WorldWideScience

Sample records for volgin prostigmata cheyletidae

  1. Ácaros prostigmata y mesostigmata asociados a la hojarasca en el bosque de galería del Parque Universitario de la UCLA, Estado Lara, Venezuela

    OpenAIRE

    Fuentes,Lilian; Vásquez,Carlos; Palma,Wendy; Bari,Carolina

    2008-01-01

    Se estudió la riqueza y abundancia de los géneros de ácaros Prostigmata y Mesostigmata habitantes de la hojarasca en un bosque de galería del Parque Universitario de la Universidad Centroccidental Lisandro Alvarado (UCLA), Estado Lara, Venezuela. Las capturas fueron realizadas utilizando trampas de caída ubicadas a lo largo de una transecta de 1800 m de longitud desde noviembre 2000 hasta diciembre 2001. La mayor riqueza y abundancia fueron registradas en el Orden Prostigmata con 18 géneros e...

  2. Development and reproduction of Panonychus citri (Prostigmata: Tetranychidae) on different species and varieties of citrus plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardi, Odimar Zanuzo; Bordini, Gabriela Pavan; Franco, Aline Aparecida; de Morais, Matheus Rovere; Yamamoto, Pedro Takao

    2015-12-01

    The species and varieties of citrus plants that are currently grown can favor the population growth of the citrus red mite Panonychus citri (McGregor) (Prostigmata: Tetranychidae) and alter the pest management programs in citrus groves. In this study we evaluated, in the laboratory, the development and reproduction of P. citri and estimated its life table parameters when reared on four varieties of Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck (Valencia, Pera, Natal, and Hamlin), one variety of Citrus reticulata Blanco (Ponkan) and one variety of Citrus limon (L.) Burm. (Sicilian). The incubation period and egg viability were not affected by the host plant. However, the development and survival of the immature stage were significantly lower on Hamlin orange than on Valencia, Pera and Natal oranges, Ponkan mandarin and Sicilian lemon. The fecundity and oviposition period of females were lower on Hamlin orange than on the other hosts. Mites reared on Valencia orange and Sicilian lemon had a higher net reproductive rate (R 0 ), intrinsic growth rate (r) and finite rate of increase (λ), and a shorter interval between generations (T) than on Pera, Natal and Hamlin oranges and Ponkan mandarin. On the other hand, mites reared on Hamlin orange had the lowest R 0 , r and λ and the highest T among the hosts. Based on the results obtained we recommend that for Valencia orange and Sicilian lemon, the mite monitoring programs should be more intense to detect the initial infestation of pest, avoiding the damage in plants and the increase in production costs.

  3. Detection, Prevalence and Phylogenetic Relationships of Demodex spp and further Skin Prostigmata Mites (Acari, Arachnida) in Wild and Domestic Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre, Natalia; Francino, Olga; Curti, Joseph N.; Armenta, Tiffany C.; Fraser, Devaughn L.; Kelly, Rochelle M.; Hunt, Erin; Silbermayr, Katja; Zewe, Christine; Sánchez, Armand; Ferrer, Lluís

    2016-01-01

    This study was conceived to detect skin mites in social mammals through real-time qPCR, and to estimate taxonomic Demodex and further Prostigmata mite relationships in different host species by comparing sequences from two genes: mitochondrial 16S rRNA and nuclear 18S rRNA. We determined the mite prevalence in the hair follicles of marmots (13%) and bats (17%). The high prevalence found in marmots and bats by sampling only one site on the body may indicate that mites are common inhabitants of their skin. Since we found three different mites (Neuchelacheles sp, Myobia sp and Penthaleus sp) in three bat species (Miotis yumanensis, Miotis californicus and Corynorhinus townsendii) and two different mites (both inferred to be members of the Prostigmata order) in one marmot species (Marmota flaviventris), we tentatively concluded that these skin mites 1) cannot be assigned to the same genus based only on a common host, and 2) seem to evolve according to the specific habitat and/or specific hair and sebaceous gland of the mammalian host. Moreover, two M. yumanensis bats harbored identical Neuchelacheles mites, indicating the possibility of interspecific cross-infection within a colony. However, some skin mites species are less restricted by host species than previously thought. Specifically, Demodex canis seems to be more transmissible across species than other skin mites. D. canis have been found mostly in dogs but also in cats and captive bats. In addition, we report the first case of D. canis infestation in a domestic ferret (Mustela putorius). All these mammalian hosts are related to human activities, and D. canis evolution may be a consequence of this relationship. The monophyletic Demodex clade showing closely related dog and human Demodex sequences also supports this likely hypothesis. PMID:27802314

  4. Detection, Prevalence and Phylogenetic Relationships of Demodex spp and further Skin Prostigmata Mites (Acari, Arachnida) in Wild and Domestic Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre, Natalia; Francino, Olga; Curti, Joseph N; Armenta, Tiffany C; Fraser, Devaughn L; Kelly, Rochelle M; Hunt, Erin; Silbermayr, Katja; Zewe, Christine; Sánchez, Armand; Ferrer, Lluís

    2016-01-01

    This study was conceived to detect skin mites in social mammals through real-time qPCR, and to estimate taxonomic Demodex and further Prostigmata mite relationships in different host species by comparing sequences from two genes: mitochondrial 16S rRNA and nuclear 18S rRNA. We determined the mite prevalence in the hair follicles of marmots (13%) and bats (17%). The high prevalence found in marmots and bats by sampling only one site on the body may indicate that mites are common inhabitants of their skin. Since we found three different mites (Neuchelacheles sp, Myobia sp and Penthaleus sp) in three bat species (Miotis yumanensis, Miotis californicus and Corynorhinus townsendii) and two different mites (both inferred to be members of the Prostigmata order) in one marmot species (Marmota flaviventris), we tentatively concluded that these skin mites 1) cannot be assigned to the same genus based only on a common host, and 2) seem to evolve according to the specific habitat and/or specific hair and sebaceous gland of the mammalian host. Moreover, two M. yumanensis bats harbored identical Neuchelacheles mites, indicating the possibility of interspecific cross-infection within a colony. However, some skin mites species are less restricted by host species than previously thought. Specifically, Demodex canis seems to be more transmissible across species than other skin mites. D. canis have been found mostly in dogs but also in cats and captive bats. In addition, we report the first case of D. canis infestation in a domestic ferret (Mustela putorius). All these mammalian hosts are related to human activities, and D. canis evolution may be a consequence of this relationship. The monophyletic Demodex clade showing closely related dog and human Demodex sequences also supports this likely hypothesis.

  5. DNA barcodes reveal female dimorphism in syringophilid mites (Actinotrichida: Prostigmata: Cheyletoidea): Stibarokris phoeniconaias and Ciconichenophilus phoeniconaias are conspecific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowska, Eliza; Dragun-Damian, Anna; Broda, Lukasz; Dabert, Jacek; Dabert, Miroslawa

    2014-06-01

    Here we present the first evidence of female dimorphism in ectoparasitic quill mites of the family Syringophilidae (Actinotrichida: Prostigmata: Cheyletoidea). Stibarokris phoeniconaias Skoracki et OConnor, 2010 and Ciconichenophilus phoeniconaias Skoracki et OConnor, 2010 so far have been treated as two distinct species cohabiting inside the quills of feathers of the lesser flamingo Phoeniconaias minor (Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire) and the American flamingo Phoenicopterus ruber Linnaeus. Although females of these species differ morphologically by the extent of body sclerotisation, presence/absence of lateral hypostomal teeth, and shape of dorsal setae, their important common features are the lack of leg setae vs II, and both stylophore and peritremes shape. Here, we apply the DNA barcode markers to test whether the differences between S. phoeniconaias and C. phoeniconaias have a genetic basis, indicating that they really are distinct taxa, or whether they just represent two morphs of a single species. All analysed sequences (616 bp for COI and 1159 bp for 28S rDNA) obtained for specimens representing females of both studied taxa as well as male, tritonymph, protonymph and larva of S. phoeniconaias were identical, which indicates that S. phoeniconaias and C. phoeniconaias are conspecific. The formal taxonomic consequence of our results is denial of the genus status of Ciconichenophilus Skoracki et OConnor, 2010 and species status of C. phoeniconaias, and recommendation that they should be treated as junior synonyms of Stibarokris Kethley, 1970 and S. phoeniconaias, respectively.

  6. Diversidad de ácaros (Acari: Prostigmata, Mesotigmata, Astigmata asociados a la hojarasca de formaciones vegetales del Parque Universitario de la UCLA, Venezuela Mite diversity (Acari: Prostigmata, Mesotigmata, Astigmata associated to soil litter from two vegetation zones at the University Park UCLA, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Vásquez

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió la diversidad de los ácaros (Prostigmata, Mesostigmata y Astigmata habitantes del estrato suelo-hojarasca de un Matorral y un Bosque Deciduo del Parque Universitario de la UCLA (Universidad Centroccidental Lisandro Alvarado, Estado Lara, Venezuela, desde diciembre 2000 a noviembre 2001. El muestreo se realizó usando trampas de caída colocadas a lo largo de una transecta de 1.800 m en ambas localidades. Todos los morfotipos fueron montados en láminas microscópicas usando líquido de Hoyer. Se registró un total de 51 morfotipos de ácaros con predominancia del número de individuos pertenecientes a Prostigmata (2528 respecto a Mesostigmata (926 y Astigmata (12. En ambas localidades, Eupodidae (Prostigmata y Macrochelidae (Mesotigmata fueron las familias más abundantes. Se determinó mayor riqueza (S= 43, diversidad (H'= 2,67 y uniformidad (E= 0,69 de morfotipos en el Bosque Deciduo al ser comparado con los valores obtenidos en el Matorral (S= 36, H'= 2,12 y E= 0,52. Ambas zonas mostraron un índice de similitud (J' de 0,59. La pendiente de la curva de diversidad-dominancia permitió inferir que el Matorral constituye un hábitat más disturbado que el Bosque Deciduo a pesar de albergar mayor número de individuos. Se requiere realizar estudios más detallados que sirvan de base para determinar el rol de la acarofauna en el equilibrio de la red trófica de suelo de las regiones tropicales.Soil mite diversity (Prostigmata, Mesostigmata, Astigmata inhabiting in litter-soil layer from a Shrubland and a Deciduous Forest was estimated from December 2000 to November 2001 in the University Park of UCLA (Universidad Centroccidental Lisandro Alvarado, state of Lara, Venezuela. Samplings were made by using pitfall traps along an 1,800 m-transect in both areas. All morfotypes were mounted in microscope slides using Hoyer's medium. A total of 51 mite morfotypes were collected with higher abundance in Prostigmata (2,528 as compared to

  7. Plant mites of the Dominican Republic, with a description of a new species of Petrobia (Tetranychina) Wainstein, 1960 (Acari, Prostigmata, Tetranychidae) and a key to the species of this subgenus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Leocadia Sánchez; Flechtmann, Carlos H W; De Moraes, Gilberto J

    2014-08-05

    Fourteen mite species of plant-associated mites of the suborder Prostigmata are reported from the Dominican Republic. Four of these refer to new findings for the country, including Petrobia (Tetranychina) hispaniola n. sp. Sánchez & Flechtmann, described from specimens collected from leaves of Citrus sp. (Rutaceae) and Rosa sp. (Rosaceae). A key for the separation of the world species of Petrobia (Tetranychina) is presented. 

  8. Diversity of Quill Mites of the Family Syringophilidae (Acari: Prostigmata) Parasitizing Owls (Aves: Strigiformes) With Remarks on the Host-Parasite Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoracki, Maciej; Unsoeld, Markus; Marciniak, Natalia; Sikora, Bozena

    2016-07-01

    The quill mite fauna of the family Syringophilidae (Acari: Prostigmata: Cheyletoidea) associated with owls (Aves: Strigiformes) is reviewed. A new genus is proposed, Neobubophilus Skoracki & Unsoeld gen. nov. It differs from closely related Bubophilus (Bubophilus Philips and Norton, 1978) by the absence of leg setae vsII in the both sexes. In addition, four new species are described: (1) Neobubophilus cunicularius Skoracki & Unsoeld sp. nov. from Athene cunicularia (Molina, 1782) (Strigidae) from Paraguay; (2) Neobubophilus atheneus Skoracki & Unsoeld sp. nov. from Athene noctua (Scopoli, 1769) and Athene brama (Temminck, 1821) (Strigidae), both from India; (3) Bubophilus tytonus Skoracki & Unsoeld sp. nov. from Tyto alba affinis (Blyth, 1862) (Tytonidae) from Cameroon, and (4) Megasyringophilus dalmas Skoracki & Unsoeld sp. nov. from Megascops choliba (Vieillot, 1817) (Strigidae) from Venezuela. The following new host species are given: Bubo bubo (Linnaeus, 1758) (Strigidae) from Nepal for Bubophilus ascalaphus (Philips and Norton 1978) and Strix woodfordii (Smith, 1834) (Strigidae) from Tanzania for Bubophilus aluconis (aluconis Nattress and Skoracki 2009). A key for syringophilid genera and species associated with owls is constructed. The host-parasite relationships of syringophilid mites and owls are discussed. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com Version of Record, first published online May 24, 2016 with fixed content and layout in compliance with Art. 8.1.3.2 ICZN.

  9. Eupalopsellidae and Stigmaeidae (Acari: Prostigmata) within citrus orchards in Florida: species distribution, relative and seasonal abundance within trees, associated vines, and ground cover plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Carl C; Ueckermann, Eduard A

    2014-10-01

    Seven citrus orchards on reduced- to no-pesticide spray programs were sampled for predacious mites in the families Eupalopsellidae and Stigmaeidae (Acari: Prostigmata) in central and south central Florida. Inner and outer canopy leaves, fruit, twigs, and trunk scrapings were sampled monthly between August 1994 and January 1996. Open flowers were sampled in March from five of the sites. Two species of eupalopsellid mites (Exothorhis caudata Summers and Saniosulus harteni (van-Dis and Ueckermann)) were identified from 252 specimens collected within citrus tree canopies within the seven citrus orchards of which 249 were E. caudata. Only two E. caudata were collected from ground cover plants within five of the seven orchards. Eight species of Stigmaeidae were identified from 5,637 specimens: Agistemus floridanus Gonzalez, A. terminalis Gonzalez, Eustigmaeus arcuata (Chandhri), E. sp. near arcuata, E. segnis (Koch), Mediostigmaeus citri (Rakha and McCoy), Stigmaeus seminudus Wood, and Zetzellia languida Gonzalez were collected from within citrus tree canopies from seven orchard sites. Agistemus floridanus was the only species in either family that was abundant with 5,483 collected from within citrus tree canopies compared with only 39 from vine or ground cover plants. A total of 431 samples from one or more of 82 vines and ground cover plants were sampled monthly between September 1994 and January 1996 in five of these orchards and one or more eupalopsellids or stigmaeids were collected from 19 of these plants. Richardia brasiliensis (Meg.) Gomez had nine A. floridanus from 5 of 25 samples collected from this plant. Solanum sp. had five A. floridanus from three samples taken. Both eupalopsellid and stigmaeid species numbers represented orchards were on full herbicide programs and ground cover plants were absent. Agistemus floridanus was more abundant in the citrus orchards with on-going or recent herbicide programs compared with orchards having well-developed ground

  10. Reproduction, survival, and life table parameters of the predatory mite Cheyletus malaccensis (Acari: Cheyletidae) at various constant temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palyvos, Nickolas E; Emmanouel, Nickolas G

    2011-06-01

    Reproduction, survival, and life table parameters of the predatory mite Cheyletus malaccensis Oudemans were evaluated at six constant temperatures: 17.5, 20, 25, 30, 32.5 and 35°C, feeding on Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank). Preoviposition period of fertilized and virgin females varied with temperature from ca. 9 days at 17.5°C to ca. 1.5 day at 32.5°C and then increased to ca. 3 days at 35°C. Virgin female oviposition period was significantly shorter than for fertilized females at the temperatures examined with the exception of 17.5°C. The mean total number of eggs per fertilized (169.7 ± 6.6) and virgin female (60.7 ± 4.3) was highest at the temperature of 30°C. The data indicated a significant positive and nearly doubling effect of fertilization on female fecundity at the temperatures examined with the exception of 17.5°C. Age-specific fecundity was described by a temperature dependent model from which the maximum daily fecundity rate was estimated for fertilized and virgin females at 10.3 (at 30°C) and 6.8 (at 32.5°C) eggs/female, respectively. Virgin female longevity was significantly shorter than for fertilized females at 20, 30 and 32.5°C, and decreased from ca. 57 days at 17.5°C to ca. 17 days at 35°C. The Weibull function that was used to describe the age specific survival of fertilized and virgin females produced excellent fits to the survival data. Estimates of intrinsic rate of increase, net reproductive rate, mean generation time, doubling time and finite rate of increase, were obtained. The r(m) value increased with temperature from 0.03 (day(-1)) at 17.5°C to 0.21 (day(-1)) at 32.5°C, after which it decreased to 0.15 (day(-1)) at 35°C. These data indicate that C. malaccensis can reproduce at temperatures between 17.5 and 35°C and can be used for biological control of astigmatid mites within the temperature range where the pest occurs.

  11. Sobre el género Neocalonyx (Acari: Prostigmata: Hydryphantidae en las Yungas About the genus Neocalonyx (Acari: Prostigmata: Hydryphantidae in the Yungas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Rosso de Ferradás

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Se tratan aquí dos especies conocidas del género Neocalonyx y se describe una nueva especie, N. diaguita sp. nov. de la provincia de Jujuy (Argentina. Se discuten los caracteres considerados en los tres subgéneros y los cuatro grupos de especies, reconocidos en uno de ellos.Two known species of Neocalonyx genus are dealt with in this paper, and one new species, N. diaguita sp. nov. from Jujuy province in Argentina is described.The characters considered in the three subgenera and the four species groups of one of them are discussed.

  12. Redescription of eutogenes vicinus summers and price, a predatory polymorphic, cheyletid mite with descriptions of males and immature stages (Acarina: Cheyletidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Smiley; John C. Moser

    1975-01-01

    Eutogenes vicinus Summer and Price is redescribed. Illustrations and descriptions are presented for the first time of the male and immature stages of this polymorphic species. Variation in length of palpi of the heteromorphic males is discussed.

  13. First report of the citrus Hindu mite, Schizotetranychus hindustanicus (Hirst) (Prostigmata: Tetranychidae), in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navia, Denise; Marsaro, Alberto L

    2010-01-01

    The citrus Hindu mite, Schizotetranychus hindustanicus (Hirst), is reported for the first time in Brazil and for the second time in South America. Mite specimens were collected from citrus in the municipality of Boa Vista, State of Roraima, northern Brazil. Symptoms associated with S.hindustanicus infestations on citrus are described. The importance of avoiding dissemination of this mite to the main citrus production areas in Brazil is discussed.

  14. Phylogenetic investigation of the genus Raoiella (Prostigmata: Tenuipalpidae): diversity, distribution, and world invasions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, A P G; Ochoa, R; Beard, J J; Welbourn, W C; Ueckermann, E A

    2012-08-01

    The genus Raoiella is best known because of the red palm mite, R. indica, a major pest of palms spreading aggressively throughout the Americas. Not much was known about the biology, geographic origins, or evolutionary history of the genus when R. indica emerged as a major invasive pest. This paper attempts to address some of the basic historical questions regarding the palm mite as well as the genus. Molecular characters from COI and 28S regions were used to produce a phylogenetic hypothesis for the genus in an effort to understand its geographic origin. It also uses COI barcode data to delimit several potentially new species discovered by the authors in Australia. Results show a basal split between R. indica and all other Raoiella species, which indicates Africa or the Middle East as the most probable origin of the genus. Additionally, COI data suggests that at least eight new species are represented among the 20 Australian populations included in this study.

  15. A review of the subfamily Picobiinae Johnston and Kethley, 1973 (Acariformes: Prostigmata: Syringophilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoracki, Maciej; Sikora, Bozena; Spicer, Greg S

    2016-05-19

    The fauna of quill mites of the subfamily Picobiinae Johnston and Kethley, 1973 (Acariformes: Cheyletoidea: Syringophilidae) is comprehensively revised. All of 78 known species, which are grouped into 11 genera, are examined and diagnosed or redescribed. Data on picobiine hosts and distribution are summarized, including new host and locality records. The following new species are described: Charadriineopicobia apricaria sp. nov. ex Pluvialis apricaria (Linnaeus) (Charadriiformes: Charadriidae) from France, Neopicobia pari sp. nov. ex Periparus venustulus Swinhoe (type host) (Passeriformes: Paridae) from China, Parus major Linnaeus (Paridae) from Macedonia and Finland, and Poecile varius Temminck and Schlegel (Paridae) from Japan, Picobia magellani sp. nov. ex Scytalopus magellanicus (Gmelin) (Passeriformes: Rhinocryptidae) from Colombia, Picobia lonchura sp. nov. ex Lonchura leucogastra (Blyth) (Passeriformes: Estrildidae) from Indonesia, Picobia makoli sp. nov. ex Xiphocolaptes promeropirhynchus (Lesson) (Passeriformes: Furnariidae) from Colombia. The species Picobia polonica Skoracki, Magowski and Dabert, 2001 syn. nov. is a junior synonym of C. khulkhaskhani Kivganov and Sharafat, 1995. The following new combinations are proposed: Neopicobia ictericus (Skoracki and Glowska, 2010) comb. nov., Rafapicobia brotogeris (Fain, Bochkov and Mironov, 2000) comb. nov., and Rafapicobia ramphastos (Fain, Bochkov and Mironov, 2000) comb. nov. Keys to the all picobiine genera and species are presented, along with a check-list of picobiine species and their hosts.

  16. Eriophyoid mites (Acari: Prostigmata: Eriophyoidea) from Turkey: description of five new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiedrowicz, Agnieszka; Denizhan, Evsel; Bromberek, Klaudia; Szydło, Wiktoria; Skoracka, Anna

    2016-01-15

    Five new eriophyoid mite species (Eriophyidae) from Turkey are described and illustrated in this paper: Aceria vanensis n. sp., Aceria onosmae n. sp., Aculus lydii n. sp., Aculus gebeliae n. sp. and Aculus spectabilis n. sp.. The descriptions are based on the morphology of females collected from weedy plants, respectively: Amaranthus retroflexus L. (Amaranthaceae), Onosma isauricum Boiss. et Heldr. (Boraginaceae), Hypericum lydium Boiss. (Hypericaceae), Lotus gebelia Vent. (Fabaceae) and Stachys spectabilis Choisy ex DC. (Lamiaceae). The new species were found to be vagrant on their host plants with no visible damage symptoms observed.

  17. Eriophyoid mites from Eastern India: description of three new species (Acari: Prostigmata: Eriophyoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Pranab; Karmakar, Krishna

    2016-01-11

    Three new eriophyoid mite species, namely Dichopelmus puncti n. sp. (Eriophyidae) from cogan grass, Imperata cylindrica (Poaceae); Calacarus kalyaniensis n. sp. (Eriophyidae) from Siam weed, Chromolaena odorata (Asteraceae) and Neorhynacus bidhanae n. sp. (Diptilomiopidae) from Croton caudatus (Euphorbiaceae), are described and illustrated from West Bengal, India. The new species are vagrants on the leaves of their respective host plants with no visible damage observed. Keys to the known species of Dichopelmus and Neorhynacus are provided along with a checklist of eriophyoid mites species present in West Bengal.

  18. Two new species of the syringophilid quill mites (Acari: Prostigmata: Syringophilidae) parasitizing apodiform birds (Aves: Apodiformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoracki, Maciej; Kaszewska, Katarzyna; Kavetska, Katarzyna

    2015-12-07

    Two new syringophilid species (Acariformes: Syringophilidae) are described, Apodisyringiana hirundapi sp. nov. from Hirundapus caudacutus (Latham) from Japan and Syringophiloidus apus sp. nov. from Apus melba (Linnaeus) from Chile.

  19. The first records of quill mites of the family Syringophilidae (Acariformes: Prostigmata: Cheyletoidea) from trogoniform birds (Aves: Trogoniformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Two new species of quill mites of the family Syringophilidae parasitising trogoniform birds (Trogoniformes: Trogonidae) are described: Syringophiloidus quetzali sp. nov. from Pharomachrus mocinno Llave and Ph. antisianus (Orbigny); and Syringophilopsis trogoni sp. nov. from Trogon citreolus Gould and T. melanocephalus Gould. These findings are the first records of syringophilids associated with trogoniform birds.

  20. New species and new records of mites of the genus Stigmaeus(Acari: Prostigmata: Stigmaeidae) from Crimea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaustov, Alexander A

    2014-05-06

    Three new species of the genus Stigmaeus Koch, 1836 (Acari: Stigmaeidae) are described from various habitats in Crimea: Stigmaeus kuznetsovi sp. nov. from nests of Microtus socialis (Rodentia: Cricetidae); S. mitrofanovi sp. nov. from galleries of Pityogenes bistridentatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) under the bark of Pinus pallasiana, and S. silvestris sp. nov. from rotten log of Pinus pallasiana. Stigmaeus corticeus Kuznetsov and Wainstein, 1977 and S. maraghehiensis Bagheri and Ueckermann, 2012 are recorded for the first time in Crimea. A key to species of the genus Stigmaeus of Crimea is provided.

  1. Effect of Host Plant on the Chemical Composition of Tetranychus urticae (Prostigmata: Tetranychidae): Variability in Soluble Protein, Anions, and Carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical analyses of two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae (Koch), and 3 of their host plants, Phaseolus vulgaris L., Phaseolus lunatus L., and Vigna unguiculata L. show that the content of total soluble protein, carbohydrates, and anions in the mites varies independently from the concentrat...

  2. Rediscovery of Tetranychus abacae Baker & Pritchard, additional description and notes on South American spider mites (Acari, Prostigmata, Tetranychidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos H.W Flechtmann

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The rediscovery of Tetranychus abacae Baker & Pritchard, 1962 is reported and additional description and drawings presented. New host and distribution records for 19 species of spider mites (Tctranychidae in South America are given.

  3. Eriophyoid mites (Acari: Prostigmata: Eriophyoidea) from Hungary: a new species on Agrimonia eupatoria (Rosaceae) and new record on Convolvulus arvensis (Convolvulaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripka, Géza

    2014-12-22

    A new species of eriophyoid mite, Aculus castriferrei n. sp., associated with Agrimonia eupatoria (Rosaceae) is described and illustrated from Hungary. Morphological differences distinguishing this vagrant species from other rosaceous inhabiting congeners are discussed. Aceria malherbae Nuzzaci is a new record for the eriophyoid fauna of Hungary after it was found causing severe damage symptoms to Convolvulus arvensis L. (Convolvulaceae).

  4. A new species of the genus Psorergates Tyrell, 1883 (Acarina: Prostigmata: Psorergatidae) parasitic on the tree-shrew Tupaia dorsalis (Mammalia: Scandentia) from Borneo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giesen, K.M.T.; Lukoschus, F.S.

    1982-01-01

    Psorergates tupaiae spec. nov. from Tupaia dorsalis Schlegel, 1857 is described and figured. The morphology of the new species is compared with that of other known species and discussed in relation to the systematic positon of the host.

  5. New mite species associated with certain plant species from Guam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadi V.P. Reddy

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Several new mite species have been reported from certain plants from Guam. Most remarkably, the spider mite, Tetranychus marianae (Prostigmata: Tetranychidae and the predatory mite Phytoseius horridus (Mesostigmata: Phytoseiidae (Solanum melongena have been found on eggplant. The noneconomically important species of Brevipalpus californicus(Banks Prostigmata: Tenuipalpidae,Eupodes sp. (Acarina: Eupodidae and predator Cunaxa sp. (Prostigmata: Cunaxidae have been reported on guava (Psidium guajava L.. Also, the non-economically important species Brevipalpus californicus Prostigmata: Tenuipalpidae, Lepidoglyphus destructor (Astigmata: Glycyphagidae and a predator Amblyseius obtusus, species group Amblyseius near lentiginosus (Mesostigmata: Phytoseiidae, have been recorded on cycad (Cycas micronesica.

  6. A new genus and species Mangalaus krishianusandhanus (Acari: Eriophyidae) from India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangalaus ikrishianusandhanus n. gen., n. sp., (Acari: Prostigmata: Eriophyoidea), collected from erineum on the underside of leaves of Cordia dichotoma (Boraginaceae) is described and illustrated from specimens collected at the Indian Agricultural Research Institute (IARI) in New Delhi, India....

  7. House dust mites in Brazil - an annotated bibliography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binotti Raquel S

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available House dust mites have been reported to be the most important allergen in human dwellings. Several articles had already shown the presence of different mite species at homes in Brazil, being Pyroglyphidae, Glycyphagidae and Cheyletidae the most important families found. This paper is an annotated bibliography that will lead to a better knowledge of house dust mite fauna in Brazil.

  8. Comparative morphological analysis of apple blister mite, Eriophyes mali Nal., a new pest in Serbia

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The apple blister mite, Eriophyes mali Nalepa, 1926 (Acari: Prostigmata: Eriophyoidea), has been recently found in Serbia as a new pest of apple. The history of its research, the results of a morphological analysis and degree of infestation are presented. A comparison of the main morphological features of mites from different populations of remote geographical origin has shown that the apple blister mite from Serbia is most similar to another European popul...

  9. [Mites allergy in children from Tula region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlobina, Zh M; Pron'kina, O V; Khlgatian, S V; Berzhets, A I; Berzhets, V M

    2006-01-01

    Characteristics of allergy to mites in children living in Tula region have been revealed. It was shown that mites from Pyroglyphidae (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae), Cheyletidae and Glycyphagidae (G. destructor, G. domesticus) families play important role in development of atopic allergy in children from this region. Efficacy of plant-origin acaricide "Milbiol" as part of prophylactic measures was evaluated. Its use in children with mild and intermediate asthma led to decrease of number of wheezing episodes, improvement of respiratory function, lessening of clinical signs of allergic rhinitis, decrease or discontinuation of usage of vasoconstrictive preparations.

  10. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of mites (Acari in domiciliary dust in rural dwellings in the "Zona da Mata" region, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Aristeu José de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available From July to September, 2000 (winter, and from January to March, 2001 (summer, 30 dust samples were collected for each season, from beds of rural dwellings located in farms in the geographical area named "Zona da Mata", Minas Gerais, Brazil. After being sorted, the mites were identified and quantified. The prevalence of mites in the samples was 100%. 891 mites were found in winter (22.97%, and 2988 in summer (77.03%. In winter, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Trouessart, 1897 was the most prevalent (55.00%, followed by Blomia tropicalis (Bronswijk, Cock & Oshima, 1973 (27.06%, Euroglyphus maynei (Cooreman, 1950 (8.85%, and predator mites from Cheyletidae family (8.07%. In summer, the most prevalent species was B. tropicalis (47.79%, followed by D. pteronyssinus (43.38%, Cheyletidae (6.87%, and E. maynei (1.28%. Few Dermatophagoides farinae (Hughes, 1961, Chortoglyphus arcuatus (Troupeau, 1879, and mites from Tarsonemidae and Cunaxidae families were found, the last two occurring only in summer. No mites from Acaridae family were found. The greatest number of immature forms found in summer suggested a greater breeding activity in this season. It was also noted that different building materials and varied cleaning routines may influence the population size of domiciliary dust mites.

  11. Geographic variation in ectoparasitic mites diversity in Tadarida Brasiliensis (Chiroptera, Molossidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana C. Pesenti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tadarida brasiliensis (Geoffroy, 1824, the Brazilian free-tailed bat, is an insectivorous bat that occurs from southern United States of America to southern South America. In this study we present the first data on diversity of ectoparasitic mites of T. brasiliensis in Brazil. A compilation and analysis of the studies of mite diversity conducted in different points the geographic distribution this bat species are provided. The mites were collected from March 2010 to November 2011 on 160 T. brasiliensis adult bats captured in southern Brazil. Four species of mites have been found: Chiroptonyssus robustipes (Ewing, 1925, Ewingana longa (Ewing, 1938, Ewingana inaequalis (Radford, 1948, and specimens of Cheyletidae. Chiroptonyssus robustipes was the most prevalent species (100%, followed by E. longa (20%, E. inaequalis (10%, and specimens of Cheyletidae (1.25%. The data currently available show that C. robustipes parasitizes T. brasiliensis throughout its region of occurrence, and this mite is highly prevalent and abundant. The two species of Ewingana accompany the geographical distribution of T. brasiliensis, but with much lower prevalence and abundance.

  12. Influence of laying hen systems on the mite fauna (Acari) community of commercial poultry farms in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Tamara Bianca; Körbes, Júlia Horn; Granich, Juliana; Senter, Malena; Ferla, Noeli Juarez

    2016-01-01

    Intensive production of confined laying hens affects their welfare and increases the risk of epidemics. Ectoparasites as hematophagous and feather mites cause low productivity and decreased egg quality. This study aimed to determine the diversity of mites captured with traps in different commercial systems of laying hens (Gallus gallus L.) (Phasianidae) in Taquari Valley, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Samplings were conducted from August 2013 to August 2014, totaling 21 sampling events in three different commercial laying hen systems: automatic production systems (A(1), (2), (3)), semiautomatic systems (S(1), (2)), and free-range system (FR). A total of 9981 mites belonging to 21 families, 31 genera, and 35 species were found. Acaridae, Caligonellidae, and Cheyletidae showed the highest richness with four species each. Megninia ginglymura (Mégnin, 1877) (Analgidae) was the most abundant ectoparasite species with 1328 specimens and was present in all commercial laying hen systems. No hematophagous mites were found. Cheyletus malaccensis(Cheyletidae) (3503), Typhlodromus transvaalensis (Phytoseiidae) (304), and Blattisocius keegani (Blattisocidae) (181) were the predators present in all systems. The similarity with control system (S(1)--without pesticide) was low (36.5 %) when compared to all other commercial laying hen systems, and it had the highest richness. In FR, low populations of mites and highest diversity were observed. The commercial laying hen system and the management influence the mite fauna in poultry farms.

  13. Redefinition of the genus Silphitrombium (Trombidiformes: Neothrombiidae) with description of two new species parasitizing beetles (Coleoptera: Elateridae, Tenebrionidae) from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashakor, Samaneh; Hajiqanbar, Hamidreza; Saboori, Alireza

    2013-11-15

    Two new species of Silphitrombium Fain, 1992 (Acari: Prostigmata: Neothrombiidae), ectoparasites of beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera), are described from Sistan and Baluchestan Province, eastern Iran: S. elateridum sp. nov. on Heteroderes heideni Reitter, 1891 (Col.: Elateridae) and S. iranicum sp. nov. on Opatroides punctulatus Brullé, 1832 (Col.: Tenebrionidae) and the genus Silphitrombium is redefined. It is the first record of the relationship between beetles of the families Elateridae and Tenebrionidae, and mites of the genus Silphitrombium. A key to the species of the genus is presented.

  14. Comparative morphological analysis of apple blister mite, Eriophyes mali Nal., a new pest in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Vidović

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The apple blister mite, Eriophyes mali Nalepa, 1926 (Acari: Prostigmata: Eriophyoidea, has been recently found in Serbia as a new pest of apple. The history of its research, the results of a morphological analysis and degree of infestation are presented. A comparison of the main morphological features of mites from different populations of remote geographical origin has shown that the apple blister mite from Serbia is most similar to another European population (Bulgarian [or Austrian?] while it differs from E. mali originating from the USA and New Zealand. The percentage of infestation varied from 1.6% to 87.6%, with an average of 22.4%.

  15. Soil microarthropods are only weakly impacted after 13 years of repeated drought treatment in wet and dry heathland soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Martin; Sørensen, Jesper G.; Schmidt, Inger Kappel

    2013-01-01

    Studies of biological responses in the terrestrial environment to rapid changes in climate have mostly been concerned with aboveground biota, whereas less is known of belowground organisms. The present study focuses on mites and springtails of heathland ecosystems and how the microarthropod...... and frequency of drought had only weak persistent effects on springtail species composition, but practically no effect on major mite groups (Oribatida, Prostigmata or Mesostigmata) suggesting that ecosystem functions of microarthropods may only be transiently impacted by repeated spring or summer drought....

  16. Mite fauna (Acari associated to commercial laying hens and bird nests in Vale do Taquari, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Liberato da Silva

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The control of ectoparasites is essential for maintaining biosafety in a poultry farm. This paper aimed to analyze the mite fauna associated to abandoned nests and commercial laying hens in the towns of Lajeado and Teutônia, Vale do Taquari, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Samplings were conducted from December 2010 to July 2011. A total of 11,757 mites belonging to 21 families and 31 species were found. Cheyletidae showed the highest number of species (4, followed by Blattisocidae (3 species. Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer showed the highest number of individuals (5,689, followed by Megninia gynglimura Mégnin (2,175, and Chortoglyphus arcuatus Troupeau (1,488. Blattisocius tarsalis Berlese, C. arcuatus, and D. gallinae were found on traps, feathers, poultry farm nests without cages (free, and abandoned bird nests.

  17. Preliminary study of the mite community structure in different black truffle producing soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikel Queralt

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aims of the study: The goals of this paper are to provide preliminary data on the composition of the mite community in truffle-producing soils (both wild and plantations; and to elucidate those species which may interact with the black truffle life cycle.Area of study: The study was carried out in two black truffle productive zones in Navarra (Spain, in four different plantations and five wild production areas.Material and Methods: Fauna was extracted using Berlese Tullgren funnels. Animals were separated into taxonomic groups, and mites were identified. To analyse the composition and community structure of the different habitats, parameters such as abundance, species richness, and Shanon Weiner diversity index (H’ were calculated.Main results: A total of 305 mites were recognized, belonging to 58 species representing the three major taxonomic groups (Oribatida, Prostigmata, Mesostigmata.Research highlights: The results show a possible trend towards wild areas having greater diversity and species richness than plantations. Furthermore, community analysis shows differences in species compositions among different study areas, and oribatid mites always exhibit the highest relative abundance and species richness.Keywords: Acari; Tuber melanosporum; Oribatida; Mesostigmata; Prostigmata; truffle orchards. 

  18. Comparison of Soil Biota Between Organic and Conventional Agroecosystems in Oregon, USA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Shan-Mei; HU Dun-Xiao; E. R. INGHAM

    2005-01-01

    Soil samples at 0-10 cm in depth were collected periodically at paired fields in Corvallis, Oregon, USA to compare differences in soil microbial and faunal populations between organic and conventional agroecosystems. Results showed that the organic soil ecosystem had a significantly higher (P < 0.05) average number or biomass of soil bacteria; densities of flagellates, amoebae of protozoa; some nematodes, such as microbivorous and predaceous nematodes and plant-parasitic nematodes; as well as Collembola. Greater numbers of Rhabditida (such as Rhabditis spp.), were present in the organic soil ecosystem while Panagrolaimus spp. were predominant in the conventional soil ecosystem. The omnivores and predators of Acarina in the Mesostigmata (such as Digamasellidae and Laelapid), and Prostigmata (such as Alicorhaiidae and Rhagidiidae), were also more abundant in the organic soil ecosystem. However, fungivorous Prostigmata (such as Terpnacaridae and Nanorchestidae) and Astigmata (such as Acarida) were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the conventional soil ecosystem, which supported the finding that total fungal biomass was greater in the conventional soil ecosystem. Seansonal variations of the population depended mostly on soil moisture condition and food web relationship.The population declined from May to October for both agroecosystems. However, higher diversities and densities of soil biota survived occurred in the organic soil ecosystem in the dry season.

  19. Demodex castoris sp. nov. (Acari: Demodecidae) parasitizing Castor fiber (Rodentia), and other parasitic arthropods associated with Castor spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izdebska, Joanna N; Fryderyk, Sławomira; Rolbiecki, Leszek

    2016-02-11

    A new species of demodecid mite, Demodex castoris sp. nov. (Acari: Prostigmata: Demodecidae), is described based on adult stages from the skin of the nasal region of the Eurasian beaver Castor fiber Linnaeus, 1758, collected in Poland. This is the first detection of a representative demodecid mite in rodents of the suborder Castorimorpha and also represents the first detection of a skin mite in Eurasian beavers. The new species is a small skin mite (average 173 µm in length) characterized by sexual dimorphism related to body proportions. D. castoris sp. nov. was observed in 4 out of 6 beavers examined (66.6%), with a mean intensity of 10.8 and an intensity range of 2-23 ind. host(-1). This paper also contains a checklist of parasitic arthropods known from Castor spp.

  20. Catalogue of snout mites (Acariformes: Bdellidae) of the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandes, Fabio A; Skvarla, Michael J; Fisher, J Ray; Dowling, Ashley P G; Ochoa, Ronald; Ueckermann, Edward A; Bauchan, Gary R

    2016-08-17

    Bdellidae (Trombidiformes: Prostigmata) are moderate to large sized predatory mites that inhabit soil, leaves, leaf litter, and intertidal rocks. They are readily recognized by an elongated, snout-like gnathosoma and by elbowed pedipalps bearing two (one in Monotrichobdella Baker & Balock) long terminal setae. Despite being among the first mites ever described, with species described by Carl Linnaeus, the knowledge about bdellids has never been compiled into a taxonomic catalogue. Here we present a catalogue listing 278 valid species; for each species we include distribution information, taxonomic literature, and type depository institutions. The genus Rigibdella Tseng, 1978 is considered a junior synonym of Cyta von Heyden, 1826, and Bdellodes Oudemans, 1937 is considered a junior synonym of Odontoscirus Tohr, 1913. Illustrated keys to subfamilies and genera are presented, as well as keys to species of each genus.

  1. Quill mites of the subfamily Picobiinae (Acari: Syringophilidae) associated with woodpeckers (Aves: Piciformes: Picidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoracki, Maciej; Unsoeld, Markus; Kavetska, Katarzyna; Kaszewska, Katarzyna

    2014-03-01

    The paper contains a review of quill mites of the subfamily Picobiinae (Acari: Prostigmata: Syringophilidae) associated with woodpeckers (Aves: Piciformes: Picidae). Three new species are described: Picobia mentalis Skoracki et Unsoeld sp. nov. from Picus mentalis Temminck, Neopicobia ea Skoracki et Unsoeld sp. nov. from Celeus flavus (St. Mueller) (type host), C. elegans (St. Mueller), C. torquatus (Boddaert), and Neopicobia freya Skoracki et Unsoeld sp. nov. from Dryocopus galeatus (Temminck) (type host) and Piculus rubiginosus (Swainson). Additionally, six new host species for Picobia heeri Haller, 1878 and 12 new host species for Picobia dryobatis (Fritsch, 1956) are reported. A complete list of the picobiines parasitising birds of the family Picidae is presented in the tabular form.

  2. The dog mite, Demodex canis: prevalence, fungal co-infection, reactions to light, and hair follicle apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Jen; Chung, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Lian-Chen; Ju, Yu-Ten; Hong, Chin-Lin; Tsai, Yu-Yang; Li, Yi-Hung; Wu, Ying-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Infection rate, reaction to light, and hair follicle apoptosis are examined in the dogmite, Demodex canis Leydig (Prostigmata: Demodicidae), in dogs from the northern area of Taiwan. An analysis of relevant samples revealed 7.2% (73/1013) prevalence of D. canis infection. Infection during the investigation peaked each winter, with an average prevalence of 12.5% (32/255). The infection rates significantly varied in accordance with month, sex, age, and breed (p light area to a dark area. Skin samples were examined for cellular apoptosis by activated caspase3 immunohistochemical staining. Cells that surrounded the infected hair follicles were activated caspase3-positive, revealing cell apoptosis in infected follicles via the activation of caspase3.

  3. 山羊蠕形螨基因组DNA提取方法初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵岩

    2011-01-01

    @@ 蠕形螨(Demodicid mites)又称毛囊虫(Follicle mites),属于节肢动物门(Arthropoda)蛛形纲(Arach-nida)螨亚纲(Acari)真螨目(Acariformes),前气门亚目(Prostigmata)食肉螨总科(Cheyletoidea)蠕形螨科(Demodicidae)[1].山羊蠕形螨是一类寄生于山羊毛囊和皮脂腺内的永久性外寄生虫,山羊感染蠕形螨后危害严重,易导致宿主剧烈瘙痒、脱毛、日渐消瘦,严重时甚至死亡.

  4. Seasonal variation in the populations of Polyphagotarsonemus latus and Tetranychus bastosi in physic nut (Jatropha curcas) plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Jander F; Picanço, Marcelo C; Sarmento, Renato A; da Silva, Ricardo Siqueira; Pedro-Neto, Marçal; Carvalho, Marcos Alberto; Erasmo, Eduardo A L; Silva, Laila Cristina Rezende

    2015-07-01

    Studies on the seasonal variation of agricultural pest species are important for the establishment of integrated pest control programs. The seasonality of pest attacks on crops is affected by biotic and abiotic factors, for example, climate and natural enemies. Besides that, characteristics of the host plant, crop management, location and the pests' bioecology also affect this seasonality. The mites Polyphagotarsonemus latus (Prostigmata: Tarsonemidae) and Tetranychus bastosi (Prostigmata: Tetranychidae) are the most important pests in the cultivation of physic nut, Jatropha curcas (Euphorbiaceae). All parts of J. curcas can be used for a wide range of purposes. In addition many researchers have studied its potential for use as neat oil, as transesterified oil (biodiesel), or as a blend with diesel. However studies about physic nut pests have been little known. The objective of this study was to assess the seasonal variation of P. latus and T. bastosi in physic nut. This study was conducted at three sites in the state of Tocantins, Brazil. We monitored climatic elements and the densities of the two mite species and of their natural enemies for a period of 2 years. Attack by P. latus occurred during rainy seasons, when the photoperiod was short and the physic nut had new leaves. In contrast, attack by T. bastosi occurred during warmer seasons with longer photoperiods and stronger winds. Populations of both mites and their natural enemies were greater in sites with greater plant diversity adjacent to the plantations. The predators found in association with P. latus and T. bastosi were Euseius concordis (Acari: Phytoseiidae), spiders, Stethorus sp. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and Chrysoperla sp. (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

  5. Role of Predatory Mites in Persistent Nonoccupational Allergic Rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Poza Guedes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mites can sensitize and induce atopic disease in predisposed individuals and are an important deteriorating factor in patients with allergic rhinitis, asthma, and atopic dermatitis. Although Pyroglyphidae mites have been extensively studied, very scarce reports are available on Cheyletidae spp. especially regarding human respiratory pathology. The main objective of the present study is to investigate the clinical role of this predator mite (Cheyletus eruditus as a respiratory antigen in a selected sensitized human population. Fifty-two adult patients were recruited from the outpatient allergy clinic to assess their eligibility for the study. The thirty-seven subjects with persistent allergic rhinitis (PAR who fulfilled the ARIA criteria had a positive IgE response confirmed by skin prick test (SPT to C. eruditus. Only those individuals (37/47 with a positive SPT to C. eruditus showed a positive nasal provocation test (NPT, while 10 patients with nonallergic mild-to-moderate persistent rhinitis, control group, had a negative NPT with C. eruditus. The present paper describes a new role for the predator mite Cheyletus eruditus as a respiratory allergen in a selected subset of patients in a subtropical environment afflicted with persistent nonoccupational allergic rhinitis.

  6. Ácaros predadores (Acari em plantas nativas e cultivadas do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil Predators mites (Acari in native and cultivated plants of the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noeli Juarez Ferla

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried out in twenty counties of the following regions in the state of Rio Grande do Sul: Plain, Central Depression, Plateau and Coast Plain to find out the diversity of mite predators in these places. Forty-six vegetable species were sampled, thirty species of miles of the families Anystidae, Ascidae, Cheyletidae, Cunaxidae, Phyloseiidae and Stigmaeidae were mel. The Phytoseiidae were the mite that presented the greatest diversity, being present in the majority of the sample plants. Most of the Phytoseiidae that were met belong to five species of the Euseius Wainstein, 1962 genus, the second genus of this family was Iphiseiodes DeLeon, 1966, with just one species. The Stigmaeidae come up as second family in number but fewer than Phytoseiidae. In this family, the most common mite belong to the Agistemus Sumers, 1960 genus. The biggest of the mites species (13 species, was met in Morus spp. (Moraceae and Tabebuia spp. (Bignoniaceae; Phaseolus vulgaris (Papilionaceae; only one species of the mite was met in Campomanesia spp. (Myrtaceae, Phaseolus vulgaris (Papilionaceae and Rosa spp. (Rosaceae. In Alamanda spp.(Apocinaceae, Ficus spp. (Moraceae, Jacaranda mimosifolia (Bignoniaceae and Solanum spp. (Solanaceae were met mites predators. A dichotomic key is presented to separate the families, genus and species of the mites.

  7. Diversity of House Dust Mite Species in Xishuangbanna Dai, a Tropical Rainforest Region in Southwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Miao Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To survey the species diversity of home dust mites (HDM in Xishuangbanna, a tropical rainforest region in Southwest China. Methods. From August 2010 to January 2011, mite-allergic patients and healthy controls were invited to participate. Dust samples from the patients’ homes were collected, and mites in the samples were isolated. Permanent slides were prepared for morphologically based species determination. Results. In total, 6316 mite specimens of morphologically identifiable species were found in 233 dust samples taken from 41 homes. The result shows that the mite family of Pyroglyphidae occupied the highest percentage of the total amount of mites collected, followed by Cheyletidae family. The most common adult Pyroglyphidae mites were Dermatophagoides (D. farinae, D. pteronyssinus, and D. siboney. The most common mites found from other families were Blomia tropicalis, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, and Aleuroglyphus ovatus. Four main allergenic dust mite species D. farinae, D. pteronyssinus, D. siboney, and Blomia tropicalis were found to be coinhabiting in 6/41 homes. Conclusion. The HDM population in homes in Xishuangbanna, a tropical rainforest region in Southwest China, has its own characteristics. It has rich dust mite species and the dust mite densities do not show significant variation across seasons.

  8. Role of Predatory Mites in Persistent Nonoccupational Allergic Rhinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poza Guedes, Paloma; Sánchez Machín, Inmaculada; Matheu, Víctor; Iraola, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    Mites can sensitize and induce atopic disease in predisposed individuals and are an important deteriorating factor in patients with allergic rhinitis, asthma, and atopic dermatitis. Although Pyroglyphidae mites have been extensively studied, very scarce reports are available on Cheyletidae spp. especially regarding human respiratory pathology. The main objective of the present study is to investigate the clinical role of this predator mite (Cheyletus eruditus) as a respiratory antigen in a selected sensitized human population. Fifty-two adult patients were recruited from the outpatient allergy clinic to assess their eligibility for the study. The thirty-seven subjects with persistent allergic rhinitis (PAR) who fulfilled the ARIA criteria had a positive IgE response confirmed by skin prick test (SPT) to C. eruditus. Only those individuals (37/47) with a positive SPT to C. eruditus showed a positive nasal provocation test (NPT), while 10 patients with nonallergic mild-to-moderate persistent rhinitis, control group, had a negative NPT with C. eruditus. The present paper describes a new role for the predator mite Cheyletus eruditus as a respiratory allergen in a selected subset of patients in a subtropical environment afflicted with persistent nonoccupational allergic rhinitis. PMID:27445552

  9. Mites associated with stored grain commodities in Benin, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannou, Ignace D; Adebo, Habib O; Zannou, Elisabeth; Hell, Kerstin

    2013-12-01

    After insects, mites are the major arthropod pests that inhabit stored agricultural products worldwide. To determine the acarofauna that infests cowpea, maize, paddy rice and sorghum in Benin (West Africa), surveys were conducted in some principal markets (Dantokpa, Glazoue and Parakou) of this country. A total of 555 samples of grains and debris were collected in May and September 2011. More than 56 species belonging to 24 mite families were recorded in the four products. These mite species included predators, parasites, fungivorous, phytophagous and other groups whose feeding habits are not well known. The family Cheyletidae was the most prevalent and the most diverse predatory mite family encountered, in which Cheyletus malaccensis Oudemans was the most abundant species. Several families of mite pests and mites responsible for allergies (Acaridae, Glycyphagidae, Pyroglyphidae, Pyemotidae and Saproglyphidae) were also detected. The three most dominant and frequent species were C. malaccensis, Suidasia nesbitti (Hughes) and Suidasia sp. Statistical analysis showed that densities of these three mite species were higher in Parakou than in Glazoue and Dantokpa, on one hand, and higher in debris than in grains, on the other hand. The densities of S. nesbitti and Suidasia sp. decreased significantly during the dry season, whereas C. malaccensis remained stable throughout the two samplings. Of all grains, sorghum was the least infested with mites. This study shows that in Benin mites are present in stored agricultural products to which they cause serious damage, and may cause various allergies to people.

  10. Ectoparasites in urban stray cats in Jerusalem, Israel: differences in infestation patterns of fleas, ticks and permanent ectoparasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salant, H; Mumcuoglu, K Y; Baneth, G

    2014-09-01

    In a period cross-sectional study performed to examine ectoparasites on 340 stray cats in Jerusalem, Israel, 186 (54.7%) were infested with the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae), 49 (14.4%) with the cat louse, Felicola subrostratus (Phthiraptera: Trichodectidae), 41 (12.0%) with the ear mite, Otodectes cynotis (Astigmata: Psoroptidae), three (0.9%) with the fur mite, Cheyletiella blakei (Trobidiformes: Cheyletidae), two (0.6%) with the itch mite Notoedres cati (Astigmata: Sarcoptidae), and 25 (7.3%) with ticks of the species Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Ixodida: Ixodidae), Rhipicephalus turanicus or Haemaphysalis adleri (Ixodida: Ixodidae). A higher number of flea infestations was observed in apparently sick cats (P < 0.05) and in cats aged < 6 months (P < 0.05). The proportion of flea-infested cats (P < 0.01), as well as the number of fleas per infested cat (P < 0.01), was higher in autumn than in other seasons. By contrast with findings in cats with flea infestations, rates of infestation with ticks were higher amongst cats with clinical signs (P < 0.01) and cats aged ≥ 6 months (P < 0.05). The high rates of ectoparasite infestation in the cats studied constitute a risk for the spread of vector-borne infections of zoonotic and veterinary importance. © 2013 The Royal Entomological Society.

  11. Suscetibilidade de Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae ao enxofre Susceptibility of Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae to sulfur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto Gonçalves

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available As criações de Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae são freqüentemente infestadas pelo ácaro Acarophenax lacunatus (Cross e Krantz (Prostigmata: Acarophenacidae. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar doses de enxofre, acaricida eficaz contra A. lacunatus, não-prejudiciais ao desenvolvimento de R. dominica. As unidades experimentais foram constituídas de placas de Petri contendo 30 g de grãos de trigo infestados com 30 adultos de R. dominica. Os tratamentos consistiram na utilização de doses de enxofre sobre os grãos, correspondentes a 0,0; 0,6; 0,9; 1,2; 1,5; 3,0; 6,0; 12,0; 24,0 e 48,0mg i a g-1, em dez repetições. As unidades experimentais foram armazenadas por 60 dias a 30±1°C, 60±5% UR e escotofase de 24h. O desenvolvimento de R. dominica foi afetado pela utilização de doses de enxofre maiores que 3,0mg i a g-1.The laboratory rearing of Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae is frequently infested by the parasite mite Acarophenax lacunatus (Cross and Krantz (Prostigmata: Acarophenacidae. This study was aimed at evaluating the sulfur doses, an effective acaricide against A. lacunatus, not harmful to the development of with R. dominica. The experimental units were Petri dishes containing 30g of whole wheat grains powdered with the different doses of the sulfur (0.0, 0.6, 0.9, 1.2, 1.5, 3.0, 6.0, 12.0, 24.0 and 48.0mg a i g-1 infested with 30 adults of R. dominica, in ten replicates. All treatments were maintained under controlled conditions (30±1°C, 60±5% r h and 24h scotophase for 60 days after the insect infestation. Sulfur doses higher than 3.0mg a i g-1 negatively affected R. dominica development.

  12. Distribution of arthropods in rice grains in Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariana A; Ho TM; Lau TY; Heah SK; Wong AL

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To determine distribution of arthropods in rice grains obtained from different sources.Methods:Rice samples were randomly collected from public in urban areas,farmers in rice field areas,aborigines in un-developed areas and retailers in commercial premises.Random samples of rice were taken out from each sam-ple for isolation of arthropods using a modified Berlese Tullgren Funnel Method.Mites were mounted prior to i-dentification;weevils were directly identified.Results:Samples of rice from retailers in commercial premises had the highest infestation by arthropods followed by samples from urbanites,aborigines and rice farmers.Two species of weevils,Sitophilus oryzae(S.oryzae)and Sitophilus granarius(S.granarius),were found.Samples from commercial premises had the least percentage of weevils compared to those collected from domestic premi-ses.Depending on the source of samples,densities of S.granarius and S.oryzae ranges from 1 1 -1 03 weevils? kg and 7-80 weevils?kg,respectively.Important species of mites in stored rice identified were mainly members of the families Cheyletidae,Echimyopodidae,Pyroglyphidae,Saproglyphidae and Tenuipalpidae.Among the species of mites identified were Austroglycyphagus malaysiensis,Cheyletus fortis,Cheyletus malaccensis,Der-matophagoides pteronyssinus,Grammolichus malukuensis and Suidasia pontifica.Average density of most of the mites was less than 40 mites?kg of rice grains.In this study,the highest number of mites in rice samples was recovered from commercial premises,followed by samples from urbanites.Samples from farmers and aborigines contained lesser mites.Conclusion:This study demonstrated the presence of 3 allergenic mite species in rice, i.e A.malaysiensis,D.pteronyssinus and S.pontifica.Weevils,S.oryzae and S.granarius that are known to be allergenic,were also found.

  13. HOUSE DUST MITE CONTAMINATION IN HOTELS AND INNS IN BANDAR ABBAS, SOUTH OF IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Soleimani, J. Rafinejad

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available House dust mites have been shown to be strongly associated with allergic respiratory diseases such as, bronchial asthma, rhinitis and atopic dermatitis in the world. The climatic conditions of Bandar-Abbas, which is located in a coastal area and has a humid subtropical climate, provide a suitable place to proliferate mites. The aim of this study was to determine the contamination rate and analyze the house dust mite fauna in hotels and inns in Bandar-Abbas that had not been investigated previously. In this study 6 hotels and 6 inns were selected randomly in six areas of Bandar-Abbas. Two dust samples were collected from each place with a vacuum cleaner. One square meter of carpets and mattresses were vacuumed for a period of 1 min. Then the samples were cleared in lactic acid and then mites were mounted in Hoyer's medium for study and identification. A total of 2644 mites were collected and identified. The major mite family was Pyroglyphidae (98%. Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus was the most frequent and most numerous species recorded, occurring in 91% of samples examined and forming 88% of the Pyroglyphidae and 86% of the total mite populations. The family Cheyletidae was less commonly found with Cheyletus malaccensis (2%. Most of the mites were isolated from the carpets (57.5%, and a smaller number from mattresses (42.5%. Mites were present in 96% of the dust samples. Results revealed that all inns and 83% of hotels were contaminated by more than one species of mite and 34% of them had a population of more than 100 mites /g dust. This rate of contamination can be a major risk factor in asthma and other respiratory allergic diseases

  14. Bartonella-like bacteria carried by domestic mite species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopecký, Jan; Nesvorná, Marta; Hubert, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Bartonella are carried by haematophagous mites, ticks, fleas and flies, and attack the erythrocytes of mammals. Here we describe a Bartonella-like clade, a distinct group related to Bartonellaceae, in stored-product mites (Acari: Astigmata) and a predatory mite Cheyletus eruditus (Acari: Prostigmata) based on the analysis of cloned 16S rRNA gene sequences. By using the clade-specific primers, closely related Bartonella-like 16S rRNA sequences were amplified from both laboratory colonies and field strains of three synanthropic mite species (Acarus siro, Lepidoglyphus destructor and Tyrophagus putrescentiae) and a predatory mite. Altogether, sequences of Bartonella-like bacteria were found in 11 strains, but were not detected in Dermatophagoides farinae and D. pteronyssinus and two strains of L. destructor. All obtained sequences formed a separate cluster branching as a sister group to Bartonellaceae and related to other separate clusters comprising uncultured bacterial clones from human skin and hemipteran insects (Nysius plebeius and Nysius sp.). The classification of sequences into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed a difference between A. siro and T. putrescentiae suggesting that the Bartonella-like bacteria are different in these two mite species. However, species specific sequences in separate OTUs were observed also for C. eruditus. Possible symbiotic interactions between Bartonella-like bacteria and their mite hosts are discussed.

  15. Cycling and effects of 36Cl labeled DDT on soil invertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dindal, Daniel L.

    1978-08-01

    DDT, radiolabeled with /sup 36/Cl (total activity of 10.2 mc) and applied in the field at the rate of 1.12 kg/ha, cannot be detected within decomposer microarthropods using liquid scintillation spectrometry. Soil microarthropods exhibit both positive and negative responses to direct and indirect effects of DDT. Faunal simplification (decreased diversity) resulting from pesticide application as reported by many others does not apply to the oribatid and prostigmatid mites of the old field. New colonization is possible by some species of Acari as a result of DDT application. Soil microbial respiration is enhanced by a single DDT application of 1 kg/ha. No apparent relationships exist between the increased microbial respiration and soil microarthropod population dynamics in this DDT treated old field. No apparent relationships exist between soil pH, moisture levels, texture and soil microarthropod population dynamics. Microarthropod community structure (species diversity and richness, interspecific relationships and similarity) are definitely affected by a single application of DDT. The Prostigmata are the most numerous mites in the soil of an old field in central Ohio. Vertebrate predators feeding on terrestrial snails may be subjected to magnified concentrations of DDT residues. Coprophagic decomposer organisms feeding on snail feces will be subject to much larger DDT concentrations. Terrestrial snails represented by Cepaea and Otala are not killed by acute oral doses of DDT. Within a three year period after a single application of DDT no effects on the soil faunal populations were seen below 3 cm of soil.

  16. Syringophilid mites (Acari: Syringophilidae) associated with the rails (Aves: Rallidae) and a key to the species of the genus Rafapicobia Skoracki, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoracki, Maciej; Unsoeld, Markus; Skorupski, Maciej; Kavetska, Katarzyna

    2014-07-01

    The fauna of quill mites of the family Syringophilidae Lavoipierre, 1953 (Acari: Prostigmata Cheyletoidea) parasitising birds of the family Rallidae Vigors (Gruiformes) is updated. A new species, Rafapicobia melzeri n. sp. (subfamily Picobiinae), is described from four host species: Rallus aquaticus Linnaeus (type-host) from Germany, Pardirallus sanguinolentus (Swainson) from Chile, Porzana porzana (Linnaeus) from France and P. parva (Scopoli) from Kirghizia. The new species is most similar to R. lepidocolaptesi Skoracki & Solarczyk, 2012 but differs in the absence of agenital plates and the length ratios of setae ag2:g1 and vi:ve:si in females and in the punctate ornament on the hysteronotal and the pygidial shields in males. A key to the species of the genus Rafapicobia is proposed. This is the first record of a representative of the subfamily Picobiinae on gruiform birds. Additionally, new rallid hosts are reported for Charadriphilus ralli Skoracki & Bochkov, 2010 (subfamily Syringophilinae): Gallinula melanops (Vieillot) from Chile, Laterallus melanophaius (Vieillot) from Paraguay, and P. parva (Scopoli) from Kirghizia.

  17. Prevalence of aquatic entomofauna, the predators of mosquitoes, in the Zayandeh River of Central Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayeghi Mansoreh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the fauna of aquatic insects in Zayandeh River of Isfahan carried out in Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2011. Methods: This study was performed in Isfahan, central of Iran in Zayandeh River. This was a descriptive study. Having fulfilled sampling for several times, we collected nearly 76 samples from different parts of river. Then they were sealed in an individual jars containing some water obtained from their habitat. Next, the insects were put in jars containing 70% ethylic alcohol. Results: A total of 76 matured samples of aquatic insects from the Zayandeh River were obtained. Among them, the order of Hemiptera which were the most prevalent order including two families: gerridae (n=27, 35.52%, and notonectidae (n=11, 14.47%. Other order were found belonging to Odonata from the family of coenagrionidae (n=12, 15.78%, coleoptera from the family of Carabidae (n=15, 19.73% and prostigmata from the family of Hydrachindae (n=11, 14.47%. This was the first faunestic study carried out in Zayandeh River of Isfahan of Iran. Conclusions: The results are appropriate for future researches to detect more ecological aspects of aquatic arthropods and their role for biological control of vectors which transmit disease to human and animals.

  18. Potential geographical distribution of the red palm mite in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, George; de Morais, Elisangela Gomes Fidelis

    2013-07-01

    Among pests that have recently been introduced into the Americas, the red palm mite, Raoiella indica Hirst (Prostigmata: Tenuipalpidae), is the most invasive. This mite has spread rapidly to several Caribbean countries, United States of America, Mexico, Venezuela, Colombia and Brazil. The potential dispersion of R. indica to other regions of South America could seriously impact the cultivation of coconuts, bananas, exotic and native palms and tropical flowers such as the Heliconiaceae. To facilitate the development of efficacious R. indica management techniques such as the adoption of phytosanitary measures to prevent or delay the dispersion of this pest, the objective of this paper was to estimate the potential geographical distribution of R. indica in South America using a maximum entropy model. The R. indica occurrence data used in this model were obtained from extant literature, online databases and field sampling data. The model predicted potential suitable areas for R. indica in northern Colombia, central and northern Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, east French Guiana and many parts of Brazil, including Roraima, the eastern Amazonas, northern Pará, Amapá and the coastal zones, from Pará to north of Rio de Janeiro. These results indicate the potential for significant R. indica related economic and social impacts in all of these countries, particularly in Brazil, because the suitable habitat regions overlap with agricultural areas for R. indica host plants such as coconuts and bananas.

  19. Cycling and effects of 36Cl labeled DDT on soil invertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dindal, Daniel L.

    1978-08-01

    DDT, radiolabeled with /sup 36/Cl (total activity of 10.2 mc) and applied in the field at the rate of 1.12 kg/ha, cannot be detected within decomposer microarthropods using liquid scintillation spectrometry. Soil microarthropods exhibit both positive and negative responses to direct and indirect effects of DDT. Faunal simplification (decreased diversity) resulting from pesticide application as reported by many others does not apply to the oribatid and prostigmatid mites of the old field. New colonization is possible by some species of Acari as a result of DDT application. Soil microbial respiration is enhanced by a single DDT application of 1 kg/ha. No apparent relationships exist between the increased microbial respiration and soil microarthropod population dynamics in this DDT treated old field. No apparent relationships exist between soil pH, moisture levels, texture and soil microarthropod population dynamics. Microarthropod community structure (species diversity and richness, interspecific relationships and similarity) are definitely affected by a single application of DDT. The Prostigmata are the most numerous mites in the soil of an old field in central Ohio. Vertebrate predators feeding on terrestrial snails may be subjected to magnified concentrations of DDT residues. Coprophagic decomposer organisms feeding on snail feces will be subject to much larger DDT concentrations. Terrestrial snails represented by Cepaea and Otala are not killed by acute oral doses of DDT. Within a three year period after a single application of DDT no effects on the soil faunal populations were seen below 3 cm of soil.

  20. Efectos del cultivo de soja transgénica en siembra directa sobre la taxocenosis de ácaros edáficos en Haplustoles del centro de Córdoba Effects of transgenic soybean cultivation under no-tillage on soil mite taxocenosis in Haplustolls of Central Córdoba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina Vanesa Arolfo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Los sistemas de siembra directa carecen de mezclado mecánico de los rastrojos con el suelo mineral por lo que dependen principalmente de los organismos del suelo para su funcionamiento adecuado, asemejándose a ecosistemas naturales. Los ácaros son uno de los grupos más abundantes y diversos de la mesofauna del suelo. El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar los cambios en la taxocenosis de ácaros producto del monocultivo de soja en siembra directa, con respecto a la taxocenosis original de pastizales naturales, en Haplustoles típicos de la cuenca General Deheza, Córdoba. Adicionalmente se evaluaron los cambios en las propiedades del suelo que se relacionan con estos organismos. La soja en siembra directa produjo una disminución de la abundancia de ácaros de la hojarasca y el suelo y cambios en la dominancia de los diferentes taxones: los sitios naturales estuvieron dominados por oribátidos, mientras que en los sitios con manejo dominaron los prostigmatas. Así, con respecto a estas características, la mesofauna de los sitios con soja en siembra directa se asemeja más a la de suelos cultivados con labranza, que a la de sitios naturales. Se sugiere que la mayor densidad aparente, el menor contenido de materia orgánica y humedad del suelo manejado, los agroquímicos aplicados y el aporte menor de rastrojos por parte de la soja, son los factores que explican las diferencias encontradas en las comunidades faunísticas. Los cambios observados en la taxocenosis de ácaros afectarían el proceso de descomposición de restos vegetales y por tanto se traducirían en una disminución de la calidad del suelo.The lack of mechanical mixing of stubble with mineral soil under no-tillage means that this management technique depends mainly on soil organisms to function properly, resembling natural ecosystems. Mites are one of the most abundant and diverse groups of soil mesofauna. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in mite taxocenosis

  1. Eficiencia del embudo Berlese-Tullgren para extracción de artrópodos edáficos en suelos argiudoles típicos de la provincia de Buenos Aires Berlese-Tullgren funnel efficiency for soil arthropod extraction from typic argiudoll soils in Buenos Aires province (Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana V Sandler

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Con la finalidad de evaluar la eficiencia del embudo de Berlese-Tullgren como método de extracción de artrópodos edáficos en suelos Argiudoles típicos de la provincia de Buenos Aires, se recolectaron 54 muestras de suelo de campos agrícolas, ganaderos y pastizales naturalizados ubicados en las localidades de Chivilcoy y Navarro en dos épocas del año: mayo y agosto del 2009. En cada fecha, se tomaron 27 muestras al azar de suelo en cuadrados de 25 x 25 cm y 5 cm de profundidad. Las muestras se recolectaron en recipientes de 150 cm³. A todas ellas se les aplicó en primer lugar el método de Berlese-Tullgren y luego el de flotación con sulfato de magnesio, con el objetivo de detectar y cuantificar la información que se pierde si sólo se aplica el método de Berlese. Los grupos taxonómicos encontrados fueron Ácaros (Oribátidos, Prostigmatas, Mesostigmatas, Colémbolos, Dípteros e Himenópteros. A los datos obtenidos (Ind/muestra se les realizó un test no paramétrico (prueba de Wilcoxon y un análisis de regresión logística. Se registraron diferencias significativas en las abundancias de individuos entre ambos métodos para todos los grupos de organismos. Si bien ambos métodos extraen los mismos grupos taxonómicos, el método de flotación es significativamente más eficiente en la extracción de ácaros y colémbolos, mientras que el embudo de Berlese extrae los Dípteros e Himenópteros.The efficiency of the Berlese-Tullgren funnel as a method for soil arthropod extraction from typical argiudol soils in Buenos Aires Province (Argentina was evaluated. Fifty-four samples were taken from agricultural, cattle grazing, and naturalized prairie soils in Navarro and Chivilcoy sites on two different occasions: may and august, 2009. On each date, 27 soil samples were taken from randomly selected 25 x 25 square samples 5 cm in depth. The samples were collected in 150 cm³ containers. The Berlese-Tullgren funnel method was then applied

  2. Water, Rather than Temperature, Dominantly Impacts How Soil Fauna Affect Dissolved Carbon and Nitrogen Release from Fresh Litter during Early Litter Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Liao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Longstanding observations suggest that dissolved materials are lost from fresh litter through leaching, but the role of soil fauna in controlling this process has been poorly documented. In this study, a litterbag experiment employing litterbags with different mesh sizes (3 mm to permit soil fauna access and 0.04 mm to exclude fauna access was conducted in three habitats (arid valley, ecotone and subalpine forest with changes in climate and vegetation types to evaluate the effects of soil fauna on the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC and total dissolved nitrogen (TDN during the first year of decomposition. The results showed that the individual density and community abundance of soil fauna greatly varied among these habitats, but Prostigmata, Isotomidae and Oribatida were the dominant soil invertebrates. At the end of the experiment, the mass remaining of foliar litter ranged from 58% for shrub litter to 77% for birch litter, and the DOC and TDN concentrations decreased to 54%–85% and increased to 34%–269%, respectively, when soil fauna were not present. The effects of soil fauna on the concentrations of both DOC and TDN in foliar litter were greater in the subalpine forest (wetter but colder during the winter and in the arid valley (warmer but drier during the growing season, and this effect was positively correlated with water content. Moreover, the effects of fauna on DOC and TDN concentrations were greater for high-quality litter and were related to the C/N ratio. These results suggest that water, rather than temperature, dominates how fauna affect the release of dissolved substances from fresh litter.

  3. Soil microcosm for testing the effects of chemical pollutants on soil fauna communities and trophic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmelee, R.W. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Entomology); Wentsel, R.S.; Phillips, C.T.; Checkai, R.T. (Army CRDEC, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)); Simini, M. (Geo-Centers, Inc., Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States))

    1993-08-01

    A microcosm technique is presented that uses community and trophic-level analysis of soil nematodes and microarthropods to determine the effects of chemicals on soil systems. Forest soil was treated with either copper, p-nitrophenol, or trinitrotoluene. Nematodes were sorted into bacterivore, fungivore, herbivore, and omnivore-predator trophic groups, and a hatchling category. Microarthropods were sorted to the acarine suborders Prostigmata, Mesostigmata, and Oribatida; the insectan order Collembola; and a miscellaneous group. Omnivore-predator nematodes and meso-stigmatid and oribatid mites were the groups most sensitive to copper and were significantly reduced at levels as low as 100 [mu]g g[sup [minus]1] copper. Total nematode and microarthropod numbers declined above 200 [mu]g g[sup [minus]1] copper. Trophic structure analysis suggested that high sensitivity of nematode predators to intermediate levels of copper reduced predation on herbivore nematodes and resulted in greater numbers of nematodes compared to controls. p-Nitrophenol was very toxic to the nematode community, and all trophic groups were significantly reduced above 20 [mu]g g[sup [minus]1]. However, there was no effect of p-nitrophenol on microarthropods. Trinitrotoluene had no significant negative effect on total abundance of either groups of soil fauna, but oribatids were significantly reduced at 200 [mu]g g[sup [minus]1]. The results demonstrated that soil nematodes and microarthropods were sensitive indicators of environmental contaminants and that trophic-structure and community analysis has the potential to detect more subtle indirect effects of chemicals on soil food-web structure. The authors conclude that microcosms with field communities of soil microfauna offer high resolution of the ecotoxicological effects of chemicals in complex soil systems.

  4. [Morphological adaptations of acariform mites (Acari: Acariformes) to permanent parasitism on mammals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkov, A V

    2007-01-01

    The external morphological adaptations to parasitism in acariform mites (Acari: Acariformes), permanently parasiting mammals, are briefly summated and analyzed. According to several external morphological criteria (structures of gnathosoma, idiosoma, setation, legs and life cycle), the following six morphoecotypes were established: skin mites (i)-- Cheyletidae, Chirorhynchobiidae, Lobalgidae, Myobiidae, Myocoptidae (the most part), Rhyncoptidae, Psoroptidae; fur mites (ii)--Atopomelidae, Clirodiscidae, Listrophoridae, Myocoptidae (Trichoecius only); skin burrowing mites (iii)--Sarcoptidae; intradermal mites (iv) - sorergatidae and Demodicidae; interstitial mites (v) - pimyodicidae; respiratory mites (vi) - reynetidae, Gastronyssidae, Lemurnyssidae, Pneumocoptidae. In the case of prostigmatic mites, the detailed reconstruction of the origin and evolution of "parasitic" morphoecotypes is possible due to the tentative phylogenetic hypotheses, which were proposed for the infraorder Eleutherengon, a, including the most part of the permanent mammalian parasites among prostigmatic mites (Kethley in Norton, 1993; Bochkov, 2002). The parasitism of Speleognathinae (Ereynetidae) in the mammalian respiratory tract arose independently of the other prostigmats. It is quite possible that these mites switched on mammals from birds, because they are more widely represented on these hosts than on mammals. The prostigmatic parasitism on mammalian skin seems to be originated independently in myobiids, in the five cheyletid tribes, Cheyletiellini, Niheliini, and Teinocheylini, Chelonotini, Cheyletini, and, probably, in a cheyletoid ansector of the sister families Psorergatidae-Demodicidae (Bochkov, Fain, 2001; Bochkov, 2002). Demodicids and psorergatids developed adaptations to parasitism in the skin gland ducts and directly in the epithelial level, respectively in the process of the subsequent specialization. Mites of the family Epimyodicidae belong to the phylogenetic line

  5. 甜槠凋落叶分解中土壤节肢动物群落结构动态及其对森林片段化的响应%Dynamics of soil arthropod community structure and its responses to forest fragmentation during the decomposition of Castanopsis eyrei leaf litter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗媛媛; 袁金凤; 沈国春; 赵谷风; 于明坚

    2011-01-01

    选取浙、闽、赣交界山地5个不同的常绿阔叶林群落(1处连续森林和4处片段化森林),对优势种甜槠凋落叶分解过程中土壤节肢动物动态进行了研究.5个研究样地共获得土壤节肢动物899头,分属9纲25目,其中鳞翅目占个体总数的10%以上,为优势类群;膜翅目、弹尾目、双翅目、前气门亚目和地蜈蚣目为常见类群.凋落叶分解速率与土壤节肢动物的类群数、个体数随季节动态呈现相一致的变化趋势.8月凋落物分解最快,土壤节肢动物类群和个体数最多;而4至6月和12月情况与之相反.片段化森林和连续森林在土壤节肢动物的类群数、个体数和物种多样性方面均显示出差异,面积效应和边缘效应在其中都起了一定的作用.%Five evergreen broad-leaved forests (one continuous forest and four fragmented forests)in the mountain areas in the juncture of Zhejiang, Fujian, and Jiangxi Provinces, East China were selected as test objects to study the dynamics of soil arthropod community structure and its responses to forest fragmentation during the decomposition of dominant tree species Castanopsis eyrei leaf litter. A total of 899 soil arthropods were collected, belonging to 9 classes and 25 orders. Lepidoptera was the dominant taxon, accounting for 10% of the individual, while Hymenoptera, Collembola,Diptera, Prostigmata, and Geophilomorpha were the common taxa. The decomposition rate of C.eyrei leaf litter was the highest in August and lower in April-June and December, which was in accordance with the seasonal dynamics of the taxa number and individual number of soil arthropods.Meanwhile, the taxa number, individual number, and species diversity of soil arthropods differed between continuous forest and fragmented forests, suggesting that both area effect and edge effect affected the dynamics of soil arthropod community structure during the decomposition of C. eyrei leaf litter.