaotic system. Cycle shift operation can change the values of the pixels efficiently. The proposed cryptosystem decreases the volume of data to be transmitted and simplifies the keys distribution simultaneously as a nonlinear encryption system. Simulation results verify the validity and the reliability of the proposed algorithm with acceptable compression and security performance.

  20. Probing off-Hugoniot states in Ta, Cu, and Al to 1000 GPa compression with magnetically driven liner implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemke, R. W., E-mail: rwlemke@sandia.gov; Dolan, D. H.; Dalton, D. G.; Brown, J. L.; Robertson, G. R.; Harding, E.; Mattsson, A. E.; Carpenter, J. H.; Drake, R. R.; Cochrane, K.; Robinson, A. C.; Mattsson, T. R. [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1189 (United States); Tomlinson, K.; Blue, B. E. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Knudson, M. D. [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1189 (United States); Institute for Shock Physics and Department of Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164 (United States)

    2016-01-07

    We report on a new technique for obtaining off-Hugoniot pressure vs. density data for solid metals compressed to extreme pressure by a magnetically driven liner implosion on the Z-machine (Z) at Sandia National Laboratories. In our experiments, the liner comprises inner and outer metal tubes. The inner tube is composed of a sample material (e.g., Ta and Cu) whose compressed state is to be inferred. The outer tube is composed of Al and serves as the current carrying cathode. Another aluminum liner at much larger radius serves as the anode. A shaped current pulse quasi-isentropically compresses the sample as it implodes. The iterative method used to infer pressure vs. density requires two velocity measurements. Photonic Doppler velocimetry probes measure the implosion velocity of the free (inner) surface of the sample material and the explosion velocity of the anode free (outer) surface. These two velocities are used in conjunction with magnetohydrodynamic simulation and mathematical optimization to obtain the current driving the liner implosion, and to infer pressure and density in the sample through maximum compression. This new equation of state calibration technique is illustrated using a simulated experiment with a Cu sample. Monte Carlo uncertainty quantification of synthetic data establishes convergence criteria for experiments. Results are presented from experiments with Al/Ta, Al/Cu, and Al liners. Symmetric liner implosion with quasi-isentropic compression to peak pressure ∼1000 GPa is achieved in all cases. These experiments exhibit unexpectedly softer behavior above 200 GPa, which we conjecture is related to differences in the actual and modeled properties of aluminum.

  1. Ultrasound attenuation dependence on air compression or expansion processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakevicius, L.; Demcenko, A.; Mardosaite, R.

    2010-01-01

    In this work variation of ultrasonic attenuation coefficient is analyzed in terms of air compression or expansion processes. In closed spaces changing air volume, the ultrasound attenuation coefficient depends on thermodynamic processes which occur during the air volume change. Two limiting cases ar

  2. Permeability and compressibility of CNT/CNF grafted reinforcements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lomov, Stepan V.; Beyers, Lesley; Gorbatikh, Larissa; Verpoest, Ignaas; Koissin, Vitaly; Kotanjac, Zeljko; Karahan, Mehmet

    2010-01-01

    The paper studies compressibility and permeability of a CNT/CNF-grafted woven carbon reinforcement. It is shown that the pressure needed to achieve the target fibre volume fraction of the perform increases drastically when CNT/CNF are present in the preform. This can lower the achievable fibre volum

  3. Permeability and compressibility of CNT/CNF grafted reinforcements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lomov, Stepan V.; Beyers, Lesley; Gorbatikh, Larissa; Verpoest, Ignaas; Koysin, V.; Kotanjac, Zeljko; Karahan, Mehmet

    2010-01-01

    The paper studies compressibility and permeability of a CNT/CNF-grafted woven carbon reinforcement. It is shown that the pressure needed to achieve the target fibre volume fraction of the perform increases drastically when CNT/CNF are present in the preform. This can lower the achievable fibre volum

  4. PDF approach for compressible turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, A. T.; Tsai, Y.-L. P.; Raju, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to develop a probability density function (pdf) turbulence model for compressible reacting flows for use with a CFD flow solver. The probability density function of the species mass fraction and enthalpy are obtained by solving a pdf evolution equation using a Monte Carlo scheme. The pdf solution procedure is coupled with a compressible CFD flow solver which provides the velocity and pressure fields. A modeled pdf equation for compressible flows, capable of capturing shock waves and suitable to the present coupling scheme, is proposed and tested. Convergence of the combined finite-volume Monte Carlo solution procedure is discussed, and an averaging procedure is developed to provide smooth Monte-Carlo solutions to ensure convergence. Two supersonic diffusion flames are studied using the proposed pdf model and the results are compared with experimental data; marked improvements over CFD solutions without pdf are observed. Preliminary applications of pdf to 3D flows are also reported.

  5. 三维等熵欧拉方程组解的爆破%Blow Up of Isentropic Euler Equations in Three Dimensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱旭生; 艾利娜; 汤传扬

    2015-01-01

    The blow up of the initial value problems of classical solutions of the isentropic Euler equations with damping term in three dimensions was investigated .Under the condition of M(0) <0 , if the initial momentum of cer-tain functions is large enough , then it follows that the classical solution must blow up in a limited time .%研究了带阻尼项的三维等熵欧拉方程组初值问题经典解的爆破。在M(0)<0条件下,若初始动量的某些泛函足够大时,得到了其经典解在有限时间内必定发生爆破的结论。

  6. Vascular compression syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czihal, Michael; Banafsche, Ramin; Hoffmann, Ulrich; Koeppel, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Dealing with vascular compression syndromes is one of the most challenging tasks in Vascular Medicine practice. This heterogeneous group of disorders is characterised by external compression of primarily healthy arteries and/or veins as well as accompanying nerval structures, carrying the risk of subsequent structural vessel wall and nerve damage. Vascular compression syndromes may severely impair health-related quality of life in affected individuals who are typically young and otherwise healthy. The diagnostic approach has not been standardised for any of the vascular compression syndromes. Moreover, some degree of positional external compression of blood vessels such as the subclavian and popliteal vessels or the celiac trunk can be found in a significant proportion of healthy individuals. This implies important difficulties in differentiating physiological from pathological findings of clinical examination and diagnostic imaging with provocative manoeuvres. The level of evidence on which treatment decisions regarding surgical decompression with or without revascularisation can be relied on is generally poor, mostly coming from retrospective single centre studies. Proper patient selection is critical in order to avoid overtreatment in patients without a clear association between vascular compression and clinical symptoms. With a focus on the thoracic outlet-syndrome, the median arcuate ligament syndrome and the popliteal entrapment syndrome, the present article gives a selective literature review on compression syndromes from an interdisciplinary vascular point of view.

  7. Critical Data Compression

    CERN Document Server

    Scoville, John

    2011-01-01

    A new approach to data compression is developed and applied to multimedia content. This method separates messages into components suitable for both lossless coding and 'lossy' or statistical coding techniques, compressing complex objects by separately encoding signals and noise. This is demonstrated by compressing the most significant bits of data exactly, since they are typically redundant and compressible, and either fitting a maximally likely noise function to the residual bits or compressing them using lossy methods. Upon decompression, the significant bits are decoded and added to a noise function, whether sampled from a noise model or decompressed from a lossy code. This results in compressed data similar to the original. For many test images, a two-part image code using JPEG2000 for lossy coding and PAQ8l for lossless coding produces less mean-squared error than an equal length of JPEG2000. Computer-generated images typically compress better using this method than through direct lossy coding, as do man...

  8. Prediction by Compression

    CERN Document Server

    Ratsaby, Joel

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that text compression can be achieved by predicting the next symbol in the stream of text data based on the history seen up to the current symbol. The better the prediction the more skewed the conditional probability distribution of the next symbol and the shorter the codeword that needs to be assigned to represent this next symbol. What about the opposite direction ? suppose we have a black box that can compress text stream. Can it be used to predict the next symbol in the stream ? We introduce a criterion based on the length of the compressed data and use it to predict the next symbol. We examine empirically the prediction error rate and its dependency on some compression parameters.

  9. LZW Data Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dheemanth H N

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Lempel–Ziv–Welch (LZW is a universal lossless data compression algorithm created by Abraham Lempel, Jacob Ziv, and Terry Welch. LZW compression is one of the Adaptive Dictionary techniques. The dictionary is created while the data are being encoded. So encoding can be done on the fly. The dictionary need not be transmitted. Dictionary can be built up at receiving end on the fly. If the dictionary overflows then we have to reinitialize the dictionary and add a bit to each one of the code words. Choosing a large dictionary size avoids overflow, but spoils compressions. A codebook or dictionary containing the source symbols is constructed. For 8-bit monochrome images, the first 256 words of the dictionary are assigned to the gray levels 0-255. Remaining part of the dictionary is filled with sequences of the gray levels.LZW compression works best when applied on monochrome images and text files that contain repetitive text/patterns.

  10. Shocklets in compressible flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁湘江; 男俊武; 沈清; 李筠

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of shocklets is studied theoretically and numerically for the stationary fluid, uniform compressible flow, and boundary layer flow. The conditions that trigger shock waves for sound wave, weak discontinuity, and Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) wave in compressible flows are investigated. The relations between the three types of waves and shocklets are further analyzed and discussed. Different stages of the shocklet formation process are simulated. The results show that the three waves in compressible flows will transfer to shocklets only when the initial disturbance amplitudes are greater than the certain threshold values. In compressible boundary layers, the shocklets evolved from T-S wave exist only in a finite region near the surface instead of the whole wavefront.

  11. Reference Based Genome Compression

    CERN Document Server

    Chern, Bobbie; Manolakos, Alexandros; No, Albert; Venkat, Kartik; Weissman, Tsachy

    2012-01-01

    DNA sequencing technology has advanced to a point where storage is becoming the central bottleneck in the acquisition and mining of more data. Large amounts of data are vital for genomics research, and generic compression tools, while viable, cannot offer the same savings as approaches tuned to inherent biological properties. We propose an algorithm to compress a target genome given a known reference genome. The proposed algorithm first generates a mapping from the reference to the target genome, and then compresses this mapping with an entropy coder. As an illustration of the performance: applying our algorithm to James Watson's genome with hg18 as a reference, we are able to reduce the 2991 megabyte (MB) genome down to 6.99 MB, while Gzip compresses it to 834.8 MB.

  12. The New CCSDS Image Compression Recommendation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Pen-Shu; Armbruster, Philippe; Kiely, Aaron; Masschelein, Bart; Moury, Gilles; Schaefer, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) data compression working group has recently adopted a recommendation for image data compression, with a final release expected in 2005. The algorithm adopted in the recommendation consists of a two-dimensional discrete wavelet transform of the image, followed by progressive bit-plane coding of the transformed data. The algorithm can provide both lossless and lossy compression, and allows a user to directly control the compressed data volume or the fidelity with which the wavelet-transformed data can be reconstructed. The algorithm is suitable for both frame-based image data and scan-based sensor data, and has applications for near-Earth and deep-space missions. The standard will be accompanied by free software sources on a future web site. An Application-Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) implementation of the compressor is currently under development. This paper describes the compression algorithm along with the requirements that drove the selection of the algorithm. Performance results and comparisons with other compressors are given for a test set of space images.

  13. Deep Blind Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Shikha; Singhal, Vanika; Majumdar, Angshul

    2016-01-01

    This work addresses the problem of extracting deeply learned features directly from compressive measurements. There has been no work in this area. Existing deep learning tools only give good results when applied on the full signal, that too usually after preprocessing. These techniques require the signal to be reconstructed first. In this work we show that by learning directly from the compressed domain, considerably better results can be obtained. This work extends the recently proposed fram...

  14. Reference Based Genome Compression

    OpenAIRE

    Chern, Bobbie; Ochoa, Idoia; Manolakos, Alexandros; No, Albert; Venkat, Kartik; Weissman, Tsachy

    2012-01-01

    DNA sequencing technology has advanced to a point where storage is becoming the central bottleneck in the acquisition and mining of more data. Large amounts of data are vital for genomics research, and generic compression tools, while viable, cannot offer the same savings as approaches tuned to inherent biological properties. We propose an algorithm to compress a target genome given a known reference genome. The proposed algorithm first generates a mapping from the reference to the target gen...

  15. Alternative Compression Garments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, M. B.; Lee, S. M. C.; Ribeiro, L. C.; Brown, A. K.; Westby, C. M.; Platts, S. H.

    2011-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance after spaceflight is still an issue for astronauts as no in-flight countermeasure has been 100% effective. Future anti-gravity suits (AGS) may be similar to the Shuttle era inflatable AGS or may be a mechanical compression device like the Russian Kentavr. We have evaluated the above garments as well as elastic, gradient compression garments of varying magnitude and determined that breast-high elastic compression garments may be a suitable replacement to the current AGS. This new garment should be more comfortable than the AGS, easy to don and doff, and as effective a countermeasure to orthostatic intolerance. Furthermore, these new compression garments could be worn for several days after space flight as necessary if symptoms persisted. We conducted two studies to evaluate elastic, gradient compression garments. The purpose of these studies was to evaluate the comfort and efficacy of an alternative compression garment (ACG) immediately after actual space flight and 6 degree head-down tilt bed rest as a model of space flight, and to determine if they would impact recovery if worn for up to three days after bed rest.

  16. The impact of lossless image compression to radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Thomas M.; Abel, Jürgen; Weiss, Claudia

    2006-03-01

    The increasing number of digital imaging modalities results in data volumes of several Tera Bytes per year that must be transferred and archived in a common-sized hospital. Hence, data compression is an important issue for picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). The effect of lossy image compression is frequently analyzed with respect to images from a certain modality supporting a certain diagnosis. However, novel compression schemes have been developed recently allowing efficient but lossless compression. In this study, we compare the lossless compression schemes embedded in the tagged image file format (TIFF), graphics interchange format (GIF), and Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG 2000 II) with the Borrows-Wheeler compression algorithm (BWCA) with respect to image content and origin. Repeated measures ANOVA was based on 1.200 images in total. Statistically significant effects (p radiographs of the head, while the lowest factor of 1,05 (7.587 bpp) resulted from the TIFF packbits algorithm applied to pelvis images captured digitally. Over all, the BWCA is slightly but significantly more effective than JPEG 2000. Both compression schemes reduce the required bits per pixel (bpp) below 3. Also, secondarily digitized images are more compressible than the directly digital ones. Interestingly, JPEG outperforms BWCA for directly digital images regardless of image content, while BWCA performs better than JPEG on secondarily digitized radiographs. In conclusion, efficient lossless image compression schemes are available for PACS.

  17. Consistent finite-volume discretization of hydrodynamic conservation laws for unstructured grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, D.E.

    1994-10-17

    We consider the conservation properties of a staggered-grid Lagrange formulation of the hydrodynamics equations (SGH). Hydrodynamics algorithms are often formulated in a relatively ad hoc manner in which independent discretizations are proposed for mass, momentum, energy, and so forth. We show that, once discretizations for mass and momentum are stated, the remaining discretizations are very nearly uniquely determined, so there is very little latitude for variation. As has been known for some time, the kinetic energy discretization must follow directly from the momentum equation; and the internal energy must follow directly from the energy currents affecting the kinetic energy. A fundamental requirement (termed isentropicity) for numerical hydrodynamics algorithms is the ability to remain on an isentrope in the absence of heating or viscous forces and in the limit of small timesteps. We show that the requirements of energy conservation and isentropicity lead to the replacement of the usual volume calculation with a conservation integral. They further forbid the use of higher order functional representations for either velocity or stress within zones or control volumes, forcing the use of a constant stress element and a constant velocity control volume. This, in turn, causes the point and zone coordinates to formally disappear from the Cartesian formulation. The form of the work equations and the requirement for dissipation by viscous forces strongly limits the possible algebraic forms for artificial viscosity. The momentum equation and a center-of-mass definition lead directly to an angular momentum conservation law that is satisfied by the system. With a few straightforward substitutions, the Cartesian formulation can be converted to a multidimensional curvilinear one. The formulation in 2D symmetric geometry preserves rotational symmetry.

  18. Comparative compressibility of hydrous wadsleyite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y.; Jacobsen, S. D.; Thomas, S.; Bina, C. R.; Smyth, J. R.; Frost, D. J.; Hauri, E. H.; Meng, Y.; Dera, P. K.

    2010-12-01

    Determining the effects of hydration on the density and elastic properties of wadsleyite, β-Mg2SiO4, is critical to constraining Earth’s global geochemical water cycle. Whereas previous studies of the bulk modulus (KT) have studied either hydrous Mg-wadsleyite, or anhydrous Fe-bearing wadsleyite, the combined effects of hydration and iron are under investigation. Also, whereas KT from compressibility studies is relatively well constrained by equation of state fitting to P-V data, the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus (K’) is usually not well constrained either because of poor data resolution, uncertainty in pressure calibrations, or narrow pressure ranges of previous single-crystal studies. Here we report the comparative compressibility of dry versus hydrous wadsleyite with Fo90 composition containing 1.9(2) wt% H2O, nearly the maximum water storage capacity of this phase. The composition was characterized by EMPA and nanoSIMS. The experiments were carried out using high-pressure, single-crystal diffraction up to 30 GPa at HPCAT, Advanced Photon Source. By loading three crystals each of hydrous and anhydrous wadsleyite together in the same diamond-anvil cell, we achieve good hkl coverage and eliminate the pressure scale as a variable in comparing the relative value of K’ between the dry and hydrous samples. We used MgO as an internal diffraction standard, in addition to recording ruby fluorescence pressures. By using neon as a pressure medium and about 1 GPa pressure steps up to 30 GPa, we obtain high-quality diffraction data for constraining the effect of hydration on the density and K’ of hydrous wadsleyite. Due to hydration, the initial volume of hydrous Fo90 wadsleyite is larger than anhydrous Fo90 wadsleyite, however the higher compressibility of hydrous wadsleyite leads to a volume crossover at 6 GPa. Hydration to 2 wt% H2O reduces the bulk modulus of Fo90 wadsleyite from 170(2) to 157(2) GPa, or about 7.6% reduction. In contrast to previous

  19. Envera Variable Compression Ratio Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles Mendler

    2011-03-15

    Aggressive engine downsizing, variable compression ratio and use of the Atkinson cycle are being combined to improve fuel economy by up to 40 percent relative to port fuel injected gasoline engines, while maintaining full engine power. Approach Engine downsizing is viewed by US and foreign automobile manufacturers as one of the best options for improving fuel economy. While this strategy has already demonstrated a degree of success, downsizing and fuel economy gains are currently limited. With new variable compression ratio technology however, the degree of engine downsizing and fuel economy improvement can be greatly increased. A small variable compression ratio (VCR) engine has the potential to return significantly higher vehicle fuel economy while also providing high power. Affordability and potential for near term commercialization are key attributes of the Envera VCR engine. VCR Technology To meet torque and power requirements, a smaller engine needs to do more work per stroke. This is typically accomplished by boosting the incoming charge with either a turbo or supercharger so that more energy is present in the cylinder per stroke to do the work. With current production engines the degree of engine boosting (which correlates to downsizing) is limited by detonation (combustion knock) at high boost levels. Additionally, the turbo or supercharger needs to be responsive and efficient while providing the needed boost. VCR technology eliminates the limitation of engine knock at high load levels by reducing compression ratio to {approx}9:1 (or whatever level is appropriate) when high boost pressures are needed. By reducing the compression ratio during high load demand periods there is increased volume in the cylinder at top dead center (TDC) which allows more charge (or energy) to be present in the cylinder without increasing the peak pressure. Cylinder pressure is thus kept below the level at which the engine would begin to knock. When loads on the engine are low

  20. Compressed Data Transmission Among Nodes in BigData

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirunavukarasu B

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many organizations are now dealing with large amount of data. Traditionally they used relational data. But nowadays they are supposed to use structured and semi structured data. To work effectively these organizations uses virtualization, parallel processing in compression etc., out of which the compression is most effective one. The data transmission of high volume usually causes high transmission time. This compression of unstructured data is immediately done when the data is being transmitted from client to DataNode. Initially once unstructured or semi-structured data is ready for transmission, the data is compressed using some software tools or procedures. This compressed data is transmitted through certain medium that undertakes an effective transmission.

  1. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, S T Samuel; Buckley, C Paul; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon.

  2. Haemodynamic and respiratory effects of an abdominal compression binder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, M.H.; Bulow, J.; Simonsen, L.

    2008-01-01

    In order to elucidate the circulatory and respiratory effects of a newly developed abdominal compression binder 25 healthy, normal weight subjects were studied. In supine position the central haemodynamics were measured and estimated with a Finapress device. Lower extremity venous haemodynamics...... with or without the abdominal compression binder. The results show that the compression binder significantly increases the venous volume in the lower extremities as showed by a reduction in the venous capacitance in the lower extremities and a reduction in the stroke volume and cardiac output, while it does...... not influence the pulmonary volumes. It is concluded that the applied abdominal binder significantly affects peripheral and central haemodynamics. It should therefore be used with caution when in the supine position for longer periods, as the pooling of blood it induces in the lower extremities may have...

  3. Compressibility of carbon fabrics with needleless electrospun PAN nanofibrous interleaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Lomov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper investigates how the presence of nanofiber interleaves affects the compressibility of the layup during manufacturing of the composites and hence determining the theoretically attainable fiber volume fraction at the given processing pressure. The results show that up to the interleave areal density of 10 g/m2 per nanofiber layer the decrease of fiber volume fraction does not exceed 3% for a laminate of carbon fiber woven fabric. Interleaves inside a fabric laminate are more compressible than a plain electrospun veil. It can be explained as the nanofibers penetrate between the carbon fibers when applying compression during composite manufacturing. It can be stated that there is a strong interference between the interleaves and the carbon reinforcement, which can lead to effective toughness improvement of the composite without significant alteration of fiber volume content.

  4. Volumetric measurement of tank volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Richard T. (Inventor); Vanbuskirk, Paul D. (Inventor); Weber, William F. (Inventor); Froebel, Richard C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method is disclosed for determining the volume of compressible gas in a system including incompressible substances in a zero-gravity environment consisting of measuring the change in pressure (delta P) for a known volume change rate (delta V/delta t) in the polytrophic region between isothermal and adiabatic conditions. The measurements are utilized in an idealized formula for determining the change in isothermal pressure (delta P sub iso) for the gas. From the isothermal pressure change (delta iso) the gas volume is obtained. The method is also applicable to determination of gas volume by utilizing work (W) in the compression process. In a passive system, the relationship of specific densities can be obtained.

  5. SYMBOLIC VERSOR COMPRESSION ALGORITHM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Hongbo

    2009-01-01

    In an inner-product space, an invertible vector generates a reflection with re-spect to a hyperplane, and the Clifford product of several invertible vectors, called a versor in Clifford algebra, generates the composition of the corresponding reflections, which is an orthogonal transformation. Given a versor in a Clifford algebra, finding another sequence of invertible vectors of strictly shorter length but whose Clifford product still equals the input versor, is called versor compression. Geometrically, versor compression is equivalent to decomposing an orthogoual transformation into a shorter sequence of reflections. This paper proposes a simple algorithm of compressing versors of symbolic form in Clifford algebra. The algorithm is based on computing the intersections of lines with planes in the corresponding Grassmann-Cayley algebra, and is complete in the case of Euclidean or Minkowski inner-product space.

  6. Image compression for dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookson, John P.; Sneiderman, Charles; Colaianni, Joseph; Hood, Antoinette F.

    1990-07-01

    Color 35mm photographic slides are commonly used in dermatology for education, and patient records. An electronic storage and retrieval system for digitized slide images may offer some advantages such as preservation and random access. We have integrated a system based on a personal computer (PC) for digital imaging of 35mm slides that depict dermatologic conditions. Such systems require significant resources to accommodate the large image files involved. Methods to reduce storage requirements and access time through image compression are therefore of interest. This paper contains an evaluation of one such compression method that uses the Hadamard transform implemented on a PC-resident graphics processor. Image quality is assessed by determining the effect of compression on the performance of an image feature recognition task.

  7. Compressive Shift Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, Henrik; Eldar, Yonina C.; Yang, Allen Y.; Sastry, S. Shankar

    2014-08-01

    The classical shift retrieval problem considers two signals in vector form that are related by a shift. The problem is of great importance in many applications and is typically solved by maximizing the cross-correlation between the two signals. Inspired by compressive sensing, in this paper, we seek to estimate the shift directly from compressed signals. We show that under certain conditions, the shift can be recovered using fewer samples and less computation compared to the classical setup. Of particular interest is shift estimation from Fourier coefficients. We show that under rather mild conditions only one Fourier coefficient suffices to recover the true shift.

  8. Graph Compression by BFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Apostolico

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The Web Graph is a large-scale graph that does not fit in main memory, so that lossless compression methods have been proposed for it. This paper introduces a compression scheme that combines efficient storage with fast retrieval for the information in a node. The scheme exploits the properties of the Web Graph without assuming an ordering of the URLs, so that it may be applied to more general graphs. Tests on some datasets of use achieve space savings of about 10% over existing methods.

  9. Image compression in local helioseismology

    CERN Document Server

    Löptien, Björn; Gizon, Laurent; Schou, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Context. Several upcoming helioseismology space missions are very limited in telemetry and will have to perform extensive data compression. This requires the development of new methods of data compression. Aims. We give an overview of the influence of lossy data compression on local helioseismology. We investigate the effects of several lossy compression methods (quantization, JPEG compression, and smoothing and subsampling) on power spectra and time-distance measurements of supergranulation flows at disk center. Methods. We applied different compression methods to tracked and remapped Dopplergrams obtained by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We determined the signal-to-noise ratio of the travel times computed from the compressed data as a function of the compression efficiency. Results. The basic helioseismic measurements that we consider are very robust to lossy data compression. Even if only the sign of the velocity is used, time-distance helioseismology is still...

  10. Graduated compression stockings in the prevention of deep vein thrombosis in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierkegaard, A; Norgren, L

    1993-10-01

    Venous volume (venous capacity) of the calf is low in patients with acute myocardial infarction, who also have a high risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). The effect of graduated compression stockings on the venous volume and on the incidence of DVT was therefore studied in 80 patients aged 70 years and above with acute myocardial infarction. Graduated compression stockings were randomly fitted to one leg, the other serving as a control, after which the venous volume was measured by strain gauge plethysmography. The incidence of DVT was measured by the 125I fibrinogen uptake test. Venous volume was significantly higher in legs treated with graduated compression stockings compared to control legs. DVT developed in eight control legs but not in any leg treated with graduated compression stockings (P = 0.003). DVT was also significantly more frequent in women compared to men and the majority of DVT developed in legs with very low venous volume values.

  11. CWICOM: A Highly Integrated & Innovative CCSDS Image Compression ASIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poupat, Jean-Luc; Vitulli, Raffaele

    2013-08-01

    The space market is more and more demanding in terms of on image compression performances. The earth observation satellites instrument resolution, the agility and the swath are continuously increasing. It multiplies by 10 the volume of picture acquired on one orbit. In parallel, the satellites size and mass are decreasing, requiring innovative electronic technologies reducing size, mass and power consumption. Astrium, leader on the market of the combined solutions for compression and memory for space application, has developed a new image compression ASIC which is presented in this paper. CWICOM is a high performance and innovative image compression ASIC developed by Astrium in the frame of the ESA contract n°22011/08/NLL/LvH. The objective of this ESA contract is to develop a radiation hardened ASIC that implements the CCSDS 122.0-B-1 Standard for Image Data Compression, that has a SpaceWire interface for configuring and controlling the device, and that is compatible with Sentinel-2 interface and with similar Earth Observation missions. CWICOM stands for CCSDS Wavelet Image COMpression ASIC. It is a large dynamic, large image and very high speed image compression ASIC potentially relevant for compression of any 2D image with bi-dimensional data correlation such as Earth observation, scientific data compression… The paper presents some of the main aspects of the CWICOM development, such as the algorithm and specification, the innovative memory organization, the validation approach and the status of the project.

  12. Lossless Compression of Classification-Map Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xie; Klimesh, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    A lossless image-data-compression algorithm intended specifically for application to classification-map data is based on prediction, context modeling, and entropy coding. The algorithm was formulated, in consideration of the differences between classification maps and ordinary images of natural scenes, so as to be capable of compressing classification- map data more effectively than do general-purpose image-data-compression algorithms. Classification maps are typically generated from remote-sensing images acquired by instruments aboard aircraft (see figure) and spacecraft. A classification map is a synthetic image that summarizes information derived from one or more original remote-sensing image(s) of a scene. The value assigned to each pixel in such a map is the index of a class that represents some type of content deduced from the original image data for example, a type of vegetation, a mineral, or a body of water at the corresponding location in the scene. When classification maps are generated onboard the aircraft or spacecraft, it is desirable to compress the classification-map data in order to reduce the volume of data that must be transmitted to a ground station.

  13. Osmotic compressibility of soft colloidal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Beng H; Tam, Kam C; Lam, Yee C; Tan, Chee B

    2005-05-10

    A turbidimetric analysis of particle interaction of model pH-responsive microgel systems consisting of methacrylic acid-ethyl acrylate cross-linked with diallyl phthalate in colloidal suspensions is described. The structure factor at zero scattering angle, S(0), can be determined with good precision for wavelengths greater than 500 nm, and it measures the dispersion's resistance to particle compression. The structure factor of microgels at various cross-linked densities and ionic strengths falls onto a master curve when plotted against the effective volume fraction, phi(eff) = kc, which clearly suggests that particle interaction potential and osmotic compressibility is a function of effective volume fraction. In addition, the deviation of the structure factor, S(0), of our microgel systems with the structure factor of hard spheres, S(PY)(0), exhibits a maximum at phi(eff) approximately 0.2. Beyond this point the osmotic de-swelling force exceeds the osmotic pressure inside the soft particles resulting in particle shrinkage. Good agreement was obtained when the structural properties of our microgel systems obtained from turbidimetric analysis and rheology measurements were compared. Therefore, a simple turbidimetric analysis of these model pH-responsive microgel systems permits a quantitative evaluation of factors governing particle osmotic compressibility.

  14. Fingerprints in Compressed Strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Cording, Patrick Hagge; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2013-01-01

    The Karp-Rabin fingerprint of a string is a type of hash value that due to its strong properties has been used in many string algorithms. In this paper we show how to construct a data structure for a string S of size N compressed by a context-free grammar of size n that answers fingerprint queries...

  15. Multiple snapshot compressive beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerstoft, Peter; Xenaki, Angeliki; Mecklenbrauker, Christoph F.

    2015-01-01

    For sound fields observed on an array, compressive sensing (CS) reconstructs the multiple source signals at unknown directions-of-arrival (DOAs) using a sparsity constraint. The DOA estimation is posed as an underdetermined problem expressing the field at each sensor as a phase-lagged superposition...

  16. Compressive CFAR radar detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Rossum, W.L. van; Maleki, A.; Baraniuk, R.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we develop the first Compressive Sensing (CS) adaptive radar detector. We propose three novel architectures and demonstrate how a classical Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) detector can be combined with ℓ1-norm minimization. Using asymptotic arguments and the Complex Approximate Messag

  17. Compressive CFAR Radar Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Rossum, W.L. van; Otten, M.P.G.; Maleki, A.; Baraniuk, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of a combined Compressive Sensing (CS) Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) radar processor under different interference scenarios using both the Cell Averaging (CA) and Order Statistic (OS) CFAR detectors. Using the properties of the Complex Approximate Mess

  18. Beamforming Using Compressive Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    dB to align the peak at 7.3o. Comparing peaks to val- leys , compressive sensing provides a greater main to interference (and noise) ratio...elements. Acknowledgments This research was supported by the Office of Naval Research. The authors would like to especially thank of Roger Gauss and Joseph

  19. A compression bandage improves local infiltration analgesia in total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lasse; Husted, Henrik; Otte, Niels Kristian Stahl Kri;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High-volume local infiltration analgesia has been shown to be an effective pain treatment after knee replacement, but the role of bandaging to prolong analgesia has not been evaluated. METHODS: 48 patients undergoing fast-track total knee replacement with high-volume (170 mL) 0...... with compression bandage than in those with non-compression bandage and with a similar low use of oxycodone. Mean hospital stay was similar (2.8 days and 3.3 days, respectively). INTERPRETATION: A compression bandage is recommended to improve analgesia after high-volume local infiltration analgesia in total knee...... arthroplasty Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12...

  20. Survey of data compression techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryder, R.; Hake, K.

    1991-09-01

    PM-AIM must provide to customers in a timely fashion information about Army acquisitions. This paper discusses ways that PM-AIM can reduce the volume of data that must be transmitted between sites. Although this paper primarily discusses techniques of data compression, it also briefly discusses other options for meeting the PM-AIM requirements. The options available to PM-AIM, in addition to hardware and software data compression, include less-frequent updates, distribution of partial updates, distributed data base design, and intelligent network design. Any option that enhances the performance of the PM-AIM network is worthy of consideration. The recommendations of this paper apply to the PM-AIM project in three phases: the current phase, the target phase, and the objective phase. Each recommendation will be identified as (1) appropriate for the current phase, (2) considered for implementation during the target phase, or (3) a feature that should be part of the objective phase of PM-AIM's design. The current phase includes only those measures that can be taken with the installed leased lines. The target phase includes those measures that can be taken in transferring the traffic from the leased lines to the DSNET environment with minimal changes in the current design. The objective phase includes all the things that should be done as a matter of course. The objective phase for PM-AIM appears to be a distributed data base with data for each site stored locally and all sites having access to all data.

  1. Survey of data compression techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryder, R.; Hake, K.

    1991-09-01

    PM-AIM must provide to customers in a timely fashion information about Army acquisitions. This paper discusses ways that PM-AIM can reduce the volume of data that must be transmitted between sites. Although this paper primarily discusses techniques of data compression, it also briefly discusses other options for meeting the PM-AIM requirements. The options available to PM-AIM, in addition to hardware and software data compression, include less-frequent updates, distribution of partial updates, distributed data base design, and intelligent network design. Any option that enhances the performance of the PM-AIM network is worthy of consideration. The recommendations of this paper apply to the PM-AIM project in three phases: the current phase, the target phase, and the objective phase. Each recommendation will be identified as (1) appropriate for the current phase, (2) considered for implementation during the target phase, or (3) a feature that should be part of the objective phase of PM-AIM`s design. The current phase includes only those measures that can be taken with the installed leased lines. The target phase includes those measures that can be taken in transferring the traffic from the leased lines to the DSNET environment with minimal changes in the current design. The objective phase includes all the things that should be done as a matter of course. The objective phase for PM-AIM appears to be a distributed data base with data for each site stored locally and all sites having access to all data.

  2. Existence and uniqueness of weak solutions of the compressible spherically symmetric Navier-Stokes equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiangdi

    2017-02-01

    One of the most influential fundamental tools in harmonic analysis is the Riesz transforms. It maps Lp functions to Lp functions for any p ∈ (1 , ∞) which plays an important role in singular operators. As an application in fluid dynamics, the norm equivalence between ‖∇u‖Lp and ‖ div u ‖ Lp +‖ curl u ‖ Lp is well established for p ∈ (1 , ∞). However, since Riesz operators sent bounded functions only to BMO functions, there is no hope to bound ‖∇u‖L∞ in terms of ‖ div u ‖ L∞ +‖ curl u ‖ L∞. As pointed out by Hoff (2006) [11], this is the main obstacle to obtain uniqueness of weak solutions for isentropic compressible flows. Fortunately, based on new observations, see Lemma 2.2, we derive an exact estimate for ‖∇u‖L∞ ≤ (2 + 1 / N)‖ div u ‖ L∞ for any N-dimensional radially symmetric vector functions u. As a direct application, we give an affirmative answer to the open problem of uniqueness of some weak solutions to the compressible spherically symmetric flows in a bounded ball.

  3. Combined vapor compression/absorption heat pump cycles for engine-driven heat pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radermacher, Reinhard; Herold, Keith E.; Howe, Lawrence A.

    1988-12-01

    The performance of three combined absorption/vapor compression cycles for gas-fired internal combustion engine driven heat pumps was theoretically assessed. Two cycles were selected for the preliminary design of breadboard systems using only off-the-shelf components. The first cycle, based on the working pair ammonia/water, is termed the simple-cycle. The second cycle, based on the working pair lithium-bromide/water, is termed the compressor enhanced double-effect chiller. Both cycles are found to be technically feasible. The coefficient of performance and the capacity are increased by up to 21 percent for cooling in the first case (compressor efficiency of 0.7) and by up to 14 percent in the second (compressor efficiency of 0.5). Both were compared against the engine drive R22 vapor compression heat pump. The performance of actual machinery for both cycles is, in the current design, hampered by the fact that the desired oil-free compressors have poor isentropic efficiencies. Oil lubricated compressors together with very effective oil separators would improve the performance of the combined LiBr/water cycle to 23 percent.

  4. EVALUATION OF REGISTRATION, COMPRESSION AND CLASSIFICATION ALGORITHMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayroe, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    Several types of algorithms are generally used to process digital imagery such as Landsat data. The most commonly used algorithms perform the task of registration, compression, and classification. Because there are different techniques available for performing registration, compression, and classification, imagery data users need a rationale for selecting a particular approach to meet their particular needs. This collection of registration, compression, and classification algorithms was developed so that different approaches could be evaluated and the best approach for a particular application determined. Routines are included for six registration algorithms, six compression algorithms, and two classification algorithms. The package also includes routines for evaluating the effects of processing on the image data. This collection of routines should be useful to anyone using or developing image processing software. Registration of image data involves the geometrical alteration of the imagery. Registration routines available in the evaluation package include image magnification, mapping functions, partitioning, map overlay, and data interpolation. The compression of image data involves reducing the volume of data needed for a given image. Compression routines available in the package include adaptive differential pulse code modulation, two-dimensional transforms, clustering, vector reduction, and picture segmentation. Classification of image data involves analyzing the uncompressed or compressed image data to produce inventories and maps of areas of similar spectral properties within a scene. The classification routines available include a sequential linear technique and a maximum likelihood technique. The choice of the appropriate evaluation criteria is quite important in evaluating the image processing functions. The user is therefore given a choice of evaluation criteria with which to investigate the available image processing functions. All of the available

  5. Randomness Testing of Compressed Data

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Weiling; Yun, Xiaochun; Wang, Shupeng; Yu, Xiangzhan

    2010-01-01

    Random Number Generators play a critical role in a number of important applications. In practice, statistical testing is employed to gather evidence that a generator indeed produces numbers that appear to be random. In this paper, we reports on the studies that were conducted on the compressed data using 8 compression algorithms or compressors. The test results suggest that the output of compression algorithms or compressors has bad randomness, the compression algorithms or compressors are not suitable as random number generator. We also found that, for the same compression algorithm, there exists positive correlation relationship between compression ratio and randomness, increasing the compression ratio increases randomness of compressed data. As time permits, additional randomness testing efforts will be conducted.

  6. TEM Video Compressive Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Andrew J.; Kovarik, Libor; Abellan, Patricia; Yuan, Xin; Carin, Lawrence; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-08-02

    One of the main limitations of imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution during in-situ TEM experiments is the frame rate of the camera being used to image the dynamic process. While the recent development of direct detectors has provided the hardware to achieve frame rates approaching 0.1ms, the cameras are expensive and must replace existing detectors. In this paper, we examine the use of coded aperture compressive sensing methods [1, 2, 3, 4] to increase the framerate of any camera with simple, low-cost hardware modifications. The coded aperture approach allows multiple sub-frames to be coded and integrated into a single camera frame during the acquisition process, and then extracted upon readout using statistical compressive sensing inversion. Our simulations show that it should be possible to increase the speed of any camera by at least an order of magnitude. Compressive Sensing (CS) combines sensing and compression in one operation, and thus provides an approach that could further improve the temporal resolution while correspondingly reducing the electron dose rate. Because the signal is measured in a compressive manner, fewer total measurements are required. When applied to TEM video capture, compressive imaging couled improve acquisition speed and reduce the electron dose rate. CS is a recent concept, and has come to the forefront due the seminal work of Candès [5]. Since the publication of Candès, there has been enormous growth in the application of CS and development of CS variants. For electron microscopy applications, the concept of CS has also been recently applied to electron tomography [6], and reduction of electron dose in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging [7]. To demonstrate the applicability of coded aperture CS video reconstruction for atomic level imaging, we simulate compressive sensing on observations of Pd nanoparticles and Ag nanoparticles during exposure to high temperatures and other environmental

  7. Asymptotic stability of steady compressible fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Padula, Mariarosaria

    2011-01-01

    This volume introduces a systematic approach to the solution of some mathematical problems that arise in the study of the hyperbolic-parabolic systems of equations that govern the motions of thermodynamic fluids. It is intended for a wide audience of theoretical and applied mathematicians with an interest in compressible flow, capillarity theory, and control theory. The focus is particularly on recent results concerning nonlinear asymptotic stability, which are independent of assumptions about the smallness of the initial data. Of particular interest is the loss of control that sometimes results when steady flows of compressible fluids are upset by large disturbances. The main ideas are illustrated in the context of three different physical problems: (i) A barotropic viscous gas in a fixed domain with compact boundary. The domain may be either an exterior domain or a bounded domain, and the boundary may be either impermeable or porous. (ii) An isothermal viscous gas in a domain with free boundaries. (iii) A h...

  8. Data Compression of Hydrocarbon Reservoir Simulation Grids

    KAUST Repository

    Chavez, Gustavo Ivan

    2015-05-28

    A dense volumetric grid coming from an oil/gas reservoir simulation output is translated into a compact representation that supports desired features such as interactive visualization, geometric continuity, color mapping and quad representation. A set of four control curves per layer results from processing the grid data, and a complete set of these 3-dimensional surfaces represents the complete volume data and can map reservoir properties of interest to analysts. The processing results yield a representation of reservoir simulation results which has reduced data storage requirements and permits quick performance interaction between reservoir analysts and the simulation data. The degree of reservoir grid compression can be selected according to the quality required, by adjusting for different thresholds, such as approximation error and level of detail. The processions results are of potential benefit in applications such as interactive rendering, data compression, and in-situ visualization of large-scale oil/gas reservoir simulations.

  9. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.;

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...

  10. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees [3]. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...

  11. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...

  12. Reinterpreting Compression in Infinitary Rewriting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketema, J.; Tiwari, Ashish

    2012-01-01

    Departing from a computational interpretation of compression in infinitary rewriting, we view compression as a degenerate case of standardisation. The change in perspective comes about via two observations: (a) no compression property can be recovered for non-left-linear systems and (b) some standar

  13. Lossless Compression of Broadcast Video

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Bo; Eriksen, N.; Faber, E.

    1998-01-01

    We investigate several techniques for lossless and near-lossless compression of broadcast video.The emphasis is placed on the emerging international standard for compression of continous-tone still images, JPEG-LS, due to its excellent compression performance and moderatecomplexity. Except for one...

  14. Building indifferentiable compression functions from the PGV compression functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gauravaram, P.; Bagheri, Nasour; Knudsen, Lars Ramkilde

    2016-01-01

    Preneel, Govaerts and Vandewalle (PGV) analysed the security of single-block-length block cipher based compression functions assuming that the underlying block cipher has no weaknesses. They showed that 12 out of 64 possible compression functions are collision and (second) preimage resistant. Black...... cipher is ideal. We address the problem of building indifferentiable compression functions from the PGV compression functions. We consider a general form of 64 PGV compression functions and replace the linear feed-forward operation in this generic PGV compression function with an ideal block cipher...... independent of the one used in the generic PGV construction. This modified construction is called a generic modified PGV (MPGV). We analyse indifferentiability of the generic MPGV construction in the ideal cipher model and show that 12 out of 64 MPGV compression functions in this framework...

  15. Time-resolved temperature measurements in a rapid compression machine using quantum cascade laser absorption in the intrapulse mode

    KAUST Repository

    Nasir, Ehson Fawad

    2016-07-16

    A temperature sensor based on the intrapulse absorption spectroscopy technique has been developed to measure in situ temperature time-histories in a rapid compression machine (RCM). Two quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) emitting near 4.55μm and 4.89μm were operated in pulsed mode, causing a frequency "down-chirp" across two ro-vibrational transitions of carbon monoxide. The down-chirp phenomenon resulted in large spectral tuning (δν ∼2.8cm-1) within a single pulse of each laser at a high pulse repetition frequency (100kHz). The wide tuning range allowed the application of the two-line thermometry technique, thus making the sensor quantitative and calibration-free. The sensor was first tested in non-reactive CO-N2 gas mixtures in the RCM and then applied to cases of n-pentane oxidation. Experiments were carried out for end of compression (EOC) pressures and temperatures ranging 9.21-15.32bar and 745-827K, respectively. Measured EOC temperatures agreed with isentropic calculations within 5%. Temperature rise measured during the first-stage ignition of n-pentane is over-predicted by zero-dimensional kinetic simulations. This work presents, for the first time, highly time-resolved temperature measurements in reactive and non-reactive rapid compression machine experiments. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Compressive Principal Component Pursuit

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, John; Min, Kerui; Ma, Yi

    2012-01-01

    We consider the problem of recovering a target matrix that is a superposition of low-rank and sparse components, from a small set of linear measurements. This problem arises in compressed sensing of structured high-dimensional signals such as videos and hyperspectral images, as well as in the analysis of transformation invariant low-rank recovery. We analyze the performance of the natural convex heuristic for solving this problem, under the assumption that measurements are chosen uniformly at random. We prove that this heuristic exactly recovers low-rank and sparse terms, provided the number of observations exceeds the number of intrinsic degrees of freedom of the component signals by a polylogarithmic factor. Our analysis introduces several ideas that may be of independent interest for the more general problem of compressed sensing and decomposing superpositions of multiple structured signals.

  17. On Network Functional Compression

    CERN Document Server

    Feizi, Soheil

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we consider different aspects of the network functional compression problem where computation of a function (or, some functions) of sources located at certain nodes in a network is desired at receiver(s). The rate region of this problem has been considered in the literature under certain restrictive assumptions, particularly in terms of the network topology, the functions and the characteristics of the sources. In this paper, we present results that significantly relax these assumptions. Firstly, we consider this problem for an arbitrary tree network and asymptotically lossless computation. We show that, for depth one trees with correlated sources, or for general trees with independent sources, a modularized coding scheme based on graph colorings and Slepian-Wolf compression performs arbitrarily closely to rate lower bounds. For a general tree network with independent sources, optimal computation to be performed at intermediate nodes is derived. We introduce a necessary and sufficient condition...

  18. Hamming Compressed Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Tianyi

    2011-01-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) and 1-bit CS cannot directly recover quantized signals and require time consuming recovery. In this paper, we introduce \\textit{Hamming compressed sensing} (HCS) that directly recovers a k-bit quantized signal of dimensional $n$ from its 1-bit measurements via invoking $n$ times of Kullback-Leibler divergence based nearest neighbor search. Compared with CS and 1-bit CS, HCS allows the signal to be dense, takes considerably less (linear) recovery time and requires substantially less measurements ($\\mathcal O(\\log n)$). Moreover, HCS recovery can accelerate the subsequent 1-bit CS dequantizer. We study a quantized recovery error bound of HCS for general signals and "HCS+dequantizer" recovery error bound for sparse signals. Extensive numerical simulations verify the appealing accuracy, robustness, efficiency and consistency of HCS.

  19. Compressive Spectral Renormalization Method

    CERN Document Server

    Bayindir, Cihan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a novel numerical scheme for finding the sparse self-localized states of a nonlinear system of equations with missing spectral data is introduced. As in the Petviashivili's and the spectral renormalization method, the governing equation is transformed into Fourier domain, but the iterations are performed for far fewer number of spectral components (M) than classical versions of the these methods with higher number of spectral components (N). After the converge criteria is achieved for M components, N component signal is reconstructed from M components by using the l1 minimization technique of the compressive sampling. This method can be named as compressive spectral renormalization (CSRM) method. The main advantage of the CSRM is that, it is capable of finding the sparse self-localized states of the evolution equation(s) with many spectral data missing.

  20. Speech Compression and Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    phonological rules combined with diphone improved the algorithms used by the phonetic synthesis prog?Im for gain normalization and time... phonetic vocoder, spectral template. i0^Th^TreprtTörc"u’d1sTuV^ork for the past two years on speech compression’and synthesis. Since there was an...from Block 19: speech recognition, pnoneme recogmtion. initial design for a phonetic recognition program. We also recorded ana partially labeled a

  1. Shock compression of nitrobenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozu, Naoshi; Arai, Mitsuru; Tamura, Masamitsu; Fujihisa, Hiroshi; Aoki, Katsutoshi; Yoshida, Masatake; Kondo, Ken-Ichi

    1999-06-01

    The Hugoniot (4 - 30 GPa) and the isotherm (1 - 7 GPa) of nitrobenzene have been investigated by shock and static compression experiments. Nitrobenzene has the most basic structure of nitro aromatic compounds, which are widely used as energetic materials, but nitrobenzene has been considered not to explode in spite of the fact its calculated heat of detonation is similar to TNT, about 1 kcal/g. Explosive plane-wave generators and diamond anvil cell were used for shock and static compression, respectively. The obtained Hugoniot consists of two linear lines, and the kink exists around 10 GPa. The upper line agrees well with the Hugoniot of detonation products calculated by KHT code, so it is expected that nitrobenzene detonates in that area. Nitrobenzene solidifies under 1 GPa of static compression, and the isotherm of solid nitrobenzene was obtained by X-ray diffraction technique. Comparing the Hugoniot and the isotherm, nitrobenzene is in liquid phase under experimented shock condition. From the expected phase diagram, shocked nitrobenzene seems to remain metastable liquid in solid phase region on that diagram.

  2. Compressed sensing electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leary, Rowan, E-mail: rkl26@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Saghi, Zineb; Midgley, Paul A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Holland, Daniel J. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, New Museums Site, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-15

    The recent mathematical concept of compressed sensing (CS) asserts that a small number of well-chosen measurements can suffice to reconstruct signals that are amenable to sparse or compressible representation. In addition to powerful theoretical results, the principles of CS are being exploited increasingly across a range of experiments to yield substantial performance gains relative to conventional approaches. In this work we describe the application of CS to electron tomography (ET) reconstruction and demonstrate the efficacy of CS–ET with several example studies. Artefacts present in conventional ET reconstructions such as streaking, blurring of object boundaries and elongation are markedly reduced, and robust reconstruction is shown to be possible from far fewer projections than are normally used. The CS–ET approach enables more reliable quantitative analysis of the reconstructions as well as novel 3D studies from extremely limited data. - Highlights: • Compressed sensing (CS) theory and its application to electron tomography (ET) is described. • The practical implementation of CS–ET is outlined and its efficacy demonstrated with examples. • High fidelity tomographic reconstruction is possible from a small number of images. • The CS–ET reconstructions can be more reliably segmented and analysed quantitatively. • CS–ET is applicable to different image content by choice of an appropriate sparsifying transform.

  3. Determination of micelle formation of ketorolac tromethamine in aqueous media by acoustic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savaroglu, Gokhan, E-mail: gsavarog@ogu.edu.tr [Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Department of Physics, 26480 Eskisehir (Turkey); Genc, Luetfi [Anadolu University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, 26470 Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2013-01-20

    Graphical abstract: Value of critical micelle concentration (CMC) were detected by speed of sound and determined by an analytical method based on the Phillips definition of the CMC. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The aim of this study was to investigate the aggregation behaviour of KT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Influence of KT concentration and temperature upon volumetric properties was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CMC of KT aqueous solution was determined by using speeds of sound measurements. - Abstract: Density and speed of sound of ketorolac tromethamine in aqueous solutions have been measured as a function of concentration at atmospheric pressure and in the temperature range from 293.15 to 313.15 K. Apparent molar volumes, apparent isentropic compressibility and isentropic compressibility values have also been calculated from the experimental density and speed of sound data. Partial molar volume and partial molar isentropic compressibility are obtained from fitting procedures the data on apparent molar volume, V{sub {phi}}, and apparent isentropic compressibility, K{sub {phi}(S)}. Partial molar volume, V{sub {phi}}{sup 0}, and partial molar isentropic compressibility, k{sub {phi}(S)}{sup 0}, are informative thermodynamic characteristics that reflect solute hydration. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) was determined from speed of sound data by an analytical method based on the Phillips definition of the CMC. Using these results, it was possible to establish the solvent-drug interactions.

  4. Ultraspectral sounder data compression review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bormin HUANG; Hunglung HUANG

    2008-01-01

    Ultraspectral sounders provide an enormous amount of measurements to advance our knowledge of weather and climate applications. The use of robust data compression techniques will be beneficial for ultraspectral data transfer and archiving. This paper reviews the progress in lossless compression of ultra-spectral sounder data. Various transform-based, pre-diction-based, and clustering-based compression methods are covered. Also studied is a preprocessing scheme for data reordering to improve compression gains. All the coding experiments are performed on the ultraspectral compression benchmark dataset col-lected from the NASA Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) observations.

  5. Engineering Relative Compression of Genomes

    CERN Document Server

    Grabowski, Szymon

    2011-01-01

    Technology progress in DNA sequencing boosts the genomic database growth at faster and faster rate. Compression, accompanied with random access capabilities, is the key to maintain those huge amounts of data. In this paper we present an LZ77-style compression scheme for relative compression of multiple genomes of the same species. While the solution bears similarity to known algorithms, it offers significantly higher compression ratios at compression speed over a order of magnitude greater. One of the new successful ideas is augmenting the reference sequence with phrases from the other sequences, making more LZ-matches available.

  6. Joint Compression-Segmentation of functional MRI Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, N.; Wu, Mo; Forchhammer, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) data sets are four dimensional (4D) and very large in size. Compression can enhance system performance in terms of storage and transmission capacities. Two approaches are investigated: adaptive DPCM and integer wavelets. In the DPCM approach, each voxel...... information. Each voxel time sequence is DPCM coded using a quantized autoregressive model. The prediction residuals are coded by simple Rice coding for high decoder throughput. In the wavelet approach, the 4D fMRI data set is mapped to a 3D data set, with the 3D volume at each time instance being laid out...... into a 2D plane as a slice mosaic. 3D integer wavelet packets are used for lossless compression of fMRI data. The wavelet coefficients are compressed by 3D context-based adaptive arithmetic coding. An object-oriented compression mode is also introduced in the wavelet codec. An elliptic mask combined...

  7. Lossless Compression of Medical Images Using 3D Predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Luis; Rodrigues, Nuno; Cruz, Luis; Faria, Sergio

    2017-06-09

    This paper describes a highly efficient method for lossless compression of volumetric sets of medical images, such as CTs or MRIs. The proposed method, referred to as 3D-MRP, is based on the principle of minimum rate predictors (MRP), which is one of the state-of-the-art lossless compression technologies, presented in the data compression literature. The main features of the proposed method include the use of 3D predictors, 3D-block octree partitioning and classification, volume-based optimisation and support for 16 bit-depth images. Experimental results demonstrate the efficiency of the 3D-MRP algorithm for the compression of volumetric sets of medical images, achieving gains above 15% and 12% for 8 bit and 16 bit-depth contents, respectively, when compared to JPEG-LS, JPEG2000, CALIC, HEVC, as well as other proposals based on MRP algorithm.

  8. Compressive optical image watermarking using joint Fresnel transform correlator architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhong, Ting; Dai, Xiaofang; Yang, Chanxia; Li, Rong; Tang, Zhilie

    2017-02-01

    A new optical image watermarking technique based on compressive sensing using joint Fresnel transform correlator architecture has been presented. A secret scene or image is first embedded into a host image to perform optical image watermarking by use of joint Fresnel transform correlator architecture. Then, the watermarked image is compressed to much smaller signal data using single-pixel compressive holographic imaging in optical domain. At the received terminal, the watermarked image is reconstructed well via compressive sensing theory and a specified holographic reconstruction algorithm. The preliminary numerical simulations show that it is effective and suitable for optical image security transmission in the coming absolutely optical network for the reason of the completely optical implementation and largely decreased holograms data volume.

  9. Effect Of Compression Ratio On The Performance Of Diesel Engine At Different Loads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Reddy G

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Variable compression ratio (VCR technology has long been recognized as a method for improving the automobile engine performance, efficiency, fuel economy with reduced emission. The main feature of the VCR engine is to operate at different compression ratio, by changing the combustion chamber volume, depending on the vehicle performance needs .The need to improve the performance characteristics of the IC Engine has necessitated the present research. Increasing the compression ratio to improve on the performance is an option. The compression ratio is a factor that influences the performance characteristics of internal combustion engines. This work is an experimental investigation of the influence of the compression ratio on the brake power, brake thermal efficiency, brake mean effective pressure and specific fuel consumption of the Kirloskar variable compression ratio duel fuel engine. Compression Ratios of 14, 15, 16 and 18 and engine loads of 3kg to 12 kg, in increments of 3kg, were utilized for Diesel.

  10. Low-cost still-picture compression chip set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Abbas; Shenberg, Isaac; Retter, Rafi; Friedlander, Rami; Jaliff, Ari; Frenkel, Miri; Nakagawa, Chihiro; Yamada, Hidetoshi

    1992-04-01

    Image compression is used to handle large volume of digitized image data in order to minimize the time and cost required to store and transfer the digitized data. Image compression is one of the key components in emerging applications such as digital still video cameras, multimedia, color printers, video fax machines, and desktop publishing. This paper will describe the Zoran 031 image compression chip set. The chip set is comprised of the ZR36020 Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) Processor and the ZR36031 Image Compression Coder/Decoder that work together to perform image compression and expansion. The chip set employs an algorithm for high quality compression of continuous-tone color or monochrome images, similar to the algorithm specified in the Joint Photographic Expert Group standard. The 031 chip set is targeted at cost-sensitive business and consumer applications such as digital still video cameras, color printers, color fax machines, and scanners. The architecture and the coding/decoding algorithm of the chip set as well as the add-in image compression PC board in which it is utilized will be discussed.

  11. A materials test system for static compression at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korellis, J.S.; Steinhaus, C.A.; Totten, J.J.

    1992-06-01

    This report documents modifications to our existing computer-controlled compression testing system to allow elevated temperature testing in an evacuated environment. We have adopted an ``inverse`` design configuration where the evacuated test volume is located within the induction heating coil, eliminating the expense and minimizing the evacuation time of a much larger traditional vacuum chamber. 2 refs.

  12. A materials test system for static compression at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korellis, J.S.; Steinhaus, C.A.; Totten, J.J.

    1992-06-01

    This report documents modifications to our existing computer-controlled compression testing system to allow elevated temperature testing in an evacuated environment. We have adopted an inverse'' design configuration where the evacuated test volume is located within the induction heating coil, eliminating the expense and minimizing the evacuation time of a much larger traditional vacuum chamber. 2 refs.

  13. Permeability and compressibility of CNT/CNF grafted reinforcements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lomov, Stepan V.; Beyers, Lesley; Gorbatikh, Larissa; Verpoest, Ignaas; Koysin, V.; Kotanjac, Zeljko; Karahan, Mehmet

    2010-01-01

    The paper studies compressibility and permeability of a CNT/CNF-grafted woven carbon reinforcement. It is shown that the pressure needed to achieve the target fibre volume fraction of the perform increases drastically when CNT/CNF are present in the preform. This can lower the achievable fibre

  14. Structure and Properties of Compressed Borate Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Bauer, U.; Behrens, H.;

    in a series of borate glasses. Upon isostatic compression, NMR experiments show that the fraction of tetrahedral boron increases, leading to an overall decrease of the molar volume of the network. We correlate these structural changes with changes in elastic moduli from Brillouin scattering experiments......While the influence of thermal history on the structure and properties of glasses has been thoroughly studied in the past century, the influence of pressure history has received considerably less attention. In this study, we investigate the pressure-induced changes in structure and properties...

  15. Simultaneous encryption and compression of medical images based on optimized tensor compressed sensing with 3D Lorenz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingzhu; Chen, Xiaoming; Wei, Mengying; Miao, Zhuang

    2016-11-04

    The existing techniques for simultaneous encryption and compression of images refer lossy compression. Their reconstruction performances did not meet the accuracy of medical images because most of them have not been applicable to three-dimensional (3D) medical image volumes intrinsically represented by tensors. We propose a tensor-based algorithm using tensor compressive sensing (TCS) to address these issues. Alternating least squares is further used to optimize the TCS with measurement matrices encrypted by discrete 3D Lorenz. The proposed method preserves the intrinsic structure of tensor-based 3D images and achieves a better balance of compression ratio, decryption accuracy, and security. Furthermore, the characteristic of the tensor product can be used as additional keys to make unauthorized decryption harder. Numerical simulation results verify the validity and the reliability of this scheme.

  16. Volume Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Astuti, Valerio; Rovelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Building on a technical result by Brunnemann and Rideout on the spectrum of the Volume operator in Loop Quantum Gravity, we show that the dimension of the space of the quadrivalent states --with finite-volume individual nodes-- describing a region with total volume smaller than $V$, has \\emph{finite} dimension, bounded by $V \\log V$. This allows us to introduce the notion of "volume entropy": the von Neumann entropy associated to the measurement of volume.

  17. Ultrasound beamforming using compressed data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yen-Feng; Li, Pai-Chi

    2012-05-01

    The rapid advancements in electronics technologies have made software-based beamformers for ultrasound array imaging feasible, thus facilitating the rapid development of high-performance and potentially low-cost systems. However, one challenge to realizing a fully software-based system is transferring data from the analog front end to the software back end at rates of up to a few gigabits per second. This study investigated the use of data compression to reduce the data transfer requirements and optimize the associated trade-off with beamforming quality. JPEG and JPEG2000 compression techniques were adopted. The acoustic data of a line phantom were acquired with a 128-channel array transducer at a center frequency of 3.5 MHz, and the acoustic data of a cyst phantom were acquired with a 64-channel array transducer at a center frequency of 3.33 MHz. The receive-channel data associated with each transmit event are separated into 8 × 8 blocks and several tiles before JPEG and JPEG2000 data compression is applied, respectively. In one scheme, the compression was applied to raw RF data, while in another only the amplitude of baseband data was compressed. The maximum compression ratio of RF data compression to produce an average error of lower than 5 dB was 15 with JPEG compression and 20 with JPEG2000 compression. The image quality is higher with baseband amplitude data compression than with RF data compression; although the maximum overall compression ratio (compared with the original RF data size), which was limited by the data size of uncompressed phase data, was lower than 12, the average error in this case was lower than 1 dB when the compression ratio was lower than 8.

  18. Compressive Transient Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Qilin

    2017-04-01

    High resolution transient/3D imaging technology is of high interest in both scientific research and commercial application. Nowadays, all of the transient imaging methods suffer from low resolution or time consuming mechanical scanning. We proposed a new method based on TCSPC and Compressive Sensing to achieve a high resolution transient imaging with a several seconds capturing process. Picosecond laser sends a serious of equal interval pulse while synchronized SPAD camera\\'s detecting gate window has a precise phase delay at each cycle. After capturing enough points, we are able to make up a whole signal. By inserting a DMD device into the system, we are able to modulate all the frames of data using binary random patterns to reconstruct a super resolution transient/3D image later. Because the low fill factor of SPAD sensor will make a compressive sensing scenario ill-conditioned, We designed and fabricated a diffractive microlens array. We proposed a new CS reconstruction algorithm which is able to denoise at the same time for the measurements suffering from Poisson noise. Instead of a single SPAD senor, we chose a SPAD array because it can drastically reduce the requirement for the number of measurements and its reconstruction time. Further more, it not easy to reconstruct a high resolution image with only one single sensor while for an array, it just needs to reconstruct small patches and a few measurements. In this thesis, we evaluated the reconstruction methods using both clean measurements and the version corrupted by Poisson noise. The results show how the integration over the layers influence the image quality and our algorithm works well while the measurements suffer from non-trival Poisson noise. It\\'s a breakthrough in the areas of both transient imaging and compressive sensing.

  19. Statistical Mechanical Analysis of Compressed Sensing Utilizing Correlated Compression Matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Takeda, Koujin

    2010-01-01

    We investigate a reconstruction limit of compressed sensing for a reconstruction scheme based on the L1-norm minimization utilizing a correlated compression matrix with a statistical mechanics method. We focus on the compression matrix modeled as the Kronecker-type random matrix studied in research on multi-input multi-output wireless communication systems. We found that strong one-dimensional correlations between expansion bases of original information slightly degrade reconstruction performance.

  20. Compressive full waveform lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiyi; Ke, Jun

    2017-05-01

    To avoid high bandwidth detector, fast speed A/D converter, and large size memory disk, a compressive full waveform LIDAR system, which uses a temporally modulated laser instead of a pulsed laser, is studied in this paper. Full waveform data from NEON (National Ecological Observatory Network) are used. Random binary patterns are used to modulate the source. To achieve 0.15 m ranging resolution, a 100 MSPS A/D converter is assumed to make measurements. SPIRAL algorithm with canonical basis is employed when Poisson noise is considered in the low illuminated condition.

  1. Metal Hydride Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Bowman, Robert [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Barton [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Anovitz, Lawrence [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jensen, Craig [Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers LLC, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Conventional hydrogen compressors often contribute over half of the cost of hydrogen stations, have poor reliability, and have insufficient flow rates for a mature FCEV market. Fatigue associated with their moving parts including cracking of diaphragms and failure of seal leads to failure in conventional compressors, which is exacerbated by the repeated starts and stops expected at fueling stations. Furthermore, the conventional lubrication of these compressors with oil is generally unacceptable at fueling stations due to potential fuel contamination. Metal hydride (MH) technology offers a very good alternative to both conventional (mechanical) and newly developed (electrochemical, ionic liquid pistons) methods of hydrogen compression. Advantages of MH compression include simplicity in design and operation, absence of moving parts, compactness, safety and reliability, and the possibility to utilize waste industrial heat to power the compressor. Beyond conventional H2 supplies of pipelines or tanker trucks, another attractive scenario is the on-site generating, pressuring and delivering pure H2 at pressure (≥ 875 bar) for refueling vehicles at electrolysis, wind, or solar generating production facilities in distributed locations that are too remote or widely distributed for cost effective bulk transport. MH hydrogen compression utilizes a reversible heat-driven interaction of a hydride-forming metal alloy with hydrogen gas to form the MH phase and is a promising process for hydrogen energy applications [1,2]. To deliver hydrogen continuously, each stage of the compressor must consist of multiple MH beds with synchronized hydrogenation & dehydrogenation cycles. Multistage pressurization allows achievement of greater compression ratios using reduced temperature swings compared to single stage compressors. The objectives of this project are to investigate and demonstrate on a laboratory scale a two-stage MH hydrogen (H2) gas compressor with a

  2. Beamforming using compressive sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, Geoffrey F; Gaumond, Charles F

    2011-10-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) is compared with conventional beamforming using horizontal beamforming of at-sea, towed-array data. They are compared qualitatively using bearing time records and quantitatively using signal-to-interference ratio. Qualitatively, CS exhibits lower levels of background interference than conventional beamforming. Furthermore, bearing time records show increasing, but tolerable, levels of background interference when the number of elements is decreased. For the full array, CS generates signal-to-interference ratio of 12 dB, but conventional beamforming only 8 dB. The superiority of CS over conventional beamforming is much more pronounced with undersampling.

  3. Geometrical modeling of fibrous materials under compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maze, Benoit; Tafreshi, Hooman Vahedi; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam

    2007-10-01

    Many fibrous materials such as nonwovens are consolidated via compaction rolls in a so-called calendering process. Hot rolls compress the fiber assembly and cause fiber-to-fiber bonding resulting in a strong yet porous structure. In this paper, we describe an algorithm for generating three dimensional virtual fiberwebs and simulating the geometrical changes that happen to the structure during the calendering process. Fibers are assumed to be continuous filaments with square cross sections lying randomly in the x or y direction. The fibers are assumed to be flexible to allow bending over one another during the compression process. Lateral displacement is not allowed during the compaction process. The algorithm also does not allow the fibers to interpenetrate or elongate and so the mass of the fibers is conserved. Bending of the fibers is modeled either by considering a constant "slope of bending" or constant "span of bending." The influence of the bending parameters on the propagation of compression through the material's thickness is discussed. In agreement with our experimental observations, it was found that the average solid volume fraction profile across the thickness becomes U shaped after the calendering. The application of these virtual structures in studying transport phenomena in fibrous materials is also demonstrated.

  4. Compressive Deconvolution in Medical Ultrasound Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhouye; Basarab, Adrian; Kouamé, Denis

    2016-03-01

    The interest of compressive sampling in ultrasound imaging has been recently extensively evaluated by several research teams. Following the different application setups, it has been shown that the RF data may be reconstructed from a small number of measurements and/or using a reduced number of ultrasound pulse emissions. Nevertheless, RF image spatial resolution, contrast and signal to noise ratio are affected by the limited bandwidth of the imaging transducer and the physical phenomenon related to US wave propagation. To overcome these limitations, several deconvolution-based image processing techniques have been proposed to enhance the ultrasound images. In this paper, we propose a novel framework, named compressive deconvolution, that reconstructs enhanced RF images from compressed measurements. Exploiting an unified formulation of the direct acquisition model, combining random projections and 2D convolution with a spatially invariant point spread function, the benefit of our approach is the joint data volume reduction and image quality improvement. The proposed optimization method, based on the Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers, is evaluated on both simulated and in vivo data.

  5. Filming the invisible - time-resolved visualization of compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleine, H.

    2010-04-01

    introduced near-isentropic perturbation wavelets. This new diagnostic tool can be used to qualitatively and quantitatively determine otherwise inaccessible thermodynamic properties of a compressible flow.

  6. Compressive sensing in medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Christian G; Sidky, Emil Y

    2015-03-10

    The promise of compressive sensing, exploitation of compressibility to achieve high quality image reconstructions with less data, has attracted a great deal of attention in the medical imaging community. At the Compressed Sensing Incubator meeting held in April 2014 at OSA Headquarters in Washington, DC, presentations were given summarizing some of the research efforts ongoing in compressive sensing for x-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems. This article provides an expanded version of these presentations. Sparsity-exploiting reconstruction algorithms that have gained popularity in the medical imaging community are studied, and examples of clinical applications that could benefit from compressive sensing ideas are provided. The current and potential future impact of compressive sensing on the medical imaging field is discussed.

  7. Speech Compression Using Multecirculerletet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Murtadha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressing the speech reduces the data storage requirements, leading to reducing the time of transmitting the digitized speech over long-haul links like internet. To obtain best performance in speech compression, wavelet transforms require filters that combine a number of desirable properties, such as orthogonality and symmetry.The MCT bases functions are derived from GHM bases function using 2D linear convolution .The fast computation algorithm methods introduced here added desirable features to the current transform. We further assess the performance of the MCT in speech compression application. This paper discusses the effect of using DWT and MCT (one and two dimension on speech compression. DWT and MCT performances in terms of compression ratio (CR, mean square error (MSE and peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR are assessed. Computer simulation results indicate that the two dimensions MCT offer a better compression ratio, MSE and PSNR than DWT.

  8. libpolycomp: Compression/decompression library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Libpolycomp compresses and decompresses one-dimensional streams of numbers by means of several algorithms. It is well-suited for time-ordered data acquired by astronomical instruments or simulations. One of the algorithms, called "polynomial compression", combines two widely-used ideas (namely, polynomial approximation and filtering of Fourier series) to achieve substantial compression ratios for datasets characterized by smoothness and lack of noise. Notable examples are the ephemerides of astronomical objects and the pointing information of astronomical telescopes. Other algorithms implemented in this C library are well known and already widely used, e.g., RLE, quantization, deflate (via libz) and Burrows-Wheeler transform (via libbzip2). Libpolycomp can compress the timelines acquired by the Planck/LFI instrument with an overall compression ratio of ~9, while other widely known programs (gzip, bzip2) reach compression ratios less than 1.5.

  9. Image Compression using GSOM Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHABBIR AHMAD

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available compression. Conventional techniques such as Huffman coding and the Shannon Fano method, LZ Method, Run Length Method, LZ-77 are more recent methods for the compression of data. A traditional approach to reduce the large amount of data would be to discard some data redundancy and introduce some noise after reconstruction. We present a neural network based Growing self-organizing map technique that may be a reliable and efficient way to achieve vector quantization. Typical application of such algorithm is image compression. Moreover, Kohonen networks realize a mapping between an input and an output space that preserves topology. This feature can be used to build new compression schemes which allow obtaining better compression rate than with classical method as JPEG without reducing the image quality .the experiment result show that proposed algorithm improve the compression ratio in BMP, JPG and TIFF File.

  10. Data compression on the sphere

    CERN Document Server

    McEwen, J D; Eyers, D M; 10.1051/0004-6361/201015728

    2011-01-01

    Large data-sets defined on the sphere arise in many fields. In particular, recent and forthcoming observations of the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) made on the celestial sphere contain approximately three and fifty mega-pixels respectively. The compression of such data is therefore becoming increasingly important. We develop algorithms to compress data defined on the sphere. A Haar wavelet transform on the sphere is used as an energy compression stage to reduce the entropy of the data, followed by Huffman and run-length encoding stages. Lossless and lossy compression algorithms are developed. We evaluate compression performance on simulated CMB data, Earth topography data and environmental illumination maps used in computer graphics. The CMB data can be compressed to approximately 40% of its original size for essentially no loss to the cosmological information content of the data, and to approximately 20% if a small cosmological information loss is tolerated. For the topographic and il...

  11. Energy transfer in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, Francoise; Zhou, YE; Bertoglio, Jean-Pierre

    1995-01-01

    This letter investigates the compressible energy transfer process. We extend a methodology developed originally for incompressible turbulence and use databases from numerical simulations of a weak compressible turbulence based on Eddy-Damped-Quasi-Normal-Markovian (EDQNM) closure. In order to analyze the compressible mode directly, the well known Helmholtz decomposition is used. While the compressible component has very little influence on the solenoidal part, we found that almost all of the compressible turbulence energy is received from its solenoidal counterpart. We focus on the most fundamental building block of the energy transfer process, the triadic interactions. This analysis leads us to conclude that, at low turbulent Mach number, the compressible energy transfer process is dominated by a local radiative transfer (absorption) in both inertial and energy containing ranges.

  12. Global classical solutions to the 1-D vacuum free boundary problem for full compressible Navier-Stokes equations with large data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Yaobin

    2017-01-01

    The vacuum free boundary problem of one-dimensional non-isentropic compressible Navier-Stokes equations with large initial data is investigated in this paper. The fluid is initially assumed to occupy a finite interval and connect to the vacuum continuously at the free boundary, which is often considered in the gas-vacuum interface problem. Using the method of Lagrangian particle path, we derive some point-wise estimates and weighted spatial and time energy estimates for the classical solutions. Then the global existence and uniqueness of classical solutions are shown, and the expanding speed for the free boundary is proved to be finite. The main difficulty of this problem is the degeneracy of the system near the free boundary. Previous results are only for the solutions with low regularity (cf. [G. Q. Chen and M. Kratka, Commun. Partial Differ. Equations. 27 907-943 (2002)]).

  13. Perceptually Lossless Wavelet Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Yang, Gloria Y.; Solomon, Joshua A.; Villasenor, John

    1996-01-01

    The Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) decomposes an image into bands that vary in spatial frequency and orientation. It is widely used for image compression. Measures of the visibility of DWT quantization errors are required to achieve optimal compression. Uniform quantization of a single band of coefficients results in an artifact that is the sum of a lattice of random amplitude basis functions of the corresponding DWT synthesis filter, which we call DWT uniform quantization noise. We measured visual detection thresholds for samples of DWT uniform quantization noise in Y, Cb, and Cr color channels. The spatial frequency of a wavelet is r 2(exp -1), where r is display visual resolution in pixels/degree, and L is the wavelet level. Amplitude thresholds increase rapidly with spatial frequency. Thresholds also increase from Y to Cr to Cb, and with orientation from low-pass to horizontal/vertical to diagonal. We propose a mathematical model for DWT noise detection thresholds that is a function of level, orientation, and display visual resolution. This allows calculation of a 'perceptually lossless' quantization matrix for which all errors are in theory below the visual threshold. The model may also be used as the basis for adaptive quantization schemes.

  14. Compressive Sensing DNA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G. Baraniuk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressive sensing microarrays (CSMs are DNA-based sensors that operate using group testing and compressive sensing (CS principles. In contrast to conventional DNA microarrays, in which each genetic sensor is designed to respond to a single target, in a CSM, each sensor responds to a set of targets. We study the problem of designing CSMs that simultaneously account for both the constraints from CS theory and the biochemistry of probe-target DNA hybridization. An appropriate cross-hybridization model is proposed for CSMs, and several methods are developed for probe design and CS signal recovery based on the new model. Lab experiments suggest that in order to achieve accurate hybridization profiling, consensus probe sequences are required to have sequence homology of at least 80% with all targets to be detected. Furthermore, out-of-equilibrium datasets are usually as accurate as those obtained from equilibrium conditions. Consequently, one can use CSMs in applications in which only short hybridization times are allowed.

  15. Compressive light field sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babacan, S Derin; Ansorge, Reto; Luessi, Martin; Matarán, Pablo Ruiz; Molina, Rafael; Katsaggelos, Aggelos K

    2012-12-01

    We propose a novel design for light field image acquisition based on compressive sensing principles. By placing a randomly coded mask at the aperture of a camera, incoherent measurements of the light passing through different parts of the lens are encoded in the captured images. Each captured image is a random linear combination of different angular views of a scene. The encoded images are then used to recover the original light field image via a novel Bayesian reconstruction algorithm. Using the principles of compressive sensing, we show that light field images with a large number of angular views can be recovered from only a few acquisitions. Moreover, the proposed acquisition and recovery method provides light field images with high spatial resolution and signal-to-noise-ratio, and therefore is not affected by limitations common to existing light field camera designs. We present a prototype camera design based on the proposed framework by modifying a regular digital camera. Finally, we demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed system using experimental results with both synthetic and real images.

  16. Splines in Compressed Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Abhishek

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available It is well understood that in any data acquisition system reduction in the amount of data reduces the time and energy, but the major trade-off here is the quality of outcome normally, lesser the amount of data sensed, lower the quality. Compressed Sensing (CS allows a solution, for sampling below the Nyquist rate. The challenging problem of increasing the reconstruction quality with less number of samples from an unprocessed data set is addressed here by the use of representative coordinate selected from different orders of splines. We have made a detailed comparison with 10 orthogonal and 6 biorthogonal wavelets with two sets of data from MIT Arrhythmia database and our results prove that the Spline coordinates work better than the wavelets. The generation of two new types of splines such as exponential and double exponential are also briefed here .We believe that this is one of the very first attempts made in Compressed Sensing based ECG reconstruction problems using raw data.  

  17. q-ary compressive sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Mroueh, Youssef; Rosasco, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    We introduce q-ary compressive sensing, an extension of 1-bit compressive sensing. We propose a novel sensing mechanism and a corresponding recovery procedure. The recovery properties of the proposed approach are analyzed both theoretically and empirically. Results in 1-bit compressive sensing are recovered as a special case. Our theoretical results suggest a tradeoff between the quantization parameter q, and the number of measurements m in the control of the error of the resulting recovery a...

  18. Compressive sensing of sparse tensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, Shmuel; Li, Qun; Schonfeld, Dan

    2014-10-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) has triggered an enormous research activity since its first appearance. CS exploits the signal's sparsity or compressibility in a particular domain and integrates data compression and acquisition, thus allowing exact reconstruction through relatively few nonadaptive linear measurements. While conventional CS theory relies on data representation in the form of vectors, many data types in various applications, such as color imaging, video sequences, and multisensor networks, are intrinsically represented by higher order tensors. Application of CS to higher order data representation is typically performed by conversion of the data to very long vectors that must be measured using very large sampling matrices, thus imposing a huge computational and memory burden. In this paper, we propose generalized tensor compressive sensing (GTCS)-a unified framework for CS of higher order tensors, which preserves the intrinsic structure of tensor data with reduced computational complexity at reconstruction. GTCS offers an efficient means for representation of multidimensional data by providing simultaneous acquisition and compression from all tensor modes. In addition, we propound two reconstruction procedures, a serial method and a parallelizable method. We then compare the performance of the proposed method with Kronecker compressive sensing (KCS) and multiway compressive sensing (MWCS). We demonstrate experimentally that GTCS outperforms KCS and MWCS in terms of both reconstruction accuracy (within a range of compression ratios) and processing speed. The major disadvantage of our methods (and of MWCS as well) is that the compression ratios may be worse than that offered by KCS.

  19. Uncommon upper extremity compression neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, Elisa J; Calfee, Ryan P

    2013-08-01

    Hand surgeons routinely treat carpal and cubital tunnel syndromes, which are the most common upper extremity nerve compression syndromes. However, more infrequent nerve compression syndromes of the upper extremity may be encountered. Because they are unusual, the diagnosis of these nerve compression syndromes is often missed or delayed. This article reviews the causes, proposed treatments, and surgical outcomes for syndromes involving compression of the posterior interosseous nerve, the superficial branch of the radial nerve, the ulnar nerve at the wrist, and the median nerve proximal to the wrist. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Image Compression Algorithms Using Dct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Er. Abhishek Kaushik

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Image compression is the application of Data compression on digital images. The discrete cosine transform (DCT is a technique for converting a signal into elementary frequency components. It is widely used in image compression. Here we develop some simple functions to compute the DCT and to compress images. An image compression algorithm was comprehended using Matlab code, and modified to perform better when implemented in hardware description language. The IMAP block and IMAQ block of MATLAB was used to analyse and study the results of Image Compression using DCT and varying co-efficients for compression were developed to show the resulting image and error image from the original images. Image Compression is studied using 2-D discrete Cosine Transform. The original image is transformed in 8-by-8 blocks and then inverse transformed in 8-by-8 blocks to create the reconstructed image. The inverse DCT would be performed using the subset of DCT coefficients. The error image (the difference between the original and reconstructed image would be displayed. Error value for every image would be calculated over various values of DCT co-efficients as selected by the user and would be displayed in the end to detect the accuracy and compression in the resulting image and resulting performance parameter would be indicated in terms of MSE , i.e. Mean Square Error.

  1. Lossless compression for three-dimensional images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoli; Pearlman, William A.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate and compare the performance of several three-dimensional (3D) embedded wavelet algorithms on lossless 3D image compression. The algorithms are Asymmetric Tree Three-Dimensional Set Partitioning In Hierarchical Trees (AT-3DSPIHT), Three-Dimensional Set Partitioned Embedded bloCK (3D-SPECK), Three-Dimensional Context-Based Embedded Zerotrees of Wavelet coefficients (3D-CB-EZW), and JPEG2000 Part II for multi-component images. Two kinds of images are investigated in our study -- 8-bit CT and MR medical images and 16-bit AVIRIS hyperspectral images. First, the performances by using different size of coding units are compared. It shows that increasing the size of coding unit improves the performance somewhat. Second, the performances by using different integer wavelet transforms are compared for AT-3DSPIHT, 3D-SPECK and 3D-CB-EZW. None of the considered filters always performs the best for all data sets and algorithms. At last, we compare the different lossless compression algorithms by applying integer wavelet transform on the entire image volumes. For 8-bit medical image volumes, AT-3DSPIHT performs the best almost all the time, achieving average of 12% decreases in file size compared with JPEG2000 multi-component, the second performer. For 16-bit hyperspectral images, AT-3DSPIHT always performs the best, yielding average 5.8% and 8.9% decreases in file size compared with 3D-SPECK and JPEG2000 multi-component, respectively. Two 2D compression algorithms, JPEG2000 and UNIX zip, are also included for reference, and all 3D algorithms perform much better than 2D algorithms.

  2. Axial Compressive Strength of Foamcrete with Different Profiles and Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othuman Mydin M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight foamcrete is a versatile material; primarily consist of a cement based mortar mixed with at least 20% volume of air. High flow ability, lower self-weight, minimal requirement of aggregate, controlled low strength and good thermal insulation properties are a few characteristics of foamcrete. Its dry densities, typically, is below 1600kg/m3 with compressive strengths maximum of 15MPa. The ASTM standard provision specifies a correction factor for concrete strengths of between 14 and 42MPa to compensate for the reduced strength when the aspect height-to-diameter ratio of specimen is less than 2.0, while the CEB-FIP provision specifically mentions the ratio of 150 x 300mm cylinder strength to 150 mm cube strength. However, both provisions requirements do not specifically clarify the applicability and/or modification of the correction factors for the compressive strength of foamcrete. This proposed laboratory work is intended to study the effect of different dimensions and profiles on the axial compressive strength of concrete. Specimens of various dimensions and profiles are cast with square and circular cross-sections i.e., cubes, prisms and cylinders, and to investigate their behavior in compression strength at 7 and 28 days. Hypothetically, compressive strength will decrease with the increase of concrete specimen dimension and concrete specimen with cube profile would yield comparable compressive strength to cylinder (100 x 100 x 100mm cube to 100dia x 200mm cylinder.

  3. High Temperature Behavior of Isothermally Compressed M50 Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-xing SUN; Miao-quan LI

    2015-01-01

    The isothermal compression of M50 steel is carried out on a Gleeble-3500 thermo-mechanical simulator in temperature range of 1 223—1 423 K and strain rates range of 10—70 s—1. The results show that the carbides play a signiifcant role in the lfow be-havior and microstructure evolution during isothermal compression of M50 steel. The average apparent activation energy for defor-mation in isothermal compression of M50 steel is (281.1±42.6) kJ∙mol—1 at the strains of 0.4—0.8. The dynamic recrystallization of austenite grains occurs in isothermal compression of M50 steel at 1 363 K and 1 393 K, enhancing with the increase of strain rate and/or strain. The volume fraction of the carbides decreases with the increase of deformation temperature during isothermal com-pression of M50 steel and the ifne carbides inhibit the dynamic recrystallization of austenite grain. With the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization, the austenite grains are reifned, leading to a minor increase in the lfow stress and apparent activation energy for deformation in isothermal compression of M50 steel. The austenite grains begin to coarsen at 1 423 K and dynamic recrystalliza-tion is limited. Hot working of M50 steel should not be performed above 1 393 K in order to achieve good workability.

  4. An underwater acoustic data compression method based on compressed sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭晓乐; 杨坤德; 史阳; 段睿

    2016-01-01

    The use of underwater acoustic data has rapidly expanded with the application of multichannel, large-aperture underwater detection arrays. This study presents an underwater acoustic data compression method that is based on compressed sensing. Underwater acoustic signals are transformed into the sparse domain for data storage at a receiving terminal, and the improved orthogonal matching pursuit (IOMP) algorithm is used to reconstruct the original underwater acoustic signals at a data processing terminal. When an increase in sidelobe level occasionally causes a direction of arrival estimation error, the proposed compression method can achieve a 10 times stronger compression for narrowband signals and a 5 times stronger compression for wideband signals than the orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) algorithm. The IOMP algorithm also reduces the computing time by about 20% more than the original OMP algorithm. The simulation and experimental results are discussed.

  5. Compressed Data Cube for Approximate OLAP Query Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯玉; 王珊

    2002-01-01

    Approximate query processing has emerged as an approach to dealing with thehuge data volume and complex queries in the environment of data warehouse. In this paper,we present a novel method that provides approximate answers to OLAP queries. Our methodis based on building a compressed (approximate) data cube by a clustering technique and usingthis compressed data cube to provide answers to queries directly, so it improves the performanceof the queries. We also provide the algorithm of the OLAP queries and the confidence intervalsof query results. An extensive experimental study with the OLAP council benchmark showsthe effectiveness and scalability of our cluster-based approach compared to sampling.

  6. Waves and compressible flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ockendon, Hilary

    2016-01-01

    Now in its second edition, this book continues to give readers a broad mathematical basis for modelling and understanding the wide range of wave phenomena encountered in modern applications.  New and expanded material includes topics such as elastoplastic waves and waves in plasmas, as well as new exercises.  Comprehensive collections of models are used to illustrate the underpinning mathematical methodologies, which include the basic ideas of the relevant partial differential equations, characteristics, ray theory, asymptotic analysis, dispersion, shock waves, and weak solutions. Although the main focus is on compressible fluid flow, the authors show how intimately gasdynamic waves are related to wave phenomena in many other areas of physical science.   Special emphasis is placed on the development of physical intuition to supplement and reinforce analytical thinking. Each chapter includes a complete set of carefully prepared exercises, making this a suitable textbook for students in applied mathematics, ...

  7. Central cooling: compressive chillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J.E.

    1978-03-01

    Representative cost and performance data are provided in a concise, useable form for three types of compressive liquid packaged chillers: reciprocating, centrifugal, and screw. The data are represented in graphical form as well as in empirical equations. Reciprocating chillers are available from 2.5 to 240 tons with full-load COPs ranging from 2.85 to 3.87. Centrifugal chillers are available from 80 to 2,000 tons with full load COPs ranging from 4.1 to 4.9. Field-assemblied centrifugal chillers have been installed with capacities up to 10,000 tons. Screw-type chillers are available from 100 to 750 tons with full load COPs ranging from 3.3 to 4.5.

  8. Compressive Fatigue in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clorius, Christian Odin; Pedersen, Martin Bo Uhre; Hoffmeyer, Preben;

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of fatigue failure in wood subjected to load cycles in compression parallel to grain is presented. Small clear specimens of spruce are taken to failure in square wave formed fatigue loading at a stress excitation level corresponding to 80% of the short term strength. Four...... frequencies ranging from 0.01 Hz to 10 Hz are used. The number of cycles to failure is found to be a poor measure of the fatigue performance of wood. Creep, maximum strain, stiffness and work are monitored throughout the fatigue tests. Accumulated creep is suggested identified with damage and a correlation...... is observed between stiffness reduction and accumulated creep. A failure model based on the total work during the fatigue life is rejected, and a modified work model based on elastic, viscous and non-recovered viscoelastic work is experimentally supported, and an explanation at a microstructural level...

  9. Compression-based Similarity

    CERN Document Server

    Vitanyi, Paul M B

    2011-01-01

    First we consider pair-wise distances for literal objects consisting of finite binary files. These files are taken to contain all of their meaning, like genomes or books. The distances are based on compression of the objects concerned, normalized, and can be viewed as similarity distances. Second, we consider pair-wise distances between names of objects, like "red" or "christianity." In this case the distances are based on searches of the Internet. Such a search can be performed by any search engine that returns aggregate page counts. We can extract a code length from the numbers returned, use the same formula as before, and derive a similarity or relative semantics between names for objects. The theory is based on Kolmogorov complexity. We test both similarities extensively experimentally.

  10. Adaptively Compressed Exchange Operator

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The Fock exchange operator plays a central role in modern quantum chemistry. The large computational cost associated with the Fock exchange operator hinders Hartree-Fock calculations and Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals, even for systems consisting of hundreds of atoms. We develop the adaptively compressed exchange operator (ACE) formulation, which greatly reduces the computational cost associated with the Fock exchange operator without loss of accuracy. The ACE formulation does not depend on the size of the band gap, and thus can be applied to insulating, semiconducting as well as metallic systems. In an iterative framework for solving Hartree-Fock-like systems, the ACE formulation only requires moderate modification of the code, and can be potentially beneficial for all electronic structure software packages involving exchange calculations. Numerical results indicate that the ACE formulation can become advantageous even for small systems with tens...

  11. Kinetics of the B1-B2 phase transition in KCl under rapid compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chuanlong; Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Park, Changyong; Kono, Yoshio; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Rod, Eric; Shen, Guoyin, E-mail: gshen@ciw.edu [HPCAT, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Kinetics of the B1-B2 phase transition in KCl has been investigated under various compression rates (0.03–13.5 GPa/s) in a dynamic diamond anvil cell using time-resolved x-ray diffraction and fast imaging. Our experimental data show that the volume fraction across the transition generally gives sigmoidal curves as a function of pressure during rapid compression. Based upon classical nucleation and growth theories (Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov theories), we propose a model that is applicable for studying kinetics for the compression rates studied. The fit of the experimental volume fraction as a function of pressure provides information on effective activation energy and average activation volume at a given compression rate. The resulting parameters are successfully used for interpreting several experimental observables that are compression-rate dependent, such as the transition time, grain size, and over-pressurization. The effective activation energy (Q{sub eff}) is found to decrease linearly with the logarithm of compression rate. When Q{sub eff} is applied to the Arrhenius equation, this relationship can be used to interpret the experimentally observed linear relationship between the logarithm of the transition time and logarithm of the compression rates. The decrease of Q{sub eff} with increasing compression rate results in the decrease of the nucleation rate, which is qualitatively in agreement with the observed change of the grain size with compression rate. The observed over-pressurization is also well explained by the model when an exponential relationship between the average activation volume and the compression rate is assumed.

  12. Adaptive compressive sensing camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Charles; Hsu, Ming K.; Cha, Jae; Iwamura, Tomo; Landa, Joseph; Nguyen, Charles; Szu, Harold

    2013-05-01

    We have embedded Adaptive Compressive Sensing (ACS) algorithm on Charge-Coupled-Device (CCD) camera based on the simplest concept that each pixel is a charge bucket, and the charges comes from Einstein photoelectric conversion effect. Applying the manufactory design principle, we only allow altering each working component at a minimum one step. We then simulated what would be such a camera can do for real world persistent surveillance taking into account of diurnal, all weather, and seasonal variations. The data storage has saved immensely, and the order of magnitude of saving is inversely proportional to target angular speed. We did design two new components of CCD camera. Due to the matured CMOS (Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) technology, the on-chip Sample and Hold (SAH) circuitry can be designed for a dual Photon Detector (PD) analog circuitry for changedetection that predicts skipping or going forward at a sufficient sampling frame rate. For an admitted frame, there is a purely random sparse matrix [Φ] which is implemented at each bucket pixel level the charge transport bias voltage toward its neighborhood buckets or not, and if not, it goes to the ground drainage. Since the snapshot image is not a video, we could not apply the usual MPEG video compression and Hoffman entropy codec as well as powerful WaveNet Wrapper on sensor level. We shall compare (i) Pre-Processing FFT and a threshold of significant Fourier mode components and inverse FFT to check PSNR; (ii) Post-Processing image recovery will be selectively done by CDT&D adaptive version of linear programming at L1 minimization and L2 similarity. For (ii) we need to determine in new frames selection by SAH circuitry (i) the degree of information (d.o.i) K(t) dictates the purely random linear sparse combination of measurement data a la [Φ]M,N M(t) = K(t) Log N(t).

  13. Application specific compression : final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melgaard, David Kennett; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Myers, Daniel S.; Harrison, Carol D.; Lee, David S.; Lewis, Phillip J.; Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2008-12-01

    With the continuing development of more capable data gathering sensors, comes an increased demand on the bandwidth for transmitting larger quantities of data. To help counteract that trend, a study was undertaken to determine appropriate lossy data compression strategies for minimizing their impact on target detection and characterization. The survey of current compression techniques led us to the conclusion that wavelet compression was well suited for this purpose. Wavelet analysis essentially applies a low-pass and high-pass filter to the data, converting the data into the related coefficients that maintain spatial information as well as frequency information. Wavelet compression is achieved by zeroing the coefficients that pertain to the noise in the signal, i.e. the high frequency, low amplitude portion. This approach is well suited for our goal because it reduces the noise in the signal with only minimal impact on the larger, lower frequency target signatures. The resulting coefficients can then be encoded using lossless techniques with higher compression levels because of the lower entropy and significant number of zeros. No significant signal degradation or difficulties in target characterization or detection were observed or measured when wavelet compression was applied to simulated and real data, even when over 80% of the coefficients were zeroed. While the exact level of compression will be data set dependent, for the data sets we studied, compression factors over 10 were found to be satisfactory where conventional lossless techniques achieved levels of less than 3.

  14. Streaming Compression of Hexahedral Meshes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isenburg, M; Courbet, C

    2010-02-03

    We describe a method for streaming compression of hexahedral meshes. Given an interleaved stream of vertices and hexahedral our coder incrementally compresses the mesh in the presented order. Our coder is extremely memory efficient when the input stream documents when vertices are referenced for the last time (i.e. when it contains topological finalization tags). Our coder then continuously releases and reuses data structures that no longer contribute to compressing the remainder of the stream. This means in practice that our coder has only a small fraction of the whole mesh in memory at any time. We can therefore compress very large meshes - even meshes that do not file in memory. Compared to traditional, non-streaming approaches that load the entire mesh and globally reorder it during compression, our algorithm trades a less compact compressed representation for significant gains in speed, memory, and I/O efficiency. For example, on the 456k hexahedra 'blade' mesh, our coder is twice as fast and uses 88 times less memory (only 3.1 MB) with the compressed file increasing about 3% in size. We also present the first scheme for predictive compression of properties associated with hexahedral cells.

  15. Data Compression with Linear Algebra

    OpenAIRE

    Etler, David

    2015-01-01

    A presentation on the applications of linear algebra to image compression. Covers entropy, the discrete cosine transform, thresholding, quantization, and examples of images compressed with DCT. Given in Spring 2015 at Ocean County College as part of the honors program.

  16. Compressed sensing for body MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Li; Benkert, Thomas; Block, Kai Tobias; Sodickson, Daniel K; Otazo, Ricardo; Chandarana, Hersh

    2017-04-01

    The introduction of compressed sensing for increasing imaging speed in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has raised significant interest among researchers and clinicians, and has initiated a large body of research across multiple clinical applications over the last decade. Compressed sensing aims to reconstruct unaliased images from fewer measurements than are traditionally required in MRI by exploiting image compressibility or sparsity. Moreover, appropriate combinations of compressed sensing with previously introduced fast imaging approaches, such as parallel imaging, have demonstrated further improved performance. The advent of compressed sensing marks the prelude to a new era of rapid MRI, where the focus of data acquisition has changed from sampling based on the nominal number of voxels and/or frames to sampling based on the desired information content. This article presents a brief overview of the application of compressed sensing techniques in body MRI, where imaging speed is crucial due to the presence of respiratory motion along with stringent constraints on spatial and temporal resolution. The first section provides an overview of the basic compressed sensing methodology, including the notion of sparsity, incoherence, and nonlinear reconstruction. The second section reviews state-of-the-art compressed sensing techniques that have been demonstrated for various clinical body MRI applications. In the final section, the article discusses current challenges and future opportunities. 5 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:966-987. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Volumetric and acoustic behaviour of systems containing n-hexane, or n-heptane and isomeric chlorobutanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, H.; Pera, G.; Giner, I.; Bandres, I. [Departamento de Quimica Organica - Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Lafuente, C., E-mail: celadi@unizar.e [Departamento de Quimica Organica - Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2010-11-15

    Densities and speeds of sound at atmospheric pressure and temperatures of (283.15, 298.15, and 313.15) K for the binary mixtures formed by n-hexane or n-heptane with isomeric chlorobutanes were determined. Afterwards excess volumes, excess isentropic compressibilities and excess speeds of sound were calculated using the experimental data and correlated using a Redlich-Kister type equation. Finally, the results were studied using the Prigogine-Flory-Patterson theory showing excellent predictions for speed of sound and isentropic compressibility values of mixtures as well as a strong influence of the interactional contribution term for excess volume values.

  18. Imaging industry expectations for compressed sensing in MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kevin F.; Kanwischer, Adriana; Peters, Rob

    2015-09-01

    Compressed sensing requires compressible data, incoherent acquisition and a nonlinear reconstruction algorithm to force creation of a compressible image consistent with the acquired data. MRI images are compressible using various transforms (commonly total variation or wavelets). Incoherent acquisition of MRI data by appropriate selection of pseudo-random or non-Cartesian locations in k-space is straightforward. Increasingly, commercial scanners are sold with enough computing power to enable iterative reconstruction in reasonable times. Therefore integration of compressed sensing into commercial MRI products and clinical practice is beginning. MRI frequently requires the tradeoff of spatial resolution, temporal resolution and volume of spatial coverage to obtain reasonable scan times. Compressed sensing improves scan efficiency and reduces the need for this tradeoff. Benefits to the user will include shorter scans, greater patient comfort, better image quality, more contrast types per patient slot, the enabling of previously impractical applications, and higher throughput. Challenges to vendors include deciding which applications to prioritize, guaranteeing diagnostic image quality, maintaining acceptable usability and workflow, and acquisition and reconstruction algorithm details. Application choice depends on which customer needs the vendor wants to address. The changing healthcare environment is putting cost and productivity pressure on healthcare providers. The improved scan efficiency of compressed sensing can help alleviate some of this pressure. Image quality is strongly influenced by image compressibility and acceleration factor, which must be appropriately limited. Usability and workflow concerns include reconstruction time and user interface friendliness and response. Reconstruction times are limited to about one minute for acceptable workflow. The user interface should be designed to optimize workflow and minimize additional customer training. Algorithm

  19. Compression Maps and Stable Relations

    CERN Document Server

    Price, Kenneth L

    2011-01-01

    Balanced relations were defined by G. Abrams to extend the convolution product used in the construction of incidence rings. We define stable relations,which form a class between balanced relations and preorders. We also define a compression map to be a surjective function between two sets which preserves order, preserves off-diagonal relations, and has the additional property every transitive triple is the image of a transitive triple. We show a compression map preserves the balanced and stable properties but the compression of a preorder may be stable and not transitive. We also cover an example of a stable relation which is not the compression of a preorder. In our main theorem we provide necessary and sufficient conditions for a finite stable relation to be the compression of a preorder.

  20. Compressive Sensing for Quantum Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Gregory A.

    This thesis describes the application of compressive sensing to several challenging problems in quantum imaging with practical and fundamental implications. Compressive sensing is a measurement technique that compresses a signal during measurement such that it can be dramatically undersampled. Compressive sensing has been shown to be an extremely efficient measurement technique for imaging, particularly when detector arrays are not available. The thesis first reviews compressive sensing through the lens of quantum imaging and quantum measurement. Four important applications and their corresponding experiments are then described in detail. The first application is a compressive sensing, photon-counting lidar system. A novel depth mapping technique that uses standard, linear compressive sensing is described. Depth maps up to 256 x 256 pixel transverse resolution are recovered with depth resolution less than 2.54 cm. The first three-dimensional, photon counting video is recorded at 32 x 32 pixel resolution and 14 frames-per-second. The second application is the use of compressive sensing for complementary imaging---simultaneously imaging the transverse-position and transverse-momentum distributions of optical photons. This is accomplished by taking random, partial projections of position followed by imaging the momentum distribution on a cooled CCD camera. The projections are shown to not significantly perturb the photons' momenta while allowing high resolution position images to be reconstructed using compressive sensing. A variety of objects and their diffraction patterns are imaged including the double slit, triple slit, alphanumeric characters, and the University of Rochester logo. The third application is the use of compressive sensing to characterize spatial entanglement of photon pairs produced by spontaneous parametric downconversion. The technique gives a theoretical speedup N2/log N for N-dimensional entanglement over the standard raster scanning technique

  1. Compression Responses of Preform in Vacuum Infusion Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan Yuexin; Tan Zhaoyuan; Zhao Yan; Sun Jing

    2008-01-01

    The final thickness of a product after the vacuum infusion process (VIP), which is equal to the fiber volume fraction, depends in part on the compression responses of the preform because one of the mold faces is flexible in VIP. This study aims at investigating the compression responses of different fabrics under dry or wet conditions. The main factors affecting the compression response under investigation include, the vacuum pressure, the loading and unloading repeatability on the preform, the layup design, the kinds of fabrics,and the resin viscosity. Besides, the effects of some internal factors such as nesting and elastic recovery of fibers, lubrication of resin,friction between fibers, and so on, are also studied. In the end, this article expatiates the meaning of the matching requirements of the permeability of the preform and that of the distribution medium.

  2. Evaluation of a procedure for compressing hyperspectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Michael E.; Winter, Edwin M.

    2014-06-01

    Hyperspectral sensors produce large quantities of data when operating on uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAV) that can overwhelm available data links. Technical Research Associates, Inc. designed, developed, and implemented a data compression approach that is capable of reducing this data volume by a factor of 100 or more with no loss in the tactical utility of the data. This algorithm, Full Spectrum Wavelet, combines efficient coding of the spectral dimension with a wavelet transformation of the spatial dimension. The approach has been tested on a wide variety of reflection band and thermal band hyperspectral data sets. In addition to such traditional measures as the error introduced by the compression, the performance of the algorithm was evaluated using application-oriented measures such as Receiver Operating Curves (ROC) and terrain categorization maps. Comparisons between these products showed little or no degradation of performance out to compression factors of 100. The evaluation procedure provided results directly relevant to tactical users of the data

  3. Conceptual compression for pattern recognition in 3D model output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudden, Rachel; Robinson, Niall; Arribas, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    The problem of data compression is closely related to the idea of comprehension. If you understand a scene at a qualitative level, this should enable you to make reasonable predictions about its contents, meaning that less extra information is needed to encode it precisely. These ideas have already been applied in the field of image compression; see for example the work on conceptual compression by Google DeepMind. Applying similar methods to multidimensional atmospheric data could have significant benefits. Beyond reducing storage demands, the ability to recognise complex features would make it far easier to interpret and search large volumes of meteorological data. Our poster will present some early work in this area.

  4. A new compression design that increases proximal locking screw bending resistance in femur compression nails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaarslan, Ahmet Adnan; Karakaşli, Ahmet; Karci, Tolga; Aycan, Hakan; Yildirim, Serhat; Sesli, Erhan

    2015-06-01

    The aim is to present our new method of compression, a compression tube instead of conventional compression screw and to investigate the difference of proximal locking screw bending resistance between compression screw application (6 mm wide contact) and compression tube (two contact points with 13 mm gap) application. We formed six groups each consisting of 10 proximal locking screws. On metal cylinder representing lesser trochanter level, we performed 3-point bending tests with compression screw and with compression tube. We determined the yield points of the screws in 3-point bending tests using an axial compression testing machine. We determined the yield point of 5 mm screws as 1963±53 N (mean±SD) with compression screw, and as 2929±140 N with compression tubes. We found 51% more locking screw bending resistance with compression tube than with compression screw (p=0,000). Therefore compression tubes instead of compression screw must be preferred at femur compression nails.

  5. Compressed Submanifold Multifactor Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Khoa; Savvides, Marios; Bui, Tien; Suen, Ching

    2016-04-14

    Although widely used, Multilinear PCA (MPCA), one of the leading multilinear analysis methods, still suffers from four major drawbacks. First, it is very sensitive to outliers and noise. Second, it is unable to cope with missing values. Third, it is computationally expensive since MPCA deals with large multi-dimensional datasets. Finally, it is unable to maintain the local geometrical structures due to the averaging process. This paper proposes a novel approach named Compressed Submanifold Multifactor Analysis (CSMA) to solve the four problems mentioned above. Our approach can deal with the problem of missing values and outliers via SVD-L1. The Random Projection method is used to obtain the fast low-rank approximation of a given multifactor dataset. In addition, it is able to preserve the geometry of the original data. Our CSMA method can be used efficiently for multiple purposes, e.g. noise and outlier removal, estimation of missing values, biometric applications. We show that CSMA method can achieve good results and is very efficient in the inpainting problem as compared to [1], [2]. Our method also achieves higher face recognition rates compared to LRTC, SPMA, MPCA and some other methods, i.e. PCA, LDA and LPP, on three challenging face databases, i.e. CMU-MPIE, CMU-PIE and Extended YALE-B.

  6. The OMV Data Compression System Science Data Compression Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Garton H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The Video Compression Unit (VCU), Video Reconstruction Unit (VRU), theory and algorithms for implementation of Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) source coding, docking mode, channel coding, error containment, and video tape preprocessed space imagery are presented in viewgraph format.

  7. Thermodynamic properties of peptide solutions 19. Partial molar isothermal compressions at T = 298.15 K of some peptides of sequence gly-X-gly in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedwig, Gavin R., E-mail: G.Hedwig@massey.ac.n [Institute of Fundamental Sciences - Chemistry, Massey University, Private Bag 11 222, Palmerston North (New Zealand)

    2010-02-15

    The partial molar isobaric expansions at infinite dilution and T = 298.15 K, E{sub 2}{sup 0}left braceE{sub 2}{sup 0}=(partial derivV{sub 2}{sup 0}/partial derivT){sub p}right brace were determined recently for some tripeptides of sequence glycyl-X-glycine, where X is one of the amino acids alanine, valine, leucine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, methionine, proline, serine, threonine, asparagine, glutamine, histidine, and tyrosine. These quantities, along with partial molar heat capacity data available from the literature, were used to convert the partial molar isentropic compressions at infinite dilution determined previously for these tripeptides into the partial molar isothermal compressions at infinite dilution and T = 298.15 K, K{sub T,2}{sup 0}left braceK{sub T,2}{sup 0}=-(partial derivV{sub 2}{sup 0}/partial derivp){sub T}right brace. These K{sub T,2}{sup 0} results, along with that for triglycine, were used to estimate the contributions of the amino acid side-chains to the partial molar isothermal compressions of peptides. The side-chain contributions have been rationalized in terms of the likely peptide-water interactions.

  8. Wearable EEG via lossless compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufort, Guillermo; Favaro, Federico; Lecumberry, Federico; Martin, Alvaro; Oliver, Juan P; Oreggioni, Julian; Ramirez, Ignacio; Seroussi, Gadiel; Steinfeld, Leonardo

    2016-08-01

    This work presents a wearable multi-channel EEG recording system featuring a lossless compression algorithm. The algorithm, based in a previously reported algorithm by the authors, exploits the existing temporal correlation between samples at different sampling times, and the spatial correlation between different electrodes across the scalp. The low-power platform is able to compress, by a factor between 2.3 and 3.6, up to 300sps from 64 channels with a power consumption of 176μW/ch. The performance of the algorithm compares favorably with the best compression rates reported up to date in the literature.

  9. Context-Aware Image Compression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacky C K Chan

    Full Text Available We describe a physics-based data compression method inspired by the photonic time stretch wherein information-rich portions of the data are dilated in a process that emulates the effect of group velocity dispersion on temporal signals. With this coding operation, the data can be downsampled at a lower rate than without it. In contrast to previous implementation of the warped stretch compression, here the decoding can be performed without the need of phase recovery. We present rate-distortion analysis and show improvement in PSNR compared to compression via uniform downsampling.

  10. Compressive sensing for urban radar

    CERN Document Server

    Amin, Moeness

    2014-01-01

    With the emergence of compressive sensing and sparse signal reconstruction, approaches to urban radar have shifted toward relaxed constraints on signal sampling schemes in time and space, and to effectively address logistic difficulties in data acquisition. Traditionally, these challenges have hindered high resolution imaging by restricting both bandwidth and aperture, and by imposing uniformity and bounds on sampling rates.Compressive Sensing for Urban Radar is the first book to focus on a hybrid of two key areas: compressive sensing and urban sensing. It explains how reliable imaging, tracki

  11. Designing experiments through compressed sensing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Joseph G.; Ridzal, Denis

    2013-06-01

    In the following paper, we discuss how to design an ensemble of experiments through the use of compressed sensing. Specifically, we show how to conduct a small number of physical experiments and then use compressed sensing to reconstruct a larger set of data. In order to accomplish this, we organize our results into four sections. We begin by extending the theory of compressed sensing to a finite product of Hilbert spaces. Then, we show how these results apply to experiment design. Next, we develop an efficient reconstruction algorithm that allows us to reconstruct experimental data projected onto a finite element basis. Finally, we verify our approach with two computational experiments.

  12. Compressive myelopathy in fluorosis: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.K. [MR Section, Department of Radiology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow-226014 (India); Agarwal, P. [MR Section, Department of Radiology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow-226014 (India); Kumar, S. [MR Section, Department of Radiology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow-226014 (India); Surana, P.K. [Department of Neurology, SGPGIMS, Lucknow-226014 (India); Lal, J.H. [MR Section, Department of Radiology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow-226014 (India); Misra, U.K. [Department of Neurology, SGPGIMS, Lucknow-226014 (India)

    1996-05-01

    We examined four patients with fluorosis, presenting with compressive myelopathy, by MRI, using spin-echo and fast low-angle shot sequences. Cord compression due to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) and ligamentum flavum (LF) was demonstrated in one and ossification of only the LF in one. Marrow signal was observed in the PLL and LF in all the patients on all pulse sequences. In patients with compressive myelopathy secondary to ossification of PLL and/or LF, fluorosis should be considered as a possible cause, especially in endemic regions. (orig.). With 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Partial transparency of compressed wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Sugimori, Masatoshi

    2016-05-01

    We have developed novel wood composite with optical transparency at arbitrary region. Pores in wood cells have a great variation in size. These pores expand the light path in the sample, because the refractive indexes differ between constituents of cell and air in lumen. In this study, wood compressed to close to lumen had optical transparency. Because the condition of the compression of wood needs the plastic deformation, wood was impregnated phenolic resin. The optimal condition for high transmission is compression ratio above 0.7.

  14. Compressive phase-only filtering at extreme compression rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor-Calle, David; Pastuszczak, Anna; Mikołajczyk, Michał; Kotyński, Rafał

    2017-01-01

    We introduce an efficient method for the reconstruction of the correlation between a compressively measured image and a phase-only filter. The proposed method is based on two properties of phase-only filtering: such filtering is a unitary circulant transform, and the correlation plane it produces is usually sparse. Thanks to these properties, phase-only filters are perfectly compatible with the framework of compressive sensing. Moreover, the lasso-based recovery algorithm is very fast when phase-only filtering is used as the compression matrix. The proposed method can be seen as a generalization of the correlation-based pattern recognition technique, which is hereby applied directly to non-adaptively acquired compressed data. At the time of measurement, any prior knowledge of the target object for which the data will be scanned is not required. We show that images measured at extremely high compression rates may still contain sufficient information for target classification and localization, even if the compression rate is high enough, that visual recognition of the target in the reconstructed image is no longer possible. The method has been applied by us to highly undersampled measurements obtained from a single-pixel camera, with sampling based on randomly chosen Walsh-Hadamard patterns.

  15. The compressibility equation for soft-matter liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Tejero, C F

    2003-01-01

    Effective interactions in soft-matter physics result from a formal contraction of an initial multicomponent system, composed of mesoscopic and small particles, into an effective one-component description. By tracing out in the partition function the degrees of freedom of the small particles, a one-component system of mesoscopic particles interacting with a state-dependent Hamiltonian is found. Although the effective Hamiltonian is not in general pairwise additive, it is usually approximated by a volume term and a pair-potential contribution. In this paper the relation between the structure, for which the volume term plays no role, and the thermodynamics of a fluid of particles interacting with a density-dependent pair potential is analysed. It is shown that the compressibility equation differs from that of atomic fluids. An important consequence is that the infinite-compressibility line derived from the thermodynamics does not coincide with the spinodal line stemming from the divergence of correlations.

  16. Efficient Lossy Compression for Compressive Sensing Acquisition of Images in Compressive Sensing Imaging Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangwei Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Compressive Sensing Imaging (CSI is a new framework for image acquisition, which enables the simultaneous acquisition and compression of a scene. Since the characteristics of Compressive Sensing (CS acquisition are very different from traditional image acquisition, the general image compression solution may not work well. In this paper, we propose an efficient lossy compression solution for CS acquisition of images by considering the distinctive features of the CSI. First, we design an adaptive compressive sensing acquisition method for images according to the sampling rate, which could achieve better CS reconstruction quality for the acquired image. Second, we develop a universal quantization for the obtained CS measurements from CS acquisition without knowing any a priori information about the captured image. Finally, we apply these two methods in the CSI system for efficient lossy compression of CS acquisition. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed solution improves the rate-distortion performance by 0.4~2 dB comparing with current state-of-the-art, while maintaining a low computational complexity.

  17. Efficient lossy compression for compressive sensing acquisition of images in compressive sensing imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangwei; Lan, Xuguang; Yang, Meng; Xue, Jianru; Zheng, Nanning

    2014-12-05

    Compressive Sensing Imaging (CSI) is a new framework for image acquisition, which enables the simultaneous acquisition and compression of a scene. Since the characteristics of Compressive Sensing (CS) acquisition are very different from traditional image acquisition, the general image compression solution may not work well. In this paper, we propose an efficient lossy compression solution for CS acquisition of images by considering the distinctive features of the CSI. First, we design an adaptive compressive sensing acquisition method for images according to the sampling rate, which could achieve better CS reconstruction quality for the acquired image. Second, we develop a universal quantization for the obtained CS measurements from CS acquisition without knowing any a priori information about the captured image. Finally, we apply these two methods in the CSI system for efficient lossy compression of CS acquisition. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed solution improves the rate-distortion performance by 0.4~2 dB comparing with current state-of-the-art, while maintaining a low computational complexity.

  18. International magnetic pulse compression workshop: (Proceedings)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirbie, H.C.; Newton, M.A.; Siemens, P.D.

    1991-04-01

    A few individuals have tried to broaden the understanding of specific and salient pulsed-power topics. One such attempt is this documentation of a workshop on magnetic switching as it applies primarily to pulse compression (power transformation), affording a truly international perspective by its participants under the initiative and leadership of Hugh Kirbie and Mark Newton of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and supported by other interested organizations. During the course of the Workshop at Granlibakken, a great deal of information was amassed and a keen insight into both the problems and opportunities as to the use of this switching approach was developed. The segmented workshop format proved ideal for identifying key aspects affecting optimum performance in a variety of applications. Individual groups of experts addressed network and system modeling, magnetic materials, power conditioning, core cooling and dielectrics, and finally circuits and application. At the end, they came together to consolidate their input and formulate the workshop's conclusions, identifying roadblocks or suggesting research projects, particularly as they apply to magnetic switching's trump card--its high-average-power-handling capability (at least on a burst-mode basis). The workshop was especially productive both in the quality and quantity of information transfer in an environment conducive to a free and open exchange of ideas. We will not delve into the organization proper of this meeting, rather we wish to commend to the interested reader this volume, which provides the definitive and most up-to-date compilation on the subject of magnetic pulse compression from underlying principles to current state of the art as well as the prognosis for the future of magnetic pulse compression as a consensus of the workshop's organizers and participants.

  19. Compressive Acquisition of Dynamic Scenes

    CERN Document Server

    Sankaranarayanan, Aswin C; Chellappa, Rama; Baraniuk, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) is a new approach for the acquisition and recovery of sparse signals and images that enables sampling rates significantly below the classical Nyquist rate. Despite significant progress in the theory and methods of CS, little headway has been made in compressive video acquisition and recovery. Video CS is complicated by the ephemeral nature of dynamic events, which makes direct extensions of standard CS imaging architectures and signal models difficult. In this paper, we develop a new framework for video CS for dynamic textured scenes that models the evolution of the scene as a linear dynamical system (LDS). This reduces the video recovery problem to first estimating the model parameters of the LDS from compressive measurements, and then reconstructing the image frames. We exploit the low-dimensional dynamic parameters (the state sequence) and high-dimensional static parameters (the observation matrix) of the LDS to devise a novel compressive measurement strategy that measures only the...

  20. Normalized Compression Distance of Multiples

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Andrew R

    2012-01-01

    Normalized compression distance (NCD) is a parameter-free similarity measure based on compression. The NCD between pairs of objects is not sufficient for all applications. We propose an NCD of finite multisets (multiples) of objacts that is metric and is better for many applications. Previously, attempts to obtain such an NCD failed. We use the theoretical notion of Kolmogorov complexity that for practical purposes is approximated from above by the length of the compressed version of the file involved, using a real-world compression program. We applied the new NCD for multiples to retinal progenitor cell questions that were earlier treated with the pairwise NCD. Here we get significantly better results. We also applied the NCD for multiples to synthetic time sequence data. The preliminary results are as good as nearest neighbor Euclidean classifier.

  1. Compression fractures of the back

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taking steps to prevent and treat osteoporosis is the most effective way to prevent compression or insufficiency fractures. Getting regular load-bearing exercise (such as walking) can help you avoid bone loss.

  2. Compressed sensing for distributed systems

    CERN Document Server

    Coluccia, Giulio; Magli, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a survey of the state-of-the art in the exciting and timely topic of compressed sensing for distributed systems. It has to be noted that, while compressed sensing has been studied for some time now, its distributed applications are relatively new. Remarkably, such applications are ideally suited to exploit all the benefits that compressed sensing can provide. The objective of this book is to provide the reader with a comprehensive survey of this topic, from the basic concepts to different classes of centralized and distributed reconstruction algorithms, as well as a comparison of these techniques. This book collects different contributions on these aspects. It presents the underlying theory in a complete and unified way for the first time, presenting various signal models and their use cases. It contains a theoretical part collecting latest results in rate-distortion analysis of distributed compressed sensing, as well as practical implementations of algorithms obtaining performance close to...

  3. Preprocessing of compressed digital video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, C. Andrew; Karunaratne, Passant V.; Katsaggelos, Aggelos K.

    2000-12-01

    Pre-processing algorithms improve on the performance of a video compression system by removing spurious noise and insignificant features from the original images. This increases compression efficiency and attenuates coding artifacts. Unfortunately, determining the appropriate amount of pre-filtering is a difficult problem, as it depends on both the content of an image as well as the target bit-rate of compression algorithm. In this paper, we explore a pre- processing technique that is loosely coupled to the quantization decisions of a rate control mechanism. This technique results in a pre-processing system that operates directly on the Displaced Frame Difference (DFD) and is applicable to any standard-compatible compression system. Results explore the effect of several standard filters on the DFD. An adaptive technique is then considered.

  4. Compressed gas fuel storage system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wozniak, John J. (Columbia, MD); Tiller, Dale B. (Lincoln, NE); Wienhold, Paul D. (Baltimore, MD); Hildebrand, Richard J. (Edgemere, MD)

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas vehicle fuel storage system comprised of a plurality of compressed gas pressure cells supported by shock-absorbing foam positioned within a shape-conforming container. The container is dimensioned relative to the compressed gas pressure cells whereby a radial air gap surrounds each compressed gas pressure cell. The radial air gap allows pressure-induced expansion of the pressure cells without resulting in the application of pressure to adjacent pressure cells or physical pressure to the container. The pressure cells are interconnected by a gas control assembly including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and means for connecting the fuel storage system to a vehicle power source and a refueling adapter. The gas control assembly is enclosed by a protective cover attached to the container. The system is attached to the vehicle with straps to enable the chassis to deform as intended in a high-speed collision.

  5. Lossless data compression for infrared hyperspectral sounders: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bormin; Huang, Hung-Lung A.; Ahuja, Alok; Schmit, Timothy J.; Heymann, Roger W.

    2004-10-01

    The compression of hyperspectral sounder data is beneficial for more efficient archive and transfer given its large 3-D volume. Moreover, since physical retrieval of geophysical parameters from hyperspectral sounder data is a mathematically ill-posed problem that is sensitive to the error of the data, lossless or near-lossless compression is desired. This paper provides an update into applications of state-of-the-art 2D and 3D lossless compression algorithms such as 3D EZW, 3D SPIHT, 2D JPEG2000, 2D JPEG-LS and 2D CALIC for hyperspectral sounder data. In addition, in order to better explore the correlations between the remote spectral regions affected by the same type of atmospheric absorbing constituents or clouds, the Bias-Adjusted Reordering (BAR) scheme is presented which reorders the data such that the bias-adjusted distance between any two neighboring vectors is minimized. This scheme coupled with any of the state-of-the-art compression algorithms produces significant compression gains.

  6. High-Frequency Chest Compression: A Summary of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Dosman, Cara F; Jones, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present literature summary is to describe high-frequency chest compression (HFCC), summarize its history and outline study results on its effect on mucolysis, mucus transport, pulmonary function and quality of life. HFCC is a mechanical method of self-administered chest physiotherapy, which induces rapid air movement in and out of the lungs. This mean oscillated volume is an effective method of mucolysis and mucus clearance. HFCC can increase independence. Some studies have...

  7. A Quadratic Closure for Compressible Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Futterman, J A

    2008-09-16

    We have investigated a one-point closure model for compressible turbulence based on third- and higher order cumulant discard for systems undergoing rapid deformation, such as might occur downstream of a shock or other discontinuity. In so doing, we find the lowest order contributions of turbulence to the mean flow, which lead to criteria for Adaptive Mesh Refinement. Rapid distortion theory (RDT) as originally applied by Herring closes the turbulence hierarchy of moment equations by discarding third order and higher cumulants. This is similar to the fourth-order cumulant discard hypothesis of Millionshchikov, except that the Millionshchikov hypothesis was taken to apply to incompressible homogeneous isotropic turbulence generally, whereas RDT is applied only to fluids undergoing a distortion that is 'rapid' in the sense that the interaction of the mean flow with the turbulence overwhelms the interaction of the turbulence with itself. It is also similar to Gaussian closure, in which both second and fourth-order cumulants are retained. Motivated by RDT, we develop a quadratic one-point closure for rapidly distorting compressible turbulence, without regard to homogeneity or isotropy, and make contact with two equation turbulence models, especially the K-{var_epsilon} and K-L models, and with linear instability growth. In the end, we arrive at criteria for Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Finite Volume simulations.

  8. Efficient lossless compression scheme for multispectral images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benazza-Benyahia, Amel; Hamdi, Mohamed; Pesquet, Jean-Christophe

    2001-12-01

    Huge amounts of data are generated thanks to the continuous improvement of remote sensing systems. Archiving this tremendous volume of data is a real challenge which requires lossless compression techniques. Furthermore, progressive coding constitutes a desirable feature for telebrowsing. To this purpose, a compact and pyramidal representation of the input image has to be generated. Separable multiresolution decompositions have already been proposed for multicomponent images allowing each band to be decomposed separately. It seems however more appropriate to exploit also the spectral correlations. For hyperspectral images, the solution is to apply a 3D decomposition according to the spatial and to the spectral dimensions. This approach is not appropriate for multispectral images because of the reduced number of spectral bands. In recent works, we have proposed a nonlinear subband decomposition scheme with perfect reconstruction which exploits efficiently both the spatial and the spectral redundancies contained in multispectral images. In this paper, the problem of coding the coefficients of the resulting subband decomposition is addressed. More precisely, we propose an extension to the vector case of Shapiro's embedded zerotrees of wavelet coefficients (V-EZW) with achieves further saving in the bit stream. Simulations carried out on SPOT images indicate the outperformance of the global compression package we performed.

  9. Controlling Liquid Release by Compressing Electrospun Nanowebs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.G. Kornev

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrospun nanowebs with pores ranging from nanometers to micrometers, constitute new materials with enhanced absorbency and ability to retain liquids in pores for a long period of time. These materials can be used as nanofluidic probes collecting minute amount of liquids. However, extraction of liquids from nanofibrous materials presents a problem: menisci in the interfiber pores create very high suction pressure which holds the liquid inside the material. This problem can be resolved if the probe is completely filled with the liquid: menisci at the probe edges become flat to establish a pressure equilibrium with the atmosphere. Therefore, one can take advantage of the nanoweb softness and extract liquid by mechanically deforming the nanowebs. We show that the liquid-saturated nanowebs follow the Voigt-type rheology upon loading. We theoretically explain this behavior and derive the relations between the Voigt phenomenological parameters, nanoweb permeability and compression modulus. We show that the limiting deformations follow the Hooke’s law which assumes linear relation between the extracted volume of liquid and the applied load. Because of this predictable behavior, the nanoweb probes can be engineered to release minute liquid doses upon compression. The developed experimental methodology can be used for characterization of nanostructured materials which otherwise impossible to analyze by using the existing instruments.

  10. Shock compression of polyvinyl chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Anupam; Mitra, Nilanjan

    2016-04-01

    This study presents shock compression simulation of atactic polyvinyl chloride (PVC) using ab-initio and classical molecular dynamics. The manuscript also identifies the limits of applicability of classical molecular dynamics based shock compression simulation for PVC. The mechanism of bond dissociation under shock loading and its progression is demonstrated in this manuscript using the density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations. The rate of dissociation of different bonds at different shock velocities is also presented in this manuscript.

  11. Implicit compressible flow solvers on unstructured meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Makoto; Horinouchi, Nariaki

    1993-09-01

    An implicit solver for compressible flows using Bi-CGSTAB method is proposed. The Euler equations are discretized with the delta-form by the finite volume method on the cell-centered triangular unstructured meshes. The numerical flux is calculated by Roe's upwind scheme. The linearized simultaneous equations with the irregular nonsymmetric sparse matrix are solved by the Bi-CGSTAB method with the preconditioner of incomplete LU factorization. This method is also vectorized by the multi-colored ordering. Although the solver requires more computational memory, it shows faster and more robust convergence than the other conventional methods: three-stage Runge-Kutta method, point Gauss-Seidel method, and Jacobi method for two-dimensional inviscid steady flows.

  12. Bridgman's concern (shock compression science)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, R. A.

    1994-07-01

    In 1956 P. W. Bridgman published a letter to the editor in the Journal of Applied Physics reporting results of electrical resistance measurements on iron under static high pressure. The work was undertaken to verify the existence of a polymorphic phase transition at 130 kbar (13 GPa) reported in the same journal and year by the Los Alamos authors, Bancroft, Peterson, and Minshall for high pressure, shock-compression loading. In his letter, Bridgman reported that he failed to find any evidence for the transition. Further, he raised some fundamental concerns as to the state of knowledge of shock-compression processes in solids. Later it was determined that Bridgman's static pressure scale was in error, and the shock observations became the basis for calibration of pressure values in static high pressure apparatuses. In spite of the error in pressure scales, Bridgman's concerns on descriptions of shock-compression processes were perceptive and have provided the basis for subsequent fundamental studies of shock-compressed solids. The present paper, written in response to receipt of the 1993 American Physical Society Shock-Compression Science Award, provides a brief contemporary assessment of those shock-compression issues which were the basis of Bridgman's 1956 concerns.

  13. Hidden force opposing ice compression

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Chang Q; Zheng, Weitao

    2012-01-01

    Coulomb repulsion between the unevenly-bound bonding and nonbonding electron pairs in the O:H-O hydrogen-bond is shown to originate the anomalies of ice under compression. Consistency between experimental observations, density functional theory and molecular dynamics calculations confirmed that the resultant force of the compression, the repulsion, and the recovery of electron-pair dislocations differentiates ice from other materials in response to pressure. The compression shortens and strengthens the longer-and-softer intermolecular O:H lone-pair virtual-bond; the repulsion pushes the bonding electron pair away from the H+/p and hence lengthens and weakens the intramolecular H-O real-bond. The virtual-bond compression and the real-bond elongation symmetrize the O:H-O as observed at ~60 GPa and result in the abnormally low compressibility of ice. The virtual-bond stretching phonons ( 3000 cm-1) softened upon compression. The cohesive energy of the real-bond dominates and its loss lowers the critical temperat...

  14. Compressive Structured Light for Recovering Inhomogeneous Participating Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jinwei; Nayar, Shree K; Grinspun, Eitan; Belhumeur, Peter N; Ramamoorthi, Ravi

    2013-03-01

    We propose a new method named compressive structured light for recovering inhomogeneous participating media. Whereas conventional structured light methods emit coded light patterns onto the surface of an opaque object to establish correspondence for triangulation, compressive structured light projects patterns into a volume of participating medium to produce images which are integral measurements of the volume density along the line of sight. For a typical participating medium encountered in the real world, the integral nature of the acquired images enables the use of compressive sensing techniques that can recover the entire volume density from only a few measurements. This makes the acquisition process more efficient and enables reconstruction of dynamic volumetric phenomena. Moreover, our method requires the projection of multiplexed coded illumination, which has the added advantage of increasing the signal-to-noise ratio of the acquisition. Finally, we propose an iterative algorithm to correct for the attenuation of the participating medium during the reconstruction process. We show the effectiveness of our method with simulations as well as experiments on the volumetric recovery of multiple translucent layers, 3D point clouds etched in glass, and the dynamic process of milk drops dissolving in water.

  15. THE EFFECT OF COMPRESSION RATIO VARIATIONS ON THE ENGINE PERFORMANCE PARAMETRES IN SPARK IGNITION ENGINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakup SEKMEN

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance of the spark ignition engines may be increased by changing the geometrical compression ratio according to the amount of charging in cylinders. The designed geometrical compression ratio can be realized as an effective compression ratio under the full load and full open throttle conditions since the effective compression ratio changes with the amount of charging into the cylinder in spark ignition engines. So, this condition of the spark ignition engines forces designers to change their geometrical compression ratio according to the amount of charging into the cylinder for improvement of performance and fuel economy. In order to improve the combustion efficiency, fuel economy, power output, exhaust emissions at partial loads, compression ratio must be increased; but, under high load and low speed conditions to prevent probable knock and hard running the compression ratio must be decreased gradually. In this paper, relation of the performance parameters to compression ratio such as power, torque, specific fuel consumption, cylindir pressure, exhaust gas temperature, combustion chamber surface area/volume ratio, thermal efficiency, spark timing etc. in spark ignition engines have been investigated and using of engines with variable compression ratio is suggested to fuel economy and more clear environment.

  16. Comparing image compression methods in biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libor Hargas

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Compression methods suitable for image processing are described in this article in biomedical applications. The compression is often realized by reduction of irrelevance or redundancy. There are described lossless and lossy compression methods which can be use for compress of images in biomedical applications and comparison of these methods based on fidelity criteria.

  17. 29 CFR 1917.154 - Compressed air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressed air. 1917.154 Section 1917.154 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.154 Compressed air. Employees shall be... this part during cleaning with compressed air. Compressed air used for cleaning shall not exceed...

  18. Formulation of the third-order Grueneisen parameter at extreme compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanker, J. [Department of Physics, Institute of Basic Sciences, Dr. B.R. Ambedkar University, Khandari Campus, Agra 282 002 (India); Sunil, K., E-mail: k.sunil.ibs@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Institute of Basic Sciences, Dr. B.R. Ambedkar University, Khandari Campus, Agra 282 002 (India); Sharma, B.S. [Department of Physics, Institute of Basic Sciences, Dr. B.R. Ambedkar University, Khandari Campus, Agra 282 002 (India)

    2012-06-15

    We present a direct method using the basic principles of calculus to derive the expression for the third-order Grueneisen parameter in terms of the pressure derivatives of bulk modulus at extreme compression. The derivation presented here does not depend on the assumptions regarding the values of free-volume parameter and its variation with pressure. The identities used in the present analysis are valid at extreme compression for all physically acceptable equations of state.

  19. The Compression Algorithm for the Data Acquisition System in HT-7 Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱琳; 罗家融; 李贵明; 岳冬利

    2003-01-01

    HT-7 superconducting tokamak in the Institute of Plasma Physics of the ChineseAcademy of Sciences is an experimental device for fusion research in China. The main task of thedata acquisition system of HT-7 is to acquire, store, analyze and index the data. The volume ofthe data is nearly up to hundreds of million bytes. Besides the hardware and software support, agreat capacity of data storage, process and transfer is a more important problem. To deal withthis problem, the key technology is data compression algorithm. In the paper, the data formatin HT-7 is introduced first, then the data compression algorithm, LZO, being a kind of portablelossless data compression algorithm with ANSI C, is analyzed. This compression algorithm, whichfits well with the data acquisition and distribution in the nuclear fusion experiment, offers a prettyfast compression and extremely fast decompression. At last the performance evaluation of LZOapplication in HT-7 is given.

  20. Compressibility, turbulence and high speed flow

    CERN Document Server

    Gatski, Thomas B

    2013-01-01

    Compressibility, Turbulence and High Speed Flow introduces the reader to the field of compressible turbulence and compressible turbulent flows across a broad speed range, through a unique complimentary treatment of both the theoretical foundations and the measurement and analysis tools currently used. The book provides the reader with the necessary background and current trends in the theoretical and experimental aspects of compressible turbulent flows and compressible turbulence. Detailed derivations of the pertinent equations describing the motion of such turbulent flows is provided and

  1. 30 CFR 75.1730 - Compressed air; general; compressed air systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Compressed air; general; compressed air systems. (a) All pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed... pressure has been relieved from that part of the system to be repaired. (d) At no time shall compressed air... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressed air; general; compressed air systems...

  2. Word-Based Text Compression

    CERN Document Server

    Platos, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Today there are many universal compression algorithms, but in most cases is for specific data better using specific algorithm - JPEG for images, MPEG for movies, etc. For textual documents there are special methods based on PPM algorithm or methods with non-character access, e.g. word-based compression. In the past, several papers describing variants of word-based compression using Huffman encoding or LZW method were published. The subject of this paper is the description of a word-based compression variant based on the LZ77 algorithm. The LZ77 algorithm and its modifications are described in this paper. Moreover, various ways of sliding window implementation and various possibilities of output encoding are described, as well. This paper also includes the implementation of an experimental application, testing of its efficiency and finding the best combination of all parts of the LZ77 coder. This is done to achieve the best compression ratio. In conclusion there is comparison of this implemented application wi...

  3. Fluid displacement from intraluminal thrombus of abdominal aortic aneurysm as a result of uniform compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Noort, Kim; Schuurmann, Richte Cl; Wermelink, Bryan; Slump, Cornelis H; Kuijpers, Karel C; de Vries, Jean-Paul Pm

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The results after aneurysm repair with an endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS) system are dependent on the stability of the aneurysm sac and particularly the intraluminal abdominal aortic thrombus (ILT). The postprocedural ILT volume is decreased compared with preprocedural ILT volume in aortic aneurysm patients treated with EVAS. We hypothesize that ILT is not stable in all patients and pressurization of the ILT may result in displacement of fluids from the ILT, no differently than serum is displaced from whole blood when it settles. To date, the mechanism and quantification of fluid displacement from ILT are unknown. Methods The study included 21 patients who underwent elective open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. The ILT was harvested as a routine procedure during the operation. After excision of a histologic sample of the ILT specimen in four patients, ILT volume was measured and the ILT was compressed in a dedicated compression setup designed to apply uniform compression of 200 mmHg for 5 min. After compression, the volumes of the remaining thrombus and the displaced fluid were measured. Results The median (interquartile-range) of ILT volume before compression was 60 (66) mL, and a median of 5.7 (8.4) mL of fluid was displaced from the ILT after compression, resulting in a median thrombus volume decrease of 11% (10%). Fluid components can be up to 31% of the entire ILT volume. Histologic examination of four ILT specimens showed a reduction of the medial layer of the ILT after compression, which was the result of compression of fluid-containing canaliculi. Conclusions Applying pressure of 200 mmHg to abdominal aortic aneurysm ILT resulted in the displacement of fluid, with a large variation among patients. Fluid displacement may result in decrease of ILT volume during and after EVAS, which might have implications on pre-EVAS volume planning and on stability of the endobags during follow-up which may lead to migration, endoleak or both.

  4. Micro-Mechanical Analysis About Kink Band in Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composites Under Longitudinal Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mi; Guan, Zhidong; Wang, Xiaodong; Du, Shanyi

    2016-12-01

    Kink band is a typical phenomenon for composites under longitudinal compression. In this paper, theoretical analysis and finite element simulation were conducted to analyze kink angle as well as compressive strength of composites. Kink angle was considered to be an important character throughout longitudinal compression process. Three factors including plastic matrix, initial fiber misalignment and rotation due to loading were considered for theoretical analysis. Besides, the relationship between kink angle and fiber volume fraction was improved and optimized by theoretical derivation. In addition, finite element models considering fiber stochastic strength and Drucker-Prager constitutive model for matrix were conducted in ABAQUS to analyze kink band formation process, which corresponded with the experimental results. Through simulation, the loading and failure procedure can be evidently divided into three stages: elastic stage, softening stage, and fiber break stage. It also shows that kink band is a result of fiber misalignment and plastic matrix. Different values of initial fiber misalignment angle, wavelength and fiber volume fraction were considered to explore the effects on compressive strength and kink angle. Results show that compressive strength increases with the decreasing of initial fiber misalignment angle, the decreasing of initial fiber misalignment wavelength and the increasing of fiber volume fraction, while kink angle decreases in these situations. Orthogonal array in statistics was also built to distinguish the effect degree of these factors. It indicates that initial fiber misalignment angle has the largest impact on compressive strength and kink angle.

  5. Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Thanh [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ahluwalia, Rajesh [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Peng, J. -K [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kromer, Matt [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Lasher, Stephen [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); McKenney, Kurtis [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Law, Karen [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Sinha, Jayanti [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States)

    2010-09-01

    This technical report describes DOE's assessment of the performance and cost of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications. The on-board performance (by Argonne National Lab) and high-volume manufacturing cost (by TIAX LLC) were estimated for compressed hydrogen storage tanks. The results were compared to DOE's 2010, 2015, and ultimate full fleet hydrogen storage targets. The Well-to-Tank (WTT) efficiency as well as the off-board performance and cost of delivering compressed hydrogen were also documented in the report.

  6. Ultrasonic study of molecular interaction in binary liquid mixtures at 30°C

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Ali; A K Nain

    2002-04-01

    Densities ρ and ultrasonic speeds of the binary mixtures of tetrahydrofuran (THF) with 1-butanol and tert-butanol, at 30°C, over the entire composition range were measured. From these data isentropic compressibility, s, intermolecular free length f, relative association A, acoustic impedance , molar sound speed m, deviations in isentropic compressibility s, and excess volume E were calculated. The variation of these parameters with composition of the mixture helps us in understanding the nature and extent of interaction between unlike molecules in the mixtures. Further, theoretical values of ultrasonic speed were evaluated using theories and empirical relations. The relative merits of these theories and relations were discussed.

  7. Influence of Temperature on Thermodynamic Properties of Methyl t-Butyl Ether (MTBE) + Gasoline Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Olmos, R.; Iglesias, M.; Goenaga, J. M.; Resa, J. M.

    2007-08-01

    The densities and sound speeds of binary mixtures of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) + (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, isooctane, tert-butyl alcohol) have been measured at temperatures from 288.15 to 323.15 K and at atmospheric pressure over the complete concentration range. The experimental excess volumes and deviations of isentropic compressibility were calculated. The deviation of isentropic compressibility data have been analyzed in terms of different theoretical models; adequate agreement between the experimental and predicted values is obtained. The data from this study improve the data situation related to gasoline additives and help to understand the MTBE volumetric and acoustic behavior for various chemical systems.

  8. Evaluating lossy data compression on climate simulation data within a large ensemble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Allison H.; Hammerling, Dorit M.; Mickelson, Sheri A.; Xu, Haiying; Stolpe, Martin B.; Naveau, Phillipe; Sanderson, Ben; Ebert-Uphoff, Imme; Samarasinghe, Savini; De Simone, Francesco; Carbone, Francesco; Gencarelli, Christian N.; Dennis, John M.; Kay, Jennifer E.; Lindstrom, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution Earth system model simulations generate enormous data volumes, and retaining the data from these simulations often strains institutional storage resources. Further, these exceedingly large storage requirements negatively impact science objectives, for example, by forcing reductions in data output frequency, simulation length, or ensemble size. To lessen data volumes from the Community Earth System Model (CESM), we advocate the use of lossy data compression techniques. While lossy data compression does not exactly preserve the original data (as lossless compression does), lossy techniques have an advantage in terms of smaller storage requirements. To preserve the integrity of the scientific simulation data, the effects of lossy data compression on the original data should, at a minimum, not be statistically distinguishable from the natural variability of the climate system, and previous preliminary work with data from CESM has shown this goal to be attainable. However, to ultimately convince climate scientists that it is acceptable to use lossy data compression, we provide climate scientists with access to publicly available climate data that have undergone lossy data compression. In particular, we report on the results of a lossy data compression experiment with output from the CESM Large Ensemble (CESM-LE) Community Project, in which we challenge climate scientists to examine features of the data relevant to their interests, and attempt to identify which of the ensemble members have been compressed and reconstructed. We find that while detecting distinguishing features is certainly possible, the compression effects noticeable in these features are often unimportant or disappear in post-processing analyses. In addition, we perform several analyses that directly compare the original data to the reconstructed data to investigate the preservation, or lack thereof, of specific features critical to climate science. Overall, we conclude that applying

  9. Evaluating lossy data compression on climate simulation data within a large ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Allison H.; Hammerling, Dorit M.; Mickelson, Sheri A.; Xu, Haiying; Stolpe, Martin B.; Naveau, Phillipe; Sanderson, Ben; Ebert-Uphoff, Imme; Samarasinghe, Savini; De Simone, Francesco; Carbone, Francesco; Gencarelli, Christian N.; Dennis, John M.; Kay, Jennifer E.; Lindstrom, Peter

    2016-12-01

    High-resolution Earth system model simulations generate enormous data volumes, and retaining the data from these simulations often strains institutional storage resources. Further, these exceedingly large storage requirements negatively impact science objectives, for example, by forcing reductions in data output frequency, simulation length, or ensemble size. To lessen data volumes from the Community Earth System Model (CESM), we advocate the use of lossy data compression techniques. While lossy data compression does not exactly preserve the original data (as lossless compression does), lossy techniques have an advantage in terms of smaller storage requirements. To preserve the integrity of the scientific simulation data, the effects of lossy data compression on the original data should, at a minimum, not be statistically distinguishable from the natural variability of the climate system, and previous preliminary work with data from CESM has shown this goal to be attainable. However, to ultimately convince climate scientists that it is acceptable to use lossy data compression, we provide climate scientists with access to publicly available climate data that have undergone lossy data compression. In particular, we report on the results of a lossy data compression experiment with output from the CESM Large Ensemble (CESM-LE) Community Project, in which we challenge climate scientists to examine features of the data relevant to their interests, and attempt to identify which of the ensemble members have been compressed and reconstructed. We find that while detecting distinguishing features is certainly possible, the compression effects noticeable in these features are often unimportant or disappear in post-processing analyses. In addition, we perform several analyses that directly compare the original data to the reconstructed data to investigate the preservation, or lack thereof, of specific features critical to climate science. Overall, we conclude that applying

  10. The Effect of Al on the Compressibility of Silicate Perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, M. J.; Kubo, A.; Yoshino, T.; Koga, K. T.; Ohishi, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Experimental data on compressibility of aluminous silicate perovskite show widely disparate results. Several studies show that Al causes a dramatic increase in compressibility1-3, while another study indicates a mild decrease in compressibility4. Here we report new results for the effect of Al on the room-temperature compressibility of perovskite using in situ X-ray diffraction in the diamond anvil cell from 30 to 100 GPa. We studied compressibility of perovskite in the system MgSiO3-Al2O3 in compositions with 0 to 25 mol% Al. Perovskite was synthesized from starting glasses using laser-heating in the DAC, with KBr as a pressure medium. Diffraction patterns were obtained using monochromatic radiation and an imaging plate detector at beamline BL10XU, SPring8, Japan. Addition of Al into the perovskite structure causes systematic increases in orthorhombic distortion and unit cell volume at ambient conditions (V0). Compression of the perovskite unit cell is anisotropic, with the a axis about 25% and 3% more compressive than the b and c axes, respectively. The magnitude of orthorhombic distortion increases with pressure, but aluminous perovskite remains stable to at least 100 GPa. Our results show that Al causes only a mild increase in compressibility, with the bulk modulus (K0) decreasing at a rate of 0.7 GPa/0.01 XAl. This increase in compressibility is consistent with recent ab initio calculations if Al mixes into both the 6- and 8-coordinated sites by coupled substitution5, where 2 Al3+ = Mg2+ + Si4+. Our results together with those of [4] indicate that this substitution mechanism predominates throughout the lower mantle. Previous mineralogic models indicating the upper and lower mantle are compositionally similar in terms of major elements remain effectively unchanged because solution of 5 mol% Al into perovskite has a minor effect on density. 1. Zhang & Weidner (1999). Science 284, 782-784. 2. Kubo et al. (2000) Proc. Jap. Acad. 76B, 103-107. 3. Daniel et al

  11. Morphological Transform for Image Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Pastor Sanchez Fernandez

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A new method for image compression based on morphological associative memories (MAMs is presented. We used the MAM to implement a new image transform and applied it at the transformation stage of image coding, thereby replacing such traditional methods as the discrete cosine transform or the discrete wavelet transform. Autoassociative and heteroassociative MAMs can be considered as a subclass of morphological neural networks. The morphological transform (MT presented in this paper generates heteroassociative MAMs derived from image subblocks. The MT is applied to individual blocks of the image using some transformation matrix as an input pattern. Depending on this matrix, the image takes a morphological representation, which is used to perform the data compression at the next stages. With respect to traditional methods, the main advantage offered by the MT is the processing speed, whereas the compression rate and the signal-to-noise ratio are competitive to conventional transforms.

  12. Compressive Sensing in Communication Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fyhn, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Wireless communication is omnipresent today, but this development has led to frequency spectrum becoming a limited resource. Furthermore, wireless devices become more and more energy-limited, due to the demand for continual wireless communication of higher and higher amounts of information....... The need for cheaper, smarter and more energy efficient wireless devices is greater now than ever. This thesis addresses this problem and concerns the application of the recently developed sampling theory of compressive sensing in communication systems. Compressive sensing is the merging of signal...... acquisition and compression. It allows for sampling a signal with a rate below the bound dictated by the celebrated Shannon-Nyquist sampling theorem. In some communication systems this necessary minimum sample rate, dictated by the Shannon-Nyquist sampling theorem, is so high it is at the limit of what...

  13. Compressive Sensing for MIMO Radar

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Yao; Poor, H Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar systems have been shown to achieve superior resolution as compared to traditional radar systems with the same number of transmit and receive antennas. This paper considers a distributed MIMO radar scenario, in which each transmit element is a node in a wireless network, and investigates the use of compressive sampling for direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation. According to the theory of compressive sampling, a signal that is sparse in some domain can be recovered based on far fewer samples than required by the Nyquist sampling theorem. The DOA of targets form a sparse vector in the angle space, and therefore, compressive sampling can be applied for DOA estimation. The proposed approach achieves the superior resolution of MIMO radar with far fewer samples than other approaches. This is particularly useful in a distributed scenario, in which the results at each receive node need to be transmitted to a fusion center for further processing.

  14. Compressive Sensing with Optical Chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rontani, D.; Choi, D.; Chang, C.-Y.; Locquet, A.; Citrin, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) is a technique to sample a sparse signal below the Nyquist-Shannon limit, yet still enabling its reconstruction. As such, CS permits an extremely parsimonious way to store and transmit large and important classes of signals and images that would be far more data intensive should they be sampled following the prescription of the Nyquist-Shannon theorem. CS has found applications as diverse as seismology and biomedical imaging. In this work, we use actual optical signals generated from temporal intensity chaos from external-cavity semiconductor lasers (ECSL) to construct the sensing matrix that is employed to compress a sparse signal. The chaotic time series produced having their relevant dynamics on the 100 ps timescale, our results open the way to ultrahigh-speed compression of sparse signals.

  15. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Bradley E. (Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin, FL); Kabir, Md. E. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  16. Instability of ties in compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Thomas Cornelius

    2013-01-01

    Masonry cavity walls are loaded by wind pressure and vertical load from upper floors. These loads results in bending moments and compression forces in the ties connecting the outer and the inner wall in a cavity wall. Large cavity walls are furthermore loaded by differential movements from...... the temperature gradient between the outer and the inner wall, which results in critical increase of the bending moments in the ties. Since the ties are loaded by combined compression and moment forces, the loadbearing capacity is derived from instability equilibrium equations. Most of them are iterative, since......-connectors in cavity walls was developed. The method takes into account constraint conditions limiting the free length of the wall tie, and the instability in case of pure compression which gives an optimal load bearing capacity. The model is illustrated with examples from praxis....

  17. Fast, efficient lossless data compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Douglas

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents lossless data compression and decompression algorithms which can be easily implemented in software. The algorithms can be partitioned into their fundamental parts which can be implemented at various stages within a data acquisition system. This allows for efficient integration of these functions into systems at the stage where they are most applicable. The algorithms were coded in Forth to run on a Silicon Composers Single Board Computer (SBC) using the Harris RTX2000 Forth processor. The algorithms require very few system resources and operate very fast. The performance of the algorithms with the RTX enables real time data compression and decompression to be implemented for a wide range of applications.

  18. [Vascular compression of the duodenum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, B; Guachalla, G; Martínez, C; Felce, S; Ledezma, G

    1991-01-01

    The acute vascular compression of the duodenum is a well-recognized clinical entity, characterized by recurrent vomiting, abdominal distention, weight loss, post prandial distress. The cause of compression is considered to be effect produced as a result of the angle formed by the superior mesenteric vessels and sometimes by one of its first two branches, and vertebrae and paravertebral muscles, when the angle between superior mesenteric vessels and the aorta it's lower than 18 degrees we can saw this syndrome. The duodenojejunostomy is the best treatment, as well as in our patient.

  19. GPU-accelerated compressive holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Yutaka; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Kakue, Takashi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2016-04-18

    In this paper, we show fast signal reconstruction for compressive holography using a graphics processing unit (GPU). We implemented a fast iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm on a GPU to solve the ℓ1 and total variation (TV) regularized problems that are typically used in compressive holography. Since the algorithm is highly parallel, GPUs can compute it efficiently by data-parallel computing. For better performance, our implementation exploits the structure of the measurement matrix to compute the matrix multiplications. The results show that GPU-based implementation is about 20 times faster than CPU-based implementation.

  20. Compressing the Inert Doublet Model

    CERN Document Server

    Blinov, Nikita; Morrissey, David E; de la Puente, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The Inert Doublet Model relies on a discrete symmetry to prevent couplings of the new scalars to Standard Model fermions. This stabilizes the lightest inert state, which can then contribute to the observed dark matter density. In the presence of additional approximate symmetries, the resulting spectrum of exotic scalars can be compressed. Here, we study the phenomenological and cosmological implications of this scenario. We derive new limits on the compressed Inert Doublet Model from LEP, and outline the prospects for exclusion and discovery of this model at dark matter experiments, the LHC, and future colliders.

  1. Ultrasonic study on molecular interactions in binary mixtures of formamide with 1-propanol or 2-propanol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manju Rani; Suman Gahlyan; Ankur Gaur; Sanjeev Maken

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic speeds have been measured at 298.15 K and 308.15 K for mixtures of formamide+1-propanol or 2-propanol. For an equimolar mixture, excess molar compressibility follows the sequence of 1-propanol N 2-propanol. The ultrasonic speed data are correlated by various correlations such as Nomoto's relation, van Dael's mixing relation and impedance dependence relation, and analyzed in terms of Jacobson's free length theory and Schaaff's collision factor theory. Excess isentropic compressibility is calculated from ex-perimental ultrasonic speed data and previously reported excess volume data. The excess molar ultrasonic speed and isentropic compressibility values are fitted to Redlich–Kister polynomial equation. Other proper-ties such as molecular association, avallable volume, free volume, and intermolecular free length are also calculated. The excess isentropic compressibility data are also interpreted in terms of graph theoretical ap-proach. The calculated isentropic compressibility values are well consistent with the experimental data. It is found that the interaction between formamide and propanol increases when hydroxyl group attached to a carbon atom has more–CH3 groups.

  2. Development and evaluation of a novel lossless image compression method (AIC: artificial intelligence compression method) using neural networks as artificial intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukatsu, Hiroshi; Naganawa, Shinji; Yumura, Shinnichiro

    2008-04-01

    This study was aimed to validate the performance of a novel image compression method using a neural network to achieve a lossless compression. The encoding consists of the following blocks: a prediction block; a residual data calculation block; a transformation and quantization block; an organization and modification block; and an entropy encoding block. The predicted image is divided into four macro-blocks using the original image for teaching; and then redivided into sixteen sub-blocks. The predicted image is compared to the original image to create the residual image. The spatial and frequency data of the residual image are compared and transformed. Chest radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, radioisotope mammography, ultrasonography, and digital subtraction angiography images were compressed using the AIC lossless compression method; and the compression rates were calculated. The compression rates were around 15:1 for chest radiography and mammography, 12:1 for CT, and around 6:1 for other images. This method thus enables greater lossless compression than the conventional methods. This novel method should improve the efficiency of handling of the increasing volume of medical imaging data.

  3. Mammographic compression – A need for mechanical standardization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branderhorst, Woutjan, E-mail: w.branderhorst@amc.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering & Physics, P.O. Box 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sigmascreening B.V., Meibergdreef 45, 1105 BA Amsterdam (Netherlands); Groot, Jerry E. de, E-mail: jerry.degroot@sigmascreening.com [Academic Medical Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering & Physics, P.O. Box 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam (Netherlands); Highnam, Ralph, E-mail: ralph.highnam@volparasolutions.com [Volpara Solutions Limited, P.O. Box 24404, Manners St Central, Wellington 6142 (New Zealand); Chan, Ariane, E-mail: ariane.chan@volparasolutions.com [Volpara Solutions Limited, P.O. Box 24404, Manners St Central, Wellington 6142 (New Zealand); Böhm-Vélez, Marcela, E-mail: marcelabvelez@gmail.com [Weinstein Imaging Associates, 5850 Centre Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15206 (United States); Broeders, Mireille J.M., E-mail: mireille.broeders@radboudumc.nl [Radboud University Medical Center, Department for Health Evidence, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); LRCB Dutch Reference Center for Screening, P.O. Box 6873, 6503 GJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Heeten, Gerard J. den, E-mail: g.denheeten@lrcb.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam (Netherlands); LRCB Dutch Reference Center for Screening, P.O. Box 6873, 6503 GJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Grimbergen, Cornelis A., E-mail: c.a.grimbergen@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering & Physics, P.O. Box 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sigmascreening B.V., Meibergdreef 45, 1105 BA Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-04-15

    centre in Pittsburgh, PA (US data set). Both sets were processed using VolparaAnalytics and VolparaDensity to obtain the applied average force, pressure, breast thickness, breast volume, breast density and average glandular dose (AGD) as a function of the size of the contact area between the breast and the paddle. Results: On average, the forces and pressures applied in the NL data set were significantly higher than in the US data set. The relative standard deviation was larger in the US data set than in the NL data set. Breasts were compressed with a force in the high range of >15 daN for 31.1% and >20 kPa for 12.3% of the NL data set versus, respectively, 1.5% and 1.7% of the US data set. In the low range we encountered compressions with a pressure of <5 daN for 21.1% and <5 kPa for 21.7% of the US data set versus, respectively, 0.05% and 0.6% in the NL data set. Both the average and the standard deviation of the AGD were higher in the US data set. Conclusion: (1) Current mammographic breast compression policies lead to a wide range of applied forces and pressures, with large variations both within and between clinical sites. (2) Pressure standardization could decrease variation, improve reproducibility, and reduce the risk of unnecessary pain, unnecessary high radiation doses and inadequate image quality.

  4. Wavelet and wavelet packet compression of electrocardiograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, M L

    1997-05-01

    Wavelets and wavelet packets have recently emerged as powerful tools for signal compression. Wavelet and wavelet packet-based compression algorithms based on embedded zerotree wavelet (EZW) coding are developed for electrocardiogram (ECG) signals, and eight different wavelets are evaluated for their ability to compress Holter ECG data. Pilot data from a blind evaluation of compressed ECG's by cardiologists suggest that the clinically useful information present in original ECG signals is preserved by 8:1 compression, and in most cases 16:1 compressed ECG's are clinically useful.

  5. Progressive or degressive compression pressure profile in patients with chronic venous disorders of the lower limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Mosti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Graduated compression devices are considered the standard care for management of venous and lymphatic disorders. Recently compression devices exerting a pressure over the calf higher than over the ankle have been proved to be more effective than traditional graduated devices in increasing the impaired ejection fraction (EF from the lower leg in patients with venous disease. Aim of this work is presenting an overview of the new concept on progressive compression, its potential benefits and limits. In different series of tests, the EF from the lower leg was assessed in 70 patients with severe reflux in the great saphenous vein (GSV. EF was measured by strain gauge plethysmography, in baseline conditions and after applying graduated compression devices or the new inversely graduated or progressive compression (PC devices. The interface pressure was recorded, simultaneously with the EF, both in the gaiter area (B1 point and at the calf (C point in order to assess the compression pressure profile. EF, severely impaired in patients with GSV reflux, was increased by compression. So called PC devices (both PC elastic stocking and PC inelastic bandages were significantly more effective than graduated compression in increasing the ejection fraction. The higher the pressure on the calf the higher the EF improvement. Maintaining the same strong pressure over the calf by means of two progressive stockings and increasing the pressure only over the calf to restore a graduated compression didn’t improve the EF. To improve venous pumping function in the ambulant patient stronger compression of the calf is more effective than graduated compression. This can be explained by the higher amount of blood volume pooled in the calf veins.

  6. GPU Lossless Hyperspectral Data Compression System for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keymeulen, Didier; Aranki, Nazeeh; Hopson, Ben; Kiely, Aaron; Klimesh, Matthew; Benkrid, Khaled

    2012-01-01

    On-board lossless hyperspectral data compression reduces data volume in order to meet NASA and DoD limited downlink capabilities. At JPL, a novel, adaptive and predictive technique for lossless compression of hyperspectral data, named the Fast Lossless (FL) algorithm, was recently developed. This technique uses an adaptive filtering method and achieves state-of-the-art performance in both compression effectiveness and low complexity. Because of its outstanding performance and suitability for real-time onboard hardware implementation, the FL compressor is being formalized as the emerging CCSDS Standard for Lossless Multispectral & Hyperspectral image compression. The FL compressor is well-suited for parallel hardware implementation. A GPU hardware implementation was developed for FL targeting the current state-of-the-art GPUs from NVIDIA(Trademark). The GPU implementation on a NVIDIA(Trademark) GeForce(Trademark) GTX 580 achieves a throughput performance of 583.08 Mbits/sec (44.85 MSamples/sec) and an acceleration of at least 6 times a software implementation running on a 3.47 GHz single core Intel(Trademark) Xeon(Trademark) processor. This paper describes the design and implementation of the FL algorithm on the GPU. The massively parallel implementation will provide in the future a fast and practical real-time solution for airborne and space applications.

  7. Dynamic blade row compression component model for stability studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesch, W. A.; Steenken, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes a generalized dynamic model which has been developed for use in compression component aerodynamic stability studies. The model is a one-dimensional, pitch-line, blade row, lumped volume system. Arbitrary placement of blade free volumes upstream, within, and downstream of the compression component as well as the removal of bleed flow from the exit of any rotor or stator are model options. The model has been applied to a two-stage fan and an eight-stage compressor. The clean inlet pressure ratio/flow maps and the surge line have been reproduced, thereby validating the capability of the dynamic model to reproduce the steady-flow characteristics of the compression component. A method for determining the onset of an aerodynamic instability which is associated with surge is described. Sinusoidally time-varying inlet and exit boundary conditions have been applied to the eight stage compressor as examples of the manner in which this model may be used for stability studies.

  8. Osmosis at constant volume. Negative pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Zupanovic, Pasko; Brumen, Milan; Fajmut, Ales; Juretic, Davor

    2009-01-01

    A thermodynamic state of solvent and solution separated with an elastic semipermeable membrane, in the box with a fixed volume, is considered. It is shown that the minimum of the free energy is accompanied by the compression of the solution and tension of the solvent caused by the transfer of solvent molecules into compartment with solution. The tensile state of the solvent is described in terms of negative pressure. It is found that the negative pressure as well as compression pressure is of the order of osmotic pressure given by van't Hoff equation. It is proposed that this mechanism could be responsible for the water uptake in tall trees.

  9. STEREOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF HYDRATION OF CARBOHYDRATES IN AQUEOUS-SOLUTIONS .3. DENSITY AND ULTRASOUND MEASUREMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GALEMA, SA; HOILAND, H

    1991-01-01

    Density and ultrasound measurements have been performed in aqueous solutions of pentoses, hexoses, methylpyranosides, and disaccharides as a function of molality of carbohydrate (0-0.3 mol kg-1). Partial molar volumes, partial molar isentropic compressibilities, and hydration numbers have been calcu

  10. Thermodynamic properties of binary liquid mixtures of diethylenetriamine with alcohols at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubey, Gyan Prakash, E-mail: gyan.dubey@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136119 (India); Kumar, Krishan [Department of Chemistry, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136119 (India)

    2011-09-20

    Highlights: {yields} Thermodynamic study of diethylenetriamine + 2-methyl-1-propanol, +2-propanol or +1-butanol have been made. {yields} Excess molar volumes and isentropic compressibility were determined. {yields} Types of interactions were discussed based on derived properties. - Abstract: Densities, {rho}, viscosities, {eta}, and speeds of sound, u, were measured for the binary liquid mixtures containing diethylenetriamine with 2-methyl-1-propanol, 2-propanol and 1-butanol at 293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15 and 313.15 K. From density and speed of sound data, excess molar volumes, V{sub m}{sup E} and deviations in isentropic compressibility, {Delta}{kappa}{sub s}, and speed of sound, {Delta}u have been evaluated. Viscosity data were used to compute deviations in viscosity and excess Gibbs energy of activation of viscous flow {Delta}G*{sup E} at 298.15, 303.15 and 308.15 K. A Redlich-Kister type equation was applied to fit the excess molar volumes and deviations in isentropic compressibility, speed of sound and viscosity data. The viscosity data have been correlated with the equations of Grunberg-Nissan, Tamura-Kurata, Heric-Brewer and of Hind et al. All the binary systems of the present study have negative values of excess molar volumes and deviations in isentropic compressibility over whole composition range and at all temperatures which indicates strong interactions between the components of binary mixtures.

  11. STEREOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF HYDRATION OF CARBOHYDRATES IN AQUEOUS-SOLUTIONS .3. DENSITY AND ULTRASOUND MEASUREMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GALEMA, SA; HOILAND, H

    1991-01-01

    Density and ultrasound measurements have been performed in aqueous solutions of pentoses, hexoses, methylpyranosides, and disaccharides as a function of molality of carbohydrate (0-0.3 mol kg-1). Partial molar volumes, partial molar isentropic compressibilities, and hydration numbers have been

  12. Maxwell's Demon and Data Compression

    CERN Document Server

    Hosoya, Akio; Shikano, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    In an asymmetric Szilard engine model of Maxwell's demon, we show the equivalence between information theoretical and thermodynamic entropies when the demon erases information optimally. The work gain by the engine can be exactly canceled out by the work necessary to reset demon's memory after optimal data compression a la Shannon before the erasure.

  13. Grid-free compressive beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Gerstoft, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation problem involves the localization of a few sources from a limited number of observations on an array of sensors, thus it can be formulated as a sparse signal reconstruction problem and solved efficiently with compressive sensing (CS) to achieve high...

  14. LIDAR data compression using wavelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, B.; Mansor, Shattri; Ramli, Abdul Rahman; Mohamed Sharif, Abdul Rashid B.; Sandeep, K.

    2005-10-01

    The lifting scheme has been found to be a flexible method for constructing scalar wavelets with desirable properties. In this paper, it is extended to the LIDAR data compression. A newly developed data compression approach to approximate the LIDAR surface with a series of non-overlapping triangles has been presented. Generally a Triangulated Irregular Networks (TIN) are the most common form of digital surface model that consists of elevation values with x, y coordinates that make up triangles. But over the years the TIN data representation has become a case in point for many researchers due its large data size. Compression of TIN is needed for efficient management of large data and good surface visualization. This approach covers following steps: First, by using a Delaunay triangulation, an efficient algorithm is developed to generate TIN, which forms the terrain from an arbitrary set of data. A new interpolation wavelet filter for TIN has been applied in two steps, namely splitting and elevation. In the splitting step, a triangle has been divided into several sub-triangles and the elevation step has been used to 'modify' the point values (point coordinates for geometry) after the splitting. Then, this data set is compressed at the desired locations by using second generation wavelets. The quality of geographical surface representation after using proposed technique is compared with the original LIDAR data. The results show that this method can be used for significant reduction of data set.

  15. Compressed Blind De-convolution

    CERN Document Server

    Saligrama, V

    2009-01-01

    Suppose the signal x is realized by driving a k-sparse signal u through an arbitrary unknown stable discrete-linear time invariant system H. These types of processes arise naturally in Reflection Seismology. In this paper we are interested in several problems: (a) Blind-Deconvolution: Can we recover both the filter $H$ and the sparse signal $u$ from noisy measurements? (b) Compressive Sensing: Is x compressible in the conventional sense of compressed sensing? Namely, can x, u and H be reconstructed from a sparse set of measurements. We develop novel L1 minimization methods to solve both cases and establish sufficient conditions for exact recovery for the case when the unknown system H is auto-regressive (i.e. all pole) of a known order. In the compressed sensing/sampling setting it turns out that both H and x can be reconstructed from O(k log(n)) measurements under certain technical conditions on the support structure of u. Our main idea is to pass x through a linear time invariant system G and collect O(k lo...

  16. Compressing spatio-temporal trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Joachim; Katajainen, Jyrki; Merrick, Damian

    2009-01-01

    A trajectory is a sequence of locations, each associated with a timestamp, describing the movement of a point. Trajectory data is becoming increasingly available and the size of recorded trajectories is getting larger. In this paper we study the problem of compressing planar trajectories such tha...

  17. Range Compressed Holographic Aperture Ladar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    digital holography, laser, active imaging, remote sensing, laser imaging 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT: SAR 8...slow speed tunable lasers, while relaxing the need to precisely track the transceiver or target motion. In the following section we describe a scenario...contrast targets. As shown in Figure 28, augmenting holographic ladar with range compression relaxes the dependence of image reconstruction on

  18. Compressive passive millimeter wave imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Liao, Shaolin; Elmer, Thomas W; Koehl, Eugene R; Heifetz, Alexander; Raptis, Apostolos C

    2015-01-27

    A compressive scanning approach for millimeter wave imaging and sensing. A Hadamard mask is positioned to receive millimeter waves from an object to be imaged. A subset of the full set of Hadamard acquisitions is sampled. The subset is used to reconstruct an image representing the object.

  19. Renormalized Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gover, A. Rod; Waldron, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    We develop a universal distributional calculus for regulated volumes of metrics that are suitably singular along hypersurfaces. When the hypersurface is a conformal infinity we give simple integrated distribution expressions for the divergences and anomaly of the regulated volume functional valid for any choice of regulator. For closed hypersurfaces or conformally compact geometries, methods from a previously developed boundary calculus for conformally compact manifolds can be applied to give explicit holographic formulæ for the divergences and anomaly expressed as hypersurface integrals over local quantities (the method also extends to non-closed hypersurfaces). The resulting anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, while the regulator dependence of the divergences is precisely captured by these formulæ. Conformal hypersurface invariants can be studied by demanding that the singular metric obey, smoothly and formally to a suitable order, a Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the conformal infinity. We prove that the volume anomaly for these singular Yamabe solutions is a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. Recently, Graham proved that the first variation of the volume anomaly recovers the density obstructing smooth solutions to this singular Yamabe problem; we give a new proof of this result employing our boundary calculus. Physical applications of our results include studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies.

  20. Experimental Study on Volume Change Indices of Bentonite Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports experimental results regarding statically compacted clay specimens to study the volume change behavior of bentonites. The volume change indices such as the coefficients of compressibility, volume compressibility, and consolidation ( i. e.av , mv and cv respectively) and the saturated coefficient of permeability k at different surcharge pressures were determined with the commonly adopted procedures. The swell potentials, swelling pressures, different phases of the swollen specimens were analyzed for the volume change behavior during compression. Experimental results revealed that the swell potential is dependent on the initial dry density, the initial water content and the vertical pressure at which the clay specimens were allowed to swell. The swelling pressure was found to be similar for the specimens with varying water content, showing strong dependency on the initial void ratio. The compression indices ( viz. mv and av) of saturated specimens decreased with an increase in the vertical pressure. About 80% to 90% of the volume change occurred in the primary compression phase under any given vertical pressure. The coefficient of consolidation cv and the saturated coefficient of permeability k decreased with an increase in the vertical pressure.

  1. Probing planetary interiors: Shock compression of water to 700 GPa and 3.8 g/cc, and recent high precision Hugoniot measurements of deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, Marcus

    2013-06-01

    The past several years have seen tremendous increase in the number of identified extra-solar planetary systems. Our understanding of the formation of these systems is tied to our understanding of the internal structure of these exoplanets, which in turn rely upon equations of state of light elements and compounds such as water and hydrogen. Here we present shock compression data for water with unprecedented accuracy that shows commonly used models for water in planetary modeling significantly overestimate the compressibility at conditions relevant to planetary interiors. Furthermore, we show that its behavior at these conditions, including reflectivity and isentropic response, is well described by a recent first-principles based equation of state. These findings advocate the use of this model as the standard for modeling Neptune, Uranus, and ``hot Neptune'' exoplanets, and should contribute to improved understanding of the interior structure of these planets, and perhaps improved understanding of formation mechanisms of planetary systems. We also present very recent experiments on deuterium that have taken advantage of continued improvements in both experimental configuration and the understanding of the quartz shock standard to obtain Hugoniot data with a significant increase in precision. These data will prove to provide a stringent test for the equation of state of hydrogen and its isotopes. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-ACO4-94AL85000.

  2. On the existence of weak solutions to the three-dimensional steady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in bounded domains

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Song

    2011-01-01

    We prove the existence of a weak solution to the three-dimensional steady compressible isentropic Navier-Stokes equations in bounded domains for any specific heat ratio \\gamma > 1. Generally speaking, the proof is based on the new weighted estimates of both pressure and kinetic energy for the approximate system which result in some higher integrability of the density, and the method of weak convergence. Comparing with [12] where the spatially periodic case was studied, here we have to control the additional integral terms of both pressure and kinetic energy involving with the points near the boundary which become degenerate when the points approach the boundary. Such integral terms are estimated using some new techniques, i.e., we use the techniques of the mirror image and boundary straightening to prove that the weighted estimates of both pressure and kinetic energy for the points near the boundary can be controlled by the weighted estimates for the points on the boundary. Moreover, we prove that once the we...

  3. MacCormack's technique-based pressure reconstruction approach for PIV data in compressible flows with shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shun; Xu, Jinglei; Yu, Kaikai

    2017-06-01

    This paper proposes an improved approach for extraction of pressure fields from velocity data, such as obtained by particle image velocimetry (PIV), especially for steady compressible flows with strong shocks. The principle of this approach is derived from Navier-Stokes equations, assuming adiabatic condition and neglecting viscosity of flow field boundaries measured by PIV. The computing method is based on MacCormack's technique in computational fluid dynamics. Thus, this approach is called the MacCormack method. Moreover, the MacCormack method is compared with several approaches proposed in previous literature, including the isentropic method, the spatial integration and the Poisson method. The effects of velocity error level and PIV spatial resolution on these approaches are also quantified by using artificial velocity data containing shock waves. The results demonstrate that the MacCormack method has higher reconstruction accuracy than other approaches, and its advantages become more remarkable with shock strengthening. Furthermore, the performance of the MacCormack method is also validated by using synthetic PIV images with an oblique shock wave, confirming the feasibility and advantage of this approach in real PIV experiments. This work is highly significant for the studies on aerospace engineering, especially the outer flow fields of supersonic aircraft and the internal flow fields of ramjets.

  4. Performance evaluation of a vapor compression heat pump cycle using binary zeotropic refrigerant mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Shigeru; Yara, Tomoyasu

    1999-07-01

    The HCFC refrigerants such as R22 have been used widely as working fluids in refrigeration and air-conditioning systems until now. These refrigerants, however, should be phased out early in the next century to prevent the depletion of the ozone layer. In this situation, binary and/or ternary mixtures composed of HFC and/or natural refrigerants have attracted a great deal of attention due to the following possibilities: (1) to improve the coefficient of performance, COP, by utilizing the temperature glide during phase change processes; (2) to keep the system in more suitable condition for given temperature levels of heat source and heat sink by selecting the combination and composition of refrigerants, etc. From this point of view, in the present study, the performance prediction of a vapor compression heat pump cycle using binary zeotropic refrigerant mixtures is carried out to clarify the effects of the combination of refrigerants, the composition of refrigerants and the size of heat exchangers on COP. In the prediction calculation, a vapor compression heat pump cycle, which consists of a compressor, a vertical plate-fin condenser, an expansion valve, a liquid-vapor separator and a vertical plate-fin evaporator is treated, and the following assumptions are employed: (1) the compression process is isentropic, (2) the expansion process is isenthalpic, (3) the refrigerant is a saturated liquid at the condenser outlet and a superheated vapor at the evaporator outlet, (4) the pressure drop in the condenser is negligible, while that in the evaporator is considered, (5) the local heat transfer characteristics in heat exchangers are considered. The prediction calculation is done for the binary zeotropic refrigerant mixtures of HFC134a/HCFC123 on condition that the heat source water temperature at the condenser outlet, the heat sink water temperature at the evaporator inlet, the water temperature change through condenser and evaporator, the heat load of condenser, the

  5. Control volume based hydrocephalus research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Benjamin; Voorhees, Abram; Wei, Timothy

    2008-11-01

    Hydrocephalus is a disease involving excess amounts of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) in the brain. Recent research has shown correlations to pulsatility of blood flow through the brain. However, the problem to date has presented as too complex for much more than statistical analysis and understanding. This talk will highlight progress on developing a fundamental control volume approach to studying hydrocephalus. The specific goals are to select physiologically control volume(s), develop conservation equations along with the experimental capabilities to accurately quantify terms in those equations. To this end, an in vitro phantom is used as a simplified model of the human brain. The phantom's design consists of a rigid container filled with a compressible gel. The gel has a hollow spherical cavity representing a ventricle and a cylindrical passage representing the aquaducts. A computer controlled piston pump supplies pulsatile volume fluctuations into and out of the flow phantom. MRI is used to measure fluid velocity, and volume change as functions of time. Independent pressure measurements and flow rate measurements are used to calibrate the MRI data. These data are used as a framework for future work with live patients.

  6. Semantic Source Coding for Flexible Lossy Image Compression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phoha, Shashi; Schmiedekamp, Mendel

    2007-01-01

    Semantic Source Coding for Lossy Video Compression investigates methods for Mission-oriented lossy image compression, by developing methods to use different compression levels for different portions...

  7. Infraspinatus muscle atrophy from suprascapular nerve compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, Christopher B; Owens, Brett D

    2014-02-01

    Muscle weakness without pain may signal a nerve compression injury. Because these injuries should be identified and treated early to prevent permanent muscle weakness and atrophy, providers should consider suprascapular nerve compression in patients with shoulder muscle weakness.

  8. High-frequency chest compression: a summary of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosman, Cara F; Jones, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present literature summary is to describe high-frequency chest compression (HFCC), summarize its history and outline study results on its effect on mucolysis, mucus transport, pulmonary function and quality of life. HFCC is a mechanical method of self-administered chest physiotherapy, which induces rapid air movement in and out of the lungs. This mean oscillated volume is an effective method of mucolysis and mucus clearance. HFCC can increase independence. Some studies have shown that HFCC leads to more mucus clearance and better lung function compared with conventional chest physiotherapy. However, HFCC also decreases end-expiratory lung volume, which can lead to increased airway resistance and a decreased oscillated volume. Adding positive end-expiratory pressure to HFCC has been shown to prevent this decrease in end-expiratory lung volume and to increase the oscillated volume. It is possible that the HFCC-induced decrease in end-expiratory lung volume may result in more mucus clearance in airways that remain open by reducing airway size. Adjunctive methods, such as positive end-expiratory pressure, may not always be needed to make HFCC more effective.

  9. High-Frequency Chest Compression: A Summary of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara F Dosman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present literature summary is to describe high-frequency chest compression (HFCC, summarize its history and outline study results on its effect on mucolysis, mucus transport, pulmonary function and quality of life. HFCC is a mechanical method of self-administered chest physiotherapy, which induces rapid air movement in and out of the lungs. This mean oscillated volume is an effective method of mucolysis and mucus clearance. HFCC can increase independence. Some studies have shown that HFCC leads to more mucus clearance and better lung function compared with conventional chest physiotherapy. However, HFCC also decreases end-expiratory lung volume, which can lead to increased airway resistance and a decreased oscillated volume. Adding positive end-expiratory pressure to HFCC has been shown to prevent this decrease in end-expiratory lung volume and to increase the oscillated volume. It is possible that the HFCC-induced decrease in end-expiratory lung volume may result in more mucus clearance in airways that remain open by reducing airway size. Adjunctive methods, such as positive end-expiratory pressure, may not always be needed to make HFCC more effective.

  10. ADVANCED RECIPROCATING COMPRESSION TECHNOLOGY (ARCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danny M. Deffenbaugh; Klaus Brun; Ralph E. Harris; J. Pete Harrell; Robert J. Mckee; J. Jeffrey Moore; Steven J. Svedeman; Anthony J. Smalley; Eugene L. Broerman; Robert A Hart; Marybeth G. Nored; Ryan S. Gernentz; Shane P. Siebenaler

    2005-12-01

    The U.S. natural gas pipeline industry is facing the twin challenges of increased flexibility and capacity expansion. To meet these challenges, the industry requires improved choices in gas compression to address new construction and enhancement of the currently installed infrastructure. The current fleet of installed reciprocating compression is primarily slow-speed integral machines. Most new reciprocating compression is and will be large, high-speed separable units. The major challenges with the fleet of slow-speed integral machines are: limited flexibility and a large range in performance. In an attempt to increase flexibility, many operators are choosing to single-act cylinders, which are causing reduced reliability and integrity. While the best performing units in the fleet exhibit thermal efficiencies between 90% and 92%, the low performers are running down to 50% with the mean at about 80%. The major cause for this large disparity is due to installation losses in the pulsation control system. In the better performers, the losses are about evenly split between installation losses and valve losses. The major challenges for high-speed machines are: cylinder nozzle pulsations, mechanical vibrations due to cylinder stretch, short valve life, and low thermal performance. To shift nozzle pulsation to higher orders, nozzles are shortened, and to dampen the amplitudes, orifices are added. The shortened nozzles result in mechanical coupling with the cylinder, thereby, causing increased vibration due to the cylinder stretch mode. Valve life is even shorter than for slow speeds and can be on the order of a few months. The thermal efficiency is 10% to 15% lower than slow-speed equipment with the best performance in the 75% to 80% range. The goal of this advanced reciprocating compression program is to develop the technology for both high speed and low speed compression that will expand unit flexibility, increase thermal efficiency, and increase reliability and integrity

  11. Optimization of compressive strength of zirconia based dental composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U V Hambire; V K Tripathi

    2014-10-01

    Dental composites are tooth-coloured restorative material used by dentists for various applications. Restoration of a lost tooth structure requires a material having mechanical as well as aesthetic properties similar to that of tooth. This poses challenges to engineers and the dentist alike. Dental composites consist of a matrix and a dispersed phase called filler, which are mainly responsible for its mechanical properties. Most commonly used matrix is bisphenol glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGMA). Silica and glass are conventional fillers used in the past. Recently, zirconia is being used due to its improved mechanical properties. A study was conducted to evaluate the contribution of zirconia to the mechanical properties in general and compressive strength in particular. We have attempted to make an experimental dental composite with a conglomerate of nanofillers, namely, zirconia, glass and silica, and optimize this filler volume percentage and obtain an optimum compressive strength for the experimental dental composite.

  12. Sampling theory, a renaissance compressive sensing and other developments

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Reconstructing or approximating objects from seemingly incomplete information is a frequent challenge in mathematics, science, and engineering. A multitude of tools designed to recover hidden information are based on Shannon’s classical sampling theorem, a central pillar of Sampling Theory. The growing need to efficiently obtain precise and tailored digital representations of complex objects and phenomena requires the maturation of available tools in Sampling Theory as well as the development of complementary, novel mathematical theories. Today, research themes such as Compressed Sensing and Frame Theory re-energize the broad area of Sampling Theory. This volume illustrates the renaissance that the area of Sampling Theory is currently experiencing. It touches upon trendsetting areas such as Compressed Sensing, Finite Frames, Parametric Partial Differential Equations, Quantization, Finite Rate of Innovation, System Theory, as well as sampling in Geometry and Algebraic Topology.

  13. Equation of State for Shock Compression of High Distension Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Dennis

    2013-06-01

    Shock Hugoniot data for full-density and porous compounds of boron carbide, silicon dioxide, tantalum pentoxide, uranium dioxide and playa alluvium are investigated for the purpose of equation-of-state representation of intense shock compression. Complications of multivalued Hugoniot behavior characteristic of highly distended solids are addressed through the application of enthalpy-based equations of state of the form originally proposed by Rice and Walsh in the late 1950's. Additivity of cold and thermal pressure intrinsic to the Mie-Gruneisen EOS framework is replaced by isobaric additive functions of the cold and thermal specific volume components in the enthalpy-based formulation. Additionally, experimental evidence supports acceleration of shock-induced phase transformation on the Hugoniot with increasing levels of initial distention for silicon dioxide, uranium dioxide and possibly boron carbide. Methods for addressing this experimentally observed facet of the shock compression are introduced into the EOS model.

  14. Equation of state for shock compression of distended solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Dennis; Fenton, Gregg; Vogler, Tracy

    2014-05-01

    Shock Hugoniot data for full-density and porous compounds of boron carbide, silicon dioxide, tantalum pentoxide, uranium dioxide and playa alluvium are investigated for the purpose of equation-of-state representation of intense shock compression. Complications of multivalued Hugoniot behavior characteristic of highly distended solids are addressed through the application of enthalpy-based equations of state of the form originally proposed by Rice and Walsh in the late 1950's. Additive measures of cold and thermal pressure intrinsic to the Mie-Gruneisen EOS framework is replaced by isobaric additive functions of the cold and thermal specific volume components in the enthalpy-based formulation. Additionally, experimental evidence reveals enhancement of shock-induced phase transformation on the Hugoniot with increasing levels of initial distension for silicon dioxide, uranium dioxide and possibly boron carbide. Methods for addressing this experimentally observed feature of the shock compression are incorporated into the EOS model.

  15. Anomalous compression behavior of germanium during phase transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Xiaozhi [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR), Shanghai 201203 (China); Tan, Dayong [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR), Shanghai 201203 (China); Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academic of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ren, Xiangting [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR), Shanghai 201203 (China); Yang, Wenge, E-mail: yangwg@hpstar.ac.cn, E-mail: duanweihe@scu.edu.cn [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR), Shanghai 201203 (China); High Pressure Synergetic Consortium (HPSynC), Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); He, Duanwei, E-mail: yangwg@hpstar.ac.cn, E-mail: duanweihe@scu.edu.cn [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Institute of Fluid Physics and National Key Laboratory of Shockwave and Detonation Physic, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Mao, Ho-Kwang [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR), Shanghai 201203 (China); High Pressure Synergetic Consortium (HPSynC), Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)

    2015-04-27

    In this article, we present the abnormal compression and plastic behavior of germanium during the pressure-induced cubic diamond to β-tin structure transition. Between 8.6 GPa and 13.8 GPa, in which pressure range both phases are co-existing, first softening and followed by hardening for both phases were observed via synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. These unusual behaviors can be interpreted as the volume misfit between different phases. Following Eshelby, the strain energy density reaches the maximum in the middle of the transition zone, where the switch happens from softening to hardening. Insight into these mechanical properties during phase transformation is relevant for the understanding of plasticity and compressibility of crystal materials when different phases coexist during a phase transition.

  16. Considerations and Algorithms for Compression of Sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Jesper

    compression algorithm that allows transparent incorporation of various estimates for probability distribution. Our experimental results allow the conclusion that set compression can benefit from incorporat- ing statistics, using our method or variants of previously known techniques.......We consider compression of unordered sets of distinct elements. After a discus- sion of the general problem, we focus on compressing sets of fixed-length bitstrings in the presence of statistical information. We survey techniques from previous work, suggesting some adjustments, and propose a novel...

  17. Cascaded quadratic soliton compression at 800 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Moses, Jeffrey;

    2007-01-01

    We study soliton compression in quadratic nonlinear materials at 800 nm, where group-velocity mismatch dominates. We develop a nonlocal theory showing that efficient compression depends strongly on characteristic nonlocal time scales related to pulse dispersion.......We study soliton compression in quadratic nonlinear materials at 800 nm, where group-velocity mismatch dominates. We develop a nonlocal theory showing that efficient compression depends strongly on characteristic nonlocal time scales related to pulse dispersion....

  18. Still image and video compression with MATLAB

    CERN Document Server

    Thyagarajan, K

    2010-01-01

    This book describes the principles of image and video compression techniques and introduces current and popular compression standards, such as the MPEG series. Derivations of relevant compression algorithms are developed in an easy-to-follow fashion. Numerous examples are provided in each chapter to illustrate the concepts. The book includes complementary software written in MATLAB SIMULINK to give readers hands-on experience in using and applying various video compression methods. Readers can enhance the software by including their own algorithms.

  19. Simultaneous denoising and compression of multispectral images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagag, Ahmed; Amin, Mohamed; Abd El-Samie, Fathi E.

    2013-01-01

    A new technique for denoising and compression of multispectral satellite images to remove the effect of noise on the compression process is presented. One type of multispectral images has been considered: Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus. The discrete wavelet transform (DWT), the dual-tree DWT, and a simple Huffman coder are used in the compression process. Simulation results show that the proposed technique is more effective than other traditional compression-only techniques.

  20. Image quality (IQ) guided multispectral image compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yufeng; Chen, Genshe; Wang, Zhonghai; Blasch, Erik

    2016-05-01

    Image compression is necessary for data transportation, which saves both transferring time and storage space. In this paper, we focus on our discussion on lossy compression. There are many standard image formats and corresponding compression algorithms, for examples, JPEG (DCT -- discrete cosine transform), JPEG 2000 (DWT -- discrete wavelet transform), BPG (better portable graphics) and TIFF (LZW -- Lempel-Ziv-Welch). The image quality (IQ) of decompressed image will be measured by numerical metrics such as root mean square error (RMSE), peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), and structural Similarity (SSIM) Index. Given an image and a specified IQ, we will investigate how to select a compression method and its parameters to achieve an expected compression. Our scenario consists of 3 steps. The first step is to compress a set of interested images by varying parameters and compute their IQs for each compression method. The second step is to create several regression models per compression method after analyzing the IQ-measurement versus compression-parameter from a number of compressed images. The third step is to compress the given image with the specified IQ using the selected compression method (JPEG, JPEG2000, BPG, or TIFF) according to the regressed models. The IQ may be specified by a compression ratio (e.g., 100), then we will select the compression method of the highest IQ (SSIM, or PSNR). Or the IQ may be specified by a IQ metric (e.g., SSIM = 0.8, or PSNR = 50), then we will select the compression method of the highest compression ratio. Our experiments tested on thermal (long-wave infrared) images (in gray scales) showed very promising results.

  1. Brain image Compression, a brief survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleha Masood

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain image compression is known as a subfield of image compression. It allows the deep analysis and measurements of brain images in different modes. Brain images are compressed to analyze and diagnose in an effective manner while reducing the image storage space. This survey study describes the different existing techniques regarding brain image compression. The techniques come under different categories. The study also discusses these categories.

  2. Position index preserving compression of text data

    OpenAIRE

    Akhtar, Nasim; Rashid, Mamunur; Islam, Shafiqul; Kashem, Mohammod Abul; Kolybanov, Cyrll Y.

    2011-01-01

    Data compression offers an attractive approach to reducing communication cost by using available bandwidth effectively. It also secures data during transmission for its encoded form. In this paper an index based position oriented lossless text compression called PIPC ( Position Index Preserving Compression) is developed. In PIPC the position of the input word is denoted by ASCII code. The basic philosopy of the secure compression is to preprocess the text and transform it into some intermedia...

  3. Minute ventilation at different compression to ventilation ratios, different ventilation rates, and continuous chest compressions with asynchronous ventilation in a newborn manikin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solevåg Anne L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In newborn resuscitation the recommended rate of chest compressions should be 90 per minute and 30 ventilations should be delivered each minute, aiming at achieving a total of 120 events per minute. However, this recommendation is based on physiological plausibility and consensus rather than scientific evidence. With focus on minute ventilation (Mv, we aimed to compare today’s standard to alternative chest compression to ventilation (C:V ratios and different ventilation rates, as well as to continuous chest compressions with asynchronous ventilation. Methods Two investigators performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation on a newborn manikin with a T-piece resuscitator and manual chest compressions. The C:V ratios 3:1, 9:3 and 15:2, as well as continuous chest compressions with asynchronous ventilation (120 compressions and 40 ventilations per minute were performed in a randomised fashion in series of 10 × 2 minutes. In addition, ventilation only was performed at three different rates (40, 60 and 120 ventilations per minute, respectively. A respiratory function monitor measured inspiration time, tidal volume and ventilation rate. Mv was calculated for the different interventions and the Mann–Whitney test was used for comparisons between groups. Results Median Mv per kg in ml (interquartile range was significantly lower at the C:V ratios of 9:3 (140 (134–144 and 15:2 (77 (74–83 as compared to 3:1 (191(183–199. With ventilation only, there was a correlation between ventilation rate and Mv despite a negative correlation between ventilation rate and tidal volumes. Continuous chest compressions with asynchronous ventilation gave higher Mv as compared to coordinated compressions and ventilations at a C:V ratio of 3:1. Conclusions In this study, higher C:V ratios than 3:1 compromised ventilation dynamics in a newborn manikin. However, higher ventilation rates, as well as continuous chest compressions with asynchronous

  4. H.264/AVC Video Compression on Smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharabayko, M. P.; Markov, N. G.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the usage of H.264/AVC video compression tools by the flagship smartphones. The results show that only a subset of tools is used, meaning that there is still a potential to achieve higher compression efficiency within the H.264/AVC standard, but the most advanced smartphones are already reaching the compression efficiency limit of H.264/AVC.

  5. BPCS steganography using EZW lossy compressed images

    OpenAIRE

    Spaulding, Jeremiah; Noda, Hideki; Shirazi, Mahdad N.; Kawaguchi, Eiji

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a steganography method based on an embedded zerotree wavelet (EZW) compression scheme and bit-plane complexity segmentation (BPCS) steganography. The proposed steganography enables us to use lossy compressed images as dummy files in bit-plane-based steganographic algorithms. Large embedding rates of around 25% of the compressed image size were achieved with little noticeable degradation in image quality.

  6. Study of Effect of Raw Data Compression on Azimuth Multi-channel SAR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available An effective way to achieve High Resolution and Wide Swath (HRWS imaging capability is the multi-channel technique in azimuth. Improved resolution and swath can dramatically increase the volume of echo data in the SAR system. However, the onboard data storage and data-transmission bandwidth are limited, so data compression technique is typically used to reduce the volume of echo data. To study the effect of raw data compression on the azimuth multi-channel SAR system, in this paper, we establish a multi-channel SAR signal model based on data compression. We then derive and analyze the effects of data compression on the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR scaling factor of the multi-channel SAR system and quantization noise. Finally, we verify the validity of the proposed model and analysis results using simulation and real data and discuss the effect of data compression on the Peek-to-Ghost Ratio (PGR. The results of this paper provide an important theoretical basis for the choice of compression method in the multi-channel SAR system.

  7. Scan Cell Positioning for Boosting the Compression of Fan-Out Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ozgur Sinanoglu; Mohammed Al-Mulla; Noora A.Shunaiber; Alex Orailoglu

    2009-01-01

    Ensuring a high manufacturing test quality of an integrated electronic circuit mandates the application of a large volume test set.Even if the test data can be fit into the memory of an external tester,the consequent increase in test application time reflects into elevated production costs.Test data compression solutions have been proposed to address the test time and data volume problem by storing and delivering the test data in a compressed format,and subsequently by expanding the data on-chip.In this paper,we propose a scan cell positioning methodology that accompanies a compression technique in order to boost the compression ratio,and squash the test data even further.While we present the application of the proposed approach in conjunction with the fan-out based decompression architecture,this approach CaD.be extended for application along with other compression solutions as well.The experimental results also confirm the compression enhancement of the proposed methodology.

  8. A Novel Pumped Hydro Combined with Compressed Air Energy Storage System

    OpenAIRE

    Erren Yao; Xinbing Wang; Liqin Wang; Huanran Wang

    2013-01-01

    A novel pumped hydro combined with compressed air energy storage (PHCA) system is proposed in this paper to resolve the problems of bulk energy storage in the wind power generation industry over an area in China, which is characterised by drought and water shortages. Thermodynamic analysis of the energy storage system, which focuses on the pre-set pressure, storage volume capacity, water air volume ratio, pump performance, and water turbine performance of the storage system, is also presented...

  9. The plastic compressibility of 7075-T651 aluminum-alloy plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, A. D.; Sandor, B. I.

    1986-01-01

    The change in volume, and therefore the change in mass density, of an aluminum alloy was measured in uniaxial tension using clip-on extensometers. The experimental data do not agree with the assumption of plastic incompressibility found in the classical theories of plasticity. In fact, the elastic and plastic volume changes are of the same order of magnitude. Plastic anisotropy is thought to be the prime cause of this plastic compressibility.

  10. Stability of compressible boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, Ali H.

    1989-01-01

    The stability of compressible 2-D and 3-D boundary layers is reviewed. The stability of 2-D compressible flows differs from that of incompressible flows in two important features: There is more than one mode of instability contributing to the growth of disturbances in supersonic laminar boundary layers and the most unstable first mode wave is 3-D. Whereas viscosity has a destabilizing effect on incompressible flows, it is stabilizing for high supersonic Mach numbers. Whereas cooling stabilizes first mode waves, it destabilizes second mode waves. However, second order waves can be stabilized by suction and favorable pressure gradients. The influence of the nonparallelism on the spatial growth rate of disturbances is evaluated. The growth rate depends on the flow variable as well as the distance from the body. Floquet theory is used to investigate the subharmonic secondary instability.

  11. Conservative regularization of compressible flow

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnaswami, Govind S; Thyagaraja, Anantanarayanan

    2015-01-01

    Ideal Eulerian flow may develop singularities in vorticity w. Navier-Stokes viscosity provides a dissipative regularization. We find a local, conservative regularization - lambda^2 w times curl(w) of compressible flow and compressible MHD: a three dimensional analogue of the KdV regularization of the one dimensional kinematic wave equation. The regulator lambda is a field subject to the constitutive relation lambda^2 rho = constant. Lambda is like a position-dependent mean-free path. Our regularization preserves Galilean, parity and time-reversal symmetries. We identify locally conserved energy, helicity, linear and angular momenta and boundary conditions ensuring their global conservation. Enstrophy is shown to remain bounded. A swirl velocity field is identified, which transports w/rho and B/rho generalizing the Kelvin-Helmholtz and Alfven theorems. A Hamiltonian and Poisson bracket formulation is given. The regularized equations are used to model a rotating vortex, channel flow, plane flow, a plane vortex ...

  12. 基于整型小波变换的DEM数据压缩%DEM Compression Based on Integer Wavelet Transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈仁喜; 李鑫慧

    2007-01-01

    DEM data is an important component of spatial database in GIS. The data volume is so huge that compression is necessary. Wavelet transform has many advantages and has become a trend in data compression. Considering the simplicity and high efficiency of the compression system, integer wavelet transform is applied to DEM and a simple coding algorithm with high efficiency is introduced. Experiments on a variety of DEM are carried out and some useful rules are presented at the end of this paper.

  13. Compressibility effects on the flow past a rotating cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teymourtash, A. R.; Salimipour, S. E.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, laminar flow past a rotating circular cylinder placed in a compressible uniform stream is investigated via a two-dimensional numerical simulation and the compressibility effects due to the combination of the free-stream and cylinder rotation on the flow pattern such as forming, shedding, and removing of vortices and also the lift and drag coefficients are studied. The numerical simulation of the flow is based on the discretization of convective fluxes of the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations by second-order Roe's scheme and an explicit finite volume method. Because of the importance of the time dependent parameters in the solution, the second-order time accurate is applied by a dual time stepping approach. In order to validate the operation of a computer program, some results are compared with previous experimental and numerical data. The results of this study show that the effects due to flow compressibility such as normal shock wave caused the interesting variations on the flow around the cylinder even at a free-stream with a low Mach number. At incompressible flow around the rotating cylinder, increasing the speed ratio, α (ratio of the surface speed to free-stream velocity), causes the ongoing increase in the lift coefficient, but in compressible flow for each free-stream Mach number, increasing the speed ratio results in obtaining a limited lift coefficient (a maximum mean lift coefficient). In addition, results from the compressible flow indicate that by increasing the free-stream Mach number, the maximum mean lift coefficient is decreased, while the mean drag coefficient is increased. It is also found that by increasing the Reynolds number at low Mach numbers, the maximum mean lift coefficient and critical speed ratio are decreased and the mean drag coefficient and Strouhal number are increased. However at the higher Mach numbers, these parameters become independent of the Reynolds number.

  14. Antiproton compression and radial measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, G. B.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Bray, C. C.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Funakoshi, R.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Page, R. D.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; El Nasr, S. Seif; Silveira, D. M.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-08-01

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, achieved by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile, and its relation to that of the electron plasma. We also measure the outer radial profile by ejecting antiprotons to the trap wall using an octupole magnet.

  15. Volumetric and ultrasonic behaviour of binary mixtures of 1-nonanol with o-cresol, m-cresol, p-cresol and anisole at T = (293.15 and 313.15) K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, Subhash C., E-mail: bhatiasc2@rediffmail.co [Department of Chemistry, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136 119 (India); Rani, Ruman, E-mail: rumanjangra58@gmail.co [Department of Chemistry, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136 119 (India); Bhatia, Rachna, E-mail: bhatiarachna_3@rediffmail.co [Department of Chemistry, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136 119 (India); Anand, Hardeep [Department of Chemistry, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136 119 (India)

    2011-03-15

    Densities, {rho}, and speeds of sound, u, of binary liquid mixtures of 1-nonanol with o-cresol, m-cresol, p-cresol and anisole have been measured over the entire range of composition at T = (293.15 and 313.15) K and at atmospheric pressure. Using these data, the excess molar volume, V{sup E}, molar free volume, V{sub f}, parameters related to space-filling ability, V{sub f}/V, non-linearity parameters, B/A, isentropic compressibility, {kappa}{sub S}, molar isentropic compressibility, K{sub S,m}, deviation of molar isentropic compressibility, K{sub S,m}{sup E}, deviations of the speed of sound, u{sup D}, and limiting excess partial molar volume, V-bar{sub m,i}{sup E,0}, and isentropic compressibility, K-bar{sub m,i}{sup E,0}, have been calculated. The calculated excess and deviation functions have been fitted to the Redlich-Kister polynomial equations and the results analyzed in terms of molecular interactions and structural effects.

  16. Compressibility effects on turbulent mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panickacheril John, John; Donzis, Diego

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the effect of compressibility on passive scalar mixing in isotropic turbulence with a focus on the fundamental mechanisms that are responsible for such effects using a large Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) database. The database includes simulations with Taylor Reynolds number (Rλ) up to 100, turbulent Mach number (Mt) between 0.1 and 0.6 and Schmidt number (Sc) from 0.5 to 1.0. We present several measures of mixing efficiency on different canonical flows to robustly identify compressibility effects. We found that, like shear layers, mixing is reduced as Mach number increases. However, data also reveal a non-monotonic trend with Mt. To assess directly the effect of dilatational motions we also present results with both dilatational and soleniodal forcing. Analysis suggests that a small fraction of dilatational forcing decreases mixing time at higher Mt. Scalar spectra collapse when normalized by Batchelor variables which suggests that a compressive mechanism similar to Batchelor mixing in incompressible flows might be responsible for better mixing at high Mt and with dilatational forcing compared to pure solenoidal mixing. We also present results on scalar budgets, in particular on production and dissipation. Support from NSF is gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Laser Compression of Nanocrystalline Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, M. A.; Jarmakani, H. N.; Bringa, E. M.; Earhart, P.; Remington, B. A.; Vo, N. Q.; Wang, Y. M.

    2009-12-01

    Shock compression in nanocrystalline nickel is simulated over a range of pressures (10-80 GPa) and compared with experimental results. Laser compression carried out at Omega and Janus yields new information on the deformation mechanisms of nanocrystalline Ni. Although conventional deformation does not produce hardening, the extreme regime imparted by laser compression generates an increase in hardness, attributed to the residual dislocations observed in the structure by TEM. An analytical model is applied to predict the critical pressure for the onset of twinning in nanocrystalline nickel. The slip-twinning transition pressure is shifted from 20 GPa, for polycrystalline Ni, to 80 GPa, for Ni with g. s. of 10 nm. Contributions to the net strain from the different mechanisms of plastic deformation (partials, perfect dislocations, twinning, and grain boundary shear) were quantified in the nanocrystalline samples through MD calculations. The effect of release, a phenomenon often neglected in MD simulations, on dislocation behavior was established. A large fraction of the dislocations generated at the front are annihilated.

  18. Image Compression Using Discrete Wavelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mozammel Hoque Chowdhury

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Image compression is a key technology in transmission and storage of digital images because of vast data associated with them. This research suggests a new image compression scheme with pruning proposal based on discrete wavelet transformation (DWT. The effectiveness of the algorithm has been justified over some real images, and the performance of the algorithm has been compared with other common compression standards. The algorithm has been implemented using Visual C++ and tested on a Pentium Core 2 Duo 2.1 GHz PC with 1 GB RAM. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed technique provides sufficient high compression ratios compared to other compression techniques.

  19. Mathematical theory of compressible fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Von Mises, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical Theory of Compressible Fluid Flow covers the conceptual and mathematical aspects of theory of compressible fluid flow. This five-chapter book specifically tackles the role of thermodynamics in the mechanics of compressible fluids. This text begins with a discussion on the general theory of characteristics of compressible fluid with its application. This topic is followed by a presentation of equations delineating the role of thermodynamics in compressible fluid mechanics. The discussion then shifts to the theory of shocks as asymptotic phenomena, which is set within the context of

  20. Video compressive sensing using Gaussian mixture models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianbo; Yuan, Xin; Liao, Xuejun; Llull, Patrick; Brady, David J; Sapiro, Guillermo; Carin, Lawrence

    2014-11-01

    A Gaussian mixture model (GMM)-based algorithm is proposed for video reconstruction from temporally compressed video measurements. The GMM is used to model spatio-temporal video patches, and the reconstruction can be efficiently computed based on analytic expressions. The GMM-based inversion method benefits from online adaptive learning and parallel computation. We demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed inversion method with videos reconstructed from simulated compressive video measurements, and from a real compressive video camera. We also use the GMM as a tool to investigate adaptive video compressive sensing, i.e., adaptive rate of temporal compression.