WorldWideScience

Sample records for volume 2-3 revised

  1. Revised tephra volumes for Cascade Range volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathenson, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Isopach maps from tephra eruptions from Mount St. Helens were reported in Carey et al. (1995) and for tephra eruptions from Glacier Peak in Gardner et al. (1998). For exponential thinning, the isopach data only define a single slope on a log thickness versus square root of area plot. Carey et al. (1995) proposed a model that was used to estimate a second slope, and volumes were presented in both studies using this model. A study by Sulpizio (2005) for estimating the second slope and square root of area where the lines intersect involves a systematic analysis of many eruptions to provide correlation equations. The purpose of this paper is to recalculate the volumes of Cascades eruptions and compare results from the two methods. In order to gain some perspective on the methods for estimating the second slope, we use data for thickness versus distance beyond the last isopach that are available for some of the larger eruptions in the Cascades. The thickness versus square root of area method is extended to thickness versus distance by developing an approximate relation between the two assuming elliptical isopachs with the source at one of the foci. Based on the comparisons made between the Carey et al. (1995) and Sulpizio (2005) methods, it is felt that the later method provides a better estimate of the second slope. For Mount St. Helens, the estimates of total volume using the Sulpizio (2005) method are generally smaller than those using the Carey et al. (1995) method. For the volume estimates of Carey et al. (1995), the volume of the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens is smaller than six of the eight previous eruptions. With the new volumes using the Sulpizio (2005) method, the 1980 eruption is smaller in volume than the upper end of the range for only three of the layers (Wn, Ye, and Yn) and is the same size as layer We. Thus the 1980 eruption becomes representative of the mid-range of volumes rather than being in the lower range.

  2. Safety analysis on Non-LOCA events for the revision of Wolsong NPP unit 2,3,4 sar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Jin, Dong Sik; Ryu, Eui Seung; Kho, Dong Wook; Kim, Sung Min

    2015-01-01

    Korean Wolsong Nuclear Power Plant Units 2,3,4 (CANDU-6 Type) has prepared the revision of safety analysis report (Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) chapter 15) from the original performed in the year of 1990s, using the updated and state-of-the-art methodology and tools including IST safety analysis codes and more detail modelling. Compared with the original FSAR15, the revised FSAR15 has significant improvement in both the scope and the depth of safety analysis, which has demonstrated the safety analysis results have complied with the safety requirements(acceptance criteria). This paper will present the analysis scope for Non-LOCA events re-analyzed or added for the FSAR15 revision, methodologies applied such as codes and modelling and some important analysis results will be demonstrated with comparison to acceptance criteria. Application of more detail and near-realistic assumptions and method including Dev-PDO options and uncertainty related to the CHF correlations has altogether brought about more safety margin compared with the original FSAR15 with respect to SDS trip effectiveness etc. (author)

  3. Approved Site Treatment Plan, Volumes 1 and 2. Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmich, E.H.; Molen, G.; Noller, D.

    1996-03-22

    The US Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), has prepared the Site Treatment Plan (STP) for Savannah River Site (SRS) mixed wastes in accordance with RCRA Section 3021(b), and SCDHEC has approved the STP (except for certain offsite wastes) and issued an order enforcing the STP commitments in Volume 1. DOE-SR and SCDHEC agree that this STP fulfills the requirements contained in the FFCAct, RCRA Section 3021, and therefore, pursuant to Section 105(a) of the FFCAct (RCRA Section 3021(b)(5)), DOE`s requirements are to implement the plan for the development of treatment capacities and technologies pursuant to RCRA Section 3021. Emerging and new technologies not yet considered may be identified to manage waste more safely, effectively, and at lower cost than technologies currently identified in the plan. DOE will continue to evaluate and develop technologies that offer potential advantages in public acceptance, privatization, consolidation, risk abatement, performance, and life-cycle cost. Should technologies that offer such advantages be identified, DOE may request a revision/modification of the STP in accordance with the provisions of Consent Order 95-22-HW. The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume 1) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume 2) and is provided for information.

  4. Approved Site Treatment Plan, Volumes 1 and 2. Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmich, E.H.; Molen, G.; Noller, D.

    1996-01-01

    The US Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), has prepared the Site Treatment Plan (STP) for Savannah River Site (SRS) mixed wastes in accordance with RCRA Section 3021(b), and SCDHEC has approved the STP (except for certain offsite wastes) and issued an order enforcing the STP commitments in Volume 1. DOE-SR and SCDHEC agree that this STP fulfills the requirements contained in the FFCAct, RCRA Section 3021, and therefore, pursuant to Section 105(a) of the FFCAct (RCRA Section 3021(b)(5)), DOE's requirements are to implement the plan for the development of treatment capacities and technologies pursuant to RCRA Section 3021. Emerging and new technologies not yet considered may be identified to manage waste more safely, effectively, and at lower cost than technologies currently identified in the plan. DOE will continue to evaluate and develop technologies that offer potential advantages in public acceptance, privatization, consolidation, risk abatement, performance, and life-cycle cost. Should technologies that offer such advantages be identified, DOE may request a revision/modification of the STP in accordance with the provisions of Consent Order 95-22-HW. The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume 1) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume 2) and is provided for information

  5. VIPRE-01: a thermal-hydraulic code for reactor cores. Volume 2: user's manual (Revision 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuta, J.M.; Koontz, A.S.; Stewart, C.W.; Montgomery, S.D.; Nomura, K.K.

    1985-07-01

    Revisions to the VIPRE code documents for Volume 2 are presented. These revisions conform to the changes made to VIPRE-01, CYCLE-00 to produce the new version of the code denoted by VIPRE-01, CYCLE-01. The first pages of the revisions specify where the replacement pages are to be inserted and which pages of the original documents should be retained

  6. TIBER II/ETR final design report: Volume 2, 3.0 Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.

    1987-09-01

    This paper discusses the design of the TIBER II Tokamak. This particular volume discusses: mechanical systems; electrical systems; shield nuclear analysis and tritium issues; reactor building facilities; and tritium systems

  7. Graphic Display Development Program. Volume II, Revision 0. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and utility of developing a set of graphic displays to support symptom-based emergency operating procedures (EOPs). Development of generic graphic displays is based on Revision 3 of the symptomatic Emergency Procedure Guidelines (EPGs) prepared by the BWR Owners' Group (BWROG), and development of plant-specific graphic displays is based on a set of emergency operating procedures developed from these EPGs

  8. Revised draft: Northeastern Regional geologic characterization report. Volume 3. Plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    Volume 7(3) contains the following maps: Index Map; Faults, Ground Acceleration, and In Situ Stress; Rock and Mineral Resources; Drainage Basins and Groundwater Discharge Zones; Groundwater Resources; and Crystalline Rock Bodies

  9. The Self-Concept. Volume 1, A Review of Methodological Considerations and Measuring Instruments. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Ruth C.

    This volume of the revised edition describes and evaluates measurement methods, research designs, and procedures which have been or might appropriately be used in self-concept research. Working from the perspective that self-concept or phenomenal personality theories can be scientifically investigated, methodological flaws and questionable…

  10. Revised

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Vivian Kvist; Nord-Larsen, Thomas; Riis-Nielsen, Torben

    This report is a revised analysis of the Danish data on CO2 emissions from forest, afforestation and deforestation for the period 1990 - 2008 and a prognosis for the period until 2020. Revision have included measurements from 2009 in the estimations. The report is funded by the Ministry of Climate...

  11. Optimal Volume for Concert Halls Based on Ando’s Subjective Preference and Barron Revised Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Cerdá

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Ando-Beranek’s model, a linear version of Ando’s subjective preference theory, obtained by the authors in a recent work, was combined with Barron revised theory. An optimal volume region for each reverberation time was obtained for classical music in symphony orchestra concert halls. The obtained relation was tested with good agreement with the top rated halls reported by Beranek and other halls with reported anomalies.

  12. Standard technical specifications General Electric plants, BWR/6. Volume 1, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for General Electric BWR/6 Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.10 of the improved STS

  13. Standard technical specifications: General Electric plants, BWR/4. Volume 1, Revision 1: Specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for General Electric BWR/4 Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.10 of the improved STS

  14. Standard technical specifications: Combustion engineering plants. Volume 1, Revision 1: Specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for Combustion Engineering Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.9 of the improved STS

  15. Low-level radioactive waste in the northeast: revised waste volume projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-06-01

    The volume of low-level radioactive waste generated in the eleven Northeast states has undergone significant change since the inital 1982 analysis and projection. These revised projections incorporate improved data reporting and evidence of sharp declines in certain categories of waste. Volumes in the 1982-1983 period reflect waste shipped for disposal as reported by disposal site operators. Projected waste volumes represent waste intended for disposal. The recent dramatic changes in source reduction and waste management practices underscore the need for annual review of waste volume projections. The volume of waste shipped for off-site disposal has declined approximately 12% in two years, from an average 1,092,500 ft 3 annually in 1979 to 1981 to an average annual 956,500 ft 3 in 1982 to 1983; reactor waste disposal volumes declined by about 39,000 ft 3 or 7% during this period. Non-reactor waste volumes shipped for disposal declined by over 70,000 ft 3 or 15% during this period. The data suggest that generators increased their use of such management practices as source reduction, compaction, or, for carbon-14 and tritium, temporary storage followed by disposal as non-radioactive waste under the NRC de minimus standard effective March 1981. Using the Technical Subcommittee projection methodology, the volume of low-level waste produced annually in the eleven states, individually and collectively, is expected to increase through the year 2000, but at a significantly lower rate of increase than initially projected. By the year 2000, the Northeast is projected to generate 1,137,600 ft 3 of waste annually, an increase of about 20% over 1982 to 1983 average volume

  16. 2,3-Dihydroxybenzoic acid attenuates kanamycin-induced volume reduction in mouse utricular type I hair cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Stig Åvall; Kirkegaard, Mette; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2006-01-01

    injection. Total volume of the utricle, as well as total number of hair and supporting cells, were estimated on light microscopic sections. Total volume and mean volume of hair cell types I and II and supporting cells were estimated on digital transmission electron micrographs. Total volume of the utricular...... macula, hair cell type I and supporting cells decreased significantly in animals injected with kanamycin but not in animals co-treated with DHB. Hair and supporting cell numbers remained unchanged in all three groups. In conclusion, the kanamycin-induced volume reduction of type I hair cells...

  17. Human-system interface design review guideline -- Process and guidelines: Final report. Revision 1, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-06-01

    NUREG-0700, Revision 1, provides human factors engineering (HFE) guidance to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff for its: (1) review of the human system interface (HSI) design submittals prepared by licensees or applications for a license or design certification of commercial nuclear power plants, and (2) performance of HSI reviews that could be undertaken as part of an inspection or other type of regulatory review involving HSI design or incidents involving human performance. The guidance consists of a review process and HFE guidelines. The document describes those aspects of the HSI design review process that are important to the identification and resolution of human engineering discrepancies that could adversely affect plant safety. Guidance is provided that could be used by the staff to review an applicant`s HSI design review process or to guide the development of an HSI design review plan, e.g., as part of an inspection activity. The document also provides detailed HFE guidelines for the assessment of HSI design implementations. NUREG-0700, Revision 1, consists of three stand-alone volumes. Volume 1 consists of two major parts. Part 1 describes those aspects of the review process of the HSI design that are important to identifying and resolving human engineering discrepancies. Part 2 contains detailed guidelines for a human factors engineering review which identify criteria for assessing the implementation of an applicant`s or licensee`s HSI design.

  18. Preliminary environmental assessment for the Satellite Power System (SPS). Revision 1. Volume 2. Detailed assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is considering several options for generating electrical power to meet future energy needs. The satellite power system (SPS), one of these options, would collect solar energy through a system of satellites in space and transfer this energy to earth. A reference system has been described that would convert the energy to microwaves and transmit the microwave energy via directive antennas to large receiving/rectifying antennas (rectennas) located on the earth. At the rectennas, the microwave energy would be converted into electricity. The potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating the satellite power system are being assessed as a part of the Department of Energy's SPS Concept Development and Evaluation Program. This report is Revision I of the Preliminary Environmental Assessment for the Satellite Power System published in October 1978. It refines and extends the 1978 assessment and provides a basis for a 1980 revision that will guide and support DOE recommendations regarding future SPS development. This is Volume 2 of two volumes. It contains the technical detail suitable for peer review and integrates information appearing in documents referenced herein. The key environmental issues associated with the SPS concern human health and safety, ecosystems, climate, and electromagnetic systems interactions. In order to address these issues in an organized manner, five tasks are reported: (I) microwave-radiation health and ecological effects; (II) nonmicrowave health and ecological effectss; (III) atmospheric effects; (IV) effects on communication systems due to ionospheric disturbance; and (V) electromagnetic compatibility. (WHK)

  19. Human-system interface design review guideline -- Process and guidelines: Final report. Revision 1, Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    NUREG-0700, Revision 1, provides human factors engineering (HFE) guidance to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff for its: (1) review of the human system interface (HSI) design submittals prepared by licensees or applications for a license or design certification of commercial nuclear power plants, and (2) performance of HSI reviews that could be undertaken as part of an inspection or other type of regulatory review involving HSI design or incidents involving human performance. The guidance consists of a review process and HFE guidelines. The document describes those aspects of the HSI design review process that are important to the identification and resolution of human engineering discrepancies that could adversely affect plant safety. Guidance is provided that could be used by the staff to review an applicant's HSI design review process or to guide the development of an HSI design review plan, e.g., as part of an inspection activity. The document also provides detailed HFE guidelines for the assessment of HSI design implementations. NUREG-0700, Revision 1, consists of three stand-alone volumes. Volume 1 consists of two major parts. Part 1 describes those aspects of the review process of the HSI design that are important to identifying and resolving human engineering discrepancies. Part 2 contains detailed guidelines for a human factors engineering review which identify criteria for assessing the implementation of an applicant's or licensee's HSI design

  20. Extrastriatal dopamine D-2/3 receptors and cortical grey matter volumes in antipsychotic-naive schizophrenia patients before and after initial antipsychotic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørbak-Emig, Henrik; Pinborg, Lars H.; Raghava, Jayachandra M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Long-term dopamine D2/3 receptor blockade, common to all antipsychotics, may underlie progressive brain volume changes observed in patients with chronic schizophrenia. In the present study, we examined associations between cortical volume changes and extrastriatal dopamine D2/3 recept...... binding potentials (BPND) in first-episode schizophrenia patents at baseline and after antipsychotic treatment. METHODS: Twenty-two initially antipsychotic-naïve patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), [(123)I]epidepride single-photon emission computerised tomography (SPECT......), and psychopathology assessments before and after 3 months of treatment with either risperidone (N = 13) or zuclopenthixol (N = 9). Twenty healthy controls matched on age, gender and parental socioeconomic status underwent baseline MRI and SPECT. RESULTS: Neither extrastriatal D2/3 receptor BPND at baseline, nor...

  1. Hospital volume and the risk of revision in Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty in the Nordic countries -an observational study of 14,496 cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badawy, Mona; Fenstad, Anne M.; Bartz-Johannessen, Christoffer A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: High procedure volume and dedication to unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) has been suggested to improve revision rates. This study aimed to quantify the annual hospital volume effect on revision risk in Oxfordu? nicompartmental knee arthroplasty in the Nordic countries. Methods......). The outcome was revision risk after 2 and 10 years calculated using Kaplan Meier method. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to assess the Hazard Ratio (HR) of any revision due to specific reasons with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: The implant survival was 80% at 10 years in the volume...

  2. Effect of hysteroscopic adhesiolysis combined with growth hormone on endometrial blood flow and volume as well as Smad2/3 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-Chan Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of hysteroscopic adhesiolysis combined with growth hormone on endometrial blood flow and volume as well as Smad2/3 expression. Methods: A total of 64 patients with moderate or severe intrauterine adhesions who received hysteroscopic adhesiolysis in our hospital from May 2013 to October 2015 were selected as the research subjects and randomly divided into two groups who received different postoperative drug treatment, observation group received postoperative manual cycle intervention combined with growth hormone treatment and control group only received manual cycle intervention. Transvaginal ultrasonography was conducted after treatment to assess endometrial thickness, volume and blood flow, and endometrium was collected to determine Smad2, Smad3 and TGF- β1 levels. Results: After treatment, endometrial blood flow signal of observation group was more abundant than that of control group, ultrasound parameters RI and PI were significantly lower than those of control group, and VI, FI and VFI as well as endometrial thickness and endometrial cavity volume were significantly higher than those of control group; Smad2, Smad3 and TGF-β1 levels in endometrial tissue of observation group after treatment were significantly lower than those of control group. Conclusions: Hysteroscopic adhesiolysis combined with growth hormone therapy can promote endometrial repair and growth, increase endometrial blood flow and volume and also suppress the expression of Smad2/3 and TGF-β1 in patients with intrauterine adhesions.

  3. Revised Calculated Volumes Of Individual Shield Volcanoes At The Young End Of The Hawaiian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J. E.; Eakins, B. W.

    2003-12-01

    Recent, high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and a digital elevation model of the Hawaiian Islands allow us to recalculate Bargar and Jackson's [1974] volumes of coalesced volcanic edifices (Hawaii, Maui-Nui, Oahu, Kauai, and Niihau) and individual shield volcanoes at the young end of the Hawaiian Ridge, taking into account subsidence of the Pacific plate under the load of the volcanoes as modeled by Watts and ten Brink [1989]. Our volume for the Island of Hawaii (2.48 x105 km3) is twice the previous estimate (1.13 x105 km3), due primarily to crustal subsidence, which had not been accounted for in the earlier work. The volcanoes that make up the Hawaii edifice (Mahukona, Kohala, Mauna Kea, Hualalai, Mauna Loa, Kilauea, and Loihi) are generally considered to have formed within the past million years and our revised volume for Hawaii indicates that either magma-supply rates are greater than previously estimated (0.25 km3/yr as opposed to 0.1 km3/yr) or that Hawaii's volcanoes have erupted over a longer period of time (>1 million years). Our results also indicate that magma supply rates have increased dramatically to build the Hawaiian edifices: the average rate of the past 5 million years (0.096 km3/yr) is substantially greater than the overall average of the Hawaiian Ridge (0.018km3/yr) or Emperor Seamounts (0.012 km3/yr) as calculated by Bargar and Jackson, and that rates within the past million years are greater still (0.25 km3/yr). References: Bargar, K. E., and Jackson, E. D., 1974, Calculated volumes of individual shield volcanoes along the Hawaiian-Emperor Chain, Jour. Research U.S. Geol. Survey, Vol. 2, No. 5, p. 545-550. Watts, A. B., and ten Brink, U. S., 1989, Crustal structure, flexure, and subsidence history of the Hawaiian Islands, Jour. Geophys. Res., Vol. 94, No. B8, p. 10,473-10,500.

  4. Probabilistic safety analysis procedures guide. Sections 1-7 and appendices. Volume 1, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, R.A.; Buslik, A.J.; Cho, N.Z.

    1985-08-01

    A procedures guide for the performance of probabilistic safety assessment has been prepared for interim use in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs. It will be revised as comments are received, and as experience is gained from its use. The probabilistic safety assessment studies performed are intended to produce probabilistic predictive models that can be used and extended by the utilities and by NRC to sharpen the focus of inquiries into a range of issues affecting reactor safety. This first volume of the guide describes the determination of the probability (per year) of core damage resulting from accident initiators internal to the plant (i.e., intrinsic to plant operation) and from loss of off-site electric power. The scope includes human reliability analysis, a determination of the importance of various core damage accident sequences, and an explicit treatment and display of uncertainties for key accident sequences. The second volume deals with the treatment of the so-called external events including seismic disturbances, fires, floods, etc. Ultimately, the guide will be augmented to include the plant-specific analysis of in-plant processes (i.e., containment performance). This guide provides the structure of a probabilistic safety study to be performed, and indicates what products of the study are valuable for regulatory decision making. For internal events, methodology is treated in the guide only to the extent necessary to indicate the range of methods which is acceptable; ample reference is given to alternative methodologies which may be utilized in the performance of the study. For external events, more explicit guidance is given

  5. Ocean Optics Protocols for Satellite Ocean Color Sensor Validation, Revision 4, Volume IV: Inherent Optical Properties: Instruments, Characterizations, Field Measurements and Data Analysis Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, J. L.; Fargion, G. S.; McClain, C. R. (Editor); Pegau, S.; Zanefeld, J. R. V.; Mitchell, B. G.; Kahru, M.; Wieland, J.; Stramska, M.

    2003-01-01

    This document stipulates protocols for measuring bio-optical and radiometric data for the Sensor Intercomparision and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) Project activities and algorithm development. The document is organized into 6 separate volumes as Ocean Optics Protocols for Satellite Ocean Color Sensor Validation, Revision 4. Volume I: Introduction, Background, and Conventions; Volume II: Instrument Specifications, Characterization and Calibration; Volume III: Radiometric Measurements and Data Analysis Methods; Volume IV: Inherent Optical Properties: Instruments, Characterization, Field Measurements and Data Analysis Protocols; Volume V: Biogeochemical and Bio-Optical Measurements and Data Analysis Methods; Volume VI: Special Topics in Ocean Optics Protocols and Appendices. The earlier version of Ocean Optics Protocols for Satellite Ocean Color Sensor Validation, Revision 3 is entirely superseded by the six volumes of Revision 4 listed above.

  6. RELAP5/MOD3 code manual: Summaries and reviews of independent code assessment reports. Volume 7, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.L.; Sloan, S.M.; Schultz, R.R.; Wilson, G.E.

    1996-10-01

    Summaries of RELAP5/MOD3 code assessments, a listing of the assessment matrix, and a chronology of the various versions of the code are given. Results from these code assessments have been used to formulate a compilation of some of the strengths and weaknesses of the code. These results are documented in the report. Volume 7 was designed to be updated periodically and to include the results of the latest code assessments as they become available. Consequently, users of Volume 7 should ensure that they have the latest revision available

  7. Savannah River Site mixed waste Proposed Site Treatment Plan (PSTP). Volumes 1 and 2 and reference document: Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmich, E.; Noller, D.K.; Wierzbicki, K.S.; Bailey, L.L.

    1995-01-01

    The DOE is required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act to prepare site treatment plans describing the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating mixed waste. This proposed plan contains Savannah River Site's preferred options and schedules for constructing new facilities, and otherwise obtaining treatment for mixed wastes. The proposed plan consists of 2 volumes. Volume 1, Compliance Plan, identifies the capacity to be developed and the schedules as required. Volume 2, Background, provides a detailed discussion of the preferred options with technical basis, plus a description of the specific waste streams. Chapters are: Introduction; Methodology; Mixed low level waste streams; Mixed transuranic waste; High level waste; Future generation of mixed waste streams; Storage; Process for evaluation of disposal issues in support of the site treatment plans discussions; Treatment facilities and treatment technologies; Offsite waste streams for which SRS treatment is the Preferred Option (Naval reactor wastes); Summary information; and Acronyms and glossary. This revision does not contain the complete revised report, but only those pages that have been revised

  8. Law for the expanion of renewable energies. German Renewable Energy Act 2014 - EEG 2014. Special volume to volume 2. 3. new rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saecker, Franz Juergen

    2015-01-01

    No field of law is currently so intense in motion as the energy law. The amendment of 2014 has been for one of the most important tools for implementing the energy transition in Germany, the EEG, a ''fundamental reform'' (as in the title of the Law of 07.21.2014). In the present additional special volume of Berlin commentary on energy law EEG 2014 is explained with all its serious changes by respected academics and practitioners; the possibility of the draft amendment to the federal government is already taken into account by 01.04.2015. Particular attention will be the new rules for tendering promoting of greenfield installations. Questions of auditing which have the great practical importance under the amended regulations for placement exemption under paragraph paragraph 60 ff. EEG 2014, for the first time commented on by auditors. Besides dogmatic foundations of comment therefore provides an important aid in practical issues of relevance levy burden and its exceptions. [de

  9. Standard Technical Specifications General Electric plants, BWR/4:Bases (Sections 3.4-3.10). Volume 3, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for General Electric BWR/4 Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains he Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1-3.3 of the improved STS. This document, Volume 3, contains the Bases for Sections 3.4-3.10 of the improved STS

  10. Standard technical specifications: Combustion engineering plants. Volume 3, Revision 1: Bases (Sections 3.4--3.9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for Combustion Engineering Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.9 of the improved STS

  11. Standard technical specifications: Babcock and Wilcox plants. Volume 3, Revision 1: Bases (Sections 3.4--3.9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for Babcock and Wilcox Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.9 of the improved STS

  12. Standard Technical Specifications General Electric plants, BWR/4: Bases (Sections 2.0-3.3). Volume 2, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for General Electric BWR/4 Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved ST or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume I contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. This document, Volume 2, contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1-3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4-3.10 of the improved STS

  13. Human-system interface design review guideline -- Review software and user's guide: Final report. Revision 1, Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    NUREG-0700, Revision 1, provides human factors engineering (HFE) guidance to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff for its: (1) review of the human system interface (HSI) design submittals prepared by licensees or applications for a license or design certification of commercial nuclear power plants, and (2) performance of HSI reviews that could be undertaken as part of an inspection or other type of regulatory review involving HSI design or incidents involving human performance. The guidance consists of a review process and HFE guidelines. The document describes those aspects of the HSI design review process that are important to the identification and resolution of human engineering discrepancies that could adversely affect plant safety. Guidance is provided that could be used by the staff to review an applicant's HSI design review process or to guide the development of an HSI design review plan, e.g., as part of an inspection activity. The document also provides detailed HFE guidelines for the assessment of HSI design implementations. NUREG-0700, Revision 1, consists of three stand-alone volumes. Volume 3 contains an interactive software application of the NUREG-0700, Revision 1 guidance and a user's guide for this software. The software supports reviewers during review preparation, evaluation design using the human factors engineering guidelines, and in report preparation. The user's guide provides system requirements and installation instructions, detailed explanations of the software's functions and features, and a tutorial on using the software

  14. Standard technical specifications combustion engineering plants: Bases (Sections 2.0--3.3). Volume 2, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for General Electric BWR/6 Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes

  15. Human-system interface design review guideline -- Reviewer`s checklist: Final report. Revision 1, Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    NUREG-0700, Revision 1, provides human factors engineering (HFE) guidance to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff for its: (1) review of the human system interface (HSI) design submittals prepared by licensees or applications for a license or design certification of commercial nuclear power plants, and (2) performance of HSI reviews that could be undertaken as part of an inspection or other type of regulatory review involving HSI design or incidents involving human performance. The guidance consists of a review process and HFE guidelines. The document describes those aspects of the HSI design review process that are important to the identification and resolution of human engineering discrepancies that could adversely affect plant safety. Guidance is provided that could be used by the staff to review an applicant`s HSI design review process or to guide the development of an HSI design review plan, e.g., as part of an inspection activity. The document also provides detailed HFE guidelines for the assessment of HSI design implementations. NUREG-0700, Revision 1, consists of three stand-alone volumes. Volume 2 is a complete set of the guidelines contained in Volume 1, Part 2, but in a checklist format that can be used by reviewers to assemble sets of individual guidelines for use in specific design reviews. The checklist provides space for reviewers to enter guidelines evaluations and comments.

  16. Standard technical specifications, Westinghouse Plants: Bases (Sections 3.4--3.9). Volume 3, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This NUREG contains the improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for Westinghouse plants. Revision 1 incorporates the cumulative changes to Revision 0, which was published in September 1992. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, specifically the Westinghouse Owners Group (WOG), NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993 (58 FR 39132). Licensees are encouraged to upgrade their technical specifications consistent with those criteria and conforming, to the extent practical and consistent with the licensing basis for the facility, to Revision 1 to the improved STS. The Commission continues to place the highest priority on requests for complete conversions to the improved STS. Licensees adopting portions of the improved STS to existing technical specifications should adopt all related requirements, as applicable, to achieve a high degree of standardization and consistency

  17. Standard technical specifications, Westinghouse Plants: Bases (Sections 2.0--3.3). Volume 2, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This NUREG contains the improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for Westinghouse plants. Revision 1 incorporates the cumulative changes to Revision 0, which was published in September 1992. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, specifically the Westinghouse Owners Group (WOG), NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993 (58 FR 39132). Licensees are encouraged to upgrade their technical specifications consistent with those criteria and conforming, to the extent practical and consistent with the licensing basis for the facility, to Revision 1 to the improved STS. The Commission continues to place the highest priority on requests for complete conversions to the improved STS. Licensees adopting portions of the improved STS to existing technical specifications should adopt all related requirements, as applicable, to achieve a high degree of standardization and consistency

  18. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Miscellaneous -- Volume 3, Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrie, L.M.; Jordon, W.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Edwards, A.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice; (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System developments has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. This manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation, Volume 2--for the functional module documentation, and Volume 3--for the data libraries and subroutine libraries.

  19. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Control modules -- Volume 1, Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landers, N.F.; Petrie, L.M.; Knight, J.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. This manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation, Volume 2--for the functional module documentation, and Volume 3 for the documentation of the data libraries and subroutine libraries.

  20. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Miscellaneous -- Volume 3, Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrie, L.M.; Jordon, W.C.; Edwards, A.L.

    1995-04-01

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice; (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System developments has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. This manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation, Volume 2--for the functional module documentation, and Volume 3--for the data libraries and subroutine libraries

  1. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Control modules -- Volume 1, Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landers, N.F.; Petrie, L.M.; Knight, J.R.

    1995-04-01

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. This manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation, Volume 2--for the functional module documentation, and Volume 3 for the documentation of the data libraries and subroutine libraries

  2. Revised draft: North Central Regional geologic characterization report. Volume 2. Plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    Volume 8(2) comprises the following maps pertaining to the North-Central Region: Index Map; Overburden Thickness; Faults and Ground Acceleration; Rock and Mineral Resources; Groundwater Basins and Potential Major Zones; Groundwater Resource Potential; and a Geologic Map

  3. Preoperational baseline and site characterization report for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. Volume 2, Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weekes, D.C.; Lindsey, K.A.; Ford, B.H.; Jaeger, G.K.

    1996-12-01

    This document is Volume 2 in a two-volume series that comprise the site characterization report, the Preoperational Baseline and Site Characterization Report for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. Volume 1 contains data interpretation and information supporting the conclusions in the main text. This document presents original data in support of Volume 1 of the report. The following types of data are presented: well construction reports; borehole logs; borehole geophysical data; well development and pump installation; survey reports; preoperational baseline chemical data and aquifer test data. Five groundwater monitoring wells, six deep characterization boreholes, and two shallow characterization boreholes were drilled at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) site to directly investigate site-specific hydrogeologic conditions

  4. Ocean Optics Protocols for Satellite Ocean Color Sensor Validation. Volume 2; Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, James L. (Editor); Fargion, Giulietta S. (Editor); Trees, C.; Austin, R. W.; Pietras, C. (Editor); Hooker, S.; Holben, B.; McClain, Charles R.; Clark, D. K.; Yuen, M.

    2002-01-01

    This document stipulates protocols for measuring bio-optical and radiometric data for the SIMBIOS Project. It supersedes the earlier version, and is organized into four parts: Introductory Background, Instrument Characteristics, Field Measurements and Data Analysis, Data Reporting and Archival. Changes in this revision include the addition of three new chapters: (1) Fundamental Definitions, Relationships and Conventions; (2) MOBY, A Radiometric Buoy for Performance Monitoring and Vicarious Calibration of Satellite Ocean Color Sensors: Measurement and Data Analysis Protocols; and (3) Normalized Water-Leaving Radiance and Remote Sensing Reflectance: Bidirectional Reflectance and Other Factors. Although the present document represents another significant, incremental improvement in the ocean optics protocols, there are several protocols that have either been overtaken by recent technological progress, or have been otherwise identified as inadequate. Revision 4 is scheduled for completion sometime in 2003. This technical report is not meant as a substitute for scientific literature. Instead, it will provide a ready and responsive vehicle for the multitude of technical reports issued by an operational Project. The contributions are published as submitted, after only minor editing to correct obvious grammatical or clerical errors.

  5. Ocean Optics Protocols for Satellite Ocean Color Sensor Validation. Volume 1; Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, James L. (Editor); Fargion, Giulietta (Editor); Mueller, J. L.; Trees, C.; Austin, R. W.; Pietras, C.; Hooker, S.; Holben, B.; McClain, Charles R.; Clark, D. K.; hide

    2002-01-01

    This document stipulates protocols for measuring bio-optical and radiometric data for the SIMBIOS Project. It supersedes the earlier version, and is organized into four parts: Introductory Background, Instrument Characteristics, Field Measurements and Data Analysis, Data Reporting and Archival. Changes in this revision include the addition of three new chapters: (1) Fundamental Definitions, Relationships and Conventions; (2) MOBY, A Radiometric Buoy for Performance Monitoring and Vicarious Calibration of Satellite Ocean Color Sensors: Measurement and Data Analysis Protocols; and (3) Normalized Water-Leaving Radiance and Remote Sensing Reflectance: Bidirectional Reflectance and Other Factors. Although the present document represents another significant, incremental improvement in the ocean optics protocols, there are several protocols that have either been overtaken by recent technological progress, or have been otherwise identified as inadequate. Revision 4 is scheduled for completion sometime in 2003. This technical report is not meant as a substitute for scientific literature. Instead, it will provide a ready and responsive vehicle for the multitude of technical reports issued by an operational Project. The contributions are published as submitted, after only minor editing to correct obvious grammatical or clerical errors.

  6. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages. Volume 2, Revision 17: Certificates of compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This directory contains a Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volume 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Materials Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on Quality Assurance Programs and Packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR section 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure themselves that they have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program

  7. Directory of Certificates of Compliance for radioactive materials packages: Certificates of Compliance. Volume 2, Revision 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the front of Volumes 1 and 2. An alphabetical listing by user name is included in the back of Volume 3 of approved QA programs. The reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved QA programs prior to the publication date

  8. Directory of Certificates of Compliance for radioactive materials packages: Certificates of Compliance. Volume 2, Revision 18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the front of Volumes 1 and 2. An alphabetical listing by user name is included in the back of Volume 3 of approved QA programs. The reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved QA programs prior to the publication date.

  9. No-migration variance petition. Volume 3, Revision 1: Appendix B, Attachments A through D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    Volume III contains the following attachments: TRUPACT-II content codes (TRUCON); TRUPACT-II chemical list; chemical compatibility analysis for Rocky Flats Plant waste forms (Appendix 2.10.12 of TRUPACT-II safety analysis report); and chemical compatibility analyses for waste forms across all sites.

  10. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages. Volume 2, Revision 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    This directory contains a Summary Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volume 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Material Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance number is included at the back of each volume of the directory. The Summary Report includes a listing of all users of each package design prior to the publication date of the directory. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure them that they have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program. Copies of the current approval may be obtained from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Public Document Room files (see Docket No. listed on each certificate) at 1717 H Street, Washington, DC 20555. Note that the general license of 10 CFR 71.12 does not authorize the receipt, possession, use or transfer of byproduct source, or special nuclear material; such authorization must be obtained pursuant to 10 CFR Parts 30 to 36, 40, 50, or 70

  11. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages. Certificates of compliance. Volume 2. Revision 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    This directory contains a Summary Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volume 1). Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Material Packages (Volumes 3). The purpose of this directory is make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance number is included at the back of each volume of the directory. The Summary Report includes a listing of all users of each package design prior to the publication date of the directory. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure them that they have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program. Copies of the current approval may be obtained from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Public Document Room files (see Docket No. listed on each certificate) at 1717 H Street, Washington, DC 20555. Note that the general license of 10 CFR 71.12 does not authorize the receipt, possession, use or transfer of byproduct source, or special nuclear material; such authorization must be obtained pursuant to 10 CFR 30 to 36, 40, 50, or 70

  12. Directory of Certificates of Compliance for Radioactive Materials Packages. Certificates of Compliance. Volume 2, Revision 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    This directory contains a Summary Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volume 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Material Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance number is included at the back of each volume of the directory. The Summary Report includes a listing of all users of each package design prior to the publication date of the directory. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure them that they have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program. Copies of the current approval may be obtained from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Public Document Room files (see Docket No. listed on each certificate) at 1717 H Street, Washington, DC 20555. Note that the general license of 10 CFR 71.12 does not authorize the receipt, possession, use or transfer of byproduct source, or special nuclear material; such authorization must be obtained pursuant to 10 CFR Parts 30 to 36, 40, 50, or 70

  13. No-migration variance petition. Appendices C--J: Volume 5, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    Volume V contains the appendices for: closure and post-closure plans; RCRA ground water monitoring waver; Waste Isolation Division Quality Program Manual; water quality sampling plan; WIPP Environmental Procedures Manual; sample handling and laboratory procedures; data analysis; and Annual Site Environmental Monitoring Report for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.

  14. Advanced Neutron Source enrichment study. Volume 2: Appendices -- Final report, Revision 12/94

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, R.A.; Ludewig, H.; Weeks, J.

    1994-01-01

    A study has been performed of the impact on performance of using low enriched uranium (20% 235 U) or medium enriched uranium (35% 235 U) as an alternative fuel for the Advanced Neutron Source, which is currently designed to use uranium enriched to 93% 235 U. Higher fuel densities and larger volume cores were evaluated at the lower enrichments in terms of impact on neutron flux, safety, safeguards, technical feasibility, and cost. The feasibility of fabricating uranium silicide fuel at increasing material density was specifically addressed by a panel of international experts on research reactor fuels. The most viable alternative designs for the reactor at lower enrichments were identified and discussed. Several sensitivity analyses were performed to gain an understanding of the performance of the reactor at parametric values of power, fuel density, core volume, and enrichment that were interpolations between the boundary values imposed on the study or extrapolations from known technology. Volume 2 of this report contains 26 appendices containing results, meeting minutes, and fuel panel presentations. There are 26 appendices in this volume

  15. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages: certificates of compliance. Volume 2, Revision 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    This directory contains a Summary Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volume 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Material Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance number is included at the back of each volume of the directory. The Summary Report includes a listing of all users of each package design prior to the publication date of the directory. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure that they have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program. Copies of the current approval may be obtained from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Public Document Room files (see Docket No. listed on each certificate) at 1717 H Street, Washington, DC 20555. Note the general license of 10 CFR 71.12 does not authorize the receipt, possession, use or transfer of byproduct source, or special nuclear material; such authorization must be obtained pursuant to 10 CFR Parts 30 to 36, 40, 50, or 70

  16. Hanford Site background: Part 1, Soil background for nonradioactive analytes. Revision 1, Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    Volume two contains the following appendices: Description of soil sampling sites; sampling narrative; raw data soil background; background data analysis; sitewide background soil sampling plan; and use of soil background data for the detection of contamination at waste management unit on the Hanford Site.

  17. The relationship between subcortical brain volume and striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in healthy humans assessed with [11 C]-raclopride and [11 C]-(+)-PHNO PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggio, Fernando; Ku Chung, Jun; Plitman, Eric; Boileau, Isabelle; Gerretsen, Philip; Kim, Julia; Iwata, Yusuke; Patel, Raihaan; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Remington, Gary; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2017-11-01

    Abnormalities in dopamine (DA) and brain morphology are observed in several neuropsychiatric disorders. However, it is not fully understood how these abnormalities may relate to one another. For such in vivo findings to be used as biomarkers for neuropsychiatric disease, it must be understood how variability in DA relates to brain structure under healthy conditions. We explored how the availability of striatal DA D 2/3 receptors (D 2/3 R) is related to the volume of subcortical brain structures in a sample of healthy humans. Differences in D 2/3 R availability measured with an antagonist radiotracer ([ 11 C]-raclopride) versus an agonist radiotracer ([ 11 C]-(+)-PHNO) were examined. Data from 62 subjects scanned with [ 11 C]-raclopride (mean age = 38.98 ± 14.45; 23 female) and 68 subjects scanned with [ 11 C]-(+)-PHNO (mean age = 38.54 ± 14.59; 25 female) were used. Subcortical volumes were extracted from T1-weighted images using the Multiple Automatically Generated Templates (MAGeT-Brain) algorithm. Partial correlations were used controlling for age, gender, and total brain volume. For [ 11 C]-(+)-PHNO, ventral caudate volumes were positively correlated with BP ND in the dorsal caudate and globus pallidus (GP). Ventral striatum (VS) volumes were positively correlated with BP ND in the VS. With [ 11 C]-raclopride, BP ND in the VS was negatively correlated with subiculum volume of the hippocampus. Moreover, BP ND in the GP was negatively correlated with the volume of the lateral posterior nucleus of the thalamus. Findings are purely exploratory and presented corrected and uncorrected for multiple comparisons. We hope they will help inform the interpretation of future PET studies where concurrent changes in D 2/3 R and brain morphology are observed. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5519-5534, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Mixed waste focus area integrated technical baseline report. Phase I, Volume 2: Revision 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This document (Volume 2) contains the Appendices A through J for the Mixed Waste Focus Area Integrated Technical Baseline Report Phase I for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included are: Waste Type Managers' Resumes, detailed information on wastewater, combustible organics, debris, unique waste, and inorganic homogeneous solids and soils, and waste data information. A detailed list of technology deficiencies and site needs identification is also provided

  19. Sequence Coding and Search System for licensee event reports: user's guide. Volume 1, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, N.M.; Mays, G.T.; Johnson, M.P.

    1985-04-01

    Operating experience data from nuclear power plants are essential for safety and reliability analyses, especially analyses of trends and patterns. The licensee event reports (LERs) that are submitted to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by the nuclear power plant utilities contain much of this data. The NRC's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) has developed, under contract with NSIC, a system for codifying the events reported in the LERs. The primary objective of the Sequence Coding and Search System (SCSS) is to reduce the descriptive text of the LERs to coded sequences that are both computer-readable and computer-searchable. This system provides a structured format for detailed coding of component, system, and unit effects as well as personnel errors. The database contains all current LERs submitted by nuclear power plant utilities for events occurring since 1981 and is updated on a continual basis. This four volume report documents and describes SCSS in detail. Volume 1 is a User's Guide for searching the SCSS database. This volume contains updated material through February 1985 of the working version of ORNL/NSIC-223, Vol. 1

  20. Preoperational baseline and site characterization report for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. Volume 1, Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weekes, D.C.; Lindsey, K.A.; Ford, B.H.; Jaeger, G.K.

    1996-12-01

    This document is the first in a two-volume series that comprise the site characterization report. Volume 1 contains data interpretation and information supporting the conclusions in the text (Appendices A through G). Volume 2 provides raw data. A site located between 200 East and 200 West Areas, in the central portion of the Hanford Site, was selected as the prime location for the ERDF. Modifications to the facility design minimize the footprint and have resulted in a significant reduction in the areal size. This change was initiated in part as a response to recommendations of the Hanford Future Site Uses Working Group to limit waste management activities to an exclusive zone within the squared-off boundary of the 200 Areas. Additionally, the reduction in size of the footprint was initiated to minimize impacts to ecology. The ERDF is designed for disposal of remediation wastes generated during the cleanup of Hanford Site and could be expanded to hold as much as 28 million yd 3 (21.4 million m 3 ) of solid waste

  1. Advanced Neutron Source enrichment study -- Volume 1: Main report. Final report, Revision 12/94

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, R.A.; Ludewig, H.; Weeks, J.

    1994-01-01

    A study has been performed of the impact on performance of using low enriched uranium (20% 235 U) or medium enriched uranium (35% 235 U) as an alternative fuel for the Advanced Neutron Source, which is currently designed to use uranium enriched to 93% 235 U. Higher fuel densities and larger volume cores were evaluated at the lower enrichments in terms of impact on neutron flux, safety, safeguards, technical feasibility, and cost. The feasibility of fabricating uranium silicide fuel at increasing material density was specifically addressed by a panel of international experts on research reactor fuels. The most viable alternative designs for the reactor at lower enrichments were identified and discussed. Several sensitivity analyses were performed to gain an understanding of the performance of the reactor at parametric values of power, fuel density, core volume, and enrichment that were interpolations between the boundary values imposed on the study or extrapolations from known technology. Volume 2 of this report contains 26 appendices containing results, meeting minutes, and fuel panel presentations

  2. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant No-Migration Variance Petition. Revision 1, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, Arlen

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of the WIPP No-Migration Variance Petition is to demonstrate, according to the requirements of RCRA {section}3004(d) and 40 CFR {section}268.6, that to a reasonable degree of certainty, there will be no migration of hazardous constituents from the facility for as long as the wastes remain hazardous. The DOE submitted the petition to the EPA in March 1989. Upon completion of its initial review, the EPA provided to DOE a Notice of Deficiencies (NOD). DOE responded to the EPA`s NOD and met with the EPA`s reviewers of the petition several times during 1989. In August 1989, EPA requested that DOE submit significant additional information addressing a variety of topics including: waste characterization, ground water hydrology, geology and dissolution features, monitoring programs, the gas generation test program, and other aspects of the project. This additional information was provided to EPA in January 1990 when DOE submitted Revision 1 of the Addendum to the petition. For clarity and ease of review, this document includes all of these submittals, and the information has been updated where appropriate. This document is divided into the following sections: Introduction, 1.0: Facility Description, 2.0: Waste Description, 3.0; Site Characterization, 4.0; Environmental Impact Analysis, 5.0; Prediction and Assessment of Infrequent Events, 6.0; and References, 7.0.

  3. No-migration variance petition. Appendices A--B: Volume 2, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    Volume II contains Appendix A, emergency plan and Appendix B, waste analysis plan. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Emergency plan and Procedures (WP 12-9, Rev. 5, 1989) provides an organized plan of action for dealing with emergencies at the WIPP. A contingency plan is included which is in compliance with 40 CFR Part 265, Subpart D. The waste analysis plan provides a description of the chemical and physical characteristics of the wastes to be emplaced in the WIPP underground facility. A detailed discussion of the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria and the rationale for its established units are also included.

  4. Design parameters and source terms: Volume 2, Source terms: Revision 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    The Design Parameters and Source Terms Document was prepared in accordance with DOE request and to provide data for the environmental impact study to be performed in the future for the Deaf Smith County, Texas site for a nuclear waste repository in salt. This document updates a previous unpublished report to the level of the Site Characterization Plan---Conceptual Design Report SCP-CDR. The previous study identifies the data needs for the Environmental Assessment effort for seven possible salt repository sites. Volume 2 contains tables of source terms

  5. RELAP/MOD3 code manual: User's guidelines. Volume 5, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, C.D.; Schultz, R.R.

    1995-08-01

    The RELAP5 code has been developed for best estimate transient simulation of light water reactor coolant systems during postulated accidents. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system and the core for loss-of-coolant accidents, and operational transients, such as anticipated transient without scram, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling approach is used that permits simulating a variety of thermal hydraulic systems. Control system and secondary system components are included to permit modeling of plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater systems. Volume V contains guidelines that have solved over the past several years through the use of the RELAP5 code

  6. Savannah River Site Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1, Section 1000 Addendum: Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jannik, G.T.

    1994-01-01

    This document -- the Savannah River Site Environmental Monitoring Plan (SRS EM Plan) -- has been prepared according to guidance contained in the DOE 5400 Series orders, in 10 CFR 834, and in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and environmental Surveillance [DOE, 1991]. The SRS EM Plan's purpose is to define the criteria, regulations, and guideline requirements with which SRS will comply. These criteria and requirements are applicable to environmental monitoring activities performed in support of the SRS Environmental Monitoring Program (SRS EM Program), WSRC-3Q1-2, Volume 1, Section 1100. They are not applicable to monitoring activities utilized exclusively for process monitoring/control. The environmental monitoring program requirements documented in the SRS EM Plan incorporate all applicable should requirements of DOE/EH-0173T and expand upon them to include nonradiological environmental monitoring program requirements

  7. RELAP/MOD3 code manual: User`s guidelines. Volume 5, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, C.D.; Schultz, R.R. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The RELAP5 code has been developed for best estimate transient simulation of light water reactor coolant systems during postulated accidents. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system and the core for loss-of-coolant accidents, and operational transients, such as anticipated transient without scram, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling approach is used that permits simulating a variety of thermal hydraulic systems. Control system and secondary system components are included to permit modeling of plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater systems. Volume V contains guidelines that have solved over the past several years through the use of the RELAP5 code.

  8. FY 93 thermal loading systems study final report: Volume 1. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saterlie, S.F.; Thomson, B.H.

    1994-01-01

    The ability to meet the overall performance requirements for the proposed Mined Geology Disposal System at Yucca Mountain, Nevada requires the two major subsystem (natural barriers and engineered barriers) to positively contribute to containment and radionuclide isolation. In addition to the postclosure performance the proposed repository must meet preclosure requirements of safety, retrievability, and operability. Cost and schedule were also considered. The thermal loading strategy chosen may significantly affect both the postclosure and preclosure performance of the proposed repository. Although the current Site Characterization Plan reference case is 57 kilowatts (kW)/acre, other thermal loading strategies (different areal mass loadings) have been proposed which possess both advantages and disadvantages. The objectives of the FY 1993 Thermal Loading Study were to (1) place bounds on the thermal loading which would establish the loading regime that is ''too hot'' and the loading regime that is ''too cold'', to (2) ''grade'' or evaluate the performance, as a function of thermal loading, of the repository to contain high level wastes against performance criteria and to (3) evaluate the performance of the various options with respect to cost, safety, and operability. Additionally, the effort was to (4) identify important uncertainties that need to be resolved by tests and/or analyses in order to complete a performance assessment on the effects of thermal loading. The FY 1993 Thermal Loading Study was conducted from December 1, 1992 to December 30, 1993 and this final report provides the findings of the study. Volume 1 contains the Introduction; Performance requirements; Input and assumptions; Near-field thermal analysis; Far-field thermal analysis; Cost analysis; Other considerations; System analysis; Additional thermal analysis; and Conclusions and recommendations. 71 refs., 54 figs

  9. Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume 3, Appendix A: Public response to revised NOI, Appendix B: Environmental restoration, Appendix C, Environmental impact analysis methods, Appendix D, Risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    Volume three contains appendices for the following: Public comments do DOE's proposed revisions to the scope of the waste management programmatic environmental impact statement; Environmental restoration sensitivity analysis; Environmental impacts analysis methods; and Waste management facility human health risk estimates

  10. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages. Volume 1. Summary report of NRC approved packages. Revision 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    This directory contains a Summary Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Approved Packages (Volume 1), all Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs (Volume 3) for Radioactive Material Packages effective September 14, 1983

  11. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Functional modules F9--F16 -- Volume 2, Part 2, Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, J.T.; Hoffman, T.J.; Emmett, M.B.; Childs, K.W.; Petrie, L.M.; Landers, N.F.; Bryan, C.B.; Giles, G.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. The manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation, Volume 2--for functional module documentation; and Volume 3--for documentation of the data libraries and subroutine libraries. This volume discusses the following functional modules: MORSE-SGC; HEATING 7.2; KENO V.a; JUNEBUG-II; HEATPLOT-S; REGPLOT 6; PLORIGEN; and OCULAR.

  12. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Functional modules F9--F16 -- Volume 2, Part 2, Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, J.T.; Hoffman, T.J.; Emmett, M.B.; Childs, K.W.; Petrie, L.M.; Landers, N.F.; Bryan, C.B.; Giles, G.E.

    1995-04-01

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. The manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation, Volume 2--for functional module documentation; and Volume 3--for documentation of the data libraries and subroutine libraries. This volume discusses the following functional modules: MORSE-SGC; HEATING 7.2; KENO V.a; JUNEBUG-II; HEATPLOT-S; REGPLOT 6; PLORIGEN; and OCULAR

  13. Standard technical specifications - Babcock and Wilcox Plants: Bases (Sections 2.0-3.3). Volume 2, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This NUREG contains the improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for Babcock and Wilcox (B ampersand W) plants. Revision 1 incorporates the cumulative changes to Revision 0, which was published in September 1992. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, specifically the B ampersand W Owners Group (BWOG), NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993 (58 FR 39132). Licensees are encouraged to upgrade their technical specifications consistent with those criteria and conforming, to the extent practical and consistent with the licensing basis for the facility, to Revision 1 to the improved STS. The Commission continues to place the highest priority on requests for complete conversions to the improved STS. Licensees adopting portions of the improved STS to existing technical specifications should adopt all related requirements, as applicable, to achieve a high degree of standardization and consistency

  14. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Functional modules F1--F8 -- Volume 2, Part 1, Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, N.M.; Petrie, L.M.; Westfall, R.M.; Bucholz, J.A.; Hermann, O.W.; Fraley, S.K.

    1995-04-01

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. The manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation; Volume 2--for functional module documentation; and Volume 3--for documentation of the data libraries and subroutine libraries

  15. SCALE: A modular code system for performing standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluation. Functional modules F1--F8 -- Volume 2, Part 1, Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, N.M.; Petrie, L.M.; Westfall, R.M.; Bucholz, J.A.; Hermann, O.W.; Fraley, S.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automate the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.2 of the system. The manual is divided into three volumes: Volume 1--for the control module documentation; Volume 2--for functional module documentation; and Volume 3--for documentation of the data libraries and subroutine libraries.

  16. Internal magnesium, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, and the regulation of the steady-state volume of human red blood cells by the Na/K/2Cl cotransport system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This study is concerned with the relationship between the Na/K/Cl cotransport system and the steady-state volume (MCV) of red blood cells. Cotransport rate was determined in unfractionated and density- separated red cells of different MCV from different donors to see whether cotransport differences contribute to the difference in the distribution of MCVs. Cotransport, studied in cells at their original MCVs, was determined as the bumetanide (10 microM)-sensitive 22Na efflux in the presence of ouabain (50 microM) after adjusting cellular Na (Nai) and Ki to achieve near maximal transport rates. This condition was chosen to rule out MCV-related differences in Nai and Ki that might contribute to differences in the net chemical driving force for cotransport. We found that in both unfractionated and density-separated red cells the cotransport rate was inversely correlated with MCV. MCV was correlated directly with red cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG), whereas total red cell Mg was only slightly elevated in cells with high MCV. Thus intracellular free Mg (Mgifree) is evidently lower in red cells with high 2,3-DPG (i.e., high MCV) and vice versa. Results from flux measurements at their original MCVs, after altering Mgifree with the ionophore A23187, indicated a high Mgi sensitivity of cotransport: depletion of Mgifree inhibited and an elevation of Mgifree increased the cotransport rate. The apparent K0.5 for Mgifree was approximately 0.4 mM. Maximizing Mgifree at optimum Nai and Ki minimized the differences in cotransport rates among the different donors. It is concluded that the relative cotransport rate is regulated for cells in the steady state at their original cell volume, not by the number of copies of the cotransporter but by differences in Mgifree. The interindividual differences in Mgifree, determined primarily by differences in the 2,3-DPG content, are responsible for the differences in the relative cotransport activity that results in an inverse relationship

  17. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), Slick Rock, Colorado, Revision 1. Volume 1, Calculations, Final design for construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Volume one contains calculations for: embankment design--embankment material properties; Union Carbide site--bedrock contours; vicinity properties--origin of contamination; North Continent and Union Carbide sites contaminated materials--excavation quantities; and demolition debris--quantity estimate

  18. Entorhinal cortex volume measured with 3T MRI is positively correlated with the Wechsler memory scale-revised logical/verbal memory score for healthy subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Masami; Abe, Osamu; Takao, Hidemasa; Inano, Sachiko; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni; Miyati, Tosiaki; Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Hayashi, Naoto; Kabasawa, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Shigeki; Ino, Kenji; Iida, Kyouhito; Yano, Keiichi

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies revealed a correlation between local brain volume and cognitive function. The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between local gray matter volume and the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) logical/verbal memory (WMS-R-verbal) score in healthy adults using a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were obtained in 1,169 healthy adults. The T1-weighted images in native space were bias-corrected, spatially normalized, and segmented into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid images with Statistical Parametric Mapping 5. To investigate regionally the specific effects of the WMS-R-verbal score on the gray matter images, simple regression analysis was performed by VBM treating age, total intracranial volume, and gender as confounding covariates. A P value of less than 0.05 corrected with false discovery rate in voxel difference was considered to be statistically significant. Our study showed a significant positive correlation between the WMS-R-verbal score and the bilateral entorhinal cortex volume. In the right entorhinal, T value is 4.75, and the size of the clusters is 155 voxels. In the left entorhinal, T value is 4.08, and the size of the clusters is 23 voxels. A significant negative correlation was not found. To our knowledge, this is the first VBM study showing that entorhinal cortex volume is positively correlated with the WMS-R-verbal score for healthy subjects. Therefore, in our structural neuroimaging study, we add evidence to the hypothesis that the entorhinal cortex is involved in verbal memory processing. (orig.)

  19. Entorhinal cortex volume measured with 3T MRI is positively correlated with the Wechsler memory scale-revised logical/verbal memory score for healthy subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Masami [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Radiological Technology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kanazawa University, Tsunomatyou, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa (Japan); Abe, Osamu; Takao, Hidemasa; Inano, Sachiko; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Miyati, Tosiaki [Kanazawa University, Tsunomatyou, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa (Japan); Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Hayashi, Naoto [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Computational Diagnostic Radiology and Preventive Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kabasawa, Hiroyuki [GE Healthcare, Japan Applied Science Laboratory, Hino (Japan); Aoki, Shigeki [Juntendo University, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Ino, Kenji; Iida, Kyouhito; Yano, Keiichi [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Radiological Technology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    Previous studies revealed a correlation between local brain volume and cognitive function. The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between local gray matter volume and the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) logical/verbal memory (WMS-R-verbal) score in healthy adults using a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were obtained in 1,169 healthy adults. The T1-weighted images in native space were bias-corrected, spatially normalized, and segmented into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid images with Statistical Parametric Mapping 5. To investigate regionally the specific effects of the WMS-R-verbal score on the gray matter images, simple regression analysis was performed by VBM treating age, total intracranial volume, and gender as confounding covariates. A P value of less than 0.05 corrected with false discovery rate in voxel difference was considered to be statistically significant. Our study showed a significant positive correlation between the WMS-R-verbal score and the bilateral entorhinal cortex volume. In the right entorhinal, T value is 4.75, and the size of the clusters is 155 voxels. In the left entorhinal, T value is 4.08, and the size of the clusters is 23 voxels. A significant negative correlation was not found. To our knowledge, this is the first VBM study showing that entorhinal cortex volume is positively correlated with the WMS-R-verbal score for healthy subjects. Therefore, in our structural neuroimaging study, we add evidence to the hypothesis that the entorhinal cortex is involved in verbal memory processing. (orig.)

  20. Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR): Data manual. Part 3: Hardware component failure data; Volume 5, Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reece, W.J.; Gilbert, B.G.; Richards, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    This data manual contains a hard copy of the information in the Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) Version 3.5 database, which is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUCLARR was designed as a tool for risk analysis. Many of the nuclear reactors in the US and several outside the US are represented in the NUCLARR database. NUCLARR includes both human error probability estimates for workers at the plants and hardware failure data for nuclear reactor equipment. Aggregations of these data yield valuable reliability estimates for probabilistic risk assessments and human reliability analyses. The data manual is organized to permit manual searches of the information if the computerized version is not available. Originally, the manual was published in three parts. In this revision the introductory material located in the original Part 1 has been incorporated into the text of Parts 2 and 3. The user can now find introductory material either in the original Part 1, or in Parts 2 and 3 as revised. Part 2 contains the human error probability data, and Part 3, the hardware component reliability data

  1. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) planning for the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of the waste. This report estimates volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms of GTCC LLW to the year 2035. It groups the waste into four categories, representative of the type of generator or holder of the waste: Nuclear Utilities, Sealed Sources, DOE-Held, and Other Generator. GTCC LLW includes activated metals (activation hardware from reactor operation and decommissioning), process wastes (i.e., resins, filters, etc.), sealed sources, and other wastes routinely generated by users of radioactive material. Estimates reflect the possible effect that packaging and concentration averaging may have on the total volume of GTCC LLW. Possible GTCC mixed LLW is also addressed. Nuclear utilities will probably generate the largest future volume of GTCC LLW with 65--83% of the total volume. The other generators will generate 17--23% of the waste volume, while GTCC sealed sources are expected to contribute 1--12%. A legal review of DOE`s obligations indicates that the current DOE-Held wastes described in this report will not require management as GTCC LLW because of the contractual circumstances under which they were accepted for storage. This report concludes that the volume of GTCC LLW should not pose a significant management problem from a scientific or technical standpoint. The projected volume is small enough to indicate that a dedicated GTCC LLW disposal facility may not be justified. Instead, co-disposal with other waste types is being considered as an option.

  2. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) planning for the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of the waste. This report estimates volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms of GTCC LLW to the year 2035. It groups the waste into four categories, representative of the type of generator or holder of the waste: Nuclear Utilities, Sealed Sources, DOE-Held, and Other Generator. GTCC LLW includes activated metals (activation hardware from reactor operation and decommissioning), process wastes (i.e., resins, filters, etc.), sealed sources, and other wastes routinely generated by users of radioactive material. Estimates reflect the possible effect that packaging and concentration averaging may have on the total volume of GTCC LLW. Possible GTCC mixed LLW is also addressed. Nuclear utilities will probably generate the largest future volume of GTCC LLW with 65--83% of the total volume. The other generators will generate 17--23% of the waste volume, while GTCC sealed sources are expected to contribute 1--12%. A legal review of DOE's obligations indicates that the current DOE-Held wastes described in this report will not require management as GTCC LLW because of the contractual circumstances under which they were accepted for storage. This report concludes that the volume of GTCC LLW should not pose a significant management problem from a scientific or technical standpoint. The projected volume is small enough to indicate that a dedicated GTCC LLW disposal facility may not be justified. Instead, co-disposal with other waste types is being considered as an option

  3. 1, 2, 3 ... FAIR !

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturm, C.; Sharkov, B.; Stoecker, H.

    2010-01-01

    The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR at Darmstadt/Germany will provide worldwide unique accelerator and experimental facilities allowing for a large variety of unprecedented forefront research in hadron, nuclear, atomic and plasma physics and applied sciences. The start version of FAIR, the so called Modularized Start Version includes a basic accelerator as well as three experimental modules - 1, 2, 3 FAIR!

  4. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages. Volume 1, Revision 17: Report of NRC approved packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This directory contains a Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volume 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Materials Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on Quality Assurance Programs and Packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR section 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure themselves that they have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program

  5. Directory of Certificates of Compliance for radioactive materials packages: Report of NRC approved packages. Volume 1, Revision 18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the front of Volumes 1 and 2. An alphabetical listing by user name is included in the back of Volume 3 of approved QA programs. The reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved QA programs prior to the publication date.

  6. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), Slick Rock, Colorado, Revision 1, Volume 3. Calculations, Final design for construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Volume three contains calculations for: site hydrology--rainfall intensity, duration, and frequency relations; site hydrology-- probable maximum precipitation; erosion protection--rock quality evaluation; erosion protection--embankment top and side slope; erosion protection--embankment toe apron; erosion protection-- gradations and layer thicknesses; Union Carbide site--temporary drainage ditch design; Union Carbide site--retention basin sediment volume; Union Carbide site--retention basin sizing; Burro Canyon site temporary drainage--temporary drainage facilities; and Union Carbide site temporary drainage--water balance

  7. Directory of Certificates of Compliance for radioactive materials packages: Report of NRC approved packages. Volume 1, Revision 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the front of Volumes 1 and 2. An alphabetical listing by user name is included in the back of Volume 3 of approved QA programs. The reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved QA programs prior to the publication date

  8. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), Slick Rock, Colorado, Revision 1. Volume 2, Calculations, Final design for construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Volume two contains calculations for: embankment design--slope stability analysis; embankment design--excavation stability; embankment design--settlement and cover cracking analysis; radon barrier design--statistical analysis of ra-226 concentrations for North Continent and Union Carbide sites; radon barrier design--RAECOM input data; radon barrier design--design thickness; and cover design--frost penetration depth

  9. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), Slick Rock, Colorado, Revision 1, Volume 4. Calculations, Final design for construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Volume four contains calculations for: Borrow areas--site evaluation; temporary facilities--material quantities; embankment quantities--excavation and cover materials; Burro Canyon site excavation quantities--rippable and unrippable materials; site restoration--earthwork quantities and seeding; and bid schedule quantities and material balance

  10. Directory of Certificates of Compliance for Radioactive Materials Packages. Summary report of NRC approved packages. Volume 1, Revision 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    This directory contains a Summary Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volume 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Material Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance number is included at the back of each volume of the directory. The Summary Report includes a listing of all users of each package design prior to the publication date of the directory. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure them that they have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program. Copies of the current approval may be obtained from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Public Document Room files (see Docket No. listed on each certificate) at 1717 H Street, Washington, DC 20555. Note that the general license of 10 CFR 71.12 does not authorize the receipt, possession, use or transfer of byproduct source, or special nuclear material; such authorization must be obtained pursuant to 10 CFR Parts 30 to 36, 40, 50, or 70

  11. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages. Summary report of NRC approved packages. Volume 1. Revision 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    This directory contains a Summary Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volume 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Material Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and Corresponding Certificate of Compliance number is included at the back of each volume of the directory. The Summary Report includes a listing of all users of each package design prior to the publication date of the directory. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Sections 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure them that they have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program. Copies of the current approval may be obtained from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Public Document Room files (see Docket No. listed on each certificate) at 1717 H Street, Washington, DC 20555. Note that the general license of 10 CFR 71.12 does not authorize the receipt, possession, use or transfer of byproduct source, or special nuclear material; such authorization must be obtained pursuant to 10 CFR Parts 30 to 36, 40, 50, or 70

  12. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages. Summary report of NRC approved packages. Volume 1, Revision 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    This directory contains a Summary Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volume 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Material Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance number is included at the back of each volume of the directory. The Summary Report includes a listing of all users of each package design prior to the publication date of the directory. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure that they have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program. Copies of the current approval may be obtained from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Public Document Room files (see Docket No. listed on each certificate) at 1717 H Street, Washington, DC 20555. Note that the general license of 10 CFR 71.12 does not authorize the receipt, possession, use or transfer of byproduct source, or special nuclear material; such authorization must be obtained pursuant to 10 CFR Parts 30 to 36, 40, 50, or 70

  13. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 1, Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    This volume includes the following chapters: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant RCRA A permit application; facility description; waste analysis plan; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; RCRA contingency plan; personnel training; corrective action for solid waste management units; and other Federal laws.

  14. 2,3-Diaminophenazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyu Fu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we synthesized 2,3-diaminophenazine (DAP from o-phenylenediamine (OP using fungal laccase as a biocatalyst. The conversion ratio of OP monomer was 85% and the yield of the final purified product, DAP, was 63%. The structure of the main product, DAP, was confirmed by using several spectroscopy techniques (UV-VIS, IR, 2D-NMR, and MS.

  15. Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume 3, Appendix A: Public response to revised NOI, Appendix B: Environmental restoration, Appendix C, Environmental impact analysis methods, Appendix D, Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    Volume three contains appendices for the following: Public comments do DOE`s proposed revisions to the scope of the waste management programmatic environmental impact statement; Environmental restoration sensitivity analysis; Environmental impacts analysis methods; and Waste management facility human health risk estimates.

  16. U.S. Navy Marine Climatic Atlas of the World. Volume 5. South Pacific Ocean. (Revised 1979)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    5 50S 81 03W 3.5 4.6 Corral, Bah a Corral ---------------. 39 52 7326W 3.2 4.0 4,3 Palta ------------------------------ 50 Ss 81 (7W 3.8 4.9...17 168 45E 3.6 5.2 3.3 Palta ---------------------------- 5 81 07W 3.8 4.9 2.4 Tlara- ------------------------4 35 8117W 4,0 5.2 2.6 Jaluit Atoll (SE

  17. Revised users manual, Pulverized Coal Gasification or Combustion: 2-dimensional (87-PCGC-2): Final report, Volume 2. [87-PCGC-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, P.J.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S.

    1987-12-01

    A two-dimensional, steady-state model for describing a variety of reactive and non-reactive flows, including pulverized coal combustion and gasification, is presented. Recent code revisions and additions are described. The model, referred to as 87-PCGC-2, is applicable to cylindrical axi-symmetric systems. Turbulence is accounted for in both the fluid mechanics equations and the combustion scheme. Radiation from gases, walls, and particles is taken into account using either a flux method or discrete ordinates method. The particle phase is modeled in a Lagrangian framework, such that mean paths of particle groups are followed. Several multi-step coal devolatilization schemes are included along with a heterogeneous reaction scheme that allows for both diffusion and chemical reaction. Major gas-phase reactions are modeled assuming local instantaneous equilibrium, and thus the reaction rates are limited by the turbulent rate mixing. A NO/sub x/ finite rate chemistry submodel is included which integrates chemical kinetics and the statistics of the turbulence. The gas phase is described by elliptic partial differential equations that are solved by an iterative line-by-line technique. Under-relaxation is used to achieve numerical stability. The generalized nature of the model allows for calculation of isothermal fluid mechanicsgaseous combustion, droplet combustion, particulate combustion and various mixtures of the above, including combustion of coal-water and coal-oil slurries. Both combustion and gasification environments are permissible. User information and theory are presented, along with sample problems. 106 refs.

  18. Evaluation of severe accident risks: Methodology for the containment, source term, consequence, and risk integration analyses. Volume 1, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorham, E.D.; Breeding, R.J.; Brown, T.D.; Harper, F.T.; Helton, J.C.; Murfin, W.B.; Hora, S.C.

    1993-12-01

    NUREG-1150 examines the risk to the public from five nuclear power plants. The NUREG-1150 plant studies are Level III probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) and, as such, they consist of four analysis components: accident frequency analysis, accident progression analysis, source term analysis, and consequence analysis. This volume summarizes the methods utilized in performing the last three components and the assembly of these analyses into an overall risk assessment. The NUREG-1150 analysis approach is based on the following ideas: (1) general and relatively fast-running models for the individual analysis components, (2) well-defined interfaces between the individual analysis components, (3) use of Monte Carlo techniques together with an efficient sampling procedure to propagate uncertainties, (4) use of expert panels to develop distributions for important phenomenological issues, and (5) automation of the overall analysis. Many features of the new analysis procedures were adopted to facilitate a comprehensive treatment of uncertainty in the complete risk analysis. Uncertainties in the accident frequency, accident progression and source term analyses were included in the overall uncertainty assessment. The uncertainties in the consequence analysis were not included in this assessment. A large effort was devoted to the development of procedures for obtaining expert opinion and the execution of these procedures to quantify parameters and phenomena for which there is large uncertainty and divergent opinions in the reactor safety community

  19. Revised shallow and deep water-level and storage-volume changes in the Equus Beds Aquifer near Wichita, Kansas, predevelopment to 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Cristi V.; Lanning-Rush, Jennifer L.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2013-01-01

    credits from the Equus Beds aquifer by the city of Wichita. The 1993 water levels correspond to the lowest recorded levels and largest storage declines since 1940. Revised and new water-level maps of shallow and deep layers were developed to better represent the general condition of the aquifer. Only static water levels were used to better represent the general condition of the aquifer and comply with Wichita’s ASR permits. To ensure adequate data density, the January 1993 period was expanded to October 1992 through February 1993. Static 1993 water levels from the deep aquifer layer of the Equus Beds aquifer possibly could be used as the lower baseline for regulatory purposes. Previously, maps of water-level changes used to estimate the storage-volume changes included a combination of static (unaffected by pumping or nearby pumping) and stressed (affected by pumping or nearby pumping) water levels from wells. Some of these wells were open to the shallow aquifer layer and some were open to the deep aquifer layer of the Equus Beds aquifer. In this report, only static water levels in the shallow aquifer layer were used to determine storage-volume changes. The effects on average water-level and storage-volume change from the use of mixed, stressed water levels and a specific yield of 0.20 were compared to the use of static water levels in the shallow aquifer and a specific yield of 0.15. This comparison indicates that the change in specific yield causes storage-volume changes to decrease about 25 percent, whereas the use of static water levels in the shallow aquifer layer causes an increase of less than 4 percent. Use of a specific yield of 0.15 will result in substantial decreases in the amount of storage-volume change compared to those reported previously that were calculated using a specific yield of 0.20. Based on these revised water-level maps and computations, the overall decline and change in storage from predevelopment to 1993 represented a loss in storage of about

  20. Revising Translations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kirsten Wølch; Schjoldager, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The paper explains the theoretical background and findings of an empirical study of revision policies, using Denmark as a case in point. After an overview of important definitions, types and parameters, the paper explains the methods and data gathered from a questionnaire survey and an interview...... survey. Results clearly show that most translation companies regard both unilingual and comparative revisions as essential components of professional quality assurance. Data indicate that revision is rarely fully comparative, as the preferred procedure seems to be a unilingual revision followed by a more...... or less comparative rereading. Though questionnaire data seem to indicate that translation companies use linguistic correctness and presentation as the only revision parameters, interview data reveal that textual and communicative aspects are also considered. Generally speaking, revision is not carried...

  1. Leak testing plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory liquid low-level waste systems (active tanks): Revision 2. Volume 1: Regulatory background and plan approach; Volume 2: Methods, protocols, and schedules; Volume 3: Evaluation of the ORNL/LT-823DP differential pressure leak detection method; Appendix to Revision 2: DOE/EPA/TDEC correspondence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, D.G.; Wise, R.F.; Starr, J.W.; Maresca, J.W. Jr. [Vista Research, Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States)

    1994-11-01

    This document, the Leak Testing Plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Liquid Low-Level Waste System (Active Tanks), comprises three volumes. The first two volumes address the component-based leak testing plan for the liquid low-level waste system at Oak Ridge, while the third volume describes the performance evaluation of the leak detection method that will be used to test this system. Volume 1, describes that portion of the liquid low-level waste system at that will be tested; it provides the regulatory background, especially in terms of the requirements stipulated in the Federal Facilities Agreement, upon which the leak testing plan is based. Volume 1 also describes the foundation of the plan, portions of which were abstracted from existing federal documents that regulate the petroleum and hazardous chemicals industries. Finally, Volume 1 gives an overview the plan, describing the methods that will be used to test the four classes of components in the liquid low-level waste system. Volume 2 takes the general information on component classes and leak detection methods presented in Volume 1 and shows how it applies particularly to each of the individual components. A complete test plan for each of the components is presented, with emphasis placed on the methods designated for testing tanks. The protocol for testing tank systems is described, and general leak testing schedules are presented. Volume 3 describes the results of a performance evaluation completed for the leak testing method that will be used to test the small tanks at the facility (those less than 3,000 gal in capacity). Some of the details described in Volumes 1 and 2 are expected to change as additional information is obtained, as the viability of candidate release detection methods is proven in the Oak Ridge environment, and as the testing program evolves.

  2. Leak testing plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory liquid low-level waste systems (active tanks): Revision 2. Volume 1: Regulatory background and plan approach; Volume 2: Methods, protocols, and schedules; Volume 3: Evaluation of the ORNL/LT-823DP differential pressure leak detection method; Appendix to Revision 2: DOE/EPA/TDEC correspondence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, D.G.; Wise, R.F.; Starr, J.W.; Maresca, J.W. Jr.

    1994-11-01

    This document, the Leak Testing Plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Liquid Low-Level Waste System (Active Tanks), comprises three volumes. The first two volumes address the component-based leak testing plan for the liquid low-level waste system at Oak Ridge, while the third volume describes the performance evaluation of the leak detection method that will be used to test this system. Volume 1, describes that portion of the liquid low-level waste system at that will be tested; it provides the regulatory background, especially in terms of the requirements stipulated in the Federal Facilities Agreement, upon which the leak testing plan is based. Volume 1 also describes the foundation of the plan, portions of which were abstracted from existing federal documents that regulate the petroleum and hazardous chemicals industries. Finally, Volume 1 gives an overview the plan, describing the methods that will be used to test the four classes of components in the liquid low-level waste system. Volume 2 takes the general information on component classes and leak detection methods presented in Volume 1 and shows how it applies particularly to each of the individual components. A complete test plan for each of the components is presented, with emphasis placed on the methods designated for testing tanks. The protocol for testing tank systems is described, and general leak testing schedules are presented. Volume 3 describes the results of a performance evaluation completed for the leak testing method that will be used to test the small tanks at the facility (those less than 3,000 gal in capacity). Some of the details described in Volumes 1 and 2 are expected to change as additional information is obtained, as the viability of candidate release detection methods is proven in the Oak Ridge environment, and as the testing program evolves

  3. Luther's Lectures on Genesis 1:26-2:3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Else Marie Wiberg

    2017-01-01

    This is a revised translation of Luther's Lectures on Genesis 1:26-2:3 (1535), drawn from Luther's Works, vol. 1, 55-82, but based on the Latin version of WA 42, 41-62. This revised translation is done with regard to inclusive language, and in this respect much closer to the Latin origin than...... to the English of the LW. I have added completely new annotations to explain Luther's theology as well as contetualize it, and chiefly new footnotes to explain the language and translations made....

  4. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages. Volume 3, revision 1. Summary report of NRC approved quality assurance programs for radioactive material packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    The directory contains a Summary Report of NRC approved Packages (Volume 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Material Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, and index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance number is included at the back of each volume of the directory. The Summary Report includes a listing of all users of each package design prior to the publication date of the directory

  5. High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 7. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burt, D.L.

    1994-04-01

    The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 7) presents the standards and requirements for the following sections: Occupational Safety and Health, and Environmental Protection

  6. High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 7. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, D.L.

    1994-04-01

    The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 7) presents the standards and requirements for the following sections: Occupational Safety and Health, and Environmental Protection.

  7. 2-(3-Hydroxybenzylaminoacetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Hua Zhi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available There are two independent 2-(3-hydroxybenzylaminoacetic acid molecules, C9H11NO3, in the asymmetric unit of the title compound. The dihedral angle between the benzene rings of the two independent molecules is 58.12 (4°. The crystal packing is stablized by intermolecular O—H...O and N—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  8. Transition projects, Fiscal Year 1996: Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for WBS 1.31, 7.1, and 6.13. Revision 1, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartmell, D.B.

    1995-09-01

    Based on US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) review, specific areas of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), Transition Projects ``Draft`` Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) were revised in preparation for the RL approval ceremony on September 26, 1995. These changes were reviewed with the appropriate RL Project Manager. The changes have been incorporated to the MYPP electronic file, and hard copies replacing the ``Draft`` MYPP will be distributed after the formal signing. In addition to the comments received, a summary level schedule and outyear estimates for the K Basin deactivation beginning in FY 2001 have been included. The K Basin outyear waste data is nearing completion this week and will be incorporated. This exclusion was discussed with Mr. N.D. Moorer, RL, Facility Transition Program Support/Integration. The attached MYPP scope/schedule reflects the Integrated Target Case submitted in the April 1995 Activity Data Sheets (ADS) with the exception of B Plant and the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The 8 Plant assumption in FY 1997 reflects the planning case in the FY 1997 ADS with a shortfall of $5 million. PFP assumptions have been revised from the FY 1997 ADS based on the direction provided this past summer by DOE-Headquarters. This includes the acceleration of the polycube stabilization back to its originally planned completion date. Although the overall program repricing in FY 1996 allowed the scheduled acceleration to fall with the funding allocation, the FY 1997 total reflects a shortfall of $6 million.

  9. Transition projects, Fiscal Year 1996: Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for WBS 1.31, 7.1, and 6.13. Revision 1, Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartmell, D.B.

    1995-09-01

    Based on US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) review, specific areas of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), Transition Projects ''Draft'' Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) were revised in preparation for the RL approval ceremony on September 26, 1995. These changes were reviewed with the appropriate RL Project Manager. The changes have been incorporated to the MYPP electronic file, and hard copies replacing the ''Draft'' MYPP will be distributed after the formal signing. In addition to the comments received, a summary level schedule and outyear estimates for the K Basin deactivation beginning in FY 2001 have been included. The K Basin outyear waste data is nearing completion this week and will be incorporated. This exclusion was discussed with Mr. N.D. Moorer, RL, Facility Transition Program Support/Integration. The attached MYPP scope/schedule reflects the Integrated Target Case submitted in the April 1995 Activity Data Sheets (ADS) with the exception of B Plant and the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The 8 Plant assumption in FY 1997 reflects the planning case in the FY 1997 ADS with a shortfall of $5 million. PFP assumptions have been revised from the FY 1997 ADS based on the direction provided this past summer by DOE-Headquarters. This includes the acceleration of the polycube stabilization back to its originally planned completion date. Although the overall program repricing in FY 1996 allowed the scheduled acceleration to fall with the funding allocation, the FY 1997 total reflects a shortfall of $6 million

  10. Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR): Data manual. Part 2: Human error probability (HEP) data; Volume 5, Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, W.J.; Gilbert, B.G.; Richards, R.E. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-09-01

    This data manual contains a hard copy of the information in the Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) Version 3.5 database, which is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUCLARR was designed as a tool for risk analysis. Many of the nuclear reactors in the US and several outside the US are represented in the NUCLARR database. NUCLARR includes both human error probability estimates for workers at the plants and hardware failure data for nuclear reactor equipment. Aggregations of these data yield valuable reliability estimates for probabilistic risk assessments and human reliability analyses. The data manual is organized to permit manual searches of the information if the computerized version is not available. Originally, the manual was published in three parts. In this revision the introductory material located in the original Part 1 has been incorporated into the text of Parts 2 and 3. The user can now find introductory material either in the original Part 1, or in Parts 2 and 3 as revised. Part 2 contains the human error probability data, and Part 3, the hardware component reliability data.

  11. Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR): Data manual. Part 2: Human error probability (HEP) data; Volume 5, Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reece, W.J.; Gilbert, B.G.; Richards, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    This data manual contains a hard copy of the information in the Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) Version 3.5 database, which is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUCLARR was designed as a tool for risk analysis. Many of the nuclear reactors in the US and several outside the US are represented in the NUCLARR database. NUCLARR includes both human error probability estimates for workers at the plants and hardware failure data for nuclear reactor equipment. Aggregations of these data yield valuable reliability estimates for probabilistic risk assessments and human reliability analyses. The data manual is organized to permit manual searches of the information if the computerized version is not available. Originally, the manual was published in three parts. In this revision the introductory material located in the original Part 1 has been incorporated into the text of Parts 2 and 3. The user can now find introductory material either in the original Part 1, or in Parts 2 and 3 as revised. Part 2 contains the human error probability data, and Part 3, the hardware component reliability data

  12. Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR): Data manual, Part 2: Human Error Probability (HEP) Data. Volume 5, Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reece, W.J.; Gilbert, B.G.; Richards, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    This data manual contains a hard copy of the information in the Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) Version 3.5 database, which is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUCLARR was designed as a tool for risk analysis. Many of the nuclear reactors in the US and several outside the US are represented in the NUCLARR database. NUCLARR includes both human error probability estimates for workers at the plants and hardware failure data for nuclear reactor equipment. Aggregations of these data yield valuable reliability estimates for probabilistic risk assessments and human reliability analyses. The data manual is organized to permit manual searches of the information if the computerized version is not available. Originally, the manual was published in three parts. In this revision the introductory material located in the original Part 1 has been incorporated into the text of Parts 2 and 3. The user can now find introductory material either in the original Part 1, or in Parts 2 and 3 as revised. Part 2 contains the human error probability data, and Part 3, the hardware component reliability data

  13. Remedial Investigation for Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) Hanover, New Hampshire. Phase 2. Volume 1. Sections 1.0 Through 8.0. Revision 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-18

    banks, wide-ranging carnivorous mammals also might occur locally, such as the Mink { Mustela vison ). 6.2.3.6 Rare and Endangered Species In the...from direct contact with soil, sediment, and/or surface water Respiratory intake of contaminants from surface water via gills of fish and/or

  14. 2,3-Dimethylbenzoxazolium Methosulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanas Kurutos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An economically benign solvent-free approach to synthesise 2,3-dimethylbenzoxazolium methosulfate is reported in the present work. The title compound is derived from 2-methylbenzoxazole reacting with a slight excess of dimethylsulfate, at room temperature. The reaction proceeds via an intrinsic exothermic reaction, and the benzoxazolium salt crystallized after a short time into a white crystalline form. The product was filtered off and washed with acetone and diethyl ether to provide the desired product in 89% yield. The target compound was evaluated by ESI/MS analysis.

  15. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages. Volume 3, Revision 14: Report of NRC approved quality assurance programs for radioactive materials packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This directory contains a Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volume 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Materials Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on Quality Assurance Programs and Packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR section 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure themselves that they have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program

  16. Directory of Certificates of Compliance for Radioactive Materials Packages. Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Material Packages. Volume 3. Revision 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    This directory contains a Summary Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Approved Packages (Volume I), all Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs (Volume 3) for Radioactive Material Packages effective October 1, 1985. The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the back of Volumes 1 and 2 of the directory. A listing by packaging types is included in the back of Volume 2. An alphabetical listing by Company name is included in the back of Volume 3 for approved QA programs. The Summary Reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved QA programs prior to the publication date of the directory. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packages must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR Section 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure themselves that they have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with a Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved quality assurance program. Copies of the current approval may be obtained from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Public Document Room files (see Docket No. listed on each certificate) at 1717 H Street, Washington, DC 20555. Note that the general license of 10 CFR Section 71.12 does not authorize the receipt, possession, use or transfer of byproduct, source or special nuclear material; such authorization must be obtained pursuant to 10 CFR Parts 30 to 36, 40, or 70

  17. Directory of Certificates of Compliance for radioactive materials packages: Report of NRC approved quality assurance programs for radioactive materials packages. Volume 3, Revision 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the front of Volumes 1 and 2. An alphabetical listing by user name is included in the back of Volume 3 of approved QA programs. The reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved QA programs prior to the publication date

  18. SCALE: A modular code system for performing Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation. Volume 1, Part 2: Control modules S1--H1; Revision 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automated the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.3 of the system

  19. SCALE: A modular code system for performing Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation. Volume 2, Part 3: Functional modules F16--F17; Revision 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automated the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.3 of the system

  20. SCALE: A modular code system for performing Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation. Volume 2, Part 3: Functional modules F16--F17; Revision 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    SCALE--a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analyses Licensing Evaluation--has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the request of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The SCALE system utilizes well-established computer codes and methods within standard analysis sequences that (1) allow an input format designed for the occasional user and/or novice, (2) automated the data processing and coupling between modules, and (3) provide accurate and reliable results. System development has been directed at problem-dependent cross-section processing and analysis of criticality safety, shielding, heat transfer, and depletion/decay problems. Since the initial release of SCALE in 1980, the code system has been heavily used for evaluation of nuclear fuel facility and package designs. This revision documents Version 4.3 of the system.

  1. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages: summary report of NRC approved quality-assurance programs for radioactive-material packages. Volume 3, Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    This directory contains a Summary Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volume 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Material Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance number is included at the back of each volume of the directory. The Summary Report includes a listing of all users of each package design prior to the publication date of the directory. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure them in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program. Copies of the current approval may be obtained from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Public Document Room files (see Docket No. listed on each certificate) at 1717 H Street, Washington, DC 20555. Note that the general license of 10 CFR 71.12 does not authorize the receipt, possession, use or transfer of byproduct source, or special nuclear material; such authorization must be obtained pursuant to 10 CFR Parts 30 to 36, 40, 50, or 70

  2. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages. Summary report of NRC approved quality assurance programs for radioactive material packages. Volume 3, Revision 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    This directory contains a Summary Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volumes 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Material Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance number is included at the back of each volume of the directory. The Summary Report includes a listing of all users of each package design prior to the publication date of the directory. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure them that have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program. Copies of the current approval may be obtained from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Public Document Room files (see Docket No. listed on each certificate) at 1717 H Street, Washington, DC 20555. Note that the general license of 10 CFR 71.12 does not authorize the receipt, possession, use of transfer of byproduct source, or special nuclear material; such authorization must be obtained pursuant to 10 CFR Parts 30 to 36, 40, 50, or 70

  3. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages. Summary report of NRC approved quality assurance programs for radioactive material packages. Volume 3, Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    This directory contains a Summary Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volume 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Material Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance number is included at the back of each volume of the directory. The Summary Report includes a listing of all users of each package design prior to the publication date of the directory. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure they have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program. Copies of the current approval may be obtained from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Public Document Room files (see Docket No. listed on each certificate) at 1717 H Street, Washington, DC 20555. Note that the general license of 10 CFR 71.12 does not authorize the receipt, possession, use or transfer of byproduct source, or special nuclear material; such authorization must be obtained pursuant to 10 CFR Parts 30 to 36, 40, 50, or 70

  4. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 5, Chapter D, Appendix D1 (conclusion), Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Neville G.W.; Heuze, Francois E.; Miller, Hamish D.S.; Thoms, Robert L.

    1993-03-01

    The reference design for the underground facilities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant was developed using the best criteria available at initiation of the detailed design effort. These design criteria are contained in the US Department of Energy document titled Design Criteria, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Revised Mission Concept-IIA (RMC-IIA), Rev. 4, dated February 1984. The validation process described in the Design Validation Final Report has resulted in validation of the reference design of the underground openings based on these criteria. Future changes may necessitate modification of the Design Criteria document and/or the reference design. Validation of the reference design as presented in this report permits the consideration of future design or design criteria modifications necessitated by these changes or by experience gained at the WIPP. Any future modifications to the design criteria and/or the reference design will be governed by a DOE Standard Operation Procedure (SOP) covering underground design changes. This procedure will explain the process to be followed in describing, evaluating and approving the change.

  5. Definitive design report: Design report project W-025, Radioactive Mixed Waste (RMW) Land Disposal Facility NON-DRAG-OFF. Revision 1, Volume 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roscha, V.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the definitive design of the Radioactive Mixed Waste (RMW) Non-Drag-Off disposal facility, Project W-025. This report presents a n of the major landfill design features and a discussion of how each of the criteria is addressed in the design. The appendices include laboratory test results, design drawings, and individual analyses that were conducted in support of the design. Revision 1 of this document incorporates design changes resulting from an increase in the required operating life of the W-025 landfill from 2 to 20 years. The rationale for these design changes is described in Golder Associates Inc. 1991a. These changes include (1) adding a 1.5-foot-thick layer of compacted admix directory-under the primary FML on the floor of the landfill to mitigate the effects of possible stress cracking in the primary flexible membrane liner (FML), and (2) increasing the operations layer thickness from two to three feet over the entire landfill area, to provide additional protection for the secondary admix layer against mechanical damage and the effects of freezing and desiccation. The design of the W-025 Landfill has also been modified in response to the results of the EPA Method 9090 chemical compatibility testing program (Golder Associates Inc. 1991b and 1991c), which was completed after the original design was prepared. This program consisted of testing geosynthetic materials and soil/bentonite admix with synthetic leachate having the composition expected during the life of the W-025 Landfill., The results of this program indicated that the polyester geotextile originally specified for the landfill might be susceptible to deterioration. On this basis, polypropylene geotextiles were substituted as a more chemically-resistant alternative. In addition, the percentage of bentonite in the admix was increased to provide sufficiently low permeability to the expected leachate

  6. In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) geotechnical report, WSRC-TR-95-0057, Revision 0, Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    A geotechnical study has been completed in H-Area for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and the balance of the H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. The study consisted of subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing, and engineering analyses. The purpose of these investigations is to evaluate the overall stability of the H-Area tanks under static and dynamic conditions. The objectives of the study are to define the site-specific geological conditions at ITP and HTF, obtain engineering properties for the assessment of the stability of the native soils and embankment under static and dynamic loads (i.e., slope stability, liquefaction potential, and potential settlements), and derive properties for soil-structure interaction studies. This document (Volume 4) contains the laboratory test results for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) Geotechnical Report

  7. Minimum K_2,3-saturated Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Ya-Chen

    2010-01-01

    A graph is K_{2,3}-saturated if it has no subgraph isomorphic to K_{2,3}, but does contain a K_{2,3} after the addition of any new edge. We prove that the minimum number of edges in a K_{2,3}-saturated graph on n >= 5 vertices is sat(n, K_{2,3}) = 2n - 3.

  8. Guidelines and workbook for assessment of organization and administration of utilities seeking operating license for a nuclear power plant. Guidelines for utility organization and administration plan. Volume 1, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurber, J.A.; Olson, J.; Osborn, R.N.; Sommers, P.; Widrig, R.D.

    1986-09-01

    Volumes 1 and 2 of this report are a partial response to the requirements of Item I.B.1.1 of the ''NRC Action Plan Developed as a Result of the TMI-2 Accident,'' NUREG-0660, and are designed to serve as a basis for replacing the earlier NUREG-0731, ''Guidelines for Utility Management Structure and Technical Resources.'' These Guidelines are intended to provide guidance to the user in preparing a written plan for a proposed nuclear organization and administration. The purpose of the Workbook (Vol. 2) is to guide the NRC reviewer through a systematic review and assessment of a proposed organization and administration. It is the NRC's intention to incorporate these Guidelines and Workbook into a future revision of the Standard Review Plan (SRP), NUREG-0800. However, at this time the report is being published so that the material may be used on a voluntary basis by industry to systematically prepare or evaluate their organization or administration plans. Use of the report by the NRC would not occur until after it has been incorpoarted in the SRP

  9. In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) geotechnical report, WSRC-TR-95-0057, Revision 0, Volume 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The SRS/ITP Soil Evaluation Testing Program was developed and performed to investigate the behavior of the soil deposits at the Savannah River Site's In-Tank Precipitation facility under dynamic loading. There were two distinct soil deposits involved in the current testing program: the Tobacco Road formation (sampled at depths between 28 and 100 feet at the site) and the Santee formation (sampled from depths between 170 and 180 feet). The Tobacco Road samples consisted of clayey sands (typically open-quotes SCclose quotes by the Unified Soil Classification System), yellow to reddish-brown in color with fine to medium sized sand particles. The Santee samples were also clayey sands, but nearly white in color. The two types of cyclic triaxial tests performed at the U.C. Berkeley Geotechnical Laboratories as part of this testing program were (a) traditional liquefaction tests and (b) low-amplitude cyclic tests designed to provide information on threshold strains for these specimens. This report describes the results of both the liquefaction testing component of the study, which was limited to the soils from the Tobacco Road formation, and the low-amplitude testing of both Tobacco Road and Santee specimens. Additional information was obtained from some of the specimens by (a) measuring the volumetric strains of many of the specimens when drainage (and reconsolidation) was permitted following liquefaction, or (b) determining the residual stress-strain behavior of other specimens subjected to monotonic loading immediately following liquefaction. This document is Volume 6 of the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) Geotechnical Report, and contains laboratory test results

  10. 39 CFR 2.3 - Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Offices. 2.3 Section 2.3 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE GENERAL AND TECHNICAL PROVISIONS (ARTICLE II) § 2.3 Offices. The principal office of the Postal Service is located in Washington, DC, with...

  11. The restoration in vivo of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) in stored red cells, after transfusion. The levels of red cells 2,3-DPG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Ana; Zsigmond, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Since the main reason for transfusing preserved red cells is to increase the oxygen carrying capacity of the recipient, the circulating preserved red cells should have at the time of transfusion normal oxygen uptake and normal oxyhemoglobin dissociation characteristics. We evaluated the effectiveness of transfused red cells, through periodical determination of erythrocyte components, during 72 hours after transfusions of large quantities (3,000 mL) of blood. Three patients with massive hemorrhages, two after amputation and one after nephrectomy were given each 3,000 mL preserved blood (in ACD, 10 days, at 4 degrees C). Red cell 2,3-DPG and serum inorganic phosphorus were determined prior to transfusion and after, periodically, for three days. Red cell 2,3-DPG was determined by Krimsky's method and inorganic phosphorus by Kuttner and Lichtenstein's method. The in vivo restoration of 2,3-DPG--of transfused red cells is shown as a percentage of recipient's final 2,3-DPG level, and was calculated in each of the three patients. The level of erythrocyte 2,3-DPG was greater than 60% of the final level within 24 hours, after the end of transfusion. The in vivo rates of restoration of 2,3-DPG in transfused red cells for periods of 0-6, 6-24, 24-48 and 48-72 hours are 0.251, 0.238, 0.133, 0.120 mM/L cells/hour. The therapeutic significance of the increased oxygen affinity of stored blood becomes very important in clinical conditions, when large volumes of red cells are urgently needed. After massive transfusions, the restoration of 2,3-DPG in red cells produces a decrease of serum inorganic phosphorus through its consumption. The stored blood with low values of erythrocyte 2,3-DPG can be used without hesitation when correcting a chronic anemia for instance, but in acute situation, when the organism needs restoration of the oxygen releasing capacity within minutes, the resynthesis is obviously insufficient. In such situations, fresh blood or blood with a near normal 2,3-DPG

  12. Operational waste volume projection. Revision 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koreski, G.M.; Strode, J.N.

    1994-01-01

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of July 1994

  13. Loosening After Acetabular Revision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckmann, Nicholas A.; Weiss, Stefan; Klotz, Matthias C.M.

    2014-01-01

    The best method of revision acetabular arthroplasty remains unclear. Consequently, we reviewed the literature on the treatment of revision acetabular arthroplasty using revision rings (1541 cases; mean follow-up (FU) 5.7 years) and Trabecular Metal, or TM, implants (1959 cases; mean FU 3.7 years...

  14. IDC Reengineering Phase 2 & 3 Project Scope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, James M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Prescott, Ryan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has prepared a cost estimate budgetary planning for the IDC Reengineering Phase 2 & 3 effort. This report provides the cost estimate and describes the methodology, assumptions, and cost model details used to create the cost estimate.

  15. 2,3-Diphosphoglycerate in acute asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, P. J.

    1971-01-01

    The blood levels of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate have been studied in 16 acute asthmatics and a group of healthy controls. No significant difference was found, but asthmatics had higher haemoglobin concentrations. PMID:5094683

  16. Revised hypothesis and future perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norsk, P; Drummer, C; Christensen, N J

    2001-01-01

    Results from space have been unexpected and not predictable from the results of ground-based simulations. Therefore, the concept of how weightlessness and gravity modulates the regulation of body fluids must be revised and a new simulation model developed. The main questions to ask in the future...... are the following: Does weightlessness induce a diuresis and natriuresis during the initial hours of space flight leading to an extracellular and intravascular fluid volume deficit? Can sodium in excess be stored in a hitherto unknown way, particularly during space flight? Why are fluid and sodium retaining systems...

  17. Relationship of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate mutase in various mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemtob, S; Gibb, W; Bard, H

    1980-01-01

    To investigate a possible mechanism involved in the regulation of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) synthesis, 2,3-DPG mutase (DPGM) was measured in different mammals presenting large differences in 2,3-DPG concentration between fetal, neonatal and adult life to see the activity of this enzyme, necessary for 2,3-DPG synthesis, was related to the levels of 2,3-DPG. The data demonstrated that the minimal levels of 2,3-DPG in the adult sheep are likely due to the very low levels of DPGM. Also these findings show that the increases in 2,3-DPG levels, found in the newborn sheep during the 1st week of life, in adult rabbit and guinea pig when compared with their fetuses, are not due to an increase in levels of the DPGM.

  18. [2,3 diphosphoglycerate in preterm newborns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scopesi, F; Canini, S; Mazzella, M; Arioni, C; Lantieri, P; Serra, G

    2000-01-01

    It has been largely shown that during the first month of life, in the preterm neonate Hb levels and Hct percentages rapidly decrease, high HbF concentration persists and a high oxygen affinity occurs. Data are needed to establish the level at which 2,3 dyphosphoglycerate (2,3 DPG) interacts with the regulation of oxygen affinity. 24 samples, from eight uncomplicated preterm newborns (34.1 +/- 1.83 GW, 1869 +/- +/- 291 BW) obtained at the same time as those required for the clinical management of the infants, were collected on the 2nd, 7th and 14th day of life. Blood gases, total hemoglobin and hematocrit were obtained from 0.3 ml arterialised capillary blood. Assays of 2,3 DPG were made separately on 0.4 ml venous blood. As expected tHb concentration and Hct percentages significantly decreased from day 2 to day 14 in all eight cases. On the contrary 2,3 DPG and p50 values remained stable. Subsequently throughout the study period all neonates had an increased 2,3 DPG/Hb ratio that was significantly related with p50 at standard conditions (p < 0.05). Stable 2,3 DPG concentrations during all study period have been detected. The subsequent significant increased 2.3 DPG/Hb, ratio related to increased p50 values, could have a key role in a physiological mechanism aimed to ensure adequate oxygen delivery to the tissues and to counteract the higher oxygen affinity of fetal hemoglobin. A wider sample is needed to validate this hypothesis.

  19. The synthesis of [2-3H2] taurine and [2-3H2] hypotaurine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellman, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The synthesis of [2- 3 H 2 ]-2-aminoethanesulfonate [2- 3 H]-taurine by the reduction of cyanomethanesulfonic acid with tritium gas is described. The conversion of [2- 3 H]-taurine and its 14 C and 35 S isotopic forms to 2-aminoethanesulfinate (hypotaurine) was accomplished by converting taurine to its corresponding sulfonyl chloride and reducing the latter with metallic zinc. (author)

  20. Verification Testing of Air Pollution Control Technology Quality Management Plan Revision 2.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Air Pollution Control Technology Verification Center was established in 1995 as part of the EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification Program to accelerate the development and commercialization of improved environmental technologies’ performance.

  1. ONKALO rock mechanics model (RMM). Version 2.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haekkinen, T.; Merjama, S.; Moenkkoenen, H. [WSP Finland, Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-07-15

    The Rock Mechanics Model of the ONKALO rock volume includes the most important rock mechanics features and parameters at the Olkiluoto site. The main objective of the model is to be a tool to predict rock properties, rock quality and hence provide an estimate for the rock stability of the potential repository at Olkiluoto. The model includes a database of rock mechanics raw data and a block model in which the rock mechanics parameters are estimated through block volumes based on spatial rock mechanics raw data. In this version 2.3, special emphasis was placed on refining the estimation of the block model. The model was divided into rock mechanics domains which were used as constraints during the block model estimation. During the modelling process, a display profile and toolbar were developed for the GEOVIA Surpac software to improve visualisation and access to the rock mechanics data for the Olkiluoto area. (orig.)

  2. EPRI BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Giannelli, Joseph F.

    2014-01-01

    BWRVIP-190: BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines – 2008 Revision has been revised. The revision committee consisted of U.S. and non-U.S. utilities (members of the BWR Vessel and Internals Protection (BWRVIP) Mitigation Committee), reactor system manufacturers, fuel suppliers, and EPRI and industry experts. The revised document, BWRVIP-190 Revision 1, was completely reformatted into two volumes, with a simplified presentation of water chemistry control, diagnostic and good practice parameters in Volume 1 and the technical bases in Volume 2, to facilitate use. The revision was developed in parallel and in coordination with preparation of the Fuel Reliability Guidelines Revision 1: BWR Fuel Cladding Crud and Corrosion. Guidance is included for plants operating under normal water chemistry (NWC), moderate hydrogen water chemistry (HWC-M), and noble metal application (GE-Hitachi NobleChem™) plus hydrogen injection. Volume 1 includes significant changes to BWR feedwater and reactor water chemistry control parameters to provide increased assurance of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) mitigation of reactor materials and fuel reliability during all plant conditions, including cold shutdown (≤200°F (93°C)), startup/hot standby (>200°F (93°C) and ≤ 10%) and power operation (>10% power). Action Level values for chloride and sulfate have been tightened to minimize environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of all wetted surfaces, including those not protected by hydrogen injection, with or without noble metals. Chemistry control guidance has been enhanced to minimize shutdown radiation fields by clarifying targets for depleted zinc oxide (DZO) injection while meeting requirements for fuel reliability. Improved tabular presentations of parameter values explicitly indicate levels at which actions are to be taken and required sampling frequencies. Volume 2 provides the technical bases for BWR water chemistry control for control of EAC, flow accelerated corrosion

  3. Civilian use transport of radioactive substances on public road. Volume 1: Shipment accreditation and approval requests. Guide Nr 7, Revision 2 of 15 February 2016. Volume 2: safety file of package models, European guide 'Package Design Safety Report'. Civilian use transport of radioactive packages or substances on public road. Volume 3: Compliance of package models not subject to accreditation. Guide Nr 7, Revision 7 of the 2015/11/13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    After having recalled the regulatory context and sanctions susceptible to be applied, the first volume presents the accreditation process for a package model: file content, tests programme, safety file, certification studies, documents to be produced, accreditation prorogation request, accreditation extension or package model modifications, instruction delays. Some peculiar cases are described. Models of accreditation certificate are provided, and obligations concerning packaging design, fabrication, use and maintenance are briefly discussed. The second volume is a European technical guide which is intended to assist in the preparation of the Package Design Safety Report (PDSR) to demonstrate compliance of a package design for the transport of radioactive material with the regulatory requirements. It covers package designs requiring competent authority approval, and also covers package designs not requiring competent authority approval. In its first two chapters, this document provides a generic structure and contents of a PDSR which applies to all package types. The contents are described in a comprehensive way to cover all important aspects. Some of these aspects may not be applicable to specific package type and details can be found in the annexes which provide further guidance for the scope of the contents of a PDSR, specifically for each package type. The third volume presents recommendations made by the ASN for all stakeholders to guarantee the compliance to regulation of package models which are 'not submitted to competent authority approval'. After an indication and a comment of the regulatory context, it presents requirements to be applied for the design of those package models, and then describes and comments the structure and content of a safety file for such package models (generalities, authorised contents, packaging description, safety demonstration, receipt, use and maintenance instruction, management system). The last part presents the

  4. 25 CFR 2.3 - Applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... administrative appeal procedure applicable to a specific type of decision. ... AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROCEDURES AND PRACTICE APPEALS FROM ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIONS § 2.3 Applicability. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, this part applies to all appeals from...

  5. Bibliocable. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable Television Information Center, Washington, DC.

    This selective, annotated bibliography is a revision of the original published in 1972 (ED 071 402). Some 104 books, articles, and reports included here deal with access, applications, franchising, regulation, technology, and other aspects of cable television. The listings are of two types in each category. First are revisions of the original…

  6. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald; Svane, Inge Marie

    2015-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an immunoregulatory enzyme. Remarkably, we discovered IDO-specific T cells that can influence adaptive immune reactions in patients with cancer. Further, a recent phase I clinical trial demonstrated long-lasting disease stabilization without toxicity in patien...... with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who were vaccinated with an IDO-derived HLA-A2-restricted epitope....

  7. Enzymatic degradation of cyclic 2,3-diphosphoglycerate to 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, M V; Robertson, D E; Moynihan, J A; Roberts, M F

    1992-03-24

    2,3-Diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) has been found to be the product of the enzymatic degradation of cyclic 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (cDPG) in the archaebacterium Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum delta H. Although 2,3-DPG has not previously been detected as a major soluble component of M. thermoautotrophicum, large pools accumulated at an incubation temperature of 50 degrees C (below the optimum growth temperature of 62 degrees C). Under these conditions, cellular activity was significantly decreased; a return of the culture to the optimum growth temperature restored the 2,3-DPG pool back to original low levels and caused steady-state cDPG levels to increase again. While 13CO2-pulse/12CO2-chase experiments at 50 degrees C showed that the cDPG turned over, the appearance of 2,3-DPG at NMR-visible concentrations required at least 10 h. Production of 2,3-DPG in vivo was prevented by exposure of the cells to O2. The enzyme responsible for this hydrolysis of cDPG was purified by affinity chromatography and appears to be a 33-kDa protein. Activity was detected in the presence of oxygen and was enhanced by a solution of 1 M KCl, 25 mM MgCl2, and dithiothreitol. Both Km and Vmax have been determined at 37 degrees C; kinetics also indicate that in vitro the product, 2,3-DPG, is an inhibitor of cDPG hydrolysis. These findings are discussed in view of a proposed role for cDPG in methanogens.

  8. Enzymatic degradation of cyclic 2,3-diphosphoglycerate to 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna Sastry, M.V.; Robertson, D.E.; Moynihan, J.A.; Roberts, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    2,3-Diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) has been found to be the product of the enzymatic degradation of cyclic 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (cDPG) in the archaebacterium Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum ΔH. Although 2,3-DPG has not previously been detected as a major soluble component of M. thermoautotrophicum, large pools accumulated at an incubation temperature of 50C. Under these conditions, cellular activity was significantly decreased; a return of the culture to the optimum growth temperature restored the 2,3-DPG pool back to original low levels and caused steady-state cDPG levels to increase again. While 13 CO 2 -pulse/ 12 CO 2 -chase experiments at 50C showed that the cDPG turned over, the appearance of 2,3-DPG at NMR-visible concentrations required at least 10 h. Production of 2,3-DPG in vivo was prevented by exposure of the cells to O 2 . the enzyme responsible for this hydrolysis of cDPG was purified by affinity chromatography and appears to be a 33-kDa protein. Activity was detected in the presence of oxygen and was enhanced by a solution of 1 M KCl, 25 mM MgCl 2 , and dithiothreitol. Both K m and V max have been determined at 37C; kinetics also indicate that in vitro the product, 2,3-DPG, is an inhibitor of cDPG hydrolysis. These findings are discussed in view of a proposed role for cDPG in methanogens

  9. Publishing and Revising Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Editors and Webmasters can publish content without going through a workflow. Publishing times and dates can be set, and multiple pages can be published in bulk. Making an edit to published content created a revision.

  10. Letter of Map Revision

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  11. Herwig++ 2.3 Release Note

    CERN Document Server

    Bähr, M; Gigg, M; Grellscheid, D; Hamilton, K; Plätzer, S; Richardson, P; Seymour, M H; Tully, J

    2008-01-01

    A new release of the Monte Carlo program Herwig++ (version 2.3) is now available. This version includes a number of improvements including: the extension of the program to lepton-hadron collisions; the inclusion of several processes accurate at next-to-leading order in the POsitive Weight Hardest Emission Generator (POWHEG) scheme; the inclusion of three-body decays and finite-width effects in Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) physics processes; a new procedure for reconstructing the kinematics of the parton shower based on the colour structure of the hard scattering process; a new model for baryon decays including excited baryon multiplets; the addition of a soft component to the multiple scattering model of the underlying event; new matrix elements for Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) and e+e- processes.

  12. SRS Station 2.3 manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, C.; Miller, M.; MacLean, E.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this manual is to effectively provide assistance to users so that they can perform successful experiments at Station 2.3 during their visits. In order to compile a comprehensive document, the functions of the instrument hardware and software are described in detail. Where appropriate it also contains useful information and other documentation for help and/or reference. In addition, suggestions and instructions are available to overcome problems which inevitably face the users in the performing of complex experimental tasks. This document can provide help as part of the overall user support facility, and it is therefore intended that the manual is readily available in hard copy as well as in electronic form. (author)

  13. Risk factors for total hip arthroplasty aseptic revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatod, Monti; Cafri, Guy; Namba, Robert S; Inacio, Maria C S; Paxton, Elizabeth W

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient, operative, implant, surgeon, and hospital factors associated with aseptic revision after primary THA in patients registered in a large US Total Joint Replacement Registry. A total of 35,960 THAs registered from 4/2001-12/2010 were evaluated. The 8-year survival rate was 96.7% (95% CI 96.4%-97.0%). Females had a higher risk of aseptic revision than males. Hispanic and Asian patients had a lower risk of revision than white patients. Ceramic-on-ceramic, ceramic-on-conventional polyethylene, and metal-on-conventional polyethylene bearing surfaces had a higher risk of revision than metal-on-highly cross-linked polyethylene. Body mass index, health status, diabetes, diagnosis, fixation, approach, bilateral procedures, head size, surgeon fellowship training, surgeon and hospital volume were not revision risk factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Revision total hip arthoplasty: factors associated with re-revision surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatod, Monti; Cafri, Guy; Inacio, Maria C S; Schepps, Alan L; Paxton, Elizabeth W; Bini, Stefano A

    2015-03-04

    The survivorship of implants after revision total hip arthroplasty and risk factors associated with re-revision are not well defined. We evaluated the re-revision rate with use of the institutional total joint replacement registry. The purpose of this study was to determine patient, implant, and surgeon factors associated with re-revision total hip arthroplasty. A retrospective cohort study was conducted. The total joint replacement registry was used to identify patients who had undergone revision total hip arthroplasty for aseptic reasons from April 1, 2001, to December 31, 2010. The end point of interest was re-revision total hip arthroplasty. Risk factors evaluated for re-revision total hip arthroplasty included: patient risk factors (age, sex, body mass index, race, and general health status), implant risk factors (fixation type, bearing surface, femoral head size, and component replacement), and surgeon risk factors (volume and experience). A multivariable Cox proportional hazards model was used. Six hundred and twenty-nine revision total hip arthroplasties with sixty-three (10%) re-revisions were evaluated. The mean cohort age (and standard deviation) was 57.0 ± 12.4 years, the mean body mass index (and standard deviation) was 29.5 ± 6.1 kg/m(2), and most of the patients were women (64.5%) and white (81.9%) and had an American Society of Anesthesiologists score of associated with the risk of re-revision. For every ten-year increase in patient age, the hazard ratio for re-revision decreases by a factor of 0.72 (95% confidence interval, 0.58 to 0.90). For every five revision surgical procedures performed by a surgeon, the risk of revision decreases by a factor of 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.86 to 0.99). At the time of revision, a new or retained cemented femoral implant or all-cemented hip implant increases the risk of revision by a factor of 3.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.22 to 8.38) relative to a retained or new uncemented hip implant. A ceramic on a

  15. Levels of glutathione and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in the red blood cells of Australian Aborigines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agar, N S

    1980-01-01

    There were no significant differences in packed cell volume (PCV) and red cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) levels in Australian Aborigines and Caucasians. A highly significant negative correlation was found between PCV and 2,3-DPG in both Aborigines (r = 0.251; n = 231) and Caucasians (r = 0.435; n = 227). Levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) in the red blood cells of Aborigines were significantly lower (P < 0.001) compared to those of Caucasians. There was a significant negative correlation between PCV and GSH in both the groups; (Aborigines r = -0.637, n = 115; Caucasians r = 0.388, n = 111).

  16. Acetabular Cup Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Ho

    2017-09-01

    The use of acetabular cup revision arthroplasty is on the rise as demands for total hip arthroplasty, improved life expectancies, and the need for individual activity increase. For an acetabular cup revision to be successful, the cup should gain stable fixation within the remaining supportive bone of the acetabulum. Since the patient's remaining supportive acetabular bone stock plays an important role in the success of revision, accurate classification of the degree of acetabular bone defect is necessary. The Paprosky classification system is most commonly used when determining the location and degree of acetabular bone loss. Common treatment options include: acetabular liner exchange, high hip center, oblong cup, trabecular metal cup with augment, bipolar cup, bulk structural graft, cemented cup, uncemented cup including jumbo cup, acetabular reinforcement device (cage), trabecular metal cup cage. The optimal treatment option is dependent upon the degree of the discontinuity, the amount of available bone stock and the likelihood of achieving stable fixation upon supportive host bone. To achieve successful acetabular cup revision, accurate evaluation of bone defect preoperatively and intraoperatively, proper choice of method of acetabular revision according to the evaluation of acetabular bone deficiency, proper technique to get primary stability of implant such as precise grafting technique, and stable fixation of implant are mandatory.

  17. REVISION PERMISSIABILITY IN CIVIL PROCEDURE IN REPUBLIC OF MACEDONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Gligorova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The revision as an extraordinary legal remedy is one more legal instrument for litigant in the effort to achieve protection of the rights or to defend against ungrounded claims of the other party. Litigants may declare revision of the litigation process due to substantive violations of the provisions of Civil Procedure and incorrect application of substantive law. Declaring revision because of a substantive violation of the provisions of Civil Procedure is limited. The purpose of this research paper is to investigate the most common reasons for filing revision of the litigation process in the period from June 2011 to June in 2012. The research includes what kind of reasons are often repeated, and the volume, or the number of reviews submitted to the Supreme Court of the Republic of Macedonia. As general hypothesis is that most of the adopted revisions are due to substantial violations of the provisions of civil procedure. Two-thirds of the stated revisions in front of the Supreme Court of Republic of Macedonia were rejected as unfounded and only one third of the submitted revisions from June 2011 to June 2012 were grounded. Since accepted revisions 59% due to incorrect application of substantive law, and 41% due to substantial violations of the provisions of Civil Procedure.

  18. A high-resolution atlas of the infrared spectrum of the sun and the earth atmosphere from space. A compilation of ATMOS spectra of the region from 650 to 4800 cm-1 (2.3 to 16 microns). Volume 2: Stratosphere and mesosphere, 650 to 3350 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Crofton B.; Norton, Robert H.

    1989-01-01

    During the period April 29 to May 2, 1985, the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment was operated for the first time, as part of the Spacelab-3 payload of the shuttle Challenger. The principal purpose of this experiment was to study the distributions of the atmosphere's minor and trace molecular constituents. The instrument, a modified Michelson interferometer covering the frequency range from 600 to 5000/cm-1 at a spectral resolution of 0.01/cm-1, recorded infrared absorption spectra of the sun and of the earth's atmosphere at times close to entry into and exit from occultation by the earth's limb. Spectra were obtained that are free from absorptions due to constituents of the atmosphere (i.e., they are pure solar spectra), as well as spectra of the atmosphere itself, covering line-of-sight tangent altitudes that span the range from the lower thermosphere to the bottom of the troposphere. This atlas presents a compilation of these spectra arranged in a hardcopy format suitable for quick-look reference purposes. Volume 2 covers the stratosphere and mesosphere (i.e., tangent altitudes from 20 to 80 km) for frequencies from 650 to 3350/cm-1.

  19. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 2, Chapter C, Appendix C1--Chapter C, Appendix C3 (beginning), Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    This volume contains appendices for the following: Rocky Flats Plant and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory waste process information; TRUPACT-II content codes (TRUCON); TRUPACT-II chemical list; chemical compatibility analysis for Rocky Flats Plant waste forms; chemical compatibility analysis for waste forms across all sites; TRU mixed waste characterization database; hazardous constituents of Rocky Flats Transuranic waste; summary of waste components in TRU waste sampling program at INEL; TRU waste sampling program; and waste analysis data.

  20. Guidelines and workbook for of organization and administration of utilities seeking operating license for a nuclear power plant. Workbook for assessment of organization and management. Volume, 2, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurber, J.A.; Olson, J.; Osborn, R.N.; Sommers, P.; Widrig, R.D.

    1986-09-01

    This report is a partial response to the requirements of Item I.B.1.1 of the ''NRC Action Plan Developed as a Result of the TMI-2 Accident,'' NUREG-0660, and is designed to serve as a basis for replacing the earlier NUREG-0731, ''Guidelines for Utility Management Structure and Technical Resources.'' The Guidelines are intended to provide guidance to the user in preparing a written plan for a proposed nuclear organization and administration. The purpose of the Workbook is to guide the NRC reviewer through a systematic review and assessment of a proposed organization and administration. It is the NRC's intention to incorporate these Guidelines and Workbook into a future revision of the Standard Review Plan (SRP), NUREG-0800. However, at this time the report is being published so that the material may be used on a voluntary basis by industry to systematically prepare or evaluate their organization or administration plans. Use of the report by the NRC would not occur until after it has been incorporated in the SRP

  1. Revision of Pachycentria (Melastomataceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clausing, Gudrun

    2000-01-01

    A revision of Pachycentria Blume, which includes the monotypic Pogonanthera Blume, is presented. Pachycentria comprises eight species and one subspecies. Two species, P. vogelkopensis and P. hanseniana, are newly described. The genus is distinguished from other genera in the Medinillinae by a small

  2. Revision of Oxandra (Annonaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junikka, L.; Maas, P.J.M.; Maas-van de Kamer, H.; Westra, L.Y.Th.

    2016-01-01

    A taxonomic revision is given of the Neotropical genus Oxandra (Annonaceae). Within the genus 27 species are recognized, 4 of which are new to science. Most of the species are occurring in tropical South America, whereas a few (6) are found in Mexico and Central America and two in the West Indies

  3. Revision without ordinals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivello, Edoardo

    2013-01-01

    We show that Herzberger’s and Gupta’s revision theories of truth can be recast in purely inductive terms, without any appeal neither to the transfinite ordinal numbers nor to the axiom of Choice. The result is presented in an abstract and general setting, emphasising both its validity for a wide

  4. Revising and editing for translators

    CERN Document Server

    Mossop, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Revising and Editing for Translators provides guidance and learning materials for translation students learning to edit texts written by others, and professional translators wishing to improve their self-revision ability or learning to revise the work of others. Editing is understood as making corrections and improvements to texts, with particular attention to tailoring them to the given readership. Revising is this same task applied to draft translations. The linguistic work of editors and revisers is related to the professional situations in which they work. Mossop offers in-depth coverage of a wide range of topics, including copyediting, style editing, structural editing, checking for consistency, revising procedures and principles, and translation quality assessment. This third edition provides extended coverage of computer aids for revisers, and of the different degrees of revision suited to different texts. The inclusion of suggested activities and exercises, numerous real-world examples, a proposed gra...

  5. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 11, Chapter D, Appendix D4--Chapter D, Appendix D17: Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    This volume contains appendices D4 through D17 which cover the following: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site environmental report; ecological monitoring program at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant; site characterization; regional and site geology and hydrology; general geology; dissolution features; ground water hydrology; typical carbon sorption bed efficiency; VOC monitoring plan for bin-room tests; chemical compatibility analysis of waste forms and container materials; probable maximum precipitation; WHIP supplementary roof support system room 1, panel 1; and corrosion risk assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant ``humid`` test bins.

  6. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms

  7. Bedrock geology Forsmark. Modelling stage 2.3. Implications for and verification of the deterministic geological models based on complementary data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, Michael B. (Geological Survey of Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden)); Simeonov, Assen (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)); Isaksson, Hans (GeoVista AB, Luleaa (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company is in the process of completing site descriptive modelling at two locations in Sweden, with the objective to site a deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel. At Forsmark, the results of the stage 2.2 geological modelling formed the input for downstream users. Since complementary ground and borehole geological and geophysical data, acquired after model stage 2.2, were not planned to be included in the deterministic rock domain, fracture domain and deformation zone models supplied to the users, it was deemed necessary to evaluate the implications of these stage 2.3 data for the stage 2.2 deterministic geological models and, if possible, to make use of these data to verify the models. This report presents the results of the analysis of the complementary stage 2.3 geological and geophysical data. Model verification from borehole data has been implemented in the form of a prediction-outcome test. The stage 2.3 geological and geophysical data at Forsmark mostly provide information on the bedrock outside the target volume. Additional high-resolution ground magnetic data and the data from the boreholes KFM02B, KFM11A, KFM12A and HFM33 to HFM37 can be included in this category. Other data complement older information of identical character, both inside and outside this volume. These include the character and kinematics of deformation zones and fracture mineralogy. In general terms, it can be stated that all these new data either confirm the geological modelling work completed during stage 2.2 or are in good agreement with the data that were used in this work. In particular, although the new high-resolution ground magnetic data modify slightly the position and trace length of some stage 2.2 deformation zones at the ground surface, no new or modified deformation zones with a trace length longer than 3,000 m at the ground surface have emerged. It is also apparent that the revision of fracture orientation data

  8. Bedrock geology Forsmark. Modelling stage 2.3. Implications for and verification of the deterministic geological models based on complementary data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, Michael B.; Simeonov, Assen; Isaksson, Hans

    2008-12-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company is in the process of completing site descriptive modelling at two locations in Sweden, with the objective to site a deep geological repository for spent nuclear fuel. At Forsmark, the results of the stage 2.2 geological modelling formed the input for downstream users. Since complementary ground and borehole geological and geophysical data, acquired after model stage 2.2, were not planned to be included in the deterministic rock domain, fracture domain and deformation zone models supplied to the users, it was deemed necessary to evaluate the implications of these stage 2.3 data for the stage 2.2 deterministic geological models and, if possible, to make use of these data to verify the models. This report presents the results of the analysis of the complementary stage 2.3 geological and geophysical data. Model verification from borehole data has been implemented in the form of a prediction-outcome test. The stage 2.3 geological and geophysical data at Forsmark mostly provide information on the bedrock outside the target volume. Additional high-resolution ground magnetic data and the data from the boreholes KFM02B, KFM11A, KFM12A and HFM33 to HFM37 can be included in this category. Other data complement older information of identical character, both inside and outside this volume. These include the character and kinematics of deformation zones and fracture mineralogy. In general terms, it can be stated that all these new data either confirm the geological modelling work completed during stage 2.2 or are in good agreement with the data that were used in this work. In particular, although the new high-resolution ground magnetic data modify slightly the position and trace length of some stage 2.2 deformation zones at the ground surface, no new or modified deformation zones with a trace length longer than 3,000 m at the ground surface have emerged. It is also apparent that the revision of fracture orientation data

  9. High Production of 2,3-Butanediol (2,3-BD by Raoultella ornithinolytica B6 via Optimizing Fermentation Conditions and Overexpressing 2,3-BD Synthesis Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taeyeon Kim

    Full Text Available Biological production of 2,3-butandiol (2,3-BD has received great attention as an alternative to the petroleum-based 2,3-BD production. In this study, a high production of 2,3-BD in fed-batch fermentation was investigated with a newly isolated bacterium designated as Raoultella ornithinolytica B6. The isolate produced 2,3-BD as the main product using hexoses (glucose, galactose, and fructose, pentose (xylose and disaccharide (sucrose. The effects of temperature, pH-control schemes, and agitation speeds on 2,3-BD production were explored to optimize the fermentation conditions. Notably, cell growth and 2,3-BD production by R. ornithinolytica B6 were higher at 25°C than at 30°C. When three pH control schemes (no pH control, pH control at 7, and pH control at 5.5 after the pH was decreased to 5.5 during fermentation were tested, the best 2,3-BD titer and productivity along with reduced by-product formation were achieved with pH control at 5.5. Among different agitation speeds (300, 400, and 500 rpm, the optimum agitation speed was 400 rpm with 2,3-BD titer of 68.27 g/L, but acetic acid was accumulated up to 23.32 g/L. Further enhancement of the 2,3-BD titer (112.19 g/L, yield (0.38 g/g, and productivity (1.35 g/L/h as well as a significant reduction of acetic acid accumulation (9.71 g/L was achieved by the overexpression of homologous budABC genes, the 2,3-BD-synthesis genes involved in the conversion of pyruvate to 2,3-BD. This is the first report presenting a high 2,3-BD production by R.ornithinolytica which has attracted little attention with respect to 2,3-BD production, extending the microbial spectrum of 2,3-BD producers.

  10. 10 CFR 2.3 - Resolution of conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Resolution of conflict. 2.3 Section 2.3 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION RULES OF PRACTICE FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING PROCEEDINGS AND ISSUANCE OF ORDERS § 2.3 Resolution of conflict. (a) In any conflict between a general rule in subpart C of this part and a special...

  11. 10 CFR 960.5-2-3 - Meteorology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Meteorology. 960.5-2-3 Section 960.5-2-3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Preclosure Guidelines Preclosure Radiological Safety § 960.5-2-3 Meteorology. (a) Qualifying...

  12. A New Method for the Synthesis of 2,3-Aziridino-2,3-dideoxyhexonamides and Their Conversion into 3-Amoni-2,3-dideoxyhexonic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christel Thea; Pedersen, Christian; Søtofte, Inger

    1998-01-01

    The new 2,3-Aziridino-2,3-dideoxyhexonamides 3 and 11 were prepared by a three-step procedure from commercially available D-glucono-1,5-lactone and D-gulono-1,4-lactone, respectively. The lactones were converted into methyl 3,4;5,6-di-O-isopropylidene-2-Omesyl esters 2 and 10, which upon treatmen...... with ammonia formed the title aziridino compounds. These were reductively cleaved by hydrazine to give 3-amino-2,3-dideoxyhexonic hydrazides 13 and 15, which were easily converted into corresponding lactone 14 and acid 16, respectively....

  13. Trajectory Reconstruction Program Milestone 2/3 Report. Volume 1. Description and Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-12-16

    Inertial platform sensed velocity meters Gimbal angles and rates Inertial body angular rates Ballistic impact range, latitude, longitude, and time Altitude...ideal platform gimbal angles can be measured, and for this rea- son it is called the G frame (Fig. 3-9). The orientation of this coordinate system is...0 c W0.W &z I &C0.0 Il to11A. I. UV. w40 U x 14 v J.-0 U. - 0.- V)I- &I 0 0 ulii" 043 Wix . C uJYl~ V hi 0.. 04 crw "U e IAl..w1.44 1-0 0al z11 P OX I

  14. [The physiologic significance of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and changes in its erythrocyte levels in an experiment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béder, I; Orgonásová, M; Brozman, B; Horecký, J; Mataseje, A

    1990-05-01

    The regulatory effect of 2,3-DPG on oxygen transport and binding to hemoglobin was analyzed. Under conditions of substitution hemodilution by isooncotic 3.4% Rheodextran (Spofa), changes in the content of 2,3-DPG in arterial and venous blood were enzymatically determined over several days. Reference values of 2,3-DPG were obtained in the studied series of dogs (2.05 +/- 0.74 x 10(-6) mol.ml-1 in whole blood 4.69 +/- 1.52 x 10(-6) mol.g-1 of erythrocyte volume, and 13.39 +/- 2.82 x 10(-6) mol.ml-1 of hemoglobin). In anesthetized animals the content of 2,3-DPG in arterial blood was significantly higher (6.28 +/- 0.84 x 10(-6) mol.ml-1 of erythrocyte volume) than in venous blood (6.01 +/- 0.80 x 10(-6) mol.ml-1 of erythrocyte volume). At substitution hemodilution the 2,3-DPG content in erythrocytes of venous blood decreased from 5.46 +/- 0.67 to 4.97 +/- 1.31 x 10(-6) mol.ml-1 of erythrocyte volume. The subsequent increase to 6.04 +/- 0.71 x 10(-6) mol.ml-1 of erythrocyte volume was achieved by nonlinear increase over the following days, at persisting low hemoglobin content in blood.

  15. Pain and Function Following Revision Cubital Tunnel Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidge, Kristen M; Ebersole, Gregory C; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine pain and functional outcomes following revision cubital tunnel surgery and to identify predictors of poor postoperative outcome. A retrospective cohort study was conducted of all patients undergoing revision cubital tunnel surgery over a 5-year period at a high-volume peripheral nerve center. Intraoperative findings, demographic and injury factors, and outcomes were reviewed. Average pain, worst pain, and impact of pain on self-perceived quality of life were each measured using a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS). Function was evaluated using pinch and grip strength, as well as the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire. Differences in preoperative and postoperative pain, strength, and DASH were analyzed using nonparametric tests. Predictors of postoperative average pain were evaluated using odds ratios and linear regression analyses. The final cohort consisted of 50 patients (mean age: 46.3 ± 12.5 years; 29 [68%] male) undergoing 52 revision ulnar nerve transpositions (UNTs). Pain VAS scores decreased significantly following revision UNT. Strength and DASH scores demonstrated nonsignificant improvements postoperatively. Worse preoperative pain and greater than 1 prior cubital tunnel procedure were significant predictors of worse postoperative average pain VAS scores. Patients can and do improve following revision cubital tunnel surgery, particularly as it relates to pain. Intraoperative findings during the revision procedure suggest that adherence to specific principles in the primary operation is key to prevention of secondary cubital tunnel syndrome.

  16. Waterborne Transportation Lines of the United States : calendar year 1999. Volume 2 : vessel company summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The Vessel Company Summary, : Volume 2, is one of three publications for : the annual revision of the WTLUS, which : provides a summary of the vessel : companies detailed in the WTLUS, Vessel : Characteristics, Volume 3. The names of : the vessel com...

  17. Waterborne Transportation Lines of the United States : calendar year 2008. Volume 2 : vessel company summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-16

    The Vessel Company Summary, Volume 2, : is one of three publications for the annual : revision of the WTLUS, which provides a summary : of the vessel companies detailed in the : WTLUS, Vessel Characteristics, Volume 3. : The names of the vessel compa...

  18. 40 CFR 35.2109 - Step 2+3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Step 2+3. 35.2109 Section 35.2109... ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2109 Step 2+3. The Regional Administrator may award a Step 2+3 grant which will provide the Federal share of an allowance under appendix B and the...

  19. Condensed phase preparation of 2,3-pentanedione

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D.J.; Perry, S.M.; Fanson, P.T.; Jackson, J.E.

    1998-11-03

    A condensed phase process for the preparation of purified 2,3-pentanedione from lactic acid and an alkali metal lactate is described. The process uses elevated temperatures between about 200 to 360 C for heating a reaction mixture of lactic acid and an alkali metal lactate to produce the 2,3-pentanedione in a reaction vessel. The 2,3-pentanedione produced is vaporized from the reaction vessel and condensed with water. 5 figs.

  20. Vanadium(IV)-stimulated hydrolysis of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankiewicz, P J

    1989-05-01

    Vanadium(IV) stimulates the hydrolysis of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate at 23 degrees C. The pH optimum is 5.0. Reactions were analyzed by enzymatic and phosphate release assays. The products of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate hydrolysis are inorganic phosphate and 3-phosphoglycerate. The reaction is inhibited by high concentrations of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and an equation has been formulated that describes the kinetic constants for this reaction at pH 7. The possible relevance of the reaction to the therapeutic lowering by vanadium(IV) of red cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in sickle-cell disease is discussed.

  1. Revised Rules for Concrete Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Jensen, F. M.; Middleton, C.

    This paper is based on research performed for the Highway Agency, London, UK under the project DPU/9/44 "Revision of Bridge Assessment Rules Based on Whole Life Performance: Concrete Bridges" It contains details of a methodology which can be used to generate Whole Life (WL) reliability profiles....... These WL reliability profiles may be used to establish revised rules for Concrete Bridges....

  2. Emotion Processes in Knowledge Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevors, Gregory J.; Kendeou, Panayiota; Butterfuss, Reese

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, a number of insights have been gained into the cognitive processes that explain how individuals overcome misconceptions and revise their previously acquired incorrect knowledge. The current study complements this line of research by investigating the moment-by-moment emotion processes that occur during knowledge revision using a…

  3. Philippines revises power plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, D.

    1988-02-01

    Following an unexpected surge in electricity demand the Philippines has revised its medium term power development programme. The sharp increase in electricity consumption follows three years of slack demand due to civil disturbances before the end of the Macros administration and the election of Corazon Aquino as President in 1986. Originally, the Aquino government's medium term power development plans called for about 500MW of generating capacity to be installed between 1986 and 1992. The three proposed plants were scheduled for commissioning in 1991 and 1992. However, a spurt in power demand growth during the past nine months has caused concern among industrialists that power shortages could occur by the end of the decade. So additional capacity will be installed to prevent an anticipated shortfall in electricity supplies by the early 1990s.

  4. Revised SRAC code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchihashi, Keichiro; Ishiguro, Yukio; Kaneko, Kunio; Ido, Masaru.

    1986-09-01

    Since the publication of JAERI-1285 in 1983 for the preliminary version of the SRAC code system, a number of additions and modifications to the functions have been made to establish an overall neutronics code system. Major points are (1) addition of JENDL-2 version of data library, (2) a direct treatment of doubly heterogeneous effect on resonance absorption, (3) a generalized Dancoff factor, (4) a cell calculation based on the fixed boundary source problem, (5) the corresponding edit required for experimental analysis and reactor design, (6) a perturbation theory calculation for reactivity change, (7) an auxiliary code for core burnup and fuel management, etc. This report is a revision of the users manual which consists of the general description, input data requirements and their explanation, detailed information on usage, mathematics, contents of libraries and sample I/O. (author)

  5. Microcomputers and the Improvement of Revision Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Ernest; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses use of word processing software as an effective tool in writing and revision instruction, and describes the role of the teacher. Examples of exercises that encourage revision and of software designed to teach effective revision skills are reviewed. (MBR)

  6. 78 FR 62451 - Air Quality: Revision to Definition of Volatile Organic Compounds-Exclusion of 2,3,3,3...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program (CAA Sec. 612; 40 CFR 82 subpart G). The SNAP program has issued a final... incentive for industry to use negligibly reactive compounds in place of more highly reactive compounds that are regulated as VOCs. The EPA lists compounds that it has determined to be negligibly reactive in its...

  7. 16 CFR 2.3 - Policy as to private controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Policy as to private controversies. 2.3 Section 2.3 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE... other action when the alleged violation of law is merely a matter of private controversy and does not...

  8. 42 CFR 2.3 - Purpose and effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purpose and effect. 2.3 Section 2.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF... individual who has an alcohol or drug problem and who does not seek treatment. (3) Because there is a...

  9. 17 CFR 2.3 - Prohibitions against misuse of seal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prohibitions against misuse of seal. 2.3 Section 2.3 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION OFFICIAL... character, or with wrongful or fraudulent intent, using, buying, procuring, selling or transferring to...

  10. Purification of Arp2/3 complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Lynda K.; Rosen, Michael K.; Padrick, Shae B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Much of cellular control over actin dynamics comes through regulation of actin filament initiation. At the molecular level, this is accomplished through a collection of cellular protein machines, called actin nucleation factors, which position actin monomers to initiate a new actin filament. The Arp2/3 complex is a principal actin nucleation factor used throughout the eukaryotic family tree. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven to be not only an excellent genetic platform for the study of the Arp2/3 complex, but also an excellent source for the purification of endogenous Arp2/3 complex. Here we describe a protocol for the preparation of endogenous Arp2/3 complex from wild type Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This protocol produces material suitable for biochemical study, and yields milligram quantities of purified Arp2/3 complex. PMID:23868593

  11. SIRT1, 2, 3 protect mouse oocytes from postovulatory aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng; Zhou, Yang; Li, Li; Wang, Hong-Hui; Ma, Xue-Shan; Qian, Wei-Ping; Shen, Wei; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    The quality of metaphase II oocytes will undergo a time-dependent deterioration following ovulation as the result of the oocyte aging process. In this study, we determined that the expression of sirtuin family members (SIRT1, 2, 3) was dramatically reduced in mouse oocytes aged in vivo or in vitro. Increased intracellular ROS was observed when SIRT1, 2, 3 activity was inhibited. Increased frequency of spindle defects and disturbed distribution of mitochondria were also observed in MII oocytes aged in vitro after treatment with Nicotinamide (NAM), indicating that inhibition of SIRT1, 2, 3 may accelerate postovulatory oocyte aging. Interestingly, when MII oocytes were exposed to caffeine, the decline of SIRT1, 2, 3 mRNA levels was delayed and the aging-associated defective phenotypes could be improved. The results suggest that the SIRT1, 2, 3 pathway may play a potential protective role against postovulatory oocyte aging by controlling ROS generation.

  12. Blood rheology and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels after erythropoietin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, J P; Chazan, J A; Metzger, J B; Pono, L; Valeri, C R

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-seven transfusion dependent patients with end-stage renal disease on long-term dialysis had blood cell counts, serum chemistries, blood pressure, and whole blood viscosity measured, as well as having transfusion requirements assessed. Three months after the institution of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHU-EPO) (75 u per kg per wk), there was an 88 percent fall in transfusion requirement. After four months, the hematocrit increased from 24 +/- 3.8 to 25.6 +/- 4.2 percent, mean corpuscular volume from 93 +/- 4.9 to 97 +/- 6.6 fl, 2-3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) from 13.2 +/- 3.2 to 15.6 +/- 4.3 microM per g of Hb. Whole blood viscosity fell from 14.1 +/- 2.1 to 12.7 +/- 2.3 seconds, and ferritin levels fell from 3282 +/- 3889 to 2131 +/- 2441 ng per ml. In eight patients in whom the dose of rHU-EPO was further increased by up to 50 units per kg three times weekly for three months, the hematocrit rose further to 29.3 +/- 3.0 percent and the rise in hematocrit was accompanied by a further increase in 2,3-DPG to 17.9 +/- 2.8 microM per g of Hb (p < 0.03). There were no major side effects or vascular complications.

  13. A study on scar revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Talwar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Scars are psychologically distressing for the patients and have an impact on the quality of life and self esteem of the patients. Scar revision is an aesthetic skill which is mastered by plastic surgeons and encroached now by dermatosurgeons. Scars on the face are aesthetically unacceptable and various techniques have been improvised for making a scar aesthetically acceptable. Various types of techniques are used for scar revision like W plasty, Z plasty and VY plasty. Aims: To see the efficacy of various scar revision techniques including Z plasty, VY plasty and W plasty in 30 patients with disfiguring scars. Methods: We selected twenty patients of disfiguring scars for the study. The scars from various causes including trauma and burns were included in our study. Various techniques of scar revision include Z plasty, W plasty and VY plasty were performed according to the type and site of scar. Results: Male: female was 1.5: 1. The scar revision surgery yielded excellent results with minimal complications including haematoma formation, secondary infection and delayed healing seen in 5% patients each. Regarding the efficacy of scar revision, excellent improvement was seen in 60% patients, moderate improvement was seen in 30% patients and mild improvement was seen in 10% patients. Conclusions: Dermatologists can employ a number of surgical scar revision techniques. While some are better suited to treat specific types of scars, they can be used in combination with each other or with adjunctive therapies to achieve optimal results.

  14. Antisickling effects of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poillon, W N; Kim, B C; Labotka, R J; Hicks, C U; Kark, J A

    1995-06-01

    Elevation of 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) in sickle erthrocytes (SS RBCs) and concomitant acidification of the cell interior promote polymerization by decreasing the solubility (csat) of deoxyhemoglobin S. The antisickling effect of 2,3-DPG depletion was evaluated after activation of the 2,3-DPG phosphatase activity of bisphosphoglycerate mutase by glycolate-2-phosphate, leading to rapid loss of intracellular 2,3-DPG. To ensure its maximal reduction in a physiologic medium, isosmotic CO2/bicarbonate-buffered saline, pH 7.0, was used. Substitution of K+ for Na+ as the major extracellular cation suppressed K:Cl cotransport, prevented cell shrinkage, and allowed demonstration of the full antisickling effect of 2,3-DPG depletion. The modest effect on solubility per se of removing intraerythrocytic 2,3-DPG (delta Csat = 1.6 g/dL) was amplified into a much larger antisickling effect by interaction with three other cellular variables affecting solubility and polymer content (intracellular pH, O2 saturation, and mean cell hemoglobin concentration). Acting in concert, these four antisickling effects (three solubilizing, one osmotic) reduced polymer fraction of glycolate-treated SS RBCs by 32% to 63%, with a concomitant decrease in sickling of 46% to 95% at the nominal pO2 of the microcirculation (20 mm Hg). A decrement in sickling of this magnitude should significantly ameliorate the vasoocclusive severity of sickle cell disease.

  15. Reactions of dialkyl hydrogen phosphites with 2,3-diphenylindone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbuzov, B.A.; Fuzhenkova, A.V.; Banderova, N.A.

    1987-01-01

    Dialkyl hydrogen phosphites are found to add to 2,3-diphenylindone at the carbonyl group with the formation of dialkyl 1-hydroxy-2,3-diphenylinden-1-yl phosphonates, which, under conditions of basic catalysis, are rearranged into diakyl 2,3-diphenylinden-1-yl phosphates, presumably as a result of phosphonate-phosphate rearrangement. Data derived by IR and NMR spectroscopy are included on the electronic and molecular structure of the resulting isomers. Electron density and spin-spin coupling constants are also determined

  16. Risk factors for revision of primary total hip arthroplasty: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokopetz Julian JZ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous papers have been published examining risk factors for revision of primary total hip arthroplasty (THA, but there have been no comprehensive systematic literature reviews that summarize the most recent findings across a broad range of potential predictors. Methods We performed a PubMed search for papers published between January, 2000 and November, 2010 that provided data on risk factors for revision of primary THA. We collected data on revision for any reason, as well as on revision for aseptic loosening, infection, or dislocation. For each risk factor that was examined in at least three papers, we summarize the number and direction of statistically significant associations reported. Results Eighty-six papers were included in our review. Factors found to be associated with revision included younger age, greater comorbidity, a diagnosis of avascular necrosis (AVN as compared to osteoarthritis (OA, low surgeon volume, and larger femoral head size. Male sex was associated with revision due to aseptic loosening and infection. Longer operating time was associated with revision due to infection. Smaller femoral head size was associated with revision due to dislocation. Conclusions This systematic review of literature published between 2000 and 2010 identified a range of demographic, clinical, surgical, implant, and provider variables associated with the risk of revision following primary THA. These findings can inform discussions between surgeons and patients relating to the risks and benefits of undergoing total hip arthroplasty.

  17. Revised draft: Northeastern Regional geologic characterization report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    This report presents available geologic information pertinent to siting a repository for high-level nuclear waste in crystalline rock in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont. For each of the states within the Northeastern Region, information is provided on the disqualifying factor and the screening variables to be used in region-to-area screening. These factors and variables include: hydrologically significant natural resources, rock mass extent, post-emplacement faulting, suspected Quaternary faulting, seismicity, rock and mineral resources, major ground-water discharge zones, water resources, ground-water salinity, and state of stress. Information is presented on its age, areal extent, shape, thickness of overburden, composition, texture, degree and type of alteration, rock mass thickness, and structural features associated with each rock body or complex. Regional seismic and tectonic information is presented, including patterns of earthquake occurrence, earthquake magnitudes, horizontal ground accelerations, and vertical crustal movements. Also included are discussions of the rock and mineral deposits or mines located within or near crystalline bodies; ground-water resources and regional hydrology; postulated changes in climate and the associated effects; and landforms, surface processes, and surficial materials on or near the subject rock bodies

  18. Revised draft: Southeastern Regional geologic characterization report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    This report presents available geologic information pertinent to siting a repository for high-level nuclear waste in crystalline rock in Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia. For each of the states within the southeastern region, information is provided on the disqualifying factor and the screening variables to be used in region-to-area screening. These factors and variables include hydrologically significant natural resources, rock mass extent, postemplacement faulting, suspected Quaternary faulting, seismicity, rock and mineral resources, major ground-water discharge zones, water resources, ground-water salinity, and state of stress. Information is presented on the age, areal extent, shape, thickness of overburden, composition, texture, degree and type of alteration, and structural features associated with each rock body or complex. Regional seismic and tectonic information is presented, including patterns of earthquake occurrence, earthquake magnitudes, horizontal ground accelerations, and vertical crustal movements. Also included are discussions of the rock and mineral deposits or mines located within or near crystalline bodies; groundwater resources and regional hydrology; postulated changes in climate and the associated effects; and landforms, surface processes, and surficial materials on or near the subject rock bodies. A discussion of the relationship between the DOE Siting Guidelines and the geologic disqualifying factor and regional screening variables to be used in the region-to-area screening process is also presented

  19. Revised draft: North Central Regional geologic characterization report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    This report presents available geologic information pertinent to siting a repository for high-level nuclear waste in crystalline rock in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. For each of the states within the North Central Region, information is provided on the disqualifying factor and the screening variables to be used in region-to-area screening. These factors and variables include hydrologically significant natural resources, rock mass extent, post-emplacement faulting, suspected Quaternary faulting, seismicity, rock and mineral resources, major groundwater discharge zones, water resources, groundwater salinity, and state of stress. Information is presented on age, areal extent, shape, thickness of overburden, composition, texture, degree and type of alteration, and structural features associated with each rock body or complex. Regional seismic and tectonic information is presented, including patterns of earthquake occurrence, earthquake magnitudes, horizontal ground accelerations, and vertical crustal movements. Also included are discussions of the rock and mineral deposits or mines located within or near crystalline rock bodies; groundwater resources and regional hydrology; postulated changes in climate and the associated effects; and landforms, surface processes, and surficial materials on or near the subject rock bodies. A discussion of the relationship between the DOE Siting Guidelines and the geologic disqualifying factor and regional screening variables to be used in the region-to-area screening process is also presented

  20. 2101-M pond closure plan. Volume 1, Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izatt, R. D.; Lerch, R. E.

    1993-06-01

    This document describes activities for the closure of a surface impoundment (2101-M Pond) at the Hanford Site. The 2101-H Pond was initially constructed in 1953 to serve as a drainage collection area for the 2101-H Building. (Until the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) Laboratory was constructed in the 2101-M Building in 1979--1981, the only source contributing discharge to the pond was condensate water from the 2101-H Building heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. The drains for the BWIP Laboratory rooms were plumbed into a 4-in., cast-iron, low-pressure drain pipe that carries waste water from the HVAC system to the pond. During the active life of the BWIP Laboratory, solutions of dissolved barium in groundwater samples were discharged to the 2101-M Pond via the laboratory drains. As a result of the discharges, a Part A permit application was initially submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in August 1986 which designates the 2101-M Pond as a surface impoundment.

  1. RASCAL Version 2.1 workbook. Volume 2, Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Athey, G.F.; Sjoreen, A.L.; McKenna, T.J.

    1994-12-01

    The Radiological Assessment System for Consequence Analysis, Version 2.1 (RASCAL 2.1) was developed for use by the NRC personnel who respond to radiological emergencies. This workbook complements the RASCAL 2.1 User's guide (NUREG/CR-5247, Vol. 1, Rev. 2). The workbook contains exercises designed to familiarize the user with the computer-based tools of RASCAL through hands-on problem solving. The workbook contains four major sections. The first is a RASCAL familiarization exercise to acquaint the user with the operation of the forms, menus, online help, and documentation. The latter three sections contain exercises in using the three tools of RASCAL Version 2.1: DECAY, FM-DOSE, and ST-DOSE. A discussion section describing how the tools could be used to solve the problems follows each set of exercises

  2. Revised draft: Northeastern Regional environmental characterization report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    This report presents available environmental information pertinent to siting a repository for high-level nuclear waste in crystalline rock in Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, northeastern and southeastern New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, northern New Jersey, and eastern Pennsylvania. For each of the states within the Northeastern Region, information is provided on those environmental disqualifying factors and regional screening variables to be used in region-to-area screening. These environmental factors and variables include existing and proposed federal protected lands, proximity to federal protected lands, existing state protected lands, proximity to state protected lands, population density and distribution, proximity to highly populated areas, national and state forest lands, state wildlife lands, designated critical habitats for threatened and endangered species, surface water bodies, and wetlands. In addition, supplementary descriptive information providing a general characterization of the region is presented, as is information on environmental parameters that may be of use at later phases of screening. Also included is a discussion of the relationship between the US Department of Energy (DOE) Siting Guidelines and those environmental disqualifying factors and regional screening variables to be used in the region-to-area screening process

  3. Revised draft: Southeastern Regional environmental characterization report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    This report presents available environmental information pertinent to siting a repository for high-level nuclear waste in crystalline rock in central Maryland; noncoastal Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina; and northern Georgia. For each of the states within the Southeastern Region, information is provided on those environmental disqualifying factors and regional screening variables to be used in region-to-area screening. These environmental factors and variables include existing and proposed federal protected lands, proximity to federal protected lands, existing state protected lands, proximity to state protected lands, population density and distribution, proximity to highly populated areas, national and state forest lands, state wild-life lands, designated critical habitats for threatened and endangered species, surface water bodies, and wetlands. In addition, supplementary descriptive information providing a general characterization of the region is presented, as is information on environmental parameters that may be of use at later phases of screening. Also included is a discussion of the relationship between the US Department of Energy (DOE) Siting Guidelines and those environmental disqualifying factors and regional screening variables to be used in the region-to-area screening process

  4. Revised draft: North Central Regional environmental characterization report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    This report presents available environmental information pertinent to siting a repository for high-level nuclear waste in crystalline rock in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. For each of the states within the North Central Region, information is provided on those environmental disqualifying factors and regional screening variables to be used in region-to-area screening. These environmental factors and variables include existing and proposed federal protected lands, proximity to federal protected lands, existing state protected lands, proximity to state protected lands, population density and distribution, proximity to highly populated areas, national and state forest lands, state wildlife lands, designated critical habitats for threatened and endangered species, surface water bodies, and wetlands. In addition, supplementary descriptive information providing a general characterization of the region is presented, as is information on environmental parameters that may be of use at later phases of screening. Also included is a discussion of the relationship between the DOE Siting Guidelines and those environmental disqualifying factors and regional screening variables to be used in the region-to-area screening process

  5. Revision of ASCE 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, T.A.; Murray, R.C.; Short, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    The original version of ASCE Standard 4, ''Seismic Analysis of Safety-Related Nuclear Structures'' was published in September 1986. It is ASCE policy to update its standards on a five year interval and the Working Group on Seismic Analysis of Safety Related Nuclear Structures was reconvened to formulate the revisions. The goal in updating the standard is to make sure that it is still relevant and that it incorporates the state of the practice in seismic engineering or, in some cases, where it has been demonstrated that state-of-the-art improvements need to be made to standard practice; new improvements are included. The contents of the new standard cover the same areas as the original version, with some additions. The contents are as follows: Input - response spectra and time histories; modeling of structures; analysis of structures; soil-structure interaction; input for subsystem analysis; special structures - buried pipes and conduits, earth-retaining walls, above-ground vertical tanks, raceways, and base-isolated structures; and an appendix providing seismic probabilistic risk assessment and margin assessment

  6. Contact activation: a revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaier, A H

    1997-07-01

    In conclusion, a revised view of the contact system has been presented. This system has little to do with the initiation of hemostasis. Like lupus anticoagulants, deficiencies of contact proteins give prolonged APTTs but may be risk factors for thrombosis. BK from kininogens is a potent modulator of vascular biology inducing vasodilation, tissue plasminogen activator release, and prostacyclin liberation. Kininogens, themselves, are selective inhibitors of alpha-thrombin-induced platelet activation preventing alpha-thrombin from cleaving the cloned thrombin receptor after arginine41. Kininogens' alpha-thrombin inhibitory activity exists in intact kininogens, BK, and all of BK's breakdown products. HK also is the pivotal protein for contact protein assembly on endothelium. It is the receptor for prekallikrein which when bound to HK becomes activated to kallikrein by an endothelial cell enzyme system independent of activated forms of plasma factor XII. Prekallikrein activation on endothelial cells results in kinetically favorable single chain urokinase and plasminogen activation. Thus the "physiologic, negatively charged surface" for contact system activation is really the assembly of these proteins on cell membranes and activation by membrane-associated enzymes.

  7. epoxy isocapnolactone and 8- hydroxyisocapnolactone-2'3'-diol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    Sep 15, 2009 ... microscope analyses, the compounds were confirmed to have ability in promoting apoptosis. However, ... Some of them have cytostatic properties and the others ..... rescent images of untreated cells, 2',3'-epoxyisocapno-.

  8. 2, 3-Dihydrazone cellulose: Prospective material for tissue engineering scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Vipin; Verma, Poonam; Ray, Pratima; Ray, Alok R.

    2008-01-01

    Cellulose was oxidized by sodium metaperiodate to give rise to 2, 3-dialdehyde cellulose with 92% oxidation ratio, which was further reacted with hydrazine to form 2, 3-dihydrazone cellulose for the incorporation of NH 2 groups. Two forms of matrix, i.e. films and sponges were fabricated. The materials were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy revealed its porous architecture with an average pore size of 150 μm. Swelling studies were carried out in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) at physiological pH 7.4. The contact angle of the 2, 3-dihydrazone cellulose surface was determined for assessing its hydrophilicity which came out to be 23 deg. ± 2 deg. NIH3T3 mice fibroblast cells were used for determining the cytocompatibility of the surfaces. The morphology of the cells was observed through optical inverted microscopy. The results show that 2, 3-dihydrazone cellulose can be used as scaffold material in tissue engineering

  9. Ion chemistry of 1H-1,2,3-triazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichino, Takatoshi; Andrews, Django H; Rathbone, G Jeffery; Misaizu, Fuminori; Calvi, Ryan M D; Wren, Scott W; Kato, Shuji; Bierbaum, Veronica M; Lineberger, W Carl

    2008-01-17

    A combination of experimental methods, photoelectron-imaging spectroscopy, flowing afterglow-photoelectron spectroscopy and the flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube technique, and electronic structure calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of density functional theory (DFT) have been employed to study the mechanism of the reaction of the hydroxide ion (HO-) with 1H-1,2,3-triazole. Four different product ion species have been identified experimentally, and the DFT calculations suggest that deprotonation by HO- at all sites of the triazole takes place to yield these products. Deprotonation of 1H-1,2,3-triazole at the N1-H site gives the major product ion, the 1,2,3-triazolide ion. The 335 nm photoelectron-imaging spectrum of the ion has been measured. The electron affinity (EA) of the 1,2,3-triazolyl radical has been determined to be 3.447 +/- 0.004 eV. This EA and the gas-phase acidity of 2H-1,2,3-triazole are combined in a negative ion thermochemical cycle to determine the N-H bond dissociation energy of 2H-1,2,3-triazole to be 112.2 +/- 0.6 kcal mol-1. The 363.8 nm photoelectron spectroscopic measurements have identified the other three product ions. Deprotonation of 1H-1,2,3-triazole at the C5 position initiates fragmentation of the ring structure to yield a minor product, the ketenimine anion. Another minor product, the iminodiazomethyl anion, is generated by deprotonation of 1H-1,2,3-triazole at the C4 position, followed by N1-N2 bond fission. Formation of the other minor product, the 2H-1,2,3-triazol-4-ide ion, can be rationalized by initial deprotonation of 1H-1,2,3-triazole at the N1-H site and subsequent proton exchanges within the ion-molecule complex. The EA of the 2H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl radical is 1.865 +/- 0.004 eV.

  10. Circumcision revision in male children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Al-Ghazo

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine indications for circumcision revision and to identify the specialty of the person who performed unsatisfactory primary circumcision. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The authors reviewed medical records of 52 cases that underwent circumcision revision over a 6-year period (1998 to 2004. Sleeve surgical technique was used for revision in patients with redundant foreskin or concealed penis, penoplasty for partial or complete degloving of the penis and meatotomy for external meatal stenosis. The mean age of children was 32 months (range 6 months to 9 years. RESULTS: Most of unsatisfactory primary circumcisions (86.7% were performed by laymen. All patients who underwent circumcision revision had good to excellent cosmetic results. CONCLUSION: Primary circumcision performed by laymen carry a high complication rate and serious complications may occur. A period of training and direct supervision by physicians is required before allowing laymen to perform circumcision independently.

  11. EPR first responders revision test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    In this revision test evaluates the acquired knowledge in case of radiological emergency confront. Actions to be taken in relation to people, equipment and the environment. Doses, radioactive sources, pollution

  12. Corporate Author Entries. Revision 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, P.L.

    1986-05-01

    This reference authority has been created and is maintained to provide standard forms for recording the names of organizations consistently in bibliographic citations. This revision includes approximately 42,000 entries established since 1973

  13. A Way to Revised Quantum Electrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehnert B.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In conventional theoretical physics and its Standard Model the guiding principle is that the equations are symmetrical. This limitation leads to a number of difficulties, because it does not permit masses for leptons and quarks, the electron tends to “explode” un- der the action of its self-charge, a corresponding photon model has no spin, and such a model cannot account for the “needle radiation” proposed by Einstein and observed in the photoelectric e ff ect and in two-slit experiments. This paper summarizes a revised Lorentz and gauge invariant quantum electrodynamic theory based on a nonzero electric field divergence in the vacuum and characterized by linear intrinsic broken symmetry. It thus provides an alternative to the Higgs concept of nonlinear spontaneous broken sym- metry, for solving the difficulties of the Standard Model. New results are obtained, such as nonzero and finite lepton rest masses, a point-charge-like behavior of the electron due to a revised renormalization procedure, a magnetic volume force which counteracts the electrostatic eigen-force of the electron, a nonzero spin of the photon and of light beams, needle radiation, and an improved understanding of the photoelectric effect, two-slit ex- periments, electron-positron pair formation, and cork-screw-shaped light beams.

  14. Outcomes of Ahmed Glaucoma Valve Revision in Pediatric Glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Omairi, Ahmed Mansour; Al Ameri, Aliah H; Al-Shahwan, Sami; Khan, Arif O; Al-Jadaan, Ibrahim; Mousa, Ahmed; Edward, Deepak P

    2017-11-01

    Encapsulation of the Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) plate is a common cause for postoperative elevation of intraocular pressure, especially in children. Many reports have described the outcomes of AGV revision in adults. However, the outcomes of AGV revision in children are poorly documented. The aim of this study was to determine the outcomes of AGV revision in children. Retrospective cross-sectional study. A retrospective chart review of patients less than 15 years of age who underwent AGV revision with a minimum postoperative follow-up of 6 months was conducted. Outcome measures included reduction in intraocular pressure from baseline, survival analysis, and reduction in the number of antiglaucoma medications. Postoperative complications were also noted. Complete success was defined as an IOP of 21 mm Hg or less without medications, while qualified success was defined as having an IOP of 21 mm Hg or less with medications. A total of 44 eyes met the inclusion criteria. Primary congenital glaucoma was present in 39 eyes (88.6%), aphakic glaucoma in 4 eyes (9.1%), and Peters anomaly-associated glaucoma in 1 eye (2.3%). The mean number of previous surgeries was 1.4, and the mean age was 6.7 years (range, 1.9-13 years) with a median follow-up of 12 months (range, 6-24 months). The IOP was reduced from a preoperative mean of 30.4 (± 10.3) to 24.9 (± 10.6) mm Hg at 6 months postoperatively. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the complete success rate at 1 month was 100% followed by a rapid decline at 6 months to 38.6%, 27.7% at 1 year, and 5.5% at 2 years. Qualified success rate was 100% at 1 month followed by a 6-month and 1-year survival rate of approximately 50% and a 2-year survival rate of approximately 16%. The median survival time was 14 months. No specific risk factors for failure were identified. Visual acuity remained unchanged following revision. The most common complication was recurrence of encapsulation with elevated IOP (15.9%). Other

  15. NRL Plasma Formulary. Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Description SI Gaussian 9B 1l0B Faraday’s law V x E -- V x E =-- at c Ot c9D 10D 4wr Ampere’s law V x H + J V x H =- + -J at c Ot c Poisson equation V - D = p...Froude Fr V/(g L) 1/ 2 t(Inertial force/gravitational or V/NL buoyancy force) 1 /2 Gay- Lussac Ga 1/fOAT Inverse of relative change in volume during... law heat coefficient, k = crAT0ax Volumetric expansion coefficient, dV/V = )3dT Bulk modulus (units kg m 1 s - 2) 6R, AV, Ap, AT Imposed difference in

  16. Exploring the mechanism of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackray, Sarah J.; Mowat, Christopher G.; Chapman, Stephen K.

    2008-01-01

    The haem proteins TDO (tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase) and IDO (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase) are specific and powerful oxidation catalysts that insert one molecule of dioxygen into L-tryptophan in the first and rate-limiting step in the kynurenine pathway. Recent crystallographic and biochemical analyses of TDO and IDO have greatly aided our understanding of the mechanisms employed by these enzymes in the binding and activation of dioxygen and tryptophan. In the present paper, we briefly discuss the function, structure and possible catalytic mechanism of these enzymes. PMID:19021508

  17. Efficient Synthesis of 1-Sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raushel, Jessica; Fokin, Valery V.

    2010-01-01

    An efficient room temperature method for the synthesis of 1-sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles from in situ generated copper(I) acetylides and sulfonyl azides is described. Copper(I) thiophene-2-carboxylate (CuTC) catalyst produces the title compounds under both non-basic anhydrous and aqueous conditions in good yields. PMID:20931987

  18. SYNTHESIS OF 2,3-UNSATURATED FURANIC HEX- AND PENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    [12] and reduction in two steps of 3-(2-furyl)-acrolein[13] in good yields. The reaction of alcohols 2a-e with glucal 1, carried out in presence of boron trifluoride [7]. (method A), ferric chloride [11] (method B) and CAN [10] (method C), afforded the corresponding 2,3-unsaturated glucopyranosides 3a-e (Table 1). Table 1.

  19. 10 CFR 960.4-2-3 - Rock characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR THE PRELIMINARY SCREENING OF POTENTIAL SITES FOR A NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY Postclosure Guidelines § 960.4-2-3 Rock characteristics. (a) Qualifying condition. The present and... the waste could significantly decrease the isolation provided by the host rock as compared with pre...

  20. Accident sequence precursor analysis level 2/3 model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lui, C.H.; Galyean, W.J.; Brownson, D.A.

    1997-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) program currently uses simple Level 1 models to assess the conditional core damage probability for operational events occurring in commercial nuclear power plants (NPP). Since not all accident sequences leading to core damage will result in the same radiological consequences, it is necessary to develop simple Level 2/3 models that can be used to analyze the response of the NPP containment structure in the context of a core damage accident, estimate the magnitude of the resulting radioactive releases to the environment, and calculate the consequences associated with these releases. The simple Level 2/3 model development work was initiated in 1995, and several prototype models have been completed. Once developed, these simple Level 2/3 models are linked to the simple Level 1 models to provide risk perspectives for operational events. This paper describes the methods implemented for the development of these simple Level 2/3 ASP models, and the linkage process to the existing Level 1 models

  1. N=2 3d-matrix integral with Myers term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomino, Dan

    2004-01-01

    An exact matrix integral is evaluated for a 2x2 3-dimensional matrix model with Myers term. We derive weak and strong coupling expansions of the effective action. We also calculate the expectation values of the quadratic and cubic operators. Implications for non-commutative gauge theory on fuzzy sphere are discussed. (author)

  2. Substituted 4-hydroxy-1,2,3-triazoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pippione, Agnese C.; Dosio, Franco; Ducime, Alex

    2015-01-01

    the distal (S)-glutamic acid carboxyl group using the 4-hydroxy-1,2,3-triazole moiety is applied, to obtain two promising glutamate analogs. In the second example, a scaffold hopping approach is applied, replacing the phenolic moiety present in MDG-1-33A, a potent inhibitor of Onchocerca volvulus chitinase...

  3. Quantification of "2"3"2Th, "2"3"4U, "2"3"5U and "2"3"8U in river mollusks by magnetic sector mass spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma source (Icp-SFMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arevalo R, D. L.; Hernandez M, H.; Romero G, E. T.; Lara A, N.; Alfaro de la T, M. C.

    2016-09-01

    The present work deals with the methodology established for the quantification of "2"3"2Th, "2"3"4U, "2"3"8U and "2"3"5U in the shell of gastropod mollusks collected in the rivers Valles, Coy and Axtla of San Luis Potosi, Mexico, which belong to the Panuco River basin; these rivers have as main source of pollution the discharge of municipal sewage, waste from small industries, agricultural and cattle residues and from natural sources. Conventional methods for measuring radio-nuclides are confronted with certain conditions related to the requirement in measurement, basically in the characterization that is related to the concepts of precision and accuracy. The analysis of the gastropod mollusk shell was performed by the Icp-SFMS technique; the main advantages of this technique lie in the isotope quantification capacity, the high precision and the low limits of detection, in this study are very important because these elements are in concentrations between ppb and ppt. This technique allowed the analysis of the samples having a complex matrix by the presence CaCO_3 minimizing the interferences thanks to the ionization efficiency of the Ar plasma. For the species Pachychilus monachus were found concentrations of "2"3"2Th of 0.16-5.37 μg/g and of total U of 0.101-4.081 μg/g being this species where the highest values of total U were found. For Thiara (melanoids) tuberculata the lowest values were found among the different species ("2"3"2Th 0.61-3.61 μg/g and total U 0.006-0.042 μg/g), for Pachychilus suturalis, values of "2"3"2Th of 0.58-6.4 μg/g and for Pachychilus sp. were found between 0.26-7.62 μg/g and for total U values between 0.28-3.33 μg/g. The method offers several advantages: speed, good precision, low values of quantification limits and high sensitivity in the measurement of radio-nuclides and heavy metals. (Author)

  4. Revised licensee event report system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mays, G.T.; Poore, W.P.

    1985-01-01

    Licensee Event Reports (LERs) provide the basis for evaluating and assessing operating experience information from nuclear power plants. The reporting requirements for submitting LERs to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission have been revised. Effective Jan. 1, 1984, all events were to be submitted in accordance with 10 CFR 50.73 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Report NUREG-1022, Licensee Event Report System-Description of System and Guidelines for Reporting, describes the guidelines on reportability of events. This article summarizes the reporting requirements as presented in NUREG-1022, high-lights differences in data reported between the revised and previous LER systems, and presents results from a preliminary assessment of LERs submitted under the revised LER reporting system

  5. Standard technical specifications: Babcock and Wilcox Plants. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for Babcock ampersand Wilcox Plants. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.9 of the improved STS

  6. Quantum interaction. Revised selected papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Dawei; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Lei [Aberdeen Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Computing; Melucci, Massimo [Padua Univ., Padova (Italy). Dept. of Information Engineering; Frommholz, Ingo [Bedfordshire Univ. (United Kingdom); Arafat, Sachi (eds.) [Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Computing Science

    2011-07-01

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Quantum Interaction, QI 2011, held in Aberdeen, UK, in June 2011. The 26 revised full papers and 6 revised poster papers, presented together with 1 tutorial and 1 invited talk were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous submissions during two rounds of reviewing and improvement. The papers show the cross-disciplinary nature of quantum interaction covering topics such as computation, cognition, mechanics, social interaction, semantic space and information representation and retrieval. (orig.)

  7. HEDR modeling approach: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipler, D.B.; Napier, B.A.

    1994-05-01

    This report is a revision of the previous Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project modeling approach report. This revised report describes the methods used in performing scoping studies and estimating final radiation doses to real and representative individuals who lived in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. The scoping studies and dose estimates pertain to various environmental pathways during various periods of time. The original report discussed the concepts under consideration in 1991. The methods for estimating dose have been refined as understanding of existing data, the scope of pathways, and the magnitudes of dose estimates were evaluated through scoping studies

  8. Quantum interaction. Revised selected papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Dawei; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Lei; Arafat, Sachi

    2011-01-01

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Quantum Interaction, QI 2011, held in Aberdeen, UK, in June 2011. The 26 revised full papers and 6 revised poster papers, presented together with 1 tutorial and 1 invited talk were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous submissions during two rounds of reviewing and improvement. The papers show the cross-disciplinary nature of quantum interaction covering topics such as computation, cognition, mechanics, social interaction, semantic space and information representation and retrieval. (orig.)

  9. Medical writing, revising and editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Morten

    2006-01-01

    The globalization of science makes medical writing, editing and revision a rapidly growing field of linguistic study and practice. Medical science texts are written according to uniform, general guidelines and medical genres have become highly conventionalized in terms of structure and linguistic...... form. Medical editing often takes the form of peer review and mainly addresses issues of contents and overall validity. Medical revision incorporates the checking of the macrostructure and the microstructure of the text, its language and style and its suitability for the target reader or client...

  10. Revising Nabokov Revising”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Bouchet

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Nabokov revised his works as he translated them and, on another plane, canon revisionism has been having its backlash and provoked other refracting waves. The purpose of the conference was to advance Nabokov studies through the discussion of how our view of Nabokov’s standing and his works today should be revised, especially after the publication of The Original of Laura. However the conference was not confined to just this theme, since “revising” is a word rich with implications. To borrow s...

  11. Failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leta, Tesfaye H; Lygre, Stein Håkon L; Skredderstuen, Arne; Hallan, Geir; Furnes, Ove

    2015-02-01

    In Norway, the proportion of revision knee arthroplasties increased from 6.9% in 1994 to 8.5% in 2011. However, there is limited information on the epidemiology and causes of subsequent failure of revision knee arthroplasty. We therefore studied survival rate and determined the modes of failure of aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties. This study was based on 1,016 aseptic revision total knee arthroplasties reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register between 1994 and 2011. Revisions done for infections were not included. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to assess the survival rate and the relative risk of re-revision with all causes of re-revision as endpoint. 145 knees failed after revision total knee arthroplasty. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of re-revision (28%), followed by instability (26%), loose tibial component (17%), and pain (10%). The cumulative survival rate for revision total knee arthroplasties was 85% at 5 years, 78% at 10 years, and 71% at 15 years. Revision total knee arthroplasties with exchange of the femoral or tibial component exclusively had a higher risk of re-revision (RR = 1.7) than those with exchange of the whole prosthesis. The risk of re-revision was higher for men (RR = 2.0) and for patients aged less than 60 years (RR = 1.6). In terms of implant survival, revision of the whole implant was better than revision of 1 component only. Young age and male sex were risk factors for re-revision. Deep infection was the most frequent cause of failure of revision of aseptic total knee arthroplasties.

  12. 1-Propyl-1H-indole-2,3-dione

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Zahrae Qachchachi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C11H11NO2, the 1H-indole-2,3-dione unit is essentially planar, with an r.m.s. deviation of 0.0387 (13 Å. This plane makes a dihedral angle of 72.19 (17° with the plane of the propyl substituent. In the crystal, chains propagating along the b axis are formed through C—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  13. Electronic and conformational properties of 2,3-benzodiazepine derivates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelaggi, M.; Girlanda, R.; Chimirri, A.; Gitto, R.

    1996-01-01

    The molecular geometric and electronic structures of 2,3-benzodiazepine derivates have been studied by means of the MNDO-PM3 method. A number of electronic properties have been computed and examined in order to find indication of the role of the electronic characteristics of the different molecules and their pharmacological properties. Theoretical data indicate that both electronic and structural properties appear responsible for the varying degree of anticonvulsant activity exhibited by compounds 1-4

  14. Electronic and conformational properties of 2,3-benzodiazepine derivates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelaggi, M.; Girlanda, R. [Messina Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Fisica della Materia e Fisica dell`Ambiente; Chimirri, A.; Gitto, R. [Messina Univ. (Italy). Dip. Farmaco-Chimico

    1996-04-01

    The molecular geometric and electronic structures of 2,3-benzodiazepine derivates have been studied by means of the MNDO-PM3 method. A number of electronic properties have been computed and examined in order to find indication of the role of the electronic characteristics of the different molecules and their pharmacological properties. Theoretical data indicate that both electronic and structural properties appear responsible for the varying degree of anticonvulsant activity exhibited by compounds 1-4.

  15. Increased 2,3-Diphosphoglycerate During Normocapnic Hypobaric Hypoxia,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maintenance of normal plasma pH at high altitude (HA) by acetazolamide has been shown to prevent the HA-induced change in 2,3- diphosphoglycerate (DPG...had significant elevations in DPG above sea- level values after two days. Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentrations (MCHC) remained within normal...limits during the first two days, then decreased significantly below sea- level values in Group I (days 3-5) and Group II (days 4-5). Thus prevention of

  16. (E-4-Bromo-N-(2,3-dimethoxybenzylideneaniline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Fejfarová

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The title Schiff base compound, C15H14BrNO2, was prepared by the condensation of 2,3-dimethoxybenzaldehyde with 4-bromoaniline. It adopts an E configuration with respect to the C=N bond. The dihedral angle between the two aromatic rings is 56.79 (8°. Weak C—H...O and C—-H...π bonds can be found in the crystal structure.

  17. Hydroxyapatite particles as carriers for "2"2"3Ra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasiliev, A.N.

    2017-01-01

    Systematic investigation of optimal conditions for preparation and in vitro stability of HAP particles labeled with "2"2"3Ra, that could be considered as promising candidates for targeted α-therapy, has been carried out. Two different approaches to HAP labelling were tested: sorption of Ra"2"+ on pre-synthesized HAP-particles and incorporation of Ra"2"+ into the structure of HAP during its synthesis. Two textural forms of HAP particles were used-nanoparticles and particles with the diameter of 350 ± 20 μm. Kinetics of "2"2"3Ra sorption on HAP of different particle size and desorption in 0.9 % NaCl solution were studied. The influence of solution acidity and solid to liquid phase ratio on sorption of Ra was evaluated and the sorption yield up to 98 % was achieved. It was found that the optimal conditions for the sorption included synthesis of HAP nanoparticles in the presence of "2"2"3Ra at pH values of 4-7 followed by annealing at 900 deg C. In this case subsequent cumulative desorption of Ra was <5 % of initial activity. (author)

  18. Effects of 2,3-iminosqualene in cultured cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popjak, G.; Meenan, A.; Nes, W.D.

    1987-01-01

    2,3-Iminosqualene added to culture media 10 ug/ml) of rat hepatoma (H4-II-E-C3) or Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells irreversibly inactivates the squalene-oxide: lanosterol cyclase, but it does not inhibit general polyprenyl synthesis either from [ 14 C]acetate or [ 14 C]mevalonate. Isq added to lipoprotein-containing media of H4 cells causes in 24 hr an over twofold rise in HMG-CoA reductase and abolishes the repressive effect of mevalonate (MVA) on the reductase. H4 cells synthesize from [2- 14 C]-MVA labelled squalene, squalene-2,3-oxide, squalene-2,3-22,23-dioxide, but very little sterol. The conversion of MVA to these polyprenyls in the presence of Isq is as efficient as its conversion to squalene and cholesterol in control cells. They conclude that the repressor of HMG-CoA reductase derived from MVA is a sterol - whatever might be the nature of that sterol - and not a nonsteroidal derivative of MVA metabolism. H4 cells exposed to Isq in lipid-depleted media die in 48-72 hr, but can be rescued by LDL, but not by free cholesterol or MVA. CHO cells are more resistant than H4 cells and succumb only after 8-9 days' exposure to Isq

  19. Fukushima. The accident sequence and important causes. Pt. 2/3; Fukushima. Unfallablauf und wesentliche Ursachen. T. 2/3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pistner, Christoph [Oeko-Institut e.V., Darmstadt (Germany). Bereich Nukleartechnik und Anlagensicherheit

    2013-07-01

    In this part on the accident sequence in the NPP Fukushima Daiichi on March 11, 2011 the important safety systems of a nuclear power plant are described, including the design of a nuclear boiling water reactor with Mark-II type containment, the high-pressure injection system and the systems for afterheat removal. The chronology of the accident progress in the NPP units 1-3 is described. The units 4-6 were shutdown due to revision work. Due to the earthquake an electric power transformation station close to the NPP site and the power poles were destroyed, the redundant power supply of the neighboring electricity supplier Tohoku did not work. All emergency diesel generators were flooded and destroyed resulting in the so-called station blackout. Firefighting trucks and materials for radiation protection and the infrastructure at the NPP site were destroyed. The release of radioactivity induced a severe contamination of the reactor site.

  20. The nuclear liability conventions revised

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyners, P.

    2004-01-01

    The signature on 12 February 2004 of the Protocols amending respectively the 1960 Paris Convention and the 1963 Brussels Supplementary Convention was the second step of the process of modernisation of the international nuclear liability regime after the adoption in September 1997 of a Protocol revising the 1963 Vienna Convention and of a new Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage. The common objective of the new instruments is to provide more funds to compensate a larger number of potential victims in respect of a broader range of damage. Another goal of the revision exercise was to maintain the compatibility between the Paris and Vienna based systems, a commitment enshrined in the 1988 Joint Protocol, as well as to ascertain that Paris/Brussels countries could also become a Party to the Convention on Supplementary Compensation. However, while generally consistent vis a vis the Joint Protocol, the provisions of the Paris and Vienna Conventions, as revised, differ on some significant aspects. Another remaining issue is whether the improved international nuclear liability regime will succeed in attracting in the future a larger number of countries, particularly outside Europe, and will so become truly universal. Therefore, the need for international co-operation to address these issues, to facilitate the adoption of new implementing legislation and to ensure that this special regime keeps abreast of economic and technological developments, is in no way diminished after the revision of the Conventions.(author)

  1. Concise revision of the Sarcospermataceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, H.J.; Royen, van P.

    1952-01-01

    After the senior writer, together with W. W. Varossieau, had published a revision of this monogeneric family (Blumea III, 1938—’39 and IV, 1941), some more material has been examined by us and, moreover, some new species have been described. Thanks to the courtesy of Prof. F. Gagnepain of Paris, and

  2. Guidelines for Curriculum Development. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, K.; And Others

    The curriculum development process explained in this booklet was first implemented at College of the Redwoods in May 1986 and then revised in June 1989. First, information on the college's Curriculum Committee is provided, indicating that the committee was formed to plan credit/non-credit courses; evaluate and approve additions, modifications, or…

  3. Revised Accounting for Business Combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Arlette C.; Key, Kimberly

    2008-01-01

    The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) has recently issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 141 (Revised 2007) Business Combinations. The object of this Statement is to improve the relevance, representational faithfulness, and comparability of reported information about a business combination and its effects. This Statement…

  4. How Adults Learn. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, J. R.

    The book's emphasis is on learning during the years of adulthood and examines present-day practice of adult education for practitioners. This revised edition brings up to date advances in such areas of learning as controversial theory; the effects of environment; sensory processes; intellectual capacities; motivation and attitude; transactional…

  5. A revision of the Paronychiinae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaudhri, Mohammad Nazeer

    1968-01-01

    This study was undertaken, in April 1964, at the suggestion of Prof. Dr. J. Lanjouw. The need for such a revision, was, however, stressed by the authors of the subtribe, viz. PAX et K. HOFFMANN, who, while delimiting these genera, remarked that the Systematics of both the (main) genera of this

  6. Diet History Questionnaire: Database Revision History

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following details all additions and revisions made to the DHQ nutrient and food database. This revision history is provided as a reference for investigators who may have performed analyses with a previous release of the database.

  7. [Revised practice guideline 'Anaemia in midwifery practice'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beentjes, M.; Jans, S.M.P.J.

    2012-01-01

    The practice guideline of the Royal Dutch Organization of Midwives 'Anaemia in primary care midwifery practice' published in 2000, has recently been revised. The revised guideline takes physiological haemodilution during pregnancy into consideration and provides gestation specific reference values

  8. Revised Human Health Risk Assessment on Chlorpyrifos

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have revised our human health risk assessment and drinking water exposure assessment for chlorpyrifos that supported our October 2015 proposal to revoke all food residue tolerances for chlorpyrifos. Learn about the revised analysis.

  9. 75 FR 60485 - NRC Enforcement Policy Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2008-0497] NRC Enforcement Policy Revision AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Policy statement. SUMMARY: The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or Commission) is publishing a major revision to its Enforcement Policy (Enforcement Policy or Policy) to...

  10. High proximal migration in cemented acetabular revisions operated with bone impaction grafting; 47 revision cups followed with RSA for 17 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohaddes, Maziar; Herberts, Peter; Malchau, Henrik; Johanson, Per-Erik; Kärrholm, Johan

    2017-05-12

    Bone impaction grafting is a biologically and mechanically appealing option in acetabular revision surgery, allowing restitution of the bone stock and restoration of the biomechanics. We analysed differences in proximal migration of the revision acetabular components when bone impaction grafting is used together with a cemented or an uncemented cup. 43 patients (47 hips), revised due to acetabular loosening and judged to have less than 50% host bone-implant contact were included. The hips were randomised to either an uncemented (n = 20) or a cemented (n = 27) revision cup. Radiostereometry and radiography was performed postoperatively, at 3 and 6 months, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 13 and 17 years postoperatively. Clinical follow-up was performed at 1, 2 and 5 years postoperatively and thereafter at the same interval as in the radiographic follow-up. There were no differences in the base line demographic data between the 2 groups. At the last follow-up (17 years) 14 hips (10 cemented, 4 uncemented) had been re-revised due to loosening. 3 additional cups (1 uncemented and 2 cemented) were radiographically loose. There was a higher early proximal migration in the cemented cups. Cups operated on with cement showed a higher early migration measured with RSA and also a higher number of late revisions. The reason for this is not known, but factors such as inclusion of cases with severe bone defects, use of smaller bone chips and issues related to the impaction technique might have had various degrees of influence.

  11. Advancements in Wind Energy Metrology - UPWIND 1A2.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, Troels F.; Wagner, R.

    2011-02-15

    An overview of wind related metrology research made at Risoe DTU over the period of the UPWIND project is given. A main part of the overview is devoted to development of the Lidar technology with several sub-chapters considering different topics of the research. Technical problems are not rare for this new technology, and testing against a traditional met mast have shown to be efficient for gaining confidence with the ground based Lidar technology and for trust in accuracy of measurements. In principle, Lidar measurements could be traceable through the fundamental measurement principles, but at this stage of development it is not found feasible. Instead, traceability is secured through comparison with met masts that are traceable through wind tunnel calibrations of cup anemometers. The ground based Lidar measurement principle works almost acceptable in flat terrain. In complex terrain and close to woods the measurement volume is disturbed because the flow is no longer horizontally homogeneous. These conditions require special attention and correction methods. Due to the large measurement volume, ground based Lidars perform a spatial averaging which has the effect of a low pass filter on turbulence measurements. Theory and measurements seem to be in good agreement. Lidar measurements from a rotating spinner have been performed. The analysis show good perspectives for scanning the incoming wind, which may lead to better controlled wind turbines. Lidars have also been used to scan the wake of wind turbines. These measurements document the meandering wake pattern. The second part of the overview considers power performance measurements. A new investigation on the influence of wind shear points to a revision of the definition of a power curve. A new measurement method has been developed which has a good chance of being implemented in the present revision of the IEC performance standard. Also, a turbulence normalization method has been tested but not found efficient

  12. Separating 2,3-butanediol from fermentation broth using n-butylaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjun Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a complete separation process for 2,3-butanediol fermentation broth has been developed using reactive-extraction and reactive-distillation. n-Butylaldehyde can be used as both reactant and extractant in the process. Equilibrium and kinetics were studied on the reaction between 2,3-butanediol and n-butylaldehyde using different catalysts. Pseudo-Homogeneous model was used to describe the reaction behavior. The kinetic parameters were determined by analyzing experimental data. The results revealed that the reaction enthalpy ΔrH0 = −21.58 ± 1.63 kJ mol−1. The reaction rate was found to increase with increasing reaction temperature and had a linear correlation with catalyst amount. The activity energy for H2SO4 system and HCl system was 57.52 ± 5.35 and 58.14 ± 5.06 kJ mol−1, respectively. Feasible operation conditions have been obtained as follows: volume ratio of n-butylaldehyde to fermentation broth is 0.2; feed molar ratio of water and 2-propyl-4,5-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolane (n-butylaldehyde 2,3-butanediol acetal for hydrolysis is 3.0; theoretical plate number for reactive-distillation column is 10 with concentration of HCl solution of 0.5 mol/L. With the above conditions, more than 90% of 2,3-butanediol can be recovered from fermentation broth by reactive-extraction process and the purity of final product can be over 99%.

  13. Humeral windows in revision total elbow arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, Chris A; Salama, Amir; Stanley, David

    2016-04-01

    The use of cortical windows for revision elbow arthroplasty has not previously been widely reported. Their use aids safe revision of a well fixed humeral prosthesis and can be used in the setting of dislocation, periprosthetic fracture or aseptic loosening of the ulnar component. We describe our technique and results of cortical windows in the distal humerus for revision elbow arthroplasty surgery.

  14. A taxonomic revision of the genus Podocarpus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laubenfels, de D.J.

    1985-01-01

    In connection with the forthcoming revision of the Coniferae for the Flora Malesiana, the author thought it necessary to revise the genus Podocarpus. Although this genus has a substantial representation in Malesia (30 species), the revision is too involved to be appropriate with the Flora Malesiana

  15. 24 CFR 968.225 - Budget revisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Budget revisions. 968.225 Section... Fewer Than 250 Units) § 968.225 Budget revisions. (a) A PHA shall not incur any modernization cost in excess of the total HUD-approved CIAP budget. A PHA shall submit a budget revision, in a form prescribed...

  16. 7 CFR 3015.115 - Budget revisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Budget revisions. 3015.115 Section 3015.115..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE UNIFORM FEDERAL ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS Programmatic Changes and Budget Revisions § 3015.115 Budget revisions. (a) Nonconstruction projects. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of...

  17. 48 CFR 15.307 - Proposal revisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Source Selection 15.307 Proposal revisions. (a) If an... allow proposal revisions to clarify and document understandings reached during negotiations. At the... submit a final proposal revision. The contracting officer is required to establish a common cut-off date...

  18. Preparation of 2,3-dimethylene-2,3-dihydrofurans by the flash vacuum pyrolysis of substituted furylmethyl esters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trahanovsky, W.S.; Cassady, T.J.; Woods, T.L.

    1981-01-01

    Pyrolysis of 3-methylfurfuryl benzoate gives a 21% yield of 3-methyl-4-methylenecyclobutenone and a 24% yield of 4H,5H,9H,10H-cycloocta]1,2-b:6,5-b']difuran (8), the head-to-head, [4 + 4] dimer of 2,3-dimethylene-2,3-dihydrofuran (6). A similar pyrolysis of 2-methyl-3-furylmethyl benzoate (10) gives 8 in 51% yield. Low-temperature 1 H and 13 C NMR spectral studies show that 6 is the intermediate in the formation of 8. Compound 6 reacts with methyl acrylate to form a mixture of the isomeric Diels-Alder adducts. Pyrolysis of 2-methyl-3-furylmethyl-α,α-d 2 benzoate (10-d 2 ) gives 8-d 4 via the intermediacy of 6-d 2 . Pyrolysis of 2,4-dimethyl-3-furylmethyl benzoate gives a 43% yield of 3,6-dimethyl-4H,5H,9H,10H-cycloocta[1,2-b:6,5-b'] difuran (13), the head-to-head, [4 + 4] dimer of 4-methyl-2,3-dimethylene-2,3-dihydrofuran (14). Low-temperature 1 H and 13 C NMR studies show that 14 is the intermediate in the formation of 13. Compound 14 can be trapped with methyl acrylate to form a 3.1 to 1 ratio of the Diels-Alder adducts 15 and 16. The structure proof of 15 and 16 involves the conversion of 15 to the commercially available, natural product menthofuran and 16 to isomenthofuran, which is synthesized by an independent route

  19. Transformation and biodegradation of 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP)

    OpenAIRE

    Samin, Ghufrana; Janssen, Dick B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose 1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP) is a persistent groundwater pollutant and a suspected human carcinogen. It is also is an industrial chemical waste that has been formed in large amounts during epichlorohydrin manufacture. In view of the spread of TCP via groundwater and its toxicity, there is a need for cheap and efficient technologies for the cleanup of TCP-contaminated sites. In situ or on-site bioremediation of TCP is an option if biodegradation can be achieved and stimulated. This pap...

  20. Simulation of SONGS unit 2/3 NSSS with RETACT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakory, M.R.; Olmos, J.

    1991-01-01

    RETACT Code which is a major code for real time simulation of thermal-hydraulic phenomena has been enhanced and configured for the first time for Simulation of the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) of C-E designed PWRs at San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station. SONGS Unit 2/3 Simulator was upgraded for thermal-hydraulic and containment models as well as the instructor station. In this paper the simulator results for various transients and accidents were benchmarked against plant data, the comparison for some of the benchmarkings including steam generator level swell/shrink, and loss-of-coolant accident are presented

  1. 2,3-Bis[(3-methylbiphenyl-4-ylimino]butane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Chen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C30H28N2, is a product of the condensation reaction of 2-methyl-4-phenylaniline and butane-2,3-dione. The molecule lies on a crystallographic inversion centre. The C=N bond has an E conformation. The dihedral angle between the two benzene rings of the 4-phenyl-2-methylphenyl group is 29.19 (76°. The 1,4-diazabutadiene plane makes an angle of 70.1 (10° with the N-bonded methylphenyl ring and an angle of 81.08 (97° with the terminal phenyl group.

  2. INDOLEAMINE 2,3-DIOXYGENASE (IDO AND IMMUNE TOLERANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coma-del-Corral MJ

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO is an intracellular and extrahepatic enzyme predominantly found in many cells, especially macrophages. Tryptophan degradation generates kynurenine, and this pathway of tryptophan metabolism is an effective mechanism for modulating the immune response. The IDO facilitates immune tolerance and is one of the main actors involved in the inhibition of cell proliferation, including activated T cells. IDO induces production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide (NO radicals. Several pathways involved in the regulation of immune response are regulated by redox mechanisms. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS-RNS and other redox active molecules play key roles in immunity.

  3. Addendum to the remedial investigation report on Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 2 (Rust Spoil Area, Spoil Area 1, and SY-200 Yard) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Main text

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This addendum to the Remedial Investigation (RI) Report on Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was prepared in accordance with requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for reporting the results of a site characterization for public review. This addendum is a supplement to a document that was previously issued in January 1995 and that provided the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of the 1993 investigation performed at OU 2. The January 1995 D2 version of the RI Report on Bear Creek Valley OU 2 included information on risk assessments that have evaluated impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in the document formed the basis for the development of the Feasibility Study Report. This addendum includes revisions to four chapters of information that were a part of the document issued in January 1995. Specifically, it includes revisions to Chaps. 2, 3, 4, and 9. Volume 1 of this document is not being reissued in its entirety as a D3 version because only the four chapters just mentioned have been affected by requested changes. Note also that Volume 2 of this RI Report on Bear Creek Valley OU 2 is not being reissued in conjunction with Volume 1 of this document because there have been no changes requested or made to the previously issued version of Volume 2 of this document.

  4. Fragrance material review on 2-(3-methylphenyl) ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scognamiglio, J; Jones, L; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of 2-(3-methylphenyl) ethanol when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. 2-(3-Methylphenyl) ethanol is a member of the fragrance structural group Aryl Alkyl Alcohols and is a primary alcohol. The AAAs are a structurally diverse class of fragrance ingredients that includes primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl alcohols covalently bonded to an aryl (Ar) group, which may be either a substituted or unsubstituted benzene ring. The common structural element for the AAA fragrance ingredients is an alcohol group -C-(R1)(R2)OH and generically the AAA fragrances can be represented as an Ar-C-(R1)(R2)OH or Ar-Alkyl-C-(R1)(R2)OH group. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. A safety assessment of the entire Aryl Alkyl Alcohols will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all other branched chain saturated alcohols in fragrances. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 78 FR 15299 - New York: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-11

    ...: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision AGENCY: Environmental... Waste program as addressed by the federal used oil management regulations that were published on..., New York Codes, Rules and Regulations (6 NYCRR), Volume A-2A, Hazardous Waste Management System...

  6. Yeni Redhouse Lugati; Ingilizce-Turkce (Revised Redhouse Dictionairy; English-Turkish).

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Church Board for World Ministries, Istanbul (Turkey). Near East Mission.

    The general plan of this dictionary, first prepared by Sir James Redhouse in 1861 and revised in 1950 and 1953, has been to include all words which appear in the Oxford Concise Dictionary and Webster's Collegiate Dictionary. In addition, a great number of idioms have been added; the volume now contains between 60,000 and 70,000 definitions.…

  7. ASSET guidelines. Revised 1991 Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    The present publication is an updated version of the IAEA Assessment of Safety Significant Events Team (ASSET) Guidelines, IAEA-TECDOC-573, published in 1990. Sections 5 and 6 include revised definitions and investigation guidelines for identification of both direct and root causes. These revisions were recommended by a Consultants Meeting held in Vienna on 3-7 December 1990. This guidance is not intended to infringe an expert's prerogative to investigate additional items. Its main purpose is to provide a basic structure and ensure consistency in the assessments. Use of the ASSET guidelines should also facilitate comparison between the observations made in different nuclear power plants and harmonize the reporting of generic ASSET results. The guidelines should always be used with a critical attitude and a view to possible improvements

  8. Trust Revision for Conflicting Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    strategy is to first revise a priori trust assignments as a function of the degree of conflict, before the evidence is fused. This paper focuses on the...practical trust transitivity seems to be idiosyncratic for humans and animals, with no true analogue among non- living forms (and in the physical world ...visiting a foreign country Alice is looking for a restaurant where the locals go, because she would like to avoid places overrun by tourists. She meets a

  9. Clean Air Act. Revision 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Air Act, as amended, and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. This Reference Book has been completely revised and is current through February 15, 1994.

  10. Revised dietary guidelines for Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Young Ai; Lee, Haeng Shin; Kim, Bok Hee; Lee, Yoonna; Lee, Hae Jeung; Moon, Jae Jin; Kim, Cho-il

    2008-01-01

    With rapidly changing dietary environment, dietary guidelines for Koreans were revised and relevant action guides were developed. First, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee was established with experts and government officials from the fields of nutrition, preventive medicine, health promotion, agriculture, education and environment. The Committee set dietary goals for Koreans aiming for a better nutrition state of all after a thorough review and analysis of recent information related to nutritional status and/or problems of Korean population, changes in food production/supply, disease pattern, health policy and agricultural policy. Then, the revised dietary guidelines were proposed to accomplish these goals in addition to 6 different sets of dietary action guides to accommodate specific nutrition and health problems of respective age groups. Subsequently, these guidelines and guides were subjected to the focus group review, consumer perception surveys, and a public hearing for general and professional comments. Lastly, the language was clarified in terms of public understanding and phraseology. The revised Dietary guidelines for Koreans are as follows: eat a variety of grains, vegetables, fruits, fish, meat, poultry and dairy products; choose salt-preserved foods less, and use less salt when you prepare foods; increase physical activity for a healthy weight, and balance what you eat with your activity; enjoy every meal, and do not skip breakfast; if you drink alcoholic beverages, do so in moderation; prepare foods properly, and order sensible amounts; enjoy our rice-based diet.

  11. 2,3-Diaminopyridinium 6-carboxypyridine-2-carboxylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Foroughian

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title proton-transfer compound, C5H8N3+·C7H4NO4−, consists of one mono-deprotonated pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid as anion and one protonated 2,3-diaminopyridine as cation. The crystal packing shows extensive O—H...O, N—H...O and N—H...N hydrogen bonds. Thre are also several π–π interactions between the anions and also between the cations [centriod–centroid distances = 3.6634 (7, 3.7269 (7, 3.6705 (7 and 3.4164 (7 Å].

  12. Levels of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in Friend leukaemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeoh, G C

    1980-05-08

    Most cells are thought to contain trace amounts of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG), as it acts as a cofactor in the interconversion of 2-phosphoglycerate and 3-phosphoglycerate by the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglyceromutase. DPG is synthesized from 1,3-diphosphoglycerate by the action of diphosphoglycerate mutase. Lowry et al. reported levels of 29 mumol DPG per kg wet weight brain tissue which is approximately 3 pmol per 10(8) cells, assuming that 1 g of brain tissue contains 10(9) cells. In contrast, erythroid cells contain 50-100 nmol DPG per 10(8) cells, depending on the species and the stage of development. This is of the order of a 1,000-fold more DPG compared with non-erythroid cells. In red cells DPG concentration modulates the binding of oxygen to haemoglobin. I show here that erythroid precurser cells also contain markedly raised levels of DPG.

  13. 2,3,8-Trisubstituted Quinolines with Antimalarial Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Pablo D G; Krake, Susann H; Poggi, Maitia L; Campbell, Simon F; Willis, Paul A; Dias, Luiz C

    2018-01-01

    Combination therapy drugs are considered a fundamental way to control malaria as it mimimizes the risk of emergence of resistance to the individual partner drugs. Consequently, this type of therapy constitutes a driving force for the discovery of new drugs with different modes of action, since this will provide options for combining different drugs to achieve the optimum antimalarial treatment. In this context, a 2,3,8-trisubstitued quinoline compound was found in a high throughput screen (HTS) to show an excellent inhibition of P. falciparum NF54 (IC50 = 22 nM) and low cytotoxicity. We performed a detailed evaluation of the substituents to improve the metabolic stability and solubility liabilities of the original hit and identified derivatives with enhanced physicochemical and/or PK properties and that maintained biological activity. However the high potency was not retained on testing against drug resistant plasmodium strains.

  14. 2,3,8-Trisubstituted Quinolines with Antimalarial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PABLO D.G. MARTINEZ

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Combination therapy drugs are considered a fundamental way to control malaria as it mimimizes the risk of emergence of resistance to the individual partner drugs. Consequently, this type of therapy constitutes a driving force for the discovery of new drugs with different modes of action, since this will provide options for combining different drugs to achieve the optimum antimalarial treatment. In this context, a 2,3,8-trisubstitued quinoline compound was found in a high throughput screen (HTS to show an excellent inhibition of P. falciparum NF54 (IC50 = 22 nM and low cytotoxicity. We performed a detailed evaluation of the substituents to improve the metabolic stability and solubility liabilities of the original hit and identified derivatives with enhanced physicochemical and/or PK properties and that maintained biological activity. However the high potency was not retained on testing against drug resistant plasmodium strains.

  15. 2,3-Diphenylmaleimide 1-methylpyrrolidin-2-one monosolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny Bulatov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C16H11NO2·C5H9NO, the dihedral angles between the maleimide and phenyl rings are 34.7 (2 and 64.8 (2°. In the crystal, the 2,3-diphenylmaleimide and 1-methylpyrrolidin-2-one molecules form centrosymmetrical dimers via pairs of strong N—H...O hydrogen bonds and π–π stacking interactions between the two neighboring maleimide rings [centroid–centroid distance = 3.495 (2 Å]. The dimers are further linked by weak C—H...O and C—H...π hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional framework.

  16. SRS station guide. Station 2.3 manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, C.; Miller, M.; Laundy, D.

    1996-06-01

    The object of the manual is to effectively provide assistance to users so that they can perform successful experiments at station 2.3 during their visits. In order to compile a comprehensive document, the functions of the instrument hardware and software are described in detail. Where appropriate it also contains useful information and other documentation for help and/or reference. In addition, suggestions and instructions are available to overcome problems which inevitably face the users as the instrument is quite advanced in the performing of complex experimental tasks. This document can provide help as part of the overall user support facility and it is therefore intended that the manual is readily available in hardcopy as well as in electronic form. (author)

  17. Making LULUCF matrix of Korea by Approach 2&3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, J.; Jang, R.; Seong, M.; Yim, J.; Jeon, S. W.

    2017-12-01

    To establish and implement policies in response to climate change, it is very important to identify domestic greenhouse gas emission sources and sinks, and accurately calculate emissions and removals from each source and sink. The IPCC Guideline requires the establishment of six sectors of energy, industrial processes, solvents and other product use, agriculture, Land-Use Change and Forestry (LULUCF) and waste in estimating GHG inventories. LULUCF is divided into 6 categories according to land use, purpose, and type, and then it calculates greenhouse gas emission/absorption amount due to artificial activities according to each land use category and greenhouse gas emission/absorption amount according to land use change. The IPCC Guideline provides three approaches to how to create a LULUCF discipline matrix. According to the IPCC Guidelines, it is a principle to divide into the land use that is maintained and the land use area changed to other lands. However, Korea currently uses Approach 1, which is based on statistical data, it is difficult to detect changed area. Therefore, in this study, we are going to do a preliminary work for constructing the LULUCF matrix at Approach 2 & 3 level. NFI data, GIS, and RS data were used to build the matrix of Approach 2 method by Sampling method. For used for Approach 3, we analyzed the four thematic maps - Cadastral Map, Land Cover Map, Forest Type Map, and Biotope Map - representing land cover and utilization in terms of legal, property, quantitative and qualitative aspects. There is a difference between these maps because their purpose, resolution, timing and spatial range are different. Comparing these maps is important because it can help for decide map which is suitable for constructing the LULUCF matrix.Keywords: LULUCF, GIS/RS, IPCC Guideline, Approach 2&3, Thematic Maps

  18. Onsite vibrational characterization of DCMIX2/3 experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollé, Judit; Dubert, Diana; Gavaldà, Josefina; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Ruiz, Xavier; Shevtsova, Valentina

    2017-11-01

    The SODI-DCMIX thermodiffusion series experiments are part of the fluid research program carried out by the European Space Agency on board of the International Space Station (ISS). In particular, DCIMIX2/3 were conducted in the past inside the Microgravity Science Glovebox in the US Laboratory. Due to the physical nature of the processes implied, these kind of runs were very long and particularly delicate because the low vibratory limit requirements must be maintained for hours. This restrictive condition not always is achieved, therefore, an accurate surveillance of the acceleration levels along the different experiments is necessary, to ensure a correct interpretation of the experimental results. This work analyzes onsite vibrational environment of DCMIX2/3 covering the periods in which the experiments were going on. To do so, acceleration signals only coming from the es03 sensor, nearest to the experimental equipment and located in the Glovebox, were downloaded from the PIMS NASA website. To be as precise as possible the signals have always been treated minute by minute. To detect the transient disturbances along the experiments, several warnings were considered. First, 1 min RMS values, for the three acceleration components were evaluated, in time and in frequency domain. Additional information was obtained by plotting the power spectral densities of the signals, PSD, and their spectrogram with the aim of characterizing long periods of acceleration data. Due to great influence of low frequencies in this type of experiments, the Frequency Factor Index, FFI, was evaluated each minute. Complementary, the spectral entropy evolution was proposed as a fast new indicator of external perturbations. It has been found a good correlation between the spectrogram, temporal RMS and spectral entropy. Finally, a graphic representation of the points associated to the 1-min RMS values in one-third-octave frequency intervals which exceed the ISS limit curve requirements, was

  19. The Revised Academic Consensus Definition of Terrorism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex P. Schmid

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Terrorism is a contested concept. While there are many national and regional definitions, there is no universal legal definition approved by the General Assembly of the United Nations (the one proposed by the Security Council in Res. 1566 (2004 is non-binding, lacking legal authority in international law. The Ad Hoc Committee on Terrorism of the 6th (legal Committee of the General Assembly has, with some interruptions, been trying to reach a legal definition since 1972 - but in vain. In the absence of a legal definition, attempts have been made since the 1980s to reach agreement on an academic consensus definition. The latest outcome is the revised definition reprinted below. It is the result of three rounds of consultations among academics and other professionals. A description how it was arrived at can be found on pp. 39 - 98 of Alex P. Schmid (Ed.. The Routledge Handbook of Terrorism Research. London and New York: Routledge, 2011. The same volume also contains 260 other definitions compiled by Joseph J. Easson and Alex P. Schmid on pp. 99 -200.

  20. Through analysis of LOFT L2-3 by THYDE-P code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Masashi

    1981-10-01

    A through calculation of Experiment L2-3 of the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Facility Power Ascension Series (Experiment Series L2) was performed with the THYDE-P code. The specific objectives of Experiment L2-3 were to determine the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the nuclear core and the thermal-mechanical response of the fuel rod cladding with a maximum linear heat generation rate of 39.4 kW/m. The THYDE-P code is a computer code to analyze both the blowdown and refill-reflood phases of loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) without a change in the methods and the models and is now under verification study and modification. The present calculation was performed by best estimate (BE) options as Sample Calculation Run 40, which is a portion of a series of THYDE-P sample calculations. The calculation was carried out from test initiation until complete submersion of the core volume with subcooled water, i.e. about 60 sec. The trend of the calculated cladding surface temperature was in good agreement with that of the experimental results. (author)

  1. Bulletin 2005-12 : revised Alberta pipeline regulation issued

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-05-31

    A revised Pipeline Regulation has been issued and is currently available on the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) website. Changes to the regulation reflect bothchanges in EUB regulatory policy and processes and technological improvements. Goals of the revision include improvements in overall pipeline performance, and the implementation of recommendations derived from the Public Safety and Sour Gas Committee concerning sour gas pipeline safety. The regulation was re-organized for greater clarity, and structured into 11 parts. Issues concerning the transition to the revised regulation were presented. The summary of notable administrative changes included clarifications of when a pipeline application is not required; when ABSA approval is required for steam lines; situations for which low-pressure natural gas lines must be licensed; and emergency response requirements. Technical clarifications include requirements for pipeline operations and maintenance manuals; composite materials; limitations on amounts of H{sub 2}S in polymeric pipe; pressure mismatches; approval for testing with gaseous media; venting of small volumes of raw gas; right-of-way surveillance; inspection of surface construction activities; annual corrosion evaluations; registering of pipelines and excavators in controlled areas with Alberta One-Call; ground disturbance training; restoration and signage maintenance on abandoned pipelines; sour service steel pipelines; unused pipelines and abandoned pipelines; and remediation of stub ends in operating pipelines.

  2. Revision for prosthetic joint infection following hip arthroplasty: Evidence from the National Joint Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenguerrand, E; Whitehouse, M R; Beswick, A D; Jones, S A; Porter, M L; Blom, A W

    2017-06-01

    We used the National Joint Registry for England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Isle of Man (NJR) to investigate the risk of revision due to prosthetic joint infection (PJI) for patients undergoing primary and revision hip arthroplasty, the changes in risk over time, and the overall burden created by PJI. We analysed revision total hip arthroplasties (THAs) performed due to a diagnosis of PJI and the linked index procedures recorded in the NJR between 2003 and 2014. The cohort analysed consisted of 623 253 index primary hip arthroplasties, 63 222 index revision hip arthroplasties and 7585 revision THAs performed due to a diagnosis of PJI. The prevalence, cumulative incidence functions and the burden of PJI (total procedures) were calculated. Overall linear trends were investigated with log-linear regression. We demonstrated a prevalence of revision THA due to prosthetic joint infection of 0.4/100 procedures following primary and 1.6/100 procedures following revision hip arthroplasty. The prevalence of revision due to PJI in the three months following primary hip arthroplasty has risen 2.3-fold (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3 to 4.1) between 2005 and 2013, and 3.0-fold (95% CI 1.1 to 8.5) following revision hip arthroplasty. Over 1000 procedures are performed annually as a consequence of hip PJI, an increase of 2.6-fold between 2005 and 2013. Although the risk of revision due to PJI following hip arthroplasty is low, it is rising and, coupled with the established and further predicted increased incidence of both primary and revision hip arthroplasty, this represents a growing and substantial treatment burden. Cite this article : E. Lenguerrand, M. R. Whitehouse, A. D. Beswick, S. A. Jones, M. L. Porter, A. W. Blom. Revision for prosthetic joint infection following hip arthroplasty: Evidence from the National Joint Registry. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:391-398. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.66.BJR-2017-0003.R1. © 2017 Lenguerrand et al.

  3. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2016 Rates; Revisions of Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers, Including Changes Related to the Electronic Health Record Incentive Program; Extensions of the Medicare-Dependent, Small Rural Hospital Program and the Low-Volume Payment Adjustment for Hospitals. Final rule; interim final rule with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-17

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2016. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act), the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Reform(SGR) Act of 2013, the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015, and other legislation. We also are addressing the update of the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2016.As an interim final rule with comment period, we are implementing the statutory extensions of the Medicare dependent,small rural hospital (MDH)Program and changes to the payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals under the IPPS.We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2016 and implementing certain statutory changes to the LTCH PPS under the Affordable Care Act and the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013 and the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014.In addition, we are establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals,PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, and LTCHs) that are participating in Medicare, including related provisions for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals participating in the Medicare Electronic Health Record (EHR)Incentive Program. We also are updating policies relating to the

  4. Transformation and biodegradation of 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samin, Ghufrana; Janssen, Dick B

    2012-09-01

    1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP) is a persistent groundwater pollutant and a suspected human carcinogen. It is also is an industrial chemical waste that has been formed in large amounts during epichlorohydrin manufacture. In view of the spread of TCP via groundwater and its toxicity, there is a need for cheap and efficient technologies for the cleanup of TCP-contaminated sites. In situ or on-site bioremediation of TCP is an option if biodegradation can be achieved and stimulated. This paper presents an overview of methods for the remediation of TCP-contaminated water with an emphasis on the possibilities of biodegradation. Although TCP is a xenobiotic chlorinated compound of high chemical stability, a number of abiotic and biotic conversions have been demonstrated, including abiotic oxidative conversion in the presence of a strong oxidant and reductive conversion by zero-valent zinc. Biotransformations that have been observed include reductive dechlorination, monooxygenase-mediated cometabolism, and enzymatic hydrolysis. No natural organisms are known that can use TCP as a carbon source for growth under aerobic conditions, but anaerobically TCP may serve as electron acceptor. The application of biodegradation is hindered by low degradation rates and incomplete mineralization. Protein engineering and genetic modification can be used to obtain microorganisms with enhanced TCP degradation potential.

  5. Pressure-frozen 1,2,3-trichloropropane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podsiadło, Marcin; Katrusiak, Andrzej

    2006-12-01

    The structure of 1,2,3-trichloropropane, ClCH2CHClCH2Cl, in-situ crystallized in a diamond-anvil cell, has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction at 0.28 and 0.35 GPa. A melting point at 295 K and 0.22 GPa has been determined. The molecular conformation of aliphatic chain and terminal Cl atoms is approximately C2 symmetric. Of the intermolecular contacts, the tightest are the Cl...Cl and then the Cl...H contacts, whereas the H...H distances are considerably longer than the sum of the van der Waals radii and leave narrow voids in the structure. The elevated pressure reduces the H...H separations but hardly affects the Cl...Cl distances. The crystal growth rates, compression and types of intermolecular interactions in the structures can be correlated with the directions of the Cl...Cl contacts, which can be considered the main motif responsible for the molecular arrangement in the structure.

  6. Antitumour agents as inhibitors of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantouris, Georgios; Mowat, Christopher G., E-mail: C.G.Mowat@ed.ac.uk

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •∼2800 National Cancer Institute USA compounds have been screened as potential inhibitors of TDO and/or IDO. •Seven compounds with anti-tumour properties have been identified as potent inhibitors. •NSC 36398 (taxifolin, dihydroquercetin) is selective for TDO with a K{sub i} of 16 M. •This may help further our understanding of the role of TDO in cancer. -- Abstract: The involvement of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) in cancer biology has recently been described, with the enzyme playing an immunomodulatory role, suppressing antitumour immune responses and promoting tumour cell survival and proliferation. This finding reinforces the need for specific inhibitors of TDO that may potentially be developed for therapeutic use. In this work we have screened ∼2800 compounds from the library of the National Cancer Institute USA and identified seven potent inhibitors of TDO with inhibition constants in the nanomolar or low micromolar range. All seven have antitumour properties, killing various cancer cell lines. For comparison, the inhibition potencies of these compounds were tested against IDO and their inhibition constants are reported. Interestingly, this work reveals that NSC 36398 (dihydroquercetin, taxifolin), with an in vitro inhibition constant of ∼16 μM, is the first TDO-selective inhibitor reported.

  7. 1-Ethyl-5-iodoindoline-2,3-dione

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are two independent molecules in the asymmetric unit of the title compound, C10H8INO2, which differ in the degree of planarity. The iodoindoline-2,3-dione skeleton of molecule 1 is essentially planar [mean deviation = 0.003 (2 Å for the nine non-H atoms of the indoline core, with a maximum deviation of 0.033 (1 Å for the I atom]. The I atom and O atom in the 3-position of molecule 2 deviate by 0.195 (1 and 0.120 (2 Å, respectively, from the least-squares plane through the nine non-H atoms of the indoline core. Molecules 1 and 2 are roughly coplanar, the mean planes through their cores making a dihedral angle of 6.84 (1°. This coplanarity results in a layer-like structure parallel to (6,11,17 in the crystal, the distance between adjacent least-squares planes through the cores of molecules 1 and 2 being 3.37 (1 Å. In such a layer, molecules 1 and 2 are linked by C—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming chains along [11-1]. The chains are further coupled to construct a kind of double-chain structure via I...O interactions [3.270 (2 Å].

  8. Cyclic-2,3-diphosphoglycerate cycle in methanogenic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahrney, D.E.; Harper, S.H.; Krueger, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    A new and unprecedented model for P/sub i/ translocation into Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum is proposed. It is based on an analysis of the rates of P/sub i/ uptake and concomitant flux through the cyclic-2,3-diphosphoglycerate (cDPG) pool in the presence of cyanide. CN - completely blocks flow of carbon into cellular constituents, but methanogenesis continues at about 70%, indicating considerable energy flow. P/sub i/ uptake continued at 20% of control for 30 min or longer, resulting in an expansion of the intracellular P/sub i/ pool. During this period the flux of phosphate through the cDPG pool remained equal to the rate of P/sub i/ entry. The distribution of 32 P in cDPG showed that the C-2 phosphoryl group was labeled preferentially, indicating that this phosphoryl group has a half-life under 10 min in the presence of CN - . Since CN - completely blocks CO 2 fixation but does not interfere with cDPG turnover, cDPG is neither a biosynthetic intermediate nor a phosphate storage compound. Earlier they had demonstrated that this methanogen can transport P/sub i/ against a million-fold concentration gradient via a H 2 -driven transport system having a K/sub m/ of 25 nM. The evidence that cDPG may play a role in this transport mechanism seems compelling, but further studies are needed

  9. 2',3'-Dideoxycytidine and human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starnes, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    2',3'-Dideoxycytidine (ddCyd) is a candidate for clinical trial in the treatment of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, as a result of its potent inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) replication. The cellular metabolism and cytotoxicity of ddCyd are, as well as the interaction of ddCTP and other nucleotide and pyrophosphate analogs with mammalian DNA polymerases and HIV reverse transcriptase (RT). In addition, some structural and functional characteristics of HIV RT are described. 5 μM ddCyd reduced Molt 4 cell division by 50% during a 48 h continuous exposure; however, a 24 h exposure to 0.5 μM ddCyd reduced clonogenic survival by 50%. [ 14 C]-dThd incorporation into DNA was reduced during exposure to ddCyd. Acid-soluble ddCyd metabolites were ddCMP, ddCDP, and ddCTP. Initial ddCyd phosphorylation was catalyzed primarily by cytoplasmic dCyd kinase, and ddCyd was not a substrate for human Cyd-dCyd deaminase. Metabolism of ddCyd was identical in mock and HIV infected H9 cells

  10. Recent progress in printed 2/3D electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Andreas; Patter, Paul; Popovic, Karl; Blümel, Alexander; Sax, Stefan; Lenz, Martin; Glushko, Oleksandr; Cordill, Megan J.; List-Kratochvil, Emil J. W.

    2015-09-01

    New, energy-saving, efficient and cost-effective processing technologies such as 2D and 3D inkjet printing (IJP) for the production and integration of intelligent components will be opening up very interesting possibilities for industrial applications of molecular materials in the near future. Beyond the use of home and office based printers, "inkjet printing technology" allows for the additive structured deposition of photonic and electronic materials on a wide variety of substrates such as textiles, plastics, wood, stone, tiles or cardboard. Great interest also exists in applying IJP in industrial manufacturing such as the manufacturing of PCBs, of solar cells, printed organic electronics and medical products. In all these cases inkjet printing is a flexible (digital), additive, selective and cost-efficient material deposition method. Due to these advantages, there is the prospect that currently used standard patterning processes can be replaced through this innovative material deposition technique. A main issue in this research area is the formulation of novel functional inks or the adaptation of commercially available inks for specific industrial applications and/or processes. In this contribution we report on the design, realization and characterization of novel active and passive inkjet printed electronic devices including circuitry and sensors based on metal nanoparticle ink formulations and the heterogeneous integration into 2/3D printed demonstrators. The main emphasis of this paper will be on how to convert scientific inkjet knowledge into industrially relevant processes and applications.

  11. The Epidemiology of Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Adults from Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Timothy; Wasserstein, David; Dwyer, Tim; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell; Marks, Paul H.; Bach, Bernard R.; Townley, John; Mahomed, Nizar; Chahal, Jaskarndip

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The morbidity associated with revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is largely unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the rate of and risk factors for re-revision, re-operation, and re-admission following revision ACLR in the general population. Methods: All patients who underwent first revision ACLR in Ontario, Canada from January 2004 to December 2010 were identified and followed to December 2012. Exclusions included age (<16 years), previous osteotomy, or multi-ligament knee reconstruction. The main outcome was re-revision ACLR. Secondary outcomes included re-operation [irrigation and debridement (I&D), meniscectomy, manipulation under anesthesia (MUA), contralateral ACLR, and total knee arthroplasty (TKA)], and re-admission within 90 days of surgery. Survival to re-revision was determined using the Kaplan-Meier (KM) approach. A Cox proportional hazards model or logistic regression were used to determine the influence of patient factors (age, sex, neighborhood income quintile, and comorbidity), surgical factors (graft choice, concurrent meniscal procedure, and fixation method), and provider factors (surgeon volume, surgeon years in practice, and hospital status) on outcomes. A post-hoc analysis was performed to determine the influence of the aforementioned factors on overall post-operative infection risk, including both operative and non-operative cases. Results: Overall, 827 patients were included (median age: 30 years; 58.8% males). Single stage revisions comprised 92.9% of cases, and a meniscal procedure (repair or debridement) was performed in 45.3% of cases. The re-revision rate at a mean follow-up of 4.8±2.2 years was 4.4%, and the five-year survival rate was 95.4% (Figure 1). The rates of I&D, meniscectomy, contralateral ACLR, and re-admission were 0.8%, 3.1%, 3.4%, and 4.1%, respectively. MUA and TKA were rare. Young age significantly increased contralateral ACLR risk (risk decreased by 5.1% with each year

  12. Re-visions of rationality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Ben R

    2005-01-01

    The appeal of simple algorithms that take account of both the constraints of human cognitive capacity and the structure of environments has been an enduring theme in cognitive science. A novel version of such a boundedly rational perspective views the mind as containing an 'adaptive toolbox' of specialized cognitive heuristics suited to different problems. Although intuitively appealing, when this version was proposed, empirical evidence for the use of such heuristics was scant. I argue that in the light of empirical studies carried out since then, it is time this 'vision of rationality' was revised. An alternative view based on integrative models rather than collections of heuristics is proposed.

  13. A taxonomic revision of the genus Podocarpus

    OpenAIRE

    Laubenfels, de, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    In connection with the forthcoming revision of the Coniferae for the Flora Malesiana, the author thought it necessary to revise the genus Podocarpus. Although this genus has a substantial representation in Malesia (30 species), the revision is too involved to be appropriate with the Flora Malesiana per se. One new subgenus and 17 new sections are described, and 94 species are enumerated, of which 11 species and 1 variety are described as new, and 3 varieties have been raised to specific rank....

  14. Viability Assessment Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This volume describes the major design features of the Monitored Geologic Repository. This document is not intended to provide an exhaustive, detailed description of the repository design. Rather, this document summarizes the major systems and primary elements of the design that are radiologically significant, and references the specific technical documents and design analyses wherein the details can be found. Not all portions of the design are at the same level of completeness. Highest priority has been given to assigning resources to advance the design of the Monitored Geologic Repository features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation and for which there is no NRC licensing precedent. Those features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation, but for which there is an NRC precedent, receive second priority. Systems and features that have no impact on radiological safety or waste isolation receive the lowest priority. This prioritization process, referred to as binning, is discussed in more detail in Section 2.3. Not every subject discussed in this volume is given equal treatment with regard to the level of detail provided. For example, less detail is provided for the surface facility design than for the subsurface and waste package designs. This different level of detail is intentional. Greater detail is provided for those functions, structures, systems, and components that play key roles with regard to protecting radiological health and safety and that are not common to existing nuclear facilities already licensed by NRC. A number of radiological subjects are not addressed in the VA, (e.g., environmental qualification of equipment). Environmental qualification of equipment and other radiological safety considerations will be addressed in the LA. Non-radiological safety considerations such as silica dust control and other occupational safety considerations are considered equally important but are not addressed in

  15. Fixation of Hydroxyapatite-Coated Revision Implants Is Improved by the Surgical Technique of Cracking the Sclerotic Bone Rim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmengaard, Brian; Bechtold, Joan E.; Chen, Xinqian; Søballe, Kjeld

    2013-01-01

    Revision joint replacement has poorer outcomes that have been associated with poorer mechanical fixation. We investigate a new bone-sparing surgical technique that locally cracks the sclerotic bone rim formed during aseptic loosening. We inserted 16 hydroxyapatite-coated implants bilaterally in the distal femur of eight dogs, using a controlled weight-bearing experimental model that replicates important features of a typical revision setting. At 8 weeks, a control revision procedure and a crack revision procedure were performed on contralateral implants. The crack procedure used a splined tool to perform a systematic local perforation of the sclerotic bone rim of the revision cavity. After 4 weeks, the hydroxyapatite-coated implants were evaluated for mechanical fixation by a push-out test and for tissue distribution by histomorphometry. The cracking revision procedure resulted in significantly improved mechanical fixation, significantly more bone ongrowth and bone volume in the gap, and reduced fibrous tissue compared to the control revision procedure. The study demonstrates that the sclerotic bone rim prevents bone ingrowth and promotes fixation by fibrous tissue. The effect of the cracking technique may be due to improved access to the vascular compartment of the bone. The cracking technique is a simple surgical method that potentially can improve the fixation of revision implants in sclerotic regions important for obtaining the fixation critical for overall implant stability. PMID:19148940

  16. Revision Total Hip Arthoplasty: Factors Associated with Re-Revision Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Khatod, M; Cafri, G; Inacio, MCS; Schepps, AL; Paxton, EW; Bini, SA

    2015-01-01

    The survivorship of implants after revision total hip arthroplasty and risk factors associated with re-revision are not well defined. We evaluated the re-revision rate with use of the institutional total joint replacement registry. The purpose of this study was to determine patient, implant, and surgeon factors associated with re-revision total hip arthroplasty.A retrospective cohort study was conducted. The total joint replacement registry was used to identify patients who had undergone revi...

  17. Percutaneous Revision of a Testicular Prosthesis is Safe, Cost-effective, and Provides Good Patient Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene B. Cone

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Office-based percutaneous revision of a testicular prosthesis has never been reported. A patient received a testicular prosthesis but was dissatisfied with the firmness of the implant. In an office setting, the prosthesis was inflated with additional fluid via a percutaneous approach. Evaluated outcomes included patient satisfaction, prosthesis size, recovery time, and cost savings. The patient was satisfied, with no infection, leak, or complication after more than 1 year of follow-up, at significantly less cost than revision surgery. Percutaneous adjustment of testicular prosthesis fill-volume can be safe, inexpensive, and result in good patient satisfaction.

  18. Biosynthesis of cyclic 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. Isolation and characterization of 2-phosphoglycerate kinase and cyclic 2,3-diphosphoglycerate synthetase from Methanothermus fervidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmacher, A; Vogt, A B; Hensel, R

    1990-10-15

    Starting from 2-phosphoglycerate the biosynthesis of cDPG comprises two steps: (i) the phosphorylation of 2-phosphoglycerate to 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and (ii) the intramolecular cyclization to cyclic 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. The involved enzymes, 2-phosphoglycerate kinase and cyclic 2,3-diphosphoglycerate synthetase, were purified form Methanothermus fervidus. Their molecular and catalytic properties were characterized.

  19. Revised nonstochastic health effects models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaniv, S.S.; Scott, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    In 1989, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published a revision of the 1985 report, Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis, NUREG/CR-4214, that included models for early occurring and continuing nonstochastic effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. This paper discusses specific models for lethality from early occurring and continuing effects. For brevity, hematopoietic-syndrome lethality is called hematopoietic death; pulmonary-syndrome lethality is called pulmonary death; and gastrointestinal syndrome lethality is called gastrointestinal death. Two-parameter Weibull risk functions are recommended for estimating the risk of hematopoietic, pulmonary, or gastrointestinal death. The risks are obtained indirectly by using hazard functions; as a result, this type of approach has been called hazard-function modeling and the models generated are called hazard-function models. In the 1989 NUREG/CR-4214 report, changes were made in the parameter values for a number of effects, and the models used to estimate hematopoietic and pulmonary deaths were substantially revised. Upper and lower estimates of model parameters are provided for all early health effects models. In this paper, we discuss the 1989 models for hematopoietic and pulmonary deaths, highlighting the differences between the 1989 and 1985 models. In addition, we give the reasons for which the 1985 models were modified

  20. Revising Lecture Notes: How Revision, Pauses, and Partners Affect Note Taking and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Linlin; Kiewra, Kenneth A.; Samuelson, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    Note taking has been categorized as a two-stage process: the recording of notes and the review of notes. We contend that note taking might best involve a three-stage process where the missing stage is revision. This study investigated the benefits of revising lecture notes and addressed two questions: First, is revision more effective than…

  1. Revised and extended analysis of Br IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyaz, A.; Rahimullah, K.; Tauheed, A.

    2014-01-01

    The spectrum of three-times ionized bromine Br IV has been studied in the 319-2350 Å wavelength region. The spectrum was recorded on a 3-m normal incidence vacuum spectrograph at the St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish (Canada) and 6.65-m grazing incidence spectrograph at the Zeeman laboratory (Amsterdam). The light sources used were a triggered spark and sliding spark, respectively. The ground configuration of Br IV 3d104s24p2, the excited configurations 3d104s4p3+3d104s24p (4d+5d+6d+5s+6s+7s) in the odd parity system and 3d104s24p (5p+4f+5f)+3d104s4p2 (4d+5s)+3d104p4 in the even parity system have been studied. Relativistic Hartree-Fock (HFR) and least squares fitted (LSF) parametric calculations were used to interpret the observed spectrum. 120 Levels of Br IV have now been established, 58 being new. Among 424 spectral lines, 277 are newly classified. The levels 4s4p35S2, 4s24p4d 3F4 and 4p5p (3P0, 1, 3D1, 2, 3S1) are revised. We estimate the accuracy of our measured wavelength for sharp and unblended lines to be ±0.005 Å. The ionization limit is determined as 385,390±100 cm-1 (47.782±0.012 eV).

  2. Selection of 3013 containers for field surveillance: LA-14310, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peppers, Larry; Kelly, Elizabeth; McClard, James; Friday, Gary; Venetz, Theodore; Stakebake, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    This document is the fifth in a series of reports that document the binning, statistical sampling, and sample selection of 3013 containers for field surveillance. 1,2,3,39 Revisions to binning assignments documented in this report are primarily a result of new prompt gamma data. This report also documents changes to the random sample specification resulting from these binning changes and identifies and provides the rationale for the engineering judgment sample items for Fiscal Year (FY) 2008 and 2009. This revision also updates the changes to the previous surveillance sample resulting from changes to the order that specific containers undergo surveillance. This report will continue to be reviewed regularly and revised as needed to meet the requirements of the surveillance program.

  3. GLOBECOM '85 - Global Telecommunications Conference, New Orleans, LA, December 2-5, 1985, Conference Record. Volumes 1, 2, & 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Various papers on global telecommunications are presented. The general topics addressed include: multiservice integration with optical fibers, multicompany owned telecommunication networks, softworks quality and reliability, advanced on-board processing, impact of new services and systems on operations and maintenance, analytical studies of protocols for data communication networks, topics in packet radio networking, CCITT No. 7 to support new services, document processing and communication, antenna technology and system aspects in satellite communications. Also considered are: communication systems modelling methodology, experimental integrated local area voice/data nets, spread spectrum communications, motion video at the DS-0 rate, optical and data communications, intelligent work stations, switch performance analysis, novel radio communication systems, wireless local networks, ISDN services, LAN communication protocols, user-system interface, radio propagation and performance, mobile satellite system, software for computer networks, VLSI for ISDN terminals, quality management, man-machine interfaces in switching, and local area network performance.

  4. GLOBECOM '87 - Global Telecommunications Conference, Tokyo, Japan, Nov. 15-18, 1987, Conference Record. Volumes 1, 2, & 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present conference on global telecommunications discusses topics in the fields of Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) technology field trial planning and results to date, motion video coding, ISDN networking, future network communications security, flexible and intelligent voice/data networks, Asian and Pacific lightwave and radio systems, subscriber radio systems, the performance of distributed systems, signal processing theory, satellite communications modulation and coding, and terminals for the handicapped. Also discussed are knowledge-based technologies for communications systems, future satellite transmissions, high quality image services, novel digital signal processors, broadband network access interface, traffic engineering for ISDN design and planning, telecommunications software, coherent optical communications, multimedia terminal systems, advanced speed coding, portable and mobile radio communications, multi-Gbit/second lightwave transmission systems, enhanced capability digital terminals, communications network reliability, advanced antimultipath fading techniques, undersea lightwave transmission, image coding, modulation and synchronization, adaptive signal processing, integrated optical devices, VLSI technologies for ISDN, field performance of packet switching, CSMA protocols, optical transport system architectures for broadband ISDN, mobile satellite communications, indoor wireless communication, echo cancellation in communications, and distributed network algorithms.

  5. International Congress of Fluid Mechanics, 3rd, Cairo, Egypt, Jan. 2-4, 1990, Proceedings. Volumes 1, 2, 3, & 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Mobarak, A.; Rayan, M. Abou

    This conference presents papers in the fields of flow separation, unsteady aerodynamics, fluid machinery, boundary-layer control and stability, grid generation, vorticity dominated flows, and turbomachinery. Also considered are propulsion, waves and sound, rotor aerodynamics, computational fluid dynamics, Euler and Navier-Stokes equations, cavitation, mixing and shear layers, mixing layers and turbulent flows, and fluid machinery and two-phase flows. Also addressed are supersonic and reacting flows, turbulent flows, and thermofluids.

  6. International Congress of Fluid Mechanics, 3rd, Cairo, Egypt, Jan. 2-4, 1990, Proceedings. Volumes 1, 2, 3, 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayfeh, A.H.; Mobarak, A.; Rayan, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    This conference presents papers in the fields of flow separation, unsteady aerodynamics, fluid machinery, boundary-layer control and stability, grid generation, vorticity dominated flows, and turbomachinery. Also considered are propulsion, waves and sound, rotor aerodynamics, computational fluid dynamics, Euler and Navier-Stokes equations, cavitation, mixing and shear layers, mixing layers and turbulent flows, and fluid machinery and two-phase flows. Also addressed are supersonic and reacting flows, turbulent flows, and thermofluids.

  7. The participant Coster-Kronig preceded Auger transition in the resonant L2,3-M2,3V Auger electron spectrum of Ti metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Masahide

    2008-01-01

    The L 2,3 -M 2,3 V resonant Auger electron spectroscopy (RAES) spectrum of Ti metal measured by Le Fevre et al. [P. Le Fevre, J. Danger, H. Magnan, D. Chandesris, J. Jupille, S. Bourgeois, M.-A. Arrio, R. Gotter, A. Verdini, A. Morgante, Phys. Rev. B69 (2004) 155421] is analyzed in the light of relaxation and decay of the resonantly excited L 2,3 -hole states. The relaxation time of the resonantly excited L 2,3 -hole state to the fully relaxed (screened) one is much shorter than the L 2,3 -hole Auger decay time, whereas the participant Coster-Kronig (CK) decay time of the resonantly excited L 2 -hole state to the fully relaxed L 3 -hole state at the L 2 resonance is as short as the relaxation time of the resonantly excited L 2 -hole state to the fully relaxed one. The excited electron is predominantly either rapidly decoupled from the L 2,3 -hole decay or annihilated by the participant CK decay. Thus, near the L 2,3 edges the L 2,3 -M 2,3 V RAES spectral peak appears at constant kinetic energy. The L 2,3 -M 2,3 V RAES spectrum shows a normal L 2,3 -M 2,3 V Auger decay profile not modulated by the density of empty d states probed by the resonant excitation. Not only the relaxation time but also the participant CK decay time depends on photon energy because they depend on the density of empty d states probed by the resonant excitation. As a result, the L 2,3 X-ray absorption spectroscopy spectral line broadening depends on photon energy

  8. Sequenced Peer Revision: Creating Competence and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Ingrid K.; Robertson, John

    2013-01-01

    Mastering techniques of self- and peer revision is a valuable tool for all writers, especially US-educated Generation 1.5 students, whose near fluency enables them to dialogue successfully about their writing. Using action research, 2 academic writing instructors systematically trained students to more responsibly and effectively revise their…

  9. 77 FR 23133 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Yolo-Solano Air Quality Management District

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ... the California State Implementation Plan, Yolo- Solano Air Quality Management District AGENCY... approve revisions to the Yolo-Solano Air Quality Management District (Yolo-Solano AQMD) portion of the.... * * * * * (381) * * * (i) * * * (I) Yolo-Solano Air Quality Management District. (1) Rule 2.3, ``Ringelmann Chart...

  10. Asthma 1-2-3: a low literacy multimedia tool to educate African American adults about asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Rina M; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K; Waite, Katherine R; Rittner, Sarah S; Wilson, Elizabeth A H; Wolf, Michael S

    2009-08-01

    Asthma 1-2-3 is a newly-developed low-literacy multimedia education tool designed to promote asthma self-care concepts among African American adults. An expert panel (n = 10) informed content development for the tool. The video script and storyboard imagery were shown to 30 African Americans recruited from the American Lung Association, whose reactions and comments guided further revisions. The final version was pilot tested in three diverse community settings in Chicago to determine the efficacy of Asthma 1-2-3 at improving patient understanding of asthma and its symptoms. In all, 130 adults participated in the pilot test. Knowledge scores significantly improved from pretest to posttest following presentation of the developed tool for subjects across all literacy levels (Pretest: Mean = 4.2 [SD = 1.6]; Posttest: M = 6.8 [SD = 2.0], P < 0.001). Symptom pathophysiology concepts were the least understood. Individuals with low literacy had less total knowledge score gains compared to those with marginal and adequate literacy (1.8, 2.6, and 3.2 respectively; P = 0.002). The multimedia tool significantly improved understanding of asthma. Individuals with limited literacy may require additional instruction, repeated viewing, or added tangible cues (i.e. supplementary print materials) to support knowledge retention. In general, feedback from the target population was particularly helpful in the development of the tool and its initial evaluation, and should be considered as a necessary step in the creation of other patient education materials.

  11. Revised GCFR safety program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, A.P.; Boyack, B.E.; Torri, A.

    1980-05-01

    This paper presents a summary of the recently revised gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) safety program plan. The activities under this plan are organized to support six lines of protection (LOPs) for protection of the public from postulated GCFR accidents. Each LOP provides an independent, sequential, quantifiable risk barrier between the public and the radiological hazards associated with postulated GCFR accidents. To implement a quantitative risk-based approach in identifying the important technology requirements for each LOP, frequency and consequence-limiting goals are allocated to each. To ensure that all necessary tasks are covered to achieve these goals, the program plan is broken into a work breakdown structure (WBS). Finally, the means by which the plan is being implemented are discussed

  12. Radiological control manual. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloepping, R.

    1996-05-01

    This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Radiological Control Manual (LBNL RCM) has been prepared to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements and interpretation of the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is one methodology to implement the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. Information given in this manual is also intended to provide demonstration of compliance to specific requirements in 10 CFR 835. The LBNL RCM (Publication 3113) and LBNL Health and Safety Manual Publication-3000 form the technical basis for the LBNL RPP and will be revised as necessary to ensure that current requirements from Rules and Orders are represented. The LBNL RCM will form the standard for excellence in the implementation of the LBNL RPP.

  13. Potentialities of Revised Quantum Electrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehnert B.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The potentialities of a revised quantum electrodynamic theory (RQED earlier established by the author are reconsidered, also in respect to other fundamental theories such as those by Dirac and Higgs. The RQED theory is characterized by intrinsic linear symmetry breaking due to a nonzero divergence of the electric field strength in the vacuum state, as supported by the Zero Point Energy and the experimentally confirmed Casimir force. It includes the results of electron spin and antimatter by Dirac, as well as the rest mass of elementary particles predicted by Higgs in terms of spontaneous nonlinear symmetry breaking. It will here be put into doubt whether the approach by Higgs is the only theory which becomes necessary for explaining the particle rest masses. In addition, RQED theory leads to new results beyond those being available from the theories by Dirac, Higgs and the Standard Model, such as in applications to leptons and the photon.

  14. Hot sample archiving. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVey, C.B.

    1995-01-01

    This Engineering Study revision evaluated the alternatives to provide tank waste characterization analytical samples for a time period as recommended by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Program. The recommendation of storing 40 ml segment samples for a period of approximately 18 months (6 months past the approval date of the Tank Characterization Report) and then composite the core segment material in 125 ml containers for a period of five years. The study considers storage at 222-S facility. It was determined that the critical storage problem was in the hot cell area. The 40 ml sample container has enough material for approximately 3 times the required amount for a complete laboratory re-analysis. The final result is that 222-S can meet the sample archive storage requirements. During the 100% capture rate the capacity is exceeded in the hot cell area, but quick, inexpensive options are available to meet the requirements

  15. Radiological control manual. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloepping, R.

    1996-05-01

    This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Radiological Control Manual (LBNL RCM) has been prepared to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements and interpretation of the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is one methodology to implement the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. Information given in this manual is also intended to provide demonstration of compliance to specific requirements in 10 CFR 835. The LBNL RCM (Publication 3113) and LBNL Health and Safety Manual Publication-3000 form the technical basis for the LBNL RPP and will be revised as necessary to ensure that current requirements from Rules and Orders are represented. The LBNL RCM will form the standard for excellence in the implementation of the LBNL RPP

  16. Physiological variations in levels of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in horse erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, I M; McLan, J G

    1975-03-01

    The levels of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG), which affects the transport of oxygen by haemoglobin, were examined in horse blood. Resting levels of erythrocyte 2,3-DPG were established in thoroughbred horses, and levels of 2,3-DPG together with haemoglobin levels, were examined in a variety of conditions. A negative correlation was observed between erythrocyte 2,3-DPG and haemoglobin levels. Mares had higher erythrocyte 2,3-DPG levels was observed during training, and this variation may have a significant effect on haemoglobin oxygen transport. Erythrocyte 2,3-DPG levels were not affected by age or exercise.

  17. The absence of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate from myocytes, hepatocytes and adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, W J; Burns, A H

    1976-04-23

    Myocytes, hepatocytes and adipocytes were prepared from heart, liver and epididymal fat pad of the rat. No detectable level of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate was found. Evidence is also presented which indicates the absence from these cells of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate mutase and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate phosphatase. Previous findings by others of the presence of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate mutase probably resulted from erythrocytes sequestered in the tissue.

  18. Results from levels 2/3 fusion implementations: issues, challenges, retrospectives, and perspectives for the future an annotated perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadar, Ivan; Bosse, Eloi; Salerno, John; Lambert, Dale A.; Das, Subrata; Ruspini, Enrique H.; Rhodes, Bradley J.; Biermann, Joachim

    2008-04-01

    Even though the definition of the Joint Director of Laboratories (JDL) "fusion levels" were established in 1987, published 1991, revised in 1999 and 2004, the meaning, effects, control and optimization of interactions among the fusion levels have not as yet been fully explored and understood. Specifically, this is apparent from the abstract JDL definitions of "Levels 2/3 Fusion" - situation and threat assessment (SA/TA), which involve deriving relations among entities, e.g., the aggregation of object states (i.e., classification and location) in SA, while TA uses SA products to estimate/predict the impact of actions/interactions effects on situations taken by the participant entities involved. Given all the existing knowledge in the information fusion and human factors literature, (both prior to and after the introduction of "fusion levels" in 1987) there are still open questions remaining in regard to implementation of knowledge representation and reasoning methods under uncertainty to afford SA/TA. Therefore, to promote exchange of ideas and to illuminate the historical, current and future issues associated with Levels 2/3 implementations, leading experts were invited to present their respective views on various facets of this complex problem. This paper is a retrospective annotated view of the invited panel discussion organized by Ivan Kadar (first author), supported by John Salerno, in order to provide both a historical perspective of the evolution of the state-of-the-art (SOA) in higher-level "Levels 2/3" information fusion implementations by looking back over the past ten or more years (before JDL), and based upon the lessons learned to forecast where focus should be placed to further enhance and advance the SOA by addressing key issues and challenges. In order to convey the panel discussion to audiences not present at the panel, annotated position papers summarizing the panel presentation are included.

  19. Cloning, Sequencing, and Expression of the Gene Encoding Cyclic 2,3-Diphosphoglycerate Synthetase, the Key Enzyme of Cyclic 2,3-Diphosphoglycerate Metabolism in Methanothermus fervidus

    OpenAIRE

    Matussek, Karl; Moritz, Patrick; Brunner, Nina; Eckerskorn, Christoph; Hensel, Reinhard

    1998-01-01

    Cyclic 2,3-diphosphoglycerate synthetase (cDPGS) catalyzes the synthesis of cyclic 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (cDPG) by formation of an intramolecular phosphoanhydride bond in 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. cDPG is known to be accumulated to high intracellular concentrations (>300 mM) as a putative thermoadapter in some hyperthermophilic methanogens. For the first time, we have purified active cDPGS from a methanogen, the hyperthermophilic archaeon Methanothermus fervidus, sequenced the coding gene, and...

  20. The economic impact of revision otologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadimi, Sahar; Leonetti, John P; Pontikis, George

    2016-03-01

    Revision otologic surgery places a significant economic burden on patients and the healthcare system. We conducted a retrospective chart analysis to estimate the economic impact of revision canal-wall-down (CWD) mastoidectomy. We reviewed the medical records of all 189 adults who had undergone CWD mastoidectomy performed by the senior author between June 2006 and August 2011 at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Ill. Institutional charges and collections for all patients were extrapolated to estimate the overall healthcare cost of revision surgery in Illinois and at the national level. Of the 189 CWD mastoidectomies, 89 were primary and 100 were revision procedures. The total charge for the revision cases was $2,783,700, and the net reimbursement (collections) was $846,289 (30.4%). Using Illinois Hospital Association data, we estimated that reimbursement for 387 revision CWD mastoidectomies that had been performed in fiscal year 2011 was nearly $3.3 million. By extrapolating our data to the national level, we estimated that 9,214 patients underwent revision CWD mastoidectomy in the United States during 2011, which cost the national healthcare system roughly $76 million, not including lost wages and productivity. Known causes of failed CWD mastoidectomies that often result in revision surgery include an inadequate meatoplasty, a facial ridge that is too high, residual diseased air cells, and recurrent cholesteatoma. A better understanding of these factors can reduce the need for revision surgery, which could have a positive impact on the economic strain related to this procedure at the local, state, and national levels.

  1. Cochlear implant revision surgeries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Maria Stella Arantes do; Reis, Ana Cláudia Mirândola B; Massuda, Eduardo T; Hyppolito, Miguel Angelo

    2018-02-16

    The surgery during which the cochlear implant internal device is implanted is not entirely free of risks and may produce problems that will require revision surgeries. To verify the indications for cochlear implantation revision surgery for the cochlear implant internal device, its effectiveness and its correlation with certain variables related to language and hearing. A retrospective study of patients under 18 years submitted to cochlear implant Surgery from 2004 to 2015 in a public hospital in Brazil. Data collected were: age at the time of implantation, gender, etiology of the hearing loss, audiological and oral language characteristics of each patient before and after Cochlear Implant surgery and any need for surgical revision and the reason for it. Two hundred and sixty-five surgeries were performed in 236 patients. Eight patients received a bilateral cochlear implant and 10 patients required revision surgery. Thirty-two surgeries were necessary for these 10 children (1 bilateral cochlear implant), of which 21 were revision surgeries. In 2 children, cochlear implant removal was necessary, without reimplantation, one with cochlear malformation due to incomplete partition type I and another due to trauma. With respect to the cause for revision surgery, of the 8 children who were successfully reimplanted, four had cochlear calcification following meningitis, one followed trauma, one exhibited a facial nerve malformation, one experienced a failure of the cochlear implant internal device and one revision surgery was necessary because the electrode was twisted. The incidence of the cochlear implant revision surgery was 4.23%. The period following the revision surgeries revealed an improvement in the subject's hearing and language performance, indicating that these surgeries are valid in most cases. Copyright © 2018 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Blowdown hydraulic influence on core thermal response in LOFT nuclear experiment L2-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeder, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental research into pressurized water reactor (PWR) loss-of-coolant phenomena conducted in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility has given results indicating that for very large pipe breaks the core thermal response is tightly coupled to the fluid hydraulic phenomena during the blowdown phase of the loss-of-coolant transient. This summary presents and discusses data supporting this conclusion. LOFT Loss-of-Coolant Experiment (LOCE) L2-3 simulated a complete double-ended offset shear break of a primary coolant reactor vessel inlet pipe in a commercial PWR. The LOFT system conditions at experiment initiation were: fuel rod maximum linear heat generation rate (MLHGR) of 39.4 +- 3 kW/m, hot leg temperature of 593 +- 3 K, core ΔT of 32.2 +- 4 K, system pressure of 15.06 +- 0.03 MPa, and flow rate/system volume of 25.6 +- 0.8 kg/m 3 . These conditions are typical of those in commercial PWR systems at normal operating conditions

  3. Posttransfusional changes of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and nucleotides in CPD-SAGM-preserved erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthes, G; Strunk, S; Siems, W; Grune, T

    1993-06-01

    Posttransfusional changes of preserved red blood cells can influence the oxygen equilibrium curve which is mainly affected by the concentration of erythrocyte 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG). The regeneration kinetics of DPG and nucleotides (ATP, ADP, AMP, GTP, GDP) was determined over a period of 0-48 h in surgically treated patients following transfusion of DPG-depleted packed red cells stored for 14 days in CPD-SAGM. 3 h after transfusion the DPG levels raised up to 40% of the patients' prior DPG concentrations. Complete regeneration of the DPG concentrations occurred 36-48 h after transfusion. Changes in the nucleotide pattern indicate, after a temporary decrease of ATP and GTP levels (after 10-30 min) and an activation phase (after 3-12 h), the full regeneration of these parameters 24-48 h after transfusion. The regeneration kinetics of DPG should be taken into consideration for transfusions with blood units stored for more than 14 days, especially in patients with reduced compensatory mechanisms (coronary and cerebral scleroses, pacemaker, etc.) and large transfusion volumes.

  4. Reinvestigation of KMg1/3Nb2/3OPO4Dedicated to Professor Nikolay S. Slobodyanik on the occasion of his 65th birthday.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay S. Slobodyanik

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of potassium magnesium niobium oxide phosphate, KMg1/3Nb2/3OPO4, which was described in the space group P4322 [McCarron & Calabrese, (1993. J. Solid State Chem. 102, 354–361], has been redetermined in the revised space group P41. Accordingly, the assignment of the space group P4322 and, therefore, localization of K at a single half-occupied position, as noted in the previous study, proved to be an artifact. As a consequence, two major and two minor positions of K are observed due to the splitting along [001], as first noted for KTiOPO4 structure analogues. It has been shown that the geometry of the {MII1/3Nb2/3O6/2}∞ framework is almost unaffected by the lowering of symmetry.

  5. Revision of infected knee arthroplasties in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg-Larsen, Martin; Jørgensen, Christoffer C; Bagger, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose - The surgical treatment of periprosthetic knee infection is generally either a partial revision procedure (open debridement and exchange of the tibial insert) or a 2-stage exchange arthroplasty procedure. We describe the failure rates of these procedures on a nationwide...... basis. Patients and methods - 105 partial revisions (100 patients) and 215 potential 2-stage revision procedures (205 patients) performed due to infection from July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013 were identified from the Danish Knee Arthroplasty Register (DKR). Failure was defined as surgically related death...

  6. Individual questions of financial control and revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. М. Глібко

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Problem setting. In modern conditions at investigation and gathering of proofs in criminal proceedings according to item 93 CPC of Ukraine collecting of proofs which is carried out by the criminal proceedings parties, victim is important, the representative of the legal person, in which relation carries out manufacture, including a way истребования and receptions from public authorities, local governments, the enterprises, establishments and organisations, official and physical persons of things, documents, data, conclusions of experts, conclusions of revisions and certificates of checks. Recent research and publications analisis. In scientific sources questions of carrying out of revisions S. B.Zhivko, V.V.Akimov, G.Demjanchuk, J.Buzdugan is considered. Paper objective. Article purpose is studying and definition of a place of revision among forms of inspection of the state control and use of results of revision in criminal proceedings. Paper main body. Off-schedule exit revision that is revision which is not provided in plans of work of body of the state financial control is considered and is spent at presence at least one of the circumstances listed in item 11 of the Law of Ukraine «About main principles of realisation of the state financial control in Ukraine». If revision is carried out on request of investigating bodies it is spent on the basis of the petition of the inspector and accepted by the results of consideration of this petition of the decision of the investigatory judge. The primary goal of revision on request of investigating bodies or on the basis of court definition is reception of proofs on business. Therefore the revision certificate admits the written proof as on the basis of its conclusion of the inspector, the public prosecutor receives the information on a perfect crime, abusing, and also on the persons who have committed a crime, on the period of commission of crime and an amount of damage. In criminal

  7. Revised and extended analysis of Br IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riyaz, A.; Rahimullah, K.; Tauheed, A.

    2014-01-01

    The spectrum of three-times ionized bromine Br IV has been studied in the 319–2350 Å wavelength region. The spectrum was recorded on a 3-m normal incidence vacuum spectrograph at the St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish (Canada) and 6.65-m grazing incidence spectrograph at the Zeeman laboratory (Amsterdam). The light sources used were a triggered spark and sliding spark, respectively. The ground configuration of Br IV 3d 10 4s 2 4p 2 , the excited configurations 3d 10 4s4p 3 +3d 10 4s 2 4p (4d+5d+6d+5s+6s+7s) in the odd parity system and 3d 10 4s 2 4p (5p+4f+5f)+3d 10 4s4p 2 (4d+5s)+3d 10 4p 4 in the even parity system have been studied. Relativistic Hartree–Fock (HFR) and least squares fitted (LSF) parametric calculations were used to interpret the observed spectrum. 120 Levels of Br IV have now been established, 58 being new. Among 424 spectral lines, 277 are newly classified. The levels 4s4p 35 S 2 , 4s 2 4p4d 3 F 4 and 4p5p ( 3 P 0,1 , 3 D 1,2 , 3 S 1 ) are revised. We estimate the accuracy of our measured wavelength for sharp and unblended lines to be ±0.005 Å. The ionization limit is determined as 385,390±100 cm −1 (47.782±0.012 eV). -- Highlights: • The spectrum of Br was recorded on a 3-m spectrograph with triggered spark source. • Atomic transitions for Br IV were identified to established new energy levels. • CI calculations with relativistic corrections were made for theoretical predictions. • Weighted oscillator strength (gf) and transition probabilities (gA) were calculated. • Ionization potential of Br IV was determined experimentally

  8. Taxation and Welfare: A Revision Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Offers a revision exercise intended to remind students of some economic terminology associated with taxation and welfare. Provides a set of definitions for which students are to supply matching terms. Includes an answer list and suggests related exercises. (SG)

  9. Student-initiated revision in child health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaham, M; Gray, O P; Davies, D P

    1994-03-01

    Most teaching of child health in Cardiff takes place in block attachments of 8 weeks. There is an introductory seminar of 2 days followed by a 6-week clinical attachment in a district general hospital in Wales, and then a revision period of one week designed to help students formalize and structure their basic knowledge and to clarify aspects of child health which they may have had difficulty in understanding. The revision programme has to take into account: the short time available, the small number of teaching staff, the most relevant basic knowledge and active participation by the student. This paper describes how this week has been improved through the use of student-initiated revision (SIR). The students' appraisal of this revision and in particular SIR is presented.

  10. New and revised standards for coke production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.A. Kotsyuba; M.I. Alpatov; Y.G. Shapoval [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2009-07-15

    The need for new and revised standards for coke production in Ukraine and Russia is outlined. Such standards should address improvements in plant operation, working conditions, environmental protection, energy conservation, fire and explosion safety, and economic indices.

  11. FFTF operations procedures preparation guide. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-12-01

    The Guide is intended to provide guidelines for the initial preparation of FFTF Operating Procedures. The Procedures Preparation Guide was developed from the plan presented and approved in the FFTF Reactor Plant Procedures Plan, PC-1, Revision 3

  12. Revising incompletely specified convex probabilistic belief bases

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rens, G

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available revision employing the notion of optimum entropy, and point out some of the benefits and difficulties in those methods. Both the boundary distribution method and the optimum entropy method are reasonable, yet yield different results....

  13. Descriptor revision belief change through direct choice

    CERN Document Server

    Hansson, Sven Ove

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a critical examination of how the choice of what to believe is represented in the standard model of belief change. In particular the use of possible worlds and infinite remainders as objects of choice is critically examined. Descriptors are introduced as a versatile tool for expressing the success conditions of belief change, addressing both local and global descriptor revision. The book presents dynamic descriptors such as Ramsey descriptors that convey how an agent’s beliefs tend to be changed in response to different inputs. It also explores sentential revision and demonstrates how local and global operations of revision by a sentence can be derived as a special case of descriptor revision. Lastly, the book examines revocation, a generalization of contraction in which a specified sentence is removed in a process that may possibly also involve the addition of some new information to the belief set.

  14. NRC revision to 10 CFR Part 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, R.E.; Cool, W.S.; Mills, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's pollution standards have been revised since publication in the late 1950s, but the basic approach has not changed. The revisions resulted in inaccuracies, conflicts, and ambiguities in requirements. The need for comprehensive updating including radiation-protection principles, risk, occupational exposure dose limits, standards for the public (including de minimis level), surveys and monitoring, disposal into sewerage systems, and records is discussed. 2 tables

  15. Revised data taking schedule with ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Gazdzicki, Marek; Aduszkiewicz, A; Andrieu, B; Anticic, T; Antoniou, N; Argyriades, J; Asryan, A G; Baatar, B; Blondel, A; Blumer, J; Boldizsar, L; Bravar, A; Brzychczyk, J; Bubak, A; Bunyatov, S A; Choi, K U; Christakoglou, P; Chung, P; Cleymans, J; Derkach, D A; Diakonos, F; Dominik, W; Dumarchez, J; Engel, R; Ereditato, A; Feofilov, G A; Fodor, Z; Ferrero, A; Gazdzicki, M; Golubeva, M; Grebieszkow, K; Grzeszczuk, A; Guber, F; Hasegawa, T; Haungs, A; Igolkin, S; Ivanov, A S; Ivashkin, A; Kadija, K; Katrynska, N; Kielczewska, D; Kikola, D; Kisiel, J; Kobayashi, T; Kolesnikov, V I; Kolev, D; Kolevatov, R S; Kondratiev, V P; Kowalski, S; Kurepin, A; Lacey, R; Laszlo, A; Lyubushkin, V V; Majka, Z; I Malakhov, A; Marchionni, A; Marcinek, A; Maris, I; Matveev, V; Melkumov, G L; Meregaglia, A; Messina, M; Mijakowski, P; Mitrovski, M; Montaruli, T; Mrówczynski, St; Murphy, S; Nakadaira, T; Naumenko, P A; Nikolic, V; Nishikawa, K; Palczewski, T; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Peryt, W; Planeta, R; Pluta, J; Popov, B A; Posiadala, M; Przewlocki, P; Rauch, W; Ravonel, M; Renfordt, R; Röhrich, D; Rondio, E; Rossi, B; Roth, M; Rubbia, A; Rybczynski, M; Sadovskii, A; Sakashita, K; Schuster, T; Sekiguchi, T; Seyboth, P; Shibata, M; Sissakian, A N; Skrzypczak, E; Slodkowski, M; Sorin, A S; Staszel, P; Stefanek, G; Stepaniak, J; Strabel, C; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpétery, I; Szuba, M; Tada, M; Taranenko, A; Tsenov, R; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Vassiliou, M; Vechernin, V V; Vesztergombi, G; Wlodarczyk, Z; Wojtaszek, A; Zipper, W; CERN. Geneva. SPS and PS Experiments Committee; SPSC

    2009-01-01

    This document presents the revised data taking schedule of NA61 with ion beams. The revision takes into account limitations due to the new LHC schedule as well as final results concerning the physics performance with secondary ion beams. It is proposed to take data with primary Ar and Xe beams in 2012 and 2014, respectively, and to test and use for physics a secondary B beam from primary Pb beam fragmentation in 2010, 2011 and 2013.

  16. Introductory Business Textbook Revision Cycles: Are They Getting Shorter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinser, Brian; Brunswick, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The rate of textbook revision cycles is examined in light of the recent trend towards more rapid revisions (and adoptions of textbooks). The authors conduct background research to better understand the context for textbook revision cycles and the environmental forces that have been influencing what appears to be more rapid textbook revisions. A…

  17. Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2010-02-09

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, “Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,” Revision 0 issued in October 2009. Brief Description of Revision: A minor revision to correct oversights made during revision to incorporate the 10 CFR 835 Update; and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

  18. Deletion of meso-2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase gene budC for enhanced D-2,3-butanediol production in Bacillus licheniformis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background D-2,3-butanediol has many industrial applications such as chiral reagents, solvents, anti-freeze agents, and low freezing point fuels. Traditional D-2,3-butanediol producing microorganisms, such as Klebsiella pneumonia and K. xoytoca, are pathogenic and not capable of producing D-2,3-butanediol at high optical purity. Bacillus licheniformis is a potential 2,3-butanediol producer but the wild type strain (WX-02) produces a mix of D- and meso-type isomers. BudC in B. licheniformis is annotated as 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase or acetoin reductase, but no pervious experiment was performed to verify this hypothesis. Results We developed a genetically modified strain of B. licheniformis (WX-02 ΔbudC) as a D-2,3-butanediol producer with high optimal purity. A marker-less gene deletion protocol based on a temperature sensitive knock-out plasmid T2-Ori was used to knock out the budC gene in B. licheniformis WX-02. The budC knock-out strain successfully abolished meso-2,3-butanediol production with enhanced D-2,3-butanediol production. No meso-BDH activity was detectable in cells of this strain. On the other hand, the complementary strain restored the characteristics of wild strain, and produced meso-2,3-butanediol and possessed meso-BDH activity. All of these data suggested that budC encoded the major meso-BDH catalyzing the reversible reaction from acetoin to meso-2,3-butanediol in B. licheniformis. The budC knock-out strain produced D-2,3-butanediol isomer only with a high yield of 30.76 g/L and a productivity of 1.28 g/L-h. Conclusions We confirmed the hypothesis that budC gene is responsible to reversibly transfer acetoin to meso-2,3-butanediol in B. licheniformis. A mutant strain of B. licheniformis with depleted budC gene was successfully developed and produced high level of the D-2,3-butanediol with high optimal purity. PMID:24475980

  19. Revision of the DELFIC Particle Activity Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, David A [ORNL; Jodoin, Vincent J [ORNL

    2010-09-01

    The Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC) was originally released in 1968 as a tool for modeling fallout patterns and for predicting exposure rates. Despite the continual advancement of knowledge of fission yields, decay behavior of fission products, and biological dosimetry, the decay data and logic of DELFIC have remained mostly unchanged since inception. Additionally, previous code revisions caused a loss of conservation of radioactive nuclides. In this report, a new revision of the decay database and the Particle Activity Module is introduced and explained. The database upgrades discussed are replacement of the fission yields with ENDF/B-VII data as formatted in the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation (ORIGEN) code, revised decay constants, revised exposure rate multipliers, revised decay modes and branching ratios, and revised boiling point data. Included decay logic upgrades represent a correction of a flaw in the treatment of the fission yields, extension of the logic to include more complex decay modes, conservation of nuclides (including stable nuclides) at all times, and conversion of key variables to double precision for nuclide conservation. Finally, recommended future work is discussed with an emphasis on completion of the overall radiation physics upgrade, particularly for dosimetry, induced activity, decay of the actinides, and fractionation.

  20. Revision surgery for failed thermal capsulorrhaphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyung Bin; Yokota, Atsushi; Gill, Harpreet S; El Rassi, George; McFarland, Edward G

    2005-09-01

    With the failure of thermal capsulorrhaphy for shoulder instability, there have been concerns with capsular thinning and capsular necrosis affecting revision surgery. To report the findings at revision surgery for failed thermal capsulorrhaphy and to evaluate the technical effects on subsequent revision capsular plication. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Fourteen patients underwent arthroscopic evaluation and open reconstruction for a failed thermal capsulorrhaphy. The cause of the failure, the quality of the capsule, and the ability to suture the capsule were recorded. The patients were evaluated at follow-up for failure, which was defined as recurrent subluxations or dislocations. The origin of the instability was traumatic (n = 6) or atraumatic (n = 8). At revision surgery in the traumatic group, 4 patients sustained failure of the Bankart repair with capsular laxity, and the others experienced capsular laxity alone. In the atraumatic group, all patients experienced capsular laxity as the cause of failure. Of the 14 patients, the capsule quality was judged to be thin in 5 patients and ablated in 1 patient. A glenoid-based capsular shift could be accomplished in all 14 patients. At follow-up (mean, 35.4 months; range, 22 to 48 months), 1 patient underwent revision surgery and 1 patient had a subluxation, resulting in a failure rate of 14%. Recurrent capsular laxity after failed thermal capsular shrinkage is common and frequently associated with capsular thinning. In most instances, the capsule quality does not appear to technically affect the revision procedure.

  1. Hydrogeological conceptual model development and numerical modelling using CONNECTFLOW, Forsmark modelling stage 2.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follin, Sven (SF GeoLogic AB, Taeby (Sweden)); Hartley, Lee; Jackson, Peter; Roberts, David (Serco TAP (United Kingdom)); Marsic, Niko (Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2008-05-15

    hypotheses are supported by new evidence, which strengthens the overall credibility in the conceptual model presented in stage 2.2. The sensitivity of the calibrated groundwater flow and solute transport model developed in stage 2.2 to parameter uncertainty was addressed in stage 2.3 by means of numerical modelling. A comprehensive set of uncertainties have been quantified to each of the model elements: HCD, HRD and HSD as well as boundary conditions both in terms of their effects on the model calibration processes and in predictions of discharge areas for groundwater flow through the repository candidate volume. The results from the sensitivity tests carried out confirm that high degrees of anisotropy in the regolith and/or the uppermost bedrock seem to characterise the near-surface hydrogeological conditions of the site.

  2. Successful therapy with hemoperfusion and plasma exchange in acute 1,2,3-trichloropropane poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, P; Liang, Y-G; Meng, Q-Y; Zhang, C-G; Wang, H-C; Zhang, X-G; Li, G; Liu, Z-Y; He, Y-Z

    2012-05-01

    1,2,3-trichloropropane (1,2,3-TCP) is commonly used as an intermediate in pesticide and an industrial specialty solvent. Acute 1,2,3-TCP poisoning is rare but a medical emergency. Sporadic cases of toxic hepatic injury from 1,2,3-TCP in humans have been reported. Liver is a target organ for 1,2,3-TCP toxicity, which may ensue in a short period after ingestion. A specific antidote against 1,2,3-TCP is not available. So it is important to distinguish that a patient with 1,2,3-TCP poisoning constitutes a medical emergency. In this case study, the poisoned patient's clinical condition and laboratory values improved gradually after she received hemoperfusion (HP) and plasma exchange, which indicated that the therapy with HP and plasma exchange were helpful in the treatment of 1,2,3-TCP poisoning.

  3. Metabolism of 1,2,3,4-, 1,2,3,5-, and 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene in the squirrel monkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, H.; Chu, I.; Villeneuve, D.C.; Benoit, F.M.

    1987-01-01

    The metabolism of three tetrachlorobenzene isomers (TeCB) was investigated in the squirrel monkey. The animals were administered orally 6 single doses of 14 C-labeled 1,2,3,4-, 1,2,4,5-, or 1,2,3,5-tetrachlorobenzene over a 3-wk period at levels ranging from 50 to 100 mg/kg body weight (b.w) and kept in individual metabolism cages to collect urine and feces for radioassay. Approximately 38% (1,2,3,4-TeCB), 36% (1,2,3,5-TeCB), and 18% (1,2,4,5-TeCB) of the doses were excreted respectively in the feces 48 h post administration. In monkeys dosed with 1,2,3,4-TeCB, unchanged compound accounted for 50% of the fecal radioactivity. Unchanged compound accounted for more than 50% of the fecal radioactivity found in the monkeys dosed with 1,2,3,5-TeCB. The fecal metabolites were identified in both groups. No metabolites were detected in the feces of monkeys dosed with 1,2,4,5-TeCB. While the fecal route represented the major route of excretion for 1,2,3,4-TeCB, the other two isomers were eliminated exclusively in the feces. The above data in the squirrel monkey are different from those obtained with the rat and the rabbit, and demonstrate the different metabolic pathways for the isomers

  4. An efficient synthesis of novel pyrano[2,3-d]- and furopyrano[2,3-d]pyrimidines via indium-catalyzed multi-component domino reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gohain Mukut

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Various novel pyrano [2,3-d]pyrimidines 5 and furopyrano [2,3-d]pyrimidines 7 were synthesized in 80–99% yields via a multicomponent domino Knoevenagel/hetero-Diels-Alder reaction of 1,3-dimethyl barbituric acid with an aromatic aldehyde and ethyl vinyl ether/2,3-dihydrofuran in presence of 1 mol% of indium(III chloride. The reaction also proceeds in aqueous media without using any catalyst, but the yield is comparatively less (65–70%.

  5. X-ray structural study of Nd[N(CN)2]3x2OP(NMe2)3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapshuk, A.A.; Skopenko, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    The results of X-ray structure study of Nd(N(CN) 2 ) 3 x2OP(NMe) 2 ) 3 are presented. The crystals are monoclinic: a=12,787(6), b=17.731(9), c=15.302(5) A, γ=114.84(3) deg, Z=4, sp.gr. p2 1 /n. The structure is formed of infinite corrugated netting consisting of neodymium atoms, coordinating two OP(NMe 2 ) 3 molecules, and three bidentate-bridge dicyanamide groups. Neodymium coordination number is 8, coordination polyhedron is a distorted twocapped trigonal prism. Certain aspects of crystal chemistry of dicyanamide complexes are discussed

  6. The structural basis of actin filament branching by the Arp2/3 complex

    OpenAIRE

    Rouiller, Isabelle; Xu, Xiao-Ping; Amann, Kurt J.; Egile, Coumaran; Nickell, Stephan; Nicastro, Daniela; Li, Rong; Pollard, Thomas D.; Volkmann, Niels; Hanein, Dorit

    2008-01-01

    The actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex mediates the formation of branched actin filaments at the leading edge of motile cells and in the comet tails moving certain intracellular pathogens. Crystal structures of the Arp2/3 complex are available, but the architecture of the junction formed by the Arp2/3 complex at the base of the branch was not known. In this study, we use electron tomography to reconstruct the branch junction with sufficient resolution to show how the Arp2/3 complex in...

  7. The effects of gamma radiation on 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DFG) content in healthy men's erythrocytes after submaximal physical exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudek, I.; Zagorski, T.; Kedziora, J.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of gamma radiation and submaximal physical exercise on 2,3-DFG content in healthy men erythrocytes were studied. Twelve men aged 20-22 were examined. They were loaded by physical exrecise (at doses of 2 M/kg body weight) for 15 minutes. Erythrocytes were exposed to gamma radiation (500 Gy doses) from a 60 Co source. The concentration of 2,3-DFG in erythrocytes was estimated by Bartlett's method. Gamma radiation was found to decrese 2,3-DFG content in erythrocytes both at rest and after submaximal exercise. Furthermore, submaximal physical exercise was found to decrease 2,3-DFG content in non-irradiated erythrocytes. 20 refs., 1 tab. (author)

  8. A New Type of Synthesis of 1,2,3-Thiadiazole and 1,2,3-Diazaphosphole Derivatives Via-Hurd-Mori Cyclization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona A. Hosny

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a short and efficient synthesis of the title compounds starting with cheap and readily available camphor and derivatives of acetophenone. The optimized sequence allows the large-scale preparation of this new type of synthesis in a few steps. New 1,2,3-thiadiazole and 1,2,3-diazaphosphole derivatives 11-20, were prepared from the ketones 1-5 via the corresponding semicarbazones 6-10. The Hurd-Mori and Lalezari methods were used, respectively, for the preparation of these 1,2,3-thiadiazole and 1,2,3-diazaphospholene derivatives. These derivatives exhibit anticancer effect due to their high potential biological activity.

  9. Ion radical rupture of the carbon-carbon bond in oxidation of 1,3,1',3'-tetramethyl-2,3,2',3'- tetrahydro-2,2'-diperimidinyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabanov, V.Kh.; Kibizova, A.Yu.; Klimov, E.S.; Berberova, N.T.; Okhlobystin, O.Yu.

    1987-01-01

    Electrochemical and chemical oxidation of 1,3,1',3'-tetramethyl-2,3,2',3'-tetrahydro-2,2'-dipyriminyl takes place with rupture of the C-C bond in the initially formed cation radical. In the oxidation of the compound with aluminum chloride in nitrobenzene, ESR revealed a cation radical with an unresolved hyperfine structure. Oxidation of the dihydrodimer with nitrosonium perchlorate in nitrobenzene or nitromethane resulted in the same spectra. Cyclic volt-ampere diagrams are included

  10. Phosphoglycolate phosphatase and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in red cells of normal and anemic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somoza, R; Beutler, E

    1983-10-01

    Red cell phosphoglycolate phosphatase (PGP) and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) were investigated in normal and anemic patients and rabbits. In hemolytic anemia and blood-loss anemia, characterized by a young red cell population, there was an increase in both phosphoglycolate phosphatase activity and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels. In aplastic anemia, the phosphoglycolate phosphatase activity was normal, but the 2,3-diphosphoglycerate values were nonetheless increased. Thus, no relationship was found between phosphoglycolate phosphatase activity and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels. The lack of correlation between the activity of phosphoglycolate phosphatase and 2,3-DPG levels suggests that modulation of phosphoglycolate phosphatase activity does not control the level of 2,3-DPG in erythrocytes.

  11. Synthesis and Cytotoxic Evaluation of 1H-1,2,3-Triazol-1-ylmethyl-2,3-dihydronaphtho[1,2-b]furan-4,5-diones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    INGRID C. CHIPOLINE

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The 1,2-naphthoquinone compound was previously considered active against solid tumors. Moreover, glycosidase inhibitors such as 1,2,3-1H triazoles has been pointed out as efficient compounds in anticancer activity studies. Thus, a series of eleven 1,2-naphthoquinones tethered in C2 to 1,2,3-1H-triazoles 9a-k were designed, synthesized and their cytotoxic activity evaluated using HCT-116 (colon adenocarcinoma, MCF-7 (breast adenocarcinoma and RPE (human nontumor cell line from retinal epithelium. The chemical synthesis was performed from C-3 allylation of lawsone followed by iodocyclization with subsequent nucleophilic displacement with sodium azide and, finally, the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition catalyzed by Cu(I with terminal alkynes led to the formation of 1H-1,2,3-Triazol-1-ylmethyl-2,3-dihydronaphtho[1,2-b]furan-4,5-diones in good yields. Compounds containing aromatic group linked to 1,2,3-triazole ring (9c, 9d, 9e, 9i presented superior cytotoxic activity against cancer cell lines with IC50 in the range of 0.74 to 4.4 µM indicating that the presence of aromatic rings substituents in the 1,2,3-1H-triazole moiety is probably responsible for the improved cytotoxic activity.

  12. Postoperative pain outcomes after transvaginal mesh revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, Jill M; Osborn, David J; Reynolds, W Stuart; Biller, Daniel H; Dmochowski, Roger R

    2015-01-01

    Although the current literature discusses mesh complications including pain, as well as suggesting different techniques for removing mesh, there is little literature regarding pain outcomes after surgical removal or revision. The purpose of this study is to determine if surgical removal or revision of vaginal mesh improves patient's subjective complaints of pelvic pain associated with original placement of mesh. After obtaining approval from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center Institutional Review Board, a retrospective review of female patients with pain secondary to previous mesh placement who underwent excision or revision of vaginal mesh from January 2000 to August 2012 was performed. Patient age, relevant medical history including menopause status, previous hysterectomy, smoking status, and presence of diabetes, fibromyalgia, interstitial cystitis, and chronic pelvic pain, was obtained. Patients' postoperative pain complaints were assessed. Of the 481 patients who underwent surgery for mesh revision, removal or urethrolysis, 233 patients met our inclusion criteria. One hundred and sixty-nine patients (73 %) reported that their pain improved, 19 (8 %) reported that their pain worsened, and 45 (19 %) reported that their pain remained unchanged after surgery. Prior history of chronic pelvic pain was associated with increased risk of failure of the procedure to relieve pain (OR 0.28, 95 % CI 0.12-0.64, p = 0.003). Excision or revision of vaginal mesh appears to be effective in improving patients' pain symptoms most of the time. Patients with a history of chronic pelvic pain are at an increased risk of no improvement or of worsening pain.

  13. Software Engineering and Knowledge Engineering Theory and Practice Volume 2

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The volume includes a set of selected papers extended and revised from the I2009 Pacific-Asia Conference on Knowledge Engineering and Software Engineering (KESE 2009) was held on December 19~ 20, 2009, Shenzhen, China.   Volume 2 is to provide a forum for researchers, educators, engineers, and government officials involved in the general areas of Knowledge Engineering and Communication Technology to disseminate their latest research results and exchange views on the future research directions of these fields. 135 high-quality papers are included in the volume. Each paper has been peer-reviewed by at least 2 program committee members and selected by the volume editor Prof.Yanwen Wu.   On behalf of the this volume, we would like to express our sincere appreciation to all of authors and referees for their efforts reviewing the papers. Hoping you can find lots of profound research ideas and results on the related fields of Knowledge Engineering and Communication Technology. 

  14. Mechanism of 2,3-butanediol stereoisomers formation in a newly isolated Serratia sp. T241.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liaoyuan; Guo, Zewang; Chen, Jiebo; Xu, Quanming; Lin, Hui; Hu, Kaihui; Guan, Xiong; Shen, Yaling

    2016-01-12

    Serratia sp. T241, a newly isolated xylose-utilizing strain, produced three 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD) stereoisomers. In this study, three 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenases (BDH1-3) and one glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH) involved in 2,3-BD isomers formation by Serratia sp. T241 were identified. In vitro conversion showed BDH1 and BDH2 could catalyzed (3S)-acetoin and (3R)-acetoin into (2S,3S)-2,3-BD and meso-2,3-BD, while BDH3 and GDH exhibited the activities from (3S)-acetoin and (3R)-acetoin to meso-2,3-BD and (2R,3R)-2,3-BD. Four encoding genes were assembled into E. coli with budA (acetolactate decarboxylase) and budB (acetolactate synthase), responsible for converting pyruvate into acetoin. E. coli expressing budAB-bdh1/2 produced meso-2,3-BD and (2S,3S)-2,3-BD. Correspondingly, (2R,3R)-2,3-BD and meso-2,3-BD were obtained by E. coli expressing budAB-bdh3/gdh. These results suggested four enzymes might contribute to 2,3-BD isomers formation. Mutants of four genes were developed in Serratia sp. T241. Δbdh1 led to reduced concentration of meso-2,3-BD and (2S,3S)-2,3-BD by 97.7% and 87.9%. (2R,3R)-2,3-BD with a loss of 73.3% was produced by Δbdh3. Enzyme activity assays showed the decrease of 98.4% and 22.4% by Δbdh1 and Δbdh3 compared with the wild strain. It suggested BDH1 and BDH3 played important roles in 2,3-BD formation, BDH2 and GDH have small effects on 2,3-BD production by Serratia sp. T241.

  15. Advancements in Wind Energy Metrology – UPWIND 1A2.3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelou, Nikolas; Bingöl, Ferhat; Courtney, Michael

    of wind turbines. These measurements document the meandering wake pattern. The second part of the overview considers power performance measurements. A new investigation on the influence of wind shear points to a revision of the definition of a power curve. A new measurement method has been developed which...... has a good chance of being implemented in the present revision of the IEC performance standard. Also, a turbulence normalization method has been tested but not found efficient enough for inclusion in the IEC standard. In relation to the coming IEC standard on performance verification with the use...

  16. INC93: international nuclear congress. Proceedings. V. 1,2,3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The conference dealt mainly with safety, environmental and human aspects of nuclear energy, including waste management. Volume 1 contains the keynote addresses, invited papers, round table discussions, and conclusions. Volumes 2 and 3 contain contributed papers

  17. INC93: international nuclear congress. Proceedings. V. 1,2,3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-11-01

    The conference dealt mainly with safety, environmental and human aspects of nuclear energy, including waste management. Volume 1 contains the keynote addresses, invited papers, round table discussions, and conclusions. Volumes 2 and 3 contain contributed papers.

  18. Ultraviolet transitions from the 2 3P states of helium-like argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W.A.

    1976-09-01

    This thesis describes the observation of two allowed electric dipole transitions in helium-like argon. The transitions are 2 3 P 2 --2 3 S 1 and 2 3 P 0 --2 3 S 1 . These transitions were observed by using a vacuum ultraviolet monochromator to collect photons from decays-in-flight of a beam-foil excited argon ion beam. The ion beam was generated by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory heavy ion linear accelerator (SuperHILAC) and had a beam energy of 138 MeV with a charge current of roughly 500 nanoamperes. After initial observation, the lifetimes and absolute wavelengths of these transitions were measured. The results are tau(2 3 P 2 ) = 1.62 +- 0.08 X 10 -9 sec, tau(2 3 P 0 ) = 4.87 +- 0.44 X 10 -9 sec, lambda(2 3 P 2 --2 3 S 1 ) = 560.2 +- 0.9A, and lambda(2 3 P 0 --2 3 S 1 ) = 660.7 +- 1.1A. This work has demonstrated the observability of these transitions in high-Z ions using beam-foil excitation. Employing a new grazing-incidence spectrometer this work will be pursued in ions of higher Z. Accuracies of at least one part in a thousand should be attainable and will probe the radiative contributions to these transitions to better than 10 percent in a previously unstudied region

  19. Physiological red cell, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate increase by the sixth hour after birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barretto, O C; Nonoyama, K; Deutsch, A D; Ramos, J L

    1995-01-01

    As the available hemoglobin A1 at birth ranges from 20 to 30% a possible mechanism to favor oxygen release to the tissues could be a decrease of hemoglobin A1 affinity to oxygen. This may be accomplished by an increase in blood pH soon after birth and by an elevation in red cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG). This hypothesis is supported by Valleri and Hirsch, who described a rapid 2,3-DPG recovery of transfused depleted 2,3-DPG red cells. That being so, we carried out this current study by assaying the 2,3-DPG of cord blood from 22 newborns and at 6, 24 and 72 hours after birth, as well as those enzymes assumed to be envolved in the 2,3-DPG levels regulation. 2,3-DPG (nmoles g-1 Hb) demonstrated the following values: cord blood: 9,770 +/- 1,026; 6h: 12,773 +/- 1,726; 72 h: 11,990 +/- 728, unveiling a distinct behavior of a sharp increase of 30% by the sixth hour. This confirmed our hypothesis. Regarding the metabolic mechanisms which can account for the 2,3-DPG increase, besides the rise of blood pH, we detected a significant decrease of the 2,3-DPG phosphatase activity, which might diminish the 2,3-DPG breakdown.

  20. Determination of the Thermodynamic Properties of Poly [2-(3-phenyl-3-methylcyclobutyl)-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid] at Infinite Dilution by Inverse Gas Chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    KAYA, İsmet

    2014-01-01

    Some thermodynamic quantities were obtained for the interactions of poly [2-(3-phenyl -3- methylcyclobutyl)-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid] Poly (PCHEMA-co-MA) with alcohols, ketones, acetates, aromatics and n-alkanes by inverse gas chromatography in the temperature range of 150-180oC. The specific retention volumes, Vgo, weight fraction activity coefficients of solute probes at infinite dilution, W1\\infty and Flory-Huggins thermodynamic interaction parameters, c12...

  1. Hanford Site technical baseline database. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, P.E.

    1995-01-01

    This report lists the Hanford specific files (Table 1) that make up the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database. Table 2 includes the delta files that delineate the differences between this revision and revision 0 of the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database. This information is being managed and maintained on the Hanford RDD-100 System, which uses the capabilities of RDD-100, a systems engineering software system of Ascent Logic Corporation (ALC). This revision of the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database uses RDD-100 version 3.0.2.2 (see Table 3). Directories reflect those controlled by the Hanford RDD-100 System Administrator. Table 4 provides information regarding the platform. A cassette tape containing the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database is available

  2. Lanthanide ions induce hydrolysis of hemoglobin-bound 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG), conformational changes of globin and bidirectional changes of 2,3-DPG-hemoglobin's oxygen affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y; Lin, H; Xue, D; Li, R; Wang, K

    2001-02-14

    The changes in structure and function of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate-hemoglobin (2,3-DPG-Hb) induced by Ln(3+) binding were studied by spectroscopic methods. The binding of lanthanide cations to 2,3-DPG is prior to that to Hb. Ln(3+) binding causes the hydrolysis of either one from the two phosphomonoester bonds in 2,3-DPG non-specifically. The results using the ultrafiltration method indicate that Ln(3+) binding sites for Hb can be classified into three categories: i.e. positive cooperative sites (N(I)), non-cooperative strong sites (N(S)) and non-cooperative weak sites (N(W)) with binding constants in decreasing order: K(I)>K(S)>K(W). The total number of binding sites amounts to about 65 per Hb tetramer. Information on reaction kinetics was obtained from the change of intrinsic fluorescence in Hb monitored by stopped-flow fluorometry. Fluctuation of fluorescence dependent on Ln(3+) concentration and temperature was observed and can be attributed to the successive conformational changes induced by Ln(3+) binding. The results also reveal the bidirectional changes of the oxygen affinity of Hb in the dependence on Ln(3+) concentration. At the range of [Ln(3+)]/[Hb]<2, the marked increase of oxygen affinity (P(50) decrease) with the Ln(3+) concentration can be attributed to the hydrolysis of 2,3-DPG, while the slight rebound of oxygen affinity in higher Ln(3+) concentration can be interpreted by the transition to the T-state of the Hb tetramer induced by Ln(3+) binding. This was indicated by the changes in secondary structure characterized by the decrease of alpha-helix content.

  3. Switchable Synthesis of 4,5-Functionalized 1,2,3-Thiadiazoles and 1,2,3-Triazoles from 2-Cyanothioacetamides under Diazo Group Transfer Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filimonov, Valeriy O; Dianova, Lidia N; Galata, Kristina A; Beryozkina, Tetyana V; Novikov, Mikhail S; Berseneva, Vera S; Eltsov, Oleg S; Lebedev, Albert T; Slepukhin, Pavel A; Bakulev, Vasiliy A

    2017-04-21

    High yield solvent-base-controlled, transition metal-free synthesis of 4,5-functionalized 1,2,3-thiadiazoles and 1,2,3-triazoles from 2-cyanothioacetamides and sulfonyl azides is described. Under diazo transfer conditions in the presence of a base in an aprotic solvent 2-cyanothioacetamides operating as C-C-S building blocks produce 5-amino-4-cyano-1,2,3-thiadiazoles exclusively. The use of alkoxide/alcohol system completely switches the reaction course due to the change of one of the reaction centers in the 2-cyanothioacetamide (C-C-N building block) resulting in the formation of 5-sulfonamido-1,2,3-triazole-4-carbothioamide sodium salts as the only products. The latter serve as good precursors for 5-amino-1,2,3-thiadiazole-4-carboximidamides, the products of Cornforth-type rearrangement occurring in neutral protic medium or under acid conditions. According to DFT calculations (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p)) the rearrangement proceeds via intermediate formation of a diazo compound, and can be catalyzed by acids via the protonation of oxygen atom of the sulfonamide group.

  4. Fermentation temperature and wort composition influence on diacetyl and 2, 3-pentanedione contents in beer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejin Jelena D.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione are important constituents of beer sensory properties. A new GC/MS method for diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione content determination was developed. This method was applied for the determination of diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione contents during beer fermentation (primary fermentation and maturation. Primary fermentations were carried out at different temperatures (8°C and 14°C. Primary fermentation temperature had a great influence on diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione formation and reduction. Formation and reduction rates increased with the primary fermentation temperature increasment. Diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione contents also increased with the corn grits increasment. Fermentations were carried out with Saccharomyces cerevisiae pure culture, specially prepared for each fermentation. This GC/MS method for diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione determination was valuable for analysing the influence of wort composition or fermentation conditions such as primary fermentation temperature on their formation and reduction.

  5. BmRobo2/3 is required for axon guidance in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Tong; Yu, Qi; Zhou, Qi-Sheng; Zhao, Xiao; Liu, Zhao-Yang; Cui, Wei-Zheng; Liu, Qing-Xin

    2016-02-15

    Axon guidance is critical for proper wiring of the nervous system. During the neural development, the axon guidance molecules play a key role and direct axons to choose the correct way to reach the target. Robo, as the receptor of axon guidance molecule Slit, is evolutionarily conserved from planarians to humans. However, the function of Robo in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, remained unknown. In this study, we cloned robo2/3 from B. mori (Bmrobo2/3), a homologue of robo2/3 in Tribolium castaneum. Moreover, BmRobo2/3 was localized in the neuropil, and RNAi-mediated knockdown of Bmrobo2/3 resulted in the longitudinal connectives forming closer to the midline. These data demonstrate that BmRobo2/3 is required for axon guidance in the silkworm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Membrane-bound 2,3-diphosphoglycerate phosphatase of human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, W; Neuvians, M

    1970-12-01

    Gradual osmotic hemolysis of human erythrocytes reduces the cell content of whole protein, hemoglobin, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and triosephosphate isomerase extensively, but not that of membrane protein and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate phosphatase. After the refilling of the ghosts with 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and reconstitution of the membrane, the 2,3-diphosphoglycerate phosphatase activity equals that of intact red cells. The membrane-bound 2,3-diphosphoglycerate phosphatase can be activated by sodium hyposulfite. The enzyme system of ghosts seems to differ from that of intact red cells with regard to the optima of pH and temperature. It remains to be elucidated if the membrane binding of the 2,3-diphosphoglycerate phosphatase is related to the transfer of inorganic phosphate across the red cell membrane.

  7. Resource description and access 2013 revision

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This e-book contains the 2013 Revision of RDA: Resource Description and Access, and includes the July 2013 Update. This e-book offers links within the RDA text and the capability of running rudimentary searches of RDA, but please note that this e-book does not have the full range of content or functionality provided by the subscription product RDA Toolkit. Included: A full accumulation of RDA- the revision contains a full set of all current RDA instructions. It replaces the previous version of RDA Print as opposed to being an update packet to that version. RDA has gone through many changes sin

  8. Revised Huang-Yang multipolar pseudopotential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derevianko, Andrei

    2005-01-01

    A number of authors have recently pointed out inconsistencies of results obtained with the Huang-Yang multipolar pseudopotential for low-energy scattering [K. Huang and K. C. Yang, Phys. Rev. 105, 767 (1957); later revised by Huang, Statistical Mechanics (Wiley, New York, 1963)]. The conceptual validity of their original derivation has been questioned. Here I show that these inconsistencies are rather due to an algebraic mistake made by Huang and Yang. With the corrected error, I present the revised version of the multipolar pseudopotential

  9. Plan-Belief Revision in Jason

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Schmidt; Villadsen, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    When information is shared between agents of unknown reliability, it is possible that their belief bases become inconsistent. In such cases, the belief base must be revised to restore consistency, so that the agent is able to reason. In some cases the inconsistent information may be due to use of...... of incorrect plans. We extend work by Alechina et al. to revise belief bases in which plans can be dynamically added and removed. We present an implementation of the algorithm in the AgentSpeak implementation Jason....

  10. Fast-track revision knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik; Otte, Niels Kristian Stahl; Kristensen, Billy B

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background and purpose Fast-track surgery has reduced the length of hospital stay (LOS), morbidity, and convalescence in primary hip and knee arthroplasty (TKA). We assessed whether patients undergoing revision TKA for non-septic indications might also benefit from fast-track surgery....... Methods 29 patients were operated with 30 revision arthroplasties. Median age was 67 (34-84) years. All patients followed a standardized fast-track set-up designed for primary TKA. We determined the outcome regarding LOS, morbidity, mortality, and satisfaction. Results Median LOS was 2 (1-4) days...

  11. PWR secondary water chemistry guidelines: Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lurie, S.; Bucci, G.; Johnson, L.; King, M.; Lamanna, L.; Morgan, E.; Bates, J.; Burns, R.; Eaker, R.; Ward, G.; Linnenbom, V.; Millet, P.; Paine, J.P.; Wood, C.J.; Gatten, T.; Meatheany, D.; Seager, J.; Thompson, R.; Brobst, G.; Connor, W.; Lewis, G.; Shirmer, R.; Gillen, J.; Kerns, M.; Jones, V.; Lappegaard, S.; Sawochka, S.; Smith, F.; Spires, D.; Pagan, S.; Gardner, J.; Polidoroff, T.; Lambert, S.; Dahl, B.; Hundley, F.; Miller, B.; Andersson, P.; Briden, D.; Fellers, B.; Harvey, S.; Polchow, J.; Rootham, M.; Fredrichs, T.; Flint, W.

    1993-05-01

    An effective, state-of-the art secondary water chemistry control program is essential to maximize the availability and operating life of major PWR components. Furthermore, the costs related to maintaining secondary water chemistry will likely be less than the repair or replacement of steam generators or large turbine rotors, with resulting outages taken into account. The revised PWR secondary water chemistry guidelines in this report represent the latest field and laboratory data on steam generator corrosion phenomena. This document supersedes Interim PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Recommendations for IGA/SCC Control (EPRI report TR-101230) as well as PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines--Revision 2 (NP-6239)

  12. Asymmetric Temporal Integration of Layer 4 and Layer 2/3 Inputs in Visual Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Hang, Giao B.; Dan, Yang

    2010-01-01

    Neocortical neurons in vivo receive concurrent synaptic inputs from multiple sources, including feedforward, horizontal, and feedback pathways. Layer 2/3 of the visual cortex receives feedforward input from layer 4 and horizontal input from layer 2/3. Firing of the pyramidal neurons, which carries the output to higher cortical areas, depends critically on the interaction of these pathways. Here we examined synaptic integration of inputs from layer 4 and layer 2/3 in rat visual cortical slices...

  13. Potassium vanadium selenite, K(VO2)3(SeO3)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, W.T.A.; Dussack, L.L.; Jacobson, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    The hydrothermal synthesis and single-crystal structure of potassium vanadium(V) selenite, K(VO 2 ) 3 (SeO 3 ) 2 , are reported. K(VO 2 ) 3 (SeO 3 ) 2 is a layered phase based on a hexagonal tungsten-oxide-like array of corner-sharing VO 6 octahedra capped by Se atoms, and is isostructural with NH 4 (VO 2 ) 3 (SeO 3 ) 2 . (orig.)

  14. DETERMINAN STUNTING PADA ANAK USIA 2-3 TAHUN DI TINGKAT PROVINSI (DETERMINANTS OF STUNTING IN CHILDREN 2-3 YEARS OF AGE AT PROVINCE LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Mulyati

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Latar belakang: Prevalensi pendek (stunting pada balita masih 36,6 persen. Tingginya prevalensi stunting pada anak balita merupakan refleksi masalah gizi ibu selama kehamilan dan erat kaitannya dengan kemiskinan. Secara agregat, IPKM (Indeks Pembangunan Kesehatan Masyarakat merupakan indikator kemajuan pembangunan kesehatan dan IPM (Indeks Pembangunan Manusia termasuk salah satu dari 24 indikator dalam IPKM. Tujuan analisis: mempelajari determinan faktor yang menjadi pembeda terhadap tinggi rendahnya prevalensi stunting pada anak usia 2-3 tahun di tingkat provinsi. Metode: analisis ini merupakan studi populasi. Data yang dianalisis adalah data agregat dari variabel IPKM, KEK pada ibu hamil dan rumah tangga defisit energi dari data Riskesdas 2007. Sementara variabel IPM dan kemiskinan tahun 2007 dari data BPS. Dalam analisis ini, stunting pada anak usia 2-3 tahun merupakan variabel terikat, sedangkan variabel lainnya merupakan variabel bebas. Uji statistik yang digunakan adalah uji korelasi dan uji diskriminan. Hasil Analisis: Secara bivariat tidak ditemukan korelasi antara KEK pada bumil dengan stunting pada anak usia 2-3 tahun, namun ditemukan korelasi antara stunting dengan IPKM (r=-0,67; p=0,000, IPM (r=-0,52; p=0,002 dan kemiskinan (r=0,58;p=0,003. Hasil uji diskriminan menunjukkan bahwa IPKM adalah faktor pembeda antara prevalensi stunting rendah dan stunting tinggi pada anak usia 2-3 tahun di tingkat provinsi. Kontribusi varian IPKM terhadap perbedaan kedua kelompok stunting sebesar 34 persen. Fungsi diskriminan yang dihasilkan Z = -6.491 + 17.853 *IPKM dengan kemampuan prediksi sebesar 78,8 persen. Kesimpulan: IPKM merupakan faktor pembeda antara prevalensi stunting tinggi dan rendah pada anak usia 2-3 tahun di tingkat provinsi.     ABSTRACT Background: Stunting prevalence in children 2-3 years of age is still 36.6 percent, the high stunting in the age group shows that nutrition problem in mother during pregnancy is highly

  15. Engineering cofactor flexibility enhanced 2,3-butanediol production in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Keming; Shen, Claire R

    2017-12-01

    Enzymatic reduction of acetoin into 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD) typically requires the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) or its phosphate form (NADPH) as electron donor. Efficiency of 2,3-BD biosynthesis, therefore, is heavily influenced by the enzyme specificity and the cofactor availability which varies dynamically. This work describes the engineering of cofactor flexibility for 2,3-BD production by simultaneous overexpression of an NADH-dependent 2,3-BD dehydrogenase from Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpBudC) and an NADPH-specific 2,3-BD dehydrogenase from Clostridium beijerinckii (CbAdh). Co-expression of KpBudC and CbAdh not only enabled condition versatility for 2,3-BD synthesis via flexible utilization of cofactors, but also improved production stereo-specificity of 2,3-BD without accumulation of acetoin. With optimization of medium and fermentation condition, the co-expression strain produced 92 g/L of 2,3-BD in 56 h with 90% stereo-purity for (R,R)-isoform and 85% of maximum theoretical yield. Incorporating cofactor flexibility into the design principle should benefit production of bio-based chemical involving redox reactions.

  16. Red cell 2, 3-diphosphoglycerate levels among diabetic patents with and without vascular complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Y; Bessman, S P; Bessman, A

    1975-08-01

    There have been differences of opinion among authors concening in the levels of red cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) and nucleotides in nonacidotic diabetic patients. Our data suggest that abnormal levels of 2, 3-DPG in diabetic patients are related to the presence of vascular complications and not to the duration of the disease per sec. 2,3-DPG levels are normal in diabetic patients with no evidence of vascular complications (group A). In ambulatory patients with vascular complications (group B), significantly higher levels of 2,3-DPG are found than in normal subjects and patients in group A. In hospitalized diabetic patients with active peripheral vascular complications (group C), levels of 2,3-DPG are likewise significantly increased over those of normal subjects and patients of group A. 2,3-DPG was found to be significantly elevated in patients of group C as compared with group B. 2,3-DPG levels in venous blood from infected legs as compared with those of the peripheral venous blood were not significantly different, thereby ruling out local factors. There were no differences in the blood lactate levels in any of the group studied. The elevation of the 2,3-DPG levels may be a reflection of attempted red blood cell compensation for tissue hypoxia in the diabetic with vascular disease.

  17. 4,6-Dibromo-N-{3-[(4,6-dibromo-2,3-dimethylphenylimino]butan-2-ylidene}-2,3-dimethylaniline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Huang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C20H20Br4N2, is a product of the condensation reaction of 4,6-dibromo-2,3-dimethylaniline and butane-2,3-dione. The molecule has a center of symmetry at the mid-point of the central C—C bond. The dihedral angle between the benzene ring and the 1,4-diazabutadiene plane is 78.3 (2°. Niether hydrogen bonding nor aromatic stacking is observed in the crystal structure.

  18. K East basin sludge volume estimates for integrated water treatment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, K.L.

    1998-01-01

    This document provides estimates of the volume of sludge expected from Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) processing of the fuel elements and in the fuel storage canisters in K East Basin. The original estimates were based on visual observations of fuel element condition in the basin and laboratory measurements of canister sludge density. Revision 1 revised the volume estimates of sludge from processing of the fuel elements based on additional data from evaluations of material from the KE Basin fuel subsurface examinations. A nominal Working Estimate and an upper level Working Bound is developed for the canister sludge and the fuel wash sludge components in the KE Basin

  19. Excess of "2"3"6U in the northwest Mediterranean Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamizo, E.; López-Lora, M.; Bressac, M.; Levy, I.; Pham, M.K.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present first "2"3"6U results in the northwestern Mediterranean. "2"3"6U is studied in a seawater column sampled at DYFAMED (Dynamics of Atmospheric Fluxes in the Mediterranean Sea) station (Ligurian Sea, 43°25′N, 07°52′E). The obtained "2"3"6U/"2"3"8U atom ratios in the dissolved phase, ranging from about 2 × 10"−"9 at 100 m depth to about 1.5 × 10"−"9 at 2350 m depth, indicate that anthropogenic "2"3"6U dominates the whole seawater column. The corresponding deep-water column inventory (12.6 ng/m"2 or 32.1 × 10"1"2 atoms/m"2) exceeds by a factor of 2.5 the expected one for global fallout at similar latitudes (5 ng/m"2 or 13 × 10"1"2 atoms/m"2), evidencing the influence of local or regional "2"3"6U sources in the western Mediterranean basin. On the other hand, the input of "2"3"6U associated to Saharan dust outbreaks is evaluated. An additional "2"3"6U annual deposition of about 0.2 pg/m"2 based on the study of atmospheric particles collected in Monaco during different Saharan dust intrusions is estimated. The obtained results in the corresponding suspended solids collected at DYFAMED station indicate that about 64% of that "2"3"6U stays in solution in seawater. Overall, this source accounts for about 0.1% of the "2"3"6U inventory excess observed at DYFAMED station. The influence of the so-called Chernobyl fallout and the radioactive effluents produced by the different nuclear installations allocated to the Mediterranean basin, might explain the inventory gap, however, further studies are necessary to come to a conclusion about its origin. - Highlights: • First "2"3"6U results in the northwest Mediterranean Sea are reported. • Anthropogenic "2"3"6U dominates the whole seawater column at DYFAMED station. • "2"3"6U deep-water column inventory exceeds by a factor of 2.5 the global fallout one. • Saharan dust intrusions are responsible for an annual "2"3"6U flux of 0.02 pg/m"2. • Further studies are necessary to explain the

  20. Revision of the genus Phaeanthus (Annonaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mols, J.B.; Keßler, P.J.A.

    2000-01-01

    A revision of the genus Phaeanthus Hook.f. & Thomson (Annonaceae) is presented. The genus comprises 8 species. A key to the fruiting and/or flowering specimens of the genus is included. The genus consists of shrubs to small-sized trees from Malesia and Vietnam. It is characterised by sepals and

  1. Revision of South African pavement design method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kannemeyer, L

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available an improved mechanistic-empirical design method has been developed, based on the latest available local and international research and design trends. The process followed during revision as well as some of the key outcomes of this process are presented...

  2. A revision of the genus Mastixia (Cornaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthew, K.M.

    1976-01-01

    A revision of the genus in its entire range of distribution is presented. Out of more than 50 published specific names, 9 species (with 13 subspecies or varieties) are recognized, in addition to 4 new species and one new subspecies. The two subgenera Pentamastixia and Tetramastixia of Wangerin

  3. EU law revisions and legislative drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghetto, Enrico; Mäder, Lars Kai

    2014-01-01

    in force in their original form for several years while others are revised soon after their enactment. What factors account for this variation? We empirically analyze the proposition that in the presence of ‘legislative drift,’ i.e. the intertemporal variation of decision-makers’ preferences, major...

  4. A synoptic revision of Inversodicraea (Podostemaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheek, M.; Feika, A.; Lebbie, A.; Goyder, D.; Tchiengue, B.; Sene, O.; Tchouto, P.; Burgt, van der X.

    2017-01-01

    Six new species of Inversodicraea (I. feika from Sierra Leone, I. liberia from Liberia, and I. ebo, I. eladii, I. tchoutoi, and I. xanderi from Cameroon) are described as new to science in the context of a synoptic revision of this African genus, now comprising 30 species, including I. cussetiana

  5. The Brosimum allene: a structural revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Gaojie; Liu, Kai; Williams, Lawrence J

    2008-12-04

    Insight derived from a synthetic model, calculated (13)C NMR data, and comparison to experimental data indicate that the proposed allenic structure A, originally assigned to an isolate from Brosimum acutifolium Huber, should be revised to B, a natural product and nonallenic substance, mururin C.

  6. Rhinoplasty for the multiply revised nose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the problems encountered on revising a multiply operated nose and the methods used in correcting such problems. The study included 50 cases presenting for revision rhinoplasty after having had 2 or more previous rhinoplasties. An external rhinoplasty approach was used in all cases. Simultaneous septal surgery was done whenever indicated. All cases were followed for a mean period of 32 months (range, 1.5-8 years). Evaluation of the surgical result depended on clinical examination, comparison of pre- and postoperative photographs, and degree of patients' satisfaction with their aesthetic and functional outcome. Functionally, 68% suffered nasal obstruction that was mainly caused by septal deviations and nasal valve problems. Aesthetically, the most common deformities of the upper two thirds of the nose included pollybeak (64%), dorsal irregularities (54%), dorsal saddle (44%), and open roof deformity (42%), whereas the deformities of lower third included depressed tip (68%), tip contour irregularities (60%), and overrotated tip (42%). Nasal grafting was necessary in all cases; usually more than 1 type of graft was used in each case. Postoperatively, 79% of the patients, with preoperative nasal obstruction, reported improved breathing; 84% were satisfied with their aesthetic result; and only 8 cases (16%) requested further revision to correct minor deformities. Revision of a multiply operated nose is a complex and technically demanding task, yet, in a good percentage of cases, aesthetic as well as functional improvement are still possible.

  7. Title TBA: Revising the Abstract Submission Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibon, Roni; Open Science Committee, Cbu; Henson, Richard

    2018-04-01

    Academic conferences are among the most prolific scientific activities, yet the current abstract submission and review process has serious limitations. We propose a revised process that would address these limitations, achieve some of the aims of Open Science, and stimulate discussion throughout the entire lifecycle of the scientific work. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. A taxonomic revision of Lamium (Lamiaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mennema, J.

    1989-01-01

    The present study deals with the systematics and taxonomy of the genus Lamium (Lamiaceae). The taxonomic revision is mainly based on the study of herbarium collections, and to a smaller degree on field observations and abstracts from literature. The research was done at the Rijksherbarium, Leyden,

  9. 25 CFR 276.14 - Budget revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... changes include: (1) The use of grantee funds in furtherance of program objectives over and above the... the objective of the grant-supported program. (2) The revision indicates the need for additional... programs, functions, and activities when budgeted separately for a grant, except that the Bureau shall...

  10. Revised Reynolds Stress and Triple Product Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Michael E.; Lillard, Randolph P.

    2017-01-01

    Revised versions of Lag methodology Reynolds-stress and triple product models are applied to accepted test cases to assess the improvement, or lack thereof, in the prediction capability of the models. The Bachalo-Johnson bump flow is shown as an example for this abstract submission.

  11. INDIRECT WRITTEN CORRECTIVE FEEDBACK, REVISION, AND LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Poorebrahim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrective feedback, the necessity of providing it, and how it should be provided has been one of the hot topics in the area of ELT. Amid continuing controversies over whether providing feedback helps L2 learners improve their writing accuracy, many research studies have been undertaken to compare the relative effectiveness of different types of feedback. However, the difference between two types of indirect corrective feedback, namely indication and indication plus location, have not been properly examined yet. Motivated to narrow this gap, this study is designed to compare two groups of Iranian learners, each revising their papers based on one of the aforementioned options. For data analysis, a series of independent samples t tests were employed. The results revealed that the difference between the two groups in their reduction of errors from the original draft to the revision of each task followed a growing trend and became significant. Nonetheless, the difference in accuracy of new pieces of writing fell short of significance. Finally, it was found that error reduction in revision stage cannot be considered as learning. The results of the study, discussed in relation to that of others, implicate that the purpose for which feedback is provided is essential in determining the type of feedback; more explicit feedback is better for revising purposes while more implicit feedback is good for learning purposes.

  12. Migrant Education Administrative Handbook. Revised April 1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Compensatory Education.

    The revised handbook provides specific references to the legislation and the National Migrant Program Guidelines, while setting forth the administrative procedures required for migrant projects in North Carolina. Specific topics of discussion in migrant program administration cover Public Law 89-750, state and local educational agency…

  13. 76 FR 2291 - TRICARE Reimbursement Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-13

    ... rule revises the regulation by removing references to specific numeric Diagnosis Related Group (DRG... following methods: Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov . Follow the instructions for... descriptions became obsolete, so we are removing the numeric references in the regulation and utilizing only...

  14. 78 FR 59982 - Revisions to Radiation Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0268] Revisions to Radiation Protection AGENCY: Nuclear..., ``Radiation Sources,'' Section 12.3 -12.4, ``Radiation Protection Design Features,'' and Section 12.5, ``Operational Radiation Protection Program.'' DATES: The effective date of this Standard Review Plan update is...

  15. Abschluss einer Aphanocephalus-revision (Coleoptera. Discolomidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    John, H.

    1967-01-01

    Im Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie, Leiden, befand sich eine Anzahl noch von Grouvelle determinierter Exemplare der Gattung Aphanocephalus Wollaston, die bei meiner Revision dieser Gattung (John, 1956, Ent. Blätt. 52) nicht berücksichtigt werden konnte, da das Material mir damals nicht

  16. A revision of Jatropha (Euphorbiaceae) in Malesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welzen, van P.C.; Sweet, F.S.T.; Fernández-Casas, F.J.

    2017-01-01

    Jatropha, a widespread, species rich genus, ranges from the Americas and Caribbean to Africa and India. In Malesia five species occur, all of which were introduced and originated in Central and South America. The five species are revised and an identification key, nomenclature, descriptions,

  17. Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality, Revision 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, E. D.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Durst, Bonita E.; Erickson, David; Puigh, Raymond J.

    2010-02-19

    This report is revision 6 of the Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality. This report is required reading for the training of criticality professionals in many organizations both nationally and internationally. This report describes many different classes of nuclear criticality anomalies that are different than expected.

  18. New Directions in Reading Instruction--Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, Bess, Ed.

    The gains in knowledge about the nature of reading and how to most effectively teach it come from cognitive research. This booklet (in the form of a flipchart) synthesizes and summarizes much of the current research on effective instruction for improved literacy and greater student achievement. The booklet, a revised edition of "New…

  19. Fast-track revision knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik; Otte, Niels Kristian Stahl; Kristensen, Billy B

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background and purpose Fast-track surgery has reduced the length of hospital stay (LOS), morbidity, and convalescence in primary hip and knee arthroplasty (TKA). We assessed whether patients undergoing revision TKA for non-septic indications might also benefit from fast-track surgery...

  20. Revision of Dorstenia sect. Nothodorstenia (Moraceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, C.C.

    1978-01-01

    The African genus Craterogyne Lanjouw has to be united with Dorstenia L. Most species of Craterogyne can be included in Dorstenia sect. Nothodorstenia Engl. A revision of this section is presented. 5 species have been accepted, viz. D. elliptica Bureau, D. djettii J. L. Guillaumet, D. oligogyna

  1. The target preparation of "2"3"2Th plated on the nickel with copper as substrate and "2"3"0Pa generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Hua; Geng Junxia; Gao Size; Zhang Guoxin; Zhang Lan; Li Wenxin; Li Qingnuan; Wu Guozhong

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical parameters on nickel plating on the copper have been studied using aqueous electroplating technique. And thorium is plated on the nickel flake using molecular plating technique. The better experimental parameters are obtained. According to these optimized parameters, the "2"3"2Th target which is suitable for Cyclone-30 accelerator is prepared. The proton beam with energy of 21 MeV bombed the "2"3"2Th target (total beam time 20 μAh). The results showed that the better range of plating current density of nickel plated on copper is l.30∼1.68 A/dm"2. The thickness of nickel plating layer can reach more than 10 μm. The current density is 3∼5 mA/cm"2, and the thickness of plated thorium layer is up to micrometer scale. The binding force of as-prepared "2"3"2Th target is very well. There is "2"3"0Pa appeared after the target is bombed by the proton beam. (authors)

  2. Outcome, revision rate and indication for revision following resurfacing hemiarthroplasty for osteoarthritis of the shoulder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, J V; Polk, A; Sorensen, A K

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated patient-reported outcomes, the rate of revision and the indications for revision following resurfacing hemiarthroplasty of the shoulder in patients with osteoarthritis. All patients with osteoarthritis who underwent primary resurfacing hemiarthroplasty and reported...... to the Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry (DSR), between January 2006 and December 2010 were included. There were 772 patients (837 arthroplasties) in the study. The Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder (WOOS) index was used to evaluate patient-reported outcome 12 months (10 to 14) post......-operatively. The rates of revision were calculated from the revisions reported to the DSR up to December 2011 and by checking deaths with the Danish National Register of Persons. A complete questionnaire was returned by 688 patients (82.2%). The mean WOOS was 67 (0 to 100). A total of 63 hemiarthroplasties (7...

  3. 41 CFR 51-2.3 - Notice of proposed addition or deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... addition or deletion. 51-2.3 Section 51-2.3 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions... or deletion. At least 30 days prior to the Committee's consideration of the addition or deletion of a... Register announcing the proposed addition or deletion and providing interested persons an opportunity to...

  4. Supplementary data: Table 1. QTL for tassel related traits of F2:3 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    User

    Supplementary data: Table 1. QTL for tassel related traits of F2:3 population across and RIL population through single-environment analysis (SEA). Trait. Population. Environment. QTL. Binlocusa. Flanking marker. Peak position. (cM). Range. (cM)b. Ac. Dd. Gene actione. R2(%)f. Subtotal R2. (%)g. F(0.05)h type. TTL. F2:3.

  5. An unusual hydrogen addition of indolo-2,3-quinodimethanes to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    is also reported.12. A convenient method for the synthesis of carba- zoles involving the Diels–Alder reaction of an in- dolo-2,3-quinodimethane intermediate with suitable dienophile, furnishing carbazole derivatives has been reported.1 We were interested in the synthesis of carboline derivatives by reaction of indolo-2,3-.

  6. Striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in treatment resistant depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart P de Kwaasteniet

    Full Text Available Several studies demonstrated improvement of depressive symptoms in treatment resistant depression (TRD after administering dopamine agonists which suggest abnormal dopaminergic neurotransmission in TRD. However, the role of dopaminergic signaling through measurement of striatal dopamine D(2/3 receptor (D2/3R binding has not been investigated in TRD subjects. We used [(123I]IBZM single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT to investigate striatal D2/3R binding in TRD. We included 6 severe TRD patients, 11 severe TRD patients on antipsychotics (TRD AP group and 15 matched healthy controls. Results showed no significant difference (p = 0.75 in striatal D2/3R availability was found between TRD patients and healthy controls. In the TRD AP group D2/3R availability was significantly decreased (reflecting occupancy of D2/3Rs by antipsychotics relative to TRD patients and healthy controls (p<0.001 but there were no differences in clinical symptoms between TRD AP and TRD patients. This preliminary study therefore does not provide evidence for large differences in D2/3 availability in severe TRD patients and suggests this TRD subgroup is not characterized by altered dopaminergic transmission. Atypical antipsychotics appear to have no clinical benefit in severe TRD patients who remain depressed, despite their strong occupancy of D2/3Rs.

  7. A Pseudomonas putida strain genetically engineered for 1,2,3-trichloropropane bioremediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samin, Ghufrana; Pavlova, Martina; Arif, Muhammad; Postema, Christiaan P; Damborsky, Jiri; Janssen, Dick B

    1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP) is a toxic compound that is recalcitrant to biodegradation in the environment. Attempts to isolate TCP-degrading organisms using enrichment cultivation have failed. A potential biodegradation pathway starts with hydrolytic dehalogenation to 2,3-dichloro-1-propanol (DCP),

  8. 41 CFR 302-2.3 - What determines my entitlements and allowances for relocation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What determines my entitlements and allowances for relocation? 302-2.3 Section 302-2.3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES INTRODUCTION 2-EMPLOYEES ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS...

  9. Dopaol 2-keto- and 2,3-diketo-glycosides from Chelone obliqua (Scrophulariaceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franzyk, Henrik; Olsen, Carl Erik; Jensen, Søren Rosendal

    2004-01-01

    Two unique 2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethyl glycosides, namely, dopaol beta-D-2-ketoglucopyranoside and dopaol beta-D-2,3-diketoglucopyranoside, were isolated from Chelone obliqua together with the iridoid glucoside catalpol, dopaol beta-D-glucopyranoside, descaffeoylverbascoside, and verbascoside. G...

  10. Dopaol 2-keto- and 2,3-diketoglycosides from Chelone obliqua

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franzyk, Henrik; Olsen, Carl Erik; Jensen, Søren Rosendal

    2004-01-01

    Two unique 2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethyl glycosides, namely, dopaol beta-D-2-ketoglucopyranoside and dopaol beta-D-2,3-diketoglucopyranoside, were isolated from Chelone obliqua together with the iridoid glucoside catalpol, dopaol beta-D-glucopyranoside, descaffeoylverbascoside, and verbascoside. G...

  11. Effects of Cyanate and 2,3-Diphosphoglycerate on Sickling RELATIONSHIP TO OXYGENATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Michael; Bunn, H. Franklin; Halikas, George; Kan, Yuet Wai; Nathan, David G.

    1973-01-01

    Cyanate and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) both influence the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. The studies presented here concern the effects of these compounds on the sickling phenomenon. The inhibitory effect of cyanate on sickling is largely due to the fact that it increases the percentage of oxyhemoglobin S at a given oxygen tension. In addition, cyanate inhibits sickling by a mechanism that is independent of oxygenation. In this paper, we have demonstrated that the viscosity of carbamylated sickle blood was lower than that of non-carbamylated controls at the same oxygen saturation. Furthermore, carbamylation resulted in an increase in the minimum concentration of deoxy-sickle hemoglobin required for gelation. Like cyanate, 2,3-DPG affected sickling of intact erythrocytes by two mechanisms. Since 2,3-DPG decreases the percentage of oxyhemoglobin S at a given oxygen tension, sickling is enhanced. In addition, 2,3-DPG had a direct effect. When the intracellular 2,3-DPG concentration was increased in vitro, a greater percentage of cells were sickled at a given oxygen saturation. Conversely, sickling was inhibited in cells in which 2,3-DPG was artificially lowered. These data indicate that the enhancement of sickling by 2,3-DPG is in part independent of its influence on oxygen affinity. PMID:4729047

  12. Erythrocyte 2,3-diphosphoglycerate depletion associated with hypophosphatemia detected by routine arterial blood gas analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, V H; Waldau, T; Gravesen, H; Siggaard-Andersen, O

    1996-01-01

    To describe a clinical case where an extremely low erythrocyte 2,3-diphosphoglycerate concentration (2,3-DPG) was discovered by routine blood gas analysis supplemented by computer calculation of derived quantities. The finding of a low 2,3-DPG revealed a severe hypophosphatemia. Open uncontrolled study of a patient case. Intensive care observation during 41 days. A 44 year old woman with an abdominal abscess. Surgical drainage, antibiotics and parenteral nutrition. daily routine blood gas analyses with computer calculation of the hemoglobin oxygen affinity and estimation of the 2,3-DPG. An abrupt decline of 2,3-DPG was observed late in the course coincident with a pronounced hypophosphatemia. The fall in 2,3-DPG was verified by enzymatic analysis. 2,3-DPG may be estimated by computer calculation of routine blood gas data. A low 2,3-DPG which may be associated with hypophosphatemia causes an unfavorable increase in hemoglobin oxygen affinity which reduces the oxygen release to the tissues.

  13. EPRI PWR primary water chemistry guidelines revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElrath, Joel; Fruzzetti, Keith

    2014-01-01

    EPRI periodically updates the PWR Primary Water Chemistry Guidelines as new information becomes available and as required by NEI 97-06 (Steam Generator Program Guidelines) and NEI 03-08 (Guideline for the Management of Materials Issues). The last revision of the PWR water chemistry guidelines identified an optimum primary water chemistry program based on then-current understanding of research and field information. This new revision provides further details with regard to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), fuel integrity, and shutdown dose rates. A committee of industry experts, including utility specialists, nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) and fuel vendor representatives, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) representatives, consultants, and EPRI staff collaborated in reviewing the available data on primary water chemistry, reactor water coolant system materials issues, fuel integrity and performance issues, and radiation dose rate issues. From the data, the committee updated the water chemistry guidelines that all PWR nuclear plants should adopt. The committee revised guidance with regard to optimization to reflect industry experience gained since the publication of Revision 6. Among the changes, the technical information regarding the impact of zinc injection on PWSCC initiation and dose rate reduction has been updated to reflect the current level of knowledge within the industry. Similarly, industry experience with elevated lithium concentrations with regard to fuel performance and radiation dose rates has been updated to reflect data collected to date. Recognizing that each nuclear plant owner has a unique set of design, operating, and corporate concerns, the guidelines committee has retained a method for plant-specific optimization. Revision 7 of the Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Water Chemistry Guidelines provides guidance for PWR primary systems of all manufacture and design. The guidelines continue to emphasize plant

  14. Molecular Structure of WlbB, a Bacterial N-Acetyltransferase Involved in the Biosynthesis of 2,3-Diacetamido-2,3-dideoxy-d-mannuronic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoden, James B.; Holden, Hazel M. (UW)

    2010-09-08

    The pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bordetella pertussis contain in their outer membranes the rare sugar 2,3-diacetamido-2,3-dideoxy-D-mannuronic acid. Five enzymes are required for the biosynthesis of this sugar starting from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. One of these, referred to as WlbB, is an N-acetyltransferase that converts UDP-2-acetamido-3-amino-2,3-dideoxy-D-glucuronic acid (UDP-GlcNAc3NA) to UDP-2,3-diacetamido-2,3-dideoxy-D-glucuronic acid (UDP-GlcNAc3NAcA). Here we report the three-dimensional structure of WlbB from Bordetella petrii. For this analysis, two ternary structures were determined to 1.43 {angstrom} resolution: one in which the protein was complexed with acetyl-CoA and UDP and the second in which the protein contained bound CoA and UDP-GlcNAc3NA. WlbB adopts a trimeric quaternary structure and belongs to the L{beta}H superfamily of N-acyltransferases. Each subunit contains 27 {beta}-strands, 23 of which form the canonical left-handed {beta}-helix. There are only two hydrogen bonds that occur between the protein and the GlcNAc3NA moiety, one between O{sup {delta}1} of Asn 84 and the sugar C-3{prime} amino group and the second between the backbone amide group of Arg 94 and the sugar C-5{prime} carboxylate. The sugar C-3{prime} amino group is ideally positioned in the active site to attack the si face of acetyl-CoA. Given that there are no protein side chains that can function as general bases within the GlcNAc3NA binding pocket, a reaction mechanism is proposed for WlbB whereby the sulfur of CoA ultimately functions as the proton acceptor required for catalysis.

  15. Safety Evaluation Report on Tennessee Valley Authority: Revised Corporate Nuclear Performance Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    The TVA Corporate Nuclear Performance Plan addresses those corporate concerns identified by the NRC staff. Because much of the TVA corporate plan is programmatic, its effectiveness depends on its implementation, and the NRC staff plans to closely monitor this implementation. The NRC staff will address site-specific concerns in subsequent SERs on each volume of the Nuclear Performance Plan. On the basis of its review, the NRC staff finds TVA's revised Corporate Nuclear Performance Plan (Revision 4) acceptable. The NRC staff concludes that the organization and staffing of TVA's Office of Nuclear Power and the programmatic improvements in place or under way are sufficient, if implemented properly, to resolve the problems at the corporate level that led to issuance of the 10 CFR 50.54(f) letter dated September 17, 1985, and to support continuing TVA nuclear activities, including plant operations. 19 refs., 3 figs

  16. Comprehensive Identification of SUMO2/3 Targets and Their Dynamics during Mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Julie; Kelstrup, Christian D; Hayward, Daniel G

    2014-01-01

    During mitosis large alterations in cellular structures occur rapidly, which to a large extent is regulated by post-translational modification of proteins. Modification of proteins with the small ubiquitin-related protein SUMO2/3 regulates mitotic progression, but few mitotic targets have been...... identified so far. To deepen our understanding of SUMO2/3 during this window of the cell cycle, we undertook a comprehensive proteomic characterization of SUMO2/3 modified proteins in mitosis and upon mitotic exit. We developed an efficient tandem affinity purification strategy of SUMO2/3 modified proteins...... from mitotic cells. Combining this purification strategy with cell synchronization procedures and quantitative mass spectrometry allowed for the mapping of numerous novel targets and their dynamics as cells progressed out of mitosis. This identified RhoGDIα as a major SUMO2/3 modified protein...

  17. Pharmacologic manipulation of human erythrocyte 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels by prednisone administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silken, A B

    1975-02-01

    Erythrocyte 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) concentrations in 10 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia rose 21.3%(P smaller than 0.02) after 3 weeks of prednisone and vincristine therapy, and returned to pretreatment level 2 weeks after therapy had been discontinued. The mean 2,3-DPG level of three patients on vincristine alone did not vary significantly from the control level of the leukemia patients on prednisone and vincristine. No significant change in serum inorganic phosphate level was observed. The mean erythrocyte 2,3-DPG concentration of 17 nephrotic syndrome patients being treated with chronic prednisone therapy was 14.0% higher than a control group of 20 nephrotic syndrome patients not being treated with prednisone (P small than 0.01). A significant positive correlation was observed between the dose of prednisone and 2,3-DPG level.

  18. An improved automated method for the measurement of red cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Y; Brozović, B

    1976-01-01

    A modified automated colorimetric micromethod for the determination of red cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) adapted from that of Grisolia et al (1969) is described. In the modified method, ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (EDTA) is not used and consequently concentrations of several reagents are changed. During the development of the method it was found that the presence of EDTA, either in the blood or in reagents, consistently reduced the measured value of 2,3-DPG by 15%. This effect of EDTA, not previously recognized, is independent of the EDTA concentration within the range of 5 to 50 mmol/1 and is at present unexplianed. In normal subjects (41 men and 30 women) the mean red cell 2,3-DPG was 14-5 mol/g haemoglobin (range 12-1-18-1 mol/g haemoglobin). There was no significant difference in 2,3-DPG concentrations between male and female subjects. PMID:827552

  19. Increased sensitivity of OSHA method analysis of diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBouf, Ryan; Simmons, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) operated in selected ion monitoring mode was used to enhance the sensitivity of OSHA Methods 1013/1016 for measuring diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione in air samples. The original methods use flame ionization detection which cannot achieve the required sensitivity to quantify samples at or below the NIOSH recommended exposure limits (REL: 5 ppb for diacetyl and 9.3 ppb for 2,3-pentanedione) when sampling for both diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione. OSHA Method 1012 was developed to measure diacetyl at lower levels but requires an electron capture detector, and a sample preparation time of 36 hours. Using GC/MS allows detection of these two alpha-diketones at lower levels than OSHA Method 1012 for diacetyl and OSHA Method 1016 for 2,3-pentanedione. Acetoin and 2,3-hexanedione may also be measured using this technique. Method quantification limits were 1.1 ppb for diacetyl (22% of the REL), 1.1 ppb for 2,3-pentanedione (12% of the REL), 1.1 ppb for 2,3-hexanedione, and 2.1 ppb for acetoin. Average extraction efficiencies above the limit of quantitation were 100% for diacetyl, 92% for 2,3-pentanedione, 89% for 2,3-hexanedione, and 87% for acetoin. Mass spectrometry with OSHA Methods 1013/1016 could be used by analytical laboratories to provide more sensitive and accurate measures of exposure to diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione.

  20. 40 CFR 60.4124 - Hg budget permit revisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hg budget permit revisions. 60.4124... Coal-Fired Electric Steam Generating Units Permits § 60.4124 Hg budget permit revisions. Except as provided in § 60.4123(b), the permitting authority will revise the Hg Budget permit, as necessary, in...

  1. Integrating Relational Reasoning and Knowledge Revision during Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendeou, Panayiota; Butterfuss, Reese; Van Boekel, Martin; O'Brien, Edward J.

    2017-01-01

    Our goal in this theoretical contribution is to connect research on knowledge revision and relational reasoning. To achieve this goal, first, we review the "knowledge revision components framework" (KReC) that provides an account of knowledge revision processes, specifically as they unfold during reading of texts. Second, we review a…

  2. Processing the ITU vocabulary: revisions and adaptations to the Pisa syntactic-semantic parser

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Carol; Federici, Stefano; Montemagni, Simonetta; Calzolari, Nicoletta

    1993-01-01

    The first version of the Pisa syntactic-semantic parser was described in detail in Deliverable 4, Section 2 and Appendices 2,3, and 4. The scope of this report is to discuss the testing of the parser on the sample set of vocabulary which has been selected from the ITU Corpus (see Deliverable 6.1) and to illustrate the revisions and extensions that are now being implemented. The report therefore concentrates on presenting analysis and extraction activities. We need to specify clearly all the k...

  3. Mean nuclear volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O.; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Bichel, P.

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the following nine parameters with respect to their prognostic value in females with endometrial cancer: four stereologic parameters [mean nuclear volume (MNV), nuclear volume fraction, nuclear index and mitotic index], the immunohistochemical expression of cancer antigen (CA125...

  4. Thermal properties Forsmark. Modelling stage 2.3 Complementary analysis and verification of the thermal bedrock model, stage 2.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, Jan; Wrafter, John; Laendell, Maerta (Geo Innova AB (Sweden)); Back, Paer-Erik; Rosen, Lars (Sweco AB (Sweden))

    2008-11-15

    This report present the results of thermal modelling work for the Forsmark area carried out during modelling stage 2.3. The work complements the main modelling efforts carried out during modelling stage 2.2. A revised spatial statistical description of the rock mass thermal conductivity for rock domain RFM045 is the main result of this work. Thermal modelling of domain RFM045 in Forsmark model stage 2.2 gave lower tail percentiles of thermal conductivity that were considered to be conservatively low due to the way amphibolite, the rock type with the lowest thermal conductivity, was modelled. New and previously available borehole data are used as the basis for revised stochastic geological simulations of domain RFM045. By defining two distinct thermal subdomains, these simulations have succeeded in capturing more of the lithological heterogeneity present. The resulting thermal model for rock domain RFM045 is, therefore, considered to be more realistic and reliable than that presented in model stage 2.2. The main conclusions of modelling efforts in model stage 2.3 are: - Thermal modelling indicates a mean thermal conductivity for domain RFM045 at the 5 m scale of 3.56 W/(mK). This is slightly higher than the value of 3.49 W/(mK) derived in model stage 2.2. - The variance decreases and the lower tail percentiles increase as the scale of observation increases from 1 to 5 m. Best estimates of the 0.1 percentile of thermal conductivity for domain RFM045 are 2.24 W/(mK) for the 1 m scale and 2.36 W/(mK) for the 5 m scale. This can be compared with corresponding values for domain RFM029 of 2.30 W/(mK) for the 1 m scale and 2.87 W/(mK)for the 5 m scale. - The reason for the pronounced lower tail in the thermal conductivity distribution for domain RFM045 is the presence of large bodies of the low-conductive amphibolite. - The modelling results for domain RFM029 presented in model stage 2.2 are still applicable. - As temperature increases, the thermal conductivity decreases

  5. Blood volume studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, S.M.; Yin, J.A.L.

    1986-01-01

    The use of dilution analysis with such radioisotopes as 51 Cr, 32 P, sup(99m)Tc and sup(113m)In for measuring red cell volume is reviewed briefly. The use of 125 I and 131 I for plasma volume studies is also considered and the subsequent determination of total blood volume discussed, together with the role of the splenic red cell volume. Substantial bibliography. (UK)

  6. Molecular characteristic and pathogenicity of Indonesian H5N1 clade 2.3.2 viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmayanti NLPI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The outbreak of disease in late 2012 in Indonesia caused high duck mortality. The agent of the disease was identified as H5N1 clade 2.3.2. The disease caused economic loss to the Indonesian duck farmer. The clade 2.3.2 of H5N1 virus has not previously been identified, so this study was conducted to characterize 4 of H5N1 clade 2.3.2 viruses by DNA sequencing in eight genes segment virus namely HA, NA, NS, M, PB1, PB2, PA and NP. The pathogenicity test of clade 2.3.2 viruses in ducks was compared to clade 2.1.3 viruses which predominat circulating in Indonesia. Results of phylogenetic tree analysis showed that the four of clade 2.3.2 viruses isolated in 2012 was the new introduced virus from abroad. Further analysis showed eight genes were in one group with the clade 2.3.2 viruses, especially those from VietNam and did not belong to Indonesia viruses group. The pathogenicity test in ducks showed that virus H5N1 clade 2.3.2 and clade 2.1.3 have similar clinical symptoms and pathogenicity and cause death in 75% of ducks on days 3-6 after infection.

  7. Oxygen isotope separation by isotopically selective infrared multiphoton dissociation of 2,3-dihydropyran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Atsushi; Ohba, Hironori; Akagi, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Keiichi; Saeki, Morihisa; Katsumata, Keiichi

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen isotopic selectivity on infrared multiphoton dissociation of 2,3-dihydropyran has been studied by the examination of the effects of excitation frequency, laser fluence, and gas pressure on the dissociation probability of 2,3-dihydropyran and isotopic composition of products. Oxygen-18 was enriched in a dissociation product: 2-propenal. The enrichment factor of 18 O and the dissociation probability were measured at laser frequency between 1033.5 and 1057.3 cm -1 ; the laser fluence of 2.2 - 2.3 J/cm 2 ; and the 2,3-dihydropyran pressure of 0.27 kPa. The dissociation probability decreases as the laser frequency being detuned from the absorption peak of 2,3-dihydropyran around 1081 cm -1 . On the other hand, the enrichment factor increases with detuning the frequency. The enrichment factor of 18 O increases with increasing the 2,3-dihydropyran pressure at the laser fluence below 3 J/cm 2 and the laser frequency of 1033.5 cm -1 , whereas the yield of 2-propenal decreases with increasing the pressure. Very high enrichment factor of 751 was obtained by the irradiation of 0.53 kPa of 2,3-dihydropyran at 2.1 J/cm 2 . (author)

  8. Effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on estrogenic responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romkes, M.

    1988-01-01

    The competitive receptor binding affinities of thirteen 2-substituted-3,7,8-trichlorodibenzo-p-dioxins to hepatic cytosol from rat, mouse, guinea pig and hamster were determined using ({sup 3}H)-2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) as the radio-ligand. Significant species-dependent structural differences in the Ah receptor ligand binding site were observed and support the heterologous nature of the receptor protein. The interactions of 2,3,7,8-TCDD and estrogenic responses in the female rat and human breast cancer cells were also investigated. Cotreatment of 25-day-old female Long Evans rats with 20 or 80 ug/kg of 2,3,7,8-TCDD resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in both uterine and hepatic estrogen receptor (ER) levels. Moreover, these levels are decreased for at least ten days and appear to be related to the tissue persistence of 2,3,7,8-TCDD. In contrast, estradiol elevated uterine and hepatic ER levels and increased uterine wet weights. Cotreatment of the rats with 2,3,7,8-TCDD and estradiol resulted in hepatic and uterine ER levels which were comparable to those observed in the control rats; in addition, 2,3,7,8-TCDD also antagonized the effects of estradiol-induced uterine wet weights.

  9. Red cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels in children with hereditary haemolytic anaemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidas, S; Zannos-Mariolea, L; Matsaniotis, N

    1975-12-01

    The role of red cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) in increasing the availability of haemoglobin oxygen in neonatal jaundice and hereditary haemolytic anaemias was investigated. Measurements of 2,3-DPG were carried out on 58 normal children and six normal adults, 18 full-term newborns with neonatal jaundice and 57 cases (51 children and six adults) with hereditary haemolytic anaemias. In normal children and adults, with a mean haemoglobin of 12.69 g/dl, mean 2,3-DPG was 14.90 mumol/g Hb. In jaundiced newborns with a mean haemoglobin of 16.04 g/dl mean 2,3-DPG levels were 14.51 mumol/g Hb, i.e. normal. 2,3-DPG levels were increased in patients with beta-thalassaemia major, alpha-thalassaemia, sickle-cell disease, favism, hereditary spherocytosis and in heterozygotes for beta-thalassaemia with increased haemoglobin F. In heterozygotes for beta-thalassaemia with increased haemoglobin A2 only and in sickle cell trait 2,3-DPG levels were normal.

  10. 75 FR 57597 - Revised Proposal for Revisions to the Schedules of Civil Penalties for a Violation of a Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... Revisions to the Schedules of Civil Penalties for a Violation of a Federal Railroad Safety Law or Federal... railroad safety laws and regulations are necessary because many of FRA's civil penalties have not been..., et al. Revised Proposal for Revisions to the Schedules of Civil Penalties for a Violation of a...

  11. 2,3-DPG-Hb complex: a hypothesis for an asymmetric binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomponi, M; Bertonati, C; Fuglei, E; Wiig, O; Derocher, A E

    2000-05-15

    This study was undertaken to test the symmetry of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) binding site in hemoglobin (Hb). From Arnone's study [A. Arnone, Nature (London) 237 (1972) 146] the 2,3-DPG binding site is located at the top of the cavity, that runs through the center of the deoxy-Hb molecule. However, it is possible that this symmetry reported by Arnone, for crystals of 2,3-DPG-Hb complex, might not be conserved in solution. In this paper, we report the 31P nuclear magnetic resonances of the 2,3-DPG interaction with Hb. The 2,3-DPG chemical shifts of the P2 and P3 resonance are both pH- and hemoglobin-dependent [protein from man, polar bear (Ursus maritimus), Arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) and bovine]. 2,3-DPG binds tightly to deoxyhemoglobin and weakly, nevertheless significantly, to oxyhemoglobin. In particular, our results suggest similar spatial position of the binding site of 2,3-DPG in both forms of Hb in solutions. However, the most unexpected result was the apparent loss of symmetry in the binding site, which might correlate with the ability of the hemoglobin to modulate its functional behavior. The different interactions of the phosphate groups indicate small differences in the quaternary structure of the different deoxy forms of hemoglobin. Given the above structural perturbation an asymmetric binding in the complex could justify, at least in part, different physiological properties of Hb. Regardless, functionally relevant effects of 2,3-DPG seem to be measured and best elucidated through solution studies.

  12. [Oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in chronic hypoxemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, M

    1991-05-01

    The measurement of the oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve (ODC) and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) in patients with chronic hypoxemia is important from the view point of tissue oxygenation. However, there have been no consistent results that explain the relation among chronic hypoxemia, 2,3-DPG and P50, which is oxygen pressure at an oxygen saturation of 50 percent. The aim of this study is to clarify what factors affect P50 and 2,3-DPG. 1) Patients with chronic hypoxemia, who showed PaO2 less than 60 Torr, had significantly higher P50 than normal subjects. 2) The concentration of Hb showed significant negative correlation with both P50 and 2,3-DPG. 3) Arterial blood pH showed significant positive correlation with both P50 and 2,3-DPG. 4) In a group with normal levels of Hb and pH, there was significant negative relationship between PaO2 and P50. 5) In a group with normal levels of Hb and pH, there was significant positive relationship between PaCO2 and P50. 6) In a group with normal levels of Hb, pH and PaCO2, there was significant negative relationship between PaO2 and 2,3-DPG. In conclusion, P50 and 2,3-DPG are affected largely by Hb concentration or blood pH, with or without hypoxemia. However there is a mechanism by which P50 and 2,3-DPG are increased by hypoxemia itself in a group with normal levels of Hb, pH and PaCO2.

  13. Copper-Assisted Oxidative Trifluoromethylthiolation of 2,3-Allenoic Acids with AgSCF3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shen; Huang, Yangen; Xu, Xiu-Hua; Qing, Feng-Ling

    2017-09-01

    The oxidative trifluoromethylthiolation of 2,3-allenoic acids with AgSCF 3 in the presence of (NH 4 ) 2 S 2 O 8 and catalytic copper salt was investigated. A series of 4-aryl-2,3-allenoic acids underwent radical trifluoromethylthiolation/intramolecular cyclization to afford β-trifluoromethylthiolated butenolides, which were conveniently transformed into trifluoromethylthiolated furan derivatives. In contrast, 2-monosubstituted 2,3-allenoic acids were converted into the corresponding 3,4-bis(trifluoromethylthio)but-2-enoic-acids under similar reaction conditions.

  14. Optimized hyperventilation preserves 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in severe traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Torres,Rayne Borges; Terzi,Renato Giuseppe Giovanni; Falcão,Antônio Luís Eiras; Höehr,Nelci Fenalti; Dantas Filho,Venâncio Pereira

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The concentration of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG/Hct) increases as a physiological occurrence to pH increase and hyperventilation. This response was tested in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). METHOD: The concentration of 2,3-DPG/Hct was measured daily for six days in eleven patients with severe TBI in need of optimized hyperventilation because of intracranial hypertension. RESULTS:There was correlation between pH and the concentration of DPG/Hct. The concen...

  15. In-vessel source term analysis code TRACER version 2.3. User's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyohara, Daisuke; Ohno, Shuji; Hamada, Hirotsugu; Miyahara, Shinya

    2005-01-01

    A computer code TRACER (Transport Phenomena of Radionuclides for Accident Consequence Evaluation of Reactor) version 2.3 has been developed to evaluate species and quantities of fission products (FPs) released into cover gas during a fuel pin failure accident in an LMFBR. The TRACER version 2.3 includes new or modified models shown below. a) Both model: a new model for FPs release from fuel. b) Modified model for FPs transfer from fuel to bubbles or sodium coolant. c) Modified model for bubbles dynamics in coolant. Computational models, input data and output data of the TRACER version 2.3 are described in this user's manual. (author)

  16. Synthesis and crystallographic analysis of meso-2,3-difluoro-1,4-butanediol and meso-1,4-dibenzyloxy-2,3-difluorobutane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Linclau

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A large-scale synthesis of meso-2,3-difluoro-1,4-butanediol in 5 steps from (Z-but-2-enediol is described. Crystallographic analysis of the diol and the corresponding benzyl ether reveals an anti conformation of the vicinal difluoride moiety. Monosilylation of the diol is high-yielding but all attempts to achieve chain extension through addition of alkyl Grignard and acetylide nucleophiles failed.

  17. Reexamination of M2,3 atomic level widths and L1M2,3 transition energies of elements 69≤Z≤95

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennane, K.; Berset, M.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Hoszowska, J.; Raboud, P.-A.; Campbell, J. L.

    2013-11-01

    We report on high-resolution measurements of the photoinduced L1M2 and L1M3 x-ray emission lines of 69Tm, 70Yb, 71Lu, 73Ta, 74W, 75Re, 77Ir, 81Tl, 83Bi, and 95Am. From the linewidths of the measured transitions an accurate set of M2 and M3 level widths is determined assuming for the L1 level widths the values reported by Raboud [P.-A. Raboud et al., Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.65.022512 65, 022512 (2002)]. Furthermore, the present experimental M2,3 data set is extended to 80Hg, 90Th, and 92U, using former L1M2,3 high-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy measurements performed by our group. A detailed comparison of the M2 and M3 level widths determined in the present work with those recommended by Campbell and Papp [J. L. Campbell and T. Papp, At. Data Nucl. Data TablesADNDAT0092-640X10.1006/adnd.2000.0848 77, 1 (2001)] and other available experimental data as well as theoretical predictions is done. The observed abrupt changes of the M2,3 level widths versus atomic number Z can be explained satisfactorily by the cutoffs and onsets of the M2M4N1, respectively M3M4N3,4,5 and M3M5N2,3 Coster-Kronig transitions deduced from the semiempirical (Z+1) approximation. As a spin-off result of this study, precise L1M2 and L1M3 transition energies are obtained for the investigated elements. A very good agreement with transition energies calculated within the many-body perturbation theory is found.

  18. Cloning, Sequencing, and Expression of the Gene Encoding Cyclic 2,3-Diphosphoglycerate Synthetase, the Key Enzyme of Cyclic 2,3-Diphosphoglycerate Metabolism in Methanothermus fervidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matussek, Karl; Moritz, Patrick; Brunner, Nina; Eckerskorn, Christoph; Hensel, Reinhard

    1998-01-01

    Cyclic 2,3-diphosphoglycerate synthetase (cDPGS) catalyzes the synthesis of cyclic 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (cDPG) by formation of an intramolecular phosphoanhydride bond in 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. cDPG is known to be accumulated to high intracellular concentrations (>300 mM) as a putative thermoadapter in some hyperthermophilic methanogens. For the first time, we have purified active cDPGS from a methanogen, the hyperthermophilic archaeon Methanothermus fervidus, sequenced the coding gene, and expressed it in Escherichia coli. cDPGS purification resulted in enzyme preparations containing two isoforms differing in their electrophoretic mobility under denaturing conditions. Since both polypeptides showed the same N-terminal amino acid sequence and Southern analyses indicate the presence of only one gene coding for cDPGS in M. fervidus, the two polypeptides originate from the same gene but differ by a not yet identified modification. The native cDPGS represents a dimer with an apparent molecular mass of 112 kDa and catalyzes the reversible formation of the intramolecular phosphoanhydride bond at the expense of ATP. The enzyme shows a clear preference for the synthetic reaction: the substrate affinity and the Vmax of the synthetic reaction are a factor of 8 to 10 higher than the corresponding values for the reverse reaction. Comparison with the kinetic properties of the electrophoretically homogeneous, apparently unmodified recombinant enzyme from E. coli revealed a twofold-higher Vmax of the enzyme from M. fervidus in the synthesizing direction. PMID:9811660

  19. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene encoding cyclic 2, 3-diphosphoglycerate synthetase, the key enzyme of cyclic 2, 3-diphosphoglycerate metabolism in Methanothermus fervidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matussek, K; Moritz, P; Brunner, N; Eckerskorn, C; Hensel, R

    1998-11-01

    Cyclic 2,3-diphosphoglycerate synthetase (cDPGS) catalyzes the synthesis of cyclic 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (cDPG) by formation of an intramolecular phosphoanhydride bond in 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. cDPG is known to be accumulated to high intracellular concentrations (>300 mM) as a putative thermoadapter in some hyperthermophilic methanogens. For the first time, we have purified active cDPGS from a methanogen, the hyperthermophilic archaeon Methanothermus fervidus, sequenced the coding gene, and expressed it in Escherichia coli. cDPGS purification resulted in enzyme preparations containing two isoforms differing in their electrophoretic mobility under denaturing conditions. Since both polypeptides showed the same N-terminal amino acid sequence and Southern analyses indicate the presence of only one gene coding for cDPGS in M. fervidus, the two polypeptides originate from the same gene but differ by a not yet identified modification. The native cDPGS represents a dimer with an apparent molecular mass of 112 kDa and catalyzes the reversible formation of the intramolecular phosphoanhydride bond at the expense of ATP. The enzyme shows a clear preference for the synthetic reaction: the substrate affinity and the Vmax of the synthetic reaction are a factor of 8 to 10 higher than the corresponding values for the reverse reaction. Comparison with the kinetic properties of the electrophoretically homogeneous, apparently unmodified recombinant enzyme from E. coli revealed a twofold-higher Vmax of the enzyme from M. fervidus in the synthesizing direction.

  20. Temperature dependence of He(2 3PJ) reactions: Collision-induced mixing and conversion to He2( 3Πg) molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, X.; Soletsky, P.A.; Bryan, W.H.; Dunning, F.B.; Walters, G.K.

    1993-01-01

    The rate coefficients for mixing between He(2 3 P J, MJ) levels during collisions with ground-state helium atoms and for conversion of He(2 3 P J ) atoms to He 2 (b 3 Π g ) molecules via three-body reactions in helium gas have been investigated over the temperature range 1.6--300 K. The measured rate coefficients for collisionally induced P-state mixing decrease slowly with decreasing temperature, from (1.8±0.5)x10 -9 cm 3 s -1 at 300 K to (4.5±0.5)x10 -10 cm 3 s -1 at 4.2 K. The rate coefficients for the production of He 2 (b 3 Π g ) molecules via three-body reactions are observed to increase with decreasing temperature and are described by the relation k P congruent(2.5+267T -1 )x10 -32 cm 6 s -1 . This behavior, which is very different from that noted in earlier studies of the conversion of He(2 3 S 1 ) atoms to He 2 (a 3 Σ u + ) molecules through three-body reactions, suggests that the reaction is not thermally activated

  1. Revised National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel Pressure Injury Staging System: Revised Pressure Injury Staging System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edsberg, Laura E; Black, Joyce M; Goldberg, Margaret; McNichol, Laurie; Moore, Lynn; Sieggreen, Mary

    Our understanding of pressure injury etiology and development has grown in recent years through research, clinical expertise, and global interdisciplinary expert collaboration. Therefore, the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) has revised the definition and stages of pressure injury. The revision was undertaken to incorporate the current understanding of the etiology of pressure injuries, as well as to clarify the anatomical features present or absent in each stage of injury. An NPUAP-appointed Task Force reviewed the literature and created drafts of definitions, which were then reviewed by stakeholders and the public, including clinicians, educators, and researchers around the world. Using a consensus-building methodology, these revised definitions were the focus of a multidisciplinary consensus conference held in April 2016. As a result of stakeholder and public input, along with the consensus conference, important changes were made and incorporated into the new staging definitions. The revised staging system uses the term injury instead of ulcer and denotes stages using Arabic numerals rather than Roman numerals. The revised definition of a pressure injury now describes the injuries as usually occurring over a bony prominence or under a medical or other device. The revised definition of a Stage 2 pressure injury seeks to clarify the difference between moisture-associated skin damage and injury caused by pressure and/or shear. The term suspected has been removed from the Deep Tissue Pressure Injury diagnostic label. Each definition now describes the extent of tissue loss present and the anatomical features that may or may not be present in the stage of injury. These important revisions reflect the methodical and collaborative approach used to examine the available evidence and incorporate current interdisciplinary clinical expertise into better defining the important phenomenon of pressure injury etiology and development.

  2. Infinity in Logic and Computation: International Conference, ILC 2007, Cape Town, South Africa, November 3-5, 2007: Revised selected papers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archibald, M.; Brattka, V.; Goranko, V.; Löwe, B.

    2009-01-01

    Edited in collaboration with FoLLI, the Association of Logic, Language and Information, this volume constitutes a selection of papers presented at the Internatonal Conference on Infinity in Logic and Computation, ILC 2007, held in Cape Town, South Africa, in November 2007. The 7 revised papers

  3. A revised Self- and Family Management Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Margaret; Schulman-Green, Dena; Knafl, Kathleen; Reynolds, Nancy R

    2015-01-01

    Research on self- and family management of chronic conditions has advanced over the past 6 years, but the use of simple frameworks has hampered the understanding of the complexities involved. We sought to update our previously published model with new empirical, synthetic, and theoretical work. We used synthesis of previous studies to update the framework. We propose a revised framework that clarifies facilitators and barriers, processes, proximal outcomes, and distal outcomes of self- and family management and their relationships. We offer the revised framework as a model that can be used in studies aimed at advancing self- and family management science. The use of the framework to guide studies would allow for the design of studies that can address more clearly how self-management interventions work and under what conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Standards for vision science libraries: 2014 revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motte, Kristin; Caldwell, C Brooke; Lamson, Karen S; Ferimer, Suzanne; Nims, J Chris

    2014-10-01

    This Association of Vision Science Librarians revision of the "Standards for Vision Science Libraries" aspires to provide benchmarks to address the needs for the services and resources of modern vision science libraries (academic, medical or hospital, pharmaceutical, and so on), which share a core mission, are varied by type, and are located throughout the world. Through multiple meeting discussions, member surveys, and a collaborative revision process, the standards have been updated for the first time in over a decade. While the range of types of libraries supporting vision science services, education, and research is wide, all libraries, regardless of type, share core attributes, which the standards address. The current standards can and should be used to help develop new vision science libraries or to expand the growth of existing libraries, as well as to support vision science librarians in their work to better provide services and resources to their respective users.

  5. Revision of Sciaphila (Triuridaceae in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Hsin Hsieh

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The genus Sciaphila (Triuridaceae is revised based on comparative morphological and palynological studies in Taiwan. Four species are recognized, i. E. Sciaphila arfakiana Becc., S. Maculata Miers, S. ramosa Fukuy. & T. Suzuki, and S. secundiflora Thwaites ex Benth. Sciaphila arfakiana and S. maculata are new record to Flora of Taiwan and S. secundiflora distributed in Kueishan Island is a new distribution. SEM micrographs of pollen grains, a key to species, species descriptions, and taxonomic notes are provided.

  6. Revised Unfilling Procedure for Solid Lithium Lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveling, A.

    2003-01-01

    A procedure for unfilling used lithium lenses to has been described in Pbar Note 664. To date, the procedure has been used to disassemble lenses 20, 21, 17, 18, and 16. As a result of this work, some parts of the original procedure were found to be time consuming and ineffective. Modifications to the original procedure have been made to streamline the process and are discussed in this note. The revised procedure is included in this note.

  7. Benchmarking i eksternt regnskab og revision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thinggaard, Frank; Kiertzner, Lars

    2001-01-01

    løbende i en benchmarking-proces. Dette kapitel vil bredt undersøge, hvor man med nogen ret kan få benchmarking-begrebet knyttet til eksternt regnskab og revision. Afsnit 7.1 beskæftiger sig med det eksterne årsregnskab, mens afsnit 7.2 tager fat i revisionsområdet. Det sidste afsnit i kapitlet opsummerer...... betragtningerne om benchmarking i forbindelse med begge områder....

  8. Revised Safety Instruction 41 (IS41 REV.)

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Secretariat

    2005-01-01

    Please note that the Revised Safety Instruction No. 41 (IS41 REV.), entitled 'The use of plastic and other non-metallic materials at CERN with respect to fire safety and radiation resistance' is available on the web at the following url: https://edms.cern.ch/document/335806/LAST_RELEASED Paper copies can also be obtained from the SC Unit Secretariat, e-mail: sc.secretariat@cern.ch SC Secretariat

  9. Revising strategies for different text types

    OpenAIRE

    Roussey, JY; Piolat, A; Guercin, F

    1990-01-01

    Forty-eight children and forty-eight adults of contrasting degrees of expertise made a series of corrections in order to improve a text (narrative or description) in which three within-statement errors and three between-statement errors had been inserted. Subjects used a simplified word processor (SCRIPREV) which recorded all movements of linguistic units. The purpose of this research was to study revising strategies by examining the correction-sequencing procedures implemented by these subje...

  10. Revised coordinates of variable stars in Cassiopeia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesci, R.

    2018-02-01

    The identification of the variable stars published on IBVS 3573 has ben revised on the basis of the original (unpublished) finding charts. Cross check with the 2MASS catalog has been made to get more accurate coordinates and to confirm their nature from their , colors. The Mira stars, given their known periods, could be used with the astrometric parallaxes of the forthcoming Gaia catalog to improve the Period-Luminosity relation.

  11. Revision of ISO 15859 Aerospace Fluid Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Benjamin; McClure, Mark B.

    2012-01-01

    A detailed review of ISO 15859 "Space Systems - Fluid Characteristics, Sampling and Test Methods" was performed An approach to revising Parts 1-9 and 11-13 was developed and concurred by the NASA Technical Standards Program Office. The approach was to align them with the highest level source documents, and not to program-specific requirements. The updated documents were prepared and presented.

  12. Rhodium-Catalyzed Enantioselective Cyclopropanation of Olefins with N-Sulfonyl 1,2,3-Triazoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuprakov, Stepan; Kwok, Sen Wai; Zhang, Li; Lercher, Lukas; Fokin, Valery V.

    2009-01-01

    N-Sulfonyl 1,2,3-triazoles readily form rhodium(II) azavinyl carbenes, which react with olefins to produce cyclopropanes with excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivity and in high yield. PMID:19928917

  13. Uus 3G mobiilivõrk maksab 2-3 miljardit / Raigo Neudorf

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Neudorf, Raigo

    2003-01-01

    Kolmanda põlvkonna (3G) ehk UMTS mobiilsidevõrgu loomine läheb kohalikele mobiilioperaatoritele maksma hinnanguliselt 2-3 miljardit krooni. Litsentsi eest riigi nõutavat 70 miljonit krooni peetakse kalliks

  14. Synthesis of pyrrolo(2,3-b)quinolines by palladium-catalyzed heteroannulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gee, Moon Bae; Lee, Won Jung; Yum, Eul Kgun

    2003-01-01

    Palladium-catalyzed heteroannulation of 2-amino-3-iodoquinoline derivatives and 1-trimethylsilyl internal alkynes provided highly regioselective pyrrolo(2,3-b)quinolines with trimethylsilyl group next to the nitrogen atom in the pyrrole ring

  15. Relationship of frontal D2/3 binding potentials to cognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagerlund, Birgitte; Pinborg, Lars H; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2013-01-01

    for set shifting. The main findings indicated a relation between D2/3 receptor binding in the frontal cortex and set shifting, planning and attention, but also support a differential involvement of cortical dopamine D2/3 receptor binding in at least some cognitive functions, perhaps particularly attention......Studies of in vivo dopamine receptors in schizophrenia have mostly focused on D2 receptors in striatal areas or on D1 receptors in cortex. No previous study has examined the correlation between cortical dopamine D2/3 receptor binding potentials and cognition in schizophrenia patients. The objective......, in schizophrenia patients compared to healthy people. The results suggest that cortical D2/3 receptor function may be more involved in some cognitive functions (i.e. attention, fluency and planning) in patients with schizophrenia than in healthy people, suggesting that information processing in schizophrenia may...

  16. Maternal blood total oxypurines and erythrocyte 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels during normal pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, S; Akiyama, H; Kurauchi, O; Taira, H; Yamada, R; Narita, O; Tomoda, Y

    1985-01-01

    The effects of pregnancy on the levels of maternal plasma total oxypurines (hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid) and erythrocyte 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) was investigated. With advancing gestation there was a slight increasing tendency in plasma total oxypurines as well as erythrocyte 2,3-DPG in pregnant women. When the ratio of 2,3-DPG to total oxypurines was calculated, the ratio was almost unchanged until week 34. After week 35, the ratio decreased to week 37; the ratios between week 37 and 40 had similar values to cord blood. The above data suggest that the changes of these metabolites in maternal peripheral blood may be indicative for hypoxia with fetoplacental tissue.

  17. 2,3-Diphosphoglycerate in normal, anaemic and transfused human fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soothill, P W; Lestas, A N; Nicolaides, K H; Rodeck, C H; Bellingham, A J

    1988-05-01

    1. The effect of anaemia and transfusion with adult blood on fetal 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels was investigated by studying fetal blood from 45 normal pregnancies at 17-42 weeks of gestation and in 34 pregnancies complicated by erythroblastosis fetalis. 2. In normal fetuses, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate concentration was higher than in adults and did not change significantly with gestational age. 3. In erythroblastotic fetuses, there was a significant negative correlation between 2,3-diphosphoglycerate concentration and haemoglobin concentration. 4. When adult blood was transfused into the fetal circulation, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate concentration reached similar levels to that found in untransfused fetuses after allowing for the severity of anaemia.

  18. The healthfulness of food and beverage purchases after the federal food package revisions: The case of two New England states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreyeva, Tatiana; Tripp, Amanda S

    2016-10-01

    In 2009, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) implemented new food packages to improve dietary intake among WIC participants. This paper examines how the healthfulness of food purchases among low-income households changed following this reform. Point-of-sale data for 2137 WIC-participating and 1303 comparison households were obtained from a regional supermarket chain. The healthfulness of purchased foods and beverages was determined per their saturated fat, sugar, and sodium content. A pre-post assessment (2009-2010) of the product basket healthfulness was completed using generalized estimating equation models. Data were analyzed in 2015. At baseline, healthy products accounted for most of the food volume purchased by WIC participants, but beverages were dominated by moderation (less healthy) items. With new subsidies for fruit, vegetables and whole grains, the WIC revisions increased the volume of healthy food purchases of WIC-participating households by 3.9% and reduced moderation foods by 1.8%. The biggest improvements were reductions in moderation beverages (down by 24.7% in volume), driven by milk fat restrictions in the WIC food package revisions. The healthfulness of the product basket increased post-WIC revisions; mainly due to a reduction in the volume of moderation food and beverages purchased (down by 15.5%) rather than growth in healthy products (up by 1.9%). No similar improvements were seen in a comparison group of low-income nonparticipants. After the WIC revisions, the healthfulness of participant purchases improved, particularly for beverages. Efforts to encourage healthy eating by people receiving federal food assistance are paying off. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Guidance document for revision of DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudera, D.E.; McMurtrey, C.D.; Meagher, B.G.

    1993-04-01

    This document provides guidance for the revision of DOE Order 5820.2A, ``Radioactive Waste Management.`` Technical Working Groups have been established and are responsible for writing the revised order. The Technical Working Groups will use this document as a reference for polices and procedures that have been established for the revision process. The overall intent of this guidance is to outline how the order will be revised and how the revision process will be managed. In addition, this document outlines technical issues considered for inclusion by a Department of Energy Steering Committee.

  20. Nuclear safety guide: TID--7016, Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.T.

    1978-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Guide was first issued in 1956 as classified AEC report LA-2063 and was reprinted the next year, unclassified, as TID-7016. Revision 1, published in 1961, extended the scope and refined the guiding information. Revision 2 of the Guide differs significantly from its predecessor in that the latter was intentionally conservative in its recommendations. Firmly based on experimental evidence of criticality, the original Guide and the first revision were considered to be of most value to organizations whose activities with fissionable materials were not extensive and, secondarily, that it would serve as a point of departure for members of established nuclear safety teams experienced in the field. The advance of calculational capability has permitted validated calculations to extend and substitute for experimental data. The broadened data base has enabled better interpolation, extension, and understanding of available information, especially in areas previously addressed by undefined but adequate factors of safety. The content has been thereby enriched in qualitative guidance. The information inherently contains, and the user can recapture, the quantitative guidance characteristic of the former Guides by employing appropriate safety factors

  1. Revised inspection program for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulates nuclear power plants to assure adequate protection of the public and the environment from the dangers associated with nuclear materials. NRC fulfills this responsibility through comprehensive safety reviews of nuclear facilities, licensing of organizations that use nuclear materials, and continuing inspection. The NRC inspection program is currently conducted from the five regional offices in or near Philadelphia, Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas and San Francisco. Inspectors travel from the regional offices to nuclear power plants in various phases of construction, test and operation in order to conduct inspections. However, in June 1977 the Commission approved a revision to the inspection program that will include stationing inspectors at selected plants under construction and at all plants in operation. In addition, the revised program provides for appraising the performance of licensees on a national basis and involves more direct measurement and observation by NRC inspectors of work and tests in progress. The program also includes enhanced career management consisting of improved training and career development for inspectors and other professionals. The report was requested in the Conference Report on the NRC Authorization for Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1978. The report provides a discussion of the basis for both the current and revised inspection programs, describes these programs, and shows how the NRC inspection force will be trained and utilized. In addition, the report includes a discussion of the actions that will be taken to assure the objectivity of inspectors

  2. The Subunit Principle in Scar Face Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshahat, Ahmed; Lashin, Riham

    2017-06-01

    Facial scaring is considered one of the most difficult cosmetic problems for any plastic surgeon to solve. The condition is more difficult if the direction of the scar is not parallel to relaxed skin tension lines. Attempts to manage this difficult situation included revisions using geometric designs, Z plasties or W plasties to camouflage the straight line visible scaring. The use of long-lasting resorbable sutures was tried too. Recently, the use of botulinum toxin during revision improved the results. Fractional CO2 lasers, microfat grafts, and platelet-rich plasma were added to the armamentarium. The scar is least visible if placed in the junction between the facial subunits. The aim of this study is to investigate the use of the subunit principle to improve the results of scar revision. Four patients were included in this study. Tissue expansion of the intact part of the subunit allowed shifting the scar to the junction between the affected subunit and the adjacent one. Tissue expansion, delivery of the expanders, and advancement of the flaps were successful in all patients. The fact that this is a 2-stage procedure and sacrifices some of the intact skin from the affected facial subunit, makes this technique reserved to patients with ugly facial scars who are ambitious to improve their appearance.

  3. A Pseudomonas putida Strain Genetically Engineered for 1,2,3-Trichloropropane Bioremediation

    OpenAIRE

    Samin, Ghufrana; Pavlova, Martina; Arif, M. Irfan; Postema, Christiaan P.; Damborsky, Jiri; Janssen, Dick B.

    2014-01-01

    1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP) is a toxic compound that is recalcitrant to biodegradation in the environment. Attempts to isolate TCP-degrading organisms using enrichment cultivation have failed. A potential biodegradation pathway starts with hydrolytic dehalogenation to 2,3-dichloro-1-propanol (DCP), followed by oxidative metabolism. To obtain a practically applicable TCP-degrading organism, we introduced an engineered haloalkane dehalogenase with improved TCP degradation activity into the DCP...

  4. Synthesis of New 1,2,3-Triazol-4-yl-quinazoline Nucleoside and Acyclonucleoside Analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelaaziz Ouahrouch

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we describe the synthesis of 1,4-disustituted-1,2,3-triazolo-quinazoline ribonucleosides or acyclonucleosides by means of 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between various O or N-alkylated propargyl-quinazoline and 1'-azido-2',3',5'-tri-O-benzoylribose or activated alkylating agents under microwave conditions. None of the compounds selected showed significant anti-HCV activity in vitro.

  5. Tropomyosin Promotes Lamellipodial Persistence by Collaborating with Arp2/3 at the Leading Edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayford, Simon; Bryce, Nicole S; Schevzov, Galina; Haynes, Elizabeth M; Bear, James E; Hardeman, Edna C; Gunning, Peter W

    2016-05-23

    At the leading edge of migrating cells, protrusion of the lamellipodium is driven by Arp2/3-mediated polymerization of actin filaments [1]. This dense, branched actin network is promoted and stabilized by cortactin [2, 3]. In order to drive filament turnover, Arp2/3 networks are remodeled by proteins such as GMF, which blocks the actin-Arp2/3 interaction [4, 5], and coronin 1B, which acts by directing SSH1L to the lamellipodium where it activates the actin-severing protein cofilin [6, 7]. It has been shown in vitro that cofilin-mediated severing of Arp2/3 actin networks results in the generation of new pointed ends to which the actin-stabilizing protein tropomyosin (Tpm) can bind [8]. The presence of Tpm in lamellipodia, however, is disputed in the literature [9-19]. Here, we report that the Tpm isoforms 1.8/9 are enriched in the lamellipodium of fibroblasts as detected with a novel isoform-specific monoclonal antibody. RNAi-mediated silencing of Tpm1.8/9 led to an increase of Arp2/3 accumulation at the cell periphery and a decrease in the persistence of lamellipodia and cell motility, a phenotype consistent with cortactin- and coronin 1B-deficient cells [2, 7]. In the absence of coronin 1B or cofilin, Tpm1.8/9 protein levels are reduced while, conversely, inhibition of Arp2/3 with CK666 leads to an increase in Tpm1.8/9 protein. These findings establish a novel regulatory mechanism within the lamellipodium whereby Tpm collaborates with Arp2/3 to promote lamellipodial-based cell migration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. On a directed variation of the 1-2-3 and 1-2 Conjectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barme, Emma; Bensmail, Julien; Przybyło, Jakub

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the following question, which stands as a directed analogue of the well-known 1-2-3 Conjecture: Given any digraph D with no arc uv verifying d+(u) = d¯(v) = 1, is it possible to weight the arcs of D with weights among ⟨1; 2; 3⟩ so that, for every arc uv of D, the sum of...

  7. Base-catalyzed oxidation of silybin and isosilybin into 2,3-dehydro derivatives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gažák, Radek; Trouillas, P.; Biedermann, David; Fuksová, Kateřina; Marhol, Petr; Kuzma, Marek; Křen, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 4 (2013), s. 315-317 ISSN 0040-4039 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/0662; GA ČR GAP207/10/0288; GA MŠk(CZ) LD11051 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : 2,3-Dehydroisosilybin * Iso silybin * 2,3-Dehydrosilybin Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.391, year: 2013

  8. CuO-Nanoparticles Catalyzed Synthesis of 1,4-Disubstituted-1,2,3 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    John Paul Raj

    2018-04-13

    Apr 13, 2018 ... has been developed for the synthesis of 1,2,3-triazoles. A library of 1 ... Kuang et al., described Cu-catalyzed synthesis of 1H-. 1,2,3-triazoles from 1 ..... Tornøe C W, Christensen C and Meldal M 2002 Peptido- triazoles on solid ... 2015 Copper-catalyzed [3+2] cycloaddition/oxidation reactions between ...

  9. Export Control and the U.S. Defense Industrial Base - Revised. Volume 1: Summary Report and Volume 2: Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    differentiating their products as “ITAR-free”, in the hopes that this can give them a leg up on US producers. To date this “marketing campaign” has...Inspectorate of Strategic Products Slovenia Ministry of Defence Slovakia Ministry of Economy United DTI Export Control Organization [Check] E-41

  10. The GABRB1 gene is associated with thalamus volume and modulates the association between thalamus volume and intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bi; Chen, Chuansheng; Xue, Gui; Lei, Xuemei; Li, Jin; Moyzis, Robert K; Dong, Qi; Lin, Chongde

    2014-11-15

    The GABRB1 gene encodes the beta 1 subunit of the gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor (GABA A receptor), which is responsible for mediating inhibitory neurotransmission in the thalamus. Potential relationships between the GABRB1 gene, thalamus volume, and intelligence have been suggested by previous clinical studies, but have not been directly examined among nonclinical samples. The current study collected structural MRI, genetic, and behavioral data from 316 healthy Chinese adults (including 187 females and 129 males), and examined associations between GABRB1 variants, thalamus volume, and intelligence (measured by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Revised). After controlling for intracranial volume, sex, and age, GABRB1 genetic polymorphism at the SNP rs7435958 had the strongest association with thalamus volume (p = 0.002 and 0.00008 for left and right thalamus volumes, respectively), with GG homozygotes having smaller bilateral thalamus volumes than the other genotypes. Furthermore, there were positive correlations between bilateral thalamus volumes and intelligence, especially for GABRB1 rs7435958 GG female homozygotes (r's = 0.31 and 0.29, p intelligence with left and right thalamus volumes, respectively). This study provides the first evidence for the involvement of the GABRB1 gene in the thalamus structure and their interactive effects on intelligence. Future studies of the thalamus-intelligence associations should consider genetic factors as potential moderators. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Acute 1,2,3-trichloropane poisoning: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hui

    2010-12-01

    1,2,3-Trichloropropane is widely used in industrial and agricultural production. However 1,2,3-trichloropropane poisoning has been rarely encountered in clinical practices. Here, a 45-year-old farmer who suffered fulminant hepatic failure due to ingestion of 1,2,3-trichloropropane has been reported and literature about 1,2,3-trichloropane poisoning has been reviewed. For this case, reduced glutathione, vitamin K, pantoprazole were infused intravenously, and transfusion of blood plasma, platelets and red blood cells were carried out. Unfortunately, the patient's family gave up treatment and they left the hospital with the patient because of the low chance of recovery 20 hr after admission. Based on blood toxicology screening, patient history and rapid deterioration of the patient, the cause of fulminant hepatic failure was determined to be acute intoxication of 1,2,3-trichloropropane by unintentional toxicity. 1,2,3-trichloropropane has histopathological toxic effects on many organs and this toxic effect occurs within a short period after ingestion, with liver as the major affected organ. © 2010 The Author. Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology © 2010 Nordic Pharmacological Society.

  12. 2,3-Butanediol recovery from fermentation broth by alcohol precipitation and vacuum distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sangjun; Kim, Duk-Ki; Song, Hyohak; Lee, Hee Jong; Park, Sunghoon; Seung, Doyoung; Chang, Yong Keun

    2014-04-01

    This study presents a new and effective downstream process to recover 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD) from fermentation broth which is produced by a recombinant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain. The ldhA-deficient K. pneumoniae strain yielded about 90 g/L of 2,3-BD, along with a number of by-products, such as organic acids and alcohols, in a 65 h fed-batch fermentation. The pH-adjusted cell-free fermentation broth was firstly concentrated until 2,3-BD reached around 500 g/L by vacuum evaporation at 50°C and 50 mbar vacuum pressure. The concentrated solution was further treated using light alcohols, including methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol, for the precipitation of organic acids and inorganic salts. Isopropanol showed the highest removal efficiency, in which 92.5% and 99.8% of organic acids and inorganic salts were precipitated, respectively. At a final step, a vacuum distillation process enabled the recovery of 76.2% of the treated 2,3-BD, with 96.1% purity, indicating that fermentatively produced 2,3-BD is effectively recovered by a simple alcohol precipitation and vacuum distillation. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of novel polynuclear heterocyclic compounds derived from 2,3-diaminophenazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahran, Asma M; Ragab, Sherif Sh; Hashem, Ahmed I; Ali, Mamdouh M; Nada, Afaf A

    2015-01-27

    2,3-Diaminophenazine 1 was used as a precursor for the preparation of some novel phenazine derivatives such as imidazo[4,5-b]phenazine-2-thione 2, its methylthio 3, ethyl 1-aryl-3H-[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a]imidazo[4,5-b]phenazines 8a-c, ethyl (2Z)-[3-aminophenazin-2-yl)amino](phenylhydrazono)ethanoate 9, pyrazino[2,3-b]phenazine derivatives 10, 12, 15-17, [1,4]diazepino[2,3-b]phenazine derivatives 13, 14, 2,3-dibenzoylaminophenazine 18, 1H-Imidazo[4,5-b]phenazine derivatives 20, 23a-c, 24, 25 and 4-[(E)-(3-amino phenazin-2-yl)diazenyl] derivatives 27-29. All compounds were tested as inhibitors of the proliferation of human lung carcinoma and colorectal cancer cell lines through inhibition of Tyrosine Kinases. Most of compounds exert good activity against the two cancer cell lines. Five compounds (1, 2, 3, 25 and 28) were found to possess the same activity as the standard drug Cisplatin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of additives on red cell 2,3 diphosphoglycerate levels in CPDA preservatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, S; West, C; Beutler, E

    1989-01-01

    Forty-two chemical substances, chosen because they might influence red cell metabolism, were screened for effect on red cell adenosine triphosphate and 2,3 diphosphoglycerate (2,3 DPG) levels during storage in CPD or CPDA-1 at 4 degrees C. Of these substances, six appeared on initial screening to increase 2,3 DPG levels during storage; on repeated examination, four compounds, i.e., oxalate, glyoxalate, ethyl oxaloacetate, and L-phenylalanyl-L-alanine, consistently increased 2,3 DPG levels during storage. It was shown that glyoxalate was converted rapidly to oxalate in blood, presumably through the lactate dehydrogenase reaction. Ethyl oxaloacetate is known to hydrolyze, giving rise to oxalate. Thus, the effect of both glyoxalate and ethyl oxaloacetate can be explained by the formation of oxalate, a compound already known to increase 2,3 DPG levels. The effect of L-phenylalanyl-L-alanine remains to be explained, but it may be hydrolyzed to L-alanine and L-phenylalanine, both of which are thought to have the capacity to increase red cell 2,3 DPG levels by inhibiting pyruvate kinase activity.

  15. Optimized hyperventilation preserves 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Rayne Borges; Terzi, Renato Giuseppe Giovanni; Falcão, Antônio Luís Eiras; Höehr, Nelci Fenalti; Dantas Filho, Venâncio Pereira

    2007-09-01

    The concentration of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG/Hct) increases as a physiological occurrence to pH increase and hyperventilation. This response was tested in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). The concentration of 2,3-DPG/Hct was measured daily for six days in eleven patients with severe TBI in need of optimized hyperventilation because of intracranial hypertension. There was correlation between pH and the concentration of DPG/Hct. The concentration of 2,3-DPG/Hct remained predominantly within normal levels with slight increase in the sixth day of the study. The concentration of 2,3-DPG/Hct correlated significantly with measured partial pressure of oxygen that saturates 50% the hemoglobin of the blood (P50st), confirming the consistency of our data. The expected physiological response of a progressive increase in concentration of 2,3-DPG/Hct to hyperventilation was not observed. This fact may be explained by the intermittent and not sustained hyperventilation as dictated by the protocol of optimized ventilation.

  16. Poly[μ-aqua-diaqua(μ2-pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylatodilithium(I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kutalmis Guven

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, [Li2(C6H2N2O4(H2O3]n, consists of two independent Li+ cations, one pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylate dianion and three water molecules. One of the Li+ cations has a distorted tetrahedral geometry, coordinated by one of the carboxylate O atoms of the pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylate ligand and three O atoms from three water molecules, whereas the other Li+ cation has a distorted trigonal-bipyramidal geometry, coordinated by a carboxylate O atom of a symmetry-related pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylate ligand, two water molecules and a chelating pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylate ligand (by utilizing both N and O atoms of an adjacent molecule. The synthesis of a hydrated polymeric dinuclear lithium complex formed with two pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid ligands has been reported previously [Tombul et al. (2008a. Acta Cryst. E64, m491–m492]. By comparision to the complex reported here, the dinuclear complex formed with two pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid ligands differs in the coordination geometry of both Li atoms. The crystal structure further features O—H...O and O—H...N hydrogen-bonding interactions involving the water molecules and carboxylate O atoms.

  17. Dietary nucleotide supplementation raises erythrocyte 2, 3-diphosphoglycerate concentration in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scopesi, F; Verkeste, C M; Paola, D; Gazzolo, D; Pronzato, M A; Bruschettini, P L; Marinari, U M

    1999-03-01

    The present study was designed to test if dietary intake of nucleotides increases erythrocyte 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) in neonatal rats. To this end, rat pups were fed a nucleotide-supplemented formula (S, n = 14) from d 9 until d 16 after birth. The results were compared with those obtained from a group of breast-fed pups (C, n = 14) and a group of pups artificially fed with nucleotide-free formula (NS, n = 14). Neonatal weight, 2,3-DPG concentration, hematocrit (Hct) and hemoglobin concentration (Hb) were determined before the experiment (d 9) and after 7 d of treatment (d 16). In all groups, 2,3-DPG concentration was greater at d 16 than d 9, and the increase was greater in the S group than in the NS group. Alterations in neonatal weight, Hct and Hb concentration did not differ among the groups. On d 16 the 2, 3-DPG/Hb ratio, reflecting the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen, was significantly higher in the C and S groups than in the NS group. We conclude that in neonatal rats, dietary nucleotides increase erythrocyte 2,3-DPG concentration. Studies need to be conducted in humans to assess the effect of this increase on both neonatal peripheral hemodynamics and metabolism in this species.

  18. Revision of Krsko NPP Quality Assurance Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biscan, R.; Fifnja, I.; Kavsek, D.

    2012-01-01

    International standards from nuclear power plant operation area are being frequently upgraded and revised in accordance with the continuous improvement philosophy. This philosophy applies also to the area of Quality Assurance, which has also undergone significant improvement since the early 1950s. Besides just nuclear industry, there are also other international quality standards that are being continuously developed and revised, bringing needs for upgrades also in the nuclear application. Since the beginning of Krsko NPP construction, the overall Quality Assurance program and its applicable procedures were in place to assure that all planned and systematic actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that an item or service will satisfy given requirements to quality, are in place. The overall requirements for quality as one of the major objectives for Krsko NPP operation are also set forth in the Updated Safety Analyses Report, the document that serves as a base for operating license. During more than 30 years of Krsko NPP operation, the quality requirements and related documents were revised and upgraded in several attempts. The latest revision 6 of QD-1, Quality Assurance Plan was issued during the year 2011. The bases for the revision were: Changes of the Slovenian regulatory requirements (ZVISJV, JV5, JV9?), Changes of Krsko NPP licensing documents (USAR section 13?), SNSA inspection requirements, Changes of international standards (IAEA, ISO?), Conclusions of first PSR, Implementation of ISO standards in Krsko NPP (ISO14001, ISO17025), Changes of plant procedures, etc. One of the most obvious changes was the enlargement of the QA Plan scope to cover interdisciplinary areas defined in the plant management program MD-1, such as Safety culture, Self-assessment, Human performance, Industrial Safety etc. The attachment of the QA Plan defining relationships between certain standards was also updated to provide matrix for better correlation of requirements of

  19. r-1,t-2,3,c-4-tetrahydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrophenanthrene in humanurine: A potential biomarker for assessing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolic activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecht, S.S.; Chen, M.L.; Yagi, H.; Jerina, D.M.; Carmella, S.G. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2003-12-01

    Carcinogen metabolite phenotyping is proposed as a more reliable way to determinethe role of host metabolism in PAH-related cancer. Phenanthrene,is the simplest PAH with a bay region and is metabolized to diol epoxides by the same enzymes and with the same stereochemistry as the prototypic carcinogenic PAH, benzo(a)pyrene. The major end product of this metabolic activation pathway is r-1,t-2,3,c-4-tetrahydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrophenanthrene (trans, anti-PheT). We have developed a method for the analysis of trans, anti-PheT in human urine. r-1,t-2,4,c-3,-tetrahydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrophenanthrene (trans,syn-PheT) was used as internal standard. After hydrolysis by beta-glucuronidase and sulfatase, solid phase extraction, and high-performance liquid chromatography collection, the sample was silylated and analyzed by gas chromatography-negative ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry-selected ion monitoring. Thechromatograms were clean and trans, anti-PheT was detected in all human urine samples. Levels of trans, anti-PheT were 791 {+-} 363 pmol/mg creatinine (n = 20) in psoriasis patients treated with a PAH-containing ointment, 25.7 {+-} 16.8 pmol/mg creatinine (n = 32) in coke oven workers exposed to PAH, 4.58 {+-} 2.95 pmol/mg creatinine (n = 31) in smokers, and 1.51 {+-} 1.15 pmol/mg creatinine (n = 30) in nonsmokers. Levels of trans, anti-PheT correlated with levels of 1-hydroxypyrene in the urine of coke oven workers, smokers, and nonsmokers. Trans, anti-PheT appears to be an excellent biomarker of PAH uptake. Levels of trans, anti-PheT were 8,000-19,000 times higher than those can be detected in human urine.

  20. Revised Starling equation and the glycocalyx model of transvascular fluid exchange: an improved paradigm for prescribing intravenous fluid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, T E; Woodcock, T M

    2012-03-01

    I.V. fluid therapy does not result in the extracellular volume distribution expected from Starling's original model of semi-permeable capillaries subject to hydrostatic and oncotic pressure gradients within the extracellular fluid. Fluid therapy to support the circulation relies on applying a physiological paradigm that better explains clinical and research observations. The revised Starling equation based on recent research considers the contributions of the endothelial glycocalyx layer (EGL), the endothelial basement membrane, and the extracellular matrix. The characteristics of capillaries in various tissues are reviewed and some clinical corollaries considered. The oncotic pressure difference across the EGL opposes, but does not reverse, the filtration rate (the 'no absorption' rule) and is an important feature of the revised paradigm and highlights the limitations of attempting to prevent or treat oedema by transfusing colloids. Filtered fluid returns to the circulation as lymph. The EGL excludes larger molecules and occupies a substantial volume of the intravascular space and therefore requires a new interpretation of dilution studies of blood volume and the speculation that protection or restoration of the EGL might be an important therapeutic goal. An explanation for the phenomenon of context sensitivity of fluid volume kinetics is offered, and the proposal that crystalloid resuscitation from low capillary pressures is rational. Any potential advantage of plasma or plasma substitutes over crystalloids for volume expansion only manifests itself at higher capillary pressures.

  1. Redefining the Boundaries of Language Study. Issues in Language Program Direction: A Series of Annual Volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramsch, Claire, Ed.

    The papers in this volume fall into five categories. After "Introduction: Making the Invisible Visible" (Claire Kramsch), Part 1, "Theoretical Boundaries," includes "The Metamorphosis of the Foreign Language Director, or: Waking Up to Theory" (Mark Webber) and "Subjects-in-Process: Revisioning TA Development…

  2. Developing Open-Ended Questions for Surface Area and Volume of Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, Henry; Putri, Ratu Ilma Indra; Hartono, Yusuf

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to show open-ended questions about surface area and beam volume which valid and practice, have potential effect. This research is research development which consists of two main phases: preliminary phase (preparation phase and problem design) and formative evaluation phase (evaluation and revision phases). The…

  3. Defense waste solidification studies. Volume 2. Drawing supplement. Savannah River Plant, Project S-1780

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Volume 2 contains the drawings prepared and used in scoping and estimating the Glass-Form Waste Solidification facilities and the alternative studies cited in the report, the Off-Site Shipping Case, the Decontaminated Salt Storage Case, and a revised Reference Plant (Concrete-Form Waste) Case

  4. Engineering Drawing Practices - Volume I of II: Aerospace and Ground Support Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    This manual establishes the essential requirements and reference documents for the preparation and revision of digital product definition data sets prepared for or by NASA at KSC. This volume is only applicable to KSC in-house programs/projects. These requirements do not apply to the preparation of illustrations, artwork, or figures in technical publications.

  5. Automation of ETE-CC 2/3 (Effluent Treatment Station); Automacao da ETE-CC 2/3 (Estacao de Tratamento de Efluentes)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinzato, Frederico Takashi Di Tanno; Esteves, Joao Paulo Leite; Souza, Rafael Soares de; Gomes, Lucio Nascimento; Santos, Leonardo Paiva [Companhia Siderurgica Nacional (CSN), Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-11-01

    The present technical contribution presents the results of the implantation of a complete automation system of the ETE-CC 2/3 (Effluent Treatment Station of Continuous Casting Machine 2 and 3 of CSN), improving the reliability and the operation mode of the plant. The implanted system has the following features: remote operation and remote monitoring of all equipment of station; redundancy of operation stations, PLC's, communication networks and UPS; possibility of local control of equipment without automation system; wireless system of control and monitoring for the filters; recording system for all process variables. (author)

  6. Diastereomerically and enantiomerically pure 2,3-disubstituted pyrrolidines from 2,3-aziridin-1-ols using a sulfoxonium ylide: a one-carbon homologative relay ring expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomaker, Jennifer M; Bhattacharjee, Somnath; Yan, Jun; Borhan, Babak

    2007-02-21

    An ylide-based aza-Payne rearrangement of 2,3-aziridin-1-ols leads to an efficient process for the preparation of pyrrolidines. The aza-Payne rearrangement under basic reaction conditions favors the formation of epoxy amines. Subsequent nucleophilic attack of the epoxide by the ylide yields a bis-anion, which upon a 5-exo-tet ring-closure yields the desired pyrrolidine, thus completing the relay of the three-membered to the five-membered nitrogen-containing ring system. This process takes place with complete transfer of stereochemical fidelity and can be applied to sterically hindered aziridinols.

  7. Volume regulation in epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2016-01-01

    to amphibian skin and mammalian cortical collecting tubule of low and intermediate osmotic permeability. Crosstalk between entrance and exit mechanisms interferes with volume regulation both at aniso-osmotic and iso-osmotic volume perturbations. It has been proposed that cell volume regulation is an intrinsic...... regulation are cloned. The volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) exhibiting specific electrophysiological characteristics seems exclusive to serve cell volume regulation. This is contrary to K+ channels as well as cotransporters and exchange mechanisms that may serve both transepithelial transport and cell...... volume regulation. In the same cell, these functions may be maintained by different ion pathways that are separately regulated. RVD is often preceded by increase in cytosolic free Ca2+, probably via influx through TRP channels, but Ca2+ release from intracellular stores has also been observed. Cell...

  8. How to Revise, and Revise Really Well, for Premier Academic Journals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaPlaca, Peter J.; Lindgreen, Adam; Vanhamme, Joelle

    2018-01-01

    Most of the premier academic journals in all fields routinely have rejection rates of 80%, 95%, or higher. All journals prefer articles that make significant contributions to the field. Revising a manuscript and responding properly to the comments of reviewers and editors often is challenging....... This article discusses how to revise effectively a manuscript according to the (minor or major) comments of reviewers and editors for premier academic journals. We provide a series of tips for helping the authors in their endeavor, making the process less arduous and improving the possibility of a positive...

  9. Tibial slope correction combined with second revision ACL produces good knee stability and prevents graft rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejour, David; Saffarini, Mo; Demey, Guillaume; Baverel, Laurent

    2015-10-01

    Revision ACL reconstruction requires careful analysis of failure causes particularly in cases of two previous graft ruptures. Intrinsic factors as excessive tibial slope or narrow femoral notch increase failure risks but are rarely addressed in revision surgery. The authors report outcomes, at minimum follow-up of 2 years, for second revision ACL reconstructions combined with tibial deflexion osteotomy for correction of excessive slope (>12°). Nine patients that underwent second revision ACL reconstruction combined with tibial deflexion osteotomy were retrospectively studied. The mean age was 30.3 ± 4.4 years (median 28; range 26-37), and mean follow-up was 4.0 ± 2.0 years (median 3.6; range 2.0-7.6). Autografts were harvested from the quadriceps tendon (n = 8) or hamstrings (n = 1), and tibial osteotomy was done by anterior closing wedge, without detachment of the patellar tendon, to obtain a slope of 3° to 5°. All patients had fused osteotomies, stable knees, and there were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The mean posterior tibial slope decreased from 13.2° ± 2.6° (median 13°; range 12°-18°) preoperatively to 4.4° ± 2.3° (median 4°; range 2°-8°) postoperatively. The mean Lysholm score was 73.8 ± 5.8 (median 74; range 65-82), and the IKDC-SKF was 71.6 ± 6.1 (median 72.8; range 62.2-78.5). The satisfactory results of second revision ACL reconstruction combined with tibial deflexion osteotomy at minimum follow-up of 2 years suggest that tibia slope correction protects reconstructed ACL from fatigue failure in this study. The authors stress the importance of careful analysis failure causes prior to revision ACL reconstruction, and recommend correction of tibial slope if it exceeds 12°, to reduce the risks of graft retear. III.

  10. Solid-phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography for the determination of 2,3-dimethyl-2,3-dinitrobutane as a marking agent for explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiujuan; Zeng, Zhaorui; Zeng, Yi

    2007-06-15

    This paper investigates the detection of 2,3-dimethyl-2,3-dinitrobutane (DMNB), a marking agent in explosives, by gas chromatography (GC) with electron capture detection using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) as a sample preparation technique. The 25,27-dihydroxy-26,28-oxy (2',7'-dioxo-3',6'-diazaoctyl) oxy-p-tert-butylcalix[4]arene/hydroxy-terminated silicone oil coated fiber was highly sensitive to trap DMNB from ammonium nitrate matrix. The analysis was performed by extracting 2g of explosives for 30s at room temperature and then immediately introducing into the heated GC injector for 1min of thermal desorption. The method showed good linearity in the range from 0.01 to 1.0mug/g. The relative standard deviations for these extractions were <8%. The calculated limit of detection for DMNB (S/N=3) was 4.43x10(-4)mug/g, which illustrates that the proposed systems are suitable for explosive detection at trace level. This is the first report of an SPME-GC system shown to extract marking agent in explosives for subsequent detection in a simple, rapid, sensitive, and inexpensive manner.

  11. Toxicological evaluation of a novel umami flavour compound: 2-(((3-(2,3-Dimethoxyphenyl-1H-1,2,4-triazol-5-ylthiomethylpyridine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald S. Karanewsky

    Full Text Available A toxicological evaluation of a umami flavour compound, 2-(((3-(2,3-dimethoxyphenyl-1H-1,2,4-triazol-5-ylthiomethylpyridine (S3643; CAS 902136-79-2, was completed for the purpose of assessing its safety for use in food and beverage applications. S3643 undergoes extensive oxidative metabolism in vitro with rat microsomes producing the S3643-sulfoxide and 4′-hydroxy-S3643 as the major metabolites. In incubations with human microsomes, the O-demethyl-S3643 and S3643-sulfoxide were produced as the major metabolites. In pharmacokinetic studies in rats, the S3643-sulfoxide represents the dominant biotransformation product. S3643 was not found to be mutagenic or clastogenic in vitro, and did not induce micronuclei in CHO-WBL cells. In subchronic oral toxicity studies in rats, the no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL for S3643 was 100 mg/kg bw/day (highest dose tested when administered in the diet for 90 consecutive days. Keywords: Umami flavour, S3643, FEMA GRAS, Subchronic toxicological evaluation, Genetic toxicological evaluation

  12. Characterization and in vitro degradation of poly(2,3-(1,4-diethyl tartrate)-co-2,3-isopropyliden tartrate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schliecker, Gesine; Schmidt, Carsten; Fuchs, Stefan; Kissel, Thomas

    2004-07-23

    In the present study, a less known polyester based on tartaric acid was characterized with respect to its degradation mechanism. Poly(2,3-(1,4-diethyl tartrate)-co-2,3-isopropyliden tartrate) (PTA) differs from commonly used biodegradable polyesters, such as poly(lactides-co-glycolides) (PLGA) by the presence of additional cleavable bonds in the polymer side chains. This modification results in different polymer properties and influences polymer degradation. The hydrolytic degradation of PTA was studied in parallel to PLGA using disc-shape matrices, which were obtained by compression-molding. The discs were incubated in pH 7.4 phosphate buffer solution at 37 degrees C. The degraded samples were characterized for percentage mass loss, water absorption, decay of molecular weight and change in glass transition temperature. The results demonstrate that the degradation of PTA proceeds via bulk erosion similar to PLGA. However, the degradation of PTA implants is characterized by a rapid mass loss within a short period of time appearing after a definite lag phase without remarkable mass loss. This makes the polymer promising for pulsatile drug release systems.

  13. Fragrance material review on 1-(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8-octahydro-2,3,8,8-tetramethyl-2-naphthalenyl)ethanone (OTNE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scognamiglio, J; Letizia, C S; Politano, V T; Api, A M

    2013-12-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of 1-(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8-octahydro-2,3,8,8-tetramethyl-2-naphthalenyl)ethanone (OTNE) when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. OTNE is a member of the fragrance structural group Alkyl Cyclic Ketones. These fragrances can be described as being composed of an alkyl, R1, and various substituted and bicyclic saturated or unsaturated cyclic hydrocarbons, R2, in which one of the rings may include up to 12 carbons. Alternatively, R2 may be a carbon bridge of C2-C4 carbon chain length between the ketone and cyclic hydrocarbon. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for OTNE were evaluated then summarized and includes physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, mucous membrane (eye) irritation, skin sensitization, elicitation, phototoxicity, photoallergy, toxicokinetics, repeated dose, reproductive toxicity, and genotoxicity data. A safety assessment of the entire Alkyl Cyclic Ketones will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al. (2013) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all Alkyl Cyclic Ketones in fragrances. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. HPLC Determination of α-Keto Acids from Human Serum Using 2, 3-Diamino-2, 3- Dimethyl Butane as Derivatizing Reagent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahar, K.P.; Shar, G.Q.; Khuhawar, M.Y.; Abbasi, K.U.; Azmat, R.; Jameel Ahmed Biag, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Seven α-keto acids, pyruvic acid (PYR), 2-oxobutyric acid (KB), 3-methyl-2-oxobutyric acid (MKBA), 3-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid (K3MVA), 4-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid (K4MVA), 2-oxoglutaric acid (KG) and Phenyl pyruvic acid (PPY) as derivatives of 2,3-diamino-2,3-dimethybutane (DDB) were separated by HPLC column Zorbax C-18 (4.6x150 mm-id). The compounds were eluted with methanol-water-acetonitrile (40:58:2 V/V/V) with flow rate 1 ml/min. UV detection was carried out by photodiode array at 255 nm. Linear calibration plots were obtained with 0.1 to 60 μg/ml with limits of detection (LoD) within 0.04-0.4 μg/ml. The method was applied for the analysis of α-keto acids from serum of diabetic patients with blood glucose level 430-458 mg/dl and healthy volunteers. The amounts of α-keto acids observed 3.24-9.71 μg/ml with RSD 1.1-1.9 percentage in diabetic patients were higher than healthy volunteer's 0.11-1.3 μg/ml with RSD 0.9-2.6 percentage. (author)

  15. Revision of failed hemiarthroplasty for painful glenoid arthrosis to anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Mihir M; Sholder, Daniel; Abboud, Joseph; Lazarus, Mark D; Ramsey, Matthew L; Williams, Gerald R; Namdari, Surena

    2018-05-10

    The impending burden of revision shoulder arthroplasty has increased interest in outcomes of revision procedures. Painful glenoid arthrosis following hemiarthroplasty is a common cause of reoperation, and conversion to anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty is one option. We identified patients who underwent revision of painful hemiarthroplasty to total shoulder arthroplasty over a 15-year period in a single tertiary-care health system. Presurgical and operative data were analyzed for 28 patients who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Patients were contacted at a minimum of 2 years' follow-up after revision surgery for functional outcome scores, reoperations, and implant survival. The 2- and 5-year implant survival rates were 93% and 86%, respectively. Functional outcomes were obtained from 21 patients with surviving implants. The mean American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, visual analog scale score for pain, and Single Assessment Numerical Evaluation score were 78 ± 20, 2.3 ± 2.6, and 71 ± 24, respectively. The mean Short Form 12 mental and physical scores were 49 ± 10 and 43 ± 9, respectively. Of the patients, 17 (81%) were either satisfied or very satisfied with their outcome. Complications were seen in 10 patients (36%), and 6 patients (21%) required reoperation. Anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty following hemiarthroplasty can achieve successful outcomes and implant survival rates. Given our poor understanding of reverse shoulder arthroplasty longevity, this procedure should remain an option for patients with glenoid arthrosis and an intact rotator cuff. Copyright © 2018 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. What Is the Impact of Smoking on Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, Nicholas A; Dowdle, S Blake; Wilkinson, Brandon G; Duchman, Kyle R; Gao, Yubo; Callaghan, John J

    2018-07-01

    There is a paucity of literature evaluating the impact of smoking on revision arthroplasty procedures. The purpose of this study was to identify the effect of smoking on complications after revision total knee arthroplasty (rTKA). We queried the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database to identify patients who underwent rTKA between 2006 and 2014. Patients were divided into current smokers and nonsmokers according to the NSQIP definitions. Each cohort was compared in terms of demographic data, preoperative comorbidities, and operative time. Infection end points were created from composite surgical site infection variables defined by the NSQIP database. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was utilized to adjust for confounding variables and calculate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and associated 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). In total, 8776 patients underwent rTKA. Of these patients, 11.6% were current smokers. Univariate analyses demonstrated that smokers had a higher rate of any wound complication (3.8% vs 1.8%, P < .0001), deep infection (2.5% vs 1.0%, P < .0001), pneumonia (1.3% vs 0.4%, P < .0001), and reoperation (5.0% vs 3.1%, P = .001) compared to nonsmokers undergoing revision total knee arthroplasty. Multivariate analysis identified current smokers as being at a significantly increased risk of any wound complication (OR 2.1; 95% CI 1.4-3.1) and deep infection (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.2-3.6) after rTKA. This study demonstrates that smoking significantly increases the risk of infection, wound complications, and reoperation after rTKA. The results are even more magnified for revision procedures compared to published effects of smoking on primary total knee arthroplasty complications. Further research is needed regarding the impact of smoking cessation on mitigation of these observed risks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Systematic metabolic engineering of Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z for 2,3-butanediol production from methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh Duc; Hwang, In Yeub; Lee, Ok Kyung; Kim, Donghyuk; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G; Mariyana, Rina; Hadiyati, Susila; Kim, Min Sik; Lee, Eun Yeol

    2018-04-16

    Methane is considered a next-generation feedstock, and methanotrophic cell-based biorefinery is attractive for production of a variety of high-value compounds from methane. In this work, we have metabolically engineered Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z for 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BDO) production from methane. The engineered strain 20Z/pBudK.p, harboring the 2,3-BDO synthesis gene cluster (budABC) from Klebsiella pneumoniae, accumulated 2,3-BDO in methane-fed shake flask cultures with a titer of 35.66 mg/L. Expression of the most efficient gene cluster was optimized using selection of promoters, translation initiation rates (TIR), and the combination of 2,3-BDO synthesis genes from different sources. A higher 2,3-BDO titer of 57.7 mg/L was measured in the 20Z/pNBM-Re strain with budA of K. pneumoniae and budB of Bacillus subtilis under the control of the Tac promoter. The genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction of M. alcaliphilum 20Z enabled in silico gene knockout predictions using an evolutionary programming method to couple growth and 2,3-BDO production. The ldh, ack, and mdh genes in M. alcaliphilum 20Z were identified as potential knockout targets. Pursuing these targets, a triple-mutant strain ∆ldh ∆ack ∆mdh was constructed, resulting in a further increase of the 2,3-BDO titer to 68.8 mg/L. The productivity of this optimized strain was then tested in a fed-batch stirred tank bioreactor, where final product concentrations of up to 86.2 mg/L with a yield of 0.0318 g-(2,3-BDO) /g-CH 4 were obtained under O 2 -limited conditions. This study first demonstrates the strategy of in silico simulation-guided metabolic engineering and represents a proof-of-concept for the production of value-added compounds using systematic approaches from engineered methanotrophs. Copyright © 2018 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Reductions in red blood cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate concentration during continuous renal replacment therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shilpa; Brugnara, Carlo; Betensky, Rebecca A; Waikar, Sushrut S

    2015-01-07

    Hypophosphatemia is a frequent complication during continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), a dialytic technique used to treat AKI in critically ill patients. This study sought to confirm that phosphate depletion during CRRT may decrease red blood cell (RBC) concentration of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG), a crucial allosteric effector of hemoglobin's (Hgb's) affinity for oxygen, thereby leading to impaired oxygen delivery to peripheral tissues. Phosphate mass balance studies were performed in 20 patients with severe AKI through collection of CRRT effluent. RBC concentrations of 2,3-DPG, venous blood gas pH, and oxygen partial pressure required for 50% hemoglobin saturation (P50) were measured at CRRT initiation and days 2, 4, and 7. Similar measurements were obtained on days 0 and 2 in a reference group of 10 postsurgical patients, most of whom did not have AKI. Associations of 2,3-DPG with laboratory parameters and clinical outcomes were examined using mixed-effects and Cox regression models. Mean 2,3-DPG levels decreased from a mean (±SD) of 13.4±3.4 µmol/g Hgb to 11.0±3.1 µmol/g Hgb after 2 days of CRRT (Plevels decreased from 29.7±4.4 mmHg to 26.7±4.0 mmHg (Plevels after 2 days of CRRT were not significantly lower than those in the reference group on day 2. Among patients receiving CRRT, 2,3-DPG decreased by 0.53 µmol/g Hgb per 1 g phosphate removed (95% confidence interval 0.38 to 0.68 µmol/g Hgb; P<0.001). Greater reductions in 2,3-DPG were associated with higher risk for death (hazard ratio, 1.43; 95% confidence interval, 1.09 to 1.88; P=0.01). CRRT-induced phosphate depletion is associated with measurable reductions in RBC 2,3-DPG concentration and a shift in the O2:Hgb affinity curve even in the absence of overt hypophosphatemia. 2,3-DPG reductions may be associated with higher risk for in-hospital death and represent a potentially avoidable complication of CRRT. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  19. Green synthesis of tri/tetrasubstituted 1-imidazoles and 2,3 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (1H)-ones using nano aluminium nitride as solid source of ammonia. Maryam Hajjami Arash Ghorbani-Choghamarani Zakieh Yousofvand Masoomeh Rorouzi. Regular Articles Volume 127 Issue 7 July 2015 pp 1221-1228 ...

  20. Asymmetric temporal integration of layer 4 and layer 2/3 inputs in visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Giao B; Dan, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Neocortical neurons in vivo receive concurrent synaptic inputs from multiple sources, including feedforward, horizontal, and feedback pathways. Layer 2/3 of the visual cortex receives feedforward input from layer 4 and horizontal input from layer 2/3. Firing of the pyramidal neurons, which carries the output to higher cortical areas, depends critically on the interaction of these pathways. Here we examined synaptic integration of inputs from layer 4 and layer 2/3 in rat visual cortical slices. We found that the integration is sublinear and temporally asymmetric, with larger responses if layer 2/3 input preceded layer 4 input. The sublinearity depended on inhibition, and the asymmetry was largely attributable to the difference between the two inhibitory inputs. Interestingly, the asymmetric integration was specific to pyramidal neurons, and it strongly affected their spiking output. Thus via cortical inhibition, the temporal order of activation of layer 2/3 and layer 4 pathways can exert powerful control of cortical output during visual processing.