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Sample records for volcanism persistent seismicity

  1. Toward Forecasting Volcanic Eruptions using Seismic Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Brenguier, Florent; Campillo, Michel; Ferrazzini, Valerie; Duputel, Zacharie; Coutant, Olivier; Nercessian, Alexandre

    2007-01-01

    During inter-eruption periods, magma pressurization yields subtle changes of the elastic properties of volcanic edifices. We use the reproducibility properties of the ambient seismic noise recorded on the Piton de la Fournaise volcano to measure relative seismic velocity variations of less than 0.1 % with a temporal resolution of one day. Our results show that five studied volcanic eruptions were preceded by clearly detectable seismic velocity decreases within the zone of magma injection. These precursors reflect the edifice dilatation induced by magma pressurization and can be useful indicators to improve the forecasting of volcanic eruptions.

  2. Towards a Comprehensive Catalog of Volcanic Seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, G.

    2014-12-01

    Catalogs of earthquakes located using differential travel-time techniques are a core product of volcano observatories, and while vital, they represent an incomplete perspective of volcanic seismicity. Many (often most) earthquakes are too small to locate accurately, and are omitted from available catalogs. Low frequency events, tremor and signals related to rockfalls, pyroclastic flows and lahars are not systematically catalogued, and yet from a hazard management perspective are exceedingly important. Because STA/LTA detection schemes break down in the presence of high amplitude tremor, swarms or dome collapses, catalogs may suggest low seismicity when seismicity peaks. We propose to develop a workflow and underlying software toolbox that can be applied to near-real-time and offline waveform data to produce comprehensive catalogs of volcanic seismicity. Existing tools to detect and locate phaseless signals will be adapted to fit within this framework. For this proof of concept the toolbox will be developed in MATLAB, extending the existing GISMO toolbox (an object-oriented MATLAB toolbox for seismic data analysis). Existing database schemas such as the CSS 3.0 will need to be extended to describe this wider range of volcano-seismic signals. WOVOdat may already incorporate many of the additional tables needed. Thus our framework may act as an interface between volcano observatories (or campaign-style research projects) and WOVOdat. We aim to take the further step of reducing volcano-seismic catalogs to sets of continuous metrics that are useful for recognizing data trends, and for feeding alarm systems and forecasting techniques. Previous experience has shown that frequency index, peak frequency, mean frequency, mean event rate, median event rate, and cumulative magnitude (or energy) are potentially useful metrics to generate for all catalogs at a 1-minute sample rate (directly comparable with RSAM and similar metrics derived from continuous data). Our framework

  3. Recent seismicity detection increase in the Santorini volcanic island complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouliaras, G.; Drakatos, G.; Makropoulos, K.; Melis, N. S.

    2012-04-01

    Santorini is the most active volcanic complex in the South Aegean Volcanic Arc. To improve the seismological network detectability of the seismicity in this region, the Institute of Geodynamics of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA) recently installed 4 portable seismological stations supplementary to the 3 permanent stations operating in the region. The addition of these stations has significantly improved the detectability and reporting of the local seismic activity in the NOA instrumental seismicity catalogue. In this study we analyze quantitatively the seismicity of the Santorini volcanic complex. The results indicate a recent significant reporting increase mainly for events of small magnitude and an increase in the seismicity rate by more than 100%. The mapping of the statistical significance of the rate change with the z-value method reveals that the rate increase exists primarily in the active fault zone perpendicular to the extensional tectonic stress regime that characterizes this region. The spatial distribution of the b-value around the volcanic complex indicates a low b-value distribution parallel to the extensional stress field, while the b-value cross section of the volcanic complex indicates relatively high b-values under the caldera and a significant b-value decrease with depth. These results are found to be in general agreement with the results from other volcanic regions and they encourage further investigations concerning the seismic and volcanic hazard and risk estimates for the Santorini volcanic complex using the NOA earthquake catalogue.

  4. Recent seismicity detection increase in the Santorini volcanic island complex

    OpenAIRE

    G. Chouliaras; Drakatos, G.; Makropoulos, K.; Melis, N. S.

    2012-01-01

    Santorini is the most active volcanic complex in the South Aegean Volcanic Arc. To improve the seismological network detectability of the seismicity in this region, the Institute of Geodynamics of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA) recently installed 4 portable seismological stations supplementary to the 3 permanent stations operating in the region. The addition of these stations has significantly improved the detectability and reporting of the local seismic activity in the NOA instrume...

  5. Recent seismicity detection increase in the Santorini volcanic island complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chouliaras

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Santorini is the most active volcanic complex in the South Aegean Volcanic Arc. To improve the seismological network detectability of the seismicity in this region, the Institute of Geodynamics of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA recently installed 4 portable seismological stations supplementary to the 3 permanent stations operating in the region. The addition of these stations has significantly improved the detectability and reporting of the local seismic activity in the NOA instrumental seismicity catalogue.

    In this study we analyze quantitatively the seismicity of the Santorini volcanic complex. The results indicate a recent significant reporting increase mainly for events of small magnitude and an increase in the seismicity rate by more than 100%. The mapping of the statistical significance of the rate change with the z-value method reveals that the rate increase exists primarily in the active fault zone perpendicular to the extensional tectonic stress regime that characterizes this region.

    The spatial distribution of the b-value around the volcanic complex indicates a low b-value distribution parallel to the extensional stress field, while the b-value cross section of the volcanic complex indicates relatively high b-values under the caldera and a significant b-value decrease with depth.

    These results are found to be in general agreement with the results from other volcanic regions and they encourage further investigations concerning the seismic and volcanic hazard and risk estimates for the Santorini volcanic complex using the NOA earthquake catalogue.

  6. Recent seismicity detection increase at Santorini' s volcanic islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouliaras, G.; Drakatos, G.; Makropoulos, K.; Melis, N. S.

    2012-04-01

    Santorini is the most active volcano in the southern Aegean volcanic arc. To improve the seismological network detectability of the Santorini seismicity, the Institute of Geodynamics of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA) installed 6 new seismological stations. The addition of these stations which begun in the year 2010 has significantly improved the detectability and reporting of the local seismic activity in NOA's instrumental seismicity catalog. Anomalous spatial and temporal changes in the b-value of the frequency-magnitude relationship and changes in the seismicity rate have been reported for many active volcanoes and have been used for the mapping of active magma chambers. In this study we present the results from a quantitative analysis of the seismicity in the Santorini volcanic complex using the seismicity catalog of NOA. From these results we observe a significant detection increase after the year 2010 mainly for events of small magnitudes and an increase in the seismicity rate by more than 100%. The statistical significance of this rate change is determined and mapped with the z-value method and it is found that the seismicity rate increases significantly within the two main active fault zones of the volcanic complex, in a zone perpendicular to the extensive tectonic regime that characterizes this region. Temporal variations in the b-value for different time periods indicate a rather homogeneous behaviour of the frequency-magnitude curves. The spatial distribution of the b-value is shown to vary around the volcanic complex exhibiting low b-values in the two main regions of seismic activity. A b-value cross section of the volcanic complex indicates relatively high b-values under the caldera and a significant b-value decrease with depth. The results from this study are found to be in general agreement with the results from other volcanic regions and they encourage further investigations concerning the seismic and volcanic hazard and risk estimates for

  7. Small instrument to volcanic seismic signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, Normandino; Gomariz, Spartacus; Manuel, Antoni

    2014-05-01

    Currently, the presence of volcanoes represents a threat to their local populations, and for this reason, scientific communities invest resources to monitor seismic activity of an area, and to obtain information to identify risk situations. To perform such monitoring, it can use different general purpose acquisition systems commercially available, but these devices do not meet to the specifications of reduced dimensions, low weight, low power consumption and low cost. These features allow the system works in autonomous mode for a long period of time, and it makes easy to be carried and to be installed. In the line of designing a volcanic acquisition system with the previously mentioned specifications, exists the Volcanology Department of CSIC, developers of a system with some of these specifications. The objective of this work is to improve the energy consumption requirements of the previous system, providing three channels of data acquisition and with the possibility to transmit data acquisition via radio frequency to a base station, allowing operation it in remote mode. The developed acquisition system consists of three very low-power acquisition modules of Texas Instruments (ADS1246), and this is designed to capture information of the three coordinate axes. A microprocessor also of Texas Instruments (MSP430F5438) is used to work in low-power, due to it is ready to run this consumption and also takes advantage the power save mode in certain moments when system is not working. This system is configurable by serial port, and it has a SD memory to storage data. Contrast to the previous system, it has a RF communication module incorporated specially to work in remote mode of Lynx (YLX-TRM8053-025-05), and boasts also with a GPS module which keeps the time reference synchronized with module of SANAV (GM-1315LA). Thanks to this last selection of components, it is designed a small system about 106 x 106 mm. Assuming that the power supply system is working during all the

  8. Multidimensional analysis and probabilistic model of volcanic and seismic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, V.

    2009-04-01

    A search for space and time regularities in volcanic and seismic events for the purpose of forecast method development seems to be of current concern, both scientifically and practically. The seismic and volcanic processes take place in the Earth's field of gravity which in turn is closely related to gravitational fields of the Moon, the Sun, and the planets of the Solar System. It is mostly gravity and tidal forces that exercise control over the Earth's configuration and relief. Dynamic gravitational interaction between the Earth and other celestial bodies makes itself evident in tidal phenomena and other effects in the geospheres (including the Earth's crust). Dynamics of the tidal and attractive forces is responsible for periodical changes in gravity force, both in value and direction [Darwin, 1965], in the rate of rotation and orbital speed; that implies related changes in the endogenic activity of the Earth. The Earth's rotation in the alternating gravitational field accounts to a considerable extent for regular pattern of crustal deformations and dislocations; it is among principal factors that control the Earth's form and structure, distribution of oceans and continents and, probably, continental drift [Peive, 1969; Khain, 1973; Kosygin, 1983]. The energy of gravitational interaction is transmitted through the tidal energy to planetary spheres and feeds various processes there, including volcanic and seismic ones. To determine degree, character and special features of tidal force contribution to the volcanic and seismic processes is of primary importance for understanding of genetic and dynamic aspects of volcanism and seismicity. Both volcanic and seismic processes are involved in evolution of celestial bodies; they are operative on the planets of the Earth group and many satellites [Essays…, 1981; Lukashov, 1996]. From this standpoint, studies of those processes are essential with a view to development of scenarios of the Earth's evolution as a celestial

  9. Seismicity at Lusi and the adjacent volcanic complex, Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermann, Anne; Karyono, Karyono; Diehl, Tobias; Lupi, Matteo; Mazzini, Adriano

    2017-04-01

    We study the local seismicity around the spectacular Lusi eruption site, a sedimentary- hosted hydrothermal system in East Java. Lusi is located 10 km NE of the Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex and is fed by both mantellic and hydrothermal fluids rising and mixing with those present in the sedimentary formations. During a period of 17 months, we observed 289 micro-seismic earthquakes with local magnitudes ranging from ML0.5 to ML1.7. The events predominantly nucleate at depths of 8-13 km below the Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex. Despite the geological evidence of active tectonic deformation and faulting observed at the surface, little to no seismicity is observed in the sedimentary basin hosting Lusi. Although we cannot entirely rule out artifacts due to a significantly increased detection threshold in the sedimentary basin, the deficit in seismicity suggests aseismic deformation beneath Lusi due to the large amount of fluids that may lubricate the fault system. An analysis of focal mechanisms of seven selected events around the Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex indicate predominantly strike-slip faulting activity in the region SW of Lusi. This type of activity is consistent the orientation and the movements observed for the Watukosek fault system that extends from the volcanic complex towards the NE of Java. Our results suggest that the tectonic deformation of the region is characterized by scattered faulting, rather than localized along a distinct fault plane.

  10. Assessing the likelihood and magnitude of volcanic explosions based on seismic quiescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Diana C.; Rodgers, Mel; Geirsson, Halldor; LaFemina, Peter C.; Tenorio, Virginia

    2016-09-01

    Volcanic eruptions are generally forecast based on strong increases in monitoring parameters such as seismicity or gas emissions above a relatively low background level (e.g., Voight, 1988; Sparks, 2003). Because of this, forecasting individual explosions during an ongoing eruption, or at persistently restless volcanoes, is difficult as seismicity, gas emissions, and other indicators of unrest are already in a heightened state. Therefore, identification of short-term precursors to individual explosions at volcanoes already in heightened states of unrest, and an understanding of explosion trigger mechanisms, is important for the reduction of volcanic risk worldwide. Seismic and visual observations at Telica Volcano, Nicaragua, demonstrate that a) episodes of seismic quiescence reliably preceded explosions during an eruption in May 2011 and b) the duration of precursory quiescence and the energy released in the ensuing explosion were strongly correlated. Precursory seismic quiescence is interpreted as the result of sealing of shallow gas pathways, leading to pressure accumulation and eventual catastrophic failure of the system, culminating in an explosion. Longer periods of sealing and pressurization lead to greater energy release in the ensuing explosion. Near-real-time observations of seismic quiescence at restless or erupting volcanoes can thus be useful for both timely eruption warnings and for forecasting the energy of impending explosions.

  11. Seismic monitoring at Cascade Volcanic Centers, 2004?status and recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Seth C.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to assess the current (May, 2004) status of seismic monitoring networks at the 13 major Cascade volcanic centers. Included in this assessment are descriptions of each network, analyses of the ability of each network to detect and to locate seismic activity, identification of specific weaknesses in each network, and a prioritized list of those networks that are most in need of additional seismic stations. At the outset it should be recognized that no Cascade volcanic center currently has an adequate seismic network relative to modern-day networks at Usu Volcano (Japan) or Etna and Stromboli volcanoes (Italy). For a system the size of Three Sisters, for example, a modern-day, cutting-edge seismic network would ideally consist of a minimum of 10 to 12 short-period three-component seismometers (for determining particle motions, reliable S-wave picks, moment tensor inversions, fault-plane solutions, and other important seismic parameters) and 7 to 10 broadband sensors (which, amongst other considerations, enable detection and location of very long period (VLP) and other low-frequency events, moment tensor inversions, and, because of their wide dynamic range, on-scale recording of large-amplitude events). Such a dense, multi component seismic network would give the ability to, for example, detect in near-real-time earthquake migrations over a distance of ~0.5km or less, locate tremor sources, determine the nature of a seismic source (that is, pure shear, implosive, explosive), provide on-scale recordings of very small and very large-amplitude seismic signals, and detect localized changes in seismic stress tensor orientations caused by movement of magma bodies. However, given that programmatic resources are currently limited, installation of such networks at this time is unrealistic. Instead, this report focuses on identifying what additional stations are needed to guarantee that anomalous seismicity associated with volcanic unrest will be

  12. Mode switching in volcanic seismicity: El Hierro 2011-2013

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    Roberts, Nick S.; Bell, Andrew F.; Main, Ian G.

    2016-05-01

    The Gutenberg-Richter b value is commonly used in volcanic eruption forecasting to infer material or mechanical properties from earthquake distributions. Such studies typically analyze discrete time windows or phases, but the choice of such windows is subjective and can introduce significant bias. Here we minimize this sample bias by iteratively sampling catalogs with randomly chosen windows and then stack the resulting probability density functions for the estimated b>˜ value to determine a net probability density function. We examine data from the El Hierro seismic catalog during a period of unrest in 2011-2013 and demonstrate clear multimodal behavior. Individual modes are relatively stable in time, but the most probable b>˜ value intermittently switches between modes, one of which is similar to that of tectonic seismicity. Multimodality is primarily associated with intermittent activation and cessation of activity in different parts of the volcanic system rather than with respect to any systematic inferred underlying process.

  13. Seismic Activity at tres Virgenes Volcanic and Geothermal Field

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    Antayhua, Y. T.; Lermo, J.; Quintanar, L.; Campos-Enriquez, J. O.

    2013-05-01

    The volcanic and geothermal field Tres Virgenes is in the NE portion of Baja California Sur State, Mexico, between -112°20'and -112°40' longitudes, and 27°25' to 27°36' latitudes. Since 2003 Power Federal Commission and the Engineering Institute of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) initiated a seismic monitoring program. The seismograph network installed inside and around the geothermal field consisted, at the beginning, of Kinemetrics K2 accelerometers; since 2009 the network is composed by Guralp CMG-6TD broadband seismometers. The seismic data used in this study covered the period from September 2003 - November 2011. We relocated 118 earthquakes with epicenter in the zone of study recorded in most of the seismic stations. The events analysed have shallow depths (≤10 km), coda Magnitude Mc≤2.4, with epicentral and hypocentral location errors geothermal explotation zone where there is a system NW-SE, N-S and W-E of extensional faults. Also we obtained focal mechanisms for 38 events using the Focmec, Hash, and FPFIT methods. The results show normal mechanisms which correlate with La Virgen, El Azufre, El Cimarron and Bonfil fault systems, whereas inverse and strike-slip solutions correlate with Las Viboras fault. Additionally, the Qc value was obtained for 118 events. This value was calculated using the Single Back Scattering model, taking the coda-waves train with window lengths of 5 sec. Seismograms were filtered at 4 frequency bands centered at 2, 4, 8 and 16 Hz respectively. The estimates of Qc vary from 62 at 2 Hz, up to 220 at 16 Hz. The frequency-Qc relationship obtained is Qc=40±2f(0.62±0.02), representing the average attenuation characteristics of seismic waves at Tres Virgenes volcanic and geothermal field. This value correlated with those observed at other geothermal and volcanic fields.

  14. High volcanic seismic b-values: Real or artefacts?

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    Roberts, Nick; Bell, Andrew; Main, Ian G.

    2015-04-01

    The b-value of the Gutenberg-Richter distribution quantifies the relative proportion of large to small magnitude earthquakes in a catalogue, in turn related to the population of fault rupture areas and the average slip or stress drop. Accordingly the b-value is an important parameter to consider when evaluating seismic catalogues as it has the potential to provide insight into the temporal or spatial evolution of the system, such as fracture development or changes in the local stress regime. The b-value for tectonic seismicity is commonly found to be close to 1, whereas much higher b-values are frequently reported for volcanic and induced seismicity. Understanding these differences is important for understanding the processes controlling earthquake occurrence in different settings. However, it is possible that anomalously high b-values could arise from small sample sizes, under-estimated completeness magnitudes, or other poorly applied methodologies. Therefore, it is important to establish a rigorous workflow for analyzing these datasets. Here we examine the frequency-magnitude distributions of volcanic earthquake catalogues in order to determine the significance of apparently high b-values. We first derive a workflow for computing the completeness magnitude of a seismic catalogue, using synthetic catalogues of varying shape, size, and known b-value. We find the best approach involves a combination of three methods: 'Maximum Curvature', 'b-value stability', and the 'Goodness-of-Fit test'. To calculate a reliable b-value with an error ≤0.25, the maximum curvature method is preferred for a 'sharp-peaked' discrete distribution. For a catalogue with a broader peak the b-value stability method is the most reliable with the Goodness-of-Fit test being an acceptable backup if the b-value stability method fails. We apply this workflow to earthquake catalogues from El Hierro (2011-2013) and Mt Etna (1999-2013) volcanoes. In general, we find the b-value to be equal to or

  15. Volcanic Seismicity - The Power of the b-value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, I. G.; Roberts, N.; Bell, A. F.

    2016-12-01

    The Gutenberg-Richter `b-value' is commonly used in volcanic eruption forecasting to infer material or mechanical properties from earthquake distributions. It is `well known' that the b-value tends to be high or very high for volcanic earthquake populations relative to b = 1 for those of tectonic earthquakes, and that b varies significantly with time during periods of unrest. Subject to suitable calibration the b-value also allows us to quantify and characterise earthquake distributions of both ancient and currently-active populations, as a measure of the frequency-size distribution of source rupture area or length. Using a new iterative sampling method (Roberts et al. 2016), we examine data from the El Hierro seismic catalogue during a period of unrest in 2011-2013, and quantify the resulting uncertainties. The results demonstrate commonly-applied methods of assessing uncertainty in b-value significantly underestimate the total uncertainty, particularly when b is high. They also show clear multi-modal behaviour in the evolution of the b-value. Individual modes are relatively stable in time, but the most probable b-value intermittently switches between modes, one of which is similar to that of tectonic seismicity, and some are genuinely higher within the total error. A key benefit of this approach is that it is able to resolve different b-values associated with contemporaneous processes, even in the case where some generate high rates of events for short durations and others low rates for longer durations. These characteristics that are typical for many volcanic processes. Secondly, we use a range field observations from the exhumed extinct magma chamber on the Isle of Rum, NW Scotland, to infer an equivalent a b-value for the `frozen' fracture system that would have been active at the time of volcanism 65Ma ago. Using measurements from millimetre-scale fractures to lineation's on satellite imagery over 100m in length, we estimate b=1.8, significantly greater than

  16. Monitoring of low-energy seismic activity in Elbrus volcanic area with the use of underground seismic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalevsky, V.; Sobisevitch, A.

    2012-04-01

    Results of experiment with underground seismic array for studying low-energy seismic activity in the Elbrus volcanic area are presented. Linear seismic array of 2.5 km aperture is created in the tunnel of Baksan neutrino observatory. Horizontal tunnel of 4.3 km length is drilled in the mount Andyrchi at a distance of 20 km from Elbrus volcano. Array includes 6 three-component seismic sensors with 24-byte recorders installed with 500 m interval one from another along the tunnel. Underground seismic array is the new instrument of geophysical observatory organized for studies of geophysical processes in the Elbrus volcanic area. The observatory equipped with modern geophysical instruments including broadband tri-axial seismometers, quartz tilt-meters, magnetic variometers, geo-acoustic sensors, hi-precision distributed thermal sensors and gravimeters. The initial analysis of seismic signals recorded by seismic array allows us to detect low-energy seismic activity in the Elbrus volcanic area beginning from the distance of 3-5 km (the faults in a vicinity of mount Andyrchi) up to 15-25 km (area of Elbrus volcano). The regional micro-earthquakes with magnitude 1-2 at the distances 50-100 km was also recorded. 2.5 km aperture of the underground linear seismic array make it possible to determine with high accuracy hypocenters of local seismic events associated with geodynamic of volcanic magmatic structures and to realize seismo-emission tomography of the active zones of Elbrus volcano.

  17. Magma intrusion near Volcan Tancítaro: Evidence from seismic analysis

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    Pinzón, Juan I.; Núñez-Cornú, Francisco J.; Rowe, Charlotte A.

    2017-01-01

    Between May and June 2006, an earthquake swarm occurred near Volcan Tancítaro in Mexico, which was recorded by a temporary seismic deployment known as the MARS network. We located ∼1000 events from this seismic swarm. Previous earthquake swarms in the area were reported in the years 1997, 1999 and 2000. We relocate and analyze the evolution and properties of the 2006 earthquake swarm, employing a waveform cross-correlation-based phase repicking technique. Hypocenters from 911 events were located and divided into eighteen families having a correlation coefficient at or above 0.75. 90% of the earthquakes provide at least sixteen phase picks. We used the single-event location code Hypo71 and the P-wave velocity model used by the Jalisco Seismic and Accelerometer Network to improve hypocenters based on the correlation-adjusted phase arrival times. We relocated 121 earthquakes, which show clearly two clusters, between 9-10 km and 3-4 km depth respectively. The average location error estimates are <1 km epicentrally, and <2 km in depth, for the largest event in each cluster. Depths of seismicity migrate upward from 16 to 3.5 km and exhibit a NE-SW trend. The swarm first migrated toward Paricutin Volcano but by mid-June began propagating back toward Volcán Tancítaro. In addition to its persistence, noteworthy aspects of this swarm include a quasi-exponential increase in the rate of activity within the first 15 days; a b-value of 1.47; a jug-shaped hypocenter distribution; a shoaling rate of ∼5 km/month within the deeper cluster, and a composite focal mechanism solution indicating largely reverse faulting. These features of the swarm suggest a magmatic source elevating the crustal strain beneath Volcan Tancítaro.

  18. Detailed Seismic Reflection Images of the Central American Volcanic Arc

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    McIntosh, K. D.; Fulthorpe, C. S.

    2005-12-01

    New high-resolution seismic reflection profiles across the Central American volcanic arc (CAVA) reveal an asymmetric deformation pattern with large-scale folding and uplift of basinal strata in the forearc contrasted by intrusive bodies, normal faults, and possible strikes-slip faults in the backarc. Since Miocene times the CAVA has migrated seaward, apparently impinging on the Sandino forearc basin and creating or modifying the low-lying Nicaragua depression, which contains the backarc and much of the arc. However the structural nature of the depression and its possible relationship to forearc sliver movement is poorly known. In November-December 2004 we recorded a large, high-resolution, seismic reflection dataset largely on the Pacific shelf (forearc) area of Central America, extending from NW Costa Rica to the SE edge of El Salvador's territorial waters. We seized an opportunity to study the nature of the CAVA by recording data into the Gulf of Fonseca, a large embayment at the intersection of Nicaragua, Honduras, and El Salvador. With 3 GI airguns and a 2100 m streamer we recorded data with typical penetration of 2-3 seconds in the Sandino basin and frequency content of ~10-250 Hz (at shallow levels). Penetration was limited over the arc summit with high velocity volcanic rocks encountered at depths as shallow as a few hundred meters. To the NE the edge of the Nicaragua depression occurs abruptly; our data show a well-developed sedimentary basin 1.5-3 km thick separated by numerous steeply-dipping faults. The broadband signal and good penetration of this dataset will help us determine the chronology of arc development in this position and the styles of deformation in the forearc, arc, and backarc areas. In turn, this will help us understand the regional tectonic and stratigraphic development of this margin due to the profound affects of the arc.

  19. Seismic Tremors and Magma Wagging During Explosive Volcanism

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    Jellinek, M.; Bercovici, D.

    2010-12-01

    Volcanic tremor is a ubiquitous feature of explosive eruptions. This ground oscillation persists for minutes to weeks and is characterized by a remarkably narrow band of frequencies (i.e., ~0.5 - 7 Hz). Prior to major eruptions, tremor can occur in concert with ground deformation probably related to a buildup of magmatic gas. Volcanic tremor is, thus, of particular value for eruption forecasting. Most models for volcanic tremor rely on specific properties of the geometry, structure and constitution of volcanic conduits as well as the gas content of the erupting magma. Because neither the initial structure nor the evolution of the magma-conduit system will be the same from one volcano to the next, it is surprising that tremor characteristics are so consistent among different volcanoes. Indeed, this universality of tremor properties remains a major enigma. Here we employ the contemporary view that silicic magma rises in the conduit as a columnar plug surrounded by a highly vesicular annulus of sheared bubbles. We demonstrate that, for most geologically relevant conditions, the magma column will oscillate or "wag" against the restoring "gas-spring" force of the annulus at observed tremor frequencies. In contrast to previous models, the magma wagging oscillation is relatively insensitive to the conduit structure and geometry, thereby predicting the narrow band of tremor frequencies observed around the world. Moreover, the model predicts that as an eruption proceeds there will be an upward drift in both the maximum frequency and the total signal frequency bandwidth, the nature of which depends on the explosivity of the eruption, as observed.

  20. Tracking changes in volcanic systems with seismic Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Matt; Alicia J. Hotovec-Ellis,; Ninfa L. Bennington,; Silvio De Angelis,; Clifford Thurber,

    2014-01-01

    use ambient noise tomography (ANT) to map the 3D structure of a volcanic interior (at Piton de la Fournaise). Subsequent studies have imaged volcanoes with ANT at Okmok (Masterlark et al. 2010), Toba (Stankiewicz et al. 2010), Katmai (Thurber et al. 2012), Asama (Nagaoka et al. 2012), Uturuncu (Jay et al. 2012), and Kilauea (Ballmer et al. 2013b). In addition, Ma et al. (2013) have imaged a scatterer in the volcanic region of southern Peru by applying array techniques to ambient noise correlations. Prior to and in tandem with the development of ANT, researchers discovered that repeating earthquakes, which often occur at volcanoes, could be used to monitor subtle time-dependent changes with a technique known as the doublet method or coda wave interferometry (CWI) (Poupinet et al. 1984; Roberts et al. 1992; Ratdomopurbo and Poupinet 1995; Snieder et al. 2002; Pandolfi et al. 2006; Wegler et al. 2006; Martini et al. 2009; Haney et al. 2009; De Angelis 2009; Nagaoka et al. 2010; Battaglia et al. 2012; Erdem and Waite 2005; Hotovec-Ellis et al. 2014). Chaput et al. (2012) have also used scattered waves from Strombolian eruption coda at Erebus volcano to image the reflectivity of the volcanic interior with body wave interferometry. However, CWI in its original form was limited in that repeating earthquakes, or doublets, were not always guaranteed to occur. With the widespread use of noise correlations in seismology following the groundbreaking work by Campillo and Paul (2003) and Shapiro et al. (2005), it became evident that the nature of the ambient seismic field, due to its oceanic origin, enabled the continuous monitoring of subtle, time-dependent changes at both fault zones (Wegler and Sens-Schönfelder 2007; Brenguier et al. 2008b; Wegler et al. 2009; Sawazaki et al. 2009; Tatagi et al. 2012) and volcanoes (Sens-Schönfelder and Wegler 2006; Brenguier et al. 2008a) without the need for repeating earthquakes. Seismic precursors to eruptions based on ambient noise we

  1. Geophysical imaging of subsurface structures in volcanic area by seismic attenuation profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuru, Tetsuro; No, Tetsuo; Fujie, Gou

    2017-01-01

    Geophysical imaging by using attenuation property of multichannel seismic reflection data was tested to map spatial variation of physical properties of rocks in a volcanic area. The study area is located around Miyakejima volcanic island, where an intensive earthquake swarm was observed associated with 2000 Miyakejima eruption. Seismic reflection survey was conducted five months after the swarm initiation in order to clarify crustal structure around the hypocenters of the swarm activity. However, the resulting seismic reflection profiles were unable to provide significant information of deep structures around the hypocenters. The authors newly applied a seismic attribute method that focused seismic attenuation instead of reflectivity to the volcanic area, and designed this paper to assess the applicability of this method to subsurface structural studies in poorly reflective volcanic areas. Resulting seismic attenuation profiles successfully figured out attenuation structures around the Miyakejima volcanic island. Interestingly, a remarkable high-attenuation zone was detected between Miyakejima and Kozushima islands, being well correlated with the hypocenter distribution of the earthquake swarm in 2000. The high-attenuation zone is interpreted as a fractured area that was developed by magma activity responsible for the earthquake swarms that have been repeatedly occurring there. The present study can be one example showing the applicability of seismic attenuation profiling in a volcanic area. [Figure not available: see fulltext. Caption: .

  2. Monitoring El Hierro submarine volcanic eruption events with a submarine seismic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Maria Jose; Molino, Erik; Lopez, Carmen

    2013-04-01

    A submarine volcanic eruption took place near the southernmost emerged land of the El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain), from October 2011 to February 2012. The Instituto Geografico Nacional (IGN) seismic stations network evidenced seismic unrest since July 2012 and was a reference also to follow the evolution of the seismic activity associated with the volcanic eruption. From the beginning of the eruption a geophone string was installed less than 2 km away from the new volcano, next to La Restinga village shore, to record seismic activity related to the volcanic activity, continuously and with special interest on high frequency events. The seismic array was endowed with 8, high frequency, 3 component, 250 Hz, geophone cable string with a separation of 6 m between them. The analysis of the dataset using spectral techniques allows the characterization of the different phases of the eruption and the study of its dynamics. The correlation of the data analysis results with the observed sea surface activity (ash and lava emission and degassing) and also with the seismic activity recorded by the IGN field seismic monitoring system, allows the identification of different stages suggesting the existence of different signal sources during the volcanic eruption and also the posteruptive record of the degassing activity. The study shows that the high frequency capability of the geophone array allow the study of important features that cannot be registered by the standard seismic stations. The accumulative spectral amplitude show features related to eruptive changes.

  3. An updated Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayona, J. A., Sr.; Suarez, G.; Zuniga, R. R.; Jaimes, M. Á.

    2014-12-01

    The Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt is the volcanic arc located in Central Mexico. This zone is not as seismically active as some other regions in Mexico, such as the subduction zone along the Pacific coast. However, there is evidence of major historical earthquakes (M > 7) occurring on the volcanic belt near densely populated cities such as Mexico City, Guadalajara and Morelia. Furthermore, almost 50% of the population of the country lives in cities and towns located on the Volcanic Belt. Using empirical magnitude-Intensity regressions, data obtained from historical descriptions of earthquakes were calibrated with instrumental data to determine their moment magnitude in order to create a complete seismic catalogue of this geological province. We propose a methodology to solve the problem of merging both historical and instrumental datasets. The method consists of dividing our catalogue into three different segments, according to the temporary nature and magnitude of our records. This segmentation was made considering the cut-off magnitude of our catalogue. In this way, we determined three Gutenberg-Richter distributions and correlated them geometrical and statistically. Based on the local seismic sources and using Bayesian statistics as well as appropriate seismic waves attenuation models, we generate seismic hazard maps that would be useful for more than 40 million people that live in the zone.

  4. Seismic and volcanic risk studies - western Gulf of Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objectives of this research are to evaluate geologic hazards to offshore petroleum development due to earthquake and volcanic activity in the lower Cook Inlet,...

  5. Dome/Conduit inflation-deflation at Volcan de Fuego, Colima: evidence from seismic and geodetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Castaneda, E.; Salazar-Tlaczani, L.; DeMets, C.; Marquez-Azua, B.

    2013-12-01

    Volcan de Fuego is a strato-volcano (3860 m high) in Colima Mexico, which has been presenting high explosive activity from small to large explosive events, occasionally accompanied by pyroclastic flows, periodic dome growth and destructive phases, intense fumarole activity and degassing, during the last decade. Since June 2011 a broadband seismic and geodetic network has been operating at radial distances ranging between 1.5 and 4 km from the crater. Five stations are equipped with a Nanometrics 120 s Trillium seismometer and Trimble NetR9 GPS receiver, from which three of them include a MiniDOAS gas detection system. During the period of study eruptive activity of Volcan de Fuego has been dominated by dome growth, degassing and occasional large explosions. These events are associated with the partial dome destruction and frequent ash emissions. Preliminary analyses of two-year continuous records of broadband seismic and geodesy data have revealed dome/conduit inflation-deflation phases related to conspicuous VLP tremor in the 1-20 s period band. VLP tremor has been detected in several periods since 2011 in all stations of the network. VLP tremor may be spasmodic or a persistent signal that fluctuates both in amplitude and time. Since in volcanic areas microseismicity may cover a period range of 5 to 20 s, we analyze and characterize the noise levels considering the relative amplitude with respect to the average amplitude of microseismic noise at each station. We evaluate temporal and frequency variations of volcanic activity with respect the microseismic levels. Our results indicate that the energy of the wave field in the 1-20 s period band is dominated by volcanic activity, especially in cases associated with large eruptive events. The presence of VLP tremor correlates well with inflation-deflation phases observed in the GPS time series, with total vertical displacements of 20-40 mm. This behavior is most evident in the COPN, COPE and COLW stations, which are

  6. Lichen Persistence and Recovery in Response to Varied Volcanic Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, P.; Wheeler, T. B.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions produce many ecological disturbances that structure vegetation. While lichens are sensitive to disturbances, little is known about their responses to volcanic disturbances, except for colonization of lava. We examined lichen community responses through time to different disturbances produced by the May 1, 2008 eruption of Volcan Chaiten in south-central Chile. Pre-eruption vegetation near the volcano was old-growth Valdivian temperate rainforest dominated by closed-canopy Nothofagus sp... In 2012, we installed thirteen 1-acre plots across volcanic disturbance zones on which a time-constrained search was done for all macrolichen species, each of which was assigned an approximate log10 categorical abundance. We also installed a 0.2 m2 quadrat on two representative trees per plot for repeat photography of lichen cover. We remeasured at least one plot per disturbance zone in 2014 and re-photographed tree quadrats in 2013 and 2014. We then analyzed species composition and abundance differences among disturbance zones. In 2012, the blast (pyroclastic density flow), scorch (standing scorched forest at the edge of the blast) and deep tephra (>10 cm) zones had the lowest lichen species richness (5-13 species), followed by reference (unimpacted) and shallow (lichen species since 2012 while the light tephra and reference were essentially unchanged. Gravel rain, gravel rain + pumice and flooded forest plots all had about the same number of species in 2014 as 2012. Lichen colonization and growth in tree quadrats varied widely, from very little colonization in the blast to prolific colonization in the gravel rain + pumice zone. Lichen's varied responses to different volcanic disturbances were attributable to varying degrees of mortality and subsequent availability of substrate, quantity of light and removal of competitors. While sensitive to disturbance, lichens are apparently resilient to and can quickly recolonize after a variety of large, violent volcanic

  7. High resolution seismic reflection profiles of Holocene volcanic and tectonic features, Mono Lake, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayko, A. S.; Hart, P. E.; Bursik, M. I.; McClain, J. S.; Moore, J. C.; Boyle, M.; Childs, J. R.; Novick, M.; Hill, D. P.; Mangan, M.; Roeske, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Inyo-Mono Craters of Long Valley and Mono Basin, California are the youngest eruptive vents of the Great Basin, USA and the second youngest in California. They are one of two seismically active volcanic centers with geothermal power production in the Walker Lane, western Great Basin, the other being the Coso Volcanic Field to the south. High resolution seismic reflection data collected from the northern tip of the Mono Craters eruptive centers in Mono Lake delinates two structural zones proximal to the active volcanic centers in Mono Lake. A growth structure drapped by ~30 m or more of bedded sediment shows increasing deformation and offset of clastic deposits on the northwest margin of the basin. Coherent thin-bedded stratigraphic sections with strong reflectors to 30-100m depth are preserved on the western and northern margins of the basin. The southern and southeastern areas of the lake are generally seismically opaque, due to extensive ash and tephra deposits as well as widespread methane. Thin pockets of well-bedded, poorly consolidated sediment of probable Holocene and last glacial age are present within intrabasin depressions providing some local age constraints on surfaces adjacent to volcanic vents and volcanically modified features.

  8. Evidence of persistent seismo-volcanic activity at Marsili seamount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino D'Alessandro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Marsili submarine volcano is the largest European volcano, and it can be considered as the key to our understanding of the dynamics of the spreading and back-arc lithosphere formation in the Tyrrhenian sector [Marani et al. 2004, and references therein]. Despite its size, it is very difficult to monitor due to its geographical position [D'Alessandro et al. 2011], and it still remains little known. In 2006, the Centro Nazionale Terremoti (National Earthquake Centre of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV deployed a broadband ocean-bottom seismometer with hydrophone (OBS/H [Mangano et al. 2011] on the flat top of Marsili volcano, at a depth of ca. 790 m. In only nine days, the instrument recorded ca. 800 seismo-volcanic events [D'Alessandro et al. 2009]. This revealed the intense seismo-volcanic activity of Marsili volcano for the first time. […] 

  9. Persistent volcanic signature observed around Barren Island, Andaman Sea, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Laluraj, C.M.; Balachandran, K.K.; Sabu, P.S.; Panampunnayil, U.

    2005). Sea surface temperatures of > 28?C are generally considered favourable for the development of tropical cyclones (Whitney and Hobgood 1997; Saunders and Harris 1997; Shapiro and Goldenberg 1998) and in the Bay of Bengal; the surface... (2000) Volcanic eruptions and climate. Reviews of Geophysics 38(2): 191-219. Saunders M A, and Harris A R (1997) Statistical evidence links exceptional 1995 Atlantic hurricane season to record sea warming. Geophysical Research Letters 24: 1255...

  10. New inferences from spectral seismic energy measurement of a link between regional seismicity and volcanic activity at Mt. Etna, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, R.; Falsaperla, S.; Marrero, J. M.; Messina, A.

    2009-04-01

    The existence of a relationship between regional seismicity and changes in volcanic activity has been the subject of several studies in the last years. Generally, activity in basaltic volcanoes such as Villarica (Chile) and Tungurahua (Ecuador) shows very little changes after the occurrence of regional earthquakes. In a few cases volcanic activity has changed before the occurrence of regional earthquakes, such as observed at Teide, Tenerife, in 2004 and 2005 (Tárraga et al., 2006). In this paper we explore the possible link between regional seismicity and changes in volcanic activity at Mt. Etna in 2006 and 2007. On 24 November, 2006 at 4:37:40 GMT an earthquake of magnitude 4.7 stroke the eastern coast of Sicily. The epicenter was localized 50 km SE of the south coast of the island, and at about 160 km from the summit craters of Mt. Etna. The SSEM (Spectral Seismic Energy Measurement) of the seismic signal at stations at 1 km and 6 km from the craters highlights that four hours before this earthquake the energy associated with volcanic tremor increased, reached a maximum, and finally became steady when the earthquake occurred. Conversely, neither before nor after the earthquake, the SSEM of stations located between 80 km and 120 km from the epicentre and outside the volcano edifice showed changes. On 5 September, 2007 at 21:24:13 GMT an earthquake of magnitude 3.2 and 7.9 km depth stroke the Lipari Island, at the north of Sicily. About 38 hours before the earthquake occurrence, there was an episode of lava fountain lasting 20 hours at Etna volcano. The SSEM of the seismic signal recorded during the lava fountain at a station located at 6 km from the craters highlights changes heralding this earthquake ten hours before its occurrence using the FFM method (e.g., Voight, 1988; Ortiz et al., 2003). A change in volcanic activity - with the onset of ash emission and Strombolian explosions - was observed a couple of hours before the occurrence of the regional

  11. Local seismic hazard assessment in explosive volcanic settings by 3D numerical analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzano, Roberto; Pagliaroli, Alessandro; Moscatelli, Massimiliano; Gaudiosi, Iolanda; Avalle, Alessandra; Giallini, Silvia; Marcini, Marco; Polpetta, Federica; Simionato, Maurizio; Sirianni, Pietro; Sottili, Gianluca; Vignaroli, Gianluca; Bellanova, Jessica; Calamita, Giuseppe; Perrone, Angela; Piscitelli, Sabatino

    2017-04-01

    This work deals with the assessment of local seismic response in the explosive volcanic settings by reconstructing the subsoil model of the Stracciacappa maar (Sabatini Volcanic District, central Italy), whose pyroclastic succession records eruptive phases ended about 0.09 Ma ago. Heterogeneous characteristics of the Stracciacappa maar (stratification, structural setting, lithotypes, and thickness variation of depositional units) make it an ideal case history for understanding mechanisms and processes leading to modifications of amplitude-frequency-duration of seismic waves generated at earthquake sources and propagating through volcanic settings. New geological map and cross sections, constrained with recently acquired geotechnical and geophysical data, illustrate the complex geometric relationships among different depositional units forming the maar. A composite interfingering between internal lacustrine sediments and epiclastic debris, sourced from the rim, fills the crater floor; a 45 meters thick continuous coring borehole was drilled in the maar with sampling of undisturbed samples. Electrical Resistivity Tomography surveys and 2D passive seismic arrays were also carried out for constraining the geological model and the velocity profile of the S-waves, respectively. Single station noise measurements were collected in order to define natural amplification frequencies. Finally, the nonlinear cyclic soil behaviour was investigated through simple shear tests on the undisturbed samples. The collected dataset was used to define the subsoil model for 3D finite difference site response numerical analyses by using FLAC 3D software (ITASCA). Moreover, 1D and 2D numerical analyses were carried out for comparison purposes. Two different scenarios were selected as input motions: a moderate magnitude (volcanic event) and a high magnitude (tectonic event). Both earthquake scenarios revealed significant ground motion amplification (up to 15 in terms of spectral acceleration

  12. New Insight on the Increasing Seismicity during Tenerife's 2004 Volcanic Reactivation

    CERN Document Server

    Cerdeña, I Domínguez; Rivera, L; 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2011.06.005

    2012-01-01

    Starting in April 2004, unusual seismic activity was observed in the interior of the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) with much evidence pointing to a reawakening of volcanic activity. This seismicity is now analyzed with techniques unprecedented in previous studies of this crisis. The 200 earthquakes located onshore during 2004 and 2005 have been classified by cross-correlation, resulting in a small number of significant families. The application of a relative location algorithm (hypoDD) revealed important features about the spatial distribution of the earthquakes. The seismic catalogue has been enhanced with more than 800 additional events, detected only by the closest seismic station. These events were assigned to families by correlation and as a consequence their hypocentral location and magnitude were estimated by comparing them to the earthquakes of each family. The new catalogue obtained by these methods identifies two major seismogenic zones, one to the northwest and the other to the southwe...

  13. Pre-eruption deformation and seismic anomalies in 2012 in Tolbachik volcanic zone, Kamchatka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugaenko, Yulia; Saltykov, Vadim; Titkov, Nikolay

    2014-05-01

    Tolbachik volcanic zone (active volcano Plosky Tolbachik, dormant volcano Ostry Tolbachik and Tolbachik zone of cinder cones) is situated in the south part of Klyuchevskaya group of volcanoes in Kamchatka. All historical fissure eruptions of Tolbachik volcanic zone (1740, 1941, 1975-76 and 2012-13) were connected with one or another activity of Plosky Tolbachik volcano. In 1941 the fissure vent was occurred during the completion of 1939-41 terminal eruption of Plosky Tolbachik. In 1975 the Large Tolbachik Fissure Eruption (LTFE) was forestalled by Plosky Tolbachik terminal activity of the Hawaiian type and then was accompanied by the catastrophic collapse in the crater of Plosky Tolbachik. What events took place in the vicinity of Plosky Tolbachik in 2012 before the 2012-13 fissure eruption? In contrast of the 1975-76 LTFE the eruption 2012-13 was not preceded by intensive seismic preparation. Nowadays Klyuchevskaya group of volcanoes is under monitoring by 12 seismic stations, so we can investigate seismicity in details on the lower energy level then forty years ago. We analyzed seismicity of Plosky Tolbachik using regional catalogue 1999-2012. Anomalies of low-energy (M≥1.5) seismicity parameters (increase of seismicity rate and seismic energy) were discovered. This is evidence of seismic activization covered the whole Plosky Tolbachik volcano. The significance of this anomaly was estimated by distribution function of emitted seismic energy. Statistically significant transition of seismicity from background level to high and extremely high levels was revealed. It corresponds to multiple growth of earthquake number and seismic energy in 2012, July-November (five months before the eruption). The seismicity transition from background level to high level was happen in August 2012. During last three weeks before fissure eruption seismicity of analyzed seismoactive volume was on extremely high level. Earthquakes from fissure site directly appeared only on November 27

  14. Seismic Signals of the 2005 Explosive Events at Volcan de Fuego, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Vargas-Bracamontes, D. M.; Suarez-Plascencia, C.

    2005-12-01

    The current eruptive process of Volcan de Fuego (also known as Colima Volcano), started in the second semester of 1998, has presented several intermittent effusive and explosive phases. Since early 2005, a sequence of explosive events with VEI less or equal than 3 occured, the behavior of such explosive activity has been similar to that presented by the volcano in 1903. Most of the explosive events has been recorded by the seismic digital three components stations operated by the University of Guadalajara and Jalisco Civil Defense. These signals have been recorded not only by stations located on the volcanic edifice, but also by the stations BSSJ (San Sebastian del Oeste) and MCUJ (Minas del Cuale) located at 184 and 182 km in the northern coast of Jalisco, respectively. These stations recorded the seismic signal and the sonic wave. The origin times of the explosions were calculated using the sonic wave, also the sound velocity at the explosion time. Velocities of the seismic waves between the volcano and the seismic stations were also evaluated. Finally, the magnitude of the seismic signals and the energy of the sonic waves were calculated and compared with the size of the explosions reported by other authors.

  15. MIGRATION OF SEISMIC AND VOLCANIC ACTIVITY AS DISPLAY OF WAVE GEODYNAMIC PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Vikulin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Publications about the earthquake foci migration have been reviewed. An important result of such studies is establishment of wave nature of seismic activity migration that is manifested by two types of rotational waves; such waves are responsible for interaction between earthquakes foci and propagate with different velocities. Waves determining long-range interaction of earthquake foci are classified as Type 1; their limiting velocities range from 1 to 10 cm/s. Waves determining short-range interaction of foreshocks and aftershocks of individual earthquakes are classified as Type 2; their velocities range from 1 to 10 km/s. According to the classification described in [Bykov, 2005], these two types of migration waves correspond to slow and fast tectonic waves. The most complete data on earthquakes (for a period over 4.1 million of years and volcanic eruptions (for 12 thousand years of the planet are consolidated in a unified systematic format and analyzed by methods developed by the authors. For the Pacific margin, Alpine-Himalayan belt and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, which are the three most active zones of the Earth, new patterns of spatial and temporal distribution of seismic and volcanic activity are revealed; they correspond to Type 1 of rotational waves. The wave nature of the migration of seismic and volcanic activity is confirmed. A new approach to solving problems of geodynamics is proposed with application of the data on migration of seismic and volcanic activity, which are consolidated in this study, in combination with data on velocities of movement of tectonic plate boundaries. This approach is based on the concept of integration of seismic, volcanic and tectonic processes that develop in the block geomedium and interact with each other through rotating waves with a symmetric stress tensor. The data obtained in this study give grounds to suggest that a geodynamic value, that is mechanically analogous to an impulse

  16. Temporal Evolution of a Seismic Swarm at Chiles - Cerro Negro volcanic complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Mario

    2015-04-01

    The increasing seismic activity in the area of the Chiles - Cerro Negro volcanic complex, located on the Ecuador-Colombian border, has been jointly monitored by the Instituto Geofisico - Ecuador and the Observatorio Vulcanologico y Sismologico de Pasto (OVSP), a division of the Servicio Geologico Colombiano. Since April 2013, three seismic swarms have been detected in this area, and more than 400.000 events have been recorded since November 2013. The largest and most recent swarm has a daily average of 3894 events between March and the 12th of December 2014. Currently a seismic network of 13 short- and broad-band stations (5 Colombian, 8 Ecuadorian) was deployed in this area. High quality epicenters of seismic events with magnitudes Ml>2.0, RMSChiles volcano with shallow depths (up to 14 km). Most events have magnitudes between 1.0 to 4.0. Fifteen events have magnitudes larger than 4.0 including an event that occurred on October 20, 2014. This event had a local magnitude of 5.7 and an oblique (strike-slip with some thrusting) focal mechanism. Waveforms and spectral patterns define these events as volcano-tectonic. However, events with moderate to large magnitudes (above 3.0) contain pronounced very-long-period components. Position time series recorded by a dual-frequency GPS receiver at the SE flank of Chiles show a slight departure from the normal tectonic trend beginning with the appearance of the last seismic swarm on or around September 30, 2014. This trend is subsequently punctuated by a sharp deformation transient related to the coseismic displacement of the October 20 event. After more than a year of very anomalous seismic activity and concurrent minor deformation, no evidence of surficial volcanic activity has been documented.

  17. Monitoring Persistent Volcanic Emissions from Sulphur Springs, Saint Lucia: A Community Approach to Disaster Risk Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, E. P.; Beckles, D. M.; Cox, L.; Jackson, V. B.; Alexander, D.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic and geothermal emissions are known natural sources of volatiles to the atmosphere. Volcanogenic air pollutants known to cause the most serious impact are carbon dioxide (CO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2), hydrogen chloride (HCl) and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Some studies into the potential for volcanic emissions to produce chronic diseases in humans indicate that areas of major concern include respiratory problems, particularly silicosis (Allen et al. 2000; Baxter et al. 1999; Buist et al. 1986), psychological stress (Shore et al. 1986), and chemical impacts of gas or ash (Giammanco et al. 1998). Sulphur Springs Park in Saint Lucia has a very high recreational value with >200,000 visitors annually, while the nearby town of Soufrière has >8,400 residents. Residents and visitors have raised concerns about the volcanic emissions and its health effects. As part of the volcanic surveillance programme undertaken by the UWI, Seismic Research Centre (SRC) in Saint Lucia, a new monitoring network has been established for quantifying the ambient SO2 in air, to which staff and visitors at the volcanic park are exposed to. The implementation and continued operation of this network has involved the training of local personnel in the active field sampling and analytical techniques required for the assessment of ambient SO2 concentrations, using a low cost monitor as well as commercial passive samplers. This approach recognizes that environmental hazards are a usual part of life and productive livelihoods, and to minimize post-disaster response and recovery it is beneficial to promote preparedness and mitigation, which is best achieved at the local level with community involvement. It is also intended that the volcanic emissions monitoring network could be used as a method to establish and maintain community-based initiatives that would also be helpful when volcanic threat manifests.

  18. The attenuation of seismic intensity in the Etna region and comparison with other Italian volcanic districts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tuvè

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A detailed analysis of the intensity attenuation in the Etna and other Italian volcanic districts, was performed using the most recent and complete intensity datasets. Attenuation laws were derived through empirical models fitting ?I (the difference between epicentral I0 and site Ix intensities average values versus hypocentral site distances by the least-square method. The huge amount of data available for the Etna area allowed us to elaborate bi-linear and logarithmic attenuation models, also taking source effects into account. Furthermore, the coefficients of the Grandori formulation have been re-calculated to verify the ones previously defined for seismic hazard purposes. Among the tested relationships, the logarithmic one is simple and fairly stable, so it was also adopted for the other volcanic Italian areas. The analysis showed different attenuation trends: on the one hand, Etna and Ischia show the highest decay of intensity (?I=4 in the first 20 km; on the contrary, the Aeolian Islands and Albani Hills present a slight intensity attenuation (?I=2 at 20 km from the hypocentre; finally, Vesuvius seems to have an intermediate behaviour between the two groups. The proposed regionalization gives a significantly better image of near-field damage in volcanic regions and is easily applicable to probabilistic seismic hazard analyses.

  19. Planning the improvement of seismic monitoring in a volcanic supersite: experience on Mt. Etna

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Antonino; Scarfi, Luciano; Scaltrito, Antonio; Aiesi, Giampiero; Di Prima, Sergio; Ferrari, Ferruccio; Rapisarda, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    Etna is one of the most active volcanoes in the world and one of the most intriguing natural laboratories for the understanding of eruptive processes and lava uprising in basalt-type volcanic environments; indeed, it is considered, by the scientific international community, together with the Vesuvius and the Hawaiian Islands, as a volcanic supersite. Its activity is continuously monitored by the Osservatorio Etneo of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), by means of an array of integrated multidisciplinary techniques. In particular, Etna seismicity is recorded by a dense local seismic network (ESN- Etna Seismic Network), which, nowadays, consists of about 40 real-time seismic stations, many of which equipped with broadband velocity and accelerometer sensors. The data are analyzed routinely in detail by the Osservatorio Etneo staff, producing daily and periodic reports and bulletins of the earthquakes located in the whole Sicily and southern Calabria region. In the last decades, seismological observations provided important information on both the dynamics and internal structure of the volcano, in addition to their interaction with the regional tectonic structures. In the last year, in the framework of the VULCAMED project, an INGV workgroup has taken on the task of developing the existing seismic network through the installation of new measurement stations. By considering the spatial distribution of earthquakes in the area, the presence of structures known as seismically active and through extensive geological-geophysical surveys, ten potential new sites were identified. In the following months, some of these sites will complement the existing network. The choice of optimal sites must clearly be made through a careful analysis of environmental noise, of the possible logistics, technical and broadcast problems, but must also take into account the geometry of the existing seismic network. For this purpose, we applied the Seismic Network

  20. The Persistence of Volcanic Ash in the Tropical Stratosphere after the Kelud Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernier, J. P.; Fairlie, T. D.; Deshler, T.; Knepp, T. N.; Natarajan, M.; Foster, K.; Trepte, C. R.; Thomason, L. W.; Bedka, K. M.; Wienhold, F.

    2014-12-01

    An increase of volcanic activity over the past decade is thought to have contributed significantly to the global warming "hiatus". Thus, it is important to improve our understanding of the microphysical and optical properties of even small volcanic plumes as well as their associated climate impacts. On February 13th, 2014, the Mt Kelud volcano, located near 4°S on the island of Java (Indonesia), injected volcanic gases and ash into the tropical stratosphere. An overpass of the CALIPSO lidar during the active phase of the eruption showed volcanic materials reaching 26 km with the main volcanic cloud near 18-19 km. This is the highest altitude volcanic injection since Mt Pinatubo in 1991. CALIPSO has tracked the dispersion of the Kelud plume throughout the tropical lower stratosphere (~20N-20S) since then. Depolarization lidar measurements (0.3-0.4) indicate that the plume was likely composed of irregularly shaped ash particles during the first few days after the eruption, and that sulfate aerosol (spherical droplets) formed thereafter, gradually lowering the mean depolarization to 0.1-0.2. In May, 2014, we mounted a 2-week campaign to Darwin (Australia) to measure several profiles of backscatter in red and blue channels, and one profile of aerosol size distribution using two optical particle counters, one with an inlet heated to 200°C. The purpose was to characterize particle sizes, optical properties, and sulfate fraction from a relatively fresh volcanic plume in the low stratosphere. Preliminary results from the campaign suggest the persistence of ash particles at the bottom of the Kelud plume 3 months after the eruption. This is significant because the climate impact of ash is neglected in most climate models.

  1. Neogene seismites and seismic volcanic rocks in the Linqu area, Shandong Province, E China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian H.S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Yishu Fault Zone runs through the centre of Shandong Province (E China; it is a deep-seated large fault system that still is active. Two volcanic faulted basins (the Shanwang and Linqu Basins in the Linqu area, west of the fault zone, are exposed to rifting, which process is accompanied by a series of tectonic and volcanic earthquakes with a magnitude of 5-8. Lacustrine sediments in the basins were affected by these earthquakes so that seismites with a variety of soft-sediment deformation structures originated. The seismites form part of the Shanwang Formation of the Linqu Group. Semi-consolidated fluvial conglomerates became deformed in a brittle way; these seismites are present at the base of the Yaoshan Formation. Intense earthquakes triggered by volcanic activity left their traces in the form of seismic volcanic rocks associated with liquefied-sand veins in the basalt/sand intercalations at the base of the Yaoshan Formation. These palaeo-earthquake records are dated around 14-10 Ma; they are responses to the intense tectonic extension and the basin rifting in this area and even the activity of the Yishu Fault Zone in the Himalayan tectonic cycle.

  2. Shallow magma chamber under the Wudalianchi Volcanic Field unveiled by seismic imaging with dense array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiwei; Ni, Sidao; Zhang, Baolong; Bao, Feng; Zhang, Senqi; Deng, Yang; Yuen, David A.

    2016-05-01

    The Wudalianchi Volcano Field (WDF) is a typical intraplate volcano in northeast China with generation mechanism not yet well understood. As its last eruption was around 300 years ago, the present risk for volcano eruption is of particular public interest. We have carried out a high-resolution ambient noise tomography to investigate the location of magma chambers beneath the volcanic cones with a dense seismic array of 43 seismometers and ~ 6 km spatial interval. Significant low-velocity anomalies up to 10% are found at 7-13 km depth under the Weishan volcano, consistent with the pronounced high electrical-conductivity anomalies from previous magnetotelluric survey. We propose these extremely low velocity anomalies can be interpreted as partial melting in a shallow magma chamber with volume at least 200 km3 which may be responsible for most of the recent volcanic eruptions in WDF. Therefore, this magma chamber may pose a serious hazard for northeast China.

  3. Attenuation of short period seismic waves at Etna as compared to other volcanic areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pezzo, E.; Gresta, S.; Patané, G.; Patané, D.; Scarcella, G.

    1987-11-01

    Coda Q for Etna volcano is frequency dependent and the Q frequency pattern and the numerical values ranging from about 100 at 1 Hz to about 300 at 18 Hz are similar to the values obtained for other volcanoes: Campi Flegrei, Aeolian Islands and Hawaii. Moreover the frequency pattern and the numerical values of coda quality factor, for most of the seismically active zones of Italy are very different from those of the volcanic zones. Several studies of the location of magma chambers show the presence of magma pockets beneath Lipari and Vulcano Islands of the Aeolian archipelago and an anomalous low velocity body beneath Etna. These evidences suggest that a possible interpretation of the characteristic frequency pattern of Q on volcanic areas is that the presence of magma can modify the scattering environment and consequently the coda Q estimates.

  4. High velocity anomaly beneath the Deccan volcanic province: Evidence from seismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, H.M.; Gaur, V.K.; Rai, S.S.; Ramesh, D.S.; Rao, C.V.R.; Srinagesh, D.; Suryaprakasam, K.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of teleseismic P-wave residuals observed at 15 seismograph stations operated in the Deccan volcanic province (DVP) in west central India points to the existence of a large, deep anomalous region in the upper mantle where the velocity is a few per cent higher than in the surrounding region. The seismic stations were operated in three deployments together with a reference station on precambrian granite at Hyderabad and another common station at Poona. The first group of stations lay along a west-northwesterly profile from Hyderabad through Poona to Bhatsa. The second group roughly formed an L-shaped profile from Poona to Hyderabad through Dharwar and Hospet. The third group of stations lay along a northwesterly profile from Hyderabad to Dhule through Aurangabad and Latur. Relative residuals computed with respect to Hyderabad at all the stations showed two basic features: a large almost linear variation from approximately +1s for teleseisms from the north to-1s for those from the southeast at the western stations, and persistance of the pattern with diminishing magnitudes towards the east. Preliminary ray-plotting and three-dimensional inversion of the P-wave residual data delineate the presence of a 600 km long approximately N-S trending anomalous region of high velocity (1-4% contrast) from a depth of about 100 km in the upper mantle encompassing almost the whole width of the DVP. Inversion of P-wave relative residuals reveal the existence of two prominent features beneath the DVP. The first is a thick high velocity zone (1-4% faster) extending from a depth of about 100 km directly beneath most of the DVP. The second feature is a prominent low velocity region which coincides with the westernmost part of the DVP. A possible explanation for the observed coherent high velocity anomaly is that it forms the root of the lithosphere which coherently translates with the continents during plate motions, an architecture characteristic of precambrian shields. The low

  5. Réunion (Indian Ocean) Oceanic Island Volcanism: Seismic Structure and Heterogeneity of the Upper Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirn, A.

    2002-12-01

    Réunion island in the Indian Ocean is commonly considered as the recent and active expression of the hotspot that formed the Deccan traps, although both the hypothesis of recent small hotspots for both Reunion and Mauritius, or of relation with the plate heterogeneity have been proposed. Structural studies by seismic methods, from the scale of the upper cone of the active Fournaise volcano to that of the crust 100 km around, have been carried out. At this scale significant departures appear from the Hawaiian case to which it is traditionally compared, with the seismic signature of active volcanism showing differences too. Refraction-reflection seismics do not see a geometry of the top of the underlying plate towards the island, expected in plate flexure modelling by analogy with other hotspot island. Where it is sampled, doming is suggested instead. There appears to be less magmatic products than if there was a large amount buried in a flexural depression. The velocity structure resolved for the volcanic island, apart from high velocity cores under the volcanoes leads to smaller overall density than usually considered in flexure modelling. The same appears to hold for the material of the cone of about 120 km radius rising above the regional sea-bottom level to the 30 km radius island, from coincident reflection and refraction seismics on several lines radial to the southeastern half of the island. At the crust-mantle level, there is evidence from reflection-refraction line extending 150 km either side of the island for a layer of velocity intermediate between normal crust and mantle values. Two radial reflection line to the SSW, close to each other detect a differences in depth of the oceanic basement. This may coincide with a fracture zone suggested from the reconstruction of the sea-floor spreading history from the magnetic anomaly pattern. The latter has been interpreted previously to indicate that the western part of Réunion developed atop a Paleogene fossil

  6. 2-D crustal Poisson's ratio from seismic travel time inversion in Changbaishan Tianchi volcanic region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhi; ZHANG Xian-kang; WANG Fu-yun; DUAN Yong-hong; LAI Xiao-ling

    2005-01-01

    Based on the inversion method of 2D velocity structure and interface, the crustal velocity structures of P-wave and S-wave along the profile L1 are determined simultaneously with deep seismic sounding data in Changbaishan Tianchi volcanic region, and then its Poisson's ratio is obtained. Calculated results show that this technique overcomes some defects of traditional forward calculation method, and it is also very effective to determine Poisson's ratio distribution of deep seismic sounding profile, especially useful for study on volcanic magma and crustal fault zone. Study result indicates that there is an abnormally high Poisson's ratio body that is about 30 km wide and 12 km high in the low velocity region under Tianchi crater. Its value of Poisson's ratio is 8% higher than that of surrounding medium and it should be the magma chamber formed from melted rock with high temperature. There is a high Poisson's ratio zone ranging from magma chamber to the top of crust, which may be the uprise passage of hot substance. The lower part with high Poisson's ratio, which stretches downward to Moho, is possibly the extrusion way of hot substance from the uppermost mantle. The conclusions above are consistent with the study results of both tomographic determination of 3D crustal structure and magnetotelluric survey in this region.

  7. Response of hydrothermal system to stress transients at Lassen Volcanic Center, California, inferred from seismic interferometry with ambient noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Taka'aki; Brenguier, Florent

    2016-10-01

    Time-lapse monitoring of seismic velocity at volcanic areas can provide unique insight into the property of hydrothermal and magmatic fluids and their temporal variability. We established a quasi real-time velocity monitoring system by using seismic interferometry with ambient noise to explore the temporal evolution of velocity in the Lassen Volcanic Center, Northern California. Our monitoring system finds temporal variability of seismic velocity in response to stress changes imparted by an earthquake and by seasonal environmental changes. Dynamic stress changes from a magnitude 5.7 local earthquake induced a 0.1 % velocity reduction at a depth of about 1 km. The seismic velocity susceptibility defined as ratio of seismic velocity change to dynamic stress change is estimated to be about 0.006 MPa-1, which suggests the Lassen hydrothermal system is marked by high-pressurized hydrothermal fluid. By combining geodetic measurements, our observation shows that the long-term seismic velocity fluctuation closely tracks snow-induced vertical deformation without time delay, which is most consistent with an hydrological load model (either elastic or poroelastic response) in which surface loading drives hydrothermal fluid diffusion that leads to an increase of opening of cracks and subsequently reductions of seismic velocity. We infer that heated-hydrothermal fluid in a vapor-dominated zone at a depth of 2-4 km range is responsible for the long-term variation in seismic velocity[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. High-precision mapping of seismicity in the 2014 Bárdarbunga volcanic episode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogfjörd, Kristín S.; Hensch, Martin; Gudmundsson, Gunnar B.; Jónsdóttir, Kristín

    2015-04-01

    The Bárdarbunga volcano and its associated fissure swarm in Iceland's Eastern volcanic zone is a highly active system with over 20 eruptions in the last 11 centuries. The location of this active volcano and much of the fissure swarm under several hundred metres thick ice gives rise to multiple hazards, including explosive, subglacial eruptions and associated subglacial floods (jökulhlaups), as well as fissure eruptions extruding large volumes of lava. After a decade of increasing seismic activity, volcanic unrest at Bárdarbunga suddenly escalated into a minor subglacial eruption on 16 August 2014. In the following weeks seismic activity soared and surface deformation of tens of cm were observed, caused by rifting and a dyke intrusion, which propagated 48 km northward from the central volcano (Sigmundsson et al., 2014). The dyke propagation stopped just outside the glacial margin and ended in a fissure eruption at Holuhraun at the end of August. At the time of writing the eruption is ongoing, having extruded a lava volume of over 1 km3 and released high rates of SO2 into the atmosphere. Over twenty thousand microearthquakes have been recorded. Initially most were in the dyke, but after the first two weeks the activity around the caldera rim increased and over 70 shallow earthquakes with MW > 5 have been located along the caldera rim accompanied by caldera subsidence. At the onset of the unrest on 16 August, the seismicity was located in the caldera and north of the caldera rim, but already in the first few hours the activity propagated out of the caldera to the SE. Still, the activity continued for a few days in the fissure swarm to the NE of the rim. High-precision earthquake locations in the propagating dyke have revealed its very detailed, planar rifting segments, with the events distributed over a 3-4 km depth range, and mostly between 6 and 9 km. These very planar event distributions are highly unusual in volcanic areas and strongly suggest rifting of

  9. Seismicity and active tectonics at Coloumbo Reef (Aegean Sea, Greece): Monitoring an active volcano at Santorini Volcanic Center using a temporary seismic network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, I.; Karagianni, E.; Panagiotopoulos, D.; Papazachos, C.; Hatzidimitriou, P.; Bohnhoff, M.; Rische, M.; Meier, T.

    2009-02-01

    The volcanic center of Santorini Island is the most active volcano of the southern Aegean volcanic arc. Α dense seismic array consisting of fourteen portable broadband seismological stations has been deployed in order to monitor and study the seismo-volcanic activity at the broader area of the Santorini volcanic center between March 2003 and September 2003. Additional recordings from a neighbouring larger scale temporary network (CYCNET) were also used for the relocation of more than 240 earthquakes recorded by both arrays. A double-difference relocation technique was used, in order to obtain optimal focal parameters for the best-constrained earthquakes. The results indicate that the seismic activity of the Santorini volcanic center is strongly associated with the tectonic regime of the broader Southern Aegean Sea area as well as with the volcanic processes. The main cluster of the epicenters is located at the Coloumbo Reef, a submarine volcano of the volcanic system of Santorini Islands. A smaller cluster of events is located near the Anydros Islet, aligned in a NE-SW direction, running almost along the main tectonic feature of the area under study, the Santorini-Amorgos Fault Zone. In contrast, the main Santorini Island caldera is characterized by the almost complete absence of seismicity. This contrast is in very good agreement with recent volcanological and marine studies, with the Coloumbo volcanic center showing an intense high-temperature hydrothermal activity, in comparison to the corresponding low-level activity of the Santorini caldera. The high-resolution hypocentral relocations present a clear view of the volcanic submarine structure at the Coloumbo Reef, showing that the main seismic activity is located within a very narrow vertical column, mainly at depths between 6 and 9 km. The focal mechanisms of the best-located events show that the cluster at the Coloumbo Reef is associated with the "Kameni-Coloumbo Fracture Zone", which corresponds to the

  10. Seismic activity and thermal regime of low temperature fumaroles at Mt. Vesuvius in 2004-2011: distinguishing among seismic, volcanic and hydrological signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Cusano

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Seismological, soil temperature and hydrological data from Mt. Vesuvius are collected to characterize the present-day activity of the volcanic/hydrothermal system and to detect possible unrest-related phenomena. We present patterns of seismicity and soil temperature in the crater area during the period February 2004-December 2011. The temporal distribution of number and depth of Volcano-Tectonic earthquakes and the energy release are considered. Hourly data of soil temperature have been acquired since January 2004 in different locations along the rim and within the crater. The observed changes of temperature are studied to establish a temporal-based correlation with the volcanic activity and/or with external forcing, as variations of the regional and local stress field acting on the volcano or meteorological phenomena. The comparison between seismic activity and temperature data highlights significant variations possibly related to changes in fluid circulation in the hydrothermal system of the volcano. The common continuous observations start just before a very shallow earthquake occurred in August 2005, which was preceded by a thermal anomaly. This coincidence has been interpreted as related to fluid-driven rock fracturing, as observed in other volcanoes. For the successive temporal patterns, the seismicity rate and energy release are characterized by slight variations accompanied by changes in temperature. This evidence of reactivity of the fumarole thermal field to seismic strain can be used to discriminate between tectonic and volcanic signals at Mt. Vesuvius.

  11. Three-dimensional seismic velocity tomography of the upper crust in Tengchong volcanic area, Yunnan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    楼海; 王椿镛; 皇甫岗; 秦嘉政

    2002-01-01

    Based on data collected by deep seismic sounding carried out in 1999, a three-dimensional P wave velocity structure is determined with tomographic inversion. The tomographic result shows that there is a P wave low velocity zone (LVZ) in the upper crust beneath the Tengchong volcanic area. The LVZ is in the depth of 7~8 km and may be a small magma chamber or a partial melting body. The result also shows that the LVZ is in the northeastern side of the Rehai hydrothermal field, which is located in another LVZ near the surface. The shallow LVZ may represent a well-developed fracture zone. The strong hydrothermal activity in Rehai area can attribute to the existence of fractures between two LVZs. These fractures are the channels for going upwards of the deep hot fluid.

  12. An FP7 "Space" project: Aphorism "Advanced PRocedures for volcanic and Seismic Monitoring"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Iorio, A., Sr.; Stramondo, S.; Bignami, C.; Corradini, S.; Merucci, L.

    2014-12-01

    APHORISM project proposes the development and testing of two new methods to combine Earth Observation satellite data from different sensors, and ground data. The aim is to demonstrate that this two types of data, appropriately managed and integrated, can provide new improved GMES products useful for seismic and volcanic crisis management. The first method, APE - A Priori information for Earthquake damage mapping, concerns the generation of maps to address the detection and estimate of damage caused by a seism. The use of satellite data to investigate earthquake damages is not an innovative issue. We can find a wide literature and projects concerning such issue, but usually the approach is only based on change detection techniques and classifications algorithms. The novelty of APE relies on the exploitation of a priori information derived by InSAR time series to measure surface movements, shake maps obtained from seismological data, and vulnerability information. This a priori information is then integrated with change detection map to improve accuracy and to limit false alarms. The second method deals with volcanic crisis management. The method, MACE - Multi-platform volcanic Ash Cloud Estimation, concerns the exploitation of GEO (Geosynchronous Earth Orbit) sensor platform, LEO (Low Earth Orbit) satellite sensors and ground measures to improve the ash detection and retrieval and to characterize the volcanic ash clouds. The basic idea of MACE consists of an improvement of volcanic ash retrievals at the space-time scale by using both the LEO and GEO estimations and in-situ data. Indeed the standard ash thermal infrared retrieval is integrated with data coming from a wider spectral range from visible to microwave. The ash detection is also extended in case of cloudy atmosphere or steam plumes. APE and MACE methods have been defined in order to provide products oriented toward the next ESA Sentinels satellite missions.The project is funded under the European Union FP7

  13. Relations among soil radon, environmental parameters, volcanic and seismic events at Mt. Etna (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammanco, S.; Ferrera, E.; Cannata, A.; Montalto, P.; Neri, M.

    2013-12-01

    From November 2009 to April 2011 soil radon activity was continuously monitored using a Barasol probe located on the upper NE flank of Mt. Etna volcano (Italy), close both to the Piano Provenzana fault and to the NE-Rift. Seismic, volcanological and radon data were analysed together with data on environmental parameters, such as air and soil temperature, barometric pressure, snow and rain fall. In order to find possible correlations among the above parameters, and hence to reveal possible anomalous trends in the radon time-series, we used different statistical methods: i) multivariate linear regression; ii) cross-correlation; iii) coherence analysis through wavelet transform. Multivariate regression indicated a modest influence on soil radon from environmental parameters (R2 = 0.31). When using 100-day time windows, the R2 values showed wide variations in time, reaching their maxima (~0.63-0.66) during summer. Cross-correlation analysis over 100-day moving averages showed that, similar to multivariate linear regression analysis, the summer period was characterised by the best correlation between radon data and environmental parameters. Lastly, the wavelet coherence analysis allowed a multi-resolution coherence analysis of the time series acquired. This approach allowed to study the relations among different signals either in the time or in the frequency domain. It confirmed the results of the previous methods, but also allowed to recognize correlations between radon and environmental parameters at different observation scales (e.g., radon activity changed during strong precipitations, but also during anomalous variations of soil temperature uncorrelated with seasonal fluctuations). Using the above analysis, two periods were recognized when radon variations were significantly correlated with marked soil temperature changes and also with local seismic or volcanic activity. This allowed to produce two different physical models of soil gas transport that explain the

  14. Magma replenishment and volcanic unrest inferred from the analysis of VT micro-seismicity and seismic velocity changes at Piton de la Fournaise Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenguier, F.; Rivemale, E.; Clarke, D. S.; Schmid, A.; Got, J.; Battaglia, J.; Taisne, B.; Staudacher, T.; Peltier, A.; Shapiro, N. M.; Tait, S.; Ferrazzini, V.; Di Muro, A.

    2011-12-01

    Piton de la Fournaise volcano (PdF) is among the most active basaltic volcanoes worldwide with more than one eruption per year on average. Also, PdF is densely instrumented with short-period and broad-band seismometers as well as with GPS receivers. Continuous seismic waveforms are available from 1999. Piton de la Fournaise volcano has a moderate inter-eruptive seismic activity with an average of five detected Volcano-Tectonic (VT) earthquakes per day with magnitudes ranging from 0.5 to 3.5. These earthquakes are shallow and located about 2.5 kilometers beneath the edifice surface. Volcanic unrest is captured on average a few weeks before eruptions by measurements of increased VT seismicity rate, inflation of the edifice summit, and decreased seismic velocities from correlations of seismic noise. Eruptions are usually preceded by seismic swarms of VT earthquakes. Recently, almost 50 % of seismic swarms were not followed by eruptions. Within this work, we aim to gather results from different groups of the UnderVolc research project in order to better understand the processes of deep magma transfer, volcanic unrest, and pre-eruptive magma transport initiation. Among our results, we show that the period 1999-2003 was characterized by a long-term increase of VT seismicity rate coupled with a long-term decrease of seismic velocities. These observations could indicate a long-term replenishment of the magma storage area. The relocation of ten years of inter-eruptive micro-seismicity shows a narrow (~300 m long) sub-vertical fault zone thus indicating a conduit rather than an extended magma reservoir as the shallow magma feeder system. Also, we focus on the processes of short-term volcanic unrest and prove that magma intrusions within the edifice leading to eruptions activate specific VT earthquakes that are distinct from magma intrusions that do not lead to eruptions. We thus propose that, among the different pathways of magma transport within the edifice, only one will

  15. Relationship between volcanic ash fallouts and seismic tremor: quantitative assessment of the 2015 eruptive period at Cotopaxi volcano, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Benjamin; Battaglia, Jean; Proaño, Antonio; Hidalgo, Silvana; Vásconez, Francisco; Hernandez, Stephen; Ruiz, Mario

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the relationships between geophysical signals and volcanic products is critical to improving real-time volcanic hazard assessment. Thanks to high-frequency sampling campaigns of ash fallouts (15 campaigns, 461 samples), the 2015 Cotopaxi eruption is an outstanding candidate for quantitatively comparing the amplitude of seismic tremor with the amount of ash emitted. This eruption emitted a total of 1.2E + 9 kg of ash ( 8.6E + 5 m3) during four distinct phases, with masses ranging from 3.5E + 7 to 7.7E + 8 kg of ash. We compare the ash fallout mass and the corresponding cumulative quadratic median amplitude of the seismic tremor and find excellent correlations when the dataset is divided by eruptive phase. We use scaling factors based on the individual correlations to reconstruct the eruptive process and to extract synthetic Eruption Source Parameters (daily mass of ash, mass eruption rate, and column height) from the seismic records. We hypothesize that the change in scaling factor through time, associated with a decrease in seismic amplitudes compared to ash emissions, is the result of a more efficient fragmentation and transport process. These results open the possibility of feeding numerical models with continuous geophysical data, after adequate calibration, in order to better characterize volcanic hazards during explosive eruptions.

  16. Soil radon measurements as potential tracer of seismic and volcanic activity at Etna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Marco; Giammanco, Salvatore; Galli, Gianfranco; Ferrera, Elisabetta

    2014-05-01

    obtained by the radon probe installed along the NE flank of Etna (~1800 m asl), nearby a seismogenic fault that is the westernmost segment of the Pernicana fault system. The probe is located also close to the North-East Rift, an important volcano-tectonic structure of Etna which is site of frequent lateral volcanic eruptions. The collected data (radon, temperature and atmospheric pressure) were statistically analyzed and compared with the main meteorological parameters. In two periods (28/Feb/2010-06/May/2010 and 01/Jan/2011- 18/Feb/2011) we observed major anomalies in the signal of radon. An earthquake swarm has affected the western portion of the Pernicana fault system on 2-3 April 2010. Moreover, the period under investigation was characterized by tree eruptive paroxysms occurred on 11-12 January, 18 February and 10 April 2011, respectively. The maximum release of seismic energy falls almost halfway through the first radon anomaly (28/Feb/2010-06/Maj/2010), after about 33 days from its inception. Regarding the second radon anomaly (01/Jan/2011-18/Feb/2011), two of the three paroxysmal eruptions (11-12 January and 18 February 2011) fall within that timeframe. In this case the radon anomaly begins ~10 days before the 11-12 January paroxysm. The results show the possibility of using the anomalous variations of radon as potential tracers of seismic and volcanic activity.

  17. The impact of persistent volcanic degassing on vegetation: A case study at Turrialba volcano, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortini, R.; van Manen, S. M.; Parkes, B. R. B.; Carn, S. A.

    2017-07-01

    Although the impacts of large volcanic eruptions on the global environment have been frequently studied, the impacts of lower tropospheric emissions from persistently degassing volcanoes remain poorly understood. Gas emissions from persistent degassing exceed those from sporadic eruptive activity, and can have significant long-term (years to decades) effects on local and regional scales, both on humans and the environment. Here, we exploit a variety of high temporal and high spatial resolution satellite-based time series and complementary ground-based measurements of element deposition and surveys of species richness, to enable a comprehensive spatio-temporal assessment of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions and their associated impacts on vegetation at Turrialba volcano (Costa Rica) from 2000 to 2013. We observe increased emissions of SO2 coincident with a decline in vegetation health downwind of the vents, in accordance with the prevalent wind direction at Turrialba. We also find that satellite-derived vegetation indices at various spatial resolutions are able to accurately define the vegetation kill zone, the extent of which is independently confirmed by ground-based sampling, and monitor its expansion over time. In addition, ecological impacts in terms of vegetation composition and diversity and physiological damage to vegetation, all spatially correspond to fumigation by Turrialba's plume. This study shows that analyzing and relating satellite observations to conditions and impacts on the ground can provide an increased understanding of volcanic degassing, its impacts in terms of the long-term vegetation response and the potential of satellite-based monitoring to inform hazard management strategies related to land use.

  18. Seismic properties of volcanic rocks from Montagne Pelée (Martinique, Lesser Antilles) and their relations to transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, M.-L.; Zamora, M.

    2012-04-01

    Numerous laboratory and theoretical studies on the physical properties of rocks and their relationships - lead mainly in the framework of petroleum exploration - show that rock physics is necessary for an accurate quantitative interpretation of geophysical observations. Moreover joint inversion of different geophysical datasets is emerging as an important tool to enhance resolution and decrease inversion artifacts in imaging of structurally complex areas such as volcanoes. In many cases, the coupling between the inverted parameters is based on empirical or theoretical relationships derived from laboratory data. Consequently rock physics can be used to: interpret simultaneously several geophysical datasets on volcanoes when they are available, improve the imaging of volcano structures, and better understand the coupled processes that can occur during volcanic unrest. It's in this context that we lead a laboratory study on the transport properties (permeability, thermal and electrical conductivities) and seismic properties (velocity and attenuation of P and S waves) of volcanic rocks representative of Montagne Pelée (Martinique) deposits. In this presentation we will focus on (1) the seismic properties and (2) the relations between seismic and transport properties. The 43 samples collected are representative of the main lithological units of this volcano: vesicular lava blocks and indurated ashed from indurated block-and-ash flows also called breccias, vesicular lava blocks from "Pelean nuee ardente" flows, scoriae from scoria flows, pumices from ash-and-pumices flows, and dense lava blocks from lava flows and lava domes. Their total porosity varies over a wide range from 4 to 73%. Since the samples present similar chemical and mineralogical compositions (andesites), the main difference between the samples comes from their pore structure and reflects differences in the mechanisms of magma degassing and vesiculation during their formation (Bernard et al., 2007). This

  19. Studies of crustal structure, seismic precursors to volcanic eruptions and earthquake hazard in the eastern provinces of the Democratic Republic of Congo

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mavonga, T

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, civil wars in the eastern provinces of the Democratic Republic of Congo have caused massive social disruptions, which have been exacerbated by volcanic and earthquake disasters. Seismic data were gathered and analysed as part...

  20. Progressive Landslides in Uplifted Volcanic Plateaus: Persistent Loci of Channel Perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, E. B.; Anderson, S. W.; Mills-Novoa, M.; Othus, S.; Ely, L.; House, P. K.; O'Connor, J. E.; Grant, G.; Fenton, C.; Beebee, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    The semi-arid uplifted volcanic plateaus of the southern interior Columbia River basin contain over 300 large landslides or landslide complexes, ranging in area from several tenths of a km2 to several tens of km2. The distribution of these landslides is dominated by the outcropping of key stratigraphic contacts between coherent, volcanic cap rock atop weak sedimentary or volcaniclastic units in areas of >100 m local relief. The morphologies of many of these landslide complexes suggest a progressive mode of mass movement, with rubble-capped failure slices arrayed downslope at intervals of 10s to 100s of meters and deep tension cracks separating incipient failure blocks from the intact headscarp. Field evidence from the Owyhee River in southeastern Oregon indicates that individual landslide complexes can persist for millions of years. In one reach, for example, remnants of a 1.9 million year old intracanyon lava flow are inset against ancient landslide blocks. In the same location, cosmogenic isotope dating of boulders on a likely dam-burst flood deposit reveal a channel-blocking mass movement that may be as young as Holocene in age. The persistence of these landslide complexes has important implications for channel evolution, as it suggests that, in some environments, sediment supply may be chronically elevated at point sources. On the basis of GIS-based mapping of regional landslides and on field study of individual landslide complexes, we hypothesize that: 1) this sediment supply becomes increasingly dominated by fine-grained material as channels progressively incise into the weak units underlying coherent lava caps; and 2) the mass movements that impinge on the channels become correspondingly more earthflow-like. Loci of persistent landsliding are also subject to episodic variations in channel width due to physical constrictions caused by impinging failure masses. The discrete localization of large landslide complexes by particular stratigraphic and topographic

  1. Reduction of randomness in seismic noise as a short-term precursor to a volcanic eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, C. C.; Konstantinou, K. I.

    2016-11-01

    Ambient seismic noise is characterized by randomness incurred by the random position and strength of the noise sources as well as the heterogeneous properties of the medium through which it propagates. Here we use ambient noise data recorded prior to the 1996 Gjálp eruption in Iceland in order to show that a reduction of noise randomness can be a clear short-term precursor to volcanic activity. The eruption was preceded on 29 September 1996 by a Mw ~5.6 earthquake that occurred in the caldera rim of the Bárdarbunga volcano. A significant reduction of randomness started occurring 8 days before the earthquake and 10 days before the onset of the eruption. This reduction was observed even at stations more than 100 km away from the eruption site. Randomness increased to its previous levels 160 minutes after the Bárdarbunga earthquake, during which time aftershocks migrated from the Bárdarbunga caldera to a site near the Gjálp eruption fissure. We attribute this precursory reduction of randomness to the lack of higher frequencies (>1 Hz) in the noise wavefield caused by high absorption losses as hot magma ascended in the upper crust.

  2. Induced seismicity in EGS reservoir : analysis of persistent multiplets at Soultz-sous-Forêts, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchie, Léna; Lengliné, Olivier; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2017-04-01

    Abundant seismicity is generally observed during the exploitation of geothermal reservoirs, especially during phases of hydraulic stimulations. At the Enhanced Geothermal System of Soultz-Sous-Forêts in France, the induced seismicity has been thoroughly studied over the years of exploitation and the mechanism at its origin has been related to both fluid pressure increase during stimulation and aseismic creeping movements. The fluid-induced seismic events often exhibit a high degree of similarity and the mechanism at the origin of these repeated events is thought to be associated with slow slip process where asperities on the rupture zone act several times. In order to improve our knowledge on the mechanisms associated with such events and on the damaged zones involved during the hydraulic stimulations, we investigate the behaviour of the multiplets and their persistent nature, if it prevails, over several water injection intervals. For this purpose, we analysed large datasets recorded from a downhole seismic network for several water injection periods (1993, 2000, …). For each stimulation interval, thousands of events are recorded at depth. We detected the events using the continuous kurtosis-based migration method and classified them into families of comparable waveforms using an approach based on cross-correlation analysis. We obtain precise relative locations of the multiplets using differential arrival times obtained through cross-correlation of similar waveforms. Finally, the properties of the similar fluid-induced seismic events are derived (magnitude, spectral content) and examined over the several hydraulic tests. Hopefully these steps will lead to a better understanding of the repetitive nature of these events and the investigation of their persistence will outline the heterogeneities of the structures (temperatures anomalies, regional stress perturbations, fluid flow channelling) regularly involved during the different stimulations.

  3. Planning the improvement of a seismic network for monitoring active volcanic areas: the experience on Mt. Etna

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, A.; Scarfì, L.; Scaltrito, A.; Di Prima, S.; Rapisarda, S.

    2013-10-01

    Seismology and geodesy are generally seen as the most reliable diagnostic tools for monitoring highly active or erupting volcanoes, like Mt. Etna. From the early 1980's, seismic activity was monitored at Mt. Etna by a permanent seismic network, progressively improved in the following years. This network has been considerably enhanced since 2005 by 24-bit digital stations equipped with broad-band (40 s) sensors. Today, thanks to a configuration of 33 broad-band and 12 short-period stations, we have a good coverage of the volcanic area as well as a high quality of the collected data. In the framework of the VULCAMED project a workgroup of Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia has taken on the task of developing the seismic monitoring system, through the installation of other seismic stations. The choice of optimal sites must be clearly made through a careful analysis of the geometry of the existing seismic network. In this paper, we applied the Seismic Network Evaluation through Simulation in order to evaluate the performance of the Etna Seismic Network before and after the addition of the stations in the candidate sites. The main advantage of the adopted method is that we can evaluate the improvement of the network before the actual installation of the stations. Our analysis has permitted to identify some critical issues of the current permanent seismic network related to the lack of stations in the southern sector of the volcano, which is nevertheless affected by a number of seismogenic structures. We have showed that the addition of stations at the candidate sites would greatly extend the coverage of the network to the south by significantly reducing the errors in the hypocenter parameters estimation.

  4. Seismicity, focal mechanisms, and stress distribution in the Tres Virgenes volcanic and geothermal region, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Victor; Munguia, Luis [Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada (Mexico)

    2006-01-15

    In October 1993 we carried out a seismic monitoring in the Tres Virgenes volcanic region in order to record the background seismicity associated with the volcanic structures, the geothermal field and the tectonic features of the area. Hypocenters for 257 microearthquakes were located in the volcanic edifices and along the northwest right-lateral, strike-slip La Virgen fault. Focal depths range from close to the Earth surface to about 8 km. Shallow depths occur mainly in the volcanic edifices. Deeper seismic events occurred outside the volcanic area. The duration magnitudes of the located microearthquakes range between 1 and 3. The Vp/Vs ratio and the low-Q values estimated suggest heterogeneous material properties in the volcanic structures mainly toward the El Azufre fault and the El Aguajito Caldera, where hydrothermal activity has been reported. The P- and T-axes of focal mechanisms for 90 microearthquakes suggest that the region is under N-S compression and E-W extension, in agreement with the regional tectonic stress field of the NW-SE right-lateral strike-slip transform fault system of the Gulf of California. [Spanish] En octubre de 1993 se llevo a cabo un monitoreo sismico en la region volcanica Las Tres Virgenes con el proposito de registrar la actividad sismica asociada a las estructuras volcanicas, al campo geotermico y a la tectonica local. Se localizaron 257 microsismos con hipocentros en los edificios volcanicos y a lo largo de la falla de rumbo, lateral derecha conocida como falla La Virgen. La profundidad focal de los sismos varia desde los muy cercanos a la superficie de la Tierra hasta los 8 km. Las profundidades someras ocurren principalmente en los edificios volcanicos. Los sismos mas profundos ocurren fuera del area volcanica. La magnitud de duracion de los microsismos localizados varia entre 1 y 3. La razon Vp/Vs y los valores bajos de Q que se estimaron en la zona sugieren un material con propiedades heterogeneas bajo las estructuras

  5. Source Dynamics of Long-Period Seismicity in Volcanic and Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouet, B. A.

    2006-12-01

    Long-period (LP) seismicity, including individual LP events and tremor, is widely observed in relation to magmatic and hydrothermal activities in volcanic areas and is recognized as a precursory phenomenon for eruptive activity. The waveform of the LP event is characterized by simple decaying harmonic oscillations except for a brief interval at the event onset. This characteristic event signature is commonly interpreted as oscillations of a fluid-filled resonator in response to a time-localized excitation. By the same token, tremor may be viewed as oscillations of the same resonator in response to a sustained excitation. Because the properties of the resonator system at the source of the LP event can be inferred from the complex frequencies of the decaying harmonic oscillations in the tail of the seismogram, these events are particularly important in the quantification of volcanic and hydrothermal processes. The damped oscillations in the LP coda are characterized by two parameters, T and Q, where T is the period of the dominant mode of oscillation, and Q is the quality factor of the oscillatory system representing the combined effects of radiation and intrinsic losses. Typical periods observed for LP events are in the range 0.2 - 2 s, while observed Q range from values near 1 to values larger than 100. Waveform inversions of LP signals carried out so far point to a crack geometry at the source of these events. Detailed investigations of the oscillating characteristics of LP sources based on the fluid-filled crack model suggest source dimensions ranging from tens to several hundred meters. Such studies further indicate that dusty gases and bubbly basalt are the most common types of fluids involved at the source of LP events in magmatic systems, while misty gases, steam and bubbly water commonly represent LP events of hydrothermal origin. Observations carried out in different volcanic settings point to a wide variety of LP excitation mechanisms. At Stromboli

  6. Evidence for sub-lacustrine volcanic activity in Lake Bolsena (central Italy) revealed by high resolution seismic data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhorst, Katja; Krastel, Sebastian; Wagner, Bernd; Schuerer, Anke

    2017-06-01

    The Bolsena caldera that formed between 0.6 and 0.2 Ma has a well preserved structural rim, which makes it an ideal site to study the tectonic and volcanic evolution of calderas. However, the main area is covered by a 150 m deep lake which makes it rather difficult to investigate the subsurface structure directly. To overcome this problem new high resolution hydro-acoustic surveys using a multichannel reflection seismic system and a sediment echo-sounder system were conducted in September 2012. As space was limited we used a rowing boat towed by a rubber boat to handle a 36 m long and 24 channel streamer to receive seismic reflections produced using a Mini GI-Gun (0.25 l). The subsurface structure of Lake Bolsena was imaged up to a sediment depth of 190 m, which is estimated to have filled over a period of 333 kyrs. However, massive pyroclastic flow deposits found in the deeper parts of the basin indicate an initial infill of volcanic deposits from two adjacent younger calderas, the Latera (W) and Montefiascone (SE) calderas. Our data suggest that the caldera has a long history of active volcanism, because the lacustrine sediments show post-sedimentary influences of geothermal fluids. We mapped several mound structures at various stratigraphic depths. Two volcanic structures outcrop at the modern lake surface implying recent activity. One of these structures is hardly covered by sediments and has a crater-like feature in its summit. The other structure shows a pockmark-like depression on top. Another observable feature is a partially sediment filled crater located in the western part of the lake which further implies the existence of a magma chamber located beneath the Bolsena caldera. Since the late Pleistocene and Holocene, the sedimentation was mainly hemipelagic evidenced by a sediment drape of up to 10 m thick sediment drape on the uppermost sediments. Beneath the drape we found evidence for a distal tephra layer likely related to an explosive eruption from

  7. Volcano seismicity and ground deformation unveil the gravity-driven magma discharge dynamics of a volcanic eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripepe, Maurizio; Donne, Dario Delle; Genco, Riccardo; Maggio, Giuseppe; Pistolesi, Marco; Marchetti, Emanuele; Lacanna, Giorgio; Ulivieri, Giacomo; Poggi, Pasquale

    2015-05-18

    Effusive eruptions are explained as the mechanism by which volcanoes restore the equilibrium perturbed by magma rising in a chamber deep in the crust. Seismic, ground deformation and topographic measurements are compared with effusion rate during the 2007 Stromboli eruption, drawing an eruptive scenario that shifts our attention from the interior of the crust to the surface. The eruption is modelled as a gravity-driven drainage of magma stored in the volcanic edifice with a minor contribution of magma supplied at a steady rate from a deep reservoir. Here we show that the discharge rate can be predicted by the contraction of the volcano edifice and that the very-long-period seismicity migrates downwards, tracking the residual volume of magma in the shallow reservoir. Gravity-driven magma discharge dynamics explain the initially high discharge rates observed during eruptive crises and greatly influence our ability to predict the evolution of effusive eruptions.

  8. Influence of seismic processes and volcanic activity on the formation of disastrous floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, Dmitriy

    2014-05-01

    models of hydraulic systems, but ultimately due to difference of pressures in their respective segments and areas of the transport network. At the exit of the groundwater on the surface such change in pressure is connected both with the state of the actual water flow in underground cavities, or violations of the structure (topology) of 3D-network. As one of the major and sudden reasons of change of pressure in the underground system can serve seismic processes, including volcanic eruptions (as magmatic and ash). During these processes enormous underground space can be freed from the dense rock. This leads to rapid changes in pressure and that, in principle, a new topology of 3D network and water flows in it. It is important that such dynamic processes occur over huge distances in underground basins of thousands of kilometers [3], of course, with a certain time delay. In the result of the analysis of large-scale flooding in Russia in 2001-2002, as well as the catastrophic floods in Western Europe, in the Amur region of Russia and in the state of Colorado USA in 2013, a correlation between seismic and volcanic activities and floods, expressed by specific numerical correlation coefficients, has been revealed. For example, knowing the date, location and magnitude of an earthquake, we can identify potentially dangerous territories in the aspect of the probability of occurrence of floods, because the stresses in the crust, spreading from the hypocenter of earthquakes, and their subsequent relaxation are one of the most important factors of floods. Mechanisms of distribution of these stresses are well-studied today [2] unlike their influence on the groundwater. The defined boundaries of potentially dangerous sites are broad enough; with regard to the direction of distribution of stress, it is about the sectors in 40 degrees (from the line of the movement of the crustal plate) in the direction from the boundaries of lithospheric plates. Distribution of this impact occurs, as a

  9. Micro-seismic Signals Recorded During Fast Depressurization of Natural Volcanic Samples in a Shock Tube Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Alatorre-Ibargüengoitia, M.; Dingwell, D. B.; Scheu, B.; Delgado Granados, H.; Navarrete Montesinos, M.; Richard, D.; Kueppers, U.; Lavallée, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions generate different types of seismic signals in a wide frequency bandwidth. Volcano seismology studies have dealt with analyzing seismic signals characteristics and waveform patterns in order to discriminate between source, path and site effects and reconstruct the volcanic source dynamics. The source may involve brittle failure, magma transport, magma fragmentation, bubble collapse, fluid depressurization, fluid instabilities, degassing or a combination of these processes. Given the complexity of the volcanic source dynamics and the impossibility to undertake direct observations of the source, laboratory experiments provide a promising approach to investigate the source process. In this study we present preliminary results of an experimental approach in a shock tube apparatus. The apparatus consists of two serial steel pipes separated by a diaphragm: the autoclave which represents the "source mechanism", where the samples are pressurized and fragmented, and a tank which represents a conduit. The physical mechanism consists of the slow pressurization (using Argon gas) followed by rapid depressurization of natural samples of ash (> 0.5 mm), pumice (with average porosity of 63%,) and fragmented particles of pumice. Several experiments were designed under controlled pressure conditions (ranging from 4 to 20 MPa), at room temperature. Micro-seismic signals were detected during the depressurization process using high dynamic piezo film sensors (PDF, 0.001 - 10 G Hz analog bandwidth, low impedance), fixed and distributed along the tube system. In addition, two laser beams (wavelength 532 nm) measure the speed of the ejected materials; all sensors were correlated and synchronized with two dynamic pressure sensors located at the autoclave. The resonance of the empty tube apparatus was characterized in order to distinguish between natural resonance of the tank due to the pressure shock wave and the signals generated by depressurization of the system and

  10. Evidence of non-extensivity in the seismicity observed during the 2011–2012 unrest at the Santorini volcanic complex, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Papadakis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During the period of October 2011–January 2012, an increase of earthquake activity has been observed in the volcanic complex of Santorini Island, Greece. Herein, the magnitude distribution of earthquakes as well as the temporal distribution of seismicity are studied. The statistics of both parameters exhibit complexity that is evident in the frequency-magnitude distribution and the inter-event time distribution, respectively. Because of this, we have used the analysis framework of non-extensive statistical physics (NESP, which seems suitable for studying complex systems. The observed inter-event time distribution for the swarm-like earthquake events, as well as the energy and the inter-event earthquake energy distributions for the observed seismicity can be successfully described with NESP, indicating the inherent complexity of the Santorini volcanic seismicity along with the applicability of the NESP concept to volcanic earthquake activity, where complex correlations exist.

  11. In situ and space-based observations of the Kelud volcanic plume: The persistence of ash in the lower stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernier, Jean-Paul; Fairlie, T. Duncan; Deshler, Terry; Natarajan, Murali; Knepp, Travis; Foster, Katie; Wienhold, Frank G.; Bedka, Kristopher M.; Thomason, Larry; Trepte, Charles

    2016-09-01

    Volcanic eruptions are important causes of natural variability in the climate system at all time scales. Assessments of the climate impact of volcanic eruptions by climate models almost universally assume that sulfate aerosol is the only radiatively active volcanic material. We report satellite observations from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite after the eruption of Mount Kelud (Indonesia) on 13 February 2014 of volcanic materials in the lower stratosphere. Using these observations along with in situ measurements with the Compact Optical Backscatter AerosoL Detector (COBALD) backscatter sondes and optical particle counters (OPCs) made during a balloon field campaign in northern Australia, we find that fine ash particles with a radius below 0.3 µm likely represented between 20 and 28% of the total volcanic cloud aerosol optical depth 3 months after the eruption. A separation of 1.5-2 km between the ash and sulfate plumes is observed in the CALIOP extinction profiles as well as in the aerosol number concentration measurements of the OPC after 3 months. The settling velocity of fine ash with a radius of 0.3 µm in the tropical lower stratosphere is reduced by 50% due to the upward motion of the Brewer-Dobson circulation resulting a doubling of its lifetime. Three months after the eruption, we find a mean tropical clear-sky radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere from the Kelud plume near -0.08 W/m2 after including the presence of ash; a value 20% higher than if sulfate alone is considered. Thus, surface cooling following volcanic eruptions could be affected by the persistence of ash and should be considered in climate simulations.

  12. Characterization of the Hydrothermal System of the Tinguiririca Volcanic Complex, Central Chile, using Structural Geology and Passive Seismic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavez Orrego, Claudia; Tapia, Felipe; Comte, Diana; Gutierrez, Francisco; Lira, Elías; Charrier, Reynaldo; Benavente, Oscar

    2016-04-01

    A structural characterization of the hydrothermal-volcanic field associated with the Tinguiririca Volcanic Complex had been performed by combining passive seismic tomography and structural geology. This complex corresponds to a 20 km long succession of N25°E oriented of eruptive centers, currently showing several thermal manifestations distributed throughout the area. The structural behavior of this zone is controlled by the El Fierro - El Diablo fault system, corresponding to a high angle reverse faults of Oligocene - Miocene age. In this area, a temporary seismic network with 16 short-period stations was setup from January to April of 2010, in the context of the MSc thesis of Lira- Energía Andina (2010), covering an area of 200 km2 that corresponds with the hydrothermal field of Tinguiririca Volcanic Complex (TVC), Central Chile, Southern Central Andes. Using P- and S- wave arrival times, a 3D seismic velocity tomography was performed. High Vp/Vs ratios are interpreted as zones with high hot fluid content and high fracturing. Meanwhile, low Vp/Vs anomalies could represent the magmatic reservoir and the conduit network associated to the fluid mobility. Based on structural information and thermal manifestations, these anomalies have been interpreted. In order to visualize the relation between local geology and the velocity model, the volume associated with the magma reservoir and the fluid circulation network has been delimited using an iso-value contour of Vp/Vs equal to 1.70. The most prominent observed feature in the obtained model is a large "V" shaped low - velocity anomaly extending along the entire study region and having the same vergency and orientation as the existing high-angle inverse faults, which corroborates that El Fierro - El Diablo fault system represents the local control for fluid mobility. This geometry coincides with surface hydrothermal manifestations and with available geochemical information of the area, which allowed us to generate a

  13. A conceptual model of geological risk in the Ischia Island (Italy): highlights on volcanic history, seismicity and flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlino, Stefano; Cubellis, Elena; Iannuzzi, Raffaello; Luongo, Giuseppe

    2010-05-01

    During the last eight centuries the island of Ischia was hit by earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and floods producing heavy damages and numerous fatalities. Since the last twenty century the Ischia population is grown very fast, nowadays more than 56.000 people live in the island and 4 million of people visit it during the year, thus this area is characterised as an high geological risk territory. The island is here presented as an interesting "laboratory" for volcanic, seismic and hydrogeological risks assessment, from which to draw lessons for planning in risk areas. Ischia is a volcanic field, formed by the succession of effusive and explosive eruptions which formed lavas, welded and loose pyroclastic rocks. The succession of rock layers, with different permeability, promotes, during heavy rainfall, the formation of flows with high kinetic energy, which can produce devastating landslides. In this context, the remarkable development of settlements in the island, occurred in recent times, and the lack of planning that bring attention to the vulnerability of the area, have produced an exponential risk increase. Eruptions, earthquakes, flooding occurred in the island of Ischia in the past, have produced a wealth literature about catastrophic natural events. In general, the accounts of the events were recorded by various means, such as: newspaper, property disputes, historical and sociological analysis, poetic or artistic works, scientific analysis. As regard volcanism, earthquakes, tsunamis, there are myths, legends, historical documents, archaeological findings and results of recent surveys. Documented descriptions of historical eruptive events are only available for the last eruption of 1301-1302, while there are records for eruptive events in the early centuries of the Christian Age. More comprehensive accounts are available about historical seismicity. Information and documentations are available since the 1228 earthquake. However, more detailed and useful

  14. Persistent scatter radar interferometry for crustal deformation studies and modeling of volcanic deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Andrew John

    While conventional interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is a very effective technique for measuring crustal deformation, almost any interferogram includes large areas where the signals decorrelate and no measurement is possible. Consequently, most InSAR studies to date have focused on areas that are dry and sparsely vegetated. A relatively new analysis technique, permanent scatterer InSAR, overcomes the decorrelation problem by identifying resolution elements whose echo is dominated by a single scatterer in a series of interferograms. This technique has been useful for analysis of urban areas, where angular structures produce efficient reflectors that dominate background scattering. However, man-made structures are absent from most of the Earth's surface. Furthermore, this technique requires, a priori, an approximate temporal model for the deformation, whereas characterizing the temporal pattern of deformation is commonly one of the aims of any study. We have developed a new method of analysis, StaMPS, using spatial correlation of interferogram phase to find a network of stable pixels in all terrains, with or without buildings. Prior knowledge of temporal variations in the deformation rate is not required. We refer to these pixels as persistent scatterers (PS). A key component of our method is the development of two algorithms to unwrap a three-dimensional series of interferograms. We observe temporally-variable deformation, using an initial version of StaMPS, in data acquired over Long Valley caldera in California, for a period when deformation rates varied significantly. The inferred displacements of the PS compare well with ground truth. Using an enhanced version of StaMPS, we detect a period of steady deflation within the Volcan Alcedo caldera in the Galapagos Islands between 1997 and 2001, which we model with a contracting ellipsoidal magma body. Conventional InSAR has been limited here until now by high rates of temporal decorrelation over much of

  15. Submarine seismic monitoring of El Hierro volcanic eruption with a 3C-geophone string: applying new acquisition and data processing techniques to volcano monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Maria Jose; Ripepe, Maurizio; Lopez, Carmen; Blanco, Maria Jose; Crespo, Jose

    2015-04-01

    A submarine volcanic eruption took place near the southernmost emerged land of the El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain), from October 2011 to February 2012. The Instituto Geografico Nacional (IGN) seismic stations network evidenced seismic unrest since July 2011 and was a reference also to follow the evolution of the seismic activity associated with the volcanic eruption. Right after the eruption onset, in October 2011 a geophone string was deployed by the CSIC-IGN to monitor seismic activity. Monitoring with the seismic array continued till May 2012. The array was installed less than 2 km away from the new vol¬cano, next to La Restinga village shore in the harbor from 6 to 12m deep into the water. Our purpose was to record seismic activity related to the volcanic activity, continuously and with special interest on high frequency events. The seismic array was endowed with 8, high frequency, 3 component, 250 Hz, geophone cable string with a separation of 6 m between them. Each geophone consists on a 3-component module based on 3 orthogonal independent sensors that measures ground velocity. Some of the geophones were placed directly on the seabed, some were buried. Due to different factors, as the irregular characteristics of the seafloor. The data was recorded on the surface with a seismometer and stored on a laptop computer. We show how acoustic data collected underwater show a great correlation with the seismic data recorded on land. Finally we compare our data analysis results with the observed sea surface activity (ash and lava emission and degassing). This evidence is disclosing new and innovative tecniques on monitoring submarine volcanic activity. Reference Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN), "Serie El Hierro." Internet: http://www.ign.es/ign/resources /volcanologia/HIERRO.html [May, 17. 2013

  16. Deep seismic sounding investigation into the deep structure of the magma system in Changbaishan-Tianchi volcanic region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张先康; 张成科; 赵金仁; 杨卓欣; 李松林; 张建狮; 刘宝峰; 成双喜; 孙国伟; 潘素珍

    2002-01-01

    The magma system of Changbaishan-Tianchi Volcanic region is studied with three-dimensional deep seismic sounding (DSS) technique. The results show that the magma system of Changbaishan-Tianchi volcanic region, mainly characterized by low velocity of P wave, can be divided into three parts in terms of depth. At the depth range of 9(15 km, the distribution of the magma system is characterized by extensiveness, large scale and near-SN orientation. This layer is the major place for magma storage. From the depth of 15 km down to the lower crust, it is characterized by small lateral scale, which indicates the (trace( of magma intrusion from the upper mantle into the crust and also implies that the magma system most probably extends to the upper mantle, or even deeper.(less than 8(9 km deep), the range of magma distribution is even smaller, centering on an SN-oriented area just north of the Tianchi crater. If low velocity of P wave is related to the magma system, it then reflects that the magma here is still in a state of relatively high temperature. In this sense, the magma system of Changbaishan-Tianchi volcanic region is at least not (remains(, in other words, it is in an (active( state.

  17. Neotectonics of Graciosa island (Azores: a contribution to seismic hazard assessment of a volcanic area in a complex geodynamic setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Hipólito

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Graciosa is a mid-Pleistocene to Holocene volcanic island that lies in a complex plate boundary between the North American, Eurasian, and Nubian plates. Large fault scarps displace the oldest (Middle Pleistocene volcanic units, but in the younger areas recent volcanism (Holocene to Upper Pleistocene conceals the surface expression of faulting, limiting neotectonic observations. The large displacement accumulated by the older volcanic units when compared with the younger formations suggests a variability of deformation rates and the possibility of alternating periods of higher and lower tectonic deformation rates; this would increase the recurrence interval of surface rupturing earthquakes. Nevertheless, in historical times a few destructive earthquakes affected the island attesting for its seismic hazard. Regarding the structural data, two main fault systems, incompatible with a single stress field, were identified at Graciosa Island. Thus, it is proposed that the region is affected by two alternating stress fields. The stress field #1 corresponds to the regional stress regime proposed by several authors for the interplate shear zone that constitutes the Azorean segment of the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary. It is suggested that the stress field #2 will act when the area under the influence of the regional stress field #1 narrows as a result of variations in the differential spreading rates north and south of Azores. The islands closer to the edge of the sheared region will temporarily come under the influence of a different (external stress field (stress field #2. Such data support the concept that, in the Azores, the Eurasia-Nubia boundary corresponds to a complex and wide deformation zone, variable in time.

  18. Buried volcanic structures in the Gulf of Naples (Southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy resulting from high resolution magnetic survey and seismic profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ruggieri

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a correlation between volcanic structures and magnetic anomalies in the Gulf of Naples (Southern Tyrrhenian Sea based on high resolution magnetic profiling. A densely spaced grid of magnetic profiles coupled with multichannel seismics (seismic source Watergun 15 cubic inch was recorded in the Gulf of Naples, representing an active volcanic area during the Late Quaternary (volcanic centers of Somma-Vesuvius, Phlegraean Fields and Ischia and Procida islands. The dataset was collected during the oceanographic cruise GMS00-05 which took place during October-November 2000 in the South Tyrrhenian Sea onboard of the R/V Urania (National Research Council, Italy. Shallow volcanic structures in the subsurface of the gulf were recognized by seismo-stratigraphic analysis of high resolution profiles; the volcanic nature of some of these structures was inferred identifying the magnetic anomalies on a high resolution magnetic anomaly map of the gulf. Even if qualitative, the correlations between seismic and magnetic profiles allow us to better assess the geological structure of the Gulf of Naples.

  19. Global positioning system survey data for active seismic and volcanic areas of eastern Sicily, 1994 to 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonforte, Alessandro; Fagone, Sonia; Giardina, Carmelo; Genovese, Simone; Aiesi, Gianpiero; Calvagna, Francesco; Cantarero, Massimo; Consoli, Orazio; Consoli, Salvatore; Guglielmino, Francesco; Puglisi, Biagio; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Saraceno, Benedetto

    2016-08-01

    This work presents and describes a 20-year long database of GPS data collected by geodetic surveys over the seismically and volcanically active eastern Sicily, for a total of more than 6300 measurements. Raw data were initially collected from the various archives at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione di Catania—Osservatorio Etneo and organized in a single repository. Here, quality and completeness checks were performed, while all necessary supplementary information were searched, collected, validated and organized together with the relevant data. Once all data and information collections were completed, raw binary data were converted into the universal ASCII RINEX format; all data are provided in this format with the necessary information for precise processing. In order to make the data archive readily consultable, we developed software allowing the user to easily search and obtain the needed data by simple alphanumeric and geographic queries.

  20. Global positioning system survey data for active seismic and volcanic areas of eastern Sicily, 1994 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonforte, Alessandro; Fagone, Sonia; Giardina, Carmelo; Genovese, Simone; Aiesi, Gianpiero; Calvagna, Francesco; Cantarero, Massimo; Consoli, Orazio; Consoli, Salvatore; Guglielmino, Francesco; Puglisi, Biagio; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Saraceno, Benedetto

    2016-08-01

    This work presents and describes a 20-year long database of GPS data collected by geodetic surveys over the seismically and volcanically active eastern Sicily, for a total of more than 6300 measurements. Raw data were initially collected from the various archives at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione di Catania-Osservatorio Etneo and organized in a single repository. Here, quality and completeness checks were performed, while all necessary supplementary information were searched, collected, validated and organized together with the relevant data. Once all data and information collections were completed, raw binary data were converted into the universal ASCII RINEX format; all data are provided in this format with the necessary information for precise processing. In order to make the data archive readily consultable, we developed software allowing the user to easily search and obtain the needed data by simple alphanumeric and geographic queries.

  1. Improved techniques in data analysis and interpretation of potential fields: examples of application in volcanic and seismically active areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Florio

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Geopotential data may be interpreted by many different techniques, depending on the nature of the mathematical equations correlating specific unknown ground parameters to the measured data set. The investigation based on the study of the gravity and magnetic anomaly fields represents one of the most important geophysical approaches in the earth sciences. It has now evolved aimed both at improving of known methods and testing other new and reliable techniques. This paper outlines a general framework for several applications of recent techniques in the study of the potential methods for the earth sciences. Most of them are here described and significant case histories are shown to illustrate their reliability on active seismic and volcanic areas.

  2. Exploring a long-lasting volcanic eruption by means of in-soil radon measurements and seismic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsaperla, Susanna; Neri, Marco; Di Grazia, Giuseppe; Langer, Horst; Spampinato, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    We analyze in-soil radon (Rn) emission and ambient parameters (barometric pressure and air temperature measurements) along with seismic activity during the longest flank eruption of this century at Mt. Etna, Italy. This eruption occurred between 14 May 2008 and 6 July 2009, from a N120-140°E eruptive fissure extending between 3050 and 2620 m above sea level. It was heralded by a short-lived (~5 hours) episode of lava fountaining three days before a dike-forming intrusion fed a lava emission, which affected the summit area of the volcano over ~15 months. The peculiar position of the station for the Rn measurement, which was at an altitude of 2950 m above sea level and near (~1 km) the summit active craters, offered us the uncommon chance: i) to explore the temporal development of the gas emission close (relationship between in-soil Rn fluxes and seismic signals (in particular, local earthquakes and volcanic tremor) during the uninterrupted lava emission. This approach reveals important details about the recharging phases characterizing the 2008-2009 eruption, which are not visible with other methods of investigation. Our study benefitted from the application of methods of pattern classification developed in the framework of the European MEDiterrranean Supersite Volcanoes (MED­SUV) project.

  3. Preliminary Seismic Velocity Structure Results from Ambient Noise and Teleseismic Tomography: Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wespestad, C.; Thurber, C. H.; Zeng, X.; Bennington, N. L.; Cardona, C.; Singer, B. S.

    2016-12-01

    Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field is a large, restless, rhyolitic system in the Southern Andes that is being heavily studied through several methods, including seismology, by a collaborative team of research institutions. A temporary array of 52 seismometers from OVDAS (the Southern Andean Volcano Observatory), PASSCAL (Portable Array Seismic Studies of the Continental Lithosphere), and the University of Wisconsin-Madison was used to collect the 1.3 years worth of data for this preliminary study. Ambient noise tomography uses surface wave dispersion data obtained from noise correlation functions (NCFs) between pairs of seismic stations, with one of each pair acting as a virtual source, in order to image the velocity structure in 3-D. NCFs were computed for hour-long time windows, and the final NCFs were obtained with phase-weighted stacking. The Frequency-Time Analysis technique was then utilized to measure group velocity between station pairs. NCFs were also analyzed to detect temporal changes in seismic velocity related to magmatic activity at the volcano. With the surface wave data from ambient noise, our small array aperture limits our modeling to the upper crust, so we employed teleseismic tomography to study deeper structures. For picking teleseismic arrivals, we tested two different correlation and stacking programs, which utilize adaptive stacking and multi-channel cross-correlation, to get relative arrival time data for a set of high quality events. Selected earthquakes were larger than magnitude 5 and between 30 and 95 degrees away from the center of the array. Stations that consistently show late arrivals may have a low velocity body beneath them, more clearly visualized via a 3-D tomographic model. Initial results from the two tomography methods indicate the presence of low-velocity zones at several depths. Better resolved velocity models will be developed as more data are acquired.

  4. Seismicity pattern: an indicator of source region of volcanism at convergent plate margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špičák, Aleš; Hanuš, Václav; Vaněk, Jiří

    2004-04-01

    The results of detailed investigation into the geometry of distribution of earthquakes around and below the volcanoes Korovin, Cleveland, Makushin, Yake-Dake, Oshima, Lewotobi, Fuego, Sangay, Nisyros and Montagne Pelée at convergent plate margins are presented. The ISC hypocentral determinations for the period 1964-1999, based on data of global seismic network and relocated by Engdahl, van der Hilst and Buland, have been used. The aim of this study has been to contribute to the solution of the problem of location of source regions of primary magma for calc-alkaline volcanoes spatially and genetically related to the process of subduction. Several specific features of seismicity pattern were revealed in this context. (i) A clear occurrence of the intermediate-depth aseismic gap (IDAG) in the Wadati-Benioff zone (WBZ) below all investigated active volcanoes. We interpret this part of the subducted slab, which does not contain any teleseismically recorded earthquake with magnitude greater than 4.0, as a partially melted domain of oceanic lithosphere and as a possible source of primary magma for calc-alkaline volcanoes. (ii) A set of earthquakes in the shape of a seismically active column (SAC) seems to exists in the continental wedge below volcanoes Korovin, Makushin and Sangay. The seismically active columns probably reach from the Earth surface down to the aseismic gap in the Wadati-Benioff zone. This points to the possibility that the upper mantle overlying the subducted slab does not contain large melted domains, displays an intense fracturing and is not likely to represent the site of magma generation. (iii) In the continental wedge below the volcanoes Cleveland, Fuego, Nisyros, Yake-Dake, Oshima and Lewotobi, shallow seismicity occurs down to the depth of 50 km. The domain without any earthquakes between the shallow seismically active column and the aseismic gap in the Wadati-Benioff zone in the depth range of 50-100 km does not exclude the melting of the mantle

  5. Possible structural control on the 2011 eruption of Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcanic Complex (southern Chile) determined by InSAR, GPS and seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Anja; Tassara, Andrés; Báez, Juan Carlos; Basualto, Daniel; Lara, Luis E.; García, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    The Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcanic Complex (PCCVC) is one of the best examples of tectonic control on volcanism at the Southern Volcanic Zone of the Andes (southern Chile). The PCCVC comprises several volcanic centres that erupted dominantly SiO2-rich magmas at the intersection of the trench-parallel Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone (LOFZ) and an inherited NW-SE basement structure. The PCCVC began an explosive and later effusive eruption on 2011 June 4 causing decimetre- to metre-scale surface deformation that was observed by a series of Envisat ASAR satellite scenes. We modelled this data and complemented it with time-series of two continuous GPS stations and seismicity recorded by a local network. Deformation during the first 3 days of the eruption can be modelled either by two point sources aligned with the NW-SE Cordón Caulle graben or by a closing dyke with a significant component of left-lateral motion along the graben. These models are discussed with respect to their implications on the estimated rheology and the eruption mechanism. GPS observations near the volcanic complex reveal an additional, more localised effect related to the LOFZ in the south of the complex. Coeruptive deformation at the main geological structures of the PCCVC is further supported by relocated seismicity, which is concentrated along the Cordón Caulle graben and to the western side of the LOFZ.

  6. Origin of the Changbai intraplate volcanism in Northeast China:Evidence from seismic tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Dapeng; LEI Jianshe; TANG Rongyu

    2004-01-01

    Seismic images of the mantle beneath the active Changbai intraplate volcano in Northeast China determined by teleseismic travel time tomography are presented. The data are measured at a new seismic network consisting of 19 portable stations and 3 permanent stations. The results show a columnar low-velocity (-3 %) anomaly extending to 400 km depth under the Changbai volcano. High velocity anomalies are visible in the mantle transition zone, and deep earthquakes occur at depths of 500-600 km under the region,suggesting that the subducting Pacific slab is stagnant in the transition zone, as imaged clearly also by global tomography.These results suggest that the Changbai intraplate volcano is not a hotspot like Hawaii but a kind of back-arc volcano related to the upwelling of hot asthenospheric materials associated with the deep subduction and stagnancy of the Pacific slab under northeast Asia.

  7. Scientific results from the deepened Lopra-1 borehole, Faroe Islands: Borehole seismic studies of a volcanic succession from the Lopra-1/1A borehole in the Faroe Islands, northern North Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cowper, David

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Extruded basalt flows overlying sedimentary sequences present a challenge to hydrocarbon exploration using reflection seismic techniques. The Lopra-1/1A re-entry well on the Faroese island of Suðuroy allowed us to study the seismic characteristics of a thick sequence of basalt flows from well logs and borehole seismic recordings. Data acquired during the deepening operation in 1996 are presented here.The re-entry well found that the seismic event at 2340 m, prognosed from the pre-drill Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP as a decrease in impedance, was not base basalt and the deepened well remainedwithin the lower series basalts. Nonetheless, compressional and shear sonic logs and a density log were recorded over the full open hole interval. These allowed a firm tie to be made with the reflectedwavefield from a new VSP. The sonic logs show a compressional to shear wavespeed ratio of 1.84 which is almost constant with depth. Sonic compressional wavespeeds are 3% higher than seismicvelocities, suggesting dispersion in the basalt flows. Azimuthal anisotropy was weakly indicated by the shear sonic log but its orientation is consistent with the directions of mapped master joints in the vicinity of the well.The VSP downgoing compressional wavelet shows good persistence, retaining a dominant period of 28 ms at 3510 m depth. Average vertical velocity is 5248 m/s, higher than previously reported.Attenuation can largely be modelled by geometrical spreading and scattering loss, consistent with other studies. Within the piled flows, the effective Q from scattering is about 35. Elastic layeredmedium modelling shows some hope that a mode-converted shear wave may be observed at moderate offsets. Like its predecessor, the 1996 VSP indicates a decrease in impedance below the final depth ofthe well. However, it is unlikely to be basement or sediment and is probably an event within the volcanic sequence.

  8. The Katla volcanic system imaged using local earthquakes recorded with a temporary seismic network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeddi, Zeinab; Tryggvason, Ari; Gudmundsson, Ólafur

    2016-10-01

    Katla is one of the most active subglacial volcanoes in Iceland. A temporary seismic network was operated on and around Katla for 2.5 years. A subset of 800 analyzed local earthquakes clustered geographically in four regions: (1) the caldera, (2) the western region, (3) the southern rim, and (4) the eastern rim of the glacier. Based on the frequency content of recorded seismograms, each event was labeled as volcano tectonic (VT), long period (LP), or `Mixed'. The southern cluster consists of LP events only, and the eastern cluster consists of VT events, while the western cluster is `Mixed' although primarily LP. The caldera seismicity is confined to a subregion centered in the northeastern part of the caldera above 1 km below sea level (bsl) and gradually deepens away from its center to about 4 km depth. Deeper events are almost all VT, whereas LP events in the center of caldera locate at shallow depths. This is also where the velocities are lowest in the top 3 km of the crust of our 3-D tomographic model. A high-velocity core ( 6.5 km/s) is found at 4 km bsl beneath this low-velocity zone. We propose that a "subcaldera" may be developing within the present caldera and suggest a conceptual model for Katla volcano with a thin volume ( 1 km thick) that may host hot rhyolitic material in the shallow crust below the relocated seismic activity and above the high-velocity core. We interpret this core to consist of mafic cumulates resulting from fractionation of mafic intrusions and partial melting of subsiding hydrothermally altered rocks.

  9. A detailed seismic anisotropy study during the 2011-2012 unrest period in the Santorini Volcanic Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviris, G.; Papadimitriou, P.; Kravvariti, Ph.; Kapetanidis, V.; Karakonstantis, A.; Voulgaris, N.; Makropoulos, K.

    2015-01-01

    The Santorini Volcanic Complex (SVC) is an area in the Southern Aegean (Greece) which has been characterized by low seismicity rates for the last decades, especially in the Santorini Caldera where they have been very low until 2010. This pattern changed completely in February 2011, when intense microseismic activity was initiated within the Caldera. During the manual analysis of the events, the shear-wave splitting phenomenon was observed, revealing the existence of an anisotropic upper crust in the SVC area. A detailed anisotropy study has been conducted using 231 events within the shear-wave window that fulfilled the selection criteria. The polarization direction of the fast shear-wave, the time-delay between the two split shear-waves and the source polarization direction were calculated after visual inspection, using both the polarigram and the hodogram representations. This procedure, applied for eight local stations, resulted in the determination of 340 splitting parameters. The obtained mean anisotropy directions are not homogeneous, revealing a complex regime in the activated area. Nevertheless, these results are explained by the APE model, related to the stress-sensitive behavior of fluid-saturated microcracked rocks. A detailed analysis of the temporal evolution of both the time-delay and anisotropy direction was carried out. The time-delays measured in the “band-1” window exhibit gradual increase and sudden drop that can be related to imminent bursts of seismicity, as well as to the major Mw = 5.1 and 5.2 events which took place about 40 km SW of Santorini on 26 and 27 January 2012, respectively. On the other hand, no significant temporal variations or 90° flips of the Sfast polarization direction were observed.

  10. On the predictability of volcano-tectonic events by low frequency seismic noise analysis at Teide-Pico Viejo volcanic complex, Canary Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tárraga

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The island of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain, is showing possible signs of reawakening after its last basaltic strombolian eruption, dated 1909 at Chinyero. The main concern relates to the central active volcanic complex Teide - Pico Viejo, which poses serious hazards to the properties and population of the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain, and which has erupted several times during the last 5000 years, including a subplinian phonolitic eruption (Montaña Blanca about 2000 years ago. In this paper we show the presence of low frequency seismic noise which possibly includes tremor of volcanic origin and we investigate the feasibility of using it to forecast, via the material failure forecast method, the time of occurrence of discrete events that could be called Volcano-Tectonic or simply Tectonic (i.e. non volcanic on the basis of their relationship to volcanic activity. In order to avoid subjectivity in the forecast procedure, an automatic program has been developed to generate forecasts, validated by Bayes theorem. A parameter called 'forecast gain' measures (and for the first time quantitatively what is gained in probabilistic terms by applying the (automatic failure forecast method. The clear correlation between the obtained forecasts and the occurrence of (Volcano-Tectonic seismic events - a clear indication of a relationship between the continuous seismic noise and the discrete seismic events - is the explanation for the high value of this 'forecast gain' in both 2004 and 2005 and an indication that the events are Volcano-Tectonic rather than purely Tectonic.

  11. Seismicity and volcanic activity in Japan based on crustal thermal activity. 1; Chikaku no netsukatsudo ni motozuku Nippon no jishin kazan katsudo. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, M. [Tokai Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Marine Science and Technology

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes the following matters about correlation between seismic and volcanic activities and thermal energy. Investigations on the status of seismic and volcanic activities in the Japanese archipelago during about 400 years in the past reveals the following matters: noticing earthquakes with magnitudes of upper M6 to about M7, flows of energy going outward from deep crust of the earth repeat ups and downs, whereas several prominent rising periods having certain time widths can be seen; volcanic activities are included in the rising period at the same rank as seismic activities; with regard to years 1900 and on, the similar fact can be seen if the Japanese archipelago is divided into a north portion, a south portion, and an extremely south portion southern than the Hiuga area; and the present time is going toward a period of rise in energy flows. In other words, it is thought that the crust and the uppermost portion of the mantle form one body like an organic body, making an action like a geyser releasing the energy outward. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Variations of upper plate mechanics, seismicity, and arc volcanism along the Middle America Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruh, J.; Sallares, V.; Ranero, C. R.; van Dinther, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Middle America Trench (MAT) extends from the Riviera Fracture Zone offshore Mexico down to the Panama Fracture Zone. Along the MAT, the oceanic Cocos plate changes in character from the older, deeper and relatively smooth plate offshore Guatemala-Nicaragua to the ~20 km thick crust of Cocos Ridge off Costa Rica. These changes occur because the northern part of the the Cocos plate has been formed at the East Pacific Rise, while the southern part is formed at the Cocos-Nazca spreading center, which is in turn influenced by the Galapagos Hotspot, originating prominent submarine structures such as the Cocos Ridge. In contrast, the terrane forming the overriding plate in the Pacific convergent margin, which is mainly made by the Caribbean Igneous Province rocks, is relatively homogeneous. Thus, this region is an excellent natural example to study the effect of changes in the incoming plate on the tectonics and deformation of the overriding plate. The Nicaragua lake in the north is a result of upper plate extension related to rollback of the subducting slab, whereas in the south, the Talamanca Cordillera indicates compression of the Caribbean crust probably related with the subduction of the Cocos Ridge. We present numerical models that help to understand the long-term effects of variable subducting oceanic crust age and thickness on upper plate deformation and magmatism. Furthermore, we investigate the seismic behavior of these different convergent systems. The applied numerical model consists of a 2D seismo-thermo-mechanical finite difference scheme with visco-elasto-plastic rheology and a stick-slip frictional formulation to simulate spontaneous nucleation, propagation and arrest of earthquake-like ruptures on physically consistent faults.

  13. Shallow crustal velocities and volcanism suggested from ambient noise studies using a dense broadband seismic network in the Tatun Volcano Group of Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Chih; Lin, Cheng-Horng; Kagiyama, Tsuneomi

    2017-07-01

    The Tatun Volcano Group (TVG) is situated adjacent to the Taipei metropolis and was active predominantly around 0.8-0.2 Ma (Pleistocene). Various recent lines of evidence suggest that the TVG is a potentially active volcano and that future volcanic eruptions cannot be ruled out. Geothermal activities are largely constrained to faults, but the relationship between volcanism and detailed velocity structures is not well understood. We analyzed ambient seismic noise of daily vertical components from 2014 using a dense seismic network of 40 broadband stations. We selected a 0.02° grid spacing to construct 2D and 3D shallow crustal phase velocity maps in the 0.5-3 s period band. Two S-wave velocity profiles transect Chishingshan (Mt. CS) in the shallow 3 km crust are further derived. The footwall of the Shanchiao Fault is dominated by low velocity, which may relate to Tertiary bedrock buried under andesitic lava flows dozens to hundreds of meters thick. The hanging wall of the Shanchiao Fault is the location of recent major volcanic activities. Low velocity zones in the southeast of Dayoukeng (DYK) may be interpreted as hydrothermal reservoirs or water-saturated Tertiary bedrock related to Cenozoic structures in the shallow crust. High velocities conspicuously dominate the east of the TVG, where the earliest stages of volcanism in the TVG are located, but where surface hydro-geothermal activities were absent in recent times. Between the Shanchiao Fault and Kanchiao Fault high velocities were detected, which converge below Mt. CS and may be related to early stages of magma conduits that gradually consolidated. These two faults may play a significant role with the TVG. The submarine volcanism adjacent to the Keelung coastline also requires further attention.

  14. Are volcanic seismic b-values high, and if so when?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Nick S.; Bell, Andrew F.; Main, Ian G.

    2015-12-01

    The Gutenberg-Richter exponent b is a measure of the relative proportion of large and small earthquakes. It is commonly used to infer material properties such as heterogeneity, or mechanical properties such as the state of stress from earthquake populations. It is 'well known' that the b-value tends to be high or very high for volcanic earthquake populations relative to b = 1 for those of tectonic earthquakes, and that b varies significantly with time during periods of unrest. We first review the supporting evidence from 34 case studies, and identify weaknesses in this argument due predominantly to small sample size, the narrow bandwidth of magnitude scales available, variability in the methods used to assess the minimum or cutoff magnitude Mc, and to infer b. Informed by this, we use synthetic realisations to quantify the effect of choice of the cutoff magnitude on maximum likelihood estimates of b, and suggest a new work flow for this choice. We present the first quantitative estimate of the error in b introduced by uncertainties in estimating Mc, as a function of the number of events and the b-value itself. This error can significantly exceed the commonly-quoted statistical error in the estimated b-value, especially for the case that the underlying b-value is high. We apply the new methods to data sets from recent periods of unrest in El Hierro and Mount Etna. For El Hierro we confirm significantly high b-values of 1.5-2.5 prior to the 10 October 2011 eruption. For Mount Etna the b-values are indistinguishable from b = 1 within error, except during the flank eruptions at Mount Etna in 2001-2003, when 1.5 < b < 2.0. For the time period analysed, they are rarely lower than b = 1. Our results confirm that these volcano-tectonic earthquake populations can have systematically high b-values, especially when associated with eruptions. At other times they can be indistinguishable from those of tectonic earthquakes within the total error. The results have significant

  15. Persistence of seed bank under thick volcanic deposits twenty years after eruptions of Mount Usu, Hokkaido Island, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuyuzaki, S; Goto, M

    2001-10-01

    The topsoil that contained the seed bank became buried under thick tephra after the eruptions of Mount Usu during 1977 and 1978. To determine the seed bank potential of the topsoil 20 yr after the eruptions, i.e., in 1998, 408 100-cm(3) samples were excavated under 115-185 cm of volcanic deposits. The topsoil was collected at 10-cm intervals along the horizontal scale and was divided into a 0-5 cm deep upper layer and a 5-10 cm deep lower layer. The seed bank was estimated by both the germination (GM) and flotation (FM) methods. In total, 23 species with an average seed density of 1317 seeds/m(2) were identified by GM, and 30 species with a density of 2986 seeds/m(2) were extracted by FM. The dominant species was Rumex obtusifolius, and perennial herbs, such as Carex oxyandra, Viola grypoceras, and Poa pratensis, were common. For nine species this study provided the first records for field seed longevity >20 yr. The seed density in the upper layer was double that in the lower layer, and the horizontal distribution was heterogeneous even at 10-cm intervals. We concluded that the seed bank has retained the original structure of the seed bank under the tephra and will persist longer with soil water content between 20 and 40%, no light, and low temperature fluctuations (±0.17°C of standard deviation in a day).

  16. Preliminary report, between seismic swarms, the constant cycles of inflation/ deflation in some volcanic calderas in the world and the minimum and/or solar maximum years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casati, Michele

    2014-05-01

    The global communication network and GPS satellites have enabled us to monitor for more than a decade, some of the more sensitive, well-known and highly urbanized volcanic areas around the world. The possibility of electromagnetic coupling between the dynamics of the Earth-Sun and major geophysical events is a topic of research. However the majority of researchers are orienting their research in one direction. They are attempting to demonstrate a significant EM coupling between the solar dynamics and terrestrial seismicity ignoring a possible relationship between solar dynamics and the dynamics inherent in volcanic calderas. The scientific references are scarce, however, a study conducted by the Vesuvius Observatory of Naples, notes that the seismic activity on the volcano is closely related to changes in solar activity and the Earth's magnetic field. We decided to extend the study to many other volcanic calderas in the world in order to generalise the relationship between solar activity and caldera activity and/or deformation of the ground. The list of Northern Hemisphere volcanoes examined is as follows: Long Valley, Yellowstone, Three sisters, Kilauea Hawaii, Axial seamount (United States); Augustine ( Alaska), Sakurajima (Japan); Hammarinn, Krisuvik; Askja (Iceland) and Campi Flegrei (Italy). We note that the deformation of volcanoes recorded in GPS logs varies in long, slow geodynamic processes related to the two well-known time periods within the eleven-year cycle of solar magnetic activity: the solar minimum and maximum. We find that the years of minimum (maximum), are coincident with the years in which transition between a phase of deflation (inflation) occurs. Additionally, the seismicity recorded in such areas reaches its peak in the years of solar minimum or maximum. However, the total number and magnitude of seismic events is greater during deep solar minima, than maxima, evidenced by increased seismic activity occurring between 2006 and 2010. This

  17. Seismic tomography model reveals mantle magma sources of recent volcanic activity at El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Yeguas, Araceli; Ibáñez, Jesús M.; Koulakov, Ivan; Jakovlev, Andrey; Romero-Ruiz, M. Carmen; Prudencio, Janire

    2014-12-01

    We present a 3-D model of P and S velocities beneath El Hierro Island, constructed using the traveltime data of more than 13 000 local earthquakes recorded by the Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN, Spain) in the period from 2011 July to 2012 September. The velocity models were performed using the LOTOS code for iterative passive source tomography. The results of inversion were thoroughly verified using different resolution and robustness tests. The results reveal that the majority of the onshore area of El Hierro is associated with a high-velocity anomaly observed down to 10-12-km depth. This anomaly is interpreted as the accumulation of solid igneous rocks erupted during the last 1 Myr and intrusive magmatic bodies. Below this high-velocity pattern, we observe a low-velocity anomaly, interpreted as a batch of magma coming from the mantle located beneath El Hierro. The boundary between the low- and high-velocity anomalies is marked by a prominent seismicity cluster, thought to represent anomalous stresses due to the interaction of the batch of magma with crust material. The areas of recent eruptions, Orchilla and La Restinga, are associated with low-velocity anomalies surrounding the main high-velocity block. These eruptions took place around the island where the crust is much weaker than the onshore area and where the melted material cannot penetrate. These results put constraints on the geological model that could explain the origin of the volcanism in oceanic islands, such as in the Canaries, which is not yet clearly understood.

  18. Mitigating the consequences of extreme events on strategic facilities: evaluation of volcanic and seismic risk affecting the Caspian oil and gas pipelines in the Republic of Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquarè, F A; Tormey, D; Vezzoli, L; Okrostsvaridze, A; Tutberidze, B

    2011-07-01

    In this work we identify and quantify new seismic and volcanic risks threatening the strategic Caspian oil and gas pipelines through the Republic of Georgia, in the vicinity of the recent Abuli Samsari Volcanic Ridge, and evaluate risk reduction measures, mitigation measures, and monitoring. As regards seismic risk, we identified a major, NW-SE trending strike-slip fault; based on the analysis of fault planes along this major transcurrent structure, an about N-S trend of the maximum, horizontal compressive stress (σ1) was determined, which is in good agreement with data instrumentally derived after the 1986, M 5.6 Paravani earthquake and its aftershock. Particularly notable is the strong alignment of volcanic vents along an about N-S trend that suggests a magma rising controlled by the about N-S-directed σ1. The original pipeline design included mitigation measures for seismic risk and other geohazards, including burial of the pipeline for its entire length, increased wall thickness, block valve spacing near recognized hazards, and monitoring of known landslide hazards. However, the design did not consider volcanic risk or the specific seismic hazards revealed by this study. The result of our analysis is that the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan (BTC) oil pipeline, as well as the Baku-Tbilisi-Erzerum South Caucasian natural gas pipeline (SCP) were designed in such a way that they significantly reduce the risk posed by the newly-identified geohazards in the vicinity of the Abuli-Samsari Ridge. No new measures are recommended for the pipeline itself as a result of this study. However, since the consequences of long-term shut-down would be very damaging to the economies of Western Europe, we conclude that the regionally significant BTC and SCP warrant greater protections, described in the final section of or work. The overall objective of our effort is to present the results in a matrix framework that allows the technical information to be used further in the decision

  19. Sentinel-1 automatic processing chain for volcanic and seismic areas monitoring within the Geohazards Exploitation Platform (GEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Claudio; Zinno, Ivana; Manunta, Michele; Lanari, Riccardo; Casu, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The microwave remote sensing scenario is rapidly evolving through development of new sensor technology for Earth Observation (EO). In particular, Sentinel-1A (S1A) is the first of a sensors' constellation designed to provide a satellite data stream for the Copernicus European program. Sentinel-1A has been specifically designed to provide, over land, Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) products to analyze and investigate Earth's surface displacements. S1A peculiarities include wide ground coverage (250 km of swath), C-band operational frequency and short revisit time (that will reduce from 12 to 6 days when the twin system Sentinel-1B will be placed in orbit during 2016). Such characteristics, together with the global coverage acquisition policy, make the Sentinel-1 constellation to be extremely suitable for volcanic and seismic areas studying and monitoring worldwide, thus allowing the generation of both ground displacement information with increasing rapidity and new geological understanding. The main acquisition mode over land is the so called Interferometric Wide Swath (IWS) that is based on the Terrain Observation by Progressive Scans (TOPS) technique and that guarantees the mentioned S1A large coverage characteristics at expense of a not trivial interferometric processing. Moreover, the satellite spatial coverage and the reduced revisit time will lead to an exponential increase of the data archives that, after the launch of Sentine-1B, will reach about 3TB per day. Therefore, the EO scientific community needs from the one hand automated and effective DInSAR tools able to address the S1A processing complexity, and from the other hand the computing and storage capacities to face out the expected large amount of data. Then, it is becoming more crucial to move processors and tools close to the satellite archives, being not efficient anymore the approach of downloading and processing data with in-house computing facilities. To address

  20. Time lag between deformation and seismicity along monogenetic volcanic unrest periods: The case of El Hierro Island (Canary Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamolda, Héctor; Felpeto, Alicia; Bethencourt, Abelardo

    2017-07-01

    Between 2011 and 2014 there were at least seven episodes of magmatic intrusion in El Hierro Island, but only the first one led to a submarine eruption in 2011-2012. In order to study the relationship between GPS deformation and seismicity during these episodes, we compare the temporal evolution of the deformation with the cumulative seismic energy released. In some of the episodes both deformation and seismicity evolve in a very similar way, but in others a time lag appears between them, in which the deformation precedes the seismicity. Furthermore, a linear correlation between decimal logarithm of intruded magma volume and decimal logarithm of total seismic energy released along the different episodes has been observed. Therefore, if a future magmatic intrusion in El Hierro Island follows this behavior with a proper time lag, we could have an a priori estimate on the order of magnitude the seismic energy released would reach.

  1. Seismic hydraulic fracture migration originated by successive deep magma pulses: The 2011-2013 seismic series associated to the volcanic activity of El Hierro Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Moreno, A.; Ibáñez, J. M.; De Angelis, S.; García-Yeguas, A.; Prudencio, J.; Morales, J.; Tuvè, T.; García, L.

    2015-11-01

    In this manuscript we present a new interpretation of the seismic series that accompanied eruptive activity off the coast of El Hierro, Canary Islands, during 2011-2013. We estimated temporal variations of the Gutenberg-Richter b value throughout the period of analysis, and performed high-precision relocations of the preeruptive and syneruptive seismicity using a realistic 3-D velocity model. Our results suggest that eruptive activity and the accompanying seismicity were caused by repeated injections of magma from the mantle into the lower crust. These magma pulses occurred within a small and well-defined volume resulting in the emplacement of fresh magma along the crust-mantle boundary underneath El Hierro. We analyzed the distribution of earthquake hypocenters in time and space in order to assess seismic diffusivity in the lower crust. Our results suggest that very high earthquake rates underneath El Hierro represent the response of a stable lower crust to stress perturbations with pulsatory character, linked to the injection of magma from the mantle. Magma input from depth caused large stress perturbations to propagate into the lower crust generating energetic seismic swarms. The absence of any preferential alignment in the spatial pattern of seismicity reinforces our hypothesis that stress perturbation and related seismicity, had diffusive character. We conclude that the temporal and spatial evolution of seismicity was neither tracking the path of magma migration nor it defines the boundaries of magma storage volumes such as a midcrustal sill. Our conceptual model considers pulsatory magma injection from the upper mantle and its propagation along the Moho. We suggest, within this framework, that the spatial and temporal distributions of earthquake hypocenters reflect hydraulic fracturing processes associated with stress propagation due to magma movement.

  2. Definition of Brittle Ductile Transition of the upper crust beneath the Campi Flegrei-Ischia Volcanic District and its impact on natural seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizzani, Pietro; Castaldo, Raffaele; De Novellis, Vincenzo; Santilano, Alessandro; Gola, Gianluca; Pepe, Susi; D'Auria, Luca; Solaro, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    The thermo-rheology behaviour of the rocks is a crucial aspect to understand the mechanical behaviour of the crust of tectonically active area. As a consequence, several studies have been performed since last decades in order to clarify the role of thermic state in the evolution of volcanic areas. In this framework, the knowledge of the Brittle-Ductile transition inside the upper crust may provide insights to verify the roles that some hypothesized mechanisms, such as slab pull, crustal delamination might have played in the evolution of a tectonically active region. The goal of our study was the 3D imaging of the crust rheology beneath the active Campi Flegrei-Ischia Volcanic District and its impact on natural seismicity. Despite many works have been done on the internal structure of the active volcanoes, the determination of the 3D rheological stratification of the crust below the caldera has not yet been tackled. To fill this gap of knowledge, we proposed the definition of 3D geometry of the Brittle-Ductile transition calculated via numerical optimization modelling based on geological, geochemical, and geophysical available data. We first performed a 3D numerical modelling of thermal field by using the a priori geological and geophysical information starting to thermal proprieties and mechanical heterogeneities of the crust beneath the caldera. We developed a suitable 3D conductive/convective time-dependent thermal numerical model solving the Fourier equation and further we used the retrieved thermal model to image a 3D rheological stratification of the shallow crust below the volcanic district. Finally we demonstrate the role of the crustal rheology on seismicity cut off and its implication on maximum expected earthquakes magnitude.

  3. Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John W.

    1998-11-01

    Eudora Welty, the famous writer, was once asked what should be done by society or government to encourage young writers. Her response, which surprised the questioner, and me when I heard it, was "Nothing". Welty contended that a person who was really a writer would be persistent enough to overcome whatever obstacles were in the way, needing no interference or support from others.

  4. From high quality seismic data acquisition in remote volcanic area to fast data distribution to scientific community: The UnderVolc project on Piton de la Fournaise volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenguier, Florent; Kowalski, Philippe; Pequegnat, Catherine; Lauret, Frédéric; Cougoulat, Glenn; Boissier, Patrice; Catherine, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    Piton de la Fournaise basaltic volcano (La Réunion island, France) is one of the most active volcano in the world with an average of one eruption every year. This volcano is thus an ideal case study for research projects focusing on studying magmatic, seismic and deformation processes occurring in volcanic areas. The UNDERVOLC (UNDERstanding VOLCanic Processes) research project main goal is to provide high quality 3-component broadband continuous seismic data to an amount of about 30 volcano-seismologists from different international research teams (including Japan and New-Zealand). This data acquisition system is moreover dedicated to the monitoring of Piton de la Fournaise volcano by providing real-time seismic data to the Piton de la Fournaise volcanological Observatory/IPGP. The network consists of 21 fully autonomous stations composed of CMG40-T seismometers associated to high dynamic digitizers and linked to wireless digital radio stations. The seismic signal is sent by UDP protocol to the observatory through a network of wireless LAN over large distances (~10 km) and possibly through the internet to the Observatory. The acquisition system at the observatory is composed of: 1-An Earthworm system (USGS - ISTI - CERI) with a Q330 to Earthworm data acquisition module (6 permanent stations from the observatory) 2-An Apollo server system (Nanometrics) for 15 stations (for which seismometers and digitizers belong to the French national pool of portable seismic instruments Sismob, INSU-CNRS) In both case, requests are sent back to the stations in case of loss of udp packets. This system allows us producing miniseed files every hour. Since September 2009, the full dataset has less then 1 % of gaps. In order to provide a fast data access to the scientific community, we synchronize our dataset every night with the SISMOB datacenter located in France (LGIT, Grenoble). After a quality check, seed data volumes are produced and distributed by standard NETDC requests from

  5. Seismicity and volcanic activity in Japan based on crustal thermal activity . 2; Chikaku no netsukatsudo ni motozuku Nippon no Jishin kazan katsudo. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, M. [Tokai Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Marine Science and Technology

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes the following matters about seismic and volcanic activities in Japan. The previous paper has reported a view that energy is transported from deep portions of the earth`s crust toward outer portions, and the stored energy thrusts up collectively in a certain time period (a rising period). A fact may be accounted for as one of the endorsements thereof that earthquakes and volcanic eruptions take place successively over a wide area from Okinawa to Hokkaido in a short period of time (included in the rising period). When viewed by limiting the time period and areas, a great earthquake would not occur suddenly, but stored energy is released wholly at a certain time while it has been released little by little. Referring to the Kanto Great Earthquake (1923) and the Tokai and Nankai Earthquakes (1944 and 1946), it is found that earthquakes had been occurring successively in the surrounding areas since about 20 years before the occurrence of these great earthquakes. Similar phenomena may be seen in the great earthquakes of Ansei (1854) and An-ei (1707). 5 figs.

  6. Seismicity in northeast edge of the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB), activation of an undocumented fault: the Peñamiller earthquake sequence of 2011, Queretaro, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente-Chavez, A.; Figueroa-Soto, A.; Zúñiga, F. R.; Arroyo, M.; Montiel, M.; Chavez, O.

    2013-02-01

    The Peñamiller town, in the Queretaro state, Mexico is located at the northeast border of the seismogenic zone known as the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB), which covers a central fringe of Mexico with east-west orientation. In this town, a sequence of small earthquakes occurred during the end of 2010 and beginning of 2011. Seismicity frequent in of the continental regimen of central Mexico are not common, however, it is known that there are precedents of large earthquakes (Mw magnitude greater than 6.0) occurring in this zone. In order to enrich seismic information, which has not been analyzed nor documented until this moment, is presented this work. This will contribute to gain more insight into the tectonic situation of the central Mexico region. Twenty-four shallow earthquakes records of the Peñamiller, Queretaro seismic sequence of 2011 were recorded by a provisional accelerograph network from the Universidad Autonoma de Queretaro (UAQ). The data were analysed in order to determine the source locations and for the estimation of the source parameters. The study was carried out through an inversion process and by spectral analysis. The results show that the largest earthquake, occurred on 8 February 2011 at 19:53:48.6 UTC, had a moment magnitude Mw = 3.5, and was located at latitude 21.039° and longitude -99.752°, at a depth of 5.6 km. This zone is located less than 7 km away in south-east direction from downtown Peñamiller. The focal mechanisms are mostly normal faults with a small lateral component. This feature is consistent with the extensional regimen of the southern extension of the Basin and Range (BR) province. The source area of the largest event was estimated to have a radius of 0.5 km, which corresponds to a normal fault with azimuth of 174° and an almost pure dip slip; this caused Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) of up to 100 cm s-2 in the horizontal direction. It is evident that the shallow earthquakes induced by crustal faulting can present a

  7. High resolution seismic data coupled to Multibeam bathymetry of Stromboli island collected in the frame of the Stromboli geophysical experiment: implications with the marine geophysics and volcanology of the Aeolian Arc volcanic complex (Sicily, Southern Tyrrhenian sea, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Gemma; Di Fiore, Vincenzo; Marsella, Ennio; Passaro, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    New high resolution seismic data (Subbottom Chirp) coupled to high resolution Multibeam bathymetry collected in the frame of the Stromboli geophysical experiment aimed at recording active seismic data and tomography of the Stromboli Island are here presented. The Stromboli geophysical experiment has been already carried out based on onshore and offshore data acquisition in order to investigate the deep structure and the location of the magma chambers of the Stromboli volcano. A new detailed swath bathymetry of Stromboli Island is here shown and discussed to reconstruct an up-to-date morpho-bathymetry and marine geology of the area compared to the volcanologic setting of the Aeolian Arc volcanic complex. Due to its high resolution the new Digital Terrain Model of the Stromboli Island gives interesting information about the submerged structure of the volcano, particularly about the volcano-tectonic and gravitational processes involving the submarine flanks of the edifice. Several seismic units have been identified based on the geologic interpretation of Subbottom Chirp profiles recorded around the volcanic edifice and interpreted as volcanic acoustic basement pertaining to the volcano and overlying slide chaotic bodies emplaced during its complex volcano-tectonic evolution. They are related to the eruptive activity of Stromboli, mainly poliphasic and to regional geological processes involving the intriguing geology of the Aeolian Arc, a volcanic area still in activity and needing improved research interest.

  8. Determination of temporal changes in seismic velocity caused by volcanic activity in and around Hakone volcano, central Japan, using ambient seismic noise records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukutake, Yohei; Ueno, Tomotake; Miyaoka, Kazuki

    2016-12-01

    Autocorrelation functions (ACFs) for ambient seismic noise are considered to be useful tools for estimating temporal changes in the subsurface structure. Velocity changes at Hakone volcano in central Japan, where remarkable swarm activity has often been observed, were investigated in this study. Significant velocity changes were detected during two seismic activities in 2011 and 2013. The 2011 activity began immediately after the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake, suggesting remote triggering by the dynamic stress changes resulting from the earthquake. During the 2013 activity, which exhibited swarm-like features, crustal deformations were detected by Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) stations and tiltmeters, suggesting a pressure increment of a Mogi point source at a depth of 7 km and two shallow open cracks. Waveforms that were bandpass-filtered between 1 and 3 Hz were used to calculate ACFs using a one-bit correlation technique. Fluctuations in the velocity structure were obtained using the stretching method. A gradual decrease in the velocity structure was observed prior to the 2013 activity at the KOM station near the central cone of the caldera, which started after the onset of crustal expansion observed by the GNSS stations. Additionally, a sudden significant velocity decrease was observed at the OWD station near a fumarolic area just after the onset of the 2013 activity and the tilt changes. The changes in the stress and strain caused by the deformation sources were likely the main contributors to these decreases in velocity. The precursory velocity reduction at the KOM station likely resulted from the inflation of the deep Mogi source, whereas the sudden velocity decrease at the OWD station may reflect changes in the strain caused by the shallow open-crack source. Rapid velocity decreases were also detected at many stations in and around the volcano after the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake. The velocity changes may reflect the redistribution of hydrothermal

  9. Three-dimensional seismic structure and moment tensors of non-double-couple earthquakes at the Hengill-Grensdalur volcanic complex, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A.D.; Julian, B.R.; Foulger, G.R.

    1998-01-01

    The volcanic and geothermal areas of Iceland are rich sources of non-double-couple (non-DC) earthquakes. A state-of-the-art digital seismometer network deployed at the Hengill-Grensdalur volcanic complex in 1991 recorded 4000 small earthquakes. We used the best recorded of these to determine 3-D VP and VP/VS structure tomographically and accurate earthquake moment tensors. The VP field is dominated by high seismic wave speed bodies interpreted as solidified intrusions. A widespread negative (-4 per cent) VP/VS anomaly in the upper 4 km correlates with the geothermal field, but is too strong to be caused solely by the effect of temperature upon liquid water or the presence of vapour, and requires in addition mineralogical or lithological differences between the geothermal reservoir and its surroundings. These may be caused by geothermal alteration. Well-constrained moment tensors were obtained for 70 of the best-recorded events by applying linear programming methods to P- and S-wave polarities and amplitude ratios. About 25 per cent of the mechanisms are, within observational error, consistent with DC mechanisms consistent with shear faulting. The other 75 per cent have significantly non-DC mechanisms. Many have substantial explosive components, one has a substantial implosive component, and the deviatoric component of many is strongly non-DC. Many of the non-DC mechanisms are consistent, within observational error, with simultaneous tensile and shear faulting. However, the mechanisms occupy a continuum in source-type parameter space and probably at least one additional source process is occurring. This may be fluid flow into newly formed cracks, causing partial compensation of the volumetric component. Studying non-shear earthquakes such as these has great potential for improving our understanding of geothermal processes and earthquake source processes in general.

  10. The Aftershock Sequence of the 2008 Achaia, Greece, Earthquake: Joint Analysis of Seismicity Relocation and Persistent Scatterers Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakostas, Vassilis; Mirek, Katarzyna; Mesimeri, Maria; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria; Mirek, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    On 8 June 2008 an earthquake of Mw6.4 took place in the northwestern part of Peloponnese, Greece. The main shock was felt in a wide area and caused appreciable damage along the main rupture area and particularly at the antipodal of the main shock epicenter fault edge, implying strongly unilateral rupture and stopping phase effects. Abundant aftershocks were recorded within an area of ~50 km in length in the period 8 June 2008-end of 2014, by a sufficient number of stations that secure location accuracy because the regional network is adequately dense in the area. All the available phases from seismological stations in epicentral distances up to 140 km until the end of 2014 were used for relocation with the double difference technique and waveform cross-correlation. A quite clear 3-D representation is obtained for the aftershock zone geometry and dimensions, revealing the main rupture and the activated adjacent fault segments. SAR data are processed using Stanford Method for Persistent Scatterers (StaMPS) and a surface deformation map constructed based on PS point displacement for the coseismic period. A variable slip model, with maximum slip of ~1.0 m located at the lower part of the rupture plane, is suggested and used for calculating the deformation field which was found in adequate agreement with geodetic measurements. With the same slip model the static stress changes were calculated evidencing possible triggering of the neighboring faults that were brought closer to failure. The data availability allowed monitoring the temporal variation of b values that after a continuous increase in the first 5 days, returned and stabilized to 1.0-1.1 in the following years. The fluctuation duration is considered as the equivalent time for fault healing, which appeared very short but in full accordance with the cessation of onto-fault seismicity.

  11. The Aftershock Sequence of the 2008 Achaia, Greece, Earthquake: Joint Analysis of Seismicity Relocation and Persistent Scatterers Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakostas, Vassilis; Mirek, Katarzyna; Mesimeri, Maria; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria; Mirek, Janusz

    2017-01-01

    On 8 June 2008 an earthquake of Mw6.4 took place in the northwestern part of Peloponnese, Greece. The main shock was felt in a wide area and caused appreciable damage along the main rupture area and particularly at the antipodal of the main shock epicenter fault edge, implying strongly unilateral rupture and stopping phase effects. Abundant aftershocks were recorded within an area of 50 km in length in the period 8 June 2008-end of 2014, by a sufficient number of stations that secure location accuracy because the regional network is adequately dense in the area. All the available phases from seismological stations in epicentral distances up to 140 km until the end of 2014 were used for relocation with the double difference technique and waveform cross-correlation. A quite clear 3-D representation is obtained for the aftershock zone geometry and dimensions, revealing the main rupture and the activated adjacent fault segments. SAR data are processed using Stanford Method for Persistent Scatterers (StaMPS) and a surface deformation map constructed based on PS point displacement for the coseismic period. A variable slip model, with maximum slip of 1.0 m located at the lower part of the rupture plane, is suggested and used for calculating the deformation field which was found in adequate agreement with geodetic measurements. With the same slip model the static stress changes were calculated evidencing possible triggering of the neighboring faults that were brought closer to failure. The data availability allowed monitoring the temporal variation of b values that after a continuous increase in the first 5 days, returned and stabilized to 1.0-1.1 in the following years. The fluctuation duration is considered as the equivalent time for fault healing, which appeared very short but in full accordance with the cessation of onto-fault seismicity.

  12. Wavelet analysis for the study of the relations among soil radon anomalies, volcanic and seismic events: the case of Mt. Etna (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrera, Elisabetta; Giammanco, Salvatore; Cannata, Andrea; Montalto, Placido

    2013-04-01

    from those correlated with impending seismic or volcanic events.

  13. Seismic evidence of crustal heterogeneity beneath the northwestern Deccan volcanic province of India from joint inversion of Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements and P receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, A. A.; Mohan, G.

    2016-10-01

    The northwestern Deccan volcanic province (NWDVP) of India, encompassing the Saurashtra peninsula and the adjoining Gulf of Cambay, is investigated through joint inversion of surface wave dispersion measurements and teleseismic P receiver functions, to estimate the crustal and shallow upper mantle shear wave velocity (Vs) structure. The Mw ∼ 7.7 Bhuj earthquake and the post Bhuj regional events, recorded during the period 2001-2010 at 7 stations along 37 source-receiver paths were used along with 35 teleseismic events. A joint curve fitting inversion technique is applied to obtain a best fit for the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion curves for time periods 5-50 s and high quality crustal P wave receiver functions obtained at each station. Significant crustal heterogeneity is observed within the study region with the average crustal Vs ranging from 3.5 km/s to 3.8 km/s with the paths cutting across the Gulf of Cambay exhibiting large reduction in shear wave velocities. Utilizing the average crustal Vs ≈ 3.66 km/s estimated for Saurashtra, together with the average crustal P wave velocity (Vp) ≈ 6.54 km/s derived independently through deep seismic sounding studies, yields a bulk Vp/Vs ratio of 1.786 or an equivalent crustal Poisson's ratio of 0.271. A major contribution to the high Poisson's ratio comes from the 12 to 16 km thick lower crustal layers with shear velocities ranging from 3.8 km/s to 4.19 km/s suggesting widespread magmatic underplating due to emplacement of mafic cumulates in the lower crust. The shallow uppermost mantle shear velocities are in the range 4.2-4.5 km/s averaging 4.36 km/s, which is less than that observed for the Indian shield, indicating the effects of residual thermal anomaly. The variation in the crustal Vs, high Poisson's ratios and low upper mantle shear velocities reflect the thermal and compositional effects of the Deccan volcanism which are manifested in terms of pervasive presence of mafic dykes

  14. Evidence of recent deep magmatic activity at Cerro Bravo-Cerro Machín volcanic complex, central Colombia. Implications for future volcanic activity at Nevado del Ruiz, Cerro Machín and other volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londono, John Makario

    2016-09-01

    In the last nine years (2007-2015), the Cerro Bravo-Cerro Machín volcanic complex (CBCMVC), located in central Colombia, has experienced many changes in volcanic activity. In particular at Nevado del Ruiz volcano (NRV), Cerro Machin volcano (CMV) and Cerro Bravo (CBV) volcano. The recent activity of NRV, as well as increasing seismic activity at other volcanic centers of the CBCMVC, were preceded by notable changes in various geophysical and geochemical parameters, that suggests renewed magmatic activity is occurring at the volcanic complex. The onset of this activity started with seismicity located west of the volcanic complex, followed by seismicity at CBV and CMV. Later in 2010, strong seismicity was observed at NRV, with two small eruptions in 2012. After that, seismicity has been observed intermittently at other volcanic centers such as Santa Isabel, Cerro España, Paramillo de Santa Rosa, Quindío and Tolima volcanoes, which persists until today. Local deformation was observed from 2007 at NRV, followed by possible regional deformation at various volcanic centers between 2011 and 2013. In 2008, an increase in CO2 and Radon in soil was observed at CBV, followed by a change in helium isotopes at CMV between 2009 and 2011. Moreover, SO2 showed an increase from 2010 at NRV, with values remaining high until the present. These observations suggest that renewed magmatic activity is currently occurring at CBCMVC. NRV shows changes in its activity that may be related to this new magmatic activity. NRV is currently exhibiting the most activity of any volcano in the CBCMVC, which may be due to it being the only open volcanic system at this time. This suggests that over the coming years, there is a high probability of new unrest or an increase in volcanic activity of other volcanoes of the CBCMVC.

  15. Seismic activity and stress tensor inversion at Las Tres Vírgenes Volcanic and Geothermal Field (México)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antayhua-Vera, Yanet; Lermo-Samaniego, Javier; Quintanar-Robles, Luis; Campos-Enríquez, Oscar

    2015-10-01

    We analyze local earthquakes occurring between 2003 and 2012 at the Las Tres Vírgenes Volcanic and Geothermal Field (TVVGF) to establish their temporal and spatial distribution, and relationships with local and regional fault systems, water injection, acid stimulation and steam production tests. We obtained focal mechanisms and inverted data for the stress tensor to understand the local and regional stress fields. We analyzed 423 local earthquakes with magnitudes between 0.1 and 2.9 Mc and hypocentral depths from 0.2 to 7.4 km b.s.l. The cutoff depth at ~ 7.4 km possibly delineates the brittle-ductile transition zone. We identified seven swarms (from 1 to 7). Swarms 1 (December 2009), 2 (May 2010), 3 (June-July 2010) and 7 (December 2012) are strongly correlated with injection processes; whereas swarms 5 (April 2012) and 6 (September 2012) are correlated with local tectonic faults. Stress inversion showed NW-SE, E-W and NE-SW extensional orientations (Shmin), in agreement with the local tectonic stress field; while NE-SW compressional orientations (SHmax) are correlated with the regional tectonic stress field.

  16. Characteristics of seismic waves composing Hawaiian volcanic tremor and gas-piston events observed by a near-source array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrazzini, Valerie; Aki, Keiiti; Chouet, Bernard

    1991-04-01

    A correlation method, specifically designed for describing the characteristics of a complex wave field, is applied to volcanic tremor and gas-piston events recorded by a semicircular array of GEOS instruments set at the foot of the Puu Oo crater on the east rift of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. The spatial patterns of correlation coefficients obtained as functions of frequency for the three components of motion over the entire array are similar for gas-piston events and tremor, and clearly depict dispersive waves propagating across the array from the direction of Puu Oo. The wave fields are composed of comparable amounts of Rayleigh and Love waves propagating with similar and extremely slow phase velocities ranging from 700 m/s at 2 Hz to 300 m/s at 8 Hz. The highly cracked solidified lava flow on which the array was deployed, and subjacent structure of alternating lava and ash layers formed during repeated eruptions of Puu Oo since 1983, appear to be responsible for the low velocities observed. The results from Puu Oo stand in sharp contrast to those obtained in an experiment conducted in 1976 on the partially solidified lava lake of Kilauea Iki. Rayleigh waves were not observed in Kilauea Iki, but well-developed trains of Love waves were seen to propagate there with velocities twice as high as those observed near Puu Oo. These differences in the propagation characteristics of surface waves at the two sites may be attributed to the presence of a soft horizontal layer of molten rock in Kilauea Iki, which may have lowered the phase velocity of Rayleigh waves more drastically than that of Love waves, resulting in severe scattering of the Rayleigh wave mode. On the other hand, the thin superficial pahoehoe flow under our array at Puu Oo may have favored the development of vertical columnar joints more extensively at this location than at Kilauea Iki, which may have reduced the shear moduli controlling the Love wave mode. The average phase velocities in the frequency band

  17. Research on seismic stress triggering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万永革; 吴忠良; 周公威; 黄静; 秦立新

    2002-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews basic theory of seismic stress triggering. Recent development on seismic stress triggering has been reviewed in the views of seismic static and dynamic stress triggering, application of viscoelastic model in seismic stress triggering, the relation between earthquake triggering and volcanic eruption or explosion, other explanation of earthquake triggering, etc. And some suggestions for further study on seismic stress triggering in near future are given.

  18. 松辽盆地断陷层系地震火山地层学研究:典型火山岩地震相与地质解释模式%Seismic Volcanostratigraphy of the Songliao Basin,Early Cretaceous:Typical Volcanic Seismic Facies and Geological Interpretation Pattern

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    衣健; 王璞珺; 李瑞磊; 赵然磊; 陈崇阳; 孙玥

    2014-01-01

    为了研究松辽盆地火山岩盆地充填模式及在无井或少井区寻找火山岩有利储层,需要对盆地火山岩地震相及其反射特征和地质内涵进行系统性的总结和分析。基于盆内钻井和过井地震剖面,应用火山地层学理论和地震火山地层学方法将松辽盆地火山岩地震相单元划分为火山岩丘、火山岩台地、洼地火山充填、穿切等4类10种亚类。通过井震对比,结合野外火山地层研究相关文献资料,阐述了这些地震相单元的地质解释模式和响应关系。火山岩地震相单元通常对应于以某种盆地火山充填类型(相或相组合)为主的火山岩体,火山岩丘地震相多可解释为侵出岩穹、酸性简单熔岩流和酸性复合熔岩流等具有丘状外形的充填类型,火山岩台地地震相多代表中基性岩的简单熔岩流和火山碎屑流等具有席状外形的充填类型,洼地火山充填多代表充填在先存洼地中的简单熔岩流和火山碎屑流,穿切地震相多可解释为岩席、岩墙。除了这些典型的地震相单元以外,对地震反射特征(外形、物理参数、反射结构)与火山岩地质属性的响应关系的分析可有助于更好地解释地震相单元所反映的地质含义。%In order to understand the volcanic rocks filling model in basin and explore favorable volcanic reservoir in less or no well area,the systematically study of seismic facies units,their reflection characteristics and geological interpretation is necessary.With volcanostratigraphy theory and seismic volcanostratigraphy method,the typical seismic facies of the volcanic rocks were studied based on wells and inter-well seismic profiles in the Songliao volcanic rifted grabens,Early Cretaceous.The facies can be divided into 4 types and 10 subtypes of typical seismic facies units,such as the volcanic dome unit, the volcanic platform unit,the volcanic filling unit and the cutting units

  19. Magma displacements under insular volcanic fields, applications to eruption forecasting: El Hierro, Canary Islands, 2011-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, A.; Fernández-Ros, A.; Berrocoso, M.; Marrero, J. M.; Prates, G.; De la Cruz-Reyna, S.; Ortiz, R.

    2014-04-01

    Significant deformations, followed by increased seismicity detected since 2011 July at El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain, prompted the deployment of additional monitoring equipment. The climax of this unrest was a submarine eruption first detected on 2011 October 10, and located at about 2 km SW of La Restinga, southernmost village of El Hierro Island. The eruption ceased on 2012 March 5, after the volcanic tremor signals persistently weakened through 2012 February. However, the seismic activity did not end with the eruption, as several other seismic crises followed. The seismic episodes presented a characteristic pattern: over a few days the number and magnitude of seismic event increased persistently, culminating in seismic events severe enough to be felt all over the island. Those crises occurred in 2011 November, 2012 June and September, 2012 December to 2013 January and in 2013 March-April. In all cases the seismic unrest was preceded by significant deformations measured on the island's surface that continued during the whole episode. Analysis of the available GPS and seismic data suggests that several magma displacement processes occurred at depth from the beginning of the unrest. The first main magma movement or `injection' culminated with the 2011 October submarine eruption. A model combining the geometry of the magma injection process and the variations in seismic energy release has allowed successful forecasting of the new-vent opening.

  20. Relationship between earthquake and volcanic eruption inferred from historical records

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈洪洲; 高峰; 吴雪娟; 孟宪森

    2004-01-01

    A large number of seismic records are discovered for the first time in the historical materials about Wudalianchi volcanic group eruption in 1720~1721, which provides us with abundant volcanic earthquake information. Based on the written records, the relationship between earthquake and volcanic eruption is discussed in the paper. Furthermore it is pointed that earthquake swarm is an important indication of volcanic eruption. Therefore, monitoring volcanic earthquakes is of great significance for forecasting volcanic eruption.

  1. Modelling framework developed for managing and forecasting the El Hierro 2011-2014 unrest processes based on the analysis of the seismicity and deformation data rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Alicia; Fernandez-Ros, Alberto; Berrocoso, Manuel; Marrero, Jose Manuel; Prates, Gonçalo; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Ortiz, Ramon

    2014-05-01

    In July 2011 at El Hierro (Canary Islands, Spain), a volcanic unrest was detected, with significant deformations followed by increased seismicity. A submarine eruption started on 10 October 2011 and ceased on 5 March 2012, after the volcanic tremor signals persistently weakened through February 2012. However, the seismic activity did not end when the eruption, as several other seismic crises followed since. The seismic episodes presented a characteristic pattern: over a few days the number and magnitude of seismic event increased persistently, culminating in seismic events severe enough to be felt all over the island. In all cases the seismic activity was preceded by significant deformations measured on the island's surface that continued during the whole episode. Analysis of the available GNSS-GPS and seismic data suggests that several magma injection processes occurred at depth from the beginning of the unrest. A model combining the geometry of the magma injection process and the variations in seismic energy released has allowed successful forecasting of the new-vent opening. The model presented here places special emphasis on phenomena associated to moderate eruptions, as well as on volcano-tectonic earthquakes and landslides, which in some cases, as in El Hierro, may be more destructive than an eruption itself.

  2. Refinement of Regional Distance Seismic Moment Tensor and Uncertainty Analysis for Source-Type Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-02

    as volcanic environments and geothermal systems, and other manmade shallow seismicity related to anthropogenic activities such as hydraulic...M. Larson (2007), Seismically and geodetically determined non-double couple source mechanisms from the Miyakejima volcanic earthquake swarm, J

  3. Exploring Hawaiian Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Okubo, Paul G.; Hon, Ken

    2013-02-01

    In 1912 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Thomas A. Jaggar Jr. on the island of Hawaii. Driven by the devastation he observed while investigating the volcanic disasters of 1902 at Montagne Pelée in the Caribbean, Jaggar conducted a worldwide search and decided that Hawai`i provided an excellent natural laboratory for systematic study of earthquake and volcano processes toward better understanding of seismic and volcanic hazards. In the 100 years since HVO's founding, surveillance and investigation of Hawaiian volcanoes have spurred advances in volcano and seismic monitoring techniques, extended scientists' understanding of eruptive activity and processes, and contributed to development of global theories about hot spots and mantle plumes.

  4. Exploring Hawaiian volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Okubo, Paul G.; Hon, Ken

    2013-01-01

    In 1912 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Thomas A. Jaggar Jr. on the island of Hawaii. Driven by the devastation he observed while investigating the volcanic disasters of 1902 at Montagne Pelée in the Caribbean, Jaggar conducted a worldwide search and decided that Hawai‘i provided an excellent natural laboratory for systematic study of earthquake and volcano processes toward better understanding of seismic and volcanic hazards. In the 100 years since HVO’s founding, surveillance and investigation of Hawaiian volcanoes have spurred advances in volcano and seismic monitoring techniques, extended scientists’ understanding of eruptive activity and processes, and contributed to development of global theories about hot spots and mantle plumes.

  5. Precise Hypocenter Relocation of Microearthquakes in the Torfajökull Volcanic System, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippitsch, R.; White, R. S.; Soosalu, H.

    2003-12-01

    The Torfajökull volcanic system is one of about 30 active volcanoes comprising the neovolcanic zones of Iceland. It is located at the rift-transform junction between the Eastern Volcanic Zone and the South Iceland Seismic Zone. The central volcanic part of the system is the largest silicic centre in Iceland with a caldera of about 12 km diameter. It's high-temperature geothermal system is one of the most powerful in Iceland. Torfajökull is the source of persistent seismicity, where both high- and low-frequency earthquakes occur. To study the microseismicity of the volcanic area in detail a temporary array of 20 broad-band seismic stations was deployed between May and November 2002. These temporary stations were embedded in the permanent South Iceland Lowland (SIL) network, and data from nine adjacent SIL-stations were included in the study. A 'minimum one-dimensional velocity model' with station corrections was computed for earthquake relocation by inverting manually picked P- and S- wave arrival times from events occurring in the Torfajökull volcanic centre, beneath Myrdalsjökull glacier south of the temporary array, and in the South Iceland Seismic Zone in the west. High-frequency earthquakes from the Torfajökull volcanic centre were then relocated using the program NonLinLoc, which calculates a non-linear, probabilistic solution to the earthquake location problem. From several hundred earthquakes in the Torfajökull area, 122 were well locatable (gap < 180 degrees, more than 10 observations). Subsequently, we correlated the waveforms of this sub-dataset (around 2000 obseravtions) to define linked events, calculated the relative travel time difference between event pairs, and solved for the hypocentral separation between these events with HypoDD. The resulting high-resolution pattern shows a tighter clustering in epicenter and focal depth when compared to original locations. All earthquakes are located beneath the caldera with hypocenters between 1 and 6 km

  6. Persistent long-term (1944-2015) ionosphere-magnetosphere associations at the area of intense seismic activity and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyaeva, T. L.; Arikan, F.; Stanislawska, I.

    2017-02-01

    Analysis of the earthquakes catalogues since 1944 reveals the area of the peak global earthquake occurrence in the Pacific Ocean southwards from the magnetic equator, in particular, at Australia. In the present study a long series of geomagnetic aa indices gathered from two antipodal magnetic observatories at Melbourne (Australia) and Greenwich (UK) are compared with the monthly-hourly critical frequency, foF2, from the nearby ionosonde measurements at Canberra and Slough (Chilton) and Moscow (control site) for 1944-2015. The annual percentage occurrence of the positive ionosphere storms W index (pW+) and negative index (pW-) is determined. It is found that the occurrence of the ionosphere plasma depletion pW- of the instant foF2 as compared to the monthly median is well correlated with the aa index at all three sites (cc > 0.85). The positive storm signatures of the plasma density enhancement pW+ show high correlation with the geomagnetic activity aa index at Slough (cc = 0.68) and Moscow (cc = 0.92) but drastic difference of missing correlation at Canberra (cc = 0.06). It has been suggested that the frequent earthquake occurrence over Australia may produce the persistent significant ionosphere plasma enhancements at Canberra which disrupts balance between the ionosphere-magnetosphere activities.

  7. Neural networks and dynamical system techniques for volcanic tremor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Carniel

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A volcano can be seen as a dynamical system, the number of state variables being its dimension N. The state is usually confined on a manifold with a lower dimension f, manifold which is characteristic of a persistent «structural configuration». A change in this manifold may be a hint that something is happening to the dynamics of the volcano, possibly leading to a paroxysmal phase. In this work the original state space of the volcano dynamical system is substituted by a pseudo state space reconstructed by the method of time-delayed coordinates, with suitably chosen lag time and embedding dimension, from experimental time series of seismic activity, i.e. volcanic tremor recorded at Stromboli volcano. The monitoring is done by a neural network which first learns the dynamics of the persistent tremor and then tries to detect structural changes in its behaviour.

  8. Catastrophic volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    Since primitive times, catastrophes due to volcanic activity have been vivid in the mind of man, who knew that his activities in many parts of the world were threatened by lava flows, mudflows, and ash falls. Within the present century, increasingly complex interactions between volcanism and the environment, on scales not previously experienced historically, have been detected or suspected from geologic observations. These include enormous hot pyroclastic flows associated with collapse at source calderas and fed by eruption columns that reached the stratosphere, relations between huge flood basalt eruptions at hotspots and the rifting of continents, devastating laterally-directed volcanic blasts and pyroclastic surges, great volcanic-generated tsunamis, climate modification from volcanic release of ash and sulfur aerosols into the upper atmosphere, modification of ocean circulation by volcanic constructs and attendent climatic implications, global pulsations in intensity of volcanic activity, and perhaps triggering of some intense terrestrial volcanism by planetary impacts. Complex feedback between volcanic activity and additional seemingly unrelated terrestrial processes likely remains unrecognized. Only recently has it become possible to begin to evaluate the degree to which such large-scale volcanic processes may have been important in triggering or modulating the tempo of faunal extinctions and other evolutionary events. In this overview, such processes are examined from the viewpoint of a field volcanologist, rather than as a previous participant in controversies concerning the interrelations between extinctions, impacts, and volcanism.

  9. Precambrian Lunar Volcanic Protolife

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Green

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Five representative terrestrial analogs of lunar craters are detailed relevant to Precambrian fumarolic activity. Fumarolic fluids contain the ingredients for protolife. Energy sources to derive formaldehyde, amino acids and related compounds could be by flow charging, charge separation and volcanic shock. With no photodecomposition in shadow, most fumarolic fluids at 40 K would persist over geologically long time periods. Relatively abundant tungsten would permit creation of critical enzymes, Fischer-Tropsch reactions could form polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and soluble volcanic polyphosphates would enable assembly of nucleic acids. Fumarolic stimuli factors are described. Orbital and lander sensors specific to protolife exploration including combined Raman/laser-induced breakdown spectrocsopy are evaluated.

  10. Frequency-dependent seismic coda-attenuation imaging of volcanic geomorphology: from debris flows at Mount St. Helens volcano to cross-faulting at Campi Flegrei caldera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Siena, Luca; Gabrielli, Simona; Spagnolo, Matteo

    2017-04-01

    The stochastic loss of energy measured using the later portion of seismic recordings (coda) can be used to image and monitor geomorphology in volcanoes, once appropriate sensitivity kernels for the application of attenuation tomography have been developed. The use of this advanced seismic method with GIS/InSAR techniques is an unexplored field, which is receiving increasing attention in volcano-seismology. By using this integrated approach we can image structure and monitor dynamics of the debris flow that followed the 1980 explosive eruption of Mount St. Helens (US) volcano at resolution similar to that of remote sensing data, and depths of Italy, the results provide a novel perspective on the links between deep fluid migration and surface structures. The implications of the proposed approach on volcano monitoring are evident.

  11. Subdiffusion of volcanic earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Sumiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study is performed on volcanic seismicities at Mt.Eyjafjallajokull in Iceland and Mt. Etna in Sicily, Italy, from the viewpoint of science of complex systems, and the discovery of remarkable similarities between them regarding their exotic spatio-temporal properties is reported. In both of the volcanic seismicities as point processes, the jump probability distributions of earthquakes are found to obey the exponential law, whereas the waiting-time distributions follow the power law. In particular, a careful analysis is made about the finite size effects on the waiting-time distributions, and accordingly, the previously reported results for Mt. Etna [S. Abe and N. Suzuki, EPL 110, 59001 (2015)] are reinterpreted. It is shown that spreads of the volcanic earthquakes are subdiffusive at both of the volcanoes. The aging phenomenon is observed in the "event-time-averaged" mean-squared displacements of the hypocenters. A comment is also made on presence/absence of long term memories in the context of t...

  12. Anomalous Seismic Velocity Drop in Iron and Biotite Rich Amphibolite to Granulite Facies Transitional Rocks from Deccan Volcanic Covered 1993 Killari Earthquake Region, Maharashtra (India): a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, O. P.; Tripathi, Priyanka; Vedanti, Nimisha; Srinivasa Sarma, D.

    2016-07-01

    65 Ma Deccan Volcanic Province of western India forms one of the largest flood basaltic eruptions on the surface of the earth. The nature of the concealed crust below this earthquake prone region, which is marked by several low velocity zones at different depths has hardly been understood. These low velocity zones have been invariably interpreted as fluid-filled zones, genetically connected to earthquake nucleation. While carrying out detailed geological and petrophysical studies on the Late Archean basement cores, obtained from a 617 m deep KLR-1 borehole, drilled in the epicentral zone of 1993 Killari earthquake region of the southern Deccan Volcanic Province, we came across several instances where we observed remarkable drop in measured P-wave velocity in a number of high density cores. We provide detailed petrographic and geological data on 11 such anomalous samples which belong to mid-crustal amphibolite to granulite facies transitional rocks. They are associated with a mean P-wave velocity of 6.02 km/s (range 5.82-6.22 km/s) conforming to granitic upper crust, but in contrast have a high mean density of 2.91 g/cm3 (range 2.75-3.08 g/cm3), which characterise mid to lower crust. This velocity drop, which is as much as 15 % in some cores, is primarily attributed to FeOT enrichment (up to about 23 wt%) during the course of mantle-fluid driven retrogressive metasomatic reactions, caused by exhumation of deep-seated mafic rocks. Presence of Iron content (mainly magnetite), widely seen as opaques in thin sections of the rocks, seems to have resulted into sharp increase in density, as well as mean atomic weight. Our study indicates that the measured V p is inversely related to FeOT content as well as mean atomic weight of the rock.

  13. A conceptual model for hydrocarbon accumulation and seepage processes inside Chapopote asphalt volcanism site, Southern Gulf of Mexico: from high resolution seismic point of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, F.; Spiess, V.; Fekete, N.; Keil, H.; Bohrmann, G.

    2007-05-01

    As part of the German R/V Meteor M67/2 expedition in 2006 to the southern Gulf of Mexico, a set of 2D high resolution seismic profiles was acquired across the Chapopote knoll to study sea floor asphalt occurrences and their origin. Based on regional seismic stratigraphy studies, correlated to DSDP sites, a higher reflective coarse grained sediment unit of Late Miocene age is identified as a potential shallow gas reservoir, overlain by a low permeability fine grained Pliocene and Pleistocene cover. As a result of salt diapirism, local uplift has caused reduced accumulation rates above the diaper since the late Pliocene, while the rates had been uniform throughout the area before. This has further improved the seal properties, since more fine grained material deposited in elevated locations. Nevertheless, on the crest of Chapopote, sediments above the coarse sediment unit are only around 150-75 m thick. Since oil and gas production can well be expected at depth in Jurassic and Tertiary source rocks, the presence of high amplitude reflector packages within the reservoir unit is interpreted as a result of the presence of hydrocarbons. This interpretation is further supported by the observation that some reflectors are cross-cutting and/or reveal a drop in instantaneous frequency. But, the thin seal above the reservoir unit, located directly underneath a widespread occurrence of asphalts at the sea floor, probably facilitates the leakage of hydrocarbons trapped inside the reservoir through a ~ 750 m wide acoustically chaotic zone partly aided by faulting. Since the top of Chapopote shows a high structural complexity, more seepage sites may exist beyond where seafloor asphalts have been found so far. Evolution and structure of the migration and reservoir system, which may be deep rooted, will be discussed both with respect to shallow gas and asphalt occurrences.

  14. Seismicity at the northeast edge of the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB and activation of an undocumented fault: the Peñamiller earthquake sequence of 2010–2011, Querétaro, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Clemente-Chavez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The town of Peñamiller in the state of Querétaro, Mexico, is located at the northeast border of the seismogenic zone known as the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB, which transects the central part of Mexico with an east–west orientation. In the vicinity of this town, a sequence of small earthquakes occurred during the end of 2010 and beginning of 2011. Seismicity in the continental regimen of central Mexico is not too frequent; however, it is known that there are precedents of large earthquakes (Mw magnitude greater than 6.0 occurring in this zone. Three large earthquakes have occurred in the past 100 yr: the 19 November 1912 (MS = 7.0, the 3 January 1920 (MS = 6.4, and the 29 June 1935 (MS = 6.9 earthquakes. Prior to the instrumental period, the earthquake of 11 February 1875, which took place near the city of Guadalajara, caused widespread damage. The purpose of this article is to contribute to the available seismic information of this region. This will help advance our understanding of the tectonic situation of the central Mexico MVB region. Twenty-four shallow earthquakes of the Peñamiller seismic sequence of 2011 were recorded by a temporary accelerograph network installed by the Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro (UAQ. The data were analyzed in order to determine the source locations and to estimate the source parameters. The study was carried out through an inversion process and by spectral analysis. The results show that the largest earthquake occurred on 8 February 2011 at 19:53:48.6 UTC, had a moment magnitude Mw = 3.5, and was located at latitude 21.039° and longitude −99.752°, at a depth of 5.6 km. This location is less than 7 km away in a south-east direction from downtown Peñamiller. The focal mechanisms are mostly normal faults with small lateral components. These focal mechanisms are consistent with the extensional regimen of the southern extension of the Basin and Range (BR province. The source area of the largest event was

  15. Seismicity at the northeast edge of the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB) and activation of an undocumented fault: the Peñamiller earthquake sequence of 2010-2011, Querétaro, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente-Chavez, A.; Figueroa-Soto, A.; Zúñiga, F. R.; Arroyo, M.; Montiel, M.; Chavez, O.

    2013-10-01

    The town of Peñamiller in the state of Querétaro, Mexico, is located at the northeast border of the seismogenic zone known as the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB), which transects the central part of Mexico with an east-west orientation. In the vicinity of this town, a sequence of small earthquakes occurred during the end of 2010 and beginning of 2011. Seismicity in the continental regimen of central Mexico is not too frequent; however, it is known that there are precedents of large earthquakes (Mw magnitude greater than 6.0) occurring in this zone. Three large earthquakes have occurred in the past 100 yr: the 19 November 1912 (MS = 7.0), the 3 January 1920 (MS = 6.4), and the 29 June 1935 (MS = 6.9) earthquakes. Prior to the instrumental period, the earthquake of 11 February 1875, which took place near the city of Guadalajara, caused widespread damage. The purpose of this article is to contribute to the available seismic information of this region. This will help advance our understanding of the tectonic situation of the central Mexico MVB region. Twenty-four shallow earthquakes of the Peñamiller seismic sequence of 2011 were recorded by a temporary accelerograph network installed by the Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro (UAQ). The data were analyzed in order to determine the source locations and to estimate the source parameters. The study was carried out through an inversion process and by spectral analysis. The results show that the largest earthquake occurred on 8 February 2011 at 19:53:48.6 UTC, had a moment magnitude Mw = 3.5, and was located at latitude 21.039° and longitude -99.752°, at a depth of 5.6 km. This location is less than 7 km away in a south-east direction from downtown Peñamiller. The focal mechanisms are mostly normal faults with small lateral components. These focal mechanisms are consistent with the extensional regimen of the southern extension of the Basin and Range (BR) province. The source area of the largest event was estimated to

  16. Anomalous diffusion of volcanic earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Sumiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic seismicity at Mt. Etna is studied. It is found that the associated stochastic process exhibits a subdiffusive phenomenon. The jump probability distribution well obeys an exponential law, whereas the waiting-time distribution follows a power law in a wide range. Although these results would seem to suggest that the phenomenon could be described by temporally-fractional kinetic theory based on the viewpoint of continuous-time random walks, the exponent of the power-law waiting-time distribution actually lies outside of the range allowed in the theory. In addition, there exists the aging phenomenon in the event-time averaged mean squared displacement, in contrast to the picture of fractional Brownian motion. Comments are also made on possible relevances of random walks on fractals as well as nonlinear kinetics. Thus, problems of volcanic seismicity are highly challenging for science of complex systems.

  17. Detection and Classification of Volcanic Earthquakes/Tremors in Central Anatolian Volcanic Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Metin; Arda Özacar, A.; Bülent Tank, S.; Uslular, Göksu; Kuşcu, Gonca; Türkelli, Niyazi

    2017-04-01

    Central Anatolia has been characterized by active volcanism since 10 Ma which created the so called Central Anatolia Volcanic Province (CAVP) where a series of volcanoes are located along the NE-SW trend. The petrological investigations reveal that the magma source in the CAVP has both subduction and asthenospheric signature possibly due to tearing of ongoing northward subduction of African plate along Aegean and Cyprus arcs. Recently, a temporary seismic array was deployed within the scope of Continental Dynamics: Central Anatolian Tectonics (CD-CAT) project and provided a unique opportunity to study the deep seismic signature of the CAVP. Passive seismic imaging efforts and magnetotellurics (MT) observations revealed low velocity and high conductivity zones supporting the presence of localized partial melt bodies beneath the CAVP at varying depths, especially around Mt. Hasan which exhibits both geological and archeological evidences for its eruption around 7500 B.C. In Central Anatolia, local seismicity detected by the CD-CAT array coincides well with the active faults zones. However, active or potentially active volcanoes within CAVP are characterized by the lack of seismic activity. In this study, seismic data recorded by permanent stations of Regional Earthquake-Tsunami Monitoring Center were combined with temporary seismic data collected by the CD-CAT array to improve sampling density across the CAVP. Later, the continuous seismic waveforms of randomly selected time intervals were manually analyzed to identify initially undetected seismic sources which have signal characters matching to volcanic earthquakes/tremors. For candidate events, frequency spectrums are constructed to classify the sources according to their physical mechanisms. Preliminary results support the presence of both volcano-tectonic (VT) and low-period (LT) events within the CAVP. In the next stage, the spectral and polarization analyses techniques will be utilized to the entire seismic

  18. Sediments of Lake Van - a high-resolution archive of changing climate, volcanic events and seismic activity in Eastern Anatolia for the last 500'000 yrs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockhecke, M.; Anselmetti, F. S.; Sturm, M.; Paleovan Scientific Party

    2012-04-01

    Varved sedimentary records have shown their high potential to reconstruct abrupt and global climate change within the marine realm (e.g. Cariaco Basin, Santa Barbara Basin). Continental counterparts, consisting of long and varved lacustrine records can be found in the subsurface of some deep lakes, such as Lake Van. Lake Van is a 440 m deep closed soda lake situated in a climatically sensitive semiarid and tectonically active region in Eastern Anatolia, Turkey. The ICDP project Paleovan aims to reconstruct the climatic, tectonic and volcanic history of Lake Van. Driven by an international and interdisciplinary scientific team, two sites, Ahlat Ridge (AR) and Northern Basin (NB) were drilled in summer 2010 recovering sedimentary records of 220 and 140 m, respectively. A total of 800 m of sediment-cores were opened, described and photographed in spring 2011 at the IODP core repository in Bremen. Lithologies of up to five parallel cores (multiple coring) were correlated and a composite profile was defined giving priority to core quality and continuity. Preliminary Ar/Ar dates of the core catcher yielded a basal ages of ~500´000 years. Using this rough age model, geochemical measurements (every 20 cm) indicate that TOC is high in warmer periods (interglacials) and low in colder periods (glacials). These TOC fluctuations match marine isotope stages and extrapolated Holocene sedimentation rates. The 219 m long AR composite profile consists of ~80 % lacustrine sediments, ~10 % of volcaniclastic deposits and 10 % gaps interpreted to be coarse-grained volcaniclastic that are difficult to be recovered. The lacustrine mud, i.e., clayey silt composed of mainly clay minerals and carbonate. Based on major macroscopic sediment features eight major lacustrine sediment types (~900 layer) were differentiated and separated from the volcaniclastic deposits (300 layer). Impressive color transitions and a repetitive pattern of similar lithological successions occur throughout the

  19. Long-Period seismic events at Ubinas Volcano (Peru): their implications and potentiality as monitoring tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandomeneghi, D.; Inza, A.; Metaxian, J.-P.; Macedo, O.

    2012-04-01

    Ubinas volcano (Southern Peru) is an active andesitic stratovolcano, located 75 km East of Arequipa City, with an average occurrence of 6-7 eruptions per century and persistent fumarolic and phreatic activity. The most recent eruption, accompanied by explosions and by the extrusion of a lava dome, started on March 2006 with an increase of seismicity and observed fumarole occurrence followed in April by more intense explosions, recorded until May 2009. To monitor the volcanic activity, the Geophysical Institute of Peru and the Institut de Recherche pour le Développment (France), built up a seismic network around the volcano, installing 4 permanent stations and deploying 8 supplementary temporary broadband seismometers. In addition, in the period May to July 2009, a seismic experiment was carried out on the volcano flanks with 2 cross-shaped dense antennas with broadband seismometers. As the seismic activity was characterized by recurring low-frequency waveforms, we identify their pattern of occurrence through waveform cross-correlation technique, with respect to major eruptive phases and other observations (as volcano ground deformation from tiltmeters, volcanic product composition, etc). Once established their likely association with the eruptive sequence, we utilize both local network and dense-array data and analyze their location, changes in location, spectral content variations and possible physical explanation. The final aim is to introduce this kind of analysis as quantitative tool to understand ongoing eruptive phases at andesitic volcanoes and possibly to forecast magma/fluid significant movements.

  20. A Preliminary Study of the Types of Volcanic Earthquakes and Volcanic Activity at the Changbaishan Tianchi Volcano

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Yuehong; Su Wei; Fang Lihua

    2006-01-01

    Since 2002, a significant increase in seismicity, obvious ground deformation and geochemical anomalies have been observed in the Changbaishan Tianchi volcanic area. A series felt earthquakes occur near the caldera, causing great influence to society. In this paper, the types of volcanic earthquakes recorded by the temporal seismic network since 2002 have been classified by analyzing the spectrum, time-frequency characteristics and seismic waveforms at different stations. The risk of volcano eruptions was also estimated. Our results show that almost all earthquakes occurring in Tianchi volcano are volcanic-tectonic earthquakes. The low frequency seismic waveforms observed at a few stations may be caused by local mediums, and have no relation with long-period events. Although the level of seismicity increased obviously and earthquake swarms occurred more frequently than before, we considered that the magma activity is still in its early stage and the eruption risk of Changbaishan Tianchi volcano is still iow in the near future.

  1. Volcanic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Kenneth A.; Gerlach, Terrance M.

    1995-01-01

    In Roman mythology, Vulcan, the god of fire, was said to have made tools and weapons for the other gods in his workshop at Olympus. Throughout history, volcanoes have frequently been identified with Vulcan and other mythological figures. Scientists now know that the “smoke" from volcanoes, once attributed by poets to be from Vulcan’s forge, is actually volcanic gas naturally released from both active and many inactive volcanoes. The molten rock, or magma, that lies beneath volcanoes and fuels eruptions, contains abundant gases that are released to the surface before, during, and after eruptions. These gases range from relatively benign low-temperature steam to thick hot clouds of choking sulfurous fume jetting from the earth. Water vapor is typically the most abundant volcanic gas, followed by carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. Other volcanic gases are hydrogen sulfide, hydrochloric acid, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrofluoric acid, and other trace gases and volatile metals. The concentrations of these gas species can vary considerably from one volcano to the next.

  2. Seismic event classification and precursor identification at Fuego Volcano, Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, K. A.; Waite, G. P.; Rodriguez, K.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the nature and origins of seismic signals generated by volcanic activity can greatly aid in hazard mitigation efforts. Systematic identification and detailed cataloging of explosive events provide a first step for this understanding, and can be even more valuable when the events span longer time periods. Beyond simply being a more useful monitoring tool, the detailed classification of events can illuminate the processes behind different conduit flow phenomena such as rheological sealing or piston-style chugging. Fuego volcano, Guatemala, is a basaltic-andesite stratovolcano that has been continually active since 1999. Activity is characterized by small-scale explosive eruptions and intermittent lava flows. In this study, we categorize different events recorded with a 10 station temporary seismic array at Fuego volcano in Guatemala in January 2012 that included infrasound and tilt sensors. Waveform analysis, along with visual and thermal characteristics captured by cameras allow us to identify precursory activity in different bandwidths that precedes some of the event types. We investigate the physical mechanisms behind these precursors to explain why some event types exhibit them while others may not, and how these mechanisms influence our conceptual models of explosion dynamics at Fuego. Finally, we compare events recorded in 2012 with other studies conducted at Fuego volcano in previous years to identify changes in the signal characteristics and their potential influences on activity styles observed during different field campaigns to highlight the importance of longitudinal studies at persistently active volcanic systems.

  3. Experimental investigation of remote seismic triggering by gas bubble growth in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, J. B.; Cooper, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Remotely triggered seismicity is the process by which an earthquake at one location initiates others after a time delay ranging from seconds to days, over distances up to thousands of kilometers. Candidate mechanisms have been proposed, but none specifically address the role of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas bubble growth in groundwater as a driver of remote seismic triggering in active volcanic and geothermal regions, where shallow crustal CO2 gas is abundant. In the present study, we hypothesize that a seismic wave from a distant source can initiate rapid gas bubble growth in CO2-rich groundwater, resulting in a persistent increase in pore fluid pressure and a reduction of effective stress, which can trigger failure on a critically loaded geologic fault. Under conditions representative of a confined aquifer, a Berea sandstone core flooded with an aqueous CO2 solution was subjected to a six-period burst of 0.05-0.3 Hz, 0.1-0.4 MPa confining stress oscillations. After the oscillations were terminated, the pore fluid pressure exceeded its initial value by 13-60 cm equivalent freshwater head, scaling with the amplitude and frequency - a surplus that is consistent with borehole water level changes [Roeloffs et al. (1995) USGS Open File Report, 95-42] observed in response to the June 28 1992 MW 7.3 Landers, California earthquake Rayleigh wave in Parkfield and Long Valley caldera, California, where remotely triggered earthquakes occurred [Hill et al. (1993) Science, 260(5114); Hill et al. (1995) Journal of Geophysical Research, 100(B7)]. Our experimental results indicate that seismically initiated gas bubble growth in groundwater is a physically plausible mechanism for remote seismic triggering in active volcanic and geothermal regions, suggesting that the aqueous CO2 saturation state in a confined aquifer may be used to assess susceptibility to remote seismic triggering.

  4. Short-term spasmodic switching of volcanic tremor source activation in a conduit of the 2011 Kirishima eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, S.; Shimizu, H.; Matsushima, T.; Uehira, K.; Yamashita, Y.; Nakamoto, M.; Miyazaki, M.; Chikura, H.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanic tremors are seismic indicators providing clues for magma behavior, which is related to volcanic eruptions and activity. Detection of spatial and temporal variations of volcanic tremors is important for understanding the mechanism of volcanic eruptions. However, temporal variations of tremor activity in short-term than a minute have not been previously detected by seismological observations around volcanoes. Here, we show that volcanic tremor sources were activated at the top of the conduit (i.e. the crater) and at its lower end by analyzing seismograms from a dense seismic array during the 2011 Kirishima eruption. We observed spasmodic switching in the seismic ray direction during a volcanic tremor sequence. Such fine volcanic tremor structure suggests an interaction between tremor sources located in both deep and shallow depths. Our result suggests that seismic array observations can monitor the magma behavior and contribute to the evaluation of the activity's transition.

  5. Volcanic Catastrophes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    The big news from 20th century geophysics may not be plate tectonics but rather the surprise return of catastrophism, following its apparent 19th century defeat to uniformitarianism. Divine miracles and plagues had yielded to the logic of integrating observations of everyday change over time. Yet the brilliant interpretation of the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary iridium anomaly introduced an empirically based catastrophism. Undoubtedly, decades of contemplating our own nuclear self-destruction played a role in this. Concepts of nuclear winter, volcanic winter, and meteor impact winter are closely allied. And once the veil of threat of all-out nuclear exchange began to lift, we could begin to imagine slower routes to destruction as "global change". As a way to end our world, fire is a good one. Three-dimensional magma chambers do not have as severe a magnitude limitation as essentially two-dimensional faults. Thus, while we have experienced earthquakes that are as big as they get, we have not experienced volcanic eruptions nearly as great as those preserved in the geologic record. The range extends to events almost three orders of magnitude greater than any eruptions of the 20th century. Such a calamity now would at the very least bring society to a temporary halt globally, and cause death and destruction on a continental scale. At maximum, there is the possibility of hindering photosynthesis and threatening life more generally. It has even been speculated that the relative genetic homogeneity of humankind derives from an evolutionary "bottleneck" from near-extinction in a volcanic cataclysm. This is somewhat more palatable to contemplate than a return to a form of Original Sin, in which we arrived at homogeneity by a sort of "ethnic cleansing". Lacking a written record of truly great eruptions, our sense of human impact must necessarily be aided by archeological and anthropological investigations. For example, there is much to be learned about the influence of

  6. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGrande, Allegra N.; Anchukaitis, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions represent some of the most climatically important and societally disruptive short-term events in human history. Large eruptions inject ash, dust, sulfurous gases (e.g. SO2, H2S), halogens (e.g. Hcl and Hbr), and water vapor into the Earth's atmosphere. Sulfurous emissions principally interact with the climate by converting into sulfate aerosols that reduce incoming solar radiation, warming the stratosphere and altering ozone creation, reducing global mean surface temperature, and suppressing the hydrological cycle. In this issue, we focus on the history, processes, and consequences of these large eruptions that inject enough material into the stratosphere to significantly affect the climate system. In terms of the changes wrought on the energy balance of the Earth System, these transient events can temporarily have a radiative forcing magnitude larger than the range of solar, greenhouse gas, and land use variability over the last millennium. In simulations as well as modern and paleoclimate observations, volcanic eruptions cause large inter-annual to decadal-scale changes in climate. Active debates persist concerning their role in longer-term (multi-decadal to centennial) modification of the Earth System, however.

  7. Friction in volcanic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic landscapes are amongst the most dynamic on Earth and, as such, are particularly susceptible to failure and frictional processes. In rocks, damage accumulation is frequently accompanied by the release of seismic energy, which has been shown to accelerate in the approach to failure on both a field and laboratory scale. The point at which failure occurs is highly dependent upon strain-rate, which also dictates the slip-zone properties that pertain beyond failure, in scenarios such as sector collapse and pyroclastic flows as well as the ascent of viscous magma. High-velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments have provided new opportunities to overcome the grand challenge of understanding faulting processes during volcanic phenomena. Work on granular ash material demonstrates that at ambient temperatures, ash gouge behaves according to Byerlee's rule at low slip velocities, but is slip-weakening, becoming increasingly lubricating as slip ensues. In absence of ash along a slip plane, rock-rock friction induces cataclasis and heating which, if sufficient, may induce melting (producing pseudotachylyte) and importantly, vesiculation. The viscosity of the melt, so generated, controls the subsequent lubrication or resistance to slip along the fault plane thanks to non-Newtonian suspension rheology. The shear-thinning behaviour and viscoelasticity of frictional melts yield a tendency for extremely unstable slip, and occurrence of frictional melt fragmentation. This velocity-dependence acts as an important feedback mechanism on the slip plane, in addition to the bulk composition, mineralogy and glass content of the magma, that all influence frictional behaviour. During sector collapse events and in pyroclastic density currents it is the frictional properties of the rocks and ash that, in-part, control the run-out distance and associated risk. In addition, friction plays an important role in the eruption of viscous magmas: In the conduit, the rheology of magma is integral

  8. Volcanic hazard management in dispersed volcanism areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Jose Manuel; Garcia, Alicia; Ortiz, Ramon

    2014-05-01

    Traditional volcanic hazard methodologies were developed mainly to deal with the big stratovolcanoes. In such type of volcanoes, the hazard map is an important tool for decision-makers not only during a volcanic crisis but also for territorial planning. According to the past and recent eruptions of a volcano, all possible volcanic hazards are modelled and included in the hazard map. Combining the hazard map with the Event Tree the impact area can be zoned and defining the likely eruptive scenarios that will be used during a real volcanic crisis. But in areas of disperse volcanism is very complex to apply the same volcanic hazard methodologies. The event tree do not take into account unknown vents, because the spatial concepts included in it are only related with the distance reached by volcanic hazards. The volcanic hazard simulation is also difficult because the vent scatter modifies the results. The volcanic susceptibility try to solve this problem, calculating the most likely areas to have an eruption, but the differences between low and large values obtained are often very small. In these conditions the traditional hazard map effectiveness could be questioned, making necessary a change in the concept of hazard map. Instead to delimit the potential impact areas, the hazard map should show the expected behaviour of the volcanic activity and how the differences in the landscape and internal geo-structures could condition such behaviour. This approach has been carried out in La Palma (Canary Islands), combining the concept of long-term hazard map with the short-term volcanic scenario to show the expected volcanic activity behaviour. The objective is the decision-makers understand how a volcanic crisis could be and what kind of mitigation measurement and strategy could be used.

  9. Geological and geophysical interpretation of the Espirito Santo Basin and the Abrolhos region: petrography, radiometric dating and seismic visualization of volcanic rocks; Interpretacao geologica e geofisica da Bacia do Espirito Santo e da regiao de Abrolhos: petrografia, datacao radiometrica e visualizacao sismica das rochas vulcanicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohriak, Webster Ueipass [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). E e P. Gestao de Projetos Exploratorios Sul-Sudeste], E-mail: webmohr@petrobras.com.br

    2005-11-15

    Geologic and geophysical interpretation of structural, magmatic and sedimentological features outcropping in the Abrolhos Archipelago (offshore of the Espirito Santo - Mucuri basins along the eastern Brazilian margin), and petrographic and geochronologic studies of igneous rocks, characterized a sequence of volcanic (basalts, diabase, breccia, etc.) and sedimentary rocks (fine grained to coarse grained sandstones and conglomerates in channels, sandstones with concordant stratification and locally discordant with the volcanic rocks, siltites, silty shales, etc.) which were uplifted after their original deposition between the Late Cretaceous and the Paleogene. The geochronological dating, based on the Ar-Ar method, suggests an interval of magmatism between 40 and 60 Ma. The field works suggest that siliciclastic rocks outcropping in the islands constitute a unique example of Paleogene Tertiary turbidity sedimentation in the Brazilian continental margin. Thick layers of massive sandstones with an external lobate geometry, overlying silty rhythmites, particularly in the eastern portion of the Santar Barbara Island, are probable deposits of dense flows (hyperpycnal) deposited in mid platform to upper bathyal environments. The tectonic and seismic stratigraphic interpretation suggests that these rocks were uplifted in a compressional event, probably associated with salt tectonics, affecting the sedimentary layers and creating angular unconformities that reach up to the Neogene. (author)

  10. Volcanic hazard assessment in monogenetic volcanic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Bartolini, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    [eng] One of the most important tasks of modern volcanology, which represents a significant socio-economic implication, is to conduct hazard assessment in active volcanic systems. These volcanological studies are aimed at hazard that allows to constructing hazard maps and simulating different eruptive scenarios, and are mainly addressed to contribute to territorial planning, definition of emergency plans or managing volcanic crisis. The impact of a natural event, as a volcanic eruption, can s...

  11. Seaward dipping reflectors along the SW continental margin of India: Evidence for volcanic passive margin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ajay, K.K.; Chaubey, A.K.; Krishna, K.S.; Rao, D.G.; Sar, D.

    of the Chagos-Laccadive Ridge system. Velocity structure, seismic character, 2D gravity model and geographic locations of the dipping reflectors suggest that these reflectors are volcanic in origin, which are interpreted as Seaward Dipping Reflectors (SDRs...

  12. The radiation of surface wave energy: Implications for volcanic tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, M. M.; Denolle, M.; Lyons, J. J.; Nakahara, H.

    2015-12-01

    The seismic energy radiated by active volcanism is one common measurement of eruption size. For example, the magnitudes of individual earthquakes in volcano-tectonic (VT) swarms can be summed and expressed in terms of cumulative magnitude, energy, or moment release. However, discrepancies exist in current practice when treating the radiated energy of volcano seismicity dominated by surface waves. This has implications for volcanic tremor, since eruption tremor typically originates at shallow depth and is made up of surface waves. In the absence of a method to compute surface wave energy, estimates of eruption energy partitioning between acoustic and seismic waves typically assume seismic energy is composed of body waves. Furthermore, without the proper treatment of surface wave energy, it is unclear how much volcanic tremor contributes to the overall seismic energy budget during volcanic unrest. To address this issue, we derive, from first principles, the expression of surface wave radiated energy. In contrast with body waves, the surface wave energy equation is naturally expressed in the frequency domain instead of the time domain. We validate our result by reproducing an analytical solution for the radiated power of a vertical force source acting on a free surface. We further show that the surface wave energy equation leads to an explicit relationship between energy and the imaginary part of the surface wave Green's tensor at the source location, a fundamental property recognized within the field of seismic interferometry. With the new surface wave energy equation, we make clear connections to reduced displacement and propose an improved formula for the calculation of surface wave reduced displacement involving integration over the frequency band of tremor. As an alternative to reduced displacement, we show that reduced particle velocity squared is also a valid physical measure of tremor size, one based on seismic energy rate instead of seismic moment rate. These

  13. Volcanic Alert System (VAS) developed during the (2011-2013) El Hierro (Canary Islands) volcanic process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Ramon; Berrocoso, Manuel; Marrero, Jose Manuel; Fernandez-Ros, Alberto; Prates, Gonçalo; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Garcia, Alicia

    2014-05-01

    In volcanic areas with long repose periods (as El Hierro), recently installed monitoring networks offer no instrumental record of past eruptions nor experience in handling a volcanic crisis. Both conditions, uncertainty and inexperience, contribute to make the communication of hazard more difficult. In fact, in the initial phases of the unrest at El Hierro, the perception of volcanic risk was somewhat distorted, as even relatively low volcanic hazards caused a high political impact. The need of a Volcanic Alert System became then evident. In general, the Volcanic Alert System is comprised of the monitoring network, the software tools for the analysis of the observables, the management of the Volcanic Activity Level, and the assessment of the threat. The Volcanic Alert System presented here places special emphasis on phenomena associated to moderate eruptions, as well as on volcano-tectonic earthquakes and landslides, which in some cases, as in El Hierro, may be more destructive than an eruption itself. As part of the Volcanic Alert System, we introduce here the Volcanic Activity Level which continuously applies a routine analysis of monitoring data (particularly seismic and deformation data) to detect data trend changes or monitoring network failures. The data trend changes are quantified according to the Failure Forecast Method (FFM). When data changes and/or malfunctions are detected, by an automated watchdog, warnings are automatically issued to the Monitoring Scientific Team. Changes in the data patterns are then translated by the Monitoring Scientific Team into a simple Volcanic Activity Level, that is easy to use and understand by the scientists and technicians in charge for the technical management of the unrest. The main feature of the Volcanic Activity Level is its objectivity, as it does not depend on expert opinions, which are left to the Scientific Committee, and its capabilities for early detection of precursors. As a consequence of the El Hierro

  14. Seismicity of the Jalisco Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Rutz, M.; Camarena-Garcia, M.; Trejo-Gomez, E.; Reyes-Davila, G.; Suarez-Plascencia, C.

    2002-12-01

    In April 2002 began to transmit the stations of the first phase of Jalisco Telemetric Network located at the northwest of Jalisco Block and at the area of Volcan de Fuego (Colima Volcano), in June were deployed four additional MarsLite portable stations in the Bahia de Banderas area, and by the end of August one more portable station at Ceboruco Volcano. The data of these stations jointly with the data from RESCO (Colima Telemetric Network) give us the minimum seismic stations coverage to initiate in a systematic and permanent way the study of the seismicity in this very complex tectonic region. A preliminary analysis of seismicity based on the events registered by the networks using a shutter algorithm, confirms several important features proposed by microseismicity studies carried out between 1996 and 1998. A high level of seismicity inside and below of Rivera plate is observed, this fact suggest a very complex stress pattern acting on this plate. Shallow seismicity at south and east of Bahia de Banderas also suggest a complex stress pattern in this region of the Jalisco Block, events at more than 30 km depth are located under the mouth of the bay and in face of it, a feature denominated Banderas Boundary mark the change of the seismic regime at north of this latitude (20.75°N), however some shallow events were located at the region of Nayarit.

  15. Recognition and Significance of Volcanic Rocks of the Anda Depression of the Songliao Basin in Jurassic-Cretaceous

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuhong Gao; Dongpo Wang; Xinrong Zhang; Guixia Ji; Jian Zhao

    2003-01-01

    A series of volcanic rocks were developed in the deep part of Anda faulting depression. The reflection of therocks are mainly stratiform and hummocky. Three kinds of volcanic facies, e.g. explosion facies, effusion facies andsub-volcanic facies,were recognized by different reflecting characteristics in the seismic profile. The volcanic rocks areformed during three episodes of volcanic activities from Shahezi Formation to Yingcheng Formation. The volcanismshave relation to the formation of Songliao Basin and regional tectonics of northeastern China. Some of the volcanic rocksare good oil and gas reservoirs.

  16. Seismic volcanostratigraphy of large, extrusive complexes in continental rift basins of Northeast China:Analysis of general bedding patterns in volcanostratigraphy and their seismic reflection configurations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    衣健; 王璞珺; 高有峰; 陈崇阳; 赵然磊

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work is to establish volcanic seismic reflection configuration models in the rift basins of Northeast China from a new perspective, the volcanostratigraphic structure. Accordingly, the volcanostratigraphic structure of an outcrop near the Hailaier Rift Basin was analyzed to understand the characteristics and causal factors of physical boundaries. Further, 3D seismic reflection data and analysis of deep boreholes in the Songliao Rift Basin were used to establish the relationship between volcanic seismic reflection configurations and volcanostratigraphic structures. These studies suggested that in volcanic successions, physical boundaries coincide with volcanic boundaries, and their distributions are controlled by the stacking patterns of volcanic units. Therefore, volcanic seismic reflection configurations can be interpreted in terms of the stacking patterns of volcanic units. These are also referred to as general bedding patterns in volcanostratigraphy. Furthermore, four typical seismic reflection configurations were identified, namely, the chaotic, the parallel continuous, the hummocky, the multi-mound superimposed and the composite. The corresponding interpretation models comprised single massive unit, vertical, intersectional, lateral multi-mound, and composite stacking patterns. The hummocky and composite reflection configurations with intersectional and composite stacking patterns are the most favorable for the exploration of volcanic reservoirs in rift basins.

  17. Automatic landslides detection on Stromboli volcanic Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silengo, Maria Cristina; Delle Donne, Dario; Ulivieri, Giacomo; Cigolini, Corrado; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Landslides occurring in active volcanic islands play a key role in triggering tsunami and other related risks. Therefore, it becomes vital for a correct and prompt risk assessment to monitor landslides activity and to have an automatic system for a robust early-warning. We then developed a system based on a multi-frequency analysis of seismic signals for automatic landslides detection occurring at Stromboli volcano. We used a network of 4 seismic 3 components stations located along the unstable flank of the Sciara del Fuoco. Our method is able to recognize and separate the different sources of seismic signals related to volcanic and tectonic activity (e.g. tremor, explosions, earthquake) from landslides. This is done using a multi-frequency analysis combined with a waveform patter recognition. We applied the method to one year of seismic activity of Stromboli volcano centered during the last 2007 effusive eruption. This eruption was characterized by a pre-eruptive landslide activity reflecting the slow deformation of the volcano edifice. The algorithm is at the moment running off-line but has proved to be robust and efficient in picking automatically landslide. The method provides also real-time statistics on the landslide occurrence, which could be used as a proxy for the volcano deformation during the pre-eruptive phases. This method is very promising since the number of false detections is quite small (landslide increases. The final aim will be to apply this method on-line and for a real-time automatic detection as an improving tool for early warnings of tsunami-genic landslide activity. We suggest that a similar approach could be also applied to other unstable non-volcanic also slopes.

  18. Zigzag Persistence

    CERN Document Server

    Carlsson, Gunnar

    2008-01-01

    We describe a new methodology for studying persistence of topological features across a family of spaces or point-cloud data sets, called zigzag persistence. Building on classical results about quiver representations, zigzag persistence generalises the highly successful theory of persistent homology and addresses several situations which are not covered by that theory. In this paper we develop theoretical and algorithmic foundations with a view towards applications in topological statistics.

  19. 2014 volcanic activity in Alaska: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Cheryl E.; Dixon, James P.; Neal, Christina A.; Waythomas, Christopher F.; Schaefer, Janet R.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2017-09-07

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest, and seismic events at 18 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2014. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of intermittent ash eruptions from long-active Cleveland and Shishaldin Volcanoes in the Aleutian Islands, and two eruptive episodes at Pavlof Volcano on the Alaska Peninsula. Semisopochnoi and Akutan volcanoes had seismic swarms, both likely the result of magmatic intrusion. The AVO also installed seismometers and infrasound instruments at Mount Cleveland during 2014.

  20. Principal Component Analysis for pattern recognition in volcano seismic spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unglert, Katharina; Jellinek, A. Mark

    2016-04-01

    Variations in the spectral content of volcano seismicity can relate to changes in volcanic activity. Low-frequency seismic signals often precede or accompany volcanic eruptions. However, they are commonly manually identified in spectra or spectrograms, and their definition in spectral space differs from one volcanic setting to the next. Increasingly long time series of monitoring data at volcano observatories require automated tools to facilitate rapid processing and aid with pattern identification related to impending eruptions. Furthermore, knowledge transfer between volcanic settings is difficult if the methods to identify and analyze the characteristics of seismic signals differ. To address these challenges we have developed a pattern recognition technique based on a combination of Principal Component Analysis and hierarchical clustering applied to volcano seismic spectra. This technique can be used to characterize the dominant spectral components of volcano seismicity without the need for any a priori knowledge of different signal classes. Preliminary results from applying our method to volcanic tremor from a range of volcanoes including K¯ı lauea, Okmok, Pavlof, and Redoubt suggest that spectral patterns from K¯ı lauea and Okmok are similar, whereas at Pavlof and Redoubt spectra have their own, distinct patterns.

  1. Seismic Creep

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seismic creep is the constant or periodic movement on a fault as contrasted with the sudden erupture associated with an earthquake. It is a usually slow deformation...

  2. Seismic seiches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarr, Arthur; Gupta, Harsh K.

    2011-01-01

    Seismic seiche is a term first used by Kvale (1955) to discuss oscillations of lake levels in Norway and England caused by the Assam earthquake of August 15, 1950. This definition has since been generalized to apply to standing waves set up in closed, or partially closed, bodies of water including rivers, shipping channels, lakes, swimming pools and tanks due to the passage of seismic waves from an earthquake.

  3. Volcanic Gas Measurements During the 2004 Unrest at Mount St. Helens

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, K. A.; Gerlach, T. M.; Doukas, M. P.; Sutton, A. J.

    2004-12-01

    Volcanic gas observations during the 2004 unrest at Mount St. Helens began with helicopter measurements on September 27 and shifted to fixed-wing aircraft measurements on October 7. Helicopter measurements were done by downwind plume profiling at the crater rim and crater breach, orbiting the dome and cross traversing the top of the dome. Fixed-wing aircraft measurements consisted of profiling the downwind plume as it spilled over the crater rim. Target gases included CO2, SO2, and H2S measured by LI-COR, COSPEC and Interscan analyzers. These measurements defined three periods of volcanic degassing: (a) an initial period of negligible volcanic degassing characterized by scrubbing or sealing-in of all gases; (b) an intermediate period of wet volcanic degassing when gas scrubbing dominated volcanic degassing; and (c) a period of dry volcanic degassing when volcanic degassing exceeded gas scrubbing. Measurements during the September 27-30 period of negligible volcanic degassing showed little or no CO2 above atmospheric levels; SO2 and H2S were not detected. The absence of these gases implies fairly complete gas scrubbing at high water to gas mass ratios (greater than 100) or confinement of the gases by post-1986 sealing of gas transport channel ways. Scrubbing seems likely to have dominated sealing; the high rates of concurrent seismicity and deformation favored reestablishment of transport along fractures, and the unrest followed a period with an unusually large potential for groundwater recharge. No August-September interval since the cessation of dome-building eruptions in 1986 has had heavier rainfall than in 2004, and growth of the crater glacier since 1986 has increased the amount of water available for recharge in late summer. Measurements during the period of wet volcanic degassing that began on October 1 after the first steam and ash eruption showed an increase in the frequency and size of CO2 peaks together with the increasingly common detection of H2S

  4. VOLCANIC TSUNAMI GENERATING SOURCE MECHANISMS IN THE EASTERN CARIBBEAN REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Pararas-Carayannis

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, volcanic island flank failures and underwater slides have generated numerous destructive tsunamis in the Caribbean region. Convergent, compressional and collisional tectonic activity caused primarily from the eastward movement of the Caribbean Plate in relation to the North American, Atlantic and South American Plates, is responsible for zones of subduction in the region, the formation of island arcs and the evolution of particular volcanic centers on the overlying plate. The inter-plate tectonic interaction and deformation along these marginal boundaries result in moderate seismic and volcanic events that can generate tsunamis by a number of different mechanisms. The active geo-dynamic processes have created the Lesser Antilles, an arc of small islands with volcanoes characterized by both effusive and explosive activity. Eruption mechanisms of these Caribbean volcanoes are complex and often anomalous. Collapses of lava domes often precede major eruptions, which may vary in intensity from Strombolian to Plinian. Locally catastrophic, short-period tsunami-like waves can be generated directly by lateral, direct or channelized volcanic blast episodes, or in combination with collateral air pressure perturbations, nuéss ardentes, pyroclastic flows, lahars, or cascading debris avalanches. Submarine volcanic caldera collapses can also generate locally destructive tsunami waves. Volcanoes in the Eastern Caribbean Region have unstable flanks. Destructive local tsunamis may be generated from aerial and submarine volcanic edifice mass edifice flank failures, which may be triggered by volcanic episodes, lava dome collapses, or simply by gravitational instabilities. The present report evaluates volcanic mechanisms, resulting flank failure processes and their potential for tsunami generation. More specifically, the report evaluates recent volcanic eruption mechanisms of the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat, of Mt. Pel

  5. Volcanism/tectonics working group summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovach, L.A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Young, S.R. [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This article is a summary of the proceedings of a group discussion which took place at the Workshop on the Role of Natural Analogs in Geologic Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste in San Antonio, Texas on July 22-25, 1991. The working group concentrated on the subject of the impacts of earthquakes, fault rupture, and volcanic eruption on the underground repository disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. The tectonics and seismic history of the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is discussed and geologic analogs to that site are described.

  6. Persister Awakening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kim; Shan, Yue

    2016-07-07

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Cheverton et al. (2016) report that Samonella toxin TacT contributes to persister formation by acetylating tRNA, a novel mechanism of toxin action. Hydrolyzing corrupted tRNA resuscitates persisters.

  7. Seismic Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Quittmeyer

    2006-09-25

    This technical work plan (TWP) describes the efforts to develop and confirm seismic ground motion inputs used for preclosure design and probabilistic safety 'analyses and to assess the postclosure performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As part of the effort to develop seismic inputs, the TWP covers testing and analyses that provide the technical basis for inputs to the seismic ground-motion site-response model. The TWP also addresses preparation of a seismic methodology report for submission to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The activities discussed in this TWP are planned for fiscal years (FY) 2006 through 2008. Some of the work enhances the technical basis for previously developed seismic inputs and reduces uncertainties and conservatism used in previous analyses and modeling. These activities support the defense of a license application. Other activities provide new results that will support development of the preclosure, safety case; these results directly support and will be included in the license application. Table 1 indicates which activities support the license application and which support licensing defense. The activities are listed in Section 1.2; the methods and approaches used to implement them are discussed in more detail in Section 2.2. Technical and performance objectives of this work scope are: (1) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for preclosure design analyses, provide site-specific seismic design acceleration response spectra for a range of damping values; strain-compatible soil properties; peak motions, strains, and curvatures as a function of depth; and time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement). Provide seismic design inputs for the waste emplacement level and for surface sites. Results should be consistent with the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground

  8. Basement faults and volcanic rock distributions in the Ordos Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Volcanic rocks in the Ordos Basin are of mainly two types: one in the basin and the other along the margin of the basin. Besides those along the margin, the marginal volcanic rocks also include the volcanic rocks in the Yinshanian orogenic belt north of the basin. Based on the latest collection of gravitational and aeromagnetic data, here we interpret basement faults in the Ordos Basin and its peripheral region, compare the faults derived from aeromagnetic data with those from seismic data, and identify the geological ages of the fault development. Two aeromagnetic anomaly zones exist in the NE-trending faults of the southern basin, and they are in the volcanic basement formed in pre-Paleozoic. These NE-trending faults are the channel of volcanic material upwelling in the early age (Archean-Neoproterozoic), where igneous rocks and sedimentary rocks stack successively on both sides of the continental nucleus. In the Cambrian, the basin interior is relatively stable, but in the Late Paleozoic and Mesozoic, the basin margin underwent a number of volcanic activities, accompanied by the formation of nearly north-south and east-west basement faults in the basin periphery and resulting in accumulation of great amount of volcanic materials. Volcanic tuff from the basin periphery is discovered in the central basin and volcanic materials are exposed in the margins of the basin. According to the source-reservoir-cap rock configuration, the basin peripheral igneous traps formed in the Indosinian-Early Yanshanian and Late Hercynian are favorable exploration objectives, and the volcanic rocks in the central basin are the future target of exploration.

  9. Experimental studies of anomalous radon activity in the Tlamacas Mountain, Popocatepetl Volcano area, México: new tools to study lithosphere-atmosphere coupling for forecasting volcanic and seismic events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Antonio Lopez Cruz Abeyro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available

    This study presents and discusses the results of soil radon monitoring at three different volcano sites and one reference site, from December 2007 to January 2009. This relates to the activity of the Popocatepetl Volcano and a radon survey and gamma-ray spectrometry in the area between Paso de Cortes and Tlamacas Mountain, and in the adjacent regions. The results are applied to the aspects of atmosphere electricity and lithosphere-atmosphere coupling in relation to the forecasting of volcano and earthquake activity. The monitoring of radon release reveals a decrease in radon concentration (down to total suppression with approaching moderate volcanic eruptions. The behavior of the radon activity at the Tlamacas site is more apparent, compared to other observational sites. The average level of radon release observed at the Tlamacas site is much higher, with some characteristic variations. Both the radon survey and gamma-ray spectrometry indicate intensive diffusion radon emission localized in the area of Tlamacas Mountain. The average radon concentration in the area of Tlamacas is about 10-20-fold greater than the background volcano values. The new concept of lithosphere-atmosphere coupling is presented: intensive radon release in high elevated areas shortens and modifies the Earth-to-thunderclouds electric circuit, which provokes microdischarges into the air close to the ground, attracting lightning discharges. This concept attempts to explain in a new way the noise-like geomagnetic emissions registered before major earthquakes, and it promotes interest for the study of thunderstorm activity in seismo-active zones, as a promising instrument for earthquake forecasting.

  10. Volcanic tremors and magma wagging: gas flux interactions and forcing mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, David; Jellinek, A. Mark; Michaut, Chloé; Roman, Diana C.; Morse, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Volcanic tremor is an important precursor to explosive eruptions and is ubiquitous across most silicic volcanic systems. Oscillations can persist for days and occur in a remarkably narrow frequency band (i.e. 0.5-7 Hz). The recently proposed magma-wagging model of Jellinek & Bercovici provides a basic explanation for the emergence and frequency evolution of tremor that is consistent with observations of many active silicic and andesitic volcanic systems. This model builds on work suggesting that the magma column rising in the volcanic conduit is surrounded by a permeable vesicular annulus of sheared bubbles. The magma-wagging model stipulates that the magma column rattles within the spring like foam of the annulus, and predicts oscillations at the range of observed tremor frequencies for a wide variety of volcanic environments. However, the viscous resistance of the magma column attenuates the oscillations and thus a forcing mechanism is required. Here we provide further development of the magma-wagging model and demonstrate that it implicitly has the requisite forcing to excite wagging behaviour. In particular, the extended model allows for gas flux through the annulus, which interacts with the wagging displacements and induces a Bernoulli effect that amplifies the oscillations. This effect leads to an instability involving growing oscillations at the lower end of the tremor frequency spectrum, and that drives the system against viscous damping of the wagging magma column. The fully non-linear model displays tremor oscillations associated with pulses in gas flux, analogous to observations of audible `chugging'. These oscillations also occur in clusters or envelopes that are consistent with observations of sporadic tremor envelopes. The wagging model further accurately predicts that seismic signals on opposite sides of a volcano are out of phase by approximately half a wagging or tremor period. Finally, peaks in gas flux occur at the end of the growing instability

  11. Integrated Geophysical Techniques for Exploring Deep Volcanic Rock Reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuXuejun; UDechun; ZhangChangjiang; RanXuefeng

    2003-01-01

    The Carboniferous and Pre-Carboniferous formations in Ludong, Zhungar basin, contain favorable oil/gas reservoirs. The Carboniferous formations, however, are complex in structure and exhibit lateral variations in lithology. Seismic reflections from Pre-Triassic formations are poor and the volcanic reservoirs are very difficult to identify. The analysis of physical properties concluded that the major targets in this region, i.e., the top of the Jurassic and Carboniferous formations, provide distinct density interfaces. The basic, intermediate and acid volcanic rocks were also different in density,resulting in distinguishable gravity anomalies. The differences in magnetism in this region existed not only between the volcanic rocks and clastic sedimentary rocks but also among volcanic rocks with different compositions. All formations and volcanic rocks of different lithologies presented high and low resistance interbeds, which are characterized by regional trends.The modeling study demonstrated that non-seismic integrated geophysical techniques should be feasible in this region, especiaUy the high-precision gravity/magnetic methods combined with long offset transient electromagnetic sounding.

  12. Volcanic signals in oceans

    KAUST Repository

    Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

    2009-08-22

    Sulfate aerosols resulting from strong volcanic explosions last for 2–3 years in the lower stratosphere. Therefore it was traditionally believed that volcanic impacts produce mainly short-term, transient climate perturbations. However, the ocean integrates volcanic radiative cooling and responds over a wide range of time scales. The associated processes, especially ocean heat uptake, play a key role in ongoing climate change. However, they are not well constrained by observations, and attempts to simulate them in current climate models used for climate predictions yield a range of uncertainty. Volcanic impacts on the ocean provide an independent means of assessing these processes. This study focuses on quantification of the seasonal to multidecadal time scale response of the ocean to explosive volcanism. It employs the coupled climate model CM2.1, developed recently at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration\\'s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, to simulate the response to the 1991 Pinatubo and the 1815 Tambora eruptions, which were the largest in the 20th and 19th centuries, respectively. The simulated climate perturbations compare well with available observations for the Pinatubo period. The stronger Tambora forcing produces responses with higher signal-to-noise ratio. Volcanic cooling tends to strengthen the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Sea ice extent appears to be sensitive to volcanic forcing, especially during the warm season. Because of the extremely long relaxation time of ocean subsurface temperature and sea level, the perturbations caused by the Tambora eruption could have lasted well into the 20th century.

  13. Seismic Symphonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strinna, Elisa; Ferrari, Graziano

    2015-04-01

    The project started in 2008 as a sound installation, a collaboration between an artist, a barrel organ builder and a seismologist. The work differs from other attempts of sound transposition of seismic records. In this case seismic frequencies are not converted automatically into the "sound of the earthquake." However, it has been studied a musical translation system that, based on the organ tonal scale, generates a totally unexpected sequence of sounds which is intended to evoke the emotions aroused by the earthquake. The symphonies proposed in the project have somewhat peculiar origins: they in fact come to life from the translation of graphic tracks into a sound track. The graphic tracks in question are made up by copies of seismograms recorded during some earthquakes that have taken place around the world. Seismograms are translated into music by a sculpture-instrument, half a seismograph and half a barrel organ. The organ plays through holes practiced on paper. Adapting the documents to the instrument score, holes have been drilled on the waves' peaks. The organ covers about three tonal scales, starting from heavy and deep sounds it reaches up to high and jarring notes. The translation of the seismic records is based on a criterion that does match the highest sounds to larger amplitudes with lower ones to minors. Translating the seismogram in the organ score, the larger the amplitude of recorded waves, the more the seismogram covers the full tonal scale played by the barrel organ and the notes arouse an intense emotional response in the listener. Elisa Strinna's Seismic Symphonies installation becomes an unprecedented tool for emotional involvement, through which can be revived the memory of the greatest disasters of over a century of seismic history of the Earth. A bridge between art and science. Seismic Symphonies is also a symbolic inversion: the instrument of the organ is most commonly used in churches, and its sounds are derived from the heavens and

  14. The Online GVP/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report: Providing Timely Information About Worldwide Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayberry, G. C.; Guffanti, M. C.; Luhr, J. F.; Venzke, E. A.; Wunderman, R. L.

    2001-12-01

    The awesome power and intricate inner workings of volcanoes have made them a popular subject with scientists and the general public alike. About 1500 known volcanoes have been active on Earth during the Holocene, approximately 50 of which erupt per year. With so much activity occurring around the world, often in remote locations, it can be difficult to find up-to-date information about current volcanism from a reliable source. To satisfy the desire for timely volcano-related information the Smithsonian Institution and US Geological Survey combined their strengths to create the Weekly Volcanic Activity Report. The Smithsonian's Global Volcanism Program (GVP) has developed a network of correspondents while reporting worldwide volcanism for over 30 years in their monthly Bulletin of the Global Volcanism Network. The US Geological Survey's Volcano Hazards Program studies and monitors volcanoes in the United States and responds (upon invitation) to selected volcanic crises in other countries. The Weekly Volcanic Activity Report is one of the most popular sites on both organization's websites. The core of the Weekly Volcanic Activity Report is the brief summaries of current volcanic activity around the world. In addition to discussing various types of volcanism, the summaries also describe precursory activity (e.g. volcanic seismicity, deformation, and gas emissions), secondary activity (e.g. debris flows, mass wasting, and rockfalls), volcanic ash hazards to aviation, and preventative measures. The summaries are supplemented by links to definitions of technical terms found in the USGS photoglossary of volcano terms, links to information sources, and background information about reported volcanoes. The site also includes maps that highlight the location of reported volcanoes, an archive of weekly reports sorted by volcano and date, and links to commonly used acronyms. Since the Weekly Volcanic Activity Report's inception in November 2000, activity has been reported at

  15. [Persistent diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, J A; Moreira, C; Fagundes Neto, U

    2000-07-01

    INTRODUCTION: Persistent diarrhea has high impact on infantile morbidity and mortality rates in developing countries. Several studies have shown that 3 to 20% of acute diarrheal episodes in children under 5 years of age become persistent. DEFINITION: Persistent diarrhea is defined as an episode that lasts more than 14 days. ETIOLOGY: The most important agents isolated in persistent diarrhea are: Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Salmonella, Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), Klebisiella and Cryptosporidium. CLINICAL ASPECTS: In general, the clinical characteristics of patients with persistent diarrhea do not change with the pathogenic agent. Persistent diarrhea seems to represent the final result of a several insults a infant suffers that predisposes to a more severe episode of diarrhea due to a combination of host factors and high rates of enviromental contamination. Therefore, efforts should be made to promptly treat all episodes of diarrhea with apropriate follow-up. THERAPY: The aim of the treatment is to restore hydroelectrolytic deficits and to replace losses until the diarrheal ceases. It is possible in the majority of the cases, using oral rehydration therapy and erly an appropriate type of diet. PREVENTION: It is imperative that management strategies also focus on preventive aspects. The most effective diarrheal prevention strategy in young infants worldwide is promotion of exclusive breast feeding.

  16. Volcanic Rocks and Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Volcanoes have contributed significantly to the formation of the surface of our planet. Volcanism produced the crust we live on and most of the air we breathe. The...

  17. Observations of volcanic earthquakes and tremor at Deception Island - Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Morales

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Deception Island - South Shetlands, Antarctica is site of active volcanism. Since 1988 field surveys have been carried out with the aim of seismic monitoring, and in 1994 a seismic array was set up near the site of the Spanish summer base in order to better constrain the source location and spectral properties of the seismic events related to the volcanic activity. The array was maintained during the Antarctic summer of 1995 and the last field survey was carried out in 1996. Data show the existence of three different groups (or families of seismic events: 1 long period events, with a quasi-monochromatic spectral content (1-3 Hz peak frequency and a duration of more than 50 s, often occurring in small swarms lasting from several minutes to some day; 2 volcanic tremor, with a spectral shape similar to the long period events but with a duration of several minutes (2-10; 3 hybrid events, with a waveform characterised by the presence of a high frequency initial phase, followed by a low frequency phase with characteristics similar to those of the long period events. The high frequency phase of the hybrid events was analysed using polarisation techniques, showing the presence of P waves. This phase is presumably located at short epicentral distances and shallow source depth. All the analysed seismic events show back-azimuths between 120 and 330 degrees from north (corresponding to zones of volcanic activity showing no seismic activity in the middle of the caldera. Particle motion, Fourier spectral and spectrogram analysis show that the low frequency part of the three groups of the seismic signals have similar patterns. Moreover careful observations show that the high frequency phase which characterises the hybrid events is present in the long period and in the tremor events, even with lower signal to noise ratios. This evidence suggests that long period events are events in which the high frequency part is simply difficult to observe, due to a very

  18. Supercomputer modeling of volcanic eruption dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieffer, S.W. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Valentine, G.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Woo, Mahn-Ling [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Our specific goals are to: (1) provide a set of models based on well-defined assumptions about initial and boundary conditions to constrain interpretations of observations of active volcanic eruptions--including movies of flow front velocities, satellite observations of temperature in plumes vs. time, and still photographs of the dimensions of erupting plumes and flows on Earth and other planets; (2) to examine the influence of subsurface conditions on exit plane conditions and plume characteristics, and to compare the models of subsurface fluid flow with seismic constraints where possible; (3) to relate equations-of-state for magma-gas mixtures to flow dynamics; (4) to examine, in some detail, the interaction of the flowing fluid with the conduit walls and ground topography through boundary layer theory so that field observations of erosion and deposition can be related to fluid processes; and (5) to test the applicability of existing two-phase flow codes for problems related to the generation of volcanic long-period seismic signals; (6) to extend our understanding and simulation capability to problems associated with emplacement of fragmental ejecta from large meteorite impacts.

  19. Advances in seismic monitoring at Deception Island volcano (Antarctica since the International Polar Year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Carmona

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Deception Island is an active volcano located in the south Shetland Islands, Antarctica. It constitutes a natural laboratory to test geophysical instruments in extreme conditions, since they have to endure not only the Antarctic climate but also the volcanic environment. Deception is one of the most visited places in Antarctica, both by scientists and tourists, which emphasize the importance of volcano monitoring. Seismic monitoring has been going on since 1986 during austral summer surveys. The recorded data include volcano-tectonic earthquakes, long-period events and volcanic tremor, among others. The level of seismicity ranges from quiet periods to seismic crises (e.g. 1992-1993, 1999. Our group has been involved in volcano monitoring at Deception Island since 1994. Based on this experience, in recent years we have made the most of the opportunities of the International Polar Year 2007-2008 to introduce advances in seismic monitoring along four lines: (1 the improvement of the seismic network installed for seismic monitoring during the summer surveys; (2 the development and improvement of seismic arrays for the detection and characterization of seismo-volcanic signals; (3 the design of automated event recognition tools, to simplify the process of data interpretation; and (4 the deployment of permanent seismic stations. These advances help us to obtain more data of better quality, and therefore to improve our interpretation of the seismo-volcanic activity at Deception Island, which is a crucial step in terms of hazards assessment.

  20. Automatic classification of seismo-volcanic signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malfante, Marielle; Dalla Mura, Mauro; Mars, Jérôme; Macedo, Orlando; Inza, Adolfo; Métaxian, Jean-Philippe

    2017-04-01

    The prediction of volcanic eruptions and the evaluation of their associated risks is still a timely and open issue. For this purpose, several types of signals are recorded in the proximity of volcanoes and then analysed by experts. Typically, seismic signals that are considered as precursor or indicator of an active volcanic phase are detected and manually classified. In this work, we propose an architecture for automatic classification of seismo-volcanic waves. The system we propose is based on supervised machine learning. Specifically, a prediction model is built from a large dataset of labelled examples by the means of a learning algorithm (Support Vector Machine or Random Forest). Four main steps are involved: (i) preprocess the signals, (ii) from each signal, extract features that are useful for the classes discrimination, (iii) use an automatic learning algorithm to train a prediction model and (iv) classify (i.e., assign a semantic label) newly recorded and unlabelled examples. Our main contribution lies in the definition of the feature space used to represent the signals (i.e., in the choice of the features to extract from the data). Feature vectors describe the data in a space of lower dimension with respect to the original one. Ideally, signals are separable in the feature space depending on their classes. For this work, we consider a large set of features (79) gathered from an extensive state of the art in both acoustic and seismic fields. An analysis of this feature set shows that for the application of interest, 11 features are sufficient to discriminate the data. The architecture is tested on 4725 seismic events recorded between June 2006 and September 2011 at Ubinas, the most active volcano of Peru. Six main classes of signals are considered: volcanic tremors (TR), long period (LP), volcano-tectonic (VT), explosion (EXP), hybrids (HIB) and tornillo (TOR). Our model reaches above 90% of accuracy, thereby validating the proposed architecture and the

  1. Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), Russia: preventing the danger of volcanic eruptions to aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girina, O.; Neal, Ch.

    2012-04-01

    The Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) has been a collaborative project of scientists from the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology, the Kamchatka Branch of Geophysical Surveys, and the Alaska Volcano Observatory (IVS, KB GS and AVO). The purpose of KVERT is to reduce the risk of costly, damaging, and possibly deadly encounters of aircraft with volcanic ash clouds. To reduce this risk, KVERT collects all possible volcanic information and issues eruption alerts to aviation and other emergency officials. KVERT was founded by Institute of Volcanic Geology and Geochemistry FED RAS in 1993 (in 2004, IVGG merged with the Institute of Volcanology to become IVS). KVERT analyzes volcano monitoring data (seismic, satellite, visual and video, and pilot reports), assigns the Aviation Color Code, and issues reports on eruptive activity and unrest at Kamchatkan (since 1993) and Northern Kurile (since 2003) volcanoes. KVERT receives seismic monitoring data from KB GS (the Laboratory for Seismic and Volcanic Activity). KB GS maintains telemetered seismic stations to investigate 11 of the most active volcanoes in Kamchatka. Data are received around the clock and analysts evaluate data each day for every monitored volcano. Satellite data are provided from several sources to KVERT. AVO conducts satellite analysis of the Kuriles, Kamchatka, and Alaska as part of it daily monitoring and sends the interpretation to KVERT staff. KVERT interprets MODIS and MTSAT images and processes AVHRR data to look for evidence of volcanic ash and thermal anomalies. KVERT obtains visual volcanic information from volcanologist's field trips, web-cameras that monitor Klyuchevskoy (established in 2000), Sheveluch (2002), Bezymianny (2003), Koryaksky (2009), Avachinsky (2009), Kizimen (2011), and Gorely (2011) volcanoes, and pilots. KVERT staff work closely with staff of AVO, AMC (Airport Meteorological Center) at Yelizovo Airport and the Tokyo Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), the

  2. Volcanic tremor and plume height hysteresis from Pavlof Volcano, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fee, David; Haney, Matthew M; Matoza, Robin S; Eaton, Alexa R; Cervelli, Peter; Schneider, David J; Iezzi, Alexandra M

    2017-01-06

    The March 2016 eruption of Pavlof Volcano, Alaska, produced an ash plume that caused the cancellation of more than 100 flights in North America. The eruption generated strong tremor that was recorded by seismic and remote low-frequency acoustic (infrasound) stations, including the EarthScope Transportable Array. The relationship between the tremor amplitudes and plume height changes considerably between the waxing and waning portions of the eruption. Similar hysteresis has been observed between seismic river noise and discharge during storms, suggesting that flow and erosional processes in both rivers and volcanoes can produce irreversible structural changes that are detectable in geophysical data. We propose that the time-varying relationship at Pavlof arose from changes in the tremor source related to volcanic vent erosion. This relationship may improve estimates of volcanic emissions and characterization of eruption size and intensity.

  3. Persistent Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between representation and the represented is examined here through the notion of persistent modelling. This notion is not novel to the activity of architectural design if it is considered as describing a continued active and iterative engagement with design concerns – an evident...... characteristic of architectural practice. But the persistence in persistent modelling can also be understood to apply in other ways, reflecting and anticipating extended roles for representation. This book identifies three principle areas in which these extensions are becoming apparent within contemporary....... It also provides critical insight into the use of contemporary modelling tools and methods, together with an examination of the implications their use has within the territories of architectural design, realisation and experience....

  4. Generation and propagation of infrasonic airwaves from volcanic explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. B.

    2003-02-01

    Analysis of infrasonic pressure waves generated by active volcanoes is essential to the understanding of volcanic explosion dynamics. Unlike seismic waves propagating in the earth, infrasonic airwaves offer a relatively unfiltered representation of source motions at the vent during an eruption. Time-varying acoustic propagation filters caused by changeable atmospheric conditions are minimal for microphones deployed at intermediate distances (article [ Johnson et al., J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res., in press].

  5. Frequent underwater volcanism in the central Aegean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebscher, C.; Ruhnau, M.; Dehghani, G. A.

    2012-04-01

    The extinction of the Minoan culture in the mid second millennium BCE is a well known consequence of the Plinian eruption of Thera volcano (Santorini Island). Santorini is a member of the South Aegean arc forming a chain from the Gulf of Saronikos (Susaki, Egina, Poros, Methana) at West, to an area close to the Anatolian coast at East (Kos, Nisyros and minor islands), through the central part (Milos and Santorini island groups). Underwater volcanic activity was manifested historically only once. During 1649-1650 CE the Kolumbo underwater volcano evolved about 8 km northeast of Santorini. As a consequence of this eruption volcanic ash covered the entire Aegean area and a hazardous tsunami was triggered. Here we show by means of reflection seismic and magnetic data that underwater volcanism occurred more frequently in the central Aegean Sea than previously assumed. Seismic data show that Kolumbo constitutes of five vertically stacked cones of pyroclastic sediment plus at least four smaller cones on the flank of the volcano. The formation of Kolumbo started synchronous with Santorini Island. The entire volume of the Kolumbo pyroclastic cones is estimated to more than 15 cubic-kilometers. Several small-scale cones have been detected in the Anyhdros Basin some km north-east of Kolumbo, being previously interpreted as mud volcanoes by other authors. However, the similarity of seismic and magnetic signatures of these cones and Kolumbo strongly suggest that these cones were also created by underwater volcanism. Volcanic cones, Kolumbo and Santorini are situated along a NE-SW striking graben system that evolved during five extensional tectonic pulses in the Pliocene.

  6. The seismic monitoring network of Mt. Vesuvius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Orazi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mt. Vesuvius (southern Italy is one of the most hazardous volcanoes in the world. Its activity is currently characterized by moderate seismicity, with hypocenters located beneath the crater zone with depth rarely exceeding 5 km and magnitudes generally less than 3. The current configuration of the seismic monitoring network of Mt. Vesuvius consists of 18 seismic stations and 7 infrasound microphones. During the period 2006-2010 a seismic array with 48 channels was also operative. The station distribution provides appropriate coverage of the area around the volcanic edifice. The current development of the network and its geometry, under conditions of low seismic noise, allows locating seismic events with M<1. Remote instruments continuously transmit data to the main acquisition center in Naples. Data transmission is realized using different technological solutions based on UHF, Wi-Fi radio links, and TCP/IP client-server applications. Data are collected in the monitoring center of the Osservatorio Vesuviano (Italian National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology, Naples section, which is equipped with systems for displaying and analyzing signals, using both real-time automatic and manual procedures. 24-hour surveillance allows to immediately communicate any significant anomaly to the Civil Protection authorities.

  7. Volcanic hazards to airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Mayberry, G.C.; Casadevall, T.J.; Wunderman, R.

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic activity has caused significant hazards to numerous airports worldwide, with local to far-ranging effects on travelers and commerce. Analysis of a new compilation of incidents of airports impacted by volcanic activity from 1944 through 2006 reveals that, at a minimum, 101 airports in 28 countries were affected on 171 occasions by eruptions at 46 volcanoes. Since 1980, five airports per year on average have been affected by volcanic activity, which indicates that volcanic hazards to airports are not rare on a worldwide basis. The main hazard to airports is ashfall, with accumulations of only a few millimeters sufficient to force temporary closures of some airports. A substantial portion of incidents has been caused by ash in airspace in the vicinity of airports, without accumulation of ash on the ground. On a few occasions, airports have been impacted by hazards other than ash (pyroclastic flow, lava flow, gas emission, and phreatic explosion). Several airports have been affected repeatedly by volcanic hazards. Four airports have been affected the most often and likely will continue to be among the most vulnerable owing to continued nearby volcanic activity: Fontanarossa International Airport in Catania, Italy; Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport in Alaska, USA; Mariscal Sucre International Airport in Quito, Ecuador; and Tokua Airport in Kokopo, Papua New Guinea. The USA has the most airports affected by volcanic activity (17) on the most occasions (33) and hosts the second highest number of volcanoes that have caused the disruptions (5, after Indonesia with 7). One-fifth of the affected airports are within 30 km of the source volcanoes, approximately half are located within 150 km of the source volcanoes, and about three-quarters are within 300 km; nearly one-fifth are located more than 500 km away from the source volcanoes. The volcanoes that have caused the most impacts are Soufriere Hills on the island of Montserrat in the British West Indies

  8. Habit persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther Møller, Stig

    2009-01-01

    This paper uses an iterated GMM approach to estimate and test the consumption based habit persistence model of Campbell and Cochrane (1999) on the US stock market. The empirical evidence shows that the model is able to explain the size premium, but fails to explain the value premium. Further...

  9. Geodetic Monitoring System Operating On Neapolitan Volcanic Area (southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingue, F.; Ov-Geodesy Team

    The Neapolitan volcanic area is located in the southern sector of the Campanian Plain Graben including three volcanic active structures (Somma-Vesuvius, Campi Flegrei and Ischia). The Somma-Vesuvius complex, placed East of Naples, is a strato-volcano composed by a more ancient apparatus (Mt. Somma) and a younger cone (Mt. Vesu- vius) developed inside Somma caldera. Since last eruption (1944) it is in a quiescent state characterised by a low level seismicity and deformation activity. The Campi Fle- grei, located West of Naples, are a volcanic field inside an older caldera rim. The last eruption, occurred in the 1538, built up the Mt. Nuovo cone. The Campi Flegrei are subject to a slow vertical deformation, called bradyseism. In the 1970-1972 and 1982-1984 they have been affected by two intense episodes of ground upheaval (ac- companied by an intense seismic activity)0, followed by a subsidence phase, slower than uplift and still active. Though such phenomenon has not been followed by erup- tive events, it caused serious damages, emphasizing the high volcanic risk of the phle- grean caldera. The Ischia island, located SW of Naples, has been characterised by a volcanic activity both explosive and effusive, occurred mainly in the last 50,000 years. These events modelled the topography producing fault systems and structures delim- iting the Mt. Epomeo resurgent block. The last eruption has occurred on 1302. After, the dynamics of the island has been characterised by seismic activity (the strongest earthquake occurred on 1883) and by a meaningful subsidence, on the S and NW sec- tors of the island. The concentration of such many active volcanoes in an area with a dense urbanization (about 1,500,000 inhabitants live) needs systematic and contin- uous monitoring of the dynamics. These information are necessary in order to char- acterise eruptive precursors useful for modelling the volcanoes behaviour. Insofar, the entire volcanic Neapolitan area, characterised by a

  10. Machine Learning Method for Pattern Recognition in Volcano Seismic Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radic, V.; Unglert, K.; Jellinek, M.

    2016-12-01

    Variations in the spectral content of volcano seismicity related to changes in volcanic activity are commonly identified manually in spectrograms. However, long time series of monitoring data at volcano observatories require tools to facilitate automated and rapid processing. Techniques such as Self-Organizing Maps (SOM), Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and clustering methods can help to quickly and automatically identify important patterns related to impending eruptions. In this study we develop and evaluate an algorithm applied on a set of synthetic volcano seismic spectra as well as observed spectra from Kılauea Volcano, Hawai`i. Our goal is to retrieve a set of known spectral patterns that are associated with dominant phases of volcanic tremor before, during, and after periods of volcanic unrest. The algorithm is based on training a SOM on the spectra and then identifying local maxima and minima on the SOM 'topography'. The topography is derived from the first two PCA modes so that the maxima represent the SOM patterns that carry most of the variance in the spectra. Patterns identified in this way reproduce the known set of spectra. Our results show that, regardless of the level of white noise in the spectra, the algorithm can accurately reproduce the characteristic spectral patterns and their occurrence in time. The ability to rapidly classify spectra of volcano seismic data without prior knowledge of the character of the seismicity at a given volcanic system holds great potential for real time or near-real time applications, and thus ultimately for eruption forecasting.

  11. Anomalous crustal movements with low seismic efficiency - Campi Flegrei, Italy and some examples in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nazzaro

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Campi Flegrei is a unique volcanic region located near Naples, Italy. Anomalous crustal movements at Pozzuoli in Campi Flegrei have been documented since the Roman period. The movements were gradual and have continued to the present, occasionally accompanying swarms of local earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. Generally the movements proceed with low seismicity. After the 1538 eruption of Monte Nuovo, Pozzuoli had subsided monotonously, but it changed to uplift abruptly in 1969. The uplift accelerated in 1983 and 1984 reaching more than 2 m, and thereafter began to subside. Many discussions of this event have been published. In Japan, we have examples of deformations similar to those at Campi Flegrei, mainly in volcanic areas, and rarely in non-volcanic areas. The former includes Iwojima, Miyakejima and Aira caldera while the latter is represented by Cape Omaezaki. Iwojima is a volcano island, and its secular uplifts since the 18th century are recognized as an unusual event. Miyakejima volcano and Aira caldera exhibited anomalous movements with low seismicity after their eruptions. Cape Omaezaki is not situated in volcanic zone but near a subduction zone, and gradually and continuously subsides as a precursor to a large earthquake. In such cases as Campi Flegrei and the Japanese localities, we would question whether the deformations are accompanied by normal seismicity or low seismicity. To examine quantitatively the relationship between seismicity and related deformation, seismic efficiency is generally useful. The crustal deformations in all the regions cited above are characterized by exceptionally low seismic efficiencies. In the present paper, the deformations at Pozzuoli and Iwojima are mainly described and a comparative discussion among these and other localities in Japan is supplemented. It is concluded that such anomalous phenomena in volcanic areas are attributable to peculiar rheological aspects of the material composing the local

  12. Revealing the Eruptive History of Volcanoes from Massive Cross-Correlation of Seismic Signal at Global Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, A.; Gaillard, P.; Grenouille, A.; Bui-Quang, P.; Guilhem, A.; Bobrov, D.; Kitov, I. O.; Rozhkov, M.

    2015-12-01

    We propose here a massive cross-correlation technique applied to seismic events located around volcanoes and recorded at teleseismic distance. Multichannel cross-correlations are performed between 2002 to 2012 using seismic templates occurring at the time of moderate to large volcanic eruptions. The volcanic periods are reported from the Global Volcanism Program database while the waveform data are obtained from the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). The temporal distribution of new seismic events, built from the association of teleseismic detections reveals acceleration patterns, which are highly correlated to the past eruptive activities. These newly detected events are relocated using Bayesian approach and leads to preliminary interpretation of the volcanic plumbing system. Two examples are presented. First, the large 2008 eruption (Volcanic Explosivity Index, VEI4) of Kasatochi (Aleutian Islands, 52.10°N/175.31°W) is used to demonstrate that only few seismic templates (~3) help to reveal the time scale of the eruption. Results are compared to hydroacoustic signal, which is highly correlated to the distribution of new seismic events prior and during eruption. We also show that after the peaked seismic activity (i.e., ~ 100 seismic events in 1 hour) the infrasound signal starts and signs the volcanic plume activity. The second case example reveals with success seven past volcanic eruptions of lower magnitude (VEI1 to VEI2) of the Karangetang volcano (Siau Island in Indonesia, 2.46°N/125.24°E). We show the potential of this method to detect volcanic eruptions in isolated areas. This is of special interest especially when there is no volcano observatory to monitor the volcanic activity, or when the last eruptive period is unknown.

  13. Single-station monitoring of volcanoes using seismic ambient noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Plaen, Raphael S. M.; Lecocq, Thomas; Caudron, Corentin; Ferrazzini, Valérie; Francis, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    Seismic ambient noise cross correlation is increasingly used to monitor volcanic activity. However, this method is usually limited to volcanoes equipped with large and dense networks of broadband stations. The single-station approach may provide a powerful and reliable alternative to the classical "cross-station" approach when measuring variation of seismic velocities. We implemented it on the Piton de la Fournaise in Reunion Island, a very active volcano with a remarkable multidisciplinary continuous monitoring. Over the past decade, this volcano has been increasingly studied using the traditional cross-correlation technique and therefore represents a unique laboratory to validate our approach. Our results, tested on stations located up to 3.5 km from the eruptive site, performed as well as the classical approach to detect the volcanic eruption in the 1-2 Hz frequency band. This opens new perspectives to successfully forecast volcanic activity at volcanoes equipped with a single three-component seismometer.

  14. 2015 Volcanic activity in Alaska—Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Iezzi, Alexandra M.; Wallace, Kristi

    2017-09-28

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest, and seismic events at 14 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2015. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of continuing intermittent ash eruptions from Cleveland and Shishaldin volcanoes in the Aleutian Islands. Two eruptive episodes, at Veniaminof and Pavlof, on the Alaska Peninsula ended in 2015. During 2015, AVO re-established the seismograph network at Aniakchak, installed six new broadband seismometers throughout the Aleutian Islands, and added a Multiple component Gas Analyzer System (MultiGAS) station on Augustine.

  15. Stress fields of the overriding plate at convergent margins and beneath active volcanic arcs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apperson, K D

    1991-11-01

    Tectonic stress fields in the overriding plate at convergent plate margins are complex and vary on local to regional scales. Volcanic arcs are a common element of overriding plates. Stress fields in the volcanic arc region are related to deformation generated by subduction and to magma generation and ascent processes. Analysis of moment tensors of shallow and intermediate depth earthquakes in volcanic arcs indicates that the seismic strain field in the arc region of many convergent margins is subhorizontal extension oriented nearly perpendicular to the arc. A process capable of generating such a globally consistent strain field is induced asthenospheric corner flow below the arc region.

  16. Lung problems and volcanic smog

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... releases gases into the atmosphere. Volcanic smog can irritate the lungs and make existing lung problems worse. ... deep into the lungs. Breathing in volcanic smog irritates the lungs and mucus membranes. It can affect ...

  17. SEISMIC GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>20091465 Cai Xuelin(College of Earth Sciences,Chengdu University of Technology,Chengdu 610059,China);Cao Jiamin Preliminary Study on the 3-D Crust Structure for the Longmen Lithosphere and the Genesis of the Huge Wenchuan Earthquake,Sichuan Province,China(Journal of Chengdu University of Technology,ISSN1671-9727,CN51-1634/N,35(4),2008,p.357-365,8 illus.,39 refs.)Key words:deep-seated structures,large earthquakes,Longmenshan Fracture ZoneBased on a structural analysis of many seismic sounding profiles,there are two fault systems in Longmen collisional orogenic belt,Sichuan Province,China.They are both different obviously and correlative closely.One is shallow fault system composed mainly of brittle shear zones in surface crust,and the other is deep fault system composed mainly of crust-mantle ductile shear zones cutting Moho discontinuity.Based on the result of researching geological structure and seismic sounding profiles,

  18. Volcanism and Oil & Gas In Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Xuanlong

    2000-01-01

    Based on study on the relation with volcanic rock and oil & gas in Songliao Basin and Liaohe Basin in northeast China, author proposes that material from deep by volcanism enrichs the resources in basins, that heat by volcanism promotes organic matter transforming to oil and gas, that volcanic reservoir is fracture, vesicular, solution pore, intercrystal pore.Lava facies and pyroclastic facies are favourable reservoir. Mesozoic volcanic reservoir is majority of intermediate, acid rock,but Cenozoic volcanic reservoir is majority of basalt. Types of oil and gas pool relating to volcanic rock include volcanic fracture pool, volcanic unconformity pool, volcanic rock - screened pool, volcanic darpe structural pool.

  19. Evidences for higher nocturnal seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scafetta, Nicola; Mazzarella, Adriano

    2017-04-01

    We analyze hourly seismic data measured at the Osservatorio Vesuviano Ovest (OVO, 1972-2014) and at the Bunker Est (BKE, 1999-2014) stations on the Mt. Vesuvius (Italy). The OVO record is complete for seismic events with magnitude M ≥ 1.9. We demonstrate that before 1996 this record presents a daily oscillation that nearly vanishes afterwards. To determine whether a daily oscillation exists in the seismic activity of the Mt. Vesuvius, we use the higher quality BKE record that is complete for seismic events with magnitude M ≥ 0.2. We demonstrate that BKE confirms that the seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius is higher during nighttime than during daytime. The amplitude of the daily oscillation is enhanced during summer and damped during winter. We speculate possible links with the cooling/warming diurnal cycle of the volcanic edifice and with external geomagnetic field. We find that the amplitude of the seismic daily cycle changes in time and has been increasing since 2008. Finally, we propose a seismic activity index to monitor the 24-hour oscillation that could be used to complement other methodologies currently adopted to determine the seismic status of the volcano to prevent the relative hazard. Reference: Mazzarella, A., Scafetta, N., 2016. Evidences for higher nocturnal seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 321, 102-113. DOI: 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2016.04.026

  20. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard...

  1. Quaternary volcanism in the Acambay graben, Mexican Volcanic Belt: Re-evaluation for potential volcanic danger in central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Diaz, G. J.; Pedrazzi, D.; Lacan, P.; Roldan-Quintana, J.; Ortuňo, M.; Zuniga, R. R.; Laurence, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB) is best known for the major active stratovolcanoes, such as Popocatépetl, Citlaltépetl and Colima. The most common stratovolcanoes in this province are modest-size cones with heights of 800 to 1000 m. Examples are Tequila, Sangangüey, Las Navajas, Culiacán, La Joya, El Zamorano, Temascalcingo and Altamirano; these last two were formed within the Acambay Graben in central MVB. The Acambay graben (20 x 70 km) is 100 km to the NW of Mexico City, with E-W trending seismically active normal faults; in particular the Acambay-Tixmadejé fault related to a mB =7 earthquake in 1912. Within the graben there are many volcanic structures, including calderas, domes, cinder cones and stratovolcanoes; Temascalcingo and Altamirano are the largest, with about 800 and 900 m heights, respectively. Temascalcingo is mostly composed of dacitic lavas and block and ash flow deposits. Includes a 3 x 2.5 km summit caldera and a magmatic sector collapse event with the associated debris avalanche deposit. 14C ages of 37-12 ka correspond to the volcano's latest phases that produced pyroclastic deposits. A major plinian eruption formed the San Mateo Pumice with an age of <20 Ka. Altamirano volcano is poorly studied; it is andesitic-dacitic, composed of lavas, pyroclastic flow deposits, and pumice fallouts. Morphologically is better preserved than Temascalcingo, and it should be younger. 14C ages of 4.0-2.5 ka were performed in charcoal within pyroclastic flow deposits that apparently were erupted from Altamirano. An undated 3 m thick pumice fallout on the flanks of Altamirano volcano could be also Holocene. It represents a major explosive event. The relatively young ages found in volcanic deposits within the Acambay graben raise the volcanic danger level in this area, originally thought as an inactive volcanic zone. The two major volcanoes, Temascalcingo and Altamirano, should be considered as dormant volcanoes that could restart activity at any time. We

  2. Quantitative Seismic Amplitude Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Dey, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    The Seismic Value Chain quantifies the cyclic interaction between seismic acquisition, imaging and reservoir characterization. Modern seismic innovation to address the global imbalance in hydrocarbon supply and demand requires such cyclic interaction of both feed-forward and feed-back processes. Currently, the seismic value chain paradigm is in a feed-forward mode. Modern seismic data now have the potential to yield the best images in terms of spatial resolution, amplitude accuracy, and incre...

  3. The evolution of periodic seismicity, waveform similarity, and conduit processes during unrest episodes at Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador, in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Andrew; Hernandez, Stephen; Gaunt, Elizabeth; Mothes, Patricia; Hidalgo, Silvana; Ruiz, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Tungurahua is a large andesitic stratovolcano located in the Andes of Ecuador. The current eruptive phase at Tungurahua began in 1999, and has been characterised by episodes of vulcanian and strombolian activity, interspersed by periods of relative quiescence. Despite showing only modest eruptive activity in 2015, seismic data revealed a pronounced change in the behaviour of the magma-conduit system compared to the preceding 15 years of activity. The change is most notable in the periodicity of interevent-times of volcanic earthquakes. Previous seismicity at Tungurahua is characterised by interevent-time periodicities typical of a Poisson process, or modestly clustered, with slightly elevated (anti-clustered) periodicities observed only rarely during vulcanian episodes. However, activity in 2015 saw a series of unrest episodes characterised by highly-periodic interevent-times, and including several notable episodes of 'drumbeat' earthquakes. Here we report seismic and associated geophysical signals recorded at Tungurahua in 2015 by the monitoring network of the Instituto Geofisico of Ecuador, their relation to conduit processes, and implications for the origins of unrest and likely future activity. Although the nature of the low-frequency seismic signals change both within and between unrest episodes, the underlying periodicity is more consistent and gradually evolving. Waveform similarity is high within phases, resulting from the repeated activation of persistent sources, but low between different episodes, suggesting the emergence of new sources and locations. The strength of periodicity is correlated with the average waveform similarity for all unrest episodes, with the relatively low waveform similarities observed for the highly periodic drumbeat earthquakes in April due to contamination from coexisting continuous tremor. Eruptive activity consisted of a few minor explosions and ash emission events. Notably, a short-lived episode of Strombolian activity in

  4. Mammoth Mountain, California broadband seismic experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, P. B.; Pitt, A. M.; Wilkinson, S. K.; Chouet, B. A.; Hill, D. P.; Mangan, M.; Prejean, S. G.; Read, C.; Shelly, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Mammoth Mountain is a young cumulo-volcano located on the southwest rim of Long Valley caldera, California. Current volcanic processes beneath Mammoth Mountain are manifested in a wide range of seismic signals, including swarms of shallow volcano-tectonic earthquakes, upper and mid-crustal long-period earthquakes, swarms of brittle-failure earthquakes in the lower crust, and shallow (3-km depth) very-long-period earthquakes. Diffuse emissions of C02 began after a magmatic dike injection beneath the volcano in 1989, and continue to present time. These indications of volcanic unrest drive an extensive monitoring effort of the volcano by the USGS Volcano Hazards Program. As part of this effort, eleven broadband seismometers were deployed on Mammoth Mountain in November 2011. This temporary deployment is expected to run through the fall of 2013. These stations supplement the local short-period and broadband seismic stations of the Northern California Seismic Network (NCSN) and provide a combined network of eighteen broadband stations operating within 4 km of the summit of Mammoth Mountain. Data from the temporary stations are not available in real-time, requiring the merging of the data from the temporary and permanent networks, timing of phases, and relocation of seismic events to be accomplished outside of the standard NCSN processing scheme. The timing of phases is accomplished through an interactive Java-based phase-picking routine, and the relocation of seismicity is achieved using the probabilistic non-linear software package NonLinLoc, distributed under the GNU General Public License by Alomax Scientific. Several swarms of shallow volcano-tectonic earthquakes, spasmodic bursts of high-frequency earthquakes, a few long-period events located within or below the edifice of Mammoth Mountain and numerous mid-crustal long-period events have been recorded by the network. To date, about 900 of the ~2400 events occurring beneath Mammoth Mountain since November 2011 have

  5. Mantle updrafts and mechanisms of oceanic volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Don L.; Natland, James H.

    2014-10-01

    Convection in an isolated planet is characterized by narrow downwellings and broad updrafts-consequences of Archimedes' principle, the cooling required by the second law of thermodynamics, and the effect of compression on material properties. A mature cooling planet with a conductive low-viscosity core develops a thick insulating surface boundary layer with a thermal maximum, a subadiabatic interior, and a cooling highly conductive but thin boundary layer above the core. Parts of the surface layer sink into the interior, displacing older, colder material, which is entrained by spreading ridges. Magma characteristics of intraplate volcanoes are derived from within the upper boundary layer. Upper mantle features revealed by seismic tomography and that are apparently related to surface volcanoes are intrinsically broad and are not due to unresolved narrow jets. Their morphology, aspect ratio, inferred ascent rate, and temperature show that they are passively responding to downward fluxes, as appropriate for a cooling planet that is losing more heat through its surface than is being provided from its core or from radioactive heating. Response to doward flux is the inverse of the heat-pipe/mantle-plume mode of planetary cooling. Shear-driven melt extraction from the surface boundary layer explains volcanic provinces such as Yellowstone, Hawaii, and Samoa. Passive upwellings from deeper in the upper mantle feed ridges and near-ridge hotspots, and others interact with the sheared and metasomatized surface layer. Normal plate tectonic processes are responsible both for plate boundary and intraplate swells and volcanism.

  6. Evidences for higher nocturnal seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarella, Adriano; Scafetta, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    We analyze hourly seismic data measured at the Osservatorio Vesuviano Ovest (OVO, 1972-2014) and at the Bunker Est (BKE, 1999-2014) stations on the Mt. Vesuvius. The OVO record is complete for seismic events with magnitude M ≥ 1.9. We demonstrate that before 1996 this record presents a daily oscillation that nearly vanishes afterwards. To determine whether a daily oscillation exists in the seismic activity of the Mt. Vesuvius, we use the higher quality BKE record that is complete for seismic events with magnitude M ≥ 0.2. We demonstrate that BKE confirms that the seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius is higher during nighttime than during daytime. The amplitude of the daily oscillation is enhanced during summer and damped during winter. We speculate possible links with the cooling/warming diurnal cycle of the volcanic edifice, with external geomagnetic field and with magnetostriction, which stress the rocks. We find that the amplitude of the seismic daily cycle changes in time and has been increasing since 2008. Finally, we propose a seismic activity index to monitor the 24-hour oscillation that could be used to complement other methodologies currently adopted to determine the seismic status of the volcano to prevent the relative hazard.

  7. 2013 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl; McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Waythomas, Chris

    2015-08-14

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest, and seismic events at 18 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2013. Beginning with the 2013 AVO Summary of Events, the annual description of the AVO seismograph network and activity, once a stand-alone publication, is now part of this report. Because of this change, the annual summary now contains an expanded description of seismic activity at Alaskan volcanoes. Eruptions occurred at three volcanic centers in 2013: Pavlof Volcano in May and June, Mount Veniaminof Volcano in June through December, and Cleveland Volcano throughout the year. None of these three eruptive events resulted in 24-hour staffing at AVO facilities in Anchorage or Fairbanks.

  8. Multiparametric data analysis for seismic sources identification in the Campania re-gion: merge of seismological, structural and gravimetric data.

    OpenAIRE

    G. Gaudiosi; G. Alessio; M. Fedi; G. Florio; R.; Nappi; Luiso, P.; Ricciolino, P.

    2010-01-01

    The Campania region is one of the Italian most active areas from a geodynamic point of view since it is characterized by occurrence of intense and widely spread seismic activity. The seismicity of the area is concentrated mainly along the Southern Apennines chain, as well as beneath the Campanian volcanic areas (Vesuvio, Campi Flegrei, Ischia) and is also originated by seismic sources buried in the Campanian Plain and offshore the Thyrrenian sea. The aim of this paper is an attempt to better ...

  9. Structural significance of the south Tyrrhenian volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiosi, G.; Musacchio, G.; Ventura, G.; de Astis, G.

    2003-04-01

    The southern part of the Tyrrhenian Sea represents a transition from ocenic- (the Tyrrhenian Sea) to continental-domain (the Calabrian Arc) and is affected by active calkalkaline to potassic volcanism (the Eolian Islands). Active extensional tectonics, coupled with the general upwelling of northern Sicily and Calabria continental crust, coexists with active subduction of the Ionian Plate beneath the Calabrian Arc. This has been interpreted as the result of the detachment of the slab beneath the Calbrian Arc. Present-day tectonics is characterized by NE-SW normal faults and NNW- SSE dextral oblique-slip faults. The normal faults form the major peri- Tyrrhenian basins. Refraction and high resolution onshore-offshore wide-angle-reflection profiles, as well as potential field modeling, provide a 3D image of the Moho. Short wave-length undulations characterize the Moho beneath the Aeolian Arch. The major upraise is about 6 km, beneath the Aeolian active volcanic area, and affects all the crustal boundaries. Another sharp crustal thinning is observed beneath the gulf of Patti at the south-eastern edge of the Tyrrhenian basin. We suggest that the graben-like structure, occurring along the Salina-Lipari-Vulcano islands and oriented at high angles to the trench, is lithospheric and can be followed down to Moho depths. NNW-SSE dextral oblique-slip faults, like the Tindari Letojanni fault system, control the Salina-Lipari-Vulcano portion of the Aeolian volcanism and connect the oceanic crust of the Marsili Basin to the Malta Escarpment, through the Etna volcano. Across this lineament seismicity changes from mostly shallow to the west, to deep intra- slab to the east.

  10. Studies on seismic waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海明; 陈晓非

    2003-01-01

    The development of seismic wave study in China in the past four years is reviewed. The discussion is divided into several aspects, including seismic wave propagation in laterally homogeneous media, laterally heterogeneous media, anisotropic and porous media, surface wave and seismic wave inversion, and seismic wave study in prospecting and logging problems. Important projects in the current studies on seismic wave is suggested as the development of high efficient numerical methods, and applying them to the studies of excitation and propagation of seismic waves in complex media and strong ground motion, which will form a foundation for refined earthquake hazard analysis and prediction.

  11. Astor Pass Seismic Surveys Preliminary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louie, John [UNR; Pullammanappallil, Satish [Optim; Faulds, James; Eisses, Amy; Kell, Annie; Frary, Roxanna; Kent, Graham

    2011-08-05

    In collaboration with the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe (PLPT), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) and Optim re-processed, or collected and processed, over 24 miles of 2d seismic-reflection data near the northwest corner of Pyramid Lake, Nevada. The network of 2d land surveys achieved a near-3d density at the Astor Pass geothermal prospect that the PLPT drilled during Nov. 2010 to Feb. 2011. The Bureau of Indian Affairs funded additional seismic work around the Lake, and an extensive, detailed single-channel marine survey producing more than 300 miles of section, imaging more than 120 ft below the Lake bottom. Optim’s land data collection utilized multiple heavy vibrators and recorded over 200 channels live, providing a state-of-the-art reflection-refraction data set. After advanced seismic analysis including first-arrival velocity optimization and prestack depth migration, the 2d sections show clear fault-plane reflections, in some areas as deep as 4000 ft, tying to distinct terminations of the mostly volcanic stratigraphy. Some lines achieved velocity control to 3000 ft depth; all lines show reflections and terminations to 5000 ft depth. Three separate sets of normal faults appear in an initial interpretation of fault reflections and stratigraphic terminations, after loading the data into the OpendTect 3d seismic visualization system. Each preliminary fault set includes a continuous trace more than 3000 ft long, and a swarm of short fault strands. The three preliminary normal-fault sets strike northerly with westward dip, northwesterly with northeast dip, and easterly with north dip. An intersection of all three fault systems documented in the seismic sections at the end of Phase I helped to locate the APS-2 and APS-3 slimholes. The seismic sections do not show the faults connected to the Astor Pass tufa spire, suggesting that we have imaged mostly Tertiary-aged faults. We hypothesize that the Recent, active faults that produced the tufa through hotspring

  12. Study on relationship between historical volcanic eruptions and historical strong earthquakes in China and its adjacent regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    This thesis lists and describes 6 pairs of tectonic events, i.e., historical volcanic eruptions associated with historical strong earthquakes, based on the analysis for the records of historical volcanic eruptions and historical strong earthquakes in China and its adjacent region since the first record. And discusses the relationship between historical eruptions and strong earthquakes by means of analyzing the characteristics of tectonic events themselves, plate movement, regional seismicity, and regional stress environment in China and its adjacent region.

  13. Volcanism on Mars. Chapter 41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Garry, W. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Crown, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft exploration has revealed abundant evidence that Mars possesses some of the most dramatic volcanic landforms found anywhere within the solar system. How did a planet half the size of Earth produce volcanoes like Olympus Mons, which is several times the size of the largest volcanoes on Earth? This question is an example of the kinds of issues currently being investigated as part of the space-age scientific endeavor called "comparative planetology." This chapter summarizes the basic information currently known about volcanism on Mars. The volcanoes on Mars appear to be broadly similar in overall morphology (although, often quite different in scale) to volcanic features on Earth, which suggests that Martian eruptive processes are not significantly different from the volcanic styles and processes on Earth. Martian volcanoes are found on terrains of different age, and Martian volcanic rocks are estimated to comprise more than 50% of the Martian surface. This is in contrast to volcanism on smaller bodies such as Earth's Moon, where volcanic activity was mainly confined to the first half of lunar history (see "Volcanism on the Moon"). Comparative planetology supports the concept that volcanism is the primary mechanism for a planetary body to get rid of its internal heat; smaller bodies tend to lose their internal heat more rapidly than larger bodies (although, Jupiter's moon Io appears to contradict this trend; Io's intense volcanic activity is powered by unique gravitational tidal forces within the Jovian system; see "Volcanism on Io"), so that volcanic activity on Mars would be expected to differ considerably from that found on Earth and the Moon.

  14. On the development of a seismic source zonation model for seismic hazard assessment in western Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahran, Hani M.; Sokolov, Vladimir; Roobol, M. John; Stewart, Ian C. F.; El-Hadidy Youssef, Salah; El-Hadidy, Mahmoud

    2016-07-01

    A new seismic source model has been developed for the western part of the Arabian Peninsula, which has experienced considerable earthquake activity in the historical past and in recent times. The data used for the model include an up-to-date seismic catalog, results of recent studies of Cenozoic faulting in the area, aeromagnetic anomaly and gravity maps, geological maps, and miscellaneous information on volcanic activity. The model includes 18 zones ranging along the Red Sea and the Arabian Peninsula from the Gulf of Aqaba and the Dead Sea in the north to the Gulf of Aden in the south. The seismic source model developed in this study may be considered as one of the basic branches in a logic tree approach for seismic hazard assessment in Saudi Arabia and adjacent territories.

  15. Seismic unrest at Katla Volcano- southern Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    jeddi, zeinab; Tryggvason, Ari; Gudmundsson, Olafur; Bödvarsson, Reynir; SIL Seismology Group

    2014-05-01

    Katla volcano is located on the propagating Eastern Volcanic Zone (EVZ) in South Iceland. It is located beneath Mýrdalsjökull ice-cap which covers an area of almost 600 km2, comprising the summit caldera and the eruption vents. 20 eruptions between 930 and 1918 with intervals of 13-95 years are documented at Katla which is one of the most active subglacial volcanoes in Iceland. Eruptions at Katla are mainly explosive due to the subglacial mode of extrusion and produce high eruption columns and catastrophic melt water floods (jökulhlaups). The present long Volcanic repose (almost 96 years) at Katla, the general unrest since 1955, and the 2010 eruption of the neighbouring Eyjafjallajökull volcano has prompted concerns among geoscientists about an imminent eruption. Thus, the volcano has been densely monitored by seismologists and volcanologists. The seismology group of Uppsala University as a partner in the Volcano Anatomy (VA) project in collaboration with the University of Iceland and the Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) installed 9 temporary seismic stations on and around the Mýrdalsjökull glacier in 2011. Another 10 permanent seismic stations are operated by IMO around Katla. The project's data collection is now finished and temporary stations were pulled down in August 2013. According to seismicity maps of the whole recording period, thousands of microearthquakes have occurred within the caldera region. At least three different source areas are active in Katla: the caldera region, the western Godaland region and a small cluster at the southern rim of Mýrdalsjökull near the glacial stream of Hafursarjökull. Seismicity in the southern flank has basically started after June 2011. The caldera events are mainly volcano-tectonic, while western and southern events are mostly long period (lp) and can be related to glacial or magmatic movement. One motivation of the VA Katla project is to better understand the physical mechanism of these lp events. Changes

  16. Volcanic Ash Nephelometer Probe Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced dropsondes that could effectively be guided through atmospheric regions of interest such as volcanic plumes may enable unprecedented observations of...

  17. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, A.

    2012-12-01

    Large volcanic eruptions inject sulfur gases into the stratosphere, which convert to sulfate aerosols with an e-folding residence time of about one year. The radiative and chemical effects of these aerosol clouds produce responses in the climate system. Observations and numerical models of the climate system show that volcanic eruptions produce global cooling and were the dominant natural cause of climate change for the past millennium, on timescales from annual to century. Major tropical eruptions produce winter warming of Northern Hemisphere continents for one or two years, while high latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere weaken the Asian and African summer monsoon. The Toba supereruption 74,000 years ago caused very large climate changes, affecting human evolution. However, the effects did not last long enough to produce widespread glaciation. An episode of four large decadally-spaced eruptions at the end of the 13th century C.E. started the Little Ice Age. Since the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines in 1991, there have been no large eruptions that affected climate, but the cumulative effects of small eruptions over the past decade had a small effect on global temperature trends. The June 13, 2011 Nabro eruption in Eritrea produced the largest stratospheric aerosol cloud since Pinatubo, and the most of the sulfur entered the stratosphere not by direct injection, but by slow lofting in the Asian summer monsoon circulation. Volcanic eruptions warn us that while stratospheric geoengineering could cool the surface, reducing ice melt and sea level rise, producing pretty sunsets, and increasing the CO2 sink, it could also reduce summer monsoon precipitation, destroy ozone, allowing more harmful UV at the surface, produce rapid warming when stopped, make the sky white, reduce solar power, perturb the ecology with more diffuse radiation, damage airplanes flying in the stratosphere, degrade astronomical observations, affect remote sensing, and affect

  18. System of Volcanic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. HÉDERVARI

    1972-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparison is made among the systems of B. G.
    Escher (3, of R. W. van Bemmelen (1 and that of the author (4. In this
    connection, on the basis of Esclier's classification, the terms of "constructiv
    e " and "destructive" eruptions are introduced into the author's system and
    at the same time Escher's concept on the possible relation between the depth
    of magma-chamber and the measure of the gas-pressure is discussed briefly.
    Three complementary remarks to the first paper (4 011 the subject of system
    of volcanic activity are added.

  19. Seismic instrumentation plan for the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Weston A.

    2014-01-01

    The seismic network operated by the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) is the main source of authoritative data for reporting earthquakes in the State of Hawaii, including those that occur on the State’s six active volcanoes (Kīlauea, Mauna Loa, Hualālai, Mauna Kea, Haleakalā, Lō‘ihi). Of these volcanoes, Kīlauea and Mauna Loa are considered “very high threat” in a report on the rationale for a National Volcanic Early Warning System (NVEWS) (Ewert and others, 2005). This seismic instrumentation plan assesses the current state of HVO’s seismic network with respect to the State’s active volcanoes and calculates the number of stations that are needed to upgrade the current network to provide a seismic early warning capability for forecasting volcanic activity. Further, the report provides proposed priorities for upgrading the seismic network and a cost assessment for both the installation costs and maintenance costs of the improved network that are required to fully realize the potential of the early warning system.

  20. Three Dimensional Magma Wagging: Seismic Diagnostics And Forcing Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Y.; Jellinek, M.; Bercovici, D.

    2016-12-01

    Seismic tremor involving 0.5-7 Hz ground oscillations are common precursors of explosive sillicic volcanism. Here we present recent progress on the development and application of the three dimensional magma-wagging model, which is extended from the magma wagging model for tremor [Jellinek and Bercovici, 2011, Bercovici et al., 2013]. In our model, a stiff magma column rising in a vertical conduit oscillates against a surrounding foamy annulus of bubbly magma, giving rise to tremor. Inside the volcanic conduit, the magma column undergoes swirling motion, in which each horizontal section of the column can trace elliptical trajectories. We propose seismic diagnostics for the characteristics of the swirling motion using the time-lag between seismic stations, and test our model by analyzing pre-eruptive seismic data from the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano. Our analysis demonstrates the existence of elliptical swirling motion more than one week before the eruption, and suggests that the 2009 eruption was accompanied by qualitative changes in the magma wagging behavior including fluctuations in eccentricity and a reversal in the direction of elliptical swirling motion when the eruption was immediately impending. We further explore the coupling between the dynamics of the gas flux in the foamy annulus and the wagging motion of the magma column. We show that the gas flux provides a driving force for the magma column to swirl against viscous damping. The coupling between gas flux and wagging motion also brings the possibility to link observation of out-gassing with seismic measurements.

  1. Quantitative Seismic Amplitude Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dey, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    The Seismic Value Chain quantifies the cyclic interaction between seismic acquisition, imaging and reservoir characterization. Modern seismic innovation to address the global imbalance in hydrocarbon supply and demand requires such cyclic interaction of both feed-forward and feed-back processes.

  2. Quantitative Seismic Amplitude Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dey, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    The Seismic Value Chain quantifies the cyclic interaction between seismic acquisition, imaging and reservoir characterization. Modern seismic innovation to address the global imbalance in hydrocarbon supply and demand requires such cyclic interaction of both feed-forward and feed-back processes. Cur

  3. Robotization in Seismic Acquisition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blacquière, G.; Berkhout, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    The amount of sources and detectors in the seismic method follows "Moore’s Law of seismic data acquisition", i.e., it increases approximately by a factor of 10 every 10 years. Therefore automation is unavoidable, leading to robotization of seismic data acquisition. Recently, we introduced a new

  4. 2012 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Julie A.; Neal, Christina A.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Dixon, James P.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest, or suspected unrest at 11 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2012. Of the two verified eruptions, one (Cleveland) was clearly magmatic and the other (Kanaga) was most likely a single phreatic explosion. Two other volcanoes had notable seismic swarms that probably were caused by magmatic intrusions (Iliamna and Little Sitkin). For each period of clear volcanic unrest, AVO staff increased monitoring vigilance as needed, reviewed eruptive histories of the volcanoes in question to help evaluate likely outcomes, and shared observations and interpretations with the public. 2012 also was the 100th anniversary of Alaska’s Katmai-Novarupta eruption of 1912, the largest eruption on Earth in the 20th century and one of the most important volcanic eruptions in modern times. AVO marked this occasion with several public events.

  5. Volcan Reventador's Unusual Umbrella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, P.; Gioia, G.; Kieffer, S. W.

    2005-12-01

    In the past two decades, field observations of the deposits of volcanoes have been supplemented by systemmatic, and sometimes, opportunistic photographic documentation. Two photographs of the umbrella of the December 3, 2002 eruption of Volcan Reventador, Ecuador, reveal a prominently scalloped umbrella that is unlike any umbrella previously documented on a volcanic column. The material in the umbrella was being swept off a descending pyroclastic flow, and was, therefore, a co-ignimbrite cloud. We propose that the scallops are the result of a turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability with no precedents in volcanology. We ascribe the rare loss of buoyancy that drives this instability to the fact that the Reventador column fed on a cool co-ignimbrite cloud. On the basis of the observed wavelength of the scallops, we estimate a value for the eddy viscosity of the umbrella of 4000 ~m2/s. This value is consistent with a previously obtained lower bound (200 ~m2/s, K. Wohletz, priv. comm., 2005). We do not know the fate of the material in the umbrella subsequent to the photos. The analysis suggests that the umbrella was negatively buoyant. Field work on the co-ignimbrite deposits might reveal whether or not the material reimpacted, and if so, where and whether or not this material was involved in the hazardous flows that affected the main oil pipeline across Ecuador.

  6. Uranium series, volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Application of U-series dating to volcanic rocks provides unique and valuable information about the absolute timing of crystallization and differentiation of magmas prior to eruption. The 238U–230Th and 230Th-226Ra methods are the most commonly employed for dating the crystallization of mafic to silicic magmas that erupt at volcanoes. Dates derived from the U–Th and Ra–Th methods reflect crystallization because diffusion of these elements at magmatic temperatures is sluggish (Cherniak 2010) and diffusive re-equilibration is insignificant over the timescales (less than or equal to 10^5 years) typically associated with pre-eruptive storage of nearly all magma compositions (Cooper and Reid 2008). Other dating methods based on elements that diffuse rapidly at magmatic temperatures, such as the 40Ar/39Ar and (U–Th)/He methods, yield dates for the cooling of magma at the time of eruption. Disequilibrium of some short-lived daughters of the uranium series such as 210Po may be fractionated by saturation of a volatile phase and can be employed to date magmatic gas loss that is synchronous with volcanic eruption (e.g., Rubin et al. 1994).

  7. Multiple plates subducting beneath Colombia, as illuminated by seismicity and velocity from the joint inversion of seismic and gravity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syracuse, Ellen M.; Maceira, Monica; Prieto, Germán A.; Zhang, Haijiang; Ammon, Charles J.

    2016-06-01

    Subduction beneath the northernmost Andes in Colombia is complex. Based on seismicity distributions, multiple segments of slab appear to be subducting, and arc volcanism ceases north of 5° N. Here, we illuminate the subduction system through hypocentral relocations and Vp and Vs models resulting from the joint inversion of local body wave arrivals, surface wave dispersion measurements, and gravity data. The simultaneous use of multiple data types takes advantage of the differing sensitivities of each data type, resulting in velocity models that have improved resolution at both shallower and deeper depths than would result from traditional travel time tomography alone. The relocated earthquake dataset and velocity model clearly indicate a tear in the Nazca slab at 5° N, corresponding to a 250-km shift in slab seismicity and the termination of arc volcanism. North of this tear, the slab is flat, and it comprises slabs of two sources: the Nazca and Caribbean plates. The Bucaramanga nest, a small region of among the most intense intermediate-depth seismicity globally, is associated with the boundary between these two plates and possibly with a zone of melting or elevated water content, based on reduced Vp and increased Vp/Vs. We also use relocated seismicity to identify two new faults in the South American plate, one related to plate convergence and one highlighted by induced seismicity.

  8. A catalogue of caldera unrest at Taupo Volcanic Centre, New Zealand, using the Volcanic Unrest Index (VUI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Sally H.; Scott, Bradley J.; Jolly, Gill E.; Johnston, David M.; Neall, Vince E.

    2015-09-01

    Caldera unrest occurs frequently at Taupo Volcanic Centre (TVC), New Zealand, occasionally resulting in deleterious socio-economic impacts. This large silicic volcano most recently erupted in 232 AD in an explosive, caldera-forming rhyolitic eruption, devastating the central North Island. Eruptions are preceded by volcanic unrest, often consisting of seismicity, deformation, degassing, and/or geothermal system changes. These phenomena may also occur due to non-magmatic processes, complicating eruption forecasting. As volcanic unrest may or may not lead to an eruption, it needs to be characterised to provide effective warnings; this is best achieved by understanding past unrest. In this research, a catalogue of caldera unrest at TVC is developed using an historical chronology methodology, spanning from 1872 to December 2011. The Volcanic Unrest Index (VUI), which is introduced by Potter et al. (2015), is estimated for the catalogue, demonstrating its use and providing a characterisation of unrest at TVC. Sixteen episodes of unrest are identified; 4 are classified as moderate unrest (VUI 3), and 12 are classified as minor unrest (VUI 2). There has been median interval of approximately 3 years between unrest episodes and a median unrest episode duration of just under 5 months. This research provides context for future caldera unrest crises at TVC and contributes to the global caldera unrest dataset.

  9. A mantle plume below the Eifel volcanic fields, Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Ritter, Joachim R. R.; Jordan, Michael; Christensen, Ulrich R.; Achauer, Ulrich

    2001-01-01

    We present seismic images of the upper mantle below the Quaternary Eifel volcanic fields, Germany, determined by teleseismic travel time tomography. The data were measured at a dedicated network of more than 200 stations. Our results show a columnar low P-velocity anomaly in the upper mantle with a lateral contrast of up to 2%. The 100 km wide structure extends to at least 400 km depth and is equivalent to about 150–200 K excess temperature. This clear evidence for a plume below a region of c...

  10. Seismic Swarms at Paricutin Volcano Area. Magmatic Intrusion or Tectonic Seismicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, J. I.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Escudero, C. R.; Rowe, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    We relocate a seismic swarm with more than 700 earthquakes that took place between May and June 2006 in the Paricutin volcano area, Mexico inside of the Michoacan monogenetic volcanic field. This seismic swarm was recorded by the project "Mapping the Riviera Subduction Zone" (MARS), a temporary seismic network that was installed in the states of Jalisco, Colima and Michoacán between January 2006 and June 2007. Previously seismic swarms in the area were reported in the years of 1997, 1999 and 2000. For one that took place in the year of 1997 the Servicio Sismologico Nacional deployed a local network in the area, they conclude that the source of the seismicity was tectonic with depths between 18 and 12 km. The episodes of 1999 and 2000 were reported as similar to the 1997 swarm. A previous analysis of the 2006 swarm concludes that the depth of seismicity migrates from 9 to 5 km and was originated by a magmatic intrusion. We did a relocation of this swarm reading all the events and using Hypo71 and the P-wave velocity model used by the Jalisco Seismic and Acelerometric Network; a waveform analysis using cross-correlation method was also carried out. We obtained 15 earthquakes families with a correlation factor equal or greater than 0.79 and composed focal mechanism for each family. These families present a migration in depth beginning at 16 km and ended at 9 km. Our results agrees with a magmatic intrusion, but not so shallow as the previous study of the 2006 swarm.

  11. Development of a time synchronization methodology for a wireless seismic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moure-García, David; Torres-González, Pedro; del Río, Joaquín; Mihai, Daniel; Domínguez Cerdeña, Itahiza

    2017-04-01

    Seismic arrays have multiple applications. In the past, the main use was nuclear tests monitoring that began in mid-twentieth century. The major difference with a seismic network is the hypocenter location procedure. With a seismic network the hypocenter's 3D coordinates are calculated while using an array, the source direction of the seismic signal is determined. Seismic arrays are used in volcanology to obtain the source azimuth of volcanic signals related to fluids movement, magma and/or gases, that do not show a clear seismic phases' onset. A key condition in the seismic array operativity is the temporal synchronization of all the sensors, better than 1 microsecond. Because of that, usually all sensors are connected to the acquisition system by cable to ensure an identical sampling time. In this work we present the design of a wireless low-cost and low-power consumption volcanic monitoring seismic array where all nodes (sensors) acquire data synchronously and transmit them to the center node where a coherent signal is pursued in near real time.

  12. Volcanic studies at Katmai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    The Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) is a national effort supported by the Department of Energy, the US Geological Survey, and the National Science Foundation. One of the projects proposed for the CSDP consists of drilling a series of holes in Katmai National Park in Alaska to give a third dimension to the model of the 1912 eruption of Novarupta, and to investigate the processes of explosive volcanism and hydrothermal transport of metals (Eichelberger et al., 1988). The proposal for research drilling at Katmai states that ``the size, youth, elevated temperature, and simplicity of the Novarupta vent make it a truly unique scientific target.`` The National Park Service (NPS), which has jurisdiction, is sympathetic to aims of the study. However, NPS wishes to know whether Katmai is indeed uniquely suited to the research, and has asked the Interagency Coordinating Group to support an independent assessment of this claim. NPS suggested the National Academy of Sciences as an appropriate organization to conduct the assessment. In response, the National Research Council -- the working arm of the Academy -- established, under the aegis of its US Geodynamics Committee, a panel whose specific charge states: ``The proposed investigation at Katmai has been extensively reviewed for scientific merit by the three sponsoring and participating agencies. Thus, the scientific merit of the proposed drilling at Katmai is not at issue. The panel will review the proposal for scientific drilling at Katmai and prepare a short report addressing the specific question of the degree to which it is essential that the drilling be conducted at Katmai as opposed to volcanic areas elsewhere in the world.``

  13. Quaternary basaltic volcanism in the Payenia volcanic province, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina

    The extensive Quaternary volcanism in the Payenia volcanic province, Mendoza, Argentina, is investigated in this study by major and trace element analyses, Sr, Nd, Hf and Pb-isotopic analyses and Zr-Hf isotope dilution data on samples from almost the entire province. The samples are mainly...... in basalts from all the studied volcanic fields in Payenia is signs of lower crustal contamination indicating assimilation of, in some cases, large amounts of trace element depleted, mafic, plagioclase-bearing rocks. The northern Payenia is dominated by backarc basalts erupted between late Pliocene to late...

  14. Characteristics of the Seismicity in the San Martin Tuxtla volcano area, Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espindola, J.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Godinez, M.

    2012-12-01

    San Martin Tuxtla volcano (18.572N, 95.169W, 1650 masl) is a large volcano rising in the midst of the Tuxtla volcanic field in the State of Veracruz, eastern México. The last eruption of this volcano occurred in 1793 and produced thick ash fall deposits in its vicinity. Due to increasing population in the area, the volcano poses a significant risk. To determine the seismic characteristics of the area and evaluate their possible relationship with the volcano we installed a network of three seismic stations in its surroundings. The array has recorded the seismic activity from 2007 to 2011. We present the results of the analysis of the records of this period, which in general show that the seismicity in the area is relatively low both in frequency and magnitude: only 51 events of magnitude (Mc) less than 2.5 were observed and located. Most of the earthquakes are typical volcano tectonic events occurring at shallow depths (<< 12 km) around the volcano. This low level of seismicity is probably a characteristic of the area and not of the particular period studied, as has been observed in other areas of basaltic volcanism, and could be used to establish any unusual seismicity that could be related to impending volcanic activity.

  15. Volcanic Activities of Hakkoda Volcano after the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, M.; Miura, S.

    2014-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku Earthquake of 11 March 2011 generated large deformation in and around the Japanese islands, and the large crustal deformation raises fear of further disasters including triggered volcanic activities. In this presentation, as an example of such potential triggered volcanic activities, we report the recent seismic activities of Hakkoda volcano, and discuss the relation to the movement of volcanic fluids. Hakkoda volcano is a group of stratovolcanoes at the northern end of Honshu Island, Japan. There are fumaroles and hot springs around the volcano, and phreatic eruptions from Jigoku-numa on the southwestern flank of Odake volcano, which is the highest peak of the volcanic group, were documented in its history. Since just after the occurrence of the Tohokui Earthquake, the seismicity around the volcano became higher, and the migration of hypocenters of volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes was observed.In addition to these VT earthquakes, long-period (LP) events started occurring beneath Odake at a depth of about 2-3 km since February, 2013, and subtle crustal deformation caused by deep inflation source was also detected by the GEONET GNSS network around the same time. The spectra of LP events are common between events irrespective of the magnitude of events, and they have several spectral peaks at 6-7 sec, 2-3 sec, 1 sec, and so on. These LP events sometimes occur like a swarm with an interval of several minutes. The characteristics of observed LP events at Hakkoda volcano are similar to those of LP events at other active volcanoes and hydrothermal area in the world, where abundant fluids exist. Our further analysis using far-field Rayleigh radiation pattern observed by NIED Hi-net stations reveals that the source of LP events is most likely to be a nearly vertical tensile crack whose strike is NE-SW direction. The strike is almost perpendicular to the direction of maximum extensional strain estimated from the geodetic analysis, and is almost parallel to

  16. Upper crustal seismic structure of the Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge from traveltime tomography: Implications for oceanic crustal accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weekly, Robert T.; Wilcock, William S. D.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Kim, Eunyoung

    2014-04-01

    isotropic and anisotropic P wave velocity structure of the upper oceanic crust on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge is studied using refracted traveltime data collected by an active-source, three-dimensional tomography experiment. The isotropic velocity structure is characterized by low crustal velocities in the overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) at the segment ends. These low velocities are indicative of pervasive tectonic fracturing and persist off axis, recording the history of ridge propagation. Near the segment center, velocities within the upper 1 km show ridge-parallel bands with low velocities on the outer flanks of topographic highs. These features are consistent with localized thickening of the volcanic extrusive layer from eruptions extending outside of the axial valley that flow down the fault-tilted blocks that form the abyssal hill topography. On-axis velocities are generally relatively high beneath the hydrothermal vent fields likely due to the infilling of porosity by mineral precipitation. Lower velocities are observed beneath the most vigorous vent fields in a seismically active region above the axial magma chamber and may reflect increased fracturing and higher temperatures. Seismic anisotropy is high on-axis but decreases substantially off axis over 5-10 km (0.2-0.4 Ma). This decrease coincides with an increase in seismic velocities resolved at depths ≥1 km and is attributed to the infilling of cracks by mineral precipitation associated with near-axis hydrothermal circulation. The orientation of the fast-axis of anisotropy is ridge-parallel near the segment center but curves near the segment ends reflecting the tectonic fabric within the OSCs.

  17. Angola Seismicity MAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, F. A. P.; Franca, G.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this job was to study and document the Angola natural seismicity, establishment of the first database seismic data to facilitate consultation and search for information on seismic activity in the country. The study was conducted based on query reports produced by National Institute of Meteorology and Geophysics (INAMET) 1968 to 2014 with emphasis to the work presented by Moreira (1968), that defined six seismogenic zones from macro seismic data, with highlighting is Zone of Sá da Bandeira (Lubango)-Chibemba-Oncócua-Iona. This is the most important of Angola seismic zone, covering the epicentral Quihita and Iona regions, geologically characterized by transcontinental structure tectono-magmatic activation of the Mesozoic with the installation of a wide variety of intrusive rocks of ultrabasic-alkaline composition, basic and alkaline, kimberlites and carbonatites, strongly marked by intense tectonism, presenting with several faults and fractures (locally called corredor de Lucapa). The earthquake of May 9, 1948 reached intensity VI on the Mercalli-Sieberg scale (MCS) in the locality of Quihita, and seismic active of Iona January 15, 1964, the main shock hit the grade VI-VII. Although not having significant seismicity rate can not be neglected, the other five zone are: Cassongue-Ganda-Massano de Amorim; Lola-Quilengues-Caluquembe; Gago Coutinho-zone; Cuima-Cachingues-Cambândua; The Upper Zambezi zone. We also analyzed technical reports on the seismicity of the middle Kwanza produced by Hidroproekt (GAMEK) region as well as international seismic bulletins of the International Seismological Centre (ISC), United States Geological Survey (USGS), and these data served for instrumental location of the epicenters. All compiled information made possible the creation of the First datbase of seismic data for Angola, preparing the map of seismicity with the reconfirmation of the main seismic zones defined by Moreira (1968) and the identification of a new seismic

  18. Robust satellite techniques for volcanicand seismic hazards monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Scaffidi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Several satellite techniques have been proposed to monitor events related to seismic and volcanic activity. A selfadaptive approach (RAT, Robust AVHRR Techniques has recently been proposed which seems able to recognise space-time anomalies, differently related to such events, also in the presence of highly variable contributions from atmospheric (transmittance, surface (emissivity and morphology and observational (time/season, but also solar and satellite zenithal angles conditions. On the basis of NOAA-AVHRR data, the RAT aprroach has already been applied to Mount Etna volcanic ash cloud monitoring in daytime, and to seismic area monitoring in Southern Italy. This paper presents the theoretical basis for the extension of RAT approach also to nighttime volcanic ash cloud detection, together with its possible implementation to lava flow monitoring. One example of successful forecasting (few days before of a new lava vent opening during the Mount Etna eruption of July 2001 will be discussed in some detail. Progress on the use of the same approach on seismically active area monitoring will be discussed by comparison with previous results achieved on the Irpinia-Basilicata earthquake (MS = 6.9, which occurred on November 23rd 1980 in Southern Italy.

  19. Seismic stability of the Duwamish River Delta, Seattle, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayen, Robert E.; Barnhardt, Walter A.

    2007-01-01

    The delta front of the Duwamish River valley near Elliott Bay and Harbor Island is founded on young Holocene deposits shaped by sea-level rise, episodic volcanism, and seismicity. These river-mouth deposits are highly susceptible to seismic soil liquefaction and are potentially prone to submarine landsliding and disintegrative flow failure. A highly developed commercial-industrial corridor, extending from the City of Kent to the Elliott Bay/Harbor Island marine terminal facilities, is founded on the young Holocene deposits of the Duwamish River valley. The deposits of this Holocene delta have been shaped not only by relative sea-level rise but also by episodic volcanism and seismicity. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR), cores, in situ testing, and outcrops are being used to examine the delta stratigraphy and to infer how these deposits will respond to future volcanic eruptions and earthquakes in the region. A geotechnical investigation of these river-mouth deposits indicates high initial liquefaction susceptibility during earthquakes, and possibly the potential for unlimited-strain disintegrative flow failure of the delta front.

  20. Study of Seismic Activity at Ceboruco Volcano, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Escudero, C. R.; Rodríguez Ayala, N. A.; Suarez-Plascencia, C.

    2013-12-01

    Many societies and their economies endure the disastrous consequences of destructive volcanic eruptions. The Ceboruco stratovolcano (2,280 m.a.s.l.) is located in Nayarit, Mexico, at the west of the Mexican volcanic belt and towards the Sierra de San Pedro southeast, which is a key communication point for coast of Jalisco and Nayarit and the northwest of Mexico. It last eruptive activity was in 1875, and during the following five years it presents superficial activity such as vapor emissions, ash falls and riodacitic composition lava flows along the southeast side. Although surface activity has been restricted to fumaroles near the summit, Ceboruco exhibits regular seismic unrest characterized by both low frequency seismic events and volcano-tectonic earthquakes. From March 2003 until July 2008 a three-component short-period seismograph Marslite station with a Lennartz 3D (1Hz) was deployed in the south flank (CEBN) and within 2 km from the summit to monitoring the seismic activity at the volcano. The LF seismicity recorded was classified using waveform characteristics and digital analysis. We obtained four groups: impulsive arrivals, extended coda, bobbin form, and wave package amplitude modulation earthquakes. The extended coda is the group with more earthquakes and present durations of 50 seconds. Using the moving particle technique, we read the P and S wave arrival times and estimate azimuth arrivals. A P-wave velocity of 3.0 km/s was used to locate the earthquakes, most of the hypocenters are below the volcanic edifice within a circular perimeter of 5 km of radius and its depths are calculated relative to the CEBN elevation as follows. The impulsive arrivals earthquakes present hypocenters between 0 and 1 km while the other groups between 0 and 4 km. Results suggest fluid activity inside the volcanic building that could be related to fumes on the volcano. We conclude that the Ceboruco volcano is active. Therefore, it should be continuously monitored due to the

  1. Gravimetric control of active volcanic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltogianni, Vasso; Stiros, Stathis

    2017-04-01

    Volcanic activity includes phases of magma chamber inflation and deflation, produced by movement of magma and/or hydrothermal processes. Such effects usually leave their imprint as deformation of the ground surfaces which can be recorded by GNSS and other methods, on one hand, and on the other hand they can be modeled as elastic deformation processes, with deformation produced by volcanic masses of finite dimensions such as spheres, ellipsoids and parallelograms. Such volumes are modeled on the basis of inversion (non-linear, numerical solution) of systems of equations relating the unknown dimensions and location of magma sources with observations, currently mostly GNSS and INSAR data. Inversion techniques depend on the misfit between model predictions and observations, but because systems of equations are highly non-linear, and because adopted models for the geometry of magma sources is simple, non-unique solutions can be derived, constrained by local extrema. Assessment of derived magma models can be provided by independent observations and models, such as micro-seismicity distribution and changes in geophysical parameters. In the simplest case magmatic intrusions can be modeled as spheres with diameters of at least a few tens of meters at a depth of a few kilometers; hence they are expected to have a gravimetric signature in permanent recording stations on the ground surface, while larger intrusions may also have an imprint in sensors in orbit around the earth or along precisely defined air paths. Identification of such gravimetric signals and separation of the "true" signal from the measurement and ambient noise requires fine forward modeling of the wider areas based on realistic simulation of the ambient gravimetric field, and then modeling of its possible distortion because of magmatic anomalies. Such results are useful to remove ambiguities in inverse modeling of ground deformation, and also to detect magmatic anomalies offshore.

  2. Io. [theories concerning volcanic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T. V.; Soderblom, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    A report on the continuing investigation of Io is presented. Gravitational resonance is discussed as the cause of Io's volcanism, and the volcanic activity is explained in terms of sulfur chemistry. Theories concerning the reasons for the two main types of volcanic eruptions on Io are advanced and correlated with geographical features of the satellite. The sulfur and silicate models of the calderas are presented, citing the strengths and weaknesses of each. Problems of the gravitational resonance theory of Io's heat source are then described. Finally, observations of Io planned for the Galileo mission are summarized.

  3. The Validation Activities of the APhoRISM EC 7FP Project, Aimed at Post Seismic Damage Mapping, Through a Combined Use of EOS and Ground Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanthery, N.; Luzi, G.; Stramondo, S.; Bignami, C.; Pierdicca, N.; Wegmuller, U.; Romaniello, V.; Anniballe, R.; Piscini, A.; Albano, M.; Moro, M.; Crosetto, M.

    2016-08-01

    The estimate of damage after an earthquake using spaceborne remote sensing data is one of the main application of the change detection methodologies widely discussed in literature. APhoRISM - Advanced PRocedures for volcanIc and Seismic Monitoring is a collaborative European Commission project (FP7-SP ACE- 2013-1) addressing the development of innovative methods, using space and ground sensors to support the management and mitigation of the seismic and the volcanic risk. In this paper a novel approach aimed at damage assessment based on the use of a priori information derived by different sources in a preparedness phase is described and a preliminary validation is shown.

  4. Submarine earthquake rupture, active faulting and volcanism along the major Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone and implications for seismic hazard assessment in the Patagonian Andes Ruptura sísmica submarina, tectónica y volcanismo activo a lo largo de la Falla Liquiñe-Ofqui e implicancias para el peligro sísmico en los Andes patagónicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Vargas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Liquiñe-Ofqui fault zone (LOFZ in the Patagonian Andes is an active major transpressional intra-arc fault system along which Quaternary faulting and volcanism develop. Subaerial and submarine geomorphologic and structural characterization of latest Pleistocene-Holocene faults and monogenetic volcanoes allows us to assess geological cartography of active faults and the kinematic model for recent tectonics during postglacial times, since 12,000 cal. years BP. This allows increasing the basic geological knowledge necessary for determining the seismic hazard associated with cortical structures in the Aysén region in southern Chile. Fault cartography and field observations suggest dominant dextral-reverse strike slip along north-south and locally NNW-striking faults, dextral-normal strike slip along NE to NNE- striking faults, and sinistral strike slip along east-west faults. This kinematics is consistent with regional SW-NE shortening in the context of a major transpressional fault zone. Holocene and even historic monogenetic and sub-aquatic volcanism occurred in this tectonic setting in a close spatial relationship and probably favored by the activity and local architecture of faults. Submarine fault scarps and deformed sediments observed at the bottom of the Aysén Fjord were associated with the destructive April 2007 Mw6.2 earthquake located along the LOFZ. Our observations show that this earthquake occurred along dextral 15-20 km long N-S structure named Punta Cola Fault (PCF. This fault system is located some kilometres to the east of the main N-S Río Cuervo Fault (RCF. Most of the epicentres of the seismic swarm during 2007 were located along or in between both structures. The study area is a transference zone between N-S regional branches of the LOFZ. The cartography of fault segments proposed here together with geophysical and geologic data suggest that large earthquakes Mw6.2-6.5 can be typically expected along most of the active

  5. Unrest of Chiles - Cerro Negro volcanic complex: A binational Ecuador - Colombia effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, M. C.; Gomez, D.; Torres, R.; Cadena, O.; Mothes, P. A.; Anzieta, J. C.; Pacheco, D. A.; Bernard, B.; Acero, W.; Hidalgo, S.; Enriquez, W.; Cordova, A.

    2014-12-01

    The increasing seismic activity at the area of Chiles - Cerro Negro volcanic complex, located at the Ecuador-Colombian border, has been jointly monitored by the Instituto Geofisico - Ecuador and the Observatorio Vulcanologico y Sismologico de Pasto OVSP, a division of the Servicio Geologico Colombiano. Since April 2013, three seismic swarms have been detected in this area and more than 100.000 events are recorded since November 2013. The largest and more recent swarm has a daily average of 676 events between March and June 2014. Currently a seismic network of 8 seismic stations (5 in the Colombian and 3 in Ecuadorean side) are deployed in this area. Epicenters of more than 315 seismic events with magnitudes Ml>2.0 and 10 or more phases are located in an area 1-4 km south of Chiles volcano with shallow depths (up to 14 km). Most of events have magnitudes between 1.0 to 4.0. Nine events have magnitudes larger than 4.0 and the largest event occurred on April 30. 2014 with a local magnitude of 4.7 and inverse-transcurrent component focal mechanism. Waveforms and spectral patterns define these events as volcano-tectonic. Events with large magnitudes (above 3.0) show a very long-period component. Hot spring and deformation measurements also show signals of volcanic unrest.

  6. Backarc tectonism, volcanism, and mass wasting shape seafloor morphology in the Santorini-Christiana-Amorgos region of the Hellenic Volcanic Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Toomey, Douglas R.; Lampridou, Danai; Getz, Claire; Christopoulou, Maria-Eleni; O'Hara, Daniel; Arnoux, Gillean M.; Bodmer, Miles; Gray, Melissa; Heath, Benjamin A.; VanderBeek, Brandon P.

    2017-08-01

    In subduction zone backarcs, extensional deformation and arc volcanism interact and these processes, together with mass wasting, shape the seafloor morphology. We present a new bathymetric map of the Santorini-Christiana-Amorgos backarc region of the Hellenic subduction zone by merging high-resolution multibeam swath data from the R/V Langseth PROTEUS seismic experiment with existing maps. The map together with Knudsen subbottom echosounding profiles reveal that recent tectonism, volcanism, and mass wasting are more prevalent in the Santorini-Amorgos region on the east side of Santorini than in the Christiana Basin on the west side. In the Santorini-Amorgos region, large normal faults form the Anydros and Anafi Basins. Where normal fault segments overlap, two nearby accommodation zones generate a relay ramp and the adjoining Anydros synclinal horst with associated complex faulting and elevated seismicity. The ongoing normal faulting in the Santorini-Amorgos region is accompanied by potentially tsunamigenic submarine landsliding; we identified a large submarine landslide along the Santorini-Amorgos Fault and a smaller landslide with an overlying debris chute along the Amorgos Fault. Volcanic activity is also focused in this eastern region along the Kolumbo lineament within the Anydros Basin. Within the Christiana Basin we discovered the Proteus Knoll and adjacent buried edifice. We suggest that this is an older volcanic edifice formed along the Hellenic Volcanic Arc between Santorini and Milos. Around Santorini itself, features formed during, and immediately after, the Late Bronze Age eruption dominate the seafloor morphology such as the northern strait and wrinkled seafloor pyroclastic flow deposits. This topography is continually reshaped at a smaller scale by ongoing mass wasting. We infer that the earthquake, volcanic, and tsunami activity of the Santorini-Amorgos region is a consequence of focused northwest-southeast extension as the southeastern Aegean moves

  7. A Model Simulation of Pinatubo Volcanic Aerosols in the Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao , Jing-xia; Turco, Richard P.; Toon, Owen B.

    1995-01-01

    A one-dimensional, time-dependent model is used to study the chemical, microphysical, and radiative properties of volcanic aerosols produced by the Mount Pinatubo eruption on June 15, 1991. Our model treats gas-phase sulfur photochemistry, gas-to-particle conversion of sulfur, and the microphysics of sulfate aerosols and ash particles under stratospheric conditions. The dilution and diffusion of the volcanic eruption clouds are also accounted for in these conditions. Heteromolecular homogeneous and heterogeneous binary H2SO4/H2O nucleation, acid and water condensational growth, coagulation, and gravitational sedimentation are treated in detail in the model. Simulations suggested that after several weeks, the volcanic cloud was composed mainly of sulfuric acid/water droplets produced in situ from the SO2 emissions. The large amounts of SO2 (around 20 Mt) injected into the stratosphere by the Pinatubo eruption initiated homogeneous nucleation which generated a high concentration of small H2SO4/H2O droplets. These newly formed particles grew rapidly by condensation and coagulation in the first few months and then reach their stabilized sizes with effective radii in a range between 0.3 and 0.5 micron approximately one-half year after the eruption. The predicted volcanic cloud parameters reasonably agree with measurements in term of the vertical distribution and lifetime of the volcanic aerosols, their basic microphysical structures (e.g., size distribution, concentration, mass ratio, and surface area) and radiative properties. The persistent volcanic aerosols can produce significant anomalies in the radiation field, which have important climatic consequences. The large enhancement in aerosol surface area can result in measurable global stratospheric ozone depletion.

  8. Magma storage under Iceland's Eastern Volcanic Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclennan, J.; Neave, D.; Hartley, M. E.; Edmonds, M.; Thordarson, T.; Morgan, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Eastern Volcanic Zone (EVZ) of Iceland is defined by a number of volcanic systems and large basaltic eruptions occur both through central volcanoes (e.g. Grímsvötn) and on associated fissure rows (e.g. Laki, Eldgjá). We have collected a large quantity of micro-analytical data from a number of EVZ eruptions, with the aim of identifying common processes that occur in the premonitory stages of significant volcanic events. Here, we focus on the AD 1783 Laki event, the early postglacial Saksunarvatn tephra and the sub-glacially erupted Skuggafjöll tindar and for each of these eruptions we have >100 olivine-hosted or plagioclase-hosted melt inclusion analyses for major, trace and volatile elements. These large datasets are vital for understanding the history of melt evolution in the plumbing system of basaltic volcanoes. Diverse trace element compositions in melt inclusions hosted in primitive macrocrysts (i.e. Fo>84, An>84) indicate that the mantle melts supplied to the plumbing system of EVZ eruptions are highly variable in composition. Concurrent mixing and crystallisation of these melts occurs in crustal magma bodies. The levels of the deepest of these magma bodies are not well constrained by EVZ petrology, with only a handful of high-CO2 melt inclusions from Laki providing evidence for magma supply from >5 kbar. In contrast, the volatile contents of melt inclusions in evolved macrocrysts, which are close to equilibrium with the carrier liquids, indicate that final depths of inclusion entrapment are 0.5-2 kbar. The major element composition of the matrix glasses shows that the final pressure of equilibration between the melt and its macrocryst phases also occurred at 0.5-2 kbar. The relationship between these pressures and seismic/geodetic estimates of chamber depths needs to be carefully evaluated. The melt inclusion and macrocryst compositional record indicates that injection of porphyritic, gas-rich primitive melt into evolved/enriched and degassed shallow

  9. Well log interpretation and seismic character of the cenozoic sequence in the northern Alboran Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, M. J.; Comas, M. C.

    1992-06-01

    Seismic stratigraphic and main lithological features of the sedimentary cover overlying the basement of the Alboran Sea were established via the analysis of commercial multichannel seismic surveys, geophysical well logs, and well data. Six seismic stratigraphics units (VI to I), bounded by unconformities, form the marine sediments that range in age from early Miocene to Quaternary. They are dated by extrapolation of commercial drilling results from the northern Alboran Sea. Volcanic activity is recorded within sedimentary sequences of units V to II. Undercompaction features are detected in the two basal units.

  10. Short-term seismic quiescence immediately preceding explosions during the 2011 eruption of Telica Volcano, Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, M.; Roman, D. C.; Geirsson, H.; La Femina, P. C.; Muñoz, A.; Tenorio, V.

    2013-12-01

    Telica Volcano, Nicaragua, experienced a VEI 2 eruptive episode from March-June 2011. The eruption consisted of numerous small to moderate ash explosions, many of which were observed visually and recorded by a local broadband seismic network (the TESAND network). Seismicity at Telica during both background and eruptive periods is characterized by generally high and variable rates of low-magnitude volcano-seismic events. Explosions at Telica are also detected seismically and distinguished from volcanic earthquakes by the length of the seismic signal, their emergent nature and 'cigar-shaped' envelope, and broadband spectral content. During the month of May 2011, we identified 16 explosion events on a seismometer located 0.5 km from the crater vent, some of which correlate with visually observed explosions. From May 1-12, ten explosions are apparent in continuous seismic data. During this period, the rate of volcano-seismic events is relatively low (0-20 events/hour with an average of 4 events per hour). Prior to eight of the 10 explosions, there were no detected seismic events within one hour of the explosion. From May 13-31, seven explosions were identified in the continuous seismic data. During this period, the rate of volcano-seismic events is relatively high (0-48 events per hour, with an average of 18 events per hour). In the hour preceding all seven explosions, there were no detected volcano-seismic events. Visual inspection of the continuous seismic data confirms that a strong decrease in the number of volcano-seismic events immediately preceded most of the 2011 explosions at Telica Volcano. We suggest that the apparent short-term decrease in seismicity before explosions at Telica is related to a cycle of pressure buildup and release in the shallow magmatic-hydrothermal system, with an increase in pressure prior to the explosions both resulting from and reflecting constriction of gas pathways.

  11. Using faults for PSHA in a volcanic context: the Etna case (Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzaro, Raffaele; D'Amico, Salvatore; Gee, Robin; Pace, Bruno; Peruzza, Laura

    2016-04-01

    At Mt. Etna volcano (Southern Italy), recurrent volcano-tectonic earthquakes affect the urbanised areas, with an overall population of about 400,000 and with important infrastructures and lifelines. For this reason, seismic hazard analyses have been undertaken in the last decade focusing on the capability of local faults to generate damaging earthquakes especially in the short-term (30-5 yrs); these results have to be intended as complementary to the regulatory seismic hazard maps, and devoted to establish priority in the seismic retrofitting of the exposed municipalities. Starting from past experience, in the framework of the V3 Project funded by the Italian Department of Civil Defense we performed a fully probabilistic seismic hazard assessment by using an original definition of seismic sources and ground-motion prediction equations specifically derived for this volcanic area; calculations are referred to a new brand topographic surface (Mt. Etna reaches more than 3,000 m in elevation, in less than 20 km from the coast), and to both Poissonian and time-dependent occurrence models. We present at first the process of defining seismic sources that includes individual faults, seismic zones and gridded seismicity; they are obtained by integrating geological field data with long-term (the historical macroseismic catalogue) and short-term earthquake data (the instrumental catalogue). The analysis of the Frequency Magnitude Distribution identifies areas in the volcanic complex, with a- and b-values of the Gutenberg-Richter relationship representative of different dynamic processes. Then, we discuss the variability of the mean occurrence times of major earthquakes along the main Etnean faults estimated by using a purely geologic approach. This analysis has been carried out through the software code FISH, a Matlab® tool developed to turn fault data representative of the seismogenic process into hazard models. The utilization of a magnitude-size scaling relationship

  12. Volcanic investigations in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, April to May 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, M.K.; Trusdell, F.A.; Koyanagi, R.Y.; Kojima, George; Moore, R.B.

    1995-01-01

    A team of U.S. Geological Survey geologists, a seismologist, and technicians gathered new geologic, seismic, and deformation data in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI). Nine volcanic islands on the active East Mariana Ridge north of Saipan were examined between April 20 and May 3, 1994. In addition, a new radio-telemetry seismic station was installed on the island of Agrihan (also spelled Agrigan). This report describes our continuing efforts, that began in May 1981, to establish volcano monitors and to assess hazards in the CNMI. Our previous visits, from September 1990 to May 1992, are documented in Moore and others (1991, 1993).

  13. Simplified seismic risk analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellissetti, Manuel; Klapp, Ulrich [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Within the context of probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) for nuclear power plants (NPP's), seismic risk assessment has the purpose to demonstrate that the contribution of seismic events to overall risk is not excessive. The most suitable vehicle for seismic risk assessment is a full scope seismic PSA (SPSA), in which the frequency of core damage due to seismic events is estimated. An alternative method is represented by seismic margin assessment (SMA), which aims at showing sufficient margin between the site-specific safe shutdown earthquake (SSE) and the actual capacity of the plant. Both methods are based on system analysis (fault-trees and event-trees) and hence require fragility estimates for safety relevant systems, structures and components (SSC's). If the seismic conditions at a specific site of a plant are not very demanding, then it is reasonable to expect that the risk due to seismic events is low. In such cases, the cost-benefit ratio for performing a full scale, site-specific SPSA or SMA will be excessive, considering the ultimate objective of seismic risk analysis. Rather, it will be more rational to rely on a less comprehensive analysis, used as a basis for demonstrating that the risk due to seismic events is not excessive. The present paper addresses such a simplified approach to seismic risk assessment which is used in AREVA to: - estimate seismic risk in early design stages, - identify needs to extend the design basis, - define a reasonable level of seismic risk analysis Starting from a conservative estimate of the overall plant capacity, in terms of the HCLPF (High Confidence of Low Probability of Failure), and utilizing a generic value for the variability, the seismic risk is estimated by convolution of the hazard and the fragility curve. Critical importance is attached to the selection of the plant capacity in terms of the HCLPF, without performing extensive fragility calculations of seismically relevant SSC's. A suitable basis

  14. Evidences for higher nocturnal seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzarella, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    We analyze hourly seismic data measured at the Osservatorio Vesuviano Ovest (OVO, 1972-2014) and at the Bunker Est (BKE, 1999-2014) stations on the Mt. Vesuvius. The OVO record is complete for seismic events with magnitude M > 1.9. We demonstrate that before 1996 this record presents a daily oscillation that nearly vanishes afterwards. To determine whether a daily oscillation exists in the seismic activity of the Mt. Vesuvius, we use the higher quality BKE record that is complete for seismic events with magnitude M > 0.2. We demonstrate that BKE confirms that the seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius is higher during nighttime than during day-time. The amplitude of the daily oscillation is enhanced during summer and damped during winter. We speculate possible links with the cooling/warming diurnal cycle of the volcanic edifice, with external geomagnetic field and with magnetostriction that should also stress the rocks. We find that the amplitude of the seismic daily cycle changes in time and has been increasin...

  15. Volcanic eruptions observed with infrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Aster, Richard C.; Kyle, Philip R.

    2004-07-01

    Infrasonic airwaves produced by active volcanoes provide valuable insight into the eruption dynamics. Because the infrasonic pressure field may be directly associated with the flux rate of gas released at a volcanic vent, infrasound also enhances the efficacy of volcanic hazard monitoring and continuous studies of conduit processes. Here we present new results from Erebus, Fuego, and Villarrica volcanoes highlighting uses of infrasound for constraining quantitative eruption parameters, such as eruption duration, source mechanism, and explosive gas flux.

  16. Los volcanes y los hombres

    OpenAIRE

    García, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    Desde las entrañas de la tierra, los volcanes han creado la atmósfera, el agua de los océanos, y esculpido los relieves del planeta: son, pues, los zahoríes de la vida. Existen volcanes que los hombres explotan o cultivan, y otros sobre los cuales se han construido observatorios en los que se llevan a cabo avanzadas investigaciones científicas.

  17. Volcanic hazards and aviation safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, Thomas J.; Thompson, Theodore B.; Ewert, John W.; ,

    1996-01-01

    An aeronautical chart was developed to determine the relative proximity of volcanoes or ash clouds to the airports and flight corridors that may be affected by volcanic debris. The map aims to inform and increase awareness about the close spatial relationship between volcanoes and aviation operations. It shows the locations of the active volcanoes together with selected aeronautical navigation aids and great-circle routes. The map mitigates the threat that volcanic hazards pose to aircraft and improves aviation safety.

  18. Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham J. Weir

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A conceptual model of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ is developed, to a depth of 25 km, formed from three constant density layers. The upper layer is formed from eruption products. A constant rate of eruption is assumed, which eventually implies a constant rate of extension, and a constant rate of volumetric creation in the middle and bottom layers. Tectonic extension creates volume which can accomodate magmatic intrusions. Spreading models assume this volume is distributed throughout the whole region, perhaps in vertical dykes, whereas rifting models assume the upper crust is thinned and the volume created lies under this upper crust. Bounds on the heat flow from such magmatic intrusions are calculated. Heat flow calculations are performed and some examples are provided which match the present total heat output from the TVZ of about 4200 MW, but these either have extension rates greater than the low values of about 8 ± 4 mm/a being reported from GPS measurements, or else consider extension rates in the TVZ to have varied over time.

  19. Ambient Noise Surface Wave Tomography of the volcanic systems of eastern Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, R. G.; Priestley, K. F.; White, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Vatnajökull region of central-east Iceland lies above the head of the Iceland mantle plume where the crust is thickest due to enhanced melt supply. As a result the region contains a high density of volcanic rift systems, with six large subglacial central volcanoes. Due to the ice cover, the geological structure of the area and the location of past eruptions are poorly known. Imaging of the crustal velocity heterogeneities beneath the ice sheet aims to reveal much in terms of the structure of these volcanic plumbing systems. Mapping of significant velocity changes through time may also be indicative of movement of melt around the central volcanoes; one of which (Bárðarbunga) experienced a major rifting event in August 2014 (Sigmundsson et al. Nature 2015, Green et al. Nature Geosci. 2015). We present results from tomographic imaging of the volcanic systems in the region, using continuous data from a local broadband seismic network in central-east Iceland which provides excellent ray path coverage of the volcanic systems. This is supplemented by data from the HOTSPOT and ICEMELT experiments and the permanent monitoring stations of the Icelandic Meteorological Office. We process the continuous data following Benson et al. 2007 and automatic frequency-time analysis (FTAN) routines are used to extract more than 9000 dispersion measurements. We then generate Rayleigh wave group velocity maps which we present here. We find low velocity regions beneath the Vatnajökull icecap which are bounded by the surface expression of the volcanic rift systems. The lower velocities also extend north-west to the volcanic system under the Hofsjökull ice cap, and northwards towards Askja and the volcanic systems of the northern volcanic zone. We also produce locations and focal mechanisms of earthquakes caused by magmatic and hydrothermal activity to correlate structure with the activity of the volcanic systems.

  20. Integrating volcanic gas monitoring with other geophysical networks in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Melissa A.

    2017-04-01

    The Icelandic Meteorological Office/Icelandic Volcano Observatory is rapidly developing and improving the use of gas measurements as a tool for pre- and syn-eruptive monitoring within Iceland. Observations of deformation, seismicity, hydrological properties, and gas emissions, united within an integrated approach, can provide improved understanding of subsurface magma movements. This is critical to evaluate signals prior to and during volcanic eruptions, issue timely eruption warnings, forecast eruption behavior, and assess volcanic hazards. Gas measurements in Iceland need to be processed to account for the high degree of gas composition alteration due to interaction with external water and rocks. Deeply-sourced magmatic gases undergo reactions and modifications as they move to the surface that exercise a strong control on the composition of surface emissions. These modifications are particularly strong at ice-capped volcanoes where most surface gases are dissolved in glacial meltwater. Models are used to project backwards from surface gas measurements to what the magmatic gas composition was prior to upward migration. After the pristine magma gas composition has been determined, it is used together with fluid compositions measured in mineral hosted melt inclusions to calculate magmatic properties to understand magma storage and migration and to discern if there have been changes in the volcanic system. The properties derived from surface gas measurements can be used as input to models interpreting deformation and seismic observations, and can be used as an additional, independent observation when interpreting hydrological and seismic changes. An integrated approach aids with determining whether observed hydro/geological changes can be due to the presence of shallow magma. Constraints on parameters such as magma gas content, viscosity and compressibility can be provided by the approach described above, which can be utilized syn-eruptively to help explain

  1. Seismic Catalogue and Seismic Network in Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belizaire, D.; Benito, B.; Carreño, E.; Meneses, C.; Huerfano, V.; Polanco, E.; McCormack, D.

    2013-05-01

    The destructive earthquake occurred on January 10, 2010 in Haiti, highlighted the lack of preparedness of the country to address seismic phenomena. At the moment of the earthquake, there was no seismic network operating in the country, and only a partial control of the past seismicity was possible, due to the absence of a national catalogue. After the 2010 earthquake, some advances began towards the installation of a national network and the elaboration of a seismic catalogue providing the necessary input for seismic Hazard Studies. This paper presents the state of the works carried out covering both aspects. First, a seismic catalogue has been built, compiling data of historical and instrumental events occurred in the Hispaniola Island and surroundings, in the frame of the SISMO-HAITI project, supported by the Technical University of Madrid (UPM) and Developed in cooperation with the Observatoire National de l'Environnement et de la Vulnérabilité of Haiti (ONEV). Data from different agencies all over the world were gathered, being relevant the role of the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico seismological services which provides local data of their national networks. Almost 30000 events recorded in the area from 1551 till 2011 were compiled in a first catalogue, among them 7700 events with Mw ranges between 4.0 and 8.3. Since different magnitude scale were given by the different agencies (Ms, mb, MD, ML), this first catalogue was affected by important heterogeneity in the size parameter. Then it was homogenized to moment magnitude Mw using the empirical equations developed by Bonzoni et al (2011) for the eastern Caribbean. At present, this is the most exhaustive catalogue of the country, although it is difficult to assess its degree of completeness. Regarding the seismic network, 3 stations were installed just after the 2010 earthquake by the Canadian Government. The data were sent by telemetry thought the Canadian System CARINA. In 2012, the Spanish IGN together

  2. Increased pressure from rising bubbles as a mechanism for remotely triggered seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, A.T.; Sacks, I.S.; Johnston, M.J.S.; Hill, D.P.; Bilham, R.G.

    1994-01-01

    Aftershocks of large earthquakes tend to occur close to the main rupture zone, and can be used to constrain its dimensions. But following the 1992 Landers earthquake (magnitude M(w) = 7.3) in southern California, many aftershocks were reported in areas remote from the mainshock. Intriguingly, this remote seismicity occurred in small clusters near active volcanic and geothermal systems. For one of these clusters (Long Valley, about 400 km from the Landers earthquake), crustal deformation associated with the seismic activity was also monitored. Here we argue that advective overpressure provides a viable mechanism for remote seismicity triggered by the Landers earthquake. Both the deformation and seismicity data are consistent with pressure increases owing to gas bubbles rising slowly within a volume of magma. These bubbles may have been shaken loose during the passage of seismic waves generated by the mainshock.

  3. Volcanic Environments Monitoring by Drones Mud Volcano Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amici, S.; Turci, M.; Giulietti, F.; Giammanco, S.; Buongiorno, M. F.; La Spina, A.; Spampinato, L.

    2013-08-01

    Volcanic activity has often affected human life both at large and at small scale. For example, the 2010 Eyjafjallajokull eruption caused severe economic damage at continental scale due to its strong effect on air traffic. At a local scale, ash fall and lava flow emission can cause harm and disruption. Understanding precursory signals to volcanic eruptions is still an open and tricky challenge: seismic tremor and gas emissions, for example, are related to upcoming eruptive activity but the mechanisms are not yet completely understood. Furthermore, information related to gases emission mostly comes from the summit crater area of a volcano, which is usually hard to investigate with required accuracy. Although many regulation problems are still on the discussion table, an increasing interest in the application of cutting-edge technology like unmanned flying systems is growing up. In this sense, INGV (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia) started to investigate the possibility to use unmanned air vehicles for volcanic environment application already in 2004. A flight both in visual- and radio-controlled mode was carried out on Stromboli volcano as feasibility test. In this work we present the preliminary results of a test performed by INGV in collaboration with the University of Bologna (aerospace division) by using a multi-rotor aircraft in a hexacopter configuration. Thermal camera observations and flying tests have been realised over a mud volcano located on its SW flank of Mt. Etna and whose activity proved to be related to early stages of magma accumulation within the volcano.

  4. Petroleum exploration of shallow marine deposit Carboniferous volcanic tuff reservoir in the western margin of Junggar Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jianyong; Wang Xuezhong; Ma Liqun

    2013-01-01

    In 2011,petroleum exploration of shallow marine deposits Carboniferous and volcanic tuff reservoir re-alized breakthroughs at Chepaizi slope in the western margin of Junggar Basin. Pai 61 well ,with 855.7 ~949.6 m section,in the conventional test oil obtained 6 t/d industrial oil flow. The surface viscosity is 390 mPa· s (50℃). The marine deposit of Carboniferous are deep oil source rocks and high-quality reservoir. Magma volcanic activity provides the basis for volcanic reservoir development and distribution. The weathering crust and secondary cracks developed volcanic tuff by strong rock weathering and dissolution of organic acids which has become top quality reservoir. Deep Permian oil-gas migrated and accumulated to high parts along Hong-Che fault belt and stratigraphic unconformity stripping. Permian and Triassic volcanic rocks or dense mudstone sedimentary cover as a regional seal for the late Carboniferous oil-gas to save critically. The seismic pre-stack time migration processing technologies for the problem of poor inner structures of Carboniferous were developed. Response of volcanic rock seismic and logging are obvious. The application imaging logging and nuclear magnetic technology achieved the qualitative identification and quantification of fracture description.

  5. Seismicity of the rocky mountains and Rio Grande Rift from the EarthScope Transportable Array and CREST temporary seismic networks, 2008-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, J. S.; Sheehan, A. F.; Bilek, S. L.

    2017-03-01

    We developed a catalog of small magnitude (ML -0.1 to 4.7) seismicity across Colorado and New Mexico from the EarthScope USArray Transportable Array and CREST (Colorado Rocky Mountains Experiment and Seismic Transects) seismic networks from 2008 to 2010 to characterize active deformation in the Rio Grande Rift. We recorded over 900 earthquakes in the Rio Grande Rift region, not including induced earthquakes and mine blasts, and find that the rift is actively deforming both broadly and in distinct regions. Seismic events that are likely induced, mostly in the Raton Basin, make up 66% of the catalog (1837 earthquakes). Neogene faults in the northern rift in north central Colorado are seismically active in the North Park Basin and northwestern Colorado. The central rift from the San Luis Basin (southern Colorado) to south of the Socorro Magma Body is the most seismically active rift region, and seismicity delineates the deformation in the Colorado Plateau transition zone, which is spatially correlated with volcanic vents, dikes, and faults within the western Jemez Lineament. The eastern Jemez Lineament is nearly aseismic and surrounded by a halo of seismicity culminating in boundaries defined by recent moderate (Mw 3.9 and Mw 3.3) earthquakes. The southern rift is characterized by diffuse seismicity in Texas and Mexico. This study provides an updated seismic catalog built with uniformity in seismometer coverage and low epicentral uncertainties ( 2 km) that allows for regional evaluation of seismicity. During this time period, clusters of seismicity and moderate magnitude earthquakes characterize deformation in a low-strain rate extensional environment.

  6. Imaging seismic reflections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Op 't Root, Timotheus Johannes Petrus Maria

    2011-01-01

    The goal of reflection seismic imaging is making images of the Earth subsurface using surface measurements of reflected seismic waves. Besides the position and orientation of subsurface reflecting interfaces it is a challenge to recover the size or amplitude of the discontinuities. We investigate tw

  7. A dynamical analysis of the seismic activity of Villarrica volcano (Chile) during September-October 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarraga, Marta [Departamento de Volcanologia. Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: martat@mncn.csic.es; Carniel, Roberto [Dipartimento di Georisorse e Territorio, Universita di Udine, Via Cotonificio 114, 33100 Udine (Italy)], E-mail: roberto.carniel@uniud.it; Ortiz, Ramon; Garcia, Alicia [Departamento de Volcanologia. Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Moreno, Hugo [Observatorio Volcanologico de los Andes del Sur (OVDAS), Servicio Nacional de Geologia y Mineria de Chile (SERNAGEOMIN), Temuco, IX Region (Chile)

    2008-09-15

    Although Villarrica volcano in Chile is one of the most active in the southern Andes, the literature studying its seismic activity is relatively scarce. An interesting problem recently tackled is the possibility for a regional tectonic event to trigger a change in the volcanic activity of this basaltic to basaltic-andesitic volcano, which is in turn reflected in the time evolution of the properly volcanic seismicity, especially in the form of a continuous volcanic tremor. In this work, we conduct a spectral, dynamical and statistical analysis of the tremor recorded during September and October 2000, in order to characterize the anomalous behaviour of the volcano following a tectonic event recorded on 20th September 2000. The observed dynamical transitions are compared with remote sensing and visual observations describing the changes in the eruptive style of the volcano.

  8. Storage of fluids and melts at subduction zones detectable by seismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luehr, B. G.; Koulakov, I.; Rabbel, W.; Brotopuspito, K. S.; Surono, S.

    2015-12-01

    During the last decades investigations at active continental margins discovered the link between the subduction of fluid saturated oceanic plates and the process of ascent of these fluids and partial melts forming a magmatic system that leads to volcanism at the earth surface. For this purpose the geophysical structure of the mantle and crustal range above the down going slap has been imaged. Information is required about the slap, the ascent paths, as well as the reservoires of fluids and partial melts in the mantle and the crust up to the volcanoes at the surface. Statistically the distance between the volcanoes of volcanic arcs down to their Wadati Benioff zone results of approximately 100 kilometers in mean value. Surprisingly, this depth range shows pronounced seismicity at most of all subduction zones. Additionally, mineralogical laboratory investigations have shown that dehydration of the diving plate has a maximum at temperature and pressure conditions we find at around 100 km depth. The ascent of the fluids and the appearance of partial melts as well as the distribution of these materials in the crust can be resolved by seismic tomographic methods using records of local natural seismicity. With these methods these areas are corresponding to lowered seismic velocities, high Vp/Vs ratios, as well as increased attenuation of seismic shear waves. The anomalies and their time dependence are controlled by the fluids. The seismic velocity anomalies detected so far are within a range of a few per cent to more than 30% reduction. But, to explore plate boundaries large and complex amphibious experiments are required, in which active and passive seismic investigations should be combined to achieve best results. The seismic station distribution should cover an area from before the trench up to far behind the volcanic chain, to provide under favorable conditions information down to 150 km depth. Findings of different subduction zones will be compared and discussed.

  9. SOAR Telescope seismic performance II: seismic mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Jonathan H.; Muñoz, Freddy; Warner, Michael; Rivera, Rossano; Martínez, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    We describe design modifications to the SOAR telescope intended to reduce the impact of future major earthquakes, based on the facility's experience during recent events, most notably the September 2015 Illapel earthquake. Specific modifications include a redesign of the encoder systems for both azimuth and elevation, seismic trigger for the emergency stop system, and additional protections for the telescope secondary mirror system. The secondary mirror protection may combine measures to reduce amplification of seismic vibration and "fail-safe" components within the assembly. The status of these upgrades is presented.

  10. Seismic texture classification. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinther, R.

    1997-12-31

    The seismic texture classification method, is a seismic attribute that can both recognize the general reflectivity styles and locate variations from these. The seismic texture classification performs a statistic analysis for the seismic section (or volume) aiming at describing the reflectivity. Based on a set of reference reflectivities the seismic textures are classified. The result of the seismic texture classification is a display of seismic texture categories showing both the styles of reflectivity from the reference set and interpolations and extrapolations from these. The display is interpreted as statistical variations in the seismic data. The seismic texture classification is applied to seismic sections and volumes from the Danish North Sea representing both horizontal stratifications and salt diapers. The attribute succeeded in recognizing both general structure of successions and variations from these. Also, the seismic texture classification is not only able to display variations in prospective areas (1-7 sec. TWT) but can also be applied to deep seismic sections. The seismic texture classification is tested on a deep reflection seismic section (13-18 sec. TWT) from the Baltic Sea. Applied to this section the seismic texture classification succeeded in locating the Moho, which could not be located using conventional interpretation tools. The seismic texture classification is a seismic attribute which can display general reflectivity styles and deviations from these and enhance variations not found by conventional interpretation tools. (LN)

  11. Ambient seismic noise tomography of the Colima Volcano Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Christian R.; Bandy, William L.

    2017-02-01

    The Colima Volcanic Complex (CVC) located in the western sector of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt contains the most active Mexican volcano, Volcan Colima. The CVC is located within the Colima Rift, a regional north south striking extensional structure. We used ambient seismic noise recorded by stations deployed in western Mexico during the Mapping the Rivera Subduction Zone (MARS) and the Colima Volcano Deep Seismic Experiment (CODEX). We computed the cross-correlations of the vertical component of continuous records of ambient noise data to extract empirical Greens functions. These functions provide detailed images of Rayleigh wave group velocity for different periods. Using the arrival travel time of these waves for a given period, estimates can be obtained of the lateral variations in velocity for a given period using 2D tomography. The study aims to better understand the geometry and the seismic surface wave velocity structure of the CVC and relate it to the volcanoes' structure and the geologic setting of the region. Source of low velocity anomaly over CVC is distributed fairly continuously with depth in the subsurface, which indicates magma rising along fractures. The progressive increasing toward the south in the size of low velocity anomalies indicates migration towards the south of the melting that correlates with the trend of the stratovolcanoes that form the CVC. The zone of magma generation presently fully developed under Volcan de Fuego might be starting to shift towards south to the area NW of Armería where a new void in the tear zone may be starting to form.

  12. Quaternary basaltic volcanism in the Payenia volcanic province, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina

    primitive basalts and trachybasalts but also more evolved samples from the retroarc region and the larger volcanoes Payún Matrú and Payún Liso are presented. The samples cover a broad range of compositions from intraplate lavas similar to ocean island basalts to arc andesites. A common feature found...... Pleistocene times. These basalts mark the end of a period of shallow subduction of the Nazca slab beneath the Payenia province and volcanism in the Nevado volcanic field apparently followed the downwarping slab in a north-northwest direction ending in the Northern Segment. The northern Payenia basalts...... the literature. The Nevado basalts have been modelled by 4-10 % melting of a primitive mantle added 1-5 % upper continental crust. In the southern Payenia province, intraplate basalts dominate. The samples from the Payún Matrú and Río Colorado volcanic fields are apparently unaffected by the subducting slab...

  13. Seaward dipping reflectors along the SW continental margin of India: Evidence for volcanic passive margin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K K Ajay; A K Chaubey; K S Krishna; D Gopala Rao; D Sar

    2010-12-01

    Multi-channel seismic reflection profiles across the southwest continental margin of India (SWCMI) show presence of westerly dipping seismic reflectors beneath sedimentary strata along the western flank of the Laccadive Ridge –northernmost part of the Chagos –Laccadive Ridge system. Velocity structure, seismic character, 2D gravity model and geographic locations of the dipping reflectors suggest that these reflectors are volcanic in origin, which are interpreted as Seaward Dipping Reflectors (SDRs). The SDRs; 15 to 27 km wide overlain by ∼1 km thick sediment; are observed at three locations and characterized by stack of laterally continuous, divergent and off-lapping reflectors. Occurrence of SDRs along western flank of the Laccadive Ridge adjacent to oceanic crust of the Arabian Basin and 2D crustal model deduced from free-air gravity anomaly suggest that they are genetically related to incipient volcanism during separation of Madagascar from India. We suggest that (i)SWCMI is a volcanic passive margin developed during India –Madagascar breakup in the Late Cretaceous, and (ii)continent –ocean transition lies at western margin of the Laccadive Ridge, west of feather edge of the SDRs. Occurrence of SDRs on western flank of the Laccadive Ridge and inferred zone of transition from continent to ocean further suggest continental nature of crust of the Laccadive Ridge.

  14. Source properties of Strombolian explosions at Aso volcano, Japan, derived from seismic signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobin, Vyacheslav M.; Sudo, Yasuaki

    2017-07-01

    A new episode of Strombolian activity at Aso volcano, Japan began on 25 November 2014, causing ashfall and glowing emissions. A total of 100 seismic signals of explosive events, recorded during November 2014 to February 2015 by a short-period seismic station that was situated at a distance of 150 m from the crater, were investigated. They indicated a two-phase structure of the seismic waveforms. The seismic signals consisted of the initial phase of lower frequency and lower amplitude and the main phase of higher frequency and higher amplitude that allowed to propose a two-stage conceptual model of Strombolian explosions at Aso volcano. According to the model, the initial phase is generated by the vertical movement of the gas slug in the volcanic conduit before an explosion, and the main phase is generated by the subsequent explosion. In the framework of this model, the following seismic parameters of Strombolian Aso explosions were calculated: the power of the initial seismic phases as a measure of force governing the gas-slug movement to the surface, and the power of the main seismic phases as a measure of the energy of the eruption. Direct log-log dependence of the power of the main phase of the seismic signals on the power of initial seismic phases, obtained in the paper, indicates the dependence of the eruption energy on the magnitude of the force governing the movement of the gas slug before an explosion.

  15. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Glasow, Roland

    2010-04-13

    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume, leading to extensive ozone destruction, that, depending on plume dispersal, can be maintained for several days. The very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume reduces the lifetime of the OH radical drastically, so that it is virtually absent in the volcanic plume. This would imply an increased lifetime of methane in volcanic plumes, unless reactive chlorine chemistry in the plume is strong enough to offset the lack of OH chemistry. A further effect of bromine chemistry in addition to ozone destruction shown by the model studies presented here, is the oxidation of mercury. This relates to mercury that has been coemitted with bromine from the volcano but also to background atmospheric mercury. The rapid oxidation of mercury implies a drastically reduced atmospheric lifetime of mercury so that the contribution of volcanic mercury to the atmospheric background might be less than previously thought. However, the implications, especially health and environmental effects due to deposition, might be substantial and warrant further studies, especially field measurements to test this hypothesis.

  16. Climatic impact of volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampino, Michael R.

    1991-01-01

    Studies have attempted to 'isolate' the volcanic signal in noisy temperature data. This assumes that it is possible to isolate a distinct volcanic signal in a record that may have a combination of forcings (ENSO, solar variability, random fluctuations, volcanism) that all interact. The key to discovering the greatest effects of volcanoes on short-term climate may be to concentrate on temperatures in regions where the effects of aerosol clouds may be amplified by perturbed atmospheric circulation patterns. This is especially true in subpolar and midlatitude areas affected by changes in the position of the polar front. Such climatic perturbation can be detected in proxy evidence such as decrease in tree-ring widths and frost rings, changes in the treeline, weather anomalies, severity of sea-ice in polar and subpolar regions, and poor grain yields and crop failures. In low latitudes, sudden temperature drops were correlated with the passage overhead of the volcanic dust cloud (Stothers, 1984). For some eruptions, such as Tambora, 1815, these kinds of proxy and anectdotal information were summarized in great detail in a number of papers and books (e.g., Post, 1978; Stothers, 1984; Stommel and Stommel, 1986; C. R. Harrington, in press). These studies lead to the general conclusion that regional effects on climate, sometimes quite severe, may be the major impact of large historical volcanic aerosol clouds.

  17. S-wave velocity structure inferred from receiver function inversion in Tengchong volcanic area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺传松; 王椿镛; 吴建平

    2004-01-01

    Tengchong volcanic area is located near the impinging and underthrust margin of India and Eurasia plates. The volcanic activity is closely related to the tectonic environment. The deep structure characteristics are inferred from the receiver function inversion with the teleseismic records in the paper. The results show that the low velocity zone is influenced by the NE-trending Dayingjiang fault. The S-wave low velocity structure occurs obviously in the southern part of the fault, but unobviously in its northern part. There are low velocity zones in the shallow position, which coincides with the seismicity. It also demonstrates that the low velocity zone is directly related to the thermal activity in the volcanic area. Therefore, we consider that the volcano may be alive again.

  18. Seismological study on the crustal structure of Tengchong volcanic-geothermal area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王椿镛; 楼海; 吴建平; 白志明; 皇甫岗; 秦嘉政

    2002-01-01

    Based upon the deep seismic sounding profile conducted in the Tengchong volcanic-geothermal area, a two-dimensional crustal P velocity structure is obtained by use of the finite-difference inversion and the forward travel-time fitting method. The crustal model shows that there is a low velocity zone in upper crust in the Tengchong area, which may be related to the volcanic-geothermal activities, and two intracrustal faults (the Longling-Ruili fault and Tengchong fault) exist on the profile, where the Tengchong fault may extend to the Moho discontinuity. Meanwhile, based on teleseismic data recorded by a temporary seismic network, we obtained the S-wave velocity structures beneath the Rehai-Retian region in the Tengchong area, which show the low S-wave velocity anomaly in upper crust. The authors discuss the causes of Tengchong volcanic eruption based on the deep crustal structure. The crustal structure in the Tengchong volcanic-geothermal area is characterized by low P-wave and S-wave velocity, low resistivity, high heat-flow value and low Q value. The P-wave velocity in the upper mantle is also low. For this information, it can be induced that the magma in the crust is derived from the upper mantle, and the low velocity anomaly in upper crust in the Tengchong area may be related to the differentiation of magma. The Tengchong volcanoes are close to an active plate boundary and belong to "plate boundary" volcanoes.

  19. Soil radon measurements as a potential tracer of tectonic and volcanic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Marco; Ferrera, Elisabetta; Giammanco, Salvatore; Currenti, Gilda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Patanè, Giuseppe; Zanon, Vittorio

    2016-04-01

    In Earth Sciences there is a growing interest in studies concerning soil-radon activity, due to its potential as a tracer of numerous natural phenomena. Our work marks an advance in the comprehension of the interplay between tectonic activity, volcanic eruptions and gas release through faults. Soil-radon measurements, acquired on Mt. Etna volcano in 2009–2011, were analyzed. Our radon probe is sensitive to changes in both volcanic and seismic activity. Radon data were reviewed in light of the meteorological parameters. Soil samples were analyzed to characterize their uranium content. All data have been summarized in a physical model which identifies the radon sources, highlights the mechanism of radon transport and envisages how such a mechanism may change as a consequence of seismicity and volcanic events. In the NE of Etna, radon is released mainly from a depth of 50 m/day. Three periods of anomalous gas release were found (February 2010, January and February 2011). The trigger of the first anomaly was tectonic, while the second and third had a volcanic origin. These results mark a significant step towards a better understanding of the endogenous mechanisms that cause changes in soil-radon emission at active volcanoes.

  20. Soil radon measurements as a potential tracer of tectonic and volcanic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Marco; Ferrera, Elisabetta; Giammanco, Salvatore; Currenti, Gilda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Patanè, Giuseppe; Zanon, Vittorio

    2016-04-15

    In Earth Sciences there is a growing interest in studies concerning soil-radon activity, due to its potential as a tracer of numerous natural phenomena. Our work marks an advance in the comprehension of the interplay between tectonic activity, volcanic eruptions and gas release through faults. Soil-radon measurements, acquired on Mt. Etna volcano in 2009-2011, were analyzed. Our radon probe is sensitive to changes in both volcanic and seismic activity. Radon data were reviewed in light of the meteorological parameters. Soil samples were analyzed to characterize their uranium content. All data have been summarized in a physical model which identifies the radon sources, highlights the mechanism of radon transport and envisages how such a mechanism may change as a consequence of seismicity and volcanic events. In the NE of Etna, radon is released mainly from a depth of 50 m/day. Three periods of anomalous gas release were found (February 2010, January and February 2011). The trigger of the first anomaly was tectonic, while the second and third had a volcanic origin. These results mark a significant step towards a better understanding of the endogenous mechanisms that cause changes in soil-radon emission at active volcanoes.

  1. Growth, destruction and volcanic facies architecture of three volcanic centres in the Miocene Uşak-Güre basin, western Turkey: Subaqueous-subaerial volcanism in a lacustrine setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoğlu, Özgür; Helvacı, Cahit

    2012-11-01

    Early to Mid-Miocene extension in western Anatolia, related to plate tectonic motions, resulted in the development of a number of normal fault-bounded sedimentary basins as well as different styles and compositions of volcanic activity. The Uşak and Güre basins accumulated a thick fluvio-lacustrine fill in which three distinct volcanic edifices (Elmadağ, İtecektepe and Beydağı) and their deposits can overlap with each other and with the sediments produced by the background sedimentation. In addition, complete facies architectures of small-volume (monogenetic) volcanoes have been recognised in association with the three large complex (polygenetic) volcanoes providing a complex mixed siliciclastic and volcaniclastic basin infill in the respective basins where volcanism took place. All three volcanic centres display a complex succession of effusive and explosive volcanisms and their reworked deposits, with abundant evidences of magma-water interaction such as peperites for non-explosive magma-water interaction with the lacustrine water-saturated sediment and standing water body in a large alkaline lake. During the constructive phase, proximal successions of pyroclastic flows, pyroclastic falls, and rarely surge deposits are associated with distally-emplaced debris flow deposits, sometimes of mixed volcanogenic and terrestrial origins, and are interbedded with lacustrine sediments of the Inay Group. All three volcanic centres then experienced a phase of volcano growth and degradation between 17 and 15 Ma ago, most likely related to a combination of tectonic movements on NE-SW-trending basement faults, which triggered multiple flank collapses and volcanic debris avalanches (Elmadağ), and voluminous ignimbrite eruptions that triggered caldera formation (İtecektepe and Beydağı volcanic centres). Lacustrine conditions persisted during the destruction and post-destruction stages of the volcano's evolution, as evidenced by indications of magma-water interactions

  2. Volcanic risk assessment: Quantifying physical vulnerability in the built environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, S. F.; Spence, R. J. S.; Fonseca, J. F. B. D.; Solidum, R. U.; Wilson, T. M.

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents structured and cost-effective methods for assessing the physical vulnerability of at-risk communities to the range of volcanic hazards, developed as part of the MIA-VITA project (2009-2012). An initial assessment of building and infrastructure vulnerability has been carried out for a set of broadly defined building types and infrastructure categories, with the likelihood of damage considered separately for projectile impact, ash fall loading, pyroclastic density current dynamic pressure and earthquake ground shaking intensities. In refining these estimates for two case study areas: Kanlaon volcano in the Philippines and Fogo volcano in Cape Verde, we have developed guidelines and methodologies for carrying out physical vulnerability assessments in the field. These include identifying primary building characteristics, such as construction material and method, as well as subsidiary characteristics, for example the size and prevalence of openings, that may be important in assessing eruption impacts. At-risk buildings around Kanlaon were found to be dominated by timber frame buildings that exhibit a high vulnerability to pyroclastic density currents, but a low vulnerability to failure from seismic shaking. Around Fogo, the predominance of unreinforced masonry buildings with reinforced concrete slab roofs suggests a high vulnerability to volcanic earthquake but a low vulnerability to ash fall loading. Given the importance of agriculture for local livelihoods around Kanlaon and Fogo, we discuss the potential impact of infrastructure vulnerability for local agricultural economies, with implications for volcanic areas worldwide. These methodologies and tools go some way towards offering a standardised approach to carrying out future vulnerability assessments for populated volcanic areas.

  3. Volcanic Eruptions in the southern Red Sea 2007-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jónsson, Sigurjón; Xu, Wenbin; Ruch, Joël

    2017-04-01

    After more than a century of volcanic quiescence the southern Red Sea has seen three volcanic eruptions during the past decade. The eruptions occurred on Jebel at Tair Island in 2007-8 and within the Zubair archipelago in 2011-12 and 2013. As the islands are remote, without geophysical instrumentation, and lack direct observers, we obtained most of the information about these eruptions from studying Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and optical satellite images. We used the images to deduce the timing and progress of the volcanic activity and to constrain the geometry of the dikes feeding the eruptions. The Jebel at Tair eruption started energetically and caused damage to Yemeni military buildings on the island and even a few casualties. The erupted lava came from a short summit fissure and covers about 6 km2, which is almost half of the island. The fissure orientations of this and previous eruptions indicate that the stress field on Tair Island is temporarily varying and isolated from the regional Red Sea stress field. The eruptions within the Zubair archipelago, which is located about 50 km southeast of Tair Island, produced two new islands and were fed by dikes much larger than the small size of the new islands might suggest. This is indicated by relative displacements between different islands in the archipelago, derived from offset tracking of SAR images. Together the three volcanic eruptions and several seismic swarms indicate that the southern Red Sea has been experiencing a rifting episode with multiple dike intrusions and meter-scale extension, and that this part of the plate boundary is more active than previously thought.

  4. Constraining the dynamics of 2014-15 Bardarbunga-Holuhraun intrusion and eruption using seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudron, Corentin; Donaldson, Clare; White, Robert

    2016-04-01

    The 2010 Eyjafjallajokull volcanic eruption explosively emitted a large quantity of ash in the atmosphere and paralysed the European airspace for weeks. Several seismic scientific studies already contributed to the understanding of this complex eruption (e.g., Tarasewicz et al., 2012). Although an excellent network of seismometers recorded this eruption, some volcanological and seismological aspects are still poorly understood. In order to gain further constraints on the dynamics of this ground-breaking eruptions, we mine the seismic dataset using the seismic ambient noise technique between pairs of stations and the Seismic Amplitude Ratio Analysis (SARA). Our preliminary results reveal a strong contamination of the Cross Correlation Functions (CCF) by the volcanic tremor, particularly above 0.5 Hz even for station pairs located >50 km from the volcano. Although this volcanic tremor precludes the monitoring of the seismic velocities, it literally illuminated the medium. The two phases of the eruptions (i.e., effusive and explosive) are clearly distinguished in these functions due to their different locations. During the explosive phase, an intriguing shift of the main peaks of the cross correlation functions is evidenced (early May 2010). It is remarkably consistent with the downward migration proposed by Tarasewicz et al. (2012) and is interpreted as a migration of the volcanic tremor. SARA methodology, which is continuously imaging and tracking any significant seismicity at a 10-min time scale (Taisne et al., 2010), is applied in the 5-15 Hz frequency band in order to image to continuously migrating microseismicity. The analysis displays several shallow migrations (above 5 km of depth, in March 2010) preceding the effusive phase of the eruption. Interestingly, the results also evidence a fast and deep migration (> 5 km) starting a few hours before the beginning of the explosive phase (13 April 2010). These preliminary results may shed light on the triggering of

  5. Aurorae and Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Thermal-IR Observations of Jupiter and Io with ISAAC at the VLT Summary Impressive thermal-infrared images have been obtained of the giant planet Jupiter during tests of a new detector in the ISAAC instrument on the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory (Chile). . They show in particular the full extent of the northern auroral ring and part of the southern aurora. A volcanic eruption was also imaged on Io , the very active inner Jovian moon. Although these observations are of an experimental nature, they demonstrate a great potential for regular monitoring of the Jovian magnetosphere by ground-based telescopes together with space-based facilities. They also provide the added benefit of direct comparison with the terrestrial magnetosphere. PR Photo 21a/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (L-band: 3.5-4.0 µm) . PR Photo 21b/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (Narrow-band 4.07 µm) . PR Photo 21c/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (Narrow-band 3.28 µm) . PR Photo 21d/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (Narrow-band 3.21 µm) . PR Photo 21e/01 : ISAAC image of the Jovian aurorae (false-colour). PR Photo 21f/01 : ISAAC image of volcanic activity on Io . Addendum : The Jovian aurorae and polar haze. Aladdin Meets Jupiter Thermal-infrared images of Jupiter and its volcanic moon Io have been obtained during a series of system tests with the new Aladdin detector in the Infrared Spectrometer And Array Camera (ISAAC) , in combination with an upgrade of the ESO-developed detector control electronics IRACE. This state-of-the-art instrument is attached to the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory. The observations were made on November 14, 2000, through various filters that isolate selected wavebands in the thermal-infrared spectral region [1]. They include a broad-band L-filter (wavelength interval 3.5 - 4.0 µm) as well as several narrow-band filters (3.21, 3.28 and 4.07 µm). The filters allow to record the light from different components of the Jovian atmosphere

  6. Fractal behaviour of the seismicity in the Southern Iberian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Lana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The fractal behaviour of the seismicity in the Southern Iberian Peninsula is analysed by considering two different series of data: the distance and the elapsed time between consecutive seismic events recorded by the seismic network of the Andalusian Institute of Geophysics (AIG. The fractal analyses have been repeated by considering four threshold magnitudes of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5 and 4.0. The re-scaled analysis lets to determine if the seismicity shows strong randomness or if it is characterised by time-persistence and the cluster dimension indicates the degree of time and spatial clustering of the seismicity. Another analysis, based on the reconstruction theorem, permits to evaluate the minimum number of nonlinear equations describing the dynamical mechanism of the seismicity, its 'loss of memory', its chaotic character and the instability of a possible predicting algorithm. The results obtained depict some differences depending on distances or elapsed times and the different threshold levels of magnitude also lead to slightly different results. Additionally, only a part of the fractal tools, the re-scaled analysis, have been applied to five seismic crises in the same area.

  7. Volcanic glasses, their origins and alteration processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I.; Long, W.

    1984-01-01

    Natural glass can be formed by volcanic processes, lightning (fulgarites) burning coal, and by meteorite impact. By far the most common process is volcanic - basically the glass is rapidly chilled molten rock. All natural glasses are thermodynamically unstable and tend to alter chemically or to crystallize. The rate of these processes is determined by the chemical composition of the magma. The hot and fluid basaltic melts have a structure that allows for rapid crystal growth, and seldom forms glass selvages greater than a few centimeters thick, even when the melt is rapidly cooled by extrusion in the deep sea. In contrast the cooler and very viscous rhyolitic magmas can yield bodies of glass that are tens of meters thick. These highly polymerized magmas have a high silica content - often 71-77% SiO2. Their high viscosity inhibits diffusive crystal growth. Basalt glass in sea water forms an alteration zone called palagonite whose thickness increases linearly with time. The rate of diffusion of water into rhyolitic glass, which follows the relationship - thickness = k (time) 1 2, has been determined as a function of the glass composition and temperature. Increased SiO2 increases the rate, whereas increased CaO, MgO and H2O decrease the rate. The activation energy of water diffusion varies from about 19 to 22 kcal/mol. for the glasses studied. The diffusion of alkali out of rhyolite glass occurs simultaneously with water diffusion into the glass. The rate of devitrification of rhyolitic glass is a function of the glass viscosity, which in turn is a function of water content and temperature. Although all of the aforementioned processes tend to destroy natural glasses, the slow rates of these processes, particularly for rhyolitic glass, has allowed samples of glass to persist for 60 million years. ?? 1984.

  8. Geopulsation, Volcanism and Astronomical Periods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xuexiang; Chen Dianyou; Yang Xiaoying; Yang Shuchen

    2000-01-01

    Volcanism is mainly controlled by the intermittent release of energy in the earth. As far as the differential rotation of the earth's inner core is concerned, the Galactic Year may change the gravitational constant G, the solar radiative quantity and the moving speed of the solar system and affect the exchange of angular momentum between core and mantle as well as the energy exchange between crust and mantle. As a result, this leads to eruptions of superplumes and magma, and controls the energy flow from core - mantle boundary (CMB) to crust. When the earth' s speed decreases, it will release a huge amount of energy. They are the reason of the correspondence of the volcanic cycles one by one with the astronomical periods one by one. According to the astronomical periods, volcanic eruptions may possibly be predicted in the future.

  9. Volcanic eruptions and solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1989-01-01

    The historical record of large volcanic eruptions from 1500 to 1980 is subjected to detailed time series analysis. In two weak but probably statistically significant periodicities of about 11 and 80 yr, the frequency of volcanic eruptions increases (decreases) slightly around the times of solar minimum (maximum). Time series analysis of the volcanogenic acidities in a deep ice core from Greenland reveals several very long periods ranging from about 80 to about 350 yr which are similar to the very slow solar cycles previously detected in auroral and C-14 records. Solar flares may cause changes in atmospheric circulation patterns that abruptly alter the earth's spin. The resulting jolt probably triggers small earthquakes which affect volcanism.

  10. Geochemical study for volcanic surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panichi, C.; La Ruffa, G. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, International Institute for Geothermal Research Ghezzano, PI (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    For years, geologists have been striving to reconstruct volcanic eruptions from the analysis of pyroclastic deposits and lava flows on the surface of the earth and in the oceans. This effort has produced valuable information on volcanic petrology and magma generation, separation, mixing, crystallisation, and interaction with water in phreatomagmatic and submarine eruptions. The volcanological process are tied to the dynamics of the earth's crust and lithosphere. The mantle, subducted oceanic crust, and continental crust contain different rock types and are sources of different magmas. Magmas consist primarily of completely or partially molten silicates containing volatile materials either dissolved in the melt or as bubbles of gas. The silicate and volatile portions affect the physical properties of magma and, therefore, the nature of a volcanic eruption.

  11. Models of volcanic eruption hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohletz, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions pose an ever present but poorly constrained hazard to life and property for geothermal installations in volcanic areas. Because eruptions occur sporadically and may limit field access, quantitative and systematic field studies of eruptions are difficult to complete. Circumventing this difficulty, laboratory models and numerical simulations are pivotal in building our understanding of eruptions. For example, the results of fuel-coolant interaction experiments show that magma-water interaction controls many eruption styles. Applying these results, increasing numbers of field studies now document and interpret the role of external water eruptions. Similarly, numerical simulations solve the fundamental physics of high-speed fluid flow and give quantitative predictions that elucidate the complexities of pyroclastic flows and surges. A primary goal of these models is to guide geologists in searching for critical field relationships and making their interpretations. Coupled with field work, modeling is beginning to allow more quantitative and predictive volcanic hazard assessments.

  12. Combining Geological and Geophysical Data in Volcanic Hazard Estimation for Dominica, Lesser Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, O.; Latchman, J. L.; Connor, C.; Malservisi, R.; Connor, L.

    2014-12-01

    Risk posed by volcanic eruptions are generally quantified in a few ways; in the short term geophysical data such as seismic activity or ground deformation are used to assess the state of volcanic unrest while statistical approaches such as spatial density estimates are used for long term hazard assessment. Spatial density estimates have been used in a number of monogenetic volcanic fields for hazard map generation and utilize the age, location and volumes of previous eruptions to calculate the probability of a new event occurring at a given location within this field. In a previously unpublished study, spatial density estimates of the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc showed the island of Dominica to have the highest likelihood of future vent formation. In this current study, this technique was used in combination with relocated seismic events occurring beneath Dominica within the last ~ 20 years as well as InSAR images of ground deformation to generate a hazard map which not only takes into consideration the past events but also the current state of unrest. Here, geophysical data serve as a weighting factor in the estimates with those centers showing more vigorous activity receiving stronger favorability in the assessment for future activity. In addition to this weighting, the bandwidth utilized in the 2D-radially symmetric kernel density function was optimized using the SAMSE method so as to find the value which best minimizes the error in the estimate. The end results of this study are dynamic volcanic hazards maps which will be readily updatable as changes in volcanic unrest occurs within the system.

  13. Abstracts for the October 2012 meeting on Volcanism in the American Southwest, Flagstaff, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2013-01-01

    Though volcanic eruptions are comparatively rare in the American Southwest, the States of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, and Utah host Holocene volcanic eruption deposits and are vulnerable to future volcanic activity. Compared with other parts of the western United States, comparatively little research has been focused on this area, and eruption probabilities are poorly constrained. Monitoring infrastructure consists of a variety of local seismic networks, and ”backbone“ geodetic networks with little integration. Emergency response planning for volcanic unrest has received little attention by either Federal or State agencies. On October 18–20, 2012, 90 people met at the U.S. Geological Survey campus in Flagstaff, Arizona, providing an opportunity for volcanologists, land managers, and emergency responders to meet, converse, and begin to plan protocols for any future activity. Geologists contributed data on recent findings of eruptive ages, eruption probabilities, and hazards extents (plume heights, ash dispersal). Geophysicists discussed evidence for magma intrusions from seismic, geodetic, and other geophysical techniques. Network operators publicized their recent work and the relevance of their equipment to volcanic regions. Land managers and emergency responders shared their experiences with emergency planning for earthquakes. The meeting was organized out of the recognition that little attention had been paid to planning for or mitigation of volcanic hazards in the American Southwest. Moreover, few geological meetings have hosted a session specifically devoted to this topic. This volume represents one official outcome of the meeting—a collection of abstracts related to talks and poster presentations shared during the first two days of the meeting. In addition, this report includes the meeting agenda as a record of the proceedings. One additional intended outcome will be greater discussion and coordination among emergency responders, geologists

  14. The evolution of seismic monitoring systems at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory: Chapter 2 in Characteristics of Hawaiian volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Paul G.; Nakata, Jennifer S.; Koyanagi, Robert Y.; Poland, Michael P.; Takahashi, T. Jane; Landowski, Claire M.

    2014-01-01

    In the century since the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) put its first seismographs into operation at the edge of Kīlauea Volcano’s summit caldera, seismic monitoring at HVO (now administered by the U.S. Geological Survey [USGS]) has evolved considerably. The HVO seismic network extends across the entire Island of Hawai‘i and is complemented by stations installed and operated by monitoring partners in both the USGS and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The seismic data stream that is available to HVO for its monitoring of volcanic and seismic activity in Hawai‘i, therefore, is built from hundreds of data channels from a diverse collection of instruments that can accurately record the ground motions of earthquakes ranging in magnitude from <1 to ≥8. In this chapter we describe the growth of HVO’s seismic monitoring systems throughout its first hundred years of operation. Although other references provide specific details of the changes in instrumentation and data handling over time, we recount here, in more general terms, the evolution of HVO’s seismic network. We focus not only on equipment but also on interpretative products and results that were enabled by the new instrumentation and by improvements in HVO’s seismic monitoring, analytical, and interpretative capabilities implemented during the past century. As HVO enters its next hundred years of seismological studies, it is well situated to further improve upon insights into seismic and volcanic processes by using contemporary seismological tools.

  15. The Seismic Wavefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennett, B. L. N.

    2002-12-01

    The two volumes of The Seismic Wavefield are a comprehensive guide to the understanding of seismograms in terms of physical propagation processes within the Earth. The focus is on the observation of earthquakes and man-made sources on all scales, for both body waves and surface waves. Volume I provides a general introduction and a development of the theoretical background for seismic waves. Volume II looks at the way in which observed seismograms relate to the propagation processes. Volume II also discusses local and regional seismic events, global wave propagation, and the three-dimensional Earth.

  16. Volcanic hazards and their mitigation: Progress and problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilling, Robert I.

    1989-05-01

    At the beginning of the twentieth century, volcanology began to emerge as a modern science as a result of increased interest in eruptive phenomena following some of the worst volcanic disasters in recorded history: Krakatau (Indonesia) in 1883 and Mont Pelée (Martinique), Soufrière (St. Vincent), and Santa María (Guatemala) in 1902. Volcanology is again experiencing a period of heightened public awareness and scientific growth in the 1980s, the worst period since 1902 in terms of volcanic disasters and crises. A review of hazards mitigation approaches and techniques indicates that significant advances have been made in hazards assessment, volcano monitoring, and eruption forecasting. For example, the remarkable accuracy of the predictions of dome-building events at Mount St. Helens since June 1980 is unprecedented. Yet a predictive capability for more voluminous and explosive eruptions still has not been achieved. Studies of magma-induced seismicity and ground deformation continue to provide the most systematic and reliable data for early detection of precursors to eruptions and shallow intrusions. In addition, some other geophysical monitoring techniques and geochemical methods have been refined and are being more widely applied and tested. Comparison of the four major volcanic disasters of the 1980s (Mount St. Helens, U.S.A. (1980), El Chichón, Mexico (1982); Galunggung, Indonesia (1982); and Nevado del Ruíz, Colombia (1985) illustrates the importance of predisaster geoscience studies, volcanic hazards assessments, volcano monitoring, contingency planning, and effective communications between scientists and authorities. The death toll (>22,000) from the Ruíz catastrophe probably could have been greatly reduced; the reasons for the tragically ineffective implementation of evacuation measures are still unclear and puzzling in view of the fact that sufficient warnings were given. The most pressing problem in the mitigation of volcanic and associated hazards on

  17. Volcanic tremors: Good indicators of change in plumbing systems during volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárraga, Marta; Martí, Joan; Abella, Rafael; Carniel, Roberto; López, Carmen

    2014-03-01

    Geophysical and geochemical signals recorded during episodes of unrest preceding volcanic eruptions provide information on movements of magma inside the lithosphere and on how magma prepares to reach the surface. When the eruption ensues continuous volcanic monitoring can reveal the nature of changes occurring in the volcano's plumbing system, which may be correlated with changes in both eruption behaviour and products. During the 2011-2012 submarine eruption of El Hierro (Canary Islands), the seismic signal, surface deformation, a broad stain on the sea surface of the eruption site, and the occasional appearance of floating lava balloons and pyroclastic fragments were the main observable signs. A strong continuous tremor in the vent accompanied the eruption and varied significantly in amplitude, frequency and dynamical parameters. We analysed these variations and correlated them with changes in the distribution of earthquakes and in the petrology of the erupting magma. This enabled us to relate variations in tremors to changes in the (i) stress conditions of the plumbing system, (ii) dimensions of the conduit and vent, (iii) intensity of the explosive episodes, and (iv) rheological changes in the erupting magma. The results obtained show how the tremor signal was strongly influenced by stress changes in the host rock and in the rheological variations in the erupting magma. We conclude that the tracking of real-time syn-eruptive tremor signals via the observation of variations in plumbing systems and magma physics is a potentially effective tool for interpreting eruption dynamics, and suggest that similar variations observed in pre-eruptive tremors will have a similar origin.

  18. Recurrence models of volcanic events: Applications to volcanic risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, B.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Picard, R.; Valentine, G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Perry, F.V. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-03-01

    An assessment of the risk of future volcanism has been conducted for isolation of high-level radioactive waste at the potential Yucca Mountain site in southern Nevada. Risk used in this context refers to a combined assessment of the probability and consequences of future volcanic activity. Past studies established bounds on the probability of magmatic disruption of a repository. These bounds were revised as additional data were gathered from site characterization studies. The probability of direct intersection of a potential repository located in an eight km{sup 2} area of Yucca Mountain by ascending basalt magma was bounded by the range of 10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}10} yr{sup {minus}1 2}. The consequences of magmatic disruption of a repository were estimated in previous studies to be limited. The exact releases from such an event are dependent on the strike of an intruding basalt dike relative to the repository geometry, the timing of the basaltic event relative to the age of the radioactive waste and the mechanisms of release and dispersal of the waste radionuclides in the accessible environment. The combined low probability of repository disruption and the limited releases associated with this event established the basis for the judgement that the risk of future volcanism was relatively low. It was reasoned that that risk of future volcanism was not likely to result in disqualification of the potential Yucca Mountain site.

  19. Modernization of the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Seismic Processing Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolik, L.; Shiro, B.; Friberg, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) operates a Tier 1 Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) seismic network to monitor, characterize, and report on volcanic and earthquake activity in the State of Hawaii. Upgrades at the observatory since 2009 have improved the digital telemetry network, computing resources, and seismic data processing with the adoption of the ANSS Quake Management System (AQMS) system. HVO aims to build on these efforts by further modernizing its seismic processing infrastructure and strengthen its ability to meet ANSS performance standards. Most notably, this will also allow HVO to support redundant systems, both onsite and offsite, in order to provide better continuity of operation during intermittent power and network outages. We are in the process of implementing a number of upgrades and improvements on HVO's seismic processing infrastructure, including: 1) Virtualization of AQMS physical servers; 2) Migration of server operating systems from Solaris to Linux; 3) Consolidation of AQMS real-time and post-processing services to a single server; 4) Upgrading database from Oracle 10 to Oracle 12; and 5) Upgrading to the latest Earthworm and AQMS software. These improvements will make server administration more efficient, minimize hardware resources required by AQMS, simplify the Oracle replication setup, and provide better integration with HVO's existing state of health monitoring tools and backup system. Ultimately, it will provide HVO with the latest and most secure software available while making the software easier to deploy and support.

  20. Using seismic reflection to locate a tracer testing complex south of Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryder, Levi

    Tracer testing in the fractured volcanic aquifer near Yucca Mountain, and in the alluvial aquifer south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada has been conducted in the past to determine the flow and transport properties of groundwater in those geologic units. However, no tracer testing has been conducted across the alluvium/volcanic interface. This thesis documents the investigative process and subsequent analysis and interpretations used to identify a location suitable for installation of a tracer testing complex, near existing Nye County wells south of Yucca Mountain. The work involved evaluation of existing geologic data, collection of wellbore seismic data, and a detailed surface seismic reflection survey. Borehole seismic data yielded useful information on alluvial P-wave velocities. Seismic reflection data were collected over a line of 4.5-km length, with a 10-m receiver and shot spacing. Reflection data were extensively processed to image the alluvium/volcanic interface. A location for installation of an alluvial/volcanic tracer testing complex was identified based on one of the reflectors imaged in the reflection survey; this site is located between existing Nye County monitoring wells, near an outcrop of Paintbrush Tuff. Noise in the reflection data (due to some combination of seismic source signal attenuation, poor receiver-to-ground coupling, and anthropogenic sources) were sources of error that affected the final processed data set. In addition, in some areas low impedance contrast between geologic units caused an absence of reflections in the data, complicating the processing and interpretation. Forward seismic modeling was conducted using Seismic Un*x; however, geometry considerations prevented direct comparison of the modeled and processed data sets. Recommendations for additional work to address uncertainties identified during the course of this thesis work include: drilling additional boreholes to collect borehole seismic and geologic data; reprocessing a

  1. Controls on volcanism at intraplate basaltic volcanic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hove, Jackson C.; Van Otterloo, Jozua; Betts, Peter G.; Ailleres, Laurent; Cas, Ray A. F.

    2017-02-01

    A broad range of controlling mechanisms is described for intraplate basaltic volcanic fields (IBVFs) in the literature. These correspond with those relating to shallow tectonic processes and to deep mantle plumes. Accurate measurement of the physical parameters of intraplate volcanism is fundamental to gain an understanding of the controlling factors that influence the scale and location of a specific IBVF. Detailed volume and geochronology data are required for this; however, these are not available for many IBVFs. In this study the primary controls on magma genesis and transportation are established for the Pliocene-Recent Newer Volcanics Province (NVP) of south-eastern Australia as a case-study for one of such IBVF. The NVP is a large and spatio-temporally complex IBVF that has been described as either being related to a deep mantle plume, or upper mantle and crustal processes. We use innovative high resolution aeromagnetic and 3D modelling analysis, constrained by well-log data, to calculate its dimensions, volume and long-term eruptive flux. Our estimates suggest volcanic deposits cover an area of 23,100 ± 530 km2 and have a preserved dense rock equivalent of erupted volcanics of least 680 km3, and may have been as large as 900 km3. The long-term mean eruptive flux of the NVP is estimated between 0.15 and 0.20 km3/ka, which is relatively high compared with other IBVFs. Our comparison with other IBVFs shows eruptive fluxes vary up to two orders of magnitude within individual fields. Most examples where a range of eruptive flux is available for an IBVF show a correlation between eruptive flux and the rate of local tectonic processes, suggesting tectonic control. Limited age dating of the NVP has been used to suggest there were pulses in its eruptive flux, which are not resolvable using current data. These changes in eruptive flux are not directly relatable to the rate of any interpreted tectonic driver such as edge-driven convection. However, the NVP and other

  2. Velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle at the northern group of Kamchatka volcanoes (Based on the travel time of P-waves from volcanic earthquakes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavina, L. B.; Pivovarova, N. B.; Senyukov, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    The results of a calculation of the P-wave ( V P ) velocity fields are presented on the basis of the method of the reversible wave and the TAU parameter characterizing the V P / V S ratio of seismic waves from the local volcanic earthquakes that occurred at the northern group of Kamchatka volcanoes in 2005-2007. The 3D velocity cross sections were constructed along the SW-NE-trending volcanic group from the Ploskii Tolbachik volcano in the southwest up to the Shiveluch volcano in the northeast. The change of velocity field in time and depth is found. The problems of relating these changes to volcanic activity is reviewed.

  3. Connecting Anthropogenic Seismicity Rates To Operational Parameters At The Salton Sea Geothermal Field, Southern California (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, E. E.; Lajoie, L. J.

    2013-12-01

    Geothermal power is generated at several major volcanic fields in California. As efforts to monitor seismicity increase, methods to understand the anthropogenic component need to improve. Ideally, induced earthquake rate should be forecast based on publicly-reported volumes of fluid injection or other operational parameters. At the flash facilities in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, the total volume of fluid extracted or injected tracks the long-term evolution of seismicity. However, for recent years net fluid volume (extracted-injected) is better correlated with seismicity. After correcting for the variable aftershock rate using an Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence model (ETAS), we fit the background earthquake rate with a linear combination of injection and net production rate that allows us to track the secular evolution of the field. The number of earthquakes per fluid volume injected decreases gradually over time. In the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, the new analysis of induced seismicity provides a template for future evaluation of hazard directly based on measureable, controllable operational quantities. The interactions of these anthropogenic events with the larger-scale tectonic and volcanic systems remains to be investigated. Results of the linear model of seismicity based on a combination of net production and injection. (a) Example of observed seismicity rate and model prediction using the reported fluid data and the best-fit linear model. (b) Number of earthquakes triggered per net volume of fluid extracted or total fluid injection.

  4. The Role Played by Rainfall on the Seismicity at Fogo Volcano, Azores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, F.; Saccorotti, G.; Riedel, C.; Bean, C. J.; Wallenstein, N. M.; Viveiros, F. M.

    2007-12-01

    Fogo volcano is an active central volcano, with a lake filled caldera, in the central part of Sao Miguel Island, Azores, whose current activity is limited to fumarolic and hydrothermal activity. It is affected by important active tectonic structures, with extremely high seismic activity and micro-seismicity concentrated in very frequent swarms. A recurrent feature of the seismicity observed in volcanic regions is the occurrence of seismic families, whose origins can be attributed to the same source mechanism, acting in the same small rock volume. Doublets/multiplets were identified in this study within a catalogue of small magnitude (usually lack of any main-shock after-shock sequence and organized migration of the hypocenters. This is suggestive of a very heterogeneous stress field. Vp/Vs is found to be lower than usually observed in volcanic areas, an occurrence likely related to the presence of fluid associated with the geothermal system (Saccorotti et al., 2004). Taken together, these two observations suggest that fluid migration/pressurization play a major role in triggering the recorded seismicity. The geothermal fluids around Fogo massif have been identified as derived from meteoric water, which infiltrates through Fogo Lake and the volcano flank and flows from south to north on the northern flank (Carvalho, 1999). These results point to the important role played by rainfall in triggering seismicity at Sao Miguel, possibly through pressure changes at depth in response to surface rain and/or interaction with the geothermal system.

  5. Crustal Seismicity and Recent Faults in Southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, C.; Comte, D.; Tavera, H.; Audin, L.; Herail, G.

    2004-12-01

    Most seismological studies in southern Peru have been focused on the downgoing slab seismicity in order to constrain the Wadati-Benioff zone. This study deals with the intra-continental seismicity of the southern Peru forearc (17,3° S - 18,5° S) in a post-seismic context (Arequipa thrust earthquake, Mw=8.4, 23 June, 2001). It is difficult to identify historical crustal earthquake from available catalogues, however some crustal events teleseismically recorded can be found since 1976; they exhibit normal focal mechanism solutions in the southern Peru volcanic arc and inverse focal mechanism solutions in the Central Depression. Following a notable increase of shallow crustal seismicity located close to the Western Cordillera after the 23 June 2001, a temporary seismic network was deployed between January and March 2003 in order to study the Wadati-Benioff zone and monitoring the crustal seismicity in southern Peru. From the about 1700 events locally recorded by the local network, 300 crustal earthquakes were identified in the Peruvian forearc between Tacna and Moquegua. This crustal seismicity is distributed along a lineament located at depths between 0 and 60 km, dipping at about 45° from the Western Cordillera towards the coast, almost perpendicular to the subducting slab; this behaviour was previously observed in northern Chile and in southern Peru, north of the study zone (16° S). In the Central Depression, seismic activity is not superficial occurring between 25-60 km depth and it is mostly characterized by inverse focal mechanism solutions. Superficial faults situated in the Central Depression and in the Coastal Cordillera can not be associated with the seismic activity observed in this area. However, in the Pre-Cordillera, crustal seismicity occurs at depths between 0-15 km and can be correlated with shallow fault systems recognized by satellite images and on the field. For examples, the Incapuquio fault system which was a transpressive system in Cretaceous

  6. A quantitative model for volcanic hazard assessment

    OpenAIRE

    W. Marzocchi; Sandri, L.; Furlan, C

    2006-01-01

    Volcanic hazard assessment is a basic ingredient for risk-based decision-making in land-use planning and emergency management. Volcanic hazard is defined as the probability of any particular area being affected by a destructive volcanic event within a given period of time (Fournier d’Albe 1979). The probabilistic nature of such an important issue derives from the fact that volcanic activity is a complex process, characterized by several and usually unknown degrees o...

  7. Reproducibility in Seismic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Verdejo O.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Within the field of exploration seismology, there is interest at national level of integrating reproducibility in applied, educational and research activities related to seismic processing and imaging. This reproducibility implies the description and organization of the elements involved in numerical experiments. Thus, a researcher, teacher or student can study, verify, repeat, and modify them independently. In this work, we document and adapt reproducibility in seismic processing and imaging to spread this concept and its benefits, and to encourage the use of open source software in this area within our academic and professional environment. We present an enhanced seismic imaging example, of interest in both academic and professional environments, using Mexican seismic data. As a result of this research, we prove that it is possible to assimilate, adapt and transfer technology at low cost, using open source software and following a reproducible research scheme.

  8. Seismic Fault Preserving Diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Lavialle, Olivier; Germain, Christian; Donias, Marc; Guillon, Sebastien; Keskes, Naamen; Berthoumieu, Yannick

    2007-01-01

    This paper focuses on the denoising and enhancing of 3-D reflection seismic data. We propose a pre-processing step based on a non linear diffusion filtering leading to a better detection of seismic faults. The non linear diffusion approaches are based on the definition of a partial differential equation that allows us to simplify the images without blurring relevant details or discontinuities. Computing the structure tensor which provides information on the local orientation of the geological layers, we propose to drive the diffusion along these layers using a new approach called SFPD (Seismic Fault Preserving Diffusion). In SFPD, the eigenvalues of the tensor are fixed according to a confidence measure that takes into account the regularity of the local seismic structure. Results on both synthesized and real 3-D blocks show the efficiency of the proposed approach.

  9. Seismic fault preserving diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavialle, Olivier; Pop, Sorin; Germain, Christian; Donias, Marc; Guillon, Sebastien; Keskes, Naamen; Berthoumieu, Yannick

    2007-02-01

    This paper focuses on the denoising and enhancing of 3-D reflection seismic data. We propose a pre-processing step based on a non-linear diffusion filtering leading to a better detection of seismic faults. The non-linear diffusion approaches are based on the definition of a partial differential equation that allows us to simplify the images without blurring relevant details or discontinuities. Computing the structure tensor which provides information on the local orientation of the geological layers, we propose to drive the diffusion along these layers using a new approach called SFPD (Seismic Fault Preserving Diffusion). In SFPD, the eigenvalues of the tensor are fixed according to a confidence measure that takes into account the regularity of the local seismic structure. Results on both synthesized and real 3-D blocks show the efficiency of the proposed approach.

  10. BUILDING 341 Seismic Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halle, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The Seismic Evaluation of Building 341 located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California has been completed. The subject building consists of a main building, Increment 1, and two smaller additions; Increments 2 and 3.

  11. Seismic features of the June 1999 tectonic swarm in the Stromboli volcano region, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsaperla, S.; Alparone, S.; Spampinato, S.

    2003-07-01

    Crustal tectonic seismicity in the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea is characterized by the high occurrence rates of earthquakes to the west of the alignment of Salina, Lipari and Vulcano islands in the Aeolian archipelago. Only a few earthquakes affect the crustal region east of these islands, whereas intermediate and deep seismicity plays a relevant role. Based on this evidence, two aspects of the seismic swarm recorded at the Aeolian Island Seismic Network between June 6 and 17, 1999 looked anomalous. The first aspect concerned the number of earthquakes (78) that affected the Stromboli submarine edifice in a short time interval. Secondly, despite the low maximum magnitude Md 3.2 reached, the cumulative strain release was conspicuous in comparison with previous swarms in this region. We localized the swarm about 6 km northeast of Stromboli, at a depth between 8 and 12 km. The source region was identified using standard methods of hypocentral location, as well as azimuth analysis. It is worth noting that the volcanic activity at Stromboli did not change significantly during the swarm nor throughout the following months. Therefore, the seismic swarm had no link with volcanic activity observed at the surface. Most of the earthquakes shared similar waveform and frequency content, and can be divided into families. We identified some earthquakes - with magnitude up to Md 3 - having relatively low frequency content at different seismic stations. This anomalous feature leads us to hypothesize the presence of fluid circulation and/or propagation of seismic waves in a ductile medium. Our hypothesis is in agreement with studies on marine geology, which highlight various forms of submarine volcanism in the southern basin of the Tyrrhenian Sea.

  12. Seismic facies; Facies sismicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johann, Paulo Roberto Schroeder [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Exploracao e Producao Corporativo. Gerencia de Reservas e Reservatorios]. E-mail: johann@petrobras.com.br

    2004-11-01

    The method presented herein describes the seismic facies as representations of curves and vertical matrixes of the lithotypes proportions. The seismic facies are greatly interested in capturing the spatial distributions (3D) of regionalized variables, as for example, lithotypes, sedimentary facies groups and/ or porosity and/or other properties of the reservoirs and integrate them into the 3D geological modeling (Johann, 1997). Thus when interpreted as curves or vertical matrixes of proportions, seismic facies allow us to build a very important tool for structural analysis of regionalized variables. The matrixes have an important application in geostatistical modeling. In addition, this approach provides results about the depth and scale of the wells profiles, that is, seismic data is integrated to the characterization of reservoirs in depth maps and in high resolution maps. The link between the different necessary technical phases involved in the classification of the segments of seismic traces is described herein in groups of predefined traces of two approaches: a) not supervised and b) supervised by the geological knowledge available on the studied reservoir. The multivariate statistical methods used to obtain the maps of the seismic facies units are interesting tools to be used to provide a lithostratigraphic and petrophysical understanding of a petroleum reservoir. In the case studied these seismic facies units are interpreted as representative of the depositional system as a part of the Namorado Turbiditic System, Namorado Field, Campos Basin.Within the scope of PRAVAP 19 (Programa Estrategico de Recuperacao Avancada de Petroleo - Strategic Program of Advanced Petroleum Recovery) some research work on algorithms is underway to select new optimized attributes to apply seismic facies. One example is the extraction of attributes based on the wavelet transformation and on the time-frequency analysis methodology. PRAVAP is also carrying out research work on an

  13. Volcanic forcing in decadal forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménégoz, Martin; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco; Guemas, Virginie; Asif, Muhammad; Prodhomme, chloe

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions can significantly impact the climate system, by injecting large amounts of particles into the stratosphere. By reflecting backward the solar radiation, these particles cool the troposphere, and by absorbing the longwave radiation, they warm the stratosphere. As a consequence of this radiative forcing, the global mean surface temperature can decrease by several tenths of degrees. However, large eruptions are also associated to a complex dynamical response of the climate system that is particularly tricky do understand regarding the low number of available observations. Observations seem to show an increase of the positive phases of the Northern Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) the two winters following large eruptions, associated to positive temperature anomalies over the Eurasian continent. The summers following large eruptions are generally particularly cold, especially over the continents of the Northern Hemisphere. Overall, it is really challenging to forecast the climate response to large eruptions, as it is both modulated by, and superimposed to the climate background conditions, largely driven themselves by internal variability at seasonal to decadal scales. This work describes the additional skill of a forecast system used for seasonal and decadal predictions when it includes observed volcanic forcing over the last decades. An idealized volcanic forcing that could be used for real-time forecasts is also evaluated. This work consists in a base for forecasts that will be performed in the context of the next large volcanic eruption.

  14. Seismicity surveying in central and north mexico region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, J. M.; Guzmán, M.; Nieto, A.; Zúñiga, R.; Alaniz, S.; Barboza, R.

    2003-04-01

    The seismic nature of Central Mexico is poorly understood due to insufficient sampling. This region is characterized by a very low deformation rate. The seismic activity is variable and ranges from microseismicity to large earthquakes. Some large earthquakes have occurred with an unknown returning period; structural studies show this recurrence could range from hundreds to thousands of years. Some authors argue that there is not connection between ancient and recent activity. We carried out several seismic surveys in part of the TransMexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) and the Altiplano Central. We installed a temporal network, in order to record spatial seismic distribution. This network consists of 3-5 short period instruments, consisting of triaxial digital velocity recorders (0.01-4.5 Hz). We registered several swarms; one took place in Guanajuato and lasted for 2 weeks. Another crisis occurred at the northern limit of the TMVB at Sierra Gorda. Over five weeks several micro-earthquakes M < 2 were felt with anomaously high intensity. Relocated seismicity shows very shallow (< 10km) activity. The regional crust conditions appear to be roughly uniform even though the seismicity varies significantly. In some cases like seismic swarms, several microearthquakes are aligned, and seem to be quasi-parallel to the direction of the fault strike, some other times they are perpendicular. However, surface ruptures associated to earthquakes are not observed to confirm this. Then, a challenge is to locate the seismogenic structures, basically because of the surface structures are too old to be still active. Increased seismotectonic knowledge of this region may give further insight into the details of the interaction between surface structures driven by the regional stress field.

  15. Seismic Consequence Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Gross

    2004-10-25

    The primary purpose of this model report is to develop abstractions for the response of engineered barrier system (EBS) components to seismic hazards at a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and to define the methodology for using these abstractions in a seismic scenario class for the Total System Performance Assessment - License Application (TSPA-LA). A secondary purpose of this model report is to provide information for criticality studies related to seismic hazards. The seismic hazards addressed herein are vibratory ground motion, fault displacement, and rockfall due to ground motion. The EBS components are the drip shield, the waste package, and the fuel cladding. The requirements for development of the abstractions and the associated algorithms for the seismic scenario class are defined in ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling of Drift Degradation, Waste Package and Drip Shield Vibratory Motion and Seismic Consequences'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171520]). The development of these abstractions will provide a more complete representation of flow into and transport from the EBS under disruptive events. The results from this development will also address portions of integrated subissue ENG2, Mechanical Disruption of Engineered Barriers, including the acceptance criteria for this subissue defined in Section 2.2.1.3.2.3 of the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]).

  16. Experimental generation of volcanic lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimarelli, Corrado; Alatorre-Ibargüengoitia, Miguel; Kueppers, Ulrich; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2014-05-01

    Ash-rich volcanic plumes that are responsible for injecting large quantities of aerosols into the atmosphere are often associated with intense electrical activity. Direct measurement of the electric potential at the crater, where the electric activity in the volcanic plume is first observed, is severely impeded, limiting progress in its investigation. We have achieved volcanic lightning in the laboratory during rapid decompression experiments of gas-particle mixtures under controlled conditions. Upon decompression (from ~100 bar argon pressure to atmospheric pressure), loose particles are vertically accelerated and ejected through a nozzle of 2.8 cm diameter into a large tank filled with air at atmospheric conditions. Because of their impulsive character, our experiments most closely represent the conditions encountered in the gas-thrust region of the plume, when ash is first ejected from the crater. We used sieved natural ash with different grain sizes from Popocatépetl (Mexico), Eyjafjallajökull (Iceland), and Soufrière Hills (Montserrat) volcanoes, as well as micrometric glass beads to constrain the influence of material properties on lightning. We monitored the dynamics of the particle-laden jets with a high-speed camera and the pressure and electric potential at the nozzle using a pressure transducer and two copper ring antennas connected to a high-impedance data acquisition system, respectively. We find that lightning is controlled by the dynamics of the particle-laden jet and by the abundance of fine particles. Two main conditions are required to generate lightning: 1) self-electrification of the particles and 2) clustering of the particles driven by the jet fluid dynamics. The relative movement of clusters of charged particles within the plume generates the gradient in electrical potential, which is necessary for lightning. In this manner it is the gas-particle dynamics together with the evolving particle-density distribution within different regions of

  17. Shear velocity structure of the Tyrrhenian region in relation to volcanism and tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulssen, H.; Greve, S.

    2012-12-01

    We present a detailed 3D shear velocity model of the Tyrrhenian Sea and surrounding onshore areas down to about 160 km depth. The high resolution of the model is achieved through the measurement of interstation Rayleigh wave dispersion curves in a small regional setting with dense station coverage. The most noticeable structure is a pronounced, nearly ringshaped low velocity region at about 80 km depth surrounding the Tyrrhenian Sea: from Corsica to the western part of the Italian mainland, continuing to the western part of Sicily and Sardinia. The thickness of this low velocity region is constrained to a maximum of 40 km, and it is independent of the chosen inversion parameters or the background model. The low values of the shear velocity suggest the presence of fluids or melt. The lateral extent of the low velocity region beneath the Italian mainland is well correlated with the locations of subduction-related volcanism, but there is also a striking continuation of the anomalous low-velocity region along the Northern Tyrrhenian Sea towards (and beneath) the island of Corsica. The recent (volcanism along the Northern Tyrrhenian Sea. Our seismic results now suggest that the anomalous mantle is still present beneath Corsica and the Northern Tyrrhenian Sea, although it does not produce any active volcanism anymore. The picture for the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea is different. Intriguingly, the sublithospheric low velocity anomaly does not continue to southeasternmost part of the Tyrrhenian Sea where the volcanism of the Aeolian arc is related to subduction of the steep, active Ionian slab. Instead, the seismic anomaly crosses the Tyrrhenian Sea from Vesuvius on the Italian mainland to the western part of Sicily, continuing to the southeast of Sardinia: a pattern which correlates with the locations of past subduction-related volcanism. It is striking that the Vavilov Basin in the central Tyrrhenian Sea, characterized by MORB-type volcanism, is a region of relatively normal

  18. A Volcanic Hydrogen Habitable Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Ramses M.; Kaltenegger, Lisa

    2017-03-01

    The classical habitable zone (HZ) is the circular region around a star in which liquid water could exist on the surface of a rocky planet. The outer edge of the traditional N2–CO2–H2O HZ extends out to nearly ∼1.7 au in our solar system, beyond which condensation and scattering by CO2 outstrips its greenhouse capacity. Here, we show that volcanic outgassing of atmospheric H2 can extend the outer edge of the HZ to ∼2.4 au in our solar system. This wider volcanic-hydrogen HZ (N2–CO2–H2O–H2) can be sustained as long as volcanic H2 output offsets its escape from the top of the atmosphere. We use a single-column radiative-convective climate model to compute the HZ limits of this volcanic hydrogen HZ for hydrogen concentrations between 1% and 50%, assuming diffusion-limited atmospheric escape. At a hydrogen concentration of 50%, the effective stellar flux required to support the outer edge decreases by ∼35%–60% for M–A stars. The corresponding orbital distances increase by ∼30%–60%. The inner edge of this HZ only moves out ∼0.1%–4% relative to the classical HZ because H2 warming is reduced in dense H2O atmospheres. The atmospheric scale heights of such volcanic H2 atmospheres near the outer edge of the HZ also increase, facilitating remote detection of atmospheric signatures.

  19. Self-sustained vibrations in volcanic areas extracted by Independent Component Analysis: a review and new results

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lauro, E.; de Martino, S.; Falanga, M.; Palo, M.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the physical processes associated with volcanic tremor and explosions. A volcano is a complex system where a fluid source interacts with the solid edifice so generating seismic waves in a regime of low turbulence. Although the complex behavior escapes a simple universal description, the phases of activity generate stable (self-sustained) oscillations that can be described as a non-linear dynamical system of low dimensionality. So, the system requires to be investigated with non-linear methods able to individuate, decompose, and extract the main characteristics of the phenomenon. Independent Component Analysis (ICA), an entropy-based technique is a good candidate for this purpose. Here, we review the results of ICA applied to seismic signals acquired in some volcanic areas. We emphasize analogies and differences among the self-oscillations individuated in three cases: Stromboli (Italy), Erebus (Antarctica) and Volcán de Colima (Mexico). The waveforms of the extracted independent components are specific for each volcano, whereas the similarity can be ascribed to a very general common source mechanism involving the interaction between gas/magma flow and solid structures (the volcanic edifice). Indeed, chocking phenomena or inhomogeneities in the volcanic cavity can play the same role in generating self-oscillations as the languid and the reed do in musical instruments. The understanding of these background oscillations is relevant not only for explaining the volcanic source process and to make a forecast into the future, but sheds light on the physics of complex systems developing low turbulence.

  20. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project: Seismic velocity structure of the Brawley Seismic Zone, Salton Buttes and Geothermal Field, Salton Trough, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delph, J.; Hole, J. A.; Fuis, G. S.; Stock, J. M.; Rymer, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Salton Trough is an active rift in southern California in a step-over between the plate-bounding Imperial and San Andreas Faults. In March 2011, the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) investigated the rift's crustal structure by acquiring several seismic refraction and reflection lines. One of the densely sampled refraction lines crosses the northern-most Imperial Valley, perpendicular to the strike-slip faults and parallel to a line of small Quaternary rhyolitic volcanoes. The line crosses the obliquely extensional Brawley Seismic Zone and goes through one of the most geothermally productive areas in the United States. Well logs indicate the valley is filled by several kilometers of late Pliocene-recent lacustrine, fluvial, and shallow marine sediment. The 42-km long seismic line was comprised of eleven 110-460 kg explosive shots and receivers at a 100 m spacing. First arrival travel times were used to build a tomographic seismic velocity image of the upper crust. Velocity in the valley increases smoothly from 5 km/s, indicating diagenesis and gradational metamorphism of rift sediments at very shallow depth due to an elevated geotherm. The velocity gradient is much smaller in the relatively low velocity (Chocolate Mountains. The tomographic model shows that the shallow metasedimentary basement as well as the geothermal and volcanic activity seem to be bounded by the sharp western and eastern margins of the Brawley Seismic Zone. At this location, strongly fractured crust allows both hydrothermal and magmatic fluids to rise to the surface in the most rapidly extending portion of the rift basin.

  1. Seismicity in Northern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Monika; Gestermann, Nicolai; Plenefisch, Thomas; Bönnemann, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Northern Germany is a region of low tectonic activity, where only few and low-magnitude earthquakes occur. The driving tectonic processes are not well-understood up to now. In addition, seismic events during the last decade concentrated at the borders of the natural gas fields. The source depths of these events are shallow and in the depth range of the gas reservoirs. Based on these observations a causal relationship between seismicity near gas fields and the gas production is likely. The strongest of these earthquake had a magnitude of 4.5 and occurred near Rotenburg in 2004. Also smaller seismic events were considerably felt by the public and stimulated the discussion on the underlying processes. The latest seismic event occurred near Langwedel on 22nd November 2012 and had a magnitude of 2.8. Understanding the causes of the seismicity in Northern Germany is crucial for a thorough evaluation. Therefore the Seismological Service of Lower Saxony (NED) was established at the State Office for Mining, Energy and Geology (LBEG) of Lower Saxony in January 2013. Its main task is the monitoring and evaluation of the seismicity in Lower Saxony and adjacent areas. Scientific and technical questions are addressed in close cooperation with the Seismological Central Observatory (SZO) at the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR). The seismological situation of Northern Germany will be presented. Possible causes of seismicity are introduced. Rare seismic events at greater depths are distributed over the whole region and probably are purely tectonic whereas events in the vicinity of natural gas fields are probably related to gas production. Improving the detection threshold of seismic events in Northern Germany is necessary for providing a better statistical basis for further analyses answering these questions. As a first step the existing seismic network will be densified over the next few years. The first borehole station was installed near Rethem by BGR

  2. A multi-decadal view of seismic methods for detecting precursors of magma movement and eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouet, Bernard A.; Matoza, Robin S.

    2013-02-01

    With the emergence of portable broadband seismic instrumentation, availability of digital networks with wide dynamic range, and development of new powerful analysis techniques made possible by greatly increased computer capacity, volcano seismology has now reached a mature stage where insights are rapidly being gained on the role played by magmatic and hydrothermal fluids in the generation of seismic waves. Volcanoes produce a wide variety of signals originating in the transport of magma and related hydrothermal fluids and their interaction with solid rock. Typical signals include (1) brittle failure earthquakes that reflect the response of the rock to stress changes induced by magma movement; (2) pressure oscillations accompanying the dynamics of liquids and gases in conduits and cracks; and (3) magma fracturing and fragmentation. Oscillatory behaviors within magmatic and hydrothermal systems are the norm and are the expressions of the complex rheologies of these fluids and nonlinear characteristics of associated processes underlying the release of thermo-chemical and gravitational energy from volcanic fluids along their ascent path. The interpretation of these signals and quantification of their source mechanisms form the core of modern volcano seismology. The accuracy to which the forces operating at the source can be resolved depends on the degree of resolution achieved for the volcanic structure. High-resolution tomography based on iterative inversions of seismic travel-time data can image three-dimensional structures at a scale of a few hundred meters provided adequate local short-period earthquake data are available. Hence, forces in a volcano are potentially resolvable for periods longer than ~ 1 s. In concert with techniques aimed at the interpretation of processes occurring in the fluid, novel seismic methods have emerged that are allowing the detection of stress changes in volcanic structures induced by magma movement. These methods include (1) ambient

  3. Investigating volcanic hazard in Cape Verde Islands through geophysical monitoring: network description and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, B.; Fonseca, J. F. B. D.

    2014-02-01

    We describe a new geophysical network deployed in the Cape Verde Archipelago for the assessment and monitoring of volcanic hazards as well as the first results from the network. Across the archipelago, the ages of volcanic activity range from ca. 20 Ma to present. In general, older islands are in the east and younger ones are in the west, but there is no clear age progression of eruptive activity as widely separated islands have erupted contemporaneously on geological timescales. The overall magmatic rate is low, and there are indications that eruptive activity is episodic, with intervals between episodes of intense activity ranging from 1 to 4 Ma. Although only Fogo Island has experienced eruptions (mainly effusive) in the historic period (last 550 yr), Brava and Santo Antão have experienced numerous geologically recent eruptions, including violent explosive eruptions, and show felt seismic activity and geothermal activity. Evidence for recent volcanism in the other islands is more limited and the emphasis has therefore been on monitoring of the three critical islands of Fogo, Brava and Santo Antão, where volcanic hazard levels are highest. Geophysical monitoring of all three islands is now in operation. The first results show that on Fogo, the seismic activity is dominated by hydrothermal events and volcano-tectonic events that may be related to settling of the edifice after the 1995 eruption; in Brava by volcano-tectonic events (mostly offshore), and in Santo Antão by volcano-tectonic events, medium-frequency events and harmonic tremor. Both in Brava and in Santo Antão, the recorded seismicity indicates that relatively shallow magmatic systems are present and causing deformation of the edifices that may include episodes of dike intrusion.

  4. The January 2006 Volcanic-Tectonic Earthquake Swarm at Mount Martin, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, James P.; Power, John A.

    2009-01-01

    On January 8, 2006, a swarm of volcanic-tectonic earthquakes began beneath Mount Martin at the southern end of the Katmai volcanic cluster. This was the first recorded swarm at Mount Martin since continuous seismic monitoring began in 1996. The number of located earthquakes increased during the next four days, reaching a peak on January 11. For the next two days, the seismic activity decreased, and on January 14, the number of events increased to twice the previous day's total. Following this increase in activity, seismicity declined, returning to background levels by the end of the month. The Alaska Volcano Observatory located 860 earthquakes near Mount Martin during January 2006. No additional signs of volcanic unrest were noted in association with this earthquake swarm. The earthquakes in the Mount Martin swarm, relocated using the double difference technique, formed an elongated cluster dipping to the southwest. Focal mechanisms beneath Mount Martin show a mix of normal, thrust, and strike-slip solutions, with normal focal mechanisms dominating. For earthquakes more than 1 km from Mount Martin, all focal mechanisms showed normal faulting. The calculated b-value for the Mount Martin swarm is 0.98 and showed no significant change before, during, or after the swarm. The triggering mechanism for the Mount Martin swarm is unknown. The time-history of earthquake occurrence is indicative of a volcanic cause; however, there were no low-frequency events or observations, such as increased steaming associated with the swarm. During the swarm, there was no change in the b-value, and the distribution and type of focal mechanisms were similar to those in the period before the anomalous activity. The short duration of the swarm, the similarity in observed focal mechanisms, and the lack of additional signs of unrest suggest this swarm did not result from a large influx of magma within the shallow crust beneath Mount Martin.

  5. How Volcanism Controls Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, P. L.

    2013-12-01

    Large explosive volcanoes eject megatons of sulfur dioxide into the lower stratosphere where it spreads around the world within months and is oxidized slowly to form a sulfuric-acid aerosol with particle sizes that grow large enough to reflect and scatter solar radiation, cooling Earth ~0.5C for up to 3 years. Explosive eruptions also deplete total column ozone ~6% causing up to 3C winter warming at mid-latitudes over continents. Global cooling predominates. Extrusive, basaltic volcanoes deplete ozone ~6% but do not eject much sulfur dioxide into the lower stratosphere, causing net global warming. Anthropogenic chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) deplete ozone ~3% for up to a century while each volcanic eruption, even small ones, depletes ozone twice as much but for less than a decade through eruption of halogens and ensuing photochemical processes. The 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, the 2011 eruption of Grímsvötn, plus anthropogenic CFCs depleted ozone over Toronto Canada 14% in 2012, causing an unusually warm winter and drought. Total column ozone determines how much solar ultraviolet energy with wavelengths between 290 and 340 nanometers reaches Earth where it is absorbed most efficiently by the ocean. A 25% depletion of ozone increases the amount of this radiation reaching Earth by 1 W m-2 for overhead sun and 0.25 W m-2 for a solar zenith angle of 70 degrees. The tropopause is the boundary between the troposphere heated from below by a sun-warmed Earth and the stratosphere heated from above by the Sun through photodissociation primarily of oxygen and ozone. The mean annual height of the tropopause increased ~160 m between 1980 and 2004 at the same time that northern mid-latitude total column ozone was depleted by ~4%, the lower stratosphere cooled ~2C, the upper troposphere warmed ~0.1C, and mean surface temperatures in the northern hemisphere rose ~0.5C. Regional total ozone columns are observed to increase as rapidly as 20% within 5 hours with an associated 5

  6. The seismic structure of southeast Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Mark

    The convergent motion of the Pacific and North American Plates in Alaska has produced geologic features associated with subduction zones and has transported displaced terranes along the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather fault system that forms the northeastern boundary of the Pacific Plate. These subduction features stop abruptly at the edge of the Yakutat Block displaced terrane, approximately 300 km from the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather fault. The purpose of this study was to determine the type and geometry of the boundary between the Yakutat Block and North American as well as the cause of the offset volcanic arc and missing Wadati-Benioff zone. I calculated P and S-wave receiver functions for 57 broadband seismic stations located in southeast Alaska. S-wave data was migrated using a Common Conversion Point procedure. P-wave data was imaged via a three-dimensional, pre-stack migration using plane-wave decomposition weighted by an inverse generalized Radon transform to calculate the scattering potential for each event. I also calculated the temperatures at the top of the Yakutat slab and mantle wedge using three different analytical thermal models. The 3-D images and animations I produced show that the Yakutat Block is being subducted, continuous with the Pacific slab, and extends to the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather strike-slip fault systems. The subducted slab extends north to the Wrangell Volcanic Field with a dip than increases gradually from 10° in the west to 15° in the east, stripping approximately 15 km of overlying sediments. The location of the Wrangell Volcanic Field and lack of Wadati-Benioff zone are consistent with the temperatures I calculated for the top of slab and mantle wedge after stripping 15 km of sediment.

  7. Seismic reflection survey at Llancanelo region (Mendoza, Argentina) and preliminary interpretation of Neogene stratigraphic features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osella, A.; Onnis, L.; de la Vega, M.; Tassone, A.; Violante, R. A.; Lippai, H.; López, E.; Rovere, E. I.

    2015-07-01

    A shallow multichannel seismic survey reaching depths of 700/800 m was performed for the first time in the Llancanelo Lake region (Southern Mendoza Province, Argentina), in order to depict the major Neogene sedimentary-volcanic sequences that form the final infilling of the tectonic-volcanic basin where the lake is located. The seismic survey advances on the results of previous geoelectric and electromagnetic surveys carried out at early stages of the research that reached the uppermost 80-100 m of the sequences (Quaternary), and therefore they go deeper in the subsoil. All the surveys were supported by surface and subsoil geological observations. After explaining the details of the performed seismic methodology, the obtained results are discussed, which indicate the presence of three major sedimentary units with increasing volcanic (basaltic layers) intercalations with depth, that accommodate to the geometry of the depocenter. The entire sequence encompasses most of the Neogene. This research sets the methodological basis for future, more detailed shallow seismic surveys in the region.

  8. Reassessment of the historical seismic activity with major impact on S. Miguel Island (Azores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Silveira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available On account of its tectonic setting, both seismic and volcanic events are frequent in the Azores archipelago. During the historical period earthquakes and seismic swarms of tectonic and/or volcanic origin have struck S. Miguel Island causing a significant number of casualties and severe damages. The information present in historical records made possible a new macroseismic analysis of these major events using the European Macroseismic Scale-1998 (EMS-98. Among the strongest earthquakes of tectonic origin that affected S. Miguel Island, six events were selected for this study. The isoseismal maps drawn for these events enabled the identification of areas characterized by anomalous values of seismic intensity, either positive or negative, to constrain epicentre locations and to identify some new seismogenic areas. Regarding seismic activity associated with volcanic phenomena six cases were also selected. For each of the studied cases cumulative intensity values were assessed for each locality. The distribution of local intensity values shows that the effects are not homogeneous within a certain distance from the eruptive centre, the area of major impacts relates with the eruptive style and damages equivalent to high intensities may occur in Furnas and Sete Cidades calderas. Combining all the historical macroseismic data, a maximum intensity map was produced for S. Miguel Island.

  9. Volcanic signatures in time gravity variations during the volcanic unrest on El Hierro (Canary Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainz-Maza Aparicio, S.; Arnoso Sampedro, J.; Gonzalez Montesinos, F.; Martí Molist, J.

    2014-06-01

    Gravity changes occurring during the initial stage of the 2011-2012 El Hierro submarine eruption are interpreted in terms of the preeruptive signatures during the episode of unrest. Continuous gravity measurements were made at two sites on the island using the relative spring gravimeter LaCoste and Romberg gPhone-054. On 15 September 2011, an observed gravity decrease of 45 μGal, associated with the southward migration of seismic epicenters, is consistent with a lateral magma migration that occurred beneath the volcanic edifice, an apparently clear precursor of the eruption that took place 25 days later on 10 October 2011. High-frequency gravity signals also appeared on 6-11 October 2011, pointing to an occurring interaction between a magmatic intrusion and the ocean floor. These important gravity changes, with amplitudes varying from 10 to -90 μGal, during the first 3 days following the onset of the eruption are consistent with the northward migration of the eruptive focus along an active eruptive fissure. An apparent correlation of gravity variations with body tide vertical strain was also noted, which could indicate that concurrent tidal triggering occurred during the initial stage of the eruption.

  10. Cooling-dominated cracking in thermally stressed volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, John; Meredith, Philip; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2016-08-01

    Most studies of thermally induced cracking in rocks have focused on the generation of cracks formed during heating and thermal expansion. Both the nature and the mechanism of crack formation during cooling are hypothesized to be different from those formed during heating. We present in situ acoustic emission data recorded as a proxy for crack damage evolution in a series of heating and cooling experiments on samples of basalt and dacite. Results show that both the rate and the energy of acoustic emission are consistently much higher during cooling than during heating. Seismic velocity comparisons and crack morphology analysis of our heated and cooled samples support the contemporaneous acoustic emission data and also indicate that thermal cracking is largely isotropic. These new data are important for assessing the contribution of cooling-induced damage within volcanic structures and layers such as dikes, sills, and lava flows.

  11. Volcanism, Earth Degassing and Replenished Lithosphere Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, D. K.

    1980-07-01

    Volcanism that pierces plate interiors is characteristically rich in alkalis and volatiles, and its cause and persistence are essentially expressions of the Earth's outgassing. The general balance of mobile elements (such as H, C, F and Cl) rules out recycling of sea floor, hydrosphere, sediments or atmosphere: furthermore, it is not in accord with accepted planet degassing budgets. The typical eruptive mode of volatile-rich magmatism means that the observed regional chemical variations, and even differences between adjacent volcanoes, must largely reflect source heterogeneity. In a broader context, this magmatism is also at odds with a concept of continental crust underlain by strongly depleted (refractory) mantle. Repetition of activity along crustal zones of weakness shows that the lithosphere mantle (a) is structurally complex and (b) still holds continuing (or continual) rich reserves of mobile elements. Unbroken lithosphere muffles the evolutionary escape of volatiles from the deep mantle: any lesion that appears then offers easy escape channels, whereby volatiles are drained from a large mantle region and funnelled through the plate. Horizontal movement of thick continental lithosphere releases volatiles from deep sources, imparting some of the special chemical characteristics of the stable continental magmatism. Present evidence requires consideration of the continental lithosphere as a site of primordial heterogeneity that has been accentuated rather than diminished by geological processes.

  12. Volcanic Rocks As Targets For Astrobiology Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, N.

    2010-12-01

    Almost two decades of study highlight the importance of terrestrial subaqueous volcanic rocks as microbial habitats, particularly in glass produced by the quenching of basaltic lava upon contact with water. On Earth, microbes rapidly begin colonizing glassy surfaces along fractures and cracks exposed to water. Microbial colonization of basaltic glass leads to enhanced alteration through production of characteristic granular and/or tubular bioalteration textures. Infilling of formerly hollow alteration textures by minerals enable their preservation through geologic time. Basaltic rocks are a major component of the Martian crust and are widespread on other solar system bodies. A variety of lines of evidence strongly suggest the long-term existence of abundant liquid water on ancient Mars. Recent orbiter, lander and rover missions have found evidence for the presence of transient liquid water on Mars, perhaps persisting to the present day. Many other solar system bodies, notably Europa, Enceladus and other icy satellites, may contain (or have once hosted) subaqueous basaltic glasses. The record of terrestrial glass bioalteration has been interpreted to extend back ~3.5 billion years and is widespread in modern oceanic crust and its ancient metamorphic equivalents. The terrestrial record of glass bioalteration strongly suggests that glassy or formerly glassy basaltic rocks on extraterrestrial bodies that have interacted with liquid water are high-value targets for astrobiological exploration.

  13. Demographics of antibiotic persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Ulrich; Kollerova, Silvia; Jouvet, Lionel

    2016-01-01

    Persister cells, cells that can survive antibiotic exposure but lack heritable antibiotic resistance, are assumed to play a crucial role for the evolution of antibiotic resistance. Persistence is a stage associated with reduced metabolic activity. Most previous studies have been done on batch...... cultures, rather than the individual level. Here, we used individual level bacteria data to confirm previous studies in how fast cells switch into a persistence stage, but our results challenge the fundamental idea that persistence comes with major costs of reduced growth (cell elongation) and division due...... even play a more prominent role for the evolution of resistance and failures of medical treatment by antibiotics as currently assumed....

  14. Faults and volcanoes: Main volcanic structures in the Acambay Graben, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Diaz, G. J.; Pedrazzi, D.; Suñe-Puchol, I.; Lacan, P.

    2016-12-01

    The Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB) province is best known by the major stratovolcanoes, such as Popocatepetl and Colima, but most of the province is formed by modest size stratovolcanoes and monogenetic cones. Regional fault systems were developed together with the building of the volcanic province; the most notorious one is Chapala-Tula Fault System (CTFS), which runs parallel to the central sector of the MVB, and thus it is also referred to as the Intra-Arc fault system. Acambay graben (AG) is part of this central system. It is a 20 x 70 km depression located 100 km to the NW of Mexico City, at the easternmost end of the E-W trending CTFS, and was formed as the result of NS to NE oriented extension. Seismically active normal faults, such as the Acambay-Tixmadejé fault, with a mB =7 earthquake in 1912, delimit the AG. The graben includes several volcanic structures and associated deposits ranging in age from Miocene to 3 ka. The main structures are two stratovolcanoes, Altamirano (900 m high) and Temascalcingo (800 m high). There are also several Miocene-Pliocene lava domes, and Quaternary small cinder cones and shield volcanoes. Faulting of the Acambay graben affects all these volcanic forms, but depending on their ages, the volcanoes are cut by several faults or by a few. That is the case of Altamirano and Temascalcingo volcanoes, where the former is almost unaffected whereas the latter is highly dissected by faults. Altamirano is younger than Temascalcingo; youngest pyroclastic deposits from Altamirano are dated at 12-3 ka, and those from Temascalcingo at 40-25 ka (radiocarbon ages). The relatively young ages found in volcanic deposits within the Acambay graben raise the volcanic danger level in this area, originally marked as an inactive volcanic zone, but activity could restart at any time. Supported by DGAPA-PAPIIT-UNAM grant IN-104615.

  15. Submarine volcanoes of the Kolumbo volcanic zone NE of Santorini Caldera, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomikou, P.; Carey, S.; Papanikolaou, D.; Croff Bell, K.; Sakellariou, D.; Alexandri, M.; Bejelou, K.

    2012-06-01

    The seafloor northeast of Santorini volcano in Greece consists of a small, elongated rifted basin that has been the site of recent submarine volcanism. This area lies within the Cyclades back-arc region of the present Hellenic subduction zone where the seafloor of the eastern Mediterranean Sea is descending beneath the Aegean microplate. The Cycladic region and the Aegean Sea as a whole are known to be regions of north-south back-arc extension and thinning of continental crust. Nineteen submarine volcanic cones occur within this small rift zone, the largest of these being Kolumbo which last erupted explosively in 1650 AD, causing significant damage and fatalities on the nearby island of Santorini. Previous SEABEAM mapping and seismic studies from HCMR indicate that many of the smaller v'olcanic cones have been built above the present seafloor, while others are partly buried, indicating a range of ages for the activity along this volcanic line. None of the cones to the northeast of Kolumbo had been explored in detail prior to a cruise of the E/V Nautilus (NA007) in August 2010. The ROV Hercules was used to explore the slopes, summits and craters of 17 of the 19 centers identified on multibeam maps of the area. Water depths of the submarine volcano's summits ranged from 18 to 450 m. In general, the domes/craters northeast of Kolumbo were sediment covered and showed little evidence of recent volcanic activity. Outcrops of volcanic rock were found in the crater walls and slopes of some of the cones but they typically consisted of volcanic fragments of pumice and lava that have been cemented together by biological activity, indicative of the lack of recent eruptions. Geochemical analysis of samples collected on the northeast cones showed evidence of low temperature hydrothermal circulation on the summit and upper flanks in the form of stream-like manganese precipitates emanating from pits and fractures.

  16. Climatic Impacts of a Volcanic Double Event: 536/540 CE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toohey, M.; Krüger, K.; Sigl, M.; Stordal, F.; Svensen, H.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic activity in and around the year 536 CE led to the coldest decade of the Common Era, and has been speculatively linked to large-scale societal crises around the world. Using a coupled aerosol-climate model, with eruption parameters constrained by recently re-dated ice core records and historical observations of the aerosol cloud, we reconstruct the radiative forcing resulting from a sequence of two major volcanic eruptions in 536 and 540 CE. Comparing with a reconstruction of volcanic forcing over the past 1200 years, we estimate that the decadal-scale Northern Hemisphere (NH) extra-tropical radiative forcing from this volcanic "double event" was larger than that of any known period. Earth system model simulations including the volcanic forcing are used to explore the temperature and precipitation anomalies associated with the eruptions, and compared to available proxy records, including maximum latewood density (MXD) temperature reconstructions. Special attention is placed on the decadal persistence of the cooling signal in tree rings, and whether the climate model simulations reproduce such long-term climate anomalies. Finally, the climate model results will be used to explore the probability of socioeconomic crisis resulting directly from the volcanic radiative forcing in different regions of the world.

  17. Sedimentation architecture of the volcanically-dammed Alf valley in the West Eifel Volcanic Field, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, Luise; Lange, Thomas; Engelhardt, Jörn; Polom, Ulrich; Pirrung, Michael; Büchel, Georg

    2015-04-01

    In the southeastern part of the Quaternary West Eifel Volcanic Field, the Alf valley with its morphologically wide (~ 500 m) and flat valley bottom is visibly outstanding. This flat valley bottom was formed during the Marine Isotope Stage 2 due to fluviolacustrine sediments which deposited upstream of a natural volcanic dam. The dam consisted of lava and scoria breccia from the Wartgesberg Volcano complex (Cipa 1958, Hemfler et al. 1991) that erupted ~ 31 BP (40Ar/ 39Ar dating on glass shards, Mertz, pers. communication 2014). Due to this impoundment, the Alf creek turned into a dendritic lake, trapping the catchment sediments. The overall aim is to create the sedimentation architecture of the Alf valley. In comparison to maar archives like Holzmaar or Meerfelder Maar in the vicinity, the fluviolacustrine sediments of the Alf valley show clay-silt lamination despite the water percolation. This archive covers the transition from the Last Glacial Maximum to Early Holocene (Pirrung et al. 2007). Focus of this study is the creation of a 3D model by applying the program ESRI ArcGIS 10.2 to reconstruct the pre-volcanic Alf valley. Moreover, the sedimentation architecture is reconstructed and the sediment fill quantified. Therefore, the digital elevation model with 5 m resolution from the State Survey and Geobasis Information of Rhineland-Palatinate, polreduced magnetic data measured on top of the Strohn lava stream, shear seismic data and core stratigraphies were utilized. Summarizing previous results, Lake Alf had a catchment area of ~ 55 km² (Meerfelder Maar: 1.27 km²) and a surface area of 8.2 km² (Meerfelder Maar: 0.24 km²) considering a maximum lake water level of 410 m a.s.l.. In the deepest parts (~ 50 m) of Lake Alf, lake sediments are laminated, up to 21 m thick and show a very high sedimentation rate ~ 3 mm a-1 (Dehner Maar ~ 1.5 mm a-1, (Sirocko et al. 2013)). The sediments become coarser upstream und stratigraphically above the fine-grained lake sediments

  18. A new view into the Cascadia subduction zone and volcanic arc: Implications for earthquake hazards along the Washington margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, T.; Trehu, A.M.; Luetgert, J.H.; Miller, K.; Kilbride, F.; Wells, R.E.; Fisher, M.A.; Flueh, E.; ten Brink, U.S.; Christensen, N.I.

    1998-01-01

    In light of suggestions that the Cascadia subduction margin may pose a significant seismic hazard for the highly populated Pacific Northwest region of the United States, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Research Center for Marine Geosciences (GEOMAR), and university collaborators collected and interpreted a 530-km-long wide-angle onshore-offshore seismic transect across the subduction zone and volcanic arc to study the major structures that contribute to seismogenic deformation. We observed (1) an increase in the dip of the Juan de Fuca slab from 2??-7?? to 12?? where it encounters a 20-km-thick block of the Siletz terrane or other accreted oceanic crust, (2) a distinct transition from Siletz crust into Cascade arc crust that coincides with the Mount St. Helens seismic zone, supporting the idea that the mafic Siletz block focuses seismic deformation at its edges, and (3) a crustal root (35-45 km deep) beneath the Cascade Range, with thinner crust (30-35 km) east of the volcanic arc beneath the Columbia Plateau flood basalt province. From the measured crustal structure and subduction geometry, we identify two zones that may concentrate future seismic activity: (1) a broad (because of the shallow dip), possibly locked part of the interplate contact that extends from ???25 km depth beneath the coastline to perhaps as far west as the deformation front ???120 km offshore and (2) a crustal zone at the eastern boundary between the Siletz terrane and the Cascade Range.

  19. Geology of Newberry National Volcanic Monument, Oregon, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Jensen, R. A.; Robinson, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic geology is the dominant theme at Newberry National Volcanic Monument in central Oregon. Established almost 25 years ago, the NNVM (like the Mt. St. Helens National Volcanic Monument) is managed by the U.S. Forest Service. The monument encompasses some 90 square miles in Deschutes National Forest of the 1200-sq-mi Newberry Volcano, including the 4x5 mi scenic central caldera and the volcano's youngest lava flow, the 1300-yr-old Big Obsidian Flow. The seismically-monitored Newberry Volcano is considered by the USGS to be a very high threat volcano, with the potential to impact adjacent populations in Bend, Sunriver, and LaPine and damage infrastructure including highways, railroads, and power lines. Unspectacular from a distance, the broad shield shape of Newberry Volcano hides the abundance and youthfulness of volcanic activity. Included in NNVM are 7-ka basalt to andesite lavas of the Northwest Rift Zone (NWRZ) that erupted from spatter and cinder cones over a N-S distance of 20 miles and temporarily blocked the flow of the adjacent Deschutes River. These well-exposed lavas are post-Mazama in age, having erupted after a blanket of ash and pumice was deposited on the volcano when Mt. Mazama erupted at 7.7 ka to form Crater Lake. Images from lidar data obtained in 2011 clearly display the post-Mazama lavas, which not only are unmantled by the tephra, but also lack the thick forest that has grown in the tephra further obscuring many of the youthful volcanic features across this massive rear-arc Cascades volcano. NNVM features interpretive trails at the Big Obsidian Flow in the caldera and at Lava Cast Forest and Lava Butte flow along the NWRZ. Also within the monument are two of the premier drivable viewpoints in Oregon, on Lava Butte and at the 7984-ft top of Paulina Peak on the rim of the caldera. On a clear day, views from Paulina Peak encompass much of the High Cascades, extending from Mt. Shasta in California to Mt. Adams in Washington.

  20. Joint analysis of infrasound and seismic signals by cross wavelet transform: detection of Mt. Etna explosive activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cannata

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The prompt detection of explosive volcanic activity is crucial since this kind of activity can release copious amounts of volcanic ash and gases into the atmosphere, causing severe dangers to aviation. In this work, we show how the joint analysis of seismic and infrasonic data by wavelet transform coherence (WTC can be useful to detect explosive activity, significantly enhancing its recognition that is normally done by video cameras and thermal sensors. Indeed, the efficiency of these sensors can be reduced (or inhibited in the case of poor visibility due to clouds or gas plumes. In particular, we calculated the root mean square (RMS of seismic and infrasonic signals recorded at Mt. Etna during 2011. This interval was characterised by several episodes of lava fountains, accompanied by lava effusion, and minor strombolian activities. WTC analysis showed significantly high values of coherence between seismic and infrasonic RMS during explosive activity, with infrasonic and seismic series in phase with each other, hence proving to be sensitive to both weak and strong explosive activity. The WTC capability of automatically detecting explosive activity was compared with the potential of detection methods based on fixed thresholds of seismic and infrasonic RMS. Finally, we also calculated the cross correlation function between seismic and infrasonic signals, which showed that the wave types causing such seismo-acoustic relationship are mainly incident seismic and infrasonic waves, likely with a common source.

  1. Landslide seismic magnitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. H.; Jan, J. C.; Pu, H. C.; Tu, Y.; Chen, C. C.; Wu, Y. M.

    2015-11-01

    Landslides have become one of the most deadly natural disasters on earth, not only due to a significant increase in extreme climate change caused by global warming, but also rapid economic development in topographic relief areas. How to detect landslides using a real-time system has become an important question for reducing possible landslide impacts on human society. However, traditional detection of landslides, either through direct surveys in the field or remote sensing images obtained via aircraft or satellites, is highly time consuming. Here we analyze very long period seismic signals (20-50 s) generated by large landslides such as Typhoon Morakot, which passed though Taiwan in August 2009. In addition to successfully locating 109 large landslides, we define landslide seismic magnitude based on an empirical formula: Lm = log ⁡ (A) + 0.55 log ⁡ (Δ) + 2.44, where A is the maximum displacement (μm) recorded at one seismic station and Δ is its distance (km) from the landslide. We conclude that both the location and seismic magnitude of large landslides can be rapidly estimated from broadband seismic networks for both academic and applied purposes, similar to earthquake monitoring. We suggest a real-time algorithm be set up for routine monitoring of landslides in places where they pose a frequent threat.

  2. International Collaboration on Building Local Technical Capacities for Monitoring Volcanic Activity at Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Wolf, R. P.; Chigna, G.; Morales, H.; Waite, G. P.; Oommen, T.; Lechner, H. N.

    2015-12-01

    Pacaya volcano is a frequently active and potentially dangerous volcano situated in the Guatemalan volcanic arc. It is also a National Park and a major touristic attraction, constituting an important economic resource for local municipality and the nearby communities. Recent eruptions have caused fatalities and extensive damage to nearby communities, highlighting the need for risk management and loss reduction from the volcanic activity. Volcanic monitoring at Pacaya is done by the Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH), instrumentally through one short period seismic station, and visually by the Parque Nacional Volcan de Pacaya y Laguna de Calderas (PNVPLC) personnel. We carry out a project to increase the local technical capacities for monitoring volcanic activity at Pacaya. Funding for the project comes from the Society of Exploration Geophysicists through the Geoscientists Without Borders program. Three seismic and continuous GPS stations will be installed at locations within 5 km from the main vent at Pacaya, and one webcam will aid in the visual monitoring tasks. Local educational and outreach components of the project include technical workshops on data monitoring use, and short thesis projects with the San Carlos University in Guatemala. A small permanent exhibit at the PNVPLC museum or visitor center, focusing on the volcano's history, hazards and resources, will also be established as part of the project. The strategy to involve a diverse group of local collaborators in Guatemala aims to increase the chances for long term sustainability of the project, and relies not only on transferring technology but also the "know-how" to make that technology useful. Although not a primary research project, it builds on a relationship of years of joint research projects at Pacaya between the participants, and could be a model of how to increase the broader impacts of such long term collaboration partnerships.

  3. Seismic energy data analysis of Merapi volcano to test the eruption time prediction using materials failure forecast method (FFM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anggraeni, Novia Antika, E-mail: novia.antika.a@gmail.com [Geophysics Sub-department, Physics Department, Faculty of Mathematic and Natural Science, Universitas Gadjah Mada. BLS 21 Yogyakarta 55281 (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    The test of eruption time prediction is an effort to prepare volcanic disaster mitigation, especially in the volcano’s inhabited slope area, such as Merapi Volcano. The test can be conducted by observing the increase of volcanic activity, such as seismicity degree, deformation and SO2 gas emission. One of methods that can be used to predict the time of eruption is Materials Failure Forecast Method (FFM). Materials Failure Forecast Method (FFM) is a predictive method to determine the time of volcanic eruption which was introduced by Voight (1988). This method requires an increase in the rate of change, or acceleration of the observed volcanic activity parameters. The parameter used in this study is the seismic energy value of Merapi Volcano from 1990 – 2012. The data was plotted in form of graphs of seismic energy rate inverse versus time with FFM graphical technique approach uses simple linear regression. The data quality control used to increase the time precision employs the data correlation coefficient value of the seismic energy rate inverse versus time. From the results of graph analysis, the precision of prediction time toward the real time of eruption vary between −2.86 up to 5.49 days.

  4. Monte Carlo Volcano Seismic Moment Tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, G. P.; Brill, K. A.; Lanza, F.

    2015-12-01

    Inverse modeling of volcano seismic sources can provide insight into the geometry and dynamics of volcanic conduits. But given the logistical challenges of working on an active volcano, seismic networks are typically deficient in spatial and temporal coverage; this potentially leads to large errors in source models. In addition, uncertainties in the centroid location and moment-tensor components, including volumetric components, are difficult to constrain from the linear inversion results, which leads to a poor understanding of the model space. In this study, we employ a nonlinear inversion using a Monte Carlo scheme with the objective of defining robustly resolved elements of model space. The model space is randomized by centroid location and moment tensor eigenvectors. Point sources densely sample the summit area and moment tensors are constrained to a randomly chosen geometry within the inversion; Green's functions for the random moment tensors are all calculated from modeled single forces, making the nonlinear inversion computationally reasonable. We apply this method to very-long-period (VLP) seismic events that accompany minor eruptions at Fuego volcano, Guatemala. The library of single force Green's functions is computed with a 3D finite-difference modeling algorithm through a homogeneous velocity-density model that includes topography, for a 3D grid of nodes, spaced 40 m apart, within the summit region. The homogenous velocity and density model is justified by long wavelength of VLP data. The nonlinear inversion reveals well resolved model features and informs the interpretation through a better understanding of the possible models. This approach can also be used to evaluate possible station geometries in order to optimize networks prior to deployment.

  5. Source mechanisms of volcanic tsunamis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Raphaël

    2015-10-28

    Volcanic tsunamis are generated by a variety of mechanisms, including volcano-tectonic earthquakes, slope instabilities, pyroclastic flows, underwater explosions, shock waves and caldera collapse. In this review, we focus on the lessons that can be learnt from past events and address the influence of parameters such as volume flux of mass flows, explosion energy or duration of caldera collapse on tsunami generation. The diversity of waves in terms of amplitude, period, form, dispersion, etc. poses difficulties for integration and harmonization of sources to be used for numerical models and probabilistic tsunami hazard maps. In many cases, monitoring and warning of volcanic tsunamis remain challenging (further technical and scientific developments being necessary) and must be coupled with policies of population preparedness. © 2015 The Author(s).

  6. Volcanic risk perception in the Campi Flegrei area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, T.; Barberi, F.; Davis, M. S.; Isaia, R.; Nave, R.

    2013-03-01

    The Campi Flegrei which includes part of the city of Naples, is an active volcanic system; its last eruption occurred in 1538 AD. More recently two significant crises occurred between 1969 and 72 and 1982-84 and were accompanied by ground movements (bradyseism) and seismic activity, forcing people of the town of Pozzuoli to be evacuated. Since 1984 development of a volcanic emergency plan has been underway. In 2000 Civil Protection published a risk map which defined the Red Zone, an area highly at risk from pyroclastic flows, which would need to be evacuated before an eruption. The first study to evaluate the volcanic risk perceptions of the people living within the Campi Flegrei area was completed in spring 2006, resulting in the largest sample ever studied on this topic except for one on Vesuvio area residents by Barberi et al. (2008). A 46 item questionnaire was distributed to 2000 of the approximately 300,000 residents of the Campi Flegrei Red Zone, which includes three towns and four neighborhoods within the city of Naples. A total of 1161 questionnaires were returned, for an overall response rate of 58%. Surveys were distributed to junior high and high school students, as well as to adult members of the general population. Results indicated that unlike issues such as crime, traffic, trash, and unemployment, volcanic hazards are not spontaneously mentioned as a major problem facing their community. However, when asked specific questions about volcanic risks, respondents believe that an eruption is likely and could have serious consequences for themselves and their communities and they are quite worried about the threat. Considering the events of 1969-72 and 1982-84, it was not surprising that respondents indicated earthquakes and ground deformations as more serious threats than eruptive phenomena. Of significant importance is that only 17% of the sample knows about the existence of the Emergency Plan, announced in 2001, and 65% said that they have not received

  7. Assessing the Altitude and Dispersion of Volcanic Plumes Using MISR Multi-angle Imaging from Space: Sixteen Years of Volcanic Activity in the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, Verity J. B.; Kahn, Ralph A.

    2017-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions represent a significant source of atmospheric aerosols and can display local, regional and global effects, impacting earth systems and human populations. In order to assess the relative impacts of these events, accurate plume injection altitude measurements are needed. In this work, volcanic plumes generated from seven Kamchatka Peninsula volcanoes (Shiveluch, Kliuchevskoi, Bezymianny, Tolbachik, Kizimen, Karymsky and Zhupanovsky), were identified using over 16 years of Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadimeter (MISR) measurements. Eighty-eight volcanic plumes were observed by MISR, capturing 3-25% of reported events at individual volcanoes. Retrievals were most successful where high intensity events persisted over a period of weeks to months. Compared with existing ground and airborne observations, and alternative satellite-based reports compiled by the Global Volcanism Program (GVP), MISR plume height retrievals showed general consistency; the comparison reports appear to be skewed towards the region of highest concentration observed in MISR-constrained vertical plume extent. The report observations display less discrepancy with MISR toward the end of the analysis period, with improvements in the suborbital data likely the result of the deployment of new instrumentation. Conversely, the general consistency of MISR plume heights with conventionally reported observations supports the use of MISR in the ongoing assessment of volcanic activity globally, especially where other types of volcanic plume observations are unavailable. Differences between the northern (Shiveluch, Kliuchevskoi, Bezymianny and Tolbachik) and southern (Kizimen, Karymsky and Zhupanovsky) volcanoes broadly correspond to the Central Kamchatka Depression (CKD) and Eastern Volcanic Front (EVF), respectively, geological sub-regions of Kamchatka distinguished by varying magma composition. For example, by comparison with reanalysis-model simulations of local meteorological conditions

  8. The interplay between tectonics and volcanism: a key to unravel the nature of Andean geothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cembrano, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    Field mapping combined with seismic data document the interplay between tectonics and volcanism in the Andes. In the Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ) of northern Chile (22-24°S), Pleistocene east-west shortening and a thick crust (50-70 km) are associated with major composite dacitic-andesitic volcanoes and a few monogenetic basaltic eruptive centers. CVZ stratovolcanoes are devoided of flank vents; clusters of minor eruptive centers are uncommon. Composite volcanoes and minor eruptive centers are coeval with a NS-striking system of reverse faults and fault-propagation folds. Although dextral strike-slip crustal seismicity is recorded between 18 and 21°S, evidence for long-term, margin-parallel strike-slip deformation is absent. In contrast, volcanoes of the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ), between 38 and 46°S are built on a much thinner crust (30-40 km) during intra-arc dextral transpression. Crustal seismicity shows dextral strike-slip focal mechanisms. There, a wide variety of volcanic forms and compositions coexist along the same volcanic arc. Volcanoes range from single monogenetic cones lying on master faults to major composite volcanoes organized into either NE- or NW-trending chains, oblique to the continental margin. Flank vents and elongated clusters of minor eruptive centers are common. Compositions range from primitive basalts at minor eruptive centers, to highly evolved magmas at mature stratovolcanoes. I hypothesize that the kinematics of fault-fracture networks under which magma is transported through the crust is one fundamental factor controlling the wide variety of volcanic forms, volcanic alignment patterns and rock compositions along a single volcanic arc. As a first approximation, a thicker crust favors magma differentiation processes whereas a thinner crust prevents it. Likewise, whereas bulk intra-arc compression (vertical σ3) enhances longer residence times of magmas in the CVZ, strike-slip deformation (horizontal σ3) in SVZ provides

  9. Demographics of antibiotic persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollerova, Silvia; Jouvet, Lionel; Steiner, Ulrich

    Persister cells, cells that can survive antibiotic exposure but lack heritable antibiotic resistance, are assumed to play a crucial role for the evolution of antibiotic resistance. Persistence is a stage associated with reduced metabolic activity. Most previous studies have been done on batch...... even play a more prominent role for the evolution of resistance and failures of medical treatment by antibiotics as currently assumed....

  10. Seismicity of the Earth 1900-2010 Mexico and vicinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhea, Susan; Dart, Richard L.; Villaseñor, Antonio; Hayes, Gavin P.; Tarr, Arthur C.; Furlong, Kevin P.; Benz, Harley M.

    2011-01-01

    Mexico, located in one of the world's most seismically active regions, lies on three large tectonic plates: the North American plate, Pacific plate, and Cocos plate. The relative motion of these tectonic plates causes frequent earthquakes and active volcanism and mountain building. Mexico's most seismically active region is in southern Mexico where the Cocos plate is subducting northwestward beneath Mexico creating the deep Middle America trench. The Gulf of California, which extends from approximately the northern terminus of the Middle America trench to the U.S.-Mexico border, overlies the plate boundary between the Pacific and North American plates where the Pacific plate is moving northwestward relative to the North American plate. This region of transform faulting is the southern extension of the well-known San Andreas Fault system.

  11. Stress Field and Seismicity in the Basin of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesca-Perez, E.; Quintanar, L.; Garcia-Palomo, A.

    2007-12-01

    Mexico City is located in the basin of Mexico, inside the so called Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. The region in general and the basin in particular, is characterized by local low magnitude seismicity (Mc Chalco and 3)- Juchitepec - Milpa Alta outside Mexico City; the rest of the basin presents lower seismic activity. We recorded and located 336 earthquakes with digital seismograms between 1996 and 2007. From them, just 23 focal mechanisms could be evaluated because of low magnitude that creates recording problems in the seismological networks and high frequency background noise. The focal mechanisms are mainly strike-slip and dip-slip (normal) faulting. We used three different techniques (when possible) to calculate the focal mechanisms: simple and composite first motion focal mechanism, Hash's S/P amplitude rate focal mechanism and time domain moment tensor inversion using broadband three components seismograms. The final goal is to find the local and regional stress field for the whole basin.

  12. Volcanic gas impacts on vegetation at Turrialba Volcano, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasdale, R.; Jenkins, M.; Pushnik, J.; Houpis, J. L.; Brown, D. L.

    2010-12-01

    Turrialba volcano is an active composite stratovolcano that is located approximately 40 km east of San Jose, Costa Rica. Seismic activity and degassing have increased since 2005, and gas compositions reflect further increased activity since 2007 peaking in January 2010 with a phreatic eruption. Gas fumes dispersed by trade winds toward the west, northwest, and southwest flanks of Turrialba volcano have caused significant vegetation kill zones, in areas important to local agriculture, including dairy pastures and potato fields, wildlife and human populations. In addition to extensive vegetative degradation is the potential for soil and water contamination and soil erosion. Summit fumarole temperatures have been measured over 200 degrees C and gas emissions are dominated by SO2; gas and vapor plumes reach up to 2 km (fumaroles and gases are measured regularly by OVSICORI-UNA). A recent network of passive air sampling, monitoring of water temperatures of hydrothermal systems, and soil pH measurements coupled with measurement of the physiological status of surrounding plants using gas exchange and fluorescence measurements to: (1) identify physiological correlations between leaf-level gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements of plants under long term stress induced by the volcanic gas emissions, and (2) use measurements in tandem with remotely sensed reflectance-derived fluorescence ratio indices to track natural photo inhibition caused by volcanic gas emissions, for use in monitoring plant stress and photosynthetic function. Results may prove helpful in developing potential land management strategies to maintain the biological health of the area.

  13. Study on shallow structural features in Changbaishan Tianchi volcanic region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Ji-shun; GU Meng-lin; ZHAO Cheng-bin; PAN Su-zhen

    2006-01-01

    A seismic survey by 10 shallow profiles and 6 ultra-shallow profiles was performed in Changbaishan Tianchi volcanic region in 2002. The result shows that there are three (in some areas as many as seven) stable interfaces in the survey region, but no reflection phases are found in depths greater than 500 m. The number of interfaces in the southwestern part is obviously greater than in the northwestern part of Tianchi volcano, which suggests that the faults in the southwest have a stronger controlling power over the flow direction of volcano-spewed lava as compared with those in the northwest. Six shallow faults exist in the survey region. The shallow faults are nearly vertical graben-like faults and are mostly distributed on the southwest of Tianchi crater, indicating that volcanic activities in the southwest are stronger than in the northwest. On this ground, it could be further deduced that the NE-trending major fault of Tianchi volcano ( the Liudaogou-Tianchi-Zengfengshan fault) is more active than the NW-trending Baishanzhen-Tianchi-Jince fault.

  14. Volcanic mercury in Pinus canariensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Martín, José Antonio; Nanos, Nikos; Miranda, José Carlos; Carbonell, Gregoria; Gil, Luis

    2013-08-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element that is emitted to the atmosphere by both human activities and natural processes. Volcanic emissions are considered a natural source of mercury in the environment. In some cases, tree ring records taken close to volcanoes and their relation to volcanic activity over time are contradictory. In 1949, the Hoyo Negro volcano (La Palma-Canary Islands) produced significant pyroclastic flows that damaged the nearby stand of Pinus canariensis. Recently, 60 years after the eruption, we assessed mercury concentrations in the stem of a pine which survived volcano formation, located at a distance of 50 m from the crater. We show that Hg content in a wound caused by pyroclastic impacts (22.3 μg kg-1) is an order of magnitude higher than the Hg concentrations measured in the xylem before and after the eruption (2.3 μg kg-1). Thus, mercury emissions originating from the eruption remained only as a mark—in pyroclastic wounds—and can be considered a sporadic and very high mercury input that did not affect the overall Hg input in the xylem. In addition, mercury contents recorded in the phloem (9.5 μg kg-1) and bark (6.0 μg kg-1) suggest that mercury shifts towards non-living tissues of the pine, an aspect that can be related to detoxification in volcanism-adapted species.

  15. Characterizing Volcanic Eruptions on Venus: Some Realistic (?) Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofan, E. R.; Glaze, L. S.; Grinspoon, D. H.

    2011-01-01

    When Pioneer Venus arrived at Venus in 1978, it detected anomalously high concentrations of SO2 at the top of the troposphere, which subsequently declined over the next five years. This decline in SO2 was linked to some sort of dynamic process, possibly a volcanic eruption. Observations of SO2 variability have persisted since Pioneer Venus. More recently, scientists from the Venus Express mission announced that the SPICAV (Spectroscopy for Investigation of Characteristics of the Atmosphere of Venus) instrument had measured varying amounts of SO2 in the upper atmosphere; VIRTIS (Visible and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer) measured no similar variations in the lower atmosphere (ESA, 4 April, 2008). In addition, Fegley and Prinn stated that venusian volcanoes must replenish SO2 to the atmosphere, or it would react with calcite and disappear within 1.9 my. Fegley and Tremain suggested an eruption rate on the order of approx 1 cubic km/year to maintain atmospheric SO2; Bullock and Grinspoon posit that volcanism must have occurred within the last 20-50 my to maintain the sulfuric acid/water clouds on Venus. The abundance of volcanic deposits on Venus and the likely thermal history of the planet suggest that it is still geologically active, although at rates lower than Earth. Current estimates of resurfacing rates range from approx 0.01 cubic km/yr to approx 2 cubic km/yr. Demonstrating definitively that Venus is still volcanically active, and at what rate, would help to constrain models of evolution of the surface and interior, and help to focus future exploration of Venus.

  16. Backscattering and geophysical features of volcanic ridges offshore Santa Rosalia, Baja California Sur, Gulf of California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabriol, Hubert; Delgado-Argote, Luis A.; Dañobeitia, Juan José; Córdoba, Diego; González, Antonio; García-Abdeslem, Juan; Bartolomé, Rafael; Martín-Atienza, Beatriz; Frias-Camacho, Víctor

    1999-11-01

    Volcanic ridges formed by series of volcanic edifices are identified in the central part of the Gulf of California, between Isla Tortuga and La Reforma Caldera-Santa Rosalı´a region. Isla Tortuga is part of the 40-km-long Tortuga Volcanic Ridge (TVR) that trends almost perpendicular to the spreading center of the Guaymas Basin. The Rosalı´a Volcanic Ridge (RVR), older than TVR, is characterized by volcanic structures oriented towards 310°, following a fracture zone extension and the peninsular slope. It is interpreted that most of the aligned submarine volcanic edifices are developed on continental crust while Isla Tortuga lies on oceanic-like crust of the Guaymas Basin. From a complete Bouguer anomaly map, it is observed that the alignments of gravity highs trending 310° and 290° support the volcanic and subvolcanic origin of the bathymetric highs. Volcanic curvilinear structures, lava flows and mounds were identified from backscattering images around Isla Tortuga and over a 400-m high (Vı´rgenes High), where the TVR and the RVR intersect. A refraction/wide-angle seismic profile crossing perpendicular to the Vı´rgenes High, together with gravity and magnetic data indicate the presence of shallow intrusive bodies presumably of basaltic or andesitic composition. It is inferred that most volcanic edifices along the ridges have similar internal structures. We suggest that the growth of different segments of the ridges have a volcano-tectonic origin. The older RVR lies along the extension of a fracture zone and it probably is associated with Pliocene NE-SW extension.

  17. The Role of Magmatic and Volcanic Loads in Generating Seaward Dipping Reflector Structures on Volcanic Rifted Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, X.; Buck, W. R.

    2016-12-01

    The largest volcanic constructs on Earth are the seismically imaged seaward dipping reflector (SDR) units found offshore of many rifted continental margins, including a large portion that border the Atlantic Ocean. There is considerable controversy over whether their formation requires large offset (i.e. 10s of km) normal faults or not. Although there is some evidence for faulting in association with SDRs, we here show that a wide range of SDRs structures can be produced solely by volcanic loading. To do this we first derive a simple analytic description of a particular type of volcanic construct. We assume that the increase in density when fluid magma in a dike solidifies provides load at the rift center onto the end of a lithospheric plate. Extrusives are assumed to form flat-topped layers that fill in the flexural depression produced by the load of the solidified dike. The thin-plate flexure approximation is used to calculate the deflections due to the vertical load. This simple model produces structures similar to the observed SDRs. Expressions for the maximum thickness of the volcanic pile and the dip of an individual SDR are derived in terms of the flexure parameter and material densities. Asymmetry of SDR units seen across some conjugate margins can be explained with this model if periodic offsets, or jumps of the center of magmatism are included. In addition, we developed a numerical model of lithospheric extension, magma intrusion and volcanism with a temperature dependent elasto-viscous and brittle-plastic rheology. Results of these 2D cross-sectional models with fixed thermal structure confirm the qualitative predictions of the analytic model without the simplified uniform plate assumption. Preliminary results suggest that the rapid subsidence of SDRs, inferred for some rifted margins, can occur if magma is supplied only to the brittle upper layer and the hot weak lower crust is thinned by stretching. This numerical approach may also allow us to test

  18. A Proposed Community Network For Monitoring Volcanic Emissions In Saint Lucia, Lesser Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, E. P.; Beckles, D. M.; Robertson, R. E.; Latchman, J. L.; Edwards, S.

    2013-12-01

    Systematic geochemical monitoring of volcanic systems in the English-speaking islands of the Lesser Antilles was initiated by the UWI Seismic Research Centre (SRC) in 2000, as part of its volcanic surveillance programme for the English-speaking islands of the Lesser Antilles. This programme provided the first time-series observations used for the purpose of volcano monitoring in Dominica and Saint Lucia, permitted the characterization of the geothermal fluids associated with them, and established baseline studies for understanding of the hydrothermal systems during periods of quiescence (Joseph et al., 2011; Joseph et al., 2013). As part of efforts to improve and expand the capacity of SRC to provide volcanic surveillance through its geothermal monitoring programme, it is necessary to develop economically sustainable options for the monitoring of volcanic emissions/pollutants. Towards this effort we intend to work in collaboration with local authorities in Saint Lucia, to develop a monitoring network for quantifying the background exposure levels of ambient concentrations of volcanic pollutants, SO2 in air and As in waters (as health significant marker elements in the geothermal emissions) that would serve as a model for the emissions monitoring network for other volcanic islands. This programme would facilitate the building of local capacity and training to monitor the hazardous exposure, through the application and transfer of a regionally available low-cost and low-technology SO2 measurement/detection system in Saint Lucia. Existing monitoring technologies to inform evidence based health practices are too costly for small island Caribbean states, and no government policies or health services measures currently exist to address/mitigate these influences. Gases, aerosols and toxic elements from eruptive and non-eruptive volcanic activity are known to adversely affect human health and the environment (Baxter, 2000; Zhang et al., 2008). Investigations into the

  19. Studies on seismic source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李世愚; 陈运泰

    2003-01-01

    During the period of 1999~2002, the Chinese seismologists made a serious of developments in the study on seismic sources including observations, experiments and theory. In the field of observation, the methods of the accuracy location of earthquake sources, the inversion of seismic moment tensor and the mechanism of earthquake source are improved and developed. A lot of important earthquake events are studied by using these methods. The rupture processes of these events are inverted and investigated combined with the local stress fields and the tectonic moment by using the measurements of surface deformation. In the fields of experiments and theory, many developments are obtained in cause of seismic formation, condition of stress and tectonics, dynamics of earthquake rupture, rock fracture and nucleation of strong earthquakes.

  20. Geophysical characterization of circular structures in Chubut and Mendoza (Argentina): Impact vs. Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prezzi, C.; Orgeira, M. J.; Risso, C.; Acevedo, R.; Ponce, F.; Nullo, F.; Martinez, O.; Rabassa, J.; Margonari, L.; Corbella, H.

    2013-05-01

    This work focuses on two main objectives. One of them is to provide information to discern the genesis of the circular structures present in Bajada del Diablo (Chubut, Argentina) considered as impact craters, and the other one is to contribute to a better knowledge of the circular structures located in the volcanic fields of Llancanelo and Payunia (Mendoza, Argentina). Chubut circular structures have been attributed to the collision of an extraterrestrial body, possibly an asteroid. However, doubts persist about their genesis because of the lack of direct geological evidences. Since detailed geomorphological studies have ruled out an origin by wind deflation, the prevailing alternative hypothesis attributes these circular structures to a volcanic process. On the other hand, the study of the volcanic fields of Payunia and Llancanelo (Mendoza) will contribute to the knowledge of the mechanics of hydromagmatic processes in the area, and the origin of circular structures morphologically similar to those located in Chubut. In the Payunia volcanic field at least 27 cones with evidences of hydromagmatism, in a field of more than 800 pure magmatic cones, have been recognized. This study tries to determine if a relationship between the observed volcanic circular structures and participation of water during the eruption exists. Magnetic and gravity field surveys of the circular volcanic structures in Llancanelo and Payunia volcanic fields were performed in order to determine their relationship with the type of eruption. Electromagnetic, magnetic and gravity field surveys were also carried out in Chubut circular structures. The comparative analysis of geological and geophysical results obtained in the circular structures of Chubut and those obtained in the circular structures in the volcanic areas of Llancanelo and Payunia suggest an impact origin for the circular structures of Chubut.

  1. Non-volcanic tremor driven by large transient shear stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Justin L; Vidale, John E; Gomberg, Joan; Bodin, Paul; Creager, Kenneth C; Malone, Stephen D

    2007-08-01

    Non-impulsive seismic radiation or 'tremor' has long been observed at volcanoes and more recently around subduction zones. Although the number of observations of non-volcanic tremor is steadily increasing, the causative mechanism remains unclear. Some have attributed non-volcanic tremor to the movement of fluids, while its coincidence with geodetically observed slow-slip events at regular intervals has led others to consider slip on the plate interface as its cause. Low-frequency earthquakes in Japan, which are believed to make up at least part of non-volcanic tremor, have focal mechanisms and locations that are consistent with tremor being generated by shear slip on the subduction interface. In Cascadia, however, tremor locations appear to be more distributed in depth than in Japan, making them harder to reconcile with a plate interface shear-slip model. Here we identify bursts of tremor that radiated from the Cascadia subduction zone near Vancouver Island, Canada, during the strongest shaking from the moment magnitude M(w) = 7.8, 2002 Denali, Alaska, earthquake. Tremor occurs when the Love wave displacements are to the southwest (the direction of plate convergence of the overriding plate), implying that the Love waves trigger the tremor. We show that these displacements correspond to shear stresses of approximately 40 kPa on the plate interface, which suggests that the effective stress on the plate interface is very low. These observations indicate that tremor and possibly slow slip can be instantaneously induced by shear stress increases on the subduction interface-effectively a frictional failure response to the driving stress.

  2. Mass movement processes associated with volcanic structures in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Carlos Valerio

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Mexico City, one of the most populated areas of the world, has been affected by various hazards of natural origin, such as subsidence and cracking of the soil, seismicity, floods and mass movement processes (MMPs. Owing to the lack of space on the plain, in recent years urban growth has been concentrated particularly on the slopes of the surrounding mountain ranges, and this has significantly modified the dynamics of the relief as well as the hydrogeological conditions. The specific character of natural susceptibility to mass movements is strongly dependent on the geological–structural and morphological characteristics of the volcanic bodies that form the mountainous relief. This natural susceptibility, combined with the characteristics of vulnerability of the society, creates risk conditions that can generate severe consequences for the population and the economy. Hence, based on an inventory of mass movement processes comprising 95 data points, the present study aimed to achieve a zoning of the areas susceptible to these processes, as well as to characterize the mechanisms of instability in the volcanic structures that form the relief of the area in question. The results of this work clearly show the role of the lithology, the mode of emplacement and the morpho–structural characteristics of the volcanic structures, in the types of mass movement processes. In addition, it identifies the diverse activities of anthropogenic origin that favour slope instability in the zone: deforestation and burning of rubbish, felling of timber on the slopes for building infrastructure and dwellings, leakages of water, vibrations of vehicles, rotating machinery and the use of explosives in mining works, overloading the heads of the slopes, disturbance of the geohydrological regime, generation of rubbish tips, terracing of the slopes for cultivation, inadequate building regulations, and the use of counterproductive or ineffectual stabilization measures.

  3. Seismic Disaster Reduction in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ministry of Construction

    2001-01-01

    @@ Great accomplishments have been made in seismic disaster reduction in China's engineering construction and city construction projects during the past decade (1990~2000). A new national map on the division of seismic intensity has been promulgated, and a series of anti-seismic standards and norms have been drafted or revised, which has further improved the country's technical code system on anti-seismic engineering measures.

  4. Effects of Regulation on Induced Seismicity in Southern Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, J. L.; Ellsworth, W. L.; Dougherty, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    The appearance of seismicity concurrent with the expansion of oil and gas activities in southern Kansas since September 2012 suggests that industrial operations are inducing earthquakes there. Much of the seismicity can be related to high-rate injection wells within 5 km of the earthquakes. There is significant complexity to the situation, though. Some of the seismicity, including the 2014 M4.8 Milan earthquake, the largest earthquake to occur in the area, lies at least 10km from high-rate injection wells. Additionally, the presence of high-rate wells does not guarantee that there will be nearby seismicity. Many of the highest-rate injection wells are located to the southwest of our study area, where there is minimal seismicity. We have also seen changes in earthquake rates shortly following the March 2015 enactment of new limits on the rate of wastewater disposal in five areas in southern Kansas. Overall, the earthquake rate has decreased significantly since these rules went into place. In more detail, however, earthquake rates within the five areas decreased, but the rate outside the five zones increased. It is likely that fluid-pressure diffusion is responsible for the migration of seismicity outside the areas of reduced injection because there is little injection in the areas unaffected by the new injection rules. This increase is also a reminder that seismicity can persist long after the reduction or cessation of injection. In addition to the effect of the new injection rules, it is possible that the reduction in injection may be partially caused by economic factors that have resulted in a decrease in the production of oil and gas. We have yet to disentangle the effects of the new injection rules and the low prices of oil and gas on the induced seismicity in southern Kansas.

  5. Submarine volcanoes along the Aegean volcanic arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Alexandri, Matina; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Rousakis, Grigoris

    2013-06-01

    The Aegean volcanic arc has been investigated along its offshore areas and several submarine volcanic outcrops have been discovered in the last 25 years of research. The basic data including swath bathymetric maps, air-gun profiles, underwater photos and samples analysis have been presented along the four main volcanic groups of the arc. The description concerns: (i) Paphsanias submarine volcano in the Methana group, (ii) three volcanic domes to the east of Antimilos Volcano and hydrothermal activity in southeast Milos in the Milos group, (iii) three volcanic domes east of Christiana and a chain of about twenty volcanic domes and craters in the Kolumbo zone northeast of Santorini in the Santorini group and (iv) several volcanic domes and a volcanic caldera together with very deep slopes of several volcanic islands in the Nisyros group. The tectonic structure of the volcanic centers is described and related to the geometry of the arc and the neotectonic graben structures that usually host them. The NE-SW direction is dominant in the Santorini and Nisyros volcanic groups, located at the eastern part of the arc, where strike-slip is also present, whereas NW-SE direction dominates in Milos and Methana at the western part, where co-existence of E-W disrupting normal faults is observed. The volcanic relief reaches 1100-1200 m in most cases. This is produced from the outcrops of the volcanic centers emerging usually at 400-600 m depth and ending either below sea level or at high altitudes of 600-700 m on the islands. Hydrothermal activity at relatively high temperatures observed in Kolumbo is remarkable whereas low temperature phenomena have been detected in the Santorini caldera around Kameni islands and in the area southeast of Milos. In Methana and Nisyros, hydrothermal activity seems to be limited in the coastal areas without other offshore manifestations.

  6. B341 Seismic Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halle, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-01-02

    The Seismic Evaluation of Building 341 located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California has been completed. The subject building consists of a main building, Increment 1, and two smaller additions; Increments 2 and 3. Based on our evaluation the building does not meet a Life Safety performance level for the BSE- 1E earthquake ground shaking hazard. The BSE-1E is the recommended seismic hazard level for evaluation of existing structures and is based on a 20% probability of exceedence in 50 years.

  7. Induced Seismicity Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S. R.; Jarpe, S.; Harben, P.

    2014-12-01

    There are many seismological aspects associated with monitoring of permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations. Many of these include monitoring underground gas migration through detailed tomographic studies of rock properties, integrity of the cap rock and micro seismicity with time. These types of studies require expensive deployments of surface and borehole sensors in the vicinity of the CO2 injection wells. Another problem that may exist in CO2 sequestration fields is the potential for damaging induced seismicity associated with fluid injection into the geologic reservoir. Seismic hazard monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields requires a seismic network over a spatially larger region possibly having stations in remote settings. Expensive observatory-grade seismic systems are not necessary for seismic hazard deployments or small-scale tomographic studies. Hazard monitoring requires accurate location of induced seismicity to magnitude levels only slightly less than that which can be felt at the surface (e.g. magnitude 1), and the frequencies of interest for tomographic analysis are ~1 Hz and greater. We have developed a seismo/acoustic smart sensor system that can achieve the goals necessary for induced seismicity monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields. The unit is inexpensive, lightweight, easy to deploy, can operate remotely under harsh conditions and features 9 channels of recording (currently 3C 4.5 Hz geophone, MEMS accelerometer and microphone). An on-board processor allows for satellite transmission of parameter data to a processing center. Continuous or event-detected data is kept on two removable flash SD cards of up to 64+ Gbytes each. If available, data can be transmitted via cell phone modem or picked up via site visits. Low-power consumption allows for autonomous operation using only a 10 watt solar panel and a gel-cell battery. The system has been successfully tested for long-term (> 6 months) remote operations over a wide range

  8. Seismicity Surveying in Central and North Mexico Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Samaniego, A.; Gomez-Gonzalez, J. M.; Guzman-Speziale, M.; Zuniga, R.; Alaniz-Alvarez, S.; Barboza, R.; Davalos, O.

    2003-12-01

    The seismic nature of Central Mexico is poorly understood due to insufficient sampling. We carried out a seismic survey in part of the TransMexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) and the Central Altiplano. These regions are characterized by a very low deformation rates. Seismic activity is variable and ranges from microseismicity to large earthquakes, but no large historic earthquake has been instrumentally recorded. Only few direct observations such as intensity reconstructions and recent paleoseismic studies (e.g. the Acambay-Tixmadej earthquake of 1912) are available. Large earthquakes have occurred but their recurrence period is unknown; structural studies show this recurrence could range from hundreds to thousands of years. In order to understand the regional seismic behavior, we installed a temporal network. This network consists of 3-5 short period instruments, consisting of 16-bits triaxial digital velocity recorders (0.01-4.5 Hz). We registered several seismic sequences over a period of several months. One of them took place in Guanajuato within a graben structure in the TMVB and lasted for 2 weeks. Another sequence occurred at the northern limit of the TMVB in the Sierra Gorda. Over five weeks, several micro-earthquakes M Sierra Gorda, the event distribution is aligned along a small valley, but perpendicular to the main structural grain imposed by the Sierra Madre Oriental range. In no instances have surface ruptures been observed; those seismogenic structures could be blind ones. A challenge is to locate this structures which are may be too old to be still active. Increased seismotectonic knowledge of this region will yield further insight into the details of the interaction between surface structures driven by the regional stress field. Our results provide evidence that the region requires more intensive seismic surveying, and in some cases that some structures have been reactivated recently.

  9. Temporal Changes of Seismic Velocity of Shallow Structure Associated With the 2000 Miyakejima Volcano Activity as Inferred From Ambient Seismic Noise Correlation Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggono, T.; Nishimura, T.; Sato, H.; Ueda, H.; Ukawa, M.

    2008-12-01

    Miyakejima Island, which is located about 170 km to the south of Tokyo, Japan, is an active volcano of basaltic magma. In 2000 volcanic activity started with magma ascent and migration northwestwardly on June 26 - 27. Then, the volcano formed a caldera on the summit in July, and large amount of volcanic gas emission continued from late August until now. We analyze the ambient seismic noise recorded at three NIED seismic stations (MKK, MKT, and MKS) in the island in order to study the volcano structure behavior associated with such significant volcanic activities. We apply cross correlation analyses to the continuous records of vertical component of short period seismometers (1 s). The data are sampled at a frequency of 100 Hz with an A/D resolution of 16-bit. We calculate cross correlation functions (CCFs) for time window of 60 s for each station pair. We stack the CCFs for each month and bandpass filter the stacked data at frequency band 0.4 - 0.8 Hz. The stacked CCFs, which may represent the Green function between two stations, at station pairs MKK - MKS (the distance is 1.8 km) and MKT - MKS (the distance is 3.9 km) show wave packets with large amplitudes at both sides (positive and negative time delays). The wave packets propagate at group velocities of about 0.8 - 1.0 km/s. The stacked CCFs for MKK - MKT (the distance is 3.1 km) is one sided (negative time delay). Such asymmetric might be due to the inhomogeneous distribution of propagation direction of ambient seismic noise, so we do not use the data for the following analyses. Comparing the CCFs obtained for periods from July 1999 to June 2000 with that of October 2002, we observe small phase difference of the main wave packet. Our results show that for station pair MKK - MKS, whose path crosses the northern part of the island, velocity increased about 1.6 % after the 2000 volcanic activity. For MKT - MKS, whose path closely crosses the newly formed caldera, we estimate the velocity decrease of about 1

  10. The Effect of Plate Structure on Intraplate Volcanism, Kodiak-Bowie Seamount Chain, Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, R. S.; Christeson, G. L.; Gulick, S. S.; Barth, G. A.; Van Avendonk, H. J.

    2012-12-01

    Newly acquired ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) and multi-channel seismic (MCS) data in the vicinity of the Kodiak-Bowie Seamount Chain and Aja Fracture Zone reveal the character and structure of the Pacific Plate, overlying sediment, and seamounts in the Gulf of Alaska. Our data include two marine wide-angle OBS profiles, two coincident MCS profiles, and several nearby MCS profiles, including lines parallel to and crossing the Seamount Chain and Fracture Zone. This new data may help to reveal the character of the Kodiak-Bowie Seamount Chain and associated intraplate volcanism, much of which is concealed by the Surveyor and Baranof sedimentary fan systems. The Kodiak-Bowie Seamount Chain stretches over 1000 km across the Gulf of Alaska, from the Aleutian Trench in the northwest to offshore Queen Charlotte Islands in the southeast. The ages of the seamounts range from 24 Ma at Kodiak Seamount in the northwest to ≥0.7 Ma at Bowie Seamount in the southeast. Although the seamounts are largely age-progressive, some members of the chain are dated significantly out of sequence. Previous studies suggest the possibility that the majority of seamounts in the chain could be products of the Bowie plume. The Gulf-wide Aja Fracture Zone intersects the Kodiak-Bowie Seamount Chain in the central Gulf at the location of the seismic lines. Preliminary tomographic inversions of the seismic data reveal significant changes in crustal thickness across the Aja Fracture Zone, including at least a 3 km step up in the moho from south to north. Additionally, the region north of the Fracture Zone exhibits a 3 km thick low velocity zone in the upper crust, which is double the thickness of the same feature south of the fracture zone. This low velocity zone in the upper crust may be representative of intraplate volcanism associated with the Kodiak-Bowie Chain; several higher velocity perturbations within this zone are coincident with the locations of major seamounts. We will further refine

  11. The Ventotene Volcanic Ridge: a newly explored complex in the central Tyrrhenian Sea (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuffaro, Marco; Martorelli, Eleonora; Bosman, Alessandro; Conti, Alessia; Bigi, Sabina; Muccini, Filippo; Cocchi, Luca; Ligi, Marco; Bortoluzzi, Giovanni; Scrocca, Davide; Canese, Simonepietro; Chiocci, Francesco L.; Conte, Aida M.; Doglioni, Carlo; Perinelli, Cristina

    2016-12-01

    New high-resolution geophysical data collected along the eastern margin of the Tyrrhenian back-arc basin, in the Pontine Islands area, reveal a ˜NW-SE elongated morphological high, the Ventotene Volcanic Ridge (VR), located on the northern edge of the Ventotene Basin. High-resolution multibeam bathymetry, combined with magnetic data, multi- and single-channel seismic profiles, and ROV dives, suggest that VR results from aggregation of a series of volcanic edifices. The summit of these volcanoes is flat and occurs at about 170 m water depth. Given their depths, we propose that flat morphologies were probably caused by surf erosion during Quaternary glacial sea level lowstands. Seismic stratigraphy together with magnetic data suggest that the volcanic activity in this area is older than 190-130 ka age and may be coeval with that of Ventotene Island (Middle Pleistocene). The submarine volcanoes, located 25 km north of Ventotene, are part of a ˜E-W regional volcanic alignment and extend the Pontine volcanism landward toward the Gaeta bay. Integration of structural data from multichannel seismic profiles in this sector of the eastern Tyrrhenian margin indicates that several normal and/or transtensional faults, striking WNW-ESE, NNW-SSE, and NE-SW, offset the basement and form alternating structural highs and depressions filled by thick, mostly undeformed, sedimentary units. Arc-related magmatism is widespread in the study area, where the VR is placed at the hangingwall of the west-directed Apennines subduction zone, which is undergoing tensional and transtensional tectonics. Bathymetric and topographic evidence shows that VR lies in between a major NE-SW trending escarpment east of Ponza and a NE-SW trending graben southwest of the Roccamonfina volcano, a NE-SW transfer zone that accommodate the extension along this segmented portion of the margin. This suggests that the interaction between NE-SW and NW-SE trending fault systems acts as a structural control on

  12. Robust seismic velocity change estimation using ambient noise recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskalakis, E.; Evangelidis, C. P.; Garnier, J.; Melis, N. S.; Papanicolaou, G.; Tsogka, C.

    2016-06-01

    We consider the problem of seismic velocity change estimation using ambient noise recordings. Motivated by Zhan et al., we study how the velocity change estimation is affected by seasonal fluctuations in the noise sources. More precisely, we consider a numerical model and introduce spatio-temporal seasonal fluctuations in the noise sources. We show that indeed, as pointed out by Zhan et al., the stretching method is affected by these fluctuations and produces misleading apparent velocity variations which reduce dramatically the signal to noise ratio of the method. We also show that these apparent velocity variations can be eliminated by an adequate normalization of the cross-correlation functions. Theoretically we expect our approach to work as long as the seasonal fluctuations in the noise sources are uniform, an assumption which holds for closely located seismic stations. We illustrate with numerical simulations in homogeneous and scattering media that the proposed normalization significantly improves the accuracy of the velocity change estimation. Similar behaviour is also observed with real data recorded in the Aegean volcanic arc. We study in particular the volcano of Santorini during the seismic unrest of 2011-2012 and observe a decrease in the velocity of seismic waves which is correlated with GPS measured elevation.

  13. Volcanic unrest and hazard communication in Long Valley Volcanic Region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P.; Mangan, Margaret T.; McNutt, Stephen R.

    2017-01-01

    emissions. Initial response plans developed by county and state agencies in response to the volcanic unrest began with “The Mono County Volcano Contingency Plan” and “Plan Caldera” by the California Office of Emergency Services in 1982–84. They subsequently became integrated in the regularly updated County Emergency Operation Plan. The alert level system employed by the USGS also evolved from the three-level “Notice-Watch-Warning” system of the early 1980s through a five level color-code to the current “Normal-Advisory-Watch-Warning” ground-based system in conjunction with the international 4-level aviation color-code for volcanic ash hazards. Field trips led by the scientists proved to be a particularly effective means of acquainting local residents and officials with the geologically active environment in which they reside. Relative caldera quiescence from 2000 through 2011 required continued efforts to remind an evolving population that the hazards posed by the 1980–2000 unrest persisted. Renewed uplift of the resurgent dome from 2011 to 2014 was accompanied by an increase in low-level earthquake activity in the caldera and beneath Mammoth Mountain and continues through May 2016. As unrest levels continue to wax and wane, so will the communication challenges.

  14. 3D seismic imaging of voluminous earliest Eocene buried lava fields and coastal escarpments off mid-Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planke, Sverre; Millett, John M.; Maharjan, Dwarika; Jerram, Dougal A.; Mansour Abdelmalak, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    Continental breakup between Greenland and NW Europe in the Paleogene was associated with massive basaltic volcanism, forming kilometer-thick sequences of flood basalts along the conjugate rifted margins. This event was temporarily associated with a warm world, the early Eocene greenhouse, and the short-lived Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). A 2500 km2 large industry-standard 3D seismic cube has recently been acquired on the Vøring Marginal High offshore mid-Norway to image sub-basalt sedimentary rocks. This cube also provides a unique opportunity for imaging top- and intra-basalt structures. Detailed seismic geomorphological interpretation of the Top basalt horizon reveal new insight into the late-stage development of the lava flow fields and the kilometer high coastal Vøring Escarpment. Subaerial lava flows with compressional ridges and inflated lava lobes cover the marginal high, with comparable structure and size to modern subaerial lava fields. Pitted surfaces, likely formed by lava emplaced in a wet environment, are present in the western part of the study area near the continent-ocean boundary. The prominent Vøring Escarpment formed when eastward-flowing lava reached the coastline. The escarpment morphology is influenced by pre-existing structural highs, and locally these highs are by-passed by the lava flows which are clearly deflected around them. Volcanogenic debris flows are well-imaged on the escarpment horizon along with large-scale slump blocks. Similar features exist in active volcanic environments, e.g. on the south coast of Hawaii. Numerous post-volcanic extensional faults and incised channels cut both into the marginal high and the escarpment, and show that the area was geologically active after the volcanism ceased. In conclusion, igneous seismic geomorphology and seismic volcanostratigraphy are two very powerful methods to understand the volcanic deposits and development of rifted margins, and the association of major volcanic events

  15. Acoustic monitoring of co-seismic changes in gas bubble rupture rate in a hydrothermal reservoir: field evaluation of a possible precursor and mechanism for remote seismic triggering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Remotely triggered seismicity is a phenomenon in which an earthquake at one location triggers others over distances up to thousands of kilometers. The mechanism by which low-amplitude dynamic oscillations of the confining stress can produce such an effect, often after a time delay of minutes-to-days, is unclear, but a concentration of remotely triggered seismic events in carbon-dioxide-rich volcanic and geothermal regions suggests that an increase in pore fluid pressure associated with the nucleation and growth of carbon-dioxide gas bubbles may reduce the effective stress in critically loaded geologic faults. While this hypothesis has been tested in bench-scale laboratory experiments, field detection of seismically initiated gas bubble growth in groundwater may provide further evidence for this remote triggering mechanism. In the present study, a hydrophone continuously records the acoustic power spectrum in CH-10B, a hydrothermal well located in Long Valley Caldera, California - a site that is susceptible to remotely seismic triggering. This well exhibits co-seismic changes in water level in response to near and distant earthquakes, including every magnitude-six or greater at any location on Earth. Exploiting the inverse relationship between gas bubble radius and the peak acoustic frequency emitted when a gas bubble ruptures, this investigation seeks to detect changes in the acoustic power spectrum arising from a shift in the size-distribution or count rate of rupturing gas bubbles, coincident with a distant earthquake. By resolving the timing and intensity of the onset of a change in gas bubble rupture rate after the passage of seismic wave from a distant source, it may be possible to establish the extent to which seismically initiated gas bubble growth contributes to co-seismic borehole water level response, pore fluid pressure perturbations, and the onset of remotely triggered seismicity.

  16. Elastic plate flexure above mantle plumes explains the upstream offset of volcanic activity at la Réunion and Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbault, Muriel; Fontaine, Fabrice; Rabinowicz, Michel; Bystricky, Micha

    2017-04-01

    Surface volcanism at la Réunion and Hawaii occurs with an offset of 150-180 km upstream to the plume axis with respect to the plate motion. This striking observation raises questions about the forcing of plume-lithosphere thermo-mechanical interactions on melt trajectories beneath these islands. Based on visco-elasto-plastic numerical models handled at kilometric resolution, we propose to explain this offset by the development of compressional stresses at the base of the lithosphere, that result from elastic plate bending above the upward load exerted by the plume head. This horizontal compression adopts a disc shape centered around the plume axis, 20 km thick and 150 km in radius, at 50-70 km depth where the temperature varies from 600°C to 750°C. It lasts for 5 to 10 My in an oceanic plate of age greater than 70 My, a timing that is controlled by the visco-elastic relaxation time at 50-70 km depth. This period of time exceeds the time during which both the Somalian/East-African and Pacific plates drift over the Reunion and Hawaii plumes, respectively, thus rendering this basal compression a persistent feature. It is inferred that the buoyant melts percolating in the plume head pond below this zone of compression and eventually spread laterally until the most compressive principal elastic stresses reverse to the vertical, i.e., 150 km away from the plume head. There, melts propagate through dikes upwards to 35 km depth, where the plate curvature reverses and ambient compression diminishes. This 30-35 km depth may thus host magmatic reservoirs where melts pond, until further differentiation can relaunch ascension up to the surface and form a volcanic edifice. In a second stage, as the volcano grows because of melt accumulation at the top of the plate, the lithosphere is flexed downwards, inducing extra tensile stress at 30-35 km depth and compression at 15 km depth. It implies that now the melts pond at 15 km and form another magmatic reservoir lying just

  17. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory: a natural laboratory for studying basaltic volcanism: Chapter 1 in Characteristics of Hawaiian volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilling, Robert I.; Kauahikaua, James P.; Brantley, Steven R.; Neal, Christina A.; Poland, Michael P.; Takahashi, T. Jane; Landowski, Claire M.

    2014-01-01

    In the beginning of the 20th century, geologist Thomas A. Jaggar, Jr., argued that, to fully understand volcanic and associated hazards, the expeditionary mode of studying eruptions only after they occurred was inadequate. Instead, he fervently advocated the use of permanent observatories to record and measure volcanic phenomena—at and below the surface—before, during, and after eruptions to obtain the basic scientific information needed to protect people and property from volcanic hazards. With the crucial early help of American volcanologist Frank Alvord Perret and the Hawaiian business community, the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established in 1912, and Jaggar’s vision became reality. From its inception, HVO’s mission has centered on several goals: (1) measuring and documenting the seismic, eruptive, and geodetic processes of active Hawaiian volcanoes (principally Kīlauea and Mauna Loa); (2) geological mapping and dating of deposits to reconstruct volcanic histories, understand island evolution, and determine eruptive frequencies and volcanic hazards; (3) systematically collecting eruptive products, including gases, for laboratory analysis; and (4) widely disseminating observatory-acquired data and analysis, reports, and hazard warnings to the global scientific community, emergency-management authorities, news media, and the public. The long-term focus on these goals by HVO scientists, in collaboration with investigators from many other organizations, continues to fulfill Jaggar’s career-long vision of reducing risks from volcanic and earthquake hazards across the globe.

  18. Characteristics of the seismicity of Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei during the year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iannaccone, G.; Alessio, G.; Borriello, G.; Cusano, P.; Petrosino, S.; Ricciolino, P.; Talarico, G.; Torello, V. [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Vesuviano, Naples (Italy)

    2001-12-01

    This paper describes the characteristics of the seismicity in the volcanic Neapolitan area during the year 2000 recorded by the monitoring seismic network of the Osservatorio Vesuviano. In particular, a detailed analysis of the seismicity of Vesiuvius is presented. It is compared the seismic velocity models available for the Vesuvius area locating the earthquakes recorded in the year 2000 and on the basis of the results, it is introduced for routine earthquake location the new velocity model obtained by the seismic tomography experiments (TomoVes) performed in the area. It was also determined the focal mechanisms and analysed the seismicity rate, comparing the results with those obtained for the past years. After the introduction of the new acquisition system at the Osservatorio Vesuviano, a re-calibration of the duration magnitude scale was necessary to avoid biases related to the different instrumental response. Consequently, it was re-calibrated the magnitude relation used for the Vesuvius earthquakes, obtaining a new formula to be used for the earthquakes recorded by the new acquisition system. Finally, it was given a description of the seismic activity in the Campi Flegrei area during the summer of 2000.

  19. The Alboran volcanic arc archipelago isolated the Mediterranean during the Messinian salinity crisis forming the land bridge for biota dispersal across the western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth-Rea, Guillermo; Ranero, Cesar R.; Grevemeyer, Ingo

    2017-04-01

    The Mediterranean Sea desiccation during isolation from the world oceans created the well-known Messinian salinity crisis but also landbridges that permitted the exchange of terrestrial biota between Africa and Iberia contributing to the present biodiversity of the Mediterranean region. The hypotheses for the cause chocking the Mediterranean have typically sought to explain geological features, particularly the giant salt deposits, but the implications of the faunal changes occurring around that time remain inadequately integrated by current geological models. We present wide-angle seismic data that constrain for the first time the 16-18 km thick crust structure of a volcanic arc formed mostly between 10 to 6 Ma across the eastern region of the Alboran basin. The crustal structure supports that the arc created an archipelago forming a land bridge across the basin that largely isolated the Mediterranean. After the cessation of volcanic activity, the archipelago progressively submerged by thermal subsidence and accompanying sediment loading, having emerged islands that persisted into the Pleistocene time and shallow straits forming sills during the early Pliocene. The presence of an archipelago in the eastern region of the basin may explain a number of puzzling observations previously inexplicable by the proposed barriers closing the Gibraltar arc west of Alboran. The progressive volcanic build up of the archipelago together with the closure of the Betic and Rifean marine corridors would explain the initial isolation of the Mediterranean since 7.1 Ma and the exchange of terrestrial biota since 6.2 Ma, i.e. before desiccation, which diversified radiating from SE Iberia and the opposite segment of the eastern Rif. In addition, an eastern barrier agrees with the continuous Messinian-age open marine sediments drilled at ODP site 976 in the western Alboran basin, which may have been the refuge of typical Mediterranean taxa that rapidly repopulated the Mediterranean in the

  20. A multidisciplinary approach to quantify the permeability of the Whakaari/White Island volcanic hydrothermal system (Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Michael J.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Farquharson, Jamie I.; Ashworth, James; Mayer, Klaus; Letham-Brake, Mark; Reuschlé, Thierry; Gilg, H. Albert; Scheu, Bettina; Lavallée, Yan; Siratovich, Paul; Cole, Jim; Jolly, Arthur D.; Baud, Patrick; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-02-01

    hydrothermal system can result in increases (due to alteration-induced dissolution and fracturing) and decreases (due to hydrothermal precipitation) to permeability. Importantly, a decrease in permeability-be it due to fracture sealing in lava, pore-filling alunite precipitation in tuff, near-vent cementation by sulphur, and/or well-sorted layers of fine ash-can result in pore pressure augmentation. An increase in pore pressure could result in ground deformation, seismicity, jeopardise the stability of the volcanic slopes, and/or drive the wide variety of eruptions observed at Whakaari. Our systematic study offers the most complete porosity-permeability dataset for a volcanic hydrothermal system to date. These new data will inform and support modelling, unrest monitoring, and eruption characterisation at Whakaari and other hydrothermally modified volcanic systems worldwide.

  1. Nonstructural seismic restraint guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, D.M.; Czapinski, R.H.; Firneno, M.J.; Feemster, H.C.; Fornaciari, N.R.; Hillaire, R.G.; Kinzel, R.L.; Kirk, D.; McMahon, T.T.

    1993-08-01

    The Nonstructural Seismic Restraint Guidelines provide general information about how to secure or restrain items (such as material, equipment, furniture, and tools) in order to prevent injury and property, environmental, or programmatic damage during or following an earthquake. All SNL sites may experience earthquakes of magnitude 6.0 or higher on the Richter scale. Therefore, these guidelines are written for all SNL sites.

  2. Understanding induced seismicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsworth, Derek; Spiers, Christopher J.; Niemeijer, Andre R.

    2016-01-01

    Fluid injection–induced seismicity has become increasingly widespread in oil- and gas-producing areas of the United States (1–3) and western Canada. It has shelved deep geothermal energy projects in Switzerland and the United States (4), and its effects are especially acute in Oklahoma, where seismi

  3. Understanding induced seismicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsworth, Derek; Spiers, Christopher J.; Niemeijer, Andre R.

    2016-01-01

    Fluid injection–induced seismicity has become increasingly widespread in oil- and gas-producing areas of the United States (1–3) and western Canada. It has shelved deep geothermal energy projects in Switzerland and the United States (4), and its effects are especially acute in Oklahoma, where

  4. Mobile seismic exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dräbenstedt, A.; Cao, X.; Polom, U.; Pätzold, F.; Zeller, T.; Hecker, P.; Seyfried, V.; Rembe, C.

    2016-06-01

    Laser-Doppler-Vibrometry (LDV) is an established technique to measure vibrations in technical systems with picometer vibration-amplitude resolution. Especially good sensitivity and resolution can be achieved at an infrared wavelength of 1550 nm. High-resolution vibration measurements are possible over more than 100 m distance. This advancement of the LDV technique enables new applications. The detection of seismic waves is an application which has not been investigated so far because seismic waves outside laboratory scales are usually analyzed at low frequencies between approximately 1 Hz and 250 Hz and require velocity resolutions in the range below 1 nm/s/√Hz. Thermal displacements and air turbulence have critical influences to LDV measurements at this low-frequency range leading to noise levels of several 100 nm/√Hz. Commonly seismic waves are measured with highly sensitive inertial sensors (geophones or Micro Electro-Mechanical Sensors (MEMS)). Approaching a laser geophone based on LDV technique is the topic of this paper. We have assembled an actively vibration-isolated optical table in a minivan which provides a hole in its underbody. The laser-beam of an infrared LDV assembled on the optical table impinges the ground below the car through the hole. A reference geophone has detected remaining vibrations on the table. We present the results from the first successful experimental demonstration of contactless detection of seismic waves from a movable vehicle with a LDV as laser geophone.

  5. Mobile seismic exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dräbenstedt, A., E-mail: a.draebenstedt@polytec.de, E-mail: rembe@iei.tu-clausthal.de, E-mail: ulrich.polom@liag-hannover.de; Seyfried, V. [Research & Development, Polytec GmbH, Waldbronn (Germany); Cao, X.; Rembe, C., E-mail: a.draebenstedt@polytec.de, E-mail: rembe@iei.tu-clausthal.de, E-mail: ulrich.polom@liag-hannover.de [Institute of Electrical Information Technology, TU Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Polom, U., E-mail: a.draebenstedt@polytec.de, E-mail: rembe@iei.tu-clausthal.de, E-mail: ulrich.polom@liag-hannover.de [Leibniz Institute of Applied Geophysics, Hannover (Germany); Pätzold, F.; Hecker, P. [Institute of Flight Guidance, TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany); Zeller, T. [Clausthaler Umwelttechnik Institut CUTEC, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2016-06-28

    Laser-Doppler-Vibrometry (LDV) is an established technique to measure vibrations in technical systems with picometer vibration-amplitude resolution. Especially good sensitivity and resolution can be achieved at an infrared wavelength of 1550 nm. High-resolution vibration measurements are possible over more than 100 m distance. This advancement of the LDV technique enables new applications. The detection of seismic waves is an application which has not been investigated so far because seismic waves outside laboratory scales are usually analyzed at low frequencies between approximately 1 Hz and 250 Hz and require velocity resolutions in the range below 1 nm/s/√Hz. Thermal displacements and air turbulence have critical influences to LDV measurements at this low-frequency range leading to noise levels of several 100 nm/√Hz. Commonly seismic waves are measured with highly sensitive inertial sensors (geophones or Micro Electro-Mechanical Sensors (MEMS)). Approaching a laser geophone based on LDV technique is the topic of this paper. We have assembled an actively vibration-isolated optical table in a minivan which provides a hole in its underbody. The laser-beam of an infrared LDV assembled on the optical table impinges the ground below the car through the hole. A reference geophone has detected remaining vibrations on the table. We present the results from the first successful experimental demonstration of contactless detection of seismic waves from a movable vehicle with a LDV as laser geophone.

  6. The Global Water Cycle Drives Volcanism on Seasonal to Millennial Timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, D. M.; Mason, B. G.; Jupp, T. E.; Dade, W. B.

    2005-05-01

    Global rates of occurrence of volcanic eruptions show periodic behaviour on timescales ranging from 106 years. At long timescales (>106 to 107 years), rates of eruption are controlled by plate tectonics. At shorter timescales, the periodic nature of volcanism is forced by the global water cycle. Historical records of the rates of onset of eruption for the past 300 years are dominated by small-scale activity at a number of persistently, or repeatedly, active volcanoes around the world. This record shows statistically significant evidence for `seasonality': globally, rates of eruption are about 18% higher during northern hemisphere winter than northern hemisphere summer. This pattern of seasonality is strong for volcanoes at high northern latitudes; but also exists for volcanic regions in the southern hemisphere (e.g. Chile) and at specific volcanoes (e.g. Sakurajima, Japan). Seasonality is weak at certain ocean-island volcanoes (e.g. Hawaii), and certain volcanic regions (e.g. Mediterranean). The only external parameters that account for the periodic nature of small-scale volcanism (i.e. the observation that eruption rates peak between November and March in both hemispheres) are those related to the global water cycle. Movement of water (including atmospheric vapour; soil moisture; snow and ice) between the northern-hemisphere continents and the world's oceans is responsible for an annual deformation of Earth's surface that is weakly defined in equatorial regions, and stronger at higher latitudes. This external modulation of the Earth's surface has an amplitude of the order of centimetres, and an associated (vertical) strain rate of ~ 10-16 s-1. This deformation is slow enough to be felt by the Earth's interior, and is of the same order of magnitude as the (horizontal) strain rates experienced in tectonically active continental regions. This modulation effectively applies a time-dependence to the `threshold' point at which a volcano will begin to erupt. In this way

  7. Control of Montmorillonite Surface Coatings on Quartz Grains in Bentonite by Precursor Volcanic Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendlandt, R. F.; Harrison, W. J.

    2008-12-01

    The pathogenic tendencies of respirable-sized quartz grains may be dependent on inherent characteristics of the quartz as well as external factors. Surface coatings on quartz are of particular interest as they modify both physical and chemical properties of quartz grain surfaces and sequester the grain from contact with reactive lung fluids. Wendlandt et al. (Appl. Geochem. 22, 2007) investigated the surface properties of respirable-sized quartz grains in bentonites and recognized pervasive montmorillonite surface coatings on the quartz that resisted removal by repeated vigorous washings and reaction with HCl. To understand the persistence of montmorillonite coatings on quartz grains of igneous origin, volcanic ash deposits of varying age and degree of alteration to montmorillonite were sampled in Utah, including the distal Lava Creek (c. 0.64 Ma) and Bishop Tuffs (c. 0.74 Ma), and SW Colorado (Conejos Fm, San Juan Volcanic Field) for comparison with commercial grade Cretaceous-age "western" and "southern" bentonites. Quartz grains, hand-picked from these samples, were analyzed using FE-SEM and HRTEM. Continuous coatings of volcanic glass occur on quartz grains from the distal volcanic ash samples. As glass alteration to montmorillonite becomes more extensive, quartz grain surfaces start to display patches of montmorillonite. These patches become continuous in extent on quartz grains from the bentonites. Late precipitation of opal- CT lepispheres is consistent with the alteration reaction for volcanic glass: Volcanic glass + H2O = montmorillonite + SiO2(am) + ions(aq). HRTEM of quartz grains reveals an amorphous surface layer, consistent with a volcanic glass coating. Our results indicate that persistent montmorillonite coatings on quartz grains in bentonites are related to precursor volcanic glass coatings on these grains. The absence of glass coatings on other mineral grains in bentonite (feldspar, biotite) may be a consequence of the presence of strong cleavage

  8. Geophysics and Seismic Hazard Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YuGuihua; ZhouYuanze; YuSheng

    2003-01-01

    The earthquake is a natural phenomenon, which often brings serious hazard to the human life and material possession. It is a physical process of releasing interior energy of the earth, which is caused by interior and outer forces in special tectonic environment in the earth, especially within the lithosphere. The earthquake only causes casualty and loss in the place where people inhabit. Seismic hazard reduction is composed of four parts as seismic prediction, hazard prevention and seismic engineering, seismic response and seismic rescuing, and rebuilding.

  9. Catastrophic volcanic collapse: relation to hydrothermal processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, D L; Williams, S N

    1993-06-18

    Catastrophic volcanic collapse, without precursory magmatic activity, is characteristic of many volcanic disasters. The extent and locations of hydrothermal discharges at Nevado del Ruiz volcano, Colombia, suggest that at many volcanoes collapse may result from the interactions between hydrothermal fluids and the volcanic edifice. Rock dissolution and hydrothermal mineral alteration, combined with physical triggers such as earth-quakes, can produce volcanic collapse. Hot spring water compositions, residence times, and flow paths through faults were used to model potential collapse at Ruiz. Caldera dimensions, deposits, and alteration mineral volumes are consistent with parameters observed at other volcanoes.

  10. Nephelometric Dropsonde for Volcanic Ash Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced dropsondes that could effectively be guided through atmospheric regions of interest such as volcanic plumes could enable unprecedented observations of...

  11. Interferometric methods for spatio temporal seismic monitoring in underground mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dales, Philippe; Audet, Pascal; Olivier, Gerrit; Mercier, Jean-Philippe

    2017-08-01

    In active underground mining environments, monitoring of the rockmass has important implications for both safety and productivity. Monitoring can be accomplished by exploiting the many passive seismic sources (microearthquakes, drilling, ore-crushers etc.) around the mine on the condition they can be accurately detected and located. We implement a popular beamforming-like approach that uses cross-correlation functions in a maximum likelihood search to locate sources of seismic energy. We illustrate the technique with a synthetic example in which two simultaneous sources are located and discuss briefly the effects of different processing parameters. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique by monitoring both impulsive sources (microearthquakes) and other persistent sources (drilling and ore-crushers) in two active underground mines. We then propose how this information can be used in conjunction with ambient seismic noise interferometry to estimate seismic Green's functions under temporally variable and anisotropic wavefield conditions. Alternatively, we demonstrate how stable persistent sources, typically seen as contaminants in ambient noise applications, can be used to monitor changing rockmass conditions and potentially guide mining operations.

  12. High Voltage Seismic Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogacz, Adrian; Pala, Damian; Knafel, Marcin

    2015-04-01

    This contribution describes the preliminary result of annual cooperation of three student research groups from AGH UST in Krakow, Poland. The aim of this cooperation was to develop and construct a high voltage seismic wave generator. Constructed device uses a high-energy electrical discharge to generate seismic wave in ground. This type of device can be applied in several different methods of seismic measurement, but because of its limited power it is mainly dedicated for engineering geophysics. The source operates on a basic physical principles. The energy is stored in capacitor bank, which is charged by two stage low to high voltage converter. Stored energy is then released in very short time through high voltage thyristor in spark gap. The whole appliance is powered from li-ion battery and controlled by ATmega microcontroller. It is possible to construct larger and more powerful device. In this contribution the structure of device with technical specifications is resented. As a part of the investigation the prototype was built and series of experiments conducted. System parameter was measured, on this basis specification of elements for the final device were chosen. First stage of the project was successful. It was possible to efficiently generate seismic waves with constructed device. Then the field test was conducted. Spark gap wasplaced in shallowborehole(0.5 m) filled with salt water. Geophones were placed on the ground in straight line. The comparison of signal registered with hammer source and sparker source was made. The results of the test measurements are presented and discussed. Analysis of the collected data shows that characteristic of generated seismic signal is very promising, thus confirms possibility of practical application of the new high voltage generator. The biggest advantage of presented device after signal characteristics is its size which is 0.5 x 0.25 x 0.2 m and weight approximately 7 kg. This features with small li-ion battery makes

  13. Seismic Fracture Characterization Methodologies for Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queen, John H. [Hi-Geophysical, Inc., Ponca, OK (United States)

    2016-05-09

    Executive Summary The overall objective of this work was the development of surface and borehole seismic methodologies using both compressional and shear waves for characterizing faults and fractures in Enhanced Geothermal Systems. We used both surface seismic and vertical seismic profile (VSP) methods. We adapted these methods to the unique conditions encountered in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) creation. These conditions include geological environments with volcanic cover, highly altered rocks, severe structure, extreme near surface velocity contrasts and lack of distinct velocity contrasts at depth. One of the objectives was the development of methods for identifying more appropriate seismic acquisition parameters for overcoming problems associated with these geological factors. Because temperatures up to 300º C are often encountered in these systems, another objective was the testing of VSP borehole tools capable of operating at depths in excess of 1,000 m and at temperatures in excess of 200º C. A final objective was the development of new processing and interpretation techniques based on scattering and time-frequency analysis, as well as the application of modern seismic migration imaging algorithms to seismic data acquired over geothermal areas. The use of surface seismic reflection data at Brady's Hot Springs was found useful in building a geological model, but only when combined with other extensive geological and geophysical data. The use of fine source and geophone spacing was critical in producing useful images. The surface seismic reflection data gave no information about the internal structure (extent, thickness and filling) of faults and fractures, and modeling suggests that they are unlikely to do so. Time-frequency analysis was applied to these data, but was not found to be significantly useful in their interpretation. Modeling does indicate that VSP and other seismic methods with sensors located at depth in wells will be the most

  14. Micro-seismicity in the Gulf of Cadiz: Is there a link between micro-seismicity, high magnitude earthquakes and active faults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Sónia; Terrinha, Pedro; Matias, Luis; Duarte, João C.; Roque, Cristina; Ranero, César R.; Geissler, Wolfram H.; Zitellini, Nevio

    2017-10-01

    The Gulf of Cadiz seismicity is characterized by persistent low to intermediate magnitude earthquakes, occasionally punctuated by high magnitude events such as the M 8.7 1755 Great Lisbon earthquake and the M = 7.9 event of February 28th, 1969. Micro-seismicity was recorded during 11 months by a temporary network of 25 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) in an area of high seismic activity, encompassing the potential source areas of the mentioned large magnitude earthquakes. We combined micro-seismicity analysis with processing and interpretation of deep crustal seismic reflection profiles and available refraction data to investigate the possible tectonic control of the seismicity in the Gulf of Cadiz area. Three controlling mechanisms are explored: i) active tectonic structures, ii) transitions between different lithospheric domains and inherited Mesozoic structures, and iii) fault weakening mechanisms. Our results show that micro-seismicity is mostly located in the upper mantle and is associated with tectonic inversion of extensional rift structures and to the transition between different lithospheric/rheological domains. Even though the crustal structure is well imaged in the seismic profiles and in the bathymetry, crustal faults show low to negligible seismic activity. A possible explanation for this is that the crustal thrusts are thin-skinned structures rooting in relatively shallow sub-horizontal décollements associated with (aseismic) serpentinization levels at the top of the lithospheric mantle. Therefore, co-seismic slip along crustal thrusts may only occur during large magnitude events, while for most of the inter-seismic cycle these thrusts remain locked, or slip aseismically. We further speculate that high magnitude earthquake's ruptures may only nucleate in the lithospheric mantle and then propagate into the crust across the serpentinized layers.

  15. Testing the reliability of the Gutenberg-Richter b-value to aid volcanic eruption forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Nick; Bell, Andrew; Main, Ian

    2014-05-01

    The distribution of earthquake magnitudes is an important additional attribute of a volcanic earthquake catalogue and analyses of properties of the "frequency-magnitude distribution" (FMD) underpins most studies of volcanic seismicity. The event rate and inter-event intervals are of primary interest as their changes can be a primary indicator of volcanic unrest. The classic model for the earthquake FMD is the Gutenberg-Richter (GR) relation (Gutenberg and Richter, 1954): log(N) = a - bM, where N is the cumulative number of earthquakes of magnitude equal to or greater than M, a is a measure of the total seismicity rate of the region and the b-value represents the relative proportion of large and small events in the catalogue. The b-value for tectonic earthquakes has been well studied with a global average of approximately 1. However, b-values in volcanic settings are often reported to be much higher, sometimes with values as high as 3. Spatial variations in the volcanic b-value have been used to map stress conditions and magma reservoirs, and it has been argued that temporal variations have the potential to forecast eruptive activity. Here we assess different methodologies for analysing properties of the FMD, and re-evaluate what we know about the FMD of volcanic earthquakes. Using synthetic models we evaluate the reliability of methods for calculating the catalogue completeness magnitude where earthquake rates fluctuate rapidly in time to simulate pre-, syn- and post- earthquake swarm activity. We also evaluate to what extent volcanic FMDs are consistent with the GR model, using earthquake data from volcanoes including El Hierro, Canary Islands and Kilauea and Mauna Loa, Hawaii. We suggest that much of the proposed variation in b-value can be attributed to uncertainty in the completeness magnitude, and FMDs not displaying GR properties. In the case where event rate is pulsing or swarming the b-value has a tendency not to stabilise with increasing completeness

  16. Is Inflation Persistence Over?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando N. de Oliveira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We analyze inflation persistence in several industrial and emerging countries in the recent past by implementing unit root tests in the presence of unknown structural breaks and by estimating reduced-form models of inflation dynamics. We select a very representative group of 23 industrial and 17 emerging economies. Our sample period is comprised of quarterly data and differs for each country. Our results indicate that inflation persistence is decreasing over time for the great majority of industrial economies. Many emerging economies, however, show increasing persistence and even a few have highly persistent inflationary processes. We also observe structural breaks in all inflation processes we study with the exception of the inflation processes of Germany and Austria. Our results are robust to different reduced forms of the inflation processes and different econometric techniques.

  17. Glyphosate persistence in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercurio, Philip; Flores, Florita; Mueller, Jochen F; Carter, Steve; Negri, Andrew P

    2014-08-30

    Glyphosate is one of the most widely applied herbicides globally but its persistence in seawater has not been reported. Here we quantify the biodegradation of glyphosate using standard "simulation" flask tests with native bacterial populations and coastal seawater from the Great Barrier Reef. The half-life for glyphosate at 25 °C in low-light was 47 days, extending to 267 days in the dark at 25 °C and 315 days in the dark at 31 °C, which is the longest persistence reported for this herbicide. AMPA, the microbial transformation product of glyphosate, was detected under all conditions, confirming that degradation was mediated by the native microbial community. This study demonstrates glyphosate is moderately persistent in the marine water under low light conditions and is highly persistent in the dark. Little degradation would be expected during flood plumes in the tropics, which could potentially deliver dissolved and sediment-bound glyphosate far from shore.

  18. Thermal vesiculation during volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallée, Yan; Dingwell, Donald B.; Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Cimarelli, Corrado; Hornby, Adrian J.; Kendrick, Jackie E.; von Aulock, Felix W.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Andrews, Benjamin J.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Rhodes, Emma; Chigna, Gustavo

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial volcanic eruptions are the consequence of magmas ascending to the surface of the Earth. This ascent is driven by buoyancy forces, which are enhanced by bubble nucleation and growth (vesiculation) that reduce the density of magma. The development of vesicularity also greatly reduces the ‘strength’ of magma, a material parameter controlling fragmentation and thus the explosive potential of the liquid rock. The development of vesicularity in magmas has until now been viewed (both thermodynamically and kinetically) in terms of the pressure dependence of the solubility of water in the magma, and its role in driving gas saturation, exsolution and expansion during decompression. In contrast, the possible effects of the well documented negative temperature dependence of solubility of water in magma has largely been ignored. Recently, petrological constraints have demonstrated that considerable heating of magma may indeed be a common result of the latent heat of crystallization as well as viscous and frictional heating in areas of strain localization. Here we present field and experimental observations of magma vesiculation and fragmentation resulting from heating (rather than decompression). Textural analysis of volcanic ash from Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala reveals the presence of chemically heterogeneous filaments hosting micrometre-scale vesicles. The textures mirror those developed by disequilibrium melting induced via rapid heating during fault friction experiments, demonstrating that friction can generate sufficient heat to induce melting and vesiculation of hydrated silicic magma. Consideration of the experimentally determined temperature and pressure dependence of water solubility in magma reveals that, for many ascent paths, exsolution may be more efficiently achieved by heating than by decompression. We conclude that the thermal path experienced by magma during ascent strongly controls degassing, vesiculation, magma strength and the effusive

  19. Water in volcanic glass: From volcanic degassing to secondary hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Angela N.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Watkins, James M.; Ross, Abigail M.

    2016-10-01

    Volcanic glass is deposited with trace amounts (0.1-0.6 wt.%) of undegassed magmatic water dissolved in the glass. After deposition, meteoric water penetrates into the glass structure mostly as molecular H2O. Due to the lower δD (‰) values of non-tropical meteoric waters and the ∼30‰ offset between volcanic glass and environmental water during hydration, secondary water imparts lighter hydrogen isotopic values during secondary hydration up to a saturation concentration of 3-4 wt.% H2O. We analyzed compositionally and globally diverse volcanic glass from 0 to 10 ka for their δD and H2Ot across different climatic zones, and thus different δD of precipitation, on a thermal conversion elemental analyzer (TCEA) furnace attached to a mass spectrometer. We find that tephrachronologically coeval rhyolite glass is hydrated faster than basaltic glass, and in the majority of glasses an increase in age and total water content leads to a decrease in δD (‰), while a few equatorial glasses have little change in δD (‰). We compute a magmatic water correction based on our non-hydrated glasses, and calculate an average 103lnαglass-water for our hydrated felsic glasses of -33‰, which is similar to the 103lnαglass-water determined by Friedman et al. (1993a) of -34‰. We also determine a smaller average 103lnαglass-water for all our mafic glasses of -23‰. We compare the δD values of water extracted from our glasses to local meteoric waters following the inclusion of a -33‰ 103lnαglass-water. We find that, following a correction for residual magmatic water based on an average δD and wt.% H2Ot of recently erupted ashes from our study, the δD value of water extracted from hydrated volcanic glass is, on average, within 4‰ of local meteoric water. To better understand the difference in hydration rates of mafic and felsic glasses, we imaged 6 tephra clasts ranging in age and chemical composition with BSE (by FEI SEM) down to a submicron resolution. Mafic tephra

  20. Volcanic Ash Hazards and Risk in Argentina: Scientific and Social Collaborative Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovere, E. I., II; Violante, R. A.; Vazquez Herrera, M. D.; Martinez Fernandez, M. D. L. P.

    2015-12-01

    Due to the absence of alerts or volcanic impacts during 60 years (from 1932, Quizapu-Descabezado Grande -one of the major eruptions of the XX Century- until 1991 Hudson eruption) there was mild remembrance of volcanic hazards in the collective memory of the Argentina citizens. Since then and until April 2015, the social perception changed according to different factors: age, location, education, culture, vulnerability. This variability produces a maze of challenges that go beyond the scientific knowledge. Volcanic health hazards began to be understood in 2008 after the eruption of Chaiten volcano. The particle size of ashfall (international flights for several weeks. The fear of another eruption did not wait long when Calbuco volcano started activity in April 2015, it came at a time when Villarrica volcano was also in an eruptive phase, and the SERNAGEOMIN Chile, through the Observatory OVDAS of the Southern Andes, faced multiple natural disasters at the same time, 3 volcanoes in activity, lahars, pyroclastic flows and floods in the North. In Argentina, critical infrastructure, farming, livestock and primary supplies were affected mainly in the western region. Copahue volcano, is increasing unstability on seismic and geochemistry data since 2012. Caviahue resort village, distant only 8 Km. from the active vent happens to be a high vulnerable location. In 2014 GEVAS (Geology, Volcanoes, Environment and Health) Network ARGENTINA Civil Association started collaborative activities with SEGEMAR and in 2015 with the IAPG (Geoethics, Argentina), intending to promote Best Practices in volcanic and geological hazards. Geoscientists and the volcano vulnerable population are aware about the governmental commitment to assume a strategic planning for mitigation, facing a volcanic emergency. Recently, university undergraduate students from Chile and Argentina are networking to acquire the skills needed for a better preparedness to the next volcanic eruption.

  1. Geochemical Characteristics and Metallogenesis of Volcanic Rocks as Exemplified by Volcanic Rocks in Ertix,Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘铁庚; 叶霖

    1997-01-01

    Volcanic rocks in Ertix,Xinjiang,occurring in the collision zone between the Siberia Plate and the Junggar Plate,are distributed along the Eritix River Valley in northern Xinjiang.The volcanic rocks were dated at Late Paleozoic and can be divided into the spilite-keratophyre series and the basalt-andesite series.The spilite-keratophyre series volcanic rocks occur in the Altay orogenic belt at the southwest margin of the Siberia Plate.In addition to sodic volcanic rocks.There are also associated potassic-sodic volcanic rocks and potassic volcanic rocks.The potassic-sodic volcanic rocks occur at the bottom of the eruption cycle and control the distribution of Pb and Zn deposits.The potassic volcanic rocks occur at the top of the eruption cycle and are associated with Au and Cu mineralizations.The sodic volcanic rocks occur in the middle stage of eruption cycle and control the occurrence of Cu(Zn) deposits.The basalt-andesite series volcanic rocks distributed in the North Junggar orogenic belt at the north margin of the Junggar-Kazakstan Plate belong to the potassic sodic volcain rocks.The volcanic rocks distributed along the Ulungur fault are relatively rich in sodium and poor in potassium and are predominated by Cu mineralization and associated with Au mineralization.Those volcanic rocks distributed along the Ertix fault are relatively rich in K and poor in Na,with Au mineralization being dominant.

  2. An interdisciplinary approach to volcanic risk reduction under conditions of uncertainty: a case study of Tristan da Cunha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, A.; Barclay, J.; Simmons, P.; Loughlin, S.

    2013-12-01

    This research project adopted an interdisciplinary approach to volcanic risk reduction on the remote volcanic island of Tristan da Cunha (South Atlantic). New data were produced that: (1) established no spatio-temporal pattern to recent volcanic activity; (2) quantified the high degree of scientific uncertainty around future eruptive scenarios; (3) analysed the physical vulnerability of the community as a consequence of their geographical isolation and exposure to volcanic hazards; (4) evaluated social and cultural influences on vulnerability and resilience. Despite their isolation and prolonged periods of hardship, islanders have demonstrated an ability to cope with and recover from adverse events. This resilience is likely a function of remoteness, strong kinship ties, bonding social capital, and persistence of shared values and principles established at community inception. While there is good knowledge of the styles of volcanic activity on Tristan, given the high degree of scientific uncertainty about the timing, size and location of future volcanism, a qualitative scenario planning approach was used as a vehicle to convey this information to the islanders. This deliberative, anticipatory method allowed on-island decision makers to take ownership of risk identification, management and capacity building within their community. This paper demonstrates the value of integrating social and physical sciences with development of effective, tailored communication strategies in volcanic risk reduction.

  3. New Pliocene-Pleistocene 40Ar/ 39Ar ages fill in temporal gaps in the Nicaraguan volcanic record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saginor, Ian; Gazel, Esteban; Carr, Michael J.; Swisher, Carl C., III; Turrin, Brent

    2011-04-01

    The volcanic record of western Nicaragua documents a significant lull in volcanic activity that has persisted from the late Miocene (~ 7 Ma) to the formation of the modern volcanic front around 350 ka. This study fills this gap for the first time with samples collected in Northwest Nicaragua between Cosigüina and San Cristóbal volcanoes and with samples collected from the Nicaraguan Depression. We found two previously unknown volcanic units ranging from 3.6 to 1.3 Ma and the improved volcanic record allows us to reconstruct the geochemical evolution of the Nicaraguan arc. U/Th values increased by nearly threefold since the Miocene following the "carbonate crash" at 10 Ma, when dominantly carbonate sediment deposition shifted toward hemipelagic sediment deposition. This transition was thought to be abrupt, however our new data show that it took place gradually over the last 7 Ma. Northwest Nicaragua is a particularly interesting case study because it contains Middle Miocene volcanism on either side of the Nicaraguan Depression, the Coyol Formation (25-7 Ma) to the East and the Tamarindo Formation (14.7-11.7 Ma) to the West. The presence of Mid Miocene volcanism on either side of the Nicaraguan Depression has led to the hypothesis that the two coeval units, currently separated by ~ 100 km, were once connected and have since been separated by extension. Here, we present data suggesting that the Tamarindo and Coyol are geochemically distinct and therefore cannot be considered part of the same unit.

  4. Cluster Computing For Real Time Seismic Array Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, M.; Giudicepietro, F.

    A seismic array is an instrument composed by a dense distribution of seismic sen- sors that allow to measure the directional properties of the wavefield (slowness or wavenumber vector) radiated by a seismic source. Over the last years arrays have been widely used in different fields of seismological researches. In particular they are applied in the investigation of seismic sources on volcanoes where they can be suc- cessfully used for studying the volcanic microtremor and long period events which are critical for getting information on the volcanic systems evolution. For this reason arrays could be usefully employed for the volcanoes monitoring, however the huge amount of data produced by this type of instruments and the processing techniques which are quite time consuming limited their potentiality for this application. In order to favor a direct application of arrays techniques to continuous volcano monitoring we designed and built a small PC cluster able to near real time computing the kinematics properties of the wavefield (slowness or wavenumber vector) produced by local seis- mic source. The cluster is composed of 8 Intel Pentium-III bi-processors PC working at 550 MHz, and has 4 Gigabytes of RAM memory. It runs under Linux operating system. The developed analysis software package is based on the Multiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm and is written in Fortran. The message-passing part is based upon the LAM programming environment package, an open-source imple- mentation of the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The developed software system includes modules devote to receiving date by internet and graphical applications for the continuous displaying of the processing results. The system has been tested with a data set collected during a seismic experiment conducted on Etna in 1999 when two dense seismic arrays have been deployed on the northeast and the southeast flanks of this volcano. A real time continuous acquisition system has been simulated by

  5. Volcanic spreading forcing and feedback in geothermal reservoir development, Amiata Volcano, Italia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgia, Andrea; Mazzoldi, Alberto; Brunori, Carlo Alberto; Allocca, Carmine; Delcroix, Carlo; Micheli, Luigi; Vercellino, Alberto; Grieco, Giovanni

    2014-09-01

    -water aquifer) and the rocks of the geothermal field, constitute ideal pathways for water recharge during vapour extraction for geothermal energy production. We think that volcanic spreading could maintain faults in a critically stressed state, facilitating the occurrence of induced and triggered seismicity.

  6. Collateral variations between the concentrations of mercury and other water soluble ions in volcanic ash samples and volcanic activity during the 2014-2016 eruptive episodes at Aso volcano, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marumoto, Kohji; Sudo, Yasuaki; Nagamatsu, Yoshizumi

    2017-07-01

    During 2014-2016, the Aso volcano, located in the center of the Kyushu Islands, Japan, erupted and emitted large amounts of volcanic gases and ash. Two episodes of the eruption were observed; firstly Strombolian magmatic eruptive episodes from 25 November 2014 to the middle of May 2015, and secondly phreatomagmatic and phreatic eruptive episodes from September 2015 to February 2016. Bulk chemical analyses on total mercury (Hg) and major ions in water soluble fraction in volcanic ash fall samples were conducted. During the Strombolian magmatic eruptive episodes, total Hg concentrations averaged 1.69 ± 0.87 ng g- 1 (N = 33), with a range from 0.47 to 3.8 ng g- 1. In addition, the temporal variation of total Hg concentrations in volcanic ash varied with the amplitude change of seismic signals. In the Aso volcano, the volcanic tremors are always observed during eruptive stages and quiet interludes, and the amplitudes of tremors increase at eruptive stages. So, the temporal variation of total Hg concentrations could provide an indication of the level of volcanic activity. During the phreatomagmatic and phreatic eruptive episodes, on the other hand, total Hg concentrations in the volcanic ash fall samples averaged 220 ± 88 ng g- 1 (N = 5), corresponding to 100 times higher than those during the Strombolian eruptive episode. Therefore, it is possible that total Hg concentrations in volcanic ash samples are largely varied depending on the eruptive type. In addition, the ash fall amounts were also largely different among the two eruptive episodes. This can be also one of the factors controlling Hg concentrations in volcanic ash.

  7. Different deformation patterns using GPS in the volcanic process of El Hierro (Canary Island) 2011-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cañada, Laura; José García-Arias, María; Pereda de Pablo, Jorge; Lamolda, Héctor; López, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    Ground deformation is one of the most important parameter in volcano monitoring. The detected deformations in volcanic areas can be precursors of a volcanic activity and contribute with useful information to study the evolution of an unrest, eruption or any volcanic process. GPS is the most common technique used to measure volcano deformations. It can be used to detect slow displacement rates or much larger and faster deformations associated with any volcanic process. In volcanoes the deformation is expected to be a mixed of nature; during periods of quiescence it will be slow or not present, while increased activity slow displacement rates can be detected or much larger and faster deformations can be measure due to magma intrusion, for example in the hours to days prior a eruption beginning. In response to the anomalous seismicity detected at El Hierro in July 2011, the Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN) improved its volcano monitoring network in the island with continuous GPS that had been used to measure the ground deformation associated with the precursory unrest since summer 2011, submarine eruption (October 2011-March 2012) and the following unrest periods (2012-2013). The continuous GPS time series, together with other techniques, had been used to evaluate the activity and to detect changes in the process. We investigate changes in the direction and module of the deformation obtained by GPS and they show different patterns in every unrest period, very close to the seismicity locations and migrations.

  8. The VORISA Project: An Integrated Approach to Assessing Volcanic Hazard and Risk in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, J. M.; Moufti, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has numerous large monogenetic volcanic fields, known locally as 'Harrat'. The largest of these, Harrat Rahat, produced a basaltic fissure eruption in 1256 AD with lava flows travelling within 20 km of the Islamic holy city Al-Madinah. With over 900 visible basaltic and trachytic vents and periodic seismic swarms indicating stalled eruptions, an understanding of the risk of future eruptions in this volcanic field is vital. To systematically address this need we developed the Volcanic Risk in Saudi Arabia (VORISA) Project, a 3-year, multi-disciplinary international research collaboration that integrates geological, geophysical, hazard and risk studies. Detailed mapping and geochemical studies are being combined with new and existing age determinations to determine the style and sequence of events during past basaltic and trachytic eruptions. Data from gravity and magnetotelluric surveys are being integrated with microearthquake data from an 8-station borehole seismic research array to geophysically characterise the structure and nature of the crust, and thus constrain possible physical controls on magma propagation. All available data are being synthesised in hazard models to determine patterns in eruption frequency, magnitude, and style of past activity, as well as the probable location and style of a future event. Combined with geospatial vulnerability data, these hazard models, which include a reconstruction of the 1256 AD eruption, enable us to calculate and communicate volcanic risk to the city of Al-Madinah.

  9. 40Ar-39Ar Age Constraints on Volcanism and Tectonism in the Terror Rift of the Ross Sea, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Volcanic sills and dikes inferred from seismic reflection profiles and geophysical studies of the Ross Sea are thought to be related to the rift basins in the region, and their emplacement to be coeval with extension. However, lack of precise geochronology in the Terror Rift of the Ross Sea region has left these inferred relationships poorly constrained and has hindered neotectonic studies, because of the large temporal gaps between seismic reflectors of known ages. New 40Ar/39Ar geochronology presented here for submarine volcanic rocks provides better age constraints for neotectonic interpretations within the Terror Rift. Several samples from seamounts yielded young ages between 156 ± 21 and 122 ± 26 Ka. These ages support interpretations that extension within the Terror Rift was active at least through the Pleistocene. Three evenly spaced samples from the lowermost 100 m of Franklin Island range in age from 3.28 ± 0.04 to 3.73 ± 0.05 Ma. These age determinations demonstrate that construction of a small volcanic edifice such as Franklin Island took at least several hundred thousand years, and therefore that much larger ones in the Erebus Volcanic Province are likely to have taken considerably longer than previously inferred. This warrants caution in applying a limited number of age determinations to define the absolute ages of events in the Ross Sea region

  10. Aborted eruptions at Mt. Etna (Italy) in spring 2007 unveiled by an integrated study of gas emission and volcanic tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsaperla, S.; Behncke, B.; Giammanco, S.; Neri, M.; Langer, H.; Pecora, E.; Salerno, G.

    2012-04-01

    In spring 2007, a sequence of paroxysmal episodes took place at the Southeast Crater of Mt. Etna, Italy. Eruptive activity, characterised by Strombolian explosions, lava fountains, emission of lava flows and tephra, were all associated with an outstanding increase in the amplitude of volcanic tremor. In periods of quiescence between the eruptive episodes, recurring phases of seismic unrest were observed in forms of small temporary enhancements of the volcanic tremor amplitude, even though none of them culminated in eruptive activity. Here, we present the results of an integrated geophysical and geochemical data analysis encompassing records of volcanic tremor, thermal data, plume SO2 flux and radon over two months. We conclude that between February and April 2007, magma triggered repeated episodes of gas pulses and rock fracturing, but failed to reach the surface. Our multidisciplinary study allowed us to unveil these 'aborted' eruptions by investigating the long-temporal evolution of gas measurements along with seismic radiation. Short-term changes were additionally highlighted using a method of pattern classification based on Kohonen Maps and Fuzzy Clustering applied to volcanic tremor and radon data.

  11. Seismicity at Fuego, Pacaya, Izalco, and San Cristobal Volcanoes, Central America, 1973-1974

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNutt, S.R.; Harlow, D.H.

    1983-01-01

    Seismic data collected at four volcanoes in Central America during 1973 and 1974 indicate three sources of seismicity: regional earthquakes with hypocentral distances greater than 80 km, earthquakes within 40 km of each volcano, and seismic activity originating at the volcanoes due to eruptive processes. Regional earthquakes generated by the underthrusting and subduction of the Cocos Plate beneath the Caribbean Plate are the most prominent seismic feature in Central America. Earthquakes in the vicinity of the volcanoes occur on faults that appear to be related to volcano formation. Faulting near Fuego and Pacaya volcanoes in Guatemala is more complex due to motion on a major E-W striking transform plate boundary 40 km north of the volcanoes. Volcanic activity produces different kinds of seismic signatures. Shallow tectonic or A-type events originate on nearby faults and occur both singly and in swarms. There are typically from 0 to 6 A-type events per day with b value of about 1.3. At very shallow depths beneath Pacaya, Izalco, and San Cristobal large numbers of low-frequency or B-type events are recorded with predominant frequencies between 2.5 and 4.5 Hz and with b values of 1.7 to 2.9. The relative number of B-type events appears to be related to the eruptive states of the volcanoes; the more active volcanoes have higher levels of seismicity. At Fuego Volcano, however, low-frequency events have unusually long codas and appear to be similar to tremor. High-amplitude volcanic tremor is recorded at Fuego, Pacaya, and San Cristobal during eruptive periods. Large explosion earthquakes at Fuego are well recorded at five stations and yield information on near-surface seismic wave velocities (??=3.0??0.2 km/sec.). ?? 1983 Intern. Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior.

  12. Volcanic Eruption: Students Develop a Contingency Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisinger, Philipp; Wittlich, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Dangerous, loud, sensational, exciting - natural hazards have what it takes to get students attention around the globe. Arising interest is the first step to develop an intrinsic motivation to learn about the matter and endure the hardships that students might discover along the way of the unit. Natural hazards thereby establish a close-knit connection between physical and anthropological geography through analyzing the hazardous event and its consequences for the people living in the affected area. Following a general principle of didactics we start searching right on our doorsteps to offer students the possibility to gain knowledge on the familiar and later transfer it to the unknown example. Even in Southwest Germany - a region that is rather known for its wine than its volcanic activity - we can find a potentially hazardous region. The "Laacher See" volcano (a caldera lake) in northern Rhineland-Palatinate is according to Prof. H.U. Schminke a "potentially active volcano" . Its activity can be proven by seismic activities, or experienced when visiting the lake's southeastern shore, where carbondioxid and sulphur gases from the underlying magma chamber still bubble up. The Laacher See is part of a range of volcanoes (classified from 'potentially active' to 'no longer active') of the East Eifel Volcanic Field. Precariously the Laacher See is located closely to the densely populated agglomerations of Cologne (NE, distance: 45 km) and the former capital Bonn (NE: 35km), as well as Koblenz (E: 24km) and the Rhine river. Apart from that, the towns of Andernach (E: 8km ± 30 000 inhabitants) and Mayen (SW: 11km ±20 000 inhabitants) and many smaller towns and villages are nearby due to economic reasons. The number of people affected by a possible eruption easily exceeds two million people considering the range as prime measurement. The underlying danger, as projected in a simulation presented by Prof. Schminke, is a lava stream running down the Brohltal valley

  13. Seismic swarm associated with the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi Volcano, Alaska: earthquake locations and source parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppert, Natalia G.; Prejean, Stephanie G.; Hansen, Roger A.

    2011-01-01

    An energetic seismic swarm accompanied an eruption of Kasatochi Volcano in the central Aleutian volcanic arc in August of 2008. In retrospect, the first earthquakes in the swarm were detected about 1 month prior to the eruption onset. Activity in the swarm quickly intensified less than 48 h prior to the first large explosion and subsequently subsided with decline of eruptive activity. The largest earthquake measured as moment magnitude 5.8, and a dozen additional earthquakes were larger than magnitude 4. The swarm exhibited both tectonic and volcanic characteristics. Its shear failure earthquake features were b value = 0.9, most earthquakes with impulsive P and S arrivals and higher-frequency content, and earthquake faulting parameters consistent with regional tectonic stresses. Its volcanic or fluid-influenced seismicity features were volcanic tremor, large CLVD components in moment tensor solutions, and increasing magnitudes with time. Earthquake location tests suggest that the earthquakes occurred in a distributed volume elongated in the NS direction either directly under the volcano or within 5-10 km south of it. Following the MW 5.8 event, earthquakes occurred in a new crustal volume slightly east and north of the previous earthquakes. The central Aleutian Arc is a tectonically active region with seismicity occurring in the crusts of the Pacific and North American plates in addition to interplate events. We postulate that the Kasatochi seismic swarm was a manifestation of the complex interaction of tectonic and magmatic processes in the Earth's crust. Although magmatic intrusion triggered the earthquakes in the swarm, the earthquakes failed in context of the regional stress field.

  14. APhoRISM FP7 project: the Multi-platform volcanic Ash Cloud Estimation (MACE) infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merucci, Luca; Corradini, Stefano; Bignami, Christian; Stramondo, Salvatore

    2014-05-01

    APHORISM is an FP7 project that aims to develop innovative products to support the management and mitigation of the volcanic and the seismic crisis. Satellite and ground measurements will be managed in a novel manner to provide new and improved products in terms of accuracy and quality of information. The Multi-platform volcanic Ash Cloud Estimation (MACE) infrastructure will exploit the complementarity between geostationary, and polar satellite sensors and ground measurements to improve the ash detection and retrieval and to fully characterize the volcanic ash clouds from source to the atmosphere. The basic idea behind the proposed method consists to manage in a novel manner, the volcanic ash retrievals at the space-time scale of typical geostationary observations using both the polar satellite estimations and in-situ measurements. The typical ash thermal infrared (TIR) retrieval will be integrated by using a wider spectral range from visible (VIS) to microwave (MW) and the ash detection will be extended also in case of cloudy atmosphere or steam plumes. All the MACE ash products will be tested on three recent eruptions representative of different eruption styles in different clear or cloudy atmospheric conditions: Eyjafjallajokull (Iceland) 2010, Grimsvotn (Iceland) 2011 and Etna (Italy) 2011-2012. The MACE infrastructure will be suitable to be implemented in the next generation of ESA Sentinels satellite missions.

  15. Acoustic waves in the atmosphere and ground generated by volcanic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichihara, Mie; Lyons, John; Oikawa, Jun; Takeo, Minoru [Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Instituto Geofisico, Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Ladron de Guevara E11-253, Aptdo 2759, Quito (Ecuador); Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2012-09-04

    This paper reports an interesting sequence of harmonic tremor observed in the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake volcano, southern Japan. The main eruptive activity started with ashcloud forming explosive eruptions, followed by lava effusion. Harmonic tremor was transmitted into the ground and observed as seismic waves at the last stage of the effusive eruption. The tremor observed at this stage had unclear and fluctuating harmonic modes. In the atmosphere, on the other hand, many impulsive acoustic waves indicating small surface explosions were observed. When the effusion stopped and the erupted lava began explosive degassing, harmonic tremor started to be transmitted also to the atmosphere and observed as acoustic waves. Then the harmonic modes became clearer and more stable. This sequence of harmonic tremor is interpreted as a process in which volcanic degassing generates an open connection between the volcanic conduit and the atmosphere. In order to test this hypothesis, a laboratory experiment was performed and the essential features were successfully reproduced.

  16. The roar of Yasur: Handheld audio recorder monitoring of Vanuatu volcanic vent activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; Howell, Robert; Radebaugh, Jani; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.

    2016-08-01

    We describe how near-field audio recording using a pocket digital sound recorder can usefully document volcanic activity, demonstrating the approach at Yasur, Vanuatu in May 2014. Prominent emissions peak at 263 Hz, interpreted as an organ-pipe mode. High-pass filtering was found to usefully discriminate volcano vent noise from wind noise, and autocorrelation of the high pass acoustic power reveals a prominent peak in exhalation intervals of 2.5, 4 and 8 s, with a number of larger explosive events at 200 s intervals. We suggest that this compact and inexpensive audio instrumentation can usefully supplement other field monitoring such as seismic or infrasound. A simple estimate of acoustic power interpreted with a dipole jet noise model yielded vent velocities too low to be compatible with pyroclast emission, suggesting difficulties with this approach at audio frequencies (perhaps due to acoustic absorption by volcanic gases).

  17. The 2007 Nazko, British Columbia, earthquake sequence: Injection of magma deep in the crust beneath the Anahim volcanic belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, J.F.; Balfour, N.; Hickson, C.; Kao, H.; White, Rickie; Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Mazzotti, S.; Rogers, Gary C.; Al-Khoubbi, I.; Bird, A.L.; Esteban, L.; Kelman, M.; Hutchinson, J.; McCormack, D.

    2011-01-01

    On 9 October 2007, an unusual sequence of earthquakes began in central British Columbia about 20 km west of the Nazko cone, the most recent (circa 7200 yr) volcanic center in the Anahim volcanic belt. Within 25 hr, eight earthquakes of magnitude 2.3-2.9 occurred in a region where no earthquakes had previously been recorded. During the next three weeks, more than 800 microearthquakes were located (and many more detected), most at a depth of 25-31 km and within a radius of about 5 km. After about two months, almost all activity ceased. The clear P- and S-wave arrivals indicated that these were high-frequency (volcanic-tectonic) earthquakes and the b value of 1.9 that we calculated is anomalous for crustal earthquakes but consistent with volcanic-related events. Analysis of receiver functions at a station immediately above the seismicity indicated a Moho near 30 km depth. Precise relocation of the seismicity using a double-difference method suggested a horizontal migration at the rate of about 0:5 km=d, with almost all events within the lowermost crust. Neither harmonic tremor nor long-period events were observed; however, some spasmodic bursts were recorded and determined to be colocated with the earthquake hypocenters. These observations are all very similar to a deep earthquake sequence recorded beneath Lake Tahoe, California, in 2003-2004. Based on these remarkable similarities, we interpret the Nazko sequence as an indication of an injection of magma into the lower crust beneath the Anahim volcanic belt. This magma injection fractures rock, producing high-frequency, volcanic-tectonic earthquakes and spasmodic bursts.

  18. Characteristics of volcanic reservoirs and distribution rules of effective reservoirs in the Changling fault depression, Songliao Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pujun Wang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the Songliao Basin, volcanic oil and gas reservoirs are important exploration domains. Based on drilling, logging, and 3D seismic (1495 km2 data, 546 sets of measured physical properties and gas testing productivity of 66 wells in the Changling fault depression, Songliao Basin, eruptive cycles and sub-lithofacies were distinguished after lithologic correction of the 19,384 m volcanic well intervals, so that a quantitative analysis was conducted on the relation between the eruptive cycles, lithologies and lithofacies and the distribution of effective reservoirs. After the relationship was established between lithologies, lithofacies & cycles and reservoir physical properties & oil and gas bearing situations, an analysis was conducted on the characteristics of volcanic reservoirs and the distribution rules of effective reservoirs. It is indicated that 10 eruptive cycles of 3 sections are totally developed in this area, and the effective reservoirs are mainly distributed at the top cycles of eruptive sequences, with those of the 1st and 3rd Members of Yingcheng Formation presenting the best reservoir properties. In this area, there are mainly 11 types of volcanic rocks, among which rhyolite, rhyolitic tuff, rhyolitic tuffo lava and rhyolitic volcanic breccia are the dominant lithologies of effective reservoirs. In the target area are mainly developed 4 volcanic lithofacies (11 sub-lithofacies, among which upper sub-lithofacies of effusive facies and thermal clastic sub-lithofacies of explosion lithofacies are predominant in effective reservoirs. There is an obvious corresponding relationship between the physical properties of volcanic reservoirs and the development degree of effective reservoirs. The distribution of effective reservoirs is controlled by reservoir physical properties, and the formation of effective reservoirs is influenced more by porosity than by permeability. It is concluded that deep volcanic gas exploration presents a good

  19. Multiphase flow modelling of volcanic ash particle settling in water using adaptive unstructured meshes

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobs, C.T.; Collins, G S; M. D. Piggott; S. C. Kramer; Wilson, C.R.G.

    2013-01-01

    Small-scale experiments of volcanic ash particle settling in water have demonstrated that ash particles can either settle slowly and individually, or rapidly and collectively as a gravitationally unstable ash-laden plume. This has important implications for the emplacement of tephra deposits on the seabed. Numerical modelling has the potential to extend the results of laboratory experiments to larger scales and explore the conditions under which plumes may form and persist, but many existing ...

  20. ACTIVITY AND Vp/Vs RATIO OF VOLCANO-TECTONIC SEISMIC SWARM ZONES AT NEVADO DEL RUIZ VOLCANO, COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Londoño B. John Makario

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the seismic activity for volcano-tectonic earthquake (VT swarms zones at Nevado del Ruiz Volcano (NRV was carried out for the interval 1985- 2002, which is the most seismic active period at NRV until now (2010. The swarm-like seismicity of NRV was frequently concentrated in very well defined clusters around the volcano. The seismic swarm zone located at the active crater was the most active during the entire time. The seismic swarm zone located to the west of the volcano suggested some relationship with the volcanic crises. It was active before and after the two eruptions occurred in November 1985 and September 1989. It is believed that this seismic activity may be used as a monitoring tool of volcanic activity. For each seismic swarm zone the Vp/Vs ratio was also calculated by grouping of earthquakes and stations. It was found that each seismic swarm zone had a distinct Vp/Vs ratio with respect to the others, except for the crater and west swarm zones, which had the same value. The average Vp/Vs ratios for the seismic swarm zones located at the active crater and to the west of the volcano are about 6-7% lower than that for the north swarm zone, and about 3% lower than that for the south swarm zone. We suggest that the reduction of the Vp/Vs ratio is due to degassing phenomena inside the central and western earthquake swarm zones, or due to the presence of microcracks inside the volcano. This supposition is in agreement with other studies of geophysics, geochemistry and drilling surveys carried out at NRV.

  1. Timing and climate forcing of volcanic eruptions for the past 2,500 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigl, M; Winstrup, M; McConnell, J R; Welten, K C; Plunkett, G; Ludlow, F; Büntgen, U; Caffee, M; Chellman, N; Dahl-Jensen, D; Fischer, H; Kipfstuhl, S; Kostick, C; Maselli, O J; Mekhaldi, F; Mulvaney, R; Muscheler, R; Pasteris, D R; Pilcher, J R; Salzer, M; Schüpbach, S; Steffensen, J P; Vinther, B M; Woodruff, T E

    2015-07-30

    Volcanic eruptions contribute to climate variability, but quantifying these contributions has been limited by inconsistencies in the timing of atmospheric volcanic aerosol loading determined from ice cores and subsequent cooling from climate proxies such as tree rings. Here we resolve these inconsistencies and show that large eruptions in the tropics and high latitudes were primary drivers of interannual-to-decadal temperature variability in the Northern Hemisphere during the past 2,500 years. Our results are based on new records of atmospheric aerosol loading developed from high-resolution, multi-parameter measurements from an array of Greenland and Antarctic ice cores as well as distinctive age markers to constrain chronologies. Overall, cooling was proportional to the magnitude of volcanic forcing and persisted for up to ten years after some of the largest eruptive episodes. Our revised timescale more firmly implicates volcanic eruptions as catalysts in the major sixth-century pandemics, famines, and socioeconomic disruptions in Eurasia and Mesoamerica while allowing multi-millennium quantification of climate response to volcanic forcing.

  2. Earth modeling and estimation of the local seismic ground motion due to site geology in complex volcanoclastic areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Di Fiore

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic areas often show complex behaviour as far as seismic waves propagation and seismic motion at surface are concerned. In fact, the finite lateral extent of surface layers such as lava flows, blocks, differential welding and/or zeolitization within pyroclastic deposits, introduces in the propagation of seismic waves effects such as the generation of surface waves at the edge, resonance in lateral direction, diffractions and scattering of energy, which tend to modify the amplitude as well as the duration of the ground motion. The irregular topographic surface, typical of volcanic areas, also strongly influences the seismic site response. Despite this heterogeneity, it is unfortunately a common geophysical and engineering practice to evaluate even in volcanic environments the subsurface velocity field with monodimensional investigation method (i.e. geognostic soundings, refraction survey, down-hole, etc. prior to the seismic site response computation which in a such cases is obviously also made with 1D algorithms. This approach often leads to highly inaccurate results. In this paper we use a different approach, i.e. a fully 2D P-wave Çturning rayÈ tomographic survey followed by 2D seismic site response modeling. We report here the results of this approach in three sites located at short distance from Mt. Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei and characterized by overburdens constituted by volcanoclastic deposits with large lateral and vertical variations of their elastic properties. Comparison between 1D and 2D Dynamic Amplification Factor shows in all reported cases entirely different results, both in terms of peak period and spectral contents, as expected from the clear bidimensionality of the geological section. Therefore, these studies suggest evaluating carefully the subsoil geological structures in areas characterized by possible large lateral and vertical variations of the elastic properties in order to reach correct seismic site response

  3. Comparison of seismic sources for shallow seismic: sledgehammer and pyrotechnics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brom Aleksander

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The pyrotechnic materials are one of the types of the explosives materials which produce thermal, luminous or sound effects, gas, smoke and their combination as a result of a self-sustaining chemical reaction. Therefore, pyrotechnics can be used as a seismic source that is designed to release accumulated energy in a form of seismic wave recorded by tremor sensors (geophones after its passage through the rock mass. The aim of this paper was to determine the utility of pyrotechnics for shallow seismic engineering. The work presented comparing the conventional method of seismic wave excitation for seismic refraction method like plate and hammer and activating of firecrackers on the surface. The energy released by various sources and frequency spectra was compared for the two types of sources. The obtained results did not determine which sources gave the better results but showed very interesting aspects of using pyrotechnics in seismic measurements for example the use of pyrotechnic materials in MASW.

  4. A seismic network to investigate the sedimentary hosted hydrothermal Lusi system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javad Fallahi, Mohammad; Mazzini, Adriano; Lupi, Matteo; Obermann, Anne; Karyono, Karyono

    2016-04-01

    The 29th of May 2006 marked the beginning of the sedimentary hosted hydrothermal Lusi system. During the last 10 years we witnessed numerous alterations of the Lusi system behavior that coincide with the frequent seismic and volcanic activity occurring in the region. In order to monitor the effect that the seismicity and the activity of the volcanic arc have on Lusi, we deployed a ad hoc seismic network. This temporary network consist of 10 broadband and 21 short period stations and is currently operating around the Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex, along the Watukosek fault system and around Lusi, in the East Java basin since January 2015. We exploit this dataset to investigate surface wave and shear wave velocity structure of the upper-crust beneath the Arjuno-Welirang-Lusi complex in the framework of the Lusi Lab project (ERC grant n° 308126). Rayleigh and Love waves travelling between each station-pair are extracted by cross-correlating long time series of ambient noise data recorded at the stations. Group and phase velocity dispersion curves are obtained by time-frequency analysis of cross-correlation functions, and are tomographically inverted to provide 2D velocity maps corresponding to different sampling depths. 3D shear wave velocity structure is then acquired by inverting the group velocity maps.

  5. Determining resolvability of mantle plumes with synthetic seismic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, R.; Van Keken, P. E.; Ritsema, J.; Fichtner, A.; Goes, S. D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Hotspot volcanism in locations such as Hawaii and Iceland is commonly thought to be associated with plumes rising from the deep mantle. In theory these dynamic upwellings should be visible in seismic data due to their reduced seismic velocity and their effect on mantle transition zone thickness. Numerous studies have attempted to image plumes [1,2,3], but their deep mantle origin remains unclear. In addition, a debate continues as to whether lower mantle plumes are visible in the form of body wave travel time delays, or whether such delays will be erased due to wavefront healing. Here we combine geodynamic modeling of mantle plumes with synthetic seismic waveform modeling in order to quantitatively determine under what conditions mantle plumes should be seismically visible. We model compressible plumes with phase changes at 410 km and 670 km, and a viscosity reduction in the upper mantle. These plumes thin from greater than 600 km in diameter in the lower mantle, to 200 - 400 km in the upper mantle. Plume excess potential temperature is 375 K, which maps to seismic velocity reductions of 4 - 12 % in the upper mantle, and 2 - 4 % in the lower mantle. Previous work that was limited to an axisymmetric spherical geometry suggested that these plumes would not be visible in the lower mantle [4]. Here we extend this approach to full 3D spherical wave propagation modeling. Initial results using a simplified cylindrical plume conduit suggest that mantle plumes with a diameter of 1000 km or greater will retain a deep mantle seismic signature. References[1] Wolfe, Cecily J., et al. "Seismic structure of the Iceland mantle plume." Nature 385.6613 (1997): 245-247. [2] Montelli, Raffaella, et al. "Finite-frequency tomography reveals a variety of plumes in the mantle." Science 303.5656 (2004): 338-343. [3] Schmandt, Brandon, et al. "Hot mantle upwelling across the 660 beneath Yellowstone." Earth and Planetary Science Letters 331 (2012): 224-236. [4] Hwang, Yong Keun, et al

  6. Cenozoic volcanic rocks of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, R.G.; Gregory, R.T.; Brown, G.F.

    2016-01-01

    The Cenozoic volcanic rocks of Saudi Arabia cover about 90,000 km2, one of the largest areas of alkali olivine basalt in the world. These volcanic rocks are in 13 separate fields near the eastern coast of the Red Sea and in the western Arabian Peninsula highlands from Syria southward to the Yemen Arab Republic.

  7. The SOUTHERN PUNA Seismic Experiment: Shape of the Subducting Nazca Plate, Areas of Concentrated Mantle and Crustal Earthquakes, and Crustal Focal Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahy, P.; Chen, C.; Kay, S. M.; Brown, L. D.; Alvarado, P. M.; Sandvol, E. A.; Heit, B.; Yuan, X.

    2010-12-01

    The SOUTHERN PUNA Seismic Experiment in the Central Andes between 25° - 28°S and 70° - 65°W recorded data in a 74-instrument array from Dec 07 to Nov 09 with the purpose of evaluating the structure and seismic character of the mantle and crust at the southern end of the Puna-Antiplano Plateau. Hypocenter locations for local and regional mantle earthquakes from 16 months of continuous recording confirm the persistence of the backarc teleseismic Antofalla Gap in intermediate depth mantle seismicity between 25.5° and 27.5°S consistent with the interpretation of a hot mantle wedge under this region. The best located Wadati Benioff Zone events agree with the subducting Nazca Plate contours of Cahill and Isacks (1992) north of 27°S, but show a more abrupt southward shallowing of contours in agreement with the Anderson et al. (2007) contours outlining the projected path of the already subducted Juan Fernandez Ridge. Another prominent feature in the data is the concentration of hypocenters in the Pipanaco nest to the south of the Antofalla Gap between 27° and 29°S. New PUNA results together with available HCMT solutions indicate NW oriented normal and strike-slip faulting in three general clusters within this nest at ~130km, 150km and 180km depth. Hypocenter locations and fault solutions for the Pipanaco Nest suggest flexure associated with steepening of the subducting slab consistent with the revised Wadati Benioff Zone contours. In an area of little to no crustal seismicity in global catalogs over the same time period, hundreds of well-located crustal earthquakes at depths less than 15km were recorded by the PUNA array. Among these earthquakes are three distinct clusters near relatively young volcanic centers. One cluster defines a nest northeast of the < 1 Ma Cerro Blanco caldera. The other two clusters are characterized by large quantities of earthquakes within 24-36 hours (swarms) near the Cerro Galan caldera that last erupted at ~2 Ma and near a ~1 Ma or

  8. REGULATION OF SEISMIC LOAD ON BUILDINGS SEISMIC DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh. N. Mazhiev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The issues of regulation of seismic loads on structures using kinematic supports of highstrength concrete on the impregnated coarse aggregate and seismic isolation bearings Belleville. The results of experimental studies related to the obtaining of a new coarse aggregate and construction of seismic isolation bearings. Addresses the issues of interaction forces in thehemispherical supports vibration process.

  9. E–W strike slip shearing of Kinwat granitoid at South East Deccan Volcanic Province, Kinwat, Maharashtra, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R D Kaplay; T Vijay Kumar; Soumyajit Mukherjee; P R Wesanekar; Md Babar; Sumeet Chavan

    2017-07-01

    We study the margin of South East Deccan Volcanic Province around Kinwat lineament, Maharashtra, India, which is NW extension of the Kaddam Fault. Structural field studies document ∼E–W strike-slip mostly brittle faults from the basement granite. We designate this as ‘Western boundary East Dharwar Craton Strike-slip Zone’ (WBEDCSZ). At local level, the deformation regime from Kinwat, Kaddam Fault, micro-seismically active Nanded and seismically active Killari corroborate with the nearby lineaments. Morphometric analyses suggest that the region is moderately tectonically active. The region of intense strike-slip deformation lies between seismically active fault along Tapi in NW and Bhadrachalam in the SE part of the Kaddam Fault/lineament. The WBEDCSZ with the surface evidences of faulting, presence of a major lineaments and intersection of faults could be a zone of intraplate earthquake.

  10. Stutter seismic source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumma, W. H.; Hughes, D. R.; Zimmerman, N. S.

    1980-08-12

    An improved seismic prospecting system comprising the use of a closely spaced sequence of source initiations at essentially the same location to provide shorter objective-level wavelets than are obtainable with a single pulse. In a preferred form, three dynamite charges are detonated in the same or three closely spaced shot holes to generate a downward traveling wavelet having increased high frequency content and reduced content at a peak frequency determined by initial testing.

  11. Principle and Program of Evaluating Diffuse Seismicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Xiangdong

    2001-01-01

    Concept and origin of the term "the diffuse seismicity" are illustrated. Some different viewpoints regarding the diffuse seismicity and the influence characteristics on determining seismic design basis of engineering from the seismicity are analyzed. Principle and program for evaluating diffuse seismicity are studied and discussed base on over contents.

  12. Sedimentation influx and volcanic interactions in the Fuji Five Lakes: implications for paleoseismological records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamair, Laura; Hubert-Ferrari, Aurélia; Yamamoto, Shinya; El Ouahabi, Meriam; Garrett, Ed; Shishikura, Masanobu; Schmidt, Sabine; Boes, Evelien; Obrochta, Stephen; Nakamura, Atsunori; Miyairi, Yosuke; Yokoyama, Yusuke; De Batist, Marc; Heyvaert, Vanessa M. A.

    2017-04-01

    The Fuji Fives Lakes are located at the foot of Mount Fuji volcano close to the triple junction, where the North American Plate, the Eurasian plate and the Philippine Sea Plate meet. These lakes are ideally situated to study Mount Fuji volcanism and the interaction between volcanism, changes in lake sedimentation rates and the ability of lakes to record paleoearthquakes. Here, we present newly acquired geological data of Lake Yamanaka and Lake Motosu, including seismic reflection profiles, gravity and piston cores. These two lakes and their respective watersheds were affected by several eruptions of Mount Fuji. Lake Yamanaka, a very shallow lake (max. depth 14 m), was heavily impacted by the scoria fall-out of the A.D. 1707 Hoei eruption of Mount Fuji. A detailed investigation of the effect of the Hoei eruption was conducted on short gravity cores, using high resolution XRD, C/N and 210Pb/137Cs analyses. The preliminary results suggest that the sedimentation rate of Lake Yamanaka drastically reduced after the Hoei eruption, followed by an increase until the present day. Similarly, lacustrine sedimentation in Lake Motosu (max. depth 122 m) was disturbed by Mount Fuji volcanism at a larger scale. The watershed of Lake Motosu was impacted by several lava flows and scoria cones. For example, the Omuro scoria cone reduced the catchment size of Lake Motosu and modified its physiography. The related scoria fall out covered an extensive part of the lake catchment and reduced terrigenous sedimentary influx to Lake Motosu. Within the deep basin of Lake Motosu, seismic reflection data shows two different periods that are distinguished by a major change in the dominant sedimentary processes. During the first period, sublacustrine landslides and turbidity currents were the dominant sedimentation processes. During the second one, the seismic stratigraphy evidences only deposition of numerous turbidites interrupting the hemipelagic sedimentation. Changes in sedimentary processes

  13. Degassing Processes at Persistently Active Explosive Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smekens, Jean-Francois

    Among volcanic gases, sulfur dioxide (SO2) is by far the most commonly measured. More than a monitoring proxy for volcanic degassing, SO 2 has the potential to alter climate patterns. Persistently active explosive volcanoes are characterized by short explosive bursts, which often occur at periodic intervals numerous times per day, spanning years to decades. SO 2 emissions at those volcanoes are poorly constrained, in large part because the current satellite monitoring techniques are unable to detect or quantify plumes of low concentration in the troposphere. Eruption plumes also often show high concentrations of ash and/or aerosols, which further inhibit the detection methods. In this work I focus on quantifying volcanic gas emissions at persistently active explosive volcanoes and their variations over short timescales (minutes to hours), in order to document their contribution to natural SO2 flux as well as investigate the physical processes that control their behavior. In order to make these measurements, I first develop and assemble a UV ground-based instrument, and validate it against an independently measured source of SO2 at a coal-burning power plant in Arizona. I establish a measurement protocol and demonstrate that the instrument measures SO 2 fluxes with explosions with periods of minutes to hours for the past several decades. Semeru produces an average of 21-71 tons of SO2 per day, amounting to a yearly output of 8-26 Mt. Using the Semeru data, along with a 1-D transient numerical model of magma ascent, I test the validity of a model in which a viscous plug at the top of the conduit produces cycles of eruption and gas release. I find that it can be a valid hypothesis to explain the observed patterns of degassing at Semeru. Periodic behavior in such a system occurs for a very narrow range of conditions, for which the mass balance between magma flux and open-system gas escape repeatedly generates a viscous plug, pressurizes the magma beneath the plug, and

  14. A Bayesian Seismic Hazard Analysis for the city of Naples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faenza, Licia; Pierdominici, Simona; Hainzl, Sebastian; Cinti, Francesca R.; Sandri, Laura; Selva, Jacopo; Tonini, Roberto; Perfetti, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    In the last years many studies have been focused on determination and definition of the seismic, volcanic and tsunamogenic hazard in the city of Naples. The reason is that the town of Naples with its neighboring area is one of the most densely populated places in Italy. In addition, the risk is increased also by the type and condition of buildings and monuments in the city. It is crucial therefore to assess which active faults in Naples and surrounding area could trigger an earthquake able to shake and damage the urban area. We collect data from the most reliable and complete databases of macroseismic intensity records (from 79 AD to present). For each seismic event an active tectonic structure has been associated. Furthermore a set of active faults, well-known from geological investigations, located around the study area that they could shake the city, not associated with any earthquake, has been taken into account for our studies. This geological framework is the starting point for our Bayesian seismic hazard analysis for the city of Naples. We show the feasibility of formulating the hazard assessment procedure to include the information of past earthquakes into the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis. This strategy allows on one hand to enlarge the information used in the evaluation of the hazard, from alternative models for the earthquake generation process to past shaking and on the other hand to explicitly account for all kinds of information and their uncertainties. The Bayesian scheme we propose is applied to evaluate the seismic hazard of Naples. We implement five different spatio-temporal models to parameterize the occurrence of earthquakes potentially dangerous for Naples. Subsequently we combine these hazard curves with ShakeMap of past earthquakes that have been felt in Naples. The results are posterior hazard assessment for three exposure times, e.g., 50, 10 and 5 years, in a dense grid that cover the municipality of Naples, considering bedrock soil

  15. Lakshmi Planum: A distinctive highland volcanic province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Kari M.; Head, James W.

    Lakshmi Planum, a broad smooth plain located in western Ishtar Terra and containing two large oval depressions (Colette and Sacajawea), has been interpreted as a highland plain of volcanic origin. Lakshmi is situated 3 to 5 km above the mean planetary radius and is surrounded on all sides by bands of mountains interpreted to be of compressional tectonic origin. Four primary characteristics distinguish Lakshmi from other volcanic regions known on the planet, such as Beta Regio: (1) high altitude, (2) plateau-like nature, (3) the presence of very large, low volcanic constructs with distinctive central calderas, and (4) its compressional tectonic surroundings. Building on the previous work of Pronin, the objective is to establish the detailed nature of the volcanic deposits on Lakshmi, interpret eruption styles and conditions, sketch out an eruption history, and determine the relationship between volcanism and the tectonic environment of the region.

  16. Establishing seismic design criteria to achieve an acceptable seismic margin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, R.P. [RPK Structural Mechanics Consulting, Inc., Yorba Linda, CA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    In order to develop a risk based seismic design criteria the following four issues must be addressed: (1) What target annual probability of seismic induced unacceptable performance is acceptable? (2). What minimum seismic margin is acceptable? (3) Given the decisions made under Issues 1 and 2, at what annual frequency of exceedance should the Safe Shutdown Earthquake ground motion be defined? (4) What seismic design criteria should be established to reasonably achieve the seismic margin defined under Issue 2? The first issue is purely a policy decision and is not addressed in this paper. Each of the other three issues are addressed. Issues 2 and 3 are integrally tied together so that a very large number of possible combinations of responses to these two issues can be used to achieve the target goal defined under Issue 1. Section 2 lays out a combined approach to these two issues and presents three potentially attractive combined resolutions of these two issues which reasonably achieves the target goal. The remainder of the paper discusses an approach which can be used to develop seismic design criteria aimed at achieving the desired seismic margin defined in resolution of Issue 2. Suggestions for revising existing seismic design criteria to more consistently achieve the desired seismic margin are presented.

  17. Seismic basement in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grad, Marek; Polkowski, Marcin

    2016-06-01

    The area of contact between Precambrian and Phanerozoic Europe in Poland has complicated structure of sedimentary cover and basement. The thinnest sedimentary cover in the Mazury-Belarus anteclize is only 0.3-1 km thick, increases to 7-8 km along the East European Craton margin, and 9-12 km in the Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ). The Variscan domain is characterized by a 1- to 2-km-thick sedimentary cover, while the Carpathians are characterized by very thick sediments, up to c. 20 km. The map of the basement depth is created by combining data from geological boreholes with a set of regional seismic refraction profiles. These maps do not provide data about the basement depth in the central part of the TESZ and in the Carpathians. Therefore, the data set is supplemented by 32 models from deep seismic sounding profiles and a map of a high-resistivity (low-conductivity) layer from magnetotelluric soundings, identified as a basement. All of these data provide knowledge about the basement depth and of P-wave seismic velocities of the crystalline and consolidated type of basement for the whole area of Poland. Finally, the differentiation of the basement depth and velocity is discussed with respect to geophysical fields and the tectonic division of the area.

  18. Geomorphological Approach for Regional Zoning In The Merapi Volcanic Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langgeng Wahyu Santosa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Geomorphologial approach can be used as the basic for identifying and analyzing the natural resources potentials, especially in volcanic landscape. Based on its geomorphology, Merapi volcanic landscape can be divided into 5 morphological units, i.e.: volcanic cone, volcanic slope, volcanic foot, volcanic foot plain, and fluvio-volcanic plain. Each of these morphological units has specific characteristic and natural resources potential. Based on the condition of geomorphology, the regional zoning can be compiled to support the land use planning and to maintain the conservation of environmental function in the Merapi Volcanic area.

  19. Long-period seismic events with strikingly regular temporal patterns on Katla volcano's south flank (Iceland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgattoni, Giulia; Jeddi, Zeinab; Gudmundsson, Ólafur; Einarsson, Páll; Tryggvason, Ari; Lund, Björn; Lucchi, Federico

    2016-09-01

    Katla is a threatening volcano in Iceland, partly covered by the Mýrdalsjökull ice cap. The volcano has a large caldera with several active geothermal areas. A peculiar cluster of long-period seismic events started on Katla's south flank in July 2011, during an unrest episode in the caldera that culminated in a glacier outburst. The seismic events were tightly clustered at shallow depth in the Gvendarfell area, 4 km south of the caldera, under a small glacier stream at the southern margin of Mýrdalsjökull. No seismic events were known to have occurred in this area before. The most striking feature of this seismic cluster is its temporal pattern, characterized by regular intervals between repeating seismic events, modulated by a seasonal variation. Remarkable is also the stability of both the time and waveform features over a long time period, around 3.5 years. We have not found any comparable examples in the literature. Both volcanic and glacial processes can produce similar waveforms and therefore have to be considered as potential seismic sources. Discerning between these two causes is critical for monitoring glacier-clad volcanoes and has been controversial at Katla. For this new seismic cluster on the south flank, we regard volcano-related processes as more likely than glacial ones for the following reasons: 1) the seismic activity started during an unrest episode involving sudden melting of the glacier and a jökulhlaup; 2) the glacier stream is small and stagnant; 3) the seismicity remains regular and stable for years; 4) there is no apparent correlation with short-term weather changes, such as rainstorms. We suggest that a small, shallow hydrothermal system was activated on Katla's south flank in 2011, either by a minor magmatic injection or by changes of permeability in a local crack system.

  20. Volcanism and associated hazards: the Andean perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilling, R. I.

    2009-12-01

    Andean volcanism occurs within the Andean Volcanic Arc (AVA), which is the product of subduction of the Nazca Plate and Antarctica Plates beneath the South America Plate. The AVA is Earth's longest but discontinuous continental-margin volcanic arc, which consists of four distinct segments: Northern Volcanic Zone, Central Volcanic Zone, Southern Volcanic Zone, and Austral Volcanic Zone. These segments are separated by volcanically inactive gaps that are inferred to indicate regions where the dips of the subducting plates are too shallow to favor the magma generation needed to sustain volcanism. The Andes host more volcanoes that have been active during the Holocene (past 10 000 years) than any other volcanic region in the world, as well as giant caldera systems that have produced 6 of the 47 largest explosive eruptions (so-called "super eruptions") recognized worldwide that have occurred from the Ordovician to the Pleistocene. The Andean region's most powerful historical explosive eruption occurred in 1600 at Huaynaputina Volcano (Peru). The impacts of this event, whose eruptive volume exceeded 11 km3, were widespread, with distal ashfall reported at distances >1000 km away. Despite the huge size of the Huaynaputina eruption, human fatalities from hazardous processes (pyroclastic flows, ashfalls, volcanogenic earthquakes, and lahars) were comparatively small owing to the low population density at the time. In contrast, lahars generated by a much smaller eruption (indecisiveness by government officials, rather than any major deficiencies in scientific data. Ruiz's disastrous outcome, however, together with responses to subsequent hazardous eruptions in Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru has spurred significant improvements in reducing volcano risk in the Andean region. But much remains to be done.

  1. Volcanism and associated hazards: The Andean perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilling, R.I.

    2009-01-01

    Andean volcanism occurs within the Andean Volcanic Arc (AVA), which is the product of subduction of the Nazca Plate and Antarctica Plates beneath the South America Plate. The AVA is Earth's longest but discontinuous continental-margin volcanic arc, which consists of four distinct segments: Northern Volcanic Zone, Central Volcanic Zone, Southern Volcanic Zone, and Austral Volcanic Zone. These segments are separated by volcanically inactive gaps that are inferred to indicate regions where the dips of the subducting plates are too shallow to favor the magma generation needed to sustain volcanism. The Andes host more volcanoes that have been active during the Holocene (past 10 000 years) than any other volcanic region in the world, as well as giant caldera systems that have produced 6 of the 47 largest explosive eruptions (so-called "super eruptions") recognized worldwide that have occurred from the Ordovician to the Pleistocene. The Andean region's most powerful historical explosive eruption occurred in 1600 at Huaynaputina Volcano (Peru). The impacts of this event, whose eruptive volume exceeded 11 km3, were widespread, with distal ashfall reported at distances >1000 km away. Despite the huge size of the Huaynaputina eruption, human fatalities from hazardous processes (pyroclastic flows, ashfalls, volcanogenic earthquakes, and lahars) were comparatively small owing to the low population density at the time. In contrast