WorldWideScience

Sample records for volcanological research today-and

  1. Research collaboration, hazard modeling and dissemination in volcanology with Vhub

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma Lizana, J. L.; Valentine, G. A.

    2011-12-01

    Vhub (online at vhub.org) is a cyberinfrastructure for collaboration in volcanology research, education, and outreach. One of the core objectives of this project is to accelerate the transfer of research tools to organizations and stakeholders charged with volcano hazard and risk mitigation (such as observatories). Vhub offers a clearinghouse for computational models of volcanic processes and data analysis, documentation of those models, and capabilities for online collaborative groups focused on issues such as code development, configuration management, benchmarking, and validation. A subset of simulations is already available for online execution, eliminating the need to download and compile locally. In addition, Vhub is a platform for sharing presentations and other educational material in a variety of media formats, which are useful in teaching university-level volcanology. VHub also has wikis, blogs and group functions around specific topics to encourage collaboration and discussion. In this presentation we provide examples of the vhub capabilities, including: (1) tephra dispersion and block-and-ash flow models; (2) shared educational materials; (3) online collaborative environment for different types of research, including field-based studies and plume dispersal modeling; (4) workshops. Future goals include implementation of middleware to allow access to data and databases that are stored and maintained at various institutions around the world. All of these capabilities can be exercised with a user-defined level of privacy, ranging from completely private (only shared and visible to specified people) to completely public. The volcanological community is encouraged to use the resources of vhub and also to contribute models, datasets, and other items that authors would like to disseminate. The project is funded by the US National Science Foundation and includes a core development team at University at Buffalo, Michigan Technological University, and University

  2. Current and future use of TOPSAR digital topographic data for volcanological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Rowland, Scott K.; Garbeil, Harold

    1993-01-01

    In several investigations of volcanoes, high quality digital elevation models (DEM's) are required to study either the geometry of the volcano or to investigate temporal changes in relief due to eruptions. Examples include the analysis of volume changes of a volcanic dome, the prediction of flow paths for pyroclastic flows, and the quantitative investigation of the geometry of valleys carved by volcanic mudflows. Additionally, to provide input data for models of lava flow emplacement, accurate measurements are needed of the thickness of lava flows as a function of distance from the vent and local slope. Visualization of volcano morphology is also aided by the ability to view a DEM from oblique perspectives. Until recently, the generation of these DEM's has required either high resolution stereo air photographs or extensive field surveying using the Global Positioning System (GPS) and other field techniques. Through the use of data collected by the NASA/JPL TOPSAR system, it is now possible to remotely measure the topography of volcanoes using airborne radar interferometry. TOPSAR data can be collected day or night under any weather conditions, thereby avoiding the problems associated with the derivation of DEM's from air photographs that may often contain clouds. Here we describe some of our initial work on volcanoes using TOPSAR data for Mt. Hekla (Iceland) and Vesuvius (Italy). We also outline various TOPSAR topographic studies of volcanoes in the Galapagos and Hawaii that will be conducted in the near future, describe how TOPSAR complements the volcanology investigations to be conducted with orbital radars (SIR-C/X-SAR, JERS-1 and ERS-1), and place these studies into the broader context of NASA's Global Change Program.

  3. Ten years of Developing International Volcanology Graduate Study Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, W. I.

    2010-12-01

    In 2000 I reported at this symposium about multi-institutional graduate field trips to IAVCEI events, such as the Bali meeting and its importance in building international collegiality and awareness among the volcanology doctoral students. NSF was an enthusiastic supporter of these field sessions and this support has continued through the highly successful Pucon and Reykjavik sessions. International volcanology graduate program development began with several exchange programs. EHaz was a highly successful program (McGill, Simon Fraser, Michigan Tech, Buffalo, UNAM and Universidad de Colima) funded by the Department of Education (FIPSE) that moved students across North America where dozens of graduate students spent semesters of their study abroad and shared annual field trips and online student led graduate seminar classes. Michigan Tech’s volcanology graduate program started a Masters International program that combined Peace Corps service with hazards mitigation graduate study and students were placed by Peace Corps in countries with prominent natural hazards. The new program funded 2 year residences in foreign environments, principally in Pacific Latin America. NSF strongly supported this program from its inception, and eventually it gained NSF PIRE support. Dozens of students have initiated the 3 year program (15 completed) to date. A similar PIRE developed at UAF with a link to volcanology in the Russian Far East. One gain is the development of many socially-conscious research selections. Beginning this year transatlantic dual degree masters programs in volcanology are being offered by a consortium of US and European volcanology programs (Michigan Tech, Buffalo, Clermont Ferrand and University of Milan Bicocca), again aided by FIPSE funding. Students have dual advisors on both sides of the Atlantic and spend about half of their two year programs in Europe and half in US. Faculty also travel in the program and the four campuses are increasingly linked by

  4. Experimental Volcanology: 2010 and 2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingwell, D. B.

    2010-12-01

    The advent of an experimental approach to volcanology has its roots in decades-old laboratory based approaches to characterising the properties of magmas and analog materials, together with the attempts at simulating volcanic processes in the lab. A little over ten years ago many new thrusts of experimental advance led to a new dawn for experimental science applied to volcanic eruptions. Along with that, new expectations, new goals and new strategies emerged about ten years ago. Ten years later, in 2010, many fruits have been born of this labour, and new frontiers are being unfolded as we meet here. Here are some of the youngest captivating themes being explored in experimental programs today: 1) interfacing volcanic monitoring systems to experimentally generated eruptions. 2) elucidating the physicochemical behavior of experimentally generated volcanic ash as an agent in the earth system. 3) blending experimental rock deformation and magmatology studies to understand the strength and stability of volcanic materials and volcanic structures 4) exploiting the kinematics of experimentally-generated versus natural volcanic products to understand flow style and strain history. The past ten years of experimental developments in volcanology have prepared us for great advances in the future, most of which were not perceived as likely avenues of investigation as little as ten years ago! The situation is likely to repeat itself in 2020.

  5. Volcanological constraints of Archaean tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, P. C.; Ayres, L. D.

    1986-01-01

    Volcanological and trace element geochemical data can be integrated to place some constraints upon the size, character and evolutionary history of Archean volcanic plumbing, and hence indirectly, Archean tectonics. The earliest volcanism in any greenhouse belt is almost universally tholeitic basalt. Archean mafic magma chambers were usually the site of low pressure fractionation of olivine, plagioclase and later Cpx + or - an oxide phase during evolution of tholeitic liquids. Several models suggest basalt becoming more contaminated by sial with time. Data in the Uchi Subprovince shows early felsic volcanics to have fractionated REE patterns followed by flat REE pattern rhyolites. This is interpreted as initial felsic liquids produced by melting of a garnetiferous mafic source followed by large scale melting of LIL-rich sial. Rare andesites in the Uchi Subprovince are produced by basalt fractionation, direct mantle melts and mixing of basaltic and tonalitic liquids. Composite dikes in the Abitibi Subprovince have a basaltic edge with a chill margin, a rhyolitic interior with no basalt-rhyolite chill margin and partially melted sialic inclusions. Ignimbrites in the Uchi and Abitibi Subprovinces have mafic pumice toward the top. Integration of these data suggest initial mantle-derived basaltic liquids pond in a sialic crust, fractionate and melt sial. The inirial melts low in heavy REE are melts of mafic material, subsequently melting of adjacent sial produces a chamber with a felsic upper part underlain by mafic magma.

  6. Looking Backward and Forward: A Decadal View of Volcanology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    volcanology will fare between now and 2020, as the impacts of climate change become more widespread and obvious. The Pakistani floods, which killed thousands and affected tens of millions of people, remained largely below the radar of western media, the public, and relief agencies. The muted response to this colossal calamity is likely to become the norm as the effects of climate change and resource depletion accelerate in the coming decade. Climate-related catastrophes will numb the public to all but the largest and most deadly natural-caused tragedies. At the same time, persistent economic malaise will reduce government’s ability to provide relief or to fund additional research. Only the largest volcanic events are likely to garner more than marginal media interest and associated funding. Volcano science may need to link itself more closely to studies of adaptation to climate change in order to thrive.

  7. 中国2007年以来全新世火山地质研究的主要进展%Progresses of Holocene Volcanology Research in China Since 2007

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白志达; 徐德斌; 许桂玲; 王妍

    2011-01-01

    简要列举了近年来全新世火山地质领域的研究进展,主要涉及新确定的全新世火山、精细喷发序列与喷发频率、高分辨率火山机构多维框架研究、火山碎屑物粒度分布、形貌特征与成因、火山碎屑流、涌流和火山泥石流堆积、降落堆积成因亚类、火山活动与新构造和火山地质遗迹资源、环境及火山灾害.%This paper briefly reviewed the main progress of Holocene volcanology research in China since 2007. The review includes eight topics: recently discovered Holocene vocanoes,detailed eruption sequence and frequency,high resolution reconstruction of volcanic edifices,origin, morphology and distribution of volcano clasts, studies of pyro-clastic flow, base surge and lahar deposits,subdivision of volcanic fall deposits,volcano eruptions and related structures and resources from volcano relicts and volcano disasters.

  8. The Icelandic volcanological data node and data service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogfjord, Kristin; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Futurevolc Team

    2013-04-01

    Through funding from the European FP7 programme, the International Civil Aviation Authority (ICAO), as well as the local Icelandic government and RANNÍS research fund, the establishment of the Icelandic volcano observatory (VO) as a cross-disciplinary, international volcanological data node and data service is starting to materialize. At the core of this entity is the close collaboration between the Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO), a natural hazard monitoring and research institution, and researchers at the Earth Science Institute of the University of Iceland, ensuring long-term sustainable access to research quality data and products. Existing Icelandic Earth science monitoring and research infrastructures are being prepared for integration with the European EPOS infrastructure. Because the VO is located at a Met Office, this infrastructure also includes meteorological infrastructures relevant to volcanology. Furthermore, the FP7 supersite project, FUTUREVOLC cuts across disciplines to bring together European researchers from Earth science, atmospheric science, remote sensing and space science focussed on combined processing of the different data sources and results to generate a multiparametric volcano monitoring and early warning system. Integration with atmospheric and space science is to meet the need for better estimates of the volcanic eruption source term and dispersion, which depend not only on the magma flow rate and composition, but also on atmosphere-plume interaction and dispersion. This should lead to better estimates of distribution of ash in the atmosphere. FUTUREVOLC will significantly expand the existing Icelandic EPOS infrastructure to an even more multidisciplinary volcanological infrastructure. A central and sustainable part of the project is the establishment of a research-quality data centre at the VO. This data centre will be able to serve as a volcanological data node within EPOS, making multidisciplinary data accessible to

  9. Hydrogen as a fuel for today and tomorrow: expectations for advanced hydrogen storage materials/systems research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Katsuhiko

    2011-01-01

    History shows that the evolution of vehicles is promoted by several environmental restraints very similar to the evolution of life. The latest environmental strain is sustainability. Transport vehicles are now facing again the need to advance to use sustainable fuels such as hydrogen. Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are being prepared for commercialization in 2015. Despite intensive research by the world's scientists and engineers and recent advances in our understanding of hydrogen behavior in materials, the only engineering phase technology which will be available for 2015 is high pressure storage. Thus industry has decided to implement the high pressure tank storage system. However the necessity of smart hydrogen storage is not decreasing but rather increasing because high market penetration of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles is expected from around 2025 onward. In order to bring more vehicles onto the market, cheaper and more compact hydrogen storage is inevitable. The year 2025 seems a long way away but considering the field tests and large scale preparation required, there is little time available for research. Finding smart materials within the next 5 years is very important to the success of fuel cells towards a low carbon sustainable world.

  10. Dual US-Europe Graduate Degrees in Volcanology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, W. I.; van Wyk Devries, B.; Calder, E. S.; Tibaldi, A.

    2010-12-01

    Michigan Tech, Buffalo, Universite Blaise Pascal and University of Milan Bicocca have formed an educational consortium to offer dual MS degrees in volcanology and geotechniques. Students in the program spend half of their MS in Europe and half in the US and have graduate advisory committees that bridge the Atlantic. The new program combines the expertise of four campuses and give students a broader choice of study options than any one campus can offer, while building an international professional experience. The initiative is funded jointly by the US Department of Education and the Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency (EACEA) of the European Community. Volcanology and geotechniques are global concerns: the volcanological community is fully globalized, while international consortia now deal with major geotechnical problems. Importantly, both fields require clear appreciation of specific local cultural, social and economical conditions. The new generation of researchers and professionals require international vision, but also the ability to understand local conditions. This masters specifically answers this need. This program will give students a language and cultural training in American English, French and Italian, as well as a wide course choice to meet each individual’s professional requirements. Students benefit from both research and professional approaches, acquiring a sound multidisciplinary profile for an excellent start to their careers. The trained INVOGE masters students will: meet a clear need for professionals/researchers with broad volcanology/geotechniques skills, and provide a workforce with international vision, but capable of addressing local projects. The project is innovative, combining international experience, strong multidisciplinary grounding and a broad subject range: students can choose among many possible advanced coursework and research combinations, and can have a broad choice of graduate advisors, field sites and

  11. Common processes at unique volcanoes – a volcanological conundrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine eCashman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An emerging challenge in modern volcanology is the apparent contradiction between the perception that every volcano is unique, and classification systems based on commonalities among volcano morphology and eruptive style. On the one hand, detailed studies of individual volcanoes show that a single volcano often exhibits similar patterns of behaviour over multiple eruptive episodes; this observation has led to the idea that each volcano has its own distinctive pattern of behaviour (or personality. In contrast, volcano classification schemes define eruption styles referenced to type volcanoes (e.g. Plinian, Strombolian, Vulcanian; this approach implicitly assumes that common processes underpin volcanic activity and can be used to predict the nature, extent and ensuing hazards of individual volcanoes. Actual volcanic eruptions, however, often include multiple styles, and type volcanoes may experience atypical eruptions (e.g., violent explosive eruptions of Kilauea, Hawaii1. The volcanological community is thus left with a fundamental conundrum that pits the uniqueness of individual volcanic systems against generalization of common processes. Addressing this challenge represents a major challenge to volcano research.

  12. UNM/LANL Volcanology Summer Field Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eaton, A.; Goff, F.; Fischer, T. P.; Baldridge, W.; Semken, S.

    2007-12-01

    The Volcanology Summer Field Course, taught jointly by volcanologists from the University of New Mexico and Los Alamos National Laboratory, has instructed over 140 undergraduate and graduate students from 15 countries since 1992. The course consists of nine graded field exercises conducted in diverse volcanic rocks of the Miocene to Quaternary-age Jemez Volcanic Field and Valles caldera, with excursions to the Miocene Ship Rock dike and plug complex, the Pliocene Mount Taylor composite volcano, and the Quaternary Zuni-Bandera basalt field. Exercises focus on mapping large-scale silicic eruption deposits (e.g., Bandelier Tuff as well as older and younger eruptions), establishing volcanic stratigraphy, understanding the processes of water-magma interaction through detailed mapping, and investigating hydrothermal alteration in an intra-caldera setting. Techniques such as geothermal gas sampling and identification of volcanic rocks and structures form an integral part of the training. Contributing to the success of the course include: 1) its small class size of 16 to 17 students; 2) duration of 3.5 weeks--long enough for sustained focus on the Jemez field area; 3) central lodging arrangement (Young's Ranch Field Station), with meals coordinated by a camp cook; 4) organized course structure supplementing field assignments with evening lectures in a common-room; 5) instructors with a variety of geological/volcanological expertise; and 6) the ability to team up with multi-national students bringing a wide array of approaches and experiences. The course acts as a springboard for students pursuing interests in volcanology, offering an intensive and lively field experience that is difficult to find anywhere else.

  13. Science development on volcanology flawed by the Spanish IGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Nemesio M.; Schmincke, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Scientists performing research activities in the field of volcanology, related more specifically to volcano monitoring in the Canary Islands, recently discovered that not all seismic events that occurred in the country had been listed in the Spanish National Seismic Catalogue and its related data base. The National Geographic Institute (IGN) is the legal Spanish institution in-charge of the National Seismic Catalogue, together with volcanic surveillance in Spain. It was therefore a huge surprise to discover that the number of seismic events registered in and around Tenerife Island in 2010, and according to the national catalogue, was only approximately 60, while the real number of seismic events recorded by the IGN in the region was 1,176. The existence of two different accounts of seismic activity registered by the IGN in and around Tenerife Island, keeping one for the public eye, while hiding the other one from even the scientific community, is not only illegal but also unscientific, hindering the progress of science. In addition, most importantly it is detrimental for timely forecasting of sudden/instantaneous dynamic events, such as major earthquakes and/or volcanic eruptions which might spell disaster for the population, the economy of the island, and severely impact tourism. This unethical behaviour by IGN's volcanological staff has already caused damage to open scientific discussions; a key parameter for scientific development. A scientific contribution was recently published using data from 15 years of research on diffuse CO2 emission monitoring from the summit cone of Teide volcano (Pérez et al., 2013). The seismic data that was used to discuss the observed temporal variations of the degassing pattern from Teide volcano came from the National Seismic Catalogue. In contrast it is obvious that the observed variations on diffuse CO2 emission from Teide volcano from 1997 to 2011 provided a better scientific explanation when using the real seismic data that

  14. Geomorphology and volcanology of Maat Mons, Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.

    2016-10-01

    Full-resolution (FMIDR) Magellan radar backscatter images have been used to characterize the geology and volcanology of the volcano Maat Mons on Venus. This volcano has often been identified by remote sensing techniques as one of the volcanoes on the planet that could have been recently active, and is the highest volcano on Venus with a relief of ∼9 km. The summit of Maat Mons is characterized by a caldera complex ∼26 × 30 km in diameter with at least six remnant pit craters ∼10 km in diameter preserved in the walls of the caldera, suggesting that multiple small volume (lava flow types, described as "digitate flows", "sheet flows", "fan flows" and "filamentary flows", can be identified on the flanks. Three rift zones can be identified from the distribution of 217 pit craters >1 km in diameter on the flanks. These pits appear to have formed by collapse with no effusive activity associated with their formation. No evidence for explosive volcanism can be identified, despite the (relatively) low atmospheric pressure (∼55 bar) near the summit. There is also a lack of evidence for lava channels, deformation features within the caldera, and thrust faults on the flanks, indicating that the physical volcanology of Maat Mons is simpler than that of typical martian and terrestrial shield volcanoes. Preservation of fine-scale (3-4 pixels) structures within the pit craters and summit pits is consistent with geologically very recent activity, but no evidence for current activity can be identified.

  15. Third International Volcanological Field School in Kamchatka and Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, D.; Eichelberger, J.; Gordeev, E.; Malcolm, J.; Shipman, J.; Izbekov, P.

    2005-12-01

    The Kamchatka State University, Institute of Volcanology and Seismology FEB RAS (Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, Russia) and University of Alaska Fairbanks have developed an international field school focused on explosive volcanism of the North Pacific. The concept of the field school envisages joint field studies by young Russian scientists and their peers from the United States and Japan. Beyond providing first-hand experience with some of Earth's most remarkable volcanic features, the intent is to foster greater interest in language study, cultures, and ultimately in international research collaborations. The students receive both theoretical and practical knowledge of active volcanic systems, as well experience in working productively in a harsh environment. Each year, the class is offered in both Alaska and Kamchatka. The Alaska session is held in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, product of the greatest volcanic eruption of the 20th century. A highlight in 2005 was the discovery of a new 70-m crater atop Trident Volcano. Also this year, we added the Great Tolbachik Eruption of 1975-76 to the itinerary of the Kamchatka school. Day trips were conducted to summit craters of New Tolbachik volcanoes and Plosky Tolbachik, Tolbachik lava flows; fumarole fields of Mutnovsky volcano, and a geothermal area and 60 MWe power plant. Students who attended both the Alaska and Kamchatka sessions could ponder the implications of great lateral separation of active vents - 10 km at Katmai and 30 km at Tolbachik - with multiple magmas and non-eruptive caldera collapse at the associated stratocones. During the evenings and on days of bad weather, the school faculty conducted lectures on various topics of volcanology in either Russian or English, with translation. The field school is a strong stimulus for growth of young volcanologists and cooperation among Russia, USA and Japan, leading naturally to longer student exchange visits and to joint research projects.

  16. Volcanological applications of the Kinect sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortini, R.; Carn, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Kinect is a motion capture device designed for the Microsoft Xbox system. The device comprises a visible (RGB) camera and an infrared (IR) camera, refractor and light emitter emitting a known structured light pattern at a near-infrared wavelength of 830 nm, plus a three-axis accelerometer and four microphones. Moreover, by combining the signal from the IR camera and the light emitter it is possible to produce a distance image (depth). Thanks to the efforts of the free and open source software community, although originally intended to be used for videogames the Kinect can be exploited as a short range low-cost LiDAR sensor by scientists in various fields. The main limitation of the Kinect is its working distance, which ranges from ~0.5 to 15 m, with a distance sensitivity of ~1 mm at 0.5 m and ~8 cm at 5 m estimated by Mankoff et al. (2011). After their co-registration, we will present the calibration process for the RGB, depth and IR intensity images, and a sensitivity analysis of the IR intensity to the color spectrum will be performed. We expect the intensity to exhibit a non-linear correlation with distance of the target from the sensor, with lower sensitivity and larger errors at greater distances. We envisage several possible applications of the small-scale, precise topographic data acquired by the Kinect in volcanology, and solicit other ideas from the community. Possible applications could include monitoring of light tephra accumulation to characterize mass flux, monitoring of active lava flows or mapping inactive lava tubes, capturing topographic data on the outcrop scale, mapping surface roughness variations on volcanic mass flow deposits, or visualizing analog volcano models in the lab. As a demonstration, we will present an application of the Kinect as a tool for 3D visualization of volcanic rock samples. Data will be collected with free and open source software, demonstrating the cost-effectiveness of the Kinect for volcanological applications

  17. Social studies of volcanology: knowledge generation and expert advice on active volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Amy; Oppenheimer, Clive; Bravo, Michael

    2012-04-01

    This paper examines the philosophy and evolution of volcanological science in recent years, particularly in relation to the growth of volcanic hazard and risk science. It uses the lens of Science and Technology Studies to examine the ways in which knowledge generation is controlled and directed by social forces, particularly during eruptions, which constitute landmarks in the development of new technologies and models. It also presents data from a survey of volcanologists carried out during late 2008 and early 2009. These data concern the felt purpose of the science according to the volcanologists who participated and their impressions of the most important eruptions in historical time. It demonstrates that volcanologists are motivated both by the academic science environment and by a social concern for managing the impact of volcanic hazards on populations. Also discussed are the eruptions that have most influenced the discipline and the role of scientists in policymaking on active volcanoes. Expertise in volcanology can become the primary driver of public policy very suddenly when a volcano erupts, placing immense pressure on volcanologists. In response, the epistemological foundations of volcanology are on the move, with an increasing volume of research into risk assessment and management. This requires new, integrated methodologies for knowledge collection that transcend scientific disciplinary boundaries.

  18. Punctuated Evolution of Volcanology: An Observatory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, W. C.; Eichelberger, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    Volcanology from the perspective of crisis prediction and response-the primary function of volcano observatories-is influenced both by steady technological advances and singular events that lead to rapid changes in methodology and procedure. The former can be extrapolated somewhat, while the latter are surprises or shocks. Predictable advances include the conversion from analog to digital systems and the exponential growth of computing capacity and data storage. Surprises include eruptions such as 1980 Mount St Helens, 1985 Nevado del Ruiz, 1989-1990 Redoubt, 1991 Pinatubo, and 2010 Eyjafjallajokull; the opening of GPS to civilian applications, and the advent of an open Russia. Mount St Helens switched the rationale for volcanology in the USGS from geothermal energy to volcano hazards, Ruiz and Pinatubo emphasized the need for international cooperation for effective early warning, Redoubt launched the effort to monitor even remote volcanoes for purposes of aviation safety, and Eyjafjallajokull hammered home the need for improved ash-dispersion and engine-tolerance models; better GPS led to a revolution in volcano geodesy, and the new Russian Federation sparked an Alaska-Kamchatka scientific exchange. The pattern has been that major funding increases for volcano hazards occur after these unpredictable events, which suddenly expose a gap in capabilities, rather than out of a calculated need to exploit technological advances or meet a future goal of risk mitigation. It is up to the observatory and national volcano hazard program to leverage these sudden funding increases into a long-term, sustainable business model that incorporates both the steadily increasing costs of staff and new technology and prepares for the next volcano crisis. Elements of the future will also include the immediate availability on the internet of all publically-funded volcano data, and subscribable, sophisticated hazard alert systems that run computational, fluid dynamic eruption models. These

  19. Current and future trends of Volcanology in Italy and abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papale, P.

    2010-12-01

    Volcanology in Italy and in the world has rapidly developed during last decades. In the Seventies, stratigraphy and petrology provided the basic knowledge on the volcanic activities that still forms the root for modern volcano research. During the Eighties and Nineties the interest was more on the quantitative description of the volcanic processes, with enormous progresses in different but complementary fields including laboratory measurements and experiments, physico-mathematical modeling and numerical simulations, geophysical surveys and inverse analysis, and volcano monitoring and surveillance. In year 2000 a large number of magma properties and magmatic and volcanic processes was characterized at a first or higher order. Volcano research in Italy during the first decade of the new millennium has further developed along those lines. To-date, the very high risk Campi Flegrei and Vesuvius volcanoes, and the less risky but permanently active Etna and Stromboli volcanoes, are among the best monitored and more deeply investigated worldwide. The last decade has also seen coordinated efforts aimed at exploring exploitation of knowledge and skills for the benefit of the society. A series of projects focused on volcanic hazard and risk have joined >1000 researchers from Italian and foreign (Europe, US, Japan) Universities and Research Centers, on themes and objectives jointly defined by scientists from INGV and end-users from the national Civil Protection Department. These projects provide a global picture of volcano research in year 2010, that appears to be evolving through i) further rapid developments in the fields of investigation listed above, ii) their merging into effective multidisciplinary approaches, and iii) the full inclusion of the concepts of uncertainty and probabilities in volcanic scenario predictions and hazard forecast. The latter reflects the large inaccessibility of the volcanic systems, the extreme non-linear behaviour of volcanic processes put in

  20. Volcanology: Lessons learned from Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinel, Virginie; Poland, Michael P.; Hooper, Andy

    2014-01-01

    Twenty years of continuous Earth observation by satellite SAR have resulted in numerous new insights into active volcanism, including a better understanding of subsurface magma storage and transport, deposition of volcanic materials on the surface, and the structure and development of volcanic edifices. This massive archive of data has resulted in fundamental leaps in our understanding of how volcanoes work – for example, identifying magma accumulation at supposedly quiescent volcanoes, even in remote areas or in the absence of ground-based data. In addition, global compilations of volcanic activity facilitate comparison of deformation behavior between different volcanic arcs and statistical evaluation of the strong link between deformation and eruption. SAR data are also increasingly used in timely hazard evaluation thanks to decreases in data latency and growth in processing and analysis techniques. The existing archive of SAR imagery is on the cusp of being enhanced by a new generation of satellite SAR missions, in addition to ground-based and airborne SAR systems, which will provide enhanced temporal and spatial resolution, broader geographic coverage, and improved availability of data to the scientific community. Now is therefore an opportune time to review the contributions of SAR imagery to volcano science, monitoring, and hazard mitigation, and to explore the future potential for SAR in volcanology. Provided that the ever-growing volume of SAR data can be managed effectively, we expect the future application of SAR data to expand from being a research tool for analyzing volcanic activity after the fact, to being a monitoring and research tool capable of imaging a wide variety of processes on different temporal and spatial scales as those processes are occurring. These data can then be used to develop new models of how volcanoes work and to improve quantitative forecasts of volcanic activity as a means of mitigating risk from future eruptions.

  1. International Volcanological Field School in Kamchatka and Alaska: Experiencing Language, Culture, Environment, and Active Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, J. C.; Gordeev, E.; Ivanov, B.; Izbekov, P.; Kasahara, M.; Melnikov, D.; Selyangin, O.; Vesna, Y.

    2003-12-01

    The Kamchatka State University of Education, University of Alaska Fairbanks, and Hokkaido University are developing an international field school focused on explosive volcanism of the North Pacific. An experimental first session was held on Mutnovsky and Gorely Volcanoes in Kamchatka during August 2003. Objectives of the school are to:(1) Acquaint students with the chemical and physical processes of explosive volcanism, through first-hand experience with some of the most spectacular volcanic features on Earth; (2) Expose students to different concepts and approaches to volcanology; (3) Expand students' ability to function in a harsh environment and to bridge barriers in language and culture; (4) Build long-lasting collaborations in research among students and in teaching and research among faculty in the North Pacific region. Both undergraduate and graduate students from Russia, the United States, and Japan participated. The school was based at a mountain hut situated between Gorely and Mutnovsky Volcanoes and accessible by all-terrain truck. Day trips were conducted to summit craters of both volcanoes, flank lava flows, fumarole fields, ignimbrite exposures, and a geothermal area and power plant. During the evenings and on days of bad weather, the school faculty conducted lectures on various topics of volcanology in either Russian or English, with translation. Although subjects were taught at the undergraduate level, lectures led to further discussion with more advanced students. Graduate students participated by describing their research activities to the undergraduates. A final session at a geophysical field station permitted demonstration of instrumentation and presentations requiring sophisticated graphics in more comfortable surroundings. Plans are underway to make this school an annual offering for academic credit in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska and in Kamchatka. The course will be targeted at undergraduates with a strong interest in and

  2. Misconceptions Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Mary J.; Kalinowski, Steven T.; Andrews, Tessa C.

    2014-01-01

    A recent essay in "CBE-Life Sciences Education" criticized biology education researchers' use of the term "misconceptions" and recommended that, in order to be up-to-date with education research, biology education researchers should use alternative terms for students' incorrect ideas in science. We counter that…

  3. Undergraduate Field Courses in Volcanology at the University of California, Davis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, P.

    2002-05-01

    At U.C. Davis, undergraduate Geology majors have two opportunities to participate in extended field courses in volcanology: (1) all majors spend one week in a volcanology module during their six-week, "capstone" Summer Field Geology (GEL 110) course, and (2) all majors may enroll in a two-week, Introductory Volcanology course (GEL 138) offered each summer at Kilauea Volcano. The former course is required of all majors in order to fulfill their B.S. degree requirements, whereas the latter fulfills upper division elective units for either the B.A. or B.S. degree in Geology. The volcanology module in GEL 110 is based at U.C.'s White Mountain Research Station in Bishop, California and includes four separate exercises: (1) mapping patterns of consolidation of tephra at the Black Point tuff cone in order to understand the processes of palagonitization, (2) contouring graphic mean and sorting for tephra collected from the Red Cones cinder cone to understand Strombolian processes, (3) measuring a stratigraphic section of the Bishop Tuff in the lower Owens River Gorge to differentiate cooling units in ignimbrites, and (4) mapping the relationships amongst pumice units and obsidian at the Glass Mountain flow to understand evolution of silicic flows. Most exercises require laboratory measurements for grain size or density (Mayfield and Schiffman, 1998). GEL 138, based at the Kilauea Military Camp, includes a daily schedule of morning lectures and afternoon field excursions and exercises. Exercises include: (1) measuring a stratigraphic section of the Keanakako'i Ash Member to interpret pre-1790 periods of hydrovolcanism, (2) measuring and contouring ground temperatures in the Steaming Bluffs thermal area (3) conducting granulometric measurements of tephra from the Nanawale sand hills to understand the genesis of littoral cones, (4) mapping of soil pH around the perimeter of Kilauea Caldera to illuminate climatic effects (i.e.,vog and wind patterns) on the summit region, and

  4. Reale Osservatorio Vesuviano: the First Volcanological Observatory in the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avvisati, Gala; de Vita, Sandro; Di Vito, Mauro Antonio; Marotta, Enrica; Sangianantoni, Agata; Peluso, Rosario; Pasquale Ricciardi, Giovanni; Tulino, Sabrina; Uzzo, Tullia; Ghilardi, Massimo; De Natale, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    The Reale Osservatorio Vesuviano (ROV), historic home of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), is the oldest volcanological observatory in the world. It was founded in 1841 by the Bourbon king of Naples. The building is located on the western slope of Mount Vesuvius, one of the most famous and dangerous volcanoes in the world. Since its foundation, the ROV has always attracted researchers, visitors and students from many countries. The ROV site is an elegant neo-classical building which at present hosts permanent exhibitions of part of its inheritance of valuable mineral, scientific instrument and art collections. A radical change is now under way, starting with the structural reinforcement of the building, renewal and upgrading of services, and the redefinition of exhibition itineraries so as to make visits still more enjoyable and informative. This will include the integration of outdoor footpaths and theme-based routes designed for users of differing levels of expertise. This major transformation also involves a study and a number of operations aimed at the possibility of developing self-financed activities. To this end an analysis of tourist movements in Campania was conducted, in part so as to attract to the ROV a larger and more varied group of visitors. In an area that - despite its unique characteristics - is currently significantly degraded and underused, the creation of such a powerful tourist and cultural attraction would serve as a focus for the development of additional activities and services that would greatly enhance it and stimulate growth. These activities would, of course, be compatible with a territory that has a high risk of volcanic hazards - indeed, such growth would constitute an important component in mitigating this risk in the area. The example given illustrates how the restoration and enhancement of a piece of our historic, scientific and cultural heritage could be the driving force behind the economic revival of an

  5. The new IMGC-02 transportable absolute gravimeter: measurement apparatus and applications in geophysics and volcanology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D’errico

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The research carried out at the Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (formerly Istituto di Metrologia «G. Colonnetti» aiming to develop a transportable ballistic absolute gravimeter ended with a new version of the instrument, called the IMGC-02. It uses laser interferometry to measure the symmetrical free rising and falling motion of a test mass in the gravity field. Providing the same accuracy achieved with previous versions, the instrumental improvements mainly concern size, weight, data processing algorithms and operational simplicity. An uncertainty of 9 ?Gal (1 ?Gal=1×10–8 m·s?2 can be achieved within a single observation session, lasting about 12 h, while the time series of several observation sessions show a reproducibility of 4 ?Gal. At this level, gravity measurements provide useful information in Geophysics and Volcanology. A wide set of dynamic phenomena, i.e. seismicity and volcanic activity, can produce temporal gravity changes, often quite small, with an amplitude ranging from a few to hundreds of microgals. Therefore the IMGC absolute gravimeter has been employed since 1986 in surveying the Italian active volcanoes. A brief history of the gravimeter and the description of the new apparatus, together with the main results of ongoing applications in Geophysics and Volcanology are presented.

  6. Electrotherapy: yesterday, today and tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiktinsky, R; Chen, L; Narayan, P

    2010-07-01

    The use of electrotherapy has been part of physical therapy treatment for the past few decades. There have been numerous modalities used such as TENS, interferential, diathermy, magnetic therapy, ultrasound, laser and surface electromyography to name a few. There has been an upsurge in the past decade of new and innovative modalities. There needs to be extensive research on each of these electrotherapy devices to determine the proper use of each device.

  7. Knowledge engineering in volcanology: Practical claims and general approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pshenichny, Cyril A.

    2014-10-01

    Knowledge engineering, being a branch of artificial intelligence, offers a variety of methods for elicitation and structuring of knowledge in a given domain. Only a few of them (ontologies and semantic nets, event/probability trees, Bayesian belief networks and event bushes) are known to volcanologists. Meanwhile, the tasks faced by volcanology and the solutions found so far favor a much wider application of knowledge engineering, especially tools for handling dynamic knowledge. This raises some fundamental logical and mathematical problems and requires an organizational effort, but may strongly improve panel discussions, enhance decision support, optimize physical modeling and support scientific collaboration.

  8. VarPy: A python library for volcanology and rock physics data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filgueira, Rosa; Atkinson, Malcom; Bell, Andrew; Snelling, Brawen; Main, Ian

    2014-05-01

    The increasing prevalence of digital instrumentation in volcanology and rock physics is leading to a wealth of data, which in turn is increasing the need for computational analyses and models. Today, these are largely developed by each individual or researcher. The introduction of a shared library that can be used for this purpose has several benefits: 1. when an existing function in the library meets a need recognised by a researcher it is usually much less effort than developing ones own code; 2. once functions are established and multiply used they become better tested, more reliable and eventually trusted by the community; 3. use of the same functions by different researchers makes it easier to compare results and to compare the skill of rival analysis and modelling methods; and 4. in the longer term the cost of maintaining these functions is shared over a wide community and they therefore have greater duration. Python is a high-level interpreted programming language, with capabilities for object-oriented programming. Often scientists choose this language to program their programs because of the increased productivity it provides. Although, there are many software tools available for interactive data analysis and development, there are not libraries designed specifically for volcanology and rock physics data. Therefore, we propose a new Python open-source toolbox called "VarPy" to facilitate rapid application development for rock physicists and volcanologists, which allow users to define their own workflows to develop models, analyses and visualisations. This proposal is triggered by our work on data assimilation in the NERC EFFORT (Earthquake and Failure Forecasting in Real Time) project, using data provided by the NERC CREEP 2 experimental project and volcanic experiments from INVG observatory Etna and IGN observatory Hierro as a test cases. In EFFORT project we are developing a scientist gateway which offers services for collecting and sharing volcanology

  9. Information surety for today and tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, S.K.

    1993-07-01

    Information Surety is the enhancement of the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of information and software systems. It is attained through sequential steps: identification of software reliability requirements and information protection needs, designing for a balanced level of risk throughout the system, and application of appropriate software and hardware technologies and procedures. The ability to apply these steps when developing systems is impaired by a general lack of understanding of surety issues by system developers, and by the fact that there are many separate areas of knowledge involved that are not currently integrated into a disciplined approach (e.g., risk assessment, information access control in computers and networks, secure messaging, trusted software development). Our best systems today are achieved by clever designers who use ad-hoc methods. In the absence of good development tools, technologies may be applied haphazardly and/or retrofitted, without yielding balanced protection. This paper will take the audience through an exploration of the elements of information surety, some common misconceptions about information surety today, and the even greater challenges on the horizon. It will end with some suggestions for research areas which will help evolve the discipline of information surety.

  10. The VIDA Framework as an Educational Tool: Leveraging Volcanology Data for Educational Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorgenfrei, M.; Chester, E.

    2008-12-01

    In an effort to address existing gaps in the current method of collecting, processing, and disseminating information related to volcanic eruptions a new system framework has been developed. This framework, known as VAPOR Integrated Data-Sharing and Analysis (VIDA), also holds substantial educational potential. VIDA proposes a centralized clearinghouse for volcanology data which could support education at a variety of levels. Basic geophysical data could be used to educate school children about the characteristics of volcanoes, satellite mappings could support informed growth and development of societies in at-risk areas, and raw sensor data could contribute to a wide range of university-level research projects. While the basic intention of VIDA is to support disaster risk reduction efforts, this paper will propose several methods of leveraging raw science data to support education across a wide demographic.

  11. Schoolyard Volcanoes: A Unit in Volcanology and Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, H. N.; Gochis, E. E.; Brill, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    How do you teach volcanology and volcanic hazards to students when there is no volcano nearby? You bring the volcano to them! At Michigan Technological University we have developed a four-lesson-unit for middle and high school students which incorporates virtual, analogue and numerical models to increase students' interests in geosciences while simultaneously expanding the community of earth-science-literate individuals necessary for a disaster resilient society. The unit aims to build on students' prior geoscience knowledge by examining the physical properties that influence volcanic eruptions and introduces them to challenges and methods of communicating hazards and risk. Lesson one engages students in a series of hands-on investigations that explore the "3-Vs" of volcanology: Viscosity, Volatiles and Volume. The students learn about the relationship between magma composition and viscosity and the influence on eruption style, behavior and morphology of different volcanoes. Lesson two uses an analogue model of a volcano to demonstrate the forces involved in an explosive eruption and associated hazards. Students think critically about the factors that affect hazards and risk as well as the variables (such as topography) that affect the eruption and the hazard. During lesson three students use Google Earth for a virtual field trip to Pacaya volcano, Guatemala to examine changes in the landscape over time and other evidence of volcanic activity to make interpretations about the volcano. The final lesson has the students use numerical models and GIS to create hazard maps based on probabilistic lahar scenarios. Throughout the unit students are engaged in an inquiry-based exploration that covers several Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) content and practices. This four lesson unit has been field tested in two school districts and during a summer engineering program. Results from student work and post-surveys show that this strategy raises interests in and

  12. DOW AGROSCIENCES TODAY AND NEW REVOLUTIONARY SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Vujević

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Dow AgroSciences LLC, based in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, is a top tier agricultural company providing innovative crop protection, pest and vegetation management, seed, and agricultural biotechnology solutions to serve the world's growing population. Global sales for Dow AgroSciences, a wholly owned subsidiary of The Dow Chemical Company, are $3.8 billion. The company's roots in the agricultural marketplace date back to 1950 as the agricultural unit of The Dow Chemical Company and as part of Eli Lilly and Company's agricultural business. In 1989, the DowElanco joint venture was formed, and the company continued to develop new products and acquire strategic businesses. DowElanco acquired majority ownership in Mycogen Seeds in 1996; in 1997, The Dow Chemical Company acquired 100 percent of DowElanco and the company was renamed Dow AgroSciences. Other significant acquisitions include acetochlor herbicide, Cargill Hybrid Seeds, several Brazilian seed companies and the agricultural chemicals business of Rohm and Haas. Dow AgroSciences is positioned for the future through focused implementation of its strategy which revolves around productivity, portfolio management and innovation. This focus allows the company to grow through an ambitious innovation program that maximizes the products being sold today and creates new, revolutionary solutions that will surprise customers in the future. D Dow AgroSciences is committed to sustainable chemistry and has a competitive advantage in our natural products discovery capability. We've won a prestigious award for technical innovation incorporating "green" chemistry principles into chemical design, manufacture and use. Dow AgroSciences offers a full range of seeds for corn, sunflowers, canola, cotton, soybeans and alfalfa. In addition, we have developed seeds specifically bred for nutritional quality. Dow AgroSciences uses conventional breeding techniques and tools of biotechnology to produce oils that are low in

  13. Volcanology Curricula Development Aided by Online Educational Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; van der Hoeven Kraft, Katrien J.; Teasdale, Rachel

    2011-03-01

    Using On-Line Volcano Monitoring Data in College and University Courses: The Volcano Exploration Project: Pu`u `Ō`ō (VEPP); Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii, 26-30 July 2010; Volcanic activity is an excellent hook for engaging college and university students in geoscience classes. An increasing number of Internet-accessible real-time and near-real time volcano monitoring data are now available and constitute an important resource for geoscience education; however, relatively few data sets are comprehensive, and many lack background information to aid in interpretation. In response to the need for organized, accessible, and well-documented volcano education resources, the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), in collaboration with NASA and the University of Hawai`i at Manoa, established the Volcanoes Exploration Project: Pu`u `Ō`ō (VEPP). The VEPP Web site (http://vepp.wr.usgs.gov) is an educational resource that provides access, in near real time, to geodetic, seismic, and geologic data from the active Pu`u `Ō`ō eruptive vent on Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, along with background and context information. A strength of the VEPP site is the common theme of the Pu`u `Ō`ō eruption, which allows the site to be revisited multiple times to demonstrate different principles and integrate many aspects of volcanology.

  14. Volcanology curricula development aided by online educational resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; van der Hoeven Kraft, Katrien J.; Teasdale, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Volcanic activity is an excellent hook for engaging college and university students in geoscience classes. An increasing number of Internet-accessible real-time and near–real time volcano monitoring data are now available and constitute an important resource for geoscience education; however, relatively few data sets are comprehensive, and many lack background information to aid in interpretation. In response to the need for organized, accessible, and well-documented volcano education resources, the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), in collaboration with NASA and the University of Hawai`i at Manoa, established the Volcanoes Exploration Project: Pu`u `Ō`ō (VEPP). The VEPP Web site (http://vepp.wr.usgs.gov) is an educational resource that provides access, in near real time, to geodetic, seismic, and geologic data from the active Pu`u `Ō`ō eruptive vent on Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, along with background and context information. A strength of the VEPP site is the common theme of the Pu`u `Ō`ō eruption, which allows the site to be revisited multiple times to demonstrate different principles and integrate many aspects of volcanology.

  15. Legendary Mount Vesuvius is subject of intensive volcanological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, Frank

    The Roman population centers of Pompeii and Herculaneum (circa 15,000 inhabitants) were destroyed when Mount Vesuvius erupted in 79 A.D. after centuries of repose. Many times since then its eruptions have claimed human lives; basaltic lava flows from an eruption in 1631 killed 3,000. Vesuvius' location, near the heart of the Roman empire—a center of learning in the ancient world—led it to become the site ofsome of the earliest volcanological studies on record.In letters to Tacitus, Pliny the Younger documented the sequence of events of the 79 A.D. plinian eruption. Geophysical studies of volcanoes were pioneered by Italian volcanologists who installed seismographs in an observatory on the flanks of Vesuvius to study volcano seismology and to forecast and monitor eruptions early this century. It is easy to understand why interest in Vesuvius has been so keen: it is accessible, persistently active, and a large population resides nearby. Today, around 1 million people live within the shadow of this potentially explosive and dangerous volcano.

  16. Vhub: a knowledge management system to facilitate online collaborative volcano modeling and research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Palma, Jose L; Courtland, Leah; Charbonnier, Sylvain; Tortini, Riccardo; Valentine, Greg A

    2014-01-01

    ... ) is a community cyberinfrastructure platform designed for collaboration in volcanology research, education, outreach, and discovery that complements existing volcano databases and other cyberinfrastructure projects...

  17. The VIDA Framework as an Education Tool: Leveraging Volcanology Data for Educational Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faied, D.; Sanchez, A.

    2009-04-01

    The VIDA Framework as an Education Tool: Leveraging Volcanology Data for Educational Purposes Dohy Faied, Aurora Sanchez (on behalf of SSP08 VAPOR Project Team) While numerous global initiatives exist to address the potential hazards posed by volcanic eruption events and assess impacts from a civil security viewpoint, there does not yet exist a single, unified, international system of early warning and hazard tracking for eruptions. Numerous gaps exist in the risk reduction cycle, from data collection, to data processing, and finally dissemination of salient information to relevant parties. As part of the 2008 International Space University's Space Studies Program, a detailed gap analysis of the state of volcano disaster risk reduction was undertaken, and this paper presents the principal results. This gap analysis considered current sensor technologies, data processing algorithms, and utilization of data products by various international organizations. Recommendations for strategies to minimize or eliminate certain gaps are also provided. In the effort to address the gaps, a framework evolved at system level. This framework, known as VIDA, is a tool to develop user requirements for civil security in hazardous contexts, and a candidate system concept for a detailed design phase. While the basic intention of VIDA is to support disaster risk reduction efforts, there are several methods of leveraging raw science data to support education across a wide demographic. Basic geophysical data could be used to educate school children about the characteristics of volcanoes, satellite mappings could support informed growth and development of societies in at-risk areas, and raw sensor data could contribute to a wide range of university-level research projects. Satellite maps, basic geophysical data, and raw sensor data are combined and accessible in a way that allows the relationships between these data types to be explored and used in a training environment. Such a resource

  18. Volcanology and Geochemistry of the Taney Seamounts northeast Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coumans, J. P.; Clague, D. A.; Stix, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Taney seamounts are a NW-SE trending, linear, near-ridge chain consisting of five submarine volcanoes located on the Pacific plate 300 km west of San Francisco, California. Morphologically, the seamounts are characterized as truncated cones with nested calderas decreasing in age towards the ridge axis. This study examines the volcanology and geochemistry of the largest and oldest seamount, (Taney A, ~26 Ma), which is comprised of four well-exposed nested calderas. Each successive collapse event exposes previously infilled lavas, defining a relative chronology. The caldera walls and intracaldera pillow mounds were carefully sampled by the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Doc Ricketts to obtain stratigraphically-controlled samples. Whole rock samples were analyzed for major and trace elements, volcanic glasses were analyzed for major and volatile elements(S, Cl), and plagioclase phenocrysts were separated for mineral and glass inclusion microprobe analysis. Overall, the erupted lavas are mostly subalkalic mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) varying from differentiated to more primitive (6.0 - 8.2 wt. % MgO) with decreasing age. Incompatible elements and REE profiles normalized to primitive mantle suggest that the lavas are transitional to slightly enriched (0.1 - 0.3 wt. % K2O; 1.1 - 2.2 wt. % TiO2), which is unusual for near-ridge seamounts. Sc, which is compatible in clinopyroxene, increases linearly with TiO2 at primitive compositions (>7.0 wt. % MgO). In more evolved seamount basalts (<7.0 wt. % MgO), the low CaO and Sc contents and decreasing CaO/Al2O3 suggest that there is either extensive clinopyroxene fractionation, or mixing with magmas that have undergone extensive clinopyroxene fractionation. MELTS modeling suggests that clinopyroxene fractionation occurs at <6.0 wt. % MgO, inconsistent with the observed clinopyroxene imprint at <7.0 wt. % MgO. The discrepancy could indicate magma mixing. Although whole rock ICP-MS data have some scatter, especially for

  19. Maritime Education and Research to Face the XXI-st Century Challenges in Gdynia Maritime University’s Experience Part I – Maritime Universities Facing Today and Tomorrow’s Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Mindykowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, divided into two parts, a problem of advancements in maritime education and research facing the 21st century challenges, based on the case study of the Gdynia Maritime University (GMU experience is discussed. Part I is devoted to the main directions of advances in the maritime education and research towards the challenges in a global meaning. In this context, the education and research potential of the Gdynia Maritime University, as one of the world-leading maritime universities, is shortly presented. Part II is dedicated to the Gdynia Maritime University experiencing the 21st century challenges. The GMU’s contribution and good practices concerning the participation in modification of the processes of the IMO STCW 78/2010 convention, adoption of programmes into the international and national qualification frameworks’ standards and procedures, as well as the development of research addressed to a new technological and organizational solution are described and analyzed.

  20. "IlVulcanoInforma": The restyling of the INGV Volcanological Information Centres, Aeolian Islands, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addezio, G.; Carapezza, M. L.; Riposati, D.; Team, L.

    2008-12-01

    Vulcano and Stromboli are the most active volcanoes of the Aeolian Islands. Vulcano is quiescent since the eruption of 1888-90 but in the last decades it experienced several crises with huge increase of gas output and temperature of the crater fumaroles, and variations in the magmatic gas components. Stromboli is characterized by a permanent mild explosive activity, episodically interrupted by major explosions, lava effusions, or paroxystic explosive events (October 2001: a tourist killed; December 2002: lava effusion, tsunami generated by flank collapse; April 2003: explosive paroxysm, block fallout on Ginostra village; February-March 2007: lava effusion and paroxysm). These islands are renowned tourist sites for the marvelous sea and the fascination that the volcanoes evoke. In fact, during summer risk increases as there are 10,000-15,000 persons per island (only a few hundreds in winter). Starting from the 1990 the INGV and the Civil Protection established a Volcanological Information Centre on each island with the main goal to inform population and tourists on the risks related to each volcano. During the year the two centres are visited by 8000-10,000 visitors coming from different countries. Researchers and trained students are involved in the educational activity devoted to inform visitors on the scientific aspects of volcano monitoring and hazard assessment and to ensure that tourists, willing to climb the summit crater area, will behave properly. In 2008 the Vulcano exhibition has been totally restyled. The INGV Laboratorio Grafica e Immagini has created for the project a composite and innovative graphic study. This includes a series of products (logos, brochures, panels ecc) with the intent to create new effective information means. The logo creation has been the first step for all the communications: an image with strong impact on volcano information distributed in strategic zones of the village to stimulate interest in the INGV centre and its exhibition.

  1. Teaching geography yesterday, today and tommorow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurij Kunaver

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available The history of the professional education in teaching geography in Slovene language has an age of about one hundred ycars, without intermission. The author expresses the opinion that the nowadays theoretical and praetical didactics of geography should be better linked with the research vvork and should also faster follow the results from abroad.

  2. Collective dynamics in liquids: today and tomorrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.Bryk

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Within this context, the main idea of this Special issue was to bring together experimental, theoretical and simulation groups in order to present the recent developments in experimental techniques, new possibilities of experimental studies, different methods of analysing the experimental data, recently elaborated theoretical approaches and modern simulation techniques - all focused on collective processes in liquids. Fifteen research groups from Italy, Germany, France, Japan, Spain, Great Britain, United States, Korea and Ukraine report in this volume the current studies and small reviews of their experimental/theoretical methodology.

  3. Volcanology Section Bulletin. French Geologic Society; Bulletin de la Section de Volcanologie. Societe Geologique de France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudon, G. [I.P.G.P. - Observatoire Volcanologique, 75 - Paris (France); Gourgaud, A. [Universite Blaise Pascal, 63 - Clermont Ferrand (France); Soler, E. [Universite Paris 6, Paris (France)

    1996-12-31

    This issue of the Volcanology Section Bulletin is a compilation of abstracts from the meeting the section of April, 2 1996 about the active volcanism of Central America and Mexico. The abstracts selected in this issue report on measurements of uranium, thorium and radium isotopes disequilibrium in lava, and radon fluctuations in volcanic gases. One abstract reports on new {sup 14}C datings on avalanche debris. (J.S.).

  4. Liver transplantation:Yesterday,today and tomorrow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Osman Abbasoglu

    2008-01-01

    With the advances in technical skills,management of postoperative complications and improvements in immunosuppressive drugs,liver transplantation is the standard treatment for many patients with chronic liver disease.Today,shortage of donor organs seems to be the major limiting factor for the application of liver transplantation.This review focuses on five issues that are challenging to clinical practice of liver transplantation and relevant to gastroenterologists.These include living donor liver transplantation,recurrent viral hepatitis,non-heart-beating donors,hepatocellular carcinoma,and ABO incompatible livertransplantation.Living donor and non-heart beating donor transplantations were initiated as a solution to increase the donor organ pool and it is expected that there will be an increase in the number of these donors.Recurrent hepatitis C and hepatocellular carcinoma following liver transplantation are among major problems and ongoing research in these diseases may lead to better outcomes in these recipients.

  5. Excitement in Vesicant Research -- Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-13

    obtained in several other studies: Smith eta. noted that while niacinamide (a PADPRP inhibitor) prevents metabolic death of HD- exposed epithelial...cells, it inhibits DNA repair, and may cause (delayed?) cytotoxicity; Cowan et al.𔃼 observed that although niacinamide attenuates HD-induced increases...contribute to the enhancement of protease activity; Yourick et al.8 noted that while niacinamide reduces the incidence of HD-induced microvesiculation in

  6. Educational activities of CAREER: Crystallization Kinetics in Volcanology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    Professional development of teachers is recognized as critical for improving student learning outcomes. The major outreach initiative of my CAREER award was to develop a teacher professional development program for middle school (grades 6-8) teachers that would improve teacher's mastery of geoscience and basic science skills and practices and expose them to an authentic research environment. The explicit objectives of the Research Experience for Teachers in Volcano-Petrology (RET/V-P) were for teachers to (1) master technical skills for safe and productive laboratory work, (2) deepen understanding of science content, (3) develop scientific "habits of the mind" as outlined in the National Science Standards, and (4) hone science communication skills. Six teachers, one undergraduate, and two graduate students participated in the teacher professional development program during the summers of the CAREER award period. A subsequent EAR award now supports the program, and summer 2011 saw the participation of five additional teachers. The teachers span a wide range of educational backgrounds, prior exposure to geoscience, and teaching assignments at public and private schools. Each year, the program was modified using formative and summative evaluation tools to better serve the scheduling needs and content preferences. In general, the program has evolved from an emphasis on research exposure to an emphasis on imparting basic geoscience concepts. A myriad of approaches including field trips to local outcrops, lecture tutorials and lecture-based active engagement exercises (such as iclicker delivery of Geoscience Concept Inventory questions), with a taste of laboratory work (crystal growth experiments, optics primer), has emerged as the most successful means of achieving objectives 1-4, above. The first summer I advertised the RET/V-P, no teachers applied. (This challenge was overcome in subsequent years by targeting the solicitation using teacher list serves, the Hawaii

  7. Physical Volcanology and Hazard Analysis of a Young Volcanic Field: Black Rock Desert, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, A. R.

    2009-05-01

    The Black Rock Desert volcanic field, located in west-central Utah, consists of ~30 small-volume monogenetic volcanoes with compositions ranging from small rhyolite domes to large basaltic lava flow fields. The field has exhibited bimodal volcanism for > 9 Ma with the most recent eruption of Ice Springs volcano ˜ 600 yrs ago. Together this eruptive history along with ongoing geothermal activity attests to the usefulness of a hazard assessment. The likelihood of a future eruption in this area has been calculated to be ˜ 8% over the next 1 Ka (95% confidence). However, many aspects of this field such as the explosivity and nature of many of these eruptions are not well known. The physical volcanology of the Tabernacle Hill volcano, suggests a complicated episodic eruption that may have lasted up to 50 yrs. The initial phreatomagmatic eruptions at Tabernacle Hill are reported to have begun ~14 Ka. This initial eruptive phase produced a tuff cone approximately 150 m high and 1.5 km in diameter with distinct bedding layers. Recent mapping and sampling of Tabernacle Hill's lava field, tuff cone and intra-crater deposits were aimed at better constraining the eruptive history, physical volcanology, and explosive energy associated with this eruption. Blocks ejected during the eruption were mapped and analyzed to yield minimum muzzle velocities of 60 - 70 meters per second. These velocities were used in conjunction with an estimated shallow depth of explosion to calculate an energy yield of ˜ 0.5 kT.

  8. Entrepreneurialism for Canadian Principals: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Shelleyann; Webber, Charles F.

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the various elements of Canadian educational entrepreneurialism as manifested yesterday, today, and tomorrow and in relation to the social and political influences of the time. This discussion is informed by the findings of the International Study of the Preparation of Principals (ISPP) and represents an expansion of the…

  9. Sustaining an Online, Shared Community Resource for Models, Robust Open source Software Tools and Data for Volcanology - the Vhub Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, A. K.; Valentine, G. A.; Bursik, M. I.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.; Jones, M.; Simakov, N.; Aghakhani, H.; Jones-Ivey, R.; Kosar, T.; Zhang, B.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last 5 years we have created a community collaboratory Vhub.org [Palma et al, J. App. Volc. 3:2 doi:10.1186/2191-5040-3-2] as a place to find volcanology-related resources, and a venue for users to disseminate tools, teaching resources, data, and an online platform to support collaborative efforts. As the community (current active users > 6000 from an estimated community of comparable size) embeds the tools in the collaboratory into educational and research workflows it became imperative to: a) redesign tools into robust, open source reusable software for online and offline usage/enhancement; b) share large datasets with remote collaborators and other users seamlessly with security; c) support complex workflows for uncertainty analysis, validation and verification and data assimilation with large data. The focus on tool development/redevelopment has been twofold - firstly to use best practices in software engineering and new hardware like multi-core and graphic processing units. Secondly we wish to enhance capabilities to support inverse modeling, uncertainty quantification using large ensembles and design of experiments, calibration, validation. Among software engineering practices we practice are open source facilitating community contributions, modularity and reusability. Our initial targets are four popular tools on Vhub - TITAN2D, TEPHRA2, PUFF and LAVA. Use of tools like these requires many observation driven data sets e.g. digital elevation models of topography, satellite imagery, field observations on deposits etc. These data are often maintained in private repositories that are privately shared by "sneaker-net". As a partial solution to this we tested mechanisms using irods software for online sharing of private data with public metadata and access limits. Finally, we adapted use of workflow engines (e.g. Pegasus) to support the complex data and computing workflows needed for usage like uncertainty quantification for hazard analysis using physical

  10. Santorini Volcano's 20th Century Eruptions: A Combined Petrogenetical, Volcanological, Sociological and Environmental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drymoni, Kyriaki; Magganas, Andreas; Pomonis, Panagiotis

    2014-05-01

    Santorini, the famous stratovolcano in the Aegean Sea, erupted three time periods during the 20th century (1925-1928, 1939-1941, 1950) and since then remains dormant. This study tried to combine and evaluate new and published volcanological, petrological, geochemical, environmental and sociological data of these three phases of Santorini's activity, which practically restricted to the caldera center on the Nea Kameni Islet. After field work on the formed dacite flows, pyroclastics and domes, representative rock samples and enclaves were collected and investigated for their texture, physical parameters, mineralogy and chemical composition by polarizing light microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM-EDS), XRD, Raman spectroscopy and ICP-MS. The petrogenetic evaluation of the data obtained suggests slight but significant changes in the solid and aerial phases produced during the three explosion stages, which can be attributed to minor variations in the magmatic differentiation and magma chamber physicochemical conditions. These variations were also expressed by decrease of duration and intensity of the eruptions, as well as in their volume of ejecta and lava. Probably, the subsequent relatively long dormant period of the volcano is also related to this tension of decrease. The first compared results were collected from scientific literature, old photos as well as local and regional press and state documents from the different periods of volcanism, record the past hazard case scenarios and civil defense planning of the individual eruptions. As part of the disaster management a pilot survey, in which personal interviews with aged local islanders that were eye-witnesses of the events and elderly people or tourists that they indirectly experienced or have heard about them, was also conducted. This event-tracing, along with air pollution software models using volcanological data have shown the social impacts and the environmental consequences of the volcanic

  11. Masaya, the “Mouth of Hell”, Nicaragua: Volcanological interpretation of the myths, legends and anecdotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viramonte, José G.; Incer-Barquero, Jaime

    2008-10-01

    Nicaragua's conquest started only 30years after Christopher Columbus arrived to America in 1492. At that moment the Masaya and Momotombo volcanoes were erupting simultaneously. The former was the first permanent lava lake observed by Europeans, and this produced a strong impression and interest in it. For more than a century there was great controversy over the nature of this phenomenon. Some people believed that it was the Mouth of Hell, whereas others could greedily see in the lava a source of gold or silver. This fact led to many attempts trying to prove it. In this paper, aboriginal myths about the volcano are described as well as different ideas and "supported evidence" given by the Spaniards regarding whether it was or not indeed the Mouth of Hell. Moreover, the first detailed geological descriptions are exposed as well as interesting interpretations found in the chronicles. It is also narrated the first descent into the volcano's mouth to extract samples of that "gold", a real exploit for that time. From these descriptions, a volcanological interpretation is proposed, which is a contribution to the understanding of the eruptive history and evolution of the Masaya volcanic complex, one of the largest, shallow magma chamber systems in Central America.

  12. VIDEOGRAMMETRIC RECONSTRUCTION APPLIED TO VOLCANOLOGY: PERSPECTIVES FOR A NEW MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUE IN VOLCANO MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Cecchi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with videogrammetric reconstruction of volcanic structures. As a first step, the method is tested in laboratory. The objective is to reconstruct small sand and plaster cones, analogous to volcanoes, that deform with time. The initial stage consists in modelling the sensor (internal parameters and calculating its orientation and position in space, using a multi-view calibration method. In practice two sets of views are taken: a first one around a calibration target and a second one around the studied object. Both sets are combined in the calibration software to simultaneously compute the internal parameters modelling the sensor, and the external parameters giving the spatial location of each view around the cone. Following this first stage, a N-view reconstruction process is carried out. The principle is as follows: an initial 3D model of the cone is created and then iteratively deformed to fit the real object. The deformation of the meshed model is based on a texture coherence criterion. At present, this reconstruction method and its precision are being validated at laboratory scale. The objective will be then to follow analogue model deformation with time using successive reconstructions. In the future, the method will be applied to real volcanic structures. Modifications of the initial code will certainly be required, however excellent reconstruction accuracy, valuable simplicity and flexibility of the technique are expected, compared to classic stereophotogrammetric techniques used in volcanology.

  13. Volcanological, petrographical and geochemical characteristics of Late Cretaceous volcanic rocks around Borçka-Artvin region (NE Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baser, Rasim; Aydin, Faruk; Oguz, Simge

    2015-04-01

    This study presents volcanological, petrographical and geochemical data for late Cretaceous volcanic rocks from the Borçka-Artvin region (NE Turkey) in order to investigate their origin and magmatic evolution. Based on the previous ages and recent field studies, the late Cretaceous time in the study area is characterized by two different bimodal volcanic periods. The first bimodal period of the late Cretaceous volcanism is mainly represented by mafic rock series (basaltic-basaltic andesitic pillow lavas and hyaloclastites) in the lower part, and felsic rock series (dacitic lavas, hyaloclastites, and pyrite-bearing tuffs) in the upper part. The second bimodal period of the late Cretaceous volcanism begins with mafic rock suites (basaltic-andesitic lavas and dikes-sills) and grades upward into felsic rock suites (biotite-bearing rhyolitic lavas and hyaloclastites), which are intercalated with hyaloclastites and red pelagic limestones. All volcano-sedimentary units are covered by Late Campanian-Paleocene clayey limestones and biomicrites with lesser calciturbidites. The mafic volcanic series of the study area, which comprise basaltic and andesitic rocks, generally show amygdaloidal and aphyric to porphyritic texture with phenocrysts of calcic to sodic plagioclase and augite in a hyalopilitic matrix of plag+cpx+mag. Zircon and magnetite are sometimes observed as accessory minerals, whereas chlorite, epidote and calcite are typical alteration products. On the other hand, the felsic volcanic series consisting of dacitic and rhyolitic rocks mostly display porphyritic and glomeroporphyritic textures with predominant feldspar, quartz and some biotite phenocrysts. The microgranular to felsophyric groundmass is mainly composed of aphanitic plagioclase, K-feldspar and quartz. Accessory minerals such as zircon, apatite and magnetite are common. Typical alteration products are sericite and clay minerals. Late Cretaceous Artvin-Borçka bimodal rock series generally display a

  14. VOLOBSIS: An Infrastructure for Open Access to Seismic and GNSS Data from the Volcanological and Seismological French Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satriano, C.; Lemarchand, A.; Saurel, J. M. M.; Pardo, C.; Vincent, D.; de Chabalier, J. B.; Beauducel, F.; Shapiro, N.; Cyril, G.

    2016-12-01

    The three Volcanological and Seismological Observatories of the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP) are situated in the overseas French territories: Martinique and Guadeloupe observatories in the Lesser Antilles and La Réunion Island in the Indian Ocean. The main missions of IPGP observatories is to monitor French active volcanoes and seismic activity associated with regional tectonics and to foster scientific research on the Lesser Antilles arc and La Réunion hotspot. For that, the observatories operate, among others, permanent seismological and geodetic networks and process and analyze continuously acquired data.IPGP observatories have a long story of seismic and geodetic monitoring: the first seismograph in Martinique was installed in 1902; starting from the early '80 the three observatories begun deploying permanent networks of analog sensors. During the years 2010, seismic and geodetic monitoring at the three observatories saw a significant breakthrough with the advent of broadband seismic sensors, digital recording and continuous GNSS receivers.This wealth of data is constituted today by 81 seismological stations (broad-band and short period, networks GL, MQ, PF and WI) and 48 permanent GNSS stations. Data of both type is continuously recorded and acquired at the three observatories, as well as at the IPGP Data Center in Paris. Real-time streams for seismic data are available through a SeedLink server. Seismic and GNSS data are further validated and completed at IPGP, and distributed through the VOLOBSIS web portal (http://volobsis.ipgp.fr), which provides download links as well a web service interface.Seismic data is further available through IRIS, the European Integrated Data Archive (EIDA) and the French RESIF portal (http://seismology.resif.fr).Here we discuss the different steps of data recording, quality-control and distribution behind VOLOBSIS, which provides an open data infrastructure for advancing the understanding of volcanic and

  15. The volcano in a gravel pit: Volcano monitoring meets experimental volcanology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueppers, U.; Alatorre-Ibargüengoitia, M. A.; Hort, M.; Kremers, S.; Meier, K.; Scarlato, P. G.; Scheu, B.; Taddeucci, J.; Wagner, R.; Walk, F.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions are an inevitable natural threat. During explosive eruptions, gas and pyroclasts are ejected at high speed over variable time spans and at variable intensity. As magma fragmentation inside a volcanic edifice defies direct observation, our mechanistic and quantitative understanding of the syn-eruptive processes is still incomplete. In an attempt to bridge this gap, we used a supra-disciplinary approach and combined experimental volcanology and volcano monitoring devices. We performed 34 field-based fragmentation experiments using cylindrical samples, drilled from natural volcanic rock samples. Decompression and particle ejection were monitored with (1) Doppler Radar (DR), (2) high-speed and high-definition cameras, (3) high-speed thermal camera, (4) acoustic and infrasound sensors and (5) pressure transducers. The experiments were performed at controlled sample porosity (25 to 75 vol.%) and size (60 mm height and 25 mm and 60 mm diameter, respectively), confinement geometry, applied pressure (4 to 18 MPa) and temperature (25 and 850 °C). We present how the velocity of the ejected pyroclasts was measured by and evaluated for the different approaches and how it was affected by the experimental conditions and sample characteristics. We show that all deployed instruments successfully measured the pyroclast ejection, giving coherent results of up to 130 m/s. Close and high-resolution volcano monitoring, spiced with results from our experiments, will allow for "calibrating volcanoes". An enhanced understanding of the pressurisation state of a volcano is an essential factor in ballistic hazard evaluation and eruption energy estimation and will contribute to adequate risk mitigation.

  16. Near resonant bubble acoustic cross-section corrections, including examples from oceanography, volcanology, and biomedical ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainslie, Michael A; Leighton, Timothy G

    2009-11-01

    The scattering cross-section sigma(s) of a gas bubble of equilibrium radius R(0) in liquid can be written in the form sigma(s)=4piR(0) (2)[(omega(1) (2)omega(2)-1)(2)+delta(2)], where omega is the excitation frequency, omega(1) is the resonance frequency, and delta is a frequency-dependent dimensionless damping coefficient. A persistent discrepancy in the frequency dependence of the contribution to delta from radiation damping, denoted delta(rad), is identified and resolved, as follows. Wildt's [Physics of Sound in the Sea (Washington, DC, 1946), Chap. 28] pioneering derivation predicts a linear dependence of delta(rad) on frequency, a result which Medwin [Ultrasonics 15, 7-13 (1977)] reproduces using a different method. Weston [Underwater Acoustics, NATO Advanced Study Institute Series Vol. II, 55-88 (1967)], using ostensibly the same method as Wildt, predicts the opposite relationship, i.e., that delta(rad) is inversely proportional to frequency. Weston's version of the derivation of the scattering cross-section is shown here to be the correct one, thus resolving the discrepancy. Further, a correction to Weston's model is derived that amounts to a shift in the resonance frequency. A new, corrected, expression for the extinction cross-section is also derived. The magnitudes of the corrections are illustrated using examples from oceanography, volcanology, planetary acoustics, neutron spallation, and biomedical ultrasound. The corrections become significant when the bulk modulus of the gas is not negligible relative to that of the surrounding liquid.

  17. Physical volcanology of the mafic segment of the subaqueous New Senator caldera, Abitibi greenstone belt, Quebec, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Lyndsay N; Mueller, Wulf U [Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, 555 boul. du l' Universite, Chicoutimi, Quebec, G7H2B1 (Canada)], E-mail: lyndsay.moore@uqac.ca

    2008-10-01

    Archean calderas provide valuable insight into internal geometries of subaqueous calderas. The New Senator caldera, Abitibi greenstone belt, Canada, is an Archean example of a subaqueous nested caldera with a basal stratigraphy dominated by gabbro-diorite dykes and sills, ponded magmas and basalt and andesite lava flows. The aim of our study is to focus on the use of physical volcanology to differentiate between the various mafic units found at the base of the New Senator caldera. Differentiation between these various mafic units is important from an exploration point of view because in modern subaqueous summit calders (e.g. Axial Seamount) margins of ponded magmas are often sites of VMS formation.

  18. A comparison of new, old and future densiometic techniques as applied to volcanologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankhurst, Matthew; Moreland, William; Dobson, Kate; Þórðarson, Þorvaldur; Fitton, Godfrey; Lee, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The density of any material imposes a primary control upon its potential or actual physical behaviour in relation to its surrounds. It follows that a thorough understanding of the physical behaviour of dynamic, multi-component systems, such as active volcanoes, requires knowledge of the density of each component. If we are to accurately predict the physical behaviour of synthesized or natural volcanic systems, quantitative densiometric measurements are vital. The theoretical density of melt, crystals and bubble phases may be calculated using composition, structure, temperature and pressure inputs. However, measuring the density of natural, non-ideal, poly-phase materials remains problematic, especially if phase specific measurement is important. Here we compare three methods; Archimedes principle, He-displacement pycnometry and X-ray micro computed tomography (XMT) and discuss the utility and drawbacks of each in the context of modern volcanologic study. We have measured tephra, ash and lava from the 934 AD Eldgjá eruption (Iceland), and the 2010 AD Eyjafjallajökull eruption (Iceland), using each technique. These samples exhibit a range of particle sizes, phases and textures. We find that while the Archimedes method remains a useful, low-cost technique to generate whole-rock density data, relative precision is problematic at small particles sizes. Pycnometry offers a more precise whole-rock density value, at a comparable cost-per-sample. However, this technique is based upon the assumption pore spaces within the sample are equally available for gas exchange, which may or may not be the case. XMT produces 3D images, at resolutions from nm to tens of µm per voxel where X-ray attenuation is a qualitative measure of relative electron density, expressed as greyscale number/brightness (usually 16-bit). Phases and individual particles can be digitally segmented according to their greyscale and other characteristics. This represents a distinct advantage over both

  19. Time correlation by palaeomagnetism of the 1631 eruption of Mount Vesuvius. Volcanological and volcanic hazard implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carracedo, J. C.; Principe, C.; Rosi, M.; Soler, V.

    1993-11-01

    The 1631 eruption of Mount Vesuvius was the most destructive episode in the recent volcanic history of Vesuvius and the last in which large pyroclastic flows were emitted. The controversy about whether lava flows were also generated in this eruption, as sustained in the mapping by Le Hon (1866) and by the interpretation by some authors (Burri et al., 1975; Rolandi et al., 1991) of eyewitness accounts, is important not only for a better understanding of the eruption but also for the implications in the prediction of volcanic hazards of this volcano, set in an overpopulated area with more than 3 million people potentially at risk. Short-period palaeomagnetic techniques (secular variation curve) have been applied to correlate lava flows interpreted as produced in the event of 1631 with the pyroclastic flow of this same eruption and other lava flows unquestionably emitted prior to this eruptive event. The model that best fits the results obtained suggests that the presumed 1631 lava flows were not the result of a single eruptive event but were, in fact, produced by several different eruptions. These lava flows also have a better palaeomagnetic correlation with the medieval lava flows than with the pyroclastic flow of 1631, whose juvenile pumice clasts have a well-defined single component magnetization that fits in the expected corresponding position of the secular variation curve for that age. The palaeomagnetic characteristics of the 1631 pyroclastic flow are compatible with a "hot" depositional temperature (apparently above the Curie point of magnetite, 585 °C) for the juvenile pumice fragments (magmatic fraction) and a "cold" deposition for the non-magmatic fraction. This suggests the lack of thermal equilibration during transport of the larger clasts, probably due to the short distance travelled by the pyroclastic flows. The main volcanological and volcanic hazard issues of this work are that the 1631 event was entirely explosive and that pyroclastic flow activity

  20. First Volcanological-Probabilistic Pyroclastic Density Current and Fallout Hazard Map for Campi Flegrei and Somma Vesuvius Volcanoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrolorenzo, G.; Pappalardo, L.; Troise, C.; Panizza, A.; de Natale, G.

    2005-05-01

    Integrated volcanological-probabilistic approaches has been used in order to simulate pyroclastic density currents and fallout and produce hazard maps for Campi Flegrei and Somma Vesuvius areas. On the basis of the analyses of all types of pyroclastic flows, surges, secondary pyroclastic density currents and fallout events occurred in the volcanological history of the two volcanic areas and the evaluation of probability for each type of events, matrixs of input parameters for a numerical simulation have been performed. The multi-dimensional input matrixs include the main controlling parameters of the pyroclasts transport and deposition dispersion, as well as the set of possible eruptive vents used in the simulation program. Probabilistic hazard maps provide of each points of campanian area, the yearly probability to be interested by a given event with a given intensity and resulting demage. Probability of a few events in one thousand years are typical of most areas around the volcanoes whitin a range of ca 10 km, including Neaples. Results provide constrains for the emergency plans in Neapolitan area.

  1. Metrology in electricity and magnetism: EURAMET activities today and tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piquemal, F.; Jeckelmann, B.; Callegaro, L.; Hällström, J.; Janssen, T. J. B. M.; Melcher, J.; Rietveld, G.; Siegner, U.; Wright, P.; Zeier, M.

    2017-10-01

    Metrology dedicated to electricity and magnetism has changed considerably in recent years. It encompasses almost all modern scientific, industrial, and societal challenges, e.g. the revision of the International System of Units, the profound transformation of industry, changes in energy use and generation, health, and environment, as well as nanotechnologies (including graphene and 2D materials) and quantum engineering. Over the same period, driven by the globalization of worldwide trade, the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (referred to as the CIPM MRA) was set up. As a result, the regional metrology organizations (RMOs) of national metrology institutes have grown in significance. EURAMET is the European RMO and has been very prominent in developing a strategic research agenda (SRA) and has established a comprehensive research programme. This paper reviews the highlights of EURAMET in electrical metrology within the European Metrology Research Programme and its main contributions to the CIPM MRA. In 2012 EURAMET undertook an extensive roadmapping exercise for proposed activities for the next decade which will also be discussed in this paper. This work has resulted in a new SRA of the second largest European funding programme: European Metrology Programme for Innovation and Research.

  2. Symposium: Animal welfare challenges for today and tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizzier Thaxton, Yvonne; Christensen, Karen D; Mench, Joy A; Rumley, Elizabeth R; Daugherty, Christine; Feinberg, Bruce; Parker, Molly; Siegel, Paul; Scanes, Colin G

    2016-09-01

    The increasing separation of the public from production agriculture means there is often a lack of knowledge among consumers about current production practices and a perception that increased productivity and economic efficiency are necessarily associated with a decline in animal welfare. A symposium was organized to present information about animal welfare issues and the challenges they pose for both scientists and the poultry and allied industries. Companion papers provide information about understanding public attitudes and physiological/immunological approaches to welfare assessment, while this paper outlines current and future challenges to egg and meat production and industry responses to those challenges. For broiler chickens, increases in growth rate result in corollary increases in metabolic heat generation and water consumption, leading to the need for continuing improvements in housing, ventilation, and litter management. Stocking densities, lighting programs, muscle myopathies, and use of antibiotics are also areas that require research attention. In the layer industry, the key challenge is housing, with the industry undergoing a shift from conventional cage housing to alternatives like enriched colonies or cage-free. While these alternative systems have hen welfare advantages, there are also welfare disadvantages that require the development of mitigation strategies, and it is also essential to address associated issues including economic, environmental, egg safety, and worker health impacts. Concerns on the horizon include euthanasia of surplus male chicks and spent hens as well as beak-trimming. The humaneness of slaughter methods is an important welfare and consumer confidence issue, and the current regulations for poultry slaughter in the USA are discussed and compared to those for livestock. The poultry and allied industries, including retailers, are responding to these concerns by consulting with experts, developing science-based animal care

  3. Vaccination ecosystem health check: achieving impact today and sustainability for tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatian-Elahi, Mitra; Bloom, David; Plotkin, Stanley; Picot, Valentina; Louis, Jacques; Watson, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Vaccination is a complex ecosystem with several components that interact with one another and with the environment. Today's vaccine ecosystem is defined by the pursuit of polio eradication, the drive to get as many of the new vaccines to as many people as possible and the research and development against immunologically challenging diseases. Despite these successes, vaccine ecosystem is facing keys issues with regard to supply/distribution and cost/profitability asymmetry that risk slowing its global growth. The conference "Vaccination ecosystem health check: achieving impact today and sustainability for tomorrow" held in Annecy-France (January 19-21, 2015) took stock of the health of today's vaccination ecosystem and its ability to reliably and sustainably supply high-quality vaccines while investing in tomorrow's needed innovation. Small and decreasing numbers of suppliers/manufacturing facilities; paucity of research-driven companies; regulatory pressures; market uncertainties; political prioritization; anti-vaccine movements/complacency; and technological and programmatic issues were acknowledged as the major challenges that could weaken today's vaccination ecosystem. The expert panel discussed also drivers and barriers to a sustainable vaccination ecosystem; the metrics of a vaccination ecosystem; and what should be added, removed, increased, or reduced to maintain the health of the vaccination ecosystem.

  4. Combined cycle plants: Yesterday, today, and tomorrow (review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ol'khovskii, G. G.

    2016-07-01

    Gas turbine plants (GTP) for a long time have been developed by means of increasing the initial gas temperature and improvement of the turbo-machines aerodynamics and the efficiency of the critical components air cooling within the framework of a simple thermodynamic cycle. The application of watercooling systems that were used in experimental turbines and studied approximately 50 years ago revealed the fundamental difficulties that prevented the practical implementation of such systems in the industrial GTPs. The steam cooling researches have developed more substantially. The 300 MW power GTPs with a closedloop steam cooling, connected in parallel with the intermediate steam heating line in the steam cycle of the combined cycle plant (CCP) have been built, tested, and put into operation. The designs and cycle arrangements of such GTPs and entire combined cycle steam plants have become substantially more complicated without significant economic benefits. As a result, the steam cooling of gas turbines has not become widespread. The cycles—complicated by the intermediate air cooling under compression and reheat of the combustion products under expansion and their heat recovery to raise the combustion chamber entry temperature of the air—were used, in particular, in the domestic power GTPs with a moderate (700-800°C) initial gas turbine entry temperature. At the temperatures being reached to date (1300-1450°C), only one company, Alstom, applies in their 240-300 MW GTPs the recycled fuel cycle under expansion of gases in the turbine. Although these GTPs are reliable, there are no significant advantages in terms of their economy. To make a forecast of the further improvement of power GTPs, a brief review and assessment of the water cooling and steam cooling of hot components and complication of the GTP cycle by the recycling of fuel under expansion of gases in the turbine has been made. It is quite likely in the long term to reach the efficiency for the

  5. Volcanology and eruptive styles of Barren Island: an active mafic stratovolcano in the Andaman Sea, NE Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Hetu C.; Ray, Jyotiranjan S.; Bhutani, Rajneesh; Kumar, Alok; Smitha, R. S.

    2009-11-01

    Barren Island (India) is a relatively little studied, little known active volcano in the Andaman Sea, and the northernmost active volcano of the great Indonesian arc. The volcano is built of prehistoric (possibly late Pleistocene) lava flows (dominantly basalt and basaltic andesite, with minor andesite) intercalated with volcaniclastic deposits (tuff breccias, and ash beds deposited by pyroclastic falls and surges), which are exposed along a roughly circular caldera wall. There are indications of a complete phreatomagmatic tephra ring around the exposed base of the volcano. A polygenetic cinder cone has existed at the centre of the caldera and produced basalt-basaltic andesite aa and blocky aa lava flows, as well as tephra, during historic eruptions (1787-1832) and three recent eruptions (1991, 1994-95, 2005-06). The recent aa flows include a toothpaste aa flow, with tilted and overturned crustal slabs carried atop an aa core, as well as locally developed tumuli-like elliptical uplifts having corrugated crusts. Based on various evidence we infer that it belongs to either the 1991 or the 1994-95 eruptions. The volcano has recently (2008) begun yet another eruption, so far only of tephra. We make significantly different interpretations of several features of the volcano than previous workers. This study of the volcanology and eruptive styles of the Barren Island volcano lays the ground for detailed geochemical-isotopic and petrogenetic work, and provides clues to what the volcano can be expected to do in the future.

  6. Sickle Cell Research: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have sickle cell disease. Instead, they will have sickle cell trait. People who have sickle cell trait usually have few, if any, symptoms and lead ... Will my other children have the disease or sickle cell trait? What other tests should be carried out? What ...

  7. First physical volcanological description of a Miocene, silicic, phreatomagmatic fall complex in the Carpatho-Pannonian Region (CPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biró, Tamás; Hencz, Mátyás; Karátson, Dávid; Márton, Emő; Bradák-Hayashi, Balázs; Szalai, Zoltán

    2017-04-01

    The study reports the basic physical volcanological and stratigraphical features of a hitherto unrecognized silicic phreatomagmatic fall succession from the Bükk Foreland Volcanic Area (Hungary), known as part of the extensive Miocene ignimbrite volcanism of the northern CPR. The complex have been identified at two sites, in the vicinity of Bogács and Tibolddaróc villages. Tens of mm to several dm thick layers make up the 20 m thick entire succession. The complex could be subdivided into three eruption cycles by two, intercalated well-developed paleosoil horizons, which indicate longer repose periods. The eruption cycles consist of several individual eruptive events. The volcano-sedimentological field approach was completed by granulometrical and low field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) studies. Combined dry sieving and laser diffraction particle size analysis were performed to get information on median grain size (MdΦ) and sorting (σΦ) of friable layers. AMS was used to infer the emplacement processes. Based on the following features the succession is proposed to record a large-scale, silicic, phreatomagmatic fall activity: i) Presence of very fine ash and abundant ash aggregates, ii) General poor sorting, and often bimodal grain-size distributions; ii) Extremely weak magnetic fabric compared to dilute, thin pyroclastic density current deposits. On the basis of comparison of the recorded grain size characteristics with data from other silicic phretomagmatic fall deposits worldwide, several units in the succession can be considered as phreatoplinian fall deposit (sensu lato), described for the first time in the CPR.

  8. High resolution seismic data coupled to Multibeam bathymetry of Stromboli island collected in the frame of the Stromboli geophysical experiment: implications with the marine geophysics and volcanology of the Aeolian Arc volcanic complex (Sicily, Southern Tyrrhenian sea, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Gemma; Di Fiore, Vincenzo; Marsella, Ennio; Passaro, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    New high resolution seismic data (Subbottom Chirp) coupled to high resolution Multibeam bathymetry collected in the frame of the Stromboli geophysical experiment aimed at recording active seismic data and tomography of the Stromboli Island are here presented. The Stromboli geophysical experiment has been already carried out based on onshore and offshore data acquisition in order to investigate the deep structure and the location of the magma chambers of the Stromboli volcano. A new detailed swath bathymetry of Stromboli Island is here shown and discussed to reconstruct an up-to-date morpho-bathymetry and marine geology of the area compared to the volcanologic setting of the Aeolian Arc volcanic complex. Due to its high resolution the new Digital Terrain Model of the Stromboli Island gives interesting information about the submerged structure of the volcano, particularly about the volcano-tectonic and gravitational processes involving the submarine flanks of the edifice. Several seismic units have been identified based on the geologic interpretation of Subbottom Chirp profiles recorded around the volcanic edifice and interpreted as volcanic acoustic basement pertaining to the volcano and overlying slide chaotic bodies emplaced during its complex volcano-tectonic evolution. They are related to the eruptive activity of Stromboli, mainly poliphasic and to regional geological processes involving the intriguing geology of the Aeolian Arc, a volcanic area still in activity and needing improved research interest.

  9. Online collaboration and model sharing in volcanology via VHub.org

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, G.; Patra, A. K.; Bajo, J. V.; Bursik, M. I.; Calder, E.; Carn, S. A.; Charbonnier, S. J.; Connor, C.; Connor, L.; Courtland, L. M.; Gallo, S.; Jones, M.; Palma Lizana, J. L.; Moore-Russo, D.; Renschler, C. S.; Rose, W. I.

    2013-12-01

    VHub (short for VolcanoHub, and accessible at vhub.org) is an online platform for barrier free access to high end modeling and simulation and collaboration in research and training related to volcanoes, the hazards they pose, and risk mitigation. The underlying concept is to provide a platform, building upon the successful HUBzero software infrastructure (hubzero.org), that enables workers to collaborate online and to easily share information, modeling and analysis tools, and educational materials with colleagues around the globe. Collaboration occurs around several different points: (1) modeling and simulation; (2) data sharing; (3) education and training; (4) volcano observatories; and (5) project-specific groups. VHub promotes modeling and simulation in two ways: (1) some models can be implemented on VHub for online execution. VHub can provide a central warehouse for such models that should result in broader dissemination. VHub also provides a platform that supports the more complex CFD models by enabling the sharing of code development and problem-solving knowledge, benchmarking datasets, and the development of validation exercises. VHub also provides a platform for sharing of data and datasets. The VHub development team is implementing the iRODS data sharing middleware (see irods.org). iRODS allows a researcher to access data that are located at participating data sources around the world (a cloud of data) as if the data were housed in a single virtual database. Projects associated with VHub are also going to introduce the use of data driven workflow tools to support the use of multistage analysis processes where computing and data are integrated for model validation, hazard analysis etc. Audio-video recordings of seminars, PowerPoint slide sets, and educational simulations are all items that can be placed onto VHub for use by the community or by selected collaborators. An important point is that the manager of a given educational resource (or any other

  10. Significant breakthroughs in monitoring networks of the volcanological and seismological French observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemarchand, Arnaud; Anglade, andré; Saurel, jean-marie

    2014-05-01

    In the last few years, French West Indies observatories, in collaboration with the Seismic Research Center (University of West Indies-Trinidad), have modernized the Lesser Antilles Arc seismic and deformation monitoring network. 16 new permanent stations have been installed to strengthen and expand its detection capabilities. The global network of the IPGP-SRC consortium is now composed of 21 modernized stations, all equipped with broadband seismometers, strong motion sensors, GNSS sensors and satellite communication for real-time data transfer to the observatories of Trinidad (SRC), Guadeloupe (OVSG), Martinique (OVSM). To improve the sensitivity and reduce ambient noise, special efforts were made to enhance the design of the seismic vault and the original Stuttgart shielding (D. Kurrle R. Widmer-Schnidrig, 2005) of the broadband seismometers (240 and 120 sec). Several months of tests have been performed in order to get the maximum performance level out of the seismometers with different types of shields. This renewed network feeds the Caribbean Tsunami Warning System supported by UNESCO and establishes a monitoring tool that produces high quality data for studying subduction and volcanism interactions in the Lesser Antilles arc. The project has been an opportunity to migrate the seismic data processing to SeisComP3 with new developed plugins to compute the duration magnitude and locate (modified HYPO71PC ) ever small events such as volcanic ones. The new plugins are integrated in Seiscomp3 releases. Several tools for data management and treatment (Earthworm and WebObs [Beauducel et al., 2004]) are also continuously improved. GPS data, real-time and validated seismic data (only broadband) are now available at the IPGP data center.

  11. Geology and Volcanology of Kima'Kho Mountain, Northern British Columbia: A Pleistocene Glaciovolcanic Edifice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, M.; Porritt, L. A.; Edwards, B. R.; Russell, K.

    2014-12-01

    Kima'Kho Mountain is a 1.8 Ma (40Ar/39Ar of 1.82 +/- 40 ka) Pleistocene an alkali-olivine basaltic tuya situated in northern British Columbia. The volcanic edifice rises 460 m from its base and comprises a central vent, dominated by lapilli-tuff and minor pillow lava and dykes; and a surrounding plateau underlain by a sequence of dipping beds of basaltic tuff-breccia and capped by a series of flat-lying, subaerial lava flows. We present a 1:10,000 geological map for Kima'Kho Mountain building on the preliminary work of Ryane et al. (2010). We use the volcanic stratigraphy to explore the implications of three unique features. (1) The central cone comprises massive to crudely-bedded lapilli tuffs containing abundant armoured lapilli - cores of highly-vesicular pyroclasts coated with blocky to cuspate vitric ash. These units suggest an explosive origin from within an ice-enclosed lake, and deposited by wet, dilute pyroclastic surge events. (2) The entire stratigraphic sequence hosts at least two "passage zones" (cf. Jones, 1969); the presence and geometry of these passage zones constrain ice thicknersses at the time of eruption and inform on the englacial lake dynamics. (3) Lastly, our field-based stratigraphic relationships are at odds with the classic tuya model (i.e. an effusive onset to the eruption, forming pillow basalts, followed by explosive activity). Our field mapping suggests an alternative model of tuya architecture, involving a highly-energetic, sustained explosive onset creating a tephra cone that become emergent followed by effusive eruption to create lavas and a subaqueous lava-fed delta. Jones, J. G. Intraglacial volcanoes of the Laugarvatn region, south-west Iceland-I. Geological Society of London Quarterly Journal 124, 197-211 (1969). Ryane, C., Edwards, B. R. & Russell, J. K. The volcanic stratigraphy of Kima'Kho Mountain: A Pleistocene tuya, northwestern British Columbia. Geological Survey of Canada, Current Research 2011-104, 12p, doi:10

  12. Volcanological implications of crystal-chemical variations in clinopyroxenes from the Aeolian Arc, Southern Tyrrhenian Sea (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazzareni, Sabrina; Molin, Gianmario; Peccerillo, Angelo; Zanazzi, Pier Francesco

    2001-03-01

    Crystal chemistry and structural data for clinopyroxene from the Aeolian islands (Southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy) were determined with the aim of obtaining geobarometric information and exploring implications for the structure of volcanic plumbing systems. Cell and M1 site volumes for clinopyroxenes, which are known to decrease with increasing pressure of crystallization, revealed variable values, both within some single islands and along the entire arc, indicating polybaric conditions of crystallization. The lowest cell and M1 volumes were found at Filicudi, plotting close to values of clinopyroxenes from high-pressure ultramafic xenoliths entrained in alkali basalts. Indications of high-pressure crystallization were also found at Salina and, to a lesser extent, at Alicudi, all situated in the western sector of the Aeolian Arc. The central and eastern islands of Lipari, Vulcano, Panarea and Stromboli generally show higher values of cell parameters, suggesting crystallization in shallow magma chambers. These islands are characterized by the occurrence of large calderas, which are apparently lacking at Salina and Filicudi. Time-related variations were observed for cell and M1 volumes of clinopyroxene for some islands. At Salina, the early-erupted products display low values of cell parameters with respect to later activity, thus indicating a decrease in crystallization pressure with time. A similar, although less striking, pattern is observed at Alicudi and Lipari. An overall increase in cell parameters with time was observed at the scale of the entire arc. The observed variations in clinopyroxene structural parameters highlight the significance of pyroxene crystal chemistry for petrogenetic and volcanological interpretation. Correlation with time and the structural characteristics of volcanoes suggest significant regional and temporal modifications in the plumbing systems of Aeolian volcanoes. Clinopyroxenes from Filicudi and the older Salina crystallized at high

  13. Astronomie spatiale infrarouge, aujourd’hui et demain = Infrared space astronomy, today and tomorrow

    CERN Document Server

    Lequeux, J; David, F

    2000-01-01

    This book brings together the lectures given at the Les Houches summer school "Infrared space astronomy, today and tomorrow". It gives a wide overview of infrared astronomy, a wavelength domain crucial for studies of the solar system, stars at the beginning and end of their lives, interstellar matter and galaxies at all distances. Recent developments in observational techniques have been tremendous. The first contributions give an introduction to the basic physical processes and methods of detection and data processing. They are followed by a series of lectures dealing with the wide variety of astronomical objects that can be seen in the infrared.

  14. Planning for the Future of the ROK-U.S. Alliance: A Joint Vision for Today and Post-Reunification

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ralph A Cossa

    2013-01-01

    .... alliance, both today and after reunification. A new approach with a midterm goal of peaceful coexistence is needed to keep Pyongyang positively engaged and to set the stage for eventual reunification and denuclearization...

  15. The impact of information technology on managed care pharmacy: today and tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillblom, Douglas; Schueth, Anthony; Robertson, Scott M; Topor, Laura; Low, Greg

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the use of health information technology (HIT) and its implications is crucial for the future of managed care pharmacy. Information is the cornerstone of providing and managing care, and the ability to exchange data is easier and more complicated than ever before. In this commentary, a subset of the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy Healthcare Information Technology Advisory Council addresses how HIT supports managed care today and its anticipated evolution, with a focus on quality, patient safety, communication, and efficiency. Among the tools and functions reviewed are electronic health records, electronic prescribing, health information exchange, electronic prior authorization, pharmacists as care team members, formularies, prescription drug abuse, and policy levers to address these issues. 

  16. 戴姆勒时间%A Time for Daimler-We Deliver. Today and In the Future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于占波

    2016-01-01

    Daimler presented a significant highlight at IAA 2016 by promoting its themes “We Deliver. Today and In the Future”, which had not only brought a bright imaginary and enlighten blue-map of future to audiences, but also provided a solution to the current challenge of transport and logistics industry in the world.

  17. The Challenges of Catholic Education: Evidence from the Responses to the Instrumentum Laboris "Educating Today and Tomorrow"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paletta, Angelo; Fiorin, Italo

    2016-01-01

    This article is based on the analysis of the responses to the questionnaires submitted for the Instrumentum Laboris 'Educating today and tomorrow. A renewing passion' and sets out to offer a synthesis of the main challenges facing Catholic education around the world, key criticalities as well as more positive aspects and the strategic and…

  18. Speckle metrology in the nanoworld, as it is perceived today, and how it may affect industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryputniewicz, Ryszard J.

    2010-09-01

    My memory goes back to my early collage studies that were almost entirely on the scale of "macroworld", as we practiced/perceived it some four decades ago. Since that time things have changed a lot constantly decreasing the scales of interest, at times at rather rapid pace, with monumental advances leading to the scales we work with today and plan for tomorrow. During that change/transition there were "meso" and "micro" developments characterized by changes in scales/sizes of things of interest. Today's scale of interest is "nano" and we are already not only working with "picotechnology", but are even reaching beyond while constantly "planning and projecting" the scales/worlds of the future. Advancement of any technology, especially new emerging ones as we witness/experience them today, is facilitated by the use of all available solution strategies. One of the emerging strategies that affect almost anything currently being developed and/or used, in the today's nanoworld, is based on recent advances of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Today MEMS affect almost everything we do from household appliances, via cars we drive and planes that whisk us from continent to continent, to spaceships used for search of/and exploration of other worlds. The modern microsensors are also used to explore for and produce petroleum products that are used in multitude of today's applications. To facilitate these advances a great majority of MEMS is used in the form of sensors. However development of MEMS in general and sensors in particular poses one of the greatest challenges in today's experimental mechanics. Among MEMS, the greatest contemporary interest is in the area of inertial sensors because they have numerous uses ranging from everyday applications to highly specialized ones, including many industrial platforms. As such they have tremendous potential to affect future of humanity. However, advances in MEMS, such as pressure and temperature sensors as well as gyroscopes and

  19. The Legnaro National Laboratories and the SPES facility: nuclear structure and reactions today and tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, Giacomo; Fiorentini, Gianni

    2016-11-01

    There is a very long tradition of studying nuclear structure and reactions at the Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL) of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italian Institute of Nuclear Physics). The wide expertise acquired in building and running large germanium arrays has made the laboratories one of the most advanced research centers in γ-ray spectroscopy. The ’gamma group’ has been deeply involved in all the national and international developments of the last 20 years and is currently one of the major contributors to the AGATA project, the first (together with its American counterpart GRETINA) γ-detector array based on γ-ray tracking. This line of research is expected to be strongly boosted by the coming into operation of the SPES radioactive ion beam project, currently under construction at LNL. In this report, written on the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the Nobel prize awarded to Aage Bohr, Ben R Mottelson and Leo Rainwater and particularly focused on the physics of nuclear structure, we intend to summarize the different lines of research that have guided nuclear structure and reaction research at LNL in the last decades. The results achieved have paved the way for the present SPES facility, a new laboratories infrastructure producing and accelerating radioactive ion beams of fission fragments and other isotopes.

  20. Planetary Cartography and Mapping: where we are Today, and where we are Heading For?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naß, A.; Di, K.; Elgner, S.; van Gasselt, S.; Hare, T.; Hargitai, H.; Karachevtseva, I.; Kersten, E.; Manaud, N.; Roatsch, T.; Rossi, A. P.; Skinner, J., Jr.; Wählisch, M.

    2017-07-01

    Planetary Cartography does not only provides the basis to support planning (e.g., landing-site selection, orbital observations, traverse planning) and to facilitate mission conduct during the lifetime of a mission (e.g., observation tracking and hazard avoidance). It also provides the means to create science products after successful termination of a planetary mission by distilling data into maps. After a mission's lifetime, data and higher level products like mosaics and digital terrain models (DTMs) are stored in archives - and eventually into maps and higher-level data products - to form a basis for research and for new scientific and engineering studies. The complexity of such tasks increases with every new dataset that has been put on this stack of information, and in the same way as the complexity of autonomous probes increases, also tools that support these challenges require new levels of sophistication. In planetary science, cartography and mapping have a history dating back to the roots of telescopic space exploration and are now facing new technological and organizational challenges with the rise of new missions, new global initiatives, organizations and opening research markets. The focus of this contribution is to summarize recent activities in Planetary Cartography, highlighting current issues the community is facing to derive the future opportunities in this field. By this we would like to invite cartographers/researchers to join this community and to start thinking about how we can jointly solve some of these challenges.

  1. Body donations today and tomorrow: What is best practice and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riederer, Beat M

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable agreement that the use of human bodies for teaching and research remains important, yet not all universities use dissection to teach human gross anatomy. The concept of body donation has evolved over centuries and there are still considerable discrepancies among countries regarding the means by which human bodies are acquired and used for education and research. Many countries have well-established donation programs and use body dissection to teach most if not all human gross anatomy. In contrast, there are countries without donation programs that use unclaimed bodies or perhaps a few donated bodies instead. In several countries, use of cadavers for dissection is unthinkable for cultural or religious reasons. Against this background, successful donation programs are highlighted in the present review, emphasizing those aspects of the programs that make them successful. Looking to the future, we consider what best practice could look like and how the use of unclaimed bodies for anatomy teaching could be replaced. From an ethical point of view, countries that depend upon unclaimed bodies of dubious provenance are encouraged to use these reports and adopt strategies for developing successful donation programs. In many countries, the act of body donation has been guided by laws and ethical frameworks and has evolved alongside the needs for medical knowledge and for improved teaching of human anatomy. There will also be a future need for human bodies to ensure optimal pre- and post-graduate training and for use in biomedical research. Good body donation practice should be adopted wherever possible, moving away from the use of unclaimed bodies of dubious provenance and adopting strategies to favor the establishment of successful donation programs.

  2. The Massive Compound Cofre de Perote Shield Volcano: a Volcanological Oddity in the Eastern Mexican Volcanic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, L.; Carrasco-Nunez, G.; Diaz-Castellon, R.; Rodriguez, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    Cofre de Perote volcano anchors the northern end of the easternmost of several volcanic chains orthogonal to the E-W trend of the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB). Its structure, geochemistry, and volcanic history diverge significantly from that of the large dominantly andesitic stratovolcanoes that have been the major focus of research efforts in the MVB. Andesitic-trachyandesitic to dacitic-trachydacitic effusive activity has predominated at Cofre de Perote, forming a massive low-angle compound shield volcano that dwarfs the more typical smaller shield volcanoes of the central and western MVB. The 4282-m-high volcano overlooking Xalapa, the capital city of the State of Veracruz, has a diameter of about 30 km and rises more than 3000 m above the coastal plain to the east. Repeated edifice collapse has left massive horseshoe-shaped scarps that truncate the eastern side of the edifice. Five major evolutionary stages characterize the growth of this compound volcano: 1) emplacement of a multiple-vent dome complex forming the basal structure of Cofre de Perote around 1.9-1.3 Ma; 2) construction of the basal part of the compound shield volcano from at least two main upper-edifice vents at about 400 ka; 3) effusion of the summit dome-like lavas through multiple vents at ca. 240 ka; 4) eruption of a large number of geochemically diverse, alkaline and calc-alkaline Pleistocene-to-Holocene monogenetic cones (likely related to regional volcanism) through the flanks of the Cofre de Perote edifice; 5) late-stage, large-volume edifice collapse on at least two occasions (ca. 40 ka and ca. 10 ka), producing long-runout debris avalanches that traveled to the east. An undated tephra layer from Cofre de Perote overlies deposits likely of the youngest collapse. Cofre de Perote is one of several volcanoes in the roughly N-S-trending chain that has undergone major edifice collapse. As with Citlaltepetl (Pico de Orizaba) and Las Cumbres volcanoes, Cofre de Perote was constructed at the

  3. Field/in situ upgrading : beyond dilution limitations for today and tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira-Almao, P. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Schulich School of Engineering, Catalysis for Bitumen Upgrading and Hydrogen Production

    2009-07-01

    This presentation discussed the chemical and engineering challenges regarding the use of ultra dispersed, submicronic or nano sized catalysts and adsorbents (UDCAs) to bitumen and heavy oil upgrading for both upstream and downstream processes. These versatile particles can be sent to reactors, pipelines, porous media or anywhere that dense liquids can permeate. UDCAs contact heavy molecules within the reaction media, thereby increasing the percentage converted into cleaner, lighter molecules. The research group involved in this study has designed setups for reproducible, stable and reliable UDCA preparation that will enable unattended operation for in-situ upgrading. The research group is also developing methods to evaluate the nature of the catalyst active species with particular focus on the interaction of these particles with the molecular environments of heavy oils. Fluid dynamics simulation was used to produce methods for UDCA separation, redispersion-reactivation and recycling. The reactive pathways were investigated along with the dynamics of UDCAs agglomeration with temperature up to reaction conditions. Compared to conventional catalysts, UDCAs maintain site activity for longer periods because of the absence of pore plugging. As such, UD catalysts should be recycled to the reaction zone. tabs., figs.

  4. NASA's Earth Science Flight Program Meets the Challenges of Today and Tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianson, Eric E.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Earth science flight program is a dynamic undertaking that consists of a large fleet of operating satellites, an array of satellite and instrument projects in various stages of development, a robust airborne science program, and a massive data archiving and distribution system. Each element of the flight program is complex and present unique challenges. NASA builds upon its successes and learns from its setbacks to manage this evolving portfolio to meet NASA's Earth science objectives. NASA fleet of 16 operating missions provide a wide range of scientific measurements made from dedicated Earth science satellites and from instruments mounted to the International Space Station. For operational missions, the program must address issues such as an aging satellites operating well beyond their prime mission, constellation flying, and collision avoidance with other spacecraft and orbital debris. Projects in development are divided into two broad categories: systematic missions and pathfinders. The Earth Systematic Missions (ESM) include a broad range of multi-disciplinary Earth-observing research satellite missions aimed at understanding the Earth system and its response to natural and human-induced forces and changes. Understanding these forces will help determine how to predict future changes, and how to mitigate or adapt to these changes. The Earth System Science Pathfinder (ESSP) program provides frequent, regular, competitively selected Earth science research opportunities that accommodate new and emerging scientific priorities and measurement capabilities. This results in a series of relatively low-cost, small-sized investigations and missions. Principal investigators whose scientific objectives support a variety of studies lead these missions, including studies of the atmosphere, oceans, land surface, polar ice regions, or solid Earth. This portfolio of missions and investigations provides opportunity for investment in innovative Earth science that enhances

  5. The A.D. 472 ``Pollena'' eruption: volcanological and petrological data for this poorly-known, plinian-type event at vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi, Mauro; Santacroce, Roberto

    1983-09-01

    The pyroclastic products of a poorly-known eruption of Vesuvius (ascribed by a combination of historic and radiocarbon data to A.D. 472) have been investigated from both volcanological and petrological points of view. The eruptive sequence starts with pumice-fall deposits (three units can be recognized) that darken upwards where there are sandwave interbeds. Surge deposits cover the pumice-fall bed and thick pyroclastic-flow deposits represent the uppermost levels of the deposit. Isopach maps of both the pumice-fall and pyroclastic-flow deposits led to an estimate of the total volume of tephra of about 0.32 km 3. The eruptive sequence and the distribution of lithic ejecta are similar to those of the major Plinian eruptions of Somma-Vesuvius (although the volume involved is significantly lower) and reflect an increase in the hydromagmatic character of the eruption with time. The products range in composition from phonolites (first-erupted) to phonolitic leucitites with gradual changes upwards. Whole rock chemistry and microprobe mineralogy indicate that the Pollena sequence represents a liquid line of descent towards the phonolitic minimum of petrogeny's residua system. Fractionation occurred within a shallow magma chamber (P H 2O probably slightly higher than 1 kb) and was mainly controlled by leucite and clinopyroxene. The basic parental magma approached the composition of the recent period (A.D. 1631-1944), tephritic leucitites of Vesuvius. The phonolitic magma can be derived from a leucititic parent by fractionating about 50% solid phases. A two-stage fractionation model is suggested: the first stage occurred during the rise of magma from the deep source and the second within the shallow magma chamber. The rate of magma introduction during the 150 to 200 year repose time preceeding the eruption probably averaged 1.2 to 1.7 × 10 -3 km 3-yr -1. These conditions were probably favorable for the occurrence of magma-mixing within the convecting zone of the magma

  6. Dynamic Security Assessment of Danish Power System Based on Decision Trees: Today and Tomorrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rather, Zakir Hussain; Liu, Leo; Chen, Zhe;

    2013-01-01

    The research work presented in this paper analyzes the impact of wind energy, phasing out of central power plants and cross border power exchange on dynamic security of Danish Power System. Contingency based decision tree (DT) approach is used to assess the dynamic security of present and future...... Danish Power System. Results from offline time domain simulation for large number of possible operating conditions (OC) and critical contingencies are organized to build up the database, which is then used to predict the security of present and future power system. The mentioned approach is implemented...... in DIgSILENT PowerFactory environment and applied to western Danish Power System which is passing through a phase of major transformation. The results have shown that phasing out of central power plants coupled with large scale wind energy integration and more dependence on international ties can have...

  7. Policy and finance for preconception care opportunities for today and the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kay; Atrash, Hani; Johnson, Alison

    2008-01-01

    This special supplement of Women's Health Issues offers 2 types of articles related to the policy and finance context for improving preconception health and health care. These articles discuss the impact of finance and policy on preconception health and health care, as well as the strategies that are being used to overcome the challenge of implementing preconception care with limited resources and inadequate health coverage for women. Invited papers from authors with expertise in health policy and finance issues describe how women's health and preconception care fit into the larger debates on health reform and how the paradigm for women's health must change. Other invited papers discuss opportunities and challenges for using programs such as Medicaid, Title X Family Planning, Title V Maternal and Child Health Services Block Grant, Healthy Start, and Community Health Centers in improving preconception health and health care. Contributed articles on health services research in this supplement characterize the types of change occurring across the country. This paper also presents a framework for understanding the role of policy and finance in the larger Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Preconception Health and Health Care Initiative.

  8. One hundred years and still counting: the story of NEF--yesterday, today, and tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowar-Ferres, Susan L; Fitzpatrick, M Louise; McClure, Margaret L

    2014-01-01

    Nurses Educational Funds, Inc (NEF) is the oldest and largest professionally endorsed source of funds for advanced study in nursing, which celebrated its Centennial in 2012. This philanthropic nonprofit organization is notable for its roots; NEF was organized by nurses specifically for nurses. Its history dates back to 1912, when it began in memory of Isabel Hampton Robb at Teacher's College, where the first graduate nursing education programs began. The initial Robb Memorial Fund was incorporated as a nonprofit organization in 1941 and officially became Nursing Educational Funds, Inc, in 1954. The NEF's sole mission is to raise money and give it for graduate-level scholarships in nursing education, service, practice, and research. Since its origin, more than 1000 doctoral and master's students from a broad array of schools across the nation have been recipients of awards. The NEF Board is a totally volunteer, highly dedicated group of nursing, business, and other professional leaders, who are steadfastly committed to this critical effort. Scholarships for graduate nursing education are imperative to meet the need to grow the pipeline of faculty. As charged by the 2010 Institute of Medicine report, the goal to increase the number of baccalaureate nurses to 80% of the workforce and to double the number of nurses with doctoral degrees both by 2020 speak to the heart of NEF. Funds raised currently are largely from Board members, individual donors, modest foundational support, and a number of bequests. As the nursing population grows older, the potential for bequests or planned giving becomes a realistic goal. Former NEF scholars have not unfortunately been a financial source, although pay back is an expectation. Nurses are the best ones to tell this compelling story to corporations and foundations as NEF continues to persist in the commitment to support graduate nursing education.

  9. Getting value today and incentivising for the future: Pharmaceutical development and healthcare policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Munk Johannesen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To manage the challenge of limited healthcare resources and unlimited demand for healthcare, decision makers utilise a variety of demand side policies, such as health technology appraisals and international reference pricing to regulate price and utilisation. By controlling price and utilisation demand side policies determine the earnings potential, and hence the incentives to invest in research and development (R&D of new technologies. However, the impact of demand side policies on R&D incentives is seldom formally assessed.Based on the key assumption that intellectual property rights, i.e. patents, and expected rent are key drivers of pharmaceutical R&D, this work outlines a framework illustrating the link between demand side policies and pharmaceutical R&D incentives. By analysing how policies impact expected rent and consumer surplus, the framework is used to understand how commonly used demand side policies (including timing and length of reimbursement process, international reference pricing, parallel trade, and sequential adoption into clinical practice may influence R&D incentives.The analysis demonstrates that delayed reimbursement decisions as well as sequential adoption into clinical practise may in fact reduce both expected rent and consumer surplus. It is also demonstrated how international reference pricing is likely to increase consumer surplus at the expense of lower rent and thus lower R&D incentives.Although this work illustrates the importance of considering how demand side policies may impact long-term R&D incentives, it is important to note that the purpose has not been to prescribe which demand side policies should be utilised or how. Rather, the main contribution is to illustrate the need for a structured approach to the analysis of the complex, and at times highly politicised question of how demand side policies ultimately influence population health, both in the short and in the long term. 

  10. HOSPITALITY TODAY AND TOMORROW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray F. IUNIUS

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available As a wise man once said, “Don’t worry about what you don’t know. Be worried about what you think you know, but don’t.” Regarding different ways “hospitality” is understood, the root of the problem lies in part in the different interpretations that hospitality has in different cultures and languages. In American English, for example, when we speak about “hospitality” we first think of it as an industry and only secondarily as an attribute of an individual or community. In other cultures, the primary meaning of hospitality is more a characteristic of people, or of a country or city, etc., and encompasses such ideas as welcome, reception, amiability, generosity, etc. – not an industry! Even in American English, other words are sometimes used to describe the same economic activity: lodging, accommodation, etc.

  11. Photomasks today and tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiki, Geoffrey M.

    1995-07-01

    Successive generations of semiconductors have necessitated increasingly more complex technologies to produce the desired densities, speeds and other functions. The requirements placed on the photomasks used to produce large-scale integrated circuits have concurrently increased. These changing requirements have dictated photomask technology shifts from optical steppers to electron-beam and laser pattern generators, more tightly controlled processes, as well as the investigation of techniques such as phase-shifting. The outlook for the future indicates that requirements will continue to grow more complex. This presentation describes projected roadmaps for photomask specifications and some suggested strategies to meet these enhanced requirements. Potential problem areas are highlighted, as well as related issues pertaining to the mask equipment and materials industry. A brief overview is also given on the current challenges associated with photomasks with particular emphasis on half-micron DUV lithography, and the 0.35-, 0.25- and 0.18-micron challenges. Techniques such as optical proximity correction and phase-shifting are also discussed in terms of their applicability and insertion into manufacturing. The current status of X- ray masks, as well as projections for the technical requirements and capabilities associated with their manufacture, is included. An outline of the Microlithographic Mask Development (MMD) contract objectives is also presented.

  12. Standardization Today and Tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Order for the Whole World) Eberstein, H.-H.: Sicherheitstechnisches Recht und Normen ; in: Peters. 0. H. u. A. Meyna: Handbuch der Si- cherheitstechnik...on the Protection of Labor for the Development and Design Sector) Landis, J. W.: Freie Welt - freier Handel - freie Normen ; in: DIN-Mitteilungen 57...Norm auf die Vielfalt effect of company standard on variety KonformitAt zu nationalen Normen conformity to national standards Konformit6t zu

  13. 2017: beginning of a new era for chlamydia research in China and the rest of the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Huizhou; Zhong, Guangming

    2017-10-06

    The First Chinese Chlamydia Research Meeting was held in Lanzhou, China in May 2017, 60 years after the disclosure of reproducible isolation of Chlamydia trachomatis by (Fei-fan Tang). We report current state of the Chlamydia research community in China, and briefly review recent progress in Chlamydia volcanology. The meeting represents a new milestone for Chlamydia research in the country. The Chinese Chlamydia Research Society (CCRS) was formed during the meeting. Future meetings will be held biennially and should facilitate collaboration of Chinese researchers with their domestic and international colleagues. Copyright © 2017 Institut Pasteur. All rights reserved.

  14. Workshop on recent research in the Valles caldera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, G. (comp.)

    1985-02-01

    Over the last 5 years, there has been increased interest in the geology of the Jemez Mountains volcanic field, New Mexico. Of special interest is the Toledo-Valles caldera complex, which is targeted for research coring as part of the Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The general topics covered in this workshop were (1) hydrothermal systems and rock-water interactions, (2) volcanology and structural framework of the Jemez volcanic field, (3) determining the presence or absence of melt below the Valles caldera, and (4) deep coring and drilling technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for each presentation.

  15. Strategies for the implementation of a European Volcano Observations Research Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    Active volcanic areas in Europe constitute a direct threat to millions of people on both the continent and adjacent islands. Furthermore, eruptions of "European" volcanoes in overseas territories, such as in the West Indies, an in the Indian and Pacific oceans, can have a much broader impacts, outside Europe. Volcano Observatories (VO), which undertake volcano monitoring under governmental mandate and Volcanological Research Institutions (VRI; such as university departments, laboratories, etc.) manage networks on European volcanoes consisting of thousands of stations or sites where volcanological parameters are either continuously or periodically measured. These sites are equipped with instruments for geophysical (seismic, geodetic, gravimetric, electromagnetic), geochemical (volcanic plumes, fumaroles, groundwater, rivers, soils), environmental observations (e.g. meteorological and air quality parameters), including prototype deployment. VOs and VRIs also operate laboratories for sample analysis (rocks, gases, isotopes, etc.), near-real time analysis of space-borne data (SAR, thermal imagery, SO2 and ash), as well as high-performance computing centres; all providing high-quality information on the current status of European volcanoes and the geodynamic background of the surrounding areas. This large and high-quality deployment of monitoring systems, focused on a specific geophysical target (volcanoes), together with the wide volcanological phenomena of European volcanoes (which cover all the known volcano types) represent a unique opportunity to fundamentally improve the knowledge base of volcano behaviour. The existing arrangement of national infrastructures (i.e. VO and VRI) appears to be too fragmented to be considered as a unique distributed infrastructure. Therefore, the main effort planned in the framework of the EPOS-PP proposal is focused on the creation of services aimed at providing an improved and more efficient access to the volcanological facilities

  16. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A possible strategy to influence students' understanding and perception ... researcher in higher education teaching and learning facilitated the data- ..... B. Qualitative content analysis in nursing research: Concepts, procedures and measures.

  17. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A sequential mixed-methods research design was chosen. This research ... development of the questionnaire used in the second phase of the survey. Quantitative data ... Microsoft Office Excel 2010 spreadsheet, descriptive data analysis was applied .... undergraduate curriculum, and implementation and evaluation thereof,.

  18. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-03-02

    Mar 2, 2015 ... Shared and mutually beneficial resources within international research ... organizations[1-9]. ... facilitate research career paths, but few career models exist in Africa ..... international and local resources to clinical studies locally. The ability of ... investigators were seen as an important asset for the transfer of.

  19. The Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute Astro Space Center: yesterday, today, and tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagkesamanskii, Rustam D [Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory, Astro Space Center, Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2009-11-30

    The development of Russian (formerly Soviet) radio astronomy is indissolubly linked with the P N Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Russian Academy of Sciences. From the late 1940s, the institute conducted most of its radio astronomy research in the Crimea, at stations or on field trips; in the late 1950s, the center of gravity of research moved to the southern Moscow region, where one of the largest radio astronomy observatories in the country and in the world was developed within less than twenty years. The observatory unique instrumentation system is briefly reviewed in a historical perspective. Key research areas and some major achievements are outlined, and the prospects of the observatory as (currently) part of the LPI Astro Space Center are examined. (conferences and symposia)

  20. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    2012-02-17

    Feb 17, 2012 ... This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative ..... However, this system has great potential to negatively affect access to ... Dr. Samuel Yaw Opoku: Defining the Concept and Research Design; ...

  1. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2016-04-26

    Apr 26, 2016 ... Management of biomedical waste in two medical laboratories in Bangui, Central ... Research .... Central African Republic Ministry of Health and corresponding ethics ..... In CAR, the management of BW remains embryonic. It is.

  2. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-08-28

    Aug 28, 2015 ... Ethiopia, 2Bahir Dar Regional Health Research Laboratory Center, Department ... of Public Health, 4Institute of Medical Microbiology and Epidemiology of Infectious .... active ingredient x 10,000 dilution rate of product): 0.1%.

  3. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    2011-03-11

    Mar 11, 2011 ... ... to General Organization of Teaching Hospitals and Institutes, Egypt, 2Department of .... Ethiopia at Max-Burger Research Institute, Leipzig, Germany ... [22] than Croatia (50%), Australia (53%), Thailand (41%), Italy (32.6%), ...

  4. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    7, No. 1 AJHPE. Research. A comprehensive approach to curriculum evaluation is deemed ... While evaluators are guided by the experiences of using different methods, ..... provided a follow-up in-depth exploration of the quantitative results.

  5. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... community in the design, conduct and/or evaluation of these activities. ... During Phase I of the mixed-methods research design, data were collected by ... A questionnaire survey was administered to all students registered for ... Data analysis.

  6. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2016-02-03

    Feb 3, 2016 ... Published in partnership with the African Field Epidemiology Network (AFENET). (www.afenet.net) .... What is known about this topic ... India Co-ordinated Research Project. Ministry .... African Journal of Biotechnology. 2005 ...

  7. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    2011-12-06

    Dec 6, 2011 ... Asia indicate a high incidence of Kikuchi lymphadenitis [6]. However ... It is believed that information derived from this study will be of immense value to the attending physician and also form a baseline data for future research.

  8. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual ... [5] This highlights that teaching research methodology is inclined ... to evidence-based practice in final-year undergraduate physiotherapy students.

  9. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    curricula to address health systems changes and challenges .... Likert scale questions were used, along with open-ended qualitative questions. ... Clear communicator: Able to communicate important aspects of theory, research findings clearly ...

  10. researchers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    levels who is fluent in only Afrikaans and English. Differences in race .... The lack of knowledge of a particular vernacular often places a researcher firmly as an ..... discourse of African American women', Black women in the academy. Promises.

  11. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-06

    May 6, 2014 ... Methods. The researchers used an exploratory, sequential mixed-method design, ... This design is useful to explore a topic, using qualitative ... interview a Delphi questionnaire was used to gather additional quantitative.

  12. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research. Clinical teaching is a technique used in the education of nurses. It ... learnt in a contextualised learning environment, which should support them in their ..... development of continuing professional development strategies. This study ...

  13. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2016-03-03

    Mar 3, 2016 ... radiation therapy [9, 10]. The signs of obstructive ... year's undergraduate medical student: socio-demographic including age (in years), sex. .... awareness and enhance further research in this domain. Conclusion. Patients ...

  14. Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathematics Teaching, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Implications for teachers from Piagetian-oriented piagetian-oriented research on problem solving reported in an article by Eleanor Duckworth are presented. Edward de Bono's Children Solve Problems,'' a collection of examples, is also discussed. (MS)

  15. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2016-04-29

    Apr 29, 2016 ... performance hence workplace training is tied to achieving organizational aims and objectives. .... Ethical consideration: Permission to conduct research was sought from the County ..... Everybody Business: Strengthening.

  16. The Role of Explicit and Tacit Knowledge in Purchasing and Supply Management (PSM) Today and in Future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bals, Lydia; Kelly, Steve; Schulze, Heike

    While research has shed considerable light on the organizational-level maturity of PSM organizations, the individual competencies of PSM, especially in light of current developments in the workplace such as digitization, have received relatively less attention. Firstly, this paper identifies the ...

  17. Engaging the students of today and preparing the catchment hydrologists of tomorrow: student-centered approaches in hydrology education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Ngambeki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As hydrologists confront the future of water resources on a globalized, resource-scarce and human-impacted planet, the educational preparation of future generations of water scientists becomes increasingly important. Although hydrology inherits a tradition of teacher-centered direct instruction – based on lecture, reading and assignment formats – a growing body of knowledge derived from engineering education research suggests that modifications to these methods could firstly improve the quality of instruction from a student perspective, and secondly contribute to better professional preparation of hydrologists, in terms of their abilities to transfer knowledge to new contexts, to frame and solve novel problems, and to work collaboratively in uncertain environments. Here we review the theoretical background and empirical literature relating to adopting student-centered and inductive models of teaching and learning. Models of student-centered learning and their applications in engineering education are introduced by outlining the approaches used by several of the authors to introduce student-centered and inductive educational strategies into their university classrooms. Finally, the relative novelty of research on engineering instruction in general and hydrology in particular creates opportunities for new partnerships between education researchers and hydrologists to explore the discipline-specific needs of hydrology students and develop new approaches for instruction and professional preparation of hydrologists.

  18. Engaging the students of today and preparing the catchment hydrologists of tomorrow: student-centered approaches in hydrology education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngambeki, I.; Thompson, S. E.; Troch, P. A.; Sivapalan, M.; Evangelou, D.

    2012-01-01

    As hydrologists confront the future of water resources on a globalized, resource-scarce and human-impacted planet, the educational preparation of future generations of water scientists becomes increasingly important. Although hydrology inherits a tradition of teacher-centered direct instruction - based on lecture, reading and assignment formats - a growing body of knowledge derived from engineering education research suggests that modifications to these methods could firstly improve the quality of instruction from a student perspective, and secondly contribute to better professional preparation of hydrologists, in terms of their abilities to transfer knowledge to new contexts, to frame and solve novel problems, and to work collaboratively in uncertain environments. Here we review the theoretical background and empirical literature relating to adopting student-centered and inductive models of teaching and learning. Models of student-centered learning and their applications in engineering education are introduced by outlining the approaches used by several of the authors to introduce student-centered and inductive educational strategies into their university classrooms. Finally, the relative novelty of research on engineering instruction in general and hydrology in particular creates opportunities for new partnerships between education researchers and hydrologists to explore the discipline-specific needs of hydrology students and develop new approaches for instruction and professional preparation of hydrologists.

  19. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2013-02-25

    Feb 25, 2013 ... Of these 56 eyes, the visual acuity in 49 eyes (87.5%) improved with pinhole. Twenty seven pupils had ... (www.afenet.net). Research ... primary basic 1 to 6 and aged 5 to 15 years were included in the study. The United ...

  20. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    collaboration, but also in less tangible ways affecting quality of research.[5] ... Methods. A 40-hour workshop in biostatistical reasoning was conducted ... test median score was 68% (IQR 62 - 76%), with p<0.0001 for the overall comparison of pre- v. post-scores. ... limitations of a traditional lecture-based mode of instruction.

  1. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2014-03-13

    Mar 13, 2014 ... &Corresponding author: Dr. Oliver Ezechi, Clinical Sciences Division, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, ... with Hepatitis B and C Virus infection in pregnant HIV positive Nigerians. ... Whether or not HCV directly impacts HIV disease ..... natural history, fibrosis, and impact of antiretroviral treatment:.

  2. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    understood in the profession, evolved from therapeutic activity (within a medi- cal model ... facilitate students' ability to examine institutional systems that hinder ..... don't have connections with each other … we went to the schools and were told ... for change or conduct action research projects that deal with occupational.

  3. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-12-11

    Dec 11, 2015 ... ... Dschang, Cameroon, 2Division of Health Operations Research, Ministry of Public ... This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons ... not yet been investigated but may can be explained by weakness of .... Cameroonian market and why not apply for surveillance of.

  4. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    by teaching them skills on how to acquire and appraise knowledge for a particular ... [3] Similarities have been noted in the roles of lecturers that facilitate learning rather than ..... Student feedback related to facilitators of and barriers to learning. Facilitators of ... 'Sometimes time (clinical, research, social, sport) was limited.'.

  5. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    2011-08-25

    Aug 25, 2011 ... completely replaced animals with computer modeling, manikins and ... distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original ... developed internal guidelines on the use of animals in research in 2004 [13]. ... Only one institution used human cell cultures as a replacement to live animal use.

  6. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2013-08-05

    Aug 5, 2013 ... In 2007, The World Health Organization (WHO) recommended ... are taken nearer to the community through clinical outreach ... Sample size and Sampling procedure ... researchers shared and debated the way each of them understood .... this may involve selling off assets to get the money for transport.

  7. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2016-04-20

    Apr 20, 2016 ... ... Journal - ISSN 1937-8688. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative ... diabetes mellitus, obesity, family history of premature CHD in a first ... was reviewed and approved by the Hospital's Research and Ethics .... apoptosis of peripheral adipocytes, decreased pre-adipocyte.

  8. Preferences of elderly music listeners residing in nursing homes for art music, traditional jazz, popular music of today, and country music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, J L

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate seniors' comparative music preference for four generic styles including art music, country music, popular music of today, and traditional jazz. The study also attempted to identify certain variables that have an effect on preference. Sixty-three subjects with a mean age of 82.5 from four nursing homes in the South Central Michigan area participated in the study. An interview and musical preference test were administered to the subjects individually. The listening test consisted of 16 music selections, four from each style. The seniors judged how much they liked the selections on a scale from 1 to 5, with 5 indicating greatest preference. Results indicated that country music style was preferred the most, followed by traditional jazz, art music, and lastly popular music. Variables that were found to affect preference were education level, community size in which the seniors grew up, and music training outside the school setting.

  9. Economic sociology: today and tomorrow

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Richard Swedberg

    2004-01-01

    This article ponders over the contemporary rebirth of economic sociology, attempting to distinguish its American and European traits, emphasizing the works and conceptual models of its respective pioneers...

  10. OCLC: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K. Wayne

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the Online Computer Library Center's (OCLC) evolution as an organization, highlighting its nonprofit status, financial philosophy, membership role in governance, collections and technical services, resource sharing, and reference services. Presents a chronology of OCLC products, services, and technological innovation 1967-1997. (PEN)

  11. Lighting for Today and Tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how technology has contributed to brighter, less expensive, and more efficient lighting. Four key areas where suspended Direct/Indirect lighting out performs parabolic troffers are examined. (GR)

  12. [Peritoneal dialysis today and tomorrow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grangier, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis was first used in the 1980s. Less well-known than haemodialysis, it represents an important treatment option for elderly patients at home. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Volcanology and hazards of phreatomagmatic basaltic eruptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmith, Johanne

    2017-01-01

    of paroxysmal peaks at 25± 6 km. A new quantitative method producing grain shape data of bulk samples of volcanic ash was developed to correlate the bulk average grain shape with magma fragmentation mechanisms. The new shape index: the regularity index (RI) was developed from a manually classified reference...... of 0.134 ± 0.001 (2σ) and these samples represent the extremes of the fragmentation spectrum. Subglacial samples show intermediate RIs of 0.168 ± 0.002 (2σ), 0.175 ± 0.002 (2σ) and lacustrine samples have slightly higher RI of 0.187 ± 0.002 (2σ). The method uses automated image analysis of 2D...... of future hazard and risk assessments of one of the most hazardous volcanoes in Iceland. Furthermore the RI method is expected to be widely applicable to tephra morphology studies and to be helpful during the next volcanic ash crises....

  14. Muons tomography applied to geosciences and volcanology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marteau, J., E-mail: marteau@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (UMR CNRS-IN2P3 5822), Universite Lyon 1, Lyon (France); Gibert, D.; Lesparre, N. [Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (UMR CNRS 7154), Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Nicollin, F. [Geosciences Rennes (CNRS UMR 6118), Universite Rennes 1, Bat. 15 Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes cedex (France); Noli, P. [Universita degli studi di Napoli Federico II and INFN sez. Napoli (Italy); Giacoppo, F. [Laboratory for High Energy Physics, University of Bern, SidlerStrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2012-12-11

    Imaging the inner part of large geological targets is an important issue in geosciences with various applications. Different approaches already exist (e.g. gravimetry, electrical tomography) that give access to a wide range of information but with identified limitations or drawbacks (e.g. intrinsic ambiguity of the inverse problem, time consuming deployment of sensors over large distances). Here we present an alternative and complementary tomography method based on the measurement of the cosmic muons flux attenuation through the geological structures. We detail the basics of this muon tomography with a special emphasis on the photo-active detectors.

  15. Application of Digital Terrain Model to volcanology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Achilli

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional reconstruction of the ground surface (Digital Terrain Model, DTM, derived by airborne GPS photogrammetric surveys, is a powerful tool for implementing morphological analysis in remote areas. High accurate 3D models, with submeter elevation accuracy, can be obtained by images acquired at photo scales between 1:5000-1:20000. Multitemporal DTMs acquired periodically over volcanic area allow the monitoring of areas interested by crustal deformations and the evaluation of mass balance when large instability phenomena or lava flows have occurred. The work described the results obtained from the analysis of photogrammetric data collected over the Vulcano Island from 1971 to 2001. The data, processed by means of the Digital Photogrammetry Workstation DPW 770, provided DTM with accuracy ranging between few centimeters to few decimeters depending on the geometric image resolution, terrain configuration and quality of photographs.

  16. Muons tomography applied to geosciences and volcanology

    CERN Document Server

    Marteau, J; Lesparre, N; Nicollin, F; Noli, P; Giacoppo, F

    2012-01-01

    Imaging the inner part of large geological targets is an important issue in geosciences with various applications. Dif- ferent approaches already exist (e.g. gravimetry, electrical tomography) that give access to a wide range of informations but with identified limitations or drawbacks (e.g. intrinsic ambiguity of the inverse problem, time consuming deployment of sensors over large distances). Here we present an alternative and complementary tomography method based on the measurement of the cosmic muons flux attenuation through the geological structures. We detail the basics of this muon tomography with a special emphasis on the photo-active detectors.

  17. Mount Vesuvius: 2000 years of volcanological observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandone, Roberto; Giacomelli, Lisetta; Gasparini, Paolo

    1993-11-01

    Mount Vesuvius had eruptions ranging between VEI 5+ to 0-1 during the last 2000 years. Infrequent explosive eruptions are recorded during the period 79 AD to 1631. Since the violent explosive eruption of 1631, the volcano has been in persistent activity, rebuilding the morphology that it had before that eruption. A succession of explosive and effusive eruptions occurred until 1944, with a predominance of short and violent episodes until 1872 and longer effusive eruptions since that date. Two factors mainly controlled the character of volcanic activity during this period: (1) the strength of the cone, which allowed, in the earlier period, an easy fracturing, rapid drainage, and pressure release of the magma column; (2) the interaction between magma and water, which enhanced the explosivity of several eruptions. The volcano appears to have reached a stage of quiescence because it finally attained a shape of equilibrium in which the height of the mountain is sufficient to counterbalance the buoyancy of the magma.

  18. Researching research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pais, Alexandre; Valero, Paola

    2012-01-01

    We discuss contemporary theories in mathematics education in order to do research on research. Our strategy consists of analysing discursively and ideologically recent key publications addressing the role of theory in mathematics education research. We examine how the field fabricates its object...... to a reflexivity of research on its discourses and effects. Furthermore, they enable us to present a clear distinction between what has been called the sociopolitical turn in mathematics education research and what we call a positioning of mathematics education (research) practices in the Political....

  19. Online Classroom Research and Analysis Activities Using MARGINS-Related Resources for the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Subduction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. G.

    2007-12-01

    Students today have online access to nearly unlimited scientific information in an entirely unfiltered state. As such, they need guidance and training in identifying and assessing high-quality information resources for educational and research use. The extensive research data resources available online for the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) subduction system that have been developed with MARGINS Program and related NSF funding are an ideal venue for focused Web research exercises that can be tailored to a range of undergraduate geoscience courses. This presentation highlights student web research activities examining: a) The 2003-2005 eruptions of Anatahan Volcano in the Mariana volcanic arc. MARGINS-supported geophysical research teams were in the region when the eruption initiated, permitting a unique "event response" data collection and analysis process, with preliminary results presented online at websites linked to the MARGINS homepage, and ultimately published in a special issue of the Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. In this activity, students will conduct a directed Web surf/search effort for information on and datasets from the Anatahan arc volcano, which they will use in an interpretive study of recent magmatic activity in the Mariana arc. This activity is designed as a homework exercise for use in a junior-senior level Petrology course, but could easily be taken into greater depth for the benefit of graduate-level volcanology or geochemistry offerings. b) Geochemical and mineralogical results from ODP Legs 125 and 195 focused on diapiric serpentinite mud volcanoes, which erupt cold, high pH fluids, serpentine muds, and serpentinized ultramafic clasts at a number of sites in the forearc region of the Mariana subduction zone. The focus of this activity is an examination of the trace element chemistry of the forearc serpentines and their associated upwelling porefluids as a means of understanding the roles of ionic radius, valence, and system

  20. Abstracts and final report of the Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence Coalition on Sustainability workshop on climate change and coastal communities: concerns and challenges for today and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-11-01

    The participants at this workshop presented important climate change information from a national perspective and provided an opportunity for stakeholder comments on the Southeastern New Brunswick Sea-Level Rise Project. The abstracts presented in this report outlined current research on ocean current variabilities; climate change and coastal erosion impacts in the Gulf of St. Lawrence estuary; and agriculture and climate change. Community focus presentations addressed issues associated with coastal vulnerability to climate change and sea-level rise in Haida Gwaii, BC; Inuit observations of climate change; impacts and adaptation to climate change in Atlantic Canada; and communities, fisheries and tourism. Future research orientations from governments were also examined, with information on protection policies for coastal areas; climate change impact and adaptation directorates; climate change scenarios; and potential impacts and possible adaptations to the communities in the region. The studies indicate that the sea level will rise by 70 cm by the year 2100 in the southeastern Gulf of St. Lawrence. Immediate implementation of New Brunswick's Coastal Areas Protection Policy was recommended. Climate change is an issue that contains ecological, social and economic aspects, linking science to local knowledge. This final report contains 25 abstracts presented at the conference. A participant list and an appendix of the workshop's agenda was also included.

  1. 植物染色体原位杂交技术的发展与现状%Today and Yesterday on in situ Hybridization of Plant Chromosome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建国; 朱志玉; 石春海; 樊龙江

    2001-01-01

    In this paper,we briefly introduce the development of in situ hybridization of plant chromosome. The fundamental principle and method of many main kinds of in situ hybridization have been reviewed for different research purposes,and their application and development on plant cytogenetics also been recommended.%本文主要介绍植物染色体原位杂交技术的发展历史,评述适用于不同研究目的的各种主要原位杂交技术的基本原理和方法,并介绍该技术在植物细胞遗传学领域的应用和发展。

  2. Parenting Young Children Today: What the Research Tells Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Claire; Ciervo, Lynette

    2010-01-01

    In the summer of 2009, ZERO TO THREE commissioned Hart Research Associates to conduct a survey among parents of children from birth to 36 months old. This survey of 1,615 parents provides insight on the experiences of parents today and the factors that influence their approach to parenting. The survey also explores those on whom they rely for…

  3. CNR LARA project, Italy: Airborne laboratory for environmental research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, R.; Cavalli, R. M.; Fiumi, L.; Marino, C. M.; Pignatti, S.

    1995-01-01

    The increasing interest for the environmental problems and the study of the impact on the environment due to antropic activity produced an enhancement of remote sensing applications. The Italian National Research Council (CNR) established a new laboratory for airborne hyperspectral imaging, the LARA Project (Laboratorio Aero per Ricerche Ambientali - Airborne Laboratory for Environmental Research), equipping its airborne laboratory, a CASA-212, mainly with the Daedalus AA5000 MIVIS (Multispectral Infrared and Visible Imaging Spectrometer) instrument. MIVIS's channels, spectral bandwidths, and locations are chosen to meet the needs of scientific research for advanced applications of remote sensing data. MIVIS can make significant contributions to solving problems in many diverse areas such as geologic exploration, land use studies, mineralogy, agricultural crop studies, energy loss analysis, pollution assessment, volcanology, forest fire management and others. The broad spectral range and the many discrete narrow channels of MIVIS provide a fine quantization of spectral information that permits accurate definition of absorption features from a variety of materials, allowing the extraction of chemical and physical information of our environment. The availability of such a hyperspectral imager, that will operate mainly in the Mediterranean area, at the present represents a unique opportunity for those who are involved in environmental studies and land-management to collect systematically large-scale and high spectral-spatial resolution data of this part of the world. Nevertheless, MIVIS deployments will touch other parts of the world, where a major interest from the international scientific community is present.

  4. Th.G. Sahama’s (1910–1983 volcanological and mineralogical studies in Africa: Part II. Minerals of granitic pegmatites and other mineral occurrences of eastern and southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilmari Haapala

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Eight mineralogical expeditions during 1961–1974 to pegmatites and other mineral occurrences of eastern and southern Africa produced abundant research material. Dr. O. v. Knorring from University of Leeds, U.K., participated in some expeditions, and ProfessorsJ.M. Correia Neves and J.E. Lopes Nunes participated in the study the granite pegmatites of Zambezia, northeastern Mozambique, where in the 1960’s and 1970’s were active mining operations. From the Zambezian pegmatites, Sahama and his coworkers and assistants published studies on the Ta-Nb minerals (tantalite-columbite, wodginite, ixiolite,niobian wolframite, niobian rutile as well as the bismuth and antimony minerals, including a new mineral, “natural monoclinic bismuth vanadate”(later named clinobisvanite. As a result of a systematic research, based on geochemical deductions, a new mineral, hafnon, was found as the high hafnium member of the isomorphic zircon-hafnon series. From the Buranga pegmatite in Rwanda, several phosphate minerals, including a new mineral species, burangaite, were described. In connection with the mineralogical research ofthe tungsten deposits of Uganda and Rwanda, two new secondary tungsten minerals, mpororoite and cerotungstite, were found. From Madagascar, Sahama collected material for mineralogical studies of sapphirine and kornerupine, and from Namibia, a new mineralspecies, namibite, was described.

  5. Big Ideas for the Future: UK Research That Will Have a Profound Effect on Our Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Universities UK, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Big ideas for the future is a joint report by Universities UK and Research Councils UK, published as part of the second annual Universities Week campaign. This new report explores the excellent research taking place in UK higher education today and what it will mean for us in 20 years' time. It demonstrates the value of public investment in higher…

  6. Researcher / Researched: Repositioning Research Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerwald, Agnes May Lin

    2013-01-01

    "Researcher / Researched" calls for a complementary research methodology by proposing autoethnography as both a method and text that crosses the boundaries of conventional and alternative methodologies in higher education. Autoethnography rearticulates the researcher / researched positions by blurring the boundary between them. This…

  7. Supplement to the technical assessment of geoscience-related research for geothermal energy technology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-09-01

    Detailed information (e.g., project title, sponsoring organization, research area, objective status, etc.) is presented for 338 geoscience/geothermal related projects. A summary of the projects conducted by sponsoring organization is presented and an easy reference to obtain detailed information on the number and type of efforts being sponsored is presented. The projects are summarized by research area (e.g., volcanology, fluid inclusions, etc.) and an additional project cross-reference mechanism is also provided. Subsequent to the collection of the project information, a geosciences classification system was developed to categorize each project by research area (e.g., isotope geochemistry, heat flow studies) and by type of research conducted (e.g., theoretical research, modeling/simulation). A series of matrices is included that summarize, on a project-by-project basis, the research area addressed and the type of R and D conducted. In addition, a summary of the total number of projects by research area and R and D type is given.

  8. Composites and Construction: Yesterday, today and tomorrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manso, J.

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available We will try to give a idea about the possibilities of the Composites Materials in the Construction area, examining their applications since along time. We will begin by the integral closing the building, based in the panel sandwich concept. Immediately we will comment a new material, the COMPOSTEEL, a hybrid product made of composites plus steel, indicated to the structural country. Next, we will study the "Continuous Frame" oriented also at the structural area. Finally, we will finish with two ideas:
    a The composites solving the seism phenomenon. b The composites as a ceiling to big areas.

    We will try to give a idea about the possibilities of the Composites Materials in the Construction area, examining their applications since along time. We will begin by the integral closing the building, based in the panel sandwich concept. Immediately we will comment a new material, the COMPOSTEEL, a hybrid product made of composites plus steel, indicated to the structural country. Next, we will study the "Continuous Frame" oriented also at the structural area. Finally, we will finish with two ideas:
    a The composites solving the seism phenomenon. b The composites as a ceiling to big areas.

  9. The M1 Abrams Today and Tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Somalia hobbled mission efforts, requiring United Nations armor (Pakistani forces) be called upon to mount a rescue effort of surrounded Army Rangers...overrun such a force would prove very difficult, as Iraqi forces in Baghdad discovered in 2003.14 Army Chief of Staff Gen. Raymond Odierno has...Jane’s, 2010), 177. 20. James Logan , former U.S. Army armor officer, with exten- sive experience in analyzing armored vehicles and programs at the

  10. Global aromatics supply. Today and tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M. [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Aromatics are the essential building blocks for some of the largest petrochemical products in today's use. To the vast majority they are consumed to produce intermediates for polymer products and, hence, contribute to our modern lifestyle. Their growth rates are expected to be in line with GDP growth in future. This contrasts the significantly lower growth rates of the primary sources for aromatics - fuel processing and steam cracking of naphtha fractions. A supply gap can be expected to open up in future for which creative solutions will be required. (orig.)

  11. [Today and tomorrow of forensic thanatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raszeja, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    The essence of post-mortem examination and its special place among other disciplines of forensic medicine were presented. Attention was drawn to the role of better understanding of phenomena occurring during and directly after death in the development of forensic medicine. Progress in determination of the time of death and in estimation of the intravital character of injuries found on the corpse was discussed. The need for a wider application of results of bio- and thanatochemical analyses in determination of the cause of death and its mechanism was emphasized. Examples of progress in this domain were presented, based on a number of papers published in this field, especially in Poland. Finally, the author pointed to the necessity of upgrading training of medical doctors in the field of thanatology.

  12. The Pomeron: yesterday, today and tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, E. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]|[Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St Petersburg (Russian Federation). Theory Dept.

    1995-03-01

    These lectures are a review of the main ideas and approaches to the Pomeron structure. They intend to give a brief review of the Reggeon Calculus, which was the first attempt to build the effective theory of the strong interaction at high energy. In spite of the fact that this approach turns out to be inconsistent and in lectures we show why, the Reggeon approach was and is the main source of the terminology and phenomenology for high energy soft interactions. The detail description of the QCD approach to high energy interaction. They try to combine the rigorous approach in perturbative QCD with more simple, intuitive guess based on general properties of QCD to clarify our expectations and predictions. (author). 52 refs, 36 figs, 1 tab.

  13. Combat Damage Control Resuscitation: Today and Tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    blood components to optimize hemostasis, the concept of permissive hypotension is used to decrease the bleeding from uncontrolled bleeding points, the...physiologic deterioration. The future of damage control resuscitation will most likely involve the refinement and customization of blood components for the

  14. Life sciences today and tomorrow: emerging biotechnologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, E Diane

    2016-07-03

    The purpose of this review is to survey current, emerging and predicted future biotechnologies which are impacting, or are likely to impact in the future on the life sciences, with a projection for the coming 20 years. This review is intended to discuss current and future technical strategies, and to explore areas of potential growth during the foreseeable future. Information technology approaches have been employed to gather and collate data. Twelve broad categories of biotechnology have been identified which are currently impacting the life sciences and will continue to do so. In some cases, technology areas are being pushed forward by the requirement to deal with contemporary questions such as the need to address the emergence of anti-microbial resistance. In other cases, the biotechnology application is made feasible by advances in allied fields in biophysics (e.g. biosensing) and biochemistry (e.g. bio-imaging). In all cases, the biotechnologies are underpinned by the rapidly advancing fields of information systems, electronic communications and the World Wide Web together with developments in computing power and the capacity to handle extensive biological data. A rationale and narrative is given for the identification of each technology as a growth area. These technologies have been categorized by major applications, and are discussed further. This review highlights: Biotechnology has far-reaching applications which impinge on every aspect of human existence. The applications of biotechnology are currently wide ranging and will become even more diverse in the future. Access to supercomputing facilities and the ability to manipulate large, complex biological datasets, will significantly enhance knowledge and biotechnological development.

  15. The fuel cell yesterday, today and tomorrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojević Dušan D.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The fuel cell has some characteristics of a battery carrying out direct chemical conversion into electric energy. In relation to classical systems used for chemical energy conversion into electric power, through heat energy and mechanical operation, the fuel cell has considerably higher efficiency. The thermo-mechanical conversion of chemical into electric energy, in thermal power plants is carried out with 30% efficiency, while the efficiency of chemical conversion into electric energy, using a fuel cell is up to 60%. With the exception of the space programme, the commercial usage of the fuel cell did not exist up to 1990, when the most developed countries started extensive financial support of this source of energy. By 1995, more than a hundred fuel cells were installed in the process of electricity generation in Europe, USA and Japan, while nowadays there are thousands of installations, of efficient energetic capacity. Because of its superior characteristics, the fuel cell compared to other commercial electric energy producers, fulfills the most important condition - it does not pollute or if it does, the level is minimal. With such characteristics the fuel cell can help solve the growing conflict between the further economic development of mankind and the preservation of a clean and healthy natural environment.

  16. Tertiary education in Latvia today and tomorrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Panina

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The market economy principles are deeply implemented in the system of tertiary education in Latvia. The share of private sector and private funding is significantly big, as well as the variety of study programs. Nevertheless it is only one side of supply-demand dimension that might be seriously changed by economic crisis. The author draws tertiary sector development scenarios considering probable demographic, economical and political trends. The more efficient and effective interaction of tertiary and business sectors, the development oriented decentralisation of state macro economical and regional policy are the decisive success factors for sustainability both of the state and tertiary sector.

  17. Big Five Lessons for Today and Tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    Center at Fort Polk, Louisiana. In terms of personnel, there was recognition that smart soldiers are better soldiers and make the equipment they...the back, and even a toilet ! Armor was supposed to be able to stop 14.5mm machine gun fire. The vehicle was amphibious as well as...Irwin, California. In terms of personnel, there was recognition that smart soldiers are better soldiers who make the equipment they use more capable

  18. Forward osmosis processes: Yesterday, today and tomorrow

    KAUST Repository

    Chung, Tai-Shung

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this short communication is to share our perspectives on future R & D for FO processes in order to develop effective and sustainable technologies for water, energy and pharmaceutical production. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Enteric neuropathies: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giorgio, Roberto; Bianco, Francesca; Latorre, Rocco; Caio, Giacomo; Clavenzani, Paolo; Bonora, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Enteric neuropathy is a term indicating an impairment of the innervation supplying the gastrointestinal tract. The clinical phenotypes of the enteric neuropathies are the 'tip of the iceberg' of severe functional digestive diseases, such as intestinal pseudo-obstruction syndromes (e.g., chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction). Despite progress acquired over the years, the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to enteric neuropathies are still far from being elucidated and the therapeutic approaches to these patients are mainly supportive, rather than curative.The purpose of this chapter is to review the advancements that have been done in the knowledge of enteric neuropathies identified in adult patients ('tomorrow'), going through where we currently are ('today') following a brief history of the major milestones on the pioneering discoveries in the field ('yesterday').

  20. CMS tracking challenges yesterday, today and tomorrow

    CERN Document Server

    Brondolin, Erica

    2015-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the two general purpose experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (CERN). Until 2012 (Run1), pp collisions have been delivered with a minimal bunch time separation of 50 ns and a mean of about 15 collisions per bunch crossing. After the end of the long shut-down this year, LHC is foreseen to ultimately exceed an instantaneous luminosity of $10^{34}cm^{-2}s^{-1}$, which means a bunch time separation of 25 ns with a mean of more than 25 inelastic collisions superimposed on the event of interest (Run2). In this high-occupancy environment, obtaining a precise particle momentum reconstruction is one of the biggest challenges. To this end, the CMS collaboration has constructed the largest silicon tracker ever and has developed a sophisticated tracking software, that is able to successfully reconstruct the hundreds of tracks produced in each beam crossing.However, more challenges lie ahead. CERN is planning an upgrade program of the LHC collider which will bring the luminosi...

  1. Terahertz spectroscopy – yesterday, today and tomorrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    THz spectroscopy exploits the farthest region of the infrared, at very long wavelengths. In this interesting spectral range we observe fingerprint spectra of explosives and other solid chemicals, we observe the interplay between molecules in the liquid phase, and we observe the motion of electron...

  2. Pancreatic cancer: yesterday, today and tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Daniel; Tingstedt, Bobby; Andersson, Bodil; Holmquist, Fredrik; Sturesson, Christian; Williamsson, Caroline; Sasor, Agata; Borg, David; Bauden, Monika; Andersson, Roland

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of our most lethal malignancies. Despite substantial improvements in the survival rates for other major cancer forms, pancreatic cancer survival rates have remained relatively unchanged since the 1960s. Pancreatic cancer is usually detected at an advanced stage and most treatment regimens are ineffective, contributing to the poor overall prognosis. Herein, we review the current understanding of pancreatic cancer, focusing on central aspects of disease management from radiology, surgery and pathology to oncology.

  3. Shengli Oil Fields: Today and Tomorrow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Renjie

    1996-01-01

    @@ Shengli oil area lies in the Yellow River Delta, in the north of Shandong Province bordering the Bohai Bay. The area is scattered over 28 counties, covering 37 000 square kilom eters. The main part of exploration and exploitation is located on both sides of the Yellow River estuary within the territory of Dongying City.

  4. Digital video technology, today and tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, J.

    1994-10-01

    Digital video is probably computing's fastest moving technology today. Just three years ago, the zenith of digital video technology on the PC was the successful marriage of digital text and graphics with analog audio and video by means of expensive analog laser disc players and video overlay boards. The state of the art involves two different approaches to fully digital video on computers: hardware-assisted and software-only solutions.

  5. PV Technology for Today and Tomorrow (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, S.

    2010-08-13

    The presentation was given as a webinar to the Solar Instructor Training Network on August 13, 2010. It summarizes the three primary types of photovoltaic technologies, why the three approaches are useful and some advantages and disadvantages of each approach. At the end is an answer to a question that was asked.

  6. Gold in the past, today and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rudolf

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with gold, which is described as a chemical element. Special attention is paid to its physical-chemical properties and, furthermore, where or in what form it can be found in nature. We discuss the role it has played through history and we inform how gold has been developed to the level it has reached today’s value. Still more, when gold is broken into nanoparticles, this form could be highly useful for a wide range of processes, including general nanotechnology, electronics manufacturing and the synthesizing of different functional materials. It is important that we know that gold is also used in industry in many engineering applications (contacts in micro-electronics and medicine (dental alloys, implants.

  7. Gold in the past, today and future

    OpenAIRE

    Rudolf, R; Anžel, M.; Marković, E.; M. Čolić; D. Stamenković

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with gold, which is described as a chemical element. Special attention is paid to its physical-chemical properties and, furthermore, where or in what form it can be found in nature. We discuss the role it has played through history and we inform how gold has been developed to the level it has reached today’s value. Still more, when gold is broken into nanoparticles, this form could be highly useful for a wide range of processes, including general nanotechnology, electronics m...

  8. Alternative motor fuels today and tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensaid, B

    2004-07-01

    Today, petroleum products account for 97% of the energy consumed in road transport. The purpose of replacing these products with alternative energies is to reduce oil dependence as well as greenhouse gas emissions. The high price of oil has promoted the use of 'conventional' alternative motor fuels (biofuels, LPG, NGV) and also renewed interest in syn-fuels (GTL, CTL, BTL) that have already given rise to industrial and pilot projects. (author)

  9. Augmented Reality in Sports: Today and Tomorrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafer BOZYER

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The rapid change experienced in the field of Information Technologies makes the informati cs more tangible in daily life. Today, it became possible to encounter with the informatics applications almost all the disciplines. As a matter of course, many informatics applications are put into the practice regarding the sports discipline. Because of the condition that the power of information processing has increased and the studies on wearable technol ogies in addition to the expert system design, augmented reality (AR has become a topic which gains imp ortance in the field of sports. There are many studies that are conducted with the aim of increasing the efficiency of physical activities done in many sports branches, ensuring a more fair management of competitions and providing the opportunity for spectators to watch the competitions in a more comfortable and efficient way. In this study; the information about the current augmented reality practices th at are used in various sports branches has been given and the mobile and interactive augmented reality practices which are possible to be seen in future have been mentioned. In addition, there is an augmented reality practice which is designed with the aim of ensuring that the shoots of sports people who are interested in archery, are more stable and of ensuring that the trainings and exercises are more efficient by stating to the sports people whether he or she is in the right position for shoot which is c alled as T shape seen at the time of releasing the arrow.

  10. Renal denervation:history, today and tomorrow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Ruo-tai; CHEN Zhong; MA Gen-shan

    2014-01-01

    Renal denervation is a new technique approved effective for resistant-hypertension treatment .The common renal denervation system consists of a generator and a flexible catheter .During this minimally invasive procedure , the interventionalist uses a steerable catheter with a radio frequency ( RF) energy electrode tip .The RF energy is delivered to the renal artery via standard femoral artery access .A series of 2-minute ablation are delivered in each renal artery to distroy the nerves system .The procedure does not involve a permanent device implant .By deactivating the renal nerves , and therefore reducing sympathetic nerve transmission , a significant and reliable reduction in blood pressure could be achieved .In this review, potential complications and future sights of renal denervation are also discussed .

  11. A GEOPHYSICAL COMPANY FOR TODAY AND TOMORROW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ BGP is one of the world leading onshore geophysical service contractors with a registered capital of 5,100 million Yuan. In 2002, BGP became a liability-limited company after merging other six Chinese geophysical companies.

  12. Batteries at NASA - Today and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha M.

    2015-01-01

    NASA uses batteries for virtually all of its space missions. Batteries can be bulky and heavy, and some chemistries are more prone to safety issues than others. To meet NASA's needs for safe, lightweight, compact and reliable batteries, scientists and engineers at NASA develop advanced battery technologies that are suitable for space applications and that can satisfy these multiple objectives. Many times, these objectives compete with one another, as the demand for more and more energy in smaller packages dictates that we use higher energy chemistries that are also more energetic by nature. NASA partners with companies and universities, like Xavier University of Louisiana, to pool our collective knowledge and discover innovative technical solutions to these challenges. This talk will discuss a little about NASA's use of batteries and why NASA seeks more advanced chemistries. A short primer on battery chemistries and their chemical reactions is included. Finally, the talk will touch on how the work under the Solid High Energy Lithium Battery (SHELiB) grant to develop solid lithium-ion conducting electrolytes and solid-state batteries can contribute to NASA's mission.

  13. Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow--Constant Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reader, Peter

    2011-01-01

    It is not so long ago that universities shunned words such as "public relations" and "marketing," preferring to describe staff working in these areas as information officers and even assistant registrars and with such staff drawn from a cadre of generalist administrators. If they really had to be specific, then an acceptable word was "publicity".…

  14. The World Economy Today and Tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Viktor

    The Future of the Civilization is linked to the ability of men to organize an effective mode of economic reproduction. It is difficult to see clearly now which this mode will be really. Even to reach it beyond the horizon of one or two ten years is not easy because the world economy is in which time situated in a turning point. The period of adaptation to the petrole price rise and to the dismounting of the Bretton-Woods monetary system, that had begin between 60th and 70th, go to the finish. In the first tens of the 21st century the development of the world economy would go in the frame of the all-round globalization of economic, social, cultural, ethical and political relations called to soften the enormious differences in standards of life between the regions of the Earth, between the developed and developing countries. The image of a remote Future is given by some western authors who draw a picture of a postindustrial, even a postteconomic society. This society would be based on a creative work and on a high level of well-beging of all men. The most attractive utopies of 18th-19th centuries are reviwed under the pens of these prophets…

  15. Yesterday, today and tomorrow - constant change

    OpenAIRE

    Reader, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The paper is a personal perspective on changes in PR, Marketing and Communications in universities, reviewing changes which have taken place in the last 30 years, and predicting further change to come.

  16. DOW AGROSCIENCES TODAY AND NEW REVOLUTIONARY SOLUTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Slavko Vujević; Koehler, K; Nelson, J.

    2008-01-01

    Dow AgroSciences LLC, based in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, is a top tier agricultural company providing innovative crop protection, pest and vegetation management, seed, and agricultural biotechnology solutions to serve the world's growing population. Global sales for Dow AgroSciences, a wholly owned subsidiary of The Dow Chemical Company, are $3.8 billion. The company's roots in the agricultural marketplace date back to 1950 as the agricultural unit of The Dow Chemical Company and as part of...

  17. The EtnaPlumeLab (EPL research cluster: advance the understanding of Mt. Etna plume, from source characterisation to downwind impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Sellitto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2013, a multidisciplinary research cluster named EtnaPlumeLab (EPL was established, gathering experts from volcanology and atmospheric science communities. Target of EPL is to advance the understanding of Mt. Etna's gas and aerosol emissions and the related processes, from source to its regional climatic impact in the Mediterranean area. Here, we present the cluster and its three interacting modules: EPL-RADIO (Radioactive Aerosols and other source parameters for better atmospheric Dispersion and Impact estimatiOns, SMED (Sulfur MEditerranean Dispersion and Med-SuV (MEDiterranean SUpersite Volcanoes Work Package 5. Preliminary results have for the first time highlighted the relevance of Mt. Etna's plume impact at the Mediterranean regional scale. These results underline that further efforts need to be made to get insight into a synoptic volcanogenic-atmospheric chemistry/climatic understanding of volcanic plumes impact.

  18. Topography and Volcanology of the Huangtsuishan Volcano Subgroup, Northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ming Lai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Combining the shaded relief topography model and the slope map from the Digital Terrain Model (DTM images, toporaphical map, field occurrences and petrography, the volcanic sequences of the Huangtsuishan Volcano Subgroup (HVS can be constructed. Two types of volcanic centers can be identified in this area. One is the Tachienhou volcanic dome, which may be located in the center of an older caldera. The other is the Huangtsui composite volcano, which is composed of interbedding lava flows and pyroclastic deposits with a volcanic crater named the Huangtsui pond at the summit. Eight lava plateaus radiated from Mts. Huangtsui and Tachienhou to the north and the east can be distinguished based on the DTM images. The volcanic deposits are comprised of four lithofacies, the lava flows, pyroclastic breccias, tuffs and lahars on the base of field occurrences. At least thirteen layers of lava flow, named the H1 to H13 can be recognized in the HVS and can be reconstructed and categorized into four stages. An old and large volcano erupted lava flows to form the products of stages one and two, then collapsed to form a caldera with a dome for the third stage. The latest stage of lava flow was poured out from the Huangtsui volcano, which formed a crater at the summit.

  19. Volcanology of the Alarcon Rise, Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portner, R. A.; Clague, D. A.; Dreyer, B. M.; Martin, J. F.; Paduan, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    The Alarcon Rise is a ~50 km long intermediate-rate (~50mm/a) spreading center at the southern end of the Gulf of California. In Spring 2012, an MBARI-led expedition to Alarcon Rise mapped a ~1.5- 3km wide swath of the ridge axis at 1-m resolution and completed 9 dives with the ROV Doc Ricketts (Clague et al., this session). Pillow, lobate, and sheet flows occur along the entire axis. An inflated zone of the axis south of the midpoint along the Rise is dominated by a large sheet/lobate flow that erupted from en echelon fissures that extends for 8 km. This flow extends laterally away from the fissures for at least 2 km and covered nearly all prior flows and pillow mounds in its path. The middle of the segment contains a 1km across flat-topped volcano, virtually unmodified by fissures and faults, which dissect a 2.5 km across shield 5 km to the north. The NE and SW parts of the axis are characterized by more abundant pillow mounds and less voluminous sheet flows. Many of the pillow mounds, especially those in the northern third of the axis are small, steep sided mounds. Examination of sand and slit sized fractions of the basal cm of 87 cores collected by the ROV shows that basaltic pyroclasts with fluidal or bubble-wall (limu o Pele) morphologies are ubiquitous along the entire ridge. A rugged dome-like structure about 0.5x1.2kmx75m tall occurs about 9 km from the northern end of the ridge axis. Its crest is at a depth of 2330 m. Linear ridge-parallel faults and ridges cross-cut or terminate into the dome. These ridges extend several km both NE and SW along strike from the dome. Extensive sampling during two ROV dives shows that the entire dome is constructed of coarse blocky breccia and minor lineated flows of rhyolite. Dacite, andesite, and basaltic andesite flows occur on adjacent slopes to the north, south and west, and exhibit medium- to large-diameter pillow morphologies. Many of these flows and the flanks of the dome are mantled by abundant coarse- to fine-grained volcaniclastic deposits. The eastern side of the dome is onlapped by lobate and sheet basalt flows. Proximal volcaniclastic deposits contain a wide range in componentry. A notable component is comprised of a light brown glass which is brecciated and cemented by a highly vesicular clear glass mesh that contains up to ~80% vesicles. Vesicles in the mesh are locally attenuated into elongate forms along and form expansion cracks that pass through highly fragmented jig-saw fit phenocrysts. Fluidal ash shards and pumice-to scoria clasts are also present. Pelagic sediment in more distal regions contains a significant amount of finer-grained volcaniclastic material, including some thin colorless glass shards, comparable to mafic limu o Pele. The dome was probably extruded as a series of lobes accompanied by minor explosive activity as the steep flanks of the lobes collapsed. The highly vesicular and fluidal character of some of the lapilli suggests that magma degassing powered the eruption, even at 2300m depth. Foraminifera are common in all hemipelagic sediment samples and will provide a basis for radiocarbon dating. Sedimentation ages will be used in conjuncton with zircon geochronology, to constrain the timescales of dome construction and the ages of surrounding flows.

  20. Volcanic Ash -Aircraft Encounter Damages: in Volcanological Point of View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydar, Erkan; Aladaǧ, Çaǧdaş Hakan; Menteş, Turhan

    2017-04-01

    The jet era or age began at 1930 and 40's in aviation sector, with the production of first jet engine for the aircrafts. Since 1950's, the commercial aviation with regular flights were established. Civil aviation and air-transport drastically increased due to intensive demand, and declared at least 10 fold since 1970 by IATA report. Parallelly to technological and economical developpement, the commercial jets became more comfortable, secure and rapid, bringing the world smaller, the countries closer. On the other hand, according to Global Volcanism Program Catalogues of Smithsonian Institute, about 1,500 volcanoes have erupted in the Holocene, 550 of them have had historical eruptions and considered as active. Besides an average of 55-60 volcanoes erupt each year, and about 8-10 of these eruptions produce ash clouds that reach aircraft flight altitudes (Salinas and Watt, 2004). Volcanic ash can be expected to be in air routes at altitudes greater than 9 km (30,000 ft) for roughly 20 days per year worldwide (Miller &Casadeval, 2000). A precious compilation of incidents due to encounters of aircrafts with volcanic ash clouds covering the years between 1953 and 2009 was used in this work (Guffanti et al., 2010-USGS Report) with an additional information on Eyfjallajökull-2010 eruption. According to this compilation,129 incidents happened within the concerned time interval. The damages, in general, fall in second and third class of Severity index, indicating the damages are limited on airframe of the planes, or some abrasions in jet engine, windblast etc.. We focused on fourth class of severity index involving the damages on jet engine of aircraft (engine fail) due to ingestion of volcanic ash and investigate eruption style and caused damage relationships. During the eruptive sequences of Mts Saint Helen (USA), Galunggung (Indonesia, 2 incidents), Redoubt (USA), Pinatubo (Philipinnes), Unzen (Japan), Manam (Papua New Guinea), Soufriere Hills (Lesser Antilles), Chaiten (Chilie), Eyfjallajökull (Iceland). The common point of all those eruptions is that all eruption clouds had the external water input. This input was as phreatomagmatic style eruption, ice plugged-vent clearing-vulcanian, heavy rain fall on eruption cloud or on eruptive vent, typhoon, ice grain in eruptive cloud, etc. We will show water input, case by case, to those eruptions belonging to severity index 4. Besides, we will also present other damages created by volcanic ash-aircraft encounters basing on their eruption styles as a result of advanced statistical methods.

  1. History of the volcanology in the former Netherlands East Indies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann van Padang, M.

    1983-01-01

    The description of the volcanoes in the former Netherlands East Indies are analysed in order of their publication, grouping them into three parts. The first group consists of information from old Javanese sources and incidental communications in travel accounts and the like, dating from the 16th, 17

  2. FY2011 Engineering Innovations, Research, and Technology Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, Kip [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martz, Harry E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Poyneer, Lisa A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shusteff, Maxim [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Spadaccini, Christopher M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hopkins, Jonathan B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bernier, Joel V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); King, Michael J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Puso, Michael A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Weisgraber, Todd H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Goldstein, Noah C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sales, Ana Paula De Oliveira [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dehlinger, Dietrich A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotovsky, Jack [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kuntz, Joshua D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Voss, Lars F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wheeler, Elizabeth K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chang, John T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lehman, Sean K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vernon, Stephen P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tang, Vincent [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-04-24

    This report summarizes key research, development, and technology advancements in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s Engineering Directorate for FY2011. These efforts exemplify Engineering’s nearly 60-year history of developing and applying the technology innovations needed for the Laboratory’s national security missions, and embody Engineering’s mission to “Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory’s vitality tomorrow.

  3. Educational Policy Research: Progress, Puzzles, and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Murnane

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses three topics. The first concerns the reasons that American education, which served the United States so well for the first three-quarters of the twentieth century, is not adequate today, and is especially not successful in providing disadvantaged children with the skills they need to escape poverty. The second concerns lessons from policy analyses about the efficacy of alternative approaches to improving American education, especially the education of its most disadvantaged children. I will make the case that research provides encouraging evidence on several policy approaches. At the same time, the research reveals puzzles that I believe we need to take seriously in thinking about future research to inform the design of the next round of policies. Finally, I suggest some directions for policy research that come from taking seriously puzzles in the evidence.

  4. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAGHAVENDRA

    Official International Journal of Wollega University, Ethiopia ... College of Medical and Health Sciences, Wollega University,. Post Box No: 395, Nekemte, ... rts Research Journal. 5, 4(2): .... Scientific Research & Innovation 3(6): 251-256. Evans ...

  5. Comment on: "Cobeñas, G., Thouret, J.-C., Bonadonna, C., Boivin, P., 2012. The c.2030 yr BP Plinian eruption of El Misti volcano, Peru: Eruption dynamics and hazard implications. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 241-242, 105-120."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpel, Christopher J.; de Silva, S.; Salas, G.

    2013-09-01

    Cobeñas et al. (2012) describe deposits from the 2-ka eruption of Misti volcano, southern Peru. They propose a tephra-fall deposit overlain by voluminous pyroclastic-flow and surge deposits, which are overlain by proportionally minor lahar deposits and a debris-avalanche deposit of limited distribution. Some of their data corroborate our earlier work (Harpel et al., 2011), but three of their primary interpretations differ dramatically from ours and have important hazard implications. Voluminous flowage deposits crop out, and we present evidence that the majority contain diagnostic features suggesting that they are lahar deposits rather than pyroclastic-flow deposits. Their pyroclastic-flow deposit volume is also unrealistically large and not consistent with the extant deposits. The purported debris-avalanche deposit is texturally identical to the lahar deposits and has none of the features typically associated with debris-avalanche deposits. Associating such a unit with collapse and formation of a notch in the south crater rim lacks supporting data and disregards the myriad other reasons such notches can form. They divide the tephra-fall deposit into three beds, suggest that it underlies the pyroclastic-flow deposits, and infer that the eruption ceased after pyroclastic flow formation. We delineate six beds and present evidence that the upper beds persistently crop out between the pyroclastic-flow and lahar deposits. We infer from our eruption sequence that the eruption continued vigorously after pyroclastic-flow formation.

  6. Magnetic anomalies of steel drums: a review of the literature and research results of the INGV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Marchetti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The detection and evaluation of the status of disposal sites that contain hazardous waste materials is becoming an increasingly important element in environmental investigations. Close cooperation between the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV; National Institute of Volcanology and Geophysics in Rome and the Italian environmental police has resulted in numerous underground investigations of different buried materials. Among the geophysical investigation tools, magnetometry is the most effective, rapid and precise of all of the geophysical methods for localizing buried steel drums. Analysis of magnetic map anomalies can provide a variety of information about buried materials, including extension, distribution and depth, with processing of the acquired magnetic data. This information is also very useful in case of excavations that are aimed at the recovery of hazardous waste. This study determines the most relevant analyses reported in the literature, with modeling of magnetometric methods for environmental applications both theoretically and experimentally. Some studies and research results achieved by the INGV in relation to magnetic anomalies produced by buried steel drums are also reported, as found in field operations and as achieved from test sites.

  7. Translating Volcano Hazards Research in the Cascades Into Community Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, J. W.; Driedger, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Research by the science community into volcanic histories and physical processes at Cascade volcanoes in the states of Washington, Oregon, and California has been ongoing for over a century. Eruptions in the 20th century at Lassen Peak and Mount St. Helen demonstrated the active nature of Cascade volcanoes; the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens was a defining moment in modern volcanology. The first modern volcano hazards assessments were produced by the USGS for some Cascade volcanoes in the 1960s. A rich scientific literature exists, much of which addresses hazards at these active volcanoes. That said community awareness, planning, and preparation for eruptions generally do not occur as a result of a hazard analyses published in scientific papers, but by direct communication with scientists. Relative to other natural hazards, volcanic eruptions (or large earthquakes, or tsunami) are outside common experience, and the public and many public officials are often surprised to learn of the impacts volcanic eruptions could have on their communities. In the 1980s, the USGS recognized that effective hazard communication and preparedness is a multi-faceted, long-term undertaking and began working with federal, state, and local stakeholders to build awareness and foster community action about volcano hazards. Activities included forming volcano-specific workgroups to develop coordination plans for volcano emergencies; a concerted public outreach campaign; curriculum development and teacher training; technical training for emergency managers and first responders; and development of hazard information that is accessible to non-specialists. Outcomes include broader ownership of volcano hazards as evidenced by bi-national exchanges of emergency managers, community planners, and first responders; development by stakeholders of websites focused on volcano hazards mitigation; and execution of table-top and functional exercises, including evacuation drills by local communities.

  8. Entangled research(ers)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøgger, Katja; Staunæs, Dorthe

    into the world and being situated and attuned to it in specific ways through interest, fear, boredom or something else. Combing concepts from philosophy as well as psychology, the material and the affective turn allow us to rethink and elaborate on well-known discussions on qualitative research, representation......This paper takes up the challenges of analyzing how empirical knowledge is created when the research(ers) are always already “thrown into the world” (Heidegger) and thereby affectively “intra-act” (Barad) with and ‘perform’ the empirical knowledge. ‘ ‘Thrownness’ is Heidegger’s way of expressing...

  9. FY08 Engineering Research and Technology Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minichino, C; McNichols, D

    2009-02-24

    This report summarizes the core research, development, and technology accomplishments in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate for FY2008. These efforts exemplify Engineering's more than 50-year history of developing and applying the technologies needed to support the Laboratory's national security missions. A partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence, Engineering has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and technical resources developed through both internal and external venues. These accomplishments embody Engineering's mission: 'Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow.' Engineering's mission is carried out through basic research and technology development. Research is the vehicle for creating competencies that are cutting-edge, or require discovery-class groundwork to be fully understood. Our technology efforts are discipline-oriented, preparing research breakthroughs for broader application to a variety of Laboratory needs. The term commonly used for technology-based projects is 'reduction to practice.' As we pursue this two-pronged approach, an enormous range of technological capabilities result. This report combines our work in research and technology into one volume, organized into thematic technical areas: Engineering Modeling and Simulation; Measurement Technologies; Micro/Nano-Devices and Structures; Engineering Systems for Knowledge and Inference; and Energy Manipulation. Our investments in these areas serve not only known programmatic requirements of today and tomorrow, but also anticipate the breakthrough engineering innovations that will be needed in the future.

  10. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAGHAVENDRA

    Faculty of Education and Behavioral Science,. Abstract. The main ... Science, Technology and Arts Research Journ. Sci. .... school in the academic year of 2007 E.C. In this particular study the .... regression is designed to help make predictions.

  11. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAGHAVENDRA

    academic staff, creative new comers and open channels for promotion ... approach to research and education towards human development ...... Good Teachers in the Classroom? ... Destinations, and Determinants of Mathematics and. Science ...

  12. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAGHAVENDRA

    supply, both in quality and quantity (Adugna. As a result, livestock productivity is generally low the potential (EARO ..... Horro-Guduru livestock Production and Research Center,. Ethiopia. ... of the Second North American Tannin Conference on.

  13. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAGHAVENDRA

    Items 1 - 6 ... students' insufficient in English language background at core setbacks for effective .... language teaching is preparing learners to be able to use the language ... language. As a result, the researchers were motivated to investigate.

  14. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAGHAVENDRA

    ian Institute of Agricultural Research, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia ...... Means in a column followed with the same letters are not significantly different using ..... relationships among the nutrients of NFT-grown young ... In: Sumner, M. E. and Stewart,.

  15. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAGHAVENDRA

    camel as a source of meat through multi research into ... meat technology and marketing. ... light of animal handling ethics and welfare issues. ... 500-1500 meter above sea level (masl) and majority of .... connection with such slaughtering.

  16. Digital curation of research data experiences of a baseline study in Germany

    CERN Document Server

    Strathmann, Stefan; Oßwald, Achim; Ludwig, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The relevance of research data today and for the future is well documented and discussed, in Germany as well as internationally. Ensuring that research data are accessible, sharable, and re-usable over time is increasingly becoming an essential task for researchers and research infrastructure institutions. Some reasons for this development include the following: - research data are documented and could therefore be validated - research data could be the basis for new research questions - research data could be re-analyzed by using innovative digital methods - research data could be used by other disciplines Therefore, it is essential that research data are curated, which means they are kept accessible and interpretable over time. In Germany, a baseline study was undertaken analyzing the situation in eleven research disciplines in 2012. The results were then published in a German-language edition. To address an international audience, the German-language edition of the study has been translated and abridged. T...

  17. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2013-06-10

    Jun 10, 2013 ... changed in to upward trend because of HIV epidem ... strategies adequate to overcome the challenges in TB co ... Science, Technology and Arts Research ... al incidence of untreatable drug resistance strain of .... providing information on its control and prevention ..... World Health Organization (WHO).

  18. Research Results Research Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    A Highly Efficient Route for Selective Phenol Hydrogenation to Cyclohexanone A Novel Mechanism Employed by KSHV to Maintain the Latent Infection was Revealed Breakthrough in the Synthesis of Interconnected NW/NT and NT/NW/NT Heterojunctions with Branched Topology GABA Transporter-1 Activity Modulates Hippocampal Theta Oscillation and Theta Burst Stimulation-Induced Long-Term Potentiation Meta-analysis of Vitamin D, Calcium and the Prevention of Breast Cancer New Findings on the Origin of TrpRS PKCd Regulates Cortical Radial Migration by Stabilizing the Cdk5 Activator P35 PKU Research Team Publishes Papers on Inhalation Exposure to Pollutant and Cancer Risk Progress of the Research on Arbitrarily Elliptical Invisibility Cloaks An Advance in Complete Oxidation of Formaldehyde at Low Temperatures

  19. Research of the long-focus Maksutov telephoto lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, I. P.; Tsyganok, E. A.

    2016-04-01

    The article presents the research result and the optical design of long-focus telephoto lens for photo shooting by the academician Maksutov's scheme. It shows a review of lenses for photo shooting on the market today, and also an analysis of the correctional possibilities which is based on the scheme is presented; studied long-focus telephoto lens is compared with its closest analog, the calculation of a new telephoto lens with higher image quality is made on the basis of that comparison.

  20. Utilization of biodiversity in agriculture: today and tomorrow%农业系统中生物多样性利用的研究现状与未来思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈欣; 唐建军

    2013-01-01

    Currently, world agriculture was faced with drastic challenges to produce sufficient food while minimizing negative environmental effects of crop cultivation. Unlike traditional agriculture, which used local biodiversity and species interactions to sustain food production, modern agriculture used fewer high-yield crop varieties and largely ignored species interactions. Modern agriculture relied on chemically-driven modern varieties and irrigation to ensure high production. At the same time, modern high production induced negative environmental effects, pest resistance to pesticides and high agro-production costs. Whether and how biodiversity integrated into modern agriculture was a recent trend of research. Here, we reviewed the researches on the utilization of biodiversity in agriculture in the last decades. We then proposed future researches on intensified development of sustainable global agriculture with integrated biotechnology, precision agro-technology and biodiversity utilization. Unlike natural ecosystems, agro-ecosystem species consisted of productive biota (e.g., crops, forest trees and animals), resource biota (e.g., pollinating insects and crop-related wild species) and destructive biota (e.g., weeds and insect pests). Productive biota cultured by farmers dominated agro-systems and contributed to food production. Thus designing productive biota diversity was critical for biodiversity utilization of agro-systems. Utilization of productive biota diversity in agriculture included applications of genetic, species and landscape diversity. Studies indicated that uses of multi-gene varieties and mixtures of varieties were the key approaches to genetic diversity. This effectively controlled diseases in coffee, barley, wheat and rice crops. Genetic diversity mechanisms controlled diseases via resistant plant pathogen dilution or physical isolation. For species diversity utilization, intercropping and co-culture of crops and animals were the two common

  1. On the Plagiarism in the Humanities, the Psychoanalysis and the Social exclusion in the Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Fratini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article carries some considerations on the problem of plagiarism and the social exclusion in the research in the humanities. The article highlights the contradictions around these issues, focusing in particular on the influence of pressure implicit in research by neoliberal policy in the western countries, and on the delicate issue of communication and transmission of knowledge in psychoanalysis. The article strongly supports a position on the role of psychoanalysis in favor of a defense honesty of his positions, that concern, in the world of today and in the current research field, more depth than with the original of wich an author can express and support.

  2. Research vessels

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, P.S.

    The role of the research vessels as a tool for marine research and exploration is very important. Technical requirements of a suitable vessel and the laboratories needed on board are discussed. The history and the research work carried out...

  3. Research organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bøje; Aagaard, Peter

    in Copenhagen - we argue that a post-rational form of research activity is emerging which revert these features. We term this new type of research "enchanted research", "sciencetainment" and "Mode2-b research". The factors that facilitate this development include the boring style of conventional research......, growing competition for research funds, more project funding compared to institutional funding and a demand for accountability. Countervailing forces also exist, however....

  4. Linfoma no Hodgkin oral relacionado al sida (LNHORS: Actualización y presentación de un caso clínico Aids related oral no Hodgkin lymphoma (ARONHL: Up today and report of a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Casariego

    2006-12-01

    own characteristics when it is associated with the human immunodeficiency virus syndrome (HIV. Oral cavity is one localization in Aids patients (LNHOES and its manifestations are registered on the first state of HIV infection. But oral differential diagnoses is not so frequent as this disease needs, in our environment. On HIV patients general characteristics are related to the age of patients, immunological status, treatment compliance, intravenous drug addictions for more of 35 years and lymphoma type. The present work has two objectives: 1 To present this subject in order to actualize epidemiological news, histological types and subtypes classification, illness stratification and advances on therapy, because it has been, in recent years, intensive researches about it. 2 To report a clinic HIV+ case with NHL, with an infrequent evolution. A female patient of 34 years old, with a tumor mass on maxilla bone, gingival mucosa and hart and soft palate. Lesion was ulcerated at the first consultation and hat protrude trough the mouth. Results considered different systemic studies, biopsies of the oral lesions, histological study and immuno histochemical marcation, and searching of other lymphoma´s manifestations and locations by scan´s studies. Treatments, follow up and evolution were assessed. Conclusions: An efficient and early diagnostic of ARONHL by a health team work, can increase longer survival for this patients, in an scene, where it can be possible the reconstitution of immunological function and where it could be applied Continous Infusion Chemotherapy new regimens.

  5. Is operations research really research?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NJ Manson

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper takes a philosophical look at the Research in Operations Research. First, the questions "What is Research?" and "What is Operations Research?" are discussed. Next, the paper discusses why it is important to have a clear definition of research, especially in academia. The paper then discusses a research paradigm called 'Design Research'. Design Research is defined and compared with other research paradigms. Seven guidelines for understanding, executing, and evaluating Design Research are presented. As examples, three recently published papers on Operations Research are evaluated using these guidelines. Finally, conclusions are presented discussing why it can be advantageous to understand, execute and evaluate Operations Research projects within the Design Research paradigm.

  6. Action Research and Interactive Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, lennart; Nielsen, Kurt Aagaard

    2006-01-01

    The authors present trends in Nordic action research. They ask critical questions in the development towards mode 2 and points out alternative roads for a scientific consolidation of action research and interactive research.......The authors present trends in Nordic action research. They ask critical questions in the development towards mode 2 and points out alternative roads for a scientific consolidation of action research and interactive research....

  7. Action Research and Interactive Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, lennart; Nielsen, Kurt Aagaard

    2006-01-01

    The authors present trends in Nordic action research. They ask critical questions in the development towards mode 2 and points out alternative roads for a scientific consolidation of action research and interactive research.......The authors present trends in Nordic action research. They ask critical questions in the development towards mode 2 and points out alternative roads for a scientific consolidation of action research and interactive research....

  8. Research Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Kenneth Mølbjerg Jørgensen: Research as storrytelling: constructing reflexive research practice. 21p Lars Ole Bonde: Reflections on the relationship between research questions, design and methods in the research project "Receptive music therapy with female cancer patients in rehabilitation. 35p Gunnar...

  9. Research Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Fe Community Coll., Gainesville, FL.

    The five parts of this report are: research on instruction; faculty dissertations; inter-institutional research; in-college research; and college-endorsed research. The first covers experiments in teaching French, practical nursing, English, math, and chemistry, and in giving examinations. Faculty dissertations include studies of post-graduate…

  10. Qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelling, Leslie

    2015-03-25

    Qualitative research has an important role in helping nurses and other healthcare professionals understand patient experiences of health and illness. Qualitative researchers have a large number of methodological options and therefore should take care in planning and conducting their research. This article offers a brief overview of some of the key issues qualitative researchers should consider.

  11. Research Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Gunnar Scott Reinbacher (editor) Antology.  Research Design : Validation in Social Sciences. Gunnar Scott Reinbacher: Introduction. Research design and validity. 15p Ole Riis: Creative Research design. 16 p Lennart Nørreklit: Validity in Research Design. 24p Gitte Sommer Harrits: Praxeological...... knowledge: An integrated strategy for combining "explaining" and "understanding". 22p Heidi Houlberg Salomonsen & Viola Burau: Comparative research designs. 40p Rasmus Antoft & Heidi Houlberg Salomonsen: Studying organizations by a Pragmatic Research Design: the case of qualitative case study  designs. 31p...... Kenneth Mølbjerg Jørgensen: Research as storrytelling: constructing reflexive research practice. 21p Lars Ole Bonde: Reflections on the relationship between research questions, design and methods in the research project "Receptive music therapy with female cancer patients in rehabilitation. 35p Gunnar...

  12. Biofuels: stakes, perspectives and researches; Biocarburants: enjeux, perspectives et recherches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appert, O.; Ballerin, D.; Montagne, X.

    2004-07-01

    The French institute of petroleum (IFP) is a major intervener of the biofuels sector, from the production to the end-use in engines. In this press conference, the IFP takes stock of the technological, environmental and economical stakes of today and future biofuel production processes and of their impact on transports. This document gathers 2 presentations dealing with: IFP's research strategy on biofuels (transparencies: context; today's processes: ethanol, ETBE, bio-diesel; tomorrows processes: biomass to liquid; perspectives), bio-diesel fuel: the Axens process selected by Diester Industrie company for its Sete site project of bio-diesel production unit. The researches carried out at the IFP on biofuels and biomass are summarized in an appendix: advantage and drawbacks of biofuels, the ethanol fuel industry, the bio-diesel industry, biomass to liquid fuels, French coordinated research program, statistical data of biofuel consumption in France, Spain and Germany. (J.S.)

  13. [Clinical toxicology of the Academy: yesterday, today and tomorrow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofronov, G A; Khalimov, Iu Sh; Matveev, S Iu; Kuz'mich, V G; Fomichev, A V

    2013-12-01

    National toxicology school of the Kirov Military Medical Academy, demonstrates the unity of clinical and experimental approaches related to one purpose throughout its history--saving human life and health from exposure to toxic substances of chemical nature. For more than three centuries the russian science of toxicology has been steadily developing, often ahead of the world science. It helped to create the means of protection and develop methods of treatment for chemical lesions. Currently, toxicology departments of military field therapy and military toxicology and medical protection are actively involved in the current study of military medicine, restructuring policy to provide toxicological aid in the Armed Forces, the development and introduction of Innovative methods of diagnosis and treatment of victims of toxicological etiology.

  14. Therapy of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis--Today and Tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halilbasic, Emina; Fuchs, Claudia; Hofer, Harald; Paumgartner, Gustav; Trauner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) represents a fibro-obliterative bile duct disease with unpredictable individual clinical course that may progress to liver cirrhosis and malignancy. Due to our incomplete understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of this disease, the therapeutic options are still rather limited. Bile acids play a key role in mediating cholangiocellular and hepatocellular injury in cholangiopathies such as PSC. Therefore, strategies targeting bile composition and homeostasis are valid approaches in PSC. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is the paradigm therapeutic bile acid and its role in medical therapy of PSC is still under debate. Promising novel bile acid-based therapeutic options include 24-norursodeoxycholic acid (norUDCA), a side chain-shortened C23 homologue of UDCA, and bile acid receptor/farnesoid X receptor agonists (e.g. obeticholic acid). Other nuclear receptors such as fatty acid-activated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, vitamin D receptor and vitamin A receptors (retinoic acid receptor, retinoid X receptor) are also of potential interest and can be targeted by already available drugs. Furthermore, drugs targeting the gut-liver axis (e.g. intregrin blockers such as vedolizumab, antibiotics) appear promising, based on the close link of PSC to inflammatory bowel disease and the emerging relevance of the gut microbiome for the development of PSC. Finally, fibrosis represents a valid therapeutic target for anti-fibrotic drugs (e.g. simtuzumab) in PSC as paradigm fibro-obliterative disease. This review summarizes the current status and recent progress in the development of targeted therapeutic approaches based on increasing knowledge about the pathogenesis of this disease.

  15. Diabetes 2030: Insights from Yesterday, Today, and Future Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, William R; Bezold, Clement; Arikan, Yasemin; Byrne, Erin; Krohe, Shannon

    2017-02-01

    To forecast future trends in diabetes prevalence, morbidity, and costs in the United States, the Institute for Alternative Futures has updated its diabetes forecasting model and extended its projections to 2030 for the nation, all states, and several metropolitan areas. This paper describes the methodology and data sources for these diabetes forecasts and discusses key implications. In short, diabetes will remain a major health crisis in America, in spite of medical advances and prevention efforts. The prevalence of diabetes (type 2 diabetes and type 1 diabetes) will increase by 54% to more than 54.9 million Americans between 2015 and 2030; annual deaths attributed to diabetes will climb by 38% to 385,800; and total annual medical and societal costs related to diabetes will increase 53% to more than $622 billion by 2030. Improvements in management reducing the annual incidence of morbidities and premature deaths related to diabetes over this time period will result in diabetes patients living longer, but requiring many years of comprehensive management of multiple chronic diseases, resulting in dramatically increased costs. Aggressive population health measures, including increased availability of diabetes prevention programs, could help millions of adults prevent or delay the progression to type 2 diabetes, thereby helping turn around these dire projections.

  16. Latin American Integration: Yesterday, Today and Perhaps Tomorrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Alves Soares

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to analyse, more subjectively than objectively, the development of ALALC-ALADI and to show the path for the MERCOSUR. The author evaluates the successes and failures of ALALC-ALADI -the first two attempts of regional economic concentration- focusing his attention on ALADI, being this more recent and with the aim of acting as an integrationist regional frame. About the MERCOSUR, the author remarks the potential involved in the bilateral trade between Brazil and Argentine, which can be the origin of the construction of Common Market of the South, with Paraguay's and Uruguay's participation.

  17. Molecular diagnostics in medical microbiology: yesterday, today and tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Belkum, Alex

    2003-10-01

    Clinical microbiology is clearly on the move, and various new diagnostic technologies have been introduced into laboratory practice over the past few decades. However, Henri D Isenberg recently stated that molecular biology techniques promised to revolutionise the diagnosis of infectious disease, but that, to date, this promise is still in its infancy. Molecular diagnostics have now surpassed these early stages and have definitely reached puberty. Currently, a second generation of automated molecular approaches is already within the microbiologists' reach. Quantitative amplification tests in combination with genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and related methodologies will pave the way to further enhancement of innovative microbial detection and identification.

  18. Industrial espionage today and information wars of tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyal, Paul

    1996-03-01

    In this report we review case histories of industrial espionage publicized in the media and in Congressional hearings. The threat to the United Stages as the world's largest investor in R&D is magnified by the transition from a cold war military confrontation of the super powers to an economic competition in global markets. To sustain their market share, France, Japan and Russia have initiated national programs to acquire U.S. technical know-how. Former intelligence staff now distill fragments of sensitive information into meaningful knowledge to guide industrial and national efforts to ascertain dominance. This threat is amplified by the exponential proliferation of global communication networks, like INTERENET, that reach into corporate America and permit unseen adversaries to probe the vast U.S. data stores for unprotected intelligence. Counter intelligence in industrial espionage by the United Stages on a national level is virtually impossible because of public scrutiny in our open society. On the positive side, the upheaval of a rapid transition from high-tension and high economic stability to low-tension and high economic instability is prompting international collaboration against international terrorism. On the corporate level, strategic alliances with foreign firms are expanding to sustain competitiveness and innovation in areas of specialty. A national security plan to protect the U.S. information resources is needed; and a viable policy to operate our information highways as safe conduits for electronic business. The well being of the global economy, not just that of our nation, is at stake and should not be left to chance and provocation.

  19. Biomarkers and childhood asthma: improving control today and tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Andrew H

    2005-01-01

    Although we aim to normalize the lives of children with asthma by controlling their day and night symptoms and preventing exacerbations and morbidity, optimal childhood asthma management may result when the assessment and monitoring of asthma includes measured biomarkers--meaning objective, biological measures of lung dysfunction and inflammation. Precedence for such an approach to optimizing disease control and outcomes can be appreciated in comparing asthma with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) management in children. Optimal management of these chronic conditions shares the fundamental goals to eliminate day and night symptoms and prevent exacerbations and morbidity. However, IDDM management focuses primarily on peripheral blood biomarkers of tight control (i.e., daily serum glucose levels) and predictors of long-term morbidity (i.e., hemoglobin A1C, or hemoglobin "remodeling" due to chronically poor control of glucose) for optimal assessment and monitoring and to best achieve these clinical objectives (Alemzadeh R, et al. Diabetes mellitus in children. In Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 17th ed. Behrman RE, Kliegman RM, and Jenson HB (Eds). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders Co., 1947-1972, 2004). The improved outcomes in IDDM have resulted primarily from the progress to a biomarker-based assessment to achieve tight, optimal control and not, presently, as a dramatic change in therapy. The progress in IDDM management provides a compelling paradigm to consider for improving childhood asthma management. Indeed, the time is good to not only consider some newly available biomarkers, but also to reconsider some biomarkers of lung dysfunction, inflammation, and atopy that could be broadly used today. This article reconsiders the use of current and emerging measures of lung dysfunction, inflammation, and atopy in assessing tight control and long-term risk. Concluding emphasis will be placed on what can be implemented today.

  20. Today's and tomorrow's retrieval practice in the audiovisual archive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huurnink, B.; Snoek, C.G.M.; de Rijke, M.; Smeulders, A.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Content-based video retrieval is maturing to the point where it can be used in real-world retrieval practices. One such practice is the audiovisual archive, whose users increasingly require fine-grained access to broadcast television content. We investigate to what extent content-based video retriev

  1. Today's and tomorrow's retrieval practice in the audiovisual archive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huurnink, B.; Snoek, C.G.M.; de Rijke, M.; Smeulders, A.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Content-based video retrieval is maturing to the point where it can be used in real-world retrieval practices. One such practice is the audiovisual archive, whose users increasingly require fine-grained access to broadcast television content. We investigate to what extent content-based video

  2. Turf varieties for the Intermountain West - today and tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landscape managers and sod growers in the Intermountain West are limited in their ability to select the varieties of turfgrass that perform well in this semi-arid environment. The varieties of seed sold in Utah are rarely based on what performs well here. Turf managers will often make one visit to...

  3. FLUORINATED SURFACTANTS IN THE GREAT LAKES - YESTERDAY, TODAY, AND TOMORROW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfluorooctane surfactants have been reported in biota, water, and air samples worldwide. Despite these reports, the main environmental sources of these compounds remain undefined. As a presentation to the emerging chemicals workshop of the International Joint Commission on Grea...

  4. Meat products in the past, today and in the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandendriessche, Frank

    2008-01-01

    An illustrative overview is given of the history of meat products, emphasizing the present situation. Three different consecutive and complementary periods can be defined in terms of realisations, threats and opportunities. The "Quality" period started about 15 years ago and was characterised by the introduction of the ISO Quality Systems Standards. A trend from product control towards system control for guaranteeing Food Safety and Quality was obvious. The "Food Safety" Period started with the introduction of HACCP. Pushed by Food Safety scandals this period is characterised by a growing influence of authorities and legislation besides an increase in distribution requirements. The "Nutrition and Health" period has only just started. Global health problems related to food and the (potential) answers of the meat industry are highlighted. For meat products the energy (fat) level, the sodium level and fat quality in terms of fatty acid composition are the main priorities.

  5. Electrochemical advanced oxidation processes: today and tomorrow. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirés, Ignasi; Brillas, Enric; Oturan, Mehmet A; Rodrigo, Manuel A; Panizza, Marco

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, new advanced oxidation processes based on the electrochemical technology, the so-called electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs), have been developed for the prevention and remediation of environmental pollution, especially focusing on water streams. These methods are based on the electrochemical generation of a very powerful oxidizing agent, such as the hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) in solution, which is then able to destroy organics up to their mineralization. EAOPs include heterogeneous processes like anodic oxidation and photoelectrocatalysis methods, in which (•)OH are generated at the anode surface either electrochemically or photochemically, and homogeneous processes like electro-Fenton, photoelectro-Fenton, and sonoelectrolysis, in which (•)OH are produced in the bulk solution. This paper presents a general overview of the application of EAOPs on the removal of aqueous organic pollutants, first reviewing the most recent works and then looking to the future. A global perspective on the fundamentals and experimental setups is offered, and laboratory-scale and pilot-scale experiments are examined and discussed.

  6. Burden of mortality in Greenland--today and tomorrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lasse Christian; Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Nielsen, Ulla Ringgren

    2004-01-01

    . Age standardised death rates were calculated per 10,000 person years. Regression analysis (ordinary least squares) using time as the explanatory variable was applied to project the time series 1976-1998 into the prediction period 1999-2028. RESULTS: The projections indicate that the demographic...

  7. Green roofs in Germany : yesterday, today and tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, R. [Anhalt Univ., Bernburg (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    This presentation provided a historical overview of the development of green roofs in Germany. Real interest in green roof technology in Germany began in the 1970s at which time specific guidelines for correct installation were established. In the past 20 years there has been a dramatic increase in the number of green roofs. The main market drivers were ecological concerns, energy and cost saving potential, as well as the need to manage storm water. Green roofs have an insulating effect, leading to energy savings. Some cities in Germany have implemented an incentive program whereby reductions on city water fees are allocated to owners of green roofs. Many business opportunities have been created by an increased interest in green roofs. The demand for lava, pumice, expanded clay, recycled roof tiles, crushed brick and other materials is being met by a new industry. There has been a noted increase in green roof systems and components, as well as installation and maintenance companies. It is expected that the ever increasing price for land in German cities along with an increasing population density will spur an even greater demand for green roofs. Germany is considered one of the greenest countries in the world, due to public concern for all forms of pollution, the maintenance of ecological balance, the preservation of flora and fauna, and a respect for nature. 6 refs.

  8. Overview Of Forensic Toxicology, Yesterday, Today And In The Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Heesun; Choe, Sanggil

    2017-06-22

    The scope of forensic toxicology has been tremendously expanded over the past 50 years. From two general sections forensic toxicology can be further classified into 8-9 sections. The most outstanding improvement in forensic toxicology is the changes brought by instrumental development. The field of forensic toxicology was revolutionized by the development of immunoassay and bench-top GC-MS in the 1980's and LC-MS-MS in 2000's. Detection of trace amounts of analytes has allowed the use of new specimens such as hair and oral fluids, along with blood and urine. Over a longer period of time, continuous efforts have been made to efficiently extract and separate drug and poison from biological fluids. International endeavors to develop high quality standards and guidelines for drugs and poisons in biological specimens and to promote them in order to increase reliability of laboratories are also part of the recent advancement of forensic toxicology. Interpretation of postmortem toxicology encompasses various factors including postmortem redistribution and stability. Considering the recent trend, the interpretation of toxicological results should account for autopsy findings, crime scene information, and related medical history. The fields of forensic toxicology will continuously develop to improve analysis of target analytes from various specimens, quality assurance program, and results interpretation. In addition, the development of analytical techniques will also contribute further advancement of forensic toxicology. The societies of forensic toxicologists, such as TIAFT, will play an important role for the advancement of forensic toxicology by collaborating and sharing ideas between toxicologists from both developed and developing countries. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. The biosphere today and tomorrow in the SFR area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kautsky, Ulrik (ed.)

    2001-06-01

    This report is a compilation of the work done mainly in the SAFE project for the biosphere from about 14 reports. The SAFE project is the updated safety analysis of SFR-1, the LLW and ILW repository at Forsmark. The aim of the report is to summarize the available information about the present-day biosphere in the area surrounding SFR and to use this information, together with information about the previous development of the biosphere, to predict the future development of the area in a more comparable way than the underlying reports. The data actually used for the models have been taken from the original reports which also justify or validate the data. The report compiles information about climate, oceanography, landscape, sedimentation, shoreline displacement, marine, lake and terrestrial ecosystems.

  10. Traditional Chinese medicine and oral diseases: today and tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, L W; Hua, H; Cheung, L K

    2011-01-01

    With a history of over 2000 years, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) evolves into a unique system of diagnosing and treating illnesses. It is a challenge to convey the fundamentals of this traditional medicine to our Western colleagues because of the differences in language, philosophy and concept of diagnosis and treatment. This review attempts to tackle these barriers by introducing several widely used Chinese medicines for treating oral diseases. China Journals Full-text Database and Pubmed were used as the searching engines. Although many studies have demonstrated that the Chinese medicines are effective in treating oral diseases including recurrent aphthous stomatitis, oral lichen planus, leukoplakia, and Sjögren's syndrome, most of them lacked standard criteria of post-treatment assessment and laboratory evidence. Randomized controlled clinical trials with specific assessment criteria are required to close the gap between TCM and evidenced-based medicine.

  11. Healthy environments for healthy people: Bioremediation today and tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonaventura, C. [Duke Univ. Nicholas School of the Environment Marine Lab., Beaufort, NC (United States); Johnson, F.M. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Increases in environmental contamination lead to a progressive deterioration of environmental quality. This condition challenges our global society to find effective measures of remediation to reverse the negative conditions that severely threaten human and environmental health. We discuss the progress being made toward this goal through application of bioremediation techniques. Bioremediation generally utilizes microbes (bacteria, fungi, yeast, and algae), although higher plants are used in some applications. New bioremediation approaches are emerging based on advances in molecular biology and process engineering. Bioremediation continues to be the favored approach for processing biological wastes and avoiding microbial pathogenesis. Bioremediation may also play an increasing role in concentrating metals and radioactive materials to avoid toxicity or to recover metals for reuse. Microbes can biodegrade organic chemicals; purposeful enhancement of this natural process can aid in pollutant degradation and waste-site cleanup operations. Recently developed rapid-screening assays can identify organisms capable of degrading specific wastes and new gene-probe methods can ascertain their abundance at specific sites. New tools and techniques for use of bioremediation in situ, in biofilters, and in bioreactors are contributing to the rapid growth of this field. Bioremediation has already proven itself to be a cost-effective and beneficial addition to chemical and physical methods of managing wastes and environmental pollutants. We anticipate that it will play an increasingly important role as a result of new and emerging techniques and processes. 140 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Diabetes 2030: Insights from Yesterday, Today, and Future Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezold, Clement; Arikan, Yasemin; Byrne, Erin; Krohe, Shannon

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To forecast future trends in diabetes prevalence, morbidity, and costs in the United States, the Institute for Alternative Futures has updated its diabetes forecasting model and extended its projections to 2030 for the nation, all states, and several metropolitan areas. This paper describes the methodology and data sources for these diabetes forecasts and discusses key implications. In short, diabetes will remain a major health crisis in America, in spite of medical advances and prevention efforts. The prevalence of diabetes (type 2 diabetes and type 1 diabetes) will increase by 54% to more than 54.9 million Americans between 2015 and 2030; annual deaths attributed to diabetes will climb by 38% to 385,800; and total annual medical and societal costs related to diabetes will increase 53% to more than $622 billion by 2030. Improvements in management reducing the annual incidence of morbidities and premature deaths related to diabetes over this time period will result in diabetes patients living longer, but requiring many years of comprehensive management of multiple chronic diseases, resulting in dramatically increased costs. Aggressive population health measures, including increased availability of diabetes prevention programs, could help millions of adults prevent or delay the progression to type 2 diabetes, thereby helping turn around these dire projections. PMID:27124621

  13. Israeli Water Achievements Today and Enlightenment to China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Lei; Xu Lanqing

    2008-01-01

    Despite the endemic drought, arid climate and associated limited freshwater resources, as well as difficult geopolitical realities, Israel can provide a reliable supply of high quality water to a rapidly growing population. The achievements of water supply in Israel can be summarized as water technologies (like water transportation and purification, desalination, wastewater treatment, effluent reuse, storm water catchment, control systems, rain enhancement and drip irrigation, etc.), water management and legislation as well as water industry. In view of the national concern regarding the quality and quantity of the water, the skills, technologies and know-how that Israel has accumulated in water supply and irrigation can give us enlightenment that is also presented in this paper.

  14. Guest Editorial Brain-Computer Interface: Today and Tomorrow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-Zhong Yao

    2009-01-01

    @@ As the invited editor of this special issue on brain- computer nterface (BCI), I am pleased to give a comment on the state-of-the-art with the introduction of recent advances made at the Chengdu BCI Group, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC).

  15. Forecasting European Wildfires Today and in the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Abellan, Maria; Porras Alegre, Ignasi; María Sole, Josep; Gálvez, Pedro; Bielski, Conrad; Nurmi, Pertti

    2017-04-01

    Society as a whole is increasingly exposed and vulnerable to natural disasters due to extreme weather events exacerbated by climate change. The increased frequency of wildfires is not only a result of a changing climate, but wildfires themselves also produce a significant amount of greenhouse gases that, in-turn, further contribute to global warming. I-REACT (Improving Resilience to Emergencies through Advanced Cyber Technologies) is an innovation project funded by the European Commission , which aims to use social media, smartphones and wearables to improve natural disaster management by integrating existing services, both local and European, into a platform that supports the entire emergency management cycle. In order to assess the impact of climate change on wildfire hazards, METEOSIM designed two different System Processes (SP) that will be integrated into the I-REACT service that can provide information on a variety of time scales. SP1 - Climate Change Impact The climate change impact on climate variables related to fires is calculated by building an ensemble based on the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) and CORDEX data. A validation and an Empirical-Statistical Downscaling (ESD) calibration are done to assess the changes in the past of the climatic variables related to wildfires (temperature, precipitation, wind, relative humidity and Fire Weather Index). Calculations in the trend and the frequency of extreme events of those variables are done for three time scales: near-term (2011-2040), mid-term (2041-2070) and long term (2071-2100). SP2 - Operational daily forecast of the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index (FWI) Using ensemble data from the ECMWF and from the GLAMEPS (multi-model ensemble) models, both supplied by the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), the Fire Weather Index (FWI) and its index components are produced for each ensemble member within a wide forecast time range, from a few hours up to 10 days resulting in a probabilistic output of the FWI for different regions in Europe. This work will improve the currently available information to various wildfire information users such as fire departments, the civil protection, local authorities, etc., where accurate and reliable information in extreme weather situations are vital for improving planning and risk management.

  16. Rpws Science Today and in Cassini's Final Three Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, W. S.; Lamy, L.

    2014-12-01

    Ten years of Cassini/RPWS remote and in situ observations of Saturn and its environment have provided a rich return feeding numerous studies of the various types of kronian radio emissions (such as Saturn's kilometric radiation [SKR], auroral hiss, narrowband [NB] and drifting burst emissions, and Saturn's electrostatic discharges [SED]), local plasma waves (such as chorus, upper hybrid bands and electron cyclotron harmonic emissions) and dusty plasmas. Nonetheless, several major objectives for RPWS science remain for the last three years of the Cassini mission, and will culminate with the detailed study of Saturn's auroral regions, where SKR and possibly other types of radio waves are produced and large-scale plasma acceleration is suspected to take place. During the F-ring and proximal orbital sequences, Cassini is expected to pass through northern and southern auroral regions tens of times around noon local time. These passes can be accurately predicted through the modeling of SKR sources and in turn help to trigger combined observations with other Cassini instruments and Earth-based observatories such as Hubble. Altogether, these observations will provide crucial complementary insights to understand kronian auroral processes. RPWS will also continue to measure the rotational modulation of various radio emissions (SKR, NB and hiss), pushing forward the study of magnetospheric periodicities long after equinox, pursue the monitoring of SEDs and lightning whistlers, whose occurrence probes the activity of atmospheric storms, or probe in detail the dusty environment of the D ring and wave-particle interactions taking place in the very inner magnetosphere where the magnetic field links the planet to the rings.

  17. Urban forestry and the eco-city: today and tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaret M. Carreiro; Wayne C. Zipperer

    2008-01-01

    In 1990, the Chicago Academy of Sciences held a conference, Sustainable Cities: Preserving and Restoring Urban Biodiversity, which led to the publication of a book entitled The Ecological City (Platt et aI., 1994). This symposium differed from others on cities at that time by focusing principally on cities as habitats for biodiversity. The thrust of the symposium was...

  18. TELEMEDICINE AND E-HEALTH: TODAY AND TOMORROW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti K

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Telemedicine is a generic term referring to all forms of medical information exchange, including a variety of telecommunication technologies. Applications in health and medical care include tele-communication, data and information technique are used to transfer medical information. The challenges facing developing countries (like India in delivering high-quality medical care during the next century are great. Overcoming poverty, difficult access to medical care, governmental instability, lack of trained physicians, and a large burden of existing and emerging diseases all appear at times insurmountable.

  19. Healthy environments for healthy people: bioremediation today and tomorrow.

    OpenAIRE

    Bonaventura, C; Johnson, F. M.

    1997-01-01

    Increases in environmental contamination lead to a progressive deterioration of environmental quality. This condition challenges our global society to find effective measures of remediation to reverse the negative conditions that severely threaten human and environmental health. We discuss the progress being made toward this goal through application of bioremediation techniques. Bioremediation generally utilizes microbes (bacteria, fungi, yeast, and algae), although higher plants are used in ...

  20. Glycosaminoglycan polysaccharide biosynthesis and production: today and tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, Paul L

    2012-04-01

    Glycosaminoglycans [GAGs] are essential heteropolysaccharides in vertebrate tissues that are also, in certain cases, employed as virulence factors by microbes. Hyaluronan [HA], heparin, and chondroitin sulfate [CS] are GAGs currently used in various medical applications and together are multi-billion dollar products thus targets for production by animal-free manufacture. By using bacteria as the source of GAGs, the pathogen's sword may be converted into a plowshare to help avoid potential liabilities springing from the use of animal-derived GAGs including adventitious agents (e.g., prions, pathogens), antigenicity, degradation of the environment, and depletion of endangered species. HA from microbes, which have a chemical structure identical to human HA, has already been commercialized and sold at the ton-scale. Substantial progress towards microbial heparin and CS has been made, but these vertebrate polymers are more complicated structurally than the unsulfated bacterial polysaccharide precursors thus require additional processing steps. This review provides an overview of GAG structure, medical applications, microbial biosynthesis, and the state of bacterial GAG production systems. Representatives of all glycosyltransferase enzymes that polymerize the sugar chains of the three main GAGs have been identified and serve as the core technology to harness, but the proteins involved in sugar precursor formation and chain export steps of biosynthesis are also essential to the GAG production process. In addition, this review discusses future directions and potential important issues. Overall, this area is poised to make great headway to produce safer (both increased purity and more secure supply chains) non-animal GAG-based therapeutics.

  1. Ethics and economics, today and in the past

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E. Alvey

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Economics was traditionally viewed as part of a wider study of human things, including ethics. It has drifted away from ethics despite the fact that ethical considerations inevitably form part of economics. After a brief introduction, the second section outlines the state of play in the economics discipline. The third section deals with the ethical crisis of economics today. The fourth section presents two grand narratives of ethics and economics. The fifth section sketches Amartya Sen’s critique of the mainstream and his alternative approach to economics. The sixth section provides some concluding comments.

  2. Capability Planning for Today and Tomorrow Army Installation Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Report – Provide data for IMCP metrics How are ISR-NI Data Utilized? Unclassified 9 of 22 Installation Status Report Michelle Fulton/(571)256...ol13 Measures (84.6%) ) Output ( IMCP ) ( IGI&S ) ( OSD-NIM ) (G3 SRR (FY10)) Unclassified 15 of 22 Installation Status Report Michelle Fulton

  3. Icy Satellite Science Today and in Cassini's Final Three Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Cassini Mission has turned our view of Saturn's icy moons from scientific sketches to fully realized worlds. Among the major discoveries are: Activity on Enceladus and associated plumes that originate in small hot spots on its south pole and that appear to be modulated by tidal forces; a liquid subsurface water ocean on Enceladus that is a habitable environment; several new moons; debris rings associated with moons; a unique equatorial ridge on Iapetus; the identity of new constituents on the moons including carbon dioxide ice on most of them and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)on Iapetus; differentiated or partially differentiated interiors; nano-iron on the surfaces of the moons and in the rings; volatile segregation on Iapetus and Hyperion; and a bewildering array of geologic processes on the small moons. But our new view of these icy worlds has spawned new questions. Among these unanswered questions are: How variable are the plumes? Have any other moons had activity similar to that on Enceladus and did it continue up to the recent past? How much dust do the moons contribute to the region around Saturn? What caused the ridge on Iapetus? What are the interiors of the moons like? How differentiated and compensated are they? Five additional targeted flybys, two of Dione and three of Enceladus, have been designed to answer these questions and will be implemented during the remainder of the Solstice Mission. The Dione flybys both include gravity passes to determine its state of differentiation. One of the flybys is optimized to measure the fields and particle environment around Dione. One of the two remote-sensing flybys of Enceladus will scrutinize the south polar region to further understand the size, temperature, and variability of the emitting areas, while the other will observe the north pole to determine why it is so different from the south. The third Enceladus flyby involves an unprecedented pass less than 50 km above the surface into the midst of the plume. The spacecraft's daring swoop into the inner parts of the saturnian system during the F-ring and proximal orbits will bring many of the small inner satellites into clearer focus. Funded by NASA.

  4. The Black Canyon of the Gunnison: Today and Yesterday

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Wallace R.

    1965-01-01

    Since the early visit of Captain John William Gunnison in the middle of the last century, the Black Canyon of the Gunnison has stirred mixed apprehension and wonder in the hearts of its viewers. It ranks high among the more awesome gorges of North America. Many great western canyons are as well remembered for their brightly colored walls as for their airy depths. Not so the Black Canyon. Though it is assuredly not black, the dark-gray tones of its walls and the hazy shadows of its gloomy depths join together to make its name well deserved. Its name conveys an impression, not a picture. After the first emotional impact of the canyon, the same questions come to the minds of most reflective viewers and in about the following order: How deep is the Black Canyon, how wide, how does it compare with other canyons, what are the rocks, how did it form, and how long did it take? Several western canyons exceed the Black Canyon in overall size. Some are longer; some are deeper; some are narrower; and a few have walls as steep. But no other canyon in North American combines the depth, narrowness, sheerness, and somber countenance of the Black Canyon. In many places the Black Canyon is as deep as it is wide. Between The Narrows and Chasm View in the Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Monument (fig. 15) it is much deeper than wide. Average depth in the monument is about 2,000 feet, ranging from a maximum of about 2,700 feet, north of Warner Point (which also is the greatest depth anywhere in the canyon), to a minimum of about 1,750 feet at The Narrows. The stretch of canyon between Pulpit Rock and Chasm View, including The Narrows, though the shallowest in the monument, is also the narrowest, has some of the steepest walls, and is, therefore, among the most impressive segments of the canyon (fig. 3). Profiles of several well-known western canyons are shown in figure 1. Deepest of these by far is Hells Canyon of the Snake, on the Idaho-Oregon border. Clearly, it dwarfs the Black Canyon in the immensity of its void, though its flaring walls lack the alarming verticality of the Black Canyon. Arizona's Grand Canyon of the Colorado is acknowledged as the greatest of them all; it is not as deep as Hells Canyon, but it is wider, longer, more rugged, and far more colorful. Its depth is two to three times that of the Black Canyon. Zion Canyon, Utah, combines depth, sheerness, serenity, and color in a chasm that ranges from capacious to extremely narrow. Its Narrows have a depth-to-width ratio unmatched by any other major American canyon. California's Yosemite Valley, in a setting of sylvan verdure, is unique among the gorges shown in profile in figure 1 in being the only glacial trough; its monolithic walls bear witness to the abrasive power of moving ice. Few cliffs in the world match the splendor of its El Capitan. Lodore Canyon, on the Green River in Dinosaur National Monument, Colorado, is best known, perhaps, for its noisy splashy rapids, first made famous by John Wesley Powell. Lodore Canyon also features towering cliffs of deep-red quartzite. Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, Wyoming, is noted for its great waterfalls, dashing river, and bright coloration. The Royal Gorge of the Arkansas River, Colorado, features the 'world's highest suspension bridge'. The profiles shown in figure 1 afford some basis for comparing one canyon with another. They cannot abstract in two dimensions the overall impression that each canyon makes. Color, vegetation, outcrop habit, vantage point, season of year, length of visit - even the roar of the river or lack thereof - all contribute to this highly personal effect. For a river of its size, the Gunnison has an unusually steep gradient through the Black Canyon. The river falls about 2,150 feet from the head of the canyon at Sapinero to the mouth at its junction with North Fork - a distance of about 50 miles and an average rate of fall of about 43 feet per mile. By comparison, the Green

  5. Telemedicine and e-health: Today and Tomorrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Telemedicine is a generic term referring to all forms of medical information exchange, including a variety of telecommunication technologies. Applications in health and medical care include tele-communication, data and information technique are used to transfer medical information. The challenges facing developing countries (like India in delivering high-quality medical care during the next century are great. Overcoming poverty, difficult access to medical care, governmental instability, lack of trained physicians, and a large burden of existing and emerging diseases all appear at times insurmountable.

  6. FY10 Engineering Innovations, Research and Technology Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, M A; Aceves, S M; Paulson, C N; Candy, J V; Bennett, C V; Carlisle, K; Chen, D C; White, D A; Bernier, J V; Puso, M A; Weisgraber, T H; Corey, B; Lin, J I; Wheeler, E K; Conway, A M; Kuntz, J D; Spadaccini, C M; Dehlinger, D A; Kotovsky, J; Nikolic, R; Mariella, R P; Foudray, A K; Tang, V; Guidry, B L; Ng, B M; Lemmond, T D; Chen, B Y; Meyers, C A; Houck, T L

    2011-01-11

    This report summarizes key research, development, and technology advancements in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate for FY2010. These efforts exemplify Engineering's nearly 60-year history of developing and applying the technology innovations needed for the Laboratory's national security missions, and embody Engineering's mission to ''Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow.'' Leading off the report is a section featuring compelling engineering innovations. These innovations range from advanced hydrogen storage that enables clean vehicles, to new nuclear material detection technologies, to a landmine detection system using ultra-wideband ground-penetrating radar. Many have been recognized with R&D Magazine's prestigious R&D 100 Award; all are examples of the forward-looking application of innovative engineering to pressing national problems and challenging customer requirements. Engineering's capability development strategy includes both fundamental research and technology development. Engineering research creates the competencies of the future where discovery-class groundwork is required. Our technology development (or reduction to practice) efforts enable many of the research breakthroughs across the Laboratory to translate from the world of basic research to the national security missions of the Laboratory. This portfolio approach produces new and advanced technological capabilities, and is a unique component of the value proposition of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The balance of the report highlights this work in research and technology, organized into thematic technical areas: Computational Engineering; Micro/Nano-Devices and Structures; Measurement Technologies; Engineering Systems for Knowledge Discovery; and Energy Manipulation. Our investments in these areas serve not only known programmatic requirements of today and tomorrow, but

  7. Mobile technology and academic libraries innovative services for research and learning

    CERN Document Server

    Canuel, Robin

    2017-01-01

    In seventeen chapters ranging from A Mobile-First Library Site Redesign to Mobile Technology Support for Field Research to Virtual Reality Library Environments, Mobile Technology and Academic Libraries explores how librarians around the world are working to adapt their spaces, collections, teaching, and services to the new possibilities presented by mobile technology. This is a detailed and thorough examination of technology that's emerging now and how to incorporate it into your library to help the students and researchers of both today and tomorrow.

  8. Researcher positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørck, Line Lerche; Khawaja, Iram

    2009-01-01

    abstract  This article focuses on the complex and multi-layered process of researcher positioning, specifically in relation to the politically sensitive study of marginalised and ‘othered' groups such as Muslims living in Denmark. We discuss the impact of different ethnic, religious and racial...... political and personal involvement by the researcher, which challenges traditional perspectives on research and researcher positioning. A key point in this regard is the importance of constant awareness of and reflection on the multiple ways in which one's positioning as a researcher influences the research...

  9. Fetal Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, John T.; Sladek, John R.

    1989-11-01

    This article reviews some of the significant contributions of fetal research and fetal tissue research over the past 20 years. The benefits of fetal research include the development of vaccines, advances in prenatal diagnosis, detection of malformations, assessment of safe and effective medications, and the development of in utero surgical therapies. Fetal tissue research benefits vaccine development, assessment of risk factors and toxicity levels in drug production, development of cell lines, and provides a source of fetal cells for ongoing transplantation trials. Together, fetal research and fetal tissue research offer tremendous potential for the treatment of the fetus, neonate, and adult.

  10. Research Review

    OpenAIRE

    Anonymous,

    1983-01-01

    Research Reviewed: "The Adjustment of Nominal Interest Rates to Inflation: A Review of Recent Literature"; "Role of Government in a Market Economy"; "Economic Analysis and Agricultural Policy"; "Agricultural Research Policy"

  11. Preeclampsia Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Preeclampsia Research at the NICHD Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content NICHD Research aims to detect, treat, and prevent this potentially dangerous condition of pregnancy Preeclampsia is a syndrome that occurs during pregnancy ...

  12. Research design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tobi, Hilde; Kampen, Jarl K.

    2017-01-01

    Many of today’s global scientific challenges require the joint involvement of researchers from different disciplinary backgrounds (social sciences, environmental sciences, climatology, medicine, etc.). Such interdisciplinary research teams face many challenges resulting from differences in

  13. Research Article

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-18

    Jul 18, 2016 ... 1. , N. Noushadi. 2,*. 1. M.A student in Educational Research, Yasouj University, Yasouj, Iran ... But, the academic mentoring focuses mostly on development of knowledge and research skills of ..... British Colombia. - Allen, S.

  14. Ethnographic research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, M.J.; Koster, Martijn; Vermeulen, Jeroen; Dubnick, Melvin; Bearfield, Domonic

    2015-01-01

    This entry outlines three aspects of ethnographic research. First, we describe in what way ethnographic research implies a distinct way of knowing. Second, we discuss the use of qualitative methods in ethnographic research. Third, we take up the role of writing, which is both a way of documenting re

  15. Narrative Research

    OpenAIRE

    Andrews, Molly

    2004-01-01

    In this chapter the three authors who are co-directors of the Centre for Narrative Research at the University of East London bring together their views on narrative research, theory and method. The chapter is organized around their individual stories of each author’s relationship with narrative research.

  16. Research Malpractice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubin, Daryl E.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the issue of academic fraud in the form of science research malpractice. Topic areas considered include: malpractice studies; causes of misconduct; normal and deviant research behavior; and distinguished research characteristics in production, reporting, dissemination, and evaluation. Consequences of malpractice and…

  17. Ginning Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are four USDA-ARS labs involved in cotton harvesting, processing & fiber quality research; The Southwestern Cotton Ginning Research Laboratory (Mesilla Park, NM); The Cotton Production and Processing Unit (Lubbock, TX); The Cotton Ginning Research Unit (Stoneville, MS); and The Cotton Structur...

  18. Research misconduct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, F.J. E-mail: f.j.gilbert@abdn.ac.uk; Denison, A.R

    2003-07-01

    Good research practice is important to the scientific community. An awareness of what constitutes poor practice is important. Various types of research misconduct are defined in this article. The extent of research misconduct in the field of radiology has been assessed by contacting five English language radiology journals. Redundant or duplicate publication has been reported infrequently, Radiology (1), American Journal of Roentgenology (3), Clinical Radiology (3), British Journal of Radiology (2) and European Radiology (1). The issue of how the radiology community might tackle research misconduct is discussed with reference to guidance from the Medical Research Council, the Wellcome Trust and the Committee of Publication Ethics.

  19. Researcher Positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khawaja, Iram; Mørck, Line Lerche

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the complex and multilayered process of researcher positioning,specifically in relation to the politically sensitive study of marginalised and "othered"groups such as Muslims living in Denmark. We discuss the impact of different ethnic,religious, and racial backgrounds...... involvement by the researcher, which challenges traditional perspectives onresearch and researcher positioning. A key point in this regard is the importance ofconstant awareness of and reflection on the multiple ways in which one's positioningas a researcher influences the research process. Studying the other...

  20. Animal research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, I.A.S.; Sandøe, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the ethical issues in animal research using a combined approach of ethical theory and analysis of scientific findings with bearing on the ethical analysis. The article opens with a general discussion of the moral acceptability of animal use in research. The use of animals...... in research is analyzed from the viewpoint of three distinct ethical approaches: contractarianism, utilitarianism, and animal rights view. On a contractarian view, research on animals is only an ethical issue to the extent that other humans as parties to the social contract care about how research animals...

  1. Descriptive Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    2003-01-01

    Descriptive research is described by Lathom-Radocy and Radocy (1995) to include Survey research, ex post facto research, case studies and developmental studies. Descriptive research also includes a review of the literature in order to provide both quantitative and qualitative evidence of the effect...... starts will allow effect size calculations to be made in order to evaluate effect over time. Given the difficulties in undertaking controlled experimental studies in the creative arts therapies, descriptive research methods offer a way of quantifying effect through descriptive statistical analysis...

  2. Researching Practice and Practicing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPardo, Anne

    2011-01-01

    When works of teacher scholars were recognized with major National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) research awards, and the sections and conferences instituted research initiatives of their own, many were filled with the soaring hope that a new synergy was in the making. The "Research in the Teaching of English" (RTE) Alan C. Purves Award,…

  3. Research Impact and Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oancea, Alis

    2013-01-01

    Based on a 2010-11 study involving senior researchers from seven disciplines, this article explores critically some of the diverse interpretations of impact in different disciplines, sub-fields and modes of research, and researchers' views about how these interpretations articulate with top-down impact agendas and with university structures…

  4. Research Review: Doing Artistic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serig, Dan

    2012-01-01

    In this review, the author focuses on the pragmatic consideration: How do artists do artistic research? Artistic research in the context of this review is about the connections and relationships among three primary domains: (1) the arts; (2) higher education; and (3) arts education. Broadly stated, all artists do research when they do art--whether…

  5. Researching Practice and Practicing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPardo, Anne

    2011-01-01

    When works of teacher scholars were recognized with major National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) research awards, and the sections and conferences instituted research initiatives of their own, many were filled with the soaring hope that a new synergy was in the making. The "Research in the Teaching of English" (RTE) Alan C. Purves Award,…

  6. Research 101: Understanding Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Angela; Bagby, Janet; Sulak, Tracey

    2010-01-01

    Currently, the Montessori community is increasing its focus on the importance of research. The purpose of this article is to provide some background for critical readers of research related to Montessori education and to provide the tools to implement these findings in one's own Montessori work. Research articles are generally organized in a way…

  7. Editorial -Research! Research! Research! What are Thou?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Shyam

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Being in field of Orthopaedic research since last 6 years, I have personally been witness to the rapid change in landscape of Othopaedic Research and also medical research in general. The sheer volumes of publications is overwhelming to the extent of being mostly ineffective in providing significant positive addition to the current literature. “There are too many variables” is one of my favorite phrase when I start to explain something to myself. Looking at as many variables as we can think of, makes us understand concepts within the limitations of given variables. Something similar to Ashby’s law that we spoke about in last Editorial [1]. However when we try to apply this to word ‘Research’ the amount of subjective stereotype that is associated with the word defeats all attempt to decipher and communicate clearly. Originally word Research derived from French ‘Researche’ simply means ‘Pursuit of Knowledge’. We as medical practitioners in search of better treatment for our patients are always in pursuit of knowledge. This knowledge is mostly build individually and is learned from individual experience and learning. This is a subjective body of knowledge and this is what makes one surgeon better than another. But is this ‘Research’? Yes it is Research and it serves the main purpose of medical research that is to improve the treatment given to patients. However this is a limited form of research, limited by individual’s ability and capacity. It also does not subject itself to rigorous ‘scientific methods’ and may not be acceptable to a community of ‘Modern Researchers’. Another form of Research of pursuit of knowledge is again from the clinics and from reading journals and books. A collaboration of clinical experience and written word adds a more thoughtful way of pursuing knowledge. This I think is the way majority of medical practitioners acquire knowledge. This keeps them updated and also helps them provide good

  8. Research management and research output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Bosch

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: A study was conducted at two merged South African higher education institutions to determine which management factors, as identified in a literature study as well as through a factor analysis of survey data, were predictive of the dependent variable 'research output'. Problem investigated: Research output contributes to creating sustainability of knowledge of management sciences and therefore the active management of research is in the interest of progressive universities. Research management related activities are usually associated with measurable targets, detailed plans, rigorous evaluation and decisive action - all of which are observable (perhaps programmable behaviour also referred to as tangible factors. Authors argue that the tangible factors of any successful institution can be copied, technology can be bought, and in theory you should have an instantly thriving research institution. It is, however, clear that although many institutions have exactly the same technology and structure as their successful competitors, they still fail to succeed in increasing research output. Design and Research methodology or approach: A survey was distributed to n=411 and yielded a 49.6% response rate. A confirmatory reliability analysis as well as a factor analysis was conducted. Findings/implications: The empirical model that was derived through a factor analysis strengthens the argument that both tangible and intangible factors exist in a research environment. Tangible and intangible factors play a different role in predicting research output. The tangible factors are predictors of research output for non-research-active academics. The theoretical research output prediction model highlights predictors such as 'professional activities' and 'individual skills and competence' for specific groupings. The theoretical model indicates that the factors that predict research output are largely intrinsic to a researcher but could also be supported by

  9. Animal research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, I.A.S.; Sandøe, Peter

    2012-01-01

    in research is analyzed from the viewpoint of three distinct ethical approaches: contractarianism, utilitarianism, and animal rights view. On a contractarian view, research on animals is only an ethical issue to the extent that other humans as parties to the social contract care about how research animals......This article presents the ethical issues in animal research using a combined approach of ethical theory and analysis of scientific findings with bearing on the ethical analysis. The article opens with a general discussion of the moral acceptability of animal use in research. The use of animals...... are faring. From the utilitarian perspective, the use of sentient animals in research that may harm them is an ethical issue, but harm done to animals can be balanced by benefit generated for humans and other animals. The animal rights view, when thoroughgoing, is abolitionist as regards the use of animals...

  10. Research Methodology

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekar, S; Philomination, P

    2006-01-01

    In this manuscript various components of research are listed and briefly discussed. The topics considered in this write-up cover a part of the research methodology paper of Master of Philosophy (M.Phil.) course and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) course. The manuscript is intended for students and research scholars of science subjects such as mathematics, physics, chemistry, statistics, biology and computer science. Various stages of research are discussed in detail. Special care has been taken to motivate the young researchers to take up challenging problems. Ten assignment works are given. For the benefit of young researchers a short interview with three eminent scientists is included at the end of the manuscript.

  11. Researcher positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørck, Line Lerche; Khawaja, Iram

    2009-01-01

    abstract  This article focuses on the complex and multi-layered process of researcher positioning, specifically in relation to the politically sensitive study of marginalised and ‘othered' groups such as Muslims living in Denmark. We discuss the impact of different ethnic, religious and racial...... political and personal involvement by the researcher, which challenges traditional perspectives on research and researcher positioning. A key point in this regard is the importance of constant awareness of and reflection on the multiple ways in which one's positioning as a researcher influences the research...... process. Studying the other calls for close reflections on one's own position, theoretically, personally, and politically, taking into account one's complicity in either overcoming or reproducing processes of othering and marginalisation. [i] We use the term (ethnic) minoritised, not as a distinction...

  12. Letterform research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    This paper looks into the history of letterform research and discusses why the discipline has yet to make the big break within design research. By highlighting two of the most popular focus areas (letter distinctiveness and the role of serifs) and by discussing various forms of methodological sho...... shortcomings, the paper suggests that future research into letterforms should (1) draw on results from the field of reading research (2) be based on test material informed by design knowledge and (3) move away from the former tendency of looking for universal answers.......This paper looks into the history of letterform research and discusses why the discipline has yet to make the big break within design research. By highlighting two of the most popular focus areas (letter distinctiveness and the role of serifs) and by discussing various forms of methodological...

  13. Research methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuada, John

    This book deals with how students should use of research methods in their university projects. It aims at helping students in developing comprehensive research strategies for their projects. It also provides introduction to issues of philosophy of science as applied in the social sciences....... That is it provides them with a fair understanding of the root assumptions that guide researchers in their investigations and how these assumptions inform their theoretical thinking and choice of methods....

  14. Avian Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Scope Avian Research is an open access,peer-reviewed journal publishing high quality research and review articles on all aspects of ornithology from all over the world.It aims to report the latest and most significant progress in ornithology and to encourage exchange of ideas among international ornithologists.As an Open Access journal,Avian Research provides a unique opportunity to publish

  15. Avian Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    <正>Aims and Scope Avian Research is an open access,peer-reviewed journal publishing high quality research and review articles on all aspects of ornithology from all over the world.It aims to report the latest and most significant progress in ornithology and to encourage exchange of ideas among international ornithologists.As an Open Access journal,Avian Research provides a unique opportunity to publish high quality contents that will be internationally accessible to any reader at no cost.

  16. Avian Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Scope Avian Research is an open access,peer-reviewed journal publishing high quality research and review articles on all aspects of ornithology from all over the world.It aims to report the latest and most signi cant progress in ornithology and to encourage exchange of ideas among international ornithologists.As an Open Access journal,Avian Research provides a unique opportunity to publish

  17. Action research - applied research, intervention research, collaborative research, practitioner research, or praxis research?

    OpenAIRE

    Eikeland, Olav

    2012-01-01

    "This article relates common ways of conceptualising action research as 'intervention', 'collaboration', 'interactive research', 'applied research', and 'practitioner research' to a number of different ways of knowing, extracted from the works of Aristotle. The purpose is not to disavow any of these practices but to expand the philosophical, methodological, and theoretical horizon to contain the Aristotelian concept of praxis. It is claimed that praxis knowing needs to be comprehended in orde...

  18. Descriptive Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    2003-01-01

    Descriptive research is described by Lathom-Radocy and Radocy (1995) to include Survey research, ex post facto research, case studies and developmental studies. Descriptive research also includes a review of the literature in order to provide both quantitative and qualitative evidence of the effect...... of music therapy with a specific population (Gold, Voracek & Wigram, Wigram, 2002). The collection of such evidence, through surveys of the literature and documentation of music therapy studies that show effect with a specified population are becoming increasingly important in order to underpin music...

  19. Research Review

    OpenAIRE

    Anonymous

    1981-01-01

    Research Reviewed: "Global Modeling After Its First Decade"; "Monthly Food Price Forecasts"; "Costs of Marketing Slaughter Cattle: Computerized versus Conventional Auction Systems"; "Survival Strategies for Agricultural Cooperatives"

  20. Clinical Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Irene

    2016-01-01

    This paper is about the logic of problem solving and the production of scientific knowledge through the utilisation of clinical research perspective. Ramp-up effectiveness, productivity, efficiency and organizational excellence are topics that continue to engage research and will continue doing s...... for years to come. This paper seeks to provide insights into ramp-up management studies through providing an agenda for conducting collaborative clinical research and extend this area by proposing how clinical research could be designed and executed in the Ramp- up management setting....

  1. Plant Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    The Land's agricultural research team is testing new ways to sustain life in space as a research participant with Kennedy Space Center's Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS). The Land, sponsored by Kraft General Foods, is an entertainment, research, and education facility at EPCOT Center, part of Walt Disney World. The cooperative effort is simultaneously a research and development program, a technology demonstration that provides the public to see high technology at work and an area of potential spinoff: the CELSS work may generate Earth use technology beneficial to the hydroponic (soilless growing) vegetable production industries of the world.

  2. Letterform research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    This paper looks into the history of letterform research and discusses why the discipline has yet to make the big break within design research. By highlighting two of the most popular focus areas (letter distinctiveness and the role of serifs) and by discussing various forms of methodological...... shortcomings, the paper suggests that future research into letterforms should (1) draw on results from the field of reading research (2) be based on test material informed by design knowledge and (3) move away from the former tendency of looking for universal answers....

  3. Action research: what is it? How has it been used and how can it be used in nursing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holter, I M; Schwartz-Barcott, D

    1993-02-01

    Action research has enjoyed increasing popularity across a wide variety of disciplines including nursing. Action research was designed specifically to bridge the gap between theory, research and practice and incorporates both humanistic and naturalistic scientific methods. As such, action research is a highly compelling method for nursing. However, action research does not easily lend itself to definition. A variety of approaches, definitions and uses have emerged since it was created by Kurt Lewin and have given rise to much debate within social and behavioural sciences. This confusion has carried over into nursing literature without any systematic identification of or debate about the core characteristics of action research or the multitude of approaches or uses that have come to be associated with this method. Thus this paper addresses the central characteristics, three major approaches to action research that exist today and how action research has been used and can be used in nursing.

  4. The role of research in nuclear regulation: An NRC perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    The role of research in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission was broadly defined by the US Congress in the Energy Reorganization Act of 1975. This Act empowered the Commission to do research that it deems necessary for the performance of its licensing and regulatory functions. Congress cited a need for an independent capability that would support the licensing and regulatory process through the development and analysis of technical information related to reactor safety, safeguards and environmental protection. Motivation for establishing such a safety research function within the regulatory agency is the need to address the defects, abnormal occurrences and shutdowns involving light water reactors. Congress further stated that the NRC should limit its research to {open_quotes}confirmatory assessment{close_quotes} and that the Agency {open_quotes}should never be placed in a position to generate, and then have to defend, basic design data of its own.{close_quotes} The author reviews the activities of the research arm as related to regulatory research, performed in the past, today, and projected for the future. NRC`s public health and safety mission demands that its research products be developed independently from its licensees; be credible and of the highest technical quality as established through peer review; and open to the public scrutiny through publication in technical journals as well as NRC documents. A special trust is placed on regulatory research through the products it produces as well as the three dimensions that underlie the processes through which they are produced.

  5. Research Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serig, Dan

    2011-01-01

    In this review, the author explores an often-used process in research--the mind map. He uses this method in his own research and artwork. He also uses this extensively with students, particularly master students when they are trying to surround issues in their thesis projects. Mind maps are closely associated with brainstorming, as brainstorming…

  6. Research methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuada, John

    This book deals with how students should use of research methods in their university projects. It aims at helping students in developing comprehensive research strategies for their projects. It also provides introduction to issues of philosophy of science as applied in the social sciences. That i...

  7. Research Review

    OpenAIRE

    Anonymous

    1982-01-01

    Research Reviewed: "The Allocation of International Food Aid"; "Journal of a Tamed Bureaucrat: Nils A. Olsen and the BAE, 1925-1935"; "Imperfect Markets in Agricultural Trade"; "The Socioeconomic Impact of Resource Development: Methods for Assessment"; "A Conference on Modeling and Evaluating Policy and Institutional Impacts on Farm Firms: Theory, Research, Policy, and Extension Applications"

  8. Rehabilitation Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, George N.; Trotter, Ann Beck

    A total of 97 studies are reported in this review of research in vocational rehabilitation. Projects were selected on the following criteria: (1) pertinence to rehabilitation counseling practice, (2) research approach, (3) broad generalizability, and (4) supported by the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration for a one-to-five-year period and…

  9. Avian Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Scope Avian Research is an open access,peer-reviewed journal publishing high quality research and review articles on all aspects of ornithology from all over the world.It aims to report the latest and most significant progress in ornithology and to encourage exchange of ideas among international ornithologists.As an Open Access journal,

  10. Avian Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Scope Avian Research is an open access,peer-reviewed journal publishing high quality research and review articles on all aspects of ornithology from all over the world.It aims to report the latest and most significant progress in ornithology and to encourage exchange of ideas among international ornithologists.As an Open Access journal,

  11. Avian Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    <正>Aims and Scope Avian Research is an open access,peer-reviewed journal publishing high quality research and review articles on all aspects of ornithology from all over the world.It aims to report the latest and most significant progress in ornithology and to encourage exchange of ideas among international ornithologists.As an Open Access journal,

  12. Avian Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>Aims and Scope Avian Research is an open access,peer-reviewed journal publishing high quality research and review articles on all aspects of ornithology from all over the world.It aims to report the latest and most significant progress in ornithology and to encourage exchange of ideas among international ornithologists.As an Open Access journal,

  13. Remote Research

    CERN Document Server

    Tulathimutte, Tony

    2011-01-01

    Remote studies allow you to recruit subjects quickly, cheaply, and immediately, and give you the opportunity to observe users as they behave naturally in their own environment. In Remote Research, Nate Bolt and Tony Tulathimutte teach you how to design and conduct remote research studies, top to bottom, with little more than a phone and a laptop.

  14. Research circles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Thomsen, Rie; Möller, Jonas

    in career guidance development. In the paper we draw on the preliminary findings from an ongoing Nordic project: “The future of career guidance and educational counselling”. Specifically, we explore the career guidance practitioners´ response to research circles as means to professional development. We......It is key challenge to continuously develop guidance practices to meet participants´ needs and demands from policy makers. The European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network (ELGPN) states that the guidance practitioner and citizens/users should be the focus of development of international and national...... lifelong guidance policies. This paper presents `research circles´ as a way to develop guidance practices through long-term research relationships between practice and research. Research circles support a bottom up approach to policy development just like ELGPN considers to be necessary and required...

  15. Bioprocessing research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, E.N.

    1996-06-01

    This section describes research and development activities performed for the Fossil Energy Bioprocessing Research Program. This program includes fundamental research for coal applications that investigates advanced reactor design for conversion of coal and coal liquids, the use of enzymes in pure organic media, and development of biological processes for the conversion of coal residuum. In addition, the program includes studies on advanced bioreactor systems for the treatment of gaseous substrates and the conversion to liquid fuels, removal of heteroatoms from heavy oils, renewable hydrogen production, remediation of oil containing soils. The program also includes natural gas and oil technology partnership support.

  16. Centering research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katan, Lina Hauge; Baarts, Charlotte

    and collected 24 portfolios in which students reflect auto-ethnographically on their educational practices. Analyzing this qualitative material, we explore how researchers and students respectively read and write to develop and advance their thinking in those learning processes that the two groups fundamentally...... share as the common aim of both research and education. Despite some similarities, we find that how the two groups engage in and benefit from reading and writing diverges significantly. Thus we have even more reason to believe that centering practice-based teaching on these aspects of research is a good...

  17. Action Research and Interactive Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    First part of the book is written by senior researchers on specific issues like validity, gender, new forms of organisations, methodologies and methods, earlier and new trends. - The second part of the book is written by doctoral students reporting experiences doing action research in their PhD-projects....

  18. Researching Undergraduate Social Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Jane

    2016-01-01

    The experience(s) of undergraduate research students in the social sciences is under-represented in the literature in comparison to the natural sciences or science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM). The strength of STEM undergraduate research learning environments is understood to be related to an apprenticeship-mode of learning supported…

  19. Action Research and Interactive Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    First part of the book is written by senior researchers on specific issues like validity, gender, new forms of organisations, methodologies and methods, earlier and new trends. - The second part of the book is written by doctoral students reporting experiences doing action research in their PhD-projects....

  20. Researching Undergraduate Social Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Jane

    2016-01-01

    The experience(s) of undergraduate research students in the social sciences is under-represented in the literature in comparison to the natural sciences or science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM). The strength of STEM undergraduate research learning environments is understood to be related to an apprenticeship-mode of learning supported…

  1. Research Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA provides innovative research activities that help transform the protection of human health and the environment with high-risk, high-reward Pathfinder Innovation Projects, the P3 student competition, and low-cost air monitoring.

  2. Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cognitive development of preschool children in relation to their socio economic status. The researcher ... India, early childhood is defined as the period of a child's life from ..... context some mass media technology like TV and. Radio are ...

  3. Research Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) research efforts span many topics, methods, and interests. Some projects address the Agencys immediate...

  4. Research education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Harris, Carolyn; Borenstein, Samuel; Curran, Brendan; Fox, Mitchell

    1997-11-01

    Introduction How can we get the public to appreciate the way scientific understanding advances via iterative research? How can we provide females and underrepresented minorities an opportunity to be involved in science early enough in their schooling to make a difference in career motivation? How can research laboratories help improve science education in our schools and prepare students with skills that they will need in the workforce? We do not have the answers to these questions. Indeed, we are only beginning to work together, as researchers and educators, on these topics. However, the Editor, upon seeing the large number of student and educator coauthors on our paper in this issue of Journal of Geophysical Research, invited us to describe our fledgling program, with the hope of stimulating dialogue on a topic of increasing interest.

  5. Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    home

    2014-12-19

    Dec 19, 2014 ... Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal. Sci. Technol. ... predicted students‟ English language achievement significantly to 20.5%. Specific to the .... 10 students who registered in 2013/14 academic year at. Chencha ...

  6. Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-16

    Sep 16, 2012 ... Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal ... Food Science and Bioprocess Technology Institute, Wollega University, Post Box No: 395, ..... Food. Chemistry 95: 328-336. Baranska, M., Schulze, W. and Schulz, H. (2006).

  7. Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal. April-June ... Department of History and Heritage Management, College of social sciences, Wollega University,. Post Box ..... historical aspect is remains minimal. ... De Slavic Martial. (2008).

  8. Research Article

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-05

    Jun 5, 2016 ... almost a third of world people use the groundwater for drinking waters. ... population increases the need for fresh water. ... The Researches Water Resources Organization [6], the project of integration of Mazandaran.

  9. Research Article

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-05

    Jun 5, 2016 ... We are listed under Research Associations category. EFFECTS OF ... Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Zabol University of. Medical ..... Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 2009 ...

  10. Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    home

    2014-06-15

    Jun 15, 2014 ... Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal. Sci. Technol. ... Article Information. There is a ... for the achievement of increased agricultural production and productivity in Ethiopia ...... modern approach, South-Western Pub.

  11. Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    home

    2014-03-20

    Mar 20, 2014 ... 1Department of Animal Sciences, College of Agriculture and Natural ... with 375g DM/day/head of the concentrate mixture to UGNPH based diet for small scale goat ...... Coordinated Groundnut Research Project, 25-29.

  12. Design Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    explored field, and offers a truly interdisciplinary approach to the treatment of design and the design process. It is valuable reading for students in disciplines such as design studies and theory, participatory design, informatics, arts based education, planning, sociology and interdisciplinary......Design Research is a new interdisciplinary research area with a social science orientation at its heart, and this book explores how scientific knowledge can be put into practice in ways that are at once ethical, creative, helpful, and extraordinary in their results. In order to clarify the common...... aspects – in terms of features and approaches – that characterize all strands of research disciplines addressing design, Design Research undertakes an in depth exploration of the social processes involved in doing design, as well as analyses of the contexts for design use. The book further elicits...

  13. Ontology Research

    OpenAIRE

    Welty, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    In this issue, I have collected a fairly broad, although by no means exhaustive, sampling of work in the field of ontology research. To define a field is often quite difficult; it is more a collection of people and ideas than it is a specific technology. To represent our field, I present six articles that cover several of the major thrusts of ontology research from the past decade.

  14. Quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Roger

    2015-04-01

    This article describes the basic tenets of quantitative research. The concepts of dependent and independent variables are addressed and the concept of measurement and its associated issues, such as error, reliability and validity, are explored. Experiments and surveys – the principal research designs in quantitative research – are described and key features explained. The importance of the double-blind randomised controlled trial is emphasised, alongside the importance of longitudinal surveys, as opposed to cross-sectional surveys. Essential features of data storage are covered, with an emphasis on safe, anonymous storage. Finally, the article explores the analysis of quantitative data, considering what may be analysed and the main uses of statistics in analysis.

  15. Whey research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    A brief discussion of the composition of whey and its nutritional potential is followed by consideration of the less well- known areas of research in whey technology. These include the utilization of whole whey and problems of whey taint; use of lactose, by modification to lactitol, in breadmaking or as a binder for powders such as iron oxide fines in the steel industry; food uses of whey proteins e.g. in cheese, breadmaking and 'prudent diet' foods; pharmaceutical uses of whey protein concentrates as a source of lactoperoxidase; and technological research on membrane processes and ion-exchange fractionation of whey proteins.

  16. Researching experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Lisa; Ingemann, Bruno

    In the beginning was - not the word - but the experience. This phenomenological approach provides the basis for this book, which focuses on how a person-in-situation experiences and constructs meaning from a variety of cultural visual events. This book presents video-based processual methods...... for researching experiences in a variety of settings ranging from the museum, to news photography, and interactive media. The research led to the development of a set of methodological tools and approaches we term the reflexivity lab. The interaction in the experimental situation between the media and body...

  17. Quantitative research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    2003-01-01

    possible and desirable. It is not just a type of research done in a laboratory, or by PhD students. Some for of reliable measurement can be applied to many clinical situationsto evaluate the effects of therapy over time, or the difference between clients who receive therapy and those who don't. Evaluating...

  18. Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION Navy Personnel Research and Development Center REPORT NUMBER San Diego, California 92152-6800 BK -92-05 9. SPONSORING...other interneurons , IN2, which inhibit the ganglion cell. By preferentially stimulating the suround, green light covering the receptive field lowers

  19. Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-12-17

    Dec 17, 2013 ... Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal. Oct-Dec 2013, 2(4): 47-55 .... households' onion grower during the 2005/06 year was. 414.78 kg ha-1 ..... accordingly one could predict that the same farm plot would receive ...

  20. Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-12-25

    Dec 25, 2013 ... Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal. Oct-Dec ... Article Information ... of the contaminating organisms to overcome the modern- .... bacteriocin titres can dramatically change on altering .... velopment of weak organic acid resistance in yeast. European Molecular Biology Organization journal 17:.

  1. Research evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, David Budtz

    2014-01-01

    decisions that have marked the period since the first edition was researched and published. In addition, to help make ESTE more global and interdisciplinary in scope and reach, the second edition will engage consultants from ethics centers around the world, and will feature the revised title Ethics, Science...

  2. Research Blog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jautze, K.J.

    2014-01-01

    Welcome to my personal research blog. I'm a PhD candidate from the Netherlands who has an interest in language and literature. In the project The Riddle of Literary Quality my colleagues and I explore the assumption that formal characteristics play a role in the aesthetic appreciation of novels. In

  3. Research Article

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-11

    Jun 11, 2016 ... consumption. This research aimed to study the effects of window position on natural cross ... However post-industrial progresses in technology ... Now due to economic justifications and easy use of wind energy compared with .... LITERATURE REVIEW ..... tourism, Journal of Civil Engineering, No. 24, pp.

  4. Element Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herald, Christine

    2001-01-01

    Describes a research assignment for 8th grade students on the elements of the periodic table. Students use web-based resources and a chemistry handbook to gather information, construct concept maps, and present the findings to the full class using the mode of their choice: a humorous story, a slideshow or gameboard, a brochure, a song, or skit.…

  5. Library Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Nancy Kirkpatrick

    This workbook, designed for a Library Research course at Yavapai College, provides 15 lessons in advanced library reference skills. Each lesson provides explanatory text and reinforcement exercises. After Lesson I introduces specialized dictionaries and encyclopedias (e.g., for foreign languages, medicine, music, economics, social sciences, and…

  6. Research Article

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-05

    Jun 5, 2016 ... destroying impacts on the nearby created (artifact) and natural environments, their surrounding ... Thus, the realistic analysis and recognition of the design ..... theoretical topics and a component of empirical researches of architecture. .... the diversity of constructive elements of building in physical respect.

  7. Research Misconduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFollette, Marcel C.

    1994-01-01

    How social science theory and insight could be applied to understanding and resolving the issues surrounding misconduct in scientific research is discussed. Understanding why scientists break the norms of acceptable conduct may come when their survey responses are interpreted in the contexts of sociology and psychology. (SLD)

  8. Research Article

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-18

    Jun 18, 2016 ... ... e-mail: nasrin.joka doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/jfas.v8i2s.1 ... for this research constitutes a profile for each paper which contains c the scope of ..... fusion of supervised machine learning with natural language processing.

  9. Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal ... The present study was designed to determine the acceptability of PIHCT on pregnant mothers attended ... knowledgeable to the three methods of HIV transmission from mother to child during .... Marital Status. Married. 401. 95.0. 95. Unmarried. 11. 2.6. 97.6. Divorced. 7. 1.7.

  10. Research Review

    OpenAIRE

    Anonymous

    1986-01-01

    Research Reviewed: "A Note on Explaining Farmland Price Changes in the Seventies and Eighties"; "Rivers of Empire: Water, Aridity, and the Growth of the American West"; "Agricultural Policies and World Markets"; "The Organization and Performance of the U.S. Food System"

  11. Research Article

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-13

    Jun 13, 2016 ... Agricultural Research and Education Organization. 2 ... the plant biochemical and physiological processes and decrease crop quality. Scientists showed the harvest index in safflower did not significantly changes in .... same time, Safflower do not have time to reach rosette stage and become cold resistant.

  12. Disaster Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Given the tendency of books on disasters to predominantly focus on strong geophysical or descriptive perspectives and in-depth accounts of particular catastrophes, Disaster Research provides a much-needed multidisciplinary perspective of the area. This book is is structured thematically around ke...

  13. Research Windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, Betty

    1988-01-01

    Presents summaries of research studies related to instructional computer use: three compare word processed and handwritten text of students with and without learning disabilities; one compares student retrieval skills using print and electronic encyclopedias; and one examines computer use by math and science teachers via data from a U.S. national…

  14. Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    home

    2014-04-23

    Apr 23, 2014 ... Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal. Sci. Technol. ... and 75% of recommended rates of inorganic NP, respectively. In addition, 100% ... significantly increase food barley yield and provide high economic return. Article History: ...... Recommendations : Economics Training Manual. Completely ...

  15. Research Article

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-05

    Jun 5, 2016 ... Leather is one of the most materials are used in historical object from ... 2014) Primitive man hunted wild animals for food, then made clothing, .... obtained of the all experiments that did in this research indicated the chosen ...

  16. Research Review

    OpenAIRE

    Anonymous

    1982-01-01

    Research Reviewed: "Specification of Bernoullian Utility Function in Decision Analysis: Comment"; "Linear Programming, Duality, and Cost of Production"; "Changes in the Chicago Corn Basis, 1960-75"; "A Survey of Agricultural Economics Literature"; "The Methodology of Economics (or How Economists Explain)"; "Resources and Development: Natural Resource Policies and Economic Development in an Interdependent World"

  17. FY06 Engineering Research and Technology Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minichino, C; Alves, S W; Anderson, A T; Bennett, C V; Brown, C G; Brown, W D; Chinn, D; Clague, D; Clark, G; Cook, E G; Davidson, J C; Deri, R J; Dougherty, G; Fasenfest, B J; Florando, J N; Fulkerson, E S; Haugen, P; Heebner, J E; Hickling, T; Huber, R; Hunter, S L; Javedani, J; Kallman, J S; Kegelmeyer, L M; Koning, J; Kosovic, B; Kroll, J J; LeBlanc, M; Lin, J; Mariella, R P; Miles, R; Nederbragt, W W; Ness, K D; Nikolic, R J; Paglieroni, D; Pannu, S; Pierce, E; Pocha, M D; Poland, D N; Puso, M A; Quarry, M J; Rhee, M; Romero, C E; Rose, K A; Sain, J D; Sharpe, R M; Spadaccini, C M; Stolken, J S; Van Buuren, A; Wemhoff, A; White, D; Yao, Y

    2007-01-22

    This report summarizes the core research, development, and technology accomplishments in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Engineering Directorate for FY2006. These efforts exemplify Engineering's more than 50-year history of developing and applying the technologies needed to support the Laboratory's national security missions. A partner in every major program and project at the Laboratory throughout its existence, Engineering has prepared for this role with a skilled workforce and technical resources developed through both internal and external venues. These accomplishments embody Engineering's mission: ''Enable program success today and ensure the Laboratory's vitality tomorrow''. Engineering's investment in technologies is carried out primarily through two internal programs: the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program and the technology base, or ''Tech Base'', program. LDRD is the vehicle for creating technologies and competencies that are cutting-edge, or require discovery-class research to be fully understood. Tech Base is used to prepare those technologies to be more broadly applicable to a variety of Laboratory needs. The term commonly used for Tech Base projects is ''reduction to practice''. Thus, LDRD reports have a strong research emphasis, while Tech Base reports document discipline-oriented, core competency activities. This report combines the LDRD and Tech Base summaries into one volume, organized into six thematic technical areas: Engineering Modeling and Simulation; Measurement Technologies; Micro/Nano-Devices and Structures; Precision Engineering; Engineering Systems for Knowledge and Inference; and Energy Manipulation.

  18. Globalized research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Renato Zacharias

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The current issue of IJHDR begins by a now classical dilemma relative to the high dilutions: if they lack biological effects, how might they cause adverse effects? The plausibility of the implausible is once again the subject of a letter addressed to this Editor. The present issue further features three articles from Indian authors, which somehow makes the occasion special, and worthy of reflection: what is going on in Indian homeopathy? As it is known, India has always played a significant role in the homeopathic stage by contributing with original clinical protocols and approaches. More recently, India has shown the world unexpected scientific features of the high dilutions. The natural and cultural diversity of India seems to influence the research it conducts, which ranges from physicochemical and biological studies performed in research centers and universities to clinical trials conducted in hospitals, in addition to a major concern with education. India has thus become one of the main centers concerned with the scientific side of homeopathy, which is further attested by the organization of, and participation in major scientific meetings like the LMHI congress of 2011, GIRI meetings, and the latest HRI conference, and publication in IJHDR and other scientific journals. As an example of the multiple interests of homeopathic research in India, one article in this issue of IJHDR addresses a fundamental research problem, another the patients’ satisfaction, and the third the perspective of undergraduates on the teaching of homeopathy. This same movement observed in India has been observed in other countries like Brazil and Russia among others, following many European countries, making possible and feasible the existence of an international scientific network connecting the various groups devoted to HD research across the world. IJHDR is proud to participate on this endeavor!

  19. Biological Psychiatry, Research And Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajai R. Singh

    2007-01-01

    Psychiatry, neuro-physiology and neuro-pathology, is not just the commitment of a dedicated band of researchers out to reach the truth of psychiatric diseases. That is there, of course, and is laudable. Equally important is the fact that Biological approaches get industry sponsorship and furthering it legitimizes industry's role and serves its interests. Biological approaches find neuro-physiological and biochemical correlates of behaviour and abnormalities and strengthen the case for psychopharmacological approaches as the mainstay of treatment. This is not to deride the legitimate growth of Biological approaches, it is only to understand why it is preferred over other approaches for funding and has occupied center-stage in research today. And this state of affairs obtains in other branches of medicine too. If the psychotherapeutic approach is neglected because there is no possibility of benefit to industry, the psychosomatic approach to medicine is neglected because it is equally of little benefit to industry growth. So findings, for example, of heightened stress and hostility as aetiologic in coronary heart disease get token mention, whilst sophisticated investigative and therapeutic procedures and related medications get highlighted. What makes for sound ethical practice hardly makes for sound business sense for both the researcher and industry. [No abstract avbailable.

  20. Types of Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    An infographic from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) describing the four broad categories of cancer research: basic research, clinical research, population-based research, and translational research.

  1. landsat remote sensing data as an alternative approach for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    FOR GEOLOGICAL MAPPING IN TANZANIA: A CASE STUDY IN THE. RUNGWE ... been introduced to work together with traditional ..... sometimes these data are free of charge. Moreover, to the third ... Volcanology and Geothermal Research,.

  2. Volcanology, history and myths of the Lake Albano maar (Colli Albani volcano, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Benedetti, A. A.; Funiciello, R.; Giordano, G.; Diano, G.; Caprilli, E.; Paterne, M.

    2008-10-01

    The polygenetic Albano maar is the most recent centre of the Colli Albani volcano, located just few kilometres to the south-east of Roma. Presently the maar hosts a 167.5 m deep crater lake, the deepest in Europe. The maar is to be considered quiescent, as phreatic activity is documented throughout the Holocene. This paper illustrates the close relationships between the activity of the maar and the history of settlement in the Roman region as recorded in the geology, archaeology, history and legends of the area. Severe fluctuations of the groundwater table and catastrophic overflows of the Lake Albano from the maar rim had occurred prior to and after the early prehistoric settlements dated in the maar area at the Eneolithic times (ca. III millennium B.C.). Repeated lahars occurred along the northwestern slope of the maar filling in the paleodrainage network and forming a vast plain. Paleohydraulic analyses on fluvial and lahar deposits originated from the Holocene phreatic activity of the Albano maar indicate sediment-water flows in excess of hundreds of cubic metres per second. Absolute age determinations of the paleosoil underlying one of the most recent deposits of the lahar succession at 5800 ± 100 yr B.P. ( 14C CAL) are in perfect agreement with the age of the overlying Eneolithic age settlements. The last catastrophic overflow is described in the Roman literature as a consequence of the anger of Poseidon against the Romans in 398 B.C. for their war against the Etruscans. In 394 B.C. the Romans decided to prevent the repetition of such events by the excavation through the maar crater wall of a 1.5 km long drain tunnel, which is still operational, keeping the lake 70 m below the lowest point of the maar rim. This tunnel drain may be regarded as the first prevention device for volcanic hazard in history and shows an unprecedented development of the engineering technology under the pressure of hazard perception. The surprising and still largely unknown results of this study are very important to redefine the hazard of the Roman region.

  3. A volcanological and geochemical investigation of Boa Vistta, Cape Verde Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyhr, Charlotte Thorup; Holm, Paul Martin

    2009-01-01

    and nephelinites were erupted during the third stage, initially dominated by eruption of subaerial mafic lavas around 9 Ma. Pillow lavas are erupted around 7 Ma whereupon dominantly subaerial mafic lavas were erupted. Stage 3 saw volcanism in many centres distributed mainly along the present coastline...... phonolites and trachytes are related through the fractional crystallization of three compositionally distinct magmas. Two of these may have been derived by crystal fractionation of primitive Boa Vista melts, whereas the third was not...

  4. Physical volcanology of a voluminous rhyolite lava flow: The Badlands lava, Owyhee Plateau, southwestern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Curtis R.

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes an extraordinarily well preserved example of a large, high-SiO 2 rhyolite unit that by its exposed physical features can be demonstrated to be an effusive lava flow, not a rheomorphic ignimbrite. The Badlands lava flow of southwestern Idaho shows a multi-lobate form, with flow lobes that advanced along several azimuths from a long fissure vent. The lava flowed around one of its tephra ridges and a bedrock topographic high, creating a kipuka in the middle of the flow; the other tephra ridge was shoved aside by the lava. The lava itself is everywhere flow foliated, with foliation horizontal at the base, steepening toward the top, and convex in the direction of flow advance. The foliation parallels the margins of the flow lobes and reveals the position and orientation of the vent. Many samples of the lava flow's dense upper vitrophyre show one or more fragmental textures that formed by the settling of pumiceous and glassy debris into open fractures and the debris' subsequent welding into a rock that in many respects resembles welded tuff. By this process, the lava flow mimics an ignimbrite at the scale of an outcrop or thin section. Identical textures in other units have been cited as indicative of ash-flow emplacement mechanisms. The Badlands eruption tapped a stratified magma chamber, in which a large volume of phenocryst-rich (30 vol.%) magma underlay a small volume of magma more evolved and nearly aphyric. The lava flow shows mingling relations between the two magmas, with minor volumes of the aphyric magma occurring as early, small lava lobes and as individual layers in the dominant phenocryst-rich lava. Effusion of the 15 km 3 of rhyolite lava may have continued for as short as 6 or as long as 16 years, with effusion rates comparable to those observed at the Mount St. Helens dome. The Badlands lava had a pre-eruptive volatile content of about 2.75 wt.% H 2O or less, and erupted at approximately 830 °C, much lower than the temperatures of many similar voluminous lavas. A low viscosity due to a high magmatic temperature is not a prerequisite for formation of an extensive lava flow; the low magmatic water content (which likely prevented a large explosive eruption) and large available magma volume were probably the most important factors allowing the Badlands to erupt as a lava flow.

  5. Phreatic activity on Dominica (Lesser Antilles) - constraints from field investigations and experimental volcanology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, K.; Scheu, B.; Rott, S.; Dingwell, D. B.; Gilg, H. A.

    2015-12-01

    Dominica has one of the highest concentrations of potentially active volcanoes worldwide. In addition to this activity, abundant geothermal manifestations are observed at the surface, especially in the southern part of the Island. The Boiling Lake - Valley of Desolation area is one of the most vigorous ones, hosting hot springs, mud pools, fumaroles, and steam vents. Intense alteration and many, predominantly phreatic explosive features, of varying scales characterize the whole area. The most prominent manifestation of such a phreatic eruption is the Boiling Lake, a high temperature volcanic crater lake and popular tourist attraction. Thus phreatic activity is one of the main volcanic hazards on the Island, to date largely unpredictable in time and magnitude. The conditions causing these eruptions, as well as their trigger mechanisms and magnitude need to be better understood. Field mapping, together with the determination of in situ physical (density, humidity, permeability) and mechanical (strength, stiffness) properties yield the characterization of 3 main active areas with high probabilities for phreatic events. Rapid decompression experiments on samples from these areas gave insights into the fragmentation and ejection behavior. These experiments were flanked by chemical analyses and laboratory characterization (porosity, granulometry). The results show that hydrothermal alteration likely plays a crucial role in determining the probability of explosive events. High temperature acidic fluids, which lead to an intense alteration of the host rock's mineralogy, change the rock properties favoring the formation of a low permeability layer above the vent and increasing the likelihood of the site experiencing a steam-blast eruption. The contribution of these results to constraining the conditions for and the dynamics involved in phreatic eruptions provides valuable input to hazard assessment of these frequently visited sites on Dominica and similar hydrothermally active areas worldwide.

  6. Translations of volcanological terms: cross-cultural standards for teaching, communication, and reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Andrew J. L.; Belousov, Alexander; Calvari, Sonia; Delgado-Granados, Hugo; Hort, Matthias; Koga, Ken; Wulan Mei, Estuning Tyas; Harijoko, Agung; Pacheco, José; Prival, Jean-Marie; Solana, Carmen; Þórðarson, Þorvaldur; Thouret, Jean-Claude; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin

    2017-07-01

    When teaching at a non-English language university, we often argue that because English is the international language, students need to become familiar with English terms, even if the bulk of the class is in the native language. However, to make the meaning of the terms clear, a translation into the native language is always useful. Correct translation of terminology is even more crucial for emergency managers and decision makers who can be confronted with a confusing and inconsistently applied mix of terminology. Thus, it is imperative to have a translation that appropriately converts the meaning of a term, while being grammatically and lexicologically correct, before the need for use. If terms are not consistently defined across all languages following industry standards and norms, what one person believes to be a dog, to another is a cat. However, definitions and translations of English scientific and technical terms are not always available, and language is constantly evolving. We live and work in an international world where English is the common language of multi-cultural exchange. As a result, while finding the correct translation can be difficult because we are too used to the English language terms, translated equivalents that are available may not have been through the peer review process. We have explored this issue by discussing grammatically and lexicologically correct French, German, Icelandic, Indonesian, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, and Japanese versions for terms involved in communicating effusive eruption intensity.

  7. History and Volcanology: Dialogue Overdue? The Case of a False Eruption in Medieval Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidoboni, Emanuela

    2010-06-01

    Solfatara, a shallow volcanic crater on the Phlegrean Fields near Naples, Italy, is generally thought to have last erupted in 1198. However, the entire belief in this eruption is very likely based on a misinterpretation of historical records: Though mentioned in several fifteenth- and sixteenth-century texts, the eruption in 1198 C.E. is not referred to in written sources such as chronicles and documents contemporary to or soon after the supposed event.

  8. Low titanium magmatism in northwest region of Paraná continental flood basalts (Brazil: volcanological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. B. Machado

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The early Cretaceous Paraná Continental Flood Basalts (PCFB is considered as one of the largest volcanic provinces in the world. In Brazil, it completes the last sequence of the sedimentary Paraná Basin (Serra Geral Fm.. The geological unit is contemporary to desert sandstones of Botucatu Fm. and precedes the continental sediments of the Bauru Basin. This Large Igneous Province (LIP is divided into different types of geochemical magmas which basically are based on TiO2 content (higher – HTi or lower LTi than 2 wt.% in TiO2 and incompatible trace elements ratio. Therefore, we studied the magma LTi (TiO2 2 > 2.0 wt.%. Based on rheology data considering anhydrous environment and the composition of plagioclase (An(42–67 and clinopyroxene (Wo(30–40En(34–46Fs(17–32 showed that the LTi magma is hotter than HTi, with temperatures that range from 1069 °C to 1248 °C while for the second range from 1020 °C to 1201 °C.

  9. Explosive injection of gas-particle dispersions into a non-fluidized granular host: volcanological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, P.; White, J. D.; Zimanowski, B.; Buettner, R.

    2006-12-01

    Discrete explosive bursts, or explosions, are known from many volcanic eruptions. In maar-diatreme eruptions, they have occurred in debris-filled volcanic vents when magma interacted with groundwater, implying that material mobilized by such explosions passed through the overlying and enclosing debris to reach the surface. Although other studies have addressed the form and characteristics of craters formed by discrete explosions in unconsolidated material, no details are available regarding the structure of the disturbed debris between the explosion site and the crater floor. Field studies of diatreme deposits reveal cross-cutting, steep- sided zones of non-bedded volcaniclastic material that have been inferred to result from "debris jets" driven by explosions. In order to determine the general processes and deposit geometry resulting from discrete, explosive injections of entrained particles through a particulate host, we ran a series of analog experiments in which specific volumes of compressed (5-20 MPa) air were released in bursts that drove gas-particle dispersions through a particulate host. The air expanded into and entrained red particles in a small crucible before moving upward into the white beads used for the host. Injected particles and the overlying host material were glass beads of identical size, shape and density. The experiments revealed that each burst drove into the host an expanding cavity containing air and colored particles, which rapidly collapsed as the driving gas escaped through the permeable roof. Total duration of each run, recorded with high-speed video, was approximately 0.5-1 second. As gas slowed and escaped the cavity the colored beads sedimented into the transient cavity, which was also closing laterally because of inward-directed granular flow of the host. This same behavior was observed even in runs where there was no explosive breaching of the surface, and no colored beads ejected. A columnar body of colored beads was left that is similar to the cross-cutting pipes observed in deposits filling real volcanic vents, in which cavity collapse can result not only from gas escape through a granular host as in the experiments, but also through condensation of water vapor formed in phreatomagmatic explosions. The key conclusion from these experiments is that the geometry of crosscutting granular deposits is not directly informative of the geometry of "intrusion" that formed them. An additional conclusion is that complex structures can form quickly from discrete events.

  10. Bromine monoxide / sulphur dioxide ratios in relation to volcanological observations at Mt. Etna 2006–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Giuffrida

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Over a 3-yr period, from 2006 to 2009, frequent scattered sunlight DOAS measurements were conducted at Mt. Etna at a distance of around 6 km downwind from the summit craters. During the same period and in addition to these measurements, volcanic observations were made by regularly visiting various parts of Mt. Etna. Here, results from these measurements and observations are presented and their relation is discussed. The focus of the investigation is the bromine monoxide/sulphur dioxide (BrO / SO2 ratio, and its variability in relation to volcanic processes. That the halogen/sulphur ratio can serve as a precursor or indicator for the onset of eruptive activity was already proposed by earlier works (e.g. Noguchi and Kamiya 1963; Menyailov, 1975; Pennisi and Cloarec, 1998; Aiuppa et al., 2002. However, there is still a limited understanding today because of the complexity with which halogens are released, depending on magma composition and degassing conditions. Our understanding of these processes is far from complete, for example of the rate and mechanism of bubble nucleation, growth and ascent in silicate melts (Carroll and Holloway, 1994, the halogen vapour-melt partitioning and the volatile diffusivity in the melt (Aiuppa et al., 2009. With this study we aim to add one more piece to the puzzle of what halogen/sulphur ratios might tell about volcanic activities. Our data set shows an increase of the BrO / SO2 ratio several weeks prior to an eruption, followed by a decline before and during the initial phase of eruptive activities. Towards the end of activity or shortly thereafter, the ratio increases to baseline values again and remains more or less constant during quiet phases. To explain the observed evolution of the BrO / SO2 ratio, a first empirical model is proposed. This model suggests that bromine, unlike chlorine and fluorine, is less soluble in the magmatic melt than sulphur. By using the DOAS method to determine SO2, we actually observe most of the emitted sulphur of Mt.~Etna. Regarding bromine, however, we are aware that by determining only the bromine monoxide (BrO radical we might just observe a small or even a variable fraction of the total emitted bromine, which is most probable originally in the form of HBr. Therefore, we present first studies to justify the assumption that, despite the disadvantage just mentioned, the BrO / SO2 ratio can nevertheless serve as a new parameter to indicate the state of a volcano, when measurements are conducted under certain, but rather convenient, conditions.

  11. Paleomagnetic Evidence on a Volcanological Mystery - The 1631 Eruption of Mount Vesuvius, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, G.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Gogichaishvili, A.; Incoronato, A.

    2004-12-01

    Was or was not effusive activity part of the 1631 eruption of Mount Vesuvius? We report on a detailed rock magnetic, paleomagnetic and absolute paleointensity study of lava flows from Mount Vesuvius and on its evidence concerning the enigmatic 1631 eruptive episode. Characteristic magnetization directions determined from detailed stepwise alternating field and thermal demagnetization give four new well-defined flow unit mean directions with a95 ranging from 0.7° to 2.4°. Paleodirections for eight lava flows from twenty-two flows studied appear related to the 1631 eruption, as indicated by their correlation to the early seventeen century segment of the Italian paleosecular variation reference curve. This provides new evidence supporting that the 1631 episode was an explosive-effusive eruption.

  12. The Potential of Continuous, Local Atomic Clock Measurements for Earthquake Prediction and Volcanology

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarescu, Mihai; Jetzer, Philippe; Lundgren, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Modern optical atomic clocks along with the optical fiber technology currently being developed can measure the geoid, which is the equipotential surface that extends the mean sea level on continents, to a precision that competes with existing technology. In this proceeding, we point out that atomic clocks have the potential to not only map the sea level surface on continents, but also look at variations of the geoid as a function of time with unprecedented timing resolution. The local time series of the geoid has a plethora of applications. These include potential improvement in the predictions of earthquakes and volcanoes, and closer monitoring of ground uplift in areas where hydraulic fracturing is performed.

  13. Research Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Achievements in Sino-German Interdisciplinary Major Research Project Published by Small A Conserved Proline Switch on the Ribosome Facilitates the Recruitment and Binding of trGTPases Air Pollution Contributes in Sunshine Dimming in China Role of Lymphatic Trafficking and Biodistribution Soft Fibrin Gels Promote Selection and Growth of Tumorigenic Cells Targeted Therapy: The New Lease on Life for Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia, and Beyond The Structural Basis for the Sensing and Binding of Cyclic di-GMP by STING Research on Atomic-Scale Investigation of Li Storage Mechanism in Spinel Li4Ti5O12 NSFC Funded Project Made Significant Progress in Intelligent Nanomaterial and Device Palaeobotany and the Evolution of the Monsoon in China Non Heme System Asymmetric Epoxidation Reaction Made Progress Rapid Advancement of Immunology Study in China Chinese Experts Successfully Produced Transgenic Animals from Haploid Embryonic Stem Cells

  14. Is operations research really research?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the world, such as earthquakes, diseases and human behaviour. ... Science [23], is concerned with man-made, artificial phenomena. .... We normally think of .... Circumscription is a formal logical method that assumes that every ..... This research shows that both distance and computational effort savings can be achieved.

  15. Dialogue Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duelund, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Departing from Anthony Giddens´s theory of structuration and the concept double hermeneutics and Jürgen Habermas´s Theory of Communicative Actions the article specifies theories and methods af dialogue as method in the humanities and social sciences. The article concludes by pointing at dialogues...... as a new theoretical, methodological and empirical research concept i an society where the traditional planning instruments have failed....

  16. Qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Lisa; Dertadian, George

    2017-08-07

    This narrative review aims to highlight key insights from qualitative research on drug use and drug users by profiling a selection of classic works. Consensus methods were used to identify and select four papers published in 1938, 1969, 1973 and 1984 considered to be classics. These landmark qualitative studies included the first account of addiction as a social process, demonstrating that people have meaningful responses to drug use that cannot be reduced to their pharmacological effects; the portrayal of inner-city heroin users as exacting, energetic and engaged social agents; identification of the interactive social learning processes involved in becoming a drug user; the application of the 'career' concept to understanding transitions and trajectories of drug use over time; and the articulation of a framework for understanding drug use that incorporates the interaction between pharmacology, psychology and social environments. These classic sociological and anthropological studies deployed qualitative research methods to show how drug use is shaped by complex sets of factors situated within social contexts, viewing drug users as agents engaged actively in social processes and worlds. Their findings have been used to challenge stereotypes about drug use and drug users, develop a deeper understanding of drug use among hidden, hard-to-research and under-studied populations, and provide the foundations for significant developments in scientific knowledge about the nature of drug use. They continue to retain their relevance, providing important correctives to biomedical and behaviourist paradigms, reminding us that drug use is a social process, and demonstrating how the inductive approach of qualitative research can strengthen the way we understand and respond to drug use and related harms. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  17. RESEARCH UPDATES

    OpenAIRE

    Anonymous

    1998-01-01

    Includes: Food Insecurity in Low-Income Rural Areas, Eric Icart, University of Maryland Eastern Shore New Shift in Food Distribution Orientation: The Proposition of Fresh Prepared Foods, John L. Park, Research Associate, Food Industry Management Program, Cornell University, 109 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853-7801 Distribution Barriers Confronting Small-Volume Fruit and Vegetable Growers, John R. Brooker, David B. Eastwood, and Morgan D. Gray, Professors and Computer Analyst, Department of Agri...

  18. RESEARCH UPDATES

    OpenAIRE

    Anonymous

    1999-01-01

    Includes: Price and Distribution Variations for Value-Added Vegetable Products in California. Jim Ahern and Marianne Wolf, Professors, Agribusiness Department, Cal Poly State University SLO. Case Study of Heritage Ranch, "Wolf-Friendly Beef." Helen L. Aquino, Graduate Research Assistant, Agricultural Economics, New Mexico State University. Branding Locally Grown Fruit and Vegetables Via State Logos. John R. Brooker, David B. Eastwood, and Morgan D. Gray; Faculty Members; Department of Agricul...

  19. RESEARCH COMMUNITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUGO ESCOBAR-MELO

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This article constitutes an anthology of the research in the Department of Psychology of the UniversidadJaveriana and it takes as point of consultations the book Saber, sujeto y sociedad: Una década de investigación enPsicología published in the year 2006 by the Editorial Pontificia Universidad Javeriana as a collective work;it shows the research itinerary of the groups and authors which have worked in multiple problematicnucleus like the affective bonds in terms of emotional security and care, the psychological welfare as axleof the psychology of the health, the meanings and bonds to build cultures of peace, the public opinionthat mobilizes different senses in the world, the culture of the transport, the subjetivation and the speechthat mean to the work, the experimented body in the woman, the kidnapping and their ghost of thedeath, the family as a person networks linked by the language, person, relationships and psychic operation,quality of life, numeric thought, experimental psychology and cognitive neuropsycology.Without a doubt all these problematic nucleus seemingly diverse but crossed by the significance andsignificant implication, they have conformed a true disciplinary intersection, to the style of the geometric,convergent and strong cobwebs of the spiders. It also includes the present anthology, the basic principlesof a research culture and their most visible production in the Universitas Psychologica magazine.

  20. The Research Use of Astronomical Monographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    2014-04-01

    I explored the use of astronomical monographs used for research. After scanning 135 monographs (excluding conference proceedings and textbooks) listed in 2000-2003 issues of Physics Today and counting citations of them in 2000-2013 in ADS (Astrophysics Data System), I found that 67% of the monographs received fewer than 2 citations per year. The average citation rate for the 135 monographs is statistically the same as for ApJ papers. In contrast, only 41% of the ApJ papers produce fewer than 2 citations per year. ADS also counts the number of times each book or paper is read on-line. The average in 14 years is 181 ± 27 times for the monographs and 633 ± 47 times for ApJ papers. The total numbers of citations in 14 years for the monographs ranged from 0 to 711. I explored reasons for this range and only learned that it did not depend on (1) the numbers of book reviews published or (2) the scientific stature of the authors. I am unable to predict whether a monograph will be successful or not. The decreasing of references to monographs seems to be due to (1) monographs becoming so expensive that individuals and libraries cannot afford many of them, (2) readers seeming to prefer concise reviews, such as online searches and the Annual Reviews, and (3) most of the monographs having not been available free online.

  1. 2008 Research Portfolio: Research & Development Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Testing Service, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This document describes the breadth of the research being conducted in 2008 by the Research and Development Division at Educational Testing Service (ETS). The research described falls into three large categories: (1) Research supported by the ETS research allocation; (2) Research funded by testing programs at ETS; and (3) Research funded by…

  2. Quantitative research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    2003-01-01

    possible and desirable. It is not just a type of research done in a laboratory, or by PhD students. Some for of reliable measurement can be applied to many clinical situationsto evaluate the effects of therapy over time, or the difference between clients who receive therapy and those who don't. Evaluating......Music therapy is well recognised as a profession now, and there is increasing interest in the effect of treatment over time, as well as the way that treatment works. Evidence Based Practice (EBP)looks for various types of evidence, and quantifying the benefits and value of music therapy i both...

  3. Riblet Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Research at Langley on skin friction drag was described in Tech Briefs. 3M engineers suggested to Langley that grooves molded into a lightweight plastic film with adhesive backing and pressed on an airplane would be simpler than cutting grooves directly onto the surface. Boeing became involved and tested the "riblet" on an olympic rowing shell; the US won a silver medal. Based on the riblet-like projections on shark's skins, the technology may provide a 5 percent fuel saving for airplanes. Product is no longer commercially available.

  4. USEMS & GLASS: investigator-driven frontier research in earthquake physics. Ground-breaking research in Europe enhances outreach to the general public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, S.; di Toro, G.; Collettini, C.; Usems Team; Glass Team

    2011-12-01

    Film (Munchen, Germany). The USEMS project started in June 2008, and the GLASS project in October 2010. For both projects we developed a number of web pages through the official web site of the host institution, the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology (INGV) in Rome. In these pages we describe the projects, publish pictures and short-movies of the experimental activities and keep the project results up to date. In addition the research teams collaborate within various INGV outreach schemes (school and student visits in the laboratory, writing short news reports for the INGV press office, and interviews with journalists) as well as using WWW channels (Facebook, Youtube) to make the project results available to the general public. Finally, it is notable that the ERC funding agency itself is fully involved in the outreach activities using its own communication channels and its highly skilled resources which promote through brochures, web pages, publications and documentaries the best projects. We are going to improve our effort in this direction up to the end of the projects.

  5. Research Brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfelder, Erin; McCabe, Connor; Fife, Aurora; Herzig, Lisa; Ahrens, Kym

    2017-01-01

    Adolescents with ADHD are at risk of functional problems that may be mitigated by consistent ADHD treatment. This study pilots a brief intervention for adolescents with ADHD and their parents to increase treatment knowledge and family motivation to seek treatment. The 3-hr curriculum was developed by a multidisciplinary team and included psychoeducation, goal setting, and motivational interviewing. Fifteen adolescents and 20 caregivers participated in the workshop, completed pre- and post-test assessments, and reported on acceptability. Acceptability and satisfaction with the intervention were high. Perceived knowledge of ADHD increased post intervention; stigma was unchanged. Parents reported more acceptability of stimulant medications and less willingness to use special diets or cognitive games. Family feedback informed modifications to the curriculum. The Teen ADHD Workshop is a feasible and acceptable intervention to increase knowledge of ADHD and evidence-based treatments. Further research will evaluate effects on treatment participation.

  6. Research Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    In situ Oxidation Study of Pt (110) and Its Interaction with CO Chinese Scientists Published a Paper on Prevention of Drug Craving and Relapse by Memory Retrieval-extinction Procedure in Science Series Papers Published in Energy Policy: Modeling Energy Use of China's Road Transport and Policy Evaluation Breakthrough in the Ambient Catalytic Destruction of Formaldehyde Novel Findings for High Altitude Adaptation from the Yak Genome Binary Colloidal Structures Assembled through Ising Interactions Reemergence of superconductivity at 48K in Compressed Iron Selenide Based Superconductors Nucleosomes Suppress Spontaneous Mutations Base-Specifically in Eukaryotes Single-Chain Fragmented Antibodies Guided SiRNA Delivery in Breast Cancer Does Yeast Suicide? China Scientists Developed Important Methodologies for Spatiotemporal Detecting and Manipulating of Cellular Activities Scorpions Inspire Chinese Scientists in Making Bionic Non-eroding Surfaces for Machinery Research on Phylogenetic Placement of Borthwickia and Description of a New Family of Angiosperms, Borthwickiaceae Plasmoid Ejection and Secondary Current Sheet Generation from Magnetic Reconnection in Laser-plasma Interaction Cotton Bollworm Adapts to Bt Cotton via Diverse Mutations A Histone Acetyltransferase Regulates Active DNA Demethylation in Arabidopsis

  7. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Lyn

    2004-06-01

    This paper examines what is important about talk between learners during school science and, having identified this, suggests how we can ensure that what we consider important happens. By looking at the interaction between teachers and learners talking about science, it is possible to indicate ways in which learners can be helped to continue this learning conversation with one another when teacher support is withdrawn. Strategies for teaching and learning are examined. The paper reports on the findings of a research project designed to teach children how to negotiate their ideas about science concepts through rational dialogue. Children's development of scientific concepts in classrooms is undertaken through structured activity and mediated through oral language. Children must move forward simultaneously in their use of specialized vocabulary and in their understanding of current scientific explanations, models and ideas. New language and new ways of using language are learned by doing, which means for children, primarily speaking and listening. Children's understanding of science can benefit from teaching them to understand that spoken language is a powerful tool for thinking together.

  8. Novel research

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Author Robert Harris and film director Paul Greengrass visited CERN on 26 April, passing by SM18 as well as the CCC and the ATLAS control room.   Film director Paul Greengrass (left) and author Robert Harris (right). Author Robert Harris and film director Paul Greengrass visited CERN on 26 April as part of their preliminary research on an idea that Harris has for a book, which Greengrass might turn into a film. One of the characters would be a theoretical physicist from CERN – but to say more than that might give away the story! There is definite irony in the fact that their visit was delayed for a week by the ash from the Icelandic volcanic eruption. Harris is well known for several historical novels, including ‘Pompeii’, which tells the story of a fictional hydraulic engineer at the time of the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD. His latest book, ‘The Ghost’, became a film directed by Roman Polanski, while the latest film from Greengrass is &a...

  9. Researcher Interjecting in Qualitative Race Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Mizock

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In qualitative interviews, moments when the researcher departs from the research script can highlight how researcher-participant race interactions may differentially affect results. In the present study, 40 qualitative interviews between Black- and White-identified researchers and participants were analyzed to assess the influence of researcher race in deviations from the interview script. Excerpts from these mono-racial and cross-racial research dyads are presented to highlight the function and value of researcher interjecting in multicultural research. Suggestions and implications for future qualitative research on issues of race, ethnicity, and culture are delineated. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1102134

  10. Building research capital to facilitate research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Gill; Rein, Melanie

    2013-04-04

    The National Institute for Health Research, Research Design Service (NIHR RDS) was set up to increase the number and proportion of high quality applications for funding for applied and patient focused health and social care research. Access to specialist expertise and collaboration between researchers and health practitioners at the proposal development stage is crucial for high quality applied health research. In this essay we develop the concept of 'research capital' to describe the wide range of resources and expertise required to develop fundable research projects. It highlights the key role the RDS plays supporting researchers to broker relationships to access the requisite 'research capital'.

  11. Research Productivity and Academics' Conceptions of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brew, Angela; Boud, David; Namgung, Sang Un; Lucas, Lisa; Crawford, Karin

    2016-01-01

    This paper asks the question: do people with different levels of research productivity and identification as a researcher think of research differently? It discusses a study that differentiated levels of research productivity among English and Australian academics working in research-intensive environments in three broad discipline areas: science,…

  12. African primary care research: Participatory action research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Mash

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is part of the series on African primary care research and focuses on participatory action research. The article gives an overview of the emancipatory-critical research paradigm, the key characteristics and different types of participatory action research. Following this it describes in detail the methodological issues involved in professional participatory action research and running a cooperative inquiry group. The article is intended to help students with writing their research proposal.

  13. Mixed methods research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth; Hickman, Louise

    2015-04-08

    Mixed methods research involves the use of qualitative and quantitative data in a single research project. It represents an alternative methodological approach, combining qualitative and quantitative research approaches, which enables nurse researchers to explore complex phenomena in detail. This article provides a practical overview of mixed methods research and its application in nursing, to guide the novice researcher considering a mixed methods research project.

  14. Roundtable: Researching the Selfie

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jonathan Schroeder

    2014-01-01

      This roundtable gathers researchers interested in the phenomenon of the "selfie" -- to explore current developments, research methods and interdisciplinary research into how consumer behavior, social...

  15. Stories on Research, Research on Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Sandrine; Mougenot, Catherine; Fleury, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    This article deals with a group of researchers involved in Participatory Action Research projects on biodiversity and who volunteered to take part in a "storytelling" experiment. Their "stories" were used to describe this new type of research collective comprising various partners, including researchers and managers, focused on obtaining directly…

  16. Clinical research 6: writing and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endacott, Ruth

    2008-07-01

    This six-part research series is aimed at clinicians who wish to develop research skills, or who have a particular clinical problem that they think could be addressed through research. The series aims to provide insight into the decisions that researchers make in the course of their work, and to also provide a foundation for decisions that nurses may make in applying the findings of a study to practice in their own Unit or Department. The series emphasises the practical issues encountered when undertaking research in critical care settings; readers are encouraged to source research methodology textbooks for more detailed guidance on specific aspects of the research practice.

  17. Research by Design - a research strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauberg, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    methods. Research is ‘coloured’ by traditions and professions, and research in architecture should be coloured too, taking into consideration that the practice of architects stretches from natural science and sociology to art and that the most important way in which the architect achieves new cognition...... is through work with form and space – drawings, models and completed works. Probably all good design is informed by some kind of researchresearch-based design. But can research arise from design?...

  18. [Ocean and bio-medical research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeuf, par Gilles

    2007-01-01

    On the Planet Earth, oceans and seas today correspond to the largest volume offered to Life. Roughly, 275,000 species have been described from marine environments, only representing some 15% of all the present known living. But marine biomass can be enormous. Life appeared in the ancestral ocean 3 800 million years ago and determining events occurred there: appearance of the nuclear membrane and cell nucleus, "pluricellularity", capture of bacteria transformed into organelles, then sexuality. On the 33 phyla existing today on the Earth, 12 never have left the ocean and are exclusively marine. Such biodiversity, archaism of characters, organisational and behavioural patterns make these marine organisms an excellent reservoir for identifying and extracting very interesting pharmacological and cosmetic molecules (>5 000 today) and/or to represent very pertinent "models" for basic and applied research. Relationships between ocean and public health are physical, chemical, biological and physiological. A few marine species as "models" set the base for major advances in life sciences recognized by several Nobel Prices: from the discovery of phagocytosis to anaphylactic shock, and including nervous influx transmission, memory molecular bases, cyclins discovery, eye organisation, neurotransmitter membrane receptors, bases of the specific immune system... These marine models are very useful to understand the origin and functioning of important living mechanisms in the human and sometimes to deduce applications for efficient treatments. Ocean supplies mankind with renewable living resources, much threatened today. We have to manage and protect these to maintain ecosystems, stocks and biodiversity. Only because of the greenhouse effect and anthropic emissions, temperature is globally increasing: and, what if (tomorrow?) one million species would disappear (before 2050) because of global warming?

  19. Architectural project and research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lotz, Katrine

    2005-01-01

    Discussion of criterias for research including the researchers or designers own project as theme.......Discussion of criterias for research including the researchers or designers own project as theme....

  20. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z ... Matters NIH Record Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics ...

  1. Social Biography and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepeau, Elizabeth Blesedell

    1997-01-01

    A researcher's life experiences cannot help but influence the research process. Including elements of one's social biography in research reports helps readers identify how a researcher's history and biases shaped the study. (SK)

  2. Social Biography and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepeau, Elizabeth Blesedell

    1997-01-01

    A researcher's life experiences cannot help but influence the research process. Including elements of one's social biography in research reports helps readers identify how a researcher's history and biases shaped the study. (SK)

  3. Lymphoma Research Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the stem cell transplantation process. Read More LYMPHOMA RESEARCH Featured Researcher – David Scott, MBChB, PhD Dr. Scott ... and Advocacy News Action Center Advocacy Tool Kit Research LRF Research Portfolio Disease-Specific Focus Areas Grants ...

  4. Architectural project and research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lotz, Katrine

    2005-01-01

    Discussion of criterias for research including the researchers or designers own project as theme.......Discussion of criterias for research including the researchers or designers own project as theme....

  5. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Media & Outreach More » Quick Links NIH News in Health NIH Research Matters NIH Record Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics ...

  6. The modern research environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topsøe, Flemming

    1993-01-01

    Information Technology, research environment, structured documents, networked information retrieval......Information Technology, research environment, structured documents, networked information retrieval...

  7. Design Research between Design and Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinø, Nicolai; Markussen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    and practice, as expressed in the notion of research as ‘artistic innovation work’. On the other hand, the pressure to expand research in architecture and design has seen a movement towards adopting traditional research paradigms from the technical and social sciences and humanities. For many architects......The discourse on architecture and design research in Denmark in the past thirty years has been stuck in a unproductive dichotomy between research through design on the one hand and a phantom image of academic and theoretical, word-based research on the other. Advocates of the research through...... design strand have argued, that architecture and design research must follow an architecture and design methodology – designing – and be communicated by means of architecture and design media – images and artefacts. Essentially, this view sees no difference between architecture and design research...

  8. Design Research between Design and Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinø, Nicolai; Markussen, Thomas

    The discourse on architecture and design research in Denmark in the past thirty years has been stuck in a unproductive dichotomy between research through design on the one hand and a phantom image of academic and theoretical, word-based research on the other. Advocates of the research through...... design strand have argued, that architecture and design research must follow an architecture and design methodology – designing – and be communicated by means of architecture and design media – images and artefacts. Essentially, this view sees no difference between architecture and design research...... and practice, as expressed in the notion of research as ‘artistic innovation work’. On the other hand, the pressure to expand research in architecture and design has seen a movement towards adopting traditional research paradigms from the technical and social sciences and humanities. For many architects...

  9. Design Research between Design and Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinø, Nicolai; Markussen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The discourse on architecture and design research in Denmark in the past thirty years has been stuck in a unproductive dichotomy between research through design on the one hand and a phantom image of academic and theoretical, word-based research on the other. Advocates of the research through...... design strand have argued, that architecture and design research must follow an architecture and design methodology – designing – and be communicated by means of architecture and design media – images and artefacts. Essentially, this view sees no difference between architecture and design research...... and practice, as expressed in the notion of research as ‘artistic innovation work’. On the other hand, the pressure to expand research in architecture and design has seen a movement towards adopting traditional research paradigms from the technical and social sciences and humanities. For many architects...

  10. Soft Robotics Commercialization: Jamming Grippers from Research to Product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, John; Cheng, Nadia; Fakhouri, Sami; Culley, Bill

    2016-12-01

    Recent work in the growing field of soft robotics has demonstrated a number of very promising technologies. However, to make a significant impact in real-world applications, these new technologies must first transition out of the laboratory through successful commercialization. Commercialization is perhaps the most critical future milestone facing the field of soft robotics today, and this process will reveal whether the apparent impact we now perceive has been appropriately estimated. Since 2012, Empire Robotics has been one of the first companies to attempt to reach this milestone through our efforts to commercialize jamming-based robotic gripper technology in a product called VERSABALL(®). However, in spring 2016 we are closing our doors, having not been able to develop a sustainable business around this technology. This article presents some of the key takeaways from the technical side of the commercialization process and lessons learned that may be valuable to others. We hope that sharing this information will provide a frame of reference for technology commercialization that can help others motivate research directions and maximize research impact.

  11. The School Research Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The researchED movement has generated a new debate about the role of research in schools. Of course there have always been teachers interested in undertaking research and applying the research findings of others. However, involvement in research has tended to be the personal enthusiasm of the individual teacher rather than a coordinated whole…

  12. From Action Research to Practice Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Goldkuhl

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Action research (AR has gained more acceptance as an approach to qualitative research in information systems (IS. The complexities of organisational and technical change makes this approach a suitable one in IS research. There are, however, still some controversies and confusions about the relation between “action” and “research”. The many types of AR and similar approaches (not labelled as AR that have emerged demands further conceptual clarification of AR. A conceptual inquiry of AR, presented in the paper, has led to the identification of several unresolved issues concerning intervention research like AR. An alternative research approach is presented: practice research. This research approach is well founded in pragmatism and it builds on the two premises: 1 to contribute to general practice through abstract and useful knowledge and 2 to study the empirical field as interconnected practices. Several important concepts of practice research are described as: local practice contribution vs. general practice contribution; theorizing vs. situational inquiry. Practice research is seen as a broader notion encompassing AR and other research approaches as e.g. design research and evaluation research. Two case examples of practice research are briefly presented and compared: one AR-based study in the social welfare sector and one evaluation study of a taxation e-service.

  13. Case Study Research Methodology in Nursing Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Diane G

    2015-11-01

    Through data collection methods using a holistic approach that focuses on variables in a natural setting, qualitative research methods seek to understand participants' perceptions and interpretations. Common qualitative research methods include ethnography, phenomenology, grounded theory, and historic research. Another type of methodology that has a similar qualitative approach is case study research, which seeks to understand a phenomenon or case from multiple perspectives within a given real-world context.

  14. Mixed methods research in music therapy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, Joke; Burns, Debra S; Creswell, John W

    2013-01-01

    Music therapists have an ethical and professional responsibility to provide the highest quality care possible to their patients. Much of the time, high quality care is guided by evidence-based practice standards that integrate the most current, available research in making decisions. Accordingly, music therapists need research that integrates multiple ways of knowing and forms of evidence. Mixed methods research holds great promise for facilitating such integration. At this time, there have not been any methodological articles published on mixed methods research in music therapy. The purpose of this article is to introduce mixed methods research as an approach to address research questions relevant to music therapy practice. This article describes the core characteristics of mixed methods research, considers paradigmatic issues related to this research approach, articulates major challenges in conducting mixed methods research, illustrates four basic designs, and provides criteria for evaluating the quality of mixed methods articles using examples of mixed methods research from the music therapy literature. Mixed methods research offers unique opportunities for strengthening the evidence base in music therapy. Recommendations are provided to ensure rigorous implementation of this research approach.

  15. Teacher as Researcher: Teaching as Lived Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Marni

    2012-01-01

    Teacher inquiry can shape empirical inquiries by nonpracticing researchers, by allowing them to draw on the practical knowledge of those in the classroom. This recognition challenged the author to question what legitimized her role as a teacher-researcher and ask how she could have felt empowered as a researcher without higher education. In this…

  16. Research Leadership as Entrepreneurial Organizing for Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Finn; Monsted, Mette

    2008-01-01

    The paper discusses research leadership in public universities under change and the role of entrepreneurial strategies in research. Research leadership function today in situations where the New Public Management movement one the one hand have introduced management by accountability and control in the university while on the other hand open…

  17. Research partnerships between business researchers and industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zalewska-Kurek, Katarzyna; Janßen, Björn; Harms, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    We study the strategic behaviour of management researchers when establishing research partnerships with industry. To this end we developed a framework distinguishing ‘strategic planned’ and ‘opportunity-driven’ behaviour in the process of establishing and managing research partnerships. We also

  18. Research partnerships between business researchers and industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zalewska-Kurek, Katarzyna; Janßen, Björn; Harms, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    We study the strategic behaviour of management researchers when establishing research partnerships with industry. To this end we developed a framework distinguishing ‘strategic planned’ and ‘opportunity-driven’ behaviour in the process of establishing and managing research partnerships. We also expl

  19. Research Leadership as Entrepreneurial Organizing for Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Finn; Monsted, Mette

    2008-01-01

    The paper discusses research leadership in public universities under change and the role of entrepreneurial strategies in research. Research leadership function today in situations where the New Public Management movement one the one hand have introduced management by accountability and control in the university while on the other hand open…

  20. Setting priorities in global child health research investments: assessment of principles and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudan, Igor; Gibson, Jennifer; Kapiriri, Lydia; Lansang, Mary Ann; Hyder, Adnan A; Lawn, Joy; Darmstadt, Gary L; Cousens, Simon; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Brown, Kenneth H; Hess, Sonja Y; Black, Maureen; Gardner, Julie Meeks; Webster, Jayne; Carneiro, Ilona; Chandramohan, Daniel; Kosek, Margaret; Lanata, Claudio F; Tomlinson, Mark; Chopra, Mickey; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Campbell, Harry; El Arifeen, Shams; Black, Robert E

    2007-10-01

    This article reviews theoretical and practical approaches for setting priorities in global child health research investments. It also provides an overview of previous attempts to develop appropriate tools and methodologies to define priorities in health research investments. A brief review of the most important theoretical concepts that should govern priority setting processes is undertaken, showing how different perspectives, such as medical, economical, legal, ethical, social, political, rational, philosophical, stakeholder driven, and others will necessarily conflict each other in determining priorities. We specially address present research agenda in global child health today and how it relates to United Nation's (UN) Millennium Development Goal 4, which is to reduce child mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015. The outcomes of these former approaches are evaluated and their benefits and shortcomings presented. The case for a new methodology for setting priorities in health research investments is presented, as proposed by Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative, and a need for its implementation in global child health is outlined. A transdisciplinary approach is needed to address all the perspectives from which investments into health research can be seen as priorities. This prioritization requires a process that is transparent, systematic, and that would take into account many perspectives and build on advantages of previous approaches.

  1. Researcher-researched relationship in qualitative research: Shifts in positions and researcher vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Råheim, Målfrid; Magnussen, Liv Heide; Sekse, Ragnhild Johanne Tveit; Lunde, Åshild; Jacobsen, Torild; Blystad, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    The researcher role is highly debated in qualitative research. This article concerns the researcher-researched relationship. A group of health science researchers anchored in various qualitative research traditions gathered in reflective group discussions over a period of two years. Efforts to establish an anti-authoritarian relationship between researcher and researched, negotiation of who actually "rules" the research agenda, and experiences of shifts in "inferior" and "superior" knowledge positions emerged as central and intertwined themes throughout the discussions. The dual role as both insider and outsider, characteristic of qualitative approaches, seemed to lead to power relations and researcher vulnerability which manifested in tangible ways. Shifting positions and vulnerability surfaced in various ways in the projects. They nonetheless indicated a number of similar experiences which can shed light on the researcher-researched relationship. These issues could benefit from further discussion in the qualitative health research literature.

  2. Questionable research practices among italian research psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnoli, Franca; Wicherts, Jelte M; Veldkamp, Coosje L S; Albiero, Paolo; Cubelli, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    A survey in the United States revealed that an alarmingly large percentage of university psychologists admitted having used questionable research practices that can contaminate the research literature with false positive and biased findings. We conducted a replication of this study among Italian research psychologists to investigate whether these findings generalize to other countries. All the original materials were translated into Italian, and members of the Italian Association of Psychology were invited to participate via an online survey. The percentages of Italian psychologists who admitted to having used ten questionable research practices were similar to the results obtained in the United States although there were small but significant differences in self-admission rates for some QRPs. Nearly all researchers (88%) admitted using at least one of the practices, and researchers generally considered a practice possibly defensible if they admitted using it, but Italian researchers were much less likely than US researchers to consider a practice defensible. Participants' estimates of the percentage of researchers who have used these practices were greater than the self-admission rates, and participants estimated that researchers would be unlikely to admit it. In written responses, participants argued that some of these practices are not questionable and they have used some practices because reviewers and journals demand it. The similarity of results obtained in the United States, this study, and a related study conducted in Germany suggest that adoption of these practices is an international phenomenon and is likely due to systemic features of the international research and publication processes.

  3. Questionable research practices among italian research psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicherts, Jelte M.; Veldkamp, Coosje L. S.; Albiero, Paolo; Cubelli, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    A survey in the United States revealed that an alarmingly large percentage of university psychologists admitted having used questionable research practices that can contaminate the research literature with false positive and biased findings. We conducted a replication of this study among Italian research psychologists to investigate whether these findings generalize to other countries. All the original materials were translated into Italian, and members of the Italian Association of Psychology were invited to participate via an online survey. The percentages of Italian psychologists who admitted to having used ten questionable research practices were similar to the results obtained in the United States although there were small but significant differences in self-admission rates for some QRPs. Nearly all researchers (88%) admitted using at least one of the practices, and researchers generally considered a practice possibly defensible if they admitted using it, but Italian researchers were much less likely than US researchers to consider a practice defensible. Participants’ estimates of the percentage of researchers who have used these practices were greater than the self-admission rates, and participants estimated that researchers would be unlikely to admit it. In written responses, participants argued that some of these practices are not questionable and they have used some practices because reviewers and journals demand it. The similarity of results obtained in the United States, this study, and a related study conducted in Germany suggest that adoption of these practices is an international phenomenon and is likely due to systemic features of the international research and publication processes. PMID:28296929

  4. LEMUR: Large European Module for solar Ultraviolet Research. European contribution to JAXA's Solar-C mission

    CERN Document Server

    Teriaca, Luca; Auchère, Frédéric; Brown, Charles M; Buchlin, Eric; Cauzzi, Gianna; Culhane, J Len; Curdt, Werner; Davila, Joseph M; Del Zanna, Giulio; Doschek, George A; Fineschi, Silvano; Fludra, Andrzej; Gallagher, Peter T; Green, Lucie; Harra, Louise K; Imada, Shinsuke; Innes, Davina; Kliem, Bernhard; Korendyke, Clarence; Mariska, John T; Martínez-Pillet, Valentin; Parenti, Susanna; Patsourakos, Spiros; Peter, Hardi; Poletto, Luca; Rutten, Rob; Schühle, Udo; Siemer, Martin; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Socas-Navarro, Hector; Solanki, Sami K; Spadaro, Daniele; Trujillo-Bueno, Javier; Tsuneta, Saku; Dominguez, Santiago Vargas; Vial, Jean-Claude; Walsh, Robert; Warren, Harry P; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Winter, Berend; Young, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the solar outer atmosphere requires concerted, simultaneous solar observations from the visible to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and soft X-rays, at high spatial resolution (between 0.1" and 0.3"), at high temporal resolution (on the order of 10 s, i.e., the time scale of chromospheric dynamics), with a wide temperature coverage (0.01 MK to 20 MK, from the chromosphere to the flaring corona), and the capability of measuring magnetic fields through spectropolarimetry at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Simultaneous spectroscopic measurements sampling the entire temperature range are particularly important. These requirements are fulfilled by the Japanese Solar-C mission (Plan B), composed of a spacecraft in a geosynchronous orbit with a payload providing a significant improvement of imaging and spectropolarimetric capabilities in the UV, visible, and near-infrared with respect to what is available today and foreseen in the near future. The Large European Module for solar Ultraviolet Research...

  5. Action and Interactiv research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kurt Aagaard; Svensson, Lennart

    The text is written as a first version of editors introduction to a book about action research/interactive research in Nordic countries. You can read abouttrends and contradictions in the history of action research.The authors question the trends and demands a more explicit critical approach...... to actual action research/interactive research....

  6. Second Language Education in Canada: Innovation, Research, and Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, H. H. (David)

    1986-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of language teaching in Canada today and describes some general trends in language pedagogy. Current issues in the field are highlighted. Included is a two-page comment by Birgit Harley. (MT)

  7. PHENOLIC RESINS AND THE PLASTICS INDUSTRY: YESTERDAY, TODAY, AND TOMORROW%PHENOLIC RESINS AND THE PLASTICS INDUSTRY:YESTERDAY,TODAY,AND TOMORROW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Louis Pilato

    2010-01-01

    During 2010,Phenolic Resins celebrate 100years of existence.Dr.Leo Baekeland began commercial production of phenolic resins in May 1910 in Germany and October 1910 in the United States.This activity launched the Plastics Industry as it is recognized today.It is estimated that about 255 million tons of plastics will be produced worldwide in 2010 and consist of thermoplastic,thermosetting and elastomeric materials.Some of these polymeric materials are further transformed into fiber reinforced plastics (FRP) utilizing fibers such as carbon fiber,glass fiber,and organic fibers such as Kevlar,Spectra (ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene) and others.

  8. National Privacy Research Strategy

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — On July 1, NITRD released the National Privacy Research Strategy. Research agencies across government participated in the development of the strategy, reviewing...

  9. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Have a Question In the News Researcher Story: Stuttering In a 2010 movie, The King’s Speech, many ... effects of the disorder. How Do Researchers Study Stuttering? Video of How Do Researchers Study Stuttering? A ...

  10. Children's Environmental Health Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conducted in-house, with our federal partners like NIH’s National Institute of Environmental Health Services (NIEHS), and by external researchers through a research grants program administered through the agency’s Office of Research & Development.

  11. Research on Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, Calvin H.; Hecker, William C.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives and philosophy of the Catalysis Laboratory at Brigham Young University are discussed. Also discusses recent and current research activities at the laboratory as well as educational opportunities, research facilities, and sources of research support. (JN)

  12. Research Advocacy at NCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    The patient perspective research advocates brings into NCI’s research enterprise helps to inform research focus and support the dissemination of results that lead to new and better cancer prevention, detection, and treatment methods.

  13. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications ... Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library ...

  14. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NIH News in Health Grants & Funding Funding Forms Library Due Dates How to Apply About Grants Policy & ... Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library Resources Research Resources Clinical Research Resources Safety, Regulation ...

  15. Advancing Ethical Neuroscience Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, B Rashmi; Strand, Nicolle K; Chillag, Kata L

    2016-12-01

    As neuroscience research advances, researchers, clinicians, and other stakeholders will face a host of ethical challenges. The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has published two reports that provide recommendations on how to advance research endeavors ethically. The commission addressed, among other issues, how to prioritize different types of neuroscience research and how to include research participants who have impaired consent capacity. The Bioethics Commission's recommendations provide a foundation for ethical guidelines as neuroscience research advances and progresses.

  16. Research at KT 2002

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Hassager, Ole; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this document is to give the reader a brief overview of current research directions at the department of chemical engineering. The main research topics are classified in terms of priority research areas and are achievements in these areas are highlighted through publications made...... by the 6 main research groups. It should be noted, however, the listed research topics are not the only areas of research and that there are also other interdisciplinary research groups and individual faculty members with their specific research area....

  17. High Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility in Morgantown, WV, researchers can investigate new high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen turbine combustion...

  18. Etnographic research in education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Štemberger

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the field of educational research, ethnography is not well known and consequently it is not frequently used. The concept of ethnographic research is differently, unevenly defined. It is frequently misinterpreted as qualitative research, participatory observation or as a case study. The aim of the present paper was to present ethnographic research as an approach in educational research. We first highlight the problems regarding its definition; we then present the particularities and the process of ethnographic research. We also point out to some disadvantages of this approach and we conclude the paper with the question of the role of ethnographic research in educational research.

  19. Environmental Toxicology Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Fully-equipped facilities for environmental toxicology research The Environmental Toxicology Research Facility (ETRF) located in Vicksburg, MS provides over 8,200 ft...

  20. Fuel safety research 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uetsuka, Hiroshi (ed.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-07-01

    In April 1999, the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory was newly established as a result of reorganization of the Nuclear Safety Research Center, JAERI. The laboratory was organized by combining three laboratories, the Reactivity Accident Laboratory, the Fuel Reliability Laboratory, and a part of the Sever Accident Research Laboratory. Consequently, the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory is now in charge of all the fuel safety research in JAERI. Various types of experimental and analytical researches are conducted in the laboratory by using the unique facilities such as the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR), the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR), the Japan Research Reactor 3 (JRR-3) and hot cells in JAERI. The laboratory consists of five research groups corresponding to each research fields. They are; (a) Research group of fuel behavior under the reactivity initiated accident conditions (RIA group). (b) Research group of fuel behavior under the loss-of-coolant accident conditions (LOCA group). (c) Research group of fuel behavior under the normal operation conditions (JMTR/BOCA group). (d) Research group of fuel behavior analysis (FEMAXI group). (e) Research group of FP release/transport behavior from irradiated fuel (VEGA group). This report summarizes the outline of research activities and major outcomes of the research executed in 1999 in the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory. (author)

  1. Air Force Research Laboratory Integrated Omics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    the goals of Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is the development of new methods to assess warfighter performance by using advanced...Objective (DTO) project. The research project (MD.34 Biotechnology for Near-Real-Time Predictive Toxicology ) aimed to identify biomarkers of toxicity...Technology, established in discovery work in 2001, and has provided technical support to many researchers in the Department of Defense (DoD). The

  2. Mixed methods research for the novice researcher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddings, Lynne S; Grant, Barbara M

    2006-10-01

    Mixed methods research is becoming increasingly popular in the health and social science disciplines. The aim of this article is to give an overview of the varieties of mixed methods designs. We begin by situating mixed methods research in the context of a paradigmatic framework which assists a researcher in making decisions concerning the design of their study. Although the most commonly used mixed methods designs are underpinned by positivist/postpositivist assumptions, the combination of qualitative and quantitative methods can be used within any research paradigm.

  3. National Environmental Research Parks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The National Environmental Research Parks are outdoor laboratories that provide opportunities for environmental studies on protected lands that act as buffers around Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The research parks are used to evaluate the environmental consequences of energy use and development as well as the strategies to mitigate these effects. They are also used to demonstrate possible environmental and land-use options. The seven parks are: Fermilab National Environmental Research Park; Hanford National Environmental Research Park; Idaho National Environmental Research Park; Los Alamos National Environmental Research Park; Nevada National Environmental Research Park; Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park; and Savannah River National Environmental Research Park. This document gives an overview of the events that led to the creation of the research parks. Its main purpose is to summarize key points about each park, including ecological research, geological characteristics, facilities, and available databases.

  4. New SPDF Directions and Evolving Services Supporting Heliophysics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, R.; Bilitza, D.; Candey, R.; Chimiak, R.; Cooper, J.; Fung, S.; Han, D.; Harris, B.; Johnson, R.; Klipsch, C.; Leckner, H.; Liu, M.; Papitashvili, N.; Kovalick, T.; Roberts, A.

    2006-12-01

    The next advances in Heliophysics science and its paradigm of a Great Observatory require an increasingly integrated and transparent data environment, where data can be easily accessed and used across the boundaries of both missions and traditional disciplines. The Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) project includes uniquely important multi-mission data services with current data from most operating space physics missions. This paper reviews the capabilities of key services now available and the directions in which they are expected to evolve to enable future multi-mission correlative research. The Coordinated Data Analysis Web (CDAWeb) and Satellite Situation Center Web (SSCWeb), critically supported by the Common Data Format (CDF) effort and supplemented by more focused science services such as OMNIWeb and technical services such as data format translations are important operational capabilities serving the international community today (and cited last year by 20% of the papers published in JGR Space Physics). These services continue to add data from most current missions as SPDF works with new missions such as THEMIS to help enable their unique science goals and the meaningful sharing of their data in a multi-mission correlative context. Recent enhancements to CDF, our 3D Java interactive orbit viewer (TIPSOD), the CDAWeb Plus system, the new inclusion of the VSPO effort into SPDF, our plans to support the SPASE data dictionary effort and our continuing thrust towards fully-functional web services APIs to allow ready invocation from distributed external middleware and clients will be shown.

  5. Storytelling as Research/Research as Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    If story is central to human meaning why, in the research world, is there not more storytelling? Walter Benjamin (1973) noted that, "a story is different. It does not expend itself. It preserves and concentrates its strength and is capable of releasing it even after a long time" (p. 90). How might research not expend itself, but preserve and…

  6. Teaching Qualitative Research to Practitioner-Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Rebecca D.

    2012-01-01

    Practitioner-researchers are well-positioned to apply qualitative methods to the study of significant problems of educational practice. However, while learning the skills of qualitative inquiry, practitioners may be compelled by forces outside of qualitative research classrooms to think quantitatively. In this article, the author considers two…

  7. Teaching Qualitative Research to Practitioner-Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Rebecca D.

    2012-01-01

    Practitioner-researchers are well-positioned to apply qualitative methods to the study of significant problems of educational practice. However, while learning the skills of qualitative inquiry, practitioners may be compelled by forces outside of qualitative research classrooms to think quantitatively. In this article, the author considers two…

  8. FNS Research Corner: Summary of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Danielle; Burdg, Jinee

    2017-01-01

    The FNS Research Corner provides a continuing series to summarize recently completed and current research conducted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) in the area of child nutrition. For further information, contact the Office of Policy Support (OPS) at (703) 305-2117. Links to published studies and reports as…

  9. Action Research: Bridging Service and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkavy, Ira; Puckett, John; Romer, Dan

    2000-01-01

    Action research is an approach to knowledge generation that can strengthen communities and institutions and is ideally suited to the advancement of academically-based service learning. Presents the history and goals of this approach to service learning, defining current challenges, providing examples from three action research projects responding…

  10. Research essentials. How to critique quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Sharon; Collier, Sue

    2015-11-01

    QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH is a systematic approach to investigating numerical data and involves measuring or counting attributes, that is quantities. Through a process of transforming information that is collected or observed, the researcher can often describes a situation or event, answering the 'what' and 'how many' questions about a situation ( Parahoo 2014 ).

  11. Research of vs research for education policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    -liberalism and the transnationalization of education policy-making, as well as the tension between research of policy and research for policy. Working from different perspectives, the authors help to provide a better understanding of these two important sets of issues which the field of education must contend with today....

  12. Teaching to Enhance Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harland, Tony

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I present a conceptual argument for "teaching-led research" in which university lecturers construct courses that directly and positively influence their research, while at the same time, safeguard and enhance the student experience. A research-pedagogy for higher education considers the link between teaching and research,…

  13. Effectively Communicating Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponterotto, Joseph G.; Grieger, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    This article is a guide for counseling researchers wishing to communicate the methods and results of their qualitative research to varied audiences. The authors posit that the first step in effectively communicating qualitative research is the development of strong qualitative research skills. To this end, the authors review a process model for…

  14. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Act News & Events News Releases Videos Images Events Social Media & Outreach More » Quick Links NIH News in Health NIH Research Matters NIH Record Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library ...

  15. Australian Research Council

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Introduction The Australian Research Council(ARC) is the Australian Government's main agency for allocating research funding to academics and researchers in Australian universities.Its mission is to deliver policy and programs that advance Australian research and innovation globally and benefit the community.

  16. Research Methods Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    A guiding principle for conducting research in technology, science, and engineering, leading to innovation is based on our use of research methodology (both qualitative and quantitative). A brief review of research methodology will be presented with an overview of NASA process in developing aeronautics technologies and other things to consider in research including what is innovation.

  17. Research Methods Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    A guiding principle for conducting research in technology, science, and engineering, leading to innovation is based on our use of research methodology (both qualitative and qualitative). A brief review of research methodology will be presented with an overview of NASA process in developing aeronautics technologies and other things to consider in research including what is innovation.

  18. Conditions for Teacher Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Simon

    2006-01-01

    The article starts by defining teacher research and a summary of its benefits. In reviewing teacher research in the field of ELT, the author points out that such research is not enough. The author then suggests ten conditions that would increase the incidence of teacher research. Additional questions for consideration are suggested at the end that…

  19. Decolonizing Researcher Authenticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daza, Stephanie Lynn

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the ways in which researcher authenticity is negotiated along three axes of difference, ethno-linguistic affiliation, sexual orientation and race/skin color. Ultimately, it analyzes how researcher authenticity is produced and played out within research, via interactions between participants, researchers and others who…

  20. The Integrity of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axman, Linnea; Boren, Denise

    2010-01-01

    This text is the foundation from which a distinguished lecture was developed focusing on the necessity for research in healthcare carried out with attention to issues of integrity, the hallmark of all commendable research. A cautionary historical review of research misconduct and related topics is provided. Research within a cultural context and…

  1. Catalog of Research Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    College Board, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This catalog lists research reports, research notes, and other publications available from the College Board's website. The catalog briefly describes research publications available free of charge. Introduced in 1981, the Research Report series includes studies and reviews in areas such as college admission, special populations, subgroup…

  2. Teaching to Enhance Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harland, Tony

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I present a conceptual argument for "teaching-led research" in which university lecturers construct courses that directly and positively influence their research, while at the same time, safeguard and enhance the student experience. A research-pedagogy for higher education considers the link between teaching and research,…

  3. Case study research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ruth; Thomas-Gregory, Annette

    2015-06-10

    This article describes case study research for nursing and healthcare practice. Case study research offers the researcher an approach by which a phenomenon can be investigated from multiple perspectives within a bounded context, allowing the researcher to provide a 'thick' description of the phenomenon. Although case study research is a flexible approach for the investigation of complex nursing and healthcare issues, it has methodological challenges, often associated with the multiple methods used in individual studies. These are explored through examples of case study research carried out in practice and education settings. An overview of what constitutes 'good' case study research is proposed.

  4. Stimulating translational research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentires-Alj, Mohamed; Rajan, Abinaya; van Harten, Wim;

    2015-01-01

    Translational research leaves no-one indifferent and everyone expects a particular benefit. We as EU-LIFE (www.eu-life.eu), an alliance of 13 research institutes in European life sciences, would like to share our experience in an attempt to identify measures to promote translational research with...... without undermining basic exploratory research and academic freedom.......Translational research leaves no-one indifferent and everyone expects a particular benefit. We as EU-LIFE (www.eu-life.eu), an alliance of 13 research institutes in European life sciences, would like to share our experience in an attempt to identify measures to promote translational research...

  5. Improving University Research Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley O’Reilly

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the current data management practices of university researchers at an Intermountain West land-grant research university in the United States. Key findings suggest that researchers are primarily focused on the collection and housing of research data. However, additional research value exists within the other life cycle stages for research data—specifically in the stages of delivery and maintenance. These stages are where most new demands and requirements exist for data management plans and policies that are conditional for external grant funding; therefore, these findings expose a “gap” in current research practice. These findings should be of interest to academics and practitioners alike as findings highlight key management gaps in the life cycle of research data. This study also suggests a course of action for academic institutions to coalesce campus-wide assets to assist researchers in improving research value.

  6. Research Learning on English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈媛媛; 尹静; 岳艳岭

    2016-01-01

    The research learning is to select and define research topics, initiative to acquire knowledge, application of knowledge in research, problem-solving learning activities from nature, society and life. Research learning has been widely present in students life. Research study aims to develop the students' enthusiasm, initiative development of students' personality and so on, they all plays a crucial role for the right to develop a scientific attitude.

  7. Rigour in quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claydon, Leica Sarah

    2015-07-22

    This article which forms part of the research series addresses scientific rigour in quantitative research. It explores the basis and use of quantitative research and the nature of scientific rigour. It examines how the reader may determine whether quantitative research results are accurate, the questions that should be asked to determine accuracy and the checklists that may be used in this process. Quantitative research has advantages in nursing, since it can provide numerical data to help answer questions encountered in everyday practice.

  8. Qualitative Research Process

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, Dewan Mahboob

    2011-01-01

    This article provides with an overview of the qualitative research methods. Over last few decades, qualitative research is getting very popular in the fields of business, sociology, psychology and others. This article, in its introduction, gives a general idea about the qualitative research. Then it discusses the main differences between qualitative and quantitative research methods. The article also discusses about the ethical issues important for qualitative research. Lastly it discusses ab...

  9. ULS Systems Research Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    capability Framework for incorporating additional ULS systems research Motivate Research • The roadmap shows how an individual research initiative...6.2.2 Metaheuristics in Software Engineering 6.2.3 Digital Evolution 6.3.1 Design of All Levels 6.3.2 Design Spaces and Design Rules 6.3.3 Harnessing...achieving a future ULS systems capability Framework for incorporating additional ULS systems research Motivate Research • The roadmap shows how an

  10. Effective research communication

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, J.; Walkington, H.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter begins by outlining the nature of research, identifying the key steps that both comprise the research process and help you to plan the presentation of your research. It highlights the advantages that can be gained as a geography student if you complete the research process right through to communication of your findings. The chapter makes explicit the principles of effective research communication in a variety of oral, visual and written formats, including checklists that you mig...

  11. Children's participation in research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broström professor m.so., Stig

    2012-01-01

    and research in their own preschool settings. This article offers an argument based on theory and practical examples for the inclusion of children in educational and educational research. It also introduces some of the problems which warrant consideration if researchers are to understand and cooperate...... with children as co-researchers. The author 15 portrays the educational process and the research process as a possible way for the democratisation of children....

  12. 人类经济发展的昨天、今天和明天:读《世界经济千年史》%The development of human economy yesterday,today and tomorrow:read the"world economy"the millennium history

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晨宇

    2013-01-01

      《世界经济千年史》是安格斯-麦迪森教授2001年出版的著作,书中详细介绍了千年来世界经济发展之轮廓和西方经济发展对世界其他地区的影响,以及20世纪后半叶的世界经济。麦迪森教授在书中强调个别经济事件之间在当时历史和国际背景下的因果关系和它们的微观经济学基础,以系统地揭示长期经济增长的内在逻辑。麦迪森教授科学和严密的论证使得本书成为一本研究世界经济必备的参考工具书,其影响力也将经久不衰。%"The world economic history of thousand years"is Angus-Professor Maddison 2001 book,the book details the outline of world economic development and western economic development of thousands of years of influence on other parts of the world,and in the latter half of the twentieth Century the world economy.Professor Maddison in the book emphasizes individual economic events at the time of the causal relationship between historical and international background and their microeconomic foundation,internal logic to systematically reveal the long-term economic growth.Professor Maddison scientific and rigorous argument makes this book becomes a research reference book world economy necessary,its influence will be enduring.

  13. The qualitative research proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Klopper

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative research in the health sciences has had to overcome many prejudices and a number of misunderstandings, but today qualitative research is as acceptable as quantitative research designs and is widely funded and published. Writing the proposal of a qualitative study, however, can be a challenging feat, due to the emergent nature of the qualitative research design and the description of the methodology as a process. Even today, many sub-standard proposals at post-graduate evaluation committees and application proposals to be considered for funding are still seen. This problem has led the researcher to develop a framework to guide the qualitative researcher in writing the proposal of a qualitative study based on the following research questions: (i What is the process of writing a qualitative research proposal? and (ii What does the structure and layout of a qualitative proposal look like? The purpose of this article is to discuss the process of writing the qualitative research proposal, as well as describe the structure and layout of a qualitative research proposal. The process of writing a qualitative research proposal is discussed with regards to the most important questions that need to be answered in your research proposal with consideration of the guidelines of being practical, being persuasive, making broader links, aiming for crystal clarity and planning before you write. While the structure of the qualitative research proposal is discussed with regards to the key sections of the proposal, namely the cover page, abstract, introduction, review of the literature, research problem and research questions, research purpose and objectives, research paradigm, research design, research method, ethical considerations, dissemination plan, budget and appendices.

  14. The qualitative research proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopper, H

    2008-12-01

    Qualitative research in the health sciences has had to overcome many prejudices and a number of misunderstandings, but today qualitative research is as acceptable as quantitative research designs and is widely funded and published. Writing the proposal of a qualitative study, however, can be a challenging feat, due to the emergent nature of the qualitative research design and the description of the methodology as a process. Even today, many sub-standard proposals at post-graduate evaluation committees and application proposals to be considered for funding are still seen. This problem has led the researcher to develop a framework to guide the qualitative researcher in writing the proposal of a qualitative study based on the following research questions: (i) What is the process of writing a qualitative research proposal? and (ii) What does the structure and layout of a qualitative proposal look like? The purpose of this article is to discuss the process of writing the qualitative research proposal, as well as describe the structure and layout of a qualitative research proposal. The process of writing a qualitative research proposal is discussed with regards to the most important questions that need to be answered in your research proposal with consideration of the guidelines of being practical, being persuasive, making broader links, aiming for crystal clarity and planning before you write. While the structure of the qualitative research proposal is discussed with regards to the key sections of the proposal, namely the cover page, abstract, introduction, review of the literature, research problem and research questions, research purpose and objectives, research paradigm, research design, research method, ethical considerations, dissemination plan, budget and appendices.

  15. Research technology as a barrier to research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Scheepers

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available There appears to be considerable concern regarding the progress which masters and doctoral students make in their studies and the underlying causes are thought to relate to the absence of a suitable research climate on campuses. The aim of this study was to identify factors which relate to the research output of tutors. With this in mind a questionnaire was developed and handed to 120 tutors in the human sciences for completion. The means and variances of the variables in the questionnaire were computed/ the variables were intercorrelated and subjected to a principal factor analysis. Four factors were extracted and identified as: knowledge of research technology research output/ knowledge of research methodology and ability to conduct research, and teaching experience in research methodology Two regression analyses were done. The first against a "soft" criterion (perceived ability to conduct empirical research and the second against a "hard" criterion (the real research output of tutors. Multiple correlation coefficients of 0,7257 and 0/5824 respectively, were obtained. Opsomming Die vordering van magister en doktorale studente skyn aansienlike kommer te wek, en die oorsake daarvan word in die afwesigheid van 'n gepaste navorsingsklimaat op kampusse, gesoek. Die doel van hierdie studie was om faktore te identifiseer wat verband hou met die navorsingsuitset van dosente. Met die oog hierop is 'n vraelys opgestel en aan 120 dosente in die geesteswetenskappe vir voltooiing oorhandig. Die gemiddeldes en variansies van die veranderlikes is bereken, die veranderlikes is gemterkorreleer en aan 'n hooffaktorontleding onderwerp. Vier faktore is onttrek en geidentifiseer as: kennis van navorsingstegnologie, navorsingsuitset, kennis van navor-singsmetodologie en die vermoe om navorsing te doen, en onderrigervaring m navorsingsmetodologie. Twee prcgressie-ontledings is gedoen. Die eerste teen 'n "sagte" kriterium (persepsie van dosente van hul vermoe om

  16. Fundamentals of surgical research course: research presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Kathrin

    2005-10-01

    The effective communication of research outcomes is a skill that can be learned. To make the greatest impact, it is imperative to know your audience. Oral communication is a highly effective means for dissemination of new information. The preparation of a research presentation requires significant time. The researcher must determine the key messages to be delivered and plan the presentation accordingly. High quality visual aids can impress your audience and, in combination with a succinct oral presentation, can increase retention of the material. In addition to the communication of the raw scientific data and results, the importance of stance, appearance, voice, and eye contact necessary to engage your audience should not be overlooked.

  17. Reply to: Barazzuoli P., Bertini G., Brogi A., Capezzuoli E., Conticelli S., Doveri M., Ellero A., Gianelli G., La Felice S., Liotta D., Marroni M., Manzella A., Meccheri M., Montanari D., Pandeli E., Principe C., Ruggieri R., Sbrana A., Vaselli V., Vezzoli L., 2015. COMMENT ON: "Borgia, A., Mazzoldi, A., Brunori, C.A., Allocca, C., Delcroix, C., Micheli, L., Vercellino, A., Grieco, G., 2014. Volcanic spreading forcing and feedback in geothermal resorvoir development, Amiata Volcano, Italia. J. Volc. Geoth. Res. 284, 16-31". Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, this issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgia, Andrea; Mazzoldi, Alberto; Brunori, Carlo Alberto; Allocca, Carmine; Delcroix, Carlo; Micheli, Luigi; Vercellino, Alberto; Grieco, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    The volcanic spreading model by Borgia et al. (2014) is accurate in describing the extensional structures found on the edifice and the radial compressional structures existing all around the base of Amiata Volcano. Volcanic conduits, extensional structures, and direct contact between the volcanic rocks and the Tuscan Units, constitute the hydraulic connection between the potable fresh-water aquifer contained in the volcanites and the underlying hydrothermal system. Therefore, gaseous phases tend to flow upward (particularly through faults) carrying pollutants into the freshwater aquifer, while the freshwater recharges (also through primary permeability) the exploited geothermal fields.

  18. Responsible conduct of research

    CERN Document Server

    Shamoo, Adil E

    2015-01-01

    Since the early 2000s, the field of Responsible Conduct of Research has become widely recognized as essential to scientific education, investigation, and training. At present, research institutions with public funding are expected to have some minimal training and education in RCR for their graduate students, fellows and trainees. These institutions also are expected to have a system in place for investigating and reporting misconduct in research or violations of regulations in research with human subjects, or in their applications to federal agencies for funding. Public scrutiny of the conduct of scientific researchers remains high. Media reports of misconduct scandals, biased research, violations of human research ethics rules, and moral controversies in research occur on a weekly basis. Since the 2009 publication of the 2nd edition of Shamoo and Resnik's Responsible Conduct of Research, there has been a vast expansion in the information, knowledge, methods, and diagnosis of problems related to RCR and the ...

  19. 'The research compass'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, Charlotte; Hodges, Brian; Scherpbier, Albert

    2011-01-01

    This AMEE Guide offers an introduction to research in medical education. It is intended for those who are contemplating conducting research in medical education but are new to the field. The Guide is structured around the process of transforming ideas and problems into researchable questions...... by the complexity of the field. Next is a section on how to move from an idea or problem to a research question by placing a concrete idea or problem within a conceptual, theoretical framework. The following sections are structured around an overview model of approaches to medical education research, 'The research......, choosing a research approach that is appropriate to the purpose of the study and considering the individual researcher's preferences and the contextual possibilities and constraints. The first section of the Guide addresses the rationale for research in medical education and some of the challenges posed...

  20. Life After Research Misconduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Kyle L

    2017-02-01

    Research misconduct is a serious violation of a scientific community's ethical standards. Scientists who commit research misconduct typically face corrective actions from employers and funding agencies, as well as significant professional stigma. Unfortunately, there is little systematic data about the post-misconduct career of these guilty parties. Through a review of Office of Research Integrity (ORI) case summaries, I identified a pool of 284 researchers who engaged in research misconduct and were subject to ORI corrective actions. To assess the prevalence of post-misconduct research activities for these scientists, I searched publicly available databases and online resources for evidence of post-misconduct research activities (such as publications and federal research support). The data demonstrate that researchers often receive second chances as researchers, with indicators of post-misconduct research activities identified for 134 (47.18%) of the offending researchers. In addition, those researchers have received more than US$123 million in federal support for their post-misconduct research efforts.

  1. Fuel safety research 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uetsuka, Hiroshi (ed.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-11-01

    The Fuel Safety Research Laboratory is in charge of research activity which covers almost research items related to fuel safety of water reactor in JAERI. Various types of experimental and analytical researches are being conducted by using some unique facilities such as the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR), the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR), the Japan Research Reactor 3 (JRR-3) and the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility (RFEF) of JAERI. The research to confirm the safety of high burn-up fuel and MOX fuel under accident conditions is the most important item among them. The laboratory consists of following five research groups corresponding to each research fields; Research group of fuel behavior under the reactivity initiated accident conditions (RIA group). Research group of fuel behavior under the loss-of-coolant accident conditions (LOCA group). Research group of fuel behavior under the normal operation conditions (JMTR/BOCA group). Research group of fuel behavior analysis (FEMAXI group). Research group of radionuclides release and transport behavior from irradiated fuel under severe accident conditions (VEGA group). The research conducted in the year 2001 produced many important data and information. They are, for example, the fuel behavior data under BWR power oscillation conditions in the NSRR, the data on failure-bearing capability of hydrided cladding under LOCA conditions and the FP release data at very high temperature in steam which simulate the reactor core condition during severe accidents. This report summarizes the outline of research activities and major outcomes of the research executed in 2001 in the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory. (author)

  2. Consumer Behavior Research Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chrysochou, Polymeros

    2017-01-01

    emphasizes the discussion of primary research methods. Based on the nature of the data primary research methods are further distinguished into qualitative and quantitative. The chapter describes the most important and popular qualitative and quantitative methods. It concludes with an overall evaluation......This chapter starts by distinguishing consumer behavior research methods based on the type of data used, being either secondary or primary. Most consumer behavior research studies phenomena that require researchers to enter the field and collect data on their own, and therefore the chapter...... of the methods and how to improve quality in consumer behavior research methods....

  3. Social Work Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Social work research has gathered a greater transparency and clarity of identity in North American and parts of Europe. Furthermore, the rapid emergence of social work research in other European countries, China, India, Japan and elsewhere in Asia and Pacific Rim countries, and gradually in South...... understanding of the different aspects involved in the research. Volume One: Historical Trajectories, Purposes and Key Concepts Volume Two: Key Decisions about Research Strategy Volume Three: The Practice of Social Work Research Volume Four: The Contexts of Social Work Research...

  4. Climate change and mountain water resources: overview and recommendations for research, management and politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Viviroli

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Mountains are essential sources of freshwater for our world, but their role in global water resources could well be significantly altered from anticipated climate change. How well do we understand these changes today, and what are implications for water resources management and for policy?

    With these questions in mind, a dozen researchers – most of them with experience in collaborating with water managers – from around the world assembled for a workshop in Göschenen, Switzerland on 16–19 September 2009 by invitation of the Mountain Research Initiative (MRI. Their goal was to develop an up-to-date overview of mountain water resources and climate change and to identify pressing issues with relevance for science and society.

    This special issue of Hydrology and Earth System Sciences assembles contributions providing insight into climate change and water resources for selected case-study mountain regions from around the world. The present introductory article is based on analysis of these regions and on the workshop discussions. We will give a brief overview of the subject (Sect. 1, introduce the case-study regions (Sect. 2 and examine the state of knowledge regarding the importance of water supply from mountain areas for water resources in the adjacent lowlands and anticipated climate change impacts (Sect. 3. From there, we will identify research and monitoring needs (Sect. 4, make recommendations for research, water resources management and policy (Sect. 5 and finally draw conclusions (Sect. 6.

  5. From a CEU '98er: 9 years and 5 research projects later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidala, Christine

    2007-10-01

    Since my first research experience in 1996 working in low-energy nuclear structure, the results of which were presented at the original DNP CEU poster session in Santa Fe in 1998, subsequent projects led me to weave my way through various energies and collision systems in nuclear and particle physics. Through the course of the broad exposure to research that I have been fortunate enough to experience, I have found a niche for myself in the study of nucleon spin structure. I originally got involved in the field in 1998-99 through my undergraduate senior project on studies for polarizing the proton beam at HERA in Hamburg, Germany. After a foray into particle physics followed by an unanticipated diversion from research, teaching music and English abroad, fate--and some kind individuals--would give me the opportunity to return both to physics and specifically to nucleon structure in 2001 as part of the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Six years into my research on proton spin structure as a member of the PHENIX Collaboration, I will discuss where I am today and the non-linear path that brought me here.

  6. Research ethics committees: agents of research policy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemminki Elina

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this commentary is to describe the unintended effects ethics committees may have on research and to analyse the regulatory and administrative problems of clinical trials. Discussion The Finnish law makes an arbitrary distinction between medical research and other health research, and the European Union's directive for good clinical trials further differentiates drug trials. The starting point of current rules is that clinical trials are lesser in the interest of patients and society than routine health care. However, commercial interests are not considered unethical. The contrasting procedures in research and normal health care may tempt physicians to continue introducing innovations into practice by relying on unsystematic and uncontrolled observations. Tedious and bureaucratic rules may lead to the disappearance of trials initiated by researchers. Trying to accommodate the special legislative requirements for new drug trials into more complex interventions may result in poor designs with unreliable results and increased costs. Meanwhile, current legal requirements may undermine the morale of ethics committee members. Conclusion The aims and the quality of the work of ethics committees should be evaluated, and a reformulation of the EU directive on good clinical trials is needed. Ethical judgement should consider the specific circumstance of each trial, and ethics committees should not foster poor research for legal reasons.

  7. Research by design - a research strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauberg, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The idea of an expressive component in research is important to the architectural industry. The expressive element - the possibility of expressing the qualitative aspects of the world and adding something new to the existing through experiments and proposals - is characteristic for the f...... the work with form and space – drawings, models and completed works. Probably all good design is informed by some kind of researchresearch based design. But can research arise from design?......Abstract The idea of an expressive component in research is important to the architectural industry. The expressive element - the possibility of expressing the qualitative aspects of the world and adding something new to the existing through experiments and proposals - is characteristic...... for the field. All research environments, in the science tradition and in the humanities, have their characteristics. On the one hand, they live up to certain common scientific and methodological criteria - originality and transparency - on the other hand they have different practices, using different methods...

  8. Research by Design - a research strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauberg, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The idea of an expressive component in research is important to the architectural industry. The expressive element - the possibility of expressing the qualitative aspects of the world and adding something new to the existing through experiments and proposals - is characteristic for the f...... is through work with form and space – drawings, models and completed works. Probably all good design is informed by some kind of researchresearch-based design. But can research arise from design?......Abstract The idea of an expressive component in research is important to the architectural industry. The expressive element - the possibility of expressing the qualitative aspects of the world and adding something new to the existing through experiments and proposals - is characteristic...... for the field. All research environments, in the science tradition and in the humanities, have their characteristics. On the one hand, they live up to certain common scientific and methodological criteria - originality and transparency – and on the other hand, they have different practices, using different...

  9. Economics of fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1977-10-15

    This report provides the results of a study of methods of economic analysis applied to the evaluation of fusion research. The study recognizes that a hierarchy of economic analyses of research programs exists: standard benefit-cost analysis, expected value of R and D information, and expected utility analysis. It is shown that standard benefit-cost analysis, as commonly applied to research programs, is inadequate for the evaluation of a high technology research effort such as fusion research. A methodology for performing an expected value analysis is developed and demonstrated and an overview of an approach to perform an expected utility analysis of fusion research is presented. In addition, a potential benefit of fusion research, not previously identified, is discussed and rough estimates of its magnitude are presented. This benefit deals with the effect of a fusion research program on optimal fossil fuel consumption patterns. The results of this study indicate that it is both appropriate and possible to perform an expected value analysis of fusion research in order to assess the economics of a fusion research program. The results indicate further that the major area of benefits of fusion research is likely due to the impact of a fusion research program on optimal fossil fuel consumption patterns and it is recommended that this benefit be included in future assessments of fusion research economics.

  10. Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Columbia River and groundwater well water sources are delivered to the Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL), where these resources are used to conduct research on fish...

  11. Ice Engineering Research Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Refrigerated Physical Modeling of Waterways in a Controlled EnvironmentThe Research Area in the Ice Engineering Facility at the Cold Regions Research and Engineering...

  12. Photochemistry research at NREL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, C.E.; Carlson, C.E. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Photochemistry research team at NREL conducts research and development work in all R&D areas, basic, applied, demonstration and transfer to commercialization. Basic research includes core PCO R&D and catalysts work as well as conducting research into new photochemistry areas such as photoinduced adsorption and high temperature solar PCO. Applied research work consists of remediation of chloroethylenes in gas phase, gas phase solar photoreactor development, and application research including indoor air quality, hybrid biological/PCO processes and more. We are demonstrating the PCO treatment technology in the gas phase with SEMATECH through CRADA work and remediation of organics in aqueous phase through the Solarchem Environmental Systems. We are working with IT through a CRADA to transfer the PCO gas phase remediation technology to IT to commercialize this promising -technology. Photochemistry research conducted at NREL spans the R&D spectrum from basic research through technology demonstration with the goal of technology commercialization.

  13. Epidemiology & Genomics Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program, in the National Cancer Institute's Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, funds research in human populations to understand the determinants of cancer occurrence and outcomes.

  14. Research Suggestions for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, John L.

    1974-01-01

    Describes how to perform accurate research. Also includes suggestions for specific research projects under such headings as: (1) types; (2) environments; (3) interactions; (4) classification; (5) hexagonal model; and (6) differentiation. (HMV)

  15. Flight Research Building (Hangar)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NASA Glenn Flight Research Building is located at the NASA Glenn Research Center with aircraft access to Cleveland Hopkins International Airport. The facility is...

  16. DCB - Tumor Metastasis Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor metastasis research examines the mechanisms that allow cancer cells to leave the primary tumor and spread to another part of the body. Learn about recent tumor metastasis research studies supported by the Division of Cancer Biology.

  17. Fanconi Anemia Research Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Support Publications Fundraising News What is the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund? Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease that can lead to ... population. Lynn and Dave Frohnmayer started the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, in 1989 to find effective treatments ...

  18. The kidney research predicament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Lisa; Ibrahim, Tod; Zent, Roy; Fischer, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    Research funding from public and private sources has reached an all-time low. Economic conditions, sequestration, and a trend of low award success rates have created an imbalance between the supply of highly qualified research investigators and the availability of critically necessary research dollars. This grim environment continues to hinder the success of established investigators and deter potential investigators from joining the research workforce. Without action and support of innovative science, the future of the US health care system is in jeopardy, and its leadership role in medical research will decrease. This work discusses the effects of the decline in research funding, the plight of kidney research, and the impact of the American Society of Nephrology Grants Program on scientists. The ASN also calls on the entire nephrology community to rejuvenate the research environment, improve the lives of millions of people with kidney disease, and ultimately, find a cure.

  19. Researching Identity and Interculturality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønsmann, Dorte

    2016-01-01

    Review of: Researching Identity and Interculturality / by F. Dervin and K. Risager (eds.). Routledge 2015, 245 pp.......Review of: Researching Identity and Interculturality / by F. Dervin and K. Risager (eds.). Routledge 2015, 245 pp....

  20. Cystic Fibrosis Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Steady Advances Against Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis Research Past Issues / Fall 2012 Table of Contents "Remarkable strides in cystic fibrosis research over the past two decades have culminated ...

  1. Nordic research in ophthalmology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Zetterström, Charlotta; Ehlers, Niels

    2003-01-01

    Ophthalmology, eye research, cornea, catarcat, paediatric ophthalmology, glaucoma, diabetic eye disease, age-related macular degeneration, ophthalmic oncology......Ophthalmology, eye research, cornea, catarcat, paediatric ophthalmology, glaucoma, diabetic eye disease, age-related macular degeneration, ophthalmic oncology...

  2. Can research be visual?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Kristian Moltke

    2014-01-01

    Short film interviews with for instance researchers Birger Lindberg Møller and Andreas Roepstorff and film directors Phie Ambo, Janus Metz and Joshua Oppenheimer, about the collaboration between documentary and research: http://vimeo.com/99909839...

  3. Basic Research Firing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Basic Research Firing Facility is an indoor ballistic test facility that has recently transitioned from a customer-based facility to a dedicated basic research...

  4. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics Quick Links MedlinePlus Health Info NIH News in Health Grants & Funding Funding Forms Library Due Dates ... Social Media & Outreach More » Quick Links NIH News in Health NIH Research Matters NIH Record Research & Training ...

  5. Breast Cancer Research Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript on. Feature: Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Research Update Winter 2017 Table of Contents National Cancer Institute ... Addressing Breast Cancer's Unequal Burden / Breast Cancer Research Update Winter 2017 Issue: Volume 11 Number 4 Page ...

  6. Mukilteo Research Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Research at the Mukilteo Research Station focuses on understanding the life cycle of marine species and the impacts of ecosystem stressors on anadromous and marine...

  7. Cereal Crops Research Unit

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The mission of the Cereal Crops Research Unit is to 1) conduct basic research to identify and understand the biological processes affecting the growth, development...

  8. Cereal Crops Research Unit

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The mission of the Cereal Crops Research Unit is to 1) conduct basic research to identify and understand the biological processes affecting the growth, development...

  9. Qualitative research, tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Carina Bregnholm

    2016-01-01

    had opened up to new “alternative” paradigms and subsequent methodologies. By the turn of the millennium, qualitative research was increasingly gaining ground and has now become accepted as an essential and valid tourism research strategy to a broader audience of tourism scholars. This is exemplified...... of qualitative research in generating knowledge in and about tourism. In continuation to this, new issues and interests regarding the application and role of qualitative research can also be identified. One is a growing appreciation in business and management of the rich material and knowledge generated...... of qualitative research and knowledge production. Another issue related to the status and practice of qualitative tourism research is the emerging critique of the dichotomous perception of tourism research as either strictly instrumental or purely intrinsic. This understanding of research as divided into two...

  10. Scoliosis Research Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoliosis Research Society Close Menu Member Login Become a Member Home Find a Specialist | Calendar Contact | Donate ... a Member Find a Specialist Calendar Contact Donate Scoliosis Research Society Dedicated to the optimal care of ...

  11. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... seriousness of the disorder but also how with work and understanding people can actually do things to mitigate the effects of the disorder. How Do Researchers Study Stuttering? Video of How Do Researchers Study Stuttering? ...

  12. Environmental Toxicology Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Fully-equipped facilities for environmental toxicology researchThe Environmental Toxicology Research Facility (ETRF) located in Vicksburg, MS provides over 8,200 ft...

  13. Researcher Story: Stuttering

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... research volunteers. If you stutter or have a family member who stutters, you could be eligible to ... Researchers Study Stuttering? A large portion of the family clustering of stuttering is explained by genes and ...

  14. Can research be visual?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Kristian Moltke

    2014-01-01

    Short film interviews with for instance researchers Birger Lindberg Møller and Andreas Roepstorff and film directors Phie Ambo, Janus Metz and Joshua Oppenheimer, about the collaboration between documentary and research: http://vimeo.com/99909839...

  15. Educational design research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKenney, Susan; Reeves, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    McKenney, S. & Reeves, T. (2013). Educational design research. In M. Spector, M. Merrill, J. Elen & M. Bischop (Eds.) Handbook of Research on Educational Communications & Technology, pp. 131-140. London: Springer.

  16. Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Columbia River and groundwater well water sources are delivered to the Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL), where these resources are used to conduct research on fish...

  17. Researcher Interview: Tom Hudson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom Hudson, M.D., President and Scientific Director of the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, describes the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC), which brings together cancer genomic data and research from across the world.

  18. Chinese Ecosystem Research Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Tieqing; Liu Jian; Chen Panqin; Fu Bojie

    2002-01-01

    The article analyzes the development of the Chinese Ecosystem Research Network, and its mission, mandate, and management mechanisms, with examples of research, demonstration and consultation for policy-setting.

  19. Newport Research Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Newport Research Station is the Center's only ocean-port research facility. This station is located at Oregon State University's Hatfield Marine Science Center,...

  20. The Singapore research story

    CERN Document Server

    Teck Seng, Low; Thampuran, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Ever since Singapore became independent in 1965, its leaders have invested tremendous efforts and resources to develop its economy in order to create jobs for its people and to support national development. This book describes the challenging journey of Singapore in developing a knowledge-based economy driven by research and innovation and the roles played by research institutes, universities, research manpower and appropriate collaboration between research institutes and industry. The book traces the foundations of Singapore's research story from the time of its independence in 1965 to the present day. Through interviews with the key players and research into the records, the establishment of the key institutes and the roles of a global cast of researchers, scientists and engineers in setting up the R&D infrastructure are outlined. The impact that the concerted efforts of the last 25 years to build up a credible and world-class research capability in Singapore is discussed, as are the tremendous challeng...