WorldWideScience

Sample records for volume in-situ filtration

  1. An in situ filtration system for trace element determination in suspended particulate matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grotti, Marco; Soggia, Francesco; Dalla Riva, Simona; Magi, Emanuele; Frache, Roberto

    2003-11-28

    A system for in situ filtration of suspended particulate matter (SPM) has been developed specifically for trace element determination. Minimization of metal contamination sources was realized by careful choice of materials and designing a ''closed-open-closed'' electronic procedure for the soaking of the system. In order to prevent undesired pressure increase due to the filter clogging and to avoid modification of metal distribution in the different phases of SPM, a relief valve was used to keep the pumping pressure constant. The possibility to perform a sub-sampling of SPM was also taken into account to expand the analytical capabilities. Finally, the sampler was equipped with a multiparametric probe in order to carry out real-time measurements of physical parameters (temperature, salinity, fluorescence, turbidimetry) and operating conditions (flow rates, filtered volumes, energy consumption). The system has been tested and applied successfully in Antarctic coastal waters (Terra Nova Bay, Ross Sea) in the framework of the Italian Research Programme in Antarctica (PNRA). The analytical possibilities allowed by the large amount of SPM which can be collected by FIS500 (50-100 mg) include total metal concentration, solid speciation and morphological investigation by scanning electron microscopy.

  2. Stereological estimates of nuclear volume in the prognostic evaluation of primary flat carcinoma in situ of the urinary bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Jacobsen, F

    1991-01-01

    Primary, flat carcinoma in situ of the urinary bladder is rare and its behaviour is unpredictable. The aim of this retrospective study was to obtain base-line data and investigate the prognostic value of unbiased, stereological estimates of the volume-weighted mean nuclear volume, nuclear vv, in 78...

  3. MCNP ESTIMATE OF THE SAMPLED VOLUME IN A NON-DESTRUCTIVE IN SITU SOIL CARBON ANALYSIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WIELOPOLSKI, L.; DIOSZEGI, I.; MITRA, S.

    2004-05-03

    Global warming, promoted by anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emission into the atmosphere, is partially mitigated by the photosynthesis processes of the terrestrial echo systems that act as atmospheric CO{sub 2} scrubbers and sequester carbon in soil. Switching from till to no till soils management practices in agriculture further augments this process. Carbon sequestration is also advanced by putting forward a carbon ''credit'' system whereby these can be traded between CO{sub 2} producers and sequesters. Implementation of carbon ''credit'' trade will be further promulgated by recent development of a non-destructive in situ carbon monitoring system based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS). Volumes and depth distributions defined by the 0.1, 1.0, 10, 50, and 90 percent neutron isofluxes, from a point source located at either 5 or 30 cm above the surface, were estimated using Monte Carlo calculations.

  4. Relationship between LIBS Ablation and Pit Volume for Geologic Samples: Applications for in situ Absolute Geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devismes, D.; Cohen, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    In planetary sciences, in situ absolute geochronology is a scientific and engineering challenge. Currently, the age of the Martian surface can only be determined by crater density counting. However this method has significant uncertainties and needs to be calibrated with absolute ages. We are developing an instrument to acquire in situ absolute geochronology based on the K-Ar method. The protocol is based on the laser ablation of a rock by hundreds of laser pulses. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) gives the potassium content of the ablated material and a mass spectrometer (quadrupole or ion trap) measures the quantity of 40Ar released. In order to accurately measure the quantity of released 40Ar in cases where Ar is an atmospheric constituent (e.g., Mars), the sample is first put into a chamber under high vacuum. The 40Arquantity, the concentration of K and the estimation of the ablated mass are the parameters needed to give the age of the rocks. The main uncertainties with this method are directly linked to the measures of the mass (typically some µg) and of the concentration of K by LIBS (up to 10%). Because the ablated mass is small compared to the mass of the sample, and because material is redeposited onto the sample after ablation, it is not possible to directly measure the ablated mass. Our current protocol measures the ablated volume and estimates the sample density to calculate ablated mass. The precision and accuracy of this method may be improved by using knowledge of the sample's geologic properties to predict its response to laser ablation, i.e., understanding whether natural samples have a predictable relationship between laser energy deposited and resultant ablation volume. In contrast to most previous studies of laser ablation, theoretical equations are not highly applicable. The reasons are numerous, but the most important are: a) geologic rocks are complex, polymineralic materials; b) the conditions of ablation are unusual (for example

  5. A large volume cell for in situ neutron diffraction studies of hydrothermal crystallizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fang; Qian, Gujie; Brugger, Joël; Studer, Andrew; Olsen, Scott; Pring, Allan

    2010-10-01

    A hydrothermal cell with 320 ml internal volume has been designed and constructed for in situ neutron diffraction studies of hydrothermal crystallizations. The cell design adopts a dumbbell configuration assembled with standard commercial stainless steel components and a zero-scattering Ti-Zr alloy sample compartment. The fluid movement and heat transfer are simply driven by natural convection due to the natural temperature gradient along the fluid path, so that the temperature at the sample compartment can be stably sustained by heating the fluid in the bottom fluid reservoir. The cell can operate at temperatures up to 300 °C and pressures up to 90 bars and is suitable for studying reactions requiring a large volume of hydrothermal fluid to damp out the negative effect from the change of fluid composition during the course of the reactions. The capability of the cell was demonstrated by a hydrothermal phase transformation investigation from leucite (KAlSi2O6) to analcime (NaAlSi2O6ṡH2O) at 210 °C on the high intensity powder diffractometer Wombat in ANSTO. The kinetics of the transformation has been resolved by collecting diffraction patterns every 10 min followed by Rietveld quantitative phase analysis. The classical Avrami/Arrhenius analysis gives an activation energy of 82.3±1.1 kJ mol-1. Estimations of the reaction rate under natural environments by extrapolations agree well with petrological observations.

  6. In situ calibrated defocusing PTV for wall-bounded measurement volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, T.; Hain, R.; Kähler, C. J.

    2016-08-01

    In many situations, 3D velocity measurements in thin (∼1 mm) but wide (∼100  ×  100 mm2) flow channels is an important task. To resolve the in-plane and out-of-plane velocity gradients properly, a precise calibration is required, since 3D measurement approaches rely strongly on the accuracy of the calibration procedure. It is likely that calibration targets do not fit domains with small depths, due to their size. Furthermore, in fields where such measurements are of interest, the accessibility of the measurement volume is often limited or even impossible. To overcome these drawbacks, this paper introduces an in situ calibrated defocusing particle tracking velocimetry approach for wall-bounded measurement domains with depths in the low millimeter range. The calibration function for the particle depth location is directly derived from the particle image geometries and their displacements between two frames. Employing only a single camera, this defocusing approach is capable of measuring the air flow between two parallel glass plates at a distance of 1 mm with an average uncertainty of 2.43% for each track, relative to the maximum velocity. A tomographic particle tracking velocimetry measurement, serving as a benchmark for the single camera technique, reaches an average uncertainty of 1.59%. Altogether, with its straightforward set-up and without requiring a calibration target, this in situ calibrated defocusing approach opens new areas of application for optical flow velocimetry. In particular, for measurement domains with small optical windows and a lack of accessibility.

  7. In situ fabrication of depth-type hierarchical CNT/quartz fiber filters for high efficiency filtration of sub-micron aerosols and high water repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Zong, Yichen; Zhang, Yingying; Yang, Mengmeng; Zhang, Rufan; Li, Shuiqing; Wei, Fei

    2013-03-01

    We fabricated depth-type hierarchical CNT/quartz fiber (QF) filters through in situ growth of CNTs upon quartz fiber (QF) filters using a floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The filter specific area of the CNT/QF filters is more than 12 times higher than that of the pristine QF filters. As a result, the penetration of sub-micron aerosols for CNT/QF filters is reduced by two orders of magnitude, which reaches the standard of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. Simultaneously, due to the fluffy brush-like hierarchical structure of CNTs on QFs, the pore size of the hybrid filters only has a small increment. The pressure drop across the CNT/QF filters only increases about 50% with respect to that of the pristine QF filters, leading to an obvious increased quality factor of the CNT/QF filters. Scanning electron microscope images reveal that CNTs are very efficient in capturing sub-micron aerosols. Moreover, the CNT/QF filters show high water repellency, implying their superiority for applications in humid conditions.We fabricated depth-type hierarchical CNT/quartz fiber (QF) filters through in situ growth of CNTs upon quartz fiber (QF) filters using a floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The filter specific area of the CNT/QF filters is more than 12 times higher than that of the pristine QF filters. As a result, the penetration of sub-micron aerosols for CNT/QF filters is reduced by two orders of magnitude, which reaches the standard of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. Simultaneously, due to the fluffy brush-like hierarchical structure of CNTs on QFs, the pore size of the hybrid filters only has a small increment. The pressure drop across the CNT/QF filters only increases about 50% with respect to that of the pristine QF filters, leading to an obvious increased quality factor of the CNT/QF filters. Scanning electron microscope images reveal that CNTs are very efficient in capturing sub-micron aerosols

  8. Greenland ice sheet melt area, volume, and runoff from satellite and in situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van As, D.; Box, J. E.; Fausto, R. S.; Petersen, D.; Citterio, M.; Ahlstrom, A. P.; Andersen, S. B.; Steffen, K.

    2013-12-01

    Remote sensing provides surface melt area and regional mass change. In situ automatic weather station (AWS) data provide a relatively precise, but very local surface mass budget. Combining the two methods allows melt quantification for the entire Greenland ice sheet. We use interpolated near-surface air temperature from the GC-Net and PROMICE AWS networks, and remotely-sensed MODIS surface albedo to calculate melt with a temperature/albedo-index melt model. The calculations make use of albedo, combined with top-of-the-atmosphere solar radiation and cloud cover, to take into account absorbed shortwave radiation, the dominant melt parameter. In so doing the darkening due to the melt-albedo feedback is accounted. Calculated ablation is calibrated using AWS data. Assuming that surface albedo is a first-order indicator of the firn's available pore space and cold content, refreezing is parameterized as a function of it. Meltwater runoff for selected catchments is validated with river discharge data. The product: observation-based daily maps of near-surface air temperature, melt (extent and volume), and runoff for the Greenland ice sheet.

  9. Postharvest ripening study of sweet lime (Citrus limettioides) in situ by volume-localized NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Abhishek; George, Christy; Bharathwaj, Sathyamoorthy; Chandrakumar, Narayanan

    2009-02-25

    Spatially resolved NMR--especially volume-localized spectroscopy (VLS)is useful in various fields including clinical diagnosis, process monitoring, etc. VLS carries high significance because of its ability to identify molecular species and hence track molecular events. This paper reports the application of VLS at 200 MHz to study the postharvest ripening of sweet lime ( Citrus limettioides ) in situ, including a comparative study of normal and acetylene-mediated ripening. Localization to a cubic voxel of 64 microL was achieved with point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS). Glucose, sucrose, fructose, and citric acid are found to be among the main constituents in the fruit. In the natural process, the sugar to acid ratio increases with ripening. Ethanol generation is seen to occur at a faster rate in acetylene-mediated ripening. Whereas NMR imaging experiments including parametric imaging (e.g., T(1) or T(2) maps) may be employed for "macro" monitoring of processes such as these, this work demonstrates that the molecular imprint of the process may be tracked noninvasively by VLS.

  10. Demonstration, testing, & evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume II: Appendices A to E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

    1996-02-12

    This document is a draft final report for US DOE contract entitled, {open_quotes}Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,{close_quotes} Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report This document is Volume II, containing appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120{degrees}to 130{degrees}C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow.

  11. The impact of available anti-glaucoma therapy on the volume and age profile of patients undergoing glaucoma filtration surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keane, P A

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether new classes of glaucoma medication have influenced glaucoma filtration surgery over a 20-year period in the southeast region of Ireland. METHODS: All patients undergoing glaucoma filtration surgery between January 1986 and December 2005 in Waterford Regional Hospital were identified. The following data were recorded for each patient: age; sex; and type of filtration procedure. RESULTS: Over the 20-year study period two consultant ophthalmic surgeons performed a total of 760 glaucoma filtration procedures on patients aged over 20 years. The annual average number of glaucoma surgeries declined steadily, defined by availability of different topical anti-glaucoma medications, from an average of 23.75 surgeries per surgeon per year in the subperiod 1986-1995, to 21 in 1996, 20 in 1997, and 12.69 surgeries per surgeon per year in 1998-2005, these differences being statistically significant (general linear model, P<0.001). The age profile of patients did not change significantly over the course of the study period. CONCLUSIONS: The volume of patients requiring glaucoma filtration surgery under the care of two consultant ophthalmic surgeons decreased over the 20-year study period, an era in which three classes of anti-glaucoma medications were made available. However, an increase in the age profile of patients undergoing glaucoma filtration surgery during the same period was not observed. Further study is required to resolve whether introduction of the new topical anti-glaucoma medications has led to a real reduction in the demand for glaucoma filtration surgery, or has just led to the deferral of such a demand.

  12. Demonstration, testing, and evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Final report, Volume 2, Appendices A to E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Sabato, W.

    1996-04-05

    This is a final report presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cubic yards of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. It was demonstrated that the mass flow rate of the volatile organic chemicals was enhanced in the recovered soil gas as a result of heating. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOC`s and other organic chemicals. Although it may be applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by air flow.

  13. In Situ Soil Venting - Full Scale Test Hill AFB, Guidance Document, Literature Review. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    high bulk density to reduce diffusive path length. AWARE, Inc., (now Eckenfelder , Inc.) has performed experimental and theoretical work on in situ soil...operating guidance. The Eckenfelder work has continued with a one-year field study (Reference 33), consisting of a single 4-inch vent 20-foot-deep

  14. Glomerular filtration is reduced by high tidal volume ventilation in an in vivo healthy rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Luque

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation has been associated with organ failure in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. The present study examines the effects of tidal volume (V T on renal function using two V T values (8 and 27 mL/kg in anesthetized, paralyzed and mechanically ventilated male Wistar rats. Animals were randomized into two groups of 6 rats each: V T8 (V T, 8 mL/kg; 61.50 ± 0.92 breaths/min; positive end-expiratory pressure, 3.0 cmH2O; peak airway pressure (PAW, 11.8 ± 2.0 cmH2O, and V T27 (V T, 27 mL/kg; 33.60 ± 1.56 breaths/min; positive end-expiratory pressure, none, and PAW, 22.7 ± 4.0 cmH2O. Throughout the experiment, mean PAW remained comparable between the two groups (6.33 ± 0.21 vs 6.50 ± 0.22 cmH2O. For rats in the V T27 group, inulin clearance (mL·min-1·body weight-1 decreased acutely after 60 min of mechanical ventilation and even more significantly after 90 min, compared with baseline values (0.60 ± 0.05 and 0.45 ± 0.05 vs 0.95 ± 0.07; P < 0.001, although there were no differences between groups in mean arterial pressure or gasometric variables. In the V T8 group, inulin clearance at 120 min of mechanical ventilation remained unchanged in relation to baseline values (0.72 ± 0.03 vs 0.80 ± 0.05. The V T8 and V T27 groups did not differ in terms of serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (3.97 ± 0.27 vs 4.02 ± 0.45 nmol/mL or endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression (94.25 ± 2.75 vs 96.25 ± 2.39%. Our results show that glomerular filtration is acutely affected by high tidal volume ventilation but do not provide information about the mechanism.

  15. Developing a Relationship Between LIBS Ablation and Pit Volume for In Situ Dating of Geologic Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devismes, D.; Cohen, B. A.; Gillot, P.-Y.

    2015-01-01

    In planetary exploration, in situ absolute geochronology is an important measurement. Thus far, on Mars, the age of the surface has largely been determined by crater density counting, which gives relative ages. These ages can have significant uncertainty as they depend on many poorly constrained parameters. More than that, the curves must be tied to absolute ages to relate geologic timescales on Mars to the rest of the solar system. Thus far, only the lost lander Beagle 2 was designed to conduct absolute geochronology measurements, though some recent attempts using MSL Curiosity show that this investigation is feasible (Reference Farley here) and should be strongly encouraged for future flight.

  16. The effect of strain path change on subgrain volume fraction determined from in situ X-ray measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wejdemann, Christian; Poulsen, Henning Friis; Lienert, U.

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of dislocation structures in individual bulk grains in copper during strain path changes is studied with a new in situ synchrotron technique which combines high angular resolution with fast three-dimensional reciprocal space mapping. Deformed copper contains regions with vanishing...... dislocation density called subgrains bounded by dislocation rich walls. With the new technique reciprocal space maps, consisting of sharp peaks arising from the subgrains superimposed on a cloud of lower intensity arising from the dislocation walls, are obtained, which allows properties such as subgrain...... volume fraction to be quantified. The studied strain path changes are tension-tension sequences. Polycrystalline copper sheets are pre-deformed in tension to 5% strain, and tensile samples are cut with varying angles between the first and second loading axis. The second tensile deformation up...

  17. Development and sea trials of a subsea holographic camera for large volume in-situ recording of marine organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, John; Alexander, Stephen J.; Craig, Gary; Hendry, David C.; Hobson, Peter R.; Lampitt, R. S.; Marteau, J.-M.; Nareid, Helge; Nebrensky, J. J.; Player, Michael A.; Saw, Kevin; Tipping, Keith

    2002-06-01

    We describe the development, construction and sea testing of An underwater holographic camera (HoloCam) for in situ recording of marine organisms and particles in large volumes of sea water. HoloCam comprises a laser, power supply, holographic recording optics, and plate holders, a water- tight housing and a support frame. Added to this are control electronics such that the entire camera is remotely operable and controllable from ship or dock-side. Uniquely the camera can simultaneously record both in-line and off-axis holograms using a pulsed frequency double Nd:YAG laser. In- line holography is capable of producing images of organisms with a resolution of better than 10 micrometers . Off-axis holograms of aquatic systems of up to 50,000 cm3 volume, have been recorded. Following initial laboratory testing, the holo-camera was evaluated in an observation tank and ultimately was tested in Loch Etive, Scotland. In-line and off-axis holograms were recorded to a depth of 100 m. We will present result on the ste dives and evaluation of the camera performance.

  18. In situ rheology and gas volume in Hanford double-shell waste tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, C.W.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Brewster, M.E.; Chen, G.; Reid, H.C.; Shepard, C.L.; Terrones, G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Mendoza, R.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    This report is a detailed characterization of gas retention and release in 6 Hanford DS waste tanks. The results came from the ball rheometer and void fraction instrument in (flammable gas watch list) tanks SY-101, SY-103, AW-101, AN-103, AN-104, and AN-105 are presented. Instrument operation and derivation of data reduction methods are presented. Gas retention and release information is summarized for each tank and includes tank fill history and instrumentation, waste configuration, gas release, void fraction distribution, gas volumes, rheology, and photographs of the waste column from extruded core samples. Potential peak burn pressure is computed as a function of gas release fraction to portray the `hazard signature` of each tank. It is shown that two tanks remain well below the maximum allowable pressure, even if the entire gas content were released and ignited, and that none of the others present a hazard with their present gas release behavior.

  19. Water volume estimates of the Greenland Perennial Firn Aquifer from in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, L.; Miege, C.; Forster, R. R.; Brucker, L.

    2013-12-01

    Improving our understanding of the complex Greenland hydrologic system is necessary for assessing change across the Greenland Ice Sheet and its contribution to sea level rise (SLR). A new component of the Greenland hydrologic system, a Perennial Firn Aquifer (PFA), was recently discovered in April 2011. The PFA represents a large storage of liquid water within the Greenland Ice Sheet with an area of 70,000 × 10,000 km2 simulated by the RACMO2/GR regional climate model which closely follows airborne radar-derived mapping (Forster et al., in press). The average top surface depth of the PFA as detected by radar is 23 m. In April 2013, our team drilled through the PFA for the first time to gain an understanding of firn structure constraining the PFA, to estimate the water volume within the PFA, and to measure PFA temperatures and densities. At our drill site in Southeast Greenland (~100 km Northwest of Kulusuk), water fills or partially fills the available firn pore space from depths of ~12 to 37 m. The temperature within the PFA depths is constant at 0.1 × 0.1° C while the 12 m of seasonally dry firn above the PFA has a temperature profile dominated by surface temperature forcing. Near the bottom of the PFA water completely fills available pore space as the firn is compressed to ice entrapping water filled bubbles, as opposed to air filled bubbles, which then start to refreeze. A PFA maximum density is reached as the water filling the pore space, increasing density, begins refreezing back into ice at a lower density. We define this depth as the pore water refreeze depth and use this depth as the bottom of the PFA to calculate volume. It is certain, however that a small amount of water does exist below this depth, which we do not account for. The density profile obtained from the ACT11B firn core, the closest seasonally dry firn core, is compared to both gravitational densities and high resolution densities derived from a neutron density probe at the PFA site. The

  20. In situ synthesis of calcium phosphate-polycaprolactone nanocomposites with high ceramic volume fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, C; Gotman, I; Jiang, X; Fuchs, S; Kirkpatrick, C J; Gutmanas, E Y

    2010-06-01

    Biodegradable calcium phosphate-PCL nanocomposite powders with unusually high ceramic volume fractions (80-95%) and uniform PCL distribution were synthesized by a non-aqueous chemical reaction in the presence of the dissolved polymer. No visible polymer separation occurred during processing. Depending on the reagents combination, either dicalcium phosphate (DCP) or Ca-deficient HA (CDHA) was obtained. CDHA-PCL composite powders were high pressure consolidated at room temperature yielding dense materials with high compressive strengths. Such densification route provides the possibility of incorporating drug and proteins without damaging their biological activity. The CDHA-PCL composites were tested in osteoblastic and endothelial cell line cultures and were found to support the attachment and proliferation of both cell types.

  1. Characterization of the bone-metal implant interface by Digital Volume Correlation of in-situ loading using neutron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cann, Sophie; Tudisco, Erika; Perdikouri, Christina; Belfrage, Ola; Kaestner, Anders; Hall, Stephen; Tägil, Magnus; Isaksson, Hanna

    2017-07-01

    Metallic implants are commonly used as surgical treatments for many orthopedic conditions. The long-term stability of implants relies on an adequate integration with the surrounding bone. Unsuccessful integration could lead to implant loosening. By combining mechanical loading with high-resolution 3D imaging methods, followed by image analysis such as Digital Volume Correlation (DVC), we aim at evaluating ex vivo the mechanical resistance of newly formed bone at the interface. X-rays tomography is commonly used to image bone but induces artefacts close to metallic components. Utilizing a different interaction with matter, neutron tomography is a promising alternative but has not yet been used in studies of bone mechanics. This work demonstrates that neutron tomography during in situ loading is a feasible tool to characterize the mechanical response of bone-implant interfaces, especially when combined with DVC. Experiments were performed where metal screws were implanted in rat tibiae during 4 weeks. The screws were pulled-out while the samples were sequentially imaged in situ with neutron tomography. The images were analyzed to quantify bone ingrowth around the implants. DVC was used to track the internal displacements and calculate the strain fields in the bone during loading. The neutron images were free of metal-related artefacts, which enabled accurate quantification of bone ingrowth on the screw (ranging from 60% to 71%). DVC allowed successful identification of the deformation and cracks that occurred during mechanical loading and led to final failure of the bone-implant interface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. In situ fabrication of depth-type hierarchical CNT/quartz fiber filters for high efficiency filtration of sub-micron aerosols and high water repellency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Zong, Yichen; Zhang, Yingying; Yang, Mengmeng; Zhang, Rufan; Li, Shuiqing; Wei, Fei

    2013-04-21

    We fabricated depth-type hierarchical CNT/quartz fiber (QF) filters through in situ growth of CNTs upon quartz fiber (QF) filters using a floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The filter specific area of the CNT/QF filters is more than 12 times higher than that of the pristine QF filters. As a result, the penetration of sub-micron aerosols for CNT/QF filters is reduced by two orders of magnitude, which reaches the standard of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. Simultaneously, due to the fluffy brush-like hierarchical structure of CNTs on QFs, the pore size of the hybrid filters only has a small increment. The pressure drop across the CNT/QF filters only increases about 50% with respect to that of the pristine QF filters, leading to an obvious increased quality factor of the CNT/QF filters. Scanning electron microscope images reveal that CNTs are very efficient in capturing sub-micron aerosols. Moreover, the CNT/QF filters show high water repellency, implying their superiority for applications in humid conditions.

  3. Simplified methods for assessment of renal function as the ratio of glomerular filtration rate to extracellular fluid volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jødal, Lars; Brøchner-Mortensen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Background: Instead of scaling glomerular filtration rate (GFR) to a body surface area of 1.73m2, it has been suggested to scale GFR to extracellular fluid volume (ECV). The ratio GFR/ECV has physiological meaning in that it indicates how often ‘that which is to be regulated’ (i.e. ECV) comes...... into contact with the ‘regulator’ (i.e. the kidneys). Aim: The aim of the present study was as follows: to analyse two published calculation methods for determining ECV and GFR/ECV; to develop a new simple and accurate formula for determining ECV; and to compare and evaluate these methods. Materials...... and methods: GFR was determined as 51Cr-EDTA clearance. The study comprised 128 individuals (35 women, 66 men and 27 children) with a full 51Cr-EDTA plasma concentration curve, determined from injection until 4–5 h p.i. Reference values for GFR and ECV were calculated from the full curve. One...

  4. Wear Behavior of Al-Mg2Si Cast In-situ Composite: Effect of Mg2Si Different Volume Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiasinejad, J.; Emamy, M.; Ghorbani, M. R.; Malekan, A.

    2010-06-01

    Al-Mg2Si in situ composites are great candidates for automobile brake discs due to their low density, reasonably high young's modulus and low thermal expansion coefficient. Thus, understanding wear properties of this composite is of a great importance. In this study wear behavior of an in-situ Al-Mg2Si composite, prepared from a simple casting route, has been investigated using a pin-on-disc configuration concerning the effect of Mg2Si volume fractions, 15, 20 and 25% respectively. It was found that the weight loss increases with increase in reinforce volume fraction which can be due to a coarse morphology of primary Mg2Si particles. It was found that the variations of weight loss with sliding distance comprise different regimes of which the mechanisms are discussed.

  5. Filtration Fundamentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Ken; Hunsaker, Scot

    1997-01-01

    Examines how choice of commercial swimming-pool filtration systems is driven by the project-specific needs of the pools. Also highlighted are definitions of specific terms used when discussing filtration systems. Questions that pool designers can answer to make filtration-system purchasing decisions are listed. (GR)

  6. Microstress evolution during in situ loading of a superalloy containing high volume fraction of {gamma}{sup '} phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, S.; Rangaswamy, P.; Majumdar, B.S

    2003-03-03

    Pulsed neutron diffraction under in situ mechanical loading was used to monitor microstrain evolution in individual phases of a polycrystalline {gamma}/{gamma}{sup '} superalloy, CM 247 LC. The load partitioning and yielding of differently oriented grains and phases were evaluated. The critical resolved shear stresses of individual phases were obtained and are compared with dislocation models.

  7. Filtration and compression of organic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard; Keiding, Kristian

    The conventional filtration theory has been based on filtrations of incompressible particles such as anatase, kaolin and clay. The filtration models have later been used for organic slurries but can often not explain the observed experimental data. At constant pressure, the filtrate volume does...

  8. Intermediate volume on computed tomography imaging defines a fibrotic compartment that predicts glomerular filtration rate decline in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroli, Anna; Antiga, Luca; Conti, Sara; Sonzogni, Aurelio; Fasolini, Giorgio; Ondei, Patrizia; Perico, Norberto; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Remuzzi, Andrea

    2011-08-01

    Total kidney and cyst volumes have been used to quantify disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), but a causal relationship with progression to renal failure has not been demonstrated. Advanced image processing recently allowed to quantify extracystic tissue, and to identify an additional tissue component named "intermediate," appearing hypoenhanced on contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT). The aim of this study is to provide a histological characterization of intermediate volume, investigate its relation with renal function, and provide preliminary evidence of its role in long-term prediction of functional loss. Three ADPKD patients underwent contrast-enhanced CT scans before nephrectomy. Histological samples of intermediate volume were drawn from the excised kidneys, and stained with hematoxylin and eosin and with saturated picrosirius solution for histological analysis. Intermediate volume showed major structural changes, characterized by tubular dilation and atrophy, microcysts, inflammatory cell infiltrate, vascular sclerosis, and extended peritubular interstitial fibrosis. A significant correlation (r = -0.69, P < 0.001) between relative intermediate volume and baseline renal function was found in 21 ADPKD patients. Long-term prediction of renal functional loss was investigated in an independent cohort of 13 ADPKD patients, followed for 3 to 8 years. Intermediate volume, but not total kidney or cyst volume, significantly correlated with glomerular filtration rate decline (r = -0.79, P < 0.005). These findings suggest that intermediate volume may represent a suitable surrogate marker of ADPKD progression and a novel therapeutic target.

  9. Technical issues associated with in situ vitrification of the INEL Subsurface Disposal Area. Volume 3, Application of technical issues to the TRU-contaminated pits and trenches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoots, C.M.; Bates, S.O.; Callow, R.A.; Campbell, K.A.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Krisman, G.K.; McKellar, M.G.; Nickelson, D.F.; Slater, C.E.

    1992-07-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) has been identified as an alternative technology for remediation of the acid pit and transuranic pits and trenches (TRU-PTs) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). However, a number of technical issues must be resolved before ISV can be considered applicable to these waste sites. To assist in the ISV technology evaluation, an ISV Steering Committee was formed to identify, prioritize, and develop closure roadmaps for technical issues lated with ISV application at the SDA. The activities of the ISV Steering Committee are summarized in a three-volume report. Volume I identifies the systematic approach used to identify and prioritize the ISV technical issues and briefly discusses the methodology that will be employed to resolve these issues. Volumes 2 and 3 discuss each technical issue in greater detail and suggest specific closure roadmaps to be used in resolving technical issues associated with ISV at the SDA Acid Pit and TRU-PTS, respectively. The three-volume report is a working document that will be updated as necessary to reflect current evaluation strategy for the ISV technology. This is Volume 3.

  10. Use of noninvasive geophysical techniques for the In Situ Vitrification Program. Volume 1, Literature review: Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josten, N.E.; Marts, S.T.; Carpenter, G.S.

    1991-11-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a waste pit remediation technology that can potentially eliminate the need for pit excavation. The ISV program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) funded this study to evaluate geophysical techniques that might be useful for performing detailed screening of the materials, soil conditions, and local geology of waste pits targeted for remediation. The evaluation focuses on a specific set of characterization objectives developed by ISV engineers. The objectives are based on their assessment of safety, environmental, and cost efficiency issues associated with the ISV process. A literature review of geophysical case histories was conducted and a geophysical survey was performed at the INEL simulated waste pit so that the evaluation could be based on demonstrable results.

  11. Relationship Between LIBS Ablation and Pit Volume for Geologic Samples: Applications for the In Situ Absolute Geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devismes, Damien; Cohen, Barbara; Miller, J.-S.; Gillot, P.-Y.; Lefevre, J.-C.; Boukari, C.

    2014-01-01

    These first results demonstrate that LIBS spectra can be an interesting tool to estimate the ablated volume. When the ablated volume is bigger than 9.10(exp 6) cubic micrometers, this method has less than 10% of uncertainties. Far enough to be directly implemented in the KArLE experiment protocol. Nevertheless, depending on the samples and their mean grain size, the difficulty to have homogeneous spectra will increase with the ablated volume. Several K-Ar dating studies based on this approach will be implemented. After that, the results will be shown and discussed.

  12. Volume Measurements of Laser-generated Pits for In Situ Geochronology using KArLE (Potassium-Argon Laser Experiment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, R. A.; Cohen, B. A.; Miller, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    The Potassium-Argon Laser Experiment( KArLE), is composed of two main instruments: a spectrometer as part of the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) method and a Mass Spectrometer (MS). The LIBS laser ablates a sample and creates a plasma cloud, generating a pit in the sample. The LIBS plasma is measured for K abundance in weight percent and the released gas is measured using the MS, which calculates Ar abundance in mols. To relate the K and Ar measurements, total mass of the ablated sample is needed but can be difficult to directly measure. Instead, density and volume are used to calculate mass, where density is calculated based on the elemental composition of the rock (from the emission spectrum) and volume is determined by pit morphology. This study aims to reduce the uncertainty for KArLE by analyzing pit volume relationships in several analog materials and comparing methods of pit volume measurements and their associated uncertainties.

  13. Effects of in-situ oil-shale retorting on water quality near Rock Springs, Wyoming, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner-Lunsford, J.B.; Eddy, C.A.; Plafcan, M.; Lowham, H.W.

    1990-12-01

    Experimental in-situ retorting techniques (methods of extracting shale oil without mining) were used from 1969 to 1979 by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC) at a test area near Rock Springs in southwestern Wyoming. The retorting experiments at site 9 have produced elevated concentrations of some contaminants in the ground water. During 1988 and 1989, the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, conducted a site characterization study to evaluate the chemical contamination of ground water at the site. Water samples from 34 wells were analyzed; more than 70 identifiable organic compounds were detected using a combination of gas chromatography and mass spectrometry analytical methods. This report provides information that can be used to evaluate possible remedial action for the site. Remediation techniques that may be applicable include those techniques based on removing the contaminants from the aquifer and those based on immobilizing the contaminants. Before a technique is selected, the risks associated with the remedial action (including the no-action alternative) need to be assessed, and the criteria to be used for decisions regarding aquifer restoration need to be defined. 31 refs., 23 figs., 9 tabs.

  14. In situ vitrification demonstration at Pit 1, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 1: Results of treatability study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, B.P.; Naney, M.T.; Cline, S.R.; Bogle, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Tixier, J.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    A treatability study was initiated in October 1993 to apply in situ vitrification (ISV) to at least two segments of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) seepage Pit 1 by the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. This treatability study was later extended to include all of Pit 1 and was performed to support a possible Interim Record of Decision or removal action for closure of one or more of the seepage pits and trenches beginning as early as FY 1997. This treatability study was carried out to establish the field-scale technical performance of ISV for (1) attaining the required depth, nominally 15 ft, to incorporate source contamination within and beneath the pits; (2) demonstrating field capability for the overlap of melt settings which will be necessary to achieve fused, melted segments of the source contamination; (3) demonstrating off-gas handling technology for accommodating and minimizing the volatilization of {sup 137}Cs; (4) demonstrating adequate site characterization techniques to predict ISV melting kinetics, processing temperatures, and product durability; and (5) promoting public acceptance of ISV technology by demonstrating its safety, implementability, site impacts, and air emissions and by coordinating the treatability study within the regulatory closure process. In April 1996 an expulsion of an estimated 10% of the 196 Mg (216 tons) melt body occurred resulting in significant damage to ISV equipment and, ultimately, led to an indefinite suspension of further ISV operations at Pit 1. This report summarizes the technical accomplishments and status of the project in fulfilling these objectives through September 1997.

  15. Isolating cells from female/male blood mixtures using florescence in situ hybridization combined with low volume PCR and its application in forensic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lei; Li, Cai-Xia; Han, Jun-Ping; Xu, Cheng; Hu, Lan

    2015-11-01

    To obtain single-source short tandem repeat (STR) profiles in trace female/male blood mixture samples, we combined florescence in situ hybridization (FISH), laser microdissection, and low volume PCR (LV-PCR) to isolate male/female cells and improve sensitivity. The results showed that isolation of as few as 10 leukocytes was sufficient to yield full STR profiles in fresh female or male blood samples for 32 independent tests with a low additional alleles rate (3.91%) and drop-out alleles rate (5.01%). Moreover, this procedure was tested in two fresh blood mixture series at three ratios (1:5, 1:10, and 1:20), two mock female/male blood mixture casework samples, and one practical casework sample. Male and female STR profiles were successfully detected in all of these samples, showing that this procedure could be used in forensic casework in the future.

  16. Shortening filtrations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ENOCHS Edgar E.

    2012-01-01

    Let C be a set of modules.We argue that there is an ordinal κ such that if a module has a filtration by modules in C,then it has a filtration of length κ by direct sums of modules in C.As an application we give another way to prove a result of Saorín and (S)(t)oví(c)ek and of (S)(t)oví(c)ek.

  17. In Situ Void Fraction and Gas Volume in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 as Measured with the Void Fraction Instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CW Stewart; G Chen; JM Alzheimer; PA Meyer

    1998-11-10

    The void fraction instrument (WI) was deployed in Tank 241-SY-101 three times in 1998 to confm and locate the retained gas (void) postulated to be causing the accelerating waste level rise observed since 1995. The design, operation, and data reduction model of the WI are described along with validation testing and potential sources of uncertainty. The test plans, field observations and void measurements are described in detail, including the total gas volume calculations and the gas volume model. Based on 1998 data, the void fraction averaged 0.013 i 0.001 in the mixed slurry and 0.30 ~ 0.04 in the crust. This gives gas volumes (at standard pressure and temperature) of 87 t 9 scm in the slurry and 138 ~ 22 scm in the crust for a total retained gas volume of221 *25 scm. This represents an increase of about 74 scm in the crust and a decrease of about 34 scm in the slurry from 1994/95 results. The overall conclusion is that the gas retention is occurring mainly in the crust layer and there is very little gas in the mixed slurry and loosely settled layers below. New insights on crust behavior are also revealed.

  18. First in situ measurement of the vertical distribution of ice volume in a mesospheric ice cloud during the ECOMA/MASS rocket-campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rapp

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We present in situ observations of mesospheric ice particles with a new particle detector which combines a classical Faraday cup with the active photoionization of particles and subsequent detection of photoelectrons. Our observations of charged particles and free electrons within a decaying PMSE-layer reveal that the presence of charged particles is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the presence of PMSE. That is, additional requirements like a sufficiently large electron density – which we here estimate to be on the order of ~100 cm−3 – and the presence of small scale structures (commonly assumed to be caused by turbulence need to be satisfied. Our photoelectron measurements reveal a very strong horizontal structuring of the investigated ice layer, i.e., a very broad layer (82–88 km seen on the upleg is replaced by a narrow layer from 84.5–86 km only 50 km apart on the downleg of the rocket flight. Importantly, the qualitative structure of these photoelectron profiles is in remarkable qualitative agreement with photometer measurements on the same rocket thus demonstrating the reliability of this new technique. We then show that the photoelectron currents are a unique function of the ice particle volume density (and hence ice mass within an uncertainty of only 15% and we derive corresponding altitude profiles of ice volume densities. Derived values are in the range ~2–8×10−14 cm3/cm3 (corresponding to mass densities of ~20–80 ng/m3, and water vapor mixing ratios of 3–12 ppm and are the first such estimates with the unique spatial resolution of an in situ measurement.

  19. First in situ measurement of the vertical distribution of ice volume in a mesospheric ice cloud during the ECOMA/MASS rocket-campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, M.; Strelnikova, I.; Strelnikov, B. [Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Kuehlungsborn (DE)] (and others)

    2009-07-01

    We present in situ observations of mesospheric ice particles with a new particle detector which combines a classical Faraday cup with the active photoionization of particles and subsequent detection of photoelectrons. Our observations of charged particles and free electrons within a decaying PMSE-layer reveal that the presence of charged particles is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the presence of PMSE. That is, additional requirements like a sufficiently large electron density - which we here estimate to be on the order of {proportional_to}100 cm{sup -3} - and the presence of small scale structures (commonly assumed to be caused by turbulence) need to be satisfied. Our photoelectron measurements reveal a very strong horizontal structuring of the investigated ice layer, i.e., a very broad layer (82-88 km) seen on the upleg is replaced by a narrow layer from 84.5-86 km only 50 km apart on the downleg of the rocket flight. Importantly, the qualitative structure of these photoelectron profiles is in remarkable qualitative agreement with photometer measurements on the same rocket thus demonstrating the reliability of this new technique. We then show that the photoelectron currents are a unique function of the ice particle volume density (and hence ice mass) within an uncertainty of only 15% and we derive corresponding altitude profiles of ice volume densities. Derived values are in the range {proportional_to}2-8 x 10{sup -14} cm{sup 3}/cm{sup 3} (corresponding to mass densities of {proportional_to}20-80 ng/m{sup 3}, and water vapor mixing ratios of 3-12 ppm) and are the first such estimates with the unique spatial resolution of an in situ measurement. (orig.)

  20. 3-D EM exploration of the hepatic microarchitecture – lessons learned from large-volume in situ serial sectioning

    OpenAIRE

    Gerald John Shami; Delfine Cheng; Minh Huynh; Celien Vreuls; Eddie Wisse; Filip Braet

    2016-01-01

    To-date serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM) dominates as the premier technique for generating three-dimensional (3-D) data of resin-embedded biological samples at an unprecedented depth volume. Given the infancy of the technique, limited literature is currently available regarding the applicability of SBF-SEM for the ultrastructural investigation of tissues. Herein, we provide a comprehensive and rigorous appraisal of five different SBF-SEM sample preparation protocols fo...

  1. A method for rapid in situ extraction and laboratory determination of Th, Pb, and Ra isotopes from large volumes of seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, M.; Murphy, David J.; Santschi, Peter H.; Orr, James C.; Schink, David R.

    1993-04-01

    An in situ pump and six channel extraction system, operating typically at 351 min -1, can not only filter seawater samples but also extract dissolved Th, Pb and Ra isotopes from large volumes of seawater at six different depths on a single lowering. By gamma counting the ash residues of three cartridges (one particle extractor and two nuclide extractors), we can determine 234Th and 210Pb concentrations in the particulate and dissolved phase. Extraction efficiencies for 234Th from the dissolved phase average 93 ± 5% and for 210Pb average ≥90%. At the same time we can determine radium isotopic ratios precisely, but, at present radium concentrations can only be established by the determination of 226Ra in a 30-1 cohort sample. This system can be deployed easily from ships having an A-frame. It eliminates the problems of transporting and processing large volumes of samples and involves relatively little manual labor and analytical time. We have tested and used this device repeatedly in the Gulf of Mexico. Our preliminary results agree well with values of 234Th and 210Pb concentrations and 228Ra/ 226Ra activity ratios reported in the literature for the Gulf of Mexico.

  2. Measurement of the ratio of glomerular filtration rate to plasma volume from the technetium-99m diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid renogram: comparison with glomerular filtration rate in relation to extracellular fluid volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, A.M. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom)); Allison, H. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom)); Ussov, W.Yu. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

    1994-04-01

    We describe a technique which does not require a blood sample, is already normalised for plasma volume and uses the robust Patlak plot for measuring renal uptake. The rate of kidney uptake, dR(t)/dt, at time = 0, as a fraction of the injected dose, is equal to the fraction of the plasma volume (PV) filtered per minute, i.e. IKGFR/PV. The gradient dR(0)/dt cannot be accurately measured directly but is equal to [[alpha] . LV(0)], where [alpha] is the renal uptake constant (proportional to IKGFR) and LV is the count rate over a left ventricular ROI. LV(0) was obtained by extrapolation of LV(t), while [alpha] is the slope of the Patlak plot up to 3 min. GFR/PV (i.e. right plus left kidneys) in patients with normal renal function was about 0.04 min[sup -1], as would be expected from normal values of GFR (120 ml/min) and plasma volume (3 l). GFR/PV correlated significantly with the ratio of GFR to extracellular fluid volume (ECV), measured from the terminal exponential of the plasma clearance curve (GFR/PV = 3.2.GFR/ECV + 5.3 ml/min/l [r = 0.82, n = 82]). GFR/PV (r = 0.74) and GFR/ECV (r = 0.82) both correlated inversely and non-linearly with plasma creatinine in 43 studies where the measurement was made within 1 week of the [sup 99m]Tc-DTPA study. They also correlated significantly with the plasma cyclosporin trough level in 14 patients with dermatomyositis on the 30 occasions when this measurement was made within 1 week of the renogram (r = -0.38, P < 0.05 for GFR/PV and r = -0.77, P < 0.001 for GFR/ECV). The ratio of GFR/PV to GFR/ECV is the ratio of extracellular fluid volume to plasma volume, and this was 4.0 (SD 0.99). We conclude that both GFR/PV and GFR/ECV can be easily measured with [sup 99m]Tc-DTPA and are physiologically valid expressions of GFR. (orig./MG)

  3. Enumeration of faecal indicator bacteria in large water volumes using on site membrane filtration to assess water treatment efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijnen, W.A.M.; Veendaal, D.; Speld, W.M.H. van der; Visser, Ate; Hoogenboezem, W.; Kooij, D. van der

    2000-01-01

    Sample volumes as tested in routine microbiological methods for determining the presence and absence of faecal indicator bacteria in water are too small to assess the actual concentration in the last stages of a water treatment. Consequently no accurate information can be obtained about the removal

  4. Enumeration of faecal indicator bacteria in large water volumes using on site membrane filtration to assess water treatment efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijnen, W.A.M.; Veendaal, D.; Speld, W.M.H. van der; Visser, Ate; Hoogenboezem, W.; Kooij, D. van der

    2000-01-01

    Sample volumes as tested in routine microbiological methods for determining the presence and absence of faecal indicator bacteria in water are too small to assess the actual concentration in the last stages of a water treatment. Consequently no accurate information can be obtained about the removal

  5. GSPEL - Air Filtration Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Evaluation capabilities for air filtration devices The Air Filtration Lab provides testing of air filtration devices to demonstrate and validate new or legacy system...

  6. Sperm Concentration, Testicular Volume and Age Predict Risk of Carcinoma In Situ in Contralateral Testis of Men with Testicular Germ Cell Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rud, Camilla Nymann; Daugaard, Gedske; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether semen quality or some easily attainable clinical parameters might be used to estimate the risk of contralateral carcinoma in situ in patients with unilateral testicular germ cell tumors.......We investigated whether semen quality or some easily attainable clinical parameters might be used to estimate the risk of contralateral carcinoma in situ in patients with unilateral testicular germ cell tumors....

  7. Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume Three - Appendix F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, S.R.; Denton, D.L.; Giaquinto, J.M.; McCracken, M.K.; Starr, R.C.

    1999-04-01

    This appendix supports the results and discussion of the laboratory work performed to evaluate the feasibility of in situ chemical oxidation for Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory's (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) which is contained in ORNL/TM-13711/V1. This volume contains Appendix F. Appendix F is essentially a photocopy of the ORNL researchers' laboratory notebooks from the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) and the Radioactive Materials Analytical Laboratory (RMAL).

  8. Intrathecal Delivery of Ketorolac Loaded In Situ Gels for Prolonged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in situ gel near the fractured vertebra in a rat model). ... The formulated in situ gels can potentially be used as implants for the treatment of .... xanthan gum orally in an appropriate volume. ..... polyelectrolyte alginate-chitosan complex based.

  9. Operations Support of Phase 2 Integrated Demonstration In Situ Bioremediation. Volume 1, Final report: Final report text data in tabular form, Disk 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, T.C. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-09-01

    This project was designed to demonstrate in situ bioremediation of ground water and sediment contaminated with chlorinated solvents. Indigenous microorganisms were stimulated to degrade trichlorethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and their daughter products in situ by addition of nutrients to the contaminated aquifer and adjacent vadose zone. The principle carbon/energy source nutrient used in this demonstration was methane (natural gas). In situ biodegradation is a highly attractive technology for remediation because contaminants are destroyed, not simply moved to another location or immobilized, thus decreasing costs, risks, and time, while increasing efficiency, safety, and public and regulatory acceptability. This report describes the preliminary results of the demonstration and provides conclusions only for those measures that the Bioremediation Technical Support Group felt were so overwhelmingly convincing that they do not require further analyses. Though this report is necessarily superficial it does intend to provide a basis for further evaluating the technology and for practitioners to immediately apply some parts of the technology.

  10. GSPEL - Air Filtration Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Evaluation capabilities for air filtration devicesThe Air Filtration Lab provides testing of air filtration devices to demonstrate and validate new or legacy system...

  11. Filtration and compression of organic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard; Keiding, Kristian

    The conventional filtration theory has been based on filtrations of incompressible particles such as anatase, kaolin and clay. The filtration models have later been used for organic slurries but can often not explain the observed experimental data. At constant pressure, the filtrate volume does...... not increase in proportion with square root time when e.g. sewage sludge and manure are filtered. Different explanations have been suggested. However, organic slurries are complex mixtures and it is therefore difficult to evaluate the suggested explanations and develops new models. One possible solution...

  12. Glomerular filtration rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007305.htm Glomerular filtration rate To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a test used to check ...

  13. Rotary filtration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, David T.; Maxwell, David N.

    2011-04-19

    A rotary filtration apparatus for filtering a feed fluid into permeate is provided. The rotary filtration apparatus includes a container that has a feed fluid inlet. A shaft is at least partially disposed in the container and has a passageway for the transport of permeate. A disk stack made of a plurality of filtration disks is mounted onto the shaft so that rotation of the shaft causes rotation of the filtration disks. The filtration disks may be made of steel components and may be welded together. The shaft may penetrate a filtering section of the container at a single location. The rotary filtration apparatus may also incorporate a bellows seal to prevent leakage along the shaft, and an around the shaft union rotary joint to allow for removal of permeate. Various components of the rotary filtration apparatus may be removed as a single assembly.

  14. In situ vitrification demonstration at Pit 1, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 2: Site characterization report of the Pit 1 area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, B.P.; Bogle, M.A.; Cline, S.R.; Naney, M.T.; Gu, B.

    1997-12-01

    A treatability study was initiated in October 1993, initially encompassing the application of in situ vitrification (ISV) to at least two segments of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) seepage Pit 1 by the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. This treatability study was to have supported a possible Interim Record of Decision (IROD) or removal action for closure of one or more of the seepage pits and trenches as early as FY 1997. The Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 7, which contains these seven seepage pits and trenches, will probably not begin until after the year 2000. This treatability study will establish the field-scale technical performance of ISV for (1) attaining the required depth, nominally 15 ft, to incorporate source contamination within and beneath the pits; (2) demonstrating field capability to overlap melt settings that are necessary to achieve fused, melted segments of the source contamination; (3) demonstrating off-gas handling technology for accommodating and minimizing the volatilization of {sup 137}Cs; (4) demonstrating adequate site characterization techniques to predict ISV melting kinetics, processing temperatures, and product durability; and (5) promoting public acceptance of ISV technology by demonstrating its safety, implementability, site impacts, and air emissions and by coordinating the treatability study within the regulatory closure process. This report summarizes the site characterization information gathered through the end of September 1996 which supports the planning and assessment of ISV for Pit 1 (objective 4 above).

  15. Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume Two, Appendices C, D, and E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, S.R.; Denton, D.L.; Giaquinto, J.M.; McCracken, M.K.; Starr, R.C.

    1999-04-01

    These appendices support the results and discussion of the laboratory work performed to evaluate the feasibility of in situ chemical oxidation for Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory's (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) which is contained in ORNL/TM-1371 l/Vol. This volume contains Appendices C-E. Appendix C is a compilation of all recorded data and mathematical calculations made to interpret the data. For the Task 3 and Task 4 work, the spreadsheet column definitions are included immediately before the actual spreadsheet pages and are listed as ''Sample Calculations/Column Definitions'' in the table of contents. Appendix D includes the chronological order in which the experiments were conducted and the final project costs through October 1998. Appendix E is a compilation of the monthly progress reports submitted to INEEL during the course of the project.

  16. Advanced Water Purification System for In Situ Resource Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Stephen M.; Jolley, Scott T.; Captain, James G.

    2013-01-01

    A main goal in the field of In Situ Resource Utilization is to develop technologies that produce oxygen from regolith to provide consumables to an extraterrestrial outpost. The processes developed reduce metal oxides in the regolith to produce water, which is then electrolyzed to produce oxygen. Hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids are byproducts of the reduction processes, which must be removed to meet electrolysis purity standards. We previously characterized Nation, a highly water selective polymeric proton-exchange membrane, as a filtration material to recover pure water from the contaminated solution. While the membranes successfully removed both acid contaminants, the removal efficiency of and water flow rate through the membranes were not sufficient to produce large volumes of electrolysis-grade water. In the present study, we investigated electrodialysis as a potential acid removal technique. Our studies have shown a rapid and significant reduction in chloride and fluoride concentrations in the feed solution, while generating a relatively small volume of concentrated waste water. Electrodialysis has shown significant promise as the primary separation technique in ISRU water purification processes.

  17. Mobile surface water filtration system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aashish Vatsyayan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To design a mobile system for surface water filtrationMethodology: the filtration of surface impurities begins with their retraction to concentrated thickness using non ionising surfactants, then isolation using surface tension property and sedimentation of impurities in process chamber using electrocoagulation. Result:following studies done to determine the rate of spreading of crude oil on water a method for retraction of spread crude oil to concentrated volumes is developed involving addition of non -ionising surfactants in contrast to use of dispersants. Electrocoagulation process involves multiple processes taking place to lead to depositionof impurities such as oil, grease, metals. Studies of experiments conducted reveals parameters necessary for design of electrocoagulation process chamber though a holistic approach towards system designing is still required. Propeller theory is used in determining the required design of propeller and the desired thrust, the overall structure will finally contribute in deciding the choice of propeller.

  18. In-Situ Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Anders Thais; Slot, Susanne; Paltved, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In situ simulation offers on-site training to healthcare professionals. It refers to a training strategy where simulation technology is integrated into the clinical encounter. Training in the simulation laboratory does not easily tap into situational resources, e.g. individual, team......, and organisational characteristic. Therefore, it might fail to fully mimic real clinical team processes. Though research on in situ simulation in healthcare is in its infancy, literature is abundant on patient safety and team training1. Patient safety reporting systems that identify risks to patients can improve...... offered in situ simulation faculty with a model for integrating reported critical incidents and adverse events with contextual needs analysis and short-term observations. Furthermore the research group is working on detailing the barriers of in situ simulation such as resources for team training despite...

  19. The effect of filter cake viscoelasticity on filtration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard

    Wastewater is usually treated biologically, and a by-product from this treatment is waste-activated sludge with high water content. Sludge is therefore often filtrated to reduce the volume for handling and disposal, and to minimise the water content before incineration of the sludge. However...... a function of pressure as assumed when using the conventional models. Moreover, it is shown how the existing filtration models can be modified and the filtration process for activated sludge simulated....

  20. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, T.Y.; Chin, C.J.; Lu, S.C.; Yiacoumi, S. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering] [and others

    1997-10-01

    Magnetic-seeding filtration consists of two steps: heterogeneous particle flocculation of magnetic and nonmagnetic particles in a stirred tank and high-gradient magnetic filtration (HGMF). The effects of various parameters affecting magnetic-seeding filtration (HGMF). The effects of various parameters affecting magnetic seeding filtration are theoretically and experimentally investigated. A trajectory model that includes hydrodynamic resistance, van der Waals, and electrostatic forces is developed to calculate the flocculation frequency in a turbulent-shear regime. Fractal dimension is introduced to simulate the open structure of aggregates. A magnetic-filtration model that consists of trajectory analysis, a particle build-up model, a breakthrough model, and a bivariate population-balance model is developed to predict the breakthrough curve of magnetic-seeding filtration. A good agreement between modeling results and experimental data is obtained. The results show that the model developed in this study can be used to predict the performance of magnetic-seeding filtration without using empirical coefficients or fitting parameters. 35 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. In situ groundwater bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-01

    In situ groundwater bioremediation of hydrocarbons has been used for more than 40 years. Most strategies involve biostimulation; however, recently bioaugmentation have been used for dehalorespiration. Aquifer and contaminant profiles are critical to determining the feasibility and strategy for in situ groundwater bioremediation. Hydraulic conductivity and redox conditions, including concentrations of terminal electron acceptors are critical to determine the feasibility and strategy for potential bioremediation applications. Conceptual models followed by characterization and subsequent numerical models are critical for efficient and cost effective bioremediation. Critical research needs in this area include better modeling and integration of remediation strategies with natural attenuation.

  2. Operations Support of Phase 2 Integrated Demonstration In Situ Bioremediation. Volume 4, Final report: Averaged data in tabular form, Disks 3,4; Averaged data in graphical form, Disks 1,2,3,4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, T.C. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-09-01

    This report contains experimental data collected during the demonstration of in situ bioremediation at the Savannah River Site. This project was designed to demonstrate in situ bioremediation of ground water and sediment contaminated with chlorinated solvents. Indigenous microorganisms were stimulated to degrade trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and their daughter products in situ by addition of nutrients to the contaminated aquifer and adjacent vadose zone. The principle carbon/energy source nutrient used in this demonstration was methane. In situ biodegradation is a highly attractive technology for remediation because contaminants are destroyed, not simply moved to another location or immobilized, thus decreasing costs, risks, and time, while increasing efficiency, safety, and public and regulatory acceptability.

  3. Filtration in Porous Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao; Shapiro, Alexander

    There is a considerable and ongoing effort aimed at understanding the transport and the deposition of suspended particles in porous media, especially non-Fickian transport and non-exponential deposition of particles. In this work, the influential parameters in filtration models are studied...... to understand their effects on the non-Fickian transport and the non-exponential deposition. The filtration models are validated by the comparisons between the modelling results and the experimental data.The elliptic equation with distributed filtration coefficients may be applied to model non-Fickian transport...... and hyperexponential deposition. The filtration model accounting for the migration of surface associated particles may be applied for non-monotonic deposition....

  4. Water Filtration Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    American Water Corporation manufactures water filtration products which incorporate technology originally developed for manned space operations. The formula involves granular activated charcoal and other ingredients, and removes substances by catalytic reactions, mechanical filtration, and absorption. Details are proprietary. A NASA literature search contributed to development of the compound. The technology is being extended to a deodorizing compound called Biofresh which traps gas and moisture inside the unit. Further applications are anticipated.

  5. Visualization of water flow during filtration using flat filtration materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrůza Jakub

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Filtration materials are very important elements of some industrial appliances. Water filtration is a separation of solid materials from fluid. Solid particles are captured on the frontal area of the filtration textile and only liquid passes through it. It is important to know the filtration process in a detailed way to be able to develop filtration materials. Visualization of filtration process enables a better view of the filtration. This method also enables to determine efficiency and homogeneity of filtration using image analysis. For this purpose, a new waterfiltration measuring setup was proposed and constructed. Filtration material is mounted into the optically transparent place in the setup. Laser sheet is directed into this place as in the case of Particle Image Velocimetry measuring method. Monochrome and sensitive camera records the light scattered by seeding particles in water. The seeding particles passing through the filter serve for measuring filtration efficiency, and also for visualization of filtration process. Filtration setup enables to measure also the pressure drop and a flow. The signals are processed by National Instruments compactDAQ system and UMA software. Microfibrous and nanofibrous filtration materials are tested by this measuring method. In the case of nanofibrous filtration, appropriate size of seeding particles is needed to be used to perform a process of filtration.

  6. In Situ Mass Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The In Situ Mass Spectrometer projects focuses on a specific subsystem to leverage advanced research for laser-based in situ mass spectrometer development...

  7. Microfluidic colloid filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today’s water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a “cake layer” – often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level.

  8. A revised and unified pressure-clamp/relaxation theory for studying plant cell water relations with pressure probes: in-situ determination of cell volume for calculation of volumetric elastic modulus and hydraulic conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipfer, T; Fei, J; Gambetta, G A; Shackel, K A; Matthews, M A

    2014-10-21

    The cell-pressure-probe is a unique tool to study plant water relations in-situ. Inaccuracy in the estimation of cell volume (νo) is the major source of error in the calculation of both cell volumetric elastic modulus (ε) and cell hydraulic conductivity (Lp). Estimates of νo and Lp can be obtained with the pressure-clamp (PC) and pressure-relaxation (PR) methods. In theory, both methods should result in comparable νo and Lp estimates, but this has not been the case. In this study, the existing νo-theories for PC and PR methods were reviewed and clarified. A revised νo-theory was developed that is equally valid for the PC and PR methods. The revised theory was used to determine νo for two extreme scenarios of solute mixing between the experimental cell and sap in the pressure probe microcapillary. Using a fully automated cell-pressure-probe (ACPP) on leaf epidermal cells of Tradescantia virginiana, the validity of the revised theory was tested with experimental data. Calculated νo values from both methods were in the range of optically determined νo (=1.1-5.0nL) for T. virginiana. However, the PC method produced a systematically lower (21%) calculated νo compared to the PR method. Effects of solute mixing could only explain a potential error in calculated νo of cell turgor) of 19%, which is a fundamental parameter in calculating νo. It followed from the revised theory that the ratio of ΔV/ΔP was inversely related to the solute reflection coefficient. This highlighted that treating the experimental cell as an ideal osmometer in both methods is potentially not correct. Effects of non-ideal osmotic behavior by transmembrane solute movement may be minimized in the PR as compared to the PC method.

  9. CENTRIFUGAL MEMBRANE FILTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel J. Stepan; Bradley G. Stevens; Melanie D. Hetland

    1999-10-01

    The overall project consists of several integrated research phases related to the applicability, continued development, demonstration, and commercialization of the SpinTek centrifugal membrane filtration process. Work performed during this reporting period consisted of Phase 2 evaluation of the SpinTek centrifugal membrane filtration technology and Phase 3, Technology Partnering. During Phase 1 testing conducted at the EERC using the SpinTek ST-IIL unit operating on a surrogate tank waste, a solids cake developed on the membrane surface. The solids cake was observed where linear membrane velocities were less than 17.5 ft/s and reduced the unobstructed membrane surface area up to 25%, reducing overall filtration performance. The primary goal of the Phase 2 research effort was to enhance filtration performance through the development and testing of alternative turbulence promoter designs. The turbulence promoters were designed to generate a shear force across the entire membrane surface sufficient to maintain a self-cleaning membrane capability and improve filtration efficiency and long-term performance. Specific Phase 2 research activities included the following: System modifications to accommodate an 11-in.-diameter, two-disk rotating membrane assembly; Development and fabrication of alternative turbulence promoter designs; Testing and evaluation of the existing and alternative turbulence promoters under selected operating conditions using a statistically designed test matrix; and Data reduction and analysis; The objective of Phase 3 research was to demonstrate the effectiveness of SpinTek's centrifugal membrane filtration as a pretreatment to remove suspended solids from a liquid waste upstream of 3M's WWL cartridge technology for the selective removal of technetium (Tc).

  10. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depaoli, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This task will investigate the capabilities of magnetic-seeding filtration for the enhanced removal of magnetic and nonmagnetic particulates from liquids. This technology appies to a wide range of liquid wastes, including groundwater, process waters, and tank supernatant. Magnetic-seeding filtration can be used in several aspects of treatment, such as (1) removal of solids, particularly those in the colloidal-size range that are difficult to remove by conventional means; (2) removal of contaminants by precipitation processes; and (3) removal of contaminants by sorption processes.

  11. Filtration by eyelashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vistarakula, Krishna; Bergin, Mike; Hu, David

    2010-11-01

    Nearly every mammalian and avian eye is rimmed with lashes. We investigate experimentally the ability of lashes to reduce airborne particle deposition in the eye. We hypothesize that there is an optimum eyelash length that maximizes both filtration ability and extent of peripheral vision. This hypothesis is tested using a dual approach. Using preserved heads from 36 species of animals at the American Museum of Natural History, we determine the relationship between eye size and eyelash geometry (length and spacing). We test the filtration efficacy of these geometries by deploying outdoor manikins and measuring particle deposition rate as a function of eyelash length.

  12. Enlargements of filtrations and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Corcuera, J M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we review some old and new results about the enlargement of filtrations problem, as well as their applications to credit risk and insider trading problems. The enlargement of filtrations problem consists in the study of conditions under which a semimartingale remains a semimartingale when the filtration is enlarged, and, in such a case, how to find the Doob-Meyer decomposition. Filtrations may be enlarged in different ways. In this paper we consider initial and progressive filtration enlargements made by random variables and processes. Keywords: Credit Risk, Insider Trading, Enlargement of Filtrations

  13. Water Treatment Technology - Filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on filtration provides instructional materials for six competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on the following areas: purposes of sedimentation basins and flocculation…

  14. Filtration of Nanoparticles: Evolution of Cake Structure and Pressure-Drop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmøe, Tobias Dokkedal; Tricoli, Antonio; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk

    2009-01-01

    with constant solid volume fraction began to form, accompanied with build-up of pressuredrop which was in excellent agreement with classic cake filtration theory. An expression for the solid volume fraction of the cake (fsd,c) was obtained as a sole function of Pe. In addition, the filtration efficiency became...

  15. Life Support Filtration System Trade Study for Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agui, Juan H.; Perry, Jay L.

    2017-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administrations (NASA) technical developments for highly reliable life support systems aim to maximize the viability of long duration deep space missions. Among the life support system functions, airborne particulate matter filtration is a significant driver of launch mass because of the large geometry required to provide adequate filtration performance and because of the number of replacement filters needed to a sustain a mission. A trade analysis incorporating various launch, operational and maintenance parameters was conducted to investigate the trade-offs between the various particulate matter filtration configurations. In addition to typical launch parameters such as mass, volume and power, the amount of crew time dedicated to system maintenance becomes an increasingly crucial factor for long duration missions. The trade analysis evaluated these parameters for conventional particulate matter filtration technologies and a new multi-stage particulate matter filtration system under development by NASAs Glenn Research Center. The multi-stage filtration system features modular components that allow for physical configuration flexibility. Specifically, the filtration system components can be configured in distributed, centralized, and hybrid physical layouts that can result in considerable mass savings compared to conventional particulate matter filtration technologies. The trade analysis results are presented and implications for future transit and surface missions are discussed.

  16. Dynamic optical filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chretien, Jean-Loup (Inventor); Lu, Edward T. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A dynamic optical filtration system and method effectively blocks bright light sources without impairing view of the remainder of the scene. A sensor measures light intensity and position so that selected cells of a shading matrix may interrupt the view of the bright light source by a receptor. A beamsplitter may be used so that the sensor may be located away from the receptor. The shading matrix may also be replaced by a digital micromirror device, which selectively sends image data to the receptor.

  17. Magnetic flocculation and filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yiacoumi, Sotira; Chin, Ching-Ju; Yin, Tung-Yu [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Tsouris, C., DePaoli, D.W.; Chattin, M.R.; Spurrier, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    A model is available in predicting flocculation frequencies between particles of various properties under the influence of a magnetic field. This model provides a basic understanding of fundamental phenomena, such as particle-particle and particle-collector interactions, occurring in HGMF (high gradient magnetic field), and will be extended to describe experimental data of particle flocculation and filtration and predict the performance of high- gradient magnetic filters. It is also expected that this model will eventually lead to a tool for design and optimization of magnetic filters for environmental, metallurgical, biochemical, and other applications.

  18. Tailoring Supramolecular Nanofibers for Air Filtration Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Daniel; Skrybeck, Dominik; Misslitz, Holger; Nardini, David; Kern, Alexander; Kreger, Klaus; Schmidt, Hans-Werner

    2016-06-15

    The demand of new materials and processes for nanofiber fabrication to enhance the performance of air filters is steadily increasing. Typical approaches to obtain nanofibers are based on top-down processes such as melt blowing, centrifugal spinning, and electrospinning of polymer materials. However, fabrication of polymer nanofibers is limited with respect to either a sufficiently high throughput or the smallest achievable fiber diameter. This study reports comprehensively on a fast and simple bottom-up process to prepare supramolecular nanofibers in situ inside viscose/polyester microfiber nonwovens. Here, selected small molecules of the materials class of 1,3,5-benzenetrisamides are employed. The microfiber-nanofiber composites exhibit a homogeneous nanofiber distribution and morphology throughout the entire nonwoven scaffold. Small changes in molecular structure and processing solvent have a strong influence on the final nanofiber diameter and diameter distribution and, consequently, on the filtration performance. Choosing proper processing conditions, microfiber-nanofiber composites with surprisingly high filtration efficiencies of particulate matter are obtained. In addition, the microfiber-nanofiber composite integrity at elevated temperatures was determined and revealed that the morphology of supramolecular nanofibers is maintained compared to that of the utilized polymer nonwoven.

  19. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePaoli, D.W.; Tsouris, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Yiacoumi, Sotira

    1997-10-01

    Magnetic-seeding filtration is a technology under development for the enhanced removal of magnetic and non-magnetic particulates from liquids. This process involves the addition of a small amount of magnetic seed particles (such as naturally occurring iron oxide) to a waste suspension, followed by treatment with a magnetic filter. Non-magnetic and weakly magnetic particles are made to undergo nonhomogeneous flocculation with the seed particles, forming flocs of high magnetic susceptibility that are readily removed by a conventional high-gradient magnetic filter. This technology is applicable to a wide range of liquid wastes, including groundwater, process waters, and tank supernatants. Magnetic-seeding filtration may be used in several aspects of treatment, such as (1) removal of solids, particularly those in the colloidal size range that are difficult to remove by conventional means; (2) removal of contaminants by precipitation processes; and (3) removal of contaminants by sorption processes. Waste stream characteristics for which the technology may be applicable include (1) particle sizes ranging from relatively coarse (several microns) to colloidal particles, (2) high or low radiation levels, (3) broad-ranging flow rates, (4) low to moderate solids concentration, (5) cases requiring high decontamination factors, and (6) aqueous or non-aqueous liquids. At this point, the technology is at the bench-scale stage of development; laboratory studies and fundamental modeling are currently being employed to determine the capabilities of the process.

  20. Modus of filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Theodore H

    2006-01-01

    Experience teaches that particles larger than the pores of a filter cannot negotiate its passage. Other retention mechanisms are less obvious than sieve retention or size exclusion. They are electrical in nature, and find expression in the bonding alliances that mutually attract (or repel) filters and particles. The influence of hydrogen bonds, of van der Waals forces, of hydrophobic adsorptions, and of transient polarities on particle retentions are set forth in terms of the double electrical layer concept that also governs colloidal destabilizations. The origins of differences in membrane porosities is explained, as also the importance of the filtration conditions. The singularity of the particle-fluid-filter relationship on organism and/or pore size alteration is stressed.

  1. Filtration properties of nonwovens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gador, W; Jankowska, E

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the results and conclusions from experimental investigations concerning filtration properties of nonwovens. The needled nonwovens were made from polyester fibres (PTE) with average fibre diameter 12 micrometres and polypropylene fibres (PP) with average fibre diameter 32 micrometres. Nonwovens were produced out of each of those fibres or out of a mixture of polyester and polypropylene fibres. This paper also presents investigations of nonwoven fabric made of polypropylene fibres (PP) with average fibre diameter 2.6 micrometres, which was formed according to melt-blown technology. Oil mist, as challenge aerosol, was used to evaluate the performance of filter media at various aerosol velocities. The average oil mist test aerosol particle diameter was 0.3 micrometre. Filter penetration was measured at oil mist concentration 0.24 g/m(3).

  2. In Situ Aerosol Detector Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is developing new platform systems that have the potential to benefit Earth science research activities, which include in situ instruments for atmospheric...

  3. Air filtration in HVAC systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ginestet, Alain; Tronville, Paolo; Hyttinen, Marko

    2010-01-01

    Air filtration Guidebook will help the designer and user to understand the background and criteria for air filtration, how to select air filters and avoid problems associated with hygienic and other conditions at operation of air filters. The selection of air filters is based on external conditions such as levels of existing pollutants, indoor air quality and energy efficiency requirements.

  4. Self-Driven Desalination and Advanced Treatment of Wastewater in a Modularized Filtration Air Cathode Microbial Desalination Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Kuichang; Wang, Zhen; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Zuo, Jiaolan; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia

    2016-07-05

    Microbial desalination cells (MDCs) extract organic energy from wastewater for in situ desalination of saline water. However, to desalinate salt water, traditional MDCs often require an anolyte (wastewater) and a catholyte (other synthetic water) to produce electricity. Correspondingly, the traditional MDCs also produced anode effluent and cathode effluent, and may produce a concentrate solution, resulting in a low production of diluate. In this study, nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube membranes and Pt carbon cloths were utilized as filtration material and cathode to fabricate a modularized filtration air cathode MDC (F-MDC). With real wastewater flowing from anode to cathode, and finally to the middle membrane stack, the diluate volume production reached 82.4%, with the removal efficiency of salinity and chemical oxygen demand (COD) reached 93.6% and 97.3% respectively. The final diluate conductivity was 68 ± 12 μS/cm, and the turbidity was 0.41 NTU, which were sufficient for boiler supplementary or industrial cooling. The concentrate production was only 17.6%, and almost all the phosphorus and salt, and most of the nitrogen were recovered, potentially allowing the recovery of nutrients and other chemicals. These results show the potential utility of the modularized F-MDC in the application of municipal wastewater advanced treatment and self-driven desalination.

  5. In situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minor, Andrew M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This dissertation presents the development of the novel mechanical testing technique of in situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). This technique makes it possible to simultaneously observe and quantify the mechanical behavior of nano-scale volumes of solids.

  6. Problems of multiphase fluid filtration

    CERN Document Server

    Konovalov, AN

    1994-01-01

    This book deals with a spectrum of problems related to the mathematical modeling of multiphase filtration. Emphasis is placed on an inseparable triad: model - algorithm - computer code. An analysis of new and traditional filtration problems from the point of view of both their numerical implementation and the reproduction of one or another technological characteristics of the processes under consideration is given. The basic principles which underlie the construction of efficient numerical methods taking into account the filtration problems are discussed: non-evolutionary nature, degeneration,

  7. In situ microbial filter used for bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, M. Leslie; Taylor, Robert T.

    2000-01-01

    An improved method for in situ microbial filter bioremediation having increasingly operational longevity of an in situ microbial filter emplaced into an aquifer. A method for generating a microbial filter of sufficient catalytic density and thickness, which has increased replenishment interval, improved bacteria attachment and detachment characteristics and the endogenous stability under in situ conditions. A system for in situ field water remediation.

  8. Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume One - Main Text and Appendices A and B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, S.R.; Denton, D.L.; Giaquinto, J.M.; McCracken, M.K.; Starr, R.C.

    1999-04-01

    The laboratory investigation was performed to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing in situ chemical oxidation for remediating the secondary source of groundwater contaminants at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) Site. The study involved trichloroethene (TCE) contaminated media (groundwater, soil, and sludge) from TAN. The effectiveness of the selected oxidant, potassium permanganate (KMn0(sub4)), was evaluated at multiple oxidant and contaminant concentrations. Experiments were performed to determine the oxidant demand of each medium and the rate of TCE oxidation. The experiments were performed under highly controlled conditions (gas-tight reactors, constant 12C temperature). Multiple parameter were monitored over time including MN0(sub 4) and TCE concentrations and pH.

  9. High capacitive performance of flexible and binder-free graphene-polypyrrole composite membrane based on in situ reduction of graphene oxide and self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jintao; Chen, Peng; Oh, Bernice H. L.; Chan-Park, Mary B.

    2013-09-01

    Exploiting flexible and binder-free electrode materials is of importance for the fast development of smart supercapacitor devices. A simple and effective strategy is demonstrated to fabricate a flexible composite membrane of reduced graphene oxide and polypyrrole nanowire (RGO-PPy) via in situ reduction of graphene oxide and self-assembly. More importantly, the shape and thickness of the membrane can be reasonably controlled by varying either the concentration of GO and PPy nanowires or the filtration volume. By direct coupling of two membrane electrodes, symmetric supercapacitors can be fabricated without the use of a binder and conductive additive. The supercapacitor is able to offer large areal capacitance (175 mF cm-2) and excellent cycling stability (~93% capacitance retention after 5000 charge-discharge cycles), thanks to the synergic integration between RGO sheets and PPy nanowires and the unique self-assembled porous structure.Exploiting flexible and binder-free electrode materials is of importance for the fast development of smart supercapacitor devices. A simple and effective strategy is demonstrated to fabricate a flexible composite membrane of reduced graphene oxide and polypyrrole nanowire (RGO-PPy) via in situ reduction of graphene oxide and self-assembly. More importantly, the shape and thickness of the membrane can be reasonably controlled by varying either the concentration of GO and PPy nanowires or the filtration volume. By direct coupling of two membrane electrodes, symmetric supercapacitors can be fabricated without the use of a binder and conductive additive. The supercapacitor is able to offer large areal capacitance (175 mF cm-2) and excellent cycling stability (~93% capacitance retention after 5000 charge-discharge cycles), thanks to the synergic integration between RGO sheets and PPy nanowires and the unique self-assembled porous structure. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02381h

  10. Membrane device and process for mass exchange, separation, and filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Canfield, Nathan L.

    2016-11-15

    A membrane device and processes for fabrication and for using are disclosed. The membrane device may include a number of porous metal membranes that provide a high membrane surface area per unit volume. The membrane device provides various operation modes that enhance throughput and selectivity for mass exchange, mass transfer, separation, and/or filtration applications between feed flow streams and permeate flow streams.

  11. Latest aspects of mechanical filtration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Koláček

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe and unify all knowledge about mechanic filtration. The first part deals with the parameters and properties of filtration. Here some important basic concepts are explained such as pressure gradient, filter life, etc. There’s also a description of convenient filtration technology for coarse and fine materials, such as sand, smoke or soot. The second part primarily focuses on the real use and application of filters for liquid and gaseous media. The differences in construction between different types of filters for filtration of fuels, oils, hydraulic fluids, air and cabin filters are described. The last section is focused mainly on new materials for the production of filters. These materials are ceramic or nanomaterials, which can actually be enriched for example with antibacterial silver or some fungicides.

  12. Health benefits of particle filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisk, W J

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also, reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, for example, 7% to 25%. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

  13. Health Benefits of Particle Filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J.

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, e.g., 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

  14. Health Benefits of Particle Filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J.

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also, reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percent age improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, for example, 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

  15. In Situ Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talacua, H

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, the feasibility of in situ TE for vascular and valvular purposes were tested with the use of different materials, and animal models. First, the feasibility of a decellularized biological scaffold (pSIS-ECM) as pulmonary heart valve prosthesis is examined in sheep (Chapter 2). Next,

  16. In situ bypass og diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Leif Panduro; Schroeder, T V; Lorentzen, J E

    1993-01-01

    From 1986 through to 1990 a total of 483 in situ bypass procedures were performed in 444 patients. Preoperative risk-factors were equally distributed among diabetic (DM) and non-diabetic (NDM) patients, except for smoking habits (DM:48%, NDM:64%, p = 0.002) and cardiac disease (DM:45%, NDM:29%, p...

  17. In situ dehydration of yugawaralite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artioli, G.; Ståhl, Kenny; Cruciani, G.;

    2001-01-01

    The structural response of the natural zeolite yugawaralite (CaAl2Si6O16. 4H(2)O) upon thermally induced dehydration has been studied by Rietveld analysis of temperature-resolved powder diffraction data collected in situ in the temperature range 315-791 K using synchrotron radiation. The room-tem...

  18. Occurrence of selected pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical compounds, and stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios, in a riverbank filtration study, Platte River, Nebraska, 2001 to 2003, Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, J.R.; Verstraeten, Ingrid M.; Coplen, T.B.; Furlong, E.T.; Meyer, M.T.; Barber, L.B.

    2005-01-01

    Although studied extensively in recent years in Europe, the occurrence of endocrine disrupters and other organic wastewater compounds in the environment in the United States is not well documented. To better understand the efficiency of riverbank filtration with respect to endocrine disrupting compounds and to evaluate the use of riverbank filtration as an effective means of drinking-water treatment, a study was conducted during 2001-2003 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the City of Lincoln, at an established riverbank-filtration well field with horizontal collector wells and vertical wells. This study provides information that will be useful for (1) increased understanding of the processes and factors important in controlling the transport of endocrine disrupters, such as pesticides and pharmaceuticals during riverbank filtration, (2) better understanding of the physical and chemical processes that affect riverbank-filtration efficiency, and (3) managing the water resources of the eastern Platte River Basin. This report presents analytical methods and data collected during the study. Data are presented as generalized statistics and in figures showing temporal variations. Sites from which water-quality samples were collected for this study included wastewater sites (a cattle feedlot lagoon, a hog confinement lagoon, and wastewater-treatment plant effluent), surface-water sites (Platte River, Salt Creek, and Loup Power Canal), ground-water sites (one collector well and three vertical wells), and drinking-water sites (raw and finished). Field water-quality properties were measured in samples from these sites. Pharmaceutical compounds were detected often in the wastewater-treatment plant effluent. Surface and ground water showed low-level concentrations of pharmaceuticals. Finished drinking-water samples did not contain detectable concentrations of pharmaceuticals except for low levels of cotinine and

  19. 40 CFR 141.73 - Filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Filtration. 141.73 Section 141.73... PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Filtration and Disinfection § 141.73 Filtration. A public water system..., and does not meet all of the criteria in § 141.71 (a) and (b) for avoiding filtration, must...

  20. In-Water Hull Cleaning & Filtration System

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Dan

    2015-04-01

    Dan George R & D Mining Technology LinkedIn GRD Franmarine have received the following prestigious awards in 2014 for their research & development of an in-water hull cleaning and filtration system "The Envirocart: Golden Gecko Award for Environmental Excellence; WA Innovator of the Year - Growth Sector; Department of Fisheries - Excellence in Marine Biosecurity Award - Innovation Category; Lloyd's List Asia Awards - Environmental Award; The Australian Innovation Challenge - Environment, Agriculture and Food Category; and Australian Shipping and Maritime Industry Award - Environmental Transport Award. The Envirocart developed and patented by GRD Franmarine is a revolutionary new fully enclosed capture and containment in-water hull cleaning technology. The Envirocart enables soft Silicon based antifouling paints and coatings containing pesticides such as Copper Oxide to be cleaned in situ using a contactless cleaning method. This fully containerised system is now capable of being deployed to remote locations or directly onto a Dive Support Vessel and is rated to offshore specifications. This is the only known method of in-water hull cleaning that complies with the Department of Agriculture Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF) and Department of Fisheries WA (DoF) Guidelines. The primary underwater cleaning tool is a hydraulically powered hull cleaning unit fitted with rotating discs. The discs can be fitted with conventional brushes for glass or epoxy based coatings or a revolutionary new patented blade system which can remove marine biofouling without damaging the antifouling paint (silicone and copper oxide). Additionally there are a patented range of fully enclosed hand cleaning tools for difficult to access niche areas such as anodes and sea chests, providing an innovative total solution that enables in-water cleaning to be conducted in a manner that causes no biological risk to the environment. In full containment mode or when AIS are present, material is pumped

  1. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus and process for high-resolution in situ investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Hoyt, David W.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2015-11-24

    A continuous-flow (CF) magic angle sample spinning (CF-MAS) NMR rotor and probe are described for investigating reaction dynamics, stable intermediates/transition states, and mechanisms of catalytic reactions in situ. The rotor includes a sample chamber of a flow-through design with a large sample volume that delivers a flow of reactants through a catalyst bed contained within the sample cell allowing in-situ investigations of reactants and products. Flow through the sample chamber improves diffusion of reactants and products through the catalyst. The large volume of the sample chamber enhances sensitivity permitting in situ .sup.13C CF-MAS studies at natural abundance.

  2. In situ vadose zone bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhener, Patrick; Ponsin, Violaine

    2014-06-01

    Contamination of the vadose zone with various pollutants is a world-wide problem, and often technical or economic constraints impose remediation without excavation. In situ bioremediation in the vadose zone by bioventing has become a standard remediation technology for light spilled petroleum products. In this review, focus is given on new in situ bioremediation strategies in the vadose zone targeting a variety of other pollutants such as perchlorate, nitrate, uranium, chromium, halogenated solvents, explosives and pesticides. The techniques for biostimulation of either oxidative or reductive degradation pathways are presented, and biotransformations to immobile pollutants are discussed in cases of non-degradable pollutants. Furthermore, research on natural attenuation in the vadose zone is presented.

  3. In Situ TEM Electrical Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canepa, Silvia; Alam, Sardar Bilal; Ngo, Duc-The

    2016-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) offers high spatial and temporal resolution that provides unique information for understanding the function and properties of nanostructures on their characteristic length scales. Under controlled environmental conditions and with the ability to dynamically...... influence the sample by external stimuli, e.g. through electrical connections, the TEM becomes a powerful laboratory for performing quantitative real time in situ experiments. Such TEM setups enable the characterization of nanostructures and nanodevices under working conditions, thereby providing a deeper...... materials and devices with the specimen being contacted by electrical, mechanical or other means, with emphasis on in situ electrical measurements performed in a gaseous or liquid environment. We will describe the challenges and prospects of electrical characterization of devices and processes induced...

  4. Occidental vertical modified in situ process for the recovery of oil from oil shale, Phase 2. Construction, operation, testing, and environmental impact. Final report, August 1981-December 1982. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, A.L.; Zahradnik, R.L.; Kaleel, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Occidential Oil Shale, Inc. (OOSI) recently completed the demonstration of mining, rubblization, ignition, and simulataneous processing of two commericalized modified in situ (MIS) retorts at the Logas Wash facility near DeBeque, Colorado. Upon completion of Retort 6 in 1978, Occidential began incorporating all of the knowledge previously acquired in an effort to design two more commercial-sized MIS retorts. Any commercial venture of the future would require the ability to operate simultaneously more than one retort. Thus, Retorts 7 and 8 were developed during 1980 and 1981 through joint funding of the DOE and OOSI in Phase II. Rubblization of the retorts produced an average rubble void of 18.5% in the low grade shale (17 gallons per ton) at the Logan Wash site. After rubblization, bulkheads were constructed, inlet and offgas pipes were installed and connected to surface processing facilities and liquid product handling systems were connected to the retorts. Extensive instrumentation was installed in cooperation with Sandia National Laboratories for monitoring the complete operation of the retorts. After pre-ignition testing, Retort 8 was ignited in December of 1981 and Retort 7 was ignited in January of 1982. The retorts were operated without interruption from ignition until mid- November of 1982 at which time inlet gas injection was terminated and water quenching was begun. Total product yield from the two retorts was approximately 200,000 barrels of oil, or 70% of the Fischer Assay oil-in-place in the rubblized rock in the two retrots. Water quenching studies were conducted over a period of several months, with the objective of determining the rate of heat extraction from the retorts as well as determining the quantity and quality of offgas and water coming out from the quenching process. Data from these studies are also included in this Summary Report. 62 figs., 18 tabs.

  5. The Fundamentals of Waste Water Sludge Characterization and Filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scales, Peter J.; Dixon, David R.; Harbour, Peter J.; Stickland, Anthony D.

    2003-07-01

    The move to greater emphasis on the disposal of waste water sludges through routes such as incineration and the added cost of landfill emplacement puts high demands on dewatering technology for these sludges. A dear problem in this area is that waste water sludges are slow and difficult to dewater and traditional methods of laboratory measurement for prediction of filtration performance are inadequate. This is highly problematic for the design and operational optimisation of centrifuges, filters and settling devices in the waste water industry. The behaviour is assessed as being due to non-linear behaviour of these sludges which negates the use of classical approaches. These approaches utilise the linear portion of a t versus V{sup 2} plot (where t is the time to filtration and V is the specific filtrate volume) to extract a simple Darcian permeability. Without this parameter, a predictive capacity for dewatering using current theory is negated. (author)

  6. Oldest biliary endoprosthesis in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolo, Pierluigi; Scalisi, Giuseppe; Crinò, Stefano F; Tortora, Andrea; Giacobbe, Giuseppa; Cintolo, Marcello; Familiari, Luigi; Pallio, Socrate

    2013-01-01

    The advantages of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography over open surgery have made it the predominant method of treating patients with choledocholithiasis. After sphincterotomy, however, 10%-15% of common bile duct stones cannot be removed with a basket or balloon. The methods for managing “irretrievable stones” include surgery, mechanical lithotripsy, intraductal or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and biliary stenting. The case presented was a referred 82-year-old Caucasian woman with a 7-year-old plastic biliary endoprosthesis in situ. To the best of our knowledge the examined endoprosthesis is the oldest endoprosthesis in situ reported in the literature. Endoscopic biliary endoprosthesis placement remains a simple and safe procedure for patients with stones that are difficult to manage by conventional endoscopic methods and for patients who are unfit for surgery or who are high surgical risks. To date no consensus has been reached regarding how long a biliary prosthesis should remain in situ. Long-term biliary stenting may have a role in selected elderly patients if stones extraction has failed because the procedure may prevent stones impaction and cholangitis. PMID:23858381

  7. Cake creep during filtration of flocculated manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard; Keiding, Kristian

    the distribution of N and P on the fields. Filtration is a useful method for such a separation. Furthermore, chemicals can be added to flocculate the solids and thereby increase the filterability i.e. the specific filter-cake resistance can be reduced from 1015 m/kg to 1011 m/kg. Both the amount of added chemicals......, and the mixing procedure affect the result, and lab-scale experiments are often used to study how these pre-treatments influence the filtration process. However, the existing mathematical filtration models are based on filtration of inorganic particles and cannot simulate the filtration data obtained when manure...... that the discrepancy between the filtration theory and the observed filtration behaviour is due to a time-dependent collapse of the formed cake (creep). This can also explain the observed behaviour when flocculated manure is filtered. The filtration data can be simulated if cake creep is adopted in the filtration...

  8. Effect of membrane filtration artifacts on dissolved trace element concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Arthur J.; Elrick, Kent A.; Colberg, Mark R.

    1992-01-01

    Among environment scientists, the current and almost universally accepted definition of dissolved constituents is an operational one; only those materials which pass through a 0.45-??m membrane filter are considered to be dissolved. Detailed laboratory and field studies on Fe and Al indicate that a number of factors associated with filtration, other than just pore size, can substantially alter 'dissolved' trace element concentrations; these include: filter type, filter diameter, filtration method, volume of sample processed, suspended sediment concentration, suspended sediment grain-size distribution, concentration of colloids and colloidally associated trace elements and concentration of organic matter. As such, reported filtered-water concentrations employing the same pore size filter may not be equal. Filtration artifacts may lead to the production of chemical data that indicate seasonal or annual 'dissolved' chemical trends which do not reflect actual environmental conditions. Further, the development of worldwide averages for various dissolved chemical constituents, the quantification of geochemical cycles, and the determination of short- or long-term environmental chemical trends may be subject to substantial errors, due to filtration artifacts, when data from the same or multiple sources are combined. Finally, filtration effects could have a substantial impact on various regulatory requirements.

  9. Noise canceling in-situ detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David O.

    2014-08-26

    Technologies applicable to noise canceling in-situ NMR detection and imaging are disclosed. An example noise canceling in-situ NMR detection apparatus may comprise one or more of a static magnetic field generator, an alternating magnetic field generator, an in-situ NMR detection device, an auxiliary noise detection device, and a computer.

  10. Improving IAQ Via Air Filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Brian

    1999-01-01

    Provides tips on using air filtration to control indoor air quality in educational facilities, including dedicated spaces with unique air quality conditions such as in libraries, museums and archival storage areas, kitchens and dining areas, and laboratories. The control of particulate contaminants, gaseous contaminants, and moisture buildup are…

  11. Filtration combustion: Smoldering and SHS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matkowsky, Bernard J.

    1995-01-01

    Smolder waves and SHS (self-propagating high-temperature synthesis) waves are both examples of combustion waves propagating in porous media. When delivery of reactants through the pores to the reaction site is an important aspect of the process, it is referred to as filtration combustion. The two types of filtration combustion have a similar mathematical formulation, describing the ignition, propagation and extinction of combustion waves in porous media. The goal in each case, however, is different. In smoldering the desired goal is to prevent propagation, whereas in SHS the goal is to insure propagation of the combustion wave, leading to the synthesis of desired products. In addition, the scales in the two areas of application may well differ. For example, smoldering generally occurs at a relatively low temperature and with a smaller propagation velocity than SHS filtration combustion waves. Nevertheless, the two areas of application have much in common, so that mechanisms learned about in one application can be used to advantage in the other. In this paper we discuss recent results in the areas of filtration combustion.

  12. Demonstration of creep during filtration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard; Bugge, Thomas Vistisen; Kirchheiner, Anders Løvenbalk

    The classical filtration theory assumes a unique relationship between the local filter cake porosity and the local effective pressure. For a number of compressible materials, it has however been observed that during the consolidation stage this may not be the case. It has been found that the prod......The classical filtration theory assumes a unique relationship between the local filter cake porosity and the local effective pressure. For a number of compressible materials, it has however been observed that during the consolidation stage this may not be the case. It has been found...... that the production of filtrate also depends on the characteristic time for the filter cake solids to deform. This is formulated in the Terzaghi-Voigt model in which a secondary consolidation is introduced. The secondary consolidation may be visualized by plots of the relative cake deformation (U) v.s. the square...... magnitude as the primary consolidation (defined by the hydraulic retardation), the creep phenomenon may occur during filtration. This will lead to Ruth's plots characterized by a concave with two (more or less) distinct slopes. The slopes are defined by the relationship between the porosity...

  13. A novel insight into membrane fouling mechanism regarding gel layer filtration: Flory-Huggins based filtration mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Qian; Zhang, Meijia; Shen, Liguo; Li, Renjie; Liao, Bao-Qiang; Lin, Hongjun

    2016-09-15

    This study linked the chemical potential change to high specific filtration resistance (SFR) of gel layer, and then proposed a novel membrane fouling mechanism regarding gel layer filtration, namely, Flory-Huggins based filtration mechanism. A mathematical model for this mechanism was theoretically deduced. Agar was used as a model polymer for gel formation. Simulation of the mathematical model for agar gel showed that volume fraction of polymer and Flory-Huggins interaction parameter were the two key factors governing the gel SFR, whereas, pH and ionic strength were not related with the gel SFR. Filtration tests of gel layer showed that the total SFR value, effects of pH and ionic strength on the gel SFR well agreed with the perditions of model's simulation, indicating the real occurrence of this mechanism and the feasibility of the proposed model. This mechanism can satisfactorily explain the extremely high SFR of gel layer, and improve fundamental insights into membrane fouling regarding gel layer filtration.

  14. A novel insight into membrane fouling mechanism regarding gel layer filtration: Flory-Huggins based filtration mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Qian; Zhang, Meijia; Shen, Liguo; Li, Renjie; Liao, Bao-Qiang; Lin, Hongjun

    2016-09-01

    This study linked the chemical potential change to high specific filtration resistance (SFR) of gel layer, and then proposed a novel membrane fouling mechanism regarding gel layer filtration, namely, Flory-Huggins based filtration mechanism. A mathematical model for this mechanism was theoretically deduced. Agar was used as a model polymer for gel formation. Simulation of the mathematical model for agar gel showed that volume fraction of polymer and Flory-Huggins interaction parameter were the two key factors governing the gel SFR, whereas, pH and ionic strength were not related with the gel SFR. Filtration tests of gel layer showed that the total SFR value, effects of pH and ionic strength on the gel SFR well agreed with the perditions of model’s simulation, indicating the real occurrence of this mechanism and the feasibility of the proposed model. This mechanism can satisfactorily explain the extremely high SFR of gel layer, and improve fundamental insights into membrane fouling regarding gel layer filtration.

  15. A scalable approach for high throughput branch flow filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, David W; Herman, Nick

    2013-05-07

    Microfluidic continuous flow filtration methods have the potential for very high size resolution using minimum feature sizes that are larger than the separation size, thereby circumventing the problem of clogging. Branch flow filtration is particularly promising because it has an unlimited dynamic range (ratio of largest passable particle to the smallest separated particle) but suffers from very poor volume throughput because when many branches are used, they cannot be identical if each is to have the same size cut-off. We describe a new iterative approach to the design of branch filtration devices able to overcome this limitation without large dead volumes. This is demonstrated by numerical modelling, fabrication and testing of devices with 20 branches, with dynamic ranges up to 6.9, and high filtration ratios (14-29%) on beads and fungal spores. The filters have a sharp size cutoff (10× depletion for 12% size difference), with large particle rejection equivalent to a 20th order Butterworth low pass filter. The devices are fully scalable, enabling higher throughput and smaller cutoff sizes and they are compatible with ultra low cost fabrication.

  16. Biomass fast pyrolysis in fluidized bed : product cleaning by in-situ filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xiaoquan

    2006-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to the subject of fast pyrolysis in a fluid bed reactor. A large part of the work is related to reactor design aspects of fast pyrolysis, a subject that has not been considered sufficiently. Past research efforts were focussed mainly on the kinetics of wood pyrolysis and the

  17. Toward In Situ Monitoring of Water Contamination by Nitroenergetic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna R. Taft

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We have previously described the application of novel porous organosilicate materials to the preconcentration of nitroenergetic targets from aqueous solution prior to HPLC analysis. The performance of the sorbents and the advantages of these types of materials over commercially available solid phase extraction sorbents have been demonstrated. Here, the development of systems for application of those sorbents to in situ monitoring is described. Considerations such as column pressure, particulate filtration, and component durability are discussed. The diameter of selected column housings, the sorbent bed depth, and the frits utilized significantly impact the utility of the sorbent columns in the prototype system. The impact of and necessity for improvements in the morphological characteristics of the sorbents as they relate to reduction in column pressure are detailed. The results of experiments utilizing a prototype system are presented. Data demonstrating feasibility for use of the sorbents in preconcentration prior to ion mobility spectrometry is also presented.

  18. Filtration Understanding: FY10 Testing Results and Filtration Model Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Richard C.; Billing, Justin M.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Peterson, Reid A.; Russell, Renee L.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Shimskey, Rick W.

    2011-04-04

    This document completes the requirements of Milestone 2-4, Final Report of FY10 Testing, discussed in the scope of work outlined in the EM31 task plan WP-2.3.6-2010-1. The focus of task WP 2.3.6 is to improve the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) understanding of filtration operations for high-level waste (HLW) to improve filtration and cleaning efficiencies, thereby increasing process throughput and reducing the Na demand (through acid neutralization). Developing the cleaning/backpulsing requirements will produce much more efficient operations for both the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and the Savannah River Site (SRS), thereby significantly increasing throughput by limiting cleaning cycles. The scope of this work is to develop the understanding of filter fouling to allow developing this cleaning/backpulsing strategy.

  19. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the filtration leaching for uranium recovery from uranium ore

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The physical and chemical processes taking place in filtration leaching of uranium from uranium ore sample by sulphuric acid solution have been studied by modern physico-chemical methods (X-ray diffraction, scanning electron spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, optical emission spectroscope, ICP OES). Column leaching test was carried out for ore samples obtained from a uranium in-situ leaching (ISL) mining site using deluted sulphuricacid to study the evolution of various elements conc...

  20. 40 CFR 141.173 - Filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Filtration. 141.173 Section 141.173... PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving 10,000 or More People § 141.173 Filtration. A public water system subject to the requirements of this subpart that...

  1. In situ sensor techniques in modern bioprocess monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutel, Sascha; Henkel, Steffen

    2011-09-01

    New reactor concepts as multi-parallel screening systems or disposable bioreactor systems for decentralized and reproducible production increase the need for new and easy applicable sensor technologies to access data for process control. These sophisticated reactor systems require sensors to work with the lowest sampling volumes or, even better, to measure directly in situ, but in situ sensors are directly incorporated into a reactor or fermenter within the sterility barrier and have therefore to stand the sterilization procedures. Consequently, these in situ sensor technologies should enable the measurement of multi-analytes simultaneously online and in real-time at a low price for the robust sensing element. Current research therefore focuses on the implementation of noninvasive spectroscopic and optical technologies, and tries to employ them through fiber optics attached to disposable sensing connectors. Spectroscopic methods reach from ultraviolet to infrared and further comprising fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. Also, optic techniques like microscopy are adapted for the direct use in bioreactor systems (Ulber et al. in Anal Bioanal Chem 376:342-348, 2003) as well as various electrochemical methods (Joo and Brown in Chem Rev 108:638-651, 2008). This review shows the variety of modern in situ sensing principles in bioprocess monitoring with emphasis on spectroscopic and optical techniques and the progress in the adaption to latest reactor concepts.

  2. Centrifugal membrane filtration -- Task 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has teamed with SpinTek Membrane Systems, Inc., the developer of a centrifugal membrane filtration technology, to demonstrate applications for the SpinTek technology within the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental management (EM) Program. The technology uses supported microporous membranes rotating at high rpm, under pressure, to separate suspended and colloidal solids from liquid streams, yielding a solids-free permeate stream and a highly concentrated solids stream. This is a crosscutting technology that falls under the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program, with potential application to tank wastes, contaminated groundwater, landfill leachate, and secondary liquid waste streams from other remediation processes, including decontamination and decommissioning systems. Membrane-screening tests were performed with the SpinTek STC-X4 static test cell filtration unit, using five ceramic membranes with different pore size and composition. Based on permeate flux, a 0.25-{micro}m TiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane was selected for detailed performance evaluation using the SpinTek ST-IIL centrifugal membrane filtration unit with a surrogate tank waste solution. An extended test run of 100 hr performed on a surrogate tank waste solution showed some deterioration in filtration performance, based on flux, apparently due to the buildup of solids near the inner portion of the membrane where relative membrane velocities were low. Continued testing of the system will focus on modifications to the shear pattern across the entire membrane surface to affect improved long-term performance.

  3. Circulating tumor cell isolation: the assets of filtration methods with polycarbonate track-etched filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolfus, Claire; Piton, Nicolas; Toure, Emmanuel; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe

    2015-10-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) arise from primary or secondary tumors and enter the bloodstream by active or passive intravasation. Given the low number of CTCs, enrichment is necessary for detection. Filtration methods are based on selection of CTCs by size using a filter with 6.5 to 8 µm pores. After coloration, collected CTCs are evaluated according to morphological criteria. Immunophenotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques may be used. Selected CTCs can also be cultivated in vitro to provide more material. Analysis of genomic mutations is difficult because it requires adapted techniques due to limited DNA materials. Filtration-selected CTCs have shown prognostic value in many studies but multicentric validating trials are mandatory to strengthen this assessment. Other clinical applications are promising such as follow-up, therapy response prediction and diagnosis. Microfluidic emerging systems could optimize filtration-selected CTCs by increasing selection accuracy.

  4. Cake Filtration in Viscoelastic Polymer Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surý, Alexander; Machač, Ivan

    2009-07-01

    In this contribution, the filtration equations for a cake filtration in viscoelastic fluids are presented. They are based on a capillary hybrid model for the flow of a power law fluid. In order to express the elastic pressure drop excess in the flow of viscoelastic filtrate through the filter cake and filter screen, modified Deborah number correction functions are included into these equations. Their validity was examined experimentally. Filtration experiments with suspensions of hardened polystyrene particles (Krasten) in viscoelastic aqueous solutions of polyacryl amides (0.4% and 0.6%wt. Kerafloc) were carried out at a constant pressure on a cylindrical filtration unit using filter screens of different resistance.

  5. Training for teamwork through in situ simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Asta; Poehlman, Jon; Bollenbacher, John; Riggan, Scott; Davis, Stan; Miller, Kristi; Ivester, Thomas; Kahwati, Leila

    2015-01-01

    In situ simulations allow healthcare teams to practice teamwork and communication as well as clinical management skills in a team's usual work setting with typically available resources and equipment. The purpose of this video is to demonstrate how to plan and conduct in situ simulation training sessions, with particular emphasis on how such training can be used to improve communication and teamwork. The video features an in situ simulation conducted at a labour and delivery unit in response to postpartum hemorrhage. PMID:26294962

  6. The Tensions of In Situ Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreland, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    In situ visualization is the coupling of visualization software with a simulation or other data producer to process the data "in memory" before the data are offloaded to a storage system. Although in situ visualization provides superior analysis, it has implementation tradeoffs resulting from conflicts with some traditional expected requirements. Numerous conflicting requirements create tensions that lead to difficult implementation tradeoffs. This article takes a look at the most prevailing tensions of in situ visualization.

  7. Mechanism of reduced glomerular filtration rate in chronic malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, I; Purkerson, M L; Klahr, S; Troy, J L; Martinez-Maldonado, M; Brenner, B M

    1980-05-01

    To determine the physiological basis for the low glomerular filtration rate in chronic malnutrition, micropuncture studies were performed in Munich-Wistar rats chronically pair-fed isocaloric diets of either low (group 1, nine rats) or high protein content (group 2, nine rats). Despite the absence of hypoalbuminemia, average values for single nephron and total kidney glomerular filtration rate were nearly 35% lower in group 1 than in group 2. Mean values for glomerular capillary and Bowman's space hydraulic pressures were essentially identical in the two groups, thereby excluding glomerular transcapillary hydraulic pressure difference as the cause for the low filtration rates in group 1 animals. On the other hand, average glomerular capillary plasma flow rate and glomerular capillary ultrafiltration coefficient were significantly lower (by approximately 25 and approximately 50%, respectively) in group 1 than in group 2. The fall in glomerular capillary plasma flow rate was the consequence of increased afferent and efferent arteriolar resistances. Plasma and erythrocyte volumes were found to be equal in five additional pairs of group 1 and group 2 rats. Thus, the substantial alterations in the ultrafiltration coefficient, glomerular capillary plasma flow rate, and renal arteriolar resistances responsible for the low filtration rate in group 1 animals were not merely a consequence of decreased circulating blood or plasma volumes. Mean values for glomerular cross sectional area were significantly lower in group 1 than in group 2 despite similar values for kidney weight in the two groups. This reduction in glomerular cross sectional area in group 1 rats is presumed to reflect a decrease in effective filtration surface area and therefore likely accounts, at least in part, for the decline in ultrafiltration coefficient observed in this group.Finally, since the daily caloric intake of group 2 animals was restricted because of pair feeding requirements tied to the group 1

  8. Experimental investigation of air pressure affecting filtration performance of fibrous filter sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Yu, Xiao; Wu, Ya; Lin, Zhongping

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the effect of air pressure on their filtration performance is important for assessing the effectiveness of fibrous filters under different practical circumstances. The effectiveness of three classes of air filter sheets were investigated in laboratory-based measurements at a wide range of air pressures (60-130 KPa). The filtration efficiency was found most sensitive to the air pressure change at smaller particle sizes. As the air pressure increased from 60 to 130 KPa, significant decrease in filtration efficiency (up to 15%) and increase in pressure drop (up to 90 Pa) were observed. The filtration efficiency of the filter sheet with largest fiber diameter and smallest solid volume fraction was affected most, while the pressure drop of the filter sheet with smallest fiber diameter and largest solid volume fraction was affected most. The effect of air pressure on the filtration efficiency was slightly larger at greater filter face air velocity. However, the effect of air pressure on the pressure drop was negligible. The filtration efficiency and pressure drop were explicitly expressed as functions of the air pressure. Two coefficients were empirically derived and successfully accounted for the effects of air pressure on filtration efficiency and pressure drop.

  9. The SENSEI Generic In Situ Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayachit, Utkarsh [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States); Whitlock, Brad [Intelligent Light, Rutherford, NJ (United States); Wolf, Matthew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Loring, Burlen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Geveci, Berk [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States); Lonie, David [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States); Bethel, E. Wes [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-04-11

    The SENSEI generic in situ interface is an API that promotes code portability and reusability. From the simulation view, a developer can instrument their code with the SENSEI API and then make make use of any number of in situ infrastructures. From the method view, a developer can write an in situ method using the SENSEI API, then expect it to run in any number of in situ infrastructures, or be invoked directly from a simulation code, with little or no modification. This paper presents the design principles underlying the SENSEI generic interface, along with some simplified coding examples.

  10. Measurement of soil properties in-situ. Present methods: their applicability and potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, J.K.; Guzikowski, F.; Villet, W.C.B.

    1978-03-01

    The measurement of soil properties in-situ offers the advantages of minimal disturbance, retention of the in-situ state of stress, temperature, chemical, and biological environments, and cost effectiveness relative to many types of laboratory tests for evaluation of undisturbed soil properties. This report is concerned with techniques for in-situ measurement of permeability, strength, stress-deformation properties, and volume change properties; property classes which are of interest in most geotechnical engineering problems. Emphasis is on test concepts, data analysis and interpretation, and advantages and limitations of methods, as opposed to details of apparatus and procedure.

  11. Screening for carcinoma in situ of the contralateral testis in patients with germinal testicular cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, J G; Skakkebaek, N E; von der Maase, H

    1982-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty biopsy specimens from the contralateral testis in patients with unilateral germinal testicular cancer were analysed by light microscopy for carcinoma-in-situ changes. Changes were found in 13 (5.2%) patients. One-third of patients with an atrophic contralateral testis (volume...... of cryptorchidism or both had been screened. Since the natural course of carcinoma in situ in the contralateral testis of patients with germinal testicular cancer has not been established, the patients are being re-evaluated frequently. To date two patients with carcinoma in situ have developed a second cancer....

  12. [Real-time UV imaging of chloramphenicol intrinsic dissolution characteristics from ophthalmic in situ gel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Xiu; Guo, Zhen; Li, Hai-Yan; Wu, Li; He, Zhong-Gui; Hu, Rong-Feng; Zhang, Ji-Wen

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, chloramphenicol was selected as a model drug to prepare in situ gels. The intrinsic dissolution rate of chloramphenicol from in situ gel was evaluated using the surface dissolution imaging system. The results indicated that intrinsic dissolution rate of chloramphenicol thermosensitive in situ gel decreased significantly when the poloxamer concentration increased. The addition of the thickener reduced the intrinsic dissolution rate of chloramphenicol thermosensitive gel, wherein carbomer had the most impact. Different dilution ratios of simulated tear fluid greatly affected gel temperature, and had little influence on the intrinsic dissolution rate of chloramphenicol from the thermosensitive in situ gel. The pH of simulated tear fluid had little influence on the intrinsic dissolution rate of chloramphenicol thermosensitive in situ gel. For the pH sensitive in situ gel, the dissolution rates of chloramphenicol in weak acidic and neutral simulated tear fluids were slower than that in weak alkaline simulated tear fluid. In conclusion, the intrinsic dissolution of chloramphenicol from in situ gel was dependent on formulation and physiological factors. With advantages of small volume sample required and rapid detection, the UV imaging method can be an efficient tool for the evaluation of drug release characteristics of ophthalmic in situ gel.

  13. In-situ combustion with solvent injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Silva, J.; Kakade, G. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)]|[Maharashtra Inst. of Technology, Pune (India)

    2008-10-15

    The effects of combining in situ combustion and heavy hydrocarbon naphtha vapor injection techniques in a heavy oil reservoir were investigated. Oil production rates and steam injection efficiencies were considered. The technique was also combined with toe-to-heel air injection (THAI) processes. The study showed that the modified THAI process achieved high rates of recovery for both primary production and as a follow-up technique in partially depleted reservoirs after cyclic steam and cold production. Oil produced using the modified THAI technique was also partially upgraded by the process. Results of the vapour chamber pressure calculations showed that the volume of oil produced by naphtha assisted gravity drainage was between 1 to 3 times higher than amounts of oil produced by SAGD processes during the same amount of time. The naphtha injection process produced more oil than the steam only process. However, high amounts of naphtha were needed to produce oil. Injection and production rates during the naphtha injection process were higher. Naphtha vapor was injected near the heel of a horizontal producer well. The vapor acted as a thermal and diluent mechanism in order to reduce the viscosity of the heavy oil . 9 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs.

  14. Water Filtration Using Plant Xylem

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jongho; Chambers, Valerie; Venkatesh, Varsha; Karnik, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Effective point-of-use devices for providing safe drinking water are urgently needed to reduce the global burden of waterborne disease. Here we show that plant xylem from the sapwood of coniferous trees - a readily available, inexpensive, biodegradable, and disposable material - can remove bacteria from water by simple pressure-driven filtration. Approximately 3 cm3 of sapwood can filter water at the rate of several liters per day, sufficient to meet the clean drinking water needs of one person. The results demonstrate the potential of plant xylem to address the need for pathogen-free drinking water in developing countries and resource-limited settings.

  15. In situ vitrification: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, L.L.; Fields, D.E.

    1989-11-01

    The in situ vitrification process (ISV) converts contaminated soils and sludges to a glass and crystalline product. The process appears to be ideally suited for on site treatment of both wet and dry wastes. Basically, the system requires four molybdenum electrodes, an electrical power system for vitrifying the soil, a hood to trap gaseous effluents, an off-gas treatment system, an off-gas cooling system, and a process control station. Mounted in three transportable trailers, the ISV process can be moved from site to site. The process has the potential for treating contaminated soils at most 13 m deep. The ISV project has won a number of outstanding achievement awards. The process has also been patented with exclusive worldwide rights being granted to Battelle Memorial Institute for nonradioactive applications. While federal applications still belong to the Department of Energy, Battelle transferred the rights of ISV for non-federal government, chemical hazardous wastes to a separate corporation in 1989 called Geosafe. This report gives a review of the process including current operational behavior and applications.

  16. Chemically enhanced in situ recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sale, T. [CH2M Hill, Denver, CO (United States); Pitts, M.; Wyatt, K. [Surtek, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    Chemically enhanced recovery is a promising alternative to current technologies for management of subsurface releases of organic liquids. Through the inclusion of surfactants, solvents, polymers, and/or alkaline agents to a waterflood, the transport of targeted organic compounds can be increased and rates of recovery enhanced. By far, the vast majority of work done in the field of chemically enhanced recovery has been at a laboratory scale. The following text focuses on chemically enhanced recovery from a field application perspective with emphasis given to chlorinated solvents in a low permeability setting. While chlorinated solvents are emphasized, issues discussed are also relevant to organic liquids less dense than water such as petroleum products. Topics reviewed include: (1) Description of technology; (2) General technology considerations; (3) Low permeability media considerations; (4) Cost and reliability considerations; (5) Commercial availability; and (6) Case histories. Through this paper an appreciation is developed of both the potential and limitations of chemically enhanced recovery. Excluded from the scope of this paper is the in situ destruction of organic compounds through processes such as chemical or biological oxidation, chemically enhanced recovery of inorganic compounds, and ex situ soil treatment processes. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Four Models of In Situ Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter; Krogh, Kristian; Paltved, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    that there are four fruitful approaches to in situ simulation: (1) In situ simulation informed by reported critical incidents and adverse events from emergency departments (ED) in which team training is about to be conducted to write scenarios. (2) In situ simulation through ethnographic studies at the ED. (3) Using...... prewritten scenarios from the simulation lab and transferring them to in situ simulation. (4) Action research – insider or participant action research to obtain in-depth understanding of team processes to guide scenario design. We evaluate the approach relying on Marks’ et al. taxonomy that posits...... the following processes: Transition processes, Action processes and Interpersonal processes. Design and purpose This abstract suggests four approaches to in situ simulation. A pilot study will evaluate the different approaches in two emergency departments in the Central Region of Denmark. Methods The typology...

  18. Pig manure treatment and purification by filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makara, A; Kowalski, Z

    2015-09-15

    This study aimed to develop a new, complex pig manure treatment and filtration process. The final scheme, called the AMAK process, comprised the following successive steps: mineralization with mineral acids, alkalization with lime milk, superphosphate addition, a second alkalization, thermal treatment, and pressure filtration. The proposed method produced a filtrate with 95%, 80%, and 96% reductions in chemical oxygen demand, nitrogen content, and phosphorus content, respectively. An advantage of the proposed method was that it incorporated a crystalline phase into the solid organic part of the manure, which enabled high filtration rates (>1000 kg m(-2) h(-1)) and efficient separation. The process also eliminated odor emissions from the filtrate and sediment. The treated filtrate could be used to irrigate crops or it could be further treated in conventional biological wastewater treatment plants. The sediment could be used for producing mineral-organic fertilizer. The AMAK process is inexpensive, and it requires low investment costs.

  19. Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-10-20

    This technology evaluation assesses side stream filtration options for cooling towers, with an objective to assess key attributes that optimize energy and water savings along with providing information on specific technology and implementation options. This information can be used to assist Federal sites to determine which options may be most appropriate for their applications. This evaluation provides an overview of the characterization of side stream filtration technology, describes typical applications, and details specific types of filtration technology.

  20. Glomerular Filtration Barrier Assembly: An insight

    OpenAIRE

    Arif, Ehtesham; Nihalani, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    A glomerulus is the network of capillaries that resides in the Bowman’s capsule that functions as a filtration unit of kidney. The glomerular function ensures that essential plasma proteins are retained in blood and the filtrate is passed on as urine. The glomerular filtration assembly is composed of three main cellular barriers that are critical for the ultrafiltration process, the fenestrated endothelium, glomerular basement membrane and highly specialized podocytes. The podocytes along wit...

  1. NASA Lunar Dust Filtration and Separations Workshop Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agui, Juan H.; Stocker, Dennis P.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center hosted a 2.5-day workshop, entitled "NASA Lunar Dust Filtration and Separations Workshop" at the Ohio Aerospace Institute in Cleveland, Ohio, on November 18 to 20, 2008. The purpose of the workshop was to address the issues and challenges of particulate matter removal from the cabin atmospheres in the Altair lunar lander, lunar habitats, and in pressurized rovers. The presence of lunar regolith dust inside the pressurized volumes was a theme of particular interest. The workshop provided an opportunity for NASA, industry experts, and academia to identify and discuss the capabilities of current and developing air and gas particulate matter filtration and separations technologies as they may apply to NASA s needs. A goal of the workshop was to provide recommendations for strategic research areas in cabin atmospheric particulate matter removal and disposal technologies that will advance and/or supplement the baseline approach for these future lunar surface exploration missions.

  2. Persistent homology in graph power filtrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Allen D; Marchette, David J

    2016-10-01

    The persistence of homological features in simplicial complex representations of big datasets in R (n) resulting from Vietoris-Rips or Čech filtrations is commonly used to probe the topological structure of such datasets. In this paper, the notion of homological persistence in simplicial complexes obtained from power filtrations of graphs is introduced. Specifically, the rth complex, r ≥ 1, in such a power filtration is the clique complex of the rth power G(r) of a simple graph G. Because the graph distance in G is the relevant proximity parameter, unlike a Euclidean filtration of a dataset where regional scale differences can be an issue, persistence in power filtrations provides a scale-free insight into the topology of G. It is shown that for a power filtration of G, the girth of G defines an r range over which the homology of the complexes in the filtration are guaranteed to persist in all dimensions. The role of chordal graphs as trivial homology delimiters in power filtrations is also discussed and the related notions of 'persistent triviality', 'transient noise' and 'persistent periodicity' in power filtrations are introduced.

  3. Air filtration and indoor air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    decent ventilation and air cleaning/air filtration, high indoor air quality cannot be accomplished. The need for effective air filtration has increased with increasing evidence on the hazardous effects of fine particles. Moreover, the air contains gaseous pollutants, removal of which requires various air....... These contradictions should motivate manufacturers and researchers to develop new efficient filtration techniques and/or improve the existing ones. Development of low polluting filtration techniques, which are at the same time easy and inexpensive to maintain is the way forward in the future....

  4. Static and dynamic filtrations of different clay, electrolytes, polymer systems; Filtrations statiques et dynamiques de differents systemes argile, electrolytes, polymere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.

    1996-04-16

    Filtration properties of model drilling fluids composed of water, clays, electrolytes and water soluble polymers have been studied in static and dynamic conditions on paper filters and rock slices. Filtration experiments combined with cake observations by cryo-S.E.M. and T.E.M., show the influence of the size shape of clay particles as well as their associating mode in suspension, on the texture of the cake, its permeability, and relaxation properties. These parameters depend on the nature of the electrolyte. The polymer reduces the cake permeability by enhancing the dispersion of the clay within the suspension, but mainly by plugging the porous network due its auto aggregation properties. The cake construction in dynamic conditions, is related to the state of aggregation of the initial suspension, its poly-dispersity, its sensitivity to shear rates, and also, to the permeability of the cake built at the beginning of the filtration. In all cases, the rate of thickening of the cake is slower and larger filtrate volumes are obtained compared to the static conditions. Shear rate has two effects: first, to dissociate the weak aggregates in suspension, second, to impose a size selection of the particles in the case of a poly-dispersed suspension. At high shear rates, a cake of constant thin thickness is quickly obtained. The thickness of this limiting cake depends on the fraction of small particles present in suspension, or that can be formed by dissociation of weak aggregates under shear rate. The permeability of this limiting cake formed in dynamic conditions is, as in static conditions, controlled by the size and the shape of the particles that form the cake or by the presence of a build loss reducer water soluble polymer. Filtrations carried out on Fontainebleau sandstones allow to visualize the internal cake and to precise the risks of formation damage by the drilling fluid. (author) 127 refs.

  5. In-situ TEM characterization of nanomaterials and devices

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Moon

    2011-10-01

    Electrical properties of nano size devices were directly measured by TEM. Real time observation of phase transition behavior in PRAM revealed that the volume of the crystalline phase is the main factor in determining cell resistance. In the transistor device, we have identified the doping type and area by measuring the I-V curve at the individual nano contact on the specimen. The evolution of the graphene edge structure was controlled and monitored at and up to 1200°C in-situ. © 2011 IEEE.

  6. Pulmonary interstitial compliance and microvascular filtration coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, H S

    1980-08-01

    Static and dynamic properties governing the fluid movement into the pulmonary interstitium were examined in isolated canine lobes. The system was driven by altering intravascular presure (Piv) when the lobe was isogravimetric (change in weight (W) = 0) and allowing the lobe to become isogravimetric again. By making use of an analogy to charging a capacitor across a resistor, calculation of the filtration coefficient for transvascular fluid movement (KF) and determination of the pressure-volume relationship of the pulmonary interstitial space (Pis-Vis), with a minimum of untested assumptions, was possible. KF was found to be the same for fluid moving out of or into the intravascular space, and when the relationship between Piv and alveolar pressure (PAlv) was constant, KF was independent of transpulmonary pressure (PL). When PAlv exceeded Piv, changes in Piv did not influence KF, suggesting no significant change in either surface area available for fluid transudation or vascular permeability. The Pis-Vis curve for increasing values of Vis and Pis is best described by an exponential relationhip and is independent of PL. However, the Pis-Vis curve with decreasing values of Vis and Pis is dependent on PL.

  7. In Situ TEM Creation of Nanowire Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Sardar Bilal

    Integration of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) as active components in devices requires that desired mechanical, thermal and electrical interfaces can be established between the nanoscale geometry of the SiNW and the microscale architecture of the device. In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM...... of SiNW were also investigated in situ. SiNWs were grown on silicon microcantilever heaters using the VLS mechanism. When grown across a gap between adjacent cantilevers, contact was formed when the SiNW impinged on the sidewall of an adjacent cantilever. Using in situ TEM, SiNW contact formation...

  8. A novel in-situ sampling and VFA sensor technique for anaerobic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pind, Peter Frode; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2002-01-01

    that has made it possible to monitor VFA on-line in one of the most difficult media: animal slurry or manure. A novel in-situ filtration technique has made it possible to perform microfiltration inside the reactor system. This filter enables sampling from closed reactor systems without large scale pumping......A key information for understanding and controlling the anaerobic biogas process is the concentration of Volatile Fatty Acids (VFA). However, access to this information has so far been limited to off-line measurements by manual time and labour consuming methods. We have developed a new technique...... and filtering. Using this filtration technique together with commercially available membrane filters we have constructed a VFA sensor system that can perform automatic analysis on animal slurry at a frequency as high as every 15 minutes. The VFA sensor has been tested for a period of more than 60 days with more...

  9. Tangential flow filtration of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Andre F; Sun, Guoyong; Harris, David R

    2009-01-01

    Bovine and human hemoglobin (bHb and hHb, respectively) was purified from bovine and human red blood cells via tangential flow filtration (TFF) in four successive stages. TFF is a fast and simple method to purify Hb from RBCs using filtration through hollow fiber (HF) membranes. Most of the Hb was retained in stage III (100 kDa HF membrane) and displayed methemoglobin levels less than 1%, yielding final concentrations of 318 and 300 mg/mL for bHb and hHb, respectively. Purified Hb exhibited much lower endotoxin levels than their respective RBCs. The purity of Hb was initially assessed via SDS-PAGE, and showed tiny impurity bands for the stage III retentate. The oxygen affinity (P(50)) and cooperativity coefficient (n) were regressed from the measured oxygen-RBC/Hb equilibrium curves of RBCs and purified Hb. These results suggest that TFF yielded oxygen affinities of bHb and hHb that are comparable to values in the literature. LC-MS was used to measure the molecular weight of the alpha (alpha) and beta (beta) globin chains of purified Hb. No impurity peaks were present in the HPLC chromatograms of purified Hb. The mass of the molecular ions corresponding to the alpha and beta globin chains agreed well with the calculated theoretical mass of the alpha- and beta- globin chains. Taken together, our results demonstrate that HPLC-grade Hb can be generated via TFF. In general, this method can be more broadly applied to purify Hb from any source of RBCs. This work is significant, since it outlines a simple method for generating Hb for synthesis and/or formulation of Hb-based oxygen carriers.

  10. Mathematical analysis for internal filtration of convection-enhanced high-flux hemodialyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Chan; Lee, Kyungsoo; Kim, Hee Chan

    2012-10-01

    Structural modifications using a conventional hemodialyzer improved the internal filtration and clearance of middle molecular weight wastes by enhanced convection effect. In this study, we employed a mathematical model describing the internal filtration rate as well as the hemodynamic and hematologic parameters in highflux dialyzer to interpret the previous reported experimental results. Conventional high-flux hemodialysis and convection-enhanced high-flux hemodialysis were configured in the mathematical forms and integrated into the iterative numerical method to predict the internal filtration phenomena inside the dialyzers during dialysis. The distributions of blood pressure, dialysate pressure, oncotic pressure, blood flow rates, dialysate flow rates, local ultrafiltration, hematocrit, protein concentration and blood viscosity along the axial length of dialyzer were calculated in order to estimate the internal filtration volume. The results show that the filtration volumes by internal filtration is two times higher in a convection-enhanced high-flux hemodialyzer than in a conventional high-flux hemodialzer and explains the experimental result of improved clearance of middle molecular size waste in convection-enhanced high-flux hemodialyzer.

  11. In situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Andrew Murphy

    This dissertation presents the development of the novel mechanical testing technique of in situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). This technique makes it possible to simultaneously observe and quantify the mechanical behavior of nano-scale volumes of solids. Chapter 2 details the unique specimen preparation techniques employed to meet the geometrical constraints of the in situ experiments. These techniques include bulk silicon micromachining and the use of a focused ion beam. In section 2.4 a method of voltage-controlled mechanical testing is derived theoretically and proven experimentally. This method enables the quantification of the mechanical behavior during in situ nanoindentation experiments. Three classes of material systems were studied with this new technique: (1) bulk single crystal, (2) a soft thin film on a harder substrate and (3) a hard thin film on a softer substrate. Section 3.2 provides the first direct evidence of dislocation nucleation in single crystal silicon at room temperature. In contrast to the observation of phase transformations during conventional indentation experiments, the unique geometry employed for the in situ experiments resulted in dislocation plasticity. In section 3.3 results from in situ nanoindentation of Al films on Si substrates are presented. These results include the correlation of the microstructural deformation behavior with load vs. displacement data. It is shown that a sharp change in the force-displacement response at the elastic-to-plastic transition signifies the nucleation of dislocations. Additionally, the softening of sub-micron grains with size is observed. Section 3.4 discussed the influence of the substrate on the indentation response of two thin film/substrate systems where the films were harder than the substrate. Amorphous diamond on Si and epitaxial TiN on MgO (001) systems were studied. It was found that the deformation in the harder films was controlled by the deformation in

  12. A super hydrophilic modification of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) nanofibers: By in situ hydrothermal approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Faheem A.; Zargar, Mohammad Afzal; Tamboli, Ashif H.; Kim, Hern

    2016-11-01

    Nanofibers fabricated from Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) possesses potential applications in the field of filtrations, because of their excellent resistance towards harsh chemicals. However, the hydrophobicity restricts its further application. In this work, we focus on optimal parameters for post-electrospun tethering of Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as superhydrophilic domain onto each individual PVDF nanofibers by exploiting the in situ hydrothermal approach. The results indicated an increase in nanofiber diameters due to coating of PVA and improved surface wettability of PVDF nanofibers. The tensile tests of nanofibers indicated that mechanical properties of PVDF nanofibers could be sharply tuned from rigid to ductile. Furthermore, the studies strongly suggest that in situ hydrothermal treatment of post-electrospun nanofibers can improve the water contact angle and these nanofibers can be used in varied applications (e.g., in water purification systems).

  13. Experimental design and quality assurance: in situ fluorescence instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conmy, Robyn N.; Del Castillo, Carlos E.; Downing, Bryan D.; Chen, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Both instrument design and capabilities of fluorescence spectroscopy have greatly advanced over the last several decades. Advancements include solid-state excitation sources, integration of fiber optic technology, highly sensitive multichannel detectors, rapid-scan monochromators, sensitive spectral correction techniques, and improve data manipulation software (Christian et al., 1981, Lochmuller and Saavedra, 1986; Cabniss and Shuman, 1987; Lakowicz, 2006; Hudson et al., 2007). The cumulative effect of these improvements have pushed the limits and expanded the application of fluorescence techniques to numerous scientific research fields. One of the more powerful advancements is the ability to obtain in situ fluorescence measurements of natural waters (Moore, 1994). The development of submersible fluorescence instruments has been made possible by component miniaturization and power reduction including advances in light sources technologies (light-emitting diodes, xenon lamps, ultraviolet [UV] lasers) and the compatible integration of new optical instruments with various sampling platforms (Twardowski et at., 2005 and references therein). The development of robust field sensors skirt the need for cumbersome and or time-consuming filtration techniques, the potential artifacts associated with sample storage, and coarse sampling designs by increasing spatiotemporal resolution (Chen, 1999; Robinson and Glenn, 1999). The ability to obtain rapid, high-quality, highly sensitive measurements over steep gradients has revolutionized investigations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) optical properties, thereby enabling researchers to address novel biogeochemical questions regarding colored or chromophoric DOM (CDOM). This chapter is dedicated to the origin, design, calibration, and use of in situ field fluorometers. It will serve as a review of considerations to be accounted for during the operation of fluorescence field sensors and call attention to areas of concern when making

  14. Scientific rationale of Saturn's in situ exploration

    CERN Document Server

    Mousis, O; Lebreton, J -P; Wurz, P; Cavalié, T; Coustenis, A; Courtin, R; Gautier, D; Helled, R; Irwin, P G J; Morse, A D; Nettelmann, N; Marty, B; Rousselot, P; Venot, O; Atkinson, D H; Waite, J H; Reh, K R; Simon-Miller, A; Atreya, S; André, N; Blanc, M; Daglis, I A; Fischer, G; Geppert, W D; Guillot, T; Hedman, M M; Hueso, R; Lellouch, E; Lunine, J I; Murray, C D; O'Donoghue, J; Rengel, M; Sanchez-Lavega, A; Schmider, F -X; Spiga, A; Spilker, T; Petit, J -M; Tiscareno, M S; Ali-Dib, M; Altwegg, K; Bouquet, A; Briois, C; Fouchet, T; Guerlet, S; Kostiuk, T; Lebleu, D; Moreno, R; Orton, G S; Poncy, J

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing observations meet some limitations when used to study the bulk atmospheric composition of the giant planets of our solar system. A remarkable example of the superiority of in situ probe measurements is illustrated by the exploration of Jupiter, where key measurements such as the determination of the noble gases abundances and the precise measurement of the helium mixing ratio have only been made available through in situ measurements by the Galileo probe. This paper describes the main scientific goals to be addressed by the future in situ exploration of Saturn placing the Galileo probe exploration of Jupiter in a broader context and before the future probe exploration of the more remote ice giants. In situ exploration of Saturn's atmosphere addresses two broad themes that are discussed throughout this paper: first, the formation history of our solar system and second, the processes at play in planetary atmospheres. In this context, we detail the reasons why measurements of Saturn's bulk element...

  15. Observatory Magnetometer In-Situ Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Marusenkov

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An experimental validation of the in-situ calibration procedure, which allows estimating parameters of observatory magnetometers (scale factors, sensor misalignment without its operation interruption, is presented. In order to control the validity of the procedure, the records provided by two magnetometers calibrated independently in a coil system have been processed. The in-situ estimations of the parameters are in very good agreement with the values provided by the coil system calibration.

  16. In-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Jose A; Chupas, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Helps researchers develop new catalysts for sustainable fuel and chemical production Reviewing the latest developments in the field, this book explores the in-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts, enabling readers to take full advantage of the sophisticated techniques used to study heterogeneous catalysts and reaction mechanisms. In using these techniques, readers can learn to improve the selectivity and the performance of catalysts and how to prepare catalysts as efficiently as possible, with minimum waste. In-situ Characterization of Heterogeneous Catalysts feat

  17. Standard filtration practices may significantly distort planktonic microbial diversity estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory Cruz Padilla

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fractionation of biomass by filtration is a standard method for sampling planktonic microbes. It is unclear how the taxonomic composition of filtered biomass changes depending on sample volume. Using seawater from a marine oxygen minimum zone, we quantified the 16S rRNA gene composition of biomass on a prefilter (1.6 μm pore-size and a downstream 0.2 μm filter over sample volumes from 0.05 to 5 L. Significant community shifts occurred in both filter fractions, and were most dramatic in the prefilter community. Sequences matching Vibrionales decreased from ~40-60% of prefilter datasets at low volumes (0.05-0.5 L to less than 5% at higher volumes, while groups such at the Chromatiales and Thiohalorhabdales followed opposite trends, increasing from minor representation to become the dominant taxa at higher volumes. Groups often associated with marine particles, including members of the Deltaproteobacteria, Planctomycetes and Bacteroidetes, were among those showing the greatest increase with volume (4 to 27-fold. Taxon richness (97% similarity clusters also varied significantly with volume, and in opposing directions depending on filter fraction, highlighting potential biases in community complexity estimates. These data raise concerns for studies using filter fractionation for quantitative comparisons of aquatic microbial diversity, for example between free-living and particle-associated communities.

  18. Standard filtration practices may significantly distort planktonic microbial diversity estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Cory C; Ganesh, Sangita; Gantt, Shelby; Huhman, Alex; Parris, Darren J; Sarode, Neha; Stewart, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    Fractionation of biomass by filtration is a standard method for sampling planktonic microbes. It is unclear how the taxonomic composition of filtered biomass changes depending on sample volume. Using seawater from a marine oxygen minimum zone, we quantified the 16S rRNA gene composition of biomass on a prefilter (1.6 μm pore-size) and a downstream 0.2 μm filter over sample volumes from 0.05 to 5 L. Significant community shifts occurred in both filter fractions, and were most dramatic in the prefilter community. Sequences matching Vibrionales decreased from ~40 to 60% of prefilter datasets at low volumes (0.05-0.5 L) to less than 5% at higher volumes, while groups such at the Chromatiales and Thiohalorhabdales followed opposite trends, increasing from minor representation to become the dominant taxa at higher volumes. Groups often associated with marine particles, including members of the Deltaproteobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Bacteroidetes, were among those showing the greatest increase with volume (4 to 27-fold). Taxon richness (97% similarity clusters) also varied significantly with volume, and in opposing directions depending on filter fraction, highlighting potential biases in community complexity estimates. These data raise concerns for studies using filter fractionation for quantitative comparisons of aquatic microbial diversity, for example between free-living and particle-associated communities.

  19. In situ microcosms in aquifer bioremediation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelbaum, R T; Shati, M R; Ronen, D

    1997-07-01

    The extent to which aquifer microbiota can be studied under laboratory or simulated conditions is limited by our inability to authentically duplicate natural conditions in the laboratory. Therefore, extrapolation of laboratory results to real aquifer situations is often criticized, unless validation of the data is performed in situ. Reliable data acquisition is critical for the estimation of chemical and biological reaction rates of biodegradation processes in groundwater and as input data for mathematical models. Typically, in situ geobiochemical studies relied on the injection of groundwater spiked with compounds or bacteria of interest into the aquifer, followed by monitoring the changes over time and space. In situ microcosms provide a more confined study site for measurements of microbial reactions, yet closer to natural conditions than laboratory microcosms. Two basic types of in situ aquifer microcosm have been described in recent years, and both originated from in situ instruments initially designed for geochemical measurements. Gillham et al. [Ground Water 28 (1990) 858-862] constructed an instrument that isolates a portion of an aquifer for in situ biochemical rate measurements. More recently Shati et al. [Environ. Sci. Technol. 30 (1996) 2646-2653] modified a multilayer sampler for studying the activity of inoculated bacteria in a contaminated aquifer Keeping in mind recent advances in environmental microbiology methodologies such as immunofluorescence direct counts, oligonucleotide and PCR probes, fatty acid methyl esther analysis for the detection and characterization of bacterial communities, measurement of mRNA and expression of proteins, it is evident that much new information can now be gained from in situ work. Using in situ microcosms to study bioremediation efficiencies, the fate of introduced microorganisms and general geobiochemical aquifer processes can shed more realistic light on the microbial underworld. The aim of this paper is to

  20. in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshiko Fujita; Robert W. Smith

    2009-08-01

    in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization Yoshiko Fujita (Yoshiko.fujita@inl.gov) (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Robert W. Smith (University of Idaho-Idaho Falls, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Subsurface radionuclide and trace metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE’s greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent trace ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide strontium-90, is co-precipitation in calcite. Calcite, a common mineral in the arid western U.S., can form solid solutions with trace metals. The rate of trace metal incorporation is susceptible to manipulation using either abiotic or biotic means. We have previously demonstrated that increasing the calcite precipitation rate by stimulating the activity of urea hydrolyzing microorganisms can result in significantly enhanced Sr uptake. Urea hydrolysis causes the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity, and also by liberating the reactive cations from the aquifer matrix via exchange reactions involving the ammonium ion derived from urea: H2NCONH2 + 3H2O ? 2NH4+ + HCO3- + OH- urea hydrolysis >X:2Ca + 2NH4+ ? 2>X:NH4 + Ca2+ ion exchange Ca2+ + HCO3- + OH- ? CaCO3(s) + H2O calcite precipitation where >X: is a cation exchange site on the aquifer matrix. This contaminant immobilization approach has several attractive features. Urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which is produced by many indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Addition of foreign microbes is unnecessary. In turn the involvement of the native microbes and the consequent in situ generation of reactive components in the aqueous phase (e.g., carbonate and Ca or Sr) can allow dissemination of the reaction over a larger volume and/or farther away from an amendment injection point, as compared to direct addition of the reactants at

  1. Filtrating forms of soil bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van'kova, A. A.; Ivanov, P. I.; Emtsev, V. T.

    2013-03-01

    Filtrating (ultramicroscopic) forms (FF) of bacteria were studied in a soddy-podzolic soil and the root zone of alfalfa plants as part of populations of the most widespread physiological groups of soil bacteria. FF were obtained by filtering soil solutions through membrane filters with a pore diameter of 0.22 μm. It was established that the greater part of the bacteria in the soil and in the root zone of the plants has an ultramicroscopic size: the average diameter of the cells is 0.3 μm, and their length is 0.6 μm, which is significantly less than the cell size of banal bacteria. The number of FF varies within a wide range depending on the physicochemical conditions of the habitat. The FF number's dynamics in the soil is of a seasonal nature; i.e., the number of bacteria found increases in the summer and fall and decreases in the winter-spring period. In the rhizosphere of the alfalfa, over the vegetation period, the number of FF and their fraction in the total mass of the bacteria increase. A reverse tendency is observed in the rhizoplane. The morphological particularities (identified by an electron microscopy) and the nature of the FF indicate their physiological activity.

  2. Benchtop isolation and characterization of functional exosomes by sequential filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Mitja L; Ilmer, Matthias; Silva, Leslie P; Hawke, David H; Recio, Alejandro; Vorontsova, Maria A; Alt, Eckhard; Vykoukal, Jody

    2014-12-05

    Early and minimally invasive detection of malignant events or other pathologies is of utmost importance in the pursuit of improved patient care and outcomes. Recent evidence indicates that exosomes and extracellular vesicles in serum and body fluids can contain nucleic acid, protein, and other biomarkers. Accordingly, there is great interest in applying these clinically as prognostic, predictive, pharmacodynamic, and early detection indicators. Nevertheless, existing exosome isolation methods can be time-consuming, require specialized equipment, and/or present other inefficiencies regarding purity, reproducibility and assay cost. We have developed a straightforward, three-step protocol for exosome isolation of cell culture supernatants or large volumes of biofluid based on sequential steps of dead-end pre-filtration, tangential flow filtration (TFF), and low-pressure track-etched membrane filtration that we introduce here. Our approach yields exosome preparations of high purity and defined size distribution and facilitates depletion of free protein and other low-molecular-weight species, extracellular vesicles larger than 100nm, and cell debris. Samples of exosomes prepared using the approach were verified morphologically by nanoparticle tracking analysis and electron microscopy, and mass spectrometry analyses confirmed the presence of previously reported exosome-associated proteins. In addition to being easy-to-implement, sequential filtration yields exosomes of high purity and, importantly, functional integrity as a result of the relatively low-magnitude manipulation forces employed during isolation. This answers an unmet need for preparation of minimally manipulated exosomes for investigations into exosome function and basic biology. Further, the strategy is amenable to translation for clinical exosome isolations because of its speed, automatability, scalability, and specificity for isolating exosomes from complex biological samples.

  3. PDF-based heterogeneous multiscale filtration model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jian; Rutland, Christopher J

    2015-04-21

    Motivated by modeling of gasoline particulate filters (GPFs), a probability density function (PDF) based heterogeneous multiscale filtration (HMF) model is developed to calculate filtration efficiency of clean particulate filters. A new methodology based on statistical theory and classic filtration theory is developed in the HMF model. Based on the analysis of experimental porosimetry data, a pore size probability density function is introduced to represent heterogeneity and multiscale characteristics of the porous wall. The filtration efficiency of a filter can be calculated as the sum of the contributions of individual collectors. The resulting HMF model overcomes the limitations of classic mean filtration models which rely on tuning of the mean collector size. Sensitivity analysis shows that the HMF model recovers the classical mean model when the pore size variance is very small. The HMF model is validated by fundamental filtration experimental data from different scales of filter samples. The model shows a good agreement with experimental data at various operating conditions. The effects of the microstructure of filters on filtration efficiency as well as the most penetrating particle size are correctly predicted by the model.

  4. Fabrication and cytocompatibility of in situ crosslinked carbon nanomaterial films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sunny C; Lalwani, Gaurav; Grover, Kartikey; Qin, Yi-Xian; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2015-05-28

    Assembly of carbon nanomaterials into two-dimensional (2D) coatings and films that harness their unique physiochemical properties may lead to high impact energy capture/storage, sensors, and biomedical applications. For potential biomedical applications, the suitability of current techniques such as chemical vapor deposition, spray and dip coating, and vacuum filtration, employed to fabricate macroscopic 2D all carbon coatings or films still requires thorough examination. Each of these methods presents challenges with regards to scalability, suitability for a large variety of substrates, mechanical stability of coatings or films, or biocompatibility. Herein we report a coating process that allow for rapid, in situ chemical crosslinking of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into macroscopic all carbon coatings. The resultant coatings were found to be continuous, electrically conductive, significantly more robust, and cytocompatible to human adipose derived stem cells. The results lay groundwork for 3D layer-on-layer nanomaterial assemblies (including various forms of graphene) and also opens avenues to further explore the potential of MWCNT films as a novel class of nano-fibrous mats for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  5. Sensitivity of in-situ gamma-ray spectra to soil density and water content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, A.V.; van der Graaf, E.R.; de Meijer, R.J.; Maucec, M.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of sediment water content and bulk density on measurements of in-situ environmental gamma-radiation were investigated using Monte-Carlo simulations. The simulations consider a large bismuth-germanate detector in a semi-infinite geometry. The volume contributing radiation to the detector

  6. In-situ RHEED analysis of atomic layer deposition and characterization of AL203 gate dielectrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bankras, R.G.; Aarnink, A.A.I.; Holleman, J.; Schmitz, J.

    2003-01-01

    A new custom designed reactor was realized at the MESA+ cleanroom to fabricate high-k dielectrics using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Key features of the reactor are: a small reactor volume, in-situ RHEED analysis and low background pressure. The effect of precursor and purge pulse times is discuss

  7. In situ feeding rates of plantonic copepods: A comparison of four methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Møhlenberg, Flemming; Riisgård, Hans Ulrik

    1985-01-01

    into estimates of in situ algal grazing rates by means of independently estimated gut turnover times, and were compared with chlorophyll and particle-volume grazing rates of animals sampled simultaneously and incubated in water from the collection depth. In addition, egg-production rates of adult females were...

  8. Filtration performance of microporous ceramic supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belouatek, Aissa; Ouagued, Abdellah; Belhakem, Mustapha; Addou, Ahmed

    2008-04-24

    The use of inorganic membranes in pollution treatment is actually limited by the cost of such membranes. Advantages of inorganic membranes are their chemical, thermal and pH properties. The purpose of this work was the development of microporous ceramic materials based on clay for liquid waste processing. The supports or ceramic filters having various compositions were prepared and thermally treated at 1100 degrees C. The results show that, at the temperature studied, porosity varied according to the support composition from 12% for the double-layered (ceramic) support to 47% for the activated carbon- filled support with a mean pore diameter between 0.8 and 1.3 microm, respectively. Volumes of 5 l of distilled water were filtered tangentially for 3 h under an applied pressure of 3.5 and 5.5 bar. The retention of tubular supports prepared was tested with molecules of varying size (Evans blue, NaCl and Sacharose). The study of the liquid filtration and flow through these supports showed that the retention rate depends on support composition and pore diameter, and solute molecular weight. The S1 support (mixture of barbotine and 1% (w/w) activated carbon) gave a flux for distilled water of 68 L/m2 h while the double-layered support resulted in a flux of 8 L/m2 h for the same solution at the pressure of 3.5 bar. At a pressure of 5.5 bar an increase in the distilled water flux through the various supports was observed. It was significant for the S1 support (230 L/m h).

  9. In situ production and analysis of Weissella confusa dextran in wheat sourdough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katina, Kati; Maina, Ndegwa Henry; Juvonen, Riikka; Flander, Laura; Johansson, Liisa; Virkki, Liisa; Tenkanen, Maija; Laitila, Arja

    2009-10-01

    Several lactic acid bacteria belonging to the genera Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus, and Weissella have been introduced to wheat sourdough baking for in situ production of exopolysaccharides. This is considered a novel method for improving the shelf-life, volume and nutritional value of bread without additives. However, in situ production of exopolysaccharides during sourdough fermentation is challenged by simultaneous acidification due to metabolic activities of the bacteria, which may significantly diminish the positive technological impact of exopolysaccharides. In this study, the growth, activity and in situ production of dextran by Weissella confusa VTT E-90392 in wheat sourdoughs were investigated. Furthermore, the influence of dextran-enriched sourdoughs, at the addition level of 43%, on the subsequent bread quality was established. W. confusa efficiently produced dextran from the added sucrose in wheat sourdough without strong acid production. A new specific enzyme-assisted method for in situ analysis of dextran in sourdoughs was developed. With this method, we could for the first time proof significant (11-16 g/kg DW) production of polymeric dextran in sourdoughs. Concomitant formation of shorter isomaltooligosaccharides by W. confusa was also detected. The produced dextran significantly increased the viscosity of the sourdoughs. Application of dextran-enriched sourdoughs in bread baking provided mildly acidic wheat bread with improved volume (up to 10%) and crumb softness (25-40%) during 6 days of storage. Hence, W. confusa is a promising new strain for efficient in situ production of dextrans and isomaltooligosaccharides in sourdoughs without strong acidification.

  10. Development of a Filtration-Based Bioluminescence Assay for Detection of Microorganisms in Tea Beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, Yohei; Igarashi, Toshinori; Harada, Yasuhiro

    2016-03-01

    The market for tea drinks as healthy beverages has been steadily expanding, and ready-to-drink beverages in polyethylene terephthalate bottles have been popular. To more rapidly and accurately test tea beverages bottled in polyethylene terephthalate for microbial contamination, a newly developed filtration device and a washing method with a commercial bioluminescence assay were combined to detect low numbers of bacterial spores, fungal conidia, and ascospores. Washing buffers were formulated with nonionic detergents from the Tween series. Commercially available tea beverages were used to evaluate the filtration capacity of the filtration device, the effect of washing buffers, and the performance of the assay. The assay was tested with serially diluted suspensions of colonies of two bacterial strains, spores of three Bacillus strains, conidia of five fungal strains, and ascospores of four fungal strains. The filtration device enabled filtration of a large sample volume (100 to 500 ml), and the washing buffer significantly decreased the background bioluminescence intensity of tea samples when compared with the no-washing method. Low numbers (1 to 10 CFU/100 ml) of the tested strains of bacteria were detected within 8 to 18 h of cultivation, and fungi were detected within 24 to 48 h. Furthermore, a whole bottle (500 ml) of mixed tea was filtered through the filtration device and microbes were detected. This method could be used for quality control of bottled beverages without preincubation.

  11. Metal reduction at bulk chemical filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Toru; Daikoku, Shusaku; Tsuzuki, Shuichi; Murakami, Tetsuya

    2017-03-01

    OK73 thinner and cyclohexanone, both of which were spiked with metals were passed through Nylon 6,6 filter, varying flow rate, which include the conditions of both point-of-use and bulk filtrations. The influent and effluent metal concentrations were measured using ICP-MS for metal removal efficiency of the filtration. As a result, removal efficiency for some metals descended depending on the flow rate, while others maintained. Slower flow rate is recommended to maintain low metal concentration in bulk filtration based on the result. Metals in cyclohexanone were reduced at higher efficiency than in OK73 thinner, agrees with a metal removal model of hydrophilic adsorbent in organic solvent, evidenced in our previous paper. Further, metal reduction on 300 mm φ Si wafer after coating organic solvents with Nylon 6,6 filtration was evidenced with TREX analysis.

  12. Filtration in coal liquefaction - Influence of filtration conditions in non-hydrogenated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, J. W.; Rantell, T. D.

    1980-01-01

    A series of experiments has been carried out to study the effects of filtration conditions upon the rate of filtration of non-hydrogenated coal digests. The results show the dependence of cake resistivity on both the filtration temperature and pressure. Filter cakes were found to be compressible, resulting in smaller increases in rate with increasing pressure than with incompressible cakes. The filtration temperature determines the packing of residual solids in the cake which in turn affects the cake resistivity. An empirical relation has been derived between filtration temperature and resistivity. With increasing temperature there is an increase in filtration rate due to the reduced viscosity, but a reduction owing to a higher packing density of solids in the filter cake.

  13. Detection of airborne Legionella while showering using liquid impingement and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloge-Abarkan, Magali; Ha, Thi-Lan; Robine, Enric; Zmirou-Navier, Denis; Mathieu, Laurence

    2007-01-01

    Aerosols of water contaminated with Legionella bacteria constitute the only mode of exposure for humans. However, the prevention strategy against this pathogenic bacteria risk is managed through the survey of water contamination. No relationship linked the Legionella bacteria water concentration and their airborne abundance. Therefore, new approaches in the field of the metrological aspects of Legionella bioaerosols are required. This study was aimed at testing the main principles for bioaerosol collection (solid impaction, liquid impingement and filtration) and the in situ hybridization (FISH) method, both in laboratory and field assays, with the intention of applying such methodologies for airborne Legionella bacteria detection while showering. An aerosolization chamber was developed to generate controlled and reproducible L. pneumophila aerosols. This tool allowed the identification of the liquid impingement method as the most appropriate one for collecting airborne Legionella bacteria. The culturable fraction of airborne L. pneumophila recovered with the liquid impingement principle was 4 and 700 times higher compared to the impaction and filtration techniques, respectively. Moreover, the concentrations of airborne L. pneumophila in the impinger fluid were on average 7.0 x 10(5) FISH-cells m(-3) air with the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) method versus 9.0 x 10(4) CFU m(-3) air with the culture method. These results, recorded under well-controlled conditions, were confirmed during the field experiments performed on aerosols generated by hot water showers in health institutions. This new approach may provide a more accurate characterization of aerobiocontamination by Legionella bacteria.

  14. Design Games for In-Situ Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    on a design problem where an in-situ design practice may further the early design process: the case of designing a pervasive game. Pervasive games are computer games, played using the city as a game board and often using mobile phones with GPS. Some contextual design methods exist, but we propose an approach...... that calls for the designer to conceptualise and perform ideas in-situ, that is on the site, where the game is supposed to be played. The problem was to design a creativity method that incorporated in-situ design work and which generated game concepts for pervasive games. The proposed design method, called...... sitestorming, is based on a game using Situationistic individual exploration of the site and different types of game cards, followed by a joint evaluation of the generated ideas. A series of evaluations showed that the designers found the method enjoyable to use, that the method motivated idea generation...

  15. In situ macromolecular crystallography using microbeams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L; Aishima, Jun; Foadi, James; Morgan, Ann W; Robinson, James I; Nettleship, Joanne E; Owens, Raymond J; Moraes, Isabel; Fry, Elizabeth E; Grimes, Jonathan M; Harlos, Karl; Kotecha, Abhay; Ren, Jingshan; Sutton, Geoff; Walter, Thomas S; Stuart, David I; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-05-01

    Despite significant progress in high-throughput methods in macromolecular crystallography, the production of diffraction-quality crystals remains a major bottleneck. By recording diffraction in situ from crystals in their crystallization plates at room temperature, a number of problems associated with crystal handling and cryoprotection can be side-stepped. Using a dedicated goniometer installed on the microfocus macromolecular crystallography beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source, crystals have been studied in situ with an intense and flexible microfocus beam, allowing weakly diffracting samples to be assessed without a manual crystal-handling step but with good signal to noise, despite the background scatter from the plate. A number of case studies are reported: the structure solution of bovine enterovirus 2, crystallization screening of membrane proteins and complexes, and structure solution from crystallization hits produced via a high-throughput pipeline. These demonstrate the potential for in situ data collection and structure solution with microbeams.

  16. Microfluidic filtration system to isolate extracellular vesicles from blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ryan T; Kim, Junho; Jang, Su Chul; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Gho, Yong Song; Park, Jaesung

    2012-12-21

    Extracellular vesicles are released by various cell types, particularly tumor cells, and may be potential targets for blood-based cancer diagnosis. However, studies performed on blood-borne vesicles to date have been limited by lack of effective, standardized purification strategies. Using in situ prepared nanoporous membranes, we present a simple strategy employing a microfluidic filtration system to isolate vesicles from whole blood samples. This method can be applied to purify nano-sized particles from blood allowing isolation of intact extracellular vesicles, avoiding the need for laborious and potentially damaging centrifugation steps or overly specific antibody-based affinity purification. Porous polymer monoliths were integrated as membranes into poly(methyl methacrylate) microfluidic chips by benchtop UV photopolymerization through a mask, allowing precise positioning of membrane elements while preserving simplicity of device preparation. Pore size could be manipulated by changing the ratio of porogenic solvent to prepolymer solution, and was tuned to a size proper for extraction of vesicles. Using the membrane as a size exclusion filter, we separated vesicles from cells and large debris by injecting whole blood under pressure through the microfluidic device. To enhance isolation purity, DC electrophoresis was employed as an alternative driving force to propel particles across the filter and increase the separation efficiency of vesicles from proteins. From the whole blood of melanoma-grown mice, we isolated extracellular vesicles and performed RT-PCR to verify their contents of RNA. Melan A mRNA derived from melanoma tumor cells were found enriched in filtered samples, confirming the recovery of vesicles via their cargo. This filtration system can be incorporated into other on-chip processes enabling integrated sample preparation for the downstream analysis of blood-based extracellular vesicles.

  17. Complications and Management of the Filtration Bleb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Clement; W; N; Chan

    1992-01-01

    Filtration surgery is the commonest operation performed for closed angle or open angle glaucoma when medical treatment or laser trabeculoplasty has failed to control the intraocular pressure. It is characterized by the formation of an artificial drainage fistula between the anterior chamber and subconjunctival space. The successful operation is evidenced by the appearance of a subconjunctival filtration bleb which in turn depends on the patency of this pathway. Despite numerous modification, the procedu...

  18. The Glomerular Filtration Barrier: Components and Crosstalk

    OpenAIRE

    Madhav C. Menon; Chuang, Peter Y.; Cijiang John He

    2012-01-01

    The glomerular filtration barrier is a highly specialized blood filtration interface that displays a high conductance to small and midsized solutes in plasma but retains relative impermeability to macromolecules. Its integrity is maintained by physicochemical and signalling interplay among its three core constituents—the glomerular endothelial cell, the basement membrane and visceral epithelial cell (podocyte). Understanding the pathomechanisms of inherited and acquired human diseases as well...

  19. Dedicated breast CT: effect of adaptive filtration on dose distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the work was experimental investigations of the breast dose distributions with adaptive filtration. Adaptive filtration reduces detector dynamic range and improves image quality. The adaptive filter with predetermined shape is placed at the x-ray beam such that the x-ray intensity at the detector surface is flat. However, adaptive filter alters the mean dose to the breast, as well as volume distribution of the dose. Methods: The dose was measured using a 14 cm diameter cylindrical acrylic breast phantom. An acrylic adaptive filter was fabricated to match the 14 cm diameter of the phantom. The dose was measured using ion chamber inserted into holes distributed along the radius of the phantom from the center to the edge. The radial distribution of dose was measured and fitted by an analytical function and the volume distribution and mean value of dose was calculated. The measurements were performed at 40, 60, 90, and 120 kVp tube voltages and 6.6 mGy air kerma. Results: The adaptive filt...

  20. Experimental prestorage filtration removes antibodies and decreases lipids in RBC supernatants mitigating TRALI in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silliman, Christopher C; Kelher, Marguerite R; Khan, Samina Y; LaSarre, Monica; West, F Bernadette; Land, Kevin J; Mish, Barbara; Ceriano, Linda; Sowemimo-Coker, Samuel

    2014-05-29

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) remains a significant cause of transfusion-related mortality with red cell transfusion. We hypothesize that prestorage filtration may reduce proinflammatory activity in the red blood cell (RBC) supernatant and prevent TRALI. Filters were manufactured for both small volumes and RBC units. Plasma containing antibodies to human lymphocyte antigen (HLA)-A2 or human neutrophil antigen (HNA)-3a was filtered, and immunoglobulins and specific HNA-3a and HLA-2a neutrophil (PMN) priming activity were measured. Antibodies to OX27 were added to plasma, and filtration was evaluated in a 2-event animal model of TRALI. RBC units from 31 donors known to have antibodies against HLA antigens and from 16 antibody-negative controls were filtered. Furthermore, 4 RBC units were drawn and underwent standard leukoreduction. Immunoglobulins, HLA antibodies, PMN priming activity, and the ability to induce TRALI in an animal model were measured. Small-volume filtration of plasma removed >96% of IgG, antibodies to HLA-A2 and HNA-3a, and their respective priming activity, as well as mitigating antibody-mediated in vivo TRALI. In RBC units, experimental filtration removed antibodies to HLA antigens and inhibited the accumulation of lipid priming activity and lipid-mediated TRALI. We conclude that filtration removes proinflammatory activity and the ability to induce TRALI from RBCs and may represent a TRALI mitigation step.

  1. In situ viscometry by optical trapping interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzmán, C.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Köszali, R.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate quantitative in situ viscosity measurements by tracking the thermal fluctuations of an optically trapped microsphere subjected to a small oscillatory flow. The measured power spectral density of the sphere's positions displays a characteristic peak at the driving frequency of the f......We demonstrate quantitative in situ viscosity measurements by tracking the thermal fluctuations of an optically trapped microsphere subjected to a small oscillatory flow. The measured power spectral density of the sphere's positions displays a characteristic peak at the driving frequency...

  2. Properties of the filtrate from treatment of pig manure by filtration method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makara Agnieszka

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents properties of filtrate obtained from pig manure using the AMAK treatment process, which includes the mineralization of macro- and microfertilizer components by the hydrolyzing of organic matter into forms that are bioavailable to plants. Filtration produced two products, sediment and filtrate. The quality of the filtrate allowed for its use as a substitute of water to irrigate crops. Concentrations of heavy metals are very low and therefore the quality of the filtrate fully complies with European standard concerning fertilizers. The used mineralization process practically eliminated odors from the filtrate. The reduction of specific odor emission by 99.1-99.5% in samples taken from above the filtrate, respectively compared to the odor concentration found in samples taken from above raw pig manure. Sediment could be used as raw material for production of mineral-organic fertilizer. Filtrate and filtration sediments analyses show that the majority of nitrogen and other fertilizing compounds included in raw pig manure remains in sediment.

  3. In-situ Dendrite/Metallic Glass Matrix Composites: A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junwei Qiao

    2013-01-01

    The advanced fabrication of in-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix (MGM) composites is reviewed.Herein,the semisolid processing and Bridgman solidification are two methods,which can make the dendrites homogeneously dispersed within the metallic glass matrix.Upon quasi-static compressive loading at room temperature,almost all the in-situ composites exhibit improved plasticity,due to the effective block to the fast propagation of shear bands.Upon quasi-static tensile loading at room temperature,although the composites possess tensile ductility,the inhomogeneous deformation and associated softening dominates.High volume-fractioned dendrites and network structures make in-situ composites distinguishingly plastic upon dynamic compression.In-situ composite exhibits high tensile strength and softening (necking) in the supercooled liquid region,since the presence of high volume-fractioned dendrites lowers the rheology of the viscous glass matrix at high temperatures.At cryogenic temperatures,a distinguishingly-increased maximum strength is available; however,a ductile-to-brittle transition seems to be present by lowering the temperature.Besides,improved tension-tension fatigue limit of 473 MPa and four-point-bending fatigue limit of 567 MPa are gained for Zr58.5Ti14.3Nb5.2Cu6.1Ni4.9Be11.o MGM composites.High volume-fraction dendrites within the glass matrix induce increased effectiveness on the blunting and propagating resistance of the fatigue-crack tip.The fracture toughness of in-situ composites is comparable to those of the toughest steels and crystalline Ti alloys.During steady-state crack-growth,the confinement of damage by in-situ dendrites results in enhancement of the toughness.

  4. Development of a virus concentration method using lanthanum-based chemical flocculation coupled with modified membrane filtration procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanyan; Riley, Lela K; Lin, Mengshi; Purdy, Gregory A; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2013-06-01

    Direct membrane filtration is often used to concentrate viruses in water but it may suffer from severe membrane fouling and clogging. Here, a lanthanum-based flocculation method coupled with modified membrane filtration procedures was developed and evaluated to detect viruses in large volume (40 L) water samples. The lanthanum-based flocculation method could easily reduce the water sample volume by a factor of 40. Additional volume reduction was achieved by a two-step membrane filtration approach. First, selected membrane filters (including 1MDS electropositive filters and nitrocellulose electronegative filters-Millipore HATF filters) were used to reduce water sample volume further and compare their efficiencies in virus recovery. The Mg²⁺-modified HATF membrane performed better on MS2 retention with an average virus recovery of 83.4% (±4.5% [standard deviation]). After HATF membrane filtration and elution, centrifugal ultrafiltration through a 30 kDa cut-off membrane resulted in an overall concentration factor of 20,000. Results from the infectivity assay showed that the MS2 recovery efficiencies from the NanoCeram- and 1MDS-based direct filtration and the lanthanum-based concentration coupled with the modified filtration procedure were 10.1% (±1.0%), 3.3% (±0.1%), and 17.5% (±1.1%), respectively. Results from the PCR analysis showed that the virus recoveries of the lanthanum-based method were 20.6% (±2.9%) and 19.5% (±3.4%) for MS2 and adenovirus, respectively, while no adenovirus could be detected through the NanoCeram- and 1MDS-based direct filtration. The lanthanum-based concentration method coupled with modified membrane filtration procedures is therefore a promising method for detecting waterborne viruses.

  5. In situ SEM thermal fatigue of Al/graphite metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, G. S.; Rabenberg, L.; Marcus, H. L.

    1990-01-01

    Several thermal fatigue-induced failure mechanisms are deduced for unidirectional graphite-reinforced 6061 Al-alloy MMCs subjected to in situ thermal cycling. These thermal cycling conditions are representative of MMC service cycles in aerospace environments, where thermal fatigue is primarily associated with changes in the stress states near the interfaces due to coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between fiber and matrix. This in situ SEM thermal-cycling study clarified such factors affecting MMCs' thermal fatigue as local fiber content and distribution, void volume, fiber stiffness, thermal excursion magnitude, and number of thermal cycles. MMC microfailure modes in thermal fatigue have been deduced.

  6. Development of a Robotic Arm Based Hydrogel Additive Manufacturing System for In-Situ Printing

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao Li; Qin Lian; Dichen Li; Hua Xin; Shuhai Jia

    2017-01-01

    In-situ printing is a promising injury repair technique that can be directly applied during surgical operations. This paper features a potential in-situ printing platform based on a small-scale robotic arm with a micro-sized dispenser valve. A double-light-source curing method was applied to print poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) with a 20% (weight/volume) ratio and the entire process was controlled automatically by a computer interface where droplet diameter, curing time, mechanical ...

  7. 21 CFR 177.2910 - Ultra-filtration membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ultra-filtration membranes. 177.2910 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2910 Ultra-filtration membranes. Ultra-filtration... the processing of food, under the following prescribed conditions; (a)(1) Ultra-filtration...

  8. Carcinoma in situ in the testis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørth, M; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Andersson, L

    2000-01-01

    Carcinoma in situ (CIS) of the testis is a common precursor of germ-cell tumours in adults and adolescents, with the exception of spermatocytic seminoma. This article reviews existing knowledge on the pathobiology, genetic aspects and epidemiology of CIS, discusses current hypotheses concerning...

  9. In Situ Flash Pyrolysis of Straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Niels

    In-Situ Flash Pyrolysis of Straw Ph.D. dissertation by Niels Bech Submitted: April 2007. Supervisors: Professor Kim Dam-Johansen, Associate Professor Peter Arendt Jensen Erfaringerne med forbrænding af halm opnået gennem et årti har vist, at en proces der kan koncentrere energien på marken, fjerne...

  10. Treatment options for carcinoma in situ testis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M S; Gundgaard, M.G.; Daugaard, G

    2011-01-01

    Carcinoma in situ testis (CIS) is known as the precursor of germ cell cancer of the testis. International guidelines on diagnosis and treatment are inconsistent. Some countries offer routine biopsies of the contralateral testicle in relation to orchidectomy for testicular cancer, whereas other...

  11. Recent Advances in Fluorescence in situ Hybridization

    OpenAIRE

    吉田, 廸弘; Michihiro C., Yoshida; 北海道大学理学部附属動物染色体研究施設; Chromosome Research Unit, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University

    1992-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedures that directly couple molecular and cytological information allow precise visualization of DNA sequences on metaphase chromosomes and interphase nuclei. These techniques can be used to identify chromosomes, detect chromosomal aberrations, and analyze linear and spetial genome organization. FISH procedures are also used to clinical fields for diagnosis of disease-related chromosome changes and tumor biology.

  12. Contemporary management of ductal carcinoma in situ and lobular carcinoma in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeng-Gyasi, Samilia; Ong, Cecilia; Hwang, E Shelley

    2016-06-01

    The management of in situ lesions ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) continues to evolve. These diagnoses now comprise a large burden of mammographically diagnosed cancers, and with a global trend towards more population-based screening, the incidence of these lesions will continue to rise. Because outcomes following treatment for DCIS and LCIS are excellent, there is emerging controversy about what extent of treatment is optimal for both diseases. Here we review the current approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of both DCIS and LCIS. In addition, we will consider potential directions for future management of these lesions.

  13. In situ impedance measurement of microwave atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. T.; Nam, W. J.; Lee, J. K.; Yun, G. S.

    2017-04-01

    The impedance of atmospheric pressure argon plasma jets driven by microwave frequency is determined in situ by a novel ‘two frequency method’. In the conventional method of reflection coefficient ({{S}}11) measurement, the frequency of the driving microwave power is scanned, which inevitably affects the plasma characters and leads to uncertainty in the estimated plasma impedance. In our proposed method, the frequency-scanning signal additional to the driving power is used to measure {{S}}11 over a wide frequency range, which enables accurate determination of the plasma impedance based on an equivalent circuit model. The measured resistance and reactance of the plasma increase with the driving power in agreement with the transmission line theory. Based on this in situ measurement of the plasma impedance, the net power coupled to the plasma has been determined. The overall power efficiency remains approximately unchanged around 45% for different input power levels owing to the competing effects between the impedance mismatch and the volume change of the plasma.

  14. ENHANCED DATA DISCOVERABILITY FOR IN SITU HYPERSPECTRAL DATASETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Rasaiah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Field spectroscopic metadata is a central component in the quality assurance, reliability, and discoverability of hyperspectral data and the products derived from it. Cataloguing, mining, and interoperability of these datasets rely upon the robustness of metadata protocols for field spectroscopy, and on the software architecture to support the exchange of these datasets. Currently no standard for in situ spectroscopy data or metadata protocols exist. This inhibits the effective sharing of growing volumes of in situ spectroscopy datasets, to exploit the benefits of integrating with the evolving range of data sharing platforms. A core metadataset for field spectroscopy was introduced by Rasaiah et al., (2011-2015 with extended support for specific applications. This paper presents a prototype model for an OGC and ISO compliant platform-independent metadata discovery service aligned to the specific requirements of field spectroscopy. In this study, a proof-of-concept metadata catalogue has been described and deployed in a cloud-based architecture as a demonstration of an operationalized field spectroscopy metadata standard and web-based discovery service.

  15. Enhanced Data Discoverability for in Situ Hyperspectral Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasaiah, B.; Bellman, C.; Hewson, R. D.; Jones, S. D.; Malthus, T. J.

    2016-06-01

    Field spectroscopic metadata is a central component in the quality assurance, reliability, and discoverability of hyperspectral data and the products derived from it. Cataloguing, mining, and interoperability of these datasets rely upon the robustness of metadata protocols for field spectroscopy, and on the software architecture to support the exchange of these datasets. Currently no standard for in situ spectroscopy data or metadata protocols exist. This inhibits the effective sharing of growing volumes of in situ spectroscopy datasets, to exploit the benefits of integrating with the evolving range of data sharing platforms. A core metadataset for field spectroscopy was introduced by Rasaiah et al., (2011-2015) with extended support for specific applications. This paper presents a prototype model for an OGC and ISO compliant platform-independent metadata discovery service aligned to the specific requirements of field spectroscopy. In this study, a proof-of-concept metadata catalogue has been described and deployed in a cloud-based architecture as a demonstration of an operationalized field spectroscopy metadata standard and web-based discovery service.

  16. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Technology summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces, in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP intends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years. ISR IP is an applied research and development program broadly addressing known DOE environmental restoration needs. Analysis of a sample of 334 representative sites by the Office of Environmental Restoration has shown how many sites are amenable to in situ remediation: containment--243 sites; manipulation--244 sites; bioremediation--154 sites; and physical/chemical methods--236 sites. This needs assessment is focused on near-term restoration problems (FY93--FY99). Many other remediations will be required in the next century. The major focus of the ISR EP is on the long term development of permanent solutions to these problems. Current needs for interim actions to protect human health and the environment are also being addressed.

  17. IN-SITU RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT NEAR THE NOPAL I URANIUM DEPOSIT AT PENA BLANCA, MEXICO: CONSTRAINTS FROM SHORT-LIVED DECAY-SERIES RADIONUCLIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Luo; T.L. Ku; V. Todd; M. Murrell; J. Alfredo Rodriguez Pineda; J. Dinsmoor; A. Mitchell

    2005-07-11

    For nuclear waste management, an important mechanism by which radioactive waste components are isolated from returning to the human environment, the biosphere, is by the geological barrier in which the effectiveness of the barrier is characterized by in-situ retardation factor, i.e., the transport rate of a radionuclide relative to that of groundwater. As part of natural analog studies of the Yucca Mountain Project of the U. S. Department of Energy, we propose such characterization by using naturally-occurring decay-series radioisotopes as an analog. We collected large-volume (>1000 liters) groundwater samples from three wells (PB, Pozos, and PB4, respectively) near the Nopal I Uranium Ore site at Pena Blanca, Mexico, by using an in-situ Mn-cartridge filtration technique for analysis of short-lived decay-series radionuclides. Results show that the activities of short-lived radioisotopes ({sup 228}Ra, {sup 224}Ra and {sup 223}Ra) and activity ratios of {sup 224}Ra/{sup 228}Ra and {sup 224}Ra/{sup 223}Ra are higher at PB and Pozos than at PB4. In contrast, the {sup 210}Po activity is much lower at PB and Pozos than at PB4. The high Ra activities and activities ratios at PB and Pozos are attributable to the high alpha-recoil input from the aquifer rocks, while the high {sup 210}Po activity at PB4 is due to the enhanced colloidal transport. Based on a uranium-series transport model, we estimate that the in-situ retardation factor of Ra is (0.43 {+-} 0.02) x 10{sup 3} at PB, (1.68 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup 3} at Pozos, and (1.19 {+-} 0.08) x 10{sup 3} at PB4 and that the mean fracture width in the aquifer rocks is about 0.23 {micro}m at PB, 0.37 {micro}m at Posos, and 4.0 {micro}m at PB4, respectively. The large fracture width at PB4 as derived from the model provides an additional evidence to the inference from the Po measurements that particle-reactive radionuclides are transported mainly as colloidal forms through the large fractures in rocks. Our model also suggests that

  18. In situ heavy ion irradiation studies of nanopore shrinkage and enhanced radiation tolerance of nanoporous Au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Fan, C.; Ding, J.; Xue, S.; Chen, Y.; Li, Q.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2017-01-01

    High energy particle radiations induce severe microstructural damage in metallic materials. Nanoporous materials with a giant surface-to-volume ratio may alleviate radiation damage in irradiated metallic materials as free surface are defect sinks. Here we show, by using in situ Kr ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope at room temperature, that nanoporous Au indeed has significantly improved radiation tolerance comparing with coarse-grained, fully dense Au. In situ studies show that nanopores can absorb and eliminate a large number of radiation-induced defect clusters. Meanwhile, nanopores shrink (self-heal) during radiation, and their shrinkage rate is pore size dependent. Furthermore, the in situ studies show dose-rate-dependent diffusivity of defect clusters. This study sheds light on the design of radiation-tolerant nanoporous metallic materials for advanced nuclear reactor applications.

  19. High temperature creep behavior of in-situ synthesized MoSi2-30%SiC composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅晓伟; 杨王玥; 孙祖庆; 张来启; 朱静

    2002-01-01

    The compressive creep behavior at 1200~1400℃ of an in-situ synt hesized MoSi2-30%SiC (volume fraction) composite and a traditional PM MoSi2 -30%SiC (volume fraction) composite is investigated. The creep rate of the in -situ synthesized MoSi2-30%SiC (volume fraction) composite is about 10- 7s-1 under stress of 60~120MPa, and significantly lower than that made by PM method above 1300℃. The reason is that the interface be tween SiC particle and MoSi2 matrix in in-situ synthesized SiCp/MoSi2 is of direct atomic bonding without any amorphous glassy phase, such as SiO2 stru cture. Creep deformation occurs primarily by dislocation motion and the dislocat ions have Burgers vectors of the ty pe of 〈110〉 and 〈100〉.

  20. New in situ crosslinking chemistries for hydrogelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Meredith Colleen

    Over the last half century, hydrogels have found immense value as biomaterials in a vast number of biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. One subset of hydrogels receiving increased attention is in situ forming gels. Gelling by either bioresponsive self-assembly or mixing of binary crosslinking systems, these technologies are useful in minimally invasive applications as well as drug delivery systems in which the sol-to-gel transition aids the formulation's performance. Thus far, the field of in situ crosslinking hydrogels has received limited attention in the development of new crosslinking chemistries. Moreover, not only does the chemical nature of the crosslinking moieties allow these systems to perform in situ, but they contribute dramatically to the mechanical properties of the hydrogel networks. For example, reversible crosslinks with finite lifetimes generate dynamic viscoelastic gels with time-dependent properties, whereas irreversible crosslinks form highly elastic networks. The aim of this dissertation is to explore two new covalent chemistries for their ability to crosslink hydrogels in situ under physiological conditions. First, reversible phenylboronate-salicylhydroxamate crosslinking was implemented in a binary, multivalent polymeric system. These gels formed rapidly and generated hydrogel networks with frequency-dependent dynamic rheological properties. Analysis of the composition-structure-property relationships of these hydrogels---specifically considering the effects of pH, degree of polymer functionality, charge of the polymer backbone and polymer concentration on dynamic theological properties---was performed. These gels demonstrate diverse mechanical properties, due to adjustments in the binding equilibrium of the pH-sensitive crosslinks, and thus have the potential to perform in a range of dynamic or bioresponsive applications. Second, irreversible catalyst-free "click" chemistry was employed in the hydrogelation of multivalent azide

  1. High gradient magnetic filtration of cupric oxide and fly ash particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lua, A.C. [Nanyang Technological University (Singapore). School of Mechanical and Production Engineering

    1996-12-31

    High gradient magnetic filtration (HGMF) tests have been carried out on cupric oxide particles and power plant fly ash which were dispersed in air streams. An experimental test rig was set up to conduct these tests. Results showed that for cupric oxide particles, filtration efficiencies of up to 95% were obtained for submicron sizes with dust loadings of up to 0.36 time the matrix volume. For fly ash, filtration efficiencies of up to 65% were obtained for submicron particles. However, all particle sizes showed progressive deterioration in efficiencies with loading. At the end of the test, the matrix had collected 0.52 times its own mass of fly ash. 2 refs., 7 figs.

  2. The Glomerular Filtration Barrier: Components and Crosstalk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhav C. Menon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The glomerular filtration barrier is a highly specialized blood filtration interface that displays a high conductance to small and midsized solutes in plasma but retains relative impermeability to macromolecules. Its integrity is maintained by physicochemical and signalling interplay among its three core constituents—the glomerular endothelial cell, the basement membrane and visceral epithelial cell (podocyte. Understanding the pathomechanisms of inherited and acquired human diseases as well as experimental injury models of this barrier have helped to unravel this interdependence. Key among the consequences of interference with the integrity of the glomerular filtration barrier is the appearance of significant amounts of proteins in the urine. Proteinuria correlates with kidney disease progression and cardiovascular mortality. With specific reference to proteinuria in human and animal disease phenotypes, the following review explores the roles of the endothelial cell, glomerular basement membrane, and the podocyte and attempts to highlight examples of essential crosstalk within this barrier.

  3. Maize genome sequencing by methylation filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Lance E; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; O'Shaughnessy, Andrew L; Balija, Vivekanand S; Nascimento, Lidia U; Dike, Sujit; de la Bastide, Melissa; Martienssen, Robert A; McCombie, W Richard

    2003-12-19

    Gene enrichment strategies offer an alternative to sequencing large and repetitive genomes such as that of maize. We report the generation and analysis of nearly 100,000 undermethylated (or methylation filtration) maize sequences. Comparison with the rice genome reveals that methylation filtration results in a more comprehensive representation of maize genes than those that result from expressed sequence tags or transposon insertion sites sequences. About 7% of the repetitive DNA is unmethylated and thus selected in our libraries, but potentially active transposons and unmethylated organelle genomes can be identified. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction can be used to finish the maize transcriptome.

  4. The Perspective of Riverbank Filtration in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Teng, Y.; Zhai, Y.; Zuo, R.

    2014-12-01

    Sustainable drinking water supply can affect the health of people, and the surrounding ecosystems. According to statistics of the monitoring program of drinking water sources in 309 at or above prefecture level of China in 2013, the major pollutants index were total phosphorus, ammonia and manganese in surface drinking water sources, respectively, iron, ammonia and manganese in groundwater drinking water sources, respectively. More than 150 drinking water emergency environmental accidents happened since 2006, 52 of these accidents led to the disruption of water supply in waterworks, and a population of over ten million were affected. It indicated that there is a potential risk for people's health by the use of river water directly and it is necessary to require alternative techniques such as riverbank filtration for improving the drinking water quality. Riverbank filtration is an inexpensive natural process, not only smoothing out normal pollutant concentration found in surface water but also significantly reducing the risk from such emergency events as chemical spill into the river. Riverbank filtration technique has been used in many countries more than 100 years, including China. In China, in 1950s, the bank infiltration technique was first applied in northeast of China. Extensive bank infiltration application was conducted in 1980s, and more than 300 drinking water sources utilities bank infiltration established mainly near the Songhua River Basin, the Yellow River Basin, Haihe River Basin. However, the comparative lack of application and researches on riverbank filtration have formed critical scientific data gap in China. As the performance of riverbank filtration technique depend on not only the design and setting such as well type, pumping rate, but also the local hydrogeology and environmental properties. We recommend more riverbank filtration project and studies to be conducted to collect related significant environmental geology data in China

  5. Salt disposition alternatives filtration at SRTC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, B. W.; Hobbs, D.

    2000-01-27

    Several of the prospective salt disposition alternative technologies require a monosodium titanate (MST) contact to remove strontium and actinides from inorganic salt solution feedstock. This feedstock also contains sludge solids from waste removal operations and may contain defoamers added in the evaporator systems. Filtration is required to remove the sludge and MST solids before sending the salt solution for further processing. This report describes testing performed using the Parallel Theological Experimental Filter (PREF). The PREF contains two single tube Mott sintered metal crossflow filters. For this test one filter was isolated so that the maximum velocities could be achieved. Previous studies showed slurries of MST and sludge in the presence of sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) were filterable since the NaTPB slurry formed a filter cake which aided in removing the smaller MST and sludge particles. Some of the salt disposition alternative technologies do not use NaTPB raising the question of how effective crossflow filtration is with a feed stream containing only sludge and MST. Variables investigated included axial velocity, transmembrane pressure, defoamer effects, and solids concentration (MST and sludge). Details of the tests are outlined in the technical report WSRC-RP-98-O0691. Key conclusions from this study are: (1) Severe fouling of the Mott sintered metal filter did not occur with any of the solutions filtered. (2) The highest fluxes, in the range of .46 to 1.02 gpm/f{sup 2}, were obtained when salt solution decanted from settled solids was fed to the filter. These fluxes would achieve 92 to 204 gpm filtrate production for the current ITP filters. The filtrate fluxes were close to the flux of 0.42 gpm/f{sup 2} reported for In Tank Precipitation Salt Solution by Morrisey. (3) For the range of solids loading studied, the filter flux ranged from .04 to .17 gpm/f{sup 2} which would result in a filtrate production rate of 9 to 31 gpm for the current HP

  6. Industrial investigations of the liquid steel filtration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Janiszewski

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hitherto existing investigations concerning the ceramic filter use in the steel making processes have given good results. The obtained results of filtration have proved that this method may be used as an effective and cheap way of steel filtration from non-metallic inclusions. Placing filters in the tundish is the best location considering the limitation of the possibility of secondary pollution of steel. Yet, the results presented in this paper, of an experiment prepared and carried out in the industrial environment, are the only positive results obtained, which are connected with so much quantities of liquid steel processed with use of the multi-hole ceramic filters.

  7. Projective Dimension in Filtrated K-Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentmann, Rasmus Moritz

    2013-01-01

    Under mild assumptions, we characterise modules with projective resolutions of length n∈N in the target category of filtrated K-theory over a finite topological space in terms of two conditions involving certain Tor -groups. We show that the filtrated K-theory of any separable C∗dash-algebra over...... any topological space with at most four points has projective dimension 2 or less. We observe that this implies a universal coefficient theorem for rational equivariant KK-theory over these spaces. As a contrasting example, we find a separable C∗dash-algebra in the bootstrap class over a certain five...

  8. Projective Dimension in Filtrated K-Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentmann, Rasmus Moritz

    2013-01-01

    any topological space with at most four points has projective dimension 2 or less. We observe that this implies a universal coefficient theorem for rational equivariant KK-theory over these spaces. As a contrasting example, we find a separable C∗dash-algebra in the bootstrap class over a certain five......-point space, the filtrated K-theory of which has projective dimension 3. Finally, as an application of our investigations, we exhibit Cuntz-Krieger algebras which have projective dimension 2 in filtrated K-theory over their respective primitive spectrum....

  9. In situ hydrogen loading on zirconium powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maimaitiyili, Tuerdi, E-mail: tuerdi.maimaitiyili@mah.se; Blomqvist, Jakob [Malmö University, Östra Varvsgatan 11 A, Malmö, Skane 20506 (Sweden); Steuwer, Axel [Lund University, Ole Römers väg, Lund, Skane 22100 (Sweden); Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Gardham Avenue, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Bjerkén, Christina [Malmö University, Östra Varvsgatan 11 A, Malmö, Skane 20506 (Sweden); Zanellato, Olivier [Ensam - Cnam - CNRS, 151 Boulevard de l’Hôpital, Paris 75013 (France); Blackmur, Matthew S. [Materials Performance Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Andrieux, Jérôme [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue J Horowitz, Grenoble 38043 (France); Université de Lyon, 43 Bd du 11 novembre 1918, Lyon 69100 (France); Ribeiro, Fabienne [Institut de Radioprotection et Sûreté Nucléaire, IRSN, BP 3, 13115 Saint-Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-06-26

    Commercial-grade Zr powder loaded with hydrogen in situ and phase transformations between various Zr and ZrH{sub x} phases have been monitored in real time. For the first time, various hydride phases in a zirconium–hydrogen system have been prepared in a high-energy synchrotron X-ray radiation beamline and their transformation behaviour has been studied in situ. First, the formation and dissolution of hydrides in commercially pure zirconium powder were monitored in real time during hydrogenation and dehydrogenation, then whole pattern crystal structure analysis such as Rietveld and Pawley refinements were performed. All commonly reported low-pressure phases presented in the Zr–H phase diagram are obtained from a single experimental arrangement.

  10. In situ SU-8 silver nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Søren Vang; Uthuppu, Basil; Jakobsen, Mogens Havsteen

    2015-01-01

    to this problem, an easy new method of fabricating silver nanocomposites by an in situ reduction of precursors within the epoxy-based photoresist SU-8 has been developed. AgNO3 dissolved in acetonitrile and mixed with the epoxy-based photoresist SU-8 forms silver nanoparticles primarily during the pre- and post......Nanocomposite materials containing metal nanoparticles are of considerable interest in photonics and optoelectronics applications. However, device fabrication of such materials always encounters the challenge of incorporation of preformed nanoparticles into photoresist materials. As a solution......-exposure soft bake steps at 95 degrees C. A further high-temperature treatment at 300 degrees C resulted in the formation of densely homogeneously distributed silver nanoparticles in the photoresist matrix. No particle growth or agglomeration of nanoparticles is observed at this point. The reported new in situ...

  11. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhansl, James L; Brady, Patrick V

    2014-04-29

    An in situ recovery of uranium operation involves circulating reactive fluids through an underground uranium deposit. These fluids contain chemicals that dissolve the uranium ore. Uranium is recovered from the fluids after they are pumped back to the surface. Chemicals used to accomplish this include complexing agents that are organic, readily degradable, and/or have a predictable lifetime in an aquifer. Efficiency is increased through development of organic agents targeted to complexing tetravalent uranium rather than hexavalent uranium. The operation provides for in situ immobilization of some oxy-anion pollutants under oxidizing conditions as well as reducing conditions. The operation also artificially reestablishes reducing conditions on the aquifer after uranium recovery is completed. With the ability to have the impacted aquifer reliably remediated, the uranium recovery operation can be considered inherently safe.

  12. Mechanisms of pressure filtration of liquid aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, X.

    2006-12-01

    The Prefil Footprinter, a portable pressure filtration instrument, is usually used to detect the quality of liquid aluminum alloys. However, no investigations have ever been done to calculate the cake resistance to date. Based on the identification and classification of flow behavior using the first derivative method for filtrate mass vs filtration time curves, conventional filtration equations are successfully employed to understand the filtration behaviors. From the analyses of the variations of cake resistance with filtration time, the filtration mechanisms are discussed in detail over the different filtration stages. During the steady stage, either incompressible or compressible cake mode is the main mechanism. At the initial and terminal transient stages, however, deep-bed filtration, complete straining, and solidification clogging may appear. Solid inclusions in liquid metal have significant influence on the cake structures and properties. Some important issues related to the heterogeneity of filter media and test methodology are highlighted in this work.

  13. In situ models, physico-chemical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Cate, J M

    1994-07-01

    In situ (intra-oral) caries models are used for two purposes. First, they provide information about oral physiological processes. Such information helps to detail our knowledge of the oral ecosystem and to verify conclusions from in vitro experiments. Second, in situ models are utilized to test preventive agents in the phase between laboratory testing and clinical trials. Most investigations involving enamel inserts have been aimed at testing new dentifrices. The experimental designs of such studies usually do not allow one to draw conclusions on physico-chemical processes, e.g., because of single point measurements. Studies of model parameters (lesion type, lesion severity, and de/remineralization in time) constitute only a minority of the research reports. The most striking observation obtained with in situ models has been the significant differences in de/remineralization observed among individuals and, more importantly, within one individual during different time periods and between different sites in the same mouth (for review, see ten Cate et al., 1992). Regardless of this, some general findings can be inferred: During in situ demineralization, up to 62 vol% microns/day may be removed from enamel. For dentin specimens, this value may be as high as 89 vol% microns/day. For remineralization, during fluoride dentifrice treatment, a median deposition rate of 0.7%/day (for lesions with integrated mineral loss values between 2000 and 4000 vol% microns) is found. The rate of deposition seems to be correlated with the extent of the pre-formed lesion. This suggests that the number of sites (crystallite surface) available for calcium phosphate precipitation is an important parameter.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. In situ hybridization-theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadkol, S S; Gage, W R; Pasternack, G R

    1999-09-01

    In situ hybridization is a technique to determine and localize target nucleic acids in morphologically preserved tissue sections. Recent advances in methods have greatly increased the sensitivity of the technique, and it is currently possible to detect extremely few copies of any given target sequence with nonisotopic methods. In this teaching review, we integrate theoretical background, technical considerations, and guidelines for usage for this important component of molecular diagnosis.

  15. In situ health monitoring of piezoelectric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Scott L. (Inventor); Drouant, George J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An in situ health monitoring apparatus may include an exciter circuit that applies a pulse to a piezoelectric transducer and a data processing system that determines the piezoelectric transducer's dynamic response to the first pulse. The dynamic response can be used to evaluate the operating range, health, and as-mounted resonance frequency of the transducer, as well as the strength of a coupling between the transducer and a structure and the health of the structure.

  16. Squamous cell carcinoma in situ after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kambara, Takeshi; Nishiyama, Takafumi; Yamada, Rie; Nagatani, Tetsuo; Nakajima, Hiroshi [Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Sugiyama, Asami

    1997-12-31

    We report two cases with Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) in situ caused by irradiation to hand eczemas, resistant to any topical therapies. Both of our cases clinically show palmer sclerosis and flexor restriction of the fingers, compatible to chronic radiation dermatitis. Although SCC arising in chronic radiation dermatitis is usually developed ten to twenty years after irradiation, in our cases SCC were found more than forty years after irradiation. (author)

  17. The evolution of down-scale virus filtration equipment for virus clearance studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Andreas; Berting, Andreas; Medek, Christian; Poelsler, Gerhard; Kreil, Thomas R

    2015-03-01

    The role of virus filtration in assuring the safety of biopharmaceutical products has gained importance in recent years. This is due to the fundamental advantages of virus filtration, which conceptually can remove all pathogens as long as their size is larger than the biomolecule of commercial interest, while at the same time being neutral to the biological activity of biopharmaceutical compound(s). Major progress has been made in the development of adequate filtration membranes that can remove even smaller viruses, or possibly even all. Establishing down-scaled models for virus clearance studies that are fully equivalent with respect to operating parameters at manufacturing scale is a continuing challenge. This is especially true for virus filtration procedures where virus clearance studies at small-scale determine the operating parameters, which can be used at manufacturing scale. This has limited volume-to-filter-area-ratios, with significant impact on process economics. An advanced small-scale model of virus filtration, which allows the investigation of the full complexity of these processes, is described here. It includes the automated monitoring and control of all process parameters, as well as an electronic data acquisition system, which is fully compliant with current regulatory requirements for electronic records in a pharmaceutical environment.

  18. The effect of membrane filtration artifacts on dissolved trace element concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, A.J.; Elrick, K.A.; Colberg, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    Among environment scientists, the current and almost universally accepted definition of dissolved constituents is an operational one only those materials which pass through a 0.45-??m membrane filter are considered to be dissolved. Detailed laboratory and field studies on Fe and Al indicate that a number of factors associated with filtration, other than just pore size, can substantially alter 'dissolved' trace element concentrations; these include: filter type, filter diameter, filtration method, volume of sample processed, suspended sediment concentration, suspended sediment grain-size distribution, concentration of colloids and colloidally-associated trace elements and concentration of organic matter. As such, reported filtered-water concentrations employing the same pore size filter may not be equal. Filtration artifacts may lead to the production of chemical data that indicate seasonal or annual 'dissolved' chemical trends which do not reflect actual environmental conditions. Further, the development of worldwide averages for various dissolved chemical constituents, the quantification of geochemical cycles, and the determination of short- or long-term environmental chemical trends may be subject to substantial errors, due to filtration artifacts, when data from the same or multiple sources are combined. Finally, filtration effects could have a substantial impact on various regulatory requirements.

  19. In situ ion irradiation of zirconium carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Christopher J.; Motta, Arthur T.; Kirk, Mark A.

    2015-11-01

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is a candidate material for use in one of the layers of TRISO coated fuel particles to be used in the Generation IV high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor, and thus it is necessary to study the effects of radiation damage on its structure. The microstructural evolution of ZrCx under irradiation was studied in situ using the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscope (IVEM) at Argonne National Laboratory. Samples of nominal stoichiometries ZrC0.8 and ZrC0.9 were irradiated in situ using 1 MeV Kr2+ ions at various irradiation temperatures (T = 20 K-1073 K). In situ experiments made it possible to continuously follow the evolution of the microstructure during irradiation using diffraction contrast imaging. Images and diffraction patterns were systematically recorded at selected dose points. After a threshold dose during irradiations conducted at room temperature and below, black-dot defects were observed which accumulated until saturation. Once created, the defect clusters did not move or get destroyed during irradiation so that at the final dose the low temperature microstructure consisted only of a saturation density of small defect clusters. No long-range migration of the visible defects or dynamic defect creation and elimination were observed during irradiation, but some coarsening of the microstructure with the formation of dislocation loops was observed at higher temperatures. The irradiated microstructure was found to be only weakly dependent on the stoichiometry.

  20. In situ Raman mapping of art objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauwers, D.; Brondeel, Ph.; Moens, L.; Vandenabeele, P.

    2016-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy has grown to be one of the techniques of interest for the investigation of art objects. The approach has several advantageous properties, and the non-destructive character of the technique allowed it to be used for in situ investigations. However, compared with laboratory approaches, it would be useful to take advantage of the small spectral footprint of the technique, and use Raman spectroscopy to study the spatial distribution of different compounds. In this work, an in situ Raman mapping system is developed to be able to relate chemical information with its spatial distribution. Challenges for the development are discussed, including the need for stable positioning and proper data treatment. To avoid focusing problems, nineteenth century porcelain cards are used to test the system. This work focuses mainly on the post-processing of the large dataset which consists of four steps: (i) importing the data into the software; (ii) visualization of the dataset; (iii) extraction of the variables; and (iv) creation of a Raman image. It is shown that despite the challenging task of the development of the full in situ Raman mapping system, the first steps are very promising. This article is part of the themed issue "Raman spectroscopy in art and archaeology".

  1. Influence of size and density on filtration rate modeling and nutrient uptake by green mussel (Perna viridis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantanasarit, Chayarat; Babel, Sandhya; Englande, Andrew J; Meksumpun, Shettapong

    2013-03-15

    This study investigates green mussel filtration rates based on variation of the mussel size and density, and attempts to correlate these with the amount of Chaetoceros calcitrans consumed by kinetic modeling. The filtration rates were found to be more effective in small mussels and with greater volumes of seawater/mussel which represent low mussel densities in the mussel farms. Under field condition, the first order kinetic model is useful for evaluation of mussel filtration rate. However, the composite exponential kinetic model was determined to better describe filtration rates in a close system. Higher ratios of seawater volume L/g DW mussel tissue, resulted in an increasing filtration rate until a maximum plateau was reached at 10.37 L/h/g DW tissue as determined by first order kinetics. Based on the filtration rate, carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus uptake by green mussels were found to be 2128.72, 265.41, and 66.67 mg/year/indv, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. In situ Management and Domestication of Plants in Mesoamerica

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    ALEJANDRO CASAS; ADRIANA OTERO-ARNAIZ; EDGAR PÉREZ-NEGRÓN; ALFONSO VALIENTE-BANUET

    2007-01-01

    ... in plant populations under in situ management in the region. • Methods Information on wild and in situ managed populations of the herbaceous weedy plants Anoda cristata and Crotalaria puntila, the tree Leucaena esculenta...

  3. Application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to the analysis of ... In this study, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) as a culture-independent molecular ... a high percentage and took place in an oily biological system under aerobic ...

  4. Electret Polyvinylidene Fluoride Nanofibers Hybridized by Polytetrafluoroethylene Nanoparticles for High-Efficiency Air Filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shan; Zhao, Xinglei; Yin, Xia; Yu, Jianyong; Ding, Bin

    2016-09-14

    Airborne particulate matter (PM) pollution has become a severe environmental concern calling for electret fibrous materials with high filtration efficiency and low pressure drop. However, restraining the dissipation of the electric charges in service to ensure the stabilized electrostatic force of the fibers for effectively adsorbing particles is extremely important and also challenging. Herein, we report novel electret nanofibrous membranes with numerous charges and desirable charge stability using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as the matrix polymer and polytetrafluoroethylene nanoparticles (PTFE NPs) as an inspiring charge enhancer through the in situ charging technology of electrospinning. Benefiting from the employment of PTFE NPs and optimized injection energy, the fibrous membranes are endowed with elevated surface potentials from 0.42 to 3.63 kV and reduced decrement of charges from 75.4 to 17.5%, which contribute to the ameliorative stability of filtration efficiency. Significantly, an electret mechanism is proposed, while deepened depth of the energy level and incremental polarized dipole charges with increasing PTFE NP concentrations and injection energy have been confirmed through the measurement of open-circuit thermally stimulated discharge and surface potential decay. Ultimately, the resultant fibrous membrane exhibited a high filtration efficiency of 99.972%, a low pressure drop of 57 Pa, a satisfactory quality factor of 0.14 Pa(-1), and superior long-term service performance. The successful fabrication of such an intriguing material may provide a new approach for the design and development of electret materials for PM2.5 governance.

  5. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the filtration leaching for uranium recovery from uranium ore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolat Uralbekov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The physical and chemical processes taking place in filtration leaching of uranium from uranium ore sample by sulphuric acid solution have been studied by modern physico-chemical methods (X-ray diffraction, scanning electron spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, optical emission spectroscope, ICP OES. Column leaching test was carried out for ore samples obtained from a uranium in-situ leaching (ISL mining site using deluted sulphuricacid to study the evolution of various elements concentration in the pregnant leach solution. It has been shown that the uranium in pregnant solutions appears by dissolution of calcium and magnesium carbonates and uranium minerals as well. It was found the decreasing of filtration coefficient from 0.099 m day-1 to 0.082 m day-1, due to the presence of mechanical and chemical mudding. Partial extraction of uranium (85% from the ore has been explained by the slow diffusion of sulfuric acid to the uranium minerals locates in the cracks of silicate minerals. It was concluded that the studied uranium ore sample according to adverse geotechnical parameters is not suitable for uranium extraction by filtration leaching.

  6. Using data from colloid transport experiments to parameterize filtration model parameters for favorable conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamai, Tamir; Nassar, Mohamed K.; Nelson, Kirk E.; Ginn, Timothy R.

    2017-04-01

    Colloid filtration in porous media spans across many disciplines and includes scenarios such as in-situ bioremediation, colloid-facilitated transport, water treatment of suspended particles and pathogenic bacteria, and transport of natural and engineered nanoparticles in the environment. Transport and deposition of colloid particles in porous media are determined by a combination of complex processes and forces. Given the convoluted physical, chemical, and biological processes involved, and the complexity of porous media in natural settings, it should not come as surprise that colloid filtration theory does not always sufficiently predict colloidal transport, and that there is still a pressing need for improved predictive capabilities. Here, instead of developing the macroscopic equation from pore-scale models, we parametrize the different terms in the macroscopic collection equation through fitting it to experimental data, by optimizing the parameters in the different terms of the equation. This way we combine a mechanistically-based filtration-equation with empirical evidence. The impact of different properties of colloids and porous media are studied by comparing experimental properties with different terms of the correlation equation. This comparison enables insight about different processes that occur during colloid transport and retention under in porous media under favorable conditions, and provides directions for future theoretical developments.

  7. Aerosol filtration - performance of filter media; Filtration des aerosols - performances des medias filtrants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bemer, D.; Regnier, R. [Institut National de Recherche et de Securite (INRS), Dept. Ingenierie des Procedes, 75 - Paris (France); Calle, S.; Thomas, D.; Simon, X.; Appert-Collin, J.Ch. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Lab. des Sciences du Genie Chimique de Nancy, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2006-03-15

    Set up in 2000, the Laboratoire de Filtration des Aerosols in Nancy (LFA), associating research teams from INRS (Institut National de Recherche et de Securite and LSGC (Laboratoire des Sciences du Genie Chimique - CNRS), has been commissioned to provide expertise in the aerosol filtration field to both CRAM (Caisse Regionale de l'Assurance Maladie) prevention specialists and industrialists. Following a theoretical review of fibre medium filtration, this paper summarises the different actions undertaken by the LFA: filter performance during clogging with liquid and solid aerosols, modelling, pneumatic unclogging of baghouse dust collectors, influence of micro-leaks, etc. (authors)

  8. Prevention of febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reaction with leucocyte filtrated concentrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Shu-ming; XIANG Guo-chun; ZHANG Jia-si; CHENG Xiao-ling; LI Ru-qing

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical efficiency of the transfusion of leucocyte filtrated RBC concentrates to prevent febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTRs). Methods: One hundred patients with liver cirrhosis, gastric ulcer or cancer were subjected to receive RBC concentrates after leucocyte filtration.Another 50 patients with similar diseases were selected to receive non-filtrated RBC concentrates. The incidence of FNHTRs in all patients was investigated. Results: There was no FNHTR in 100 transfusions with leucocyte filtrated RBC concentrates, while FNHTRs occurred in 8 of 50 patients with non-filtrated RBC concentrates, with the incidence of 160%. Conclusion: FNHTRs to RBC transfusion can be prevented with leucocyte filtration.

  9. In situ synthesis studies of silicon clathrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Peter Thomas

    Solid state clathrates have shown considerable potential as a new class of materials over the past 30 years. Experimental and theoretical studies have shown that precise tuning and synthetic control of these materials, may lead to desirable properties. Very little is known about the mechanism of formation of the clathrates and so the desire to have accurate synthetic control was, until now, unrealistic. This thesis address the problem using in situ synchrotron x-ray techniques. In this study, experiments were designed to utilise time-resolved in situ diffraction techniques and high temperature 23Na NMR, in efforts to understand the mechanism of formation for this class of expanded framework materials. A complex high vacuum capillary synthesis cell was designed for loading under inert conditions and operation under high vacuum at station 6.2 of the SRS Daresbury. The cell was designed to operate in conjunction with a custom made furnace capable of temperatures in excess of 1000 C, as well as a vacuum system capable of 10"5 bar. The clathrate system was studied in situ, using rapid data collection to elucidate the mechanism of formation. The data were analysed using Rietveld methods and showed a structural link between the monoclinic, C2/c, Zintl precursors and the cubic, Pm3n, clathrate I phase. The phases were found to be linked by relation of the sodium planes in the silicide and the sodium atoms resident at cages centres in the clathrate system. This evidence suggests the guest species is instrumental in formation of the clathrate structure by templating the formation of the cages in the structure. Solid state 23Na NMR was utilised to complete specially design experiments, similar to those complete in situ using synchrotron x-ray techniques. The experiments showed increased spherical symmetry of the alkali metal sites and suggested increased mobility of the guest atoms during heating. In addition, cyclic heating experiments using in situ diffraction showed

  10. Plasma discharge self-cleaning filtration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young I.; Fridman, Alexander; Gutsol, Alexander F.; Yang, Yong

    2014-07-22

    The present invention is directed to a novel method for cleaning a filter surface using a plasma discharge self-cleaning filtration system. The method involves utilizing plasma discharges to induce short electric pulses of nanoseconds duration at high voltages. These electrical pulses generate strong Shockwaves that disintegrate and dislodge particulate matter located on the surface of the filter.

  11. Filtration of engineered nanoparticles using porous membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trzaskus, Krzystof

    2016-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis aims at providing a better understanding of the fundamental aspects responsible for nanoparticle removal and fouling development during filtration of engineered nanoparticles. The emphasis is put on the role of interparticle interactions in the feed solution,

  12. Organic micropollutant removal during river bank filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertelkamp, C.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the factors influencing the main removal mechanisms (adsorption and biodegradation) for organic micropollutant (OMP) removal during river bank filtration (RBF) and the possibility of developing a predictive model of this process for OMP removal during RBF. Chapter 2 analysed

  13. [Clinical experience of automated double filtration plasmapheresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C T; Chuang, F R; Hsu, K T; Lam, K K; Liao, S C; Liu, C C; Chen, J B; Jang, S W; Chien, Y S; Pan, H H

    1996-12-01

    Double filtration plasmapheresis, one kind of fractionation plasmapheresis, was developed from membrane type plasmapheresis to remove only the pathogen and return the normal protein back to the patient. We started our automated double filtration plasmapheresis since December 1993. There were 13 patients who received one hundred treatments totally during one year period. And they are myasthenia gravis (8 patients); acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (1 patient), multiple myeloma (1 patient); acquired factor VIII inhibitor (1 patient); autoimmune hemolytic anemia (1 patient); systemic lupus erythematous (1 patient). Technically double filtration plasmapheresis is easy to perform and time-saving. It also makes necessity of replacement fluid less frequent. Incidence of complication is rare, and this includes hypotension 2%, palpitation 1%, headache 1%, hemolysis 4%, air emboli 1%, high secondary pressure 2%, and no motality during our treatment. Clinical response is documented in cases of myasthenia gravis; acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and acquired factor VIII inhibitor in our study. In conclusion, double filtration plasmapheresis is a time-saving, convenient, and safe therapeutic modality with rare complication. Because its effectiveness on limited kinds of diseases and costs relatively high price, thus plasmapheresis should be used in selected cases and treat aggressively if indicated.

  14. Advances in hot gas filtration technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, C.

    The past decade has seen the introduction of new filter media specifically designed for 'hot-gas' filtration. These media are available as woven or knitted fabrics and as non-wovens, i.e. needled felts. Needlefelted fabrics have proven so highly successful in the dedusting of hot gases that they are widely used nowadays in this new and necessary technology. Hot-gas filtration offers advantages in, for example, the saving or recycling of energy, the elimination of the cooling process, and the short-circuiting of process steps. This paper gives a survey of the types of textile fibres available for hot-gas filtration from the more recently developed organic fibres to refractory fibres. It describes, compares and contrasts their salient properties and lists the uses to which they may be put. It concentrates on such fibres which are generally referred to as 'high performance materials', since they are expected to provide satisfactory performance under extreme conditions of temperature, chemical environment and mechanical stress. It touches on filtration theory governing the collection mechanism. 9 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Using Digital Filtration for Hurst Parameter Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Prochaska

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a new method to estimate the Hurst parameter. The method exploits the form of the autocorrelation function for second-order self-similar processes and is based on one-pass digital filtration. We compare the performance and properties of the new method with that of the most common methods.

  16. 30 CFR 828.12 - In situ processing: Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In situ processing: Monitoring. 828.12 Section 828.12 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... PROCESSING § 828.12 In situ processing: Monitoring. (a) Each person who conducts in situ...

  17. 30 CFR 828.11 - In situ processing: Performance standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In situ processing: Performance standards. 828.11 Section 828.11 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT... STANDARDS-IN SITU PROCESSING § 828.11 In situ processing: Performance standards. (a) The person who...

  18. Cake filtration modeling: Analytical cake filtration model and filter medium characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Michael

    2008-05-15

    Cake filtration is a unit operation to separate solids from fluids in industrial processes. The build up of a filter cake is usually accompanied with a decrease in overall permeability over the filter leading to an increased pressure drop over the filter. For an incompressible filter cake that builds up on a homogeneous filter cloth, a linear pressure drop profile over time is expected for a constant fluid volume flow. However, experiments show curved pressure drop profiles, which are also attributed to inhomogeneities of the filter (filter medium and/or residual filter cake). In this work, a mathematical filter model is developed to describe the relationship between time and overall permeability. The model considers a filter with an inhomogeneous permeability and accounts for fluid mechanics by a one-dimensional formulation of Darcy's law and for the cake build up by solid continuity. The model can be solved analytically in the time domain. The analytic solution allows for the unambiguous inversion of the model to determine the inhomogeneous permeability from the time resolved overall permeability, e.g. pressure drop measurements. An error estimation of the method is provided by rewriting the model as convolution transformation. This method is applied to simulated and experimental pressure drop data of gas filters with textile filter cloths and various situations with non-uniform flow situations in practical problems are explored. A routine is developed to generate characteristic filter cycles from semi-continuous filter plant operation. The model is modified to investigate the impact of non-uniform dust concentrations. (author). 34 refs., 40 figs., 1 tab

  19. In-situ biofouling assessment in spacer filled channels using optical coherence tomography (OCT): 3D biofilm thickness mapping

    KAUST Repository

    Fortunato, Luca

    2017-01-13

    Membrane systems for water purification can be seriously hampered by biofouling. The use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to investigate biofilms in membrane systems has recently increased due to the ability to do the characterization in-situ and non-destructively The OCT biofilm thickness map is presented for the first time as a tool to assess biofilm spatial distribution on a surface. The map allows the visualization and evaluation of the biofilm formation and growth in membrane filtration systems through the use of a false color scale. The biofilm development was monitored with OCT to evaluate the suitability of the proposed approach. A 3D time series analysis of biofilm development in a spacer filled channel representative of a spiral-wound membrane element was performed. The biofilm thickness map enables the time-resolved and spatial-resolved evaluation and visualization of the biofilm deposition pattern in-situ non-destructively.

  20. In situ upgrading : coupled enhanced oil recovery with in situ upgrading : ultra dispersed catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almao, P.P. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Schulich School of Engineering]|[Alberta Ingenuity Centre for In Situ Energy, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    This paper presented a research program that demonstrates the use of ultra dispersed (UD) catalysts as a means of improving the economics of oil sands processing. An outline of current processing techniques was provided. In situ upgrading options included the use of solvents, thermal methods, radiation methods, bio-upgrading, and thermo-catalytic methods. Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is often combined with in situ upgrading to increase the efficiency of energy use in reservoirs where thermal methods are used. The use of diluents often reduces water usage as well as problems related to contamination and emissions. Recent studies have suggested that vis-breaking (VB) is the lowest investment residual conversion process currently available for in situ processing. UD catalyst formulations can be commercially prepared using nano-particle techniques, and can be used in portable configurations. UD catalysts are known to outperform conventional fixed bed types for both hydrogenation, hydrotreating, and hydrocracking. Research is currently being conducted at the Alberta Ingenuity Centre for In Situ Energy to examine issues related to particles recycling, deactivation and losses. Permeability studies are also being conducted to examine permeability rates of emulsions and nanoparticles through oil sands porous media. The short term financial rewards of various in situ upgrading technologies were also considered. refs., tabs, figs.

  1. Advanced Water Purification System for In Situ Resource Utilization Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    A main goal in the field of In Situ Resource Utilization is to develop technologies that produce oxygen from regolith to provide consumables to an extratrrestrial outpost. The processes developed reduce metal oxides in the regolith to produce water, which is then electrolyzed to produce oxygen. Hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids are byproducts of the reduction processes, which must be removed to meet electrolysis purity standards. We previously characterized Nation, a highly water selective polymeric proton-exchange membrane, as a filtrtion material to recover pure water from the contaminated solution. While the membranes successfully removed both acid contaminants, the removal efficiency of and water flow rate through the membranes were not sufficient to produce large volumes of electrolysis-grade water. In the present study, we investigated electrodialysis as a potential acid removable technique. Our studies have show a rapid and significant reduction in chloride and fluoride concentrations in the feed solution, while generating a relatively small volume of concentrated waste water. Electrodialysis has shown significant promise as the primary separation technique in ISRU water purification processes.

  2. OPTIMIZATION OF THE PROCESS OF DRYING THE FILTRATE DISTILLERY DREGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Shevtsov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactions of various factors affecting the process of drying the filtrate distillery dregs are investigated. Rational conditions for the process of drying the filtrate distillery dregs in a spray dryer are obtained.

  3. Internal filtration, filtration fraction, and blood flow resistance in high- and low-flux dialyzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneditz, Daniel; Zierler, Edda; Vanholder, Raymond; Eloot, Sunny

    2014-01-01

    It was the aim to examine the fluid flow in blood and dialysate compartments of highly permeable hollow fiber dialyzers where internal filtration contributes to solute removal but where excessive filtration bears a risk of cell activation and damage. Flow characteristics of high- (HF) and low-flux (LF) dialyzers were studied in lab-bench experiments using whole bovine blood. Measurements obtained under different operating conditions and under zero net ultrafiltration were compared to theoretical calculations obtained from a mathematical model. Experimental resistances in the blood compartment were within ±2% of those calculated from the model when dialysate was used as a test fluid. With whole blood, the experimental resistances in the blood compartment were only 81.8 ± 2.8% and 83.7 ± 4.3% of those calculated for the LF and HF dialyzer, respectively. Surprisingly, measured blood flow resistance slightly but significantly decreased with increasing flow rate (p filtration fraction, while overall internal filtration increased. The increase in internal filtration when increasing blood flow is associated with a beneficial reduction in internal filtration fraction. Concerns of increased hemoconcentration when increasing blood flow therefore appear to be unwarranted.

  4. Calibrating feedwater flow nozzles in-situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caudill, M. [Tri-State Generation and Transmission, Inc., Montrose, CA (United States); Diaz-Tous, I.; Murphy, S.; Leggett, M.; Crandall, C. [ENCOR-AMERICA, Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This paper presents a new method for in-situ calibration of feedwater flow nozzles wherein feedwater flow is determined indirectly by performing a high accuracy heat balance around the highest-pressure feedwater heater. It is often difficult to reliably measure feedwater flow. Over the life of a power plant, the feedwater nozzle can accumulate deposits, erode, or suffer other damage that can render the original nozzle calibration inaccurate. Recalibration of installed feedwater flow nozzles is expensive and time consuming. Traditionally, the nozzle is cut out of the piping and sent to a laboratory for recalibration, which can be an especially difficult, expensive, and time-consuming task when involving high pressure feedwater lines. ENCOR-AMERICA, INC. has developed an accurate and cost-effective method of calibrating feedwater nozzles in-situ as previously reported at the 1994 EPRI Heat Rate Improvement Conference. In this method, feedwater flow and differential pressure across the nozzle are measured concurrently. The feedwater flow is determined indirectly by performing a heat balance around the highest-pressure feedwater heater. Extraction steam to the feedwater heater is measured by use of a high accuracy turbine flowmeter. The meters used have been calibrated at an independent laboratory with a primary or secondary device traceable to the NIST. In this paper, a new variation on the above method is reported. The new approach measures the heater drains and vent flows instead of the extraction steam flow. Test theory and instrumentation will be discussed. Results of in-situ feedwater nozzle calibration tests performed at two units owned by Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association will be presented.

  5. In-situ thermal testing program strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    In the past year the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project has implemented a new Program Approach to the licensing process. The Program Approach suggests a step-wise approach to licensing in which the early phases will require less site information than previously planned and necessitate a lesser degree of confidence in the longer-term performance of the repository. Under the Program Approach, the thermal test program is divided into two principal phases: (1) short-term in situ tests (in the 1996 to 2000 time period) and laboratory thermal tests to obtain preclosure information, parameters, and data along with bounding information for postclosure performance; and (2) longer-term in situ tests to obtain additional data regarding postclosure performance. This effort necessitates a rethinking of the testing program because the amount of information needed for the initial licensing phase is less than previously planned. This document proposes a revised and consolidated in situ thermal test program (including supporting laboratory tests) that is structured to meet the needs of the Program Approach. A customer-supplier model is used to define the Project data needs. These data needs, along with other requirements, were then used to define a set of conceptual experiments that will provide the required data within the constraints of the Program Approach schedule. The conceptual thermal tests presented in this document represent a consolidation and update of previously defined tests that should result in a more efficient use of Project resources. This document focuses on defining the requirements and tests needed to satisfy the goal of a successful license application in 2001, should the site be found suitable.

  6. Fluoroscence in situ hybridization of chicken intestinal samples with bacterial rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Katja Nyholm; Francesch, M.; Christensen, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    The objective was to develop a fast and accurate molecular method for the quantification of the intestinal flora in chickens by rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Seven weeks old conventionally reared Lohmann hens were used to set up the method. To sample ileal intestinal content......, the distal part from Meckels diverticulum to the ileo-caecal junction was removed. Fixation was performed in ethanol and phosphate buffered saline. After washing by centrifugation, the sample was resuspended in pre-heated hybridization buffer with oligonucleotide probe labelled with Cy3 (10ng/µl). The cells...... were hybridized for 24-72h, centrifuged, washed with pre-heated hybridization buffer, centrifuged and resuspended in Millipore quality water before filtration onto a 0.22 µm black polycarbonate filter. The probes used in this study were, LGC354A, LGC354B, LGC354C, Strc493, Bacto1080, Sal3, Chis150, EUB...

  7. In situ rheology of yeast biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnoni, Lorena I; Tarifa, María C; Lozano, Jorge E; Genovese, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the in situ rheological behavior of yeast biofilms growing on stainless steel under static and turbulent flow. The species used (Rhodototula mucilaginosa, Candida krusei, Candida kefyr and Candida tropicalis) were isolated from a clarified apple juice industry. The flow conditions impacted biofilm composition over time, with a predominance of C. krusei under static and turbulent flow. Likewise, structural variations occurred, with a tighter appearance under dynamic flow. Under turbulent flow there was an increase of 112 μm in biofilm thickness at 11 weeks (p rheology and contribute to a thin body of knowledge about fungal biofilm formation.

  8. Computer Aided in situ Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chongtay, Rocio A.; Hansen, John Paulin; Decker, Lone

    2006-01-01

    . One of the most common and successfully used treatments for phobic conditions has been Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), which helps people learn to detect thinking patterns that trigger the irrational fear and to replace them with more realistic ideas. The health and financial impacts in society...... presented here is being designed in a modular and scalable fashion. The web-based module can be accessed anywhere any time from a PC connected to the internet and can be used alone or as supplement for a location-based module for in situ gradual exposure therapy....

  9. In Situ Preservation of Historic Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, R.; Brooks, R.

    The loss of the Mir space station is shown to symbolize a new consciousness of the value of space artefacts. The reasons why such artefacts as Mir become historic objects worthy of preservation are examined. Preservation of space vehicles in situ is discussed, with particular reference to safety, monitoring and long term costs. An argument is made for a wider definition for World Heritage designations to include material beyond the surface of the Earth, and for international bodies to assess, monitor and oversee these projects. Such heritage sites are seen as an economic driver for the development of space tourism in the 21st century.

  10. In situ viscometry by optical trapping interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Camilo; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Köszali, Roland; Ecoffet, Carole; Forró, László; Jeney, Sylvia

    2008-11-01

    We demonstrate quantitative in situ viscosity measurements by tracking the thermal fluctuations of an optically trapped microsphere subjected to a small oscillatory flow. The measured power spectral density of the sphere's positions displays a characteristic peak at the driving frequency of the flow, which is simply proportional to the viscosity, when measured in units of the thermal power spectral density at the same frequency. Measurements are validated on different water-glycerol mixtures, as well as in a glycerol gradient, where no a priori knowledge of the solution is used to determine the glycerol concentration.

  11. In situ characterization of undulator magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Thierry; Otero, Edwige; Ohresser, Philippe

    2012-03-01

    A new in situ method is proposed to characterize the peak magnetic fields of undulator sources. The X-ray beam emitted by the HU52 Apple-2 undulator of the DEIMOS beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron is analyzed using the Bragg diffraction of a Si(111) crystal. Measurements over the undulator gap range in linear horizontal polarization are compared with simulations in order to rebuild the Halbach function linking the undulator gaps to their peak magnetic fields. The method presented also allows information about the electron beam to be obtained.

  12. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Serrato, M.

    2009-12-03

    The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate if from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,424 cubic meters or 31,945 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were design and tested for the reactor ISD project and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and work flow considerations, the recommended maximum lift height is 5 feet with 24 hours between lifts. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R-Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs

  13. Polypropylene/graphite nanocomposites by in situ polymerization; Nanocompositos polipropileno/grafite via polimerizacao in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milani, Marceo A.; Galland, Giselda B., E-mail: griselda@iq.ufrgs.br [Instituto de Quimica, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Quijada, Raul [Universidade de Chile, Santiago (Chile). Centro de Ciencias de los Materiales; Basso, Nara R.S. [Fac. de Quimica, PUCRS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This work presents the synthesis of nanocomposites of polypropylene/graphite by in situ polymerization using metallocene catalyst and graphene nanosheets. Initially was analyzed which of the metallocene catalysts rac-Et(Ind){sub 2}ZrCl{sub 2} or rac-Me{sub 2}Si(Ind){sub 2}ZrCl{sub 2} produces polypropylene with mechanical properties more relevant. Then it were performed the in situ polymerization reactions to obtain the nanocomposites. The polymeric materials were characterized by XRD, DSC, GPC and DMTA. (author)

  14. Technology Review of Modern Gas Turbine Inlet Filtration Systems

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    An inlet air filtration system is essential for the successful operation of a gas turbine. The filtration system protects the gas turbine from harmful debris in the ambient air, which can lead to issues such as FOD, erosion, fouling, and corrosion. These issues if not addressed will result in a shorter operational life and reduced performance of the gas turbine. Modern day filtration systems are comprised of multiple filtration stages. Each stage is selected based on the local operating envir...

  15. Derivation of the formula for the filtration coefficient by application of Poiseuille's law in membrane transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Jarzyńska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of Kedem-Katchalsky equations a mathematical analysis of volume flow (Jv of a binary solution through a membrane (M is presented. Two cases of transport generators have been considered: hydrostatic (Δp as well as osmotic (Δπ pressure difference. Based on the Poiseuille's law we derive the formula for the membrane filtration coefficient (Lp which takes into account the membrane properties, kinetic viscosity and density of a solution flowing across the membrane. With use of this formula we have made model calculations of the filtration coefficient Lp and volume flow Jv for a polymer membrane in the case when the solutions on both sides of the membrane are mixed.

  16. 40 CFR 141.171 - Criteria for avoiding filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criteria for avoiding filtration. 141... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving 10,000 or More People § 141.171 Criteria for avoiding filtration. In addition to...

  17. 40 CFR 141.174 - Filtration sampling requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Filtration sampling requirements. 141... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving 10,000 or More People § 141.174 Filtration sampling requirements. (a)...

  18. 40 CFR 141.71 - Criteria for avoiding filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criteria for avoiding filtration. 141... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Filtration and Disinfection § 141.71 Criteria for avoiding filtration. A public water system that uses a surface water source must meet all...

  19. Origins of the poor filtration characteristics of wheat starch hydrolysates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matser, A.M.; Steeneken, P.A.M.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of wheat starch components on the filtration characteristics of wheat starch hydrolysates were investigated with a model-based approach. The filtration rate was not affected by the removal of the pentosans or by altering the conformation of the protein. On the other hand, the filtration

  20. Modeling of Filtration Processes—Microfiltration and Depth Filtration for Harvest of a Therapeutic Protein Expressed in Pichia pastoris at Constant Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukumar Sampath

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Filtration steps are ubiquitous in biotech processes due to the simplicity of operation, ease of scalability and the myriad of operations that they can be used for. Microfiltration, depth filtration, ultrafiltration and diafiltration are some of the most commonly used biotech unit operations. For clean feed streams, when fouling is minimal, scaling of these unit operations is performed linearly based on the filter area per unit volume of feed stream. However, for cases when considerable fouling occurs, such as the case of harvesting a therapeutic product expressed in Pichia pastoris, linear scaling may not be possible and current industrial practices involve use of 20–30% excess filter area over and above the calculated filter area to account for the uncertainty in scaling. In view of the fact that filters used for harvest are likely to have a very limited lifetime, this oversizing of the filters can add considerable cost of goods for the manufacturer. Modeling offers a way out of this conundrum. In this paper, we examine feasibility of using the various proposed models for filtration of a therapeutic product expressed in Pichia pastoris at constant pressure. It is observed that none of the individual models yield a satisfactory fit of the data, thus indicating that more than one fouling mechanism is at work. Filters with smaller pores were found to undergo fouling via complete pore blocking followed by cake filtration. On the other hand, filters with larger pores were found to undergo fouling via intermediate pore blocking followed by cake filtration. The proposed approach can be used for more accurate sizing of microfilters and depth filters.

  1. In situ combustion field experiences in Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalba, M.; Estrada, M.; Bolivar, J. [INTEVEP, Caracas (Venezuela)

    1995-02-01

    A literature review of four in situ combustion projects: in Miga, Tia Juana, Melones and Morichal fields in Venezuela was made, and a summary of these projects is presented. Reservoir description and project performance data were analyzed. The behavior of the four in situ combustion field tests can be summarized as follows: The problems most often encountered were corrosion and high temperature producing wells. The direction in which the burning front moved was guided essentially by reservoir characteristics. The produced oil was upgraded by about 4{degrees} API, and viscosity was substantially reduced. For Mirochal and Miga fields, the analyses of available information from the combustion projects indicated that the process has been successful in the affected region. Conclusions from this review indicate that the two most frequent problems encountered were operational problems in producing wells and the direction of the burning front. The heterogeneous nature of the sands probably resulted in the burning front moving in a preferential direction, hence reducing areal sweep efficiency.

  2. GAS TURBINE REHEAT USING IN SITU COMBUSTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. Bachovchin; T.E. Lippert; R.A. Newby P.G.A. Cizmas

    2004-05-17

    In situ reheat is an alternative to traditional gas turbine reheat design in which fuel is fed through airfoils rather than in a bulky discrete combustor separating HP and LP turbines. The goals are to achieve increased power output and/or efficiency without higher emissions. In this program the scientific basis for achieving burnout with low emissions has been explored. In Task 1, Blade Path Aerodynamics, design options were evaluated using CFD in terms of burnout, increase of power output, and possible hot streaking. It was concluded that Vane 1 injection in a conventional 4-stage turbine was preferred. Vane 2 injection after vane 1 injection was possible, but of marginal benefit. In Task 2, Combustion and Emissions, detailed chemical kinetics modeling, validated by Task 3, Sub-Scale Testing, experiments, resulted in the same conclusions, with the added conclusion that some increase in emissions was expected. In Task 4, Conceptual Design and Development Plan, Siemens Westinghouse power cycle analysis software was used to evaluate alternative in situ reheat design options. Only single stage reheat, via vane 1, was found to have merit, consistent with prior Tasks. Unifying the results of all the tasks, a conceptual design for single stage reheat utilizing 24 holes, 1.8 mm diameter, at the trailing edge of vane 1 is presented. A development plan is presented.

  3. Molecular cytogenetics using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, J.W.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Lucas, J.; Pinkel, D.; Weier, H-U.; Yu, Loh-Chung.

    1990-12-07

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome-specific probes enables several new areas of cytogenetic investigation by allowing visual determination of the presence and normality of specific genetic sequences in single metaphase or interphase cells. in this approach, termed molecular cytogenetics, the genetic loci to be analyzed are made microscopically visible in single cells using in situ hybridization with nucleic acid probes specific to these loci. To accomplish this, the DNA in the target cells is made single stranded by thermal denaturation and incubated with single-stranded, chemically modified probe under conditions where the probe will anneal only with DNA sequences to which it has high DNA sequence homology. The bound probe is then made visible by treatment with a fluorescent reagent such as fluorescein that binds to the chemical modification carried by the probe. The DNA to which the probe does not bind is made visible by staining with a dye such as propidium iodide that fluoresces at a wavelength different from that of the reagent used for probe visualization. We show in this report that probes are now available that make this technique useful for biological dosimetry, prenatal diagnosis and cancer biology. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Beauheim, Richard Louis; Brady, Patrick Vane; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2009-05-01

    Expansion of uranium mining in the United States is a concern to some environmental groups and sovereign Native American Nations. An approach which may alleviate some problems is to develop inherently safe in situ uranium recovery ('ISR') technologies. Current ISR technology relies on chemical extraction of trace levels of uranium from aquifers that, once mined, can still contain dissolved uranium and other trace metals that are a health concern. Existing ISR operations are few in number; however, high uranium prices are driving the industry to consider expanding operations nation-wide. Environmental concerns and enforcement of the new 30 ppb uranium drinking water standard may make opening new mining operations more difficult and costly. Here we propose a technological fix: the development of inherently safe in situ recovery (ISISR) methods. The four central features of an ISISR approach are: (1) New 'green' leachants that break down predictably in the subsurface, leaving uranium, and associated trace metals, in an immobile form; (2) Post-leachant uranium/metals-immobilizing washes that provide a backup decontamination process; (3) An optimized well-field design that increases uranium recovery efficiency and minimizes excursions of contaminated water; and (4) A combined hydrologic/geochemical protocol for designing low-cost post-extraction long-term monitoring. ISISR would bring larger amounts of uranium to the surface, leave fewer toxic metals in the aquifer, and cost less to monitor safely - thus providing a 'win-win-win' solution to all stakeholders.

  5. In situ SU-8 silver nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren V. Fischer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposite materials containing metal nanoparticles are of considerable interest in photonics and optoelectronics applications. However, device fabrication of such materials always encounters the challenge of incorporation of preformed nanoparticles into photoresist materials. As a solution to this problem, an easy new method of fabricating silver nanocomposites by an in situ reduction of precursors within the epoxy-based photoresist SU-8 has been developed. AgNO3 dissolved in acetonitrile and mixed with the epoxy-based photoresist SU-8 forms silver nanoparticles primarily during the pre- and post-exposure soft bake steps at 95 °C. A further high-temperature treatment at 300 °C resulted in the formation of densely homogeneously distributed silver nanoparticles in the photoresist matrix. No particle growth or agglomeration of nanoparticles is observed at this point. The reported new in situ silver nanocomposite materials can be spin coated as homogeneous thin films and structured by using UV lithography. A resolution of 5 µm is achieved in the lithographic process. The UV exposure time is found to be independent of the nanoparticle concentration. The fabricated silver nanocomposites exhibit high plasmonic responses suitable for the development of new optoelectronic and optical sensing devices.

  6. Mitigating in situ oil sands carbon costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theriault, D.J.; Peterson, J. [Laricina Energy Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Heinrichs, H. [Canadian Chemical Technology Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Carbon capture and sequestration is a complex problem with a variety of dimensions that need to be considered. The political, social, and regulatory pressures are forcing carbon costs on the oil sands industry in an effort to reduce the carbon footprint of oil sands operations. This paper reviewed the political, social, and regulatory pressures and obligations for the in-situ oil sands industry. It presented the views and insights of Laricina Energy on the carbon challenge. It also described the initiatives that Laricina Energy is taking to manage these imperatives and outlined the challenges the industry is facing. The purpose of the paper was to encourage dialogue and collaboration by the oil sands industry. The paper also described the dimensions of the carbon problem and how the industry can contribute to a solution. Last, the paper reviewed the parameters of carbon dioxide or greenhouse gas containment and storage issues. It was concluded that the regulatory and policy requirements need to be clarified so that industry understands the new business landscape as well as the requirements that influence the economics of in-situ oil sands development. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Nanoparticles filtration by leaked fibrous filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouret, Guillaume; Calle-Chazelet, Sandrine; Thomas, Dominique; Appert-Collin, Jean-Christophe [Nancy-Universite/LSGC/CNRS - 1 rue Grandville - BP 20451 - F-54001 Nancy Cedex (France)], E-mail: sandrine.calle@ensic.inpl-nancy.fr; Bemer, Denis [INRS - Avenue de Bourgogne - F-54501 Vandoeuvre les Nancy Cedex (France)

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this work is first to measured nanoparticles penetration through three different fiberglass filters intentionally-pierced with calibrated needles at different filtration velocity. Then a semi-empirical model based on the air flow resistances of the new and perforated filter media and on the mechanism of Brownian diffusion for the collection of ultrafine particles by the media enables to well predict the efficiency observed for all tested operating conditions. Results show that the increase of particles penetration is all the more important that the pinhole is large and that the particle diameter is low. Another result is that the filtration efficiency of the new filter media controlled the penetration. A high efficiency filter with a high resistance to air flow will be more damaged than a low efficiency filter when being perforated.

  8. Integrative filtration research and sustainable nanotechnology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wang; Drew Thompson; David Y.H.Pui

    2013-01-01

    With the wide applications of nanomaterials in an array of industries,more concerns are being raised about the occupational health and safety of nanoparticles in the workplace,and implications of nanotechnology on the environment and living systems.Studies on environmental,health and safety (EHS) issues of nanomaterials play a significant role in public acceptance,and eventual sustainability,of nanotechnology.We present research results on three aspects of the EHS studies:characterization and measurement of nanoparticles,nanoparticle emission and exposure at workplaces,and control and abatement of nanoparticle release using filtration technology.Measurement of nanoparticle agglomerates using a newly developed instrument,the Universal Nanoparticle Analyzer,is discussed.Nanoparticle emission and exposure measurement results for carbon nanotubes in the manufacture of nanocomposites and for silicon nanoparticles in their production at a pilot scale facility are presented.Filtration of nanoparticles and nanoparticle agglomerates are also studied.

  9. Air filtration and indoor air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    Demands for better indoor air quality are increasing, since we spend most of our time indoors and we are more and more aware of indoor air pollution. Field studies in different parts of the world have documented that high percentage of occupants in many offices and buildings find the indoor air...... decent ventilation and air cleaning/air filtration, high indoor air quality cannot be accomplished. The need for effective air filtration has increased with increasing evidence on the hazardous effects of fine particles. Moreover, the air contains gaseous pollutants, removal of which requires various air...... cleaning techniques. Supply air filter is one of the key components in the ventilation system. Studies have shown that used ventilation filters themselves can be a significant source of indoor air pollution with consequent impact on perceived air quality, sick building syndrome symptoms and performance...

  10. Ultrasonic filtration of industrial chemical solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosma, T.

    1974-01-01

    The practical results obtained as a result of filtering industrial chemical solutions under continuous flow conditions with the aid of an ultrasonic filter are presented. The main part of the assembly consists of an ultrasonic generator with an output power of about 400 W and the filtration assembly, in which there is a magnetostrictive amplifier constructed for 20.5 kHz. In addition to ensuring a continuous flow of filtered solution, ultrasonic filters can be replaced or cleaned at intervals of time that are 8-10 times greater than in the case of mechanical filters. They yield considerably better results as far as the size of the filtered particles is concerned. The parameters on which filtration quality depends are also presented.

  11. Breakthrough of cyanobacteria in bank filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazouki, Pirooz; Prévost, Michèle; McQuaid, Natasha; Barbeau, Benoit; de Boutray, Marie-Laure; Zamyadi, Arash; Dorner, Sarah

    2016-10-01

    The removal of cyanobacteria cells in well water following bank filtration was investigated from a source water consisting of two artificial lakes (A and B). Phycocyanin probes used to monitor cyanobacteria in the source and in filtered well water showed an increase of fluorescence values demonstrating a progressive seasonal growth of cyanobacteria in the source water that were correlated with cyanobacterial biovolumes from taxonomic counts (r = 0.59, p cyanobacteria. Of cyanobacteria that passed through bank filtration, smaller cells were significantly more frequent in well water samples (p cyanobacteria to wells. Winter samples demonstrated that cyanobacteria accumulate within bank filters, leading to continued passage of cells beyond the bloom season. Although no concentrations of total microcystin-LR were above detection limits in filtered well water, there is concern that cyanobacterial cells that reach the wells have the potential to contain intracellular toxins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Titanium boride equation of state determined by in-situ X-ray diffraction

    OpenAIRE

    Shigeaki Ono; Takumi Kikegawa

    2016-01-01

    The equation of state (EOS) of titanium boride, TiB2, was investigated by in situ X-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell and multianvil high-pressure apparatus. The pressure-volume-temperature (P-V-T) data were collected at up to 111 GPa and room temperature for the diamond-anvil cell experiments and at up to 15 GPa and 1300 K for the multianvil experiments. No phase transition was observed through the entire range of experimental conditions. The pressure-volume data at room temperature we...

  13. The filtration properties of a dimorphic yeast

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Anthony A

    2001-01-01

    A dimorphic yeast Kluyveromyces marxianu var. marxianus NRRLy2415 which exhibits a wide range of mean morphological forms was used as a model organism to investigate the role of cell morphology on the dead-end and crossflow filtration behaviour. Varying the culturing conditions produced cell suspensions of different mean morphology. Batch fermentations were used to produce yeast-like morphologies and continuous cultures produced cells more mycelial in nature. Semi-automated image analysis was...

  14. Symptomatic hyponatremia during glomerular filtration rate testing

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Hyponatremia affects nearly one in five of all hospitalized patients. Severe hyponatremia is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and is therefore important to recognize. Prior reports have linked duloxetine with hyponatremia, but it is uncommon. In this case report, we describe a research subject taking duloxetine who developed severe symptomatic hyponatremia during glomerular filtration rate testing despite having undergone such testing uneventfully in the past.

  15. Alternatieve in situ bodemsaneringstechnieken; literatuuronderzoek bij het project "In Situ Biorestauratie" Asten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheuter AJ; LBG

    1997-01-01

    In developing in situ remediation most of the focus used to be on techniques using infiltration water to supply oxygen to the location. Later, techniques were developed in which soil was flushed with air to enhance the oxygen availability to microorganisms. The aim of the study reported here was to

  16. Alternatieve in situ bodemsaneringstechnieken; literatuuronderzoek bij het project "In Situ Biorestauratie" Asten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheuter AJ; LBG

    1997-01-01

    In developing in situ remediation most of the focus used to be on techniques using infiltration water to supply oxygen to the location. Later, techniques were developed in which soil was flushed with air to enhance the oxygen availability to microorganisms. The aim of the study reported here was to

  17. Portable Hybrid Powered Water Filtration Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lourdes V. Balansay

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The existing water filtration device has features that can be developed to be more useful and functional during emergency situations. The project’s development has been aided by following provisions in PEC, NEC, NEMA and Philippine National Standard for Safe Drinking Water provide standards for the construction of the project. These standards protect both the prototype and the user. These also served as guide for the maintenance of every component. The design of the portable hybrid powered water filtration device shows that the project has more advanced features such as portability and the power supply used such as photovoltaic module solar cells and manually operated generator. This also shows its effectiveness and reliability based on the results of discharging test, water quality test and water production test. Based on analysis of the overall financial aspects, the machine can be profitable and the amount of revenue and operating cost will increase as years pass. Using the proper machine/ tools and methods of fabrication helps in easy assembly of the project. The materials and components used are cost effective and efficient. The best time for charging the battery using solar panel is 9:00 am onwards while the hand crank generator is too slow because the generated current is little. The water filtration device is very efficient regarding the operating hours and water production. The machine may have a great effect to society and economy in generation of clean available water at less cost.

  18. Comparison of the aerosol optical properties and size distribution retrieved by sun photometer with in situ measurements at midlatitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvigné, Aurélien; Sellegri, Karine; Hervo, Maxime; Montoux, Nadège; Freville, Patrick; Goloub, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    observations are then compared to the near-surface in situ measurements, at dry and at ambient relative humidities. When in situ measurements are considered at dry state, the in situ fine mode diameters are 44 % higher than the sun-photometer-retrieved diameters and in situ volume concentrations are 20 % lower than those of the sun-photometer-retrieved fine mode concentration. Using a parameterised hygroscopic growth factor applied to aerosol diameters, the difference between in situ and retrieved diameters grows larger. Coarse mode in situ diameters and concentrations show a good correlation with retrieved PSDs from remote sensing.

  19. Aerosol Filtration Application Using Fibrous Media An Industrial Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨传芳

    2012-01-01

    Filtration of aerosol particles using non-woven fibrous media is a common practice for air cleaning. It has found wide applications in industries and our daily lives. This paper overviews some of these applications and provides an industrial perspective. It starts from discussing aerosol filtration theory, followed by a brief review on the advancement of filtration media. After that, filtration applications in respiratory protection, dust collection, and engine in-take air cleaning are elaborated. These are the areas that the author sees as the typical needed ones in China's fast pace economical development endeavor, where air filtration enables the protection of human health, environment and equipment for sustainability.

  20. Paper-based electroanalytical devices for in situ determination of salicylic acid in living tomato leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li-Jun; Feng, Qiu-Mei; Yan, Yong-Feng; Pan, Zhong-Qin; Li, Xiao-Hui; Song, Feng-Ming; Yang, Haibing; Xu, Jing-Juan; Bao, Ning; Gu, Hai-Ying

    2014-10-15

    Detection of phytohormones in situ has gained significant attention due to their critical roles in regulating developmental processes and signaling for defenses in plants at low concentration. As one type of plant hormones, salicylic acid has recently been found to be one of pivotal signal molecules for physiological behaviors of plants. Here we report the application of paper-based electroanalytical devices for sensitively in situ detection of salicylic acid in tomato leaves with the sample volume of several microliters. Specifically, disposable working electrodes were fabricated by coating carbon tape with the mixture of multiwall carbon nanotubes and nafion. We observed that the treatment of the modified carbon tape electrodes with oxygen plasma could significantly improve electrochemical responses of salicylic acid. The tomato leaves had a punched hole of 1.5mm diameter to release salicylic acid with minor influence on continuous growth of tomatoes. By incorporating the tomato leaf with the paper-based analytical device, we were able to perform in situ determination of salicylic acid based on its electrocatalytic oxidation. Our experimental results demonstrated that the amounts of salicylic acid differed statistically in normal, phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene silent and diseased (infected by Botrytis cinerea) tomato leaves. By quantifying salicylic acid at the level of several nanograms in situ, the simple paper-based electroanalytical devices could potentially facilitate the study of defense mechanism of plants under biotic and abiotic stresses. This study might also provide a sensitive method with spatiotemporal resolution for mapping of chemicals released from living organisms.

  1. In situ electrokinetic control of moisture and nutrients in unsaturated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, E.R.; Brady, P.V.

    1994-12-31

    Many DOE facilities have unsaturated soils contaminated with metals and organic solvents. Because of the large volumes, in situ remediation is often the most economically attractive remediation technique. The success of many in situ treatment technologies depends critically on the degree to which the movement of water and desired ions can be engineered in the vadose zone. Bioremediation efforts in the vadose zone are limited by the ability to provide moisture and nutrients to contaminant-metabolizing microorganisms. An in situ electrokinetic remediation process has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for use in unsaturated soils, and is presently undergoing field demonstration. The electrokinetic process is not limited by low soil permeabilities and, therefore, provides a level of control not achievable by hydraulic means. Moisture is added to the subsurface in a controlled fashion such that the field capacity is never exceeded, preventing the unwanted mobilization of dissolved contaminants by saturated wetting fronts. The Sandia electrokinetic process can potentially transport both water and nutrients for bioremediation efforts and is compatible with vapor phase in situ techniques such as bioventing. The approach should as bioventing. The approach should lend itself to the directed transport of biodegradable chelating agents and complexed metals from contaminated soils.

  2. Development of a Robotic Arm Based Hydrogel Additive Manufacturing System for In-Situ Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In-situ printing is a promising injury repair technique that can be directly applied during surgical operations. This paper features a potential in-situ printing platform based on a small-scale robotic arm with a micro-sized dispenser valve. A double-light-source curing method was applied to print poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA with a 20% (weight/volume ratio and the entire process was controlled automatically by a computer interface where droplet diameter, curing time, mechanical properties were measured and essential printing parameters (e.g., nozzle velocity, nozzle frequency were determined. Three different two-dimensional (2D plane models (namely, square, circular, and heart-shaped were printed during initial printing trials. The feasibility study of in-situ printing on curved surfaces was tested using a three-dimensional (3D printed defect model. The defect was successfully filled using both parallel and ring printing paths. In conclusion, the robotic arm printing platform and its forming method can achieve a rapid curing of PEGDA hydrogel on a curved surface and has the potential to be applied to in-situ printing.

  3. Filtration Combustion in Smoldering and SHS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matkowsky, Bernard J.

    2001-01-01

    Smolder waves and SHS (self-propagating high-temperature synthesis) waves are both examples of filtration combustion waves propagating in porous media. Smoldering combustion is important for the study of fire safety. Smoldering itself can cause damage, its products are toxic and it can also lead to the more dangerous gas phase combustion which corresponds to faster propagation at higher temperatures. In SHS , a porous solid sample, consisting of a finely ground powder mixture of reactants, is ignited at one end. A high temperature thermal wave, having a frontal structure, then propagates through the sample converting reactants to products. The SHS technology appears to enjoy a number of advantages over the conventional technology, in which the sample is placed in a furnace and "baked" until it is "well done". The advantages include shorter synthesis times, greater economy, in that the internal energy of the reactions is employed rather than the costly external energy of the furnace, purer products, simpler equipment and no intrinsic limitation on the size of the sample to be synthesized as exists in the conventional technology. When delivery of reactants through the pores to the reaction site is an important aspect of the combustion process, it is referred to as filtration combustion. The two types of filtration combustion have a similar mathematical formulation, describing the ignition, propagation and extinction of combustion waves in porous media. The goal in each case, however, is different. In smoldering the desired goal is to prevent propagation, whereas in SHS the goal is to ensure propagation of the combustion wave, leading to the synthesis of desired products. In addition, the scales in the two areas of application differ. Smoldering generally occurs at lower temperatures and propagation velocities than in SHS nevertheless, the two applications have much in common so that what is learned fit make application can be used to advantage in the other. In porous

  4. Nanofiber filter media for air filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Bharath Kumar

    Nanofibers have higher capture efficiencies in comparison to microfibers in the submicron particle size range of 100-500 nm because of small fiber diameter and increased surface area of the fibers. Pressure drop across the filter increases tremendously with decrease in fiber diameter in the continuum flow regime. Nanofibers with fiber diameter less than 300 nm are in the slip flow regime as a consequence of which steep increase in pressure drop is considerably reduced due to slip effect. The outlet or inlet gases have broad range of particle size distribution varying from few micrometers to nanometers. The economic benefits include capture of a wide range of particle sizes in the gas streams using compact filters composed of nanofibers and microfibers. Electrospinning technique was used to successfully fabricate polymeric and ceramic nanofibers. The nanofibers were long, continuous, and flexible with diameters in the range of 200--300 nm. Nanofibers were added to the filter medium either by mixing microfibers and nanofibers or by directly electrospinning nanofibers as thin layer on the surface of the microfiber filter medium. Experimental results showed that either by mixing Nylon 6 nanofibers with B glass fibers or by electrospinning Nylon 6 nanofibers as a thin layer on the surface of the microfiber medium in the surface area ratio of 1 which is 0.06 g of nanofibers for 2 g of microfibers performed better than microfiber filter media in air filtration tests. This improved performance is consistent with numerical modeling. The particle loading on a microfibrous filter were studied for air filtration tests. The experimental and modeling results showed that both pressure drop and capture efficiency increased with loading time. Nanofiber filter media has potential applications in many filtration applications and one of them being hot gas filtration. Ceramic nanofibers made of alumina and titania nanofibers can withstand in the range of 1000°C. Ceramic nanofibers

  5. Filtration Efficiency of Functionalized Ceramic Foam Filters for Aluminum Melt Filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Claudia; Jäckel, Eva; Taina, Fabio; Zienert, Tilo; Salomon, Anton; Wolf, Gotthard; Aneziris, Christos G.; Le Brun, Pierre

    2017-02-01

    The influence of filter surface chemistry on the filtration efficiency of cast aluminum alloys was evaluated for four different filter coating compositions (Al2O3—alumina, MgAl2O4—spinel, 3Al2O3·2SiO2—mullite, and TiO2—rutile). The tests were conducted on a laboratory scale with a filtration pilot plant, which facilitates long-term filtration tests (40 to 76 minutes). This test set-up allows the simultaneous use of two LiMCAs (before and after the filter) for the determination of the efficiency of inclusion removal. The four tested filter surface chemistries exhibited good thermal stability and mechanical robustness after 750 kg of molten aluminum had been cast. All four filter types exhibited a mean filtration efficiency of at least 80 pct. However, differences were also observed. The highest filtration efficiencies were obtained with alumina- and spinel-coated filter surfaces (>90 pct), and the complete removal of the largest inclusions (>90 µm) was observed. The efficiency was slightly lower with mullite- and rutile-coated filter surfaces, in particular for large inclusions. These observations are discussed in relation to the properties of the filters, in particular in terms of, for example, the surface roughness.

  6. Filtration Efficiency of Functionalized Ceramic Foam Filters for Aluminum Melt Filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Claudia; Jäckel, Eva; Taina, Fabio; Zienert, Tilo; Salomon, Anton; Wolf, Gotthard; Aneziris, Christos G.; Le Brun, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    The influence of filter surface chemistry on the filtration efficiency of cast aluminum alloys was evaluated for four different filter coating compositions (Al2O3—alumina, MgAl2O4—spinel, 3Al2O3·2SiO2—mullite, and TiO2—rutile). The tests were conducted on a laboratory scale with a filtration pilot plant, which facilitates long-term filtration tests (40 to 76 minutes). This test set-up allows the simultaneous use of two LiMCAs (before and after the filter) for the determination of the efficiency of inclusion removal. The four tested filter surface chemistries exhibited good thermal stability and mechanical robustness after 750 kg of molten aluminum had been cast. All four filter types exhibited a mean filtration efficiency of at least 80 pct. However, differences were also observed. The highest filtration efficiencies were obtained with alumina- and spinel-coated filter surfaces (>90 pct), and the complete removal of the largest inclusions (>90 µm) was observed. The efficiency was slightly lower with mullite- and rutile-coated filter surfaces, in particular for large inclusions. These observations are discussed in relation to the properties of the filters, in particular in terms of, for example, the surface roughness.

  7. In-situ Non-destructive Studies on Biofouling Processes in Reverse Osmosis Membrane Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Nadia

    2016-12-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane systems are high-pressure membrane filtration processes that can produce high quality drinking water. Biofouling, biofilm formation that exceeds a certain threshold, is a major problem in spiral wound RO and NF membrane systems resulting in a decline in membrane performance, produced water quality, and quantity. In practice, detection of biofouling is typically done indirectly through measurements of performance decline. Existing direct biofouling detection methods are mainly destructive, such as membrane autopsies, where biofilm samples can be contaminated, damaged and resulting in biofilm structural changes. The objective of this study was to test whether transparent luminescent planar oxygen sensing optodes, in combination with a simple imaging system, can be used for in-situ, non-destructive biofouling characterization. Aspects of the study were early detection of biofouling, biofilm spatial patterning in spacer filled channels, and the effect of feed cross-flow velocity, and feed flow temperature. Oxygen sensing optode imaging was found suitable for studying biofilm processes and gave detailed spatial and quantitative biofilm development information enabling better understanding of the biofouling development process. The outcome of this study attests the importance of in-situ, non-destructive imaging in acquiring detailed knowledge on biofilm development in membrane systems contributing to the development of effective biofouling control strategies.

  8. A novel In-situ Enzymatic Cleaning Method for Reducing Membrane Fouling in Membrane Bioreactors (MBRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Bilad

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel in-situ enzymatic cleaning method was developed for fouling control in membrane bioreactors (MBRs. It is achieved by bringing the required enzymes near the membrane surface by pulling the enzymes to a magnetic membrane (MM surface by means of magnetic forces, exactly where the cleaning is required. To achieve this, the enzyme was coupled to a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP and the membrane it self was loaded with MNP. The magnetic activity was turned by means of an external permanent magnet. The effectiveness of concept was tested in a submerged membrane filtration using the model enzyme-substrate of Bacillus subitilis xylanase-arabinoxylan. The MM had almost similar properties compared to the unloaded ones, except for its well distributed MNPs. The enzyme was stable during coupling conditions and the presence of coupling could be detected using a high-performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The system facilitated an in-situ enzymatic cleaning and could be effectively applied for control fouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs.

  9. Enhanced filtration program at LLL. A progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, W.; Taylor, R.D.; Miller, H.H.; Bierman, A.H.; Hebard, H.D.; daRoza, R.A.; Lum, B.Y.

    1978-07-28

    As part of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's Enhanced Filtration Program, we are investigating the use of an externally applied electric field to improve the performance of fibrous filters. Our objective in this program is to develop filtration systems for the nuclear industry that will reduce the cost and volume of nuclear waste associated with present systems. We have developed a new theory of the electrostatic filter that is consistent with experimental tests made during transient and steady-state conditions. For these tests, we used ac and dc electric fields, insulated and noninsulated electrodes, and conducting and nonconducting filter media; all tests were conducted in our small-scale 25 l/s test system, using sodium chloride aerosols. Our theory employs a new mechanism based on the attraction between charged particles and charged fibers in addition to the previously proposed mechanism based on the attraction between charged particles and polarized fibers. In this theory, fibers are charged when charged particles deposit on them. We have also developed a theoretical model that explains the increase in filter efficiency and pressure drop when particles load on the filter. The filter loading tests we conducted to evaluate this model verify its accuracy to a remarkable degree. By using the model equations, we are thus able to explain the observed increase in filter efficiency as a function of particle mass loading, particle size, and particle-particle collection efficiency. Two systems we developed for use in the nuclear industry use electric fields to increase the performance of fibrous filters. One is designed for use inside glove boxes to control radioactive particles at their source; the other is designed for use in ventilation systems. Here we report the results of laboratory and field evaluations for the glove box system.

  10. In-situ trainable intrusion detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symons, Christopher T.; Beaver, Justin M.; Gillen, Rob; Potok, Thomas E.

    2016-11-15

    A computer implemented method detects intrusions using a computer by analyzing network traffic. The method includes a semi-supervised learning module connected to a network node. The learning module uses labeled and unlabeled data to train a semi-supervised machine learning sensor. The method records events that include a feature set made up of unauthorized intrusions and benign computer requests. The method identifies at least some of the benign computer requests that occur during the recording of the events while treating the remainder of the data as unlabeled. The method trains the semi-supervised learning module at the network node in-situ, such that the semi-supervised learning modules may identify malicious traffic without relying on specific rules, signatures, or anomaly detection.

  11. IN SITU URANIUM STABILIZATION BY MICROBIAL METABOLITES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C; Anna Knox, A; Chad L Leverette,C; Yianne Kritzas, Y

    2006-11-29

    Soil contaminated with U was the focus of this study in order to develop in-situ, U bio-immobilization technology. We have demonstrated microbial production of a metal chelating biopolymer, pyomelanin, in U contaminated soil from the Tims Branch area of the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) as a result of tyrosine amendments. Bacterial densities of pyomelanin producers were >106 cells/g wet soil. Pyomelanin demonstrated U chelating and mineral binding capacities at pH 4 and 7. In laboratory studies, in the presence of goethite or illite, pyomelanin enhanced U sequestration by these minerals. Tyrosine amended soils in field tests demonstrated increased U sequestration capacity following pyomelanin production up to 13 months after tyrosine treatments.

  12. Unannounced in situ simulation of obstetric emergencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Jette Led; Lottrup, Pernille; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To describe how unannounced in situ simulation (ISS) was perceived by healthcare professionals before and after its implementation, and to describe the organisational impact of ISS. STUDY DESIGN: Ten unannounced ISS involving all staff were scheduled March-August 2007. Questionnaire surveys...... on staff perceptions were conducted before (2003-2006) and after (2007-2008) implementation of unannounced ISS. Information from the debriefing sessions following each ISS constituted a proxy measure of the organisational impact of the ISS. RESULTS: Five out of ten of the unannounced ISS scheduled were...... conducted. Twenty-three members of the staff at work on a scheduled day for ISS were randomly selected to participate. Questionnaires before implementation revealed that 137/196 (70%) of staff members agreed or strongly agreed that ISS was a good idea and 52/199 (26%) thought it likely to be stressful...

  13. Overview of In - Situ Biodegradation and Enhancement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Jun; Anthony ADZOMANI; ZHAO Yongsheng

    2002-01-01

    Microbial degradation technologies have been developed to restore ground water quality in aquifers polluted by organic contaminants effectively in recent years. However, in course of the degradation, the formation of biofilms in ground water remediation technology can be detrimental to the effectiveness of a ground water remediation project. Several alternatives are available to a remedial design engineer, such as Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRBs) and in -situ bioremediation, Hydrogen Releasing Compounds (HRCs) barrier, Oxygen Releasing Compounds (ORCs) barrier etc. which are efficient and cost- effective technologies. Excessive biomass formation renders a barrier ineffective in degrading the contaminants, Efforts are made to develop kinetics models which accurately determine bio - fouling and bio - filn formation and to control excessive biomass formation.

  14. In-situ SEM electrochemistry and radiolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Nilsen, Rolf Erling Robberstad; Norby, Poul

    Electron microscopy is a ubiquitous technique to see effects which are too small to see with traditional optical microscopes. Recently it has become possible to also image liquid samples by encapsulating them from the vacuum of the microscope and a natural evolution from that has been to include...... microelectrodes on the windows to enable studies of electrohcemical processes. In this way it is possible to perform in-situ electrochemical experiments such as electroplating and charge and discharge analysis of battery electrodes. In a typical liquid cell, electrons are accelerated to sufficiently high energies...... to traverse a thin window made by a silicon nitride membrane, and interact with the sample immersed in liquid. In transmission electron microscopy (TEM) the majority of the electrons continue through the sample to form an image. In scanning electron microscopy (SEM) a fraction of the electrons...

  15. High resolution in situ ultrasonic corrosion monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, R.J.

    1984-01-10

    An ultrasonic corrosion monitor is provided which produces an in situ measurement of the amount of corrosion of a monitoring zone or zones of an elongate probe placed in the corrosive environment. A monitoring zone is preferably formed between the end of the probe and the junction of the zone with a lead-in portion of the probe. Ultrasonic pulses are applied to the probe and a determination made of the time interval between pulses reflected from the end of the probe and the junction referred to, both when the probe is uncorroded and while it is corroding. Corresponding electrical signals are produced and a value for the normalized transit time delay derived from these time interval measurements is used to calculate the amount of corrosion.

  16. Support Routines for In Situ Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, Robert G.; Pariser, Oleg; Yeates, Matthew C.; Lee, Hyun H.; Lorre, Jean

    2013-01-01

    This software consists of a set of application programs that support ground-based image processing for in situ missions. These programs represent a collection of utility routines that perform miscellaneous functions in the context of the ground data system. Each one fulfills some specific need as determined via operational experience. The most unique aspect to these programs is that they are integrated into the large, in situ image processing system via the PIG (Planetary Image Geometry) library. They work directly with space in situ data, understanding the appropriate image meta-data fields and updating them properly. The programs themselves are completely multimission; all mission dependencies are handled by PIG. This suite of programs consists of: (1)marscahv: Generates a linearized, epi-polar aligned image given a stereo pair of images. These images are optimized for 1-D stereo correlations, (2) marscheckcm: Compares the camera model in an image label with one derived via kinematics modeling on the ground, (3) marschkovl: Checks the overlaps between a list of images in order to determine which might be stereo pairs. This is useful for non-traditional stereo images like long-baseline or those from an articulating arm camera, (4) marscoordtrans: Translates mosaic coordinates from one form into another, (5) marsdispcompare: Checks a Left Right stereo disparity image against a Right Left disparity image to ensure they are consistent with each other, (6) marsdispwarp: Takes one image of a stereo pair and warps it through a disparity map to create a synthetic opposite- eye image. For example, a right eye image could be transformed to look like it was taken from the left eye via this program, (7) marsfidfinder: Finds fiducial markers in an image by projecting their approximate location and then using correlation to locate the markers to subpixel accuracy. These fiducial markets are small targets attached to the spacecraft surface. This helps verify, or improve, the

  17. DUCTAL CARCINOMA IN SITU OF THE BREAST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical characteristics, treatment and prognosis of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. Methods: Clinicopathological and follow-up data were collected in 52 patients with DCIS. Results: The clinic data showed that 50 patients had signs of breast lumps or/and nipple discharges, 2 patients presented abnormal mammography; 2 patients had lymph node involved; and 14 patients were accompanied with intraductal papillomatosis. All patients were Received surgical therapy. The follow-up data showed 1 patient locally recurred after lumpectomy, and was underwent mastectomy again, then cured. There were no patients died of DCIS. Conclusion: Mastectomy should be a standard surgical mode, and the prognosis of DCIS was favorable, but mammography for screening of asymptomatic women should be strengthened to find DCIS.

  18. In situ Fabrication of Monolithic Copper Azide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Li, Mingyu; Zeng, Qingxuan; Wu, Xingyu

    2016-04-01

    Fabrication and characterization of monolithic copper azide were performed. The monolithic nanoporous copper (NPC) with interconnected pores and nanoparticles was prepared by decomposition and sintering of the ultrafine copper oxalate. The preferable monolithic NPC can be obtained through decomposition and sintering at 400°C for 30 min. Then, the available monolithic NPC was in situ reacted with the gaseous HN3 for 24 h and the monolithic NPC was transformed into monolithic copper azide. Additionally, the copper particles prepared by electrodeposition were also reacted with the gaseous HN3 under uniform conditions as a comparison. The fabricated monolithic copper azide was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC).

  19. Fungal biodegradation of phthalate plasticizer in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep, S; Faseela, P; Josh, M K Sarath; Balachandran, S; Devi, R Sudha; Benjamin, Sailas

    2013-04-01

    This unique study describes how Aspergillus japonicus, Penicillium brocae and Purpureocillium lilacinum, three novel isolates of our laboratory from heavily plastics-contaminated soil completely utilized the plasticizer di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) bound to PVC blood storage bags (BB) in simple basal salt medium (BSM) by static submerged growth (28 °C). Initial quantification as well as percentage utilization of DEHP blended to BB were estimated periodically by extracting it into n-hexane. A two-stage cultivation strategy was employed for the complete mycoremediation of DEHP from BB in situ. During the first growth stage, about two-third parts of total (33.5% w/w) DEHP bound to BB were utilized in two weeks, accompanied by increased fungal biomass (~0.15-0.32 g per g BB) and sharp declining (to ~3) of initial pH (7.2). At this stagnant growth state (low pH), spent medium was replaced by fresh BSM (pH, 7.2), and thus in the second stage the remaining DEHP (one-third) in BB was utilized completely. The ditches and furrows seen from the topology of the BB as seen by the 3D AFM image further confirmed the bioremediation of DEHP physically bound to BB in situ. Of the three mycelial fungi employed, P. lilacinum independently showed highest efficiency for the complete utilization of DEHP bound to BB, whose activity was comparable to that of the consortium comprising all the three fungi described herein. To sum up, the two-stage cultivation strategy demonstrated in this study shows that a batch process would efficiently remediate the phthalic acid esters blended in plastics on a large scale, and thus it offers potentials for the management of plastics wastes.

  20. In Situ Field Testing of Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Wang

    2001-12-14

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR.

  1. In-situ gelling polymers for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the research involving in situ gelling polymers and can be used as a guidebook for academics, industrialists and postgraduates interested in this area. This work summaries the academic contributions from the top authorities in the field and explore the fundamental principles of in situ gelling polymeric networks, along with examples of their major applications. This book aims to provide an up-to-date resource of in situ gelling polymer research.

  2. A review of in-situ EBSD experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stuart I. WRIGHT; Matthew M. NOWELL

    2005-01-01

    Automated EBSD or Orientation Imaging Microscopy (OIM) systems are being used in combination with other equipment within the scanning electron microscope (SEM) to perform in-situ measurements. This paper briefly reviews OIM studies of in-situ experiments performed using tensile and heating stages as well as in-situ serial sectioning. In particular, in-situ OIM scan results on an aluminum alloy sample deformed in tension; phase transformations in a cobalt sample, recrystallization and grain growth in a copper sample and serial sectioning of a nickel super-alloy sample are reviewed.

  3. IN SITU TRANSESTERIFIKASI MINYAK BIJI MAHONI MENJADI METIL ESTER DENGAN CO-SOLVENT THF (TETRAHYDROFURAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvianto Dwi Daryono

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Tujuan dari penelitian  adalah untuk mengkaji efektifitas penggunaan co-solvent THF pada reaksi transesterifikasi in situ minyak biji mahoni sebagai solusi proses pembuatan biodiesel yang efektif dan efisien. Variabel dan kondisi operasi  meliputi katalis NaOH, kecepatan pengadukan 450 rpm, suhu reaksi suhu kamar, rasio molar minyak:metanol = 1:101,39, rasio molar katalis:minyak = 0,5:1, % FFA minyak 1,42%, kadar air biji 0,8%, waktu reaksi 3, 8, 13, 18, dan 23 menit serta rasio molar minyak:THF 1:47,15, 1:57,85 dan 1:67,85. Biji mahoni yang telah dikeringkan dan dihaluskan ukuran +20/-30 mesh sebanyak 50 gram dimasukkan dalam labu leher tiga yang dilengkapi pendingin balik dan ditambahkan metanol, THF dan katalis NaOH serta dilakukan reaksi sesuai dengan variabel dan kondisi operasi penelitian. Setelah reaksi selesai dipisahkan antara ampas dan filtratnya. Filtrat didistilasi pada suhu ± 70oC dan residu hasil distilasi dimasukkan dalam corong pemisah dan didiamkan selama ± 12 jam agar terbentuk 2 lapisan. Lapisan atas sebagai metil ester kemudian dianalisis konsentrasi metil oleatnya dengan GC. Dari data hasil penelitian didapatkan hasil terbaik pada rasio molar minyak:THF = 1:67,85 dan waktu reaksi 23 menit dengan  konsentrasi metil oleat 59,10% dan yield metil ester 79,69%. Densitas metil ester 0,8791 g/cm3 memenuhi SNI 04-7182-2006 yaitu 0,85 – 0,89 g/cm3. Kata kunci : biodiesel, co-solvent, minyak biji mahoni, transesterifikasi in situ Abstract The purpose of this research was to assess the effectiveness of the use of co-solvent THF for in situ transesterification reaction mahogany seed oil as a biodiesel manufacturing process solutions that effectively and efficiently. Variables and operating conditions include catalyst NaOH, stirring speed of 450 rpm, room temperature the reaction temperature, molar ratio of oil: methanol = 1: 101.39, the molar ratio of catalyst: oil = 0.5: 1, % FFA oil is 1,42%,  moisture content seed of 0

  4. Melanoma "in situ" tratado con Imiquimod Melanoma in situ treated with Imiquimod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RE Achenbach

    Full Text Available Comunicamos un caso con dos melanomas "in situ", en un varón de 86 años, localizados en ambos lados de la cara con alto riesgo quirúrgico, quien fuera tratado con imiquimod al 5% una vez al día durante dos meses; los resultados hasta el momento, clínicos e histológicos han sido satisfactorios.A 86 years-old man with two melanomas "in situ" at both sides of his face, treated with imiquimod 5% are presented. The patient has a cardiovascular high risk due to isquemic heart disease, for that reason we start the treatment with imiquimod once a day for two months. The clinical and histological response was good and a follow up will be as long as we can.

  5. Fabrication of in situ composite layer on cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fraś

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study describes the technology of fabrication of composite layers in cast steel reinforced with titanium carbides. In the process under discussion, the reinforcing TiC phase is formed in situ from the substrates deposited on mould cavity, where the said substrates under the effect of heat supplied by molten metal poured into mould (1823K undergo a synthesis in the SHS reaction. An outcome of this process is the formation, within the casting surface, of a layer from 550 to 1200μm thick. Carbides produced in this synthesis have the size from 0,5 to 20μm and a non-typical spheroidal shape. The hardness of the produced layer examined in function of the distance from the casting surface is from 700 to 1134 HV, and is determined by volume fraction of the reinforcing TiC phase. To better document the type of microstructure obtained in the produced material, metallographic and structural examinations were carried out using the method of scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray microanalysis (EDS/EDX, and phase analysis (XRD. To check the mechanical properties of the examined material, hardness was measured by the Vickers test.

  6. In situ Synchrotron X-ray Thermodiffraction of Boranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal G. Yot

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Boranes of low molecular weight are crystalline materials that have been much investigated over the past decade in the field of chemical hydrogen storage. In the present work, six of them have been selected to be studied by in situ synchrotron X-ray thermodiffraction. The selected boranes are ammonia borane NH3BH3 (AB, hydrazine borane N2H4BH3 (HB, hydrazine bisborane N2H4(BH32 (HBB, lithium LiN2H3BH3 (LiHB and sodium NaN2H3BH3 (NaHB hydrazinidoboranes, and sodium triborane NaB3H8 (STB. They are first investigated separately over a wide range of temperature (80–300 K, and subsequently compared. Differences in crystal structures, the existence of phase transition, evolutions of unit cell parameters and volumes, and variation of coefficients of thermal expansion can be observed. With respect to AB, HB and HBB, the differences are mainly explained in terms of molecule size, conformation and motion (degree of freedom of the chemical groups (NH3, N2H4, BH3. With respect to LiHB, NaHB and STB, the differences are explained by a stabilization effect favored by the alkali cations via M···H interactions with four to five borane anions. The main results are presented and discussed herein.

  7. Transfer and transport of aluminum in filtration unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum salt coagulants were used prevalently in various water works. In this article, the effects of filtration on residual aluminum concentration and species distribution were researched by determining the concentration of different Aluminum species before and after single layer filter, double layer filter, and membrane filtration units. In the research, size exclusion chromatography (SEC) was used to separate colloidal and soluble aluminum, ion exchange chromatography (IEC) was used to separate organic and inorganic aluminum, and inductivity coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was used to determine the aluminum concentration. The results showed that the rapid filtration process had the ability of removing residual aluminum from coagulant effluent water, and that double layer filtration was more effective in residual aluminum removal than single layer filtration, while Nano filtration was more effective than micro filtration. It was found that when the residual aluminum concentration was below 1mg/L in sediment effluent, the residual aluminum concentration in treated water was above 0.2 mg/L. The direct rapid filtration process mainly removed the suspended aluminum. The removal of soluble and colloidal aluminum was always less than 10% and the natural small particles that adsorbed the amount of soluble or small particles aluminum on their surface were difficult to be removed in this process. Micro filtration and nano filtration were good technologies for removing aluminum; the residual aluminum concentration in the effluent was less than 0.05 mg/L.

  8. Detection of denitrification genes by in situ rolling circle amplification - fluorescence in situ hybridization (in situ RCA-FISH) to link metabolic potential with identity inside bacterial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoshino, Tatsuhiko; Schramm, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    A target-primed in situ rolling circle amplification (in situ RCA) protocol was developed for detection of single-copy genes inside bacterial cells and optimized with Pseudomonas stutzeri, targeting nitrite and nitrous oxide reductase genes (nirS and nosZ). Two padlock probes were designed per gene......). Nevertheless, multiple genes (nirS and nosZ; nirS and the 16S rRNA gene) could be detected simultaneously in P. stutzeri. Environmental application of in situ RCA-FISH was demonstrated on activated sludge by the differential detection of two types of nirS-defined denitrifiers; one of them was identified...

  9. Martingale representation property in progressively enlarged filtrations

    CERN Document Server

    Jeanblanc, M

    2012-01-01

    Consider $\\mathbb{G}$ the progressive enlargement of a filtration $\\mathbb{F}$ with a random time $\\tau$. Assuming that, in $\\mathbb{F}$, the martingale representation property holds, we examine conditions under which the martingale representation property holds also in $\\mathbb{G}$. It is noted that the classical results on this subject are no more sufficient to deal with all examples coming from credit risk modeling. In this paper, we introduce a new methodology which extends the various classical results and applies on recent examples.

  10. Chromogenic in situ hybridization: a multicenter study comparing silver in situ hybridization with FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, J M S; Campbell, Fiona M; Ibrahim, Merdol; Wencyk, Peter; Ellis, Ian; Kay, Elaine; Connolly, Yvonne; O'Grady, Anthony; Di Palma, Silvana; Starczynski, Jane; Morgan, John M; Jasani, Bharat; Miller, Keith

    2009-10-01

    Our purposes were to perform a robust assessment of a new HER2 chromogenic in situ hybridization test and report on concordance of silver in situ hybridization (SISH) data with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) data and on intraobserver and interlaboratory scoring consistency. HER2 results were scored from 45 breast cancers in 7 laboratories using the Ventana (Tucson, AZ) INFORM HER-2 SISH assay and in 1 central laboratory using a standard FISH assay. Overall, 94.8% of cases were successfully analyzed by SISH across the 6 participating laboratories that reported data. Concordance for diagnosis of HER2 amplification by SISH compared with FISH was high (96.0% overall). Intraobserver variability (8.0%) and intersite variability (12.66%) of absolute HER2/chromosome 17 ratios appear to be tightly controlled across all 6 participating laboratories. The Ventana INFORM HER-2 SISH assay is robust and reproducible, shows good concordance with a standard FISH assay, and complies with requirements in national guidelines for performance of diagnostic tests.

  11. Initial in Situ Measurements of Perennial Meltwater Storage in the Greenland Firn Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Lora S.; Miege, Clement; Forster, Richard R.; Brucker, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    A perennial storage of water in a firn aquifer was discovered in southeast Greenland in 2011. We present the first in situ measurements of the aquifer, including densities and temperatures. Water was present at depths between approx. 12 and 37m and amounted to 18.7 +/- 0.9 kg in the extracted core. The water filled the firn to capacity at approx. 35m. Measurements show the aquifer temperature remained at the melting point, representing a large heat reservoir within the firn. Using model results of liquid water extent and aquifer surface depth from radar measurements, we extend our in situ measurements to the Greenland ice sheet. The estimated water volume is 140 +/- 20 Gt, representing approx. 0.4mm of sea level rise (SLR). It is unknown if the aquifer temporary buffers SLR or contributes to SLR through drainage and/or ice dynamics.

  12. In situ observation of mechanical damage within a SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucedo-Mora, L.; Lowe, T.; Zhao, S.; Lee, P. D.; Mummery, P. M.; Marrow, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites are candidate materials for fuel cladding in Generation IV nuclear fission reactors and as accident tolerant fuel clad in current generation plant. Experimental methods are needed that can detect and quantify the development of mechanical damage, to support modelling and qualification tests for these critical components. In situ observations of damage development have been obtained of tensile and C-ring mechanical test specimens of a braided nuclear grade SiC-SiC ceramic composite tube, using a combination of ex situ and in situ computed X-ray tomography observation and digital volume correlation analysis. The gradual development of damage by matrix cracking and also the influence of non-uniform loading are examined.

  13. Initial in situ measurements of perennial meltwater storage in the Greenland firn aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Lora S.; Miège, Clément; Forster, Richard R.; Brucker, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    perennial storage of water in a firn aquifer was discovered in southeast Greenland in 2011. We present the first in situ measurements of the aquifer, including densities and temperatures. Water was present at depths between ~12 and 37 m and amounted to 18.7 ± 0.9 kg in the extracted core. The water filled the firn to capacity at ~35 m. Measurements show the aquifer temperature remained at the melting point, representing a large heat reservoir within the firn. Using model results of liquid water extent and aquifer surface depth from radar measurements, we extend our in situ measurements to the Greenland ice sheet. The estimated water volume is 140 ± 20 Gt, representing ~0.4 mm of sea level rise (SLR). It is unknown if the aquifer temporary buffers SLR or contributes to SLR through drainage and/or ice dynamics.

  14. The Potassium-Argon Laser Experiment (KArLE): In Situ Geochronology for Planetary Robotic Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The Potassium (K) - Argon (Ar) Laser Experiment (KArLE) will make in situ noble-gas geochronology measurements aboard planetary robotic landers and roverss. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is used to measure the K abun-dance in a sample and to release its noble gases; the evolved Ar is measured by mass spectrometry (MS); and rela-tive K content is related to absolute Ar abundance by sample mass, determined by optical measurement of the ablated volume. KArLE measures a whole-rock K-Ar age to 10% or better for rocks 2 Ga or older, sufficient to resolve the absolute age of many planetary samples. The LIBS-MS approach is attractive because the analytical components have been flight proven, do not require further technical development, and provide complementary measurements as well as in situ geochronology.

  15. IN-SITU TRITIUM BETA DETECTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.W. Berthold; L.A. Jeffers

    1998-04-15

    The objectives of this three-phase project were to design, develop, and demonstrate a monitoring system capable of detecting and quantifying tritium in situ in ground and surface waters, and in water from effluent lines prior to discharge into public waterways. The tritium detection system design is based on measurement of the low energy beta radiation from the radioactive decay of tritium using a special form of scintillating optical fiber directly in contact with the water to be measured. The system consists of the immersible sensor module containing the optical fiber, and an electronics package, connected by an umbilical cable. The system can be permanently installed for routine water monitoring in wells or process or effluent lines, or can be moved from one location to another for survey use. The electronics will read out tritium activity directly in units of pico Curies per liter, with straightforward calibration. In Phase 1 of the project, we characterized the sensitivity of fluor-doped plastic optical fiber to tritium beta radiation. In addition, we characterized the performance of photomultiplier tubes needed for the system. In parallel with this work, we defined the functional requirements, target specifications, and system configuration for an in situ tritium beta detector that would use the fluor-doped fibers as primary sensors of tritium concentration in water. The major conclusions from the characterization work are: A polystyrene optical fiber with fluor dopant concentration of 2% gave best performance. This fiber had the highest dopant concentration of any fibers tested. Stability may be a problem. The fibers exposed to a 22-day soak in 120 F water experienced a 10x reduction in sensitivity. It is not known whether this was due to the build up of a deposit (a potentially reversible effect) or an irreversible process such as leaching of the scintillating dye. Based on the results achieved, it is premature to initiate Phase 2 and commit to a prototype

  16. Behaviour and kinematics of continuous ram filtration in bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simon, Malene Juul; Johnson, Mark; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2009-01-01

    Balaenid whales perform long breath-hold foraging dives despite a high drag from their ram filtration of zooplankton. To maximize the volume of prey acquired in a dive with limited oxygen supplies, balaenids must either filter feed only occasionally when prey density is particularly high, or they......Balaenid whales perform long breath-hold foraging dives despite a high drag from their ram filtration of zooplankton. To maximize the volume of prey acquired in a dive with limited oxygen supplies, balaenids must either filter feed only occasionally when prey density is particularly high......, or they must swim at slow speeds while filtering to reduce drag and oxygen consumption. Using digital tags with three-axis accelerometers, we studied bowhead whales feeding off West Greenland and present here, to our knowledge, the first detailed data on the kinematics and swimming behaviour of a balaenid...... whale filter feeding at depth. Bowhead whales employ a continuous fluking gait throughout the bottom phase of foraging dives, moving at very slow speeds (less than 1 m s-1), allowing them to filter feed continuously at depth. Despite the slow speeds, the large mouth aperture provides a water filtration...

  17. Experimental Measurement of In Situ Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbo, Maria; Milkereit, Bernd; Nasseri, Farzine; Schmitt, Douglas; Young, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The World Stress Map data is determined by stress indicators including earthquake focal mechanisms, in situ measurement in mining, oil and gas boreholes as well as the borehole cores, and geologic data. Unfortunately, these measurements are not only infrequent but sometimes infeasible, and do not provide nearly enough data points with high accuracy to correctly infer stress fields in deep mines around the world. Improvements in stress measurements of Earth's crust is fundamental to several industries such as oil and gas, mining, nuclear waste management, and enhanced geothermal systems. Quantifying the state of stress and the geophysical properties of different rock types is a major complication in geophysical monitoring of deep mines. Most stress measurement techniques involve either the boreholes or their cores, however these measurements usually only give stress along one axis, not the complete stress tensor. The goal of this project is to investigate a new method of acquiring a complete stress tensor of the in situ stress in the Earth's crust. This project is part of a comprehensive, exploration geophysical study in a deep, highly stressed mine located in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, and focuses on two boreholes located in this mine. These boreholes are approximately 400 m long with NQ diameters and are located at depths of about 1300 - 1600 m and 1700 - 2000 m. Two borehole logging surveys were performed on both boreholes, October 2013 and July 2015, in order to perform a time-lapse analysis of the geophysical changes in the mine. These multi-parameter surveys include caliper, full waveform sonic, televiewer, chargeability (IP), and resistivity. Laboratory experiments have been performed on borehole core samples of varying geologies from each borehole. These experiments have measured the geophysical properties including elastic modulus, bulk modulus, P- and S-wave velocities, and density. The apparatus' used for this project are geophysical imaging cells capable

  18. Low-cost multi-stage filtration enhanced by coagulation-flocculation in upflow gravel filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez, L.D.; Marin, L.M.; Visscher, J.T.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper assesses the operational and design aspects of coagulation and flocculation in upflow gravel filters (CF-UGF) in a multi-stage filtration (MSF) plant. This study shows that CF-UGF units improve the performance of MSF considerably, when the system operates with turbidity above 30 NTU. It s

  19. Dynamic optimization of a dead-end filtration trajectory : Non-ideal cake filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankert, Bastiaan; Kattenbelt, Carolien; Betlem, Ben H.L.; Roffel, Brian

    2007-01-01

    A control strategy aimed at minimizing energy consumption is formulated for non-ideal dead-end cake filtration with an inside-out hollow fiber ultrafiltration membrane system. The non-ideal behavior was assumed to originate from cake compression, non-linear cake resistance and a variable pump effici

  20. Dynamic optimization of a dead-end filtration trajectory : Blocking filtration laws

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankert, Bastiaan; Betlem, Ben H.L.; Roffel, Brian

    2006-01-01

    An operating model for dead-end membrane filtration is proposed based on the well-known blocking laws. The resulting model contains three parameters representing, the operating strategy, the fouling mechanism and the fouling potential of the feed. The optimal control strategy is determined by minimi

  1. CRADA opportunities in removal of particulates from hot-gas streams by filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.H.

    1995-06-01

    Our analyses of samples and operating data from the Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC), cyclone, and filtration units of the Tidd Clean Coal demonstration facility show that calcined dolomitic sorbent reacted with SO{sub 2} (and O{sub 2}) to form Sulfates (CaSO{sub 4} and CaMgn [SO{sub 4}]n+1) not only in the PFBC bed, but also in the filtration vessel. Analyses of limited data from the journal literature suggest that the filter-vessel reactions may have produced sulfate {open_quotes}necks,{close_quotes} which bonded the particles together, thus substantially increasing the critical angle of repose and shear tensile strengths of the filtered powders. This proposed mechanism rationalizes the {open_quotes}bridging{close_quotes} and other particle-accumulation problems that caused filter breakage. Engineering services potentially available to resolve these problems include elucidation and modeling of ex-situ and in-situ filter-vessel chemistry, measurement and modeling of particulate materials properties, and measurement and modeling of cleaning back-pulse aerodynamics and cleaning efficiencies.

  2. Filtration of contaminated suspended solids for the treatment of surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Catherine N; Davarpanah, Neginmalak; Fukue, Masaharu; Inoue, Tomohiro

    2009-02-01

    As few technologies exist worldwide for the treatment of contaminated surface water, a new approach is currently under development consisting of an in situ water treatment system based on a floating filtration process for adsorbed contaminants such as heavy metals. Laboratory filtration tests were performed for the removal of contaminated suspended solids (SS) from surface water. SS, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and organic carbon (OC) were monitored. Of the four filters (two non-woven geotextiles, a woven geotextile and a sand filter) evaluated, filter 1 (a non-woven geotextile) was the most effective for removal % of the total suspended solids. The results demonstrated excellent efficiency by filter No. 1, for reducing turbidity by 93-98%, as well as SS by up to 98.9% and COD by 65-71% for three sites with initial turbidities of 70, 20, and 120 NTU, respectively. The level of heavy metal removal was 98.9% due the heavy metal content of the suspended solids (60 mg kg(-1) of Cu, 90 mg kg (-1) of Ni, 130 mg kg(-1) of Zn, 200 mg kg(-1) of Cr, and 80 mg kg(-1) of Pb). The development of this technology could potentially protect the public and aquatic plants and animals from dangerous contaminants such as heavy metals adsorbed onto the suspended solids.

  3. Gravity-driven membrane system for secondary wastewater effluent treatment: Filtration performance and fouling characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yiran

    2017-04-21

    Gravity-driven membrane (GDM) filtration is one of the promising membrane bioreactor (MBR) configurations. It operates at an ultra-low pressure by gravity, requiring a minimal energy. The objective of this study was to understand the performance of GDM filtration system and characterize the biofouling formation on a flat sheet membrane. This submerged GDM reactor was operated at constant gravitational pressure in treating of two different concentrations of secondary wastewater effluent. Morphology of biofilm layer was acquired by an in-situ and on-line optical coherence tomography (OCT) scanning in a fixed position at regular intervals. The thickness and roughness calculated from OCT images were related to the variation of flux, fouling resistance and permeate quality. At the end of experiment, fouling was quantified by total organic carbon (TOC) and adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) method. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was also applied for biofouling morphology observation. The biofouling formed on membrane surface was mostly removed by physical cleaning confirmed by contact angle measurement before and after cleaning. This demonstrated that fouling on the membrane under ultra-low pressure operation was highly reversible. The superiority and sustainability of GDM in both flux maintaining and long-term operation with production of high quality effluent was demonstrated.

  4. METC CFD simulations of hot gas filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, T.J.

    1995-06-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of the fluid/particle flow in several hot gas filtration vessels will be presented. These simulations have been useful in designing filtration vessels and in diagnosing problems with filter operation. The simulations were performed using the commercial code FLUENT and the METC-developed code MFIX. Simulations of the initial configuration of the Karhula facility indicated that the dirty gas flow over the filter assemblage was very non-uniform. The force of the dirty gas inlet flow was inducing a large circulation pattern that caused flow around the candles to be in opposite directions on opposite sides of the vessel. By introducing a system of baffles, a more uniform flow pattern was developed. This modification may have contributed to the success of the project. Several simulations of configurations proposed by Industrial Filter and Pump were performed, varying the position of the inlet. A detailed resolution of the geometry of the candles allowed determination of the flow between the individual candles. Recent simulations in support of the METC/CeraMem Cooperative Research and Development Agreement have analyzed the flow in the vessel during the cleaning back-pulse. Visualization of experiments at the CeraMem cold-flow facility provided confidence in the use of CFD. Extensive simulations were then performed to assist in the design of the hot test facility being built by Ahlstrom/Pyropower. These tests are intended to demonstrate the CeraMem technology.

  5. Diatomite releases silica during spirit filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, J; Gil, M L A; de la Rosa-Fox, N; Alguacil, M

    2014-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether diatomite is an inert filter aid during spirit filtration. Surely, any compound with a negative effect on the spirit composition or the consumer's health could be dissolved. In this study different diatomites were treated with 36% vol. ethanol/water mixtures and the amounts and structures of the extracted compounds were determined. Furthermore, Brandy de Jerez was diatomite- and membrane-filtered at different temperatures and the silicon content was analysed. It was found that up to 0.36% by weight of diatomite dissolved in the aqueous ethanol and amorphous silica, in the form of hollow spherical microparticles, was the most abundant component. Silicon concentrations in Brandy de Jerez increased by up to 163.0% after contact with diatomite and these changes were more marked for calcined diatomite. In contrast, reductions of more than 30% in silicon concentrations were achieved after membrane filtration at low temperatures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Renal filtration function in patients with gout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Kushnarenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study circadian blood pressure (BP profile in patients with gout depending on the presence of arterial hypertension (HT and their relationship to the renal filtration function.Material and methods. Patients with gout (n=87 were included into the study. All the patients underwent ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM with the assessment of circadian BP profile, determination of uric acid serum levels, glomerular filtration rate (GFR was evaluated by CKD-EPI method. Depending on GFR level, all the patients were divided into 2 groups - with renal dysfunction or without one.Results. ABPM revealed circadian BP dysregulation in 55% of gout patients both with HT and without HT. Chronic kidney disease (CKD was revealed in 72.4% of male patients, with the prevalence in patients with HT (76.6 vs 61%; p<0.001. Correlations between uric acid levels and some ABPM indicators and GFR were determined.Conclusion. Obtained data suggest the contribution of hyperuricemia in disorders of systemic and renal hemodynamics, leading to the early development of CKD.

  7. Riverbed Clogging and Sustainability of Riverbank Filtration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Grischek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Clogging refers to a reduction of riverbed hydraulic conductivity. Due to difficulties in determining the thickness of the clogging layer, the leakage coefficient (L is introduced and used to quantify the recoverable portion of bank filtrate. L was determined at several riverbank filtration (RBF sites in field tests and using an analytical solution. Results were compared with data from similar experiments in the early 1970s and 1991–1993. In the 1980s, severe river water pollution in conjunction with high water abstraction led to partly unsaturated conditions beneath the riverbed. A leakage coefficient L of 5 × 10−7 s−1 was determined. After water quality improvement, L increased to 1–1.5 × 10−6 s−1. An alternative, cost and time efficient method is presented to estimate accurate leakage coefficients. The analytical solution is based on groundwater level monitoring data from observation wells next to the river, which can later feed into numerical models. The analytical approach was able to reflect long-term changes as well as seasonal variations. Recommendations for its application are given based on experience.

  8. A study of dynamic filtration; Um estudo sobre filtracao dinamica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girao, Joaquim Helder S. [PETROBRAS, Natal, RN (Brazil). Distrito de Perfuracao da Bacia Potiguar. Div. de Tecnicas de Perfuracao

    1989-12-31

    The problems that cause cost increase such as: formation damage and borehole swelling or caving lead us to study the filtration of the liquid part of formation drilling fluid. With the aim of comparing static and dynamic filtration rates, we developed a modest dynamic filtration equipment, consisting of a modified API filter, connected to reservoir by means of a positive injection pump. We carried out various tests, and the results were set in charts and tables. Through these, it is possible to notice how the static and dynamic filtration curves come apart for a same pressure value. We also evaluated the effects of circulation speed, starch concentration and counter pressure. This paper does not include calculations or mathematical models accounting for filtrate invasion radii, but it demonstrates, for example, that cleaning circulation will cause lower filtration rates at lower flows. (author) 5 refs., 11 figs., 14 tabs.

  9. Physicochemical interaction and its influence on deep bed filtration process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jin-long; Meng, Jun; Li, Gui-ping; Luan, Zhao-kun; Tang, Hong-xiao

    2004-01-01

    The capillary model was used to analyze the hydraulic conditions in the deep bed filtration process. The physicochemical interaction forces between the filter media and suspended particles and their influence on deep bed filtration process were also studied theoretically. Through the comparison of the hydraulic and physicochemical forces, the key influencing factors on the filtration process were proposed and investigated. Pilot study of the microflocculation deep bed filtration was carried out in the No. 9 Potable Water Treatment Plant of Beijing, and the experimental results of hydraulic head loss, particle distribution and entrapment were presented. The theoretical prediction was reasonably consistent with the experimental results under different conditions, which indicated that the regulation and control of micro-flocculation and deep bed filtration could be realized by the evaluation of the physicochemical interactions. Further theoretical and experimental research should be carried out to investigate the interaction mechanism and its application in the deep bed filtration and other cases.

  10. CGS and In Situ Measurements in Gävle 1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Helle Karina; Korsbech, Uffe C C; Bargholz, Kim

    1999-01-01

    Calibration of CGS-equipment.In situ measuremts with HPGe-detector (and dose rate meter)in Gävle Sweden as part of the Nordic exercise RESUME99.......Calibration of CGS-equipment.In situ measuremts with HPGe-detector (and dose rate meter)in Gävle Sweden as part of the Nordic exercise RESUME99....

  11. In-situ remediation of contaminated sediments : conceivable and feasible?!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joziasse, J.; Gun, J. van der

    2000-01-01

    In-situ remediation has assumed large proportions in dealing with terrestrial soil pollution. Although implementation of in-situ remediation for contaminated sediments is restricted by the fact that dredging is necessary for nautical or water management reasons, it should not be discarded

  12. In-situ tensile testing of propellant samples within SEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benedetto, G.L. di; Ramshorst, M.C.J. van; Duvalois, W.; Hooijmeijer, P.A.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der; Klerk, W.P.C. de

    2015-01-01

    A tensile module system placed within a FEI NovaNanoSEM 650 Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) was utilized in this work to conduct in-situ tensile testing of propellant material samples. This tensile module system allows for real-time in-situ SEM analysis of the samples to determine the failure mec

  13. In situ silica-EPDM nanocomposites obtained via reactive processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miloskovska, Elena; Hristova-Bogaerds, Denka; van Duin, Martin; de With, Gijsbertus

    2015-01-01

    In situ rubber nanocomposites prepared via reactive batch mixing and via reactive extrusion were studied. Materials produced via reactive batch mixing showed a significantly higher silica content for a similar reaction time as compared to previously prepared in situ nanocomposites using a diffusion

  14. Oxidative stress inhibits calpain activity in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttmann, R P; Johnson, G V

    1998-05-22

    In this study, the effects of oxidative stress on calpain-mediated proteolysis and calpain I autolysis in situ were examined. Calpain activity was stimulated in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells with the calcium ionophore, ionomycin. Calpain-mediated proteolysis of the membrane-permeable fluorescent substrate N-succinyl-L-leucyl-L-leucyl-L-valyl-L-tyrosine-7-amido-4-methylcouma rin, as well as the endogenous protein substrates microtubule-associated protein 2, tau and spectrin, was measured. Oxidative stress, induced by addition of either doxorubicin or 2-mercaptopyridine N-oxide, resulted in a significant decrease in the extent of ionophore-stimulated calpain activity of both the fluorescent compound and the endogenous substrates compared with control, normoxic conditions. Addition of glutathione ethyl ester, as well as other antioxidants, resulted in the retention/recovery of calpain activity, indicating that oxidation-induced calpain inactivation was preventable/reversible. The rate of autolytic conversion of the large subunit of calpain I from 80 to 78 to 76 kDa was decreased during oxidative stress; however, the extent of calpain autolysis was not altered. These data indicate that oxidative stress may reversibly inactivate calpain I in vivo.

  15. Visualizing T cell migration in-situ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre P Benechet

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mounting a protective immune response is critically dependent on the orchestrated movement of cells within lymphoid tissues. The structure of secondary lymphoid organs regulates immune responses by promoting optimal cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Naïve T cells are initially activated by antigen presenting cells in secondary lymphoid organs. Following priming, effector T cells migrate to the site of infection to exert their functions. Majority of the effector cells die while a small population of antigen specific T cells persist as memory cells in distinct anatomical locations. The persistence and location of memory cells in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues is critical to protect the host from re-infection. The localization of memory T cells is carefully regulated by several factors including the highly organized secondary lymphoid structure, the cellular expression of chemokine receptors and compartmentalized secretion of their cognate ligands. This balance between the anatomy and the ordered expression of cell surface and soluble proteins regulates the subtle choreography of T cell migration. In recent years, our understanding of cellular dynamics of T cells has been advanced by the development of new imaging techniques allowing in-situ visualization of T cell responses. Here we review the past and more recent studies that have utilized sophisticated imaging technologies to investigate the migration dynamics of naive, effector and memory T cells.

  16. Cubesat in-situ degradation detector (CIDD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rievers, Benny; Milke, Alexander; Salden, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    The design of the thermal control and management system (TCS) is a central task in satellite design. In order to evaluate and dimensionize the properties of the TCS, material parameters specifying the conductive and radiative properties of the different TCS components have to be known including their respective variations within the mission lifetime. In particular the thermo-optical properties of the outer surfaces including critical TCS components such as radiators and thermal insulation are subject to degradation caused by interaction with the space environment. The evaluation of these material parameters by means of ground testing is a time-consuming and expensive endeavor. Long-term in-situ measurements on board the ISS or large satellites not only realize a better implementation of the influence of the space environment but also imply high costs. Motivated by this we propose the utilization of low-cost nano-satellite systems to realize material tests within space at a considerably reduced cost. We present a nanosat-scale degradation sensor concept which realizes low power consumption and data rates compatible with nanosat boundaries at UHF radio. By means of a predefined measurement and messaging cycle temperature curves are measured and evaluated on ground to extract the change of absorptivity and emissivity over mission lifetime.

  17. Photonic MEMS for NIR in-situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, T C; Cole, G D; Goddard, L L; Behymer, E

    2007-07-03

    We report on a novel sensing technique combining photonics and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) for the detection and monitoring of gas emissions for critical environmental, medical, and industrial applications. We discuss how MEMS-tunable vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be exploited for in-situ detection and NIR spectroscopy of several gases, such as O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, CO{sub x}, CH{sub 4}, HF, HCl, etc., with estimated sensitivities between 0.1 and 20 ppm on footprints {approx}10{sup -3} mm{sup 3}. The VCSELs can be electrostatically tuned with a continuous wavelength shift up to 20 nm, allowing for unambiguous NIR signature determination. Selective concentration analysis in heterogeneous gas compositions is enabled, thus paving the way to an integrated optical platform for multiplexed gas identification by bandgap and device engineering. We will discuss here, in particular, our efforts on the development of a 760 nm AlGaAs based tunable VCSEL for O{sub 2} detection.

  18. In Situ Immobilization of Selenium in Sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Robert C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stewart, Thomas Austin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This project focused on the use of a sorbent, carbonated apatite, to immobilize selenium in the environment. It is know that apatite will sorb selenium and based on the mechanism of sorption it is theorized that carbonated apatite will be more effective that pure apatite. Immobilization of selenium in the environment is through the use of a sorbent in a permeable reactive barrier (PRB). A PRB can be constructed by trenching and backfill with the sorbent or in the case of apatite as the sorbent formed in situ using the apatite forming solution of Moore (2003, 2004). There is very little data on selenium sorption by carbonated apatite in the literature. Therefore, in this work, the basic sorptive properties of carbonated apatite were investigated. Carbonated apatite was synthesized by a precipitation method and characterized. Batch selenium kinetic and equilibrium experiments were performed. The results indicate the carbonated apatite contained 9.4% carbonate and uptake of selenium as selenite was rapid; 5 hours for complete uptake of selenium vs. more than 100 hours for pure hydroxyapatite reported in the literature. Additionally, the carbonated apatite exhibited significantly higher distribution coefficients in equilibrium experiments than pure apatite under similar experimental conditions. The next phase of this work will be to seek additional funds to continue the research with the goal of eventually demonstrating the technology in a field application.

  19. Analysis of fouling development under dynamic membrane filtration operation

    OpenAIRE

    Saleem, Mubashir; Alibardi, Luca; Cossu, Raffaello; Lavagnolo, Maria Cristina; Spagni, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    This research is a contribution towards evaluating the appropriate fouling mechanism responsible for the flux decline under dynamic membrane (DM) filtration and its formation mechanism by using gravity-driven filtration in a specifically designed experimental setup. Series of extended short term filtration experiments were performed at varying operating conditions of mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) concentrations, trans-membrane pressures (TMP) and mesh pore sizes. Blocking models were a...

  20. Removal of cytomegalovirus DNA from donor blood by filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K L; Cobain, T; Dunstan, R A

    1993-04-01

    Blood from five donors, previously shown to be positive for cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA following polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, was filtered through commercially available leucocyte filters. Analysis of pre- and post-filtration samples by PCR with ethidium bromide staining has shown that filtration was successful in removing CMV DNA from all samples. This is evidence that leucocyte filtration of red cell concentrates may greatly decrease the risk of CMV disease following transfusion to susceptible patients.

  1. Weight filtrations on log crystalline cohomologies of families of open smooth varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Nakkajima, Yukiyoshi

    2008-01-01

    In this volume, the authors construct a theory of weights on the log crystalline cohomologies of families of open smooth varieties in characteristic p>0, by defining and constructing four filtered complexes. Fundamental properties of these filtered complexes are proved, in particular the p-adic purity, the functionality of three filtered complexes, the weight-filtered base change formula, the weight-filtered Künneth formula, the weight-filtered Poincaré duality, and the E2-degeneration of p-adic weight spectral sequences. In addition, the authors state some theorems on the weight filtration and the slope filtration on the rigid cohomology of a separated scheme of finite type over a perfect field of characteristic p>0.

  2. Biological Chitin-MOF Composites with Hierarchical Pore Systems for Air-Filtration Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisser, Dorothea; Wisser, Florian M; Raschke, Silvia; Klein, Nicole; Leistner, Matthias; Grothe, Julia; Brunner, Eike; Kaskel, Stefan

    2015-10-19

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are promising materials for gas-separation and air-filtration applications. However, for these applications, MOF crystallites need to be incorporated in robust and manageable support materials. We used chitin-based networks from a marine sponge as a non-toxic, biodegradable, and low-weight support material for MOF deposition. The structural properties of the material favor predominant nucleation of the MOF crystallites at the inside of the hollow fibers. This composite has a hierarchical pore system with surface areas up to 800 m(2)  g(-1) and pore volumes of 3.6 cm(3)  g(-1) , allowing good transport kinetics and a very high loading of the active material. Ammonia break-through experiments highlight the accessibility of the MOF crystallites and the adsorption potential of the composite indicating their high potential for filtration applications for toxic industrial gases.

  3. Resolution of the three dimensional structure of components of the glomerular filtration barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkill, Kenton P; Qvortrup, Klaus; Starborg, Tobias; Mantell, Judith M; Knupp, Carlo; Michel, C Charles; Harper, Steve J; Salmon, Andy H J; Squire, John M; Bates, Dave O; Neal, Chris R

    2014-02-01

    The human glomerulus is the primary filtration unit of the kidney, and contains the Glomerular Filtration Barrier (GFB). The GFB had been thought to comprise 3 layers - the endothelium, the basement membrane and the podocyte foot processes. However, recent studies have suggested that at least two additional layers contribute to the function of the GFB, the endothelial glycocalyx on the vascular side, and the sub-podocyte space on the urinary side. To investigate the structure of these additional layers is difficult as it requires three-dimensional reconstruction of delicate sub-microscopic (<1 μm) cellular and extracellular elements. Here we have combined three different advanced electron microscopic techniques that cover multiple orders of magnitude of volume sampled, with a novel staining methodology (Lanthanum Dysprosium Glycosaminoglycan adhesion, or LaDy GAGa), to determine the structural basis of these two additional layers. Serial Block Face Scanning Electron Microscopy (SBF-SEM) was used to generate a 3-D image stack with a volume of a 5.3 x 105 μm3 volume of a whole kidney glomerulus (13% of glomerular volume). Secondly, Focused Ion Beam milling Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB-SEM) was used to image a filtration region (48 μm3 volume). Lastly Transmission Electron Tomography (Tom-TEM) was performed on a 0.3 μm3 volume to identify the fine structure of the glycocalyx. Tom-TEM clearly showed 20 nm fibre spacing in the glycocalyx, within a limited field of view. FIB-SEM demonstrated, in a far greater field of view, how the glycocalyx structure related to fenestrations and the filtration slits, though without the resolution of TomTEM. SBF-SEM was able to determine the extent of the sub-podocyte space and glycocalyx coverage, without additional heavy metal staining. Neither SBF- nor FIB-SEM suffered the anisotropic shrinkage under the electron beam that is seen with Tom-TEM. These images demonstrate that the three dimensional structure of the GFB can

  4. In situ containment and stabilization of buried waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, M.L.; Kukacka, L.E.; Heiser, J.H.

    1992-11-01

    The objective of the project was to develop, demonstrate and implement advanced grouting materials for the in-situ installation of impermeable, durable subsurface barriers and caps around waste sites and for the in-situ stabilization of contaminated soils. Specifically, the work was aimed at remediation of the Chemical Waste (CWL) and Mixed Waste Landfills (MWL) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as part of the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). This report documents this project, which was conducted in two subtasks. These were (1) Capping and Barrier Grouts, and (2) In-situ Stabilization of Contaminated Soils. Subtask 1 examined materials and placement methods for in-situ containment of contaminated sites by subsurface barriers and surface caps. In Subtask 2 materials and techniques were evaluated for in-situ chemical stabilization of chromium in soil.

  5. Fabrication and properties of Al matrix composites strengthened by in situ alumina particulates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    New aluminum matrix composites strengthened by Al2O3 particulates through stirring cast by adding NH4Al(SO4)2 to the molten aluminum have been fabricated. TEM observation shows that in-situ Al2O3 particulates are generally spherical and they are uniformly distributed in the Al matrix. Dry sliding wear test results show that the volume loss of the unreinforced Al matrix is about three times that of the Al2O3 reinforced metal matrix composite (MMC) and the volume loss of the MMC fabricated by adding Al2O3 is larger than that of the MMC by adding NH4Al(SO4)2. Lubricating sliding wear test results show that the volume loss of the MMCs increases more slowly than that of the matrix with the increasing of the load.

  6. A Combined Approach to Measure Micropollutant Behaviour during Riverbank Filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driezum, Inge; Saracevic, Ernis; Derx, Julia; Kirschner, Alexander; Sommer, Regina; Farnleitner, Andreas; Blaschke, Alfred Paul

    2016-04-01

    Riverbank filtration (RBF) systems are widely used as natural treatment process. The advantages of RBF over surface water abstraction are the elimination of for example suspended solids, biodegradable compounds (like specific micropollutants), bacteria and viruses (Hiscock and Grischek, 2002). However, in contrast to its importance, remarkably less is known on the respective external (e.g. industrial or municipal sewage) and the internal (e.g. wildlife and agricultural influence) sources of contaminants, the environmental availability and fate of the various hazardous substances, and its potential transport during soil and aquifer passage. The goal of this study is to get an insight in the behaviour of various micropollutants and microbial indicators during riverbank filtration. Field measurements were combined with numerical modelling approaches. The study area comprises an alluvial backwater and floodplain area downstream of Vienna. The river is highly dynamic, with discharges ranging from 900 m3/s during low flow to 11000 m3/s during flood events. Samples were taken in several monitoring wells along a transect extending from the river towards a backwater river in the floodplain. Three of the piezometers were situated in the first 20 meters away from the river in order to obtain information about micropollutant behaviour close to the river. A total of 9 different micropollutants were analysed in grab samples taken under different river flow conditions (n=33). Following enrichment using SPE, analysis was performed using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Faecal indicators (E. coli and enterococci) and bacterial spores were enumerated in sample volumes of 1 L each using cultivation based methods (ISO 16649-1, ISO 7899-2:2000 and ISO 6222). The analysis showed that some compounds, e.g. ibuprofen and diclofenac, were only found in the river. These compounds were already degraded in the first ten meters away from the river. Analysis of

  7. MENDING THE IN SITU MANIPULATION BARRIER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN, S.W.

    2006-02-06

    In early 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland and Fluor Hanford requested technical assistance from the DOE Headquarters EM-23 Technical Assistance Program to provide a team of technical experts to develop recommendations for mending the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Barrier in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site in Washington State. To accommodate this request, EM-23 provided support to convene a group of technical experts from industry, a national laboratory, and a DOE site to participate in a 2 1/2-day workshop with the objective of identifying and recommending options to enhance the performance of the 100-D Area reactive barrier and of a planned extension to the northeast. This report provides written documentation of the team's findings and recommendations. In 1995, a plume of dissolved hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], which resulted from operation of the D/DR Reactors at the Hanford site, was discovered along the Columbia River shoreline and in the 100-D Area. Between 1999 and 2003, a reactive barrier using the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) technology, was installed a distance of 680 meters along the river to reduce the Cr(VI) in the groundwater. The ISRM technology creates a treatment zone within the aquifer by injection of sodium dithionite, a strong reducing agent that scavenges dissolved oxygen (DO) from the aquifer and reduces ferric iron [Fe(III)], related metals, and oxy-ions. The reduction of Fe(III) to ferrous [Fe(II)] iron provides the primary reduction capacity to reduce Cr(VI) to the +3 state, which is less mobile and less toxic. Bench-scale and field-scale treatability tests were initially conducted to demonstrate proof-of principle and to provide data for estimation of barrier longevity. These calculations estimated barrier longevity in excess of twenty years. However, several years after initial and secondary treatment, groundwater in a number of wells has been found to contain elevated chromium (Cr) concentrations

  8. MENDING THE IN SITU MANIPULATION BARRIER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN, S.W.

    2006-02-06

    In early 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland and Fluor Hanford requested technical assistance from the DOE Headquarters EM-23 Technical Assistance Program to provide a team of technical experts to develop recommendations for mending the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Barrier in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site in Washington State. To accommodate this request, EM-23 provided support to convene a group of technical experts from industry, a national laboratory, and a DOE site to participate in a 2 1/2-day workshop with the objective of identifying and recommending options to enhance the performance of the 100-D Area reactive barrier and of a planned extension to the northeast. This report provides written documentation of the team's findings and recommendations. In 1995, a plume of dissolved hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], which resulted from operation of the D/DR Reactors at the Hanford site, was discovered along the Columbia River shoreline and in the 100-D Area. Between 1999 and 2003, a reactive barrier using the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) technology, was installed a distance of 680 meters along the river to reduce the Cr(VI) in the groundwater. The ISRM technology creates a treatment zone within the aquifer by injection of sodium dithionite, a strong reducing agent that scavenges dissolved oxygen (DO) from the aquifer and reduces ferric iron [Fe(III)], related metals, and oxy-ions. The reduction of Fe(III) to ferrous [Fe(II)] iron provides the primary reduction capacity to reduce Cr(VI) to the +3 state, which is less mobile and less toxic. Bench-scale and field-scale treatability tests were initially conducted to demonstrate proof-of principle and to provide data for estimation of barrier longevity. These calculations estimated barrier longevity in excess of twenty years. However, several years after initial and secondary treatment, groundwater in a number of wells has been found to contain elevated chromium (Cr) concentrations

  9. Retinal detachment after laser In Situ keratomileusis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Al-Rashaed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To report characteristics and outcome of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK for myopia. Materials and Methods : A retrospective chart review of patients who presented with RRD after myopic LASIK over a 10-year period. Results : Fourteen eyes were identified with RRD. Of these, two of 6112 LASIK procedures were from our center. The mean age of patients with RRD was 35.43 years. The mean interval of RRD after LASIK was 37.71 months (range, 4 months to 10 years. The macula was involved in eight eyes and spared in six eyes. Retinal breaks included a macular hole in two eyes, and giant tear in two eyes. Multiple breaks (>2 breaks occurred in 6 cases. Pars plana vitrectomy (PPV was performed in 3 (21.4% eyes, a scleral buckle (SB was performed in 4 (28.5% eyes and 7 (50% eyes underwent combined PPV and SB. Mean follow-up was 15.18 months (range, 1 month to 7 years. The retina was successfully attached in all cases. The final visual acuity was 20/40 or better in 7 (50% eyes, 20/40 to 20/60 in 4 (28.5% eyes, and 20/200 or less in 3 (21.4% eyes. Poor visual outcome was secondary to proliferative vitreoretinopathy, epiretinal membrane, macular scar and amblyopia. Conclusion : The prevalence of RRD after LASIK was low at our institute. Anatomical and visual outcomes were acceptable in eyes that were managed promptly. Although there is no cause-effect relationship between LASIK and RRD, a dilated fundus examination is highly recommended before and after LASIK for myopia.

  10. Ductal carcinoma in situ: a challenging disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevilay Altintas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS represents a heterogenous group of lesions with variable malignant potential. Although it is clearly pre-invasive, not all lesions progress to an invasive malignant disease. The significant increase in the frequency of diagnosis is the result of both widespread use of screening mammography and better recognition among pathologists. Treatment is controversial, but for several decades total mastectomy has been considered as the appropriate treatment. The tendency to be less aggressive in terms of surgery has followed the pattern of events observed in the treatment of invasive breast carcinomas. More recently, it has become clear that breastconserving procedures could be applied and selected on the basis of diagnostics and risk factors. When all patients with DCIS are considered, the overall mortality is extremely low, only about 1–2%. On the other hand, breast-conserving surgery is only curative in 75–85%; 50% of the local recurrences have proven to be invasive with a mortality rate of 12–15%. There is no place for axillary node dissection, adjuvant hormonal treatment or chemotherapy in the treatment. Important factors in predicting local recurrence are age, family history, nuclear grade, comedo-type necrosis, tumor size and margin width. With the addition of radiation therapy to excisional surgery, there is a 50% reduction in the overall local recurrence rate. The Van Nuys Prognostic Index (VNPI, recently updated, is a tool that quantifies measurable prognostic factors that can be used in the decision-making process of treatment. Recent data from large cohort studies and randomized trials have emerged to guide treatment. DCIS is now understood to have diverse malignant potential and it is unlikely that there will be a single treatment for this wide range of lesions. Advances in molecular biology and gene expression profiling of human breast tumors have been providing important insights into the relationship

  11. Microbial Repopulation Following In Situ STAR Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard, J.; Overbeeke, G.; Edwards, E.; Lomheim, L.; Grant, G.

    2016-12-01

    STAR (Self-sustaining Treatment for Active Remediation) is an emerging remediation technology that employs a self-sustaining smouldering reaction to destroy nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in the subsurface. The reaction front travels outwards from an ignition well at approximately 0.5 per day and subjects the soil to temperatures of 400°C-1000°C. The objectives of this work were to monitor re-saturation of the soil over time and quantify the microbial repopulation of the treated zone. STAR is currently being applied as a full scale, in situ remedy for coal tar beneath a former creosol manufacturing facility in New Jersey, USA. This study analyzed soil cores taken at regular intervals following STAR treatment, allowing time for groundwater to re-infiltrate and for microbial populations to potentially reestablish. Soil and groundwater were analyzed for total number of microorganisms via quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR), as well as microbial diversity via amplicon sequencing. Results demonstrate that microbes rapidly repopulated over a 2 month period to 106 gene copies/g of soil. However, concentrations in the treated zone did not rise above this concentration over 6 months post-STAR, indicating a low carrying capacity of the treated soil. To examine the system in more detail and consider the effects of bio-stimulation, a bench top column study using site soil and artificial groundwater explored the rate at which STAR-treated soil is repopulated with naturally occurring microorganisms in the presence and absence of lactate and a terminal electron acceptor. Results demonstrated that biostimulation did not increase the carrying capacity of the STAR treated sol, but rather shifted the microbial community to reflect the TEA provided, in this case, promoting sulfate reducers. Overall, the work illustrates that microbial populations in STAR treated soil do recover via groundwater infiltration but robust communities will take time to naturally establish.

  12. In-situ bioassays using caged bivalves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, M.H.; Salazar, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    It is important to make the distinction between chemical measurements to assess bioaccumulation potential versus biological measurements to assess potential bioeffects because bioaccumulation is not a bioeffect. Caging provides a unique opportunity to make synoptic measurements of each and facilitates making these measurements over space and time. Measuring bioaccumulation in resident and transplanted bivalves has probably been the most frequently used form of an in-situ bioassay because bivalves concentrate chemicals in their tissues. They are also easy to collect, cage, and measure. The authors have refined bivalve bioassay methods by minimizing the size range of test animals, making repetitive measurements of the same individuals, and standardizing test protocols for a variety of applications. They are now attempting to standardize criteria for accepting and interpreting data in the same way that laboratory bioassays have been standardized. Growth measurements can serve two purposes in this assessment strategy: (1) An integrated biological response endpoint that is easily quantifiable and with significance to the population, and (2) A means of calibrating bioaccumulation by assessing the relative health and physiological state of tissues that have accumulated the chemicals. In general, the authors have found the highest bioconcentration factors associated with the highest growth rates, the highest concentrations ({micro}g/g) of chemicals in juvenile mussels, and the highest chemical content ({micro}g/animal) in adult mussels. Without accounting for possible dilution of chemical concentrations by tissue growth or magnification through degrowth, contaminant concentrations can be misleading. Examples are provided for the Sudbury River in Massachusetts (Elliptio complanata), San Diego Bay (Mytilus galloprovincialis), and the Harbor Island Superfund Site in Puget Sound (Mytilus trossulus).

  13. Membraneless water filtration using CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sangwoo; Shardt, Orest; Warren, Patrick; Stone, Howard

    2016-11-01

    Water purification technologies such as ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis utilize porous membranes to remove suspended particles and solutes. These membranes, however, cause many drawbacks such as a high pumping cost and a need for periodic replacement due to fouling. Here we show an alternative membraneless method for separating suspended particles by exposing the colloidal suspension to CO2. Dissolution of CO2 into the suspension creates solute gradients that drive phoretic motion of particles, or so-called diffusiophoresis. Due to the large diffusion potential built up by the dissociation of carbonic acid, colloidal particles move either away from or towards the gas-liquid interface depending on their surface charge. Our findings suggest a means to separate particles without membranes or filters, thus reducing operating and maintenance costs. Using the directed motion of particles induced by exposure to CO2, we demonstrate a scalable, continuous flow, membraneless particle filtration process that exhibits very low pressure drop and is essentially free from fouling.

  14. Dynamical Systems, Cytokine Storms, and Blood Filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Glenn; Hubler, Alfred

    2008-03-01

    Various infections and non-infectious diseases can trigger immune cells and the proteins (cytokines) the cells use to communicate with each other to be caught in a positive feedback loop; this ``cytokine storm'' is frequently fatal. By examining the network of cytokine-immune cell interactions we will illustrate why anti-mediator drugs have been generally ineffective in stopping this feedback. A more effective approach may be to try and reduce interactions by dampening many signals at once by filtering the cytokines out of the blood directly (think dialysis). We will argue that feedback on an out of control nonlinear dynamical system is easier to understand than its normal healthy state and apply filtration to a toy model of immune response.

  15. Pattern recognition using inverse resonance filtration

    CERN Document Server

    Sofina, Olga; Kvetnyy, Roman

    2010-01-01

    An approach to textures pattern recognition based on inverse resonance filtration (IRF) is considered. A set of principal resonance harmonics of textured image signal fluctuations eigen harmonic decomposition (EHD) is used for the IRF design. It was shown that EHD is invariant to textured image linear shift. The recognition of texture is made by transfer of its signal into unstructured signal which simple statistical parameters can be used for texture pattern recognition. Anomalous variations of this signal point on foreign objects. Two methods of 2D EHD parameters estimation are considered with the account of texture signal breaks presence. The first method is based on the linear symmetry model that is not sensitive to signal phase jumps. The condition of characteristic polynomial symmetry provides the model stationarity and periodicity. Second method is based on the eigenvalues problem of matrices pencil projection into principal vectors space of singular values decomposition (SVD) of 2D correlation matrix....

  16. Gravity filtration of suspensions: permeability effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soori, Tejaswi; Wang, Mengyu; Ward, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    This paper examines the filtration rates of mono-modal suspensions as a function of time and a cake layer builds up through theory and experimentation. Darcy's Law, which describes fluid flow through porous media, was applied along with the Kynch theory of sedimentation, which provides the basis for analyzing low concentration (ϕ filter media. A CCD camera was used to capture images of the cake formation and fluid drainage processes, and subsequent image and theoretical analysis found the fluid flow experienced a constant pressure loss due to the permeability of the filter media, whereas the experienced pressure loss due to the cake formation varies as a function of time, ϕ and d. The rate of cake formation was also found to be independent of ϕ but dependent on d which can be attributed to a change in porosity affecting permeability. Studies on similar systems with multi-modal suspensions are in-progress.

  17. In situ X-ray investigations of oxygen precipitation in semiconductor silicon; In-situ-Roentgenuntersuchungen der Sauerstoffpraezipitation in Halbleitersilizium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grillenberger, Hannes

    2011-03-04

    The precipitation of oxygen in Czochralski grown semiconductor silicon is investigated in situ during thermal treatments up to 1000 C with high energy X-rays. All investigations are performed with a focusing Laue diffractometer. The parameters of the diffraction curve are the relative full width at half maximum (rFHWM) and the enhancement of the integral intensity (EII). A readout software has been developed to extract these automatically from the detector image for the measured 220, -220 and 040 Bragg peaks. The sample thickness is set to 15 mm as this enhances the sensitivity of the method and the samples are processed after the strain-field diffraction (SFD) experiments to wafers for an ex situ characterization demanding wafers. Three experimental series with a total of 21 in situ SFD experiments with different thermal treatments have been performed. The slope of the initial temperature ramp is set to 1 K/min in the first and the third series to generate a high precipitate (Bulk Micro Defect, BMD) density. In the second series the slope is chosen as 10 K/min to generate a lower density in the same silicon material. It is shown with all experiments and with preliminary works that the built up of strain during the heat treatment is caused by BMDs during the high temperature period of the treatment. The detection limit of series 1 is found at 7 nm at a density of 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 3}, of series 2 at 40 nm at a density of 2 x 10{sup 8}/cm{sup 3}, and at 8 nm at a density of 4.8 x 10{sup 12}/cm{sup 3} for series 3. The local maximum of the EII at 450 C, which emerges coincident with a local minimum of the rFWHM in series 2 may be caused by thermal donors (TD). With the experiments is shown that SFD operates in the infrared-laser scattering tomography detection range, but also reaches in a region covered only by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) so far. In contrast to these methods SFD is not limited to low temperatures and in situ experiments can be done. Thus

  18. In situ{sup 119}Sn Moessbauer spectroscopy study of Sn-based electrode materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboulaich, Abdelmaula, E-mail: abdelmaula.aboulaich@univ-mont2.fr; Robert, Florent; Lippens, Pierre Emmanuel; Aldon, Laurent; Olivier-Fourcade, Josette [Universite Montpellier II, Laboratoire des Agregats Moleculaires et Materiaux Inorganiques (UMR 5072-CNRS) (France); Willmann, Patrick [Centre National d' Etudes Spatiales (France); Jumas, Jean-Claude [Universite Montpellier II, Laboratoire des Agregats Moleculaires et Materiaux Inorganiques (UMR 5072-CNRS) (France)

    2006-01-15

    Sn-based composite materials were synthetized by a conventional melt-quenching method, and studied by X-ray diffraction, electrochemistry and in situ{sup 119}Sn Moesssbauer spectroscopy. Tin was dispersed ex situ into a matrix formed from B{sub 2}O{sub 3}:P{sub 2}O{sub 5}. XRD and {sup 119}Sn Moessbauer spectroscopy show the formation of an interface between the active species (Sn{sup 0}) and the matrix. This amorphous interface acts as a 'buffer-zone' which compensates volume changes during the tin-lithium alloy formation and avoids aggregation of tin particles.

  19. Local strain distributions in partially recrystallized copper determined by in situ tensile investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Fengxiang; Ubhi, H.S.; Zhang, Yubin

    2015-01-01

    A partially recrystallized copper sample produced by cold-rolling and annealing was deformed in situ by uniaxial tension in a scanning electron microscope, and electron backscatter diffraction data were collected before and after deformation to certain strains. The local strain distributions...... are quantified using digital image correlation. Distributions of the normal strain along the tensile direction (εxx) are shown in this paper. The recrystallized grains are found to deform more than the remaining unrecrystallized matrix. When εxx is averaged along lines perpendicular to the tensile direction......, significant variation are observed, which may be related to the local recrystallized volume fraction....

  20. In-situ Al/24Si Functional Graded Materials Prepared by Electromagnetic Separation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Cylinder-like in-situ Al/24Si FGMs were produced by using electromagnetic separating process. Si primary phasereinforced layer with volume fraction as high as 16 pct was formed at the outer region of the cylinder-like sampleswhere the local hardness and wear resistance were enhanced remarkably. Moreover, both of strength and ductility inthe inner region provided insurance of reliable strength for this as-cast gradient material. It indicated that generalmechanical properties such as good wear resistance at the outer region and good ductility in the central part couldbe obtained with the optimized redistribution of the Si primary particles under the electromagnetic force.

  1. 3D in situ observations of glass fibre/matrix interfacial debonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martyniuk, Karolina; Sørensen, Bent F.; Modregger, Peter

    2013-01-01

    X-ray microtomography was used for 3D in situ observations of the evolution of fibre/matrix interfacial debonding. A specimen with a single fibre oriented perpendicular to the tensile direction was tested at a synchrotron facility using a special loading rig which allowed for applying a load...... transverse to the fibre. Three distinguishable damage stages were observed: (i) interfacial debond initiation at the free surface, (ii) debond propagation from the surface into the specimen and (iii) unstable debonding along the full length of the scanned volume. The high resolution microtomography provides...

  2. Some aspects of applying nanostructured materials in air filtration, water filtration and electrical engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmer, Dusan; Vincent, Ivo; Lovecka, Lenka; Kazda, Tomas; Giurg, Adam; Skorvan, Ondrej

    2017-05-01

    Nanostructures prepared from nanofibres and nanostructured composites prepared from nanofibres and fillers are gradually becoming increasingly demanded materials for applications in various industrial branches connected with catalysis, environment protection (air filtration, waste water treatment, sound absorption), in biological engineering, electronics (battery separators, electrode materials), etc. Selected applications of these materials prepared in the company SPUR a.s. are summed up in the following presentation.

  3. Vibrating membrane filtration as improved technology for microalgae dewatering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurra, Claudia; Clavero, Ester; Salvadó, Joan; Torras, Carles

    2014-04-01

    The effect of shear-enhanced filtration by vibratory process in microalgae dewatering is presented in this paper. The aim of this research was to investigate the technical performance and improvement of vibrating membrane filtration compared with conventional tangential cross-flow filtration in microalgae concentration. An industrial-scale available commercial set-up was used. Several membrane materials as polyethersulfone, polyacrylonitrile, etc., and mean pore sizes (from 7000Da to 0.2μm) were tested and compared in both filtration set-ups. Experiments were carried-out with Nannochloropsis gaditana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum microalgae. It has been demonstrated that, even if the choice of the membrane depends on its cut-off, its material and the type of microalgae filtrated, dynamic filtration is always the best technology over a conventional one. If with conventional filtration permeability values were in the vicinity of 10L/h/m(2)/bar in steady state phase, with dynamic filtration these values increased to 30L/h/m(2)/bar or more.

  4. Analysis of the Medium Resistance for Constant Pressure Filtration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴燕翔; 王碧玉

    2004-01-01

    A mathematical model for constant pressure filtration is established. The distribution of hydraulic pressure within the cake and the medium resistance are measured. The medium resistance Rm is calculated from the suppositional filtration time Ore. It is demonstrated that Rm is nearly a constant for a given filter cloth.

  5. Purification of contaminated water by filtration through porous glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wydeven, T.; Leban, M. I.

    1972-01-01

    Method for purifying water that is contaminated with mineral salts and soluble organic compounds is described. Method consists of high pressure filtration of contaminated water through stabilized porous glass membranes. Procedure for conducting filtration is described. Types of materials by percentage amounts removed from the water are identified.

  6. Filter aids influence on pressure drop across a filtration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajar, S.; Rashid, M.; Nurnadia, A.; Ammar, M. R.; Hasfalina, C. M.

    2017-06-01

    Filter aids is commonly used to reduce pressure drop across air filtration system as it helps to increase the efficiency of filtration of accumulated filter cake. Filtration velocity is one of the main parameters that affect the performance of filter aids material. In this study, a formulated filter aids consisting of PreKot™ and activated carbon mixture (designated as PrekotAC) was tested on PTFE filter media under various filtration velocities of 5, 6, and 8 m/min at a constant material loading of 0.2 mg/mm2. Results showed that pressure drop is highly influenced by filtration velocity where higher filtration velocity leads to a higher pressure drop across the filter cake. It was found that PrekotAC performed better in terms of reducing the pressure drop across the filter cake even at the highest filtration velocity. The diversity in different particle size distribution of non-uniform particle size in the formulated PrekotAC mixture presents a higher permeability causes a lower pressure drop across the accumulated filter cake. The finding suggests that PrekotAC is a promising filter aids material that helps reducing the pressure drop across fabric filtration system.

  7. Scaling and particulate fouling in membrane filtration systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerlage, S.F.E.

    2001-01-01

    In the last decade, pressure driven membrane filtration processes; reverse osmosis, nano, ultra and micro-filtration have undergone steady growth. Drivers for this growth include desalination to combat water scarcity and the removal of various material from water to comply with increasingly stringen

  8. Scaling and particulate fouling in membrane filtration systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerlage, S.F.E.

    2001-01-01

    In the last decade, pressure driven membrane filtration processes; reverse osmosis, nano, ultra and micro-filtration have undergone steady growth. Drivers for this growth include desalination to combat water scarcity and the removal of various material from water to comply with increasingly

  9. Simulation of impaction filtration by a porous filter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghazaryan, L.; Lopez Penha, D.J.; Geurts, B.J.; Stolz, S.; Winkelmann, C.; Vafai, K.

    2010-01-01

    We present a new numerical approach for estimating filtration through porous media from first principles. We numerically simulate particle motion as arises in a carrier gas flow. The filtration we look at occurs due to impaction of particles with obstructing surfaces that are contained in the solid

  10. Model and optimization of electromagnetic filtration of metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Golak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic buoyancy force causes the movement of non-conducive particles in a conducting liquid under electromagnetic field. The phenomenon allows filtration of small inclusions from molten metals. This paper presents a mathematical model of the filtration process under alternating electromagnetic field and the methodology for maximizing its efficiency.

  11. In situ fluid typing and quantification with 1D and 2D NMR logging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Boqin

    2007-05-01

    In situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) fluid typing has recently gained momentum due to data acquisition and inversion algorithm enhancement of NMR logging tools. T(2) distributions derived from NMR logging contain information on bulk fluids and pore size distributions. However, the accuracy of fluid typing is greatly overshadowed by the overlap between T(2) peaks arising from different fluids with similar apparent T(2) relaxation times. Nevertheless, the shapes of T(2) distributions from different fluid components are often different and can be predetermined. Inversion with predetermined T(2) distributions allows us to perform fluid component decomposition to yield individual fluid volume ratios. Another effective method for in situ fluid typing is two-dimensional (2D) NMR logging, which results in proton population distribution as a function of T(2) relaxation time and fluid diffusion coefficient (or T(1) relaxation time). Since diffusion coefficients (or T(1) relaxation time) for different fluid components can be very different, it is relatively easy to separate oil (especially heavy oil) from water signal in a 2D NMR map and to perform accurate fluid typing. Combining NMR logging with resistivity and/or neutron/density logs provides a third method for in situ fluid typing. We shall describe these techniques with field examples.

  12. Influence of basement structures on in situ stresses over the Surat Basin, southeast Queensland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke-Barnett, Samuel; Flottmann, Thomas; Paul, Pijush K.; Busetti, Seth; Hennings, Peter; Reid, Ray; Rosenbaum, Gideon

    2015-07-01

    The Jurassic to Cretaceous sedimentary rocks of the Surat Basin in southeast Queensland host a significant volume of coal seam gas resources. Consequently, knowledge of the in situ stress is important for coal permeability enhancement and wellbore stability. Using wireline log data and direct stress measurements, we have calculated stress orientations from 36 wells and stress magnitudes from 7 wells across the Surat Basin. Our results reveal a relationship between high tectonic stress and proximity to structures within the underlying "basement" rocks. The influence of tectonic stresses is diminished with depth in areas with thicker sedimentary cover that are relatively far from the basement structures. We suggest that this relationship is due to the redistribution of in situ stresses around areas where basement is shallower and where basement structures, such as the Leichhardt-Burunga Fault System, are present. This behavior is explained by a lower rigidity in the thickest basin cover, which reduces the ability to maintain higher tectonic stress. Over the entire Surat Basin, a significant amount of variability in in situ stress orientation is observed. The authors attribute this stress variability to complex plate boundary interactions on the northern and eastern margins of the Indo-Australian Plate.

  13. Hydraulic performance of a proposed in situ photocatalytic reactor for degradation of MTBE in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Leonard Lik Pueh; Lynch, Rod

    2011-01-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) groundwater remediation projects often require a combination of technologies resulting in increasing the project costs. A cost-effective in situ photocatalytic reactor design, Honeycomb II, is proposed and tested for its efficiency in MTBE degradation at various flows. This study is an intermediate phase of the research in developing an in situ photocatalytic reactor for groundwater remediation. It examines the effect of the operating variables: air and water flow and double passages through Honeycomb II, on the MTBE removal. MTBE vaporisation is affected by not only temperature, Henry's law constant and air flow to volume ratio but also reactor geometry. The column reactor achieved more than 84% MTBE removal after 8 h at flows equivalent to horizontal groundwater velocities slower than 21.2 cm d⁻¹. Despite the contrasting properties between a photocatalytic indicator methylene blue and MTBE, the reactor efficiency in degrading both compounds showed similar responses towards flow (equivalent groundwater velocity and hydraulic residence time (HRT)). The critical HRT for both compounds was approximately 1 d, which corresponded to a velocity of 21.2 cm d⁻¹. A double pass through both new and used catalysts achieved more than 95% MTBE removal after two passes in 48 h. It also verified that the removal efficiency can be estimated via the sequential order of the removal efficiency of one pass obtained in the laboratory. This study reinforces the potential of this reactor design for in situ groundwater remediation.

  14. Comparative laboratory studies of well treatment techniques based on in situ cross linking and polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakatos, I.; Kiss, G.M.; Lakatos, S.J.

    1982-01-01

    In order to improve the water oil ratio in operating oil wells in 1972-1978, a number of methods were developed and tested based on treating the well with polymers. Under laboratory conditions methods were studied that were based on processes occurring in situ of cross linking of polymers by multivalent cations and polymerization of monomer solutions. The polymers used were different types of polyacrylamide, and the monomers were acrylamide and N, N-methylenebis-acrylamide. The effect of the forming gel on permeability was studied on the linear section of the nonconsolidated porous material, and on the change in water-oil ratio in radial geometry on a sandstone core sample. Comparative analysis of the methods indicated that the upper limit of the temperature stability of the gel bonded by multivalent cations does not exceed 80-100/sup 0/C. The effectiveness of the method can be considerably improved by adding aliphatic alcohols or by using polymer-silicate systems. The main advantage of the method of polymerization in situ as compared to the indicated method is higher temperature of gel stability (up to 100/sup 0/C and higher). In this case gel formation does not depend on the process of dispersion, occurs in the complete volume of the injected fluid, and the gel parameters can be regulated in broad limits. Of use of the methods of in situ polymerization should be preceded by an economic evaluation of work under specific conditions.

  15. Microstructure and properties of Si-TaSi2 eutectic in situ composite for field emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI ChunJuan; ZHANG Jun; HAN Min; CHEN Jun; XU NingSheng; LIU Lin; FU HengZhi

    2007-01-01

    The Si-TaSi2 eutectic in situ composite for field emission is prepared by electron beam floating zone melting (EBFZM) technique on the basis of Czochralski (CZ) crystal growth technique. The directional solidification microstructure and the field emission properties of the Si-TaSi2 eutectic in situ composite prepared by two kinds of crystal growth techniques have been systematically tested and compared.Researches demonstrated that the solidification microstructure of EBFZM can be fined obviously because of the relatively high solidification rate and very high temperature gradient, i.e. both the diameter and inter-rod spacing of the TaSi2 fibers prepared by EBFZM technique were decreased, and the density and the volume fraction of the TaSi2 fibers prepared by EBFZM technique were increased in comparison with that of the TaSi2 fibers prepared by CZ method. Therefore the field emission property of the Si-TaSi2 eutectic in situ composite prepared by EBFZM can be improved greatly, which exhibits better field emission uniformity and straighter F-N curve.

  16. Time lapse 3D geoelectric measurements for monitoring of in-situ remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tildy, Péter; Neducza, Boriszláv; Nagy, Péter; Kanli, Ali Ismet; Hegymegi, Csaba

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, different kinds of in-situ methods have been increasingly used for hydrocarbon contamination remediation due to their effectiveness. One of these techniques operates by injection of chemical oxidant solution to remove (degrade) the subsurface contaminants. Our aim was to develop a surface (non-destructive) measurement strategy to monitor oxidative in-situ remediation processes. The difficulties of the presented study originate from the small volume of conductive solution that can be used due to environmental considerations, the effect of conductive groundwater and the high clay content of the targeted layer. Therefore a site specific synthetic modelling was necessary for measurement design involving the results of preliminary 2D ERT measurements, electrical conductivity measurements of different active agents and expected resistivity changes calculated by soil resistivity modelling. The results of soil resistivity modelling have suggested that the reagent have complex effects on contaminated soils because of chemical biodegradation. As a result the plume of resistivity changes caused by the injected agent was determined showing strong fracturing effect because of the high pressure of injection. Based on the sophisticated tests and synthetic modelling 3D time-lapse geo-electric measurements were proven to provide a usable monitoring tool for in-situ remediation to help in-field design of such techniques.

  17. Microstructural evolution in laser deposited nickel-titanium-carbon in situ metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopagoni, S. [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Hwang, J.Y., E-mail: Junyeon.Hwang@unt.edu [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Singh, A.R.P.; Mensah, B.A.; Bunce, N. [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Tiley, J. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States); Scharf, T.W.; Banerjee, R. [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: > Laser deposition of Ni-TiC composites with a relatively low volume fraction of refined homogeneously distributed carbide precipitates resulting from an in situ reaction between elemental titanium and carbon (graphite) within the molten nickel pool. > Detailed characterization of the Ni/TiC interface using high resolution TEM. > Evaluation of the microhardness and tribological properties of this novel in situ composite with comparisons to laser deposited pure Ni. - Abstract: Laser deposition of a mixture of elemental nickel, titanium, and carbon (graphite) powders via the laser engineered net shaping (LENS) process results in an in situ titanium carbide reinforced nickel metal matrix composites. The composites have been characterized in detail using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (including energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping), Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission (including high resolution) electron microscopy. Both primary and eutectic titanium carbides, observed in this composite, exhibited the FCC-TiC structure (NaCl-type). Detailed characterization of the nickel/titanium carbide interface was carried out using high resolution TEM with the orientation relationship between the phases being <1 0 0> TiC//<1 1 0> Ni and (0 0 2) TiC//(1-bar 11) Ni. Mechanical and tribological testing determined that the composites exhibited a relatively high hardness of 370 VHN and a steady-state friction coefficient of {approx}0.5, both improvements in comparison to LENS deposited pure Ni.

  18. High-resolution in situ measurement of nitrate in runoff from the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, Alexander David; Wadham, Jemma L; Hawkings, Jon; Bagshaw, Elizabeth A; Lamarche-Gagnon, Guillaume; Mowlem, Matthew C; Tranter, Martyn

    2017-09-27

    We report the first in situ high-resolution nitrate time series from two proglacial meltwater rivers draining the Greenland Ice Sheet, using a recently developed submersible analyser based on lab-on-chip (LOC) technology. The low sample volume (320 μL) required by the LOC analyser meant that low concentration (few to sub μM), highly turbid subglacial meltwater could be filtered and colourimetrically analysed in situ. These data are linked to an unparalleled, multi-component data set. Nitrate concentrations in rivers draining Leverett Glacier in South-West Greenland and Kiattuut Sermiat in Southern Greenland exhibited a clear diurnal signal and a gradual decline at the commencement of the melt season, displaying trends would not be discernible using traditional daily manual sampling. Nitrate concentrations varied by 4.4 μM (+/- 0.2 μM) over a 10-day period at Kiattuut Sermiat and 3.0 μM (+/- 0.2 μM) over a 14 day period at Leverett Glacier. Marked changes in nitrate concentrations were observed when discharge began to increase. High resolution in situ measurements such as these have the potential to significantly advance the understanding of nutrient cycling in remote systems, where the dynamics of nutrient release are complex but are important for downstream biogeochemical cycles.

  19. NOVEL IN-SITU METAL AND MINERAL EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn O' Gorman; Hans von Michaelis; Gregory J. Olson

    2004-09-22

    This white paper summarizes the state of art of in-situ leaching of metals and minerals, and describes a new technology concept employing improved fragmentation of ores underground in order to prepare the ore for more efficient in-situ leaching, combined with technology to continuously improve solution flow patterns through the ore during the leaching process. The process parameters and economic benefits of combining the new concept with chemical and biological leaching are described. A summary is provided of the next steps required to demonstrate the technology with the goal of enabling more widespread use of in-situ leaching.

  20. Filtrate of Phellinus linteus Broth Culture Reduces Infarct Size Significantly in a Rat Model of Permanent Focal Cerebral Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Sakiko; Kawamata, Takakazu; Okada, Yoshikazu; Kobayashi, Tomonori; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2011-01-01

    Phellinus linteus, a natural growing mushroom, has been known to exhibit anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic and anti-oxidant effects. Aiming to exploit the neuroprotective effects of P. linteus, we evaluated its effects on infarct volume reduction in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to right middle cerebral artery occlusion. Filtrate of P. linteus broth culture (various doses), fractionated filtrate (based on molecular weight) or control medium was administered intraperitoneally to rats before or after ischemia induction. Rats were killed at 24 h after the stroke surgery. Cortical and caudoputaminal infarct volumes were determined separately using an image analysis program following staining with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride. Significant cortical infarct volume reductions were found in the pre-treatment groups (30 and 60 minutes before onset of cerebral ischemia) compared with the control group, showing dose dependence. Posttreatment (30 minutes after ischemic onset) also significantly reduced cortical infarct volume. Furthermore, the higher molecular weight (≥12 000) fraction of the culture filtrate was more effective compared with the lower molecular weight fraction. The present findings suggest that P. linteus may be a new promising approach for the treatment of focal cerebral ischemia, with the additional benefit of a wide therapeutic time window since significant infarct volume reduction is obtained by administration even after the ischemic event. Our finding that the higher molecular weight fraction of the P. linteus culture filtrate demonstrated more prominent effect may provide a clue to identify the neuroprotective substances and mechanisms.

  1. Filtrate of Phellinus linteus Broth Culture Reduces Infarct Size Significantly in a Rat Model of Permanent Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakiko Suzuki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phellinus linteus, a natural growing mushroom, has been known to exhibit anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic and anti-oxidant effects. Aiming to exploit the neuroprotective effects of P. linteus, we evaluated its effects on infarct volume reduction in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to right middle cerebral artery occlusion. Filtrate of P. linteus broth culture (various doses, fractionated filtrate (based on molecular weight or control medium was administered intraperitoneally to rats before or after ischemia induction. Rats were killed at 24 h after the stroke surgery. Cortical and caudoputaminal infarct volumes were determined separately using an image analysis program following staining with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride. Significant cortical infarct volume reductions were found in the pre-treatment groups (30 and 60 minutes before onset of cerebral ischemia compared with the control group, showing dose dependence. Posttreatment (30 minutes after ischemic onset also significantly reduced cortical infarct volume. Furthermore, the higher molecular weight (≥12 000 fraction of the culture filtrate was more effective compared with the lower molecular weight fraction. The present findings suggest that P. linteus may be a new promising approach for the treatment of focal cerebral ischemia, with the additional benefit of a wide therapeutic time window since significant infarct volume reduction is obtained by administration even after the ischemic event. Our finding that the higher molecular weight fraction of the P. linteus culture filtrate demonstrated more prominent effect may provide a clue to identify the neuroprotective substances and mechanisms.

  2. Physicochemical interaction and its influence on deep bed filtration process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jin-long; MENG Jun; LI GUI-ping; LUAN Zhao-kun; TANG Hong-xiao

    2004-01-01

    The capillary model was used to analyze the hydraulic conditions in the deep bed filtration process. Thephysicochemical interaction forces between the filter media and suspended particles and their influence on deep bedfiltration process were also studied theoretically. Through the comparison of the hydraulic and physicochemicalforces, the key influencing factors on the filtration process were proposed and investigated. Pilot study of the micro-flocculation deep bed filtration was carried out in the No. 9 Potable Water Treatment Plant of Beijing, and theexperimental results of hydraulic head loss, particle distribution and entrapment were presented. The theoreticalprediction was reasonably consistent with the experimental results under different conditions, which indicated that theregulation and control of micro-flocculation and deep bed filtration could be realized by the evaluation of thephysicochemical interactions. Further theoretical and experimental research should be carried out to investigate theinteraction mechanism and its application in the deep bed filtration and other cases.

  3. satellite and in-situ measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José de Jesús Salas Pérez

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available La distribución espacial y temporal de la circulación superficial de la Bahía de Banderas se obtuvo con el empleo de series temporales de rapidez de viento, temperatura superficial del mar (AVHR radiómetro y un termógrafo, nivel del mar y trazas ascendentes y descendentes del radar altimétrico ERS-2. El período que abarca dichos datos es de cuatro años, ya que comenzó en el verano de 1997 y finalizó en el invierno de 2002. La marea en la Bahía es mixta (F=0.25 con predominio del armónico M2. La bahía no muestra características de resonancia con la marea del mar abierto. Amplitudes promedio de 30 cms., resultan en corrientes de marea de pocos cms./s. Las bajas frecuencias (periodos mayores a tres días parecen ser los principales generadores de la circulación marina en esta área, en la que predomina el periodo estacional sobre los otros periodos. FEOs fueron aplicadas a las componentes de velocidad, calculadas con observaciones de altimetría medidas en la boca de la Bahía, las cuales mostraron dos principales distribuciones espaciales. El primer periodo de distribución, que se extendió desde febrero hasta julio, muestra un flujo de entrada por la porción norte/sur de la bahía, con un flujo de salida por su boca (distribución anticiclónica. El segundo periodo se extiende desde agosto hasta diciembre y es opuesto al primero (distribución ciclónica. Las características de la circulación aquí presentadas son hipotéticas y observaciones de velocidad medidas in-situ deben confirmarlas

  4. In Situ Probe Science at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, D.H.; Lunine, J.I.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Atreya, S. K.; Brinckerhoff, W.; Colaprete, A.; Coustenis, A.; Fletcher, L. N.; Guillot, T.; Lebreton, J.-P.; Mahaffy, P.; Mousis, O.; Orton, G. S.; Reh, K.; Spilker, L. J.; Spilker, T. R.; Webster, C.

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental goal of solar system exploration is to understand the origin of the solar sys-tem, the initial stages, conditions, and processes by which the solar system formed, how the formation pro-cess was initiated, and the nature of the interstellar seed material from which the solar system was born. Key to understanding solar system formation and subsequent dynamical and chemical evolution is the origin and evolution of the giant planets and their atmospheres. Several theories have been put forward to explain the process of solar system formation, and the origin and evolution of the giant planets and their atmospheres. Each theory offers quantifiable predictions of the abundances of noble gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe, and abundances of key isotopic ratios 4He3He, DH, 15N14N, 18O16O, and 13C12C. Detection of certain dis-equilibrium species, diagnostic of deeper internal pro-cesses and dynamics of the atmosphere, would also help discriminate between competing theories. Measurements of the critical abundance profiles of these key constituents into the deeper well-mixed at-mosphere must be complemented by measurements of the profiles of atmospheric structure and dynamics at high vertical resolution and also require in situ explora-tion. The atmospheres of the giant planets can also serve as laboratories to better understand the atmospheric chem-istries, dynamics, processes, and climates on all planets including Earth, and offer a context and provide a ground truth for exoplanets and exoplanetary systems. Additionally, Giant planets have long been thought to play a critical role in the development of potentially habitable planetary systems. In the context of giant planet science provided by the Galileo, Juno, and Cassini missions to Jupiter and Sat-urn, a small, relatively shallow Saturn probe capable of measuring abundances and isotopic ratios of key at-mospheric constituents, and atmospheric structure in-cluding pressures, temperatures, dynamics, and cloud

  5. Screening culture filtrates of fungi for activity against Tylenchulus semipenetrans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdejo-Lucas, S.; Viera, A.; Stchigel, A. M.; Sorribas, F. J.

    2009-07-01

    Culture filtrates of 20 fungi isolated from citrus soils were screened for their activity against Tylenchulus semipenetrans in both in vitro and greenhouse tests. The filtrates of Talaromyces cyanescens (isolates 2-4 and 2-5), Paecilomyces lilacinus, Chaetomium robustum, Acremonium strictum, Engyodontium album, Myrothecium verrucaria, Emericella rugulosa, and Tarracomyces gigaspora consistently inhibited the motility of second-stage juveniles at various concentrations of the filtrate. Dose-response models were used to determine the filtrate concentration required to inhibit the motility of 50% of the juveniles (CI50). The culture filtrate of P. lilacinus showed the highest activity with a CI50 value of 58% that differed from that of C. robustum (CI50 = 68%), and A. strictum CI50 = 82%. The culture filtrates of P. lilacinus, E. album, and T. cyanescens 2-5 maintained their activity when autoclaved at 120 degree centigrade for 20 min. The autoclaved filtrate of T. cyanescens 2-4 was more effective at inhibiting juvenile motility (CI50 = 28%) than that of T. cyanescens 2-5 (CI50 = 80%), C. robustum (CI50 = 72 %) and P. lilacinus (CI50 = 72%). The culture filtrate of T. cyanescens 2-4 also inhibited egg hatching. Nematode reproduction on Cleopatra mandarin and Carrizo citrange were respectively reduced by the culture filtrate of P. lilacinus and the autoclaved filtrate of T. cyanescens 2-4. These results support the hypothesis that soil fungi may contribute to regulate nematode densities by the production of secondary metabolites with nematicidal activity. (Author) 30 refs.

  6. Performance of Regolith Feed Systems for Analog Field Tests of In-Situ Resource Utilization Oxygen Production Plants in Mauna Kea, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Ivan I.; Mueller, Robert P.; Mantovani, James G.; Zacny, Kris A.; Craft, Jack

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on practical aspects of mechanical auger and pneumatic regolith conveying system feeding In-Situ Resource Utilization Oxygen production plants. The subsystems of these feedstock delivery systems include an enclosed auger device, pneumatic venturi educator, jet-lift regolith transfer, innovative electro-cyclone gas-particle separation/filtration systems, and compressors capable of dealing with hot hydrogen and/or methane gas re-circulating in the system. Lessons learned from terrestrial laboratory, reduced gravity and field testing on Mauna Kea Volcano in Hawaii during NASA lunar analog field tests will be discussed and practical design tips will be presented.

  7. In situ investigation of ordering phase transformations in FePt magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittig, James E; Bentley, James; Allard, Lawrence F

    2016-12-11

    In situ high-resolution electron microscopy was used to reveal information at the atomic level for the disordered-to-ordered phase transformation of equiatomic FePt nanoparticles that can exhibit outstanding magnetic properties after transforming from disordered face-centered-cubic into the tetragonal L10 ordered structure. High-angle annular dark-field imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope provided sufficient contrast between the Fe and Pt atoms to readily monitor the ordering of the atoms during in situ heating experiments. However, during continuous high-magnification imaging the electron beam influenced the kinetics of the transformation so annealing had to be performed with the electron beam blanked. At 500°C where the reaction rate was relatively slow, observation of the transformation mechanisms using this sequential imaging protocol revealed that ordering proceeded from (002) surface facets but was incomplete and multiple-domain particles were formed that contained anti-phase domain boundaries and anti-site defects. At 600 and 700°C, the limitations of sequential imaging were revealed as a consequence of increased transformation kinetics. Annealing for only 5min at 700°C produced complete single-domain L10 order; such single-domain particles were more spherical in shape with (002) facets. The in situ experiments also provided information concerning nanoparticle sintering, coalescence, and consolidation. Although there was resistance to complete sintering due to the crystallography of L10 order, the driving force from the large surface-area-to-volume ratio resulted in considerable nanoparticle coalescence, which would render such FePt nanoparticles unsuitable for use as magnetic recording media. Comparison of the in situ data acquired using the protocol described above with parallel ex situ annealing experiments showed that identical behavior resulted in all cases.

  8. Epoxy nanodielectrics fabricated with in situ and ex situ techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuncer, Enis [ORNL; Polyzos, Georgios [ORNL; Sauers, Isidor [ORNL; James, David Randy [ORNL; Ellis, Alvin R [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we report fabrication and characterisation of a nanocomposite system composed of a commercial resin and extremely small (several nanometres in diameter) titanium dioxide particles. Nanoparticles were synthesised in situ with particle nucleation occurring inside the resin matrix. In this nanodielectric fabrication method, the nanoparticle precursor was mixed to the resin solution, and the nanoparticles were in situ precipitated. Note that no high shear mixing equipment was needed to improve particle dispersion - nanoparticles were distributed in the polymer matrix uniformly since particle nucleation occurs uniformly throughout the matrix. The properties of in situ nanodielectrics are compared to the unfilled resin and an ex situ nanocomposite. We anticipate that the presented in situ nanocomposite would be employed in high-temperature superconductivity applications. In additions, the improvement shown in the dielectric breakdown indicates that conventional high-voltage components and systems can be reduced in size with novel nanodielectrics.

  9. Novel Instrumentation for In Situ Combustion Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Phase I is to develop, demonstrate and test a novel instrument based on laser absorption diagnostics for fast, in situ measurements of important...

  10. Novel Instrumentation for In Situ Combustion Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Phase I is to develop, demonstrate and test a novel instrument based on laser absorption diagnostics for fast, in situ measurements of...

  11. Fathead minnow whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This study demonstrates the potential of whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH), in conjunction with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR)...

  12. In Situ Oxygen Production from Lunar and Martian Regolith Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In situ oxygen production is of immense importance to NASA in the support of the NASA initiative to sustain man's permanent presence in space. The oxygen produced...

  13. In Situ Instrument to Detect Prebiotic Compounds in Planetary Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getty, Stephanie A.; Dworkin, Jason; Glavin, Daniel P.; Southard, Adrian; Balvin, Manuel; Kotecki, Carl; Ferrance, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    The development of an in situ LC-MS instrument for future planetary science missions to icy surfaces that are of high astrobiology and astrochemistry potential will advance our understanding of organics in the solar system.

  14. An Efficient Heat Exchanger for In Situ Resource Utilization Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In situ resource utilization (ISRU) is essential for several of NASA's future flagship missions. Currently envisioned ISRU plants include production of oxygen from...

  15. Real-Time In Situ Landing Site Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D.; Hibbard, K.; McGee, T.

    2017-02-01

    Landing spacecraft on other objects in the solar system provides a unique opportunity to make direct in situ science measurements, but extraterrestrial environments create unique challenges for the design and testing of the system.

  16. In situ quantification of genomic instability in breast cancer progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos; Chin, Koei; Gray, Joe W.; Lockett, Stephen J.

    2003-05-15

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of breast and other solid cancers. Presumably caused by critical telomere reduction, GI is responsible for providing the genetic diversity required in the multi-step progression of the disease. We have used multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and 3D image analysis to quantify genomic instability cell-by-cell in thick, intact tissue sections of normal breast epithelium, preneoplastic lesions (usual ductal hyperplasia), ductal carcinona is situ or invasive carcinoma of the breast. Our in situ-cell by cell-analysis of genomic instability shows an important increase of genomic instability in the transition from hyperplasia to in situ carcinoma, followed by a reduction of instability in invasive carcinoma. This pattern suggests that the transition from hyperplasia to in situ carcinoma corresponds to telomere crisis and invasive carcinoma is a consequence of telomerase reactivation afertelomere crisis.

  17. Comparison Between Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH) and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... were collected, for culture method and bacteria characterized by biochemical ... for 24 hours and later preserved in 70% alcohol before in situ hybridization test. ... were observed in 47 to 75% while the bacterium was isolated on culture in 7 ...

  18. In-Situ Burning of Crude Oil on Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gelderen, Laurens

    in the small scale water basin. Boilovers were also observed during the burning of a heavy crude oil with a substantial light fraction without a water layer, however, which suggests that water is not essential for boilover occurrence. Further studies are required to determine the conditions under which......The fire dynamics and fire chemistry of in-situ burning of crude oil on water was studied in order to improve predictions on the suitability of this oil spill response method. For this purpose, several operational parameters were studied to determine the factors that control the burning efficiency...... of in-situ burning, i.e. the amount of oil (in wt%) removed from the water surface by the burning process. The burning efficiency is the main parameter for expressing the oil removal effectiveness of in-situ burning as response method and is thus relevant for suitability predictions of in-situ burning...

  19. In-situ Airborne Sampler for Advanced Guided Dropsonde Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a low-cost, retrievable and reusable, autonomously guided dropsonde capable of in-situ atmospheric measurements. The proposed effort will...

  20. Removal of waterborne microorganisms by filtration using clay-polymer complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undabeytia, Tomas; Posada, Rosa; Nir, Shlomo; Galindo, Irene; Laiz, Leonila; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Morillo, Esmeralda

    2014-08-30

    Clay-polymer composites were designed for use in filtration processes for disinfection during the course of water purification. The composites were formed by sorption of polymers based on starch modified with quaternary ammonium ethers onto the negatively charged clay mineral bentonite. The performance of the clay-polymer complexes in removal of bacteria was strongly dependent on the conformation adopted by the polycation on the clay surface, the charge density of the polycation itself and the ratio between the concentrations of clay and polymer used during the sorption process. The antimicrobial effect exerted by the clay-polymer system was due to the cationic monomers adsorbed on the clay surface, which resulted in a positive surface potential of the complexes and charge reversal. Clay-polymer complexes were more toxic to bacteria than the polymers alone. Filtration employing our optimal clay-polymer composite yielded 100% removal of bacteria after the passage of 3L, whereas an equivalent filter with granular activated carbon (GAC) hardly yielded removal of bacteria after 0.5L. Regeneration of clay-polymer complexes saturated with bacteria was demonstrated. Modeling of the filtration processes permitted to optimize the design of filters and estimation of experimental conditions for purifying large water volumes in short periods.

  1. In situ acoustic and laboratory ultrasonic sound speed and attenuation measured in heterogeneous soft seabed sediments: Eel River shelf, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgas, T.J.; Wilkens, R.H.; Fu, S.S.; Neil, Frazer L.; Richardson, M.D.; Briggs, K.B.; Lee, H.

    2002-01-01

    We compared in situ and laboratory velocity and attenuation values measured in seafloor sediments from the shallow water delta of the Eel River, California. This region receives a substantial volume of fluvial sediment that is discharged annually onto the shelf. Additionally, a high input of fluvial sediments during storms generates flood deposits that are characterized by thin beds of variable grain-sizes between the 40- and 90-m isobaths. The main objectives of this study were (1) to investigate signatures of seafloor processes on geoacoustic and physical properties, and (2) to evaluate differences between geoacoustic parameters measured in situ at acoustic (7.5 kHz) and in the laboratory at ultrasonic (400 kHz) frequencies. The in situ acoustic measurements were conducted between 60 and 100 m of water depth. Wet-bulk density and porosity profiles were obtained to 1.15 m below seafloor (m bsf) using gravity cores of the mostly cohesive fine-grained sediments across- and along-shelf. Physical and geoacoustic properties from six selected sites obtained on the Eel margin revealed the following. (1) Sound speed and wet-bulk density strongly correlated in most cases. (2) Sediment compaction with depth generally led to increased sound speed and density, while porosity and in situ attenuation values decreased. (3) Sound speed was higher in coarser- than in finer-grained sediments, on a maximum average by 80 m s-1. (4) In coarse-grained sediments sound speed was higher in the laboratory (1560 m s-1) than in situ (1520 m s-1). In contrast, average ultrasonic and in situ sound speed in fine-grained sediments showed only little differences (both approximately 1480 m s-1). (5) Greater attenuation was commonly measured in the laboratory (0.4 and 0.8 dB m-1 kHz-1) than in situ (0.02 and 0.65 dB m-1 kHz-1), and remained almost constant below 0.4 m bsf. We attributed discrepancies between laboratory ultrasonic and in situ acoustic measurements to a frequency dependence of

  2. Reducing bottom anti-reflective coating (BARC) defects: optimizing and decoupling the filtration and dispense process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakensiek, Nickolas L.; Martin, Gary; Simmons, Sean; Batchelder, Traci

    2006-03-01

    Semiconductor device manufacturing is one of the cleanest manufacturing operations that can be found in the world today. It has to be that way; a particle on a wafer today can kill an entire device, which raises the costs, and therefore reduces the profits, of the manufacturing company in two ways: it must produce extra wafers to make up for the lost die, and it has less product to sell. In today's state-of-the-art fab, everything is filtered to the lowest pore size available. This practice is fairly easy for gases because a gas molecule is very small compared to the pore size of the filter. Filtering liquids, especially photochemicals such as photoresists and BARCs, can be much harder because the molecules that form the polymers used to manufacture the photochemicals are approaching the filter pore size. As a result, filters may plug up, filtration rates may drop, pressure drops across the filter may increase, or a filter may degrade. These conditions can then cause polymer shearing, microbubble formation, gel particle formation, and BARC chemical changes to occur before the BARC reaches the wafer. To investigate these possible interactions, an Entegris(R) IntelliGen(R) pump was installed on a TEL Mk8 TM track to see if the filtration process would have an effect on the BARC chemistry and coating defects. Various BARC chemicals such as DUV112 and DUV42P were pumped through various filter media having a variety of pore sizes at different filtration rates to investigate the interaction between the dispense process and the filtration process. The IntelliGen2 pump has the capability to filter the BARC independent of the dispense process. By using a designed experiment to look at various parameters such as dispense rate, filtration rate, and dispense volume, the effects of the complete pump system can be learned, and appropriate conditions can be applied to yield the cleanest BARC coating process. Results indicate that filtration rate and filter pore size play a

  3. In situ guided tissue regeneration in musculoskeletal diseases and aging

    OpenAIRE

    Jakob, Franz; Ebert, Regina; Rudert, Maximilian; Nöth, Ulrich; Walles, Heike; Docheva, Denitsa; Schieker, Matthias; Meinel, Lorenz; Groll, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In situ guided tissue regeneration, also addressed as in situ tissue engineering or endogenous regeneration, has a great potential for population-wide “minimal invasive” applications. During the last two decades, tissue engineering has been developed with remarkable in vitro and preclinical success but still the number of applications in clinical routine is extremely small. Moreover, the vision of population-wide applications of ex vivo tissue engineered constructs based on cells, growth and ...

  4. In-situ resist colloidal lithography for affordable plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochenkov, Vladimir E.

    2017-09-01

    A recently developed extension of Sparse Colloidal Lithography, an In-situ Resist Colloidal Lithography method is presented. The technique is based on in-situ deposition of structured resist layer having low adhesion to target material to form nanoparticles of desired shape. A high potential of the method is demonstrated by the examples of fabricated plasmonic nanostructures with different shapes, including concentric and non-concentric rings, disks and chiral comma-like particles.

  5. In situ primary production in young Antarctic sea ice

    OpenAIRE

    Mock, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    An in situ incubation technique used successfully to measure the photosynthetic carbon assimilation of internal algal assemblages within thick multiyear Arctic sea ice was developed and improved to measure the photosynthetic carbon assimilation within young sea ice only 50 cm thick (Eastern Weddell Sea, Antarctica). The new device enabled some of the first precise measurements of in situ photosynthetic carbon assimilation in newly formed Antarctic sea ice.

  6. BAW and SAW sensors for in-situ analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.; Bao, X. Q.; Chang, Z.; Sherrit, S.

    2003-01-01

    In-situ analysis is a major goal in current and future NASA exploration missions. In general in-situ analysis experiments are designed to investigate chmical, biological or geological markers or properties to determine the complex history of the body being studied. In order to expand the number of applicable sensor schemes an investigation into piezoelectric bulk acoustic wave (BAW) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators has been initiated.

  7. Characterization of VPO ammoxidation catalysts by in situ methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.; Luecke, B.; Brueckner, A.; Steinike, U. [Institut fuer Angewandte Chemie Berlin-Adlershof e.V., Berlin (Germany); Brzezinka, K.W. [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany); Meisel, M. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Chemie

    1998-12-31

    In-situ methods are well known as powerful tools in studying catalyst formation processes, their solid state properties under working conditions and the interaction with the feed, intermediates and products to reveal reaction mechanisms. This paper gives a short overview on results of intense studies using in-situ techniques to reveal VPO catalyst generation processes, interaction of educts, intermediates and products with VPO catalyst surfaces and mechanistic insights. Catalytic data of the ammoxidation of toluene on different VPOs complete these findings. The precursor-catalyst transformation processes were preferently investigated by in-situ XRD, in-situ Raman and in-situ ESR spectroscopy. The interaction of aromatic molecules and intermediates, resp., and VPO solid surfaces was followed by in-situ ESR and in-situ FTIR spectroscopy. Mechanistic information was mainly obtained using in-situ FTIR spectroscopy and the temporal-analysis-of-products (TAP) technique. Catalytic studies were carried out in a fixed-bed microreactor on pure (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}(VO){sub 3}(P{sub 2}O{sub 7}){sub 2}, generated [(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}(VO{sub 3})(P{sub 2}O{sub 7}){sub 2}+V{sub x}O{sub y}] catalysts, having different V{sub x}O{sub y} proportions by use of VOHPO{sub 4} x 1/2H{sub 2}O (V/P=1) and recently studied (VO){sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} x 7 H{sub 2}O (V/P=1.5) precursors; the well-known (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} was used for comparison. (orig.)

  8. Advanced and In Situ Analytical Methods for Solar Fuel Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Candace K; Tüysüz, Harun; Braun, Artur; Ranjan, Chinmoy; La Mantia, Fabio; Miller, Benjamin K; Zhang, Liuxian; Crozier, Peter A; Haber, Joel A; Gregoire, John M; Park, Hyun S; Batchellor, Adam S; Trotochaud, Lena; Boettcher, Shannon W

    2016-01-01

    In situ and operando techniques can play important roles in the development of better performing photoelectrodes, photocatalysts, and electrocatalysts by helping to elucidate crucial intermediates and mechanistic steps. The development of high throughput screening methods has also accelerated the evaluation of relevant photoelectrochemical and electrochemical properties for new solar fuel materials. In this chapter, several in situ and high throughput characterization tools are discussed in detail along with their impact on our understanding of solar fuel materials.

  9. Matrix diffusion model. In situ tests using natural analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasilainen, K. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-11-01

    Matrix diffusion is an important retarding and dispersing mechanism for substances carried by groundwater in fractured bedrock. Natural analogues provide, unlike laboratory or field experiments, a possibility to test the model of matrix diffusion in situ over long periods of time. This thesis documents quantitative model tests against in situ observations, done to support modelling of matrix diffusion in performance assessments of nuclear waste repositories. 98 refs. The thesis includes also eight previous publications by author.

  10. Effect of peritumoral injection of boanmycin hydrochloride within temperature-sensitive in situ gel using Hep-G2 hepatoma nude mice model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-hui; DING Wei-ming; HU Xiang-dong; LI Mei; XU Hong-zhang; QIAN Lin-xue

    2012-01-01

    Background Boanmycin hydrochloride,a new antitumor agent,has a short half-life and fast clearance speed in vivo.The aim of this research was to investigate the effectiveness of peritumor injection of boanmycin hydrochloride within temperature-sensitive gel in situ using Hep-G2 hepatoma nude mice model.Methods Nude mice with human Hep-G2 tumor in right flank were randomly divided into four groups: normal saline group,in situ gel only group,boanmycin hydrochloride in situ saline group,and boanmycin hydrochloride in situ gel group,and were treated with injection of corresponding agents into peripheral tissue of the tumor.The volume of the tumor and the body weight of the mice were regularly measured,and tumor growth curve was generated.The size,internal echo,and blood flow of the tumors were observed by color Doppler ultrasonography.Histopathologic changes of the tumor after treatment were observed under both optical and transmission electron microscopy.Results The tumor growth was significantly inhibited by peritumoral therapy in boanmycin hydrochloride in situ gel group with the tumor inhibitory rate of 86.76%,The blood flow of the tumor was still seen in both normal saline group and in situ gel only group on color Doppler ultrasound.Punctate calcification and dotted blood flow were seen in boanmycin hydrochloride group; however,there was massive calcification and no blood flow in the tumor in the boanmycin hydrochloride in situ gel group.Large areas of necrosis and apoptotic cells were shown by microscopic observation in boanmycin hydrochloride in situ gel group.Conclusion Temperature-sensitive boanmycin hydrochloride in situ gel can effectively delay the release of boanmycin hydrochloride and increase its anticancer effects for liver cancer in animal model.

  11. IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.S.Y. YANG

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes REV 02. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in REV 02 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what

  12. Characterizing In Situ Uranium and Groundwater Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, J.; Newman, M. A.; Stucker, V.; Peacock, A.; Ranville, J.; Cabaniss, S.; Hatfield, K.; Annable, M. D.; Klammler, H.; Perminova, I. V.

    2010-12-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a new sensor that incorporates the field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter to provide direct in situ measures of uranium and groundwater fluxes. The sensor uses two sorbents and resident tracers to measure uranium flux and specific discharge directly; but, sensor principles and design should also apply to fluxes of other radionuclides. Flux measurements will assist with obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) and further advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. Project efforts will expand our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in uranium fluxes and those for salient electron donor/acceptors, and groundwater are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. The new sensor uses an anion exchange resin to measure uranium fluxes and activated carbon with resident tracers to measure water fluxes. Several anion-exchange resins including Dowex 21K and 21K XLT, Purolite A500, and Lewatit S6328 were tested as sorbents for capturing uranium on the sensor and Lewatit S6328 was determined to be the most effective over the widest pH range. Four branched alcohols proved useful as resident tracers for measuring groundwater flows using activated carbon for both laboratory and field conditions. The flux sensor was redesigned to prevent the discharge of tracers to the environment, and the new design was tested in laboratory box aquifers and the field. Geochemical modeling of equilibrium speciation using Visual Minteq and an up-to-date thermodynamic data base suggested Ca-tricarbonato-uranyl complexes predominate under field conditions, while calculated uranyl ion activities were sensitive to changes in pH, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and alkaline earth

  13. Monitoring enzymatic reactions with in situ sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ian T.; Iordanov, V.; Kroon, Arthur; Dietrich, Heidi R. C.; Moerman, R.; van den Doel, L. R.; van Dedem, G. W. K.; Bossche, Andre; Gray, Bonnie L.; Sarro, Lina; Verbeek, Piet W.; van Vliet, Lucas J.

    2003-07-01

    In previous publications and presentations we have described our construction of a laboratory-on-a-chip based on nanoliter capacity wells etched in silicon. We have described methods for dispensing reagents as well as samples, for preventing evaporation, for embedding electronics in each well to measure fluid volume per well in real-time, and for monitoring the production or consumption of NADH in enzyme-catalyzed reactions such as those found in the glycolytic pathway of yeast. In this paper we describe the use of light sensors (photodiodes) in each well to measure both fluorescence (such as that evidenced in NADH) as well as bioluminescence (such as evidenced in ATP assays). We show that our detection limit for NADH fluorescence in 100 μM and for ATP/luciferase bioluminescence is 2.4 μM.

  14. Sorghum genome sequencing by methylation filtration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A Bedell

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Sorghum bicolor is a close relative of maize and is a staple crop in Africa and much of the developing world because of its superior tolerance of arid growth conditions. We have generated sequence from the hypomethylated portion of the sorghum genome by applying methylation filtration (MF technology. The evidence suggests that 96% of the genes have been sequence tagged, with an average coverage of 65% across their length. Remarkably, this level of gene discovery was accomplished after generating a raw coverage of less than 300 megabases of the 735-megabase genome. MF preferentially captures exons and introns, promoters, microRNAs, and simple sequence repeats, and minimizes interspersed repeats, thus providing a robust view of the functional parts of the genome. The sorghum MF sequence set is beneficial to research on sorghum and is also a powerful resource for comparative genomics among the grasses and across the entire plant kingdom. Thousands of hypothetical gene predictions in rice and Arabidopsis are supported by the sorghum dataset, and genomic similarities highlight evolutionarily conserved regions that will lead to a better understanding of rice and Arabidopsis.

  15. Capturing phosphates with iron enhanced sand filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Andrew J; Gulliver, John S; Weiss, Peter T

    2012-06-01

    Most treatment practices for urban runoff capture pollutants such as phosphorus by either settling or filtration while dissolved phosphorus, typically as phosphates, is untreated. Dissolved phosphorus, however, represents an average 45% of total phosphorus in stormwater runoff and can be more than 95%. In this study, a new stormwater treatment technology to capture phosphate, called the Minnesota Filter, is introduced. The filter comprises iron filings mixed with sand and is tested for phosphate removal from synthetic stormwater. Results indicate that sand mixed with 5% iron filings captures an average of 88% phosphate for at least 200 m of treated depth, which is significantly greater than a sand filter without iron filings. Neither incorporation of iron filings into a sand filter nor capture of phosphates onto iron filings in column experiments had a significant effect on the hydraulic conductivity of the filter at mixtures of 5% or less iron by weight. Field applications with up to 10.7% iron were operated over 1 year without detrimental effects upon hydraulic conductivity. A model is applied and fit to column studies to predict the field performance of iron-enhanced sand filters. The model predictions are verified through the predicted performance of the filters in removing phosphates in field applications. Practical applications of the technology, both existing and proposed, are presented so stormwater managers can begin implementation.

  16. Crosslinked polytriazole membranes for organophilic filtration

    KAUST Repository

    Chisca, Stefan

    2016-12-30

    We report the preparation of crosslinked membranes for organophilic filtration, by reacting a new polytriazole with free OH groups, using non-toxic poly (ethylene glycol) diglycidyl ether (PEGDE). The OH-functionalized polymer was obtained by converting the oxadiazole to triazole rings with high yield (98%). The maximum degree of crosslinking is achieved after 6 h of reaction. The crosslinked polytriazole membranes are stable in a wide range of organic solvents and show high creep recovery, indicating the robustness of crosslinked membranes. The influence of different casting solutions and different crosslinking time on the membrane morphology and membrane performance was investigated. The membranes performance was studied in dimethylformamide (DMF) and (tetrahydrofuran) THF. We achieved a permeance for THF of 49 L m−2 h−1 bar−1 for membranes with molecular weight cut off (MWCO) of 7 kg mol−1 and a permeance for THF of 17.5 L m−2 h−1 bar−1 for membranes with MWCO of 3 kg mol−1. Our data indicate that by using the new polytriazole is possible to adjust the pore dimensions of the membranes to have a MWCO, which covers ultra- and nanofiltration range.

  17. Estimating Glomerular Filtration Rate in Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Garasto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed at reviewing age-related changes in kidney structure and function, methods for estimating kidney function, and impact of reduced kidney function on geriatric outcomes, as well as the reliability and applicability of equations for estimating glomerular filtration rate (eGFR in older patients. CKD is associated with different comorbidities and adverse outcomes such as disability and premature death in older populations. Creatinine clearance and other methods for estimating kidney function are not easy to apply in older subjects. Thus, an accurate and reliable method for calculating eGFR would be highly desirable for early detection and management of CKD in this vulnerable population. Equations based on serum creatinine, age, race, and gender have been widely used. However, these equations have their own limitations, and no equation seems better than the other ones in older people. New equations specifically developed for use in older populations, especially those based on serum cystatin C, hold promises. However, further studies are needed to definitely accept them as the reference method to estimate kidney function in older patients in the clinical setting.

  18. Sorghum genome sequencing by methylation filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedell, Joseph A; Budiman, Muhammad A; Nunberg, Andrew; Citek, Robert W; Robbins, Dan; Jones, Joshua; Flick, Elizabeth; Rholfing, Theresa; Fries, Jason; Bradford, Kourtney; McMenamy, Jennifer; Smith, Michael; Holeman, Heather; Roe, Bruce A; Wiley, Graham; Korf, Ian F; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Lakey, Nathan; McCombie, W Richard; Jeddeloh, Jeffrey A; Martienssen, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    Sorghum bicolor is a close relative of maize and is a staple crop in Africa and much of the developing world because of its superior tolerance of arid growth conditions. We have generated sequence from the hypomethylated portion of the sorghum genome by applying methylation filtration (MF) technology. The evidence suggests that 96% of the genes have been sequence tagged, with an average coverage of 65% across their length. Remarkably, this level of gene discovery was accomplished after generating a raw coverage of less than 300 megabases of the 735-megabase genome. MF preferentially captures exons and introns, promoters, microRNAs, and simple sequence repeats, and minimizes interspersed repeats, thus providing a robust view of the functional parts of the genome. The sorghum MF sequence set is beneficial to research on sorghum and is also a powerful resource for comparative genomics among the grasses and across the entire plant kingdom. Thousands of hypothetical gene predictions in rice and Arabidopsis are supported by the sorghum dataset, and genomic similarities highlight evolutionarily conserved regions that will lead to a better understanding of rice and Arabidopsis.

  19. Filtration application from recycled expanded polystyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, C

    2006-10-01

    Water-in-oil emulsion with drop size less than 100 mum is difficult to separate. Coalescence filtration is economical and effective for separation of secondary dispersions. Coalescence performance depends on flow rate, bed depth, fiber surface properties, and drop size. The amount of surface area of the fibers directly affects the efficiency. A new recycling method was investigated in the previous work in which polystyrene (PS) sub-mum fibers were electro-spun from recycled expanded polystyrene (EPS). These fibers are mixed with micro glass fibers to modify the glass fiber filter media. The filter media are tested in the separation of water droplets from an emulsion of water droplets in oil. The experimental results in this work show that adding nanofibers to conventional micron sized fibrous filter media improves the separation efficiency of the filter media but also increases the pressure drop. An optimum in the performance occurs (significant increase in efficiency with minimal increase in pressure drop) with the addition of about 4% by mass of 500 nm diameter PS nanofibers to glass fibers for the filters.

  20. Efficient filtration system for paraffin-catalyst slurry separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodagholi Mohammad Ali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The filtration efficiency for separating liquid paraffin (or water from a slurry consisting of 25 weight% spherical alumina in a Slurry Bubble Column Reactor (SBCR comprised of a cylindrical tube of 10 cm diameter and 150 cm length was studied. Various differential pressures (ΔP were applied to two separate tubular sintered metal stainless steel filter elements with nominal pore size of 4 and 16μm. The experimental results disclosed that the rate of filtrations increased on applying higher differential pressure to the filter element. Albeit this phenomenon is limited to moderate ΔPs and for ΔP more than 1 bar is neither harmful nor helpful. The highest filtration rates at ΔPs higher than 1 bar were 170 and 248 ml/minute for 4 and 16μm respectively. Using water as the liquid in slurry the rate of filtration enhanced to 4 folds, and this issue reveals impact of viscosity on filtration efficiency clearly. In all situations, the total amount of particles present in the filtrate part never exceeded a few parts per million (ppm. The statistical analysis of the SEM image of the filtrate indicated that by applying higher pressure difference to the filter element the frequency percent of larger particle size increases. The operation of filter cake removing was performed with back flashing of 300 ml of clean liquid with pressures of 3-5 bar of N2 gas.

  1. In situ characterization by SAXS of concentration polarization layers during cross-flow ultrafiltration of Laponite dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignon, F; Abyan, M; David, C; Magnin, A; Sztucki, M

    2012-01-17

    The structural organization inside the concentration polarization layer during cross-flow membrane separation process of Laponite colloidal dispersions has been characterized for the first time by in situ time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Thanks to the development of new "SAXS cross-flow filtration cells", concentration profiles have been measured as a function of the distance z from the membrane surface with 50 μm accuracy and linked to the permeation flux, cross-flow, and transmembrane pressure registered simultaneously. Different rheological behaviors (thixotropic gel with a yield stress or shear thinning sol) have been explored by controlling the mutual interactions between the particles as a result on the addition of peptizer. The structural reversibility of the concentration polarization layer has been demonstrated being in agreement with permeation flux measurements. These observations were related to structure of the dispersions under flow and their osmotic pressure.

  2. In Situ Manufacturing is a Necessary Part of Any Planetary Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunson, Jennifer E.; McLemore, Carole A.

    2012-01-01

    The key to any sustainable presence in space is the ability to manufacture necessary tools, parts, structures, spares, etc. in situ and on demand. Cost, volume, and up-mass constraints prohibit launching everything needed for long-duration or long-distance missions from Earth, including spare parts and replacement systems. There are many benefits to building items as-needed in situ using computer aided drafting (CAD) models and additive manufacturing technology: (1) Cost, up-mass, and volume savings for launch due to the ability to manufacture specific parts when needed. (2) CAD models can be generated on Earth and transmitted to the station or spacecraft, or they can be designed in situ for any task. Thus, multiple people in many locations can work on a single problem. (3) Items can be produced that will enhance the safety of crew and vehicles (e.g., latches or guards). (4) Items can be produced on-demand in a small amount of time (i.e., hours or days) compared to traditional manufacturing methods and, therefore, would not require the lengthy amount of time needed to machine the part from a solid block of material nor the wait time required if the part had to be launched from Earth. (5) Used and obsolete parts can be recycled into powder or wire feedstock for use in later manufacturing. (6) Ultimately, the ability to produce items as-needed will reduce mission risk, as one will have everything they need to fix a broken system or fashion a new part making it available on a more timely basis.

  3. High-pressure cell for neutron diffraction with in situ pressure control at cryogenic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Matthew K; Ridley, Christopher J; Bocian, Artur; Kirichek, Oleg; Manuel, Pascal; Khalyavin, Dmitry; Azuma, Masaki; Attfield, J Paul; Kamenev, Konstantin V

    2014-04-01

    Pressure generation at cryogenic temperatures presents a problem for a wide array of experimental techniques, particularly neutron studies due to the volume of sample required. We present a novel, compact pressure cell with a large sample volume in which load is generated by a bellow. Using a supply of helium gas up to a pressure of 350 bar, a load of up to 78 kN is generated with leak-free operation. In addition, special fiber ports added to the cryogenic center stick allow for in situ pressure determination using the ruby pressure standard. Mechanical stability was assessed using finite element analysis and the dimensions of the cell have been optimized for use with standard cryogenic equipment. Load testing and on-line experiments using NaCl and BiNiO3 have been done at the WISH instrument of the ISIS pulsed neutron source to verify performance.

  4. High-pressure cell for neutron diffraction with in situ pressure control at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Matthew K.; Ridley, Christopher J.; Bocian, Artur; Kirichek, Oleg; Manuel, Pascal; Khalyavin, Dmitry; Azuma, Masaki; Attfield, J. Paul; Kamenev, Konstantin V.

    2014-04-01

    Pressure generation at cryogenic temperatures presents a problem for a wide array of experimental techniques, particularly neutron studies due to the volume of sample required. We present a novel, compact pressure cell with a large sample volume in which load is generated by a bellow. Using a supply of helium gas up to a pressure of 350 bar, a load of up to 78 kN is generated with leak-free operation. In addition, special fiber ports added to the cryogenic center stick allow for in situ pressure determination using the ruby pressure standard. Mechanical stability was assessed using finite element analysis and the dimensions of the cell have been optimized for use with standard cryogenic equipment. Load testing and on-line experiments using NaCl and BiNiO3 have been done at the WISH instrument of the ISIS pulsed neutron source to verify performance.

  5. Titanium boride equation of state determined by in-situ X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Shigeaki; Kikegawa, Takumi

    2016-12-01

    The equation of state (EOS) of titanium boride, TiB2, was investigated by in situ X-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell and multianvil high-pressure apparatus. The pressure-volume-temperature (P-V-T) data were collected at up to 111 GPa and room temperature for the diamond-anvil cell experiments and at up to 15 GPa and 1300 K for the multianvil experiments. No phase transition was observed through the entire range of experimental conditions. The pressure-volume data at room temperature were fitted using a Vinet EOS to obtain the isothermal bulk modulus, BT0 = 256.7 GPa, and its pressure derivative, B' T0 = 3.83. When fitting a thermal EOS using the P-V-T data for the multianvil experiments, we find that [Formula: see text] = 0.095 (GPa/K) and α 0 = 2.49 × 10(-5) K(-1).

  6. Nanoscale characterization of gold nanoparticles created by in situ reduction at a polymeric surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, A; Clukay, C J; Grabill, C N; Freppon, D J; Bhattacharya, A; Kuebler, S M; Heinrich, H

    2013-07-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy is used as a quantitative method to measure the shapes, sizes and volumes of gold nanoparticles created at a polymeric surface by three different in situ synthesis methods. The atomic number contrast (Z-contrast) imaging technique reveals nanoparticles which are formed on the surface of the polymer. However, with certain reducing agents, the gold nanoparticles are additionally found up to 20 nm below the polymer surface. In addition, plan-view high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy images were statistically analyzed on one sample to measure the volume, height and effective diameter of the gold nanoparticles and their size distributions. Depth analysis from high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy micrographs also gives information on the dominant shape of the nanoparticles.

  7. In situ management and domestication of plants in Mesoamerica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Alejandro; Otero-Arnaiz, Adriana; Pérez-Negrón, Edgar; Valiente-Banuet, Alfonso

    2007-11-01

    Ethnobotanical studies in Mexico have documented that Mesoamerican peoples practise systems of in situ management of wild and weedy vegetation directed to control availability of useful plants. In situ management includes let standing, encouraging growing and protection of individual plants of useful species during clearance of vegetation, which in some cases may involve artificial selection. The aim of this study was to review, complement and re-analyse information from three case studies which examined patterns of morphological, physiological and genetic effects of artificial selection in plant populations under in situ management in the region. Information on wild and in situ managed populations of the herbaceous weedy plants Anoda cristata and Crotalaria pumila, the tree Leucaena esculenta subsp. esculenta and the columnar cacti Escontria chiotilla, Polaskia chichipe and Stenocereus stellatus from Central Mexico was re-analysed. Analyses compared morphology and frequency of morphological variants, germination patterns, and population genetics parameters between wild and managed in situ populations of the species studied. Species of columnar cacti are under different management intensities and their populations, including cultivated stands of P. chichipe and S. stellatus, were also compared between species. Significant differences in morphology, germination patterns and genetic variation documented between wild, in situ managed and cultivated populations of the species studied are associated with higher frequencies of phenotypes favoured by humans in managed populations. Genetic diversity in managed populations of E. chiotilla and P. chichipe is slightly lower than in wild populations but in managed populations of S. stellatus variation was higher than in the wild. However, genetic distance between populations was generally small and influenced more by geographic distance than by management. Artificial selection operating on in situ managed populations of the

  8. Development of a Microchannel In Situ Propellant Production System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Rassat, Scot D.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.

    2005-09-01

    An in situ propellant production (ISPP) plant on future Mars robotic missions can produce oxygen (O2) and methane (CH4) that can be used for propellant for the return voyage. By producing propellants from Mars atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen (H2) brought from Earth, the initial mass launched in low Earth orbit can be reduced by 20% to 45%, as compared to carrying all of the propellant for a round-trip mission to the Mars surface from Earth. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory used microchannel architecture to develop a Mars-based In Situ Propellant Production (ISPP) system. This three year research and development effort focused on process intensification and system miniaturization of three primary subsystems: a thermochemical compressor, catalytic reactors, and components for separating gas phases from liquid phases. These systems were designed based on a robotic direct return mission scenario, but can be scaled up to human flight missions by simply numbering up the microchannel devices. The thermochemical compression was developed both using absorption and adsorption. A multichannel adsorption system was designed to meet the full-scale CO2 collection requirements using temperature swing adsorption. Each stage is designed to achieve a 10x compression of CO2. A compression ratio to collect Martian atmospheric CO2 at ~0.8 kPa and compress it to at least 100 kPa can be achieved with two adsorption stages in series. A compressor stage incorporates eight thermally coupled adsorption cells at various stages in the adsorption/desorption cycle to maximize the recuperation of thermal energy and provide a nearly continuous flow of CO2 to the downstream reactors. The thermochemically compressed CO2 is then mixed with hydrogen gas and fed to two reactors: a Sabatier Reaction unit and a Reverse Water/Gas Shift unit. The microchannel architecture allows better heat control than is possible in an adiabatic system, resulting in significantly higher conversion. The

  9. Method for local temperature measurement in a nanoreactor for in situ high-resolution electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendelbo, S B; Kooyman, P J; Creemer, J F; Morana, B; Mele, L; Dona, P; Nelissen, B J; Helveg, S

    2013-10-01

    In situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of solids under reactive gas conditions can be facilitated by microelectromechanical system devices called nanoreactors. These nanoreactors are windowed cells containing nanoliter volumes of gas at ambient pressures and elevated temperatures. However, due to the high spatial confinement of the reaction environment, traditional methods for measuring process parameters, such as the local temperature, are difficult to apply. To address this issue, we devise an electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) method that probes the local temperature of the reaction volume under inspection by the electron beam. The local gas density, as measured using quantitative EELS, is combined with the inherent relation between gas density and temperature, as described by the ideal gas law, to obtain the local temperature. Using this method we determined the temperature gradient in a nanoreactor in situ, while the average, global temperature was monitored by a traditional measurement of the electrical resistivity of the heater. The local gas temperatures had a maximum of 56 °C deviation from the global heater values under the applied conditions. The local temperatures, obtained with the proposed method, are in good agreement with predictions from an analytical model. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Pore structure development of in-situ pyrolyzed coals for pollution prevention in iron foundries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, He; Cannon, Fred S. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 212 Sackett Building, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Wang, Yujue [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Bejing, 100084 (China)

    2009-09-15

    A protocol was devised for preparing pyrolyzed coals that could be made in-situ at foundries to capture volatile organic compound (VOC) emission. This pyrolysis created extensive micropore volume in lignite over a broad range of temperature and time; and could use waste heat from cupola exhaust gases by a heat-exchange tube. For foundry application, moderate porous carbon with relatively uniform pores over wide ranges of temperature and time would be more practical than highly porous activated carbon (AC) that requires narrowly-controlled operations. This pyrolysis protocol was developed in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and in a small tube furnace, while using lignite, bituminous coal, and anthracite. The lignite yielded the most pore volume; and this was relatively uniform (0.1-0.13 mL/g of pores) while temperatures were 600-900 C, and times were 0-60 min. Smaller grain sizes yielded improved porosity; and this corresponded to more release of phenols and naphthalenes from smaller grains, as discerned by TGA-mass spectroscopy (MS). TGA-MS also revealed that improved pore development between 600-800 C corresponded to the release of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O; and concurrently higher slurry pH linked to less oxygenated functionality. Adsorption of benzene was compared between the in-situ porous carbon and a commercial AC. (author)

  11. THE STUDY OF THE FILTRATION EFFICIENCY OF FILTER MATERIAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Ruiqing; Wang Luping; Wu Xueping

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, the course of the filtration is analyzed.In order to study the filtration efficiency of the filter material, the computer program was edited.According to the results of the computer program, some important parameters of the filter material are discussed.It shows that the filtration efficiency is closely related to the diameter (d) and the size (b).In addition, by using these results and the computer program, we can analysis the relationship between the fiber structure and filter properties quantitatively.

  12. Additive Difference Schemes for Filtration Problems in Multilayer Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ayrjan, E A; Pavlush, M; Fedorov, A V

    2000-01-01

    In the present paper difference schemes for solution of the plane filtration problem in multilayer systems are analyzed within the framework of difference schemes general theory. Attention is paid to splitting the schemes on physical processes of filtration along water-carring layers and vertical motion between layers. Some absolutely stable additive difference schemes are obtained the realization of which needs no software modification. Parallel algorithm connected with the solving of the filtration problem in every water-carring layer on a single processor is constructed. Program realization on the multi-processor system SPP2000 at JINR is discussed.

  13. Estimation of In Situ Stress and Permeability from an Extended Leak-off Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiep Quach, Quoc; Jo, Yeonguk; Chang, Chandong; Song, Insun

    2016-04-01

    stress regime with the information of the maximum principal stress that will be estimated based on borehole breakout geometry analysis. To estimate the in situ permeability from the XLOT data, we derived a theoretical equation that relates the slope of pressure versus injected water volume (P-V) curve to permeability based on the Darcy's law. The equation is expressed in terms of permeability as a function of some key parameters such as open-hole dimensions, flowrate, porosity, pressure change and injected water volume. We applied this equation to the early stage of the P-V curves prior to the leak-off point to prevent the effect of induced fractures on permeability. The estimated in situ permeability was (3.1±0.4)×10-17m2, which turns out to be quite similar to the laboratory measurements in recovered cores.

  14. Technical issues associated with in situ vitrification of the INEL Subsurface Disposal Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoots, C.M.; Bates, S.O.; Callow, R.A.; Campbell, K.A.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Krisman, G.K.; McKellar, M.G.; Nickelson, D.F.; Slater, C.E.

    1992-07-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) has been identified as an alternative technology for remediation of the acid pit and transuranic pits and trenches (TRU-PTs) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). However, a number of technical issues must be resolved before ISV can be considered applicable to these waste sites. To assist in the ISV technology evaluation, an ISV Steering Committee was formed to identify, prioritize, and develop closure roadmaps for technical issues lated with ISV application at the SDA. The activities of the ISV Steering Committee are summarized in a three-volume report. Volume I identifies the systematic approach used to identify and prioritize the ISV technical issues and briefly discusses the methodology that will be employed to resolve these issues. Volumes 2 and 3 discuss each technical issue in greater detail and suggest specific closure roadmaps to be used in resolving technical issues associated with ISV at the SDA Acid Pit and TRU-PTS, respectively. The three-volume report is a working document that will be updated as necessary to reflect current evaluation strategy for the ISV technology. This is Volume 3.

  15. In situ vitrification: application analysis for stabilization of transuranic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oma, K.H.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Rusin, J.M.

    1982-09-01

    The in situ vitrification process builds upon the electric melter technology previously developed for high-level waste immobilization. In situ vitrification converts buried wastes and contaminated soil to an extremely durable glass and crystalline waste form by melting the materials, in place, using joule heating. Once the waste materials have been solidified, the high integrity waste form should not cause future ground subsidence. Environmental transport of the waste due to water or wind erosion, and plant or animal intrusion, is minimized. Environmental studies are currently being conducted to determine whether additional stabilization is required for certain in-ground transuranic waste sites. An applications analysis has been performed to identify several in situ vitrification process limitations which may exist at transuranic waste sites. Based on the process limit analysis, in situ vitrification is well suited for solidification of most in-ground transuranic wastes. The process is best suited for liquid disposal sites. A site-specific performance analysis, based on safety, health, environmental, and economic assessments, will be required to determine for which sites in situ vitrification is an acceptable disposal technique. Process economics of in situ vitrification compare favorably with other in-situ solidification processes and are an order of magnitude less than the costs for exhumation and disposal in a repository. Leachability of the vitrified product compares closely with that of Pyrex glass and is significantly better than granite, marble, or bottle glass. Total release to the environment from a vitrified waste site is estimated to be less than 10/sup -5/ parts per year. 32 figures, 30 tables.

  16. Harvesting of Dunaliella tertiolecta cells by magnetic filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manousakis, Emmanouil; Manariotis, Ioannis D.

    2015-04-01

    The rising cost and reduced reserves of fossil fuels have enhanced the interest for finding alterative energy sources. Microalgae are considered to be the only sustainable option in biodiesel production for two key points. The energy yield from microalgae is much higher than that of oil producing crops, and the cultivation of algae it is not antagonistic with food supply chain. Because of the small size of microalgae and the dilute nature of algal cultures, the harvesting cost of microalgae is so far a limiting step for the scale up of microalgal biofuel production. It is estimated that the algal harvesting cost is at least 20-30% of the total biomass production cost. Traditional methods, which have been employed for the recovery of microalgal biomass, include centrifugation, gravity separation, filtration, flocculation, and flotation. Alternative approaches, other than conventional methods, capable of processing large cultures volume at a low cost, and reducing effluent toxicity are essential for microalgal biomass production. Magnetic separation is a promising technology and has been applied for algal removal in the mid of 1970s. The aim of this study was to investigate the harvesting of microalgae cells using magnetic microparticles (MPs). Dunaliella tertiolecta was selected as a representative for marine microalgae. The cultivation of microalgae was conducted under continuous artificial light, in 20 L flasks. Iron oxide microparticles were prepared by microwave irradiation of FeSO4 7H2O in an alkaline solution. Samples were taken at different operation intervals to conduct harvesting studies. Batch and flow-through experiments were conducted in order to investigate the effect of the magnetic material on microalgae removal. Algal removal in flow through experiments ranged from 70 to 85% depending on the initial MPs concentration even at very short hydraulic retention times (i.e. 2 min). In batch tests, algal removal was up to 97% at MPs concentration of 490 mg/L.

  17. In situ real-time measurement of physical characteristics of airborne bacterial particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae Hee; Lee, Jung Eun

    2013-12-01

    Bioaerosols, including aerosolized bacteria, viruses, and fungi, are associated with public health and environmental problems. One promising control method to reduce the harmful effects of bioaerosols is thermal inactivation via a continuous-flow high-temperature short-time (HTST) system. However, variations in bioaerosol physical characteristics - for example, the particle size and shape - during the continuous-flow inactivation process can change the transport properties in the air, which can affect particle deposition in the human respiratory system or the filtration efficiency of ventilation systems. Real-time particle monitoring techniques are a desirable alternative to the time-consuming process of microscopic analysis that is conventionally used in sampling and particle characterization. Here, we report in situ real-time optical scattering measurements of the physical characteristics of airborne bacteria particles following an HTST process in a continuous-flow system. Our results demonstrate that the aerodynamic diameter of bacterial aerosols decreases when exposed to a high-temperature environment, and that the shape of the bacterial cells is significantly altered. These variations in physical characteristics using optical scattering measurements were found to be in agreement with the results of scanning electron microscopy analysis.

  18. Clarification and filtration of the floculated partuicles suspension from a chemical treatment of waste oil-in-water emulsions from a non-ferrous metalworking plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarević Vesna B.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the coagulation/floculation conditions on clarification and filtration of the floculated particle suspension obtained by the chemical treatment of the waste oil-in-water emulsion (OWE from a non-ferrous metalworking plant were studied. The treatment involved the addition of aluminum(III sulfate and lime to the OWE. The main goal was to define the optimum conditions for clarification and filtration of the floculated particle suspension. The factors involved were amounts lime (i.e. pH and filter aid added the OWE on clarification and filtration rates. At pH>10, the clarification rate was increased and the final volume of the concentrated suspension (sludge was reduced, while filter aid affected negatively the clarification rate. The filtration rate was also increased when the coagulation was carried out at pH>10. The floculated particle suspension should be concentrated before filtration in order to decrease the filtration duration. The most efficient filter aid was Celite standard super-cel, its optimum initial concentration being found to be 2 g/dm3.

  19. Water quality and treatment of river bank filtrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vet, W.W.J.M.; Van Genuchten, C.C.A.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.; Van Dijk, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    In drinking water production, river bank filtration has the advantages of dampening peak concentrations of many dissolved components, substantially removing many micropollutants and removing, virtually completely, the pathogens and suspended solids. The production aquifer is not only fed by the

  20. Water quality and treatment of river bank filtrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vet, W.W.J.M.; Van Genuchten, C.C.A.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.; Van Dijk, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    In drinking water production, river bank filtration has the advantages of dampening peak concentrations of many dissolved components, substantially removing many micropollutants and removing, virtually completely, the pathogens and suspended solids. The production aquifer is not only fed by the

  1. Granular bed filtration of high temperature biomass gasification gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanghelle, Daniel; Slungaard, Torbjørn; Sønju, Otto K

    2007-06-18

    High temperature cleaning of producer gas from biomass gasification has been investigated with a granular filter. Field tests were performed for several hours on a single filter element at about 550 degrees C. The results show cake filtration on the granular material and indicate good filtration of the biomass gasification producer gas. The relatively low pressure drop over the filter during filtration is comparable to those of bag filters. The granular filter can operate with high filtration velocities compared to bag filters and maintain high efficiency and a low residual pressure. This work is a part of the BioSOFC-up project that has a goal of utilizing the producer gas from the gasification plant in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The BioSOFC-up project will continue to the end of 2007.

  2. Effect of lithium therapy on glomerular filtration rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decina, P; Oliver, J A; Sciacca, R R; Colt, E; Fieve, R R

    1983-08-01

    Patients taking lithium had a slightly higher serum creatinine concentration than controls. Creatinine concentration was independent of lithium level or therapy length, suggesting that lithium decreases glomerular filtration but that this effect is small, noncumulative, and of marginal clinical significance.

  3. Performance of multistage filtration using different filter media ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Performance of multistage filtration using different filter media against conventional water treatment systems. ... horizontal flow roughing filter (HRF)) as an alternative water treatment technology to the conventional one. A pilot- ... Article Metrics.

  4. Scaling and particulate fouling in membrane filtration systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerlage, S.F.E.

    2001-01-01

    Membrane filtration technologies have emerged as cost competitive and viable techniques in drinking and industrial water production. Despite advancements in membrane manufacturing and technology, membrane scaling and fouling remain major problems and may limit future growth in the industry. Scaling

  5. Advanced treatment of WWTP effluent with filtration leading to a pretreatment technique for membrane filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrenberg, S M; te Kloeze, A M; Janssen, A N; van Nieuwenhuijzen, A F; Menkveld, H W H; Bechger, M; van der Graaf, J H J M

    2010-01-01

    In 2000 the European Union introduced the Water Framework Directive (WFD). The aim of the WFD is having an ecological and chemical balance for all surface waters in Europe in 2015. The European Commission identified 33 priority substances and their maximum allowable concentrations, FHI-values (Fraunhofer Institute), which are specified in the Annex of the WFD. The objective of this research is to achieve the removal of suspended solids, nitrogen and total phosphorus together with priority substances. All these substances will be removed in one filter called a "One Step Total Effluent Polishing filter" i.e. 1-STEP(®) filter. For this purpose a filter pilot plant was tested at the WWTP Horstermeer. The results show that the filter can fulfil the target values in the filtrate water for total nitrogen (2.2 mg Ntotal/L) and total phosphorus (0.15 mg Ptotal/L). The majority of the priority (hazardous) substances in the WWTP effluent are already below the detection limit. Due to the low concentration ranges, the results on the removal of medicine and pesticides are only indicative. A decreasing tendency in the removal efficiency is shown for all measured compounds. The average specific ultrafiltration resistance (SUR) value decrease of the filter is 55% and the final value is always below 5·10(12) m(-2). This indicates that the filtrate water of the filter is very well filterable and can be used as ultrafiltration feedwater.

  6. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xianjun, E-mail: xjxie@cug.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Wang, Yanxin, E-mail: yx.wang@cug.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Pi, Kunfu [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Liu, Chongxuan [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, 430074 Wuhan (China)

    2015-09-15

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an aquifer iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technology, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main water source for drinking. The in situ arsenic removal technology was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions. The effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The arsenic removal mechanism by the coated iron oxide/hydroxide was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. Aquifer iron coating method was developed via a 4-step alternating injection of oxidant, iron salt and oxygen-free water. A continuous injection of 5.0 mmol/L FeSO{sub 4} and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 h can form a uniform goethite coating on the surface of quartz sand without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 7.2 mL/min of the injection reagents, arsenic (as Na{sub 2}HAsO{sub 4}) and tracer fluorescein sodium to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column were approximately at 126 and 7 column pore volumes, respectively. The retardation factor of arsenic was 23.0, and the adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As(V) and Fe(II) reagents. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation with fine goethite particles by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Therefore, the study results indicate that the high arsenic removal efficiency of the in situ aquifer iron coating technology likely resulted from the expanded specific surface area of the small goethite particles, which enhanced arsenic sorption capability and/or from co-precipitation of arsenic on the surface of goethite particles

  7. In Situ Raman Analyses of Natural Gas and Gas Hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, E. T.; White, S. N.; Dunk, R. M.; Brewer, P. G.; Sherman, A. D.; Schmidt, K.; Hester, K. C.; Sloan, E. D.

    2004-12-01

    During a July 2004 cruise to Hydrate Ridge, Oregon, MBARI's sea-going laser Raman spectrometer was used to obtain in situ Raman spectra of natural gas hydrates and natural gas venting from the seafloor. This was the first in situ analysis of gas hydrates on the seafloor. The hydrate spectra were compared to laboratory analyses performed at the Center for Hydrate Research, Colorado School of Mines. The natural gas spectra were compared to MBARI gas chromatography (GC) analyses of gas samples collected at the same site. DORISS (Deep Ocean Raman In Situ Spectrometer) is a laboratory model laser Raman spectrometer from Kaiser Optical Systems, Inc modified at MBARI for deployment in the deep ocean. It has been successfully deployed to depths as great as 3600 m. Different sampling optics provide flexibility in adapting the instrument to a particular target of interest. An immersion optic was used to analyze natural gas venting from the seafloor at South Hydrate Ridge ( ˜780 m depth). An open-bottomed cube was placed over the vent to collect the gas. The immersion optic penetrated the side of the cube as did a small heater used to dissociate any hydrate formed during sample collection. To analyze solid hydrates at both South and North Hydrate Ridge ( ˜590 m depth), chunks of hydrate were excavated from the seafloor and collected in a glass cylinder with a mesh top. A stand-off optic was used to analyze the hydrate inside the cylinder. Due to the partial opacity of the hydrate and the small focal volume of the sampling optic, a precision underwater positioner (PUP) was used to focus the laser spot onto the hydrate. PUP is a stand-alone system with three degrees-of-freedom, capable of moving the DORISS probe head with a precision of 0.1 mm. In situ Raman analyses of the gas indicate that it is primarily methane. This is verified by GC analyses of samples collected from the same site. Other minor constituents (such as CO2 and higher hydrocarbons) are present but may be in

  8. Rapid in situ detection of chromosome 21 by PRINS technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellestor, F.; Girardet, A.; Andreo, B. [CNRS UPR 9008, Montpellier (France)] [and others

    1995-05-08

    The {open_quotes}PRimed IN Situ labeling{close_quotes} (PRINS) method is an interesting alternative to in situ hybridization for chromosomal detection. In this procedure, chromosome labeling is performed by in situ annealing of specific oligonucleotide primers, followed by primer elongation by a Taq polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides. Using this process, we have developed a simple and semi-automatic method for rapid in situ detection of human chromosome 21. The reaction was performed on a programmable temperature cycler, with a chromosome 21 specific oligonucleotide primer. Different samples of normal and trisomic lymphocytes and amniotic fluid cells were used for testing the method. Specific labeling of chromosome 21 was obtained in both metaphases and interphase nuclei in a 1 hour reaction. The use of oligonucleotide primer for in situ labeling overcomes the need for complex preparations of specific DNA probes. The present results demonstrate that PRINS may be a simple and reliable technique for rapidly detecting aneuploidies. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  9. In situ Measurements of Phytoplankton Fluorescence Using Low Cost Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana L. Wright

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Chlorophyll a fluorometry has long been used as a method to study phytoplankton in the ocean. In situ fluorometry is used frequently in oceanography to provide depth-resolved estimates of phytoplankton biomass. However, the high price of commercially manufactured in situ fluorometers has made them unavailable to some individuals and institutions. Presented here is an investigation into building an in situ fluorometer using low cost electronics. The goal was to construct an easily reproducible in situ fluorometer from simple and widely available electronic components. The simplicity and modest cost of the sensor makes it valuable to students and professionals alike. Open source sharing of architecture and software will allow students to reconstruct and customize the sensor on a small budget. Research applications that require numerous in situ fluorometers or expendable fluorometers can also benefit from this study. The sensor costs US$150.00 and can be constructed with little to no previous experience. The sensor uses a blue LED to excite chlorophyll a and measures fluorescence using a silicon photodiode. The sensor is controlled by an Arduino microcontroller that also serves as a data logger.

  10. Nanoparticles laden in situ gelling system for ocular drug targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Designing an ophthalmic drug delivery system is one of the most difficult challenges for the researchers. The anatomy and physiology of eye create barriers like blinking which leads to the poor retention time and penetration of drug moiety. Some conventional ocular drug delivery systems show shortcomings such as enhanced pre-corneal elimination, high variability in efficiency, and blurred vision. To overcome these problems, several novel drug delivery systems such as liposomes, nanoparticles, hydrogels, and in situ gels have been developed. In situ-forming hydrogels are liquid upon instillation and undergo phase transition in the ocular cul-de-sac to form viscoelastic gel and this provides a response to environmental changes. In the past few years, an impressive number of novel temperature, pH, and ion-induced in situ-forming systems have been reported for sustain ophthalmic drug delivery. Each system has its own advantages and drawbacks. Thus, a combination of two drug delivery systems, i.e., nanoparticles and in situ gel, has been developed which is known as nanoparticle laden in situ gel. This review describes every aspects of this novel formulation, which present the readers an exhaustive detail and might contribute to research and development.

  11. Management of Adenocarcinoma In Situ of Cervix in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Abidi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenocarcinoma in situ is one of the premalignant lesions of the cervix and its incidence is believed to be increasing while the pathogenesis of the disease is not clearly understood. Management of Adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS unlike carcinoma in situ (CIS has not been clearly described in the current literature. Here we describe conservative management and serial colposcopy of two pregnant women with adenocarcinoma in situ of the cervix. Both of the cases were diagnosed initially with abnormal Pap smears and were confirmed by colposcopic directed biopsy. None of the patients agreed with any invasive procedure during pregnancy and both of them were followed with serial colposcopy. None of the lesions showed any evidence of progression. All cases underwent cold knife cone biopsies in their postpartum period. Hysterectomy as the final treatment has been done in both cases with no evidence of progression of the disease during pregnancy. We concluded that adenocarcinoma in situ of the cervix during pregnancy could be managed conservatively with definite treatment postponed till after delivery.

  12. Feasibility of in situ beta ray measurements in underwater environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye Min; Park, Ki Hyun; Kang, Sung Won; Joo, Koan Sik

    2017-09-01

    We describe an attempt at the development of an in situ detector for beta ray measurements in underwater environment. The prototype of the in situ detector is based on a CaF2: Eu scintillator using crystal light guide and Si photomultiplier. Tests were conducted using various reference sources for evaluating the linearity and stability of the detector in underwater environment. The system is simple and stable for long-term monitoring, and consumes low power. We show here an effective detection distance of 7 mm and a 2.273 MeV end-point energy spectrum of (90)Sr/(90)Y when using the system underwater. The results demonstrate the feasibility of in situ beta ray measurements in underwater environment and can be applied for designing an in situ detector for radioactivity measurement in underwater environment. The in situ detector can also have other applications such as installation on the marine monitoring platform and quantitative analysis of radionuclides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nanoparticles laden in situ gel for sustained ocular drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper availability of drug on to corneal surface is a challenging task. However, due to ocular physiological barriers, conventional eye drops display poor ocular bioavailability of drugs (< 1%. To improve precorneal residence time and ocular penetration, earlier our group developed and evaluated in situ gel and nanoparticles for ocular delivery. In interest to evaluate the combined effect of in situ gel and nanoparticles on ocular retention, we combined them. We are the first to term this combination as "nanoparticle laden in situ gel", that is, poly lactic co glycolic acid nanoparticle incorporated in chitosan in situ gel for sparfloxacin ophthalmic delivery. The formulation was tested for various physicochemical properties. It showed gelation pH near pH 7.2. The observation of acquired gamma camera images showed good retention over the entire precorneal area for sparfloxacin nanoparticle laden in situ gel (SNG as compared to marketed formulation. SNG formulation cleared at a very slow rate and remained at corneal surface for longer duration as no radioactivity was observed in systemic circulation. The developed formulation was found to be better in combination and can go up to the clinical evaluation and application.

  14. Effect of Nanofibers on Spore Penetration and Lunar Dust Filtration

    OpenAIRE

    Phil Gibson, Ph.D.; Heidi Schreuder-Gibson, Ph.D.; Robert Stote; Margaret Roylance, Ph.D.; Cathy Capone; Masami Nakagawa, Ph.D.

    2008-01-01

    The results of two separate studies on biological spore penetration and simulated lunar dust filtration illustrate the use of nanofibers in some nonstandard filtration applications (nanofibers are generally defined as having diameters of less than a micron). In the first study, a variety of microporous liners containing microfibers and nanofibers were combined with cotton-based fabrics in order to filter aerosolized spores. The aerosol penetration resistance of the nanofiber-lined fabrics was...

  15. Water Clarity Simulant for K East Basin Filtration Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2006-01-20

    This document provides a simulant formulation intended to mimic the behavior of the suspended solids in the K East (KE) Basin fuel storage pool. The simulant will be used to evaluate alternative filtration apparatus to improve Basin water clarity and to possibly replace the existing sandfilter. The simulant was formulated based on the simulant objectives, the key identified parameters important to filtration, the composition and character of the KE Basin suspended sludge particles, and consideration of properties of surrogate materials.

  16. Pesticide removal by combined ozonation and granular activated carbon filtration

    OpenAIRE

    Orlandini, E.

    1999-01-01

    Since the seventies, new water treatment processes have been introduced in the production of drinking water from surface water. Their major aim was to adequately cope with the disinfection of this water, and/or with the removal of pesticides and other organic micropollutants from it. This research focused on Biological Activated Carbon (BAC) filtration, which is a combination of ozonation and GAC filtration. Its general goal was identification and understanding of the mechanisms that underlie...

  17. Filtration ATF in automatic transmissions (AT) of cars

    OpenAIRE

    Tadeusz Dziubak; Paweł Szczepaniak

    2014-01-01

    Functions and conditions of work of suction ATF filters are presented. Requirements ofATF filters are discussed. Sources of contaminations ATF are presented. ATF filtration system wascharacterized. Classification of ATF filters and their selection of design solutions are presented. Filtermaterials used for the production of ATF suction filters are presented and characterized. Conditions ofthe work of suction ATF filters were analyzed. Hydraulic and filtration characteristics are discussed.[b]...

  18. Sampling Rate Independent Filtration Approach for Automatic ECG Delineation

    CERN Document Server

    Chereda, Hryhorii; Tymoshenko, Yury

    2016-01-01

    In this paper different types of ECG automatic delineation approaches were overviewed. A combination of these approaches was used to create sampling rate independent filtration algorithm for automatic ECG delineation that is capable of distinguishing different morphologies of T and P waves and QRS complexes. Created filtration algorithm was compared with algorithme \\`a trous. It was investigated that continuous wavelets transform with proposed automatic adaptation for different sampling rates procedure can be used for delineation problem.

  19. In situ FT-IR measurements of competitive vapor adsorption into porous thin films containing silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Charles R; Spurlin, Tighe A; Frey, Brian L

    2002-03-01

    Vapor adsorption into porous ultrathin films on a gold surface is investigated with in situ surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and polarization-modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). The thin films are prepared by the electrostatic self-assembly of oppositely charged poly(L-lysine) (PL) and silica nanoparticles on a chemically modified gold surface. Characterization with ex situ SPR and PM-IRRAS demonstrates the buildup of multiple PL/SiO2 bilayers as well as an excellent correlation between the quantitative results from these two techniques. In situ vapor adsorption experiments with these thin films show evidence of porosity, reproducibility, and rapid reversibility. Exposure to acetone vapor (P/P0 = 0.032) causes the film to adsorb 9% acetone by volume, which corresponds to coverage of approximately one-half of the silica nanoparticle surface area. In situ PM-IRRAS provides much information about the molecular interactions occurring in the film upon adsorption or desorption of vapors. Dosing with a mixture of vapors leads to a competition for adsorption into the film, and PM-IRRAS results show that acetone slightly outcompetes nitromethane. These experiments with nanoparticle thin films demonstrate the advantages of using in situ PM-IRRAS for studying reversible adsorption in the presence of vapor mixtures.

  20. Task 9 -- Centrifugal membrane filtration. Semi-annual report, April 1--September 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepan, D.J.; Grafsgaard, M.E.

    1997-12-31

    This project is designed to establish the utility of a novel centrifugal membrane filtration technology for the remediation of liquid mixed waste streams at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities in support of the DOE Environmental Management (EM) program. The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has teamed with SpinTek Membrane Systems, Inc., a small business and owner of the novel centrifugal membrane filtration technology, to establish the applicability of the technology to DOE site remediation and the commercial viability of the technology for liquid mixed waste stream remediation. The technology is a uniquely configured process that makes use of ultrafiltration and centrifugal force to separate suspended and dissolved solids from liquid waste streams, producing a filtered water stream and a low-volume contaminated concentrate stream. This technology has the potential for effective and efficient waste volume minimization, the treatment of liquid tank wastes, the remediation of contaminated groundwater plumes, and the treatment of secondary liquid waste streams from other remediation processes, as well as the liquid waste stream generated during decontamination and decommissioning activities.

  1. Diagnosis and management of ductal carcinoma in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Amina; Newman, Lisa A

    2004-04-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a preinvasive form of breast cancer that has increased in incidence over the past 25 years, primarily as a result of mammographically detected microcalcifications. Inadequately treated DCIS carries a risk for evolving into the malignant phenotype; however, the magnitude and timeline for this risk are poorly defined. Treatment options include lumpectomy with or without breast irradiation and mastectomy. The overall survival rate is 96% to 98% with any of these strategies, but the risk of local recurrence (LR) is highest after lumpectomy alone. Breast irradiation can reduce this risk from levels in excess of 40% to 10% over a 10-year follow-up period. Approximately 50% of all LR from DCIS are invasive lesions. Therefore, the occurrence of a LR after breast-conserving therapy is a potentially greater threat to the patient with DCIS compared to the patient diagnosed with invasive cancer. In patients diagnosed with invasive cancer, the risk of micrometastatic disease is present from the time of initial diagnosis. In patients with DCIS, the expectation is that a potentially 100% cure rate should be achieved with local therapy alone. Although most DCIS cases complicated by LR will be successfully salvaged with prolonged overall survival, it is critically important to take every precaution that will minimize the risk of locally recurrent disease. Therefore, radiation therapy as an adjunct to lumpectomy is essential. A subset of patients with DCIS with low-volume low-grade disease who can be safely treated by lumpectomy alone has not yet been clearly defined. Prospective studies designed to identify this category are ongoing. Inadequate margin control is the most consistent risk factor for LR that has been reported thus far, but there is no universally accepted definition for what constitutes an optimal negative margin distance. Young age at diagnosis, high nuclear grade, and comedonecrosis are other factors that have been implicated as

  2. Selective evaluation of high density lipoprotein from mouse small intestine by an in situ perfusion technique[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Zhang, Bo; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Seino, Utako; Kanagawa, Akiko; Segawa, Masaru; Nagasaka, Hironori; Suzuki, Akira; Miida, Takashi; Yamada, Sohsuke; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki; Doi, Takefumi; Saku, Keijiro; Okazaki, Mitsuyo; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Hirano, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    The small intestine (SI) is the second-greatest source of HDL in mice. However, the selective evaluation of SI-derived HDL (SI-HDL) has been difficult because even the origin of HDL obtained in vivo from the intestinal lymph duct of anesthetized rodents is doubtful. To shed light on this question, we have developed a novel in situ perfusion technique using surgically isolated mouse SI, with which the possible filtration of plasma HDL into the SI lymph duct can be prevented. With the developed method, we studied the characteristics of and mechanism for the production and regulation of SI-HDL. Nascent HDL particles were detected in SI lymph perfusates in WT mice, but not in ABCA1 KO mice. SI-HDL had a high protein content and was smaller than plasma HDL. SI-HDL was rich in TG and apo AIV compared with HDL in liver perfusates. SI-HDL was increased by high-fat diets and reduced in apo E KO mice. In conclusion, with our in situ perfusion model that enables the selective evaluation of SI-HDL, we demonstrated that ABCA1 plays an important role in intestinal HDL production, and SI-HDL is small, dense, rich in apo AIV, and regulated by nutritional and genetic factors. PMID:24569139

  3. Characterization and modification of particulate properties to enhance filtration performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, T.R.; Vann Bush, P.; Robinson, M.S.

    1990-06-01

    The specific objectives of this project are to characterize the particulate properties that determine the filtration performance of fabric filters, and to investigate methods for modifying these particulate properties to enhance filtration performance. Inherent in these objectives is the development of an experimental approach that will lead to full-scale implementation of beneficial conditioning processes identified during the project. The general approach has included a large number of laboratory evaluations to be followed by optional field tests of a new successful conditioning processes performed on a sidestream device. This project was divided into five tasks. The schedule followed for these tasks is shown in Figure 4. Tasks 2 and 3 each focus on one of the two complementary parts of the project. Task 2 Parametric Tests of Ashes and Fabrics, evaluates the degree to which ash properties and fabric design determine filtration performance. Task 3 Survey of Methods to Modify the Particle Filtration Properties, provides a literature review and laboratory study of techniques to modify ash properties. The results of these two tasks were used in Task 4 Proof-of-Concept Tests of Methods to Modify Particle Filtration Properties to demonstrate the effects on filtration performance of modifying ash properties. The findings of all the tasks are summarized in this Final Report. 13 refs.

  4. Wind Turbine Gearbox Oil Filtration and Condition Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Shuangwen

    2015-10-25

    This is an invited presentation for a pre-conference workshop, titled advances and opportunities in lubrication: wind turbine, at the 2015 Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers (STLE) Tribology Frontiers Conference held in Denver, CO. It gives a brief overview of wind turbine gearbox oil filtration and condition monitoring by highlighting typical industry practices and challenges. The presentation starts with an introduction by covering recent growth of global wind industry, reliability challenges, benefits of oil filtration and condition monitoring, and financial incentives to conduct wind operation and maintenance research, which includes gearbox oil filtration and condition monitoring work presented herein. Then, the presentation moves on to oil filtration by stressing the benefits of filtration, discussing typical main- and offline-loop practices, highlighting important factors considered when specifying a filtration system, and illustrating real-world application challenges through a cold-start example. In the next section on oil condition monitoring, a discussion on oil sample analysis, oil debris monitoring, oil cleanliness measurements and filter analysis is given based on testing results mostly obtained by and at NREL, and by pointing out a few challenges with oil sample analysis. The presentation concludes with a brief touch on future research and development (R and D) opportunities. It is hoping that the information presented can inform the STLE community to start or redirect their R and D work to help the wind industry advance.

  5. C*-Algebras over Topological Spaces: Filtrated K-Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    We define the filtrated K-theory of a C*-algebra over a finite topological space X and explain how to construct a spectral sequence that computes the bivariant Kasparov theory over X in terms of filtrated K-theory. For finite spaces with totally ordered lattice of open subsets, this spectral sequence becomes an exact sequence as in the Universal Coefficient Theorem, with the same consequences for classification. We also exhibit an example where filtrated K-theory is not yet a complete invariant. We describe a space with four points and two C*-algebras over this space in the bootstrap class that have isomorphic filtrated K-theory but are not KK(X)-equivalent. For this particular space, we enrich filtrated K-theory by another K-theory functor, so that there is again a Universal Coefficient Theorem. Thus the enriched filtrated K-theory is a complete invariant for purely infinite, stable C*-algebras with this particular spectrum and belonging to the appropriate bootstrap class.

  6. Simultaneous removal of phosphorus and EfOM using MIEX, coagulation, and low-pressure membrane filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Chul; Timmes, Thomas C; Dempsey, Brian A

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of using magnetic ion exchange (MIEX) treatment, in-line alum coagulation, and low-pressure membrane filtration was investigated for the simultaneous removal of total phosphorus (TP) and effluent organic matter (EfOM) from biologically treated wastewater. The focus was also placed on minimizing fouling of polyvinylidene fluoride and polyethersulfone membranes, which are the most commonly used low-pressure membranes in new and retrofit wastewater treatment plants. MIEX alone was effective for the removal of EfOM, and MIEX plus a small alum dose was very effective in removing both EfOM and TP. MIEX removed phosphorus, but organic acids in EfOM were preferentially removed, and the effects of competing anions on the removal of EfOM were insignificant. All the pretreatment strategies decreased the resistance to filtration. The greatest decrease in fouling was achieved by using MIEX (15 mL L⁻¹) plus a very low dose of alum (∼0.5 mg Al L⁻¹). Sweep floc coagulation using alum and without MIEX also significantly decreased fouling but did not effectively remove EfOM and produced high floc volume that could be problematic for inside-out hollow-fibre modules. The addition of these reagents into rapid mix followed by membrane filtration would provide operational simplicity and could be easily retrofitted at existing membrane filtration facilities.

  7. PREPARATION MICRO-FILTRATION CERAMIC MEMBRANE FROM NATURAL ZEOLITE FOR PROCION RED MX8B AND METHYLENE BLUE FILTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Choiriyah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of ceramic membrane fabrication from natural zeolite and its utilization for filtration of procion red MX8B and methylene blue has been investigated. The purposes of this study are to determine the effect of pressure on membrane permeability and selectivity and utilize natural zeolite as ceramic membranes procion red MX8B and methylene blue filtration. The membrane was prepared by metide press pellets and then calcined at 850 oC. The membranes were characterized by mechanical test, flux and rejection of dye. The compression test of the membrane found the values of 1369.178 psi in dry conditions to 1388.933 psi in wet conditions. The flux test found that the higher the pressure applied, the flux was increase. However, the high pressure also decreased the selectivity. Rejection test found that the rejection of methylene blue filtration up to 70 %. Meanwhile, procion red MX8B filtration has rejectivity less than 20 %.

  8. Master of Puppets: Cooperative Multitasking for In Situ Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, Dmitriy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lukic, Zarija [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Modern scientific and engineering simulations track the time evolution of billions of elements. For such large runs, storing most time steps for later analysis is not a viable strategy. It is far more efficient to analyze the simulation data while it is still in memory. Here, we present a novel design for running multiple codes in situ: using coroutines and position-independent executables we enable cooperative multitasking between simulation and analysis, allowing the same executables to post-process simulation output, as well as to process it on the fly, both in situ and in transit. We present Henson, an implementation of our design, and illustrate its versatility by tackling analysis tasks with different computational requirements. This design differs significantly from the existing frameworks and offers an efficient and robust approach to integrating multiple codes on modern supercomputers. The techniques we present can also be integrated into other in situ frameworks.

  9. Review on Fabrication Methods of in situ Metal Matrix Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals with a series of novel processing techniques based on the in situ production of metal matrix composites (MMCs). In situ techniques involve a chemical reaction resulting in the formation of a very fine and thermodynamically stable reinforcing ceramic phase within a metal matrix. As a result, this provides thermodynamic compatibility at the matrix-reinforcement interface. The reinforcement surfaces are also likely to be free of contamination and, therefore, a stronger matrix-dispersion bond can be achieved. Some of these technologies including DIMOXTM, XD, PRIMEXTM, reactive gas infiltration, high-temperature self-propagating synthesis (SHS), and liquid-solid, or solid-gas-liquid reactions as well as plasma in situ MMCs are expressed in this paper.

  10. Characteristics of in situ stress field at Qingshui coal mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xiaojie; Pang Jiewen; Lou Haopeng; Fan Lipeng

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the characteristics of geological structure at Qingshui coal mine were analyzed. And the hollow inclusion strain cell overcoring method was used to obtain the in situ stress. The effect of in situ stress on the stability of soft rock roadway was analyzed. The results show that the maximum principal stress is in the horizontal direction with a northeast orientation and has a value of about 1.2–1.9 times larger than gravity; the right side of roadway roof and floor is easily subject to serious deformation and failure, and the in situ stress is found to be a major factor. This paper presents important information for developing countermeasures against the large deformation of the soft rock roadway at Qingshui coal mine.

  11. Microstructure analysis of laboratory and in-situ compacted silts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russo Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents and discusses some results of an experimental research aimed at analysing the influence of compaction variables (w and energy and method on the resulting microstructure of a compacted silty soil. In particular, the experimental data here discussed allow to compare the microstructure induced by different dynamic compaction techniques, comparing that characterising specimens obtained by two laboratory methods (Proctor standard and Harvard and that of samples compacted in-situ during the construction of an embankment built for river regimentation purposes. Both undisturbed and disturbed samples have been retrieved from the embankment, the latter one with the purpose of collecting the soil subsequently used for laboratory compaction. Microstructural analyses (SEM, MIP performed on laboratory and in-situ compacted samples evidenced a substantial similarity of the texture induced by the various compaction techniques, highlighting that laboratory compaction is suitable to provide soil samples representative of earth in-situ compacted soil.

  12. Detector calibration for in-situ gamma ray spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Balea, G

    2002-01-01

    The power in the technique of in-situ spectrometry lies in the fact that a detector placed on ground measures gamma radiation from sources situated over an area of several hundred square meters. The 'field of view' for the detector would be larger for high energy radiation sources and for sources closer to the soil surface. In contrast, a soil sample would represent an area of a few tens of hundreds of square centimeters. In practice, an effective characterization of a site would involve in-situ gamma ray spectrometry in conjunction with soil sampling. As part of an overall program, in-situ gamma ray spectrometry provides a means to assess the degree of contamination in areas during the course of operations in the field, thus guiding the investigator on where to collect samples. It can also substantially reduce the number of samples need to be collected and subsequently analyzed. (author)

  13. In Situ Atom Probe Deintercalation of Lithium-Manganese-Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Björn; Maier, Johannes; Arlt, Jonas; Nowak, Carsten

    2017-01-30

    Atom probe tomography is routinely used for the characterization of materials microstructures, usually assuming that the microstructure is unaltered by the analysis. When analyzing ionic conductors, however, gradients in the chemical potential and the electric field penetrating dielectric atom probe specimens can cause significant ionic mobility. Although ionic mobility is undesirable when aiming for materials characterization, it offers a strategy to manipulate materials directly in situ in the atom probe. Here, we present experimental results on the analysis of the ionic conductor lithium-manganese-oxide with different atom probe techniques. We demonstrate that, at a temperature of 30 K, characterization of the materials microstructure is possible without measurable Li mobility. Also, we show that at 298 K the material can be deintercalated, in situ in the atom probe, without changing the manganese-oxide host structure. Combining in situ atom probe deintercalation and subsequent conventional characterization, we demonstrate a new methodological approach to study ionic conductors even in early stages of deintercalation.

  14. Development of portable HPGe spectrometer for in situ measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kail Artjoms

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In situ applications require a very high level of portability of high-resolution spectrometric equipment. Usage of HPGe detectors for radioactivity measurements in the environment or for nuclear safeguard applications, to combat illicit trafficking of nuclear materials or uranium and plutonium monitoring in nuclear wastes, has become a norm in the recent years. Portable HPGe-based radionuclide spectrometer with electrical cooling has lately appeared on the market for in situ applications. At the same time deterioration of energy resolution associated with vibrations produced by cryocooler or high weight of the instrument, short time of autonomous operation and high price of these spectrometers are limiting their usage in many cases. In this paper we present development results of ultra compact hand held all-in-one spectrometer for in situ measurements based on HPGe detector cooled by liquid nitrogen without listing the above disadvantages.

  15. Extreme Spectroscopy: In situ nuclear materials behavior from optical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimbretiere, G.; Canizares, A.; Raimboux, N.; Omnee, R.; Duval, F.; Ammar, M.R.; Simon, P. [CNRS - UPR3079 CEMHTI, Universite d' Orleans, 45071Orleans cedex 2 (France); Desgranges, L.; Mohun, R. [CEA, DEN, DEC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Jegou, C.; Magnin, M. [CEA/DTCD/SECM/LMPA, Marcoule 30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France); Clavier, N.; Dacheux, N. [ICSM-UMR5257 CEA/CNRS/UM2/ENSCM, Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    2015-07-01

    In the nuclear industry, materials are regularly exposed to high temperature or/and irradiation and a better knowledge and understanding of their behavior under such extreme conditions is a key-point for improvements and further developments. Nowadays, Raman spectroscopy begins to be well known as a promising technique in the post mortem and remote characterization of nuclear materials exposed to extreme conditions. On this topic, at ANIMMA 2013 conference, we have presented some results about its implementation in the study of model or real nuclear fuel. However, the strength of Raman spectroscopy as in situ characterization tool is mainly its ability to be implemented remotely through optical fibers. Aware of this, implementation of other optical techniques can be considered in order to gain information not only on the structural dynamics of materials but also on the electronic charge carrier populations. In this paper, we propose to present our last advances in Raman characterization of nuclear materials and enlarge to the in situ use of complementary optical spectroscopies. Emphasis will be made on the information that can be gained to the behavior of the model fuel depleted UO{sub 2} under extreme conditions of high temperature and ionic irradiation: - In Situ Raman identification of the radiolysis alteration products of UO{sub 2} in contact with water under ionic irradiation. - In Situ Raman recording of the damaged dynamic of UO{sub 2} under inert atmosphere. - In Situ Raman and photo-luminescence study of virgin and damaged UO2 at high temperature. - In Situ study of electronic charge carriers' behavior in U{sub x}Th{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} solid solutions by mean of Iono- and Thermo- luminescence under and post- ionic irradiation. (authors)

  16. In situ measurement of conductivity during nanocomposite film deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blattmann, Christoph O.; Pratsinis, Sotiris E., E-mail: sotiris.pratsinis@ptl.mavt.ethz.ch

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Flame-made nanosilver dynamics are elucidated in the gas-phase & on substrates. • The resistance of freshly depositing nanosilver layers is monitored. • Low T{sub g} polymers facilitate rapid synthesis of conductive films. • Conductive nanosilver films form on top of or within the polymer depending on MW. - Abstract: Flexible and electrically conductive nanocomposite films are essential for small, portable and even implantable electronic devices. Typically, such film synthesis and conductivity measurement are carried out sequentially. As a result, optimization of filler loading and size/morphology characteristics with respect to film conductivity is rather tedious and costly. Here, freshly-made Ag nanoparticles (nanosilver) are made by scalable flame aerosol technology and directly deposited onto polymeric (polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate)) films during which the resistance of the resulting nanocomposite is measured in situ. The formation and gas-phase growth of such flame-made nanosilver, just before incorporation onto the polymer film, is measured by thermophoretic sampling and microscopy. Monitoring the nanocomposite resistance in situ reveals the onset of conductive network formation by the deposited nanosilver growth and sinternecking. The in situ measurement is much faster and more accurate than conventional ex situ four-point resistance measurements since an electrically percolating network is detected upon its formation by the in situ technique. Nevertheless, general resistance trends with respect to filler loading and host polymer composition are consistent for both in situ and ex situ measurements. The time lag for the onset of a conductive network (i.e., percolation) depends linearly on the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) of the host polymer. This is attributed to the increased nanoparticle-polymer interaction with decreasing T{sub g}. Proper selection of the host polymer in combination with in situ resistance

  17. In situ and operando transmission electron microscopy of catalytic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crozier, Peter A.; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic nanomaterials play a major role in chemical conversions and energy transformations. Understanding how materials control and regulate surface reactions is a major objective for fundamental research on heterogeneous catalysts. In situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM......) is a powerful technique for revealing the atomic structures of materials at elevated temperatures in the presence of reactive gases. This approach can allow the structure-reactivity relations underlying catalyst functionality to be investigated. Thus far, ETEM has been limited by the absence of in situ...

  18. In Situ burning of Arctic marine oil spills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritt-Rasmussen, Janne

    Oil spills in ice filled and Arctic waters pose other challenges for oil spill response compared to open and temperate waters. In situ burning has been proven to be an effective oil spill response method for oil spills in ice filled waters. This thesis presents results from laboratory and field...... experiments where the ignitability of oil spill as a function of oil type and weathering conditions (time/ice) was tested. The results show that the composition of the oil and the ice cover is important for the in situ burning time-window. The results were used to develop an algorithm that was implemented...

  19. In-situ bioremediation drilling and characterization work plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koegler, K.J.

    1994-04-26

    This work plan describes the design and construction of proposed wells and outlines the characterization activities to be performed in support of the In Situ Bioremediation Task for FY 1994. The purpose of the well-design is to facilitate implementation and monitoring of in situ biodegradation of CCl{sub 4} in ground water. However, the wells will also be used to characterize the geology, hydrology, microbiology, and contaminant distribution, which will all feed into the design of the technology. Implementation and design of this remediation demonstration technology will be described separately in an integrated test plan.

  20. Continued Development of in Situ Geochronology for Planetary Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devismes, D.; Cohen, B. A.

    2015-01-01

    The instrument 'Potassium (K) Argon Laser Experiment' (KArLE) is developed and designed for in situ absolute dating of rocks on planetary surfaces. It is based on the K-Ar dating method and uses the Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy - Laser Ablation - Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry (LIBSLA- QMS) technique. We use a dedicated interface to combine two instruments similar to SAM of Mars Science Laboratory (for the QMS) and ChemCam (for the LA and LIBS). The prototype has demonstrated that KArLE is a suitable and promising instrument for in situ absolute dating.

  1. In-Situ Investigation of Advanced Structural Coatings and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustundag, Ersan

    2003-01-01

    The premise of this project is a comprehensive study that involves the in-situ characterization of advanced coatings and composites by employing both neutron and x-ray diffraction techniques in a complementary manner. The diffraction data would then be interpreted and used in developing or validating advanced micromechanics models with life prediction capability. In the period covered by this report, basic work was conducted to establish the experimental conditions for various specimens and techniques. In addition, equipment was developed that will allow the in-situ studies under a range of conditions (stress, temperature, atmosphere, etc.).

  2. Future directions for in-situ product removal (ISPR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodley, John; Bisschops, Marc; Straathof, Adrie J J

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes the main findings of a round-table discussion held to examine the key bottlenecks in the further application and industrial implementation of in-situ product removal (ISPR) techniques. It is well established that ISPR can yield great benefits for processes limited by inhibit......This paper summarizes the main findings of a round-table discussion held to examine the key bottlenecks in the further application and industrial implementation of in-situ product removal (ISPR) techniques. It is well established that ISPR can yield great benefits for processes limited...

  3. In-situ ALD growth of hafnium oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karavaev, Konstantin; Tallarida, Massimo; Schmeisser, Dieter [Brandenburgische Technische Universitaet Cottbus (Germany). Angewandte Physik - Sensorik; Zschech, Ehrenfried [AMD Saxony LLC and Co. KG, Center for Complex Analysis, Dresden (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    We report on a novel system for in-situ atomic layer growth (ALD) of high-k dielectric films. First results were obtained for Hf-oxide samples by using Hf-tetrachloride as precursor and water as oxidizer. We compare the photoelectron spectra of Si 2p, O 1s and Hf 4f of our in-situ prepared films with samples (ex-situ) prepared by industrial ALD reactors and discuss similarities and differences observed in the core level spectra of the various samples by considering the different growth conditions.

  4. In-situ strain observation in high power laser cladding

    OpenAIRE

    Ocelik, V.; Bosgra, J.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2009-01-01

    The modern experimental technique - so called Digital Image Correlation - is applied during high power laser surface treatments for in-situ observation of displacements and strains near the processing area during and a short time after laser processing. An experimental setup has been designed and tested to measure in-situ the strain during treatment with a high power 2 kW CW Nd:YAG laser, i.e. laser hardening, surface remelting, and laser cladding with Nanosteel, Eutroloy 16012 and MicroMelt ...

  5. DEBIE - first standard in-situ debris monitoring instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuitunen, J.; Drolshagen, G.; McDonnell, J. A. M.; Svedhem, H.; Leese, M.; Mannermaa, H.; Kaipiainen, M.; Sipinen, V.

    2001-10-01

    Objects larger than a few centimetres can be tracked with radar or with optical telescopes. The population of smaller particles can only be investigated by the analysis of retrieved spacecraft and passive detectors or by in-situ monitors in orbit. Patria Finavitec together with UniSpace Kent have developed the DEBIE (DEBris In-orbit Evaluator) instrument to determine the parameters of sub-millimetre sized space debris and micrometeoroids in-situ by their impact with a detecting surface. The main goal has been to develop an economical and low-resource instrument, easy to integrate into any spacecraft, while providing reliable real-time data for space debris modelling.

  6. Electrochemical atomic force microscopy: In situ monitoring of electrochemical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reggente, Melania; Passeri, Daniele; Rossi, Marco; Tamburri, Emanuela; Terranova, Maria Letizia

    2017-08-01

    The in-situ electrodeposition of polyaniline (PANI), one of the most attractive conducting polymers (CP), has been monitored performing electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM) experiments. The electropolymerization of PANI on a Pt working electrode has been observed performing cyclic voltammetry experiments and controlling the evolution of current flowing through the electrode surface, together with a standard AFM image. The working principle and the potentialities of this emerging technique are briefly reviewed and factors limiting the studying of the in-situ electrosynthesis of organic compounds discussed.

  7. Advanced Monitoring and Characterization of Biofouling in Gravity-driven Membrane Filtration

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yiran

    2016-05-01

    Gravity-driven membrane (GDM) filtration is one of the promising membrane bioreactor (MBR) technologies. It operates at a low pressure by gravity, requiring a minimal energy. Thus, it exhibits a great potential for a decentralized system, conducting household in developing and transition countries. Biofouling is a universal problem in almost all membrane filtration applications, leading to the decrease in flux or the increase in transmembrane pressure depending on different operation mode. Air scoring or regular membrane cleaning has been utilized for fouling mitigation, which requires increased energy consumption as well as complicated operations. Besides, repeating cleaning will trigger the deterioration of membranes and shorten their lifetime, elevating cost expenditures accordingly. In this way, GDM filtration stands out from conventional MBR technologies in a long-term operation with relative stable flux, which has been observed in many studies. The objective of this study was to monitor the biofilm development on a flat sheet membrane submerged in a GDM reactor with constant gravitational pressure. Morphology of biofilm layer in a fixed position was acquired by an in-situ and on-line OCT (optical coherence tomography) scanning at regular intervals for both visual investigation and structure analysis. The calculated thickness and roughness were compared to the variation of flux, fouling resistance and permeate quality, showing expected consistency. At the end of experiment, the morphology of entire membrane surface was scanned and recorded by OCT. Membrane autopsy was carried out for biofilm composition analysis by total organic carbon (TOC) and liquid chromatography with organic carbon detection (LC-OCD). In addition, biomass concentration was obtained by flow cytometer and adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) method. The data of biofilm components indicated a homogeneous biofilm structure formed after a long-term running of the GDM system, based on the morphology

  8. Novel, In-situ NAPL Modification Technique for Persistent Source Zone Control and Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateas, D. J.; Tick, G. R.; Carroll, K. C.

    2014-12-01

    Non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), such as fuels and solvents, are a major cause of groundwater and soil contamination. This environmental issue has led to concerted efforts to remediate subsurface systems impacted by NAPL pollution, but unfortunately, few of these remediation techniques have succeeded in lowering target contaminant levels below regulatory thresholds. To overcome these limitations, a novel, in-situ source remediation method was tested in the laboratory using equilibrium batch tests and two-dimensional flow cell experiments. The goal of this remediation method was to reduce the aqueous solubility, mass flux, and mass discharge of the target NAPL by the in-situ creation of a NAPL mixture source zone. Predetermined volumes of insoluble n-hexadecane or vegetable oil ("benign" NAPL) were injected into a trichloroethene or toluene ("toxic" NAPL) source zone through a simulated well within the flow cell to form a NAPL mixture. Initial NAPL-aqueous phase batch tests were conducted prior to the flow cell experiments to evaluate the effects of various NAPL mixture ratios on equilibrium aqueous-phase concentrations, and thus, to design optimal benign NAPL injection volumes for the flow cell experiments. Overall, this study indicated that the delivery of benign NAPL into the target, toxic NAPL source zone was effective in significantly reducing contaminant aqueous-phase concentration, mass flux, and mass discharge at intermediate scales. Variations in remediation performance did occur among the various predetermined injection volumes of benign NAPL and the target, toxic NAPL but were consistent to trends observed in batch tests. This novel remediation method may be feasible at larger scales, such as pilot field-scale studies, and may be a cost-effective solution to efficiently mitigate environmental pollution, attain regulatory compliance, and expedite site closure.

  9. Combination of granular activated carbon adsorption and deep-bed filtration as a single advanced wastewater treatment step for organic micropollutant and phosphorus removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Johannes; Rehfeld, Daniel; Träder, Kai; Sperlich, Alexander; Jekel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Adsorption onto granular activated carbon (GAC) is an established technology in water and advanced wastewater treatment for the removal of organic substances from the liquid phase. Besides adsorption, the removal of particulate matter by filtration and biodegradation of organic substances in GAC contactors has frequently been reported. The application of GAC as both adsorbent for organic micropollutant (OMP) removal and filter medium for solids retention in tertiary wastewater filtration represents an energy- and space saving option, but has rarely been considered because high dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and suspended solids concentrations in the influent of the GAC adsorber put a significant burden on this integrated treatment step and might result in frequent backwashing and unsatisfactory filtration efficiency. This pilot-scale study investigates the combination of GAC adsorption and deep-bed filtration with coagulation as a single advanced treatment step for simultaneous removal of OMPs and phosphorus from secondary effluent. GAC was assessed as upper filter layer in dual-media downflow filtration and as mono-media upflow filter with regard to filtration performance and OMP removal. Both filtration concepts effectively removed suspended solids and phosphorus, achieving effluent concentrations of 0.1 mg/L TP and 1 mg/L TSS, respectively. Analysis of grain size distribution and head loss within the filter bed showed that considerable head loss occurred in the topmost filter layer in downflow filtration, indicating that most particles do not penetrate deeply into the filter bed. Upflow filtration exhibited substantially lower head loss and effective utilization of the whole filter bed. Well-adsorbing OMPs (e.g. benzotriazole, carbamazepine) were removed by >80% up to throughputs of 8000-10,000 bed volumes (BV), whereas weakly to medium adsorbing OMPs (e.g. primidone, sulfamethoxazole) showed removals adsorptive removal, resulting in rapid concentration

  10. Technical issues associated with in situ vitrification of the INEL Subsurface Disposal Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoots, C.M.; Bates, S.O.; Callow, R.A.; Campbell, K.A.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Gratson, G.K.; McKellar, M.G.; Nickelson, D.F.; Slater, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) has been identified as an alternative technology for remediation of the Acid Pit and Transuranic Pits and Trenches (TRU-PTs) that are present at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). However, a number of technical issues exist that must be resolved before ISV can be considered applicable to these waste sites. To assist in the ISV technology evaluation, an ISV Steering Committee was formed to identify, prioritize, and develop closure roadmaps for technical issues associated with ISV application at the INEL SDA. The activities of the ISV Steering Committee are summarized in three volumes of this report. Volume 1 identifies the systematic approach used to identify and prioritize the ISV technical issues, and briefly discusses the methodology that will be employed to resolve these issues. This document Volume 2 and Volume 3 discusses each technical issue in greater detail and suggest specific closure roadmaps to be used in resolving technical issues associated with ISV at the SDA Acid Pit and TRU-PTs, respectively.

  11. Four years experience with filtration systems in commercial nurseries for eliminating Phytophthora species from recirculation water

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. Ufer; M. Posner; H.-P. Wessels; S. Wagner; K. Kaminski; T. Brand; Werres S.

    2008-01-01

    In a four year project, three different filtration systems were tested under commercial nursery conditions to eliminate Phytophthora spp. from irrigation water. Five nurseries were involved in the project. Slow sand filtration systems were tested in three nurseries. In the fourth nursery, a filtration system with lava grains (Shieer® Bio filtration)...

  12. In situ, spatially resolved biosignature detection at the microbial scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williford, K. H.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Hallmann, C.; Kitajima, K.; Kozdon, R.; Summons, R. E.; Kudryavstev, A.; Lepot, K.; Schopf, J.; Spicuzza, M.; Sugitani, K.; Ushikubo, T.; van Kranendonk, M.; Valley, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Whether life has ever existed beyond Earth is one of the great human questions. The Science Definition Team (SDT) for the proposed NASA Mars 2020 rover mission recently announced a suggested approach for NASA to 'demonstrate significant technical progress towards the future return of scientifically selected, well-documented samples to Earth' in part 'to investigate whether Mars was ever inhabited by microbial life.' The SDT further recommended a per-sample volume of 8 cm3 [1] (e.g., a core with a diameter of 1 cm and length of 10 cm). Such samples would be the first available for scientific inquiry with the potential to definitively answer the fundamental question of astrobiology, and their small volume would necessitate analysis with non- or minimally destructive techniques. Potential biosignatures include 'chemical, isotopic, mineralogical, and morphological features that can be created by life and also appear to be inconsistent with nonbiological processes'[1]. Guidelines for biosignature detection in extraterrestrial samples derive in part from the search for evidence of life in the most ancient sedimentary rocks on Earth, wherein the most compelling case for biogenicity is made when these 'chemical, isotopic, mineralogical, and morphological features' occur in association. Sedimentary rocks deposited on Earth prior to ~3.5 billion years ago (i.e., when persistent surface water [e.g., 2] likely supported habitable environments on Mars) have only very rarely escaped severe alteration by metamorphism and metasomatism. Understanding how these processes have operated on Earth through strategic interrogation of biosignature alteration records in (meta)sedimentary rocks is thus a critical task in the search for extraterrestrial life. Here we present techniques for and results of in situ, spatially resolved, non- or minimally destructive detection of morphological, elemental, molecular, and light stable isotopic biosignatures, as well as records of alteration, in

  13. A comparison of facemask and respirator filtration test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengasamy, Samy; Shaffer, Ronald; Williams, Brandon; Smit, Sarah

    2017-02-01

    NIOSH published a Federal Register Notice to explore the possibility of incorporating FDA required filtration tests for surgical masks (SMs) in the 42 CFR Part 84 respirator certification process. There have been no published studies comparing the filtration efficiency test methods used for NIOSH certification of N95 filtering facepiece respirators (N95 FFRs) with those used by the FDA for clearance of SMs. To address this issue, filtration efficiencies of "N95 FFRs" including six N95 FFR models and three surgical N95 FFR models, and three SM models were measured using the NIOSH NaCl aerosol test method, and FDA required particulate filtration efficiency (PFE) and bacterial filtration efficiency (BFE) methods, and viral filtration efficiency (VFE) method. Five samples of each model were tested using each method. Both PFE and BFE tests were done using unneutralized particles as per FDA guidance document. PFE was measured using 0.1 µm size polystyrene latex particles and BFE with ∼3.0 µm size particles containing Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. VFE was obtained using ∼3.0 µm size particles containing phiX 174 as the challenge virus and Escherichia coli as the host. Results showed that the efficiencies measured by the NIOSH NaCl method for "N95 FFRs" were from 98.15-99.68% compared to 99.74-99.99% for PFE, 99.62-99.9% for BFE, and 99.8-99.9% for VFE methods. Efficiencies by the NIOSH NaCl method were significantly (p = PFE, BFE, and VFE methods produced no significant difference. The above results show that the NIOSH NaCl method is relatively conservative and is able to identify poorly performing filtration devices. The higher efficiencies obtained using PFE, BFE and VFE methods show that adding these supplemental particle penetration methods will not improve respirator certification.

  14. In Situ Ca2+ Titration in the Fluorometric Study of Intracellular Ca2+ Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Shane M.; Jackson, Meyer B.

    2014-01-01

    Imaging with Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dye has provided a wealth of insight into the dynamics of cellular Ca2+ signaling. The spatiotemporal evolution of intracellular free Ca2+ observed in imaging experiments is shaped by binding and unbinding to cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffers, as well as the fluorescent indicator used for imaging. These factors must be taken into account in the interpretation of Ca2+ imaging data, and can be exploited to investigate endogenous Ca2+ buffer properties. Here we extended the use of Ca2+ fluorometry in the characterization of Ca2+ binding molecules within cells, building on a method of titration of intracellular Ca2+ binding sites in situ with measured amounts of Ca2+ entering through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. We developed a systematic procedure for fitting fluorescence data acquired during a series of voltage steps to models with multiple Ca2+ binding sites. The method was tested on simulated data, and then applied to 2-photon fluorescence imaging data from rat posterior pituitary nerve terminals patch clamp-loaded with the Ca2+ indicator fluo-8. Focusing on data sets well described by a single endogenous Ca2+ buffer and dye, this method yielded estimates of the endogenous buffer concentration and Kd, the dye Kd, and the fraction of Ca2+ inaccessible cellular volume. The in situ Kd of fluo-8 thus obtained was indistinguishable from that measured in vitro. This method of calibrating Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dyes in situ has significant advantages over previous methods. Our analysis of Ca2+ titration fluorometric data makes more effective use of the experimental data, and provides a rigorous treatment of multivariate errors and multiple Ca2+ binding species. This method offers a versatile approach to the study of endogenous Ca2+ binding molecules in their physiological milieu. PMID:25465896

  15. In Situ, High-Resolution Profiles of Labile Metals in Sediments of Lake Taihu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing labile metal distribution and biogeochemical behavior in sediments is crucial for understanding their contamination characteristics in lakes, for which in situ, high-resolution data is scare. The diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT technique was used in-situ at five sites across Lake Taihu in the Yangtze River delta in China to characterize the distribution and mobility of eight labile metals (Fe, Mn, Zn, Ni, Cu, Pb, Co and Cd in sediments at a 3 mm spatial resolution. The results showed a great spatial heterogeneity in the distributions of redox-sensitive labile Fe, Mn and Co in sediments, while other metals had much less marked structure, except for downward decreases of labile Pb, Ni, Zn and Cu in the surface sediment layers. Similar distributions were found between labile Mn and Co and among labile Ni, Cu and Zn, reflecting a close link between their geochemical behaviors. The relative mobility, defined as the ratio of metals accumulated by DGT to the total contents in a volume of sediments with a thickness of 10 mm close to the surface of DGT probe, was the greatest for Mn and Cd, followed by Zn, Ni, Cu and Co, while Pb and Fe had the lowest mobility; this order generally agreed with that defined by the modified BCR approach. Further analyses showed that the downward increases of pH values in surface sediment layer may decrease the lability of Pb, Ni, Zn and Cu as detected by DGT, while the remobilization of redox-insensitive metals in deep sediment layer may relate to Mn cycling through sulphide coprecipitation, reflected by several corresponding minima between these metals and Mn. These in situ data provided the possibility for a deep insight into the mechanisms involved in the remobilization of metals in freshwater sediments.

  16. Temperature calibration of lacustrine alkenones using in-situ sampling and growth cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.; Toney, J. L.; Andersen, R.; Fritz, S. C.; Baker, P. A.; Grimm, E. C.; Theroux, S.; Amaral Zettler, L.; Nyren, P. E.

    2010-12-01

    Sedimentary alkenones have been found in an increasing number of lakes around the globe. Studies using molecular biological tools, however, indicate that haptophyte species that produce lacustrine alkenones differ from the oceanic species. In order to convert alkenone unsaturation ratios measured in sediments into temperature, it is necessary to obtain an accurate calibration for individual lakes. Using Lake George, North Dakota, U.S. as an example, we have carried out temperature calibrations by both in-situ water column sampling and culture growth experiments. In-situ measured lake water temperatures in the lake show a strong correlation with the alkenone unsaturation indices (r-squared = 0.82), indicating a rapid equilibrium of alkenone distributions with the lake water temperature in the water column. We applied the in-situ calibration to down-core measurements for Lake George and generated realistic temperature estimates for the past 8 kyr. Algal isolation and culture growth, on the other hand, reveal the presence of two different types of alkenone producing haptophytes. The species making a predominant C37:4 alkenone (species A) produced much greater concentrations of alkenones per unit volume than the species that produced a predominant C37:3 alkenone (species B). It is the first time that a haptophyte species (species A) making a predominant C37:4 alkenone is cultured successfully and now replicated at four different growth temperatures. The distribution of alkeones in Lake George sediments matches extremely well with the alkenones produced by species A, indicating species A is likely the producer for the alkenones in the sediments. The alkenone unsaturation ratio of alkenones produced by species A haptophyte shows a primary dependence on growth temperature as expected, but the slope of change appears to vary depending on the growth stages. The implications of our findings for paleoclimate reconstructions using lacustrine alkenones will be discussed.

  17. Optically transparent polymer devices for in situ assessment of cell electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majhi, Amit Kumar; Thrivikraman, Greeshma; Basu, Bikramjit; Venkataraman, V

    2015-02-01

    In order to study cell electroporation in situ, polymer devices have been fabricated from poly-dimethyl siloxane with transparent indium tin oxide parallel plate electrodes in horizontal geometry. This geometry with cells located on a single focal plane at the interface of the bottom electrode allows a longer observation time in both transmitted bright-field and reflected fluorescence microscopy modes. Using propidium iodide (PI) as a marker dye, the number of electroporated cells in a typical culture volume of 10-100 μl was quantified in situ as a function of applied voltage from 10 to 90 V in a series of ~2-ms pulses across 0.5-mm electrode spacing. The electric field at the interface and device current was calculated using a model that takes into account bulk screening of the transient pulse. The voltage dependence of the number of electroporated cells could be explained using a stochastic model for the electroporation kinetics, and the free energy for pore formation was found to be 45.6 ± 0.5 kT at room temperature. With this device, the optimum electroporation conditions can be quickly determined by monitoring the uptake of PI marker dye in situ under the application of millisecond voltage pulses. The electroporation efficiency was also quantified using an ex situ fluorescence-assisted cell sorter, and the morphology of cultured cells was evaluated after the pulsing experiment. Importantly, the efficacy of the developed device was tested independently using two cell lines (C2C12 mouse myoblast cells and yeast cells) as well as in three different electroporation buffers (phosphate buffer saline, electroporation buffer and 10% glycerol).

  18. Development of in-line furnace for in-situ nanoscale resolution x-ray microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Christopher; Chen-Wiegart, Yu-Chen K.; Wang, Jun

    2013-09-01

    Full field transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM) is a newly developed x-ray imaging technique to provide quantitative and non-destructive 3D characterization of the complex microstructure of materials at nanometer resolution. A key missing component is an in situ apparatus enabling the imaging of the complex structural evolution of the materials and to correlate the structural change with a material's functionality under real operating conditions. This work describes the design of an environmental cell which satisfies the requirements for in situ TXM studies. The limited space within the TXM presents a spatial constraint which prohibits the use of conventional heaters, as well as requiring consideration in designing for safe and controlled operation of the system and alignment of the cell with the beam. A gravity drip-fed water cooling jacket was installed in place around the heating module to maintain critical components of the microscope at safe operating temperatures. A motion control system consisting of pulse width modulated DC motor driven XYZ translation stages was developed to facilitate fine alignment of the cell. Temperature of the sample can be controlled remotely and accurately through a controller to temperatures as high as 1200 K. Heating zone measurement was carried out and shows a 500 x 500 x 500 μm3 homogeneous zone volume for sample area, which is a critical parameter to ensure accurate observation of structural evolution at nanometer scale with a sample in size of tens of microns. Application on Ni particles for in situ oxidation experiment and dehydrogenation of aluminum hydride is also discussed.

  19. Diagnosis of In Situ Metabolic State and Rates of Microbial Metabolism During In Situ Uranium Bioremediation with Molecular Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovley, Derek R. [University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    2012-11-28

    The goal of these projects was to develop molecule tools to tract the metabolic activity and physiological status of microorganisms during in situ uranium bioremediation. Such information is important in able to design improved bioremediation strategies. As summarized below, the research was highly successful with new strategies developed for estimating in situ rates of metabolism and diagnosing the physiological status of the predominant subsurface microorganisms. This is a first not only for groundwater bioremediation studies, but also for subsurface microbiology in general. The tools and approaches developed in these studies should be applicable to the study of microbial communities in a diversity of soils and sediments.

  20. In-Situ Apatite Laser Ablation U-Th-Sm/He Dating, Methods and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, J. E.; Matthews, W.; Guest, B.; Hamilton, B.; Sykes, C.

    2015-12-01

    In-situ, laser ablation U-Th-Sm/He dating is an emerging technique in thermochronology that has been proven as a means to date zircon and monzonite1-5. In-situ U-Th-Sm/He thermochronology eliminates many of the problems and inconveniences associated with traditional, whole grain methods, including; reducing bias in grain selection based on size, shape and clarity; allowing for the use of broken grains and grains with inclusions; avoiding bad neighbour effects; and eliminating safety hazards associated with dissolution. In-situ apatite laser ablation is challenging due to low concentrations of U and Th and thus a low abundance of radiogenic He. For apatite laser ablation to be effective the ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) line must have very low and consistent background levels of He. To reduce He background, samples are mounted in a UHV stable medium. Our mounting process uses a MicroHePP (Microscope Mounted Heated Platen Press) to press samples into FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene) bonded to an aluminum backing plate. Samples are ablated using a Resonetics 193 nm excimer laser and liberated He is measured using a quadrupole mass spectrometer on the ASI Alphachron noble gas line; collectively this system is known as the Resochron. The ablated sites are imaged using a Zygo Zescope optical profilometer and ablated pit volume measured using PitVol, a custom MatLab algorithm developed to enable precise and unbiased measurement of the ablated pit geometry. We use the well-characterized Durango apatite to demonstrate the accuracy and precision of the method. He liberated from forty-two pits, having volumes between 1700 and 9000 um3, were measured using the Resochron. The ablated sites were imaged using a Zygo Zescope optical profilometer and ablated pit volume measured using PitVol. U, Th and Sm concentrations were measured by laser ablation and the U-Th-Sm/He age calculated by standard age equation. An age of 33.8±0.31 Ma was determined and compares well with conventional