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Sample records for volcanic vents south

  1. Spatial and Alignment Analyses for a field of Small Volcanic Vents South of Pavonis Mons Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Glaze, L. S.; Greeley, R.; Hauber, E.; Baloga, S. M.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Williams, D. A.; Glotch, T. D.

    2008-01-01

    The Tharsis province of Mars displays a variety of small volcanic vent (10s krn in diameter) morphologies. These features were identified in Mariner and Viking images [1-4], and Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data show them to be more abundant than originally observed [5,6]. Recent studies are classifying their diverse morphologies [7-9]. Building on this work, we are mapping the location of small volcanic vents (small-vents) in the Tharsis province using MOLA, Thermal Emission Imaging System, and High Resolution Stereo Camera data [10]. Here we report on a preliminary study of the spatial and alignment relationships between small-vents south of Pavonis Mons, as determined by nearest neighbor and two-point azimuth statistical analyses. Terrestrial monogenetic volcanic fields display four fundamental characteristics: 1) recurrence rates of eruptions,2 ) vent abundance, 3) vent distribution, and 4) tectonic relationships [11]. While understanding recurrence rates typically requires field measurements, insight into vent abundance, distribution, and tectonic relationships can be established by mapping of remotely sensed data, and subsequent application of spatial statistical studies [11,12], the goal of which is to link the distribution of vents to causal processes.

  2. Spatial and Alignment Analyses for a Field of Small Volcanic Vents South of Pavonis Mons and Implications for the Tharsis Province, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, Jacob E.; Glaze, Lori S.; Greeley, Ronald; Hauber, Ernst; Baloga, Stephen; Sakimoto, Susan E. H.; Williams, David A.; Glotch, Timothy D.

    2009-01-01

    A field of small volcanic vents south of Pavonis Mons was mapped with each vent assigned a two-dimensional data point. Nearest neighbor and two-point azimuth analyses were applied to the resulting location data. Nearest neighbor results show that vents within this field are spatially random in a Poisson sense, suggesting that the vents formed independently of each other without sharing a centralized magma source at shallow depth. Two-point azimuth results show that the vents display north-trending alignment relationships between one another. This trend corresponds to the trends of faults and fractures of the Noachian-aged Claritas Fossae, which might extend into our study area buried beneath more recently emplaced lava flows. However, individual elongate vent summit structures do not consistently display the same trend. The development of the volcanic field appears to display tectonic control from buried Noachian-aged structural patterns on small, ascending magma bodies while the surface orientations of the linear vents might reflect different, younger tectonic patterns. These results suggest a complex interaction between magma ascension through the crust, and multiple, older, buried Tharsis-related tectonic structures.

  3. In Brief: Volcanic vents found in deep Caribbean waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-04-01

    Scientists surveying the Cayman Trough in the Caribbean Sea have discovered the world's deepest undersea volcanic vents, or “black smokers,” the National Oceanography Center (NOC) in Southampton, UK, announced on 11 April. The vents were found at a depth of 5000 meters, about 800 meters deeper than any previously discovered. Jon Copley, a marine biologist at the University of Southampton's School of Ocean and Earth Science, said, “Seeing the world's deepest black-smoker vents looming out of the darkness was awe-inspiring.” Geochemist Doug Connelly of NOC, principal scientist of the expedition, noted, “We hope our discovery will yield new insights into biogeochemically important elements in one of the most extreme naturally occurring environments on our planet.” Researchers used an NOC-developed Autosub6000 robot submarine, which was remotely controlled from the Royal Research Ship James Cook. For more information, visit http://www.thesearethevoyages.net/.

  4. Differences in recovery between deep-sea hydrothermal vent and vent-proximate communities after a volcanic eruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gollner, S.; Govenar, B.; Martinez Arbizu, P.; Mills, S.; Le Bris, N.; Weinbauer, M.; Shank, T.M.; Bright, M.

    2015-01-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents and the surrounding basalt seafloor are subject to major natural disturbance events such as volcanic eruptions. In the near future, anthropogenic disturbance in the form of deep-sea mining could also significantly affect the faunal communities of hydrothermal vents. In th

  5. Cluster Analysis of vents in monogenetic volcanic fields, Lunar Crater Volcanic Field (Nevada)

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    Tadini, A.; Cortes, J. A.; Valentine, G. A.; Johnson, P. J.; Tibaldi, A.; Bonali, F. L.

    2012-12-01

    Monogenetic volcanic fields pose a serious risk to human activities and settlements due to their high occurrence around the world and because of the type of eruptive activity that they exhibit. The need of adequate tools to better undertake volcanic hazard assessment for volcanic fields, especially from a spatial point of view, is of key importance at the time of mitigate such hazard. Among these tools, a better understanding of the spatial distribution of cones and vents and any structural/tectonical relationship are essential to understand the plumbing system of the field and thus help to predict the likelihood location of future eruptions. In this study we have developed a spatial methodology, which is the combination of various methodologies developed for volcanic textures and other clustering goals [1,2], to study the clustering of volcanic vents and their relation with structural features from satellite images. The methodology first involves the statistical identification and removal of spatial outliers using a predictive elliptical area [2] and the generation of randomly distributed points in the same predictive area. A comparison of the Near Neighbor Distance (NND) between the generated data and the data measured in a volcanic field is used to determine whether the vents are clustered or not. If the vents are clustered, a combination of hierarchical clustering and K-means [3] is then used to identify the clusters and their related vents. Results are then further constrained with the study of lineaments and other structural features that can be affected and related with the clusters. The methodology was tested in the Lunar Crater Volcanic Field, Nevada (USA) and successfully has helped to identify tectonically controlled lineaments from those that are resultant of geomorphological processes such the drainage control imposed by the cone clusters. Theoretical approaches has been developed before to constrain the plumbing of a volcanic field [4], however these

  6. Spatial Compilation of Holocene Volcanic Vents in the Western Conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, D. W.; Siebert, L.

    2015-12-01

    A spatial compilation of all known Holocene volcanic vents in the western conterminous United States has been assembled. This compilation records volcanic vent location (latitude/longitude coordinates), vent type (cinder cone, dome, etc.), geologic map unit description, rock type, age, numeric age and reference (if dated), geographic feature name, mapping source, and, where available, spatial database source. Primary data sources include: USGS geologic maps, USGS Data Series, the Smithsonian Global Volcanism Program (GVP) catalog, and published journal articles. A total of 726 volcanic vents have been identified from 45 volcanoes or volcanic fields spanning ten states. These vents are found along the length of the Cascade arc in the Pacific Northwest, widely around the Basin and Range province, and at the southern margin of the Colorado Plateau into New Mexico. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Volcano Early Warning System (NVEWS) identifies 28 volcanoes and volcanic centers in the western conterminous U.S. that pose moderate, high, or very high threats to surrounding communities based on their recent eruptive histories and their proximity to vulnerable people, property, and infrastructure. This compilation enhances the understanding of volcano hazards that could threaten people and property by providing the context of where Holocene eruptions have occurred and where future eruptions may occur. Locations in this compilation can be spatially compared to located earthquakes, used as generation points for numerical hazard models or hazard zonation buffering, and analyzed for recent trends in regional volcanism and localized eruptive activity.

  7. Volcanic carbon dioxide vents show ecosystem effects of ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall-Spencer, Jason M; Rodolfo-Metalpa, Riccardo; Martin, Sophie; Ransome, Emma; Fine, Maoz; Turner, Suzanne M; Rowley, Sonia J; Tedesco, Dario; Buia, Maria-Cristina

    2008-07-01

    The atmospheric partial pressure of carbon dioxide (p(CO(2))) will almost certainly be double that of pre-industrial levels by 2100 and will be considerably higher than at any time during the past few million years. The oceans are a principal sink for anthropogenic CO(2) where it is estimated to have caused a 30% increase in the concentration of H(+) in ocean surface waters since the early 1900s and may lead to a drop in seawater pH of up to 0.5 units by 2100 (refs 2, 3). Our understanding of how increased ocean acidity may affect marine ecosystems is at present very limited as almost all studies have been in vitro, short-term, rapid perturbation experiments on isolated elements of the ecosystem. Here we show the effects of acidification on benthic ecosystems at shallow coastal sites where volcanic CO(2) vents lower the pH of the water column. Along gradients of normal pH (8.1-8.2) to lowered pH (mean 7.8-7.9, minimum 7.4-7.5), typical rocky shore communities with abundant calcareous organisms shifted to communities lacking scleractinian corals with significant reductions in sea urchin and coralline algal abundance. To our knowledge, this is the first ecosystem-scale validation of predictions that these important groups of organisms are susceptible to elevated amounts of p(CO(2)). Sea-grass production was highest in an area at mean pH 7.6 (1,827 (mu)atm p(CO(2))) where coralline algal biomass was significantly reduced and gastropod shells were dissolving due to periods of carbonate sub-saturation. The species populating the vent sites comprise a suite of organisms that are resilient to naturally high concentrations of p(CO(2)) and indicate that ocean acidification may benefit highly invasive non-native algal species. Our results provide the first in situ insights into how shallow water marine communities might change when susceptible organisms are removed owing to ocean acidification.

  8. Quantifying volcanic hazard at Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy) with uncertainty assessment: 1. Vent opening maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, Andrea; Isaia, Roberto; Neri, Augusto; Vitale, Stefano; Aspinall, Willy P.; Bisson, Marina; Flandoli, Franco; Baxter, Peter J.; Bertagnini, Antonella; Esposti Ongaro, Tomaso; Iannuzzi, Enrico; Pistolesi, Marco; Rosi, Mauro

    2015-04-01

    Campi Flegrei is an active volcanic area situated in the Campanian Plain (Italy) and dominated by a resurgent caldera. The great majority of past eruptions have been explosive, variable in magnitude, intensity, and in their vent locations. In this hazard assessment study we present a probabilistic analysis using a variety of volcanological data sets to map the background spatial probability of vent opening conditional on the occurrence of an event in the foreseeable future. The analysis focuses on the reconstruction of the location of past eruptive vents in the last 15 ka, including the distribution of faults and surface fractures as being representative of areas of crustal weakness. One of our key objectives was to incorporate some of the main sources of epistemic uncertainty about the volcanic system through a structured expert elicitation, thereby quantifying uncertainties for certain important model parameters and allowing outcomes from different expert weighting models to be evaluated. Results indicate that past vent locations are the most informative factors governing the probabilities of vent opening, followed by the locations of faults and then fractures. Our vent opening probability maps highlight the presence of a sizeable region in the central eastern part of the caldera where the likelihood of new vent opening per kilometer squared is about 6 times higher than the baseline value for the whole caldera. While these probability values have substantial uncertainties associated with them, our findings provide a rational basis for hazard mapping of the next eruption at Campi Flegrei caldera.

  9. Volcanic hazard on Deception Island (South Shetland Islands, Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini, S.; Geyer, A.; Martí, J.; Pedrazzi, D.; Aguirre-Díaz, G.

    2014-09-01

    Deception Island is the most active volcano in the South Shetland Islands and has been the scene of more than twenty identified eruptions over the past two centuries. In this contribution we present the first comprehensive long-term volcanic hazard assessment for this volcanic island. The research is based on the use of probabilistic methods and statistical techniques to estimate volcanic susceptibility, eruption recurrence and the most likely future eruptive scenarios. We perform a statistical analysis of the time series of past eruptions and the spatial extent of their products, including lava flows, fallout, pyroclastic density currents and lahars. The Bayesian event tree statistical method HASSET is applied to calculate eruption recurrence, while the QVAST tool is used in an analysis of past activity to calculate the possibility that new vents will open (volcanic susceptibility). On the basis of these calculations, we identify a number of significant scenarios using the GIS-based VORIS 2.0.1 and LAHARZ software and evaluate the potential extent of the main volcanic hazards to be expected on the island. This study represents a step forward in the evaluation of volcanic hazard on Deception Island and the results obtained are potentially useful for long-term emergency planning.

  10. Altered epiphyte community and sea urchin diet in Posidonia oceanica meadows in the vicinity of volcanic CO2 vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Patricia; Gambi, Maria Cristina; Vizzini, Salvatrice; Califano, Gianmaria; Tavares, Ana Mafalda; Santos, Rui; Martínez-Crego, Begoña

    2017-06-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) predicted for 2100 is expected to shift seagrass epiphyte communities towards the dominance of more tolerant non-calcifying taxa. However, little is known about the indirect effects of such changes on food provision to key seagrass consumers. We found that epiphyte communities of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica in two naturally acidified sites (i.e. north and south sides of a volcanic CO2 vent) and in a control site away from the vent at the Ischia Island (NW Mediterranean Sea) significantly differed in composition and abundance. Such differences involved a higher abundance of non-calcareous crustose brown algae and a decline of calcifying polychaetes in both acidified sites. A lower epiphytic abundance of crustose coralline algae occurred only in the south side of the vents, thus suggesting that OA may alter epiphyte assemblages in different ways due to interaction with local factors such as differential fish herbivory or hydrodynamics. The OA effects on food items (seagrass, epiphytes, and algae) indirectly propagated into food provision to the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, as reflected by a reduced P. oceanica exploitation (i.e. less seagrass and calcareous epiphytes in the diet) in favour of non-calcareous green algae in both vent sites. In contrast, we detected no difference close and outside the vents neither in the composition of sea urchin diet nor in the total abundance of calcareous versus non-calcareous taxa. More research, under realistic scenarios of predicted pH reduction (i.e. ≤ 0.32 units of pH by 2100), is still necessary to better understand cascading effects of this altered urchin exploitation of food resources under acidified conditions on ecosystem diversity and function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The roar of Yasur: Handheld audio recorder monitoring of Vanuatu volcanic vent activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; Howell, Robert; Radebaugh, Jani; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.

    2016-08-01

    We describe how near-field audio recording using a pocket digital sound recorder can usefully document volcanic activity, demonstrating the approach at Yasur, Vanuatu in May 2014. Prominent emissions peak at 263 Hz, interpreted as an organ-pipe mode. High-pass filtering was found to usefully discriminate volcano vent noise from wind noise, and autocorrelation of the high pass acoustic power reveals a prominent peak in exhalation intervals of 2.5, 4 and 8 s, with a number of larger explosive events at 200 s intervals. We suggest that this compact and inexpensive audio instrumentation can usefully supplement other field monitoring such as seismic or infrasound. A simple estimate of acoustic power interpreted with a dipole jet noise model yielded vent velocities too low to be compatible with pyroclast emission, suggesting difficulties with this approach at audio frequencies (perhaps due to acoustic absorption by volcanic gases).

  12. Response of key stress-related genes of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica in the vicinity of submarine volcanic vents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lauritano

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Submarine volcanic vents are being used as natural laboratories to assess the effects of CO2 on marine organisms and communities, as this gas is the main component of emissions. Seagrasses should positively react to increased dissolved carbon, but in vicinity of volcanic vents there may be toxic substances, that can have indirect effects on seagrasses. Here we analysed the expression of 35 stress-related genes in the Mediterranean keystone seagrass species P. oceanica in the vicinity of submerged volcanic vents located in the Islands of Ischia and Panarea, Italy, and compared them with those from control sites away from the influence of vents. Reverse Transcription-Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-qPCR was used to characterize the expression levels of genes. Fifty one per cent of genes analysed showed significant expression changes. Metal detoxification genes were mostly down-regulated in relation to controls both in Ischia and Panarea locations, indicating that P. oceanica does not increase the synthesis of heavy metal detoxification proteins in response to the environmental conditions present at the two vents. The expression levels of genes involved in free radical detoxification indicate that, in contrast with Ischia, P. oceanica at the Panarea vent face stressors that result in the production of reactive oxygen species triggering antioxidant responses. In addition, heat shock proteins were also activated at Panarea and not at Ischia. Overall, our study reveals that P. oceanica is generally under higher stress in the vicinity of the vents at Panarea than at Ischia, possibly resulting from environmental and evolutionary differences existing between the two volcanic sites. This is the first study analysing gene responses in marine plants living near natural CO2 vents and our results call for a careful consideration of factors, other than CO2 and acidification, that can cause stress to seagrasses and other organisms near volcanic vents.

  13. The Chthonic Charging of Volcanic Flows: The Generation of Vent Lightning

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    Méndez Harper, J.; Dufek, J.

    2015-12-01

    While volcanic lightning has been reported for millennia, the physics that generate charge in plumes still require clarification. Lightning observations during the Augustine (2006) and Redoubt (2009) eruptions have revealed a new form of lightning: nearly continuous, vent discharges associated with the explosive phase of the eruption. Vent lightning is often small (10-100 m in length) and disorganized, suggesting the existence of multiple, transient charge centers proximal to the volcanic vent. Thomas et al., 2007 and Behnke et al., 2012 have postulated that this form of lightning is driven by fragmentation charging [James et al., 2008]. However, triboelectrification—frictional charging arising from particle-particle collisions as material is advected up to the vent—should also play an important role. Because tribocharging is modulated by collision rates and energies, it is within the conduit and the gas-thrust regions that this frictional process should be most efficient. Indeed, the work of Cimarelli et al., 2014 has suggested that lightning can be generated at the vent via triboelectric charging alone. Using an energy-based comparison, we investigate the relative efficiencies of fracto- and triboelectric charging. To generate charged particles via a fragmentation process, we employ Prince Rupert's Drops (PRDs), meta-stable, tadpole-shaped structures formed by quenching molten glass in water. While a PDR's head is extremely strong, even the slightest damage to the tail causes explosive disintegration of the drop [Silverman et al., 2012]. A set of PDRs are disrupted in a controlled environment and the charge on the resulting particles is measured using a set of Faraday cups. The energy density associated with the breaking of PRDs is on the order of 105-106 J/m3. Then, to investigate tribocharging at similar energies, we eject spherical particles at high velocities, producing particle-particle collisions in a novel Faraday cube sensor. Our setup allows us to

  14. Welded tuff infilling a volcanic vent at Weolseong, Republic of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reedman, Antony John; Park, Ki Hwa; Merriman, Richard James; Kim, Seon Eok

    1987-06-01

    A plug of parataxitically welded tuff, with an elliptical (700 × 400 m) cross section, crops out in Weolseong district, Republic of Korea. It intrudes late Cretaceous granodiorite and extrusive tuffs of the Chisulryoung Volcanic Formation and displays a steeply inclined welding foliation, concordant with the intrusive contacts, and a subvertical stretching lineation. These fabrics are interpreted as resulting from laminar shearing in a boundary layer during deposition of the tuff by agglutination along the walls of a vent which served as a feeder for extrusive ignimbrites.

  15. Multiphase flow above explosion sites in debris-filled volcanic vents: Insights from analogue experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Pierre-Simon; White, James D. L.; Zimanowski, Bernd; Büttner, Ralf

    2008-11-01

    Discrete explosive bursts are known from many volcanic eruptions. In maar-diatreme eruptions, they have occurred in debris-filled volcanic vents when magma interacted with groundwater, implying that material mobilized by such explosions passed through the overlying and enclosing debris to reach the surface. Although other studies have addressed the form and characteristics of craters formed by discrete explosions in unconsolidated material, no details are available regarding the structure of the disturbed debris between the explosion site and the surface. Field studies of diatreme deposits reveal cross-cutting, steep-sided zones of non-bedded volcaniclastic material that have been inferred to result from sedimentation of material transported by "debris jets" driven by explosions. In order to determine the general processes and deposit geometry resulting from discrete, explosive injections of entrained particles through a particulate host, we ran a series of analogue experiments. Specific volumes of compressed (0.5-2.5 MPa) air were released in bursts that drove gas-particle dispersions through a granular host. The air expanded into and entrained coloured particles in a small crucible before moving upward into the host (white particles). Each burst drove into the host an expanding cavity containing air and coloured particles. Total duration of each run, recorded with high-speed video, was approximately 0.5-1 s. The coloured beads sedimented into the transient cavity. This same behaviour was observed even in runs where there was no breaching of the surface, and no coloured beads ejected. A steep-sided body of coloured beads was left that is similar to the cross-cutting pipes observed in deposits filling real volcanic vents, in which cavity collapse can result not only from gas escape through a granular host as in the experiments, but also through condensation of water vapour. A key conclusion from these experiments is that the geometry of cross-cutting volcaniclastic

  16. Using Spatial Density to Characterize Volcanic Fields on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, J. A.; Bleacher, J. E.; Connor, C. B.; Connor, L. J.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a new tool to planetary geology for quantifying the spatial arrangement of vent fields and volcanic provinces using non parametric kernel density estimation. Unlike parametricmethods where spatial density, and thus the spatial arrangement of volcanic vents, is simplified to fit a standard statistical distribution, non parametric methods offer more objective and data driven techniques to characterize volcanic vent fields. This method is applied to Syria Planum volcanic vent catalog data as well as catalog data for a vent field south of Pavonis Mons. The spatial densities are compared to terrestrial volcanic fields.

  17. Retrieving eruptive vent conditions from dynamical properties of unsteady volcanic plume using high-speed imagery and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournigand, Pierre-Yves; Taddeucci, Jacopo; José Peña Fernandez, Juan; Gaudin, Damien; Sesterhenn, Jörn; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Del Bello, Elisabetta

    2016-04-01

    Vent conditions are key parameters controlling volcanic plume dynamics and the ensuing different hazards, such as human health issues, infrastructure damages, and air traffic disruption. Indeed, for a given magma and vent geometry, plume development and stability over time mainly depend on the mass eruption rate, function of the velocity and density of the eruptive mixture at the vent, where direct measurements are impossible. High-speed imaging of eruptive plumes and numerical jet simulations were here non-dimensionally coupled to retrieve eruptive vent conditions starting from measurable plume parameters. High-speed videos of unsteady, momentum-driven volcanic plumes (jets) from Strombolian to Vulcanian activity from three different volcanoes (Sakurajima, Japan, Stromboli, Italy, and Fuego, Guatemala) were recorded in the visible and the thermal spectral ranges by using an Optronis CR600x2 (1280x1024 pixels definition, 500 Hz frame rate) and a FLIR SC655 (640x480 pixels definition, 50 Hz frame rate) cameras. Atmospheric effects correction and pre-processing of the thermal videos were performed to increase measurement accuracy. Pre-processing consists of the extraction of the plume temperature gradient over time, combined with a temperature threshold in order to remove the image background. The velocity and the apparent surface temperature fields of the plumes, and their changes over timescales of tenths of seconds, were then measured by particle image velocimetry and thermal image analysis, respectively, of the pre-processed videos. The parameters thus obtained are representative of the outer plume surface, corresponding to its boundary shear layer at the interface with the atmosphere, and may significantly differ from conditions in the plume interior. To retrieve information on the interior of the plume, and possibly extrapolate it even at the eruptive vent level, video-derived plume parameters were non-dimensionally compared to the results of numerical

  18. Structural significance of the south Tyrrhenian volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiosi, G.; Musacchio, G.; Ventura, G.; de Astis, G.

    2003-04-01

    The southern part of the Tyrrhenian Sea represents a transition from ocenic- (the Tyrrhenian Sea) to continental-domain (the Calabrian Arc) and is affected by active calkalkaline to potassic volcanism (the Eolian Islands). Active extensional tectonics, coupled with the general upwelling of northern Sicily and Calabria continental crust, coexists with active subduction of the Ionian Plate beneath the Calabrian Arc. This has been interpreted as the result of the detachment of the slab beneath the Calbrian Arc. Present-day tectonics is characterized by NE-SW normal faults and NNW- SSE dextral oblique-slip faults. The normal faults form the major peri- Tyrrhenian basins. Refraction and high resolution onshore-offshore wide-angle-reflection profiles, as well as potential field modeling, provide a 3D image of the Moho. Short wave-length undulations characterize the Moho beneath the Aeolian Arch. The major upraise is about 6 km, beneath the Aeolian active volcanic area, and affects all the crustal boundaries. Another sharp crustal thinning is observed beneath the gulf of Patti at the south-eastern edge of the Tyrrhenian basin. We suggest that the graben-like structure, occurring along the Salina-Lipari-Vulcano islands and oriented at high angles to the trench, is lithospheric and can be followed down to Moho depths. NNW-SSE dextral oblique-slip faults, like the Tindari Letojanni fault system, control the Salina-Lipari-Vulcano portion of the Aeolian volcanism and connect the oceanic crust of the Marsili Basin to the Malta Escarpment, through the Etna volcano. Across this lineament seismicity changes from mostly shallow to the west, to deep intra- slab to the east.

  19. Response of key stress-related genes of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica in the vicinity of submarine volcanic vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritano, C.; Ruocco, M.; Dattolo, E.; Buia, M. C.; Silva, J.; Santos, R.; Olivé, I.; Costa, M. M.; Procaccini, G.

    2015-07-01

    Submarine volcanic vents are being used as natural laboratories to assess the effects of increased ocean acidity and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration on marine organisms and communities. However, in the vicinity of volcanic vents other factors in addition to CO2, which is the main gaseous component of the emissions, may directly or indirectly confound the biota responses to high CO2. Here we used for the first time the expression of antioxidant and stress-related genes of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica to assess the stress levels of the species. Our hypothesis is that unknown factors are causing metabolic stress that may confound the putative effects attributed to CO2 enrichment only. We analyzed the expression of 35 antioxidant and stress-related genes of P. oceanica in the vicinity of submerged volcanic vents located in the islands of Ischia and Panarea, Italy, and compared them with those from control sites away from the influence of vents. Reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to characterize gene expression patterns. Fifty-one percent of genes analyzed showed significant expression changes. Metal detoxification genes were mostly down-regulated in relation to controls at both Ischia and Panarea, indicating that P. oceanica does not increase the synthesis of heavy metal detoxification proteins in response to the environmental conditions present at the two vents. The up-regulation of genes involved in the free radical detoxification response (e.g., CAPX, SODCP and GR) indicates that, in contrast with Ischia, P. oceanica at the Panarea site faces stressors that result in the production of reactive oxygen species, triggering antioxidant responses. In addition, heat shock proteins were also activated at Panarea and not at Ischia. These proteins are activated to adjust stress-accumulated misfolded proteins and prevent their aggregation as a response to some stressors, not necessarily high temperature. This is the first

  20. Carbon fluxes from hydrothermal vents off Milos, Aegean Volcanic Arc, and the influence of venting on the surrounding ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Paul; Aliani, Stefano; Bianchi, Nike; Kennedy, Hilary; Linke, Peter; Morri, Carla

    2014-05-01

    The island of Milos, in the Aegean Sea, has extensive hydrothermal fields to the east and southeast of the island with additional venting areas near the entrance to and within the central caldera. A calculation of the total area of the vent fields, based on ship and aerial surveys, suggested that the hydrothermal fields occupy 70 km2, twice the area previously estimated. The vents ranged in water depth from the intertidal to 300 m. As a result of the low depths there was abundant free gas release: in places water boiled on the seabed. The stream of gas bubbles rising through the sandy seabed drove a shallow re-circulation of bottom seawater. The majority of the water released with the gas, with a mean pH of 5.5, was re-circulated bottom water that had become acidified in contact with CO2 gas and was often diluted by admixture with the vapour phase from the deeper fluids. The major component of the free gas, 80%, was CO2, with an estimated total flux of 1.5-7.5 x 1012 g a-1. The methane flux, by comparison, was of the order of 1010 g a.-1 Using methane as a tracer it was shown that the major gas export from the vents was below the thermocline towards the southwest, in agreement with the prevailing currents. Areas of hydrothermal brine seepage occurred between the gas vents and occasional brine pools were observed in seabed depressions. Under relatively calm conditions, many of the brine seeps were covered by thick minero-bacterial mats consisting of silica and sulphur and surrounded by mats of diatoms and cyanobacteria. The minerals were not deposited in the absence of bacteria. Storms disrupted the mats, leading to an export of material to the surrounding area. Stable isotope data from sediments and sediment trap material suggested that exported POM was processed by zooplankton. The combined effects of the geothermal heating of the seabed, the large gas flux, variation in the venting and the effect of the brine seeps had a dramatic effect on the surrounding

  1. Morphology and Distribution of Volcanic Vents in the Orientale Basin from Chandrayaan-1 Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, James; Pieters, C.; Staid, M.; Mustard, J.; Taylor, L.; McCord, T.; Isaacson, P.; Klima, R.; Petro, N.; Clark, R.; Nettles, J.; Whitten, J.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most fundamental questions in the geological and thermal evolution of the Moon is the nature and history of mantle melting and its relationship to the formation and evolution of lunar multi-ringed basins. Mare volcanic deposits provide evidence for the nature, magnitude and composition of mantle melting as a function of space and time [1]. Many argue that mantle partial melts are derived from depths well below the influence of multiringed basin impact events [1], while others postulate that the formation of these basins can cause mantle perturbations that are more directly linked to the generation ascent and eruption of mare basalts [2,3]. In any case, longer-term basin evolution will considerably influence the state and orientation of stress in the lithosphere, and the location of mare volcanic vents in basins as a function of time [4]. Thus, the location, nature and ages of volcanic vents and deposits in relation to multi-ringed impact basins provides evidence for the role that these basins played in the generation of volcanism or in the influence of the basins on surface volcanic eruption and deposit concentration. Unfortunately, most lunar multi-ringed impact basins have been eroded by impacts or filled with lunar mare deposits [5-8], with estimates of the thickness of mare fill extending up to more than six km in the central part of some basins [9-11]. The interior of most basins (e.g., Crisium, Serenitatis, Imbrium, Humorum) are almost completely covered and obscured. Although much is known about the lava filling of multi-ringed basins, and particularly the most recent deposits [5-8], little is known about initial stages of mare volcanism and its relationship to the impact event. One multi-ringed basin, Orientale, offers substantial clues to the relationships of basin interiors and mare basalt volcanism.

  2. Assessing future vent opening locations at the Somma-Vesuvio volcanic complex: 1. A new information geodatabase with uncertainty characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadini, A.; Bisson, M.; Neri, A.; Cioni, R.; Bevilacqua, A.; Aspinall, W. P.

    2017-06-01

    This study presents new and revised data sets about the spatial distribution of past volcanic vents, eruptive fissures, and regional/local structures of the Somma-Vesuvio volcanic system (Italy). The innovative features of the study are the identification and quantification of important sources of uncertainty affecting interpretations of the data sets. In this regard, the spatial uncertainty of each feature is modeled by an uncertainty area, i.e., a geometric element typically represented by a polygon drawn around points or lines. The new data sets have been assembled as an updatable geodatabase that integrates and complements existing databases for Somma-Vesuvio. The data are organized into 4 data sets and stored as 11 feature classes (points and lines for feature locations and polygons for the associated uncertainty areas), totaling more than 1700 elements. More specifically, volcanic vent and eruptive fissure elements are subdivided into feature classes according to their associated eruptive styles: (i) Plinian and sub-Plinian eruptions (i.e., large- or medium-scale explosive activity); (ii) violent Strombolian and continuous ash emission eruptions (i.e., small-scale explosive activity); and (iii) effusive eruptions (including eruptions from both parasitic vents and eruptive fissures). Regional and local structures (i.e., deep faults) are represented as linear feature classes. To support interpretation of the eruption data, additional data sets are provided for Somma-Vesuvio geological units and caldera morphological features. In the companion paper, the data presented here, and the associated uncertainties, are used to develop a first vent opening probability map for the Somma-Vesuvio caldera, with specific attention focused on large or medium explosive events.

  3. Discovery of a black smoker vent field and vent fauna at the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Rolf B; Rapp, Hans Tore; Thorseth, Ingunn H; Lilley, Marvin D; Barriga, Fernando J A S; Baumberger, Tamara; Flesland, Kristin; Fonseca, Rita; Früh-Green, Gretchen L; Jorgensen, Steffen L

    2010-11-23

    The Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) represents one of the most slow-spreading ridge systems on Earth. Previous attempts to locate hydrothermal vent fields and unravel the nature of venting, as well as the provenance of vent fauna at this northern and insular termination of the global ridge system, have been unsuccessful. Here, we report the first discovery of a black smoker vent field at the AMOR. The field is located on the crest of an axial volcanic ridge (AVR) and is associated with an unusually large hydrothermal deposit, which documents that extensive venting and long-lived hydrothermal systems exist at ultraslow-spreading ridges, despite their strongly reduced volcanic activity. The vent field hosts a distinct vent fauna that differs from the fauna to the south along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The novel vent fauna seems to have developed by local specialization and by migration of fauna from cold seeps and the Pacific.

  4. The NOAA/PMEL Vents Program - 1983 to 2013: A History of Deep-Sea Volcanic and Hydrothermal Exploration and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, S. R.; Baker, E. T.; Embley, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    Inspiration for the Vents program arose from two serendipitous events: the discovery of seafloor spreading-center hydrothermal venting on the Galápagos Rift in 1977, and NOAA's deployment of the first US civilian research multibeam bathymetric sonar on the NOAA Ship Surveyor in 1979. Multibeam mapping in the NE Pacific revealed an unprecedented and revolutionary perspective of the Gorda and Juan de Fuca spreading centers, thus stimulating a successful exploration for volcanic and hydrothermal activity at numerous locations along both. After the 1986 discovery of the first "megaplume,", quickly recognized as the water column manifestation of a deep submarine volcanic eruption, the Vents program embarked on a multi-decadal effort to discover and understand local-, regional-, and, ultimately, global-scale physical, chemical, and biological ocean environmental impacts of submarine volcanism and hydrothermal venting. The Vents program made scores of scientific discoveries, many of which owed their success to the program's equally innovative and productive technological prowess. These discoveries were documented in hundreds of peer-reviewed papers by Vents researchers and their colleagues around the world. An emblematic success was the internationally recognized, first-ever detection, location, and study of an active deep volcanic eruption in 1993. To continue the Vents mission and further enhance its effectiveness in marine science and technology innovation, the program was reorganized in 2014 into two distinct, but closely linked, programs: Earth-Oceans Interactions and Acoustics. Both are currently engaged in expeditions and projects that maintain the Vents tradition of pioneering ocean exploration and research.

  5. Quaternary fault-controlled volcanic vents and crustal thinning: new insights from the magma-rich Tyrrhenian passive margin (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardello, Giovanni Luca; Conti, Alessia; Consorti, Lorenzo; Do Couto, Damien

    2017-04-01

    The discover of monogenic Quaternary volcanic vents, that were recently mapped along major fault zones both inland and offshore the Tyrrhenian magma-rich passive margin, poses questions about: timing and role they had into Plio-Pleistocene crustal thinning with relevant consequences for the hazard assessment of an area inhabited by some 0.5 million people. The present-day margin is stretched over 100 km between the Volsci Range (VR) and the Pontian escarpment, being defined by moderate shallow seismicity (Mw≤4.6), relative high geothermal gradient and ongoing hydrothermal activity. Although major central volcanoes (e.g., Colli Albani), occurring at major fault intersections are well studied, smaller volcanic fields were so far unconstrained. Both field survey in the VR and offshore high-resolution geophysical data, allow us to: 1) better define the anatomy of the poorly known VR volcanic field; 2) furnish new insights on the regional Quaternary dynamics; 3) propose modes and reason of magma emplacement. The VR is composed of about 40 punctual and linear monogenic and mostly phreatomagmatic vents occurring at the edges of the Apennine carbonate fold-and-thrust belt and within the VR backbone. Volcanites are characterized by zeolitized to incoherent tuffs and surge deposits locally covered by lavas and slope deposits. Most explosive units host carbonate-rich lithics with different degrees of rounding and decarbonation, which frequently belong to Albian-Cenomanian aquifers. By comparing cross-section with lithic analyses we demonstrate that fragmentation, transport, progressive disintegration and decarbonation occur at multiple depths, depending on the fold-and-thrust belt setting. Thus, along the same vent zone, juvenile lithic composition proves repeated fragmentation within pressured-aquifers, testifying for fissural activity with implications for local seismic and volcanic assessment. Pyroclastic deposits occur as well in the Pontina and Fondi coastal plains at

  6. Modelling hydrothermal venting in volcanic sedimentary basins: Impact on hydrocarbon maturation and paleoclimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Karthik; Schmid, Daniel W.; Planke, Sverre; Millett, John

    2017-06-01

    Vent structures are intimately associated with sill intrusions in sedimentary basins globally and are thought to have been formed contemporaneously due to overpressure generated by gas generation during thermogenic breakdown of kerogen or boiling of water. Methane and other gases generated during this process may have driven catastrophic climate change in the geological past. In this study, we present a 2D FEM/FVM model that accounts for 'explosive' vent formation by fracturing of the host rock based on a case study in the Harstad Basin, offshore Norway. Overpressure generated by gas release during kerogen breakdown in the sill thermal aureole causes fracture formation. Fluid focusing and overpressure migration towards the sill tips results in vent formation after only few tens of years. The size of the vent depends on the region of overpressure accessed by the sill tip. Overpressure migration occurs in self-propagating waves before dissipating at the surface. The amount of methane generated in the system depends on TOC content and also on the type of kerogen present in the host rock. Generated methane moves with the fluids and vents at the surface through a single, large vent structure at the main sill tip matching first-order observations. Violent degassing takes place within the first couple of hundred years and occurs in bursts corresponding to the timing of overpressure waves. The amount of methane vented through a single vent is only a fraction (between 5 and 16%) of the methane generated at depth. Upscaling to the Vøring and Møre Basins, which are a part of the North Atlantic Igneous Province, and using realistic host rock carbon content and kerogen values results in a smaller amount of methane vented than previously estimated for the PETM. Our study, therefore, suggests that the negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) observed in the fossil record could not have been caused by intrusions within the Vøring and Møre Basins alone and that a contribution

  7. Sill intrusion driven fluid flow and vent formation in volcanic basins: Modeling rates of volatile release and paleoclimate effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Karthik; Schmid, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Evidence of mass extinction events in conjunction with climate change occur throughout the geological record and may be accompanied by pronounced negative carbon isotope excursions. The processes that trigger such globally destructive changes are still under considerable debate. These include mechanisms such as poisoning from trace metals released during large volcanic eruptions (Vogt, 1972), CO2 released from lava degassing during the formation of Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) (Courtillot and Renne, 2003) and CH4 release during the destabilization of sub-seafloor methane (Dickens et al., 1995), to name a few. Thermogenic methane derived from contact metamorphism associated with magma emplacement and cooling in sedimentary basins has been recently gaining considerable attention as a potential mechanism that may have triggered global climate events in the past (e.g. Svensen and Jamtveit, 2010). The discovery of hydrothermal vent complexes that are spatially associated with such basins also supports the discharge of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere (e.g. Jamtveit et al., 2004; Planke et al., 2005; Svensen et al., 2006). A previous study that investigated this process using a fluid flow model (Iyer et al., 2013) suggested that although hydrothermal plume formation resulting from sill emplacement may indeed release large quantities of methane at the surface, the rate at which this methane is released into the atmosphere is too slow to trigger, by itself, some of the negative δ13C excursions observed in the fossil record over short time scales observed in the fossil record. Here, we reinvestigate the rates of gas release during sill emplacement in a case study from the Harstad Basin off-shore Norway with a special emphasis on vent formation. The presented study is based on a seismic line that crosses multiple sill structures emplaced around 55 Ma within the Lower Cretaceous sediments. A single well-defined vent complex is interpreted above the termination of the

  8. Gas venting rates from submarine hydrothermal areas around the island of Milos, Hellenic Volcanic Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, P. R.; Hughes, J. A.; Leahy, Y.; Niven, S. J.; Taylor, L. J.; Smith, C.

    1995-07-01

    Gas seeps were located, by echo sounding, SCUBA divers and ROV observations, at hydrothermal sites around the island of Milos, in the Hellenic Volcanic Arc. Samples were collected by SCUBA divers and by a ROV from water depths between 3 and 110 m. Fifty-six flow rates from 39 individual seeps were measured and these ranged from 0.2 to 18.51 h -1 at the depth of collection. The major component, 54.9-91.9% of the gas, was carbon dioxide. Hydrogen (≤3%), methane (≤9.7%) and hydrogen sulphide (≤8.1%) were also measured. Hydrothermal free gas fluxes from the submarine hydrothermal areas around Milos were estimated to be greater than 10 10 moles y -1. It was concluded that submarine gas seeps along volcanic island arcs may be an important carbon dioxide source.

  9. Volcanic-hosted massive sulfide deposits in the Murchison greenstone belt, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz-Schampera, Ulrich; Terblanche, Hennie; Oberthür, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    The Archean Murchison greenstone belt, Limpopo Province, South Africa, represents a rifted epicontinental arc sequence containing the largest volcanic-hosted massive sulfide (VMS) district in Southern Africa. The so-called Cu-Zn line is host to 12 deposits of massive sulfide mineralization including: Maranda J, LCZ, Romotshidi, Mon Desir, Solomons, and Mashawa with a total tonnage of three million metric tons of very high grade Zn, subordinate Cu, and variable Pb and Au ore. The deposits developed during initial phases of highly evolved felsic volcanism between 2,974.8 ± 3.6 and 2,963.2 ± 6.4 Ma and are closely associated with quartz porphyritic rhyolite domes. Elevated heat supply ensured regional hydrothermal convection along the entire rift. Recurrent volcanism resulted in frequent disruption of hydrothermal discharge and relative short-lived episodes of hydrothermal activity, probably responsible for the small size of the deposits. Stable thermal conditions led to the development of mature hydrothermal vent fields from focused fluid discharge and sulfide precipitation within thin layers of felsic volcaniclastic rocks. Two main ore suites occur in the massive sulfide deposits of the “Cu-Zn line”: (1) a low-temperature venting, polymetallic assemblage of Zn, Pb, Sb, As, Cd, Te, Bi, Sn, ±In, ±Au, ±Mo occurring in the pyrite- and sphalerite-dominated ore types and (2) a higher temperature suite of Cu, Ag, Au, Se, In, Co, Ni is associated with chalcopyrite-bearing ores. Sphalerite ore, mineralogy, and geochemical composition attest to hydrothermal activity at relatively low temperatures of ≤250 °C for the entire rift, with short-lived pulses of higher temperature upflow, reflected by proportions of Zn-rich versus Cu-rich deposits. Major- and trace-metal composition of the deposits and Pb isotope signatures reflect the highly evolved felsic source rock composition. Geological setting, host rock composition, and metallogenesis share many similarities not

  10. Linking gene expression to productivity to unravel long- and short-term responses of seagrasses exposed to CO2 in volcanic vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivé, Irene; Silva, João; Lauritano, Chiara; Costa, Monya M.; Ruocco, Miriam; Procaccini, Gabriele; Santos, Rui

    2017-02-01

    Ocean acidification is a major threat for marine life but seagrasses are expected to benefit from high CO2. In situ (long-term) and transplanted (short-term) plant incubations of the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa were performed near and away the influence of volcanic CO2 vents at Vulcano Island to test the hypothesis of beneficial effects of CO2 on plant productivity. We relate, for the first time, the expression of photosynthetic, antioxidant and metal detoxification-related genes to net plant productivity (NPP). Results revealed a consistent pattern between gene expression and productivity indicating water origin as the main source of variability. However, the hypothesised beneficial effect of high CO2 around vents was not supported. We observed a consistent long- and short-term pattern of gene down-regulation and 2.5-fold NPP decrease in plants incubated in water from the vents and a generalized up-regulation and NPP increase in plants from the vent site incubated with water from the Reference site. Contrastingly, NPP of specimens experimentally exposed to a CO2 range significantly correlated with CO2 availability. The down-regulation of metal-related genes in C. nodosa leaves exposed to water from the venting site suggests that other factors than heavy metals, may be at play at Vulcano confounding the CO2 effects.

  11. 40Ar/39Ar dating of tuff vents in the Campi Flegrei caldera (southern Italy): Toward a new chronostratigraphic reconstruction of the Holocene volcanic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedele, L.; Insinga, D.D.; Calvert, A.T.; Morra, V.; Perrotta, A.; Scarpati, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Campi Flegrei hosts numerous monogenetic vents inferred to be younger than the 15 ka Neapolitan Yellow Tuff. Sanidine crystals from the three young Campi Flegrei vents of Fondi di Baia, Bacoli and Nisida were dated using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. These vents, together with several other young edifices, occur roughly along the inner border of the Campi Flegrei caldera, suggesting that the volcanic conduits are controlled by caldera-bounding faults. Plateau ages of ∼9.6 ka (Fondi di Baia), ∼8.6 ka (Bacoli) and ∼3.9 ka (Nisida) indicate eruptive activity during intervals previously interpreted as quiescent. A critical revision, involving calendar age correction of literature 14C data and available 40Ar/39Ar age data, is presented. A new reference chronostratigraphic framework for Holocene Phlegrean activity, which significantly differs from the previously adopted ones, is proposed. This has important implications for understanding the Campi Flegrei eruptive history and, ultimately, for the evaluation of related volcanic risk and hazard, for which the inferred history of its recent activity is generally taken into account.

  12. Periodicities in sediment temperature time-series at a marine shallow water hydrothermal vent in Milos Island (Aegean Volcanic arc, Eastern Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliani, Stefano; Meloni, Roberto; Dando, Paul R.

    2004-05-01

    Time-series data sets of total bottom pressure (tidal plus atmospheric), seawater temperature and sediment temperature from a marine shallow hydrothermal vent (Milos, Hellenic Volcanic Arc, Aegean Sea) were studied to determine factors influencing periodicity at the vents. Bottom pressure and vent temperature were mainly opposite in phase, with the main fluctuations of vent temperature occurring at tidal frequencies. Although the fluctuations in atmospheric pressure were of the same order as those due to tidal pressure, the contribution of atmospheric pressure was considerably weaker at diurnal frequencies. Some sudden discontinuities in sediment temperature were recorded, at least one of these may have been caused by seismic events. Seawater temperature changes were not reflected in the sediment temperature record. Transient loadings, such as tidal loadings, barometric pressure and earth tides, may affect the pore pressure in sediments, influencing fluid expulsion and sediment temperature as a consequence. Most of the contribution to the fluctuations in sediment temperature depends on tidal loadings. Gravitational forces, in the form of earth tides, can also be involved and barometric pressure is probably responsible for long period temperature oscillations.

  13. Structure and petrology of newly discovered volcanic centers in the northern Kermadec-southern Tofua arc, South Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Ian J.; Reyes, Agnes G.; Wright, Ian C.; Peckett, Kimberley M.; Smith, Ian E. M.; Arculus, Richard J.

    2008-08-01

    The NZAPLUME III expedition of September-October 2004 to the northern Kermadec-southern Tofua (NKST) arc, between 28°52'S and 25°07'S, resulted in the discovery of at least seven new submarine volcanic centers and a substantial caldera complex adjacent to the previously known Monowai Seamount. The volcanic centers form a sublinear chain that coincides with the Kermadec Ridge crest in the south (Hinetapeka) and diverges ˜45 km westward of the ridge crest in the north ("V") just to the south of where the Louisville Ridge intersects with the arc. All of the centers contain calderas or caldera-like structures, as well as multiple cones, domes, fissure ridges, and vent fields. All show signs of recent eruptive and current hydrothermal activity. There are strong structural controls on edifice location, with cones and fissure ridges typically associated with faulting parallel to the regional ˜12° strike of the arc front. Several of the calderas are ellipsoidal, orientated northwest-southeast in the general direction of least compressive stress. Sampled volcanic rocks, representing the most recently erupted lavas, are all low-K tholeiites. Two of the centers, Gamble and Rakahore, yielded only high-silica dacite to rhyolite (69-74 wt% silica), whereas two others, Monowai and "V," yielded only basalt to andesite (48-63 wt% silica). Mineral assemblages are plagioclase-pyroxene dominated, with accessory Fe-Ti oxides, apatite, olivine, and quartz/tridymite/cristobalite, typical of dry volcanic arc systems. Hornblende occurs only in a felsitic rhyolite from Hinepuia volcanic center, and zircon is absent. Glass contents range to 57% in basalts-andesites (mean 20%), and 97% in andesites-rhyolites (mean 59%) and other quench textures, including swallow-tailed, plumose, or dendritic crystal forms and crystallites, are common. Most lavas are highly vesicular (≤63%; mean 28%) and have low volatile contents (mostly cristobalite, indicates explosive eruption and rapid cooling

  14. Fake ballistics and real explosions: field-scale experiments on the ejection and emplacement of volcanic bombs during vent-clearing explosive activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddeucci, J.; Valentine, G.; Gaudin, D.; Graettinger, A. H.; Lube, G.; Kueppers, U.; Sonder, I.; White, J. D.; Ross, P.; Bowman, D. C.

    2013-12-01

    Ballistics - bomb-sized pyroclasts that travel from volcanic source to final emplacement position along ballistic trajectories - represent a prime source of volcanic hazard, but their emplacement range, size, and density is useful to inverse model key eruption parameters related to their initial ejection velocity. Models and theory, however, have so far focused on the trajectory of ballistics after leaving the vent, neglecting the complex dynamics of their initial acceleration phase in the vent/conduit. Here, we use field-scale buried explosion experiments to study the ground-to-ground ballistic emplacement of particles through their entire acceleration-deceleration cycle. Twelve blasts were performed at the University at Buffalo Large Scale Experimental Facility with a range of scaled depths (burial depth divided by the cubic root of the energy of the explosive charge) and crater configurations. In all runs, ballistic analogs were placed on the ground surface at variable distance from the vertical projection of the buried charge, resulting in variable ejection angle. The chosen analogs are tennis and ping-pong balls filled with different materials, covering a limited range of sizes and densities. The analogs are tracked in multiple high-speed and high-definition videos, while Particle Image Velocimetry is used to detail ground motion in response to the buried blasts. In addition, after each blast the emplacement position of all analog ballistics was mapped with respect to the blast location. Preliminary results show the acceleration history of ballistics to be quite variable, from very short and relatively simple acceleration coupled with ground motion, to more complex, multi-stage accelerations possibly affected not only by the initial ground motion but also by variable coupling with the gas-particle mixture generated by the blasts. Further analysis of the experimental results is expected to provide new interpretative tools for ballistic deposits and better

  15. Geomorphological characteristics of the onshore/offshore volcanic edifices with respect to their evolutionary stage in the South Aegean Sea, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, S.; Nomikou, P.; Papanikolaou, D.; Alexandri, M.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanism in the South Aegean Sea first occurred about 3-4 million years ago, along four different volcanic island groups, including both onshore and recently discovered offshore volcanoes: 1) Starting from the west, the Methana group consists of the Methana stratovolcano, composed exclusively of volcaniclastics and lavas, creating cones and domes onland and the Paphsanias submarine cone in the Epidavros tectonic graben, bordered by E-W normal faults. It has a 2 km basal diameter at 400 m depth and its top rises to 150 m. 2) The Milos-Antimilos group consists of volcanic domes and calderas onland and three submarine domes to the east of Antimilos. A hydrothermal vent field is limited in the SE coastal zone of Milos, 3) The Santorini group consists of: (i) the older volcanic cones of Christianna islets and three submarine domes east of them, (ii) Santorini volcano which during the last 500 ka experienced repeated caldera collapses following Plinian eruptions and edifice rebuilding, represented by the growth of the Kamenes islands after the last catastrophic Late Bronze age eruption. (iii) a chain of about twenty submarine volcanic domes and craters in the Kolumbo zone northeast of Santorini. Kolumbo volcano is a 3 km diameter cone with a 1500 m wide crater, a crater rim as shallow as 18 m depth and a flat crater floor at 505 m depth containing an active hydrothermal vent field degassing 99% of CO2. 4) The Kos-Nisyros group at the eastern edge of the Hellenic Volcanic arc, comprises several domes and craters offshore and Nisyros volcano consists exclusively of alternating lava and pyroclastic deposits following several phases of reconstruction and caldera collapse. The rhyodacitic domes of Profitis Ilias are the latest evolutionary stage of Nisyros volcano which disrupted a pre-existed caldera and may be regarded as an earlier reconstruction phase similar to the Kameni islands at Santorini. The volcanic relief reaches 1100-1200 m in most cases. This is produced from

  16. Characterization of fine volcanic ash from explosive eruption from Sakurajima volcano, South Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanayama, F.; Furukawa, R.; Ishizuka, Y.; Yamamoto, T.; Geshi, N.; Oishi, M.

    2013-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions can affect infrastructure and ecosystem by their dispersion of the volcanic particle. Characterization of volcanic particle expelled by explosive eruption is crucial for evaluating for quantitative hazard assessment by future volcanic eruption. Especially for fine volcanic ash less than 64 micron in diameter, it can disperse vast area from the source volcano and be easily remobilized by surface wind and precipitation after the deposition. As fine volcanic ash is not preserved well at the earth surface and in strata except for enormously large scale volcanic eruption. In order to quantify quantitative characteristics of fine volcanic ash particle, we sampled volcanic ash directly falling from the eruption cloud from Showa crater, the most active vent of Sakurajima volcano, just before landing on ground. We newly adopted high precision digital microscope and particle grain size analyzer to develop hazard evaluation method of fine volcanic ash particle. Field survey was performed 5 sequential days in January, 2013 to take tamper-proof volcanic ash samples directly obtained from the eruption cloud of the Sakurajima volcano using disposable paper dishes and plastic pails. Samples were taken twice a day with time-stamp in 40 localities from 2.5 km to 43 km distant from the volcano. Japan Meteorological Agency reported 16 explosive eruptions of vulcanian style occurred during our survey and we took 140 samples of volcanic ash. Grain size distribution of volcanic ash was measured by particle grain size analyzer (Mophologi G3S) detecting each grain with parameters of particle diameter (0.3 micron - 1 mm), perimeter, length, area, circularity, convexity, solidity, and intensity. Component of volcanic ash was analyzed by CCD optical microscope (VHX-2000) which can take high resolution optical image with magnifying power of 100-2500. We discriminated each volcanic ash particle by color, texture of surface, and internal structure. Grain size

  17. Magnetic Susceptibility in Surface Sediments in the Southern South China Sea and Its Implication for Sub-sea Methane Venting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhong; Yan Wen; Tang Xianzan; Liu Jianguo; Chen Muhong; Yang Huaping

    2009-01-01

    In order to understand the characteristics of magnetic variability and their possible implication for sub-sea methane venting,magnetic susceptibility (MS) of 145 surface sediment samples from the southern South China Sea (SCS) was investigated.Magnetic particles extracted from 20 representative samples were also examined for their mineral,chemical compositions and micromorphology.Results indicate that MS values range between -7.73×10-8 and 45.06x10-8 m3/kg.The high MS zones occur at some hydrecarbon-bearing basins and along main tectonic zones,and low ones are distributed mainly within the river delta or along continental shelves.Iron concretions and manganese concretions are not main contributors for high MS values in sediments,while authigenic iron sulphide minerals are possibly responsible for the MS enhancement.This phenomenon is suspected to be produced by the reducing environment where the high upward venting methane beneath the seafloor reacts with seawater sulfate,resulting in seep precipitation of highly susceptible intermediate mineral pyrrhotite,greigite and paramagnetic pyrite.It suggests that MS variability is possibly one of the geochemical indicators for mapping sub-sea zones of methane venting in the southern SCS.

  18. Vent 7504 of the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF), Arizona: Sample Geochemistry and Implications for Cone Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, D. H.; Eppler, D. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Skinner, J. A.; Evans, C. A.; Feng, W.; Gruener, J. E.; Whitson, P. A.; Janoiko, B. A.; Mertzman, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Vent 7504 is a complex structure in the SFVF that has 3 unit classes: a central cone with exposed dikes and cinder-covered rheomorphic facies; a SE/NW-trending ridge north of the cone with cinder-covered rheomorphic facies; and three discrete lava flows that emanate to the N from the ridge and to the SW and NW from the cone. Field observations suggest the ridge was the northern crest of an initial, larger cone. The NW portion of this cone was most likely disrupted during a catastrophic breach of lava that had accumulated within the cone; this third of three lava flows carried rafted packages of the rheomorphic cone facies to the NW, forming the linear N ridge. The final phase of pyroclastic activity was concentrated in the SW portion of the original cone, covering the top of the cone with cinders and forming the more traditional conic-shaped construct observed today. This study describes the geochemistry of 9 samples collected from the mapped units (2 from the cone, 1 from the N ridge, 1 from the N lava flow, 2 from the SW lava flow, and 3 from the NW lava flow) to further constrain the formation of Vent 7504. Geochemical analyses including back-scatter electron scanning electron microscopy and laboratory X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy were conducted on the 9 collected samples to measure bulk rock and olivine phenocryst compositions. Major element concentrations in the bulk rock and olivine compositions are strongly clustered in all samples, indicating they likely originated from a single magmatic source. Bulk rock SiO2 (~47.5 wt%) and alkali (Na2O + K2O, ~2.7 wt% + 0.71 wt%) concentrations are consistent with a basaltic classification for these samples. Trends in major elements relative to MgO are observed for the olivine phenocrysts: SiO2, Al2O3, Na2O, and TiO2 remain constant relative to MgO, but strong linear trends are observed in MnO, FeO, and NiO relative to MgO. These linear trends are expected given the potential for bivalent cation exchanges in the

  19. Satellite-based detection of volcanic sulphur dioxide from recent eruptions in Central and South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Loyola

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic eruptions can emit large amounts of rock fragments and fine particles (ash into the atmosphere, as well as several gases, including sulphur dioxide (SO2. These ejecta and emissions are a major natural hazard, not only to the local population, but also to the infrastructure in the vicinity of volcanoes and to aviation. Here, we describe a methodology to retrieve quantitative information about volcanic SO2 plumes from satellite-borne measurements in the UV/Visible spectral range. The combination of a satellite-based SO2 detection scheme and a state-of-the-art 3D trajectory model enables us to confirm the volcanic origin of trace gas signals and to estimate the plume height and the effective emission height. This is demonstrated by case-studies for four selected volcanic eruptions in South and Central America, using the GOME, SCIAMACHY and GOME-2 instruments.

  20. Tectonic and magmatic controls on the location of post-subduction monogenetic volcanoes in Baja California, Mexico, revealed through spatial analysis of eruptive vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germa, Aurélie; Connor, Laura J.; Cañon-Tapia, Edgardo; Le Corvec, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    Post-subduction (12.5 Ma to less than 1 Ma) monogenetic volcanism on the Baja California peninsula, Mexico, formed one of the densest intra-continental areas of eruptive vents on Earth. It includes about 900 vents within an area ˜700 km long (N-S) and 70 to 150 km wide (W-E). This study shows that post-subduction volcanic activity was distributed along this arc and that modes exist in the volcano distribution, indicating that productivity of the magma source region was not uniform along the length of the arc. Vent clustering, vent alignments, and cone elongations were measured within eight monogenetic volcanic fields located along the peninsula. Results indicate that on a regional scale, vent clustering varies from north to south with denser spatial clustering in the north on the order of 1.9 × 10-1 vents/km2 to less dense clustering in the south on the order of 7.8 × 10-2 vents/km2. San Quintin, San Carlos, Jaraguay, and Santa Clara are spatially distinct volcanic fields with higher eruptive vent densities suggesting the existence of individual melt columns that may have persisted over time. In contrast, the San Borja, Vizcaino, San Ignacio, and La Purisima vent fields show lower degrees of vent clustering and no obvious spatial gaps between fields, thus indicating an area of more distributed volcanism. Insight into the lithospheric stress field can be gained from vent alignments and vent elongation measurements. Within the fields located along the extinct, subduction-related volcanic arc, elongation patterns of cinder cones and fissure-fed spatter cones, vent clusters, and vent alignments trend NW-SE and N-S. Within the Santa Clara field, located more to the west within the forearc, elongation patterns of the same volcanic features trend NE-SW. These patterns suggest that magmatism was more focused in the forearc and in the northern part of Baja California than in its southern region. Within the extinct arc, magma ascent created volcano alignments and elongate

  1. Origin of temporal compositional trends in monogenetic vent eruptions: Insights from the crystal cargo in the Papoose Canyon sequence, Big Pine Volcanic Field, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ruohan; Lassiter, John C.; Ramirez, Gabrielle

    2017-01-01

    Many monogenetic vents display systematic temporal-compositional variations over the course of eruption. Previous studies have proposed that these trends may reflect variable degrees of crustal assimilation, or melting and mixing of heterogeneous mantle source(s). Discrimination between these two endmember hypotheses is critical for understanding the plumbing systems of monogenetic volcanoes, which pose a significant volcanic hazard in many areas. In this study, we examine the Papoose Canyon (PC) monogenetic vent in the Big Pine Volcanic Field (BPVF), which had been well characterized for temporal-compositional variations in erupted basalts. We present new major and trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb-O isotopic data from the PC "crystal cargo" (phenocrysts and xenoliths). Comparison of "crystal cargo" and host basalt provides new constraints on the history of magma storage, fractionation, and crustal contamination that are obscured in the bulk basalts due to pre- and syn-eruptive magma mixing processes. The abundances of phenocrysts and ultramafic xenoliths in the PC sequence decrease up-section. Olivine and clinopyroxene phenocrysts span a wide range of Mg# (77-89). The majority of phenocrysts are more evolved than olivine or clinopyroxene in equilibrium with their host basalts (Mg# = 68- 71, equilibrium Fo ≈ 85- 89). In addition, the ultramafic xenoliths display cumulate textures. Olivine and clinopyroxene from ultramafic xenoliths have Mg# (73-87) similar to the phenocrysts, and lower than typical mantle peridotites. Sr-Nd-Pb isotope compositions of the xenoliths are similar to early PC basalts. Finally, many clinopyroxene phenocrysts and clinopyroxene in xenoliths have trace element abundances in equilibrium with melts that are more enriched than the erupted basalts. These features suggest that the phenocrysts and xenoliths derive from melt that is more fractionated and enriched than erupted PC basalts. Pressure constraints suggest phenocrysts and ultramafic

  2. Cretaceous alkaline volcanism in south Marzanabad, northern central Alborz, Iran: Geochemistry and petrogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roghieh Doroozi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The alkali-basalt and basaltic trachy-andesites volcanic rocks of south Marzanabad were erupted during Cretaceous in central Alborz, which is regarded as the northern part of the Alpine-Himalayan orogenic belt. Based on petrography and geochemistry, en route fractional crystallization of ascending magma was an important process in the evolution of the volcanic rocks. Geochemical characteristics imply that the south Marzanabad alkaline basaltic magma was originated from the asthenospheric mantle source, whereas the high ratios of (La/YbN and (Dy/YbN are related to the low degree of partial melting from the garnet bearing mantle source. Enrichment pattern of Nb and depletion of Rb, K and Y, are similar to the OIB pattern and intraplate alkaline magmatic rocks. The K/Nb and Zr/Nb ratios of volcanic rocks range from 62 to 588 and from 4.27 to 9 respectively, that are some higher in more evolved samples which may reflect minor crustal contamination. The isotopic ratios of Sr and Nd respectively vary from 0.70370 to 0.704387 and from 0.51266 to 0.51281 that suggest the depleted mantle as a magma source. The development of south Marzanabad volcanic rocks could be related to the presence of extensional phase, upwelling and decompressional melting of asthenospheric mantle in the rift basin which made the alkaline magmatism in Cretaceous, in northern central Alborz of Iran.

  3. Discovery of seep carbonate nodules as new evidence for gas venting on the northern continental slope of South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jianxin; CHEN Zhong; GU Senchang; MENG Fancong; YAN Wen; CHEN Muhong; WANG Shuhong; LU Jun; ZHANG Fan; XIANG Rong; XIAO Shangbin; YAN Pin

    2006-01-01

    Seep carbonate nodules were firstlycollected from the southwestern Dongsha area on northern continental slope of South China Sea for mineralogical and geochemical studies. The results of X-ray diffraction show that carbonate nodules are composed of Fe-rich domolite,siderite and a few cal cite and aragonite, as well as a small quantity of non-carbonate minerals such as goethite, quartz and clay minerals. Fe-rich dolomite and siderite characterized by euhedral microcrystalline structure were directly precipitated at cold seeps. The δ13C values for Fe-rich dolomite and siderite in the bulk nodules vary from -18.24‰ to -36.07‰, and the δ18O values range from 0.42 to 2.76‰. Their moderate depleted 13C reflects that carbon origin is possibly thermoge netic gas or mixed gas, which is evidence of gas ventings in the seafloor. Moreover, massive worm tube fossils related to cold seeps were found on the surfaces of carbonate nodules, and the conduits and/or channels in semi-solidified nodules which were not filled by carbonate or sediment were also observed. A preliminary conclusion is that active micro gas venting with a conduit/channel diameter range from 200 μm to 600 μm possibly exists in modern seafloor of the carbonate nodule area.

  4. Characterization of Dissolved Organic Matter from Deep-sea Floor Hydrothermal Vents in South Mariana Backarc Spreading Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, F.; Yamanaka, T.

    2004-12-01

    In South Mariana Backarc Spreading Center, a few active hydrothermal fields are located. We investigated a characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from hydrothermal vents in this area, in order to clarify the biosphere beneath deep-sea floor. Hot water sample was collected from a drilled hole (APM01 located in Fryer site, 12o 55.22fN, 143o 37.16fE, depth 2850m) during the ROPOS/TN167A cruise in March 2004. The hole had been drilled during Hakurei-Maru 2 cruise in January 2004. Another hot water sample was collected from a natural black smoker located in Pika site (12o 55.15fN, 143o 36.96fE, depth 2773m) during YK03-09 cruise. In this investigation, we developed a standalone filtration system in order to collect and enrich dissolved organic matter of quite low concentration. This system was designed to be put near hydrothermal vents for at least 24h. This system has an ODS disk (EmporeTM High Performance Extraction Disk C18 90mmφ) with a pre-filter (Whatman GMF 1 μ)m filter paper) to adsorb dilute organics. We collected DOM from the APM01 casing pipe for about 30h (Tmax = 25-30 o C, the estimated volume of filtrated water is max. 300L) using this filtration system. Adsorbed organics were eluted with methanol for 12h twice and toluene once using soxhlet extractor. Recovered amounts of methanol eluents are 72.8mg for APM01, and 89.7mg for the black smoker. Prior to GCMS analysis, we carried out high resolution 1 H-NMR measurement (400MHz), together with the DOM samples collected from the Suiyo Seamount in July-August 2001 and August 2002. Most of the samples show signals in the region of 3-4 ppm, and the samples from the vents of relatively low temperatures (APM01 and AP04: the natural vent at the Suiyo Seamount, temperature 8-48o C ) show signals also in the region of 0.8-1.6 ppm.

  5. Application Of Recent (2008-2013) Lunar Probe Instrumentation To The Exploration For Precambrian Protolife In Volcanic Vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jack

    2009-12-01

    Selected recent and future lunar probes have instruments suitable for the exploration of Precambrian protolife. Fumaroles contain the ingredients for protolife. With available energy including flow charging and charge separation, amino acids and related compounds could evolve into ATP. Fischer-Tropsch reactions in hydrothermal clay could create lipid micelles as reaction chambers. Fumarolic polyphosphates and tungsten catalysts could contribute to precambrian protolife evolution . The floors of Alphonsus and Lavoisier M exhibit dark mounds which could be buried fumaroles at fracture intersections. Chang'e-1 could define regolith thickness at these mounds with microwave radiometry. The MoonLITE penetrometer could likely identify hydrothermal products in these mounds using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Regarding polar craters which may host volcanic ices, intermittent illumination of selected crater floors warmed to 220 K may create a transient tenuous atmosphere of COS, H2S, CO2, CO, HCl and CH4 which could be analyzed by near infrared spectrometry (NIMS) of SELENE or Chandrayaan-1. Prior to the 2009 impact of a polar crater by LCROSS (of the LRO mission), the Soviet LEND mission may detect water using epithermal neutrons. The impact plume proposed in the LCROSS mission at a polar crater could be analyzed by NIMS for fumarolic fluids similar the the NIMS analyses of Callisto and Ganymede moons of Jupiter. The possible identification of cyanogen in the LCROSS impact plume would support the CN2 spectrogram at Aristarchus by Kozyrev in 1969. In the Aristarchus region, lunar dawn during periods of maximum orbital flexing may accentuate release of Rn, Ar and protolife gases. These gases could possibly by identified by the Chang'e-1 gamma/x ray spectrometer, NIMS and the neutral mass spectrometer of the LADEE mission. Microwave spectrometry and radar on the LEO mission as well as LROC (LRO mission) could also be directed at verified lunar transient sites.

  6. Three thousand years of flank and central vent eruptions of the San Salvador volcanic complex (El Salvador) and their effects on El Cambio archeological site: a review based on tephrostratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrés, D.; Delgado Granados, H.; Hernández, W.; Pullinger, C.; Chávez, H.; Castillo Taracena, C. R.; Cañas-Dinarte, C.

    2011-09-01

    The volcanic events of the last 3,000 years at San Salvador volcanic complex are reviewed using detailed stratigraphic records exposed in new excavations between 2005 and 2007, at El Cambio archeological site (Zapotitán Valley, El Salvador), and in other outcrops on the northern and northwestern sectors of the complex. The sequences that overlie Tierra Blanca Joven (cal. 429 ± 107 ad), from the Ilopango caldera, comprise the Loma Caldera (cal. 590 ± 90 ad) and El Playón (1658-1671) deposits and the San Andrés Tuff (cal. 1031 ± 29 ad), related to El Boquerón Volcano. The surge deposits within the El Playón, San Andrés Tuff and overlying Talpetate II sequences indicate the significance of phreatomagmatic phases in both central vent and flank eruptions during the last 1,600 years. Newly identified volcanic deposits underlying Tierra Blanca Joven at El Cambio extend the stratigraphic record of the area to 3,000 years bp. Paleosols interstratified with those deposits contain cultural artifacts which could be associated with the Middle Preclassic period (900-400 bc). If correct, human occupation of the site during the Preclassic period was more intense than previously known and volcanic eruptions must have affected prehistoric settlements. The archeological findings provide information on how prehistoric populations dealt with volcanic hazards, thousands of years ago in the eastern Zapotitán Valley, where several housing projects are currently being developed. The new stratigraphic and volcanological data can be used as a basis for local and regional hazard assessment related to future secondary vent activity in the San Salvador Volcanic Complex.

  7. Mud Volcanism in the South East Caspian, Gorgon Plane, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, A.; Poludetkina, E. N.; Mehrabi, B.; Krueger, M.; Inguaggiato, S.; Etiope, G.

    2014-12-01

    Although numerous studies have been completed on the Western Caspian side (e.g. mainly Azerbaijan), very little is known about the hydrocarbon plumbing system of the deepest and southernmost basin. This region has great potentials for hydrocarbon exploration and the study of mud volcanoes located here represents the opportunity to access to an open window to better understand the stratigraphy and the mechanisms ongoing at great depth as well as the origin and signature of the seeping fluids. Three so far unexplored mud volcano structures (Sofikam, Gharniarigh, and Naftliche) have been mapped and sampled in the Golestan region in the south eastern Caspian Sea. All the structures have negative morphology (i.e. "pockmark like") with caldera collapse. A multidisciplinary workflow of analyses is being conducted including gas and water geochemistry, incubation of microbial colonies, petrography of the seeping mud and erupted mud breccia clasts. Sofikam consists of 5 distinct pools up to 4-5 m in diameter that forms an E-W oriented alignment. All of the pools display vigorous seepage of fluids and are either water- or denser mud-dominated. Gharniarigh is a large mud volcano up to ~600 m in diameter with a bulging island in the internal part of the crater where eroded gryphons ridges witness a palaeo vigorous activity. The outskirts of the "island" are almost entirely flooded with water and/or covered with salt crusts in the summer. Here are distributed several small water and gas seeps. Naftliche (~400 m wide) is filled with water with a main seep in the centre of the lake. Preliminary gas geochemistry indicates the seepage of methane-dominated gas in all structures with additional small portions of ethane and propane as well as iC4 in Gharniarigh and Naftliche. All samples collected for microbial colonies incubation reveal strong activity with CO2 production under aerobic and anaerobic conditions as well as production of biogenic methane. In particular, samples from

  8. Paleomagnetism of the early Paleoproterozoic, volcanic Hekpoort Formation (Transvaal Supergroup) of the Kaapvaal craton, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbert, F.; Sonnette, L.; de Kock, M. O.; Robion, P.; Horng, C. S.; Cousture, A.; Wabo, H.

    2017-02-01

    The Kaapvaal craton (South Africa) was the host of several major magmatic events during the Paleoproterozoic, including the volcanic Hekpoort and Ongeluk formations. Their possible comagmatic origin is the subject of a long debate. We performed a paleomagnetic study of the Hekpoort Formation to get a primary pole can be compared with the available paleopole of the Ongeluk Formation, but also to contribute to the apparent pole wander path of the Kaapvaal craton. Characterization of magnetic mineralogy by 3-axis thermal demagnetization of IRM and magnetic susceptibility vs temperature points out magnetite as the main remanence carrier in most samples.

  9. Properties of middle-late Proterozoic volcanic rocks in South Qinling and the Precambrian continental break-up

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏林圻; 夏祖春; 徐学义

    1996-01-01

    In South Qinling, the volcanic series of the middle-late Proterozoic Yunxi Group, Yaolinghe Group, Xi.xiang Group and Bikou Group have characteristics of the continental rift volcanic rocks or continental flood basalts and are formed in continental intraplate tensional setting. The enrichment of incompatible elements, high εNd values and low-medium 87Sr/86Sr initial ratios of these volcanic rocks indicate that they were derived from asthenospheric plume. Under the action of the intense pull-apart in lithosphere, the mantle plume upwelled, quickly decompressed and melted, and finally produced magma. This tensional process made the continental crust break and eventually led to an oceanic basin in late Proterozoic. The middle-late Proterozoic volcanism is a precursor of Precarabrian continental break-up in the South Qinling.

  10. A great volcanic eruption around AD 1300 recorded in lacustrine sediment from Dongdao Island, South China Sea

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhongkang Yang; Nanye Long; Yuhong Wang; Xin Zhou; Yi Liu; Liguang Sun

    2017-02-01

    The contents of Ti, Al and Fe₂O₃ in a lacustrine sediment core (DY6) collected from Dongdao Island, South China Sea (SCS), were determined to be much higher than those in the three major sediment endmembers (coral sand, guano and plants), and their likely sources include terrigenous dust and volcanic ash. At 61 cm (~AD 1300), the contents of Ti, Al and Fe₂O₃ have an abnormally high spike, which cannot be explained by terrigenous dust. The Sr and Nd isotope compositions at 61 cm are in excellent agreement with those in volcanic materials, but they are significantly different from those in terrigenous dust, implying a possible material input from historical volcanic eruptions in the lacustrine sediment DY6. The documented great Samalas volcanic eruption at AD 1257 in Indonesia is likely the candidate for this volcanic eruption.

  11. A great volcanic eruption around AD 1300 recorded in lacustrine sediment from Dongdao Island, South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhongkang; Long, Nanye; Wang, Yuhong; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Yi; Sun, Liguang

    2017-02-01

    The contents of Ti, Al and Fe 2 O 3 in a lacustrine sediment core (DY6) collected from Dongdao Island, South China Sea (SCS), were determined to be much higher than those in the three major sediment end-members (coral sand, guano and plants), and their likely sources include terrigenous dust and volcanic ash. At 61 cm (˜AD 1300), the contents of Ti, Al and Fe 2 O 3 have an abnormally high spike, which cannot be explained by terrigenous dust. The Sr and Nd isotope compositions at 61 cm are in excellent agreement with those in volcanic materials, but they are significantly different from those in terrigenous dust, implying a possible material input from historical volcanic eruptions in the lacustrine sediment DY6. The documented great Samalas volcanic eruption at AD 1257 in Indonesia is likely the candidate for this volcanic eruption.

  12. Formation of the volcanic rifted margin off Argentina/Uruguay, South Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, D.; Reichert, C.; Ladage, S.; Schnabel, M.; Schreckenberger, B.; Neben, S.; Hinz, K.

    2009-04-01

    The Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), Germany has investigated the passive continental margins offshore Argentina and Uruguay since the early 90ies. Numerous marine geophysical surveys have meanwhile established a databasis of more than 25.000 km of regional multi-channel reflection seismic lines, accompanied with magnetic and gravity profiles. These data document that the Early Cretaceous South Atlantic continental break-up and initial sea-floor spreading were accompanied by large-scale, transient volcanism emplacing voluminous extrusives, manifested in the seismic data by huge wedges of seaward dipping reflectors (SDRs). These deeply buried and 60-120 km wide SDRs were emplaced episodically as suggested by at least three superimposed SDRS units. Distinct along-margin variations in the architecture, volume, and width of the SDRs wedges correlate with large scale margin segmentation. We identify at least four domains bounded by the Falkland Fracture Zone/Falkland Transfer, the Colorado Transfer, the Ventana Transfer and the Salado Transfer. The individual transfer zones may have acted as barriers for propagating rifts during the SDR emplacement phase, selectively directing rift segments in left stepping patterns along the western South Atlantic margin. The rift segments are offset systematically in a left stepping pattern along the western South Atlantic margin. Albeit we found extensive variations in the architecture, style and extent of the seaward dipping reflector sequences a general trend is that the largest volumes are emplaced close to the proposed transfer zones and the width of the SDRs wedges decreases northward within the individual margin segments. The different volcano-tectonic architectures of the margin segments and the distribution of the extruded magmas indicates that the emplacement of the volcanic material was controlled by the tectonic setting and the pre-rift lithosphere configuration within individual margin

  13. The Pliocene-Quaternary South Harghita (Romania) volcanic chain-ending segment - a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghedi, Ioan; Szakács, Alexandru

    2016-04-01

    South Harghita, the chain terminus segment of the Cǎlimani-Gurghiu-Harghita volcanic range is notorious for its specific characteristics. It consist of different and unique volcanological and petrological features, as compared with the rest of the range, including lowest erupted magma volumes and eruption rates, which originate from changes of the geodynamic setting along with magma generation processes. The Pliocene-Quaternary calc- alkaline volcanism developed in the 5.3 - 0.3 Ma time interval with two gaps at 3.9-2.8 and 1.6-1.0 Ma, respectively, but the volcanoes partially overlap each other along the NW-SE direction, crosscutting the Carpathian internal folded units. At 1.6 - 1.4 Ma K-alkalic volcanism developed at Bicsad/Malnaş at the southward extension of the South Harghita chain, whereas Na-alkalic volcanism (1.2-0.6 Ma) developed 40 km to the west in the Perşani Mountains. There are four major volcanic edifices recognized in this chain segment: Luci-Lazul, Cucu, Pilişca and Ciomadul. Luci-Lazu, the northernmost andesitic volcano shows a typical shield morphology. The Cucu andesite-dacite volcano displays a multiple-crater edifice topped by lava domes. Inside the craterial area there is a complex intrusive assemblage. The next volcano in the row, Pilişca is an andesitic composite volcano topped by steep dacitic lava dome complexes. The south-easternmost dacitic Ciomadul volcanic complex is most well-preserved consisting of a lava dome and flow complex and twin-crater pyroclastic cones developed during several explosive eruptions between 55.9 - 32.6 Ka. According to the recent studies Ciomadul can be viewed as having some residual magma in its crustal magma chamber whose future eruption potential is unclear. The compositional changes from calc-alkaline (Luci-Lazul) to adakite-like calc-alkaline (Cucu-Ciomadul) may be connected to the sinking of the block/slab beneath the active Vrancea seismic zone and coeval with the tearing along the Trotuş fault

  14. The Pali Aike Volcanic Field, Patagonia: slab-window magmatism near the tip of South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orazio, Massimo; Agostini, Samuele; Mazzarini, Francesco; Innocenti, Fabrizio; Manetti, Piero; Haller, Miguel J.; Lahsen, Alfredo

    2000-06-01

    The Pali Aike Volcanic Field (PAVF) represents the southernmost occurrence of the Cenozoic back-arc Patagonian Plateau Lavas. Its activity (Pliocene-Recent) started forming tabular lavas followed by the growth of about 470 essentially monogenetic volcanic centers (tuff-rings, maars, spatter and scoria cones). Azimuths of cone alignment, cone elongation and morphologic lineations show prevailing ENE-WSW and NW-SE trends. Erupted products consist mainly of alkaline basalt and basanite, with minor olivine basalt. PAVF rocks are quite primitive in composition (average Mg#=66, Ni=220 ppm and Cr=313 ppm) with relatively high TiO 2 (average 3.0 wt.%). Ultramafic garnet- and/or spinel-bearing xenoliths are found within PAVF volcanics. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns are significantly LREE-enriched and almost rectilinear [(La/Yb) N=10.9-21.0]. Primordial mantle-normalized distributions of incompatible trace elements, as well as Sr and Nd isotope ratios ( 87Sr/ 86Sr=0.70317-0.70339, 143Nd/ 144Nd=0.51290-0.51294), show values typical of intra-plate basalts, despite the fact that these rocks occur only 200 km east of the Andean Cordillera. Primary magmas were generated from a fertile garnet-bearing asthenospheric source at P=1.9-2.9 GPa and T=1420-1470°C. The data suggest a geodynamic model that implies sub-slab asthenosphere flow through a slab window, which started opening below this sector of South America 14 m.y. ago as a consequence of the collision of the Chile Ridge with the Chile Trench. The trailing edge of the Nazca Plate crossed below the Pali Aike area at 9-10 Ma, that is 6-5 m.y. before the onset of the volcanic activity. We hypothesize that this time delay resulted from changes in the kinematics of the South America-Scotia transform plate boundary which only allowed the Pali Aike magmas to rise after about 4 m.y.

  15. Sr isotope geochemistry of megacrysts from continental rift and converging plate margin alkaline volcanism in South Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, R.; Johnston, Kate; Ghiara, M. R.; Lirer, L.; Munno, Rosalba

    1981-12-01

    Mineral phases of two-clinopyroxene alkaline lavas from continental rift and plate margin volcanism in South Italy have been analyzed for their Sr isotopic composition and concentration. Sr isotope disequilibria are observed between megacrysts and groundmass in all seven analysed Campanian potassic lavas, but not in a lava from Stromboli, a volcano in the Eolian arc. Variations in 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios for different phases in the lavas are likely to reflect primary Sr isotope variations in the primitive lavas (rather than crustal contamination effects). It is suggested that the observed mineral disequilibria point to the intimate association of a range of primary magmas and small-scale source heterogeneities for the Campanian volcanism. The lack of mineral disequilibria for Stromboli suggests that here source heterogeneities are absent or else exist on a very much larger scale. It is therefore unlikely that there is any genetic connection between these two types of alkaline volcanism in South Italy.

  16. Tectonic implications of paleomagnetic poles from Lower Tertiary Volcanic Rocks, south central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillhouse, John W.; Grommé, C. Sherman; Csejtey, Bela, Jr.

    1985-12-01

    We have determined the paleolatitude of lower Tertiary volcanic rocks in southern Alaska to measure possible poleward translation of the Wrangellia and the Peninsular terranes after 50 m.y. ago. Previous paleomagnetic studies have shown that in Triassic and Jurassic time these terranes were located near the equator and have moved at least 3000 km poleward relative to the North American craton. Our sample localities are in the northern Talkeetna Mountains in mildly deformed andesite and dacite flows (50.4, 51.3, 53.9, and 56.3 m.y. by K-Ar) that overlap Lower Cretaceous flysch, Lower Permian volcanic rocks of Wrangellia, and Upper Triassic pillow basalt of the Susitna terrane. Results from 26 cooling units (23 of reversed polarity and 3 of normal polarity) give a mean paleomagnetic pole at 69.5°N, 179.6°E, α95 = 12.2°. Stratigraphic sections from opposite limbs of a syncline yield directional paths that pass the fold test, satisfying a necessary condition for primary origin of the magnetization. The corresponding mean paleolatitude (76°N) of the northern Talkeetna Mountains is 8°±10° higher than the latitude predicted from the Eocene reference pole for North America. Therefore, northward drift of the Talkeetna superterrane, which is the amalgamation of the Wrangellia and Peninsular terranes during and after Middle Jurassic time, was probably complete by 50 m.y. ago. Our results are consistent with paleomagnetic poles from uppermost Cretaceous and Paleocene volcanic sequences in Denali National Park, the Lake Clark region, northern Bristol Bay region, and near McGrath. These poles generally lie south of the cratonic poles, suggesting that the region between the Kaltag, Bruin Bay, and Castle Mountain faults has rotated counterclockwise relative to North America since the early Eocene.

  17. The Cenozoic volcanism in the Kivu rift: Assessment of the tectonic setting, geochemistry, and geochronology of the volcanic activity in the South-Kivu and Virunga regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouclet, A.; Bellon, H.; Bram, K.

    2016-09-01

    The Kivu rift is part of the western branch of the East African Rift system. From Lake Tanganyika to Lake Albert, the Kivu rift is set in a succession of Precambrian zones of weakness trending NW-SE, NNE-SSW and NE-SW. At the NW to NNE turn of the rift direction in the Lake Kivu area, the inherited faults are crosscut by newly born N-S fractures which developed during the late Cenozoic rifting and controlled the volcanic activity. From Lake Kivu to Lake Edward, the N-S faults show a right-lateral en echelon pattern. Development of tension gashes in the Virunga area indicates a clockwise rotation of the constraint linked to dextral oblique motion of crustal blocks. The extensional direction was W-E in the Mio-Pliocene and ENE-WSW in the Pleistocene to present time. The volcanic rocks are assigned to three groups: (1) tholeiites and sodic alkali basalts in the South-Kivu, (2) sodic basalts and nephelinites in the northern Lake Kivu and western Virunga, and (3) potassic basanites and potassic nephelinites in the Virunga area. South-Kivu magmas were generated by melting of spinel + garnet lherzolite from two sources: an enriched lithospheric source and a less enriched mixed lithospheric and asthenospheric source. The latter source was implied in the genesis of the tholeiitic lavas at the beginning of the South-Kivu tectono-volcanic activity, in relationships with asthenosphere upwelling. The ensuing outpouring of alkaline basaltic lavas from the lithospheric source attests for the abortion of the asthenospheric contribution and a change of the rifting process. The sodic nephelinites of the northern Lake Kivu originated from low partial melting of garnet peridotite of the sub-continental mantle due to pressure release during swell initiation. The Virunga potassic magmas resulted from the melting of garnet peridotite with an increasing degree of melting from nephelinite to basanite. They originated from a lithospheric source enriched in both K and Rb, suggesting the

  18. Earthquakes increase hydrothermal venting and nutrient inputs into the Aegean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, P. R.; Hughes, J. A.; Leahy, Y.; Taylor, L. J.; Zivanovic, S.

    1995-05-01

    Areas of submarine gas and water venting around the island of Milos, in the Hellenic volcanic island arc, were mapped. Water samples were collected from five stations in the geothermally active Paleohori Bay on 15 March 1992. Seismic events, of M s 5.0 and 4.4, occurred south of the Bay on 20 March and the sampling was repeated after these. Phosphate and manganese in the water column increased by 360% after the seismic activity. Analysis of water samples collected from gas and water seeps and of interstitial water from sediment cores showed that the hot sediment in the Bay was enriched in phosphate, to a mean concentration of 65 μmol l -1 in the interstitial water. The number of geothermally active areas in the Aegean, together with the extent of venting and the frequency of earthquakes suggests that the hydrothermal areas may be an important source of phosphate in this oligotrophic Sea.

  19. Tectono-volcanic control of fissure type vents for the 28 Ma Panalillo ignimbrite in the Villa de Reyes Graben, San Luis PotosI, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tristan-Gonzalez, Margarito; Labarthe-Hernandez, Guillermo; Aguillon-Robles, Alfredo [Instituto de Geologia/DES IngenierIa, UASLP, Av. Dr. Manuel Nava 5, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78240, San Luis PotosI, S.L.P. (Mexico); Aguirre-DIaz, Gerardo J [Centro de Geociencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Juriquilla, Queretaro, 76230 (Mexico)], E-mail: mtiistan@uasln.mx, E-mail: ger@geociencias.unam.mx

    2008-10-01

    The volcano-tectonic events at the Villa de Reyes Graben (VRG), in the southern Sierra Madre Occidental, Mexico, include 1) a regional NNE fault system developed before 32 Ma, 2) this pre-32 Ma faulting controlled the emplacement of 31.5 Ma dacitic domes, 3) NE faulting at 28 Ma that displaced the 31.5 Ma dacitic domes and formed the VRG, as well as the oblique grabens of Bledos and Enramadas oriented NW, 4) emplacement of Panalillo ignimbrite at 28 Ma filling the VRG and erupting from fissures related to the oblique grabens, and eruption of Placa basalt apparently also from fault-controlled vents.

  20. Composition, structure, origin, and evolution of off-axis linear volcanic structures of the Brazil Basin, South Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolotnev, S. G.; Peive, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    The paper considers the conditions and mechanisms of the formation of linear volcanic structures in the Brazil Basin, South Atlantic. Among these objects, those related to the ascent of deep mantle plumes predominate. It is shown that the ascent of melts from plume sources leads to the formation of (a) hot spot tracks in the form of linear volcanic ridges and (b) active hot lines in the form of submarine mountain chains with trends differing from those of hot spot tracks and with a more variable character of the age distribution of volcanic rocks. Fault tectonics affects the character of plume activity. In addition, plume material from a hot spot area is dragged by a moving plate as a flow or a sublithospheric lens, which leads to the long-term existence of particular independent segments of linear structures and sometimes to late volcanism reactivation within their limits. Decompression melting of the asthenospheric mantle in zones where thin lithosphere undergoes tension causes the formation of passive hot lines. The main mantle source for the considered volcanic rocks was a mixture of DMM and HIMU mantle components, with the latter abruptly dominating. In marginal oceanic regions, the EM1 component is also present (the EM2 component is found more rarely) within fragments of tectonically delaminated continental mantle that was trapped by the oceanic mantle during the breakup of Gondwana.

  1. Volcanic hazard management in dispersed volcanism areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Jose Manuel; Garcia, Alicia; Ortiz, Ramon

    2014-05-01

    Traditional volcanic hazard methodologies were developed mainly to deal with the big stratovolcanoes. In such type of volcanoes, the hazard map is an important tool for decision-makers not only during a volcanic crisis but also for territorial planning. According to the past and recent eruptions of a volcano, all possible volcanic hazards are modelled and included in the hazard map. Combining the hazard map with the Event Tree the impact area can be zoned and defining the likely eruptive scenarios that will be used during a real volcanic crisis. But in areas of disperse volcanism is very complex to apply the same volcanic hazard methodologies. The event tree do not take into account unknown vents, because the spatial concepts included in it are only related with the distance reached by volcanic hazards. The volcanic hazard simulation is also difficult because the vent scatter modifies the results. The volcanic susceptibility try to solve this problem, calculating the most likely areas to have an eruption, but the differences between low and large values obtained are often very small. In these conditions the traditional hazard map effectiveness could be questioned, making necessary a change in the concept of hazard map. Instead to delimit the potential impact areas, the hazard map should show the expected behaviour of the volcanic activity and how the differences in the landscape and internal geo-structures could condition such behaviour. This approach has been carried out in La Palma (Canary Islands), combining the concept of long-term hazard map with the short-term volcanic scenario to show the expected volcanic activity behaviour. The objective is the decision-makers understand how a volcanic crisis could be and what kind of mitigation measurement and strategy could be used.

  2. Violent Gas Venting on the Heng-Chun Mud Volcano, South China Sea Active Continental Margin offshore SW Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, S.; Cheng, W. Y.; Tseng, Y. T.; Chen, N. C.; Hsieh, I. C.; Yang, T. F.

    2014-12-01

    Accumulation of methane as gas hydrate under the sea floor has been considered a major trap for both thermal and biogenic gas in marine environment. Aided by rapid AOM process near the sea floor, fraction of methane escaping the sea floor has been considered at minuscule. However, most studies focused mainly on deepwater gas hydrate systems where gas hydrate remain relatively stable. We have studied methane seeps on the active margin offshore Taiwan, where rapid tectonic activities occur. Our intention is to evaluate the scale and condition of gas seeps in the tectonic active region. Towcam, coring, heat probe, chirp, multibeam bathymetric mapping and echo sounding were conducted at the study areas. Our results showed that gas is violently venting at the active margin, not only through sediments, but also through overlying sea water, directly into the atmosphere. Similar ventings, but, not in this scale, have also been identified previously in the nearby region. High concentrations of methane as well as traces of propane were found in sediments and in waters with flares. In conjunction, abundant chemosynthetic community, life mussel, clams, tube worms, bacterial mats together with high concentrations of dissolve sulfide, large authigenic carbonate buildups were also found. Our results indicate that methane could be another major green house gas in the shallow water active margin region.

  3. Geomorphic change along a gravel bed river affected by volcanic eruption: Rio Blanco - Volcan Chaiten (South Chile)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picco, Lorenzo; Ravazzolo, Diego; Ulloa, Hector; Iroumé, Andres; Aristide Lenzi, Mario

    2014-05-01

    Gravel bed rivers are environments shaped by the balance of flow, sediment regimes, large wood (LW) and vegetation. Geomorphic changes are response to fluctuations and changes of runoff and sediment supply involving mutual interactions among these factors. Typically, many natural disasters (i.e. debris flows, floods and forest fires) can affect the river basin dynamics. Explosive volcanic eruptions present, instead, the potential of exerting severe impacts as, for example, filling river valleys or changing river network patterns thanks to massive deposition of tephra and volcanic sediment all over the main channel and over the basin. These consistent impacts can strongly affect both hydrology and sediment transport dynamics, all over the river system, producing huge geomorphic changes. During the last years there has been a consistent increase in the survey technologies that permit to monitor geomorphic changes and to estimate sediment budgets through repeat topographic surveys. The calculation of differences between subsequent DEMs (difference of DEMs, DoD) is a commonly applied method to analyze and quantify these dynamics. Typically the higher uncertainty values are registered in areas with higher topographic variability and lower point density. This research was conducted along a ~ 2.2 km-long sub-reach of the Blanco River (Southern Chile), a fourth-order stream that presents a mainly rainfall regime with winter peak flows. The May 2008 Chaitén volcanic eruption strongly affected the entire Rio Blanco basin. The entire valley was highly exposed to the pyroclastic and fluvial flows, which affected directly a consistent area of evergreen forests. Extreme runoff from the upper Blanco catchment aggraded the channel and deposited up to several meters of tephra, alluvium, and LW along the entire river system. Aims of this contribution are to define and quantify the short term evolution of the Blanco River after the big eruption event and a subsequent consistent

  4. Mapping Planetary Volcanic Deposits: Identifying Vents and Distinguishing between Effects of Eruption Conditions and Local Storage and Release on Flow Field Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Eppler, D. B.; Skinner, J. A.; Evans, C. A.; Feng, W.; Gruener, J. E.; Hurwitz, D. M.; Whitson, P.; Janoiko, B.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial geologic mapping techniques are regularly used for "photogeologic" mapping of other planets, but these approaches are complicated by the diverse type, areal coverage, and spatial resolution of available data sets. When available, spatially-limited in-situ human and/or robotic surface observations can sometimes introduce a level of detail that is difficult to integrate with regional or global interpretations. To assess best practices for utilizing observations acquired from orbit and on the surface, our team conducted a comparative study of geologic mapping and interpretation techniques. We compared maps generated for the same area in the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF) in northern Arizona using 1) data collected for reconnaissance before and during the 2010 Desert Research And Technology Studies campaign, and 2) during a traditional, terrestrial field geology study. The operations, related results, and direct mapping comparisons are discussed in companion LPSC abstracts. Here we present new geologic interpretations for a volcanic cone and related lava flows as derived from all approaches involved in this study. Mapping results indicate a need for caution when interpreting past eruption conditions on other planetary surfaces from orbital data alone.

  5. Mapping Planetary Volcanic Deposits: Identifying Vents and Distingushing between Effects of Eruption Conditions and Local Lava Storage and Release on Flow Field Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Eppler, D. B.; Skinner, J. A.; Evans, C. A.; Feng, W.; Gruener, J. E.; Hurwitz, D. M.; Whitson, P.; Janoiko, B.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial geologic mapping techniques are regularly used for "photogeologic" mapping of other planets, but these approaches are complicated by the diverse type, areal coverage, and spatial resolution of available data sets. When available, spatially-limited in-situ human and/or robotic surface observations can sometimes introduce a level of detail that is difficult to integrate with regional or global interpretations. To assess best practices for utilizing observations acquired from orbit and on the surface, our team conducted a comparative study of geologic mapping and interpretation techniques. We compared maps generated for the same area in the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF) in northern Arizona using 1) data collected for reconnaissance before and during the 2010 Desert Research And Technology Studies campaign, and 2) during a traditional, terrestrial field geology study. The operations, related results, and direct mapping comparisons are discussed in companion LPSC abstracts [1-3]. Here we present new geologic interpretations for a volcanic cone and related lava flows as derived from all approaches involved in this study. Mapping results indicate a need for caution when interpreting past eruption conditions on other planetary surfaces from orbital data alone.

  6. Heterogeneous volcanism across the Permian-Triassic Boundary in South China and implications for the Latest Permian Mass Extinction: New evidence from volcanic ash layers in the Lower Yangtze Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zhiwei; Hu, Wenxuan; Cao, Jian; Wang, Xiaolin; Yao, Suping; Wu, Haiguang; Wan, Ye

    2016-09-01

    Volcanism has been suggested to have occurred widely in South China across the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB); this has important implications for understanding the cause of the Latest Permian Mass Extinction (LMPE). However, few volcanic deposits have been reported in the Lower Yangtze Region and the extent of volcanism is uncertain. Herein we report new discoveries of intensive volcanism in this region for the first time, as evidenced by multiple (n > 20) and thick (3-5 cm) claystones (volcanic ash layers, K-bentonite) found in three deep-water outcrops in Xuancheng city, southern Anhui Province. Detailed petrographic and geochemical analyses of the ash layers were conducted to understand their origin and implications for the cause of the LPME, including X-ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and whole-rock geochemistry. The petrological and mineralogical results show that the claystones contain clastic minerals indicative of a volcanic origin, such as zircon, analcites, pentagonal dodecahedral pyrite, and micro-spherules. The whole-rock geochemical data of the claystones suggest that the source rock of the ash layers was intermediate-acidic rhyodacite. The claystones are different from previously known claystones in the Middle-Upper Yangtze regions, indicating the occurrence of chemically heterogeneous volcanism in South China at the PTB.

  7. The formation of post-spreading volcanic ridges in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Minghui; Sibuet, Jean-Claude; He, Enyuan; Tan, Pingchuan; Wang, Jian; Qiu, Xuelin

    2016-04-01

    In the South China Sea (SCS), the post-spreading magmatism (˜8-13 Ma) largely masks the previous spreading fabric. The resulting post-spreading seamounts are more numerous in the northern part than in the southern part of the East sub-basin. In the eastern part of the East sub-basin, the post-spreading volcanic ridge (PSVR) is approximately N055° oriented and follows the extinct spreading ridge (ESR). In the western part of the East sub-basin, the PSVR, called the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain, is E-W oriented and hides the ESR. Based on swath bathymetric and magnetic data, the ESR in the eastern part of the East basin is also N055° oriented and thus is oblique the E-W Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain (Sibuet et al., 2016). We conducted a seismic refraction survey covering both the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain and the adjacent ESR, providing new constraints for understanding the relationship between the PSVR and the ESR. The detailed velocity structure shows that the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain was emplaced through a typical oceanic crust. The thicknesses of Zhenbei (14 km) and Huangyan seamounts (8 km) are larger than the ones of the normal oceanic crust. The correlation between crustal thicknesses and mean lower-crustal seismic velocities suggest that an asymmetric generation of seamounts in the East sub-basin where active upwelling mantle (Holbrook et al., 2001), the presence of a fertile mantle component (Korenaga et al., 2002), or buoyancy-driven decompression melting may happened (Castillo et al., 2010). Below the seamounts, the thickened lower crust is probably due to secondary magmatic intrusions and the large thickness of upper crust is possibly due to volcanic extrusions. The crustal thicknesses as well as the mean lower-crustal velocities of the Zhenbei and Huangyan seamounts are different, suggesting an independent origin for magmatic feeding. This research was granted by the Natural Science Foundation of China (91028002, 91428204

  8. Devonian sand injections and volcanism in the Murzuq Basin (south-west Libya)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Ghienne, Jean-Francois

    The highly prolific Murzuq basin in SW Libya was considered devoid of large sand injection system and volcanic activity during the Lower Palaeozoic. This study identified numerous evidences of kilometre-scale sand injections in association with volcanism of Lower Devonian age. The sand injection...

  9. Volcanic perturbations of the marine environment in South China preceding the latest Permian mass extinction and their biotic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, J; Algeo, T J; Zhou, L; Feng, Q; Yu, J; Ellwood, B

    2012-01-01

    The Dongpan section in southern Guangxi Province records the influence of local volcanic activity on marine sedimentation at intermediate water depths (~200-500 m) in the Nanpanjiang Basin (South China) during the late Permian crisis. We analyzed ~100 samples over a 12-m-thick interval, generating palynological, paleobiological, and geochemical datasets to investigate the nature and causes of environmental changes. The section records at least two major volcanic episodes that culminated in deposition of approximately 25- to 35-cm-thick ash layers (bentonites) and that had profound effects on conditions in both the Dongpan marine environment and adjacent land areas. Intensification of eruptive activity during each volcanic cycle resulted in a shift toward conifer forests, increased wildfire intensity, and elevated subaerial weathering fluxes. The resulting increase in nutrient fluxes stimulated marine productivity in the short term but led to a negative feedback on productivity in the longer term as the OMZ of the Nanpanjiang Basin expanded, putting both phytoplankton and zooplankton communities under severe stress. Radiolarians exhibit large declines in diversity and abundance well before the global mass extinction horizon, demonstrating the diachroneity of the marine biotic crisis. The latest Permian crisis, which was probably triggered by the Siberian Traps flood basalts, intensified the destructive effects of the earlier local eruptions on terrestrial and marine ecosystems of the South China craton.

  10. Geology and stratigraphy of the Challis Volcanic Group and related rocks, Little Wood River area, south-central Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Richard F.; Snee, Lawrence W.

    2005-01-01

    The southwestern part of the Challis volcanic field occupies the valley of the Little Wood River and its tributaries in the Hailey and Idaho Falls 1??2? quadrangles of south-central Idaho. The Little Wood River area is a structurally controlled topographic basin that is partly filled by Eocene Challis Volcanic Group and younger rocks. Rock types in the Challis Volcanic Group of the Little Wood River area include, in order of decreasing abundance, andesite lava flows and tuff breccia, dacite lava flows and flow breccia, volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks, lithic tuff, nonvolcanic conglomerate, and rhyolite dikes. A basal nonvolcanic conglomerate, that locally rests on upper Paleozoic sedimentary rocks at a regional unconformity, was deposited prior to eruption of volcanic rocks. Andesite was the first volcanic rock erupted and is a voluminous sequence as thick as 3,000 ft (1,000 m). Locally thick volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks accumulated in topographic lows. A sharp transition marks the beginning of dacite eruption from fissures and flow-dome complexes. Dacite flows and breccias are as thick as 2,000 ft (600 m). An upper volcaniclastic unit was deposited in paleotopographic lows following emplacement of the main dacite unit. Next, a widespread, distinctive, lithic rich ash flow tuff, correlated with the tuff of Stoddard Gulch, was deposited over much of the area. Deposition of the tuff was followed by eruption of thin andesite and dacite lava flows and deposition of conglomeratic sedimentary rocks. The entire sequence was then intruded by a dacite flow-dome complex composed of at least three separate intrusions. The Challis Volcanic Group in the study area is calcalkaline. Andesitic rocks are typically high potassium basaltic andesite, high potassium andesite, shoshonite, and banakite (latite). Dacitic rocks are high potassium dacite and trachyte. Tuffs and vitrophyres range in composition from basaltic andesite to trachyte. The paleotopographic basin in which the

  11. Dating and source determination of volcanic rocks from Khunik area (South of Birjand, South Khorasan using Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Samiee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Khunik area is located in the south of Birjand, Khorasan province, in the eastern margin of Lut block. Tertiary volcanic rocks have andesite to trachy-andesite composition. Dating analyzing by Rb-Sr method on plagioclase and hornblende as well as whole-rock isochron method was performed on pyroxene-hornblende andesite rock unit. On this basis the emplacement age is Upper Paleocene (58±11 Ma. These rocks have initial 87Sr/86Sr and εNd 0.7046-0.7049 and 2.16-3.12, respectively. According to isotopic data, volcanic rocks originated from depleted mantle and have the least crust contamination while it was fractionated. Geochemically, Khunik volcanic rocks have features typical of calk-alkaline to shoshonite and are metaluminous. Enrichment in LILEs and typical negative anomalies of Nb and Ti are evidences that the volcanic rocks formed in a subduction zone and active continental margin. Modeling suggests that these rocks were derived dominantly from 1–5% partial melting of a mainly spinel garnet lherzolite mantle source that is metasomatized by slab-derived fluid.

  12. Geochronology of middle Neoproterozoic volcanic deposits in Yangtze Craton interior of South China and its implications to tectonic settings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Here we report new SHRIMP dating results of the crystal tuff in Ejiaao Formation of middle Banxi Group in northern Guizhou. The results indicate that the volcanic deposition occurred at ~780 Ma. We also suggests that the igneous activities across Yangtze Craton with diabase dyke swarms and basal volcanic rocks during middle Banxi time are indicative of the episodic, extensive and vigorous great bimodal igneous events during middle Neoproterozoic (825-720 Ma) in South China. The characteristics of the igneous series are contrary to the model claiming they are of island-arc origin, but suggest that they are the records of rifting process and may be related to the episodic plume activities leading to the break-up of Rodinia.

  13. Timing and sources of neogene and quaternary volcanism in South-Central Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, James H.

    1987-08-01

    Five new and six existing radiometric age dates place constraints on the timing of volcanic episodes in a 1400-km 2 area east of Guatemala City. The source of the voluminous Miocene rhyolitic welded tuffs was the newly discovered Santa Rosa de Lima caldera, in the northern part of the area, not fissure eruptions as was previously believed. Resurgence during the Pliocene included the eruption of more silicic tuffs, followed by post-collapse volcanism around the perimeter. Volcanism in the southern part of the area occurred along the Neogene volcanic front. The sources for these Late Miocene and Pliocene andesitic lavas were not fissure eruptions, as was once believed, but were four large volcanic centers, Cerro Pinula, Ixhuatán, Teanzul, and Cerro La Gabia. The Santa Rosa de Lima caldera structure deflects the Jalpatagua Fault forming tensional fractures along which eruptions in the Quaternary Cuilapa-Barbarena cinder cone field took place. Pleistocene ash flows were erupted from Ixhuatán and Tecuamburro volcanoes in the southern part of the area. Tephras from Ayarza, Amatitlán, and Atitlán blanket the northern and central portions. Present-day activity is restricted to hot springs around the northern and eastern base of Tecuamburro volcano. Based on the work in this area it is proposed that rocks of the Miocene Chalatenango Formation throughout northern Central America were erupted from calderas behind the Neogene volcanic front. Rocks of the Mio-Pliocene Bálsamo Formation in Guatemala and El Salvador were erupted from discrete volcanic centers along the Neogene volcanic front. Pliocene rocks of the Cuscatlán Formation probably represent post-collapse volcanism around earlier caldera structures.

  14. Stratigraphic and geochemical evolution of an oceanic arc upper crustal section: The Jurassic Talkeetna Volcanic Formation, south-central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clift, P.D.; Draut, A.E.; Kelemen, P.B.; Blusztajn, J.; Greene, A.

    2005-01-01

    The Early Jurassic Talkeetna Volcanic Formation forms the upper stratigraphic level of an oceanic volcanic arc complex within the Peninsular Terrane of south-central Alaska. The section comprises a series of lavas, tuffs, and volcaniclastic debris-How and flow turbidite deposits, showing significant lateral facies variability. There is a general trend toward more volcaniclastic sediment at the top of the section and more lavas and tuff breccias toward the base. Evidence for dominant submarine, mostly mid-bathyal or deeper (>500 m) emplacement is seen throughout the section, which totals ???7 km in thickness, similar to modern western Pacific arcs, and far more than any other known exposed section. Subaerial sedimentation was rare but occurred over short intervals in the middle of the section. The Talkeetna Volcanic Formation is dominantly calc-alkatine and shows no clear trend to increasing SiO2 up-section. An oceanic subduction petrogenesis is shown by trace element and Nd isotope data. Rocks at the base of the section show no relative enrichment of light rare earth elements (LREEs) versus heavy rare earth elements (REES) or in melt-incompatible versus compatible high field strength elements (HFSEs). Relative enrichment of LREEs and HFSEs increases slightly up-section. The Talkeetna Volcanic Formation is typically more REE depleted than average continental crust, although small volumes of light REE-enriched and heavy REE-depleted mafic lavas are recognized low in the stratigraphy. The Talkeetna Volcanic Formation was formed in an intraoceanic arc above a north-dipping subduction zone and contains no preserved record of its subsequent collisions with Wrangellia or North America. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  15. Devonian sand injections and volcanism in the Murzuq Basin (south-west Libya)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Ghienne, Jean-Francois

    The highly prolific Murzuq basin in SW Libya was considered devoid of large sand injection system and volcanic activity during the Lower Palaeozoic. This study identified numerous evidences of kilometre-scale sand injections in association with volcanism of Lower Devonian age. The sand injection...... system is original by its interaction with volcanism and its situation in an epicontinental intracratonic basin. The sand injections form a seal-bypass system between the Ordovician-Cambrian reservoirs and the Lower Devonian sandstones, breaching through the Silurian shale seal (and source rock...

  16. Transition from potassic to sodic volcanism at ~12 Ma in the south-north striking graben: cessation of break-off and extension in south Tibet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Zhao, W.; Chen, J.; Wang, B.; Kang, Z.; Li, J.

    2008-12-01

    It has been recognized that ultra-potassic and potassic igneous rocks were dominant from 13 to 25 Ma in south Tibet, which is generally interpreted that break-off of the northward subducted Indian lithosphere or delamination of the thickened lithosphere resulted in eruption (or intrusion) of these ultra-potassic and potassic magmas (Miller et al., 1999; Maheo et al., 2002; Williams et al., 2001; Chung et al., 2005), as well as occurrence of the N-S striking extension faults ( at least before 13.5-14 Ma) on the Tibetan plateau (Coleman and Hodges, 1995; Blisniuk et al., 2001) and main elevation of the plateau in this period (e.g., 13- 18 Ma). Here we firstly report post-collisional Na-rich peralkaline volcanic rocks erupted at 12.3 (0.5) Ma within a south-north striking graben in south Tibet. These Na-rich rocks are phonolites with actual nepheline and aegirine-pyroxene minerals and significantly high Na2O/K2O ratios (higher than 1). Os-Nd isotopic and elemental compositions coupled with mineral composition analyses reveal that the Na-rich volcanic rocks cannot be generated by differentiation of the associated potassic or ultra-potassic magma; instead they were derived from a mantle source distinct from that of the latter, hinting that the mantle-derived volcanism in south Tibet experienced a temporary composition variation from potassic to sodic at about 12 Ma. Moreover, some Na-rich volcanic rocks erupted in 10-12 Ma were also found in eastern part of the Lhasa block in south Tibet. Furthermore, it has not been observed for a mantle-derived igneous rock younger than 10 Ma in south Tibet (Chung et al., 2005). Therefore, the observed transition from dominantly potassic to Na-rich magmatism represents an important tectonic event in south Tibet. We suggest that transition at about 12 Ma most possibly implies end of the break-off or delamination event, as well as temporary cession of E-W striking extension and the related uplifting process on the plateau. Thus, the

  17. Submarine Volcanic Morphology of Santorini Caldera, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomikou, P.; Croff Bell, K.; Carey, S.; Bejelou, K.; Parks, M.; Antoniou, V.

    2012-04-01

    Santorini volcanic group form the central part of the modern Aegean volcanic arc, developed within the Hellenic arc and trench system, because of the ongoing subduction of the African plate beneath the European margin throughout Cenozoic. It comprises three distinct volcanic structures occurring along a NE-SW direction: Christianna form the southwestern part of the group, Santorini occupies the middle part and Koloumbo volcanic rift zone extends towards the northeastern part. The geology of the Santorini volcano has been described by a large number of researchers with petrological as well as geochronological data. The offshore area of the Santorini volcanic field has only recently been investigated with emphasis mainly inside the Santorini caldera and the submarine volcano of Kolumbo. In September 2011, cruise NA-014 on the E/V Nautilus carried out new surveys on the submarine volcanism of the study area, investigating the seafloor morphology with high-definition video imaging. Submarine hydrothermal vents were found on the seafloor of the northern basin of the Santorini caldera with no evidence of high temperature fluid discharges or massive sulphide formations, but only low temperature seeps characterized by meter-high mounds of bacteria-rich sediment. This vent field is located in line with the normal fault system of the Kolumbo rift, and also near the margin of a shallow intrusion that occurs within the sediments of the North Basin. Push cores have been collected and they will provide insights for their geochemical characteristics and their relationship to the active vents of the Kolumbo underwater volcano. Similar vent mounds occur in the South Basin, at shallow depths around the islets of Nea and Palaia Kameni. ROV exploration at the northern slopes of Nea Kameni revealed a fascinating underwater landscape of lava flows, lava spines and fractured lava blocks that have been formed as a result of 1707-1711 and 1925-1928 AD eruptions. A hummocky topography at

  18. Complex Volcanism at Oppenheimer U Floor-Fractured Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddis, L. R.; Bennett, K.; Horgan, B.; McBride, Marie; Stopar, J.; Lawrence, S.; Gustafson, J. O.; Giguere, T.

    2017-01-01

    Recent remote sensing studies have identified complex volcanism in the floor-fractured crater (FFC) Oppenheimer U, located in the northwest floor of Oppenheimer crater (35.2degS, 166.3degW, 208 km dia., Figure 1) within the "South Pole - Aitken basin" (SPA) region of the lunar far side. Up to 15 sites of pyroclastic volcanism have been identified in the floor of Oppenheimer crater. Studies of Moon Mineralogy Mapper data (M3, 0.4-3 microns, 86 bands, [5]) indicated that the pyroclastic deposits are comprised of mixtures of clinopyroxene and iron-rich glass, with the Oppenheimer U deposit showing variable composition within the FFC and having the most iron-rich volcanic glass thus far identified on the Moon. Here we examine the floor of Oppenheimer U in more detail and show evidence for possible multiple eruptive vents.

  19. The nephelinitic-phonolitic volcanism of the Trindade Island (South Atlantic Ocean): Review of the stratigraphy, and inferences on the volcanic styles and sources of nephelinites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Gustavo Luiz Campos; Bongiolo, Everton Marques

    2016-12-01

    Trindade Island is located in the South Atlantic Ocean, 1170 km from the Brazilian coast, and represents the eastern end of the E-W Vitória-Trindade Chain. It shows the youngest plume-induced (ca. 3.7 to 2.4 Ma) and the Desejado (DF, ∼2.4 to 1.5 Ma), Morro Vermelho (MV, processes within the nephelinite-phonolite volcanism. Also, available geochemical databases were used to improve the stratigraphic correlation between nephelinites from different units and to characterize their mantle sources. The nephelinitic volcanism may represent Strombolian and Hawaiian-type activity of low viscosity and volatile-rich lavas interlayered with pyroclastic successions (fall-out deposits). Phonolitic deposits record explosive Vulcanian-style episodes of volatile-rich and higher-viscosity lavas interlayered with pyroclastic deposits (mostly pyroclastic flows). Geochemical data allowed the individualization of nephelinites as follows: (1) MV olivine-rich nephelinites and all olivine-free varieties are low K2O/Na2O, K2O/TiO2 and intermediate CaO/Al2O3 that may be derived from N-MORB and HIMU mantle components; (2) the VF olivine-rich nephelinites have high K2O/Na2O, K2O/TiO2 and CaO/Al2O3 that indicates both EM and HIMU mantle sources and; (3) the PF olivine-rich nephelinites show high K2O/TiO2 similar to those from VF, and intermediate CaO/Al2O3 as nephelinites from MV rocks, suggesting a mixed source with EM + HIMU > N-MORB components. We suggest that the HIMU and EM mantle types resulted from metasomatic episode(s) in the peridotitic mantle beneath the Trindade Island during the Brasiliano Orogeny and later, as previously pointed out by Marques et al. (1999). Thus, the major HIMU component would relate to recycled oceanic crust or lithospheric mantle (mostly CO2-eclogites) whereas the less important EM component to recycled marine or continental sediments.

  20. Supplement of: The Influence of Volcanic Eruptions on the Climate of Tropical South America During the Last Millennium in an Isotope-Enabled General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colose, Christopher; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Vuille, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Currently, little is known on how volcanic eruptions impact large-scale climate phenomena such as South American paleo-intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) position and summer monsoon behavior. In this paper, an analysis of observations and model simulations is employed to assess the influence of large volcanic eruptions on the climate of tropical South America. This problem is first considered for historically recent volcanic episodes for which more observations are available but where fewer events exist and the confounding effects of El NioSouthern Oscillation (ENSO) lead to inconclusive interpretation of the impact of volcanic eruptions at the continental scale. Therefore, we also examine a greater number of reconstructed volcanic events for the period 850CE to present that are incorporated into the NASA GISS ModelE2-R simulation of the last millennium.An advantage of this model is its ability to explicitly track water isotopologues throughout the hydrologic cycle and simulating the isotopic imprint following a large eruption. This effectively removes a degree of uncertainty associated with error-prone conversion of isotopic signals into climate variables, and allows for a direct comparison between GISS simulations and paleoclimate proxy records.Our analysis reveals that both precipitation and oxygen isotope variability respond with a distinct seasonal and spatial structure across tropical South America following an eruption. During austral winter, the heavy oxygen isotope in precipitation is enriched, likely due to reduced moisture convergence in the ITCZ domain and reduced rainfall over northern South America. During austral summer, however, more negative values of the precipitation isotopic composition are simulated over Amazonia, despite reductions in rainfall, suggesting that the isotopic response is not a simple function of the amount effect. During the South American monsoon season, the amplitude of the temperature response to volcanic forcing is larger

  1. The influence of volcanic eruptions on the climate of tropical South America during the last millennium in an isotope-enabled general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colose, Christopher M.; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Vuille, Mathias

    2016-04-01

    Currently, little is known on how volcanic eruptions impact large-scale climate phenomena such as South American paleo-Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) position and summer monsoon behavior. In this paper, an analysis of observations and model simulations is employed to assess the influence of large volcanic eruptions on the climate of tropical South America. This problem is first considered for historically recent volcanic episodes for which more observations are available but where fewer events exist and the confounding effects of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) lead to inconclusive interpretation of the impact of volcanic eruptions at the continental scale. Therefore, we also examine a greater number of reconstructed volcanic events for the period 850 CE to present that are incorporated into the NASA GISS ModelE2-R simulation of the last millennium. An advantage of this model is its ability to explicitly track water isotopologues throughout the hydrologic cycle and simulating the isotopic imprint following a large eruption. This effectively removes a degree of uncertainty associated with error-prone conversion of isotopic signals into climate variables, and allows for a direct comparison between GISS simulations and paleoclimate proxy records. Our analysis reveals that both precipitation and oxygen isotope variability respond with a distinct seasonal and spatial structure across tropical South America following an eruption. During austral winter, the heavy oxygen isotope in precipitation is enriched, likely due to reduced moisture convergence in the ITCZ domain and reduced rainfall over northern South America. During austral summer, however, more negative values of the precipitation isotopic composition are simulated over Amazonia, despite reductions in rainfall, suggesting that the isotopic response is not a simple function of the "amount effect". During the South American monsoon season, the amplitude of the temperature response to volcanic forcing is

  2. A convergent continent marginal volcanism source of ash beds near the Permian-Triassic boundary, South China: Constraints from trace elements and Hf-isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Zhao, L.; Chen, Z. Q.; Ma, D.; Yan, P.; Guo, F.; Wang, F.; Wan, Q.; Han, X.

    2015-12-01

    Growing evidence shows that volcanism near the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) may have been crucial in triggering the PTB biocrisis. However, whether this trigger is the Siberian traps or arc island volcanisms has long been debating. Meanwhile, multiple claystone beds are prominent near the PTB, South China. The nature and origin of the volcanic ashes therefore provide clue to find out the trigger of the PTB mass extinction. Following previous studies (Gao et al., 2013), 21 PTB ash beds from three additional PTB sections, namely the Shangsi, Jianshi and Meishan, all from South China have been systematically sampled. The U-Pb ages, trace elements, and Hf-isotope compositions of zircon grains from these ash beds were analyzed using LA-ICPMS and LA-MC-ICPMS. Volcanic ash geochemistry shows presence of Rhyolite or Dacite and reveal a collision-tectonic setting. Zircons from these ash layers yield comparatively low Nb/Hf and high Th/Nb ratios, dropping into the range of arc/orogenic-related settings. Zircon Hf-isotope compositions show that ɛHf(t) values vary from -11.7 to 1.8, indicating that at least two kinds of crustal component have been involved: juvenile lower crust and ancient middle-upper crust. The ash beds (Ss27a, Js129, Js130, Ms25, Ms26) near biotic extinction horizon have significant larger variation range of ɛHf(t) and relatively positive averages, implying that more juvenile lower crustal material had contributed to the volcanisms. This means that these volcanisms may have originated deeper depth or the volcanisms erupted so rapidly that there was no enough time for the mixing of different components. The volcanisms associated with biotic extinction should be the most intense and have greatest heat put. Spatial and temporal distributions of ash beds from thirty PTB sections worldwide reveal that the PTB volcanic ashes occurred only in the Paleo-Tethys region, suggesting that the volcanisms may be likely limited to the Paleo-Tethys continental

  3. 40Ar/39Ar dating, geochemistry, and isotopic analyses of the quaternary Chichinautzin volcanic field, south of Mexico City: implications for timing, eruption rate, and distribution of volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce, J. L.; Layer, P. W.; Lassiter, J. C.; Benowitz, J. A.; Macías, J. L.; Ramírez-Espinosa, J.

    2013-12-01

    Monogenetic structures located at the southern and western ends of the Chichinautzin volcanic field (Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Central Mexico) yield 40Ar/39Ar ages ranging from 1.2 Ma in the western portion of the field to 1.0-0.09 Ma in the southern portion, all of which are older than the volcanic field. These new ages indicate: (1) an eruption rate of 0.47 km3/kyr, which is much lower than the 11.7 km3/kyr previously estimated; (2) that the Chichinautzin magmatism coexisted with the Zempoala (0.7 Ma) and La Corona (1.0 Ma) polygenetic volcanoes on the southern edge of Las Cruces Volcanic Range (Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt); and confirm (3) that the drainage system between the Mexico and Cuernavaca basins was closed during early Pleistocene forming the Texcoco Lake. Whole-rock chemistry and Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic data indicate heterogeneous magmatism throughout the history of Chichinautzin activity that likely reflects variable degrees of slab and sediment contributions to the mantle wedge, fractional crystallization, and crustal assimilation. Even with the revised duration of volcanism within the Chichinautzin Volcanic Field, its eruption rate is higher than most other volcanic fields of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt and is comparable only to the Tacámbaro-Puruaran area in the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field to the west. These variations in eruption rates among different volcanic fields may reflect a combination of variable subduction rates of the Rivera and Cocos plates along the Middle America Trench, as well as different distances from the trench, variations in the depth with respect to the subducted slab, or the upper plate characteristics.

  4. 80-Myr history of buoyancy and volcanic fluxes along the trails of the Walvis and St. Helena hotspots (South Atlantic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, V.; Adam, C.; Escartin, J.

    2007-12-01

    Walvis and St.~Helena are the only long-lived hotspot chains in the South Atlantic. Therefore, their characterization is important to constrain the processes associated with mantle plume formation, their temporal evolution, and the interaction with plate and mantle dynamics in the region. We study the temporal evolution of plume buoyancy and magma production rate along both hotspot chains, which are constrained from the swell and volume of volcanic materials emplaced along the chain. The regional depth anomaly is calculated by correcting the 2' bathymetry grid of Smith & Sandwell (1997) for thermal subsidence and sediment loading. We separate the topography associated with volcanism and the swell surrounding the hotspot chains using the MiFil filtering method (Adam et al., 2005). We then estimate the temporal variations associated with both parameters by computing volumes along the hotspot tracks. Neither Walvis nor St.~Helena show a 'classical' hotspot behavior. We find that two plumes are at the origin of the St.~Helena chain. This study also shows a swell associated with the Circe seamount, supporting the existence of a hotspot NW of the St.~Helena trail. The variation in swell and volcanic fluxes suggests temporal variability in the plume behavior at time scales of 10-20~m.y. and 5~m.y., which may be related to oscillations and instabilities of the plume conduit, respectively. Cumulative fluxes in the area are largest for Walvis and weakest for Circe, and all are significantly lower than that reported for the Hawai'i hotspot.

  5. Possible Late Pleistocene volcanic activity on Nightingale Island, South Atlantic Ocean, based on geoelectrical resistivity measurements, sediment corings and 14C dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Anders Anker; Björck, Svante; Cronholm, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Tristan da Cunha is a volcanic island group situated in the central South Atlantic. The oldest of these islands, Nightingale Island, has an age of about 18Ma. In the interior of the island, there are several wetlands situated in topographic depressions. The ages of these basins have been unknown,...

  6. E–W strike slip shearing of Kinwat granitoid at South East Deccan Volcanic Province, Kinwat, Maharashtra, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R D Kaplay; T Vijay Kumar; Soumyajit Mukherjee; P R Wesanekar; Md Babar; Sumeet Chavan

    2017-07-01

    We study the margin of South East Deccan Volcanic Province around Kinwat lineament, Maharashtra, India, which is NW extension of the Kaddam Fault. Structural field studies document ∼E–W strike-slip mostly brittle faults from the basement granite. We designate this as ‘Western boundary East Dharwar Craton Strike-slip Zone’ (WBEDCSZ). At local level, the deformation regime from Kinwat, Kaddam Fault, micro-seismically active Nanded and seismically active Killari corroborate with the nearby lineaments. Morphometric analyses suggest that the region is moderately tectonically active. The region of intense strike-slip deformation lies between seismically active fault along Tapi in NW and Bhadrachalam in the SE part of the Kaddam Fault/lineament. The WBEDCSZ with the surface evidences of faulting, presence of a major lineaments and intersection of faults could be a zone of intraplate earthquake.

  7. Geologic map of the Simcoe Mountains Volcanic Field, main central segment, Yakama Nation, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, Wes; Fierstein, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Mountainous parts of the Yakama Nation lands in south-central Washington are mostly covered by basaltic lava flows and cinder cones that make up the Simcoe Mountains volcanic field. The accompanying geologic map of the central part of the volcanic field has been produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) on behalf of the Water Resources Program of the Yakama Nation. The volcanic terrain stretches continuously from Mount Adams eastward as far as Satus Pass and Mill Creek Guard Station. Most of the many hills and buttes are volcanic cones where cinders and spatter piled up around erupting vents while lava flows spread downslope. All of these small volcanoes are now extinct, and, even during their active lifetimes, most of them erupted for no more than a few years. On the Yakama Nation lands, the only large long-lived volcano capable of erupting again in the future is Mount Adams, on the western boundary.

  8. A study on the geochemical characteristics of Upper Permian continental marginal arc volcanic rocks in the northern segment of South Lancangjiang Belt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Shangyue; FENG Qinglai; WEI Qirong; ZHANG Zhibin; ZHANG Hu

    2006-01-01

    Geochemical characteristics of the Upper Permian ( P2 ) continental marginal arc volcanic rocks are described, which have been found recently around the areas of Xiaodingxi and Zangli on the eastern side of the Yunxian-Lincang granite, in terms of rock assemblage, petrochemistry, REE, trace elements, Pb isotopes, geotectonic environment and so on. The volcanic rock assemblage is dominated by basalt-andesite-dacite, with minor trachyte andecite-trachyte; the volcanic rock series is predominated by the calc-alkaline series, with minor tholleiite series and alkaline series rocks; the volcanic rocks are characterized by high Al2O3 and low TiO2 , with K2O contents showing extremely strong polarity; the REE distribution patterns are characterized by LREE enrichment and right-inclined type; trace elements and large cation elements are highly enriched, Ti and Cr are depleted, and P and Nb are partially depleted; the Pb composition is of the Gondwana type; the petrochemical points mostly fall within the field of island-arc volcanic rocks, in consistency with the projection of data points of continental marginal volcanic rocks in the southern segment of the South Lancangjiang Belt and the North Lancangjiang Belt. This continental marginal arc volcanic rock belt, together with the ocean-ridge and ocean-island volcanic rocks and ophiolites in the Changning-Menglian Belt, constitute the ocean-ridge volcanic rock, ophiolite-arc rock-magmatic rock belts which are distributed in pairs, indicating that the Lancangjiang oceanic crust subducted eastwards. This result is of great importance in constraining the evolution of the paleo-Tethys in the Lancangjiang Belt.

  9. The velocity structure of a post-spreading volcanic seamount in the Southwest Sub-basin, South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Li, Jiabiao; Ruan, Aiguo; Yu, Zhiteng; Niu, Xiongwei

    2017-04-01

    Post-spreading magmatism is extremely strong in the South China Sea and it is common feature for the pacific area (e.g. Castillo et al., 2010). Such seamounts formed by the post-spreading magmatism may provide key insights into a unique mechanism of strong magmatism without mantle convection as well as the crustal emplacement (e.g. Baloga et al., 1995; Kipf et al., 2013). We conducted a seismic refraction survey over an axial seamount (Longnan Seamount) in the Southwest Sub-basin, South China Sea in 2010. Results show that the post-spreading axial seamount is mainly formed by an extrusive process. Low upper-crustal velocities observed under the seamount are attributed to volcaniclastic rocks and high-porosity basalts. Velocity models reveal the lack of a large root and a relative high-velocity layer 3 underlying the seamount. The origin of axial seamounts is supposed to be buoyant decompression melting mechanism (Castillo et al., 2010; Meng and Zhang, 2014). This research was granted by the Natural Science Foundation of China (91028006, 91228205), the Scientific Research Fund of the Second Institute of Oceanography, SOA (JG1602) and the National Programme on Global Change and Air-Sea Interaction, SOA (GASI-GEOGE-01). References Castillo, P. R., Clague, D. A., Davis, A. S., et al., 2010. Petrogenesis of Davidson Seamount lavas and its implications for fossil spreading center and intraplate magmatism in the eastern Pacific. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, 11, Q02005, doi:10.1029/2009GC002992 Baloga, S., Spudis, P. D. and Guest, J. E., 1995. The dynamics of rapidly emplaced terrestrial lava flows and implications for planetary volcanism. J. Geophys. Res., 100 (B12), 24509-24519. Kipf, A, Hauff, F., Werner, R., et al., 2014. Seamounts off the West Antarctic margin: A case for non-hotspot driven intraplate volcanism. Gondwana Res., 25 (4), 1660-1679. Meng, L., Zhang, J., 2014. The magmatic activity mechanism of the fossil spreading center in the Southwest sub

  10. Paleomagnetism from Deception Island (South Shetlands archipelago, Antarctica), new insights into the interpretation of the volcanic evolution using a geomagnetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Urcia, B.; Gil-Peña, I.; Maestro, A.; López-Martínez, J.; Galindo-Zaldívar, J.; Soto, R.; Gil-Imaz, A.; Rey, J.; Pueyo, O.

    2016-07-01

    Deception Island shows the most recent exposed active volcanism in the northern boundary of the Bransfield Trough. The succession of the volcanic sequence in the island is broadly divided into pre- and post-caldera collapse units although a well-constrained chronological identification of the well-defined successive volcanic episodes is still needed. A new paleomagnetic investigation was carried out on 157 samples grouped in 20 sites from the volcanic deposits of Deception Island (South Shetlands archipelago, Antarctic Peninsula region) distributed in: (1) volcanic breccia (3 sites) and lavas (2 sites) prior to the caldera collapse; (2) lavas emplaced after the caldera collapse (10 sites); and (3) dikes cutting pre- and the lowermost post-caldera collapse units (5 sites). The information revealed by paleomagnetism provides new data about the evolution of the multi-episodic volcanic edifice of this Quaternary volcano, suggesting that the present-day position of the volcanic materials is close to their original emplacement position. The new data have been combined with previous paleomagnetic results in order to tentatively propose an age when comparing the paleomagnetic data with a global geomagnetic model. Despite the uncertainties in the use of averaged paleomagnetic data per volcanic units, the new data in combination with tephra occurrences noted elsewhere in the region suggest that the pre-caldera units (F1 and F2) erupted before 12,000 year BC, the caldera collapse took place at about 8300 year BC, and post-caldera units S1 and S2 are younger than 2000 year BC.

  11. Transient magmatic control in a tectonic domain: the central Aeolian volcanic arc (South Italy)

    KAUST Repository

    Ruch, Joel

    2015-04-01

    The background stress field in volcanic areas may be overprinted by that produced by transient magmatic intrusions, generating local faulting. These events are rarely monitored and thus not fully understood, generating debate about the role of magma and tectonics in any geodynamic setting. Here we carried out a field structural analysis on the NNW-SSE strike-slip system of the central Aeolian Arc, Italy (Lipari and Vulcano islands) with ages constrained by stratigraphy to better capture the tectonic and magmatic evolution at the local and regional scales. We consider both islands as a single magmatic system and define 5 principal stratigraphic units based on magmatic and tectonic activity. We collected >500 measurements of faults, extension fractures and dikes at 40 sites, mostly NNE-SSW to NNW-SSE oriented with a dominant NS orientation. These structures are governed quasi exclusively by pure dip-slip motion, consistent with an E-W extension direction, with minor dextral and sinistral slip, the latter being mostly related to old deposits (>50 ka). We further reconstructed the evolution of the Vulcano-Lipari system during the last ~20 ka and find that it consists of an overall half-graben-like structure, with faults with predominant eastward dips. Field evidence suggests that faulting occurs often in temporal and spatial relation with magmatic events, suggesting that most of the observable deformation derived from transient magmatic activity, rather than from steady regional tectonics. To explain the dominant magmatic and episodic extension in a tectonic dominant domain, we propose a model where the regional N-S trending maximum horizontal stress, responsible for strike-slip activity, locally rotates to vertical in response to transient pressurization of the magmatic system and magma rise below Lipari and Vulcano. This has possibly generated the propagation of N-S trending dikes in the past 1 ka along a 10 km long by 1 km wide crustal corridor, with important

  12. Assessing future vent opening locations at the Somma-Vesuvio volcanic complex: 2. Probability maps of the caldera for a future Plinian/sub-Plinian event with uncertainty quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadini, A.; Bevilacqua, A.; Neri, A.; Cioni, R.; Aspinall, W. P.; Bisson, M.; Isaia, R.; Mazzarini, F.; Valentine, G. A.; Vitale, S.; Baxter, P. J.; Bertagnini, A.; Cerminara, M.; de Michieli Vitturi, M.; Di Roberto, A.; Engwell, S.; Esposti Ongaro, T.; Flandoli, F.; Pistolesi, M.

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we combine reconstructions of volcanological data sets and inputs from a structured expert judgment to produce a first long-term probability map for vent opening location for the next Plinian or sub-Plinian eruption of Somma-Vesuvio. In the past, the volcano has exhibited significant spatial variability in vent location; this can exert a significant control on where hazards materialize (particularly of pyroclastic density currents). The new vent opening probability mapping has been performed through (i) development of spatial probability density maps with Gaussian kernel functions for different data sets and (ii) weighted linear combination of these spatial density maps. The epistemic uncertainties affecting these data sets were quantified explicitly with expert judgments and implemented following a doubly stochastic approach. Various elicitation pooling metrics and subgroupings of experts and target questions were tested to evaluate the robustness of outcomes. Our findings indicate that (a) Somma-Vesuvio vent opening probabilities are distributed inside the whole caldera, with a peak corresponding to the area of the present crater, but with more than 50% probability that the next vent could open elsewhere within the caldera; (b) there is a mean probability of about 30% that the next vent will open west of the present edifice; (c) there is a mean probability of about 9.5% that the next medium-large eruption will enlarge the present Somma-Vesuvio caldera, and (d) there is a nonnegligible probability (mean value of 6-10%) that the next Plinian or sub-Plinian eruption will have its initial vent opening outside the present Somma-Vesuvio caldera.

  13. Formation of post-spreading volcanic ridges in the East sub-basin of the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, E.; Zhao, M.; Sibuet, J. C.; Tan, P.; Wang, J.; Qiu, X.

    2016-12-01

    In the South China Sea (SCS), the post-spreading magmatism ( 3-13 Ma) largely masks the initial seafloor spreading fabric. The resulting post-spreading seamounts are more numerous in the northern part than in the southern part of the East sub-basin. In the eastern part of the East sub-basin, the post-spreading volcanic ridge (PSVR) is approximately N055° oriented and follows the extinct spreading ridge (ESR). In the western part of the East sub-basin, the PSVR, called the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain, is E-W oriented and hides the ESR (Sibuet et al., 2016). We conducted a seismic refraction survey covering both the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamount chain and the location of the adjacent ESR. Three E-W oriented profiles and one N-S oriented profile are parallel and perpendicular to the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamounts chain, respectively. Our research is focused on the understanding of the relationship between the crustal thicknesses and crustal seismic velocities. The detailed velocity structure shows that the Zhenbei-Huangyan seamount chain was emplaced through a typical oceanic crust. Crustal thicknesses and seismic velocities suggest an asymmetric generation of seamounts in the East sub-basin, where active upwelling mantle (Holbrook et al., 2001) or buoyancy-driven decompression melting happened (Castillo et al., 2010). The Zhenbei and Huangyan seamounts were probably formed 3-5 Ma and 7-9 Ma, after seafloor spreading cessation; their thickened lower crusts were probably due to magmatic intrusions associated with a high-velocity layer (7.4-7.6 km/s),and their large thickness of upper crust were mainly due to volcanic extrusions. These two seamounts presents a different structural orientation and their crustal thicknesses are different, suggesting an independent origin for their magmatic feeding. This research was granted by the Natural Science Foundation of China (91428204, 91028002, 41176053).

  14. Geomagnetic imprint of the Persani volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besutiu, Lucian; Seghedi, Ioan; Zlagnean, Luminita; Atanasiu, Ligia; Popa, Razvan-Gabriel; Pomeran, Mihai; Visan, Madalina

    2016-04-01

    The Persani small volume volcanism is located in the SE corner of the Transylvanian Depression, at the north-western edge of the intra-mountainous Brasov basin. It represents the south-easternmost segment of the Neogene-Quaternary volcanic chain of the East Carpathians. The alkaline basalt monogenetic volcanic field is partly coeval with the high-K calc-alkaline magmatism south of Harghita Mountains (1-1.6 Ma). Its eruptions post-dated the calc-alkaline volcanism in the Harghita Mountains (5.3-1.6 Ma), but pre-dated the high-K calc-alkaline emissions of Ciomadul volcano (1.0-0.03 Ma). The major volcanic forms have been mapped in previous geological surveys. Still, due to the small size of the volcanoes and large extent of tephra deposits and recent sediments, the location of some vents or other volcanic structures has been incompletely revealed. To overcome this problem, the area was subject to several near-surface geophysical investigations, including paleomagnetic research. However, due to their large-scale features, the previous geophysical surveys proved to be an inappropriate approach to the volcanological issues. Therefore, during the summers of 2014 and 2015, based on the high magnetic contrast between the volcanic rocks and the hosting sedimentary formations, a detailed ground geomagnetic survey has been designed and conducted, within central Persani volcanism area, in order to outline the presence of volcanic structures hidden beneath the overlying deposits. Additionally, information on the rock magnetic properties was also targeted by sampling and analysing several outcrops in the area. Based on the acquired data, a detailed total intensity scalar geomagnetic anomaly map was constructed by using the recent IGRF12 model. The revealed pattern of the geomagnetic field proved to be fully consistent with the direction of magnetisation previously determined on rock samples. In order to enhance the signal/noise ratio, the results were further processed by

  15. High resolution seismic reflection profiles of Holocene volcanic and tectonic features, Mono Lake, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayko, A. S.; Hart, P. E.; Bursik, M. I.; McClain, J. S.; Moore, J. C.; Boyle, M.; Childs, J. R.; Novick, M.; Hill, D. P.; Mangan, M.; Roeske, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Inyo-Mono Craters of Long Valley and Mono Basin, California are the youngest eruptive vents of the Great Basin, USA and the second youngest in California. They are one of two seismically active volcanic centers with geothermal power production in the Walker Lane, western Great Basin, the other being the Coso Volcanic Field to the south. High resolution seismic reflection data collected from the northern tip of the Mono Craters eruptive centers in Mono Lake delinates two structural zones proximal to the active volcanic centers in Mono Lake. A growth structure drapped by ~30 m or more of bedded sediment shows increasing deformation and offset of clastic deposits on the northwest margin of the basin. Coherent thin-bedded stratigraphic sections with strong reflectors to 30-100m depth are preserved on the western and northern margins of the basin. The southern and southeastern areas of the lake are generally seismically opaque, due to extensive ash and tephra deposits as well as widespread methane. Thin pockets of well-bedded, poorly consolidated sediment of probable Holocene and last glacial age are present within intrabasin depressions providing some local age constraints on surfaces adjacent to volcanic vents and volcanically modified features.

  16. Timing of the Wudangshan, Yaolinghe volcanic sequences and mafic sills in South Qinling: U-Pb zircon geochronology and tectonic implication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LING WenLi; REN BangFang; DUAN RuiChun; LIU XiaoMing; MAO XinWu; PENG LianHong; LIU ZaoXue; CHENG JianPing; YANG HongMei

    2008-01-01

    The Wudangshan, Yaolinghe volcanic-sedimentary sequences and doleritic-gabbroic sills comprise the largest exposed Precambrian basement in South Qinling. Zircons separated from 5 volcanic-pyroclas-tic samples of the Wudangshan Group, 2 volcanic samples of the Yaolinghe Group and one sample for the mafic sills were used for U-Pb dating by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spec-trometry (LA-ICPMS). The results reveal that the Wudangshan volcanic sequence was formed at (755±3) Ma (a weighted mean from the 5 samples, MSWD=0.47), whereas the Yaolinghe volcanic suite and the mafic sill were crystallized at (685:L±5) (2 samples, MSWD=0.36) and (679±J:3) Ma (MSWD=1.6), respectively, which are equal to each other within analysis errors. These ages are markedly younger than those previously documented for the rocks. The newly obtained ages for the Wudangshan and Yaolinghe Groups are identical to those of the bottom Liantuo and slightly older than those of the Nantuo Forms-tions, respectively, lower strata of the Nanhua (middle to late Neoproterozoic) stratotype section in eastern Three Gorges, Yangtze craton. A range of inherited magmatic zircons was recognized with ages of 830 to 780 Ma, which are typical of Neoprotzrozoic magmatisms recorded along the margins and interior of the Yangtze craton. Thus, there is Neoproterozoic basement comprising 830-780 Ma igne-ous suites in South Qinling; the inherited zircons were detrital sediments derived from the northern margin of the Yangtze craton. Accordingly, it is suggested that the South Qinling is a segment of the Yangtze craton before the Qinling Orogeny.

  17. Spatial vent opening probability map of El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Laura; Cappello, Annalisa; Galindo, Inés; Neri, Marco; Del Negro, Ciro

    2013-04-01

    The assessment of the probable spatial distribution of new eruptions is useful to manage and reduce the volcanic risk. It can be achieved in different ways, but it becomes especially hard when dealing with volcanic areas less studied, poorly monitored and characterized by a low frequent activity, as El Hierro. Even though it is the youngest of the Canary Islands, before the 2011 eruption in the "Las Calmas Sea", El Hierro had been the least studied volcanic Island of the Canaries, with more historically devoted attention to La Palma, Tenerife and Lanzarote. We propose a probabilistic method to build the susceptibility map of El Hierro, i.e. the spatial distribution of vent opening for future eruptions, based on the mathematical analysis of the volcano-structural data collected mostly on the Island and, secondly, on the submerged part of the volcano, up to a distance of ~10-20 km from the coast. The volcano-structural data were collected through new fieldwork measurements, bathymetric information, and analysis of geological maps, orthophotos and aerial photographs. They have been divided in different datasets and converted into separate and weighted probability density functions, which were then included in a non-homogeneous Poisson process to produce the volcanic susceptibility map. Future eruptive events on El Hierro is mainly concentrated on the rifts zones, extending also beyond the shoreline. The major probabilities to host new eruptions are located on the distal parts of the South and West rifts, with the highest probability reached in the south-western area of the West rift. High probabilities are also observed in the Northeast and South rifts, and the submarine parts of the rifts. This map represents the first effort to deal with the volcanic hazard at El Hierro and can be a support tool for decision makers in land planning, emergency plans and civil defence actions.

  18. Zircon SHRIMP U-Pb dating for the Cangshuipu volcanic rocks and its implications for the lower boundary age of the Nanhua strata in South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian; LI Xianhua; DUAN Taizhong; LIU Dunyi; SONG Biao; LI Zhongxiong; GAO Yonghua

    2003-01-01

    The continental volcanic rocks and volcaniclastic sedimentary conglomerates of the Cangshuipu Formation occur well in Yiyang of Hunan Province, consisting of a wedge-shaped succession of Neoproterozoic strata that overlie with high-angle unconformity the flysch turbidites of the Lengjiaxi Group in the Upper Mesoproterozoic Eonothem. SHRIMP zircon U-Pb dating gives a weighted mean age of 814 ( 12 Ma for the dacitic volcanic agglomerates from the lowest part of the volcanic rocks in the Cangshuipu Formation. This age is younger than previously reported values of 921-933 Ma for the volcanic rocks from the Cangshuipu Formation. Our new dating represents the lower boundary age of the Neoproterozoic System in the studied area. The younger age for the Cangshuipu volcanic rocks is supported by the following observations: (1) Lower Neoproterozoic strata (814-1000 Ma) are missing in the studied area; (2) the Nanhua rift system was initiated at about 820 Ma; and (3) an age of ~820 Ma may be taken as the lower boundary timing of the Nanhua System (even Neoproterozoic) in South China.

  19. Geology, thermal maturation, and source rock geochemistry in a volcanic covered basin: San Juan sag, south-central Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gries, R.R. [Priority Oil & Gas, Denver, CO (United States); Clayton, J.L. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Leonard, C. [Platte River Associates, Denver, CO (United States)

    1997-07-01

    The San Juan sag, concealed by the vast San Juan volcanic field of south-central Colorado, has only recently benefited from oil and gas wildcat drilling and evaluations. Sound geochemical analyses and maturation modeling are essential elements for successful exploration and development. Oil has been produced in minor quantities from an Oligocene sill in the Mancos Shale within the sag, and major oil and gas production occurs from stratigraphically equivalent rocks in the San Juan basin to the southwest and in the Denver basin to the northeast. The objectives of this study were to identify potential source rocks, assess thermal maturity, and determine hydrocarbon-source bed relationships. Source rocks are present in the San Juan sag in the upper and lower Mancos Shale (including the Niobrara Member), which consists of about 666 m (2184 ft) of marine shale with from 0.5 to 3.1 wt. % organic carbon. Pyrolysis yields (S{sub 1} + S{sub 2} = 2000-6000 ppm) and solvent extraction yields (1000-4000 ppm) indicate that some intervals within the Mancos Shale are good potential source rocks for oil, containing type II organic matter, according to Rock-Eval pyrolysis assay.

  20. Volcanic eruptions observed with infrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Aster, Richard C.; Kyle, Philip R.

    2004-07-01

    Infrasonic airwaves produced by active volcanoes provide valuable insight into the eruption dynamics. Because the infrasonic pressure field may be directly associated with the flux rate of gas released at a volcanic vent, infrasound also enhances the efficacy of volcanic hazard monitoring and continuous studies of conduit processes. Here we present new results from Erebus, Fuego, and Villarrica volcanoes highlighting uses of infrasound for constraining quantitative eruption parameters, such as eruption duration, source mechanism, and explosive gas flux.

  1. A structural outline of the Yenkahe volcanic resurgent dome (Tanna Island, Vanuatu Arc, South Pacific)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, O.; Brothelande, E.; Lénat, J.-F.; Bachèlery, P.; Garaébiti, E.

    2013-12-01

    A structural study has been conducted on the resurgent Yenkahe dome (5 km long by 3 km wide) located in the heart of the Siwi caldera of Tanna Island (Vanuatu arc, south Pacific). This spectacular resurgent dome hosts a small caldera and a very active strombolian cinder cone - the Yasur volcano - in the west and exhibits an intriguing graben in its central part. Detailed mapping and structural observations make it possible to unravel the volcano-tectonic history of the dome. It is shown that, following the early formation of a resurgent dome in the west, a complex collapse (caldera plus graben) occurred and this was associated with the recent uplift of the eastern part of the present dome. Eastward migration of the underlying magma related to regional tectonics is proposed to explain this evolution.

  2. Discovery of abundant hydrothermal venting on the ultraslow-spreading Gakkel ridge in the Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, H N; Michael, P J; Baker, E T; Connelly, D P; Snow, J E; Langmuir, C H; Dick, H J B; Mühe, R; German, C R; Graham, D W

    2003-01-16

    Submarine hydrothermal venting along mid-ocean ridges is an important contributor to ridge thermal structure, and the global distribution of such vents has implications for heat and mass fluxes from the Earth's crust and mantle and for the biogeography of vent-endemic organisms. Previous studies have predicted that the incidence of hydrothermal venting would be extremely low on ultraslow-spreading ridges (ridges with full spreading rates discovery of such abundant venting, and its apparent localization near volcanic centres, requires a reassessment of the geologic conditions that control hydrothermal circulation on ultraslow-spreading ridges.

  3. The sub-volcanic system of El Hierro, Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, I.; Becerril, L.; Gudmundsson, A.

    2012-04-01

    The main volcanotectonic structures of El Hierro are three rift zones, trending northeast, west, and south. Most of the eruptions in El Hierro within these zones are basaltic fissure eruptions fed by subvertical dykes. The dykes appear as close to collinear or slightly offset segments, their surface expressions being clusters of cinder cones and eruptive vents. Three large landslides, referred to as El Golfo, El Julan, and Las Playas, have eroded the areas between rift axes and provide exposures that make it possible to provide a three-dimensional view of the uppermost part of the sub-volcanic system. Here we report the results of a structural study of the sub-volcanic system as obtained through the analysis of dykes and eruptive vents. The data obtained from surface outcrops have been combined with data from subsurface water galleries. More than 600 eruptive vents and 625 dykes have been studied in detail to characterise the subvolcanic system of the island. Using cinder-cone and other eruptive-vent alignments it has been possible to infer 115 eruptive fissures with lengths that range from 40 m to 2200 m. NE-SW trending volcanic fissures and dykes are common on the entire island and predominate in the northeast rift zone. The main strike of the dykes and fissures in the south and west rift zones are approximately NNW-SSE and E-W, respectively. However, in the west rift zone, eruptive fissures display a fan distribution with directions that range from N43°E to N124°E. Volcanic fissures within the El Golfo landslide valley trend parallel to the head scarp, except those that are close to the head of the valley, many of which are perpendicular to the scarp. Dykes show a radial distribution in the head scarp of the El Golfo landslide. Three feeder-dykes directly connected with their lava flows have been identified in El Hierro. Feeder dykes are difficult to observe in the field but provide important information when their lengths and thicknesses can be measured

  4. Geochemical characteristics of sinking particles in the Tonga arc hydrothermal vent field, southwestern Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Jeek; Kim, Jonguk; Pak, Sang Joon; Ju, Se-Jong; Yoo, Chan Min; Kim, Hyun Sub; Lee, Kyeong Yong; Hwang, Jeomshik

    2016-10-01

    Studies of sinking particles associated with hydrothermal vent fluids may help us to quantify mass transformation processes between hydrothermal vent plumes and deposits. Such studies may also help us understand how various types of hydrothermal systems influence particle flux and composition. However, the nature of particle precipitation out of hydrothermal vent plumes in the volcanic arcs of convergent plate boundaries has not been well studied, nor have the characteristics of such particles been compared with the characteristics of sinking particles at divergent boundaries. We examined sinking particles collected by sediment traps for about 10 days at two sites, each within 200 m of identified hydrothermal vents in the south Tonga arc of the southwestern Pacific. The total mass flux was several-fold higher than in the non-hydrothermal southwest tropical Pacific. The contribution of non-biogenic materials was dominant (over 72%) and the contribution of metals such as Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn was very high compared to their average levels in the upper continental crust. The particle flux and composition indicate that hydrothermal authigenic particles are the dominant source of the collected sinking particles. Overall, our elemental ratios are similar to observations of particles at the divergent plate boundary in the East Pacific Rise (EPR). Thus, the nature of the hydrothermal particles collected in the south Tonga arc is probably not drastically different from particles in the EPR region. However, we observed consistent differences between the two sites within the Tonga arc, in terms of the contribution of non-biogenic material, the radiocarbon content of sinking particulate organic carbon, the ratios of iron to other metals (e.g. Cu/Fe and Zn/Fe), and plume maturity indices (e.g. S/Fe). This heterogeneity within the Tonga arc is likely caused by differences in physical environment such as water depth, phase separation due to subcritical boiling and associated sub

  5. Electrical charging of ash in Icelandic volcanic plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Aplin, Karen L; Nicoll, Keri A

    2014-01-01

    The existence of volcanic lightning and alteration of the atmospheric potential gradient in the vicinity of near-vent volcanic plumes provides strong evidence for the charging of volcanic ash. More subtle electrical effects are also visible in balloon soundings of distal volcanic plumes. Near the vent, some proposed charging mechanisms are fractoemission, triboelectrification, and the so-called "dirty thunderstorm" mechanism, which is where ash and convective clouds interact electrically to enhance charging. Distant from the vent, a self-charging mechanism, probably triboelectrification, has been suggested to explain the sustained low levels of charge observed on a distal plume. Recent research by Houghton et al. (2013) linked the self-charging of volcanic ash to the properties of the particle size distribution, observing that a highly polydisperse ash distribution would charge more effectively than a monodisperse one. Natural radioactivity in some volcanic ash could also contribute to self-charging of volcan...

  6. The unzipping of Africa and South America; New insights from the Etendeka and younger volcanic events along the Angola/Namibia margin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerram, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The volcanic margin along Angola is relatively poorly constrained. This study uses new petrographic, geochronological and geochemical observations on a new sample set collected along the margin to help understand the various types and relative timings of volcanic events along the margin. This new study has identified 3 main volcanic events that occur at ~100Ma (Sumbe event 1), 90-92Ma (Serra de Neve (SDN)-Elefantes event 2) and 80-81Ma (Namibe event 3), with the oldest event in the north of the margin and younging southwards. This is contrasting with the main Etendeka pulse in Namibia at around 130 Ma. There is a marked variety of igneous rocks along the margin with a grouping of evolved alkaline rocks in the central SDN-Elefantes section, basic submarine volcanics in the north, and basanite eruptions in the southern section. There is some overlap with geochemical types along the margin. The Sumbe event contains predominantly submarine volcanics and shallow Intrusions. SDN-Elefantes rocks have a mixed type but with a distinctive feldspar rich evolved alkali suite of rocks (nepheline syenites and variations around this composition) which occur as lava flows and shallow intrusions as well as making up the core of the SDN complex. The SDN complex itself is analogous in size to the main volcanic centres in Namibia (such as Messum, Brandberg etc.) and suggests that large volcanic feeding centres are still active along the margin as young as 90ma. These in turn will form large volcano-topographic features. In the south the Ponta Negra and Canico sites mainly contain basanites in the form of lava flows, invasive flows and shallow intrusions. At Canico one intrusive plug was sampled with a similar composition to the evolved SDN-Elefantes suite. In all three events it is clear that the volcanic systems have interacted with the sedimentary systems, in some cases dynamically, in others with regional implications for volcano-tectonic uplift. Specific thanks is given for

  7. Understanding vented gas explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lautkaski, R. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Systems

    1997-12-31

    The report is an introduction to vented gas explosions for nonspecialists, particularly designers of plants for flammable gases and liquids. The phenomena leading to pressure generation in vented gas explosions in empty and congested rooms are reviewed. The four peak model of vented gas explosions is presented with simple methods to predict the values of the individual peaks. Experimental data on the external explosion of dust and gas explosions is discussed. The empirical equation relating the internal and external peak pressures in vented dust explosions is shown to be valid for gas explosion tests in 30 m{sup 3} and 550 m{sup 3} chambers. However, the difficulty of predicting the internal peak pressure in large chambers remains. Methods of explosion relief panel design and principles of vent and equipment layout to reduce explosion overpressures are reviewed. (orig.) 65 refs.

  8. Lunar Pyroclastic Eruptions: Basin Volcanism's Dying Gasps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, G. Y.; Nahm, A.; McGovern, P. J.; Kring, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    spatially isolated volcanic units, both confined within the central peak ring. One is a thin mare deposit to the north, and to the south is a 8.5 km long pyroclastic vent. The basin also a series of fractures, which exhibit complex cross-cutting relationships with each other and the basin floor materials, thereby offering clues about the timing of their formation. Some of these fractures widen as they cut across the uplifted peak ring, indicating that they are the surface manifestations of deep faulting and are younger. An orthogonal system of fractures in the southern basin floor outside of the peak ring is of particular interest because of its possible relationship to Schrodinger's basin volcanism. We are exploring the hypothesis that an expanding magma chamber once resided in this location, uplifted the basin floor, and formed these orthogonal fractures. Post-inflation, the reservoir was emptied via a propagating dike and sill complex that eventually surfaced at the location of the pyroclastic vent. [1] Saal et al. (2008) Nature; [2] Hauri et al. (2011) Science; [3] Saal et al. (2011) NASA Lunar Sci. Inst. Forum; [4] Delano (1986) JGR; [5] Head (1976) Rev. Geophys. Space Phys.; [6] McGovern & Litherland (2011) LPSC 42;McGovern et al. (2011) AGU Fall Session

  9. Petrogenesis of Volcanic Rocks in the Khabr-Marvast Tectonized Ophiolite: Evidence for Subduction Processes in the South-Western Margin of Central Iranian Microcontinent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Azam SOLTANMOHAMMADI; Mohammad RAHGOSHAY; Morteza KHALATBARI-JAFARI

    2009-01-01

    The Late Cretaceous Khabr-Marvast tectonized ophiolite is located in the middle part of the Nain-Baft ophiolite belt, at the south-western edge of the central Iranian microcontinent. Although all the volcanic rocks in the study area indicate subduction-related magmatism (e.g. high LILE (large ion lithophile elements)/ HFSE (high field strenght elements) ratios and negative anomalies in Nb and Ta), geological and geochemical data clearly distinguish two distinct groups of volcanic rocks in the tectonized association: (1) group 1 is comprised of hyaloclustic breccias, basaltic pillow iavas, and andesite sheet flows. These rocks represent the Nain-Baft oceanic crust; and (2) group 2 is alkaline iavas from the top section of the ophiolite suite. These lavas show shoshonite affinity, but do not support the propensity of ophiolite.

  10. An authoritative global database for active submarine hydrothermal vent fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Stace E.; Baker, Edward T.; German, Christopher R.; Maffei, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    The InterRidge Vents Database is available online as the authoritative reference for locations of active submarine hydrothermal vent fields. Here we describe the revision of the database to an open source content management system and conduct a meta-analysis of the global distribution of known active vent fields. The number of known active vent fields has almost doubled in the past decade (521 as of year 2009), with about half visually confirmed and others inferred active from physical and chemical clues. Although previously known mainly from mid-ocean ridges (MORs), active vent fields at MORs now comprise only half of the total known, with about a quarter each now known at volcanic arcs and back-arc spreading centers. Discoveries in arc and back-arc settings resulted in an increase in known vent fields within exclusive economic zones, consequently reducing the proportion known in high seas to one third. The increase in known vent fields reflects a number of factors, including increased national and commercial interests in seafloor hydrothermal deposits as mineral resources. The purpose of the database now extends beyond academic research and education and into marine policy and management, with at least 18% of known vent fields in areas granted or pending applications for mineral prospecting and 8% in marine protected areas.

  11. Middle Miocene near trench volcanism in northern Colombia: A record of slab tearing due to the simultaneous subduction of the Caribbean Plate under South and Central America?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, M.; Cardona, A.; Monsalve, G.; Yarce, J.; Montes, C.; Valencia, V.; Weber, M.; De La Parra, F.; Espitia, D.; López-Martínez, M.

    2013-08-01

    Field, geochemical, geochronological, biostratigraphical and sedimentary provenance results of basaltic and associated sediments northern Colombia reveal the existence of Middle Miocene (13-14 Ma) mafic volcanism within a continental margin setting usually considered as amagmatic. This basaltic volcanism is characterized by relatively high Al2O3 and Na2O values (>15%), a High-K calc-alkaline affinity, large ion lithophile enrichment and associated Nb, Ta and Ti negative anomalies which resemble High Al basalts formed by low degree of asthenospheric melting at shallow depths mixed with some additional slab input. The presence of pre-Cretaceous detrital zircons, tourmaline and rutile as well as biostratigraphic results suggest that the host sedimentary rocks were deposited in a platform setting within the South American margin. New results of P-wave residuals from northern Colombia reinforce the view of a Caribbean slab subducting under the South American margin. The absence of a mantle wedge, the upper plate setting, and proximity of this magmatism to the trench, together with geodynamic constraints suggest that the subducted Caribbean oceanic plate was fractured and a slab tear was formed within the oceanic plate. Oceanic plate fracturing is related to the splitting of the subducting Caribbean Plate due to simultaneous subduction under the Panama-Choco block and northwestern South America, and the fast overthrusting of the later onto the Caribbean oceanic plate.

  12. Mineral chemistry of clinopyroxene: guidance on geo- thermobarometry and tectonomagmatic setting of Nabar volcanic rocks, South of Kashan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezvan Mehvari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Nabar area that is a part of the Urumieh- Dokhtar volcano- plutonic belt is located in the south of Kashan. Research works such as Emami (Emami, 1993 and Abbasi (Abbasi, 2012 have been done about the geology of this area. Rock units in the study area contain middle- upper Eocene intermediate to acidic lavas and pyroclastic rocks, green marl, shale and sandy marls of Oligo- Miocene, limestones of Qom formation, intrusive granitoids with Oligo- Miocene age and quaternary travertine and recent alluvium (Emami, 1993. The volcanic and sub volcanic rocks of this area are composed of andesite, trachyandesite, dacite, rhyolite and porphyric pyroxene diorite along with pyroclastic rocks. Materials and methods In order to achieve the aims of this work, at first field surveying and sampling were done. Then, thin and polished thin sections were prepared. Some of the samples were selected for microprobe analysis and clinopyroxene minerals were analyzed by using JEOL- JXA-8800 analyzer with a voltage of 20 Kv and a current of 12 nA in the Kanazava University of Japan and Cameca-Sx100 analyzer with a voltage of 15 Kv and a current of 15 nA in the Iranian mineral processing research center, Karaj. Discussion On the basis of petrographic investigations, porphyritic, porphyroid, fluidal, amygdaloidal and porphyry with microlitic groundmass are common textures of these rocks. Also plagioclase, clinopyroxene, amphibole, biotite, sanidine and quartz are essential minerals, opaque, zircon and apatite as accessory minerals are observed in the studied rocks. Clinopyroxenes are observed with corona texture that resulted during the uralitization process. On the basis of minerals’ chemistry, pyroxenes are Fe- Mg- Ca type in composition (Morimoto et al., 1988. These clinopyroxenes are augite. Investigations indicate that mineral composition of clinopyroxene can be effectively used to evaluation the P-T conditions during crystallization. Previous research

  13. Sill induced hydrothermal venting: A summary of our current understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerram, Dougal; Svenesn, Henrik; Planke, Sverre; Millett, John; Reynolds, Pete

    2017-04-01

    Hydrothermal vent structures which are predominantly related with the emplacement of large (>1000 km3) intrusions into the sub-volcanic basins represent a specific style of piercement structure, where climate-forcing gases can be transferred into the atmosphere and hydrosphere. In this case, the types and volumes of gas produced by intrusions is heavily dependent on the host-rock sediment properties that they intrude through. The distribution of vent structures can be shown to be widespread in Large Igneous Provinces for example on both the Norwegian and the Greenland margins of the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP). In this overview we assess the distribution, types and occurrence of hydrothermal vent structures associated with LIPs. There is particular focus on those within the NAIP using mapped examples from offshore seismic data as well as outcrop analogues, highlighting the variability of these structures and their deposits. As the availability of 3D data from offshore and onshore increases, the full nature of the volcanic stratigraphy from the subvolcanic intrusive complexes, through the main eruption cycles into the piercing vent structures, can be realised along the entirety of volcanic rifted margins and LIPs. This will help greatly in our understanding of the evolving palaeo-environments, and climate contributions during the evolution of these short lived massive volcanic events.

  14. Volcano-tectonics of the Al Haruj Volcanic Province, Central Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshaafi, Abdelsalam; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2016-10-01

    The Al Haruj intra-continental Volcanic Province (AHVP), located at the south-western margin of the Sirt Basin, hosts the most extensive and recent volcanic activity in Libya - which is considered typical for plate interiors. From north to south the AHVP is divided into two subprovinces, namely Al Haruj al Aswad and Al Haruj al Abiyad. The total area of the AHVP is around 42,000 km2. Despite the great size of the AHVP, its volcano-tectonic evolution and activity have received very little attention and are poorly documented and understood. Here we present new field data, and analytical and numerical results, on the volcano-tectonics of the AHVP. The length/thickness ratio of 47 dykes and volcanic fissures were measured to estimate magmatic overpressure at the time of eruption. The average dyke (length/thickness) ratio of 421 indicates magmatic overpressures during the associate fissure eruptions of 8-19 MPa (depending on host-rock elastic properties). Spatial distributions of 432 monogenetic eruptions sites/points (lava shields, pyroclastic cones) in the AHVP reveal two main clusters, one in the south and another in the north. Aligned eruptive vents show the dominating strike of volcanic fissures/feeder-dykes as WNW-ESE to NW-SE, coinciding with the orientation of one of main fracture/fault zones. Numerical modelling and field observations suggest that some feeder-dykes may have used steeply dipping normal-fault zones as part of their paths to the surface.

  15. Geochemistry of the Caledonian Basic Volcanic Rocks at the South Margin of the Qinling Orogenc Belt,and Its Tectonic Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The geochemistry of the basic volcanic rocks at the south margin of the Qinling orogenic belt(SMQOB) suggests that they were formed in an intraplate tectonic setting.The REE distribution patterns show these rocks are strongly enriched in LREE with high ∑REE, and their trace elements geochemistry is similar to that of contimental flood basalt.All the above evidence suggests that the Caledonian basic volcanic rocks in the SMQOB were tholeiitic basalts formed in an intraplate spreading-initial rift tectonic setting.The characteristics of regional geology and geochemistry indicate that there was an intraplate spreading-rift tectonic setting between the South Qingling block and the Yangtze block in the Caledonian epoch.The dynamic spreading in this district began in the Early Caledonian and then the intraplate spreadinginitial rifts were formed in the Late Caledonian.As a result of spreading of the Tethys and geodynamic processes in deep mantle ,the Mianlue-Huashan oceanic basin was formed between the Qinling block and the Yangtze block in Devonian,and the Qinling microplate was separated from the northern part of the Yangtze plate.

  16. Petrological insights on the effusive-explosive transitions of the Nisyros-Yali Volcanic Center, South Aegean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Razvan-Gabriel; Bachmann, Olivier; Ellis, Ben; Degruyter, Wim; Kyriakopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-04-01

    Volcanoes erupting silicic, volatile-rich magmas can exhibit both effusive and explosive eruptions, even during closely spaced eruptive episodes. Understanding the effusive-explosive transition is fundamental in order to assess the hazards involved. Magma properties strongly influence the processes during magma ascent that determine the eruptive style. Here, we investigate the link between changing conditions in the magma reservoir and the eruptive style. The Quaternary Nisyros-Yali volcanic center, from the South Aegean Sea, provides an excellent natural laboratory to study this process. Over the last 60-100 kyrs, it produced a series of dacitic to rhyolitic eruptions that emplaced alternating effusive and explosive deposits (with explosive eruptions likely shortly following effusive ones). For this study, nine fresh and well-preserved units (five effusive and four explosive) were sampled and analyzed for whole-rock, groundmass glass and mineral compositions, in order to draw insights into the magma chamber processes and thermodynamic conditions that preceded both types of eruptions. Silicic magmas in Nisyros-Yali record a complex, open-system evolution, dominated by fractionation in mushy reservoirs at mid to upper crustal depths, frequently recharged by warmer input from below. Storage temperatures recorded by the amphibole-plagioclase thermometer span a wide range, and they are always cooler than the pre-eruptive temperatures yielded by Fe-Ti oxide thermometry for the same unit, whether it is effusive or explosive. However, magmas feeding effusive eruptions typically reached cooler conditions (expressed by the presence of low-Al, low-Ti amphiboles) than in the explosive cases. The difference between the pre-eruptive and the lowest storing temperatures in the Nisyros series are in the order of 10-30°C for explosive units, while the difference is of about 40-110°C for the effusive units. The Yali series does not perfectly fit this pattern, where explosive units

  17. Antarctic marine biodiversity and deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chown, Steven L

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of many marine benthic groups is unlike that of most other taxa. Rather than declining from the tropics to the poles, much of the benthos shows high diversity in the Southern Ocean. Moreover, many species are unique to the Antarctic region. Recent work has shown that this is also true of the communities of Antarctic deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Vent ecosystems have been documented from many sites across the globe, associated with the thermally and chemically variable habitats found around these, typically high temperature, streams that are rich in reduced compounds and polymetallic sulphides. The animal communities of the East Scotia Ridge vent ecosystems are very different to those elsewhere, though the microbiota, which form the basis of vent food webs, show less differentiation. Much of the biological significance of deep-sea hydrothermal vents lies in their biodiversity, the diverse biochemistry of their bacteria, the remarkable symbioses among many of the marine animals and these bacteria, and the prospects that investigations of these systems hold for understanding the conditions that may have led to the first appearance of life. The discovery of diverse and unusual Antarctic hydrothermal vent ecosystems provides opportunities for new understanding in these fields. Moreover, the Antarctic vents south of 60°S benefit from automatic conservation under the Convention on the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources and the Antarctic Treaty. Other deep-sea hydrothermal vents located in international waters are not protected and may be threatened by growing interests in deep-sea mining.

  18. Early Cretaceous bimodal volcanic rocks in the southern Lhasa terrane, south Tibet: Age, petrogenesis and tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Ding, Lin; Liu, Zhi-Chao; Zhang, Li-Yun; Yue, Ya-Hui

    2017-01-01

    Limited geochronological and geochemical data from Early Cretaceous igneous rocks of the Gangdese Belt have resulted in a dispute regarding the subduction history of Neo-Tethyan Ocean. To approach this issue, we performed detailed in-situ zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic, whole-rock elemental and Sr-Nd isotopic analyses on Late Mesozoic volcanic rocks exposed in the Liqiongda area, southern Lhasa terrane. These volcanic rocks are calc-alkaline series, dominated by basalts, basaltic andesites, and subordinate rhyolites, with a bimodal suite. The LA-ICPMS zircon U-Pb dating results of the basaltic andesites and rhyolites indicate that these volcanic rocks erupted during the Early Cretaceous (137-130 Ma). The basaltic rocks are high-alumina (average > 17 wt.%), enriched in large ion lithophile elements (LILEs) and light rare earth elements (LREEs), and depleted in high field strength elements (HFSEs), showing subduction-related characteristics. They display highly positive zircon εHf(t) values (+ 10.0 to + 16.3) and whole-rock εNd(t) values (+ 5.38 to + 7.47). The silicic suite is characterized by low Al2O3 (extracted from a source metasomatized by slab-derived components for the petrogenesis of mafic rocks, whereas the subsequent mafic magma underplating triggered partial melting of the juvenile crust to generate acidic magma. Our results confirm the presence of Early Cretaceous volcanism in the southern Lhasa terrane. Combined with the distribution of the contemporary magmatism, deformation style, and sedimentary characteristics in the Lhasa terrane, we favor the suggestion that the Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere was flat-lying beneath the Lhasa terrane during the Early Cretaceous.

  19. Measure Guideline: Passive Vents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, David [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States); Neri, Robin [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2016-02-05

    This document addresses the use of passive vents as a source of outdoor air in multifamily buildings. The challenges associated with implementing passive vents and the factors affecting performance are outlined. A comprehensive design methodology and quantified performance metrics are provided. Two hypothetical design examples are provided to illustrate the process. This document is intended to be useful to designers, decision-makers, and contractors implementing passive ventilation strategies. It is also intended to be a resource for those responsible for setting high-performance building program requirements, especially pertaining to ventilation and outdoor air. To ensure good indoor air quality, a dedicated source of outdoor air is an integral part of high-performance buildings. Presently, there is a lack of guidance pertaining to the design and installation of passive vents, resulting in poor system performance. This report details the criteria necessary for designing, constructing, and testing passive vent systems to enable them to provide consistent and reliable levels of ventilation air from outdoors.

  20. Vent Relief Valve Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Shown is the disassembly, examination, refurbishment and testing of the LH2 ( liquid hydrogen) and LOX (liquid oxygen) vent and relief valves for the S-IVB-211 engine stage in support of the Constellation/Ares project. This image is extracted from high definition video and is the highest resolution available.

  1. Monitoring gas emissions can help forecast volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph; Maarten de Moor,; Bo Galle,

    2015-01-01

    As magma ascends in active volcanoes, dissolved volatiles partition from melt into a gas phase, rise, and are released into the atmosphere from volcanic vents. The major components of high-temperature volcanic gas are typically water vapor, carbon dioxide, and sulfur dioxide. 

  2. Sedimentological and paleontological features of sea floor sediments of Penta Palummo and Miseno volcanic highs, Gulf od Naples (South-eastern Tyrrhenian Sea)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraro, L.; Molisso, F. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Naples (Italy). Ist. di Ricerca Geomare Sud

    2000-07-01

    A sedimentological and paleontological study has been carried out on surficial sediments of Penta Palummo and Miseno volcanic banks, in the Gulf of Naples (South-eastern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy). The deposits consist of bioclastic sand (coralline algae, bryozoans, gastropods, bivalvs and echinoderms). The benthic foraminiferal assemblage is mainly characterized by epiphytic species. Bioclastics sand is autochtonous and derived from breakdown of algal buildups. [Italian] Uno studio sedimentologico e paleontologico e' stato condotto sui sedimenti superficiali dei banchi vulcanici di Penta Palummo e di Miseno (Golfo di Napoli, Mar Tirreno sudorientale). I depositi sono costituiti da sabbie bioclastiche (alghe coralline, briozoi, gasteropodi, bivalvi ed echonodermi). L'associazione a foraminiferi bentonici e' caratterizzata principalmente da specie epifite. Le sabbie bioclastiche sono autoctone e derivano dal disfacimento di biocostruzioni algali.

  3. Characterization of Bacterial Communities in Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents from Three Oceanic Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tianliang; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2016-04-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are considered to be one of the most spectacular ecosystems on Earth. Microorganisms form the basis of the food chain in vents controlling the vent communities. However, the diversity of bacterial communities in deep-sea hydrothermal vents from different oceans remains largely unknown. In this study, the pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene was used to characterize the bacterial communities of the venting sulfide, seawater, and tubeworm trophosome from East Pacific Rise, South Atlantic Ridge, and Southwest Indian Ridge, respectively. A total of 23,767 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were assigned into 42 different phyla. Although Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were the predominant phyla in all vents, differences of bacterial diversity were observed among different vents from three oceanic regions. The sulfides of East Pacific Rise possessed the most diverse bacterial communities. The bacterial diversities of venting seawater were much lower than those of vent sulfides. The symbiotic bacteria of tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae were included in the bacterial community of vent sulfides, suggesting their significant ecological functions as the primary producers in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems. Therefore, our study presented a comprehensive view of bacterial communities in deep-sea hydrothermal vents from different oceans.

  4. Late Cenozoic tectonics and volcanism along the North Anatolian Fault: new structural and geochemical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiyaman, Özlem; Chorowicz, Jean; Arnaud, O. Nicolas; Gündogdu, M. Niyazi; Gourgaud, Alain

    2001-08-01

    Different types of volcanic activity have developed along the North Anatolian Fault zone (NAF) in Turkey. Detailed analysis of satellite images and Digital Elevation Models (DEMs), and field observations have been made in order to understand the tectonics and the distribution of volcanic vents. In the Anatolian block, some faults are oblique to the NAF, and delimit extensional escape wedges. Vents rooted on open tension fractures show that emplacement of the volcanism is related to tensional fracturing of the Anatolian continental block, which we attribute to the onset of free borders in the south and west. Along the NAF, earliest extension ( ϑ1) is directed S to SSW and the latest ( ϑ2) towards W to WSW, parallel to the sinistral slip along the NAF. Major and trace element geochemical data indicate that the dominant calc-alkaline rocks are associated with various alkaline lavas. K-Ar ages of the volcanics range from 22 to 8.5 Ma in Galatia Massif, 900 to 100 ka in Niksar and 3 to 12 ka in Erzincan. Isotopic and trace element data are interpreted as reflecting a dominantly lithospheric mantle source, slightly mixed with asthenospheric liquids. Most magmas were fractionated and contaminated by continental crust during their ascent. ϑ1 and ϑ2 tectono-volcanic events have propagated through time and space from west to east. The ϑ1 extension is late Oligocene in the Galatia Massif, late Miocene in Niksar and late Pliocene in Erzincan. The ϑ2 extension and strike-slip event along the NAF began in the late Miocene in the Galatia Massif, early Pliocene in Niksar and Quaternary in Erzincan. Signature from an asthenospheric source in the second event in the three regions suggests that an ancient suture zone (Galatia Massif) and/or the lithospheric NAF transform (Niksar and Erzincan) have served to channel small quantities of asthenospheric melts existing at the base of the lithosphere.

  5. Spatiotemporal reconstruction of Late Mesozoic silicic large igneous province and related epithermal mineralization in South China: Insights from the Zhilingtou volcanic-intrusive complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Guang; Ni, Pei; Zhao, Chao; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Li, Pengfei; Chen, Hui; Zhu, An-Dong; Li, Li

    2016-11-01

    Silicic large igneous provinces (SLIPs) generally reflect large-scale melting of lower crustal materials and represent significant metal reservoirs. The South China Block-Coastal Region (SCB-CR) SLIP hosts several large epithermal deposits. To better understand these deposits, we document the spatiotemporal framework of the host SLIP across the SCB-CR. Using zircon U-Pb dating and geochemical and isotopic analysis, we identify four stages of emplacement. Stage 1 felsophyre (circa 149 Ma) shows a chemical affinity to highly fractionated I-type granites. Stages 2 and 3 of low-Mg felsic volcanics (circa 128 to 111 Ma) and stage 4 felsite (circa 100 Ma) have higher ɛHf(t) and ɛNd(t) values than stage 1 felsophyre, suggesting a significant contribution of newly underplated juvenile crust to the magma sources. Stage 4 diabase (circa 101 Ma) was likely produced by melting of subduction˗metasomatized asthenospheric mantle. Together with reliable published data, we build a new spatiotemporal framework of volcanics and infer that the majority of the SCB-CR SLIP was related to the gradual northwestward subduction of the Izanagi plate beneath South China in a continental arc setting during circa 170 to 110 Ma, and minor contribution was from the eastward retreat of the subducting slab in a back-arc setting during circa 110 to 90 Ma. We conclude that the large-scale epithermal mineralization was generated by melting of the metal-rich, thin (30-40 km), newly underplated hydrous juvenile crust during the tectonic transition from arc to back-arc settings.

  6. Volcanic ash: What it is and how it forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, G.

    1991-09-13

    There are four basic eruption processes that produce volcanic ash: (1) decompression of rising magma, gas bubble growth, and fragmentation of the foamy magma in the volcanic vent (magmatic), (2) explosive mixing of magma with ground or surface water (hydrovolcanic), (3) fragmentation of country rock during rapid expansion of steam and/or hot water (phreatic), and (4) breakup of lava fragments during rapid transport from the vent. Variations in eruption style and the characteristics of volcanic ashes produced during explosive eruptions depend on many factors, including magmatic temperature, gas content, viscosity and crystal content of the magma before eruption, the ratio of magma to ground or surface water, and physical properties of the rock enclosing the vent. Volcanic ash is composed of rock and mineral fragments, and glass shards, which is less than 2 mm in diameter. Glass shard shapes and sizes depend upon size and shape of gas bubbles present within the magma immediately before eruption and the processes responsible for fragmentation of the magma. Shards range from slightly curved, thin glass plates, which were broken from large, thin-walled spherical bubble walls, to hollow needles broken from pumiceous melts containing gas bubbles stretched by magma flow within the volcanic vent. Pumice fragments make up the coarser-grained portions of the glass fraction. Particle sizes range from meters for large blocks expelled near the volcanic vent to nanometers for fine ash and aerosol droplets within well-dispersed eruption plumes. 18 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Petrology and chemistry of late Cretaceous volcanic rocks from the southernmost segment of the Western Cordillera of Colombia (South America)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadea, P.; Espinosa, A.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents new data on the petrology and chemistry of the igneous rocks composing the Mesozoic basement of southernmost Western Cordillera of Colombia along the Ricaurte-Altaquer section. The studied sequence includes variably metamorphosed submarine lavas, breccias, tuffs and dykes of basalt to andesite composition, and minor, shallow quartz microdiorite intrusives. A Campanian age is recorded by radiolarian faunas from chert strata capping the lavas. Two different tholeiitic suites and a younger calc-alkaline suite, represented by hornblende andesite, are distinguished. One tholeiitic suite, represented by plagioclase and pyroxene phyric lavas, evolves from basalt to basaltic andesite. It is characterized by the occurrence of diopsidic pyroxene as early crystallising phase, by depletion in high-field strength elements, particularly Nb and by relative enrichment in light REE and Th. The second tholeiitic suite, which includes aphyric or poorly phyric lavas of basalt to dacite composition, differs from the first group in having moderately low {FeO tot}/{MgO} ratio and lower P 2O 5 content for a given SiO 2, and higher {Ti}/{Zr}and{Y}/{Zr} ratios. The pyroxene chemistry of the two suites also differs. The primary geochemical characteristics of the two suites suggest a similarity with tholeiitic suites generated in island-arc environment. The hornblende andesite has mineralogical and chemical characteristics of calc-alkaline lavas erupted in an oceanic setting in an evolved island-arc. Petrologic and geochemical evidence suggests that the volcanic rocks from the Ricaurte-Altraquer section are similar to the island-arc tholeiite volcanics from the upper Macuchi Formation of northern Ecuador and can be correlated partly with this unit. Conversely, they are petrochemically dissimilar from the typical Diabase Group volcanic rocks, characterized by transitional MORB lavas, extensively present to the north in the Western Cordillera of Colombia.

  8. Submarine intraplate volcanism in the South Pacific: Geological setting and petrology of the society and the austral regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekinian, Roger; Bideau, Daniel; Stoffers, Peter; Cheminee, Jean Louis; Muhe, Richard; Puteanus, Doris; Binard, Nicolas

    1991-02-01

    The southeastern prolongations of the Society and Austral islands volcanic chains are terminated by several recent submarine volcanoes (300-3800 m in height) built on irregularly shaped crustal swells or bulges (3600-3950 m in depth). The crustal swells (about 100 km in width) is bounded by deeper abyssal hill regions (>4000 m in depth) where old volcanoes with thick Fe-Mn coatings are encountered. The rocks sampled on this ancient oceanic crust are depleted mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs) similar to modem volcanics encountered on the East Pacific Rise. The volcanics of the Society hot spot consist of ankaramites, picrites, alkali-basalts, basanites, tephrites, and trachytes. Highly vesiculated pillow lavas show a wide compositional range in their large ion lithophile elements (LILE) (K2O=1-4%, Nb=25-80 ppm, Zr=200-400 ppm, Ba=300-840 ppm) and compatible element variations (Mg #=40-70, Ni=80-500 ppm), and low Zr/Nb ratios (5-8). Low-K tholeiites (K2OQueensland's xenoliths) and spinel-lherzolites, was tested as being a possible origin for the studied rocks. This model provides adequate Zr/Nb ratios and suggests that the Society mantle source contained smaller amount of homblendite (<5 wt %) and underwent lower degree of partial melting (about 5 %) than that of the Austral hot spot (10 wt % and 10-20% respectively). However, the complementary mantle source in the Society hot spot requires larger amount of LREEs than it is necessary for the Austral volcanoes. While the Zabargad amphibole-peridotites are reasonable candidates, the metasomatized peridotite xenoliths from continental alkali-basalts and the amphibole-peridotite mylonites from St. Paul's Rocks are more suitable as a potential source for the Society parental melts enriched in Ce and La. Hence the intraplate lava compositions could be the result of recycling and remelting of an ancient oceanic upper mantle which is partially metasomatized during its lateral transfer off the ridge axis. Local mantle

  9. Petrogenesis of the Early Permian volcanic rocks in the Chinese South Tianshan: Implications for crustal growth in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He; Zhang, Zhaochong; Santosh, M.; Zhang, Dongyang; Wang, Tao

    2015-07-01

    The Paleozoic and Early Mesozoic magmatic suites in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) provide important insights on the crustal growth and reworking process associated with the construction of the largest Phanerozoic orogen on the Earth. Among the tectonic blocks of the CAOB, the South Tianshan Terrane (STT) occupies the southwestern margin and is located adjacent to the Tarim Craton. Here we investigate the Early Permian Xiaotikanlike Formation in the central part of the Chinese STT in Xinjiang in Northwest China. The formation is composed of a series of terrestrial volcanic lava flows and volcanic breccia, interbedded with siltstones, sandstones and sandy conglomerates. Zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic analysis, whole-rock major oxide, trace element and Sr-Nd isotopic data are presented for the volcanic lava flows of the Xiaotikanlike Formation exposed in the Boziguo'er, Laohutai and Wensu regions. The new zircon ages from our study, together with those reported in previous investigations on the rhyolitic lava flow from the Wensu region, suggest that the volcanic rocks of the Xiaotikanlike Formation simultaneously erupted at ca. 285 Ma. The lavas of the formation show a wide range of SiO2 (49.88 to 78.56 wt.%). The basaltic rocks show SiO2 from 49.88 to 53.78 wt.%, MgO from 3.73 to 7.01 wt.% and Mg# from 41 to 61. They possess slightly enriched Sr-Nd isotope signature [(87Sr/86Sr)t = 0.70495-0.70624 and εNd(t) = - 0.5 to + 0.6], and have trace and rare earth element patterns similar to those of oceanic island basalts (OIBs). Petrographic and whole-rock chemical characteristics indicate that the basaltic lava flows are dominantly tholeiitic, and were likely derived from a spinel-dominated peridotite asthenospheric mantle source. The felsic lavas of the Xiaotikanlike Formation show SiO2 in the range of 60.71 to 78.56 wt.% and display overall similar immobile element pattern characterized by notable troughs at Nb-Ta, P and Ti and gently sloping REEs. Zircon Lu

  10. Permian-Triassic Magmatism Along the Southern Gondwana Margin: Correlating Proximal and Distal Volcanic Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, M. P.; Weislogel, A. L.; Fildani, A.

    2014-12-01

    Active margins are dominated by erosion, structural deformation, tectonic dissection, and igneous intrusions. These destructive processes lead to an incomplete record of past magmatism in active margins. Volcanic airfall tuffs that are transported and deposited in distal sedimentary basins may be more likely to be preserved in the rock record. Tuffs, however, may be affected by atmospheric fractionation during transport, postdepositional weathering, and diagenesis during burial, potentially altering ash texture, mineralogy, and geochemistry. We use outcrop observations, stratigraphic relationships, whole rock geochemistry, U-Pb zircon geochronology, and zircon rare-earth element geochemistry from Permian-Triassic strata of South Africa and South America to correlate distal volcanic ashes to proximal volcanic deposits and plutonic suites within southern Gondwana. U-Pb zircon signals of the tuffs are treated as "detrital"; the distinct zircon signals were then used to correlate distal airfall ashes to potential magmatic sources. This suggests that airfall fractionation of zircon populations is not a significant concern in tuff geochronology. Additionally, zircon inheritance may be a useful tool in matching far-traveled ashes with parental magmatic suites. Although previous studies have shown that the geochemistry of volcanic tuff deposits varies with distance from the volcanic vent, we employ whole rock and zircon REE compositions to differentiate distinct magmatic periods using distal ashes that were deposited >750 km from the volcanic source. The results of this study support a geochronologic interpretation that the Karoo strata of S. Africa are >10 Ma younger than previously thought based on biostratigraphy. Since the Karoo basin is heavily studied as a record of the end-Permian extinction and paleoclimate change, our results have major implication for this key time in Earth History.

  11. Catastrophic volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    Since primitive times, catastrophes due to volcanic activity have been vivid in the mind of man, who knew that his activities in many parts of the world were threatened by lava flows, mudflows, and ash falls. Within the present century, increasingly complex interactions between volcanism and the environment, on scales not previously experienced historically, have been detected or suspected from geologic observations. These include enormous hot pyroclastic flows associated with collapse at source calderas and fed by eruption columns that reached the stratosphere, relations between huge flood basalt eruptions at hotspots and the rifting of continents, devastating laterally-directed volcanic blasts and pyroclastic surges, great volcanic-generated tsunamis, climate modification from volcanic release of ash and sulfur aerosols into the upper atmosphere, modification of ocean circulation by volcanic constructs and attendent climatic implications, global pulsations in intensity of volcanic activity, and perhaps triggering of some intense terrestrial volcanism by planetary impacts. Complex feedback between volcanic activity and additional seemingly unrelated terrestrial processes likely remains unrecognized. Only recently has it become possible to begin to evaluate the degree to which such large-scale volcanic processes may have been important in triggering or modulating the tempo of faunal extinctions and other evolutionary events. In this overview, such processes are examined from the viewpoint of a field volcanologist, rather than as a previous participant in controversies concerning the interrelations between extinctions, impacts, and volcanism.

  12. Geology of Volcan Las Navajas, a pleistocene trachyte/peralkaline rhyolite volcanic center in Nayarit, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegre, J.A.; Nelson, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Volcan Las Navajas, located in the northwestern portion of the Mexican Volcanic Belt has produced a sequence of volcanic rocks with compositions in marked contrast to the predominantly calc-alkaline volcanoes which predominate in this part of Mexico. The oldest exposed lavas consist of trachytes with 63% SiO/sub 2/, 6% FeO*, and 500 ppm Zr along with comenditic rhyolites with 68% SiO/sub 2/, 5% FeO*, 800 ppm Zr, and an agpaitic index of 1.0. These lavas were followed by the eruption of a comenditic ash-flow tuff and the formation of a caldera 2.7 km in diameter. This caldera was subsequently filled by eruptions of pantelleritic rhyolite obsidian lava flows with 72% SiO/sub 2/, 8% FeO*, 1100 ppm Zr, and an agpaitic index of 1.5 to 1.9. A second caldera was then formed which is offset to the south of the main eruptive vents for previous eruptions. This younger caldera has a diameter of about 4.8 km and its southern walls have been covered by calc-alkaline andesitic lavas erupted from nearby Sanganguey volcano. Volcanoclastic sediments in the floor of the younger caldera have been tilted and faulted in a manner suggestive of late stage resurgence. Subsequent eruptions within the caldera, however, have been restricted to calc-alkaline andesites. Tectonically, the area in which this volcano occurs appears to have been undergoing a crustal rifting event since the Pliocene. The occurrence of these peralkaline rocks lends further support to such a hypothesis.

  13. Fingerprinting Volcanic and Anthropogenic Sulfur Dioxide in the Air: A 25 Year Record of Sulfate Aerosols from the South Pole Snowpit, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, R.; Abaunza-Quintero, M.; Jackson, T. L.; McCabe, J.; Savarino, J. P.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2012-12-01

    Sulfate aerosols, unlike greenhouse gases, cause cooling effect (-0.4 ± 0.2 W.m-2) by scattering incoming solar radiation and by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (IPCC 2007). Volcanic eruptions with explosivity Indices >5 inject large amounts of SO2 and particles into the stratosphere causing a significant decrease in temperature. For example a 0.7oC decrease in Earth's temperature was observed following the Pinatubo eruption in 1991. Stratospheric injection of sulfate aerosols has been suggested as a geoengineering effort to mitigate global warming caused by a significant increase in greenhouse gases. To understand the impact of volcanic events on the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer and subsequent changes in the dynamics of the upper atmosphere, a long term and high temporal resolution record of sulfate aerosol is needed. Here we present a 25 year (1978 to 2003) high resolution record of sulfate aerosols which covers largest volcanic eruptions of the 20th century namely, El-Chichón 1982 and Pinatubo 1991. Sulfate aerosol samples were obtained from a 1x1m snowpit at the South Pole, Antarctica with approximately 6 month time steps. Sulfate concentrations vary from 30 to 70 ppb depending on the season with exceptions during volcanic events which contributed a three to four folds increase in sulfate concentration Sulfate concentrations of120 ppb following El Chichón and 190 ppb after Pinatubo eruptions were observed. The oxygen isotopic anomaly varied from 0.7‰ to 3.9‰ with the highest anomaly occurring after the Pinatubo eruption. The positive Δ17O of sulfate derives from aqueous phase oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 and O3 oxidation and involves transfer of the isotopic anomaly from the oxidant to the product sulfate. Coupled with kinetic analysis the relative reaction rates the relative proportions of oxidation can be calculated. All other sulfate sources such as sea salt sulfates, primary sulfates from fossil fuel combustion, metal catalyzed oxidation of S

  14. Geologic Mapping of the Lunar South Pole, Quadrangle LQ-30: Volcanic History and Stratigraphy of Schroedinger Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mest, S. C.; Berman, D. C.; Petro, N. E.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we use recent images and topographic data to map the geology and geomorphology of the lunar South Pole quadrangle (LQ-30) at 1:2.5M scale [1-4] in accordance with the Lunar Geologic Mapping Program. Mapping of LQ-30 began during Mest's postdoctoral appointment and has continued under the PG&G Program, from which funding became available in February 2009. Preliminary map-ping and analyses have been done using base materials compiled by Mest, but properly mosaicked and spatially registered base materials are being compiled by the USGS and should be received by the end of June 2009. The overall objective of this research is to constrain the geologic evolution of the lunar South Pole (LQ-30: 60deg -90deg S, 0deg - +/-180deg ) with specific emphasis on evaluation of a) the regional effects of basin formation on the structure and composition of the crust and b) the spatial distribution of ejecta, in particular resulting from formation of the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin and other large basins. Key scientific objectives include: 1) Constraining the geologic history of the lunar South Pole and examining the spatial and temporal variability of geologic processes within the map area. 2) Constraining the vertical and lateral structure of the lunar regolith and crust, assessing the distribution of impact-generated materials, and determining the timing and effects of major basin-forming impacts on crustal structure and stratigraphy in the map area. And 3) assessing the distribution of resources (e.g., H, Fe, Th) and their relationships with surface materials.

  15. Increased diversity of sessile epibenthos at subtidal hydrothermal vents: seven hypotheses based on observations at Milos Island, Aegean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Nike Bianchi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Research on subtidal hydrothermal vent ecosystems at Milos, Hellenic Volcanic Arc (Aegean Sea, suggested that vent activity increased the species richness of sessile epibenthic assemblages. Based on 303 species found in 6 sites (3 close to vents, 3 farther away, the present paper uses correspondence analysis and species/samples curves to examine the species composition and richness of these assemblages. Differences due to vent proximity were more important than those due to bottom depth and distance from the shore. Diversity was confirmed to be higher near the vents, although none of the 266 species found at the vent sites can be considered as obligate vent-associated species. Seven different, although not mutually exclusive, hypotheses are discussed to explain the pattern of increased epibenthic species diversity at the vent sites, namely: (i vents represent an intermediate disturbance, inducing mortality by the emission of toxic fluids; (ii higher winter temperature allows for the occurrence of warm-water species, which add to the regional background; (iii venting disrupts the homogeneity of the water bottom layer, increasing bottom roughness and hence habitat heterogeneity; (iv deposition of minerals and enhanced bioconstruction by Ca enrichment increment habitat provision; (v fluid emission induces advective mechanisms that favour recruitment; (vi vents emit CO2, nutrients and trace elements that enhance primary productivity; and (vii bacterial chemosynthesis add to photosynthesis to provide a diversity of food sources for the fauna.

  16. 24 CFR 3280.611 - Vents and venting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Case Iron Soil Pipe and Fittings, or, Silicone Rubber, Low and High Temperature and Tear Resistant... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vents and venting. 3280.611 Section 3280.611 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...

  17. First hydroacoustic evidence of marine, active fluid vents in the Naples Bay continental shelf (Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaro, Salvatore; Genovese, Simona; Sacchi, Marco; Barra, Marco; Rumolo, Paola; Tamburrino, Stella; Mazzola, Salvatore; Basilone, Gualtiero; Placenti, Francesco; Aronica, Salvatore; Bonanno, Angelo

    2014-09-01

    We present the first results of a multidisciplinary research aimed at the detection and mapping of Active Fluid Vents (AFVs) at the seafloor of the Naples Bay, Italy. This segment of the Campania continental margin is characterised by severe Quaternary extension and intense volcanism at Ischia and Procida islands, the Campi Flegrei and Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complexes. High resolution hydroacoustic profilers were used to identify and localize fluid emission from the seafloor. ROV direct observation showed that each emission centre is generally composed by the coalescence of several emitting points. CTD probes showed that there are no significant gradients in temperature profiles. The results of this study include the detection and mapping of 54 fluid emission points all located in the - 71/- 158 m depth range, and spatially distributed into four main clusters. Three of the described clusters are located along the margin of a complex, toe-shaped seafloor morphology southwest of the Somma-Vesuvius, representing the shallow expression of partly buried, coalesced depositional features (namely, two flank collapses and one pyroclastic flow) associated with the Late Pleistocene activity of the volcano. The fourth AFV cluster was detected at the morphological - high, located about 8 km south of Naples (Banco della Montagna), represented by a field of volcaniclastic diapirs composed of massive pumiceous deposits originated from the Campi Flegrei intruding rising through the latest Quaternary-Holocene marine deposits. Our study suggests that the occurrence of AFV in this area could be genetically linked to the interaction between volcanic related seafloor morphologies and the main, NE striking faults present in the area, i.e. the Magnaghi-Sebeto line and the Vesuvian fault.

  18. Chronology and volcanology of the 1949 multi-vent rift-zone eruption on La Palma (Canary Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klügel, A.; Schmincke, H.-U.; White, J. D. L.; Hoernle, K. A.

    1999-12-01

    The compositionally zoned San Juan eruption on La Palma emanated from three eruptive centers located along a north-south-trending rift zone in the south of the island. Seismic precursors began weakly in 1936 and became strong in March 1949, with their foci progressing from the north of the rift zone towards its south. This suggests that magma ascended beneath the old Taburiente shield volcano and moved southward along the rift. The eruption began on June 24, 1949, with phreatomagmatic activity at Duraznero crater on the ridgetop (ca. 1880 m above sea level), where five vents erupted tephritic lava along a 400-m-long fissure. On June 8, the Duraznero vents shut down abruptly, and the activity shifted to an off-rift fissure at Llano del Banco, located at ca. 550 m lower elevation and 3 km to the northwest. This eruptive center issued initially tephritic aa and later basanitic pahoehoe lava at high rates, producing a lava flow that entered the sea. Two days after basanite began to erupt at Llano del Banco, Hoyo Negro crater (ca. 1880 m asl), located 700 m north of Duraznero along the rift, opened on July 12 and produced ash and bombs of basanitic to phonotephritic composition in violent phreatomagmatic explosions ( White and Schmincke, 1999). Llano del Banco and Hoyo Negro were simultaneously active for 11 days and showed a co-variance of their eruption rates indicating a shallow hydraulic connection. On July 30, after 3 days of quiescence at all vents, Duraznero and Hoyo Negro became active again during a final eruptive phase. Duraznero issued basanitic lava at high rates for 12 h and produced a lava flow that descended towards the east coast. The lava contains ca. 1 vol.% crustal and mantle xenoliths consisting of 40% tholeiitic gabbros from the oceanic crust, 35% alkaline gabbros, and 20% ultramafic cumulates. The occurrence of xenoliths almost exclusively in the final lava is consistent with their origin by wall-rock collapse at depth near the end of the eruption

  19. Antarctic marine biodiversity and deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L Chown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of many marine benthic groups is unlike that of most other taxa. Rather than declining from the tropics to the poles, much of the benthos shows high diversity in the Southern Ocean. Moreover, many species are unique to the Antarctic region. Recent work has shown that this is also true of the communities of Antarctic deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Vent ecosystems have been documented from many sites across the globe, associated with the thermally and chemically variable habitats found around these, typically high temperature, streams that are rich in reduced compounds and polymetallic sulphides. The animal communities of the East Scotia Ridge vent ecosystems are very different to those elsewhere, though the microbiota, which form the basis of vent food webs, show less differentiation. Much of the biological significance of deep-sea hydrothermal vents lies in their biodiversity, the diverse biochemistry of their bacteria, the remarkable symbioses among many of the marine animals and these bacteria, and the prospects that investigations of these systems hold for understanding the conditions that may have led to the first appearance of life. The discovery of diverse and unusual Antarctic hydrothermal vent ecosystems provides opportunities for new understanding in these fields. Moreover, the Antarctic vents south of 60°S benefit from automatic conservation under the Convention on the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources and the Antarctic Treaty. Other deep-sea hydrothermal vents located in international waters are not protected and may be threatened by growing interests in deep-sea mining.

  20. Volcanic history of Lipari (Aeolian Islands, Italy) during the last 10,000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, M.; Frazzetta, G.; La Volpe, L.

    1986-01-01

    Examination of the volcanic stratigraphy of deposits younger than 10,000 years on Lipari indicates four principal periods of volcanic activity related to specific centers. The products from each different volcanic center are defined as volcano-stratigraphic unit (VSU). From the oldest these are: the Canneto Dentro, Gabellotto-Fiume Bianco, Forgia Vecchia and Monte Pilato-Rocche Rosse VSUs. The study of textures and dispersal of the deposits permitted the vents to be localized and the recent volcanic history of Lipari to be reconstructed. The oldest event formed a small explosion breccia cone with a final obsidian lava in the Canneto Dentro area. Immediately afterward, a complex series of explosions produced the widespread dry-surge deposits of the Gabellotto-Fiume Bianco sequence. This activity ended with the extrusion of a domical lava flow. The renewal of activity occurred in the Pirrera area with an explosive eruption that produced explosion breccia deposits. The last eruptions from this vent were coeval with the first eruption of M. Pilato. The rim of the explosion breccia cone was partially destroyed by the Forgia Vecchia lava flow. M. Pilato cone grew in a very short period of time due to a continuous swarm of explosive events. After a short repose time, a series of more energetic and superficial explosions occurred through a vent slightly to the south. The extrusion of the Rocche Rosse lava flow (about 729 A.D.) ended this cycle of activity. All the volcanic centers follow a quite similar stochastic pattern starting with a fall or surge eruption and ending with effusion of viscous rhyolitic lavas. The four centers are aligned along either NW-SE or NE-SW fault systems according to the structural pattern of the island. They can be placed into two groups: the Canneto Dentro-Gabellotto centers and the Forgia Vecchia-M. Pilato centers. A long quiescence ( ⋍ 3,500 years) separates the activity of these two groups while inside of each the activities were nearly

  1. Sub-volcanic development of kimberlite pipes: Evidence from the Lace and Voorspoed (Group II) kimberlites, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Geoffrey H.; Skinner, E. Michael W.

    2013-12-01

    The Lace and Voorspoed kimberlites occur on the Kaapvaal Craton (South Africa), and form part of the Kroonstad Group II kimberlite (orangeite) cluster. The Lace kimberlite is composed of a main pipe and a satellite blind pipe, the latter of which does not reach the current land surface (~ 30 m below the current land surface), and is not observed connecting with the main pipe at depth. The main pipe increases in size from ~ 100 m to ~ 250 m in diameter at depth. The Voorspoed kimberlite pipe is the largest of the cluster and is dominantly infilled with massive layers (up to 200 m thick) of resedimented volcaniclastic kimberlite (RVK). Coherent kimberlite (CK), identified at all three pipes, is described here in order to constrain their formation.

  2. Distribution and Evolution of Volcanism of the Bolaven Plateau, Southern Laos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrin, J. S.; Sieh, K.; Wiwegwin, W.; Charusiri, P.; Singer, B. S.; Singsomboun, K.; Jicha, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Bolaven Plateau of southern Laos hosts a 6000 km2 basaltic volcanic complex erupted through flat-lying Mesozoic non-marine clastic sedimentary rocks. It is among the largest of dozens of isolated intracontinental Neogene-Quaternary volcanic centers in southeast Asia. The most voluminous flow sequences are tholeiitic, but a significant component of alkalic basalt is also present as morphologically younger cinder cones and related flows that cap the Plateau. Two salient aspects of the volcanic field are these: (1) Lava compositions appear to transition temporally from tholeiitic to alkaline, suggesting that the field tapped low-degree partial melts of a fresh mantle source toward the end of its lifespan. Circumstantial evidence for this can be found in abundant spinel lherzolite, wehrlite, and olivine websterite xenoliths within the alkaline basalts. (2) The volcanic center appears to have initiated atop a pre-existing 1000 m high, 90 km wide bedrock plateau, with nearly all visible vents confined to a 30-km wide zone that extends 80-km north to south. Our work on the Bolaven volcanic complex aims at establishment of a geochemical and temporal framework for its evolution. Using field relationships, petrologic and geochemical studies, and 40Ar/39Ar dating, we hope to unravel the genetic and age relationships of these compositionally varied lava sequences. Another objective of our investigation is to assess the possibility that lavas of the Bolaven might mask the heretofore undiscovered impact site of the Australasian tektite strewnfield (see Sieh et al, this meeting). Toward this aim, we will determine whether a sufficient expanse of the volcanic field is younger than the 0.8 Ma tektites. Finally, we intend to constrain the timing of incision of the Bolaven Plateau by the Mekong River and its tributaries.

  3. Geochronology and geochemistry of Permian bimodal volcanic rocks from central Inner Mongolia, China: Implications for the late Palaeozoic tectonic evolution of the south-eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhicheng; Chen, Yan; Li, Ke; Li, Jianfeng; Yang, Jinfu; Qian, Xiaoyan

    2017-03-01

    Zircon U-Pb ages, geochemical data and Sr-Nd isotopic data are presented for volcanic rocks from the lower Permian Dashizhai Formation. These rocks are widely distributed in the south-eastern Central Asian Orogenic Belt in central Inner Mongolia, China. The volcanic rocks mainly consist of basaltic andesite and rhyolite, subordinate dacite and local andesite, and exhibit bimodal geochemical features. The results of zircon U-Pb dating indicate that the volcanic rocks formed during the early Permian (292-279 Ma). The mafic volcanic rocks belong to low-K tholeiitic to medium-K calc-alkaline series. These mafic volcanic rocks are also characterised by moderately enriched light rare earth element (LREE) patterns; high abundances of Th, U, Zr and Hf; negative Nb, Ta and Ti anomalies; initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.70514-0.70623; and positive εNd(t) values (+1.9 to +3.8). These features indicate that the mafic volcanic rocks were likely derived from the high-percentage partial melting of subduction-related metasomatised asthenospheric mantle. The felsic rocks show an A-type affinity, with enrichments in alkalis, Th, U and LREEs. The felsic rocks are depleted in Ba, Sr, Nb, Ta and Ti and exhibit moderately LREE-enriched patterns (LaN/YbN = 2.09-6.45) and strongly negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu∗ = 0.04-0.25). These features, along with the positive εNd(t) values (+2.6 to +7.7) and young TDM2 ages (TDM2 = 435-916 Ma), indicate that the felsic rocks were likely derived from a juvenile crustal source that mainly consisted of juvenile mid-ocean ridge basalt-related rocks. The volcanic association in this study and in previously published work widely distributed in central Inner Mongolia. The observations in this study suggest that the lower Permian volcanic rocks formed in an identical tectonic environment. The regional geological data indicate that the bimodal volcanic rocks from the lower Permian Dashizhai Formation in the study area formed in an extensional setting that was

  4. Middle Jurassic Topawa group, Baboquivari Mountains, south-central Arizona: Volcanic and sedimentary record of deep basins within the Jurassic magmatic arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxel, G.B.; Wright, J.E.; Riggs, N.R.; Tosdal, R.M.; May, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    Among supracrustal sequences of the Jurassic magmatic arc of the southwestern Cordillera, the Middle Jurassic Topawa Group, Baboquivari Mountains, south-central Arizona, is remarkable for its lithologic diversity and substantial stratigraphic thickness, ???8 km. The Topawa Group comprises four units (in order of decreasing age): (1) Ali Molina Formation-largely pyroclastic rhyolite with interlayered eolian and fluvial arenite, and overlying conglomerate and sandstone; (2) Pitoikam Formation-conglomerate, sedimentary breccia, and sandstone overlain by interbedded silt- stone and sandstone; (3) Mulberry Wash Formation-rhyolite lava flows, flow breccias, and mass-flow breccias, with intercalated intraformational conglomerate, sedimentary breccia, and sandstone, plus sparse within-plate alkali basalt and comendite in the upper part; and (4) Tinaja Spring Porphyry-intrusive rhyolite. The Mulberry Wash alkali basalt and comendite are genetically unrelated to the dominant calcalkaline rhyolite. U-Pb isotopic analyses of zircon from volcanic and intrusive rocks indicate the Topawa Group, despite its considerable thickness, represents only several million years of Middle Jurassic time, between approximately 170 and 165 Ma. Sedimentary rocks of the Topawa Group record mixing of detritus from a minimum of three sources: a dominant local source of porphyritic silicic volcanic and subvolcanic rocks, identical or similar to those of the Topawa Group itself; Meso- proterozoic or Cambrian conglomerates in central or southeast Arizona, which contributed well-rounded, highly durable, polycyclic quartzite pebbles; and eolian sand fields, related to Middle Jurassic ergs that lay to the north of the magmatic arc and are now preserved on the Colorado Plateau. As the Topawa Group evidently represents only a relatively short interval of time, it does not record long-term evolution of the Jurassic magmatic arc, but rather represents a Middle Jurassic "stratigraphic snapshot" of the arc

  5. Delineation of the High Enthalpy Reservoirs of the Sierra Nevada Volcanic Geothermal System, South-Central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, M.; Muñoz, M.; Parada, M.

    2011-12-01

    Geothermal system associated with the Pleistocene-Holocene Sierra Nevada volcano (SNVGS) in the Araucanía Region of Chile has surface manifestations from the north-western flank of the volcano, up to Manzanar and Malalcahuello. Baños del Toro, located on the northwestern flank of the volcano, has numerous fumaroles and acid pools (acid sulfate waters, T=~90°C, pH=2.1, TDS=3080 mg/L); while Aguas de la Vaca, near the base of the volcano, has a bubbling spring (chloride-sulfate waters, T=~60°C, pH=7.0, TDS=950 mg/L). Five shallow (low TDS (130-210mg/L). The main heat source of the geothermal system is apparently the magmatic system of the Sierra Nevada volcano. Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone (LOFZ) that transects the area forms excellent conduits for the flow of the geothermal waters. The geothermal reservoirs are hosted in the volcanic rocks interceded with glacial deposits over the North Patagonian Batholith that forms an impermeable barrier, and thus constitutes the lower boundary of the geothermal system and also controls the lateral flow of the fluids. An equilibrium temperature of ~210°C is derived from gas geothermometry (CO2/Ar-H2/Ar) of the discharges at Baños del Toro. Geothermal fluids from the upflow area on the northwestern flank of the volcano migrate northwards to the Cautín River Valley. The geothermal system has a high enthalpy reservoir(s) on the northwestern flank of the Sierra Nevada volcano and low-enthalpy reservoirs in the Cautín River Valley that have been tapped to form spas at Manzanar and Malalcahuello. While sub-vertical fractures of LOFZ facilitate the recharge of the system, lateral flow of the geothermal fluids is apparently controlled by lithology; Melipueclo Pluton in particular prevents the westward flow from the upflow zone, causing the flow only northwards to Malalcahuello and subsequently westward on meeting poorly permeable Guapitrío Member of the Cura-Mallín Formation. This change in the flow direction from northwestward up

  6. Mafic subvolcanic intrusions and their petrologic relation with the volcanism in the south hinge Torres Syncline, Paraná-Etendeka Igneous Province, southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Carla Cecília Treib; Sommer, Carlos Augusto; Lima, Evandro Fernandes

    2017-08-01

    The hypabyssal intrusions investigated in this study are located in the east-central region of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, in the south hinge of the Torres Syncline. The intrusions comprise twenty-four dikes and ten sills, intruding in ponded pahoehoe, compound pahoehoe, rubbly and acidic lava flows of the south sub-Province of the Paraná Igneous Province and the sedimentary rocks of the Botucatu, Pirambóia, Santa Maria and Rio do Rasto Formations, on the edge of the Paraná Basin. The intrusive dikes in the flows have preferred NNW-SSE direction and the intrusive dikes in the sedimentary rocks have preferred NE-SW direction. Regarding the morphology, the dikes were separated into two different groups: symmetrical and asymmetrical. The small variation in facies is characterized by fine to aphanitic equigranular rocks. The rocks were divided into two types: Silica Supersaturated Tholeiite (SST) - dikes and sills consisting of plagioclase and clinopyroxene as essential minerals, with some olivine and felsic mesostasis, predominant intergranular texture and subordinate subophitic texture; and Silica Saturated Olivine Tholeiite (SSOT) - dikes consisting mainly of plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine, and predominant ophitic texture. The major and trace element geochemistry allows classifying these hypabyssal bodies as basalts (SSOT), basaltic andesites and trachyandesites (TSS) of tholeiitic affinity. The mineral chemistry data and the REE behavior, combined with the LILE and HFSE patterns, similar to the flows and low-Ti basic intrusions of southern Brazil and northwestern Namibia allow suggesting that these dikes and sills were part of a feeder system of the magmatism in the Paraná-Etendeka Igneous Province. The preferred direction of the intrusive dikes in the sedimentary rocks of the Paraná Basin coincides with tectonic-magmatic lineaments related to extensional processes and faulting systems that served as vents for dike swarms parallel to the Brazilian

  7. Formation and failure of volcanic debris dams in the Chakachatna River valley associated with eruptions of the Spurr volcanic complex, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waythomas, C.F.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of lahars and a debris avalanche during Holocene eruptions of the Spurr volcanic complex in south-central Alaska have led to the development of volcanic debris dams in the Chakachatna River valley. Debris dams composed of lahar and debris-avalanche deposits formed at least five times in the last 8000-10,000 years and most recently during eruptions of Crater Peak vent in 1953 and 1992. Water impounded by a large debris avalanche of early Holocene (?) age may have destabilized an upstream glacier-dammed lake causing a catastrophic flood on the Chakachatna River. A large alluvial fan just downstream of the debris-avalanche deposit is strewn with boulders and blocks and is probably the deposit generated by this flood. Application of a physically based dam-break model yields estimates of peak discharge (Qp) attained during failure of the debris-avalanche dam in the range 104 debris dams were in the range 103 debris dams have formed at other volcanoes in the Cook Inlet region, Aleutian arc, and Wrangell Mountains but apparently did not fail rapidly or result in large or catastrophic outflows. Steep valley topography and frequent eruptions at volcanoes in this region make for significant hazards associated with the formation and failure of volcanic debris dams. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  8. Metasomatic origin of garnet orthopyroxenites in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle underlying Pali Aike volcanic field, southern South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Hattori, Keiko H.; Stern, Charles R.

    2008-11-01

    Garnet-bearing orthopyroxenites occur as both discrete xenoliths and as veinlets in peridotite xenoliths that were brought to the surface by Quaternary Pali Aike alkali basalts in the southernmost of the Patagonian plateau lava fields in southern South America. Orthopyroxenites commonly contain Ti-rich minerals and also relict grains of olivine (Ol) and clinopyroxene (Cpx) occurring as inclusions in secondary orthopyroxene (Opx). The secondary Opx contains high TiO2 (0.20-0.59 wt.%), moderate Al2O3 (2.87-5.10 wt.%) and low magnesium numbers (Mg#, 84.5-89.2) compared with Opx in garnet-bearing peridotites. This suggests that secondary Opx formed at the expense of Ol and Cpx during metasomatism by an evolved Ti-rich melt. The orthopyroxenites contain bulk-rock concentrations of Cr, Ni and platinum group elements similar to peridotites, suggesting that these metals were essentially immobile during metasomatism, and that the metasomatizing melt did not introduce these elements. Instead, the metasomatizing melt contributed alkalis, Ti, Si, Al, and S to the orthopyroxenites based on increased concentrations of these elements and mineralogy. Secondary Opx has also been documented in mantle peridotite xenoliths derived from beneath both active arcs and ancient cratons. In comparison with such Opx in these mantle samples, the secondary Opx in the Pali Aike xenoliths contains relatively high Ti and Al and low Mg. High Ti and low Mg in these samples reflect the evolved nature of the metasomatizing melt that originated from the underlying asthenospheric mantle. The type of secondary Opx, typified by these samples, may be common elsewhere in subcontinental mantle lithosphere (SCLM) affected by asthenospheric upwelling.

  9. Digital Geologic Map of New Mexico - Volcanic Vents

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The geologic map was created in GSMAP at Socorro, New Mexico by Orin Anderson and Glen Jones and published as the Geologic Map of New Mexico 1:500,000 in GSMAP...

  10. Geodynamic features along the Christianna-Santorini-Kolumbo tectonic line (South Aegean Sea, Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Carey, Steve; Bejelou, Konstantina; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Kilias, Stefanos; Camilli, Rich; Escartin, Javier; Bell, Kathrine; Parks, Michelle

    2013-04-01

    Numerous oceanographic surveys have been conducted in Santorini Volcanic Group (South Aegean Sea) since 2001, revealing the spectacular morphology of the seafloor (multibeam data) and the sub-seafloor stratigraphic horizons (seismic profiles). Technological advancements in seafloor exploration such as ROVs and a submersible, enabled us to observe products of submarine volcanism that were previously inaccessible. In addition, gravity and box coring, geological and biological samples have been collected from selected areas for further analysis. The offshore geophysical survey in Santorini shows that recent volcanism occurred along a NE-SW tectonic zone named as Christianna-Santorini-Kolumbo (CSK) line. Christiana islets and three newly discovered submarine volcanic domes, with small colonies of yellow, presumably sulfur-reducing hydrothermal bacteria, occur in the southwestern part of the line. The presently active intra caldera volcanic domes of Palea and Nea Kameni islands and the low temperature (17-24°C) vent mounds covered by yellowish bacterial mat occupy the middle part of the line. The Santorini vent field is linked with the Kolumbo normal fault onshore which is likely controlling the pathways of hydrothermal circulation within the caldera. The most prominent feature at the NE part of this zone, is Kolumbo submarine volcanic chain which is extended 20Km with several volcanic domes aligned along this direction. The Kolumbo volcano had an explosive eruption in 1650 that killed 70 people on Santorini. The hydrothermal vent field in the crater floor of Kolumbo consists dominantly of active and inactive sulfide-sulfate structures in the form of vertical spires and pinnacles, mounds and flanges along a NE-SW trend, with temperatures up to 220°C and vigorous CO2 gas emission. For several years, the highest frequency of earthquakes was concentrated mainly in the vicinity of Kolumbo volcano. However, during 2011-2012 both seismic and geodetic unrest began abruptly

  11. Cement penetration after patella venting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher W; Lam, Li-On; Butler, Adam; Wood, David J; Walsh, William R

    2009-01-01

    There is a high rate of patellofemoral complications following total knee arthroplasty. Optimization of the cement-bone interface by venting and suction of the tibial plateau has been shown to improve cement penetration. Our study was designed to investigate if venting the patella prior to cementing improved cement penetration. Ten paired cadaver patellae were allocated prior to resurfacing to be vented or non-vented. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by DEXA scanning. In vented specimens, a 1.6 mm Kirschner wire was used to breach the anterior cortex at the center. Specimens were resurfaced with standard Profix instrumentation and Versabond bone cement (Smith and Nephew PLC, UK). Cement penetration was assessed from Faxitron and sectioned images by a digital image software package (ImageJ V1.38, NIH, USA). Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to assess the difference in cement penetration between groups. The relationship between BMD and cement penetration was analyzed by Pearson correlation coefficient. There was a strong negative correlation between peak BMD and cement penetration when analyzed independent of experimental grouping (r(2)=-0.812, p=0.004). Wilcoxon rank sum testing demonstrated no significant difference (rank sum statistic W=27, p=0.579) in cement penetration between vented (10.53%+/-4.66; mean+/-std dev) and non-vented patellae (11.51%+/-6.23; mean+/-std dev). Venting the patella using a Kirschner wire does not have a significant effect on the amount of cement penetration achieved in vitro using Profix instrumentation and Versabond cement.

  12. Vente d'artisanat

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Associaiton

    2014-01-01

      Éducation et Libération Vente d’artisanat du Tiers Monde Mardi 22 et mercredi 23 avril 2014 CERN, Bâtiment principal Togo, École Arc en ciel, construction des salles de classe. Appel pour le financement de ce chantier afin de libérer l’école de la charge des loyers payés pendant des années. Après nos réalisations en Amérique latine et au Bénin, nous mobilisons nos efforts pour l’école Arc en ciel de Kpémé, au Togo, sur les bords de l’Océan, à mi-chemin entre Lomé et la frontière entre le Bénin et le Togo. Il s’agit d’une école primaire privée, laïque qui a très bonne réputation en termes de résultats, notamment pour les écoliers en fin de scolar...

  13. Macrofauna of shallow hydrothermal vents on the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge at 71N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schander, C.; Rapp, H. T.; Pedersen, R. B.

    2007-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are usually associated with a highly specialized fauna and since their discovery in 1977, more than 400 species of animals have been described. Specialized vent fauna includes various animal phyla, but the most conspicuous and well known are annelids, mollusks and crustaceans. We have investigated the fauna collected around newly discovered hydrothermal vents on the Mohns Ridge north of Jan Mayen. The venting fields are located at 71°N and the venting takes place within two main areas separated by 5 km. The shallowest vent area is at 500-550 m water depth and is located at the base of a normal fault. This vent field stretches approximately 1 km along the strike of the fault, and it is composed of 10-20 major vent sites each with multiple chimney constructions discharging up to 260°C hot fluids. A large area of diffuse, low- temperature venting occurs in the area surrounding the high-temperature field. Here, partly microbial mediated iron-oxide-hydroxide deposits are abundant. The hydrothermal vent sites do not show any high abundance of specialized hydrothermal vent fauna. Single groups (i.e. Porifera and Mollusca) have a few representatives but groups otherwise common in hydrothermal vent areas (e.g. vestimentifera, Alvinellid worms, mussels, clams, galathaeid and brachyuran crabs) are absent. Up until now slightly more than 200 species have been identified from the vent area. The macrofauna found in the vent area is, with few exceptions, an assortment of bathyal species known in the area. One endemic, yet undescribed, species of mollusc has been found so far, an gastropod related to Alvania incognita Warén, 1996 and A. angularis Warén, 1996 (Rissoidae), two species originally described from pieces of sunken wood north and south of Iceland. It is by far the most numerous mollusc species at the vents and was found on smokers, in the bacterial mats, and on the ferric deposits. A single specimen of an undescribed tanaidacean has also

  14. Cerberus Fossae and Elysium Planitia Lavas, Mars: Source Vents, Flow Rates, Edifice Styles and Water Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Gregg, T. K. P.

    2004-01-01

    The Cerberus Fossae and Elysium Planitia regions have been suggested as some of the youngest martian surfaces since the Viking mission, although there was doubt whether the origins were predominantly volcanic or fluvial. The Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey Missions have shown that the region is certainly young in terms of the topographic preservation and the youthful crater counts (e.g. in the tens to a few hundred million yrs.). Numerous authors have shown that fluvial and volcanic features share common flow paths and vent systems, and that there is evidence for some interaction between the lava flows and underlying volatiles as well as the use by lavas and water of the same vent system. Given the youthful age and possible water-volcanism interaction environment, we'd like constraints on water and volcanic flux rates and interactions. Here, we model ranges of volcanic flow rates where we can well-constrain them, and consider the modest flow rate results results in context with local eruption styles, and track vent locations, edifice volumes, and flow sources and data.

  15. Newly developed evidence for the original Tethysan island-arc volcanic rocks in the southern segment of the South Lancangjiang Belt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper re-describes the characteristics of pre-Ordovician (Pt3) metamorphic volcanic rocks in the Huimin-Manlai region of Yunnan Province from the aspects of petrographic characteristics, rock assemblage, petrochemistry, REE, trace elements, lead isotopes and geotectonic setting. The metamorphic volcanic rocks maintain blasto-intergranular and blasto-andesitic textures; the volcanic rocks are characterized by a basalt-andesite-dacite assemblage; the volcanic rocks are basic-intermediate-intermediate-acid in chemical composition, belonging to semi-alkaline rocks, with calc-alkaline series and tholeiite series coexisting, and they are characterized by low TiO2 contents; their REE distribution patterns are of the LREE-enrichment right-inclined type; the volcanic rocks are enriched in large cation elements and commonly enriched in Th and partly depleted in Ti, Cr and P, belonging to the Gondwana type as viewed from their Pb isotopic composition; petrochemically the data points fall mostly within the field of island-arc volcanic rocks. All these characteristics provided new evidence for the existence of original Tethysan island-arc volcanic rocks in the region studied.

  16. The discovery of new deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities in the southern ocean and implications for biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Alex D; Tyler, Paul A; Connelly, Douglas P; Copley, Jon T; James, Rachael; Larter, Robert D; Linse, Katrin; Mills, Rachel A; Garabato, Alfredo Naveira; Pancost, Richard D; Pearce, David A; Polunin, Nicholas V C; German, Christopher R; Shank, Timothy; Boersch-Supan, Philipp H; Alker, Belinda J; Aquilina, Alfred; Bennett, Sarah A; Clarke, Andrew; Dinley, Robert J J; Graham, Alastair G C; Green, Darryl R H; Hawkes, Jeffrey A; Hepburn, Laura; Hilario, Ana; Huvenne, Veerle A I; Marsh, Leigh; Ramirez-Llodra, Eva; Reid, William D K; Roterman, Christopher N; Sweeting, Christopher J; Thatje, Sven; Zwirglmaier, Katrin

    2012-01-01

    Since the first discovery of deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the Galápagos Rift in 1977, numerous vent sites and endemic faunal assemblages have been found along mid-ocean ridges and back-arc basins at low to mid latitudes. These discoveries have suggested the existence of separate biogeographic provinces in the Atlantic and the North West Pacific, the existence of a province including the South West Pacific and Indian Ocean, and a separation of the North East Pacific, North East Pacific Rise, and South East Pacific Rise. The Southern Ocean is known to be a region of high deep-sea species diversity and centre of origin for the global deep-sea fauna. It has also been proposed as a gateway connecting hydrothermal vents in different oceans but is little explored because of extreme conditions. Since 2009 we have explored two segments of the East Scotia Ridge (ESR) in the Southern Ocean using a remotely operated vehicle. In each segment we located deep-sea hydrothermal vents hosting high-temperature black smokers up to 382.8°C and diffuse venting. The chemosynthetic ecosystems hosted by these vents are dominated by a new yeti crab (Kiwa n. sp.), stalked barnacles, limpets, peltospiroid gastropods, anemones, and a predatory sea star. Taxa abundant in vent ecosystems in other oceans, including polychaete worms (Siboglinidae), bathymodiolid mussels, and alvinocaridid shrimps, are absent from the ESR vents. These groups, except the Siboglinidae, possess planktotrophic larvae, rare in Antarctic marine invertebrates, suggesting that the environmental conditions of the Southern Ocean may act as a dispersal filter for vent taxa. Evidence from the distinctive fauna, the unique community structure, and multivariate analyses suggest that the Antarctic vent ecosystems represent a new vent biogeographic province. However, multivariate analyses of species present at the ESR and at other deep-sea hydrothermal vents globally indicate that vent biogeography is more complex than

  17. The discovery of new deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities in the southern ocean and implications for biogeography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex D Rogers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the first discovery of deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the Galápagos Rift in 1977, numerous vent sites and endemic faunal assemblages have been found along mid-ocean ridges and back-arc basins at low to mid latitudes. These discoveries have suggested the existence of separate biogeographic provinces in the Atlantic and the North West Pacific, the existence of a province including the South West Pacific and Indian Ocean, and a separation of the North East Pacific, North East Pacific Rise, and South East Pacific Rise. The Southern Ocean is known to be a region of high deep-sea species diversity and centre of origin for the global deep-sea fauna. It has also been proposed as a gateway connecting hydrothermal vents in different oceans but is little explored because of extreme conditions. Since 2009 we have explored two segments of the East Scotia Ridge (ESR in the Southern Ocean using a remotely operated vehicle. In each segment we located deep-sea hydrothermal vents hosting high-temperature black smokers up to 382.8°C and diffuse venting. The chemosynthetic ecosystems hosted by these vents are dominated by a new yeti crab (Kiwa n. sp., stalked barnacles, limpets, peltospiroid gastropods, anemones, and a predatory sea star. Taxa abundant in vent ecosystems in other oceans, including polychaete worms (Siboglinidae, bathymodiolid mussels, and alvinocaridid shrimps, are absent from the ESR vents. These groups, except the Siboglinidae, possess planktotrophic larvae, rare in Antarctic marine invertebrates, suggesting that the environmental conditions of the Southern Ocean may act as a dispersal filter for vent taxa. Evidence from the distinctive fauna, the unique community structure, and multivariate analyses suggest that the Antarctic vent ecosystems represent a new vent biogeographic province. However, multivariate analyses of species present at the ESR and at other deep-sea hydrothermal vents globally indicate that vent biogeography is more

  18. Space-time distribution of ignimbrite volcanism in the southern SMO: From Eocene to Pliocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Obregon, J.; Aguirre-Diaz, G. J.

    2004-12-01

    A distinct variation in the age of the ignimbrites of the Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO) is observed in the southern portion, which includes the area between Tepic, Nayarit (-105° W) and Aguascalientes, Ags (-102° W). Older, high-grade ignimbrites are Eocene and occur as scattered outcrops. These are in turn covered by a widespread and voluminous sequence of high-grade ignimbrites and silicic to intermediate lavas that ranges in age from Middle Oligocene to Middle Miocene. The peak of this ignimbrite volcanism was at about 21 Ma to 22 Ma, but there is evidence showing that it initiated since about 30 Ma and ended at about 17.5 Ma. This ignimbrite and lava sequence is in turn covered by another series of lavas, predominantly mafic to intermediate, in the southern part of the area. This latest volcanism represents the initiation of the Mexican Volcanic Belt. Ignimbrite volcanism apparently initiated at the NE part of the study area, and migrated to the SW with time, that is from the area Presa Calles to the valley of Bolaños. Isotopic ages reported on these rocks, cluster in various groups reflecting the time evolution of volcanism. Rocks older than 30 Ma tend to occur on the raised blocks of Sierra de El Laurel and Northern Sierra de Morones, in the eastern part of the area. The interval from 30 to 20 Ma comprises a discontinuous set of ages that are concentrated in the blocks of Southern Sierra de Morones, Tlaltenango, Bolaños and the area around Cinco Minas-San Pedro Analco-Hostotipaquillo. An apparent gap of ages occurs between 12 to 18 Ma, followed by a predominantly mafic volcanism scattered mainly to the south of the area, that represents the transition of SMO to MVB. Finally mafic volcanism of the MVB of 3 to 4 Ma is present in the south, in the area excavated on the vicinity of Rio Grande de Santiago. A similar migration pattern has been reported in general for the whole SMO by Aguirre-Diaz and Labarthe-Hernandez (2003), from NE Chihuahua to SW Nayarit

  19. Slab window-related magmatism from southernmost South America: the Late Miocene mafic volcanics from the Estancia Glencross Area (˜52°S, Argentina Chile)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orazio, M.; Agostini, S.; Innocenti, F.; Haller, M. J.; Manetti, P.; Mazzarini, F.

    2001-06-01

    The Estancia Glencross Area (EGA) volcanic rocks form a series of five isolated buttes located at the southern end (˜52°S) of the discontinuous belt of Cenozoic basaltic lava formations occurring in the extra-Andean Patagonia. EGA volcanics are subalkaline basalts and basaltic andesites erupted at 8.0-8.5 Ma in a region closely behind the Andean Cordillera. EGA volcanism predated by about 4-5 my the onset of the volcanism in the nearby Pali Aike Volcanic Field, which produced highly primitive, alkaline lavas. Incompatible trace-element distributions and Sr-Nd isotope compositions of EGA rocks are those typical of within-plate OIB-type basalts and are indicative of minimal interaction of sub-lithospheric magmas with enriched reservoirs. The geochemical characteristics of EGA volcanics, as well as their age and location are consistent with a model of slab window opening beneath this region. The high silica content and the garnet signature of the estimated EGA primary magma are explained by a two-stage process involving the initial production of melts from a garnet lherzolite source followed by the reaction of these melts with harzburgite country rocks during their ascent through the mantle lithosphere. The melt/harzburgite reaction, favoured by a slow melt ascent rate, as well as the low magma production at EGA, are likely related to the dominantly compressive stress regime operating in this area during Late Miocene.

  20. Electricity generation from hydrothermal vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryadi, Y.; Rizal, I. S.; Fadhli, M. N.

    2016-09-01

    Hydrothermal vent is a kind of manifestation of geothermal energy on seabed. It produces high temperature fluid through a hole which has a diameter in various range between several inches to tens of meters. Hydrothermal vent is mostly found over ocean ridges. There are some 67000 km of ocean ridges, 13000 of them have been already studied discovering more than 280 sites with geothermal vents. Some of them have a thermal power of up to 60 MWt. These big potential resources of energy, which are located over subsea, have a constraint related to environmental impact to the biotas live around when it becomes an object of exploitation. Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) is a method of exploiting heat energy to become electricity using organic fluid. This paper presents a model of exploitation technology of hydrothermal vent using ORC method. With conservative calculation, it can give result of 15 MWe by exploiting a middle range diameter of hydrothermal vent in deep of 2000 meters below sea level. The technology provided here really has small impact to the environment. With an output energy as huge as mentioned before, the price of constructing this technology is low considering the empty of cost for drilling as what it should be in conventional exploitation. This paper also presents the comparison in several equipment which is more suitable to be installed over subsea.

  1. Internal structure of the 85°E ridge, Bay of Bengal: Evidence for multiphase volcanism

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ismaiel, M.; Krishna, K.S.; Srinivas, K.; Mishra, J.; Saha, D.

    generalized six-stage evolutionary model is proposed for the formation of the 85E Ridge (Figure 6). During the initial phase, the volcanic vent ejected magmatic material, thereby the material has spread for long distance (~40 km away from the vent) on top... of the oceanic basement, and then the deposited 10 material gave a shape of a structural high (stage 1, Figure 6). We refer this stage of volcanism as "basal volcanism" and indicative of high effusion rate and low viscosity eruption following the reports...

  2. Flank collapse at Mount Wrangell, Alaska, recorded by volcanic mass-flow deposits in the Copper River lowland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waythomas, C.F.; Wallace, K.L.

    2002-01-01

    An areally extensive volcanic mass-flow deposit of Pleistocene age, known as the Chetaslina volcanic mass-flow deposit, is a prominent and visually striking deposit in the southeastern Copper River lowland of south-central Alaska. The mass-flow deposit consists of a diverse mixture of colorful, variably altered volcanic rocks, lahar deposits, glaciolacustrine diamicton, and till that record a major flank collapse on the southwest flank of Mount Wrangell. The deposit is well exposed near its presumed source, and thick, continuous, stratigraphic exposures have permitted us to study its sedimentary characteristics as a means of better understanding the origin, significance, and evolution of the deposit. Deposits of the Chetaslina volcanic mass flow in the Chetaslina River drainage are primary debris-avalanche deposits and consist of two principal facies types, a near-source block facies and a distal mixed facies. The block facies is composed entirely of block-supported, shattered and fractured blocks with individual blocks up to 40 m in diameter. The mixed facies consists of block-sized particles in a matrix of poorly sorted rock rubble, sand, and silt generated by the comminution of larger blocks. Deposits of the Chetaslina volcanic mass flow exposed along the Copper, Tonsina, and Chitina rivers are debris-flow deposits that evolved from the debris-avalanche component of the flow and from erosion and entrainment of local glacial and glaciolacustrine diamicton in the Copper River lowland. The debris-flow deposits were probably generated through mixing of the distal debris avalanche with the ancestral Copper River, or through breaching of a debris-avalanche dam across the ancestral river. The distribution of facies types and major-element chemistry of clasts in the deposit indicate that its source was an ancestral volcanic edifice, informally known as the Chetaslina vent, on the southwest side of Mount Wrangell. A major sector collapse of the Chetaslina vent initiated

  3. Spatial probability distribution of future volcanic eruptions at El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Laura; Cappello, Annalisa; Galindo, Inés; Neri, Marco; Del Negro, Ciro

    2013-05-01

    The 2011 submarine eruption that took place in the proximity of El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain) has raised the need to identify the most likely future emission zones even on volcanoes characterized by low frequency activity. Here, we propose a probabilistic method to build the susceptibility map of El Hierro, i.e. the spatial distribution of vent opening for future eruptions, based on the probabilistic analysis of volcano-structural data of the Island collected through new fieldwork measurements, bathymetric information, as well as analysis of geological maps, orthophotos and aerial photographs. These data have been divided into different datasets and converted into separate and weighted probability density functions, which were included in a non-homogeneous Poisson process to produce the volcanic susceptibility map. The most likely area to host new eruptions in El Hierro is in the south-western part of the West rift. High probability locations are also found in the Northeast and South rifts, and along the submarine parts of the rifts. This map represents the first effort to deal with the volcanic hazard at El Hierro and can be a support tool for decision makers in land planning, emergency measures and civil defense actions.

  4. The History of Venting (part I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Stephen C.

    2017-01-01

    Venting techniques and design are an important implementation strategy for observatory and payload contamination control, and yet venting analysis has seen a topsey turvey history, at lease from the perspective of the simple Layman trying to design a black box. Additionally, designing the vent has competing controls from Safety and EMIEMC. In the days of Shuttle, Safety placed liens against the vents of blankets, boxes, and large structural items principally to protect cargo bay vents but also from a flammability perspective. What continues to elude the Designer Community is a stable, simple way of designing vents for black boxes that satisfies everybody. But we continue to try.

  5. Cryogenic Origin for Mars Analog Carbonates in the Bockfjord Volcanic Complex Svalbard (Norway)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, H. E. F.; Benning, L.; Blake, D. F.; Fogel, M.; Ming, D.; Skidmore, M.; Steele, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Sverrefjell and Sigurdfjell eruptive centers in the Bockfjord Volcanic Complex (BVC) on Svalbard (Norway) formed by subglacial eruptions ca. 1 Ma ago. These eruptive centers carry ubiquitous magnesian carbonate deposits including dolomitemagnesite globules similar to those in the Martian meteorite ALH84001. Carbonates in mantle xenoliths are dominated by ALH84001 type carbonate globules that formed during quenching of CO2-rich mantle fluids. Lava hosted carbonates include ALH84001 type carbonate globules occurring throughout lava vesicles and microfractures and massive carbonate deposits associated with vertical volcanic vents. Massive carbonates include < or equal 5 cm thick magnesite deposits protruding downwards into clear blue ice within volcanic vents and carbonate cemented lava breccias associated with volcanic vents. Carbonate cements comprise layered deposits of calcite, dolomite, huntite, magnesite and aragonite associated with ALH84001 type carbonate globules lining lava vesicles. Combined Mossbauer, XRD and VNIR data show that breccia carbonate cements at Sverrefjell are analog to Comanche carbonates at Gusev crater.

  6. A submarine perspective of the Honolulu Volcanics, Oahu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clague, David A.; Paduan, Jennifer B.; McIntosh, William C.; Cousens, Brian L.; Davis, Alicé S.; Reynolds, Jennifer R.

    2006-03-01

    Lavas and volcaniclastic deposits were observed and collected from 4 submarine cones that are part of the Honolulu Volcanics on Oahu, Hawaii. The locations of these and a few additional, but unsampled, vents demonstrate that nearly all the vents are located on or very close to the shoreline of Oahu, with the most distal vent just 12 km offshore. The clastic samples and outcrops range from coarse breccias to cross-bedded ash deposits and show that explosive volcanism at depths between about 350 and 590 m depth played a part in forming these volcanic cones. The eruptive styles appear to be dominantly effusive to strombolian at greater depths, but apparently include violent phreatomagmatic explosive activity at the shallower sites along the submarine southwest extension of the Koko Rift. The compositions of the recovered samples are broadly similar to the strongly alkalic subaerial Honolulu Volcanics lavas, but the submarine lavas, erupted further from the Koolau caldera, have slightly more radiogenic Sr isotopic ratios, and trace element patterns that are distinct from either the subaerial Honolulu Volcanics or the submarine North Arch lavas. These patterns are characterized by moderate to strong positive Sr and P anomalies, and moderate to strong negative Cs, Rb, U, Th, Zr, and Hf anomalies. Most samples have strong negative K and moderate negative Ti anomalies, as do all subaerial Honolulu Volcanics and North Arch samples, but one group of samples from the Koko Rift lack this chemical signature. The data are consistent with more garnet in the source region for the off-shore samples than for either the on-shore Honolulu Volcanics lavas. New Ar-Ar ages show that eruptions at the submarine vents and Diamond Head occurred between about 0.5 Ma and 0.1 Ma, with the youngest ages from the Koko Rift. These ages are in general agreement with most published ages for the formation and suggest that some much younger ages reported previously from the Koko Rift are probably

  7. Volcanic studies at Katmai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    The Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) is a national effort supported by the Department of Energy, the US Geological Survey, and the National Science Foundation. One of the projects proposed for the CSDP consists of drilling a series of holes in Katmai National Park in Alaska to give a third dimension to the model of the 1912 eruption of Novarupta, and to investigate the processes of explosive volcanism and hydrothermal transport of metals (Eichelberger et al., 1988). The proposal for research drilling at Katmai states that ``the size, youth, elevated temperature, and simplicity of the Novarupta vent make it a truly unique scientific target.`` The National Park Service (NPS), which has jurisdiction, is sympathetic to aims of the study. However, NPS wishes to know whether Katmai is indeed uniquely suited to the research, and has asked the Interagency Coordinating Group to support an independent assessment of this claim. NPS suggested the National Academy of Sciences as an appropriate organization to conduct the assessment. In response, the National Research Council -- the working arm of the Academy -- established, under the aegis of its US Geodynamics Committee, a panel whose specific charge states: ``The proposed investigation at Katmai has been extensively reviewed for scientific merit by the three sponsoring and participating agencies. Thus, the scientific merit of the proposed drilling at Katmai is not at issue. The panel will review the proposal for scientific drilling at Katmai and prepare a short report addressing the specific question of the degree to which it is essential that the drilling be conducted at Katmai as opposed to volcanic areas elsewhere in the world.``

  8. Volcanic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Kenneth A.; Gerlach, Terrance M.

    1995-01-01

    In Roman mythology, Vulcan, the god of fire, was said to have made tools and weapons for the other gods in his workshop at Olympus. Throughout history, volcanoes have frequently been identified with Vulcan and other mythological figures. Scientists now know that the “smoke" from volcanoes, once attributed by poets to be from Vulcan’s forge, is actually volcanic gas naturally released from both active and many inactive volcanoes. The molten rock, or magma, that lies beneath volcanoes and fuels eruptions, contains abundant gases that are released to the surface before, during, and after eruptions. These gases range from relatively benign low-temperature steam to thick hot clouds of choking sulfurous fume jetting from the earth. Water vapor is typically the most abundant volcanic gas, followed by carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. Other volcanic gases are hydrogen sulfide, hydrochloric acid, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrofluoric acid, and other trace gases and volatile metals. The concentrations of these gas species can vary considerably from one volcano to the next.

  9. Anatomy of a volcanic district in a carbonate fold-and-thrust belt: the northern Volsci Range (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardello, Giovanni Luca; Consorti, Lorenzo; Di Filippo, Michele

    2015-04-01

    The Volsci Range is a carbonate fold-and-thrust belt crossed by important normal faults in places associated with explosive volcanic deposits and hydrothermal ongoing activity within a moderately active seismic area (e.g., Latina earthquake 2012, Mw=3.8). Though distribution of volcanites is known, origin, volume and field characterization of a previously unstudied volcanic district is far to be addressed and it is the topic of this work. Several monogenic phreatomagmatic vents occur at the edges of the chain and within its backbone. The most relevant ones are characterized at the base by well welded to zeolitized tuffs, followed either by incoherent tuffs or by surges (e.g., Patrica, Valvisciolo) and locally by lavas (i.e., Giuliano di Roma, Pofi, Terracina) and finally by late Quaternary slope deposits. Most explosive units are largely composed by local Mesozoic platform carbonate litic clasts, showing different degrees of rounding and decarbonation. Micropalaeontology and facies analysis confirm that clasts are not older than late Jurassic and not younger than Cenomanian (Upper part of the Ostracoda and Miliolidae biozone). Therefore considering the stratigraphy beneath the vent points, litics could come from depths of about 400-600 meters. Juvenile litics of different composition, accretionary lapilli and the above mention carbonate litic clasts testify for a complex conduct composition and for the rupture of the carbonatic aquifer during eruption. Right at the southern slope of the Lepini Mounts (northern Volsci Range), as detected from the analysis of the n-2 residual gravity anomalies, monogenic circular vents (tuff rings) occur buried under Quaternary deposits or are just barely cropping out as necks (Doganella di Ninfa). Further south, despite the occurrence of pyroclastic deposits in boreholes, thickness and shape of volcanic deposits below the Pontina Plain is still unconstrained, providing a challenge for further geophysical studies. However, the

  10. Preoperational test, vent building ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-20

    Preoperational Test Procedure for Vent Building Ventilation System, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The Vent Building ventilation system provides ventilation, heating, cooling, and zone confinement control for the W-030 Project Vent Building. The tests verify correct System operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control system.

  11. Clast formation in cinder cone vents: Negro Rock, Malheur County, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, M.G. (California State Univ., Sacramento, CA (United States). Geology Dept.); Pasek, T.A. (Springfield High School, OR (United States)); Cummings, M.L. (Portland State Univ., OR (United States). Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    Negro Rock is an andesitic vent complex within the middle to late Miocene Grassy Mountain Formation. Negro Rock complex includes two central vents that intrude palagonitic tephra formed during an earlier episode of hydrovolcanic-dominated volcanism. In the southwestern vent, Negro Rock, progressive fragmentation from a chilled wall to open textured scoria is preserved. Chilled, vesicle-free andesite against contact metamorphosed palagonitic tephra forms the outer wall of the vent. Inward, strongly vertically stretched vesicles occur in crudely flow banded andesite. The stretch textures give way to isolated patches of small vesicles in a non-vesiculated, non-stretched matrix. The size and abundance of vesicles patches increases inward. The non-vesiculated portion steadily decreases to a dense rim around vesiculated incipient clasts. As clast forms become more prominent the color changes from dark gray to purple. Liberated scoria clasts are red and occur with an assortment of blocks and fusiform bombs within the vent. Clast formation is due to magmatic degassing within the base of the cinder cone. The northeastern, higher vent shows incipient clast formation near the summit.

  12. Global volcanic emissions: budgets, plume chemistry and impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    Over the past few decades our understanding of global volcanic degassing budgets, plume chemistry and the impacts of volcanic emissions on our atmosphere and environment has been revolutionized. Global volcanic emissions budgets are needed if we are to make effective use of regional and global atmospheric models in order to understand the consequences of volcanic degassing on global environmental evolution. Traditionally volcanic SO2 budgets have been the best constrained but recent efforts have seen improvements in the quantification of the budgets of other environmentally important chemical species such as CO2, the halogens (including Br and I) and trace metals (including measurements relevant to trace metal atmospheric lifetimes and bioavailability). Recent measurements of reactive trace gas species in volcanic plumes have offered intriguing hints at the chemistry occurring in the hot environment at volcanic vents and during electrical discharges in ash-rich volcanic plumes. These reactive trace species have important consequences for gas plume chemistry and impacts, for example, in terms of the global fixed nitrogen budget, volcanically induced ozone destruction and particle fluxes to the atmosphere. Volcanically initiated atmospheric chemistry was likely to have been particularly important before biological (and latterly anthropogenic) processes started to dominate many geochemical cycles, with important consequences in terms of the evolution of the nitrogen cycle and the role of particles in modulating the Earth's climate. There are still many challenges and open questions to be addressed in this fascinating area of science.

  13. Halophilic Archaea determined from geothermal steam vent aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Dean G; Bizzoco, Richard W; Kelley, Scott T

    2008-06-01

    Hydrothermal vents, known as 'fumaroles', are ubiquitous features of geothermal areas. Although their geology has been extensively characterized, little is known about the subsurface microbial ecology of fumaroles largely because of the difficulty in collecting sufficient numbers of cells from boiling steam water for DNA extraction and culture isolation. Here we describe the first collection, molecular analysis and isolation of microbes from fumarole steam waters in Russia (Kamchatka) and the USA (Hawaii, New Mexico, California and Wyoming). Surprisingly, the steam vent waters from all the fumaroles contained halophilic Archaea closely related to the Haloarcula spp. found in non-geothermal salt mats, saline soils, brine pools and salt lakes around the world. Microscopic cell counting estimated the cell dispersal rate at approximately 1.6 x 10(9) cells year(-1) from a single fumarole. We also managed to enrich microbes in high-salt media from every vent sample, and to isolate Haloarcula from a Yellowstone vent in a 20% salt medium after a month-long incubation, demonstrating both salt tolerance and viability of cells collected from high-temperature steam. Laboratory tests determined that microbes enriched in salt media survived temperatures greater than 75 degrees C for between 5 and 30 min during the collection process. Hawaiian fumaroles proved to contain the greatest diversity of halophilic Archaea with four new lineages that may belong to uncultured haloarchaeal genera. This high diversity may have resulted from the leaching of salts and minerals through the highly porous volcanic rock, creating a chemically complex saline subsurface.

  14. Fluid Geochemistry of the Capelinhos Vent Site. A Key to Understand the Lucky Strike Hydrothermal Vent Field (37°N, MAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leleu, T.; Chavagnac, V.; Cannat, M.; Ceuleneer, G.; Castillo, A.; Menjot, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Lucky Strike hydrothermal field is situated at the mid-Atlantic ridge, south of the Azores, on top of a central volcano within the axial valley. The volcano is composed of a fossil lava lake surrounded by three volcanic cones. An Axial Magma Chamber (AMC) is reported 3.4km below the seafloor. The active venting sites are situated around the fossil lava lake and are directly linked to the heat supplied by the AMC. High temperature fluids from the Lucky Strike field were sampled in 2013, 2014 and 2015 in order to document the depth of the reaction zone, subsurface mixing, geographical control and magmatic degassing. A new active site named Capelinhos was discovered approximately 1.5km eastward from the lava lake, during exploration by ROV Victor6000 - MoMARsat cruise, 2013. It is composed of 10m-high chimneys discharging black smoker-type fluid. Fluid temperatures were 328°C in 2013 and decreased to 318°C in 2014 and 2015. Capelinhos fluids are Cl-depleted by 55% compared to seawater indicating phase separation at depth. In comparison, the other sites range from 6% enrichment (2608/Y3 site) to 22% depletion (Eiffel tower site). Si geothermobarometry of Y3 site estimates quartz equilibration at P=300 bars and T=360-380°C, coherent with Fe/Mn geothermometer (T=370±10°C). For Capelinhos, Fe/Mn suggests 398°C (±10°C) which is close to the critical point of seawater (P=300 bars and T=407°C). Other geothermobarometer uses Si/Cl vapor-like fluid to constrain depth of the top of reaction zone and predicts significant bias due to mixing along the up-flow zone. Application gives P=~370 bars, T=~435°C at Capelinhos and P=~390 bars, T=~440°C at Eiffel tower. This is further sustained by end-member 87Sr/86Sr=0.7038, which indicates little interaction of Capelinhos vent fluids with seawater-derived fluid, compared to other vapor-like sites with 87Sr/86Sr=0.7043. Because of its external location, Capelinhos site isn't influenced by the complex tectonic context of the

  15. Volcanic Catastrophes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    The big news from 20th century geophysics may not be plate tectonics but rather the surprise return of catastrophism, following its apparent 19th century defeat to uniformitarianism. Divine miracles and plagues had yielded to the logic of integrating observations of everyday change over time. Yet the brilliant interpretation of the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary iridium anomaly introduced an empirically based catastrophism. Undoubtedly, decades of contemplating our own nuclear self-destruction played a role in this. Concepts of nuclear winter, volcanic winter, and meteor impact winter are closely allied. And once the veil of threat of all-out nuclear exchange began to lift, we could begin to imagine slower routes to destruction as "global change". As a way to end our world, fire is a good one. Three-dimensional magma chambers do not have as severe a magnitude limitation as essentially two-dimensional faults. Thus, while we have experienced earthquakes that are as big as they get, we have not experienced volcanic eruptions nearly as great as those preserved in the geologic record. The range extends to events almost three orders of magnitude greater than any eruptions of the 20th century. Such a calamity now would at the very least bring society to a temporary halt globally, and cause death and destruction on a continental scale. At maximum, there is the possibility of hindering photosynthesis and threatening life more generally. It has even been speculated that the relative genetic homogeneity of humankind derives from an evolutionary "bottleneck" from near-extinction in a volcanic cataclysm. This is somewhat more palatable to contemplate than a return to a form of Original Sin, in which we arrived at homogeneity by a sort of "ethnic cleansing". Lacking a written record of truly great eruptions, our sense of human impact must necessarily be aided by archeological and anthropological investigations. For example, there is much to be learned about the influence of

  16. Decline of a Hydrothermal Vent Field - Escanaba Trough 12 Years Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierenberg, R. A.; Clague, D. A.; Davis, A. S.; Lilley, M. D.; McClain, J. S.; Olson, E. S.; Ross, S. L.; Von Damm, K. L.

    2001-12-01

    Hydrothermal venting was discovered in Escanaba Trough, the southern sediment-covered portion of the Gorda Ridge, in 1988. Large pyrrhotite-rich massive sulfide mounds are abundant at each of the volcanic/intrusive centers that have been investigated in Escanaba Trough, but the only area of known hydrothermal venting is the NESCA site along the ridge axis at 41\\deg N. Hydrothermal fluids venting at 217\\deg C and 108\\deg C were sampled in 1988 on two sulfide mounds separated by about 275 m. The end-member fluid compositions were indistinguishable within analytical errors. Several sulfide mounds were observed in 1988 which had diffusely venting low temperature (holes were drilled in the NESCA area in 1996 on ODP Leg 169, including Hole 1036I that penetrated to basaltic basement at 405 m below sea floor (mbsf). Surveys of the area using the drill string camera located only one area of active venting at the same mound where 217\\deg C vent fluids were sampled from two active vents in 1988. Drill hole 1036A was spudded between the two active vents on this sulfide mound (approximately 4 and 8 m away) and penetrated to 115 mbsf. The NESCA site was revisited in 2000 using MBARI's R/V Western Flyer and ROV Tiburon. The hydrothermal vents appeared essentially identical to observations made from the drill string camera in 1996 despite the presence of a drill hole within meters of the two vents. The maximum vent temperature measured in 2000 was 212\\deg C. Fluid samples have major element and isotopic compositions very similar to those collected in 1988. The vent fluids have higher methane ( ~19 mmol/kg) than those from the geologically similar Middle Valley vent field, but lower values than those at Guaymas Basin. Drill hole 1036A was weakly venting, but the diffuse hydrothermal fluids could not be sampled with the equipment available. The walls of the drill hole were colonized by palm worms, limpets, and snails. Four other drill holes showed no hydrothermal flow nor

  17. Terminal Pleistocene to early Holocene volcanic eruptions at Zuni Salt Lake, west-central New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onken, Jill; Forman, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Zuni Salt Lake (ZSL) is a large maar in the Red Hill-Quemado volcanic field located in west-central New Mexico in the southwestern USA. Stratigraphic analysis of sections in and around the maar, coupled with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C dating, indicate that ZSL volcanic activity occurred between ˜13.4 and 9.9 ka and was most likely confined to a ≤500-year interval sometime between ˜12.3 and 11.0 ka. The basal volcanic unit consists of locally widespread basaltic ash fallout interpreted to represent a violent or wind-aided strombolian eruption tentatively attributed to Cerro Pomo, a scoria cone ˜10 km south of ZSL. Subsequent eruptions emanated from vents near or within the present-day ZSL maar crater. Strombolian eruptions of multiple spatter and scoria cones produced basaltic lava and scoria lapilli fallout. Next, a phreatomagmatic eruption created the maar crater and surrounding tephra rim and apron. ZSL eruptions ended with strombolian eruptions that formed three scoria cones on the crater floor. The revised age range of ZSL is younger and more precise than the 190-24 ka 2-sigma age range derived from previous argon dating. This implies that other morphologically youthful, argon-dated volcanoes on the southern margin of the Colorado Plateau might be substantially younger than previously reported.

  18. Volcanic structure and composition of Old Shiveluch volcano, Kamchatka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbach, Natalia; Portnyagin, Maxim; Tembrel, Igor

    2013-08-01

    This paper reports results of a new comprehensive geological mapping of the Late Pleistocene Old Shiveluch volcano. The mapping results and geochemical data on major and trace element composition of the volcanic rocks are used to characterize spatial distribution, eruptive sequence and volumetric relationships between different rock types of the volcano. Old Shiveluch volcano had been constructed during two main stages: initial explosive and subsequent effusive ones. Pyroclastic deposits of the initial stage are represented by agglomerate and psephytic tuffs with very few lava flows and form at least 60% of volume of the Old Shiveluch edifice. The deposits of the second stage are dominantly lava flows erupted from four vents: Central, Western, Baidarny and Southern, reconstructed from the field relationships of their lava flows. About 75% of the Old Shiveluch edifice, both pyroclastic deposits and lava, are composed of magnesian andesites (SiO2 = 57.3-63.8 wt.%, Mg# = 0.53-0.57). The most abundant andesitic lavas were coevally erupted from the Central and Western vents in the central part of the edifice. Less voluminous high-Al basaltic andesites (SiO2 = 53.5-55.7 wt.%, Mg# = 0.52-0.56) were produced by the Western, Baidarny and Southern vents situated in the south-western sector. Small volume high-Mg basaltic andesites (SiO2 = 53.9-55.0 wt.%, Mg# = 0.59-0.64) occur in the upper part of the pyroclastic deposits. Andesites of Old and Young Shiveluch Volcanoes have similar compositions, whereas Old Shiveluch basaltic andesites are compositionally distinctive from those of the Young Shiveluch by having lower Mg#, SiO2, Cr and Ni, and higher Al2O3, FeOT, CaO, TiO2, and V contents at given MgO. Geochemical modeling suggests that the compositions of the intermediate Old Shiveluch magmas can be reasonably explained by simple fractional crystallization of olivine, clinopyroxene, plagioclase and magnetite (± hornblende) from water-bearing (~ 3 wt.% H2O) high-Mg# basaltic

  19. The Sponge Community of a Subtidal Area with Hydrothermal Vents: Milos Island, Aegean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pansini, M.; Morri, C.; Bianchi, C. N.

    2000-11-01

    Sponges were sampled by SCUBA diving at six subtidal rocky sites, three of which were close to hydrothermal vents, a common feature on the sea-floor off the south-east coast of Milos. Twenty-five species (2 Calcarea and 23 Demospongiae) were found, few compared with the 589 recorded for the Mediterranean, but an important addition to the scant information on the sponge fauna of the Aegean Sea. The number of species found at vent sites was consistently higher than that found at non-vent sites, but no vent-obligate species could be identified. However, Geodia cydonium and three species of Cliona ( C. copiosa, C. nigricans and C. rhodensis) showed a tendency to colonize vent areas. The former might take advantage of increased silica availability, the latter of the enhanced deposition of carbonates near vents. Substratum cover by sponges (estimated from wire-framed photographs of 0·7 m 2), varied greatly both among and within sites, mostly according to slope. Most sponge species preferred vertical to overhanging, shaded substrata. Proximity to vents seemed to have little or no influence on sponge cover, notwithstanding a primary effect on species diversity.

  20. Quantifying dispersal from hydrothermal vent fields in the western Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitarai, Satoshi; Watanabe, Hiromi; Nakajima, Yuichi; Shchepetkin, Alexander F; McWilliams, James C

    2016-03-15

    Hydrothermal vent fields in the western Pacific Ocean are mostly distributed along spreading centers in submarine basins behind convergent plate boundaries. Larval dispersal resulting from deep-ocean circulations is one of the major factors influencing gene flow, diversity, and distributions of vent animals. By combining a biophysical model and deep-profiling float experiments, we quantify potential larval dispersal of vent species via ocean circulation in the western Pacific Ocean. We demonstrate that vent fields within back-arc basins could be well connected without particular directionality, whereas basin-to-basin dispersal is expected to occur infrequently, once in tens to hundreds of thousands of years, with clear dispersal barriers and directionality associated with ocean currents. The southwest Pacific vent complex, spanning more than 4,000 km, may be connected by the South Equatorial Current for species with a longer-than-average larval development time. Depending on larval dispersal depth, a strong western boundary current, the Kuroshio Current, could bridge vent fields from the Okinawa Trough to the Izu-Bonin Arc, which are 1,200 km apart. Outcomes of this study should help marine ecologists estimate gene flow among vent populations and design optimal marine conservation plans to protect one of the most unusual ecosystems on Earth.

  1. Hydrothermal vents in Lake Tanganyika, East African, Rift system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiercelin, Jean-Jacques; Pflumio, Catherine; Castrec, Maryse; Boulégue, Jacques; Gente, Pascal; Rolet, Joël; Coussement, Christophe; Stetter, Karl O.; Huber, Robert; Buku, Sony; Mifundu, Wafula

    1993-06-01

    Sublacustrine hydrothermal vents with associated massive sulfides were discovered during April 1987 at Pemba and Cape Banza on the Zaire side of the northern basin of Lake Tanganyika, East African Rift system. New investigations by a team of ten scuba divers during the multinational (France, Zaire, Germany, and Burundi) TANGANYDRO expedition (August-October 1991) found hydrothermal vents down to a depth of 46 m along north-trending active faults bounding the Tanganyika rift on the western side. Temperatures from 53 to 103 °C were measured in hydrothermal fluids and sediments. Veins of massive sulfides 1-10 cm thick (pyrite and marcasite banding) were found associated with vents at the Pemba site. At Cape Banza,active vents are characterized by 1-70-cm-high aragonite chimneys, and there are microcrystalline pyrite coatings on the walls of hydrothermal pipes. Hydrothermal fluid end members show distinctive compositions at the two sites. The Pemba end member is a NaHCO3-enriched fluid similar to the NaHCO3 thermal fluids from lakes Magadi and Bogoria in the eastern branch off the rift. The Cape Banza end member is a solution enriched in NaCl. Such brines may have a deep-seated basement origin, as do the Uvinza NaCl brines on the eastern flank of the Tanganyika basin. Geothermometric calculations have yielded temperatures of fluid-rock interaction off 219 and 179 °C in the Pemba and Cape Banza systems, respectively. Abundant white or reddish-brown microbial colonies resembling Beggiatoa mats were found surrounding the active vents. Thermal fluid circulation is permitted by opening of cracks related to 130 °N normal-dextral faults that intersect the north- south major rift trend. The source of heat for such hydrothermal systems may relate to the existence of magmatic bodies under the rift, which is suggested by the isotopic composition of carbon dioxide released at Pemba and Cape Banza.

  2. Impact of river overflowing on trace element contamination of volcanic soils in south Italy: part I. Trace element speciation in relation to soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, P; Zampella, M; Gianfreda, L; Renella, G; Rutigliano, F A; Terribile, F

    2006-11-01

    Volcanic soils affected by different numbers of polluted river flooding events were investigated. Chromium and Cu were the major soil contaminants. Nickel, Fe, Zn and Mn total content never exceeded the Italian mandatory limits. The distribution of Cr and Cu total contents among studied soils indicated that only Cr contamination was related to overflowing events. In polluted soils, sequential chemical extractions revealed a preferential association of Cr and Cu with organic forms. A progressive Cr insolubilization with ageing was observed. Significant amounts of Cr and Cu were extracted by NH(4)-oxalate, suggesting metals association with short-range-order aluminosilicates and organo-mineral complexes. Possible methodological drawbacks in the use of the EU-BCR chemical speciation protocol on volcanic soils are discussed. Micromorphology and SEM/WDS analyses revealed Cr and Cu enriched silt and clay coatings in surface and subsurface soil horizons, suggesting a transfer of metal-rich sediments along the soil pore network with water movement.

  3. Zircon age and geochemistry of the Tost bimodal volcanic rocks: Constraints on the Early Carboniferous tectonic evolution of the South Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shunhu; Miao, Laicheng; Zhang, Fochin; Meng, Qingren; Zhu, Mingshuai; Baatar, Munkhtsengel; Anaad, Chimedtseren

    2016-04-01

    SIMS zircon U-Pb dating, geochemical and Sr-Nd isotopic data are presented for the Late Paleozoic volcanic rocks from Tost area in Mongolia, the southern portion of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). The Tost volcanic rocks show a bimodal feature characterized by a mafic member of basalt and a felsic component of rhyolite, which are temporally and spatially related each other, implying a genetic relationship. Zircon U-Pb isotopic data of the rhyolite constrain the Tost bimodal magmatism occurring from 355 Ma to 320 Ma. The Tost basalt is characterized by high abundances in Th, U and Pb, slightly enriched LREE patterns and low HFSE/LREE ratios. These features, together with their OIB-like isotopic signature ((87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.7039378-0.704397, εNd(t) = 3.55-5.02), suggest that they were likely derived from low-degree partial melting of a metasomatized asthenospheric mantle source with subordinate input of subduction components. The Tost rhyolite, which displays an intimate affinity to Tost basalt, with enrichment in Th, U and Pb, depleted in Nb, Ta and Ti, and gently right-tilted REE patterns, is inferred to be generated by partial melting of a juvenile lower crustal source heated by underplating mafic magmas which rise from asthenosphere during continued rifting. The Tost bimodal volcanic rocks are comparable both in age and composition with those in the East Tianshan, which together constitute an E-W-oriented belt of bimodal volcanic rocks, marking an Early Carboniferous rifting event. Considering regional geology, we propose that the rifting took place in a back-arc extensional setting, probably induced by the subduction of the Dzungaria Ocean between the East Tianshan and Junggar-Kazakhstan plate during the Early Carboniferous.

  4. Investigating pyroclast ejection dynamics using shock-tube experiments: temperature, grain size and vent geometry effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigala, V.; Kueppers, U.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions eject large quantities of gas and particles into the atmosphere. The portion directly above the vent commonly shows characteristics of underexpanded jets. Understanding the factors that influence the initial pyroclast ejection dynamics is necessary in order to better assess the resulting near- and far-field hazards. Field observations are often insufficient for the characterization of volcanic explosions due to lack of safe access to such environments. Fortunately, their dynamics can be simulated in the laboratory where experiments are performed under controlled conditions. We ejected loose natural particles from a shock-tube while controlling temperature (25˚ and 500˚C), overpressure (15MPa), starting grain size distribution (1-2 mm, 0.5-1 mm and 0.125-0.250 mm), sample-to-vent distance and vent geometry. For each explosion we quantified the velocity of individual particles, the jet spreading angle and the production of fines. Further, we varied the setup to allow for different sample-to-gas ratios and deployed four different vent geometries: 1) cylindrical, 2) funnel with a flaring of 30˚, 3) funnel with a flaring of 15˚ and 4) nozzle. The results showed maximum particle velocities up to 296 m/s, gas spreading angles varying from 21˚ to 37˚ and particle spreading angles from 3˚ to 40˚. Moreover we observed dynamically evolving ejection characteristics and variations in the production of fines during the course of individual experiments. Our experiments mechanistically mimic the process of pyroclast ejection. Thus the capability for constraining the effects of input parameters (fragmentation conditions) and conduit/vent geometry on ballistic pyroclastic plumes has been clearly established. These data obtained in the presence of well-documented conduit and vent conditions, should greatly enhance our ability to numerically model explosive ejecta in nature.

  5. Volcanic hazards of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and adjacent areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackett, W.R. [WRH Associates, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Smith, R.P. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Potential volcanic hazards are assessed, and hazard zone maps are developed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and adjacent areas. The basis of the hazards assessment and mapping is the past volcanic history of the INEL region, and the apparent similarity of INEL volcanism with equivalent, well-studied phenomena in other regions of active volcanism, particularly Hawaii and Iceland. The most significant hazards to INEL facilities are associated with basaltic volcanism, chiefly lava flows, which move slowly and mainly threaten property by inundation or burning. Related hazards are volcanic gases and tephra, and ground disturbance associated with the ascent of magma under the volcanic zones. Several volcanic zones are identified in the INEL area. These zones contain most of the volcanic vents and fissures of the region and are inferred to be the most probable sites of future INEL volcanism. Volcanic-recurrence estimates are given for each of the volcanic zones based on geochronology of the lavas, together with the results of field and petrographic investigations concerning the cogenetic relationships of INEL volcanic deposits and associated magma intrusion. Annual probabilities of basaltic volcanism within the INEL volcanic zones range from 6.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} per year (average 16,000-year interval between eruptions) for the axial volcanic zone near the southern INEL boundary and the Arco volcanic-rift zone near the western INEL boundary, to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} per year (average 100,000-year interval between eruptions) for the Howe-East Butte volcanic rift zone, a geologically old and poorly defined feature of the central portion of INEL. Three volcanic hazard zone maps are developed for the INEL area: lava flow hazard zones, a tephra (volcanic ash) and gas hazard zone, and a ground-deformation hazard zone. The maps are useful in land-use planning, site selection, and safety analysis.

  6. Investigations of a novel fauna from hydrothermal vents along the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, H.; Schander, C.; Halanych, K. M.; Levin, L. A.; Sweetman, A.; Tverberg, J.; Hoem, S.; Steen, I.; Thorseth, I. H.; Pedersen, R.

    2010-12-01

    . Few species are common to both the deep and the shallow vents, but some gastropod species show a structured population difference between the sites. Our data indicate that there has been a migration of vent fauna into the Arctic Ocean from the Pacific Ocean rather than from the known vent sites further south in the Atlantic Ocean. The discovery and sampling of these new arctic vent fields provide unique data to further understand the migration of vent organisms and interactions between different deep sea chemosynthetic environments. Based on the high degree of local adaptation and specialization of fauna from the studied sites we propose the AMOR to be a new zoogeographical province for vent fauna.

  7. Late Pleistocene ages for the most recent volcanism and glacial-pluvial deposits at Big Pine volcanic field, California, USA, from cosmogenic 36Cl dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jorge A.; Woolford, Jeff M

    2015-01-01

    The Big Pine volcanic field is one of several Quaternary volcanic fields that poses a potential volcanic hazard along the tectonically active Owens Valley of east-central California, and whose lavas are interbedded with deposits from Pleistocene glaciations in the Sierra Nevada Range. Previous geochronology indicates an ∼1.2 Ma history of volcanism, but the eruption ages and distribution of volcanic products associated with the most-recent eruptions have been poorly resolved. To delimit the timing and products of the youngest volcanism, we combine field mapping and cosmogenic 36Cl dating of basaltic lava flows in the area where lavas with youthful morphology and well-preserved flow structures are concentrated. Field mapping and petrology reveal approximately 15 vents and 6 principal flow units with variable geochemical composition and mineralogy. Cosmogenic 36Cl exposure ages for lava flow units from the top, middle, and bottom of the volcanic stratigraphy indicate eruptions at ∼17, 27, and 40 ka, revealing several different and previously unrecognized episodes of late Pleistocene volcanism. Olivine to plagioclase-pyroxene phyric basalt erupted from several vents during the most recent episode of volcanism at ∼17 ka, and produced a lava flow field covering ∼35 km2. The late Pleistocene 36Cl exposure ages indicate that moraine and pluvial shoreline deposits that overlie or modify the youngest Big Pine lavas reflect Tioga stage glaciation in the Sierra Nevada and the shore of paleo-Owens Lake during the last glacial cycle.

  8. Development and relationship of monogenetic and polygenetic volcanic fields in time and space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germa, Aurelie; Connor, Chuck; Connor, Laura; Malservisi, Rocco

    2013-04-01

    The classification of volcanic systems, developed by G. P. L. Walker and colleagues, relates volcano morphology to magma transport and eruption processes. In general, distributed monogenetic volcanic fields are characterized by infrequent eruptions, low average output rate, and a low spatial intensity of the eruptive vents. In contrast, central-vent-dominated systems, such as stratovolcanoes, central volcanoes and lava shields are characterized by frequent eruptions, higher average flux rates, and higher spatial intensity of eruptive vents. However, it has been observed that a stratovolcano is often associated to parasitic monogenetic vents on its flanks, related to the central silicic systems, and surrounded by an apron of monogenetic edifices that are part of the volcanic field but independent from the principal central system. It appears from spatial distribution and time-volume relationships that surface area of monogenetic fields reflects the lateral extent of the magma source region and the lack of magma focusing mechanisms. In contrast, magma is focused through a unique conduit system for polygenetic volcanoes, provided by a thermally and mechanically favorable pathway toward the surface that is maintained by frequent and favorable stress conditions. We plan to relate surface observations of spatio-temporal location of eruptive vents and evolution of the field area through time to processes that control magma focusing during ascent and storage in the crust. We choose to study fields that range from dispersed to central-vent dominated, through transitional fields (central felsic system with peripheral field of monogenetic vents independent from the rhyolitic system). We investigate different well-studied volcanic fields in the Western US and Western Europe in order to assess influence of the geodynamic setting and tectonic stress on the spatial distribution of magmatism. In summary, incremental spatial intensity maps should reveal how fast a central conduit

  9. Volcanic activity: a review for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhall, C G; Fruchter, J S

    1986-03-01

    Volcanoes erupt magma (molten rock containing variable amounts of solid crystals, dissolved volatiles, and gas bubbles) along with pulverized pre-existing rock (ripped from the walls of the vent and conduit). The resulting volcanic rocks vary in their physical and chemical characteristics, e.g., degree of fragmentation, sizes and shapes of fragments, minerals present, ratio of crystals to glass, and major and trace elements composition. Variability in the properties of magma, and in the relative roles of magmatic volatiles and groundwater in driving an eruption, determine to a great extent the type of an eruption; variability in the type of an eruption in turn influences the physical characteristics and distribution of the eruption products. The principal volcanic hazards are: ash and larger fragments that rain down from an explosion cloud (airfall tephra and ballistic fragments); flows of hot ash, blocks, and gases down the slopes of a volcano (pyroclastic flows); "mudflows" (debris flows); lava flows; and concentrations of volcanic gases in topographic depressions. Progress in volcanology is bringing improved long- and short-range forecasts of volcanic activity, and thus more options for mitigation of hazards. Collaboration between health professionals and volcanologists helps to mitigate health hazards of volcanic activity.

  10. The effects of volcanic eruptions at 1982 and 1991 on the variation of the solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, M.; Mohamed, A.

    A few large volcanic eruptions occur each century, which cause aerosol content of the stratosphere. This increase in the stratospheric aerosol content in turn affects the radiation balance of the earth. The eruption must be highly explosive and send large quantities of sulfur dioxide gas and dust vented into stratosphere could affect climate. This was thought to be likely because: a)Estimates of surface temperature over wide spread parts of the globe often showed a drop after a huge volcanic eruption. b)The measured intensity of direct solar beam was always reduced through the difference radiation usually increased to partially compensate. Measurements of solar radiation during the period from 1 January 1981 to 31 December 1994 at three different stations in Egypt, namely, Cairo, Khargha, Tahrir on cloudless days showed significant changes in solar radiation from 1981 to 1982, and 1990 to 1991. An increase in diffuse sky total radiation and a concomitant decrease in global radiation. It is possible the increase in diffuse sky total radiation and a concomitant decease in global radiation are due to the E1 - Chichon eruption in South Mexico on 28 March and 3-4 April 1982, and the Pinatubo eruption on southern Luzon in the Phillippines in June 1991.

  11. Engineering a robotic approach to mapping exposed volcanic fissures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcheta, C. E.; Parness, A.; Mitchell, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Field geology provides a framework for advanced computer models and theoretical calculations of volcanic systems. Some field terrains, though, are poorly preserved or accessible, making documentation, quantification, and investigation impossible. Over 200 volcanologists at the 2012 Kona Chapman Conference on volcanology agreed that and important step forward in the field over the next 100 years should address the realistic size and shape of volcanic conduits. The 1969 Mauna Ulu eruption of Kīlauea provides a unique opportunity to document volcanic fissure conduits, thus, we have an ideal location to begin addressing this topic and provide data on these geometries. Exposed fissures can be mapped with robotics using machine vision. In order to test the hypothesis that fissures have irregularities with depth that will influence their fluid dynamical behavior, we must first map the fissure vents and shallow conduit to deci- or centimeter scale. We have designed, constructed, and field-tested the first version of a robotic device that will image an exposed volcanic fissure in three dimensions. The design phase included three steps: 1) create the payload harness and protective shell to prevent damage to the electronics and robot, 2) construct a circuit board to have the electronics communicate with a surface-based computer, and 3) prototype wheel shapes that can handle a variety of volcanic rock textures. The robot's mechanical parts were built using 3d printing, milling, casting and laser cutting techniques, and the electronics were assembled from off the shelf components. The testing phase took place at Mauna Ulu, Kīlauea, Hawai'i, from May 5 - 9, 2014. Many valuable design lessons were learned during the week, and the first ever 3D map from inside a volcanic fissure were successfully collected. Three vents had between 25% and 95% of their internal surfaces imaged. A fourth location, a non-eruptive crack (possibly a fault line) had two transects imaging the textures

  12. Tellurium in active volcanic environments: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, Silvia; Calabrese, Sergio; D'Alessandro, Walter; Brusca, Lorenzo; Bellomo, Sergio; Parello, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Tellurium is a toxic metalloid and, according to the Goldschmidt classification, a chalcophile element. In the last years its commercial importance has considerably increased because of its wide use in solar cells, thermoelectric and electronic devices of the last generation. Despite such large use, scientific knowledge about volcanogenic tellurium is very poor. Few previous authors report result of tellurium concentrations in volcanic plume, among with other trace metals. They recognize this element as volatile, concluding that volcanic gases and sulfur deposits are usually enriched with tellurium. Here, we present some results on tellurium concentrations in volcanic emissions (plume, fumaroles, ash leachates) and in environmental matrices (soils and plants) affected by volcanic emissions and/or deposition. Samples were collected at Etna and Vulcano (Italy), Turrialba (Costa Rica), Miyakejima, Aso, Asama (Japan), Mutnovsky (Kamchatka) at the crater rims by using common filtration techniques for aerosols (polytetrafluoroethylene filters). Filters were both eluted with Millipore water and acid microwave digested, and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Volcanic ashes emitted during explosive events on Etna and Copahue (Argentina) were analyzed for tellurium bulk composition and after leaching experiments to evaluate the soluble fraction of tellurium. Soils and leaves of vegetation were also sampled close to active volcanic vents (Etna, Vulcano, Nisyros, Nyiragongo, Turrialba, Gorely and Masaya) and investigated for tellurium contents. Preliminary results showed very high enrichments of tellurium in volcanic emissions comparing with other volatile elements like mercury, arsenic, thallium and bismuth. This suggests a primary transport in the volatile phase, probably in gaseous form (as also suggested by recent studies) and/or as soluble salts (halides and/or sulfates) adsorbed on the surface of particulate particles and ashes. First

  13. Morphology of cone-fields in SW Elysium Planitia - Traces of hydrothermal venting on Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanz, J. K.; Saric, M. B.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction Small cone-shaped features with summit pits can be found in several regions on Mars; mainly in Isidis Planitia; Elysium Planitia; Amazonis Planitia; Acidalia Planitia; in the Cydonia Region; in Cerberus Planum; the Phlegra Montes and on several volcanic flanks. They vary greatly in size and morphology and have been compared to terrestrial features of various origins; namely (1) cinder cones (e.g. [1]), (2) tuff cones or tuff rings (e.g. [2]), (3) rootless cones (pseudocraters) (e.g. [3], [4]), (4) pingos (e.g. [5], [6]) and (5) mud volcanoes (e.g. [7]). They are often found near volcanic centers and large lava fields or cluster in regions where the volatile content of the Martian regolith was/is supposedly high. This has led to the assumption that (ground-) water or ground ice was a trigger or driving force of cone formation. They could therefore, be an important indicator of the history of water on the planet. We have studied an area in western Elysium Planitia, bordering the Aeolis Planum plateau, which exhibits a large number of pitted cones, ridges and dome-like structures. Their distribution and morphology differs strongly from pitted cones elsewhere in Elysium Planitia, which have mainly been interpreted as hydrovolcanic rootless cones, and from other regions on Mars. Based on our observations, we present an alternative model for cone formation in the study area that might hint towards hydrothermal processes in the Aeolis Planum region and possibly young igneous activity. Aeolis Planum Cones The Aeolis Planum pitted cones (referred to as APCs from now on) cluster along the southern edges of the broad shallow valley that borders the Aeolis Planum Formation (APF) to the north. Cones along the northern edges of the valley are rare and can only be found in association with APF remnants where they strongly resemble the cones in the south. Along the southern border the cone coverage is almost continuous, describing a narrow band approximately 2 to 3 km

  14. Volcanic glass signatures in spectroscopic survey of newly proposed lunar pyroclastic deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, S.; Sunshine, J.M.; Gaddis, L.R.

    2014-01-01

    Moon Mineralogy Mapper spectroscopic observations are used to assess the mineralogy of five sites that have recently been proposed to include lunar dark mantle deposits (DMDs). Volcanic glasses have, for the first time, clearly been identified at the location of three of the proposed pyroclastic deposits. This is the first time that volcanic glasses have been identified at such a small scale on the lunar surface from remote sensing observations. Deposits at Birt E, Schluter, and Walther A appear to be glassy DMDs. Deposits at Birt E and Schluter show (1) morphological evidence suggesting a likely vent and (2) mineralogical evidence indicative of the presence of volcanic glasses. The Walther A deposits, although they show no morphological evidence of vents, have the spectroscopic characteristics diagnostic of volcanic glasses. The deposits of the Freundlich-Sharonov basin are separated in two areas: (1) the Buys-Ballot deposits lack mineralogical and morphological evidence and thus are found to be associated with mare volcanism not with DMDs and (2) the Anderson crater deposits, which do not exhibit glassy DMD signatures, but they appear to be associated with possible vent structures and so may be classifiable as DMDs. Finally, dark deposits near the crater Kopff are found to be associated with likely mare volcanism and not associated with DMDs. The spectral identification of volcanic glass seen in many of the potential DMDs is a strong indicator of their pyroclastic origin.

  15. Phreatomagmatic and water-influenced Strombolian eruptions of a small-volume parasitic cone complex on the southern ringplain of Mt. Ruapehu, New Zealand: Facies architecture and eruption mechanisms of the Ohakune Volcanic Complex controlled by an unstable fissure eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kósik, S.; Németh, K.; Kereszturi, G.; Procter, J. N.; Zellmer, G. F.; Geshi, N.

    2016-11-01

    The Ohakune Volcanic Complex is a late Pleistocene tuff ring - scoria/spatter cone complex located south of Ruapehu volcano. This small-volume volcano consists of an outer E-W elongated compound tuff ring edifice, three inner scoria-spatter cones and further volcanic depressions, located on the Ohakune Fault. We quantified accurately the variations of the eruptive styles and processes through time by systematic sampling of key stratigraphic marker beds at proximal and distal locations, and the determination of grain size distribution, componentry, density and vesicularity. Using a Digital Terrain Model coupled with stratigraphic data, we also determined the spatial distribution and volume of each identified unit and individual edifices within the Ohakune Volcanic Complex. Activity began with a shallow phreatomagmatic phase characterized by an almost continuous generation of a low eruptive column, accompanied by wet pyroclastic density currents, together with the ejection of juvenile fragments and accidental lithics from the surrounding country rocks. Subsequent activity was dominated by a variety of Strombolian eruptions exhibiting differing intensities that were at times disrupted by phreatic blasts or phreatomagmatic explosions due to the interaction with external water and/or sudden changes in magma discharge rate. At least three major vent-shifting events occurred during the eruption, which is demonstrated by the truncation of the initial tuff ring and the infilling of the truncated area by several coarse grained surge units. Our study indicates that approx. 12 × 106 m3 DRE magma erupted within maximum 2.5 to 5 months through multiple vents. The erupted magma ascended from a depth of 16-18 km, and reached the surface within approximately 50 h. Alternating eruption styles, frequent vent-shifting and a variety of emplacement mechanisms inferred from the deposits of the Ohakune Volcanic Complex demonstrate the unpredictable nature of small-volume volcanism

  16. Field-trip guide to Columbia River flood basalts, associated rhyolites, and diverse post-plume volcanism in eastern Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferns, Mark L.; Streck, Martin J.; McClaughry, Jason D.

    2017-08-09

    The Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) is the youngest and best preserved continental flood basalt province on Earth, linked in space and time with a compositionally diverse succession of volcanic rocks that partially record the apparent emergence and passage of the Yellowstone plume head through eastern Oregon during the late Cenozoic. This compositionally diverse suite of volcanic rocks are considered part of the La Grande-Owyhee eruptive axis (LOEA), an approximately 300-kilometer-long (185 mile), north-northwest-trending, middle Miocene to Pliocene volcanic belt located along the eastern margin of the Columbia River flood basalt province. Volcanic rocks erupted from and preserved within the LOEA form an important regional stratigraphic link between the (1) flood basalt-dominated Columbia Plateau on the north, (2) bimodal basalt-rhyolite vent complexes of the Owyhee Plateau on the south, (3) bimodal basalt-rhyolite and time-transgressive rhyolitic volcanic fields of the Snake River Plain-Yellowstone Plateau, and (4) the High Lava Plains of central Oregon.This field-trip guide describes a 4-day geologic excursion that will explore the stratigraphic and geochemical relationships among mafic rocks of the Columbia River Basalt Group and coeval and compositionally diverse volcanic rocks associated with the early “Yellowstone track” and High Lava Plains in eastern Oregon. Beginning in Portland, the Day 1 log traverses the Columbia River gorge eastward to Baker City, focusing on prominent outcrops that reveal a distal succession of laterally extensive, large-volume tholeiitic flood lavas of the Grande Ronde, Wanapum, and Saddle Mountains Basalt formations of the CRBG. These “great flows” are typical of the well-studied flood basalt-dominated Columbia Plateau, where interbedded silicic and calc-alkaline lavas are conspicuously absent. The latter part of Day 1 will highlight exposures of middle to late Miocene silicic ash-flow tuffs, rhyolite domes, and

  17. Impact of river overflowing on trace element contamination of volcanic soils in south Italy: Part I. Trace element speciation in relation to soil properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamo, P. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Suolo, della Pianta e dell' Ambiente, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, Portici, 80055 Naples (Italy)]. E-mail: adamo@unina.it; Zampella, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Suolo, della Pianta e dell' Ambiente, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, Portici, 80055 Naples (Italy); Gianfreda, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Suolo, della Pianta e dell' Ambiente, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, Portici, 80055 Naples (Italy); Renella, G. [Dipartimento di Scienza del Suolo e Nutrizione della Pianta, Universita di Firenze, P.le delle Cascine 28, 50144 Firenze (Italy); Rutigliano, F.A. [Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Universita di Napoli, Via Vivaldi 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy); Terribile, F. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Suolo, della Pianta e dell' Ambiente, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, Portici, 80055 Naples (Italy)

    2006-11-15

    Volcanic soils affected by different numbers of polluted river flooding events were investigated. Chromium and Cu were the major soil contaminants. Nickel, Fe, Zn and Mn total content never exceeded the Italian mandatory limits. The distribution of Cr and Cu total contents among studied soils indicated that only Cr contamination was related to overflowing events. In polluted soils, sequential chemical extractions revealed a preferential association of Cr and Cu with organic forms. A progressive Cr insolubilization with ageing was observed. Significant amounts of Cr and Cu were extracted by NH{sub 4}-oxalate, suggesting metals association with short-range-order aluminosilicates and organo-mineral complexes. Possible methodological drawbacks in the use of the EU-BCR chemical speciation protocol on volcanic soils are discussed. Micromorphology and SEM/WDS analyses revealed Cr and Cu enriched silt and clay coatings in surface and subsurface soil horizons, suggesting a transfer of metal-rich sediments along the soil pore network with water movement. - River overflowing adds up soil with Cr-rich sediments which, although chemically low reactive, transfer metal along the soil pore network during water movement.

  18. Paleomagnetic and magnetic fabric studies of the San Gaspar ignimbrite, western Mexico—constraints on emplacement mode and source vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; Rosas-Elguera, J.; Bravo-Medina, T.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Henry, B.; Caballero, C.; Rivas-Sanchez, M. L.; Goguitchaichvili, A.; López-Loera, H.

    2005-10-01

    Paleomagnetic and magnetic fabric data for the 4.8 Ma San Gaspar ignimbrite, one of the largest in western Mexico, are used to investigate the source vents, emplacement mechanism and tectonics. Rock magnetic properties from distant parts of the ignimbrite are similar, suggesting relatively homogeneous mineralogy of the unit. Isothermal remanence and continuous susceptibility-temperature experiments point to low to medium-Ti titanomagnetites as the main magnetic carriers. Hysteresis ratio parameters of most samples fall in the pseudo-single-domain grain size region; wasp-waisted hysteresis loops were identified corresponding to high Hcr / Hc values. Stepwise thermal and alternating field demagnetization shows that secondary components are completely removed below 20 mT or 400 °C. Thereafter, the characteristic component is isolated with small within-site dispersion of mean direction ( α95 fabric supports that the ignimbrite welded and cooled in situ and was probably emplaced in a NW-SE rift zone from a single eruption center located south or east of a younger Pleistocene caldera in the area. Paleomagnetic, rock magnetic and ore microscopy data support the hypothesis that the extensive and widespread ignimbrite deposits in western Mexico correspond to a major explosive volcanic phase in the Pliocene.

  19. Paleomagnetic and magnetic fabric studies of the San Gaspar ignimbrite, western Mexico - constraints on emplacement mode and source vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Elguera, J.; Alva-Valdivia, L.; Goguitchaisvili, A.

    2004-12-01

    Paleomagnetic and magnetic fabric data for the 4.8 Ma San Gaspar ignimbrite, one of the largest in western Mexico, are used to investigate on the source vents and emplacement mechanism. Rock-magnetic properties are similar, suggesting relatively homogeneous mineralogy of the unit. Isothermal remanence and continuous susceptibility-temperature experiments point to low to medium-Ti titanomagnetite as the main ferromagnetic mineral. Hysteresis parameters of most samples fall in the pseudo-single-domain grain size region; wasp-waisted hysteresis loops were identified corresponding to high Hcr/Hc values. Stepwise thermal and alternating field demagnetization shows that secondary components are negligible, and always completely removed below 20 mT or 400°C. Thereafter, the characteristic component is isolated with small within-site dispersion of mean direction (á95fabric supports that the ignimbrite welded and cooled in situ and was probably emplaced in NW-SE rift zone from a single eruption center located south or east of a younger Pleistocene caldera. Paleomagnetic, rock-magnetic and ore microscopy data support the hypothesis that the extensive and widespread ignimbrite deposits in western Mexico correspond to a major explosive volcanic phase in the Pliocene.

  20. San Gaspar ignimbrite, western Mexico: Magnetic fabric and Paleomagnetic studies - constraints on emplacement mode and source vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, C.; Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; Rosas-Elguera, J.

    2005-05-01

    Paleomagnetic and magnetic fabric data for the 4.8 Ma San Gaspar ignimbrite, one of the largest in western Mexico, are used to investigate on the source vents, emplacement mechanism and tectonics. The within-site consistency of directional features of magnetic fabric supports that the ignimbrite welded and cooled in situ and was probably emplaced in NW-SE rift zone from a single eruption center located south or east of a younger Pleistocene caldera. Paleomagnetic, rock-magnetic and ore microscopy data support the hypothesis that the extensive and widespread ignimbrite deposits in western Mexico correspond to a major explosive volcanic phase in the Pliocene Rock-magnetic properties are similar, suggesting relatively homogeneous mineralogy of the unit. Isothermal remanence and continuous susceptibility-temperature experiments point to low to medium-Ti titanomagnetite as the main ferromagnetic mineral. Hysteresis parameters of most samples fall in the pseudo-single-domain grain size region; wasp-waisted hysteresis loops were identified corresponding to high Hcr/Hc values. Stepwise thermal and alternating field demagnetization shows that secondary components are negligible, and always completely removed below 20 mT or 400° C. The characteristic component is isolated in all sites with small within-site dispersion of mean direction in most of them (alfa 95 less than 10 at 7 out of 10 sites).

  1. Nature, Source and Composition of Volcanic Ash in Surficial Sediments Around the Zhongsha Islands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Quanshu; SHI Xuefa; WANG Xinyu

    2008-01-01

    Volcanic detrital sediments are a unique indicator for reconstructing the petrogenetie evolution of submarine volcanic terrains. Volcanic ash in surficial sediments around the Zhongsha Islands includes three kinds of volcanogenic detritus, i.e., brown volcanic glass, colorless volcanic glass and volcanic scoria. The major element characteristics show that bimodal volcanic activity may have taken place in the northern margin of the South China Sea, with brown volcanic glass and colorless volcanic glass repre-senting the maric end-member and felsie end-member, respectively. Fractional crystallization is the main process for magma evolu-tion. The nature of the volcanic activity implies that the origin of volcanic activity was related to extensional tectonic settings, which is corresponding to an extensional geodynamie setting in the Xisha Trench, and supports the notion, which is based on geophysical data and petrology, that there may exist a mantle plume around the Hainan Island.

  2. On the global distribution of hydrothermal vent fields: One decade later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, S. E.; Baker, E. T.; German, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Since the last global compilation one decade ago, the known number of active submarine hydrothermal vent fields has almost doubled. At the end of 2009, a total of 518 active vent fields was catalogued, with about half (245) visually confirmed and others (273) inferred active at the seafloor. About half (52%) of these vent fields are at mid-ocean ridges (MORs), 25% at volcanic arcs, 21% at back-arc spreading centers (BASCs), and 2% at intra-plate volcanoes and other settings. One third are in high seas, and the nations with the most known active vent fields within EEZs are Tonga, USA, Japan, and New Zealand. The increase in known vent fields reflects a number of factors, including increased national and commercial interests in seafloor hydrothermal deposits as mineral resources. Here, we have comprehensively documented the percentage of strike length at MORs and BASCs that has been systematically explored for hydrothermal activity. As of the end of 2009, almost 30% of the ~60,000 km of MORs had been surveyed at least with spaced vertical profiles to detect hydrothermal plumes. A majority of the vents discovered at MORs in the past decade occurred at segments with Antarctic Ridge, and the intermediate spreading Pacific-Antarctic Ridge. Although a greater percentage of the ~11,000 km of BASCs has been surveyed for hydrothermal activity, the discoveries at BASCs in the past decade were mainly at segments with intermediate to fast spreading rates. Using the same equation for F_s vs. u_s, we predicted 71 vent fields remaining to be discovered at BASCs, and most are likely to be found at ultra-slow and slow spreading segments (e.g., Andaman Basin, and central to northern Mariana Trough). With 2/3 of our overall predicted total vent fields at spreading ridges remaining to be discovered, we expect that the next decade of exploration will continue to yield new discoveries, leading to new insights into biogeography of vent fauna and the global impacts of fluxes of heat and

  3. Recurrence rate and magma effusion rate for the latest volcanism on Arsia Mons, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jacob A.; Wilson, James A.; Connor, Charles B.; Bleacher, Jacob E.; Kiyosugi, Koji

    2017-01-01

    Magmatism and volcanism have evolved the Martian lithosphere, surface, and climate throughout the history of Mars. Constraining the rates of magma generation and timing of volcanism on the surface clarifies the ways in which magma and volcanic activity have shaped these Martian systems. The ages of lava flows on other planets are often estimated using impact crater counts, assuming that the number and size-distribution of impact craters per unit area reflect the time the lava flow has been on the surface and exposed to potential impacts. Here we show that impact crater age model uncertainty is reduced by adding stratigraphic information observed at locations where neighboring lavas abut each other, and demonstrate the significance of this reduction in age uncertainty for understanding the history of a volcanic field comprising 29 vents in the 110-km-diameter caldera of Arsia Mons, Mars. Each vent within this caldera produced lava flows several to tens of kilometers in length; these vents are likely among the youngest on Mars, since no impact craters in their lava flows are larger than 1 km in diameter. First, we modeled the age of each vent with impact crater counts performed on their corresponding lava flows and found very large age uncertainties for the ages of individual vents, often spanning the estimated age for the entire volcanic field. The age model derived from impact crater counts alone is broad and unimodal, with estimated peak activity in the field around 130 Ma. Next we applied our volcano event age model (VEAM), which uses a directed graph of stratigraphic relationships and random sampling of the impact crater age determinations to create alternative age models. Monte Carlo simulation was used to create 10,000 possible vent age sets. The recurrence rate of volcanism is calculated for each possible age set, and these rates are combined to calculate the median recurrence rate of all simulations. Applying this approach to the 29 volcanic vents, volcanism

  4. VOLCANIC TSUNAMI GENERATING SOURCE MECHANISMS IN THE EASTERN CARIBBEAN REGION

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, volcanic island flank failures and underwater slides have generated numerous destructive tsunamis in the Caribbean region. Convergent, compressional and collisional tectonic activity caused primarily from the eastward movement of the Caribbean Plate in relation to the North American, Atlantic and South American Plates, is responsible for zones of subduction in the region, the formation of island arcs and the evolution of particular volcanic centers on the over...

  5. Spectroscopy of olivine basalts using FieldSpec and ASTER data: A case study from Wadi Natash volcanic field, south Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ahmed Madani

    2015-10-01

    This paper aims at revealing the spectral characteristics of the olivine basalts exposed at Wadi Natash area, Egypt, using FieldSpec spectroradiometer. It also evaluates band ratios and fusion techniques for mapping purposes using ASTER data. Several volcanic episodes occurred during Early- to Late-Cretaceous are recorded in the study area. Early-Cretaceous olivine basalts are highly carbonated. Late-Cretaceous eruptions took place throughout several volcanic cones aligned in NW direction. Based on FieldSpec measurements and petrographic data, two groups of olivine basalt namely `A' and `B' are recognized. Fresh olivine basalt (group A) is characterized by low flat spectral profile with overall low reflectance values (~20%). Spectral profile of altered olivine basalt (group B) shows moderate reflectance values (~37%) with four little absorption features around the 1.10, 1.40, 2.00 and 2.35 μm wavelength regions. These absorption features are attributed mainly to the presence of chlorite and carbonate alteration products as indicated by petrographic examination. ASTER false colour composite band ratio image (3/2:R, 8/1:G and 8/5:B) discriminates easily the fresh and altered basalts by deep blue and red-dish blue colours respectively. Image fusion between previously mentioned FCC ratios image and high spatial resolution ASTER panchromatic image are carried out using brovey and HSV transformation methods. Visual and statistical assessment methods proved that HSV fusion image yields better image interpretability results compared to brovey image. It improves the spatial resolution of original FCC ratios image with acceptable spectral preservation. The present study proved the usefulness of Field-Spec spectral profiles and the processed ASTER data for discriminating different olivine basalt groups exposed at the study area.

  6. Generation and propagation of infrasonic airwaves from volcanic explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. B.

    2003-02-01

    Analysis of infrasonic pressure waves generated by active volcanoes is essential to the understanding of volcanic explosion dynamics. Unlike seismic waves propagating in the earth, infrasonic airwaves offer a relatively unfiltered representation of source motions at the vent during an eruption. Time-varying acoustic propagation filters caused by changeable atmospheric conditions are minimal for microphones deployed at intermediate distances (article [ Johnson et al., J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res., in press].

  7. Volcanic hazard assessment in monogenetic volcanic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Bartolini, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    [eng] One of the most important tasks of modern volcanology, which represents a significant socio-economic implication, is to conduct hazard assessment in active volcanic systems. These volcanological studies are aimed at hazard that allows to constructing hazard maps and simulating different eruptive scenarios, and are mainly addressed to contribute to territorial planning, definition of emergency plans or managing volcanic crisis. The impact of a natural event, as a volcanic eruption, can s...

  8. Characterization of the Etna volcanic emissions through an active biomonitoring technique (moss-bags): part 2--morphological and mineralogical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, S; D'Alessandro, W

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic emissions were studied at Mount Etna (Italy) by using moss-bags technique. Mosses were exposed around the volcano at different distances from the active vents to evaluate the impact of volcanic emissions in the atmosphere. Morphology and mineralogy of volcanic particulate intercepted by mosses were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Particles emitted during passive degassing activity from the two active vents, Bocca Nuova and North East Crater (BNC and NEC), were identified as silicates, sulfates and halide compounds. In addition to volcanic particles, we found evidences also of geogenic, anthropogenic and marine spray input. The study has shown the robustness of this active biomonitoring technique to collect particles, very useful in active volcanic areas characterized by continuous degassing and often not easily accessible to apply conventional sampling techniques.

  9. Volcanic gas composition, metal dispersion and deposition during explosive volcanic eruptions on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renggli, C. J.; King, P. L.; Henley, R. W.; Norman, M. D.

    2017-06-01

    The transport of metals in volcanic gases on the Moon differs greatly from their transport on the Earth because metal speciation depends largely on gas composition, temperature, pressure and oxidation state. We present a new thermochemical model for the major and trace element composition of lunar volcanic gas during pyroclastic eruptions of picritic magmas calculated at 200-1500 °C and over 10-9-103 bar. Using published volatile component concentrations in picritic lunar glasses, we have calculated the speciation of major elements (H, O, C, Cl, S and F) in the coexisting volcanic gas as the eruption proceeds. The most abundant gases are CO, H2, H2S, COS and S2, with a transition from predominantly triatomic gases to diatomic gases with increasing temperatures and decreasing pressures. Hydrogen occurs as H2, H2S, H2S2, HCl, and HF, with H2 making up 0.5-0.8 mol fractions of the total H. Water (H2O) concentrations are at trace levels, which implies that H-species other than H2O need to be considered in lunar melts and estimates of the bulk lunar composition. The Cl and S contents of the gas control metal chloride gas species, and sulfide gas and precipitated solid species. We calculate the speciation of trace metals (Zn, Ga, Cu, Pb, Ni, Fe) in the gas phase, and also the pressure and temperature conditions at which solids form from the gas. During initial stages of the eruption, elemental gases are the dominant metal species. As the gas loses heat, chloride and sulfide species become more abundant. Our chemical speciation model is applied to a lunar pyroclastic eruption model with isentropic gas decompression. The relative abundances of the deposited metal-bearing solids with distance from the vent are predicted for slow cooling rates (<5 °C/s). Close to a volcanic vent we predict native metals are deposited, whereas metal sulfides dominate with increasing distance from the vent. Finally, the lunar gas speciation model is compared with the speciation of a H2O-, CO

  10. Volcanism and associated hazards: the Andean perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilling, R. I.

    2009-12-01

    Andean volcanism occurs within the Andean Volcanic Arc (AVA), which is the product of subduction of the Nazca Plate and Antarctica Plates beneath the South America Plate. The AVA is Earth's longest but discontinuous continental-margin volcanic arc, which consists of four distinct segments: Northern Volcanic Zone, Central Volcanic Zone, Southern Volcanic Zone, and Austral Volcanic Zone. These segments are separated by volcanically inactive gaps that are inferred to indicate regions where the dips of the subducting plates are too shallow to favor the magma generation needed to sustain volcanism. The Andes host more volcanoes that have been active during the Holocene (past 10 000 years) than any other volcanic region in the world, as well as giant caldera systems that have produced 6 of the 47 largest explosive eruptions (so-called "super eruptions") recognized worldwide that have occurred from the Ordovician to the Pleistocene. The Andean region's most powerful historical explosive eruption occurred in 1600 at Huaynaputina Volcano (Peru). The impacts of this event, whose eruptive volume exceeded 11 km3, were widespread, with distal ashfall reported at distances >1000 km away. Despite the huge size of the Huaynaputina eruption, human fatalities from hazardous processes (pyroclastic flows, ashfalls, volcanogenic earthquakes, and lahars) were comparatively small owing to the low population density at the time. In contrast, lahars generated by a much smaller eruption (indecisiveness by government officials, rather than any major deficiencies in scientific data. Ruiz's disastrous outcome, however, together with responses to subsequent hazardous eruptions in Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru has spurred significant improvements in reducing volcano risk in the Andean region. But much remains to be done.

  11. Volcanism and associated hazards: The Andean perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilling, R.I.

    2009-01-01

    Andean volcanism occurs within the Andean Volcanic Arc (AVA), which is the product of subduction of the Nazca Plate and Antarctica Plates beneath the South America Plate. The AVA is Earth's longest but discontinuous continental-margin volcanic arc, which consists of four distinct segments: Northern Volcanic Zone, Central Volcanic Zone, Southern Volcanic Zone, and Austral Volcanic Zone. These segments are separated by volcanically inactive gaps that are inferred to indicate regions where the dips of the subducting plates are too shallow to favor the magma generation needed to sustain volcanism. The Andes host more volcanoes that have been active during the Holocene (past 10 000 years) than any other volcanic region in the world, as well as giant caldera systems that have produced 6 of the 47 largest explosive eruptions (so-called "super eruptions") recognized worldwide that have occurred from the Ordovician to the Pleistocene. The Andean region's most powerful historical explosive eruption occurred in 1600 at Huaynaputina Volcano (Peru). The impacts of this event, whose eruptive volume exceeded 11 km3, were widespread, with distal ashfall reported at distances >1000 km away. Despite the huge size of the Huaynaputina eruption, human fatalities from hazardous processes (pyroclastic flows, ashfalls, volcanogenic earthquakes, and lahars) were comparatively small owing to the low population density at the time. In contrast, lahars generated by a much smaller eruption (indecisiveness by government officials, rather than any major deficiencies in scientific data. Ruiz's disastrous outcome, however, together with responses to subsequent hazardous eruptions in Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru has spurred significant improvements in reducing volcano risk in the Andean region. But much remains to be done.

  12. Structure Of Conduits Of The Acidic Volcanism And Related Deposits In The Paraná-Etendeka Magmatic Province, São Marcos Region, South Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, L. F.; De Campos, C. P.; Lima, E. F. D.; Janasi, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    Voluminous acidic volcanics from the Paraná-Etendeka Magmatic Province crop out in the southern part of Brazil. The conduits responsible for the feeding of this intermediate/acid volcanism are preserved and well exposed in the São Marcos region (Lima et al. 2012; Geologia USP 12:49-64). Conduits are aligned along a NW-SE trend and have thicknesses up to 1 km. These structures are often characterized by mixing between dacitic and rhyodacitic magmas, with intercalation between two major zones: 1) reddish or grayish vitrophiricdacite/rhyodacite, sub-divided in massive or vesiculated; 2) reddish or grayish vitrophiric fragmented dacite/rhyodacite composed of bubble-rich angular to rounded blocks. Such fragments commonly deform coeval to the flow. A third zone dominated by filaments depicts a chaotic stretching-and-folding process from the mixture of the acid magmas. We used classical field measurements of flow structures and recognized main flow directions in these feeder-dikes. They follow two preferential directions: NW, ranging from N272° to N 355°, and NE, varying from N20° to N85°. These directions are indicative of a transtensive fissural system, which seems to be related to conjugated fractures. Evidence of an important fragmentation process in the conduits point towards the presence of related products in this region, thus rheomorphic deposits such as those observed elsewhere (e.g. Uruguay and Namibia) are expected to occur. Possible vestiges of these deposits could be represented by restricted outcrops of lens-shaped and banded hipohyaline, occasionally bubble-rich, dacites. The presence of continuous pseudotachylitic levels, tightly folded bands with horizontal axial planes together with local deformed bubble-rich pumice-like lens could be indicative of remelting and rheomorphism of previous vulcanoclastic material. Coulees and compound (lobed) dacitic lava flows, reaching up to 5-8 meters length, occur as the uppermost deposits and correspond to the

  13. Monazite geochronology and geothermobarometry in polymetamorphic host rocks of volcanic-hosted massive sulphide mineralizations in the Mesoproterozoic Areachap Terrane, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Kai; Schulz, Bernhard; Bailie, Russell; Gutzmer, Jens

    2015-11-01

    The Areachap Terrane represents the medium-to high-grade metamorphic and deformed remnants of a Mesoproterozoic (ca. 1240-1300 Ma) volcanic arc bound to the margin of the Archean Kaapvaal Craton in the east, and the polydeformed and metamorphosed Proterozoic Namaqua Province in the west. There has been protracted debate as to the exact nature, origin, age and tectonic evolution of this terrane, adjacent to an important Mesoproterozoic crustal suture between the Archean Kaapvaal Craton and the Namaqua Province, which developed during the ∼1200-1000 Ma Namaquan Orogeny. The Areachap Terrane comprises highly deformed bimodal volcanic and volcano sedimentary successions that host a number of massive sulphide base metal orebodies. Samples from three of these orebodies at different locations were analysed to determine the age and P-T conditions of metamorphism along the Areachap Terrane. Metamorphic ages were determined by electron microprobe chemical dating of monazite. Garnet- and amphibole-bearing mineral assemblages were used for geothermobarometry at the Areachap Mine, located in the northern sector of the Areachap Terrane, monazite geochronology yields evidence for two populations of Th-U-Pb-ages at 1432 ± 30 Ma - a possible protolith age - and a metamorphic age of 1153 ± 21 Ma. Kantienpan and Copperton, representing the central and southern sector of the Areachap Terrane respectively, yield monazite ages for a younger metamorphic event with U-Th-Pb-ages of 1108 ± 19 Ma and 1104 ± 17 Ma, respectively. Geothermobarometric data give a differentiated view on the metamorphic evolution of the Areachap Terrane. An arc consistent clockwise P-T evolution path and upper amphibolite-facies peak metamorphic conditions are consistent at the three locations. The Areachap site shows a short prograde development with 8.0 kbar maximum pressure at circa 700 °C maximum temperature and a subsequent retrograde metamorphism. At Kantienpan, on the other hand, maximum metamorphic

  14. 3D structure and formation of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Møre Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjoberg, Sigurd; Schmiedel, Tobias; Planke, Sverre; Svensen, Henrik H.; Galland, Oliver; Jerram, Dougal A.

    2016-04-01

    The mid-Norwegian Møre margin is regarded as a type example of a volcanic rifted margin, with its formation usually related to the influence of the Icelandic plume activity. The area is characterized by the presence of voluminous basaltic complexes such as extrusive lava sequences, intrusive sills and dikes, and hydrothermal vent complexes within the Møre Basin. Emplacement of hydrothermal vent complexes is accommodated by deformation of the host rock. The edges of igneous intrusions mobilize fluids by heat transfer into the sedimentary host rock (aureoles). Fluid expansion may lead to formation of piercing structures due to upward fluid migration. Hydrothermal vent complexes induce bending of overlying strata, leading to the formation of dome structures at the paleo-surface. These dome structures are important as they indicate the accommodation created for the intrusions by deformation of the upper layers of the stratigraphy, and may form important structures in many volcanic margins. Both the morphological characteristics of the upper part and the underlying feeder-structure (conduit-zone) can be imaged and studied on 3D seismic data. Seismic data from the Tulipan prospect located in the western part of the Møre Basin have been used in this study. The investigation focusses on (1) the vent complex geometries, (2) the induced surface deformation patterns, (3) the relation to the intrusions (heat source), as well as (4) the emplacement depth of the hydrothermal vent complexes. We approach this by doing a detailed 3D seismic interpretation of the Tulipan seismic data cube. The complexes formed during the initial Eocene, and are believed to be a key factor behind the rapid warming event called the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM). The newly derived understanding of age, eruptive deposits, and formation of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Møre Basin enables us to contribute to the general understanding of the igneous plumbing system in volcanic basins and

  15. Geomorphologic map and derived geomorphological evolution model of the Ampato volcanic complex (Southern Peru).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalá, J.; Zamorano, J. J.; Palacios, D.

    2012-04-01

    In this work we present the evolution of the Ampato volcanic complex (15°24´-15° 51´S, 73°W; 6.288 m asl) from a geomorphological perspective based on the analysis of landforms, both volcanic and derived from cold processes such as moraines and rock glaciers. In order to do so, a detailed 1:20.000 scale geomorphological map was elaborated by integrating the following techniques: the interpretation of the 1:35.000 scale aerial photographs (Instituto Geográfico Nacional de Perú, 1956) and the analysis of satellite images (Mrsid; NASA, 2000). The cartography was corrected through field work campaigns. A geomorphological cross-section traversing the map from North to South was elaborated in order facilitate the interpretation of the landforms. From the thorough analysis of the landforms represented in the geomorphological map and their relative position we have identified six main volcanic phases, mainly constructive but also, to a lesser extent, destructive (related with a Sant. Helens eruption), interspersed by five large glacial phases. From the three andesitic stratovolcanoes that form the complex (HualcaHualca, Sabancaya and Ampato) we suggest that the oldest of them is HualcaHualca representing the first step of the process over which the other units were placed. The most recent phase corresponds to the main cone of Sabancaya and its sets of domes and large lavas flows. Also we have detected a number of well-preserved vents on the Southern slope of volcano HualcaHualca close to the 1955 glacier tongues. Their presence is an evidence of recent volcanic activity in a volcano considered extinct. The glacial activity has been very active during the Quaternary on the Ampato Complex. The most ancient glacial phase is linked to the Last Glacial Maximum of the Pleistocene. During this event, the paleoglaciers descended down to 3650 m asl and builted moraines of 25- 30 m height. The most recent advance is related to the global event known as Little Ice Age (LIA

  16. Controls on volcanism at intraplate basaltic volcanic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hove, Jackson C.; Van Otterloo, Jozua; Betts, Peter G.; Ailleres, Laurent; Cas, Ray A. F.

    2017-02-01

    A broad range of controlling mechanisms is described for intraplate basaltic volcanic fields (IBVFs) in the literature. These correspond with those relating to shallow tectonic processes and to deep mantle plumes. Accurate measurement of the physical parameters of intraplate volcanism is fundamental to gain an understanding of the controlling factors that influence the scale and location of a specific IBVF. Detailed volume and geochronology data are required for this; however, these are not available for many IBVFs. In this study the primary controls on magma genesis and transportation are established for the Pliocene-Recent Newer Volcanics Province (NVP) of south-eastern Australia as a case-study for one of such IBVF. The NVP is a large and spatio-temporally complex IBVF that has been described as either being related to a deep mantle plume, or upper mantle and crustal processes. We use innovative high resolution aeromagnetic and 3D modelling analysis, constrained by well-log data, to calculate its dimensions, volume and long-term eruptive flux. Our estimates suggest volcanic deposits cover an area of 23,100 ± 530 km2 and have a preserved dense rock equivalent of erupted volcanics of least 680 km3, and may have been as large as 900 km3. The long-term mean eruptive flux of the NVP is estimated between 0.15 and 0.20 km3/ka, which is relatively high compared with other IBVFs. Our comparison with other IBVFs shows eruptive fluxes vary up to two orders of magnitude within individual fields. Most examples where a range of eruptive flux is available for an IBVF show a correlation between eruptive flux and the rate of local tectonic processes, suggesting tectonic control. Limited age dating of the NVP has been used to suggest there were pulses in its eruptive flux, which are not resolvable using current data. These changes in eruptive flux are not directly relatable to the rate of any interpreted tectonic driver such as edge-driven convection. However, the NVP and other

  17. Hydrothermal vents is Lake Tanganyika, East African Rift system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiercelin, J.J. [Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France); Pflumio, C.; Castrec, M. [Universite Paris VI, Paris (France)] [and others

    1993-06-01

    Sublacustrine hydrothermal vents with associated massive sulfides were discovered during April 1987 at Pemba and Cape Banza on the Zaire side of the northern basin of Lake Tanganyika, East African Rift system. New investigations by a team of ten scuba divers during the multinational (France, Zaire, Germany, and Burundi) TANGANYDRO expedition (August-October 1991) found hydrothermal vents down to a depth of 46 m along north-trending active faults bounding the Tanganyika rift on the western side. Temperatures from 53 to 103 {degrees}C were measured in hydrothermal fluids and sediments. Veins of massive sulfides 1-10 cm thick (pyrite and marcasite banding) were found associated with vents at the Pemba site. At Cape Banza, active vents are characterized by 1-70-cm-high aragonite chimneys, and there are microcrystalline pyrite coatings on the walls of hydrothermal pipes. Hydrothermal fluid end members show distinctive compositions at the two sites. The Pemba end member is a NaHCO{sub 3}-enriched fluid similar to the NaHCO{sub 3} thermal fluids form lakes Magadi and Bogoria in the eastern branch of the rift. The Cape Banza end member is a solution enriched in NaCl. Such brines may have a deep-seated basement origin, as do the Uvinza NaCl brines on the eastern flank of the Tanganyika basin. Geothermometric calculations have yielded temperatures of fluid-rock interaction of 219 and 179 {degrees}C in the Pemba and Cape Banza systems, respectively. Abundant white or reddish-brown microbial colonies resembling Beggiatoa mats were found surrounding the active vents. Thermal fluid circulation is permitted by opening of cracks related to 130{degrees}N normal-dextral faults that intersect the north-south major rift trend. The sources of heat for such hydrothermal systems may relate to the existence of magmatic bodies under the rift, which is suggested by the isotopic composition of carbon dioxide released at Pemba and Cape Banza. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  18. A new CO2 vent for the study of ocean acidification in the Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, C A; Sangil, C; Hernández, J C

    2016-08-15

    Natural CO2 vents are considered the gold standard of ocean acidification (OA) studies. In coastal areas these rare vents have only been investigated at the Mediterranean temperate rocky reefs and at Indo-Pacific coral reefs, although there should be more at other volcanic shores around the world. Substantial scientific efforts on investigating OA effects have been mostly performed by laboratory experiments. However, there is a debate on how acute this kind of approach truly represents the responses to OA scenarios, since it generally involves short-term, rapid perturbation and single variable and species experiments. Due to these limitations, world areas with natural CO2 vents are essential to understand long-term marine ecosystem responses to rising human derived atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Here, we presented a new vent found in the subtropical North East Atlantic reefs (28°N, La Palma Island) that shows moderate CO2 emission (900ppm), reducing pH values to an annual average of 7.86±0.16. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mercury accumulation in hydrothermal vent mollusks from the southern Tonga Arc, southwestern Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seyong; Kim, Se-Joo; Ju, Se-Jong; Pak, Sang-Joon; Son, Seung-Kyu; Yang, Jisook; Han, Seunghee

    2015-05-01

    We provide the mercury (Hg) and monomethylmercury (MMHg) levels of the plume water, sulfide ore, sediment, and mollusks located at the hydrothermal vent fields of the southern Tonga Arc, where active volcanism and intense seismic activity occur frequently. Our objectives were: (1) to address the potential release of Hg from hydrothermal fluids and (2) to examine the distribution of Hg and MMHg levels in hydrothermal mollusks (mussels and snails) harboring chemotrophic bacteria. While high concentrations of Hg in the sediment and Hg, As, and Sb in the sulfide ore indicates that their source is likely hydrothermal fluids, the MMHg concentration in the sediment was orders of magnitude lower than the Hg (<0.001%). It suggests that Hg methylation may have not been favorable in the vent field sediment. In addition, Hg concentrations in the mollusks were much higher (10-100 times) than in other hydrothermal vent environments, indicating that organisms located at the Tonga Arc are exposed to exceedingly high Hg levels. While Hg concentration was higher in the gills and digestive glands than in the mantles and residues of snails and mussels, the MMHg concentrations in the gills and digestive glands were orders of magnitude lower (0.004-0.04%) than Hg concentrations. In summary, our results suggest that the release of Hg from the hydrothermal vent fields of the Tonga Arc and subsequent bioaccumulation are substantial, but not for MMHg.

  20. Impact of river overflowing on trace element contamination of volcanic soils in south Italy: Part II. Soil biological and biochemical properties in relation to trace element speciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Ascoli, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, via Vivaldi 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy)]. E-mail: rosaria.dascoli@unina2.it; Rao, M.A. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Suolo, della Pianta e dell' Ambiente, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, 80055 Portici (Italy)]. E-mail: maria.rao@unina.it; Adamo, P. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Suolo, della Pianta e dell' Ambiente, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, 80055 Portici (Italy)]. E-mail: adamo@unina.it; Renella, G. [Dipartimento di Scienza del Suolo e Nutrizione della Pianta, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, P.le delle Cascine 28, 50144 Firenze (Italy)]. E-mail: giancarlo.renella@unifi.it; Landi, L. [Dipartimento di Scienza del Suolo e Nutrizione della Pianta, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, P.le delle Cascine 28, 50144 Firenze (Italy)]. E-mail: loretta.landi@unifi.it; Rutigliano, F.A. [Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, via Vivaldi 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy)]. E-mail: floraa.rutigliano@unina2.it; Terribile, F. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Suolo, della Pianta e dell' Ambiente, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, 80055 Portici (Italy)]. E-mail: terribil@unina.it; Gianfreda, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Suolo, della Pianta e dell' Ambiente, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, 80055 Portici (Italy)]. E-mail: liliana.gianfreda@unina.it

    2006-11-15

    The effect of heavy metal contamination on biological and biochemical properties of Italian volcanic soils was evaluated in a multidisciplinary study, involving pedoenvironmental, micromorphological, physical, chemical, biological and biochemical analyses. Soils affected by recurring river overflowing, with Cr(III)-contaminated water and sediments, and a non-flooded control soil were analysed for microbial biomass, total and active fungal mycelium, enzyme activities (i.e., FDA hydrolase, dehydrogenase, {beta}-glucosidase, urease, arylsulphatase, acid phosphatase) and bacterial diversity (DGGE characterisation). Biological and biochemical data were related with both total and selected fractions of Cr and Cu (the latter deriving from agricultural chemical products) as well as with total and extractable organic C. The growth and activity of soil microbial community were influenced by soil organic C content rather than Cu or Cr contents. In fact, positive correlations between all studied parameters and organic C content were found. On the contrary, negative correlations were observed only between total fungal mycelium, dehydrogenase, arylsulphatase and acid phosphatase activities and only one Cr fraction (the soluble, exchangeable and carbonate bound). However, total Cr content negatively affected the eubacterial diversity but it did not determine changes in soil activity, probably because of the redundancy of functions within species of soil microbial community. On the other hand, expressing biological and biochemical parameters per unit of total organic C, Cu pollution negatively influenced microbial biomass, fungal mycelium and several enzyme activities, confirming soil organic matter is able to mask the negative effects of Cu on microbial community. - In studied soils organic C content resulted the principal factor influencing growth and activity of microbial community, with Cu and Cr contents having a lower relevance.

  1. 46 CFR 153.355 - PV venting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false PV venting systems. 153.355 Section 153.355 Shipping... Systems § 153.355 PV venting systems. When Table 1 requires a PV venting system, the cargo tank must have a PV valve in its vent line. The PV valve must be located between the tank and any connection...

  2. 46 CFR 64.63 - Minimum emergency venting capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum emergency venting capacity. 64.63 Section 64.63... emergency venting capacity. (a) The total emergency venting capacity (Q) of the relief devices of an... ASME Code, 1974 edition, or 315. (b) The total emergency venting capacity (Q) of an insulated...

  3. 30 CFR 77.304 - Explosion release vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosion release vents. 77.304 Section 77.304... Dryers § 77.304 Explosion release vents. Drying chambers, dry-dust collectors, ductwork connecting dryers... explosion release vents which open directly to the outside atmosphere, and all such vents shall be:...

  4. 24 CFR 3280.710 - Venting, ventilation and combustion air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Venting, ventilation and combustion... Fuel Burning Systems § 3280.710 Venting, ventilation and combustion air. (a) The venting as required by... appliance listing and the appliance manufacturer's instructions. (b) Venting and combustion air systems...

  5. Biogeography of bacteriophages at four hydrothermal vent sites in the Antarctic based on g23 sequence diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Andrew D; Pearce, David; Zwirglmaier, Katrin

    2016-04-01

    In this study, which was carried out within the ChEsSO consortium project (Chemosynthetically driven ecosystems south of the Polar Front), we sampled two hydrothermal vent sites on the East Scotia Ridge, Scotia Sea, one in the Kemp Caldera, South Sandwich Arc and one in the Bransfield Strait, north-west of the Antarctic Peninsula, which exhibit strong differences in their chemical characteristics. We compared a subset of their bacteriophage population by Sanger- and 454-sequencing of g23, which codes for the major capsid protein of T4likeviruses. We found that the sites differ vastly in their bacteriophage diversity, which reflects the differences in the chemical conditions and therefore putatively the differences in microbial hosts living at these sites. Comparing phage diversity in the vent samples to other aquatic samples, the vent samples formed a distinct separate cluster, which also included the non-vent control samples that were taken several hundred meters above the vent chimneys. This indicates that the influence of the vents on the microbial population and therefore also the bacteriophage population extends much further than anticipated.

  6. Database for potential hazards from future volcanic eruptions in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Melissa N.; Ramsey, David W.; Miller, C. Dan

    2011-01-01

    More than 500 volcanic vents have been identified in the State of California. At least 76 of these vents have erupted, some repeatedly, during the past 10,000 yr. Past volcanic activity has ranged in scale and type from small rhyolitic and basaltic eruptions through large catastrophic rhyolitic eruptions. Sooner or later, volcanoes in California will erupt again, and they could have serious impacts on the health and safety of the State's citizens as well as on its economy. This report describes the nature and probable distribution of potentially hazardous volcanic phenomena and their threat to people and property. It includes hazard-zonation maps that show areas relatively likely to be affected by future eruptions in California. This digital release contains information from maps of potential hazards from future volcanic eruptions in the state of California, published as Plate 1 in U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1847. The main component of this digital release is a spatial database prepared using geographic information systems (GIS) applications. This release also contains links to files to view or print the map plate, main report text, and accompanying hazard tables from Bulletin 1847. It should be noted that much has been learned about the ages of eruptive events in the State of California since the publication of Bulletin 1847 in 1989. For the most up to date information on the status of California volcanoes, please refer to the U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program website.

  7. Gas Explosions Mitigation by Ducted Venting

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The mitigation of effects of gas and dust explosions within industrial equipment is effective if venting the combustion products to safe location. The presence of relief duct is however likely to increase the severity of the explosion with respect to equipment vented to open atmosphere, due to secondary explosions occurring in the initial sections of duct, frictional drag and inertia of the gas column, acoustic and Helmholtz oscillations. The weights of these phenomena on explosion e...

  8. The vent microbiome: patterns and drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachiadaki, M.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial processes within deep-sea hydrothermal vents affect the global biogeochemical cycles. Still, there are significant gaps in our understanding of the microbiology and the biogeochemistry of deep-sea hydrothermal systems. Vents differ in temperature, host rock composition and fluid chemistry; factors that are hypothesized to shape the distribution of the microbial communities, their metabolic capabilities and their activities. Using large-scale single cell genomics, we obtained insights into the genomic content of several linkages of a diffuse flow vent. The genomes show high metabolic versatility. Sulfur oxidation appears to be predominant but there is the potential of using a variety of e- donors and acceptors to obtain energy. To further assess the ecological importance of the vent auto- and heterotrophs, the global biogeography of the analyzed lineages will be investigated by fragment recruitment of metagenomes produced from the same site as well as other hydrothermal systems. Metatranscriptomic and metaproteomic data will be integrated to examine the expression of the predominant metabolic pathways and thus the main energy sources driving chemoautotrophic production. The comparative analysis of the key players and associated pathways among various vent sites that differ in physicochemical characteristics is anticipated to decipher the patterns and drivers of the global dispersion and the local diversification of the vent microbiome.

  9. Geology and geochemistry of Pelagatos, Cerro del Agua, and Dos Cerros monogenetic volcanoes in the Sierra Chichinautzin Volcanic Field, south of México City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustín-Flores, Javier; Siebe, Claus; Guilbaud, Marie-Noëlle

    2011-04-01

    This study focuses on the geology and geochemistry of three closely-spaced monogenetic volcanoes that are located in the NE sector of the Sierra Chichinautzin Volcanic Field near México City. Pelagatos (3020 m.a.s.l.) is a small scoria cone (0.0017 km 3) with lava flows (0.036 km 3) that covered an area of 4.9 km 2. Cerro del Agua scoria cone (3480 m.a.s.l., 0.028 km 3) produced several lava flows (0.24 km 3) covering an area of 17.6 km 2. Dos Cerros is a lava shield which covers an area of 80.3 km 2 and is crowned by two scoria cones: Tezpomayo (3080 m.a.s.l., 0.022 km 3) and La Ninfa (3000 m.a.s.l., 0.032 km 3). The eruptions of Cerro del Agua and Pelagatos occurred between 2500 and 14,000 yr BP. The Dos Cerros eruption took place close to 14,000 yr BP as constrained by radiocarbon dating. Rocks from these three volcanoes are olivine-hypersthene normative basaltic andesites and andesites with porphyritic, aphanitic, and glomeroporphyritic textures. Their mineral assemblages include olivine, clinopyroxene, and orthopyroxene phenocrysts (≤ 10 vol.%) embedded in a trachytic groundmass which consists mainly of plagioclase microlites and glass. Pelagatos rocks also present quartz xenocrysts. Due to their high Cr and Ni contents, and high Mg#s, Pelagatos rocks are considered to be derived from primitive magmas, hence the importance of this volcano for understanding petrogenetic processes in this region. Major and trace element abundances and petrography of products from these volcanoes indicate a certain degree of crystal fractionation during ascent to the surface. However, the magmas that formed the volcanoes evolved independently from each other and are not cogenetically related. REE, HFSE, LILE, and isotopic (Sr, Nd, and Pb) compositions point towards a heterogeneous mantle source that has been metasomatized by aqueous/melt phases from the subducted Cocos slab. There is no clear evidence of important crustal contributions in the compositions of Pelagatos and

  10. Bacterial diversity and successional patterns during biofilm formation on freshly exposed basalt surfaces at diffuse-flow deep-sea vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulmann, Lara K; Beaulieu, Stace E; Shank, Timothy M; Ding, Kang; Seyfried, William E; Sievert, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    Many deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems are regularly impacted by volcanic eruptions, leaving fresh basalt where abundant animal and microbial communities once thrived. After an eruption, microbial biofilms are often the first visible evidence of biotic re-colonization. The present study is the first to investigate microbial colonization of newly exposed basalt surfaces in the context of vent fluid chemistry over an extended period of time (4-293 days) by deploying basalt blocks within an established diffuse-flow vent at the 9°50' N vent field on the East Pacific Rise. Additionally, samples obtained after a recent eruption at the same vent field allowed for comparison between experimental results and those from natural microbial re-colonization. Over 9 months, the community changed from being composed almost exclusively of Epsilonproteobacteria to a more diverse assemblage, corresponding with a potential expansion of metabolic capabilities. The process of biofilm formation appears to generate similar surface-associated communities within and across sites by selecting for a subset of fluid-associated microbes, via species sorting. Furthermore, the high incidence of shared operational taxonomic units over time and across different vent sites suggests that the microbial communities colonizing new surfaces at diffuse-flow vent sites might follow a predictable successional pattern.

  11. Cinnabar, arsenian pyrite and thallium-enrichment in active shallow submarine hydrothermal vents at Paleochori Bay, Milos Island, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kati, Marianna; Voudouris, Panagiotis; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Magganas, Andreas; Baltatzis, Emmanouil; Kanellopoulos, Christos; Mavrogonatos, Constantinos

    2015-04-01

    We herein report the discovery of active cinnabar-depositing hydrothermal vents in a submarine setting at Paleochori Bay, within the offshore southeastern extension of the Milos Island Geothermal Field, South Aegean Active Volcanic Arc. Active, low temperature (up to 115 °C) hydrothermal venting through volcaniclastic material has led to a varied assemblage of sulfide and alteration mineral phases in an area of approximately 1 km2. Our samples recovered from Paleochori Bay are hydrothermal edifices composed of volcaniclastic detrital material cemented by pyrite, or pure sulfide (mainly massive pyrite) mounts. Besides pyrite and minor marcasite, the hydrothermal minerals include cinnabar, amorphous silica, hydrous ferric oxides, carbonates (aragonite and calcite), alunite-jarosite solid solution and Sr-rich barite. Among others, growth textures, sieve-textured pyrite associated with barite, alunite-jarosite solid solution and hydrous ferric oxides rims colloform-banded pyrite layers. Overgrowths of arsenian pyrite layers (up to 3.2 wt. % As and/or up to 1.1 wt. % Mn) onto As-free pyrite indicate fluctuation in As content of the hydrothermal fluid. Mercury, in the form of cinnabar, occurs in up to 5 μm grains within arsenian pyrite layers, usually forming distinct cinnabar-enriched micro-layers. Hydrothermal Sr-rich barite (barite-celestine solid solution), pseudocubic alunite-jarosite solid solution and Mn- and Sr-enriched carbonates occur in various amounts and closely associated with pyrite and/or hydrous ferric oxides. Thallium-bearing sulfides and/or sulfosalts were not detected during our study; however, hydrous ferric oxides show thallium content of up to 0.5 wt. % Tl. The following scenarios may have played a role in pyrite precipitation at Paleochori: (a) H2S originally dissolved in the deep fluid but separated upon boiling could have reacted with oxygenated seawater under production of sulphuric acid, thus causing leaching and dissolution of primary iron

  12. 14 CFR 29.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... end at any point— (i) Where the discharge of fuel from the vent outlet would constitute a fire hazard... with vapor elimination connections must have a vent line to lead vapors back to one of the fuel tanks... line must lead back to the fuel tank used for takeoff and landing....

  13. 14 CFR 25.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... may end at any point— (i) Where the discharge of fuel from the vent outlet would constitute a fire... carburetor with vapor elimination connections must have a vent line to lead vapors back to one of the fuel... return line must lead back to the fuel tank used for takeoff and landing....

  14. 14 CFR 23.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... will constitute a fire hazard or from which fumes may enter personnel compartments; and (7) Vents must... a separate vent line to lead vapors back to the top of one of the fuel tanks. If there is more than... line must lead back to the fuel tank to be used first, unless the relative capacities of the tanks...

  15. ANALYSIS OF VENTING OF A RESIN SLURRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurinat, J.; Hensel, S.

    2012-03-27

    A resin slurry venting analysis was conducted to address safety issues associated with overpressurization of ion exchange columns used in the Purex process at the Savannah River Site (SRS). If flow to these columns were inadvertently interrupted, an exothermic runaway reaction could occur between the ion exchange resin and the nitric acid used in the feed stream. The nitric acid-resin reaction generates significant quantities of noncondensable gases, which would pressurize the column. To prevent the column from rupturing during such events, rupture disks are installed on the column vent lines. The venting analysis models accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) tests and data from tests that were performed in a vented test vessel with a rupture disk. The tests showed that the pressure inside the test vessel continued to increase after the rupture disk opened, though at a slower rate than prior to the rupture. Calculated maximum discharge rates for the resin venting tests exceeded the measured rates of gas generation, so the vent size was sufficient to relieve the pressure in the test vessel if the vent flow rate was constant. The increase in the vessel pressure is modeled as a transient phenomenon associated with expansion of the resin slurry/gas mixture upon rupture of the disk. It is postulated that the maximum pressure at the end of this expansion is limited by energy minimization to approximately 1.5 times the rupture disk burst pressure. The magnitude of this pressure increase is consistent with the measured pressure transients. The results of this analysis demonstrate the need to allow for a margin between the design pressure and the rupture disk burst pressure in similar applications.

  16. ANALYSIS OF VENTING OF A RESIN SLURRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurinat, J.; Hensel, S.

    2012-03-27

    A resin slurry venting analysis was conducted to address safety issues associated with overpressurization of ion exchange columns used in the Purex process at the Savannah River Site (SRS). If flow to these columns were inadvertently interrupted, an exothermic runaway reaction could occur between the ion exchange resin and the nitric acid used in the feed stream. The nitric acid-resin reaction generates significant quantities of noncondensable gases, which would pressurize the column. To prevent the column from rupturing during such events, rupture disks are installed on the column vent lines. The venting analysis models accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) tests and data from tests that were performed in a vented test vessel with a rupture disk. The tests showed that the pressure inside the test vessel continued to increase after the rupture disk opened, though at a slower rate than prior to the rupture. Calculated maximum discharge rates for the resin venting tests exceeded the measured rates of gas generation, so the vent size was sufficient to relieve the pressure in the test vessel if the vent flow rate was constant. The increase in the vessel pressure is modeled as a transient phenomenon associated with expansion of the resin slurry/gas mixture upon rupture of the disk. It is postulated that the maximum pressure at the end of this expansion is limited by energy minimization to approximately 1.5 times the rupture disk burst pressure. The magnitude of this pressure increase is consistent with the measured pressure transients. The results of this analysis demonstrate the need to allow for a margin between the design pressure and the rupture disk burst pressure in similar applications.

  17. Bulk soybean grain mass temperature in warehouses with isolated vents and vent-exhaust combined systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza Rigoni de Pontes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study aimed to compare the temperatures in the mass of bulk soybeans ( Glycine max in warehouses with isolated vents and vent-combined exhaustion. A completely randomized design was used, with two treatments and ten repetitions. Treatments consisted of warehouse with curved vents and warehouse with curved + static exhaust vents. Each repetition contained the average of all readings in three days in all cables of the warehouse part under study, totaling 10 repetitions per month. The variable analyzed was the temperature in the grain mass in the lower, middle and upper parts of the warehouse from January to May 2012. The environment temperature and humidity were also registered. Static hoods, along with curved vents on the roof of the warehouse showed a tendency to reduce the temperature of the soybean mass with decrease in environmental temperature and increase in relative environmental humidity.

  18. Preliminary geochemical characterization of volcanic and geothermal fluids discharged from the Ecuadorian volcanic arc.

    OpenAIRE

    Inguaggiato, S.; Hidalgo, S.; Beate, B.; Bourquin, J.

    2009-01-01

    In Ecuador, magmatism results from the subduction of the Nazca Plate beneath the North Western part of South America (Pennington, 1981; Kellogg and Vega, 1995; Witt et al., 2006). North of 2.5°S, the Ecuadorian Quaternary volcanic arc is characterized by about 60 volcanoes distributed in three different parallel chains. Many of these volcanoes are potentially active or currently in activity and display associated geothermal fields. South of this latitude, no active arc is present in Ecuador. ...

  19. The Zuni-Bandera Volcanic Field, NM: An Analog for Exploring Planetary Volcanic Terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Garry, W. B.; Zimbelman, J. R.; Crumpler, L. S.; Aubele, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, near Grants, New Mexico, is comprised of volcanic deposits from several basaltic eruptions during the last million years. This vent field exhibits a diverse group of coalesced lava flows and displays well-preserved volcanic features including a’a and pahoehoe flows, collapsed lava tubes, cinder cones and low shields. The McCartys flow is a 48-km long inflated basalt flow and is the youngest in the field at around 3000 years old. Over the last three years we have used the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, and the McCartys flow in particular, as a terrestrial analog for exploring planetary volcanic fields, and understanding the role of lava sheet inflation in flow field development. We have conducted three different styles of analog tests, 1) basic field science focused on understanding lava sheet inflation, 2) mission operations tests related to EVA design and real-time modification of traverse plans, and 3) science enabling technology tests. The Zuni-Bandera field is an ideal location for each style of analog test because it provides easy access to a diverse set of volcanic features with variable quality of preservation. However, many limitations must also be considered in order to maximize lessons learned. The McCartys flow displays well-preserved inflation plateaus that rise up to 15 m above the surrounding field. The preservation state enables textures and morphologies indicative of this process to be characterized. However, the pristine nature of the flow does not compare well with the much older and heavily modified inflated flows of Mars and the Moon. Older flows west of McCartys add value to this aspect of analog work because of their degraded surfaces, development of soil horizons, loose float, and limited exposure of outcrops, similar to what might be observed on the Moon or Mars. EVA design tests and science enabling technology tests at the Zuni-Bandera field provide the opportunity to document and interpret the relationships

  20. Combination of Methods for the Fractionation, Investigation, and Analysis of Micro/Nano Particles in Volcanic Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeriy, Shkinev; Michail, Ermolin; Peter, Fedotov; Aleksander, Rudnev; Nikolay, Bulychev; Vitaliy, Linnik; Gerardo, Moreno

    2013-04-01

    Micro and nanoparticles play a very important role in environment, in biology and medicine, in various technologies. The investigation of particles is often based on the fractionation according to particle size, density and charge followed by the analysis of the separated fractions. Such studies are needed in the analysis of environmental samples (natural and waste waters, soils, sediments, ashes) to assess the soil formation processes as well as distribution, transport, and biological uptake of pollutants. Recently, the review dealing with the fractionation and investigation of particles in liquid media has been published [Anal. Bioanal. Chem., 2011, v. 400, no 6, p. 1787-1804]. The present report gives a brief overview of the state-of-the-art and describes some new methods, approaches, and devices developed in the Laboratory for Concentration Methods of Vernadsky Institute for the studies of volcanic ash samples. The ash is attributed to the volcanic activity of Cordón Caulle. Puyehue and Cordón Caulle (40°35'25″S -72°07'02″W) are two coalesced volcanic vents that form a major mountain massif in Puyehue National Park in the Andes of Ranco Province, Chile. In volcanology, this group is known under the name of Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcanic Complex. Four different volcanoes constitute the volcanic group or complex, the Cordillera Nevada caldera, the Pliocene Mencheca volcano, Cordón Caulle fissure vents, and the Puyehue stratovolcano. Most stratovolcanoes on the Southern Volcanic Zone of the Andes, Puyehue and Cordón Caulle are located along the intersection of traverse fault with the larger north-south Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault. A new eruption started on 04 June 2011. By 15 June a dense column of ash (9 km height) was still erupting into the air, with the ash cloud spreading across the Southern Hemisphere. Actually the volcano activity continues. The samples were collected before and after the acidic rain which occurred due to the release of sulfur gases

  1. New insights into the initiation and venting of the Bronze-Age eruption of Santorini (Greece), from component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druitt, T. H.

    2014-02-01

    The late-seventeenth century BC Minoan eruption of Santorini discharged 30-60 km3 of magma, and caldera collapse deepened and widened the existing 22 ka caldera. A study of juvenile, cognate, and accidental components in the eruption products provides new constraints on vent development during the five eruptive phases, and on the processes that initiated the eruption. The eruption began with subplinian (phase 0) and plinian (phase 1) phases from a vent on a NE-SW fault line that bisects the volcanic field. During phase 1, the magma fragmentation level dropped from the surface to the level of subvolcanic basement and magmatic intrusions. The fragmentation level shallowed again, and the vent migrated northwards (during phase 2) into the flooded 22 ka caldera. The eruption then became strongly phreatomagmatic and discharged low-temperature ignimbrite containing abundant fragments of post-22 ka, pre-Minoan intracaldera lavas (phase 3). Phase 4 discharged hot, fluidized pyroclastic flows from subaerial vents and constructed three main ignimbrite fans (northwestern, eastern, and southern) around the volcano. The first phase-4 flows were discharged from a vent, or vents, in the northern half of the volcanic field, and laid down lithic-block-rich ignimbrite and lag breccias across much of the NW fan. About a tenth of the lithic debris in these flows was subvolcanic basement. New subaerial vents then opened up, probably across much of the volcanic field, and finer-grained ignimbrite was discharged to form the E and S fans. If major caldera collapse took place during the eruption, it probably occurred during phase 4. Three juvenile components were discharged during the eruption—a volumetrically dominant rhyodacitic pumice and two andesitic components: microphenocryst-rich andesitic pumices and quenched andesitic enclaves. The microphenocryst-rich pumices form a textural, mineralogical, chemical, and thermal continuum with co-erupted hornblende diorite nodules, and together

  2. Tectonic versus volcanic origin of the summit depression at Medicine Lake Volcano, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Leon Gwynn

    2010-05-01

    Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and

  3. TECTONIC VERSUS VOLCANIC ORIGIN OF THE SUMMIT DEPRESSION AT MEDICINE LAKE VOLCANO, CALIFORNIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Leon Gwynn

    2010-05-01

    Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and

  4. Developing International Guidelines on Volcanic Hazard Assessments for Nuclear Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Charles

    2014-05-01

    tremendous challenge in quantitative volcanic hazard assessments to encompass alternative conceptual models, and to create models that are robust to evolving understanding of specific volcanic systems by the scientific community. A central question in volcanic hazards forecasts is quantifying rates of volcanic activity. Especially for long-dormant volcanic systems, data from the geologic record may be sparse, individual events may be missing or unrecognized in the geologic record, patterns of activity may be episodic or otherwise nonstationary. This leads to uncertainty in forecasting long-term rates of activity. Hazard assessments strive to quantify such uncertainty, for example by comparing observed rates of activity with alternative parametric and nonparametric models. Numerical models are presented that characterize the spatial distribution of potential volcanic events. These spatial density models serve as the basis for application of numerical models of specific phenomena such as development of lava flow, tephra fallout, and a host of other volcanic phenomena. Monte Carlo techniques (random sampling, stratified sampling, importance sampling) are methods used to sample vent location and other key eruption parameters, such as eruption volume, magma rheology, and eruption column height for probabilistic models. The development of coupled scenarios (e.g., the probability of tephra accumulation on a slope resulting in subsequent debris flows) is also assessed through these methods, usually with the aid of event trees. The primary products of long-term forecasts are a statistical model of the conditional probability of the potential effects of volcanism, should an eruption occur, and the probability of such activity occurring. It is emphasized that hazard forecasting is an iterative process, and board consideration must be given to alternative conceptual models of volcanism, weighting of volcanological data in the analyses, and alternative statistical and numerical models

  5. Microbial Communities at Non-Volcanic and Volcanic Sites of the Gakkel Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmke, E.; Juergens, J.; Tausendfreund, M.; Wollenburg, J.; Shank, T.; Edmonds, H.; Humphris, S.; Nakamura, K.; Liljebladh, B.; Winsor, P.; Singh, H.; Reves-Sohn, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    The Gakkel Ridge in the eastern Arctic Ocean is the slowest spreading, deepest, and most isolated portion of the global mid-ocean ridge system and therefore predestined for comparative investigations on deep-sea vent communities. However, the perennial cover of thick sea ice has made this area largely inaccessible to science. The Arctic Gakkel Vents Expedition (AGAVE) utilized the icebreaker ODEN and newly developed vehicles for exploration and sampling in connection with a CTD/rosette equipped with different sensors and a high-resolution multi-beam bathymetry system. We focused our studies on the peridotite-hosted region at 85°N, 7°E and on the basaltic volcanism area at 85°N, 85°E. Water, sediment, and rock samples were taken to describe the microbial communities in different zones of these two sites. Sampling was guided by anomalies of backscattering, temperature, Eh, as well as by high-resolution seafloor imagery. Samples were preserved or processed on board immediately after sampling. Molecular analyses, cultural methods, total bacterial counts, and activity measurements were employed to describe the structure of the microbial communities, their phylogeny, potential adaptations, and possible role in biogeochemical cycles. The first molecular biological results of the bacterial communities of the 85°E site indicated atypical of deep- sea venting communities. These preliminary results were supported by the images of the under-ice vehicle "Camper" which showed thick yellow "fluffy" mats (often > 5cm thick) and orange "pebbly" material without any smell of H2S markedly different than the white, consolidated Beggiatoa mats often observable at deep venting sites. Foraminifera occurred regularly on top of basalt rocks as well as within the bacterial mats.

  6. Volcanism and associated hazards: the Andean perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Tilling

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Andean volcanism occurs within the Andean Volcanic Arc (AVA, which is the product of subduction of the Nazca Plate and Antarctica Plates beneath the South America Plate. The AVA is Earth's longest but discontinuous continental-margin volcanic arc, which consists of four distinct segments: Northern Volcanic Zone, Central Volcanic Zone, Southern Volcanic Zone, and Austral Volcanic Zone. These segments are separated by volcanically inactive gaps that are inferred to indicate regions where the dips of the subducting plates are too shallow to favor the magma generation needed to sustain volcanism. The Andes host more volcanoes that have been active during the Holocene (past 10 000 years than any other volcanic region in the world, as well as giant caldera systems that have produced 6 of the 47 largest explosive eruptions (so-called "super eruptions" recognized worldwide that have occurred from the Ordovician to the Pleistocene.

    The Andean region's most powerful historical explosive eruption occurred in 1600 at Huaynaputina Volcano (Peru. The impacts of this event, whose eruptive volume exceeded 11 km3, were widespread, with distal ashfall reported at distances >1000 km away. Despite the huge size of the Huaynaputina eruption, human fatalities from hazardous processes (pyroclastic flows, ashfalls, volcanogenic earthquakes, and lahars were comparatively small owing to the low population density at the time. In contrast, lahars generated by a much smaller eruption (<0.05 km3 in 1985 of Nevado del Ruiz (Colombia killed about 25 000 people – the worst volcanic disaster in the Andean region as well as the second worst in the world in the 20th century. The Ruiz tragedy has been attributed largely to ineffective communications of hazards information and indecisiveness by government officials, rather than any major deficiencies in scientific data. Ruiz's disastrous outcome, however, together with responses to subsequent

  7. Safety Injection System Filling Using Dynamic Venting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Je; Kim, Wong Bae; Huh, Jin; Lee, Joo Hee; Im, In Young; Kim, Eun kee [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In the APR+, the water-level elevation of the in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST) is lower than the highest piping of the SIS. Since the gravity filling of water from IRWST cannot fill all SIS piping, an SIP or an SCP test line is newly provided in order to allow the dynamic venting of the SIS. NEI 09-10 Revision 1a-A has concluded that use of dynamic venting is an effective means to remove gas from local high points and traps in piping when correctly based on the dynamic flow rate, void volume, Floude number, and the system water volume. In this study, feasibility of the dynamic vent is investigated. The work presented in this study evaluates the SIS and the SCS filling using the dynamic venting which is supposed to be applied to the APR+. The main ideas are as follows; 1. Dynamic venting using SIPs for the APR+ is not appropriate on the basis of 12 inches in diameter and with the flow rate, 1,460 gpm. 2. Because the high point of the SIS and the SCS is located at the piping that the two systems are sharing, the accumulated gas at the highest point can be removed by using the SCPs, and the dimension of the new piping will be determined by its length of them and the number of elbows. The calculated results are shown in Table 2. 3. The applicability of the dynamic venting methods using the SCPs that are mentioned above should be evaluated in the aspect of the system operation after the piping arrangements are settled in the APR+. The assessments to determine the pump operation time are also required.

  8. Vents et nuages la physique du ciel

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Les nuages et les vents sont au cœur des attentions des climatologues et des météorologues. Les premiers s’intéressent à leurs interactions avec le réchauffement climatique. Les seconds cherchent à prédire le temps qu’il fera demain, mais aussi les manifestations extrêmes (tornades, orages, cyclones…). Un numéro pour rester le nez au vent et la tête dans les nuages !

  9. Composition of gases vented from a condenser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyon, R.N.

    1980-08-01

    Designers of systems that involve condensers often need to predict the amount of process vapor that accompanies the noncondensable gases that are vented from the condensers. An approximation is given that appears to provide, in many cases, reasonably accurate values for the mole ratio of process vapor to noncondensable gases in the vented mixture. The approximation is particularly applicable to flash and direct-contact power systems for geothermal brines and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). More regorous relationships are available for exceptional cases.

  10. Quantifying diffuse and discrete venting at the Tour Eiffel vent site, Lucky Strike hydrothermal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelstaedt, Eric; EscartíN, Javier; Gracias, Nuno; Olive, Jean-Arthur; Barreyre, Thibaut; Davaille, Anne; Cannat, Mathilde; Garcia, Rafael

    2012-04-01

    The relative heat carried by diffuse versus discrete venting of hydrothermal fluids at mid-ocean ridges is poorly constrained and likely varies among vent sites. Estimates of the proportion of heat carried by diffuse flow range from 0% to 100% of the total axial heat flux. Here, we present an approach that integrates imagery, video, and temperature measurements to accurately estimate this partitioning at a single vent site, Tour Eiffel in the Lucky Strike hydrothermal field along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Fluid temperatures, photographic mosaics of the vent site, and video sequences of fluid flow were acquired during the Bathyluck'09 cruise (Fall, 2009) and the Momarsat'10 cruise (Summer, 2010) to the Lucky Strike hydrothermal field by the ROV Victor6000 aboard the French research vessel the "Pourquoi Pas"? (IFREMER, France). We use two optical methods to calculate the velocities of imaged hydrothermal fluids: (1) for diffuse venting, Diffuse Flow Velocimetry tracks the displacement of refractive index anomalies through time, and (2) for discrete jets, Particle Image Velocimetry tracks eddies by cross-correlation of pixel intensities between subsequent images. To circumvent video blurring associated with rapid velocities at vent orifices, exit velocities at discrete vents are calculated from the best fit of the observed velocity field to a model of a steady state turbulent plume where we vary the model vent radius and fluid exit velocity. Our results yield vertical velocities of diffuse effluent between 0.9 cm s-1 and 11.1 cm s-1 for fluid temperatures between 3°C and 33.5°C above that of ambient seawater, and exit velocities of discrete jets between 22 cm s-1 and 119 cm s-1 for fluid temperatures between 200°C and 301°C above ambient seawater. Using the calculated fluid velocities, temperature measurements, and photo mosaics of the actively venting areas, we calculate a heat flux due to diffuse venting from thin fractures of 3.15 ± 2.22 MW, discrete venting of

  11. Volcanism-sedimentation interaction in the Campo de Calatrava Volcanic Field (Spain): a magnetostratigraphic and geochronological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Hernández, Antonio; López-Moro, Francisco Javier; Gallardo-Millán, José Luis; Martín-Serrano, Ángel; Gómez-Fernández, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on the influence of Cenozoic volcanism of the Campo de Calatrava volcanic field on the sedimentation of two small continental basins in Spain (Argamasilla and Calzada-Moral basins). The volcanism in this area was mainly monogenetic, according to the small-volume volcanic edifices of scoria cones that were generated and the occurrence of tuff rings and maars. A sedimentological analysis of the volcaniclastic deposits led to the identification of facies close to the vents, low-density (dilute) pyroclastic surges, secondary volcanic deposits and typical maar deposits. Whole-rock K/Ar dating, together with palaeomagnetic constraints, yielded an age of 3.11-3.22 Ma for the onset of maar formation, the deposition finished in the Late Gauss-Early Matuyana. Using both techniques and previous paleontological data allowed it to be inferred that the maar formation and the re-sedimentation stage that occurred in Argamasilla and Calzada-Moral basins were roughly coeval. The occurrence of syn-eruption volcaniclastic deposits with small thicknesses that were separated by longer inter-eruption periods, where fluvial and lacustrine sedimentation was prevalent, together with the presence of small-volume volcanic edifices indicated that there were short periods of volcanic activity in this area. The volcanic activity was strongly controlled by previous basement faults that favoured magma feeding, and the faults also controlled the location of volcanoes themselves. The occurrence of the volcanoes in the continental basins led to the creation of shallow lakes that were related to the maar formation and the modification of sedimentological intra-basinal features, specifically, valley slope and sediment load.

  12. Investigating the consequences of urban volcanism using a scenario approach II: Insights into transportation network damage and functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Daniel M.; Deligne, Natalia I.; Wilson, Thomas M.; Lindsay, Jan M.; Woods, Richard

    2017-06-01

    implementation of evacuation zones; these disrupt crucial north-south links through the south eastern Auckland isthmus, and at times cause up to 435,000 residents and many businesses to be displaced. Ash deposition on road and rail following tephra-producing eruptive phases causes widespread Level-of-Service reduction, and some disruption continues for > 1 month following the end of the eruption until clean-up and re-entry to most evacuated zones is completed. Different tephra dispersal and deposition patterns can result in substantial variations to Level-of-Service and consequences for transportation management. Additional complexities may also arise during times of unrest with no eruption, particularly as residents are potentially displaced for longer periods of time due to extended uncertainties on potential vent location. The Level-of-Service metrics developed here effectively highlight the importance of considering transportation end-users when developing volcanic impact and risk assessments. We suggest that the metrics are universally applicable in other urban environments.

  13. Alkali and Halogen Chemistry in Volcanic Gases on Io

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, L

    2004-01-01

    We use chemical equilibrium calculations to model the speciation of alkalis and halogens in volcanic gases emitted on Io. The calculations cover wide temperature (500-2000 K) and pressure (10^-6 to 10^+1 bars) ranges, which overlap the nominal conditions at Pele (T = 1760 K, P = 0.01 bars). About 230 compounds of 11 elements (O, S, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, F, Cl, Br, I) are considered. We predict the major alkali and halogen species in a Pele-like volcanic gas and the major alklai and halogen condensates. We also model disequilibrium chemistry of the alkalis and halogens in the volcanic plume. Based on this work and our prior modeling for Na, K, and Cl in a volcanic plume, we predict the major loss processes for the alkali halide gases are photolysis and/or condensation onto grains. On the basis of elemental abundances and photochemical lifetimes, we recommend searching for gaseous KCl, NaF, LiF, LiCl, RbF, RbCl, CsF, and CsCl around volcanic vents during eruptions. Based on abundance considerations and observation...

  14. Long-lived volcanism within Argyre basin, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jean-Pierre; Dohm, James M.; Soare, Richard J.; Flahaut, Jessica; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Pathare, Asmin V.; Fairén, Alberto G.; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Buczkowski, Debra L.

    2017-09-01

    The Argyre basin, one of the largest impact structures on Mars with a diameter >1200 km, formed in the Early Noachian ∼3.93 Ga. The basin has collected volatiles and other material through time, and experienced partial infilling with water evident from stratigraphic sequences, crater statistics, topography, and geomorphology. Although volcanism has not been previously associated with the Argyre basin, our study of the northwest portion of the basin floor has revealed landforms suggesting volcanic and tectonic activity occurred including Argyre Mons, a ∼50 km wide volcanic-structure formed ∼3 Ga. Giant polygons with a similar surface age are also identified on terrain adjacent to the base of Argyre Mons, indicating the structure may have formed in a water-rich environment. In addition to Argyre Mons, cones, vents, mounds, dikes, and cavi or hollows, many of which are associated with extensional tectonics, are observed in the region. Multiple features appear to disrupt icy (and largely uncratered) terrain indicating a relatively young, Late Amazonian, formation age for at least some of the volcanic and tectonic features. The discovery of Argyre Mons, along with additional endogenic modification of the basin floor, suggests that the region has experienced episodes of volcanism over a protracted period of time. This has implications for habitability as the basin floor has been a region of elevated heat flow coupled with liquid water, water ice, and accumulation of sediments of diverse provenance with ranging geochemistry, along with magma-water interactions.

  15. Palynological constraints on timing and duration of Siberian Traps volcanic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, Henk; Svensen, Henrik; Looy, Cindy; Fristad, Kirsten; Polozov, Alexander; Planke, Sverre

    2010-05-01

    Lacustrine sediments intercalated locally in the voluminous flood basalts and pyroclastic rocks of the Siberian Traps igneous province are characterized by the presence of surprisingly diverse assemblages of macroscopic and microscopic plant fossils. In addition, these intertrappean sediments contain a wide variety of faunal remains, such as conchostracans, ostracodes, gastropods and insects. Outside the area of presently exposed flood basalt, plant fossils may also occur abundantly in the sedimentary infill of crater lakes above vent structures in the southern part of the Tunguska Basin on the Siberian Platform. Because of a possible cause-effect relationship between Siberian Traps magmatism and end-Permian mass-extinctions, vegetation that must have grown in the immediate vicinity of the eruptive centres is one of the most obvious biota to be investigated for evidence of terrestrial biosphere crisis. On the basis of literature information and new palynological data from cored crater-lake sediments, in this presentation we briefly address the basic question to what extent the Siberian plant fossil record confirms age-equivalence between biotic and volcanic events. At present, most published biostratigraphic interpretations of the floral and faunal records refute any correspondence of end-Permian biotic turnover with the Siberian Traps. In effect, the records are long since being used to advocate an exclusively Triassic age for the Siberian volcanism, the main phase of flood basalt eruption taking place during late Early Triassic (Olenekian) and early Middle Triassic (Anisian) times. However, re-evaluation of the chronostratigraphic significance of plant megafossils and faunal remains has resulted in alternative views, which suggest a Late Permian age for part or the whole of the volcanic sequence exposed on the Siberian Platform. Compositional characters of palynomorph assemblages indicate age-equivalence of the flood basalts in the northern part of the Tunguska

  16. A first Event-tree for the Bárðarbunga volcanic system (Iceland): from the volcanic crisis in 2014 towards a tool for hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsotti, Sara; Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnús; Jónsdottir, Kristín; Vogfjörd, Kristín; Larsen, Gudrun; Oddsson, Björn

    2015-04-01

    Bárdarbunga volcano is part of a large volcanic system that had its last confirmed eruption before the present unrest in 1910. This system is partially covered by ice within the Vatnajökull glacier and it extends further to the NNE as well as to SW. Based on historical data, its eruptive activity has been predominantly characterized by explosive eruptions, originating beneath the glacier, and important effusive eruptions in the ice-free part of the system itself. The largest explosive eruptions took place on the southern side of the fissure system in AD 1477 producing about 10 km3 of tephra. Due to the extension and location of this volcanic system, the range of potential eruptive scenarios and associated hazards is quite wide. Indeed, it includes: inundation, due to glacial outburst; tephra fallout, due to ash-rich plume generated by magma-water interaction; abundant volcanic gas release; and lava flows. Most importantly these phenomena are not mutually exclusive and might happen simultaneously, creating the premise for a wide spatial and temporal impact. During the ongoing volcanic crisis at Bárdarbunga, which started on 16 August, 2014, the Icelandic Meteorological Office, together with the University of Iceland and Icelandic Civil Protection started a common effort of drawing, day-by-day, the potential evolution of the ongoing rifting event and, based on the newest data from the monitoring networks, updated and more refined scenarios have been identified. Indeed, this volcanic crisis created the occasion for pushing forward the creation of the first Event-tree for the Bárðarbunga volcanic system. We adopted the approach suggested by Newhall and Pallister (2014) and a preliminary ET made of nine nodes has been constructed. After the two initial nodes (restless and genesis) the ET continues with the identification of the location of aperture of future eruptive vents. Due to the complex structure of the system and historical eruptions, this third node

  17. Computer controlled vent and pressurization system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslewicz, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    The Centaur space launch vehicle airborne computer, which was primarily used to perform guidance, navigation, and sequencing tasks, was further used to monitor and control inflight pressurization and venting of the cryogenic propellant tanks. Computer software flexibility also provided a failure detection and correction capability necessary to adopt and operate redundant hardware techniques and enhance the overall vehicle reliability.

  18. Light at deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dover, Cindy Lee; Reynolds, George T.; Chave, Alan D.; Tyson, J. Anthony

    Ambient light spectral data were acquired at two deep-sea hydrothermal vents with a temperature of ˜350°C: the Hole-to-Hell site on the East Pacific Rise at 9°N and the Snake-Pit site on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Measurements were made with a simple, multi-channel photometer which simultaneously detected light in four 100 nm-wide bands over the wavelength range of 650-1050 nm. Most of the light detected is near-infrared (750-1050 nm), but there is a 19x greater photon flux than expected from thermal radiation alone at shorter wavelengths (650-750 nm) at the Hole-to-Hell vent. At Snake Pit, more light in the 750-850 nm band was observed 10 cm above the orifice where the temperature was 50-100°C than at the 351°C vent opening. These data suggest the presence of non-thermal light sources in the vent environment. Some possible non-thermal mechanisms are identified, but further data will be required to resolve them.

  19. Preoperational test report, vent building ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Vent Building Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) for the W-030 Ventilation Building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  20. Mapping the Piccard Hydrothermal Field - The World's Deepest Known Vent Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsey, J. C.; German, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    We report the recent mapping and exploration of the Piccard Hydrothermal Field on the Mid-Cayman Rise. Two previous expeditions in 2009 and 2010 led to the discovery of the site, which at 5000m hosts the world's deepest known vents. The site was mapped and explored in January 2012 and the Piccard Field was found to be larger than previously appreciated. The site includes 3 separate currently active hydrothermal mounts together with 4 additional extinct depo-centers. The 3 active centers are the Beebe Vents, Beebe Woods, and Beebe Sea sites. Beebe Vents is an active black smoker system with maximum temperatures of 400-403 degrees Celsius. Beebe Woods contains a set of tall beehive smokers with temperatures of approximately 353 degrees Celsius. Beebe Sea, the largest sulfide mound in the field, contains diffuse venting together with numerous extinct chimneys that indicate significant past active focused flow. Observations of the 4 extinct mounds indicate differences in their apparent ages based on the texture and morphology of the extinct sulfides at the summit of each mound. The entire field is located on top of an axial volcanic ridge with extrusive pillow mounds prominent. A major fault traverses the mound along its long axis, from Southwest to Northeast. Beebe Woods, Beebe Sea, and extinct Beebe mound D abut this fault directly with an apparent monotonic age progression from youngest (Beebe Woods) in the SW to relict mound 'D' in the NE. Similarly, the Beebe Vents site and mound is located at the SW limit of a parallel set of mounds, offset from the fault by approximately 100m, which also ages progressively through extinct Beebe Mounds 'E', 'F' and 'G'. The major fault that bisects the axial volcanic ridge at Piccard evidently serves as a controlling mechanism for the mounds abutting that fault however the mechanism for the second line of mounds remains to be determined. Bathymetry suggests the presence of a second, smaller fault which may serve as the control

  1. 46 CFR 151.15-6 - Venting piping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Venting piping. 151.15-6 Section 151.15-6 Shipping COAST... LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Tanks § 151.15-6 Venting piping. (a) The back pressure in the relief... condensate which may accumulate in the vent piping. (b)...

  2. 14 CFR 34.11 - Standard for fuel venting emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Engine Fuel Venting Emissions (New and In-Use Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.11 Standard for fuel venting emissions. (a) No... discharge to the atmosphere of fuel drained from fuel nozzle manifolds after engines are shut down and...

  3. 46 CFR 153.358 - Venting system flow capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Venting system flow capacity. 153.358 Section 153.358 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS... Venting Systems § 153.358 Venting system flow capacity. (a) The cross-sectional flow area of any...

  4. 40 CFR 63.983 - Closed vent systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... inspections for visible, audible, or olfactory indications of leaks. (ii) If the closed vent system is... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Closed vent systems. 63.983 Section 63... Emission Standards for Closed Vent Systems, Control Devices, Recovery Devices and Routing to a Fuel...

  5. Recent seismicity detection increase in the Santorini volcanic island complex

    OpenAIRE

    G. Chouliaras; Drakatos, G.; Makropoulos, K.; Melis, N. S.

    2012-01-01

    Santorini is the most active volcanic complex in the South Aegean Volcanic Arc. To improve the seismological network detectability of the seismicity in this region, the Institute of Geodynamics of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA) recently installed 4 portable seismological stations supplementary to the 3 permanent stations operating in the region. The addition of these stations has significantly improved the detectability and reporting of the local seismic activity in the NOA instrume...

  6. Morphometric characterization of monogenetic volcanic cones of the Chichinautzin and Michoacán-Guanajuato monogenetic volcanic fields in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarazua-Carbajal, Maria Cristina; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Mendoza-Rosas, Ana Teresa

    2014-05-01

    Morphometric characterization of volcanic edifices is one of the main approaches providing information about a volcano eruptive history, whether it has one or more eruptive vents or if it had any sector collapses. It also provides essential information about the physical processes that modify their shapes during periods of quietness, and quite significantly, about the volcanoes' ages. In the case of monogenetic activity, a volcanic field can be characterized by the size and slope distributions, and other cone's morphometric parameter distributions that may provide valuable information about the temporal evolution of the volcanic field. The increasingly available high-resolution digital elevation models and the continuously developing computer tools have allowed a faster development and more detailed morphometric characterization techniques. We present here a methodology to readily obtain diverse volcanic cone shape parameters from the contour curves such as mean slope, slope distribution, dimensions of the cone and crater, crater location within the cone, orientation of the cone's principal axis, eccentricity, and other morphological features using an analysis algorithm that we developed, programmed in Python and ArcPy. Preliminary results from the implementation of this methodology to the Chichinautzin and Michoacán-Guanajuato monogenetic volcanic fields in Mexico have permitted a preliminary estimation of the age distribution of some of the cones with an acceptable correlation with the available radiometric ages. A large part of the Chichinautzin region DEM was obtained from a LIDAR survey by the Mexican National Institute of Statistics and Geography (INEGI).

  7. Geochemistry of high-potassium rocks from the mid-Tertiary Guffey volcanic center, Thirtynine Mile volcanic field, central Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobus, Reinhard A.; Mochel, David W.; Mertzman, Stanley A.; Eide, Elizabeth A.; Rothwarf, Miriam T.; Loeffler, Bruce M.; Johnson, David A.; Keating, Gordon N.; Sultze, Kimberly; Benjamin, Anne E.; Venzke, Edward A.; Filson, Tammy

    1990-07-01

    The Guffey volcanic center is the largest within the 2000 km2 mid-Tertiary Thirtynine Mile volcanic field of central Colorado. This study is the first to provide extensive chemical data for these alkalic volcanic and subvolcanic rocks, which represent the eroded remnants of a large stratovolcano of Oligocene age. Formation of early domes and flows of latite and trachyte within the Guffey center was followed by extrusion of a thick series of basalt, trachybasalt, and shoshonite flows and lahars. Plugs, dikes, and vents ranging from basalt to rhyolite cut the thick mafic deposits, and felsic tuffs and tuff breccias chemically identical to the small rhyolitic plutons are locally preserved. Whole-rock major and trace element analyses of 80 samples, ranging almost continuously from 47% to 78%SiO2, indicate that the rocks of the Guffey center are among the most highly enriched in K2O (up to 6%) and rare earth elements (typically 200-300 ppm) of any volcanic rocks in Colorado. These observations, along with the relatively high concentrations of Ba and Rb and the depletion of Cr and Ni, suggest an appreciable contribution of lower crustal material to the magmas that produced the Thirtynine Mile volcanic rocks.

  8. Hydrothermal Venting at Lake Rotomahana, New Zealand, 125 Years After the Tarawera Eruption of 1886

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, S. L.; de Ronde, C. E.; Fornari, D. J.; Leybourne, M. I.; Ferrini, V.; Kukulya, A.; Littlefield, R.; Scott, B. J.; Immenga, D.; Baker, E. T.

    2011-12-01

    In early 1886 Lake Rotomahana (North Island, NZ) was a small, shallow lake surrounded on its northern side by a geothermal field that included New Zealand's first major tourist attraction: the beautiful Pink and White (silica sinter) Terraces. The lake dramatically changed on 10 June 1886 when nearby Mt Tarawera erupted. Volcanic and hydrothermal explosions left the landscape scarred with explosion craters, blanketed with ash and mud, and devoid of vegetation. A large, steaming crater replaced the lake and the Pink and White Terraces were apparently destroyed. The crater re-filled during the next 15 years and today Lake Rotomahana is considerably deeper (125 m) and ~5 times larger than pre-eruption. While the evolution of a new geothermal field adjacent to the lake (Waimangu) has been visible and documented over the past 125 years, the evolution of the area perturbed by the eruption then subsequently submerged has been mostly inaccessible. A detailed survey of Lake Rotomahana was conducted in Jan/Feb 2011 to identify the extent and nature of present-day venting. Two autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV) with temperature, pH, turbidity, and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) sensors completed 18 missions covering a total distance of ~250 km (20-50 m line spacing; 10-15 m altitude). Water samples were collected at 14 CTD stations for chemical analyses. The lake is stratified during summer months with average surface (0-10 m depth) temperatures ~21.5°C. The topmost 1-3 meters are 0.5-1°C warmer near the boiling springs and geysers that flow into the lake on the western shore. Temperatures decrease from 21.2-16.5°C within the thermocline (12-16 m), then to 14.54°C at depth (110 m). pH values in the surface layer range from 7.4-7.9, decreasing to 6.50 below ~30 m. Temperature, pH and ORP anomalies in the water column identify at least five areas where warm water is venting into the lake: 1) in the area of the historic Pink Terraces (+3.5°C, -0.1 pH, -142 mv); 2

  9. Volcanic signals in oceans

    KAUST Repository

    Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

    2009-08-22

    Sulfate aerosols resulting from strong volcanic explosions last for 2–3 years in the lower stratosphere. Therefore it was traditionally believed that volcanic impacts produce mainly short-term, transient climate perturbations. However, the ocean integrates volcanic radiative cooling and responds over a wide range of time scales. The associated processes, especially ocean heat uptake, play a key role in ongoing climate change. However, they are not well constrained by observations, and attempts to simulate them in current climate models used for climate predictions yield a range of uncertainty. Volcanic impacts on the ocean provide an independent means of assessing these processes. This study focuses on quantification of the seasonal to multidecadal time scale response of the ocean to explosive volcanism. It employs the coupled climate model CM2.1, developed recently at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration\\'s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, to simulate the response to the 1991 Pinatubo and the 1815 Tambora eruptions, which were the largest in the 20th and 19th centuries, respectively. The simulated climate perturbations compare well with available observations for the Pinatubo period. The stronger Tambora forcing produces responses with higher signal-to-noise ratio. Volcanic cooling tends to strengthen the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Sea ice extent appears to be sensitive to volcanic forcing, especially during the warm season. Because of the extremely long relaxation time of ocean subsurface temperature and sea level, the perturbations caused by the Tambora eruption could have lasted well into the 20th century.

  10. Building Better Volcanic Hazard Maps Through Scientific and Stakeholder Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M. A.; Lindsay, J. M.; Calder, E.

    2015-12-01

    All across the world information about natural hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and tsunami is shared and communicated using maps that show which locations are potentially exposed to hazards of varying intensities. Unlike earthquakes and tsunami, which typically produce one dominant hazardous phenomenon (ground shaking and inundation, respectively) volcanic eruptions can produce a wide variety of phenomena that range from near-vent (e.g. pyroclastic flows, ground shaking) to distal (e.g. volcanic ash, inundation via tsunami), and that vary in intensity depending on the type and location of the volcano. This complexity poses challenges in depicting volcanic hazard on a map, and to date there has been no consistent approach, with a wide range of hazard maps produced and little evaluation of their relative efficacy. Moreover, in traditional hazard mapping practice, scientists analyse data about a hazard, and then display the results on a map that is then presented to stakeholders. This one-way, top-down approach to hazard communication does not necessarily translate into effective hazard education, or, as tragically demonstrated by Nevado del Ruiz, Columbia in 1985, its use in risk mitigation by civil authorities. Furthermore, messages taken away from a hazard map can be strongly influenced by its visual design. Thus, hazard maps are more likely to be useful, usable and used if relevant stakeholders are engaged during the hazard map process to ensure a) the map is designed in a relevant way and b) the map takes into account how users interpret and read different map features and designs. The IAVCEI Commission on Volcanic Hazards and Risk has recently launched a Hazard Mapping Working Group to collate some of these experiences in graphically depicting volcanic hazard from around the world, including Latin America and the Caribbean, with the aim of preparing some Considerations for Producing Volcanic Hazard Maps that may help map makers in the future.

  11. Discovery of New Hydrothermal Venting Sites in the Lau Basin, Tonga Back Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowhurst, P. V.; Arculus, R. J.; Massoth, G. J.; Baptista, L.; Stevenson, I.; Angus, R.; Baker, E. T.; Walker, S. L.; Nakamura, K.

    2009-12-01

    Between 22 April and 25 June 2009, a systematic search for hydrothermal venting along 1340 km of back-arc features was conducted throughout the Lau Basin aboard the CSIRO owned RV Southern Surveyor. The selection of survey areas was based on bathymetry, sidescan and water column anomaly datasets collected during previous marine science research and commercial exploration voyages. During 54 operational days, 76 CTD tows were completed using real-time plume mapping protocols, augmented with mini autonomous plume recorders, to discern anomalies in light scattering, and oxidation-reduction potential with water samples collected within the peak anomalies. Coincident with CTD towing at an average speed of 1.1 knots high resolution EM300 bathymetry and backscatter data was collected which significantly enhanced geological interpretation of possible source sites for follow up cross tows. 32 venting sites were detected, 24 of which are believed to be new discoveries. 13 dredge operations were conducted on 7 of these sites. Sulfides were recovered from 2 sites, one being a new discovery on the NE Lau spreading centre, ~14 km north of the commercial discovery by Teck and ~7km north of the eruption site discovery during a RV Thompson NOAA survey, both during 2008. The new venting field discoveries at North Mata, northern extent of the CLSC and far southern Valu Fa ridge are beyond any previously known areas of hydrothermal activity and further enhances the reputation of the Lau Basin as one of the most productive back arc regions for hydrothermally active spreading centers. A significant number of filter residue samples collected from the vent sites yielded greater than background values for metals including Cu and Zn, which is interpreted to imply they were sourced from active seafloor massive sulfide systems rather than volcanic activity.

  12. Volcanic Rocks and Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Volcanoes have contributed significantly to the formation of the surface of our planet. Volcanism produced the crust we live on and most of the air we breathe. The...

  13. Late Holocene volcanism at Medicine Lake Volcano, northern California Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Champion, Duane E.; Grove, Timothy L.

    2016-05-23

    Late Holocene volcanism at Medicine Lake volcano in the southern Cascades arc exhibited widespread and compositionally diverse magmatism ranging from basalt to rhyolite. Nine well-characterized eruptions have taken place at this very large rear-arc volcano since 5,200 years ago, an eruptive frequency greater than nearly all other Cascade volcanoes. The lavas are widely distributed, scattered over an area of ~300 km2 across the >2,000-km2 volcano. The eruptions are radiocarbon dated and the ages are also constrained by paleomagnetic data that provide strong evidence that the volcanic activity occurred in three distinct episodes at ~1 ka, ~3 ka, and ~5 ka. The ~1-ka final episode produced a variety of compositions including west- and north-flank mafic flows interspersed in time with fissure rhyolites erupted tangential to the volcano’s central caldera, including the youngest and most spectacular lava flow at the volcano, the ~950-yr-old compositionally zoned Glass Mountain flow. At ~3 ka, a north-flank basalt eruption was followed by an andesite eruption 27 km farther south that contains quenched basalt inclusions. The ~5-ka episode produced two caldera-focused dacitic eruptions. Quenched magmatic inclusions record evidence of intrusions that did not independently reach the surface. The inclusions are present in five andesitic, dacitic, and rhyolitic host lavas, and were erupted in each of the three episodes. Compositional and mineralogic evidence from mafic lavas and inclusions indicate that both tholeiitic (dry) and calcalkaline (wet) parental magmas were present. Petrologic evidence records the operation of complex, multi-stage processes including fractional crystallization, crustal assimilation, and magma mixing. Experimental evidence suggests that magmas were stored at 3 to 6 km depth prior to eruption, and that both wet and dry parental magmas were involved in generating the more silicic magmas. The broad distribution of eruptive events and the relative

  14. Recent seismicity detection increase in the Santorini volcanic island complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouliaras, G.; Drakatos, G.; Makropoulos, K.; Melis, N. S.

    2012-04-01

    Santorini is the most active volcanic complex in the South Aegean Volcanic Arc. To improve the seismological network detectability of the seismicity in this region, the Institute of Geodynamics of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA) recently installed 4 portable seismological stations supplementary to the 3 permanent stations operating in the region. The addition of these stations has significantly improved the detectability and reporting of the local seismic activity in the NOA instrumental seismicity catalogue. In this study we analyze quantitatively the seismicity of the Santorini volcanic complex. The results indicate a recent significant reporting increase mainly for events of small magnitude and an increase in the seismicity rate by more than 100%. The mapping of the statistical significance of the rate change with the z-value method reveals that the rate increase exists primarily in the active fault zone perpendicular to the extensional tectonic stress regime that characterizes this region. The spatial distribution of the b-value around the volcanic complex indicates a low b-value distribution parallel to the extensional stress field, while the b-value cross section of the volcanic complex indicates relatively high b-values under the caldera and a significant b-value decrease with depth. These results are found to be in general agreement with the results from other volcanic regions and they encourage further investigations concerning the seismic and volcanic hazard and risk estimates for the Santorini volcanic complex using the NOA earthquake catalogue.

  15. VOLCANIC TSUNAMI GENERATING SOURCE MECHANISMS IN THE EASTERN CARIBBEAN REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Pararas-Carayannis

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, volcanic island flank failures and underwater slides have generated numerous destructive tsunamis in the Caribbean region. Convergent, compressional and collisional tectonic activity caused primarily from the eastward movement of the Caribbean Plate in relation to the North American, Atlantic and South American Plates, is responsible for zones of subduction in the region, the formation of island arcs and the evolution of particular volcanic centers on the overlying plate. The inter-plate tectonic interaction and deformation along these marginal boundaries result in moderate seismic and volcanic events that can generate tsunamis by a number of different mechanisms. The active geo-dynamic processes have created the Lesser Antilles, an arc of small islands with volcanoes characterized by both effusive and explosive activity. Eruption mechanisms of these Caribbean volcanoes are complex and often anomalous. Collapses of lava domes often precede major eruptions, which may vary in intensity from Strombolian to Plinian. Locally catastrophic, short-period tsunami-like waves can be generated directly by lateral, direct or channelized volcanic blast episodes, or in combination with collateral air pressure perturbations, nuéss ardentes, pyroclastic flows, lahars, or cascading debris avalanches. Submarine volcanic caldera collapses can also generate locally destructive tsunami waves. Volcanoes in the Eastern Caribbean Region have unstable flanks. Destructive local tsunamis may be generated from aerial and submarine volcanic edifice mass edifice flank failures, which may be triggered by volcanic episodes, lava dome collapses, or simply by gravitational instabilities. The present report evaluates volcanic mechanisms, resulting flank failure processes and their potential for tsunami generation. More specifically, the report evaluates recent volcanic eruption mechanisms of the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat, of Mt. Pel

  16. Volcanic tremor and plume height hysteresis from Pavlof Volcano, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fee, David; Haney, Matthew M; Matoza, Robin S; Eaton, Alexa R; Cervelli, Peter; Schneider, David J; Iezzi, Alexandra M

    2017-01-06

    The March 2016 eruption of Pavlof Volcano, Alaska, produced an ash plume that caused the cancellation of more than 100 flights in North America. The eruption generated strong tremor that was recorded by seismic and remote low-frequency acoustic (infrasound) stations, including the EarthScope Transportable Array. The relationship between the tremor amplitudes and plume height changes considerably between the waxing and waning portions of the eruption. Similar hysteresis has been observed between seismic river noise and discharge during storms, suggesting that flow and erosional processes in both rivers and volcanoes can produce irreversible structural changes that are detectable in geophysical data. We propose that the time-varying relationship at Pavlof arose from changes in the tremor source related to volcanic vent erosion. This relationship may improve estimates of volcanic emissions and characterization of eruption size and intensity.

  17. Evidence for young volcanism on Mercury from the third MESSENGER flyby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prockter, Louise M; Ernst, Carolyn M; Denevi, Brett W; Chapman, Clark R; Head, James W; Fassett, Caleb I; Merline, William J; Solomon, Sean C; Watters, Thomas R; Strom, Robert G; Cremonese, Gabriele; Marchi, Simone; Massironi, Matteo

    2010-08-06

    During its first two flybys of Mercury, the MESSENGER spacecraft acquired images confirming that pervasive volcanism occurred early in the planet's history. MESSENGER's third Mercury flyby revealed a 290-kilometer-diameter peak-ring impact basin, among the youngest basins yet seen, having an inner floor filled with spectrally distinct smooth plains. These plains are sparsely cratered, postdate the formation of the basin, apparently formed from material that once flowed across the surface, and are therefore interpreted to be volcanic in origin. An irregular depression surrounded by a halo of bright deposits northeast of the basin marks a candidate explosive volcanic vent larger than any previously identified on Mercury. Volcanism on the planet thus spanned a considerable duration, perhaps extending well into the second half of solar system history.

  18. Interpreting subsurface volcanic structures using geologically constrained 3-D gravity inversions: Examples of maar-diatremes, Newer Volcanics Province, southeastern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaikie, T. N.; Ailleres, L.; Betts, P. G.; Cas, R. A. F.

    2014-04-01

    We present results and a method to geophysically image the subsurface structures of maar volcanoes to better understand eruption mechanisms and risks associated with maar-forming eruptions. High-resolution ground gravity and magnetic data were acquired across several maar volcanoes within the Newer Volcanics Province of southeastern Australia, including the Ecklin maar, Red Rock Volcanic Complex, and Mount Leura Volcanic Complex. The depth and geometry of subsurface volcanic structures were determined by interpretation of gridded geophysical data and constrained 2.5-D forward and 3-D inverse modeling techniques. Bouguer gravity lows identified across the volcanic craters reflect lower density lake sediments and pyroclastic debris infilling the underlying maar-diatremes. These anomalies were reproduced during modeling by shallow coalesced diatremes. Short-wavelength positive gravity and magnetic anomalies identified within the center of the craters suggest complex internal structures. Modeling identified feeder vents, consisting of higher proportions of volcanic debris, intrusive dikes, and ponded magma. Because potential field models are nonunique, sensitivity analyses were undertaken to understand where uncertainty lies in the interpretations, and how the models may vary between the bounds of the constraints. Rather than producing a single "ideal" model, multiple models consistent with available geologic information are created using different inversion techniques. The modeling technique we present focuses on maar volcanoes, but there are wider implications for imaging the subsurface of other volcanic systems such as kimberlite pipes, scoria cones, tuff rings, and calderas.

  19. Scientific Scope and Summary of the Arctic Gakkel Vents (AGAVE) Expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reves-Sohn, R. A.; Edmonds, H.; Humphris, S.; Shank, T.; Singh, H.; Ericsson, B.; Hedman, U.; Helmke, E.; Jakuba, M.; Kunz, C.; Larsson, B.; Liljebladh, B.; Linder, J.; Murphy, C.; Nakamura, K.; Pontbriand, C.; Sato, T.; Schlindwein, V.; Stranne, C.; Tausendfreund, M.; Upchurch, L.; Willis, C.; Winsor, P.

    2007-12-01

    The AGAVE project is an international collaboration between scientists in the United States, Sweden, Japan, and Germany with the overarching scientific objective of studying the geological, chemical, and biological characteristics of hydrothermal venting on the Gakkel Ridge, the most slowly diverging tectonic plate boundary on Earth. The AGAVE expedition took place on the IB Oden from July 1 - August 10, 2007, and occupied two field sites where evidence of hydrothermal venting had been detected in the water column during the 2001 Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge Experiment (AMORE). The first site (~85N, 7.5E) is characterized by peridotite outcrops on normal fault scarps, while the second site (~85.5N, 85E) is characterized by constructional basaltic volcanism, thereby allowing for a comparative study of hydrothermal processes at two segments of an ultra-slow spreading ridge with contrasting geological and tectonic settings. Five primary oceanographic assets were employed during the expedition; a high-resolution, ship-mounted multi-beam bathymetry system, a CTD-rosette system for surveying and sampling the water column, the PUMA autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) for fine-scale water column surveys, the JAGUAR AUV for near-bottom geophysical and photographic surveys, and the CAMPER wireline system for acquiring digital images and samples of the deep seafloor. The combined results from the expedition are significantly expanding our understanding of volcanic and hydrothermal processes on the Gakkel Ridge. Important initial results include the discovery of the Asgard volcanic chain at the 85E segment, the discovery of extensive microbial mats covering these volcanoes, the discovery of basaltic glass fragments covering large portions of the seafloor near the volcanoes, and detailed mapping and sampling of water column plumes.

  20. The Arctic Gakkel Vents (AGAVE) Expedition: Technology Development and the Search for Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Fields Under the Arctic Ice Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reves-Sohn, R. A.; Singh, H.; Humphris, S.; Shank, T.; Jakuba, M.; Kunz, C.; Murphy, C.; Willis, C.

    2007-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal fields on the Gakkel Ridge beneath the Arctic ice cap provide perhaps the best terrestrial analogue for volcanically-hosted chemosynthetic biological communities that may exist beneath the ice-covered ocean of Europa. In both cases the key enabling technologies are robotic (untethered) vehicles that can swim freely under the ice and the supporting hardware and software. The development of robotic technology for deep- sea research beneath ice-covered oceans thus has relevance to both polar oceanography and future astrobiological missions to Europa. These considerations motivated a technology development effort under the auspices of NASA's ASTEP program and NSF's Office of Polar Programs that culminated in the AGAVE expedition aboard the icebreaker Oden from July 1 - August 10, 2007. The scientific objective was to study hydrothermal processes on the Gakkel Ridge, which is a key target for global studies of deep-sea vent fields. We developed two new autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) for the project, and deployed them to search for vent fields beneath the ice. We conducted eight AUV missions (four to completion) during the 40-day long expedition, which also included ship-based bathymetric surveys, CTD/rosette water column surveys, and wireline photographic and sampling surveys of remote sections of the Gakkel Ridge. The AUV missions, which lasted 16 hours on average and achieved operational depths of 4200 meters, returned sensor data that showed clear evidence of hydrothermal venting, but for a combination of technical reasons and time constraints, the AUVs did not ultimately return images of deep-sea vent fields. Nevertheless we used our wireline system to obtain images and samples of extensive microbial mats that covered fresh volcanic surfaces on a newly discovered set of volcanoes. The microbes appear to be living in regions where reducing and slightly warm fluids are seeping through cracks in the fresh volcanic terrain. These discoveries

  1. Rifting, volcanism, and magma genesis at the northern end of the Danakil Depression: The Alid volcanic center of Eritrea (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, J. B.; Clynne, M. A.; Duffield, W. A.; Smith, J. G.; Woldegiorgis, L.

    2009-12-01

    The Alid volcanic center, Eritrea, is a structural dome formed by subvolcanic intrusion of pyroxene-bearing rhyolite, subsequently erupted as pumice and lava, during the period 40,000 to 15,000 years ago. The northern Danakil Depression is thought to be the most recently developed part of the Afar, and represents an active continental rift subparallel to the Red Sea spreading center. The location of Alid may be controlled by the intersection of the structural grain of the NE trending Senafe-Alid lineament with the NW trending Danakil Depression. Our work began as a geothermal assessment (Duffield et al., 1997, USGS Open-file 97-291) that found evidence for 300 meters of vertical offset of early Pleistocene basalt flows over the past 1.1 million years. Structural uplift at Alid reveals Proterozoic metamorphic basement rocks overlain by Quaternary marine sediments including siltstone, and sandstones interbedded with pillow lavas and hyaloclastites. These units are overlain by subaerial amphibole-bearing rhyolites (dated at ~200 ka), basalts, and andesites that were deposited on a relatively flat surface and before significant growth of a large volcanic edifice. About 1 km of structural uplift of the marine sediments began 40 ka when pyroxene-bearing rhyolitic magma intruded close to the surface. Uplift was accompanied by contemporaneous eruptions of pumice falls and more common obsidian domes and lava flows over the next 20,000 years. Uplift apparently ceased after eruption of pyroclastic flows and vent-clogging lava about 15 ka. The pumice deposits contain cognate xenoliths of granophyric pyroxene-granite (Lowenstern et al., 1997, J. Petrol. 38:1707). Our geochronology of the uplift is consistent with the idea that growth of the Alid volcanic center played a role in isolating the southern Danakil Depression from the Red Sea, helping to initiate dessication of the rift and producing the young evaporites found today at Baddha and further south at Dallol. U

  2. Hawaiian fissure fountains: Quantifying vent and shallow conduit geometry, episode 1 of the 1969-1974 Mauna Ulu eruption: Chapter 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcheta, Carolyn; Fagents, Sarah; Swanson, Donald A.; Houghton, Bruce; Ericksen, Todd; Carey, Rebecca; Cayol, Valérie; Poland, Michael P.; Weis, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Geometries of shallow magmatic pathways feeding volcanic eruptions are poorly constrained, yet many key interpretations about eruption dynamics depend on knowledge of these geometries. Direct quantification is difficult because vents typically become blocked with lava at the end of eruptions. Indirect geophysical techniques have shed light on some volcanic conduit geometries, but the scales are too coarse to resolve narrow fissures (widths typically 1 m). Kīlauea's Mauna Ulu eruption, which started with 30 m. Direct measurements at the ground surface were augmented by tripod-mounted lidar measurements to quantify the shallow conduit geometry for three vents at a resolution factors influencing these parameters. In the past, simplified first-order fissure geometries have been used in computational modeling. Our data can provide more accurate conduit shapes for better understanding of shallow fissure fluid dynamics and how it controls eruptive behavior, especially if incorporated into computer models.

  3. Rare-earth elements enrichment of Pacific seafloor sediments: the view from volcanic islands of Polynesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melleton, Jérémie; Tuduri, Johann; Pourret, Olivier; Bailly, Laurent; Gisbert, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    Rare-earth elements (REEs) are key metals for «green» technologies such as energy saving lamps or permanent magnets used in, e.g., wind turbines, hard disk drives, portable phone or electric or hybrid vehicles. Since several years, world demand for these metals is therefore drastically increasing. The quasi-monopolistic position of China, which produces around 95 % of global REEs production, generates risks for the industries that depend on a secure supply of REEs. In response, countries are developing and diversifying their supply sources, with new mining projects located outside China and efforts in the area of REEs recycling. Most of these projects focus on deposits related to carbonatites and alkaline-peralkaline magmatism, which are generally enriched in light REEs (LREEs) compared to the heavy REEs (HREEs)-enriched deposits of the ion-adsorption types, located in southern China. However, a recent study revealed new valuable resources corresponding to seafloor sediments located in the south-eastern and north-central Pacific. The deep-sea mud described by these authors show a higher HREE/LREE ratio than ion-adsorption deposits, a feature which significantly increases their economic interest. The authors suggest mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal activity as an explanation to this anomalous enrichment. However, several contributions have documented considerable REEs enrichment in basalts and peridotitic xenoliths from French Polynesia. Several arguments have been exposed in favour of a supergene origin, with a short migration, suggesting that REEs were collected from weathered basalts. The Tahaa volcanic island (Sous-le-Vent Island, Society Archipelago, French Polynesia) is the first location where such enrichment has been described. New petrographic and mineralogical investigations confirm a supergene mobilization of this abnormal occurrence. REE-bearing minerals (mainly phosphates of the rhabdophane group) are primarily located within basalt vesicles but also in

  4. Provisions for containment venting in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelm, J.G.

    1997-08-01

    In this short paper an overlook is given of the systems developed in Germany for filtered containment venting and their implementation in nuclear power plants. More information on the development can be found in the Proceedings of the DOE/NRC Aircleaning Conferences. In Germany, 28.8 % of the electric energy is produced by 19 nuclear power reactors. No new power reactor is expected to be built at least within the next ten years, but France and Germany cooperate in the development of a future European Power Reactor (ERP). This reactor type will be fitted with a core catcher and passive cooling in order to avoid serious consequences of a hypothetical core meltdown accident so that provisions for containment venting are not required. 3 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. The geology and petrology of Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii; a study of postshield volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Edward W.; Wise, William S.; Dalrymple, G. Brent

    1997-01-01

    Mauna Kea Volcano, on the Island of Hawaii, is capped by lavas of alkalic and transitional basalt (Hamakua Volcanics) erupted between approximately 250-200 and 70-65 ka and hawaiite, mugearite, and benmoreite (Laupahoehoe Volcanics) erupted between approximately 65 and 4 ka. These lavas, which form the entire subaerial surface of the volcano, issued from numerous scattered vents and are intercalated on the upper slopes with glacial deposits. The lavas record diminishing magma-supply rate and degree of partial melting from the shield stage through the postshield stage. Much of the compositional variation apparently reflects fractionation of basaltic magma in reservoirs within and beneath the volcano.

  6. Volcanic tremors: Good indicators of change in plumbing systems during volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárraga, Marta; Martí, Joan; Abella, Rafael; Carniel, Roberto; López, Carmen

    2014-03-01

    Geophysical and geochemical signals recorded during episodes of unrest preceding volcanic eruptions provide information on movements of magma inside the lithosphere and on how magma prepares to reach the surface. When the eruption ensues continuous volcanic monitoring can reveal the nature of changes occurring in the volcano's plumbing system, which may be correlated with changes in both eruption behaviour and products. During the 2011-2012 submarine eruption of El Hierro (Canary Islands), the seismic signal, surface deformation, a broad stain on the sea surface of the eruption site, and the occasional appearance of floating lava balloons and pyroclastic fragments were the main observable signs. A strong continuous tremor in the vent accompanied the eruption and varied significantly in amplitude, frequency and dynamical parameters. We analysed these variations and correlated them with changes in the distribution of earthquakes and in the petrology of the erupting magma. This enabled us to relate variations in tremors to changes in the (i) stress conditions of the plumbing system, (ii) dimensions of the conduit and vent, (iii) intensity of the explosive episodes, and (iv) rheological changes in the erupting magma. The results obtained show how the tremor signal was strongly influenced by stress changes in the host rock and in the rheological variations in the erupting magma. We conclude that the tracking of real-time syn-eruptive tremor signals via the observation of variations in plumbing systems and magma physics is a potentially effective tool for interpreting eruption dynamics, and suggest that similar variations observed in pre-eruptive tremors will have a similar origin.

  7. Trace elements deposition in the Tierra del Fuego region (south Patagonia) by using lichen transplants after the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle (north Patagonia) volcanic eruption in 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Marcelo Enrique; Jasan, Raquel; Finoia, Maria Grazia; Iavicoli, Ivo; Plá, Rita

    2016-04-01

    Lichen Usnea barbata transplants were tested as a biomonitor of atmospheric deposition in an apparently pristine environment that is Tierra del Fuego region (Patagonia, Argentina). The present survey is connected with the volcanic eruption that started in north Patagonia on June 4, 2011 from the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcano, Chile (north Patagonia, at 1700 km of distance of our sampling sites). Lichens were collected in September 2011 (one month of exposure) and September 2012 (1 year of exposure) in 27 sites covering the northern region of the province where trees are not present. The atmospheric deposition of 27 elements by using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) was determined in the collected samples. The first aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of the volcanic eruption on the regional atmospheric deposition comparing our results with baseline data we determined in U. barbata in 2006 in the same sites. The second aim was to test possible patterns of bioaccumulation between the two sampling campaigns after the volcanic eruption. With respect to 2006 baseline levels, we found significant higher levels for As, Ba, Co, Cr, Cs, Na, Sb and U in lichens collected after 1 month of exposure (first sampling campaign--2011). Between the two sampling campaigns (2011-2012) after the eruption, lichens reflected the natural contamination by volcanic ashes with significantly higher median levels of Br, Cr, Fe, K, Na, Sc, and Se. Results confirmed the very good aptitude of U. barbata to reflect the levels of elements in the environment at global scale and to reflect the volcanic emissions at distant places. Volcanic eruptions cause the emission in the atmosphere of elevated levels of particulate matter. In this regard, our findings demonstrate the importance to evaluate the metal composition of the particles to avoid possible health effects.

  8. FIERCE: FInding volcanic ERuptive CEnters by a grid-searching algorithm in R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniel, Roberto; Guzmán, Silvina; Neri, Marco

    2017-02-01

    Most eruptions are fed by dikes whose spatial distribution can provide important insights into the positions of possible old eruptive centers that are no longer clearly identifiable in the field. Locating these centers can in turn have further applications, e.g., in hazard assessment. We propose a purely geometrical algorithm—implemented as an R open-source script—named FIERCE (FInding volcanic ERuptive CEnters) based on the number of intersections of dikes identified within a grid of rectangular cells overlain onto a given search region. The algorithm recognizes radial distributions, tangential distributions, or combinations of both. We applied FIERCE to both well-known and less-studied volcanic edifices, in different tectonic settings and having different evolution histories, ages, and compositions. At Summer Coon volcano, FIERCE demonstrated that a radial dike distribution clearly indicates the position of the central vent. On Etna, it confirmed the position of the most important ancient eruptive centers and allowed us to study effects of the structural alignments and topography. On Stromboli, FIERCE not only enabled confirmation of some published locations of older vents but also identified possible vent areas not previously suggested. It also highlighted the influence of the regional structural trend and the collapse scars. FIERCE demonstrated that the dikes at the Somma-Vesuvius were emplaced before formation of Mt. Somma's caldera and indicated a plausible location for the old volcanic crater of Mt. Somma which is compatible with previous studies. At the Vicuña Pampa Volcanic Complex, FIERCE highlights the position of two different vents of a highly degraded volcano.

  9. Ecology of deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Richard A.; Kennish, Michael J.

    1993-08-01

    Studies of the many active and inactive hydrothermal vents found during the past 15 years have radically altered views of biological and geological processes in the deep sea. The biological communities occupying the vast and relatively stable soft bottom habitats of the deep sea are characterized by low population densities, high species diversity, and low biomass. In contrast, those inhabiting the generally unstable conditions of hydrothermal vent environments exhibit high densities and biomass, low species diversity, rapid growth rates, and high metabolic rates. Biological processes, such as rates of metabolism and growth, in vent organisms are comparable to those observed in organisms from shallow-water ecosystems. An abundant energy source is provided by chemosynthetic bacteria that constitute the primary producers sustaining the lush communities at the hydrothermal sites. Fluxes in vent flow and fluid chemistry cause changes in growth rates, reproduction, mortality, and/or colonization of vent fauna, leading to temporal and spatial variation of the vent communities. Vent populations that cannot adapt to modified flow rates are adversely affected, as is evidenced by high mortality or lower rates of colonization, growth, or reproduction. Substantial changes in biota have been witnessed at several vents, and successional cycles have been proposed for the Galapagos vent fields. Dramatic temporal and spatial variations in vent community structure may also relate to variations in larval dispersal and chance recruitment, as well as biotic interactions.

  10. Geology and geochemistry of Late Quaternary volcanism in northern Harrat Rahat, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: implications for eruption dynamics, regional stratigraphy and magma evolution

    OpenAIRE

    H. Murcia; J. M. Lindsay; K. Németh; I. E. M. Smith; S. J. Cronin; M. R. H. Moufti; N. N. El-Masry; Samuel Niedermann

    2017-01-01

    Harrat Rahat (,10 Ma) is one of the largest volcanic fields on western Arabia. In the north of the field, some of the youngest volcanic centres evolved through either point-like, complex or multiple aligned vents (i.e. along fissures), and have pyroclastic cones, lapilli fall deposits and/ or lava flows associated with them. The products reflect dominantly Hawaiian eruptions, and only one centre experienced phreatomagmatism. Results from new 3He surface-exposure dating provide ...

  11. Why does a mature volcano need new vents? The case of the New Southeast Crater at Etna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acocella, Valerio; Neri, Marco; Behncke, Boris; Bonforte, Alessandro; Del Negro, Ciro; Ganci, Gaetana

    2016-06-01

    Mature volcanoes usually erupt from a persistent summit crater. Permanent shifts in vent location are expected to occur after significant structural variations and are seldom documented. Here we provide such an example that recently occurred at Etna. Eruptive activity at Mount Etna during 2007 focused at the Southeast Crater (SEC), the youngest (formed in 1971) and most active of the four summit craters, and consisted of six paroxysmal episodes. The related erupted volumes, determined by field-based measurements and radiant heat flux curves measured by satellite, totalled 8.67 x 106 m3. The first four episodes occurred, between late-March and early-May, from the summit of the SEC and short fissures on its flanks. The last two episodes occurred, in September and November, from a new vent ("pit crater" or "proto-NSEC") at the SE base of the SEC cone; this marked the definitive demise of the old SEC and the shift to the new vent. The latter, fed by NW-SE striking dikes propagating from the SEC conduit, formed since early 2011 an independent cone (the New Southeast Crater, or "NSEC") at the base of the SEC. Detailed geodetic reconstruction and structural field observations allow defining the surface deformation pattern of Mount Etna in the last decade. These suggest that the NSEC developed under the NE-SW trending tensile stresses on the volcano summit promoted by accelerated instability of the NE flank of the volcano during inflation periods. The development of the NSEC is not only important from a structural point of view, as its formation may also lead to an increase in volcanic hazard. The case of the NSEC at Etna here reported shows how flank instability may control the distribution and impact of volcanism, including the prolonged shift of the summit vent activity in a mature volcano.

  12. Volcanic hazards to airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Mayberry, G.C.; Casadevall, T.J.; Wunderman, R.

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic activity has caused significant hazards to numerous airports worldwide, with local to far-ranging effects on travelers and commerce. Analysis of a new compilation of incidents of airports impacted by volcanic activity from 1944 through 2006 reveals that, at a minimum, 101 airports in 28 countries were affected on 171 occasions by eruptions at 46 volcanoes. Since 1980, five airports per year on average have been affected by volcanic activity, which indicates that volcanic hazards to airports are not rare on a worldwide basis. The main hazard to airports is ashfall, with accumulations of only a few millimeters sufficient to force temporary closures of some airports. A substantial portion of incidents has been caused by ash in airspace in the vicinity of airports, without accumulation of ash on the ground. On a few occasions, airports have been impacted by hazards other than ash (pyroclastic flow, lava flow, gas emission, and phreatic explosion). Several airports have been affected repeatedly by volcanic hazards. Four airports have been affected the most often and likely will continue to be among the most vulnerable owing to continued nearby volcanic activity: Fontanarossa International Airport in Catania, Italy; Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport in Alaska, USA; Mariscal Sucre International Airport in Quito, Ecuador; and Tokua Airport in Kokopo, Papua New Guinea. The USA has the most airports affected by volcanic activity (17) on the most occasions (33) and hosts the second highest number of volcanoes that have caused the disruptions (5, after Indonesia with 7). One-fifth of the affected airports are within 30 km of the source volcanoes, approximately half are located within 150 km of the source volcanoes, and about three-quarters are within 300 km; nearly one-fifth are located more than 500 km away from the source volcanoes. The volcanoes that have caused the most impacts are Soufriere Hills on the island of Montserrat in the British West Indies

  13. Probability hazard map for future vent opening at Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancato, Alfonso; Tusa, Giuseppina; Coltelli, Mauro; Proietti, Cristina

    2014-05-01

    Mount Etna is a composite stratovolcano located along the Ionian coast of eastern Sicily. The frequent flank eruptions occurrence (at an interval of years, mostly concentrated along the NE, S and W rift zones) lead to a high volcanic hazard that, linked with intense urbanization, poses a high volcanic risk. A long-term volcanic hazard assessment, mainly based on the past behaviour of the Etna volcano, is the basic tool for the evaluation of this risk. Then, a reliable forecast where the next eruption will occur is needed. A computer-assisted analysis and probabilistic evaluations will provide the relative map, thus allowing identification of the areas prone to the highest hazard. Based on these grounds, the use of a code such BET_EF (Bayesian Event Tree_Eruption Forecasting) showed that a suitable analysis can be explored (Selva et al., 2012). Following an analysis we are performing, a total of 6886 point-vents referring to the last 4.0 ka of Etna flank activity, and spread over an area of 744 km2 (divided into N=2976 squared cell, with side of 500 m), allowed us to estimate a pdf by applying a Gaussian kernel. The probability values represent a complete set of outcomes mutually exclusive and the relative sum is normalized to one over the investigated area; then, the basic assumptions of a Dirichlet distribution (the prior distribution set in the BET_EF code (Marzocchi et al., 2004, 2008)) still hold. One fundamental parameter is the the equivalent number of data, that depicts our confidence on the best guess probability. The BET_EF code also works with a likelihood function. This is modelled by a Multinomial distribution, with parameters representing the number of vents in each cell and the total number of past data (i.e. the 6886 point-vents). Given the grid of N cells, the final posterior distribution will be evaluated by multiplying the a priori Dirichlet probability distribution with the past data in each cell through the likelihood. The probability hazard map

  14. Explosive Volcanic Activity at Extreme Depths: Evidence from the Charles Darwin Volcanic Field, Cape Verdes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwasnitschka, T.; Devey, C. W.; Hansteen, T. H.; Freundt, A.; Kutterolf, S.

    2013-12-01

    diameters of up to 20 cm, probably abraded by fluidization within the vent, that were laterally transported for hundreds of meters through water. In spite of the great depth, both edifices feature dense but highly fragmented volcanic deposits with an unexpected combination of large clast sizes and wide clast dispersal. This suggests an energetic eruptive environment, which may have similarities with that seen in pyroclastic eruptions on land.

  15. Active Volcanism on Io as Seen by Galileo SSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, A.S.; Keszthelyi, L.; Geissler, P.; Simonelli, D.P.; Carr, M.H.; Johnson, T.V.; Klaasen, K.P.; Breneman, H.H.; Jones, T.J.; Kaufman, J.M.; Magee, K.P.; Senske, D.A.; Belton, M.J.S.; Schubert, G.

    1998-01-01

    Active volcanism on Io has been monitored during the nominal Galileo satellite tour from mid 1996 through late 1997. The Solid State Imaging (SSI) experiment was able to observe many manifestations of this active volcanism, including (1) changes in the color and albedo of the surface, (2) active airborne plumes, and (3) glowing vents seen in eclipse. About 30 large-scale (tens of kilometers) surface changes are obvious from comparison of the SSI images to those acquired by Voyager in 1979. These include new pyroclastic deposits of several colors, bright and dark flows, and caldera-floor materials. There have also been significant surface changes on Io during the Galileo mission itself, such as a new 400-km-diameter dark pyroclastic deposit around Pillan Patera. While these surface changes are impressive, the number of large-scale changes observed in the four months between the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 flybys in 1979 suggested that over 17 years the cumulative changes would have been much more impressive. There are two reasons why this was not actually the case. First, it appears that the most widespread plume deposits are ephemeral and seem to disappear within a few years. Second, it appears that a large fraction of the volcanic activity is confined to repeated resurfacing of dark calderas and flow fields that cover only a few percent of Io's surface. The plume monitoring has revealed 10 active plumes, comparable to the 9 plumes observed by Voyager. One of these plumes was visible only in the first orbit and three became active in the later orbits. Only the Prometheus plume has been consistently active and easy to detect. Observations of the Pele plume have been particularly intriguing since it was detected only once by SSI, despite repeated attempts, but has been detected several times by the Hubble Space Telescope at 255 nm. Pele's plume is much taller (460 km) than during Voyager 1 (300 km) and much fainter at visible wavelengths. Prometheus-type plumes (50

  16. Evidence for volcanism in NW Ishtar Terra, Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddis, L.; Greeley, Ronald

    Venera 15/16 radar data for an area in NW Ishtar Terra, Venus, show an area with moderate radar return and a smooth textured surface which embays low lying areas of the surrounding mountainous terrain. Although this unit may be an extension of the lava plains of Lakshmi Planum to the southeast, detailed study suggests a separate volcanic center in NW Ishtar Terra. Lakshmi Planum, on the Ishtar Terra highland, exhibits major volcanic and tectonic features. On the Venera radar image radar brightness is influenced by slope and roughness; radar-facing slopes (east-facing) and rough surfaces (approx. 8 cm average relief) are bright, while west-facing slopes and smooth surfaces are dark. A series of semi-circular features, apparently topographic depressions, do not conform in orientation to major structural trends in this region of NW Ishtar Terra. The large depression in NW Ishtar Terra is similar to the calderas of Colette and Sacajawea Paterae, as all three structures are large irregular depressions. NW Ishtar Terra appears to be the site of a volcanic center with a complex caldera structure, possibly more than one eruptive vent, and associated lobed flows at lower elevations. The morphologic similarity between this volcanic center and those of Colette and Sacajawea suggests that centralized eruptions have been the dominant form of volcanism in Ishtar. The location of this volcanic center at the intersection of two major compressional mountain belts and the large size of the calders (with an inferred large/deep magma source) support a crustal thickening/melting rather than a hot-spot origin for these magmas.

  17. The Extremes of Volcanic Activity: Earth and Jupiter's Moon Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, L. L.; Lopes, R.

    2004-12-01

    Jupiter's moon Io is the solar system's most volcanically active body, and the only place that magmatic volcanic eruptions have been observed beyond Earth. One of the first images of Io obtained by NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft in 1979 shows a plume above one of its volcanoes. The NASA Voyager and Galileo spacecraft imaged many explosive eruptions of plumes and deposits - which travel hundreds of kilometers (farther than on the Earth or the Moon). Very hot lavas that are erupting from volcanic vents on Io may be similar to lavas that erupted on Earth billions of years ago. Understanding the physical processes driving volcanic eruptions is important for the understanding of terrestrial volcanoes, not only because of their potential hazards, but also as geologic resources, biologic environments, and for their role in shaping the surface of Earth and other planets. Volcanic eruptions are perhaps the most dramatic events on Earth, and are of intrinsic interest to students, youth, and adults. Topics involving volcanoes are a part of the national science education benchmarks for understanding the Earth's composition and structure for grades 6-8 (the process of creating landforms) and grades 9-12 (the effects of movement of crustal plates). Natural events on Earth coupled with exciting discoveries in space can serve to heighten the awareness of these phenomena and provide learning opportunities for real world applications of science. Educational applications for youth to compare volcanic activity on Io and Earth have been done through NASA-sponsored field trip workshops to places such as Yellowstone National Park (allowing educators to experience environments similar to those on other worlds), targeted classroom and hands-on activities, special interest books, and other resources. A sampling of such activities will be presented, and discussion invited on other related developmentally appropriate resources and activities.

  18. Basement faults and volcanic rock distributions in the Ordos Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Volcanic rocks in the Ordos Basin are of mainly two types: one in the basin and the other along the margin of the basin. Besides those along the margin, the marginal volcanic rocks also include the volcanic rocks in the Yinshanian orogenic belt north of the basin. Based on the latest collection of gravitational and aeromagnetic data, here we interpret basement faults in the Ordos Basin and its peripheral region, compare the faults derived from aeromagnetic data with those from seismic data, and identify the geological ages of the fault development. Two aeromagnetic anomaly zones exist in the NE-trending faults of the southern basin, and they are in the volcanic basement formed in pre-Paleozoic. These NE-trending faults are the channel of volcanic material upwelling in the early age (Archean-Neoproterozoic), where igneous rocks and sedimentary rocks stack successively on both sides of the continental nucleus. In the Cambrian, the basin interior is relatively stable, but in the Late Paleozoic and Mesozoic, the basin margin underwent a number of volcanic activities, accompanied by the formation of nearly north-south and east-west basement faults in the basin periphery and resulting in accumulation of great amount of volcanic materials. Volcanic tuff from the basin periphery is discovered in the central basin and volcanic materials are exposed in the margins of the basin. According to the source-reservoir-cap rock configuration, the basin peripheral igneous traps formed in the Indosinian-Early Yanshanian and Late Hercynian are favorable exploration objectives, and the volcanic rocks in the central basin are the future target of exploration.

  19. Segmentation of the Cascade Arc Based on Compositional and Sr and Nd Isotopic Variations in Primitive Volcanic Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M. E.; Grunder, A. L.

    2006-12-01

    defined by Guffanti and Weaver (1988) based on volcanic vent distributions. The tectonic framework of the Cascade Arc is reflected in the composition of erupted primitive magmas that in turn are evidence for variable mantle source domains and melting regimes beneath the arc. Where subduction is orthogonal, calcalkaline magmas dominate (North segment), but where subduction is oblique and the arc is extensional and LKTs dominate (Central segment). Enriched primitive compositions found in the Columbia segment may be due to accreted Columbia Embayment lithospheric mantle. The large degree of variability found at the South segment seems to be related to high water contents in primitive magmas that may be related to deformation of the Gorda Plate, subduction of the Mendocino Fracture Zone and(or) enhanced melting associated with the edge of the plate.

  20. Precambrian Lunar Volcanic Protolife

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Green

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Five representative terrestrial analogs of lunar craters are detailed relevant to Precambrian fumarolic activity. Fumarolic fluids contain the ingredients for protolife. Energy sources to derive formaldehyde, amino acids and related compounds could be by flow charging, charge separation and volcanic shock. With no photodecomposition in shadow, most fumarolic fluids at 40 K would persist over geologically long time periods. Relatively abundant tungsten would permit creation of critical enzymes, Fischer-Tropsch reactions could form polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and soluble volcanic polyphosphates would enable assembly of nucleic acids. Fumarolic stimuli factors are described. Orbital and lander sensors specific to protolife exploration including combined Raman/laser-induced breakdown spectrocsopy are evaluated.

  1. Geomorphological evidence of the influence of pre-volcanic basement structure on emplacement and deformation of volcanic edifices at the Cofre de Perote Pico de Orizaba chain and implications for avalanche generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha-Dimas, Aline; Cerca, Mariano; Rodríguez, Sergio R.; Watters, Robert J.

    2005-12-01

    Pre-volcanic structure of the basement influences volcanism distribution and avalanche generation in volcanic edifices. Therefore, systematic studies of basement structure below volcanic chains are necessary to understand the deformation effects observed in the surface and vice versa. Based on a compilation of pre-existing data, interpretation of aerial photographs and satellite images, and a collection of structural data we analyzed morphological and structural features of the Cofre de Perote-Pico de Orizaba (CP-PO) volcanic chain and its basement. We have identified three sets of regional lineaments that are related to basement trends. (1) NW 55° SE fractures are parallel to anticline folds observed in Cretaceous rocks that originated during Laramide shortening. These folds present an abrupt morphology observed only in the eastern flank but that is likely to continue below the volcanic chain. (2) NE 55° SW fractures are parallel to normal faults at the basement. We infer that these basement faults confine the CP-PO chain within a stepped graben with a total normal displacement of about 400 m. These faults have been active through time since they have affected volcanic deposits and induced the emplacement of monogenetic vents. Notably, lineaments of monogenetic vents concentrate where the basement is relatively shallow. (3) Another set of faults, oriented N-S, has been observed affecting the scarce basement outcrops at the western flank of the chain covered by lacustrine deposits. Lineaments measured in the volcanic edifice of Pico de Orizaba correlate with the regional trends. In particular, the NE 55° SW alignment of monogenetic vents and fractures at Pico de Orizaba suggest that the same dike trend exists within the volcanic edifice. A normal fault with similar orientation was documented at the NE continuation of an alignment crossing the volcanic edifice along the Jamapa canyon. In the absence of magmatic activity related to collapses, the displacement of

  2. Geologic Map of Lassen Volcanic National Park and Vicinity, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynne, Michael A.; Muffler, L.J. Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The geologic map of Lassen Volcanic National Park (LVNP) and vicinity encompasses 1,905 km2 at the south end of the Cascade Range in Shasta, Lassen, Tehama, and Plumas Counties, northeastern California (fig. 1, sheet 3). The park includes 430 km2 of scenic volcanic features, glacially sculpted terrain, and the most spectacular array of thermal features in the Cascade Range. Interest in preserving the scenic wonders of the Lassen area as a national park arose in the early 1900s to protect it from commercial development and led to the establishment in 1907 of two small national monuments centered on Lassen Peak and Cinder Cone. The eruptions of Lassen Peak in 1914-15 were the first in the Cascade Range since widespread settling of the West in the late 1800s. Through the printed media, the eruptions aroused considerable public interest and inspired renewed efforts, which had languished since 1907, to establish a national park. In 1916, Lassen Volcanic National Park was established by combining the areas of the previously established national monuments and adjacent lands. The southernmost Cascade Range is bounded on the west by the Sacramento Valley and the Klamath Mountains, on the south by the Sierra Nevada, and on the east by the Basin and Range geologic provinces. Most of the map area is underlain by middle to late Pleistocene volcanic rocks; Holocene, early Pleistocene, and late Pliocene volcanic rocks (radiometric dating, photographs of geologic features, and links to related data or web sites. Data contained in the CD-ROM are also available on this Web site. The southernmost Cascade Range consists of a regional platform of basalt and basaltic andesite, with subordinate andesite and sparse dacite. Nested within these regional rocks are 'volcanic centers', defined as large, long-lived, composite, calc-alkaline edifices erupting the full range of compositions from basalt to rhyolite, but dominated by andesite and dacite. Volcanic centers are produced by the

  3. 松辽盆地南部长岭断陷火山岩岩性岩相特征及其对储层的控制作用%Lithologic and Lithofacies Characteristics of Volcanic Rock and Their Controlling Effects on Reservoirs of Changling Fault Depression in the South of Songliao Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜雪; 邹华耀; 饶勇; 杨元元

    2009-01-01

    长岭断陷是松辽盆地南部最大的断陷,其深层勘探程度低、油气资源丰富、火山岩分布面积大,是很好的油气储集空间.为了明确长岭断陷层火山岩的分布规律以预测有利的储层,本文通过对火山岩的岩心观察、薄片鉴定、测井资料、二维、三维地震资料的综合分析,提出长岭断陷层火山岩主要发育于火石岭组和营城组,以火山熔岩和火山碎屑岩为主;发育出爆发相、溢流相、火山通道相、侵出相和火山沉积相5种火山岩岩相及11种亚相,其中以爆发相和溢流相为主;长岭断陷深层火山岩主要沿深大断裂呈带状分布.裂隙式和中心式喷发兼有,在垂向上表现为多期次喷发序列的叠置:营城组发育三个火山喷发旋回.统计显示溢流相上部和下部亚相的流纹岩和爆发相热碎屑流亚相的凝灰岩的气孔、溶孔和裂缝发育,储集物性最好.%The Changling fault depression is the largest fault depression in the south of Songliao Basin. The deep formation in the depression with a low exploration degree contains abundant hydrocarbon resources, where volcanic rocks are distributedextensively, as a good reservoir of oil and gasses. According to core observation, thin section identification and integration of well log and 2D/3D seismic data, the Yingcheng formation and Huoshiling formation are rich in volcanic rocks, mainly consisting of lava and pyroclastic rocks. 5 types of volcanic lithofacies and 11 types of volcanic subfacies such as explosive facies, overflow facies, volcanic conduit facies, extrusive facies and eruptive-sedimentary facies can be identified, which are mainly overflow facies and explosive facies. The volcanic rocks in the depression are distributed along big deep faults and superimposed by many times of volcanic eruption in the vertical direction in models of eruption of both central type and fissure type. And three volcanic eruption cycles can be identified in

  4. Bathymodiolus growth dynamics in relation to environmental fluctuations in vent habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedoncelle, K.; Lartaud, F.; Contreira Pereira, L.; Yücel, M.; Thurnherr, A. M.; Mullineaux, L.; Le Bris, N.

    2015-12-01

    The deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus thermophilus is a dominant species in the East Pacific Rise (EPR) hydrothermal vent fields. On the EPR volcanically unstable area, this late colonizer reaches high biomass within 4-5 years on new habitats created by lava flows. The environmental conditions and growth rates characterizing the reestablishment of B. thermophilus populations are however largely unknown, leaving unconstrained the role of this foundation species in the ecosystem dynamics. A typical example from the vent field at 9°50'N that was affected by the last massive eruption was the Bio-9 hydrothermal vent site. Here, six years later, a large mussel population had reestablished. The von Bertalanffy growth model estimates the oldest B. thermophilus specimens to be 1.3 year-old in March 2012, consistent with the observation of scarce juveniles among tubeworms in 2010. Younger cohorts were also observed in 2012 but the low number of individuals, relatively to older cohorts, suggests limited survival or growth of new recruits at this site, that could reflect unsuitable habitat conditions. To further explore this asumption, we investigated the relationships between mussel growth dynamics and habitat properties. The approach combined sclerochronology analyses of daily shell growth with continuous habitat monitoring for two mussel assemblages; one from the Bio-9 new settlement and a second from the V-vent site unreached by the lava flow. At both vent sites, semi-diurnal fluctuations of abiotic conditions were recorded using sensors deployed in the mussel bed over 5 to 10 days. These data depict steep transitions from well oxygenated to oxygen-depleted conditions and from alkaline to acidic pH, combined with intermittent sulfide exposure. These semi-diurnal fluctuations exhibited marked changes in amplitude over time, exposing mussels to distinct regimes of abiotic constraints. The V-vent samples allowed growth patterns to be examined at the scale of individual life and

  5. Lung problems and volcanic smog

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... releases gases into the atmosphere. Volcanic smog can irritate the lungs and make existing lung problems worse. ... deep into the lungs. Breathing in volcanic smog irritates the lungs and mucus membranes. It can affect ...

  6. Volcanism and Oil & Gas In Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Xuanlong

    2000-01-01

    Based on study on the relation with volcanic rock and oil & gas in Songliao Basin and Liaohe Basin in northeast China, author proposes that material from deep by volcanism enrichs the resources in basins, that heat by volcanism promotes organic matter transforming to oil and gas, that volcanic reservoir is fracture, vesicular, solution pore, intercrystal pore.Lava facies and pyroclastic facies are favourable reservoir. Mesozoic volcanic reservoir is majority of intermediate, acid rock,but Cenozoic volcanic reservoir is majority of basalt. Types of oil and gas pool relating to volcanic rock include volcanic fracture pool, volcanic unconformity pool, volcanic rock - screened pool, volcanic darpe structural pool.

  7. El destí en el vent

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    El projecte de final de grau consisteix en la realització d'un producte audiovisual d'entreteniment. S'ha produït un curtmetratge creatiu utilitzant la tècnica d'animació stop motion. El vídeo narra, a través de dos fulls de paper, un relat inventat que parla de l'amor impossible, "El destí en el vent". El proyecto de fin de grado consiste en la realización de un producto audiovisual de entretenimiento. Se ha producido un cortometraje creativo utilizando la técnica de animación stop mot...

  8. Is vent location an important factor in the assessment of pyroclastic flow hazard from sub-Plinian events at Vesuvius?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marianelli, P.; Esposti Ongaro, T.; Neri, A.; Cavazzoni, C.; Erbacci, G.

    2009-04-01

    Reconstructions of vent location of past sub-Plinian (and Plinian) eruptions of Vesuvius show a significant spatial variability of the vent inside the caldera area. Moreover, it is likely that the exact location of the vent of a future explosive event of that type at Vesuvius will be unknown until the onset of the event itself. Nevertheless, to our knowledge, no studies exist that analyse the influence of vent location on the simulated eruptive scenarios. This omission could be particularly critical for the assessment of pyroclastic flow (or pyroclastic density current, PDC) hazard due to the specific morphology of the Somma-Vesuvius complex. In this work, we present new numerical simulations of column collapse and pyroclastic density current scenarios at Vesuvius by using the transient 3D multiphase flow code PDAC (Esposti Ongaro et al., Parallel Computing, 33, 2007). Simulations have been carried out by assuming three different locations of the vent within the caldera area: the first is in Valle del Gigante, between Mt. Somma ridge and the present Gran Cono, the second is in Piano delle Ginestre, to the west of the Gran Cono, while the third one is in Valle dell'Inferno, in the south-eastern direction with respect to the Gran Cono. Source conditions for all cases refer to a sub-Plinian event and to both partial and nearly-total collapse of the eruptive column. Simulation results clearly show the first-order effect of vent location on the propagation directions of PDCs and the areal distribution of pyroclasts, owing to the complex interaction of the flow with the proximal volcano morphology. Comparisons with simulations assuming a central vent located in the position of Gran Cono clearly show the different roles of Mt. Somma, Gran Cono, along with mean slope and channelling effects as a function of the assumed vent location. Estimates of the areas invaded by the flows are presented, although the definition of their runout is particularly difficult due to the

  9. The Temporal and Spatial Association of Faulting and Volcanism in the Cerros del Rio Volcanic Field - Rio Grande Rift, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R. A.; Hudson, M. R.; Minor, S. A.; McIntosh, W. C.; Miggins, D. P.; Grauch, V.

    2008-12-01

    The Plio-Pleistocene Cerros del Rio volcanic field (CdRVF) in northern New Mexico is one of the largest ( greater than 700 square kilometers) predominantly basaltic and andesitic volcanic centers of the Rio Grande rift; it records the late-stage, volcano-tectonic evolution of the SW part of the Espanola Basin. The CdRVF reflects both regional proclivity toward Pliocene basaltic volcanism following protracted Neogene extensional tectonism and localized eruptive response to migration of basin- bounding faults. Approximately 180 cubic kilometers of flat lying to gently dipping basalt, andesite, and minor dacite lava flows and pyroclastic deposits of the CdRVF were erupted from more than 50 exposed vents between 2.8 Ma and 1.14 Ma. Subsurface interpretations of drill hole data and incised canyon exposures of the Rio Grande show that volcanic deposits are interbedded with Santa Fe Group sediments deposited in actively subsiding sub-basins of the southernmost Espanola Basin. Major basin-bounding faults in this area strike north to northwest, dip basinward, and have mostly dip-slip and subordinate strike-slip displacement. Although major basin-bounding faults were active prior to the onset of volcanism in the CdRVF, protracted extension resulted in a westward migration of graben-bounding faults. Phases of coeval volcanism at 2.8-2.6 Ma, 2.5-2.2 Ma, and 1.5-1.1 Ma, decreased in eruptive volume through time and are delineated on the basis of mapped stratigraphy, argon geochronology, paleomagnetic and aeromagnetic properties, and record a syntectonic westward migration of eruptive centers. The alignment of vent areas with mapped faults strongly suggests deep magmatic sources utilized local structures as conduits (i.e. faults and fractures developed in response to regional stress). However, some near-surface feeder dikes associated with eroded cinder cones record orientations that are not typically correlative with regional fault patterns suggesting near-surface conduits are

  10. Culture-Independent Identification of Manganese-Oxidizing Genes from Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Chemoautotrophic Ferromanganese Microbial Communities Using a Metagenomic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R.; Tebo, B. M.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial activity has long been recognized as being important to the fate of manganese (Mn) in hydrothermal systems, yet we know very little about the organisms that catalyze Mn oxidation, the mechanisms by which Mn is oxidized or the physiological function that Mn oxidation serves in these hydrothermal systems. Hydrothermal vents with thick ferromanganese microbial mats and Mn oxide-coated rocks observed throughout the Pacific Ring of Fire are ideal models to study the mechanisms of microbial Mn oxidation, as well as primary productivity in these metal-cycling ecosystems. We sampled ferromanganese microbial mats from Vai Lili Vent Field (Tmax=43°C) located on the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Mn oxide-encrusted rhyolytic pumice (4°C) from Niua South Seamount on the Tonga Volcanic Arc. Metagenomic libraries were constructed and assembled from these samples and key genes known to be involved in Mn oxidation and carbon fixation pathways were identified in the reconstructed genomes. The Vai Lili metagenome assembled to form 121,157 contiguous sequences (contigs) greater than 1000bp in length, with an N50 of 8,261bp and a total metagenome size of 593 Mbp. Contigs were binned using an emergent self-organizing map of tetranucleotide frequencies. Putative homologs of the multicopper Mn-oxidase MnxG were found in the metagenome that were related to both the Pseudomonas-like and Bacillus-like forms of the enzyme. The bins containing the Pseudomonas-like mnxG genes are most closely related to uncultured Deltaproteobacteria and Chloroflexi. The Deltaproteobacteria bin appears to be an obligate anaerobe with possible chemoautotrophic metabolisms, while the Chloroflexi appears to be a heterotrophic organism. The metagenome from the Mn-stained pumice was assembled into 122,092 contigs greater than 1000bp in length with an N50 of 7635 and a metagenome size of 385 Mbp. Both forms of mnxG genes are present in this metagenome as well as the genes encoding the putative Mn

  11. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard...

  12. Pre-eruption deformation and seismic anomalies in 2012 in Tolbachik volcanic zone, Kamchatka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugaenko, Yulia; Saltykov, Vadim; Titkov, Nikolay

    2014-05-01

    Tolbachik volcanic zone (active volcano Plosky Tolbachik, dormant volcano Ostry Tolbachik and Tolbachik zone of cinder cones) is situated in the south part of Klyuchevskaya group of volcanoes in Kamchatka. All historical fissure eruptions of Tolbachik volcanic zone (1740, 1941, 1975-76 and 2012-13) were connected with one or another activity of Plosky Tolbachik volcano. In 1941 the fissure vent was occurred during the completion of 1939-41 terminal eruption of Plosky Tolbachik. In 1975 the Large Tolbachik Fissure Eruption (LTFE) was forestalled by Plosky Tolbachik terminal activity of the Hawaiian type and then was accompanied by the catastrophic collapse in the crater of Plosky Tolbachik. What events took place in the vicinity of Plosky Tolbachik in 2012 before the 2012-13 fissure eruption? In contrast of the 1975-76 LTFE the eruption 2012-13 was not preceded by intensive seismic preparation. Nowadays Klyuchevskaya group of volcanoes is under monitoring by 12 seismic stations, so we can investigate seismicity in details on the lower energy level then forty years ago. We analyzed seismicity of Plosky Tolbachik using regional catalogue 1999-2012. Anomalies of low-energy (M≥1.5) seismicity parameters (increase of seismicity rate and seismic energy) were discovered. This is evidence of seismic activization covered the whole Plosky Tolbachik volcano. The significance of this anomaly was estimated by distribution function of emitted seismic energy. Statistically significant transition of seismicity from background level to high and extremely high levels was revealed. It corresponds to multiple growth of earthquake number and seismic energy in 2012, July-November (five months before the eruption). The seismicity transition from background level to high level was happen in August 2012. During last three weeks before fissure eruption seismicity of analyzed seismoactive volume was on extremely high level. Earthquakes from fissure site directly appeared only on November 27

  13. PYROCLASTIC FLOW MODELING TO RECONSTRUCT A VOLCANIC EDIFICE IN PAIPA (BOYACÁ-COLOMBIA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez Óscar

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Pyroclastic deposits produced by the domes collapse (resurgence of a caldera collapse, at the west of the Honda Grande creek (Paipa, Boyacá-Colombia were related by INGEOMINAS. These deposits fill the valleys of Olitas, Calderitas and a creek at the south of the Alto de los Volcanes reaching distances near to 3 km from the focus between the Alto de los Volcanes and El Mirador Hill.The flows were modeled using 3D Software (Sheridan and Kover, 1996. A volcanic simulation was done obtaining the height and morphology of the volcanic edifice before the collapse during the last eruptive event.

  14. Major transitions in evolution linked to thermal gradients above hydrothermal vents

    CERN Document Server

    Muller, Anthonie W J

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of the main divisions of today's life: (1) unicellular prokaryotes, (2) unicellular eukaryotes, (3) multicellular eukaryotes, and (4) metazoans, are examples of the--still unexplained--major transitions in evolution. Regarding the origin of life, I have proposed that primordial life functioned as heat engine (thermosynthesis) while thermally cycled in convecting volcanic hot springs. Here I argue for a role of thermal gradients above submarine hydrothermal vents (SHV) in several major transitions. The last decade has witnessed the emergence of phononics, a novel discipline in physics based on controlled heat transport in thermal gradients. It builds thermal analogs to electronic devices: the thermal diode, the thermal transistor, the thermal switch, the thermal amplifier, the thermal memory--the thermal computer has been proposed. Encouraged by (1) the many similarities between microtubules (MT) and carbon nanotubes, which have a very high thermal conductivity, and (2) the recent discovery of a ...

  15. Biogeography of Persephonella in deep-sea hydrothermal vents of the Western Pacific.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayaka eMino

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields are areas on the seafloor with high biological productivity fueled by microbial chemosynthesis. Members of the Aquificales genus Persephonella are obligately chemosynthetic bacteria, and appear to be key players in carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen cycles in high temperature habitats at deep-sea vents. Although this group of bacteria has cosmopolitan distribution in deep-sea hydrothermal ecosystem around the world, little is known about their population structure such as intraspecific genomic diversity, distribution pattern, and phenotypic diversity. We developed the multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA scheme for their genomic characterization. Sequence variation was determined in five housekeeping genes and one functional gene of 36 P. hydrogeniphila strains originated from the Okinawa Trough and the South Mariana Trough. Although the strains share > 98.7% similarities in 16S rRNA gene sequences, MLSA revealed 35 different sequence types, indicating their extensive genomic diversity. A phylogenetic tree inferred from all concatenated gene sequences revealed the clustering of isolates according to the geographic origin. In addition, the phenotypic clustering pattern inferred from whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS analysis can be correlated to their MLSA clustering pattern. This study represents the first MLSA combined with phenotypic analysis indicative of allopatric speciation of deep-sea hydrothermal vent bacteria.

  16. MAVEN Contamination Venting and Outgassing Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petro, Elaine M.; Hughes, David W.; Secunda, Mark S.; Chen, Philip T.; Morrissey, James R.; Riegle, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) is the first mission to focus its study on the Mars upper atmosphere. MAVEN will study the evolution of the Mars atmosphere and climate, by examining the conduit through which the atmosphere has to pass as it is lost to the upper atmosphere. An analysis was performed for the MAVEN mission to address two distinct concerns. The first goal of the analysis was to perform an outgassing study to determine where species outgassed from spacecraft materials would redistribute to and how much of the released material might accumulate on sensitive surfaces. The second portion of the analysis serves to predict what effect, if any, Mars atmospheric gases trapped within the spacecraft could have on instrument measurements when re-released through vents. The re-release of atmospheric gases is of interest to this mission because vented gases from a higher pressure spacecraft interior could bias instrument measurements of the Mars atmosphere depending on the flow rates and directions.

  17. Mantle and crustal processes in the magmatism of the Campania region: inferences from mineralogy, geochemistry, and Sr-Nd-O isotopes of young hybrid volcanics of the Ischia island (South Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antonio, Massimo; Tonarini, Sonia; Arienzo, Ilenia; Civetta, Lucia; Dallai, Luigi; Moretti, Roberto; Orsi, Giovanni; Andria, Mariachiara; Trecalli, Alberto

    2013-06-01

    Ischia, one active volcano of the Phlegraean Volcanic District, prone to very high risk, is dominated by a caldera formed 55 ka BP, followed by resurgence of the collapsed area. Over the past 3 ka, the activity extruded evolved potassic magmas; only a few low-energy explosive events were fed by less evolved magmas. A geochemical and Sr-Nd-O isotope investigation has been performed on minerals and glass from products of three of such eruptions, Molara, Vateliero, and Cava Nocelle (Ischia volcanism in the past. Detailed study on the most mafic magma has permitted to investigate its origin. The mantle sector below Ischia underwent subduction processes that modified its pristine chemical, isotopic, and redox conditions by addition of ≤1 % of sediment fluids/melts. Similar processes occurred from Southeast to Northwest along the Apennine compressive margin, with addition of up to 2.5 % of sediment-derived material. This is shown by volcanics with poorly variable, typical δ18O mantle values, and 87Sr/86Sr progressively increasing toward typical continental crust values. Multiple partial melting of this modified mantle generated distinct primary magmas that occasionally assimilated continental crust, acquiring more 18O than 87Sr. At Ischia, 7 % of Hercynian granodiorite assimilation produced isotopically distinct, K-basaltic to latitic magmas. A SW-NE regional tectonic structure gave these magmas coming from large depth the opportunity to mingle/mix with felsic magmas stagnating in shallower reservoirs, eventually triggering explosive eruptions.

  18. Environmental controls on chemoautotrophic primary producers at deep-sea vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bris, Nadine; Mullineaux, Lauren; Sievert, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    High biomasses and fast growth rates of dominant chemosynthetic species characterize hydrothermal ecosystems, raising the issue of their contribution to energy transfer and carbon cycling in the deep-sea. Addressing this issue, however, needs to account for the temporal instability of hydrothermal systems, both, in terms of biological colonization and habitat conditions. Volcanic eruptions on mid-ocean ridges offer the opportunity to investigate the environmental conditions favoring the successive modes of chemoautotrophic primary production (i.e. free living microbes and symbiotic invertebrates). In that perspective, habitat-scale approaches distinguish from vent field-scale approaches based on fluid composition and provide relevant information on environmental constraints exerted at different stages of colonization focusing on parameters linked with physiological limits and available energy. Investigation of habitat physicochemical properties along a typical successional sequence of recolonization at 9°50'N EPR diffuse-flow vents, between 2006 and 2014, was performed in order to examine potential changes in environmental features associated with chemoautotrophic primary producers, from early microbial colonizers to symbiotic invertebrates. Combined in situ measurements of temperature, pH and hydrogen sulfide were used and their variability documented over a series of assemblages characterizing recolonization stages. The distributions of mature assemblages of dominant invertebrate species associate with substantial differences in habitat conditions, pointing to a strong influence of habitat properties on potential productivity. Among the differences observed, however, the amplitude and rate of environmental fluctuation appear more important than average conditions in the succession, highlighting the role of spatial heterogeneity and temporal dynamics as a control on primary producers. Invertebrate species acting as engineer species are expected to play a primary

  19. Detecting Volcanic Ash Plumes with GNSS Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainville, N.; Larson, K. M.; Palo, S. E.; Mattia, M.; Rossi, M.; Coltelli, M.; Roesler, C.; Fee, D.

    2016-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers are commonly placed near volcanic sites to measure ground deformation. In addition to the carrier phase data used to measure ground position, these receivers also record Signal to Noise ratio (SNR) data. Larson (2013) showed that attenuations in SNR data strongly correlate with ash emissions at a series of eruptions of Redoubt Volcano. This finding has been confirmed at eruptions for Tongariro, Mt Etna, Mt Shindake, and Sakurajima. In each of these detections, very expensive geodetic quality GNSS receivers were used. If low-cost GNSS instruments could be used instead, a networked array could be deployed and optimized for plume detection and tomography. The outputs of this sensor array could then be used by both local volcanic observatories and Volcano Ash Advisory Centers. Here we will describe progress in developing such an array. The sensors we are working with are intended for navigation use, and thus lack the supporting power and communications equipment necessary for a networked system. Reliably providing those features is major challenge for the overall sensor design. We have built prototypes of our Volcano Ash Plume Receiver (VAPR), with solar panels, lithium-ion batteries and onboard data storage for preliminary testing. We will present results of our field tests of both receivers and antennas. A second critical need for our array is a reliable detection algorithm. We have tested our algorithm on data from recent eruptions and have incorporated the noise characteristics of the low-cost GNSS receiver. We have also developed a simulation capability so that the receivers can be deployed to optimize vent crossing GNSS signals.

  20. Spatio-temporal evolution of the Tuxtla Volcanic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobs Nawotniak, S. E.; Espindola, J.; Godinez, L.

    2010-12-01

    Mapping of the Tuxtla Volcanic Field (TVF), located in Veracruz, Mexico, through the use of digital elevation models, aerial photography, and field confirmation has found 353 distinct cones, 4 large composite volcanoes, and 42 maars. Eruptive activity in the TVF began in the late Miocene, underwent a quiescent period approximately 2.6-0.8 Ma, and continues into historic times with the most recent eruption occurring at San Martín Tuxtla volcano in 1793. The covariance of the minimum cone separation in the TVF indicates that, despite the influence of clear vent alignments following regional faulting trends, the field as a whole is anticlustered. Dividing the cones by morphometric age shows that while the older cones have an anti-clustered distribution, the younger cones (Catemaco. These areas of concentrated volcanism roughly correspond to the locations of two gravity anomalies previously identified in the area. While the average height/width ratio is equal between the two clusters, the cones in the eastern group are significantly smaller than their counterparts in the western group. The maars of the TVF are mostly located within the younger volcanic series, west of Laguna Catemaco, and have an anticlustered distribution; many of the maars are evenly spaced along curved lines, where they are weakly grouped according to crater diameter. Results indicate volcanism TVF has undergone continued spatial restriction over time, concentrating in the western half of the TVF with the onset of the eruption of the younger volcanic series 0.8 Ma and further contracting along the principle fault system within the last 50 Ka.

  1. SO2 flux and the thermal power of volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Richard W.; Hughes, Graham O.

    2016-09-01

    A description of the dynamics, chemistry and energetics governing a volcanic system can be greatly simplified if the expansion of magmatic gas can be assumed to be adiabatic as it rises towards the surface. The conditions under which this assumption is valid are clarified by analysis of the transfer of thermal energy into the low conductivity wallrocks traversed by fractures and vents from a gas phase expanding over a range of mass flux rates. Adiabatic behavior is predicted to be approached typically within a month after perturbations in the release of source gas have stabilized, this timescale being dependent upon only the characteristic length scale on which the host rock is fractured and the thermal diffusivity of the rock. This analysis then enables the thermal energy transport due to gas release from volcanoes to be evaluated using observations of SO2 flux with reference values for the H2O:SO2 ratio of volcanic gas mixtures discharging through high temperature fumaroles in arc and mantle-related volcanic systems. Thermal power estimates for gas discharge are 101.8 to 104.1 MWH during quiescent, continuous degassing of arc volcanoes and 103.7 to 107.3 MWH for their eruptive stages, the higher value being the Plinean Pinatubo eruption in 1991. Fewer data are available for quiescent stage mantle-related volcanoes (Kilauea 102.1 MWH) but for eruptive events power estimates range from 102.8 MWH to 105.5 MWH. These estimates of thermal power and mass of gas discharges are commensurate with power estimates based on the total mass of gas ejected during eruptions. The sustained discharge of volcanic gas during quiescent and short-lived eruptive stages can be related to the hydrodynamic structure of volcanic systems with large scale gaseous mass transfer from deep in the crust coupled with episodes of high level intrusive activity and gas release.

  2. 46 CFR 56.50-85 - Tank-vent piping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank-vent piping. 56.50-85 Section 56.50-85 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Design Requirements Pertaining to Specific Systems § 56.50-85 Tank-vent piping. (a) This...

  3. Hydrogen Vent Ground Umbilical Quick Disconnect - Flight Seal Advanced Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Doug; Jankowski, Fred; Minich, Mark C.; Yu, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    This project is a team effort between NASA Engineering (NE) and Team QNA Engineering personnel to provide support for the Umbilical Systems Development project which is funded by Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) and 21st Century Launch Complex. Specifically, this project seeks to develop a new interface between the PPBE baselined Legacy SSP LH2 Vent Arm QD probe and SLS vent seal.

  4. Where are the undiscovered hydrothermal vents on oceanic spreading ridges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Stace E.; Baker, Edward T.; German, Christopher R.

    2015-11-01

    In nearly four decades since the discovery of deep-sea vents, one-third of the length of global oceanic spreading ridges has been surveyed for hydrothermal activity. Active submarine vent fields are now known along the boundaries of 46 out of 52 recognized tectonic plates. Hydrothermal survey efforts over the most recent decade were sparked by national and commercial interests in the mineral resource potential of seafloor hydrothermal deposits, as well as by academic research. Here we incorporate recent data for back-arc spreading centers and ultraslow- and slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges (MORs) to revise a linear equation relating the frequency of vent fields along oceanic spreading ridges to spreading rate. We apply this equation globally to predict a total number of vent fields on spreading ridges, which suggests that ~900 vent fields remain to be discovered. Almost half of these undiscovered vent fields (comparable to the total of all vent fields discovered during 35 years of research) are likely to occur at MORs with full spreading rates less than 60 mm/yr. We then apply the equation regionally to predict where these hydrothermal vents may be discovered with respect to plate boundaries and national jurisdiction, with the majority expected to occur outside of states' exclusive economic zones. We hope that these predictions will prove useful to the community in the future, in helping to shape continuing ridge-crest exploration.

  5. COVIS Detects Interconnections Between Atmospheric, Oceanic and Geologic systems at a Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemis, K. G.; Xu, G.; Lee, R.

    2015-12-01

    COVIS (Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar) is an innovative sonar system designed to quantitatively monitor focused and diffuse flows from deep-sea hydrothermal vent clusters. From 9/2010 to 9/2015, COVIS was connected to the NEPTUNE observatory at Grotto vent in the Main Endeavour Field, JdFR. COVIS monitored plumes and diffuse discharge by transmitting high-frequency (200-400 kHz), pulsed acoustic waves and recording the backscattered signals to yield time series of plume heat and volume transports, plume bending, and diffuse flow area. Temporal variations indicate the rate of hydrothermal plume mixing with the ambient seawater increases with the magnitude of ocean currents. Such current-driven entrainment links the dynamics of a deep-sea hydrothermal plume with oceanic and atmospheric processes. We estimate the direction and relative amplitude of the local bottom currents from the bending angles of the plumes. A comparison with currents from an ADCP (~80 m south of Grotto) reveals significant complexity in the mean bottom flow structure within a hydrothermal vent field. Diffuse flow area, temperature, and faunal densities vary periodically reflecting some combination of tidal pressure and current interactions. The heat transport time series suggests the heat source driving the plume remained relatively steady for 41 months. Local seismic data reveals that increased heat transport in 2000 followed seismic events in 1999 and 2000 and the steady heat flux from 10/2011 to 2/2015 coincided with quiescent seismicity. Such a correlation points to the close linkage of a seafloor hydrothermal system with geological processes. These findings demonstrate the intimate interconnections of seafloor hydrothermal systems with processes spanning the Earth's interior to the sea surface. Further, they (and the time-series acquired by COVIS) testify to the effectiveness and robustness of employing an acoustic-imaging sonar for long-term monitoring of a seafloor hydrothermal

  6. Quaternary volcanism in Deception Island (Antarctica): South Shetland Trench subduction-related signature in the Bransfield Basin back arc domain; Vulcanismo cuaternario de la Isla Decepcion (Antartida): una signatura relacionada con la subduccion de la Fosa de las Shetland del Sur en el dominio de tras-arco de la Cuenca de Bransfield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gale, C.; Ubide, T.; Lago, M.; Gil-Imaz, A.; Gil-Pena, I.; Galindo-Zaldivar, J.; Rey, J.; Maestro, A.; Lopez-Martinez, J.

    2014-06-01

    Deception Island shows a volcanism related to the Phoenix Plate subduction and roll-back under South Shetland Block in the present times. The development of the island is related to the evolution and collapse of a volcanic caldera, and this study is focused on the petrology, mineralogy and geochemistry of the post-caldera rocks. We have made a study of the lava flows, dikes and the youngest historic eruption in 1970. These rocks range from dacite to rhyolite and have a microporphyritic texture with olivine and minor clinopyroxene. A pre-caldera basaltic andesite has also been studied. It has a microporphyritic texture with clinopyroxene. The intermediate and acid compositions alternating in the volcanostratigraphic sequence suggest either mafic recharge events or melt extraction from different levels in the deep magmatic system. All the studied compositions share a subduction-related signature similar to other magmatics from the Bransfield Basin. However, compositional differences between pre-caldera and post-caldera rocks indicate a different magma source and depth of crystallisation. According to the geothermobarometric calculations the pre-caldera magmas started to crystallise at deeper levels (13.5-15 km) than the post-caldera magmas (6.2-7.8 km). Specifically, the postcaldera magmas indicate a smaller influence of the subducting slab in the southwestern part of the Bransfield Basin in respect to the available data from other sectors as well as the involvement of crustal contamination in the genesis of the magmas. (Author)

  7. Assessment of Literature Related to Combustion Appliance Venting Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, V. H.; Less, B. D.; Singer, B. C.; Stratton, J. C.; Wray, C. P.

    2015-02-01

    In many residential building retrofit programs, air tightening to increase energy efficiency is often constrained by safety concerns with naturally vented combustion appliances. Tighter residential buildings more readily depressurize when exhaust equipment is operated, making combustion appliances more prone to backdraft or spill combustion exhaust into the living space. Several measures, such as installation guidelines, vent sizing codes, and combustion safety diagnostics, are in place with the intent to prevent backdrafting and combustion spillage, but the diagnostics conflict and the risk mitigation objective is inconsistent. This literature review summarizes the metrics and diagnostics used to assess combustion safety, documents their technical basis, and investigates their risk mitigations. It compiles information from the following: codes for combustion appliance venting and installation; standards and guidelines for combustion safety diagnostics; research evaluating combustion safety diagnostics; research investigating wind effects on building depressurization and venting; and software for simulating vent system performance.

  8. Natural Gas Venting on the Northern Cascadia Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherwath, M.; Riedel, M.; Roemer, M.; Paull, C. K.; Spence, G.; Veloso, M.

    2016-12-01

    Over the past decades, hundreds of natural gas vents have been observed along the Northern Cascadia Margin in the Northeast Pacific, and we present a summary of these observations from offshore Vancouver Island, BC, Canada. We have gathered observed locations and analyzed original data from published literature as well as research cruises and fishing sonar from various archives. By far the highest accumulation of gas vent locations appear both shallow (100-200 m) and concentrated towards the mouth of the Juan de Fuca Strait, however these observations are naturally biased toward the distribution of the observation footprints. Normalized observations confirm the shallow high concentrations of gas vents but also establish some deeper sections of focused venting activity. We will speculate about the reasons behind the distribution, focus on specific examples, extrapolate for rough margin flux rate ranges and comment on short-comings and future directions for margin-wide gas vent studies.

  9. Volcanic hazard assessment in the Phlegraean Fields: A contribution based on stratigraphic and historical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosi, M.; Santacroce, R. (Universita di Pisa (Italy) Gruppo Nazionale per la Vulcanologia, Roma (Italy))

    1984-01-01

    Phenomena occurring since 1982 in the Phlegraean fields, interpreted as precursors of a potential renewal of volcanic activity, have forced the authors to anticipate some conclusions of a volcanic-hazard study based on the reconstruction of past eruptions in the area, to serve as basis for civil defense preparedness plans. The eruptive history of the Phlegraean Fields suggests a progressive decrease with time in the strength of eruptive phenomena paralleling a migration of vents towards the center of the Phlegraean caldera. Studies concerning the volcanic risk zonation were therefore concentrated on activities during the last 4,500 years and two eruptions (Monte Nuovo and Agnano Monte Spina), that occurred in 1538 and 4,400 years B.P., respectively were selected as the reference eruptions from which possible eruption scenarios were drawn.

  10. Volcanic Ash -Aircraft Encounter Damages: in Volcanological Point of View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydar, Erkan; Aladaǧ, Çaǧdaş Hakan; Menteş, Turhan

    2017-04-01

    (Chilie), Eyfjallajökull (Iceland). The common point of all those eruptions is that all eruption clouds had the external water input. This input was as phreatomagmatic style eruption, ice plugged-vent clearing-vulcanian, heavy rain fall on eruption cloud or on eruptive vent, typhoon, ice grain in eruptive cloud, etc. We will show water input, case by case, to those eruptions belonging to severity index 4. Besides, we will also present other damages created by volcanic ash-aircraft encounters basing on their eruption styles as a result of advanced statistical methods.

  11. Exploring Hawaiian Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Okubo, Paul G.; Hon, Ken

    2013-02-01

    In 1912 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Thomas A. Jaggar Jr. on the island of Hawaii. Driven by the devastation he observed while investigating the volcanic disasters of 1902 at Montagne Pelée in the Caribbean, Jaggar conducted a worldwide search and decided that Hawai`i provided an excellent natural laboratory for systematic study of earthquake and volcano processes toward better understanding of seismic and volcanic hazards. In the 100 years since HVO's founding, surveillance and investigation of Hawaiian volcanoes have spurred advances in volcano and seismic monitoring techniques, extended scientists' understanding of eruptive activity and processes, and contributed to development of global theories about hot spots and mantle plumes.

  12. Exploring Hawaiian volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Okubo, Paul G.; Hon, Ken

    2013-01-01

    In 1912 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Thomas A. Jaggar Jr. on the island of Hawaii. Driven by the devastation he observed while investigating the volcanic disasters of 1902 at Montagne Pelée in the Caribbean, Jaggar conducted a worldwide search and decided that Hawai‘i provided an excellent natural laboratory for systematic study of earthquake and volcano processes toward better understanding of seismic and volcanic hazards. In the 100 years since HVO’s founding, surveillance and investigation of Hawaiian volcanoes have spurred advances in volcano and seismic monitoring techniques, extended scientists’ understanding of eruptive activity and processes, and contributed to development of global theories about hot spots and mantle plumes.

  13. Semi-automatic delimitation of volcanic edifice boundaries: Validation and application to the cinder cones of the Tancitaro-Nueva Italia region (Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field, Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Traglia, Federico; Morelli, Stefano; Casagli, Nicola; Garduño Monroy, Victor Hugo

    2014-08-01

    The shape and size of monogenetic volcanoes are the result of complex evolutions involving the interaction of eruptive activity, structural setting and degradational processes. Morphological studies of cinder cones aim to evaluate volcanic hazard on the Earth and to decipher the origins of various structures on extraterrestrial planets. Efforts have been dedicated so far to the characterization of the cinder cone morphology in a systematic and comparable manner. However, manual delimitation is time-consuming and influenced by the user subjectivity but, on the other hand, automatic boundary delimitation of volcanic terrains can be affected by irregular topography. In this work, the semi-automatic delimitation of volcanic edifice boundaries proposed by Grosse et al. (2009) for stratovolcanoes was tested for the first time over monogenetic cinder cones. The method, based on the integration of the DEM-derived slope and curvature maps, is applied here to the Tancitaro-Nueva Italia region of the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field (Mexico), where 309 Plio-Quaternary cinder cones are located. The semiautomatic extraction allowed identification of 137 of the 309 cinder cones of the Tancitaro-Nueva Italia region, recognized by means of the manual extraction. This value corresponds to the 44.3% of the total number of cinder cones. Analysis on vent alignments allowed us to identify NE-SW vent alignments and cone elongations, consistent with a NE-SW σmax and a NW-SE σmin. Constructing a vent intensity map, based on computing the number of vents within a radius r centred on each vent of the data set and choosing r = 5 km, four vent intensity maxima were derived: one is positioned in the NW with respect to the Volcano Tancitaro, one in the NE, one to the S and another vent cluster located at the SE boundary of the studied area. The spacing of centroid of each cluster (24 km) can be related to the thickness of the crust (9-10 km) overlying the magma reservoir.

  14. Subdiffusion of volcanic earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Sumiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study is performed on volcanic seismicities at Mt.Eyjafjallajokull in Iceland and Mt. Etna in Sicily, Italy, from the viewpoint of science of complex systems, and the discovery of remarkable similarities between them regarding their exotic spatio-temporal properties is reported. In both of the volcanic seismicities as point processes, the jump probability distributions of earthquakes are found to obey the exponential law, whereas the waiting-time distributions follow the power law. In particular, a careful analysis is made about the finite size effects on the waiting-time distributions, and accordingly, the previously reported results for Mt. Etna [S. Abe and N. Suzuki, EPL 110, 59001 (2015)] are reinterpreted. It is shown that spreads of the volcanic earthquakes are subdiffusive at both of the volcanoes. The aging phenomenon is observed in the "event-time-averaged" mean-squared displacements of the hypocenters. A comment is also made on presence/absence of long term memories in the context of t...

  15. New insights into hydrothermal vent processes in the unique shallow-submarine arc-volcano, Kolumbo (Santorini), Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilias, Stephanos P; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Godelitsas, Athanasios; Argyraki, Ariadne; Carey, Steven; Gamaletsos, Platon; Mertzimekis, Theo J; Stathopoulou, Eleni; Goettlicher, Joerg; Steininger, Ralph; Betzelou, Konstantina; Livanos, Isidoros; Christakis, Christos; Bell, Katherine Croff; Scoullos, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We report on integrated geomorphological, mineralogical, geochemical and biological investigations of the hydrothermal vent field located on the floor of the density-stratified acidic (pH ~ 5) crater of the Kolumbo shallow-submarine arc-volcano, near Santorini. Kolumbo features rare geodynamic setting at convergent boundaries, where arc-volcanism and seafloor hydrothermal activity are occurring in thinned continental crust. Special focus is given to unique enrichments of polymetallic spires in Sb and Tl (±Hg, As, Au, Ag, Zn) indicating a new hybrid seafloor analogue of epithermal-to-volcanic-hosted-massive-sulphide deposits. Iron microbial-mat analyses reveal dominating ferrihydrite-type phases, and high-proportion of microbial sequences akin to "Nitrosopumilus maritimus", a mesophilic Thaumarchaeota strain capable of chemoautotrophic growth on hydrothermal ammonia and CO2. Our findings highlight that acidic shallow-submarine hydrothermal vents nourish marine ecosystems in which nitrifying Archaea are important and suggest ferrihydrite-type Fe(3+)-(hydrated)-oxyhydroxides in associated low-temperature iron mats are formed by anaerobic Fe(2+)-oxidation, dependent on microbially produced nitrate.

  16. Bioindication of volcanic mercury (Hg) deposition around Mt Etna (Sicily)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R.; Witt, M. L.; Sawyer, G. M.; Watt, S.; Bagnato, E.; Calabrese, S.; Aiuppa, A.; Delmelle, P.; Pyle, D. M.; Mather, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    Mt. Etna is a major natural source of Hg to the Mediterranean region. Total mercury concentrations, [Hg]tot, in Castanea sativa (sweet chestnut) leaves sampled 7-13 km from Etna's vents (during six campaigns in 2005-2011) were determined using atomic absorption spectroscopy. [Hg]tot in C. sativa was greatest on Etna's SE flank reflecting Hg deposition from the typically overhead volcanic plume. When adjusted for leaf age, [Hg]tot in C. sativa also increased with recent eruptive activity. [Hg]tot in C. sativa was not controlled by [Hg]tot in soils, which instead was greatest on the (upwind) NW flank and correlated strongly with soil organic matter (% Org). Our results suggest that at least ~1% of Hg emitted from Etna is deposited proximally, supporting recent measurement and model results which indicate that GEM (Hg0; the dominant form of Hg in high temperature magmatic gases) is oxidised rapidly to RGM and Hgp in ambient temperature volcanic plumes. Samples of C. sativa and soils were also collected in July and September 2012 alongside SO2 and acid gas diffusion tube samples. These new samples will enable us to investigate Hg accumulation over a single growth season with reference to the exposure of vegetation to volcanic gases and particles.

  17. Quantitative volcanic susceptibility analysis of Lanzarote and Chinijo Islands based on kernel density estimation via a linear diffusion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, I.; Romero, M. C.; Sánchez, N.; Morales, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Risk management stakeholders in high-populated volcanic islands should be provided with the latest high-quality volcanic information. We present here the first volcanic susceptibility map of Lanzarote and Chinijo Islands and their submarine flanks based on updated chronostratigraphical and volcano structural data, as well as on the geomorphological analysis of the bathymetric data of the submarine flanks. The role of the structural elements in the volcanic susceptibility analysis has been reviewed: vents have been considered since they indicate where previous eruptions took place; eruptive fissures provide information about the stress field as they are the superficial expression of the dyke conduit; eroded dykes have been discarded since they are single non-feeder dykes intruded in deep parts of Miocene-Pliocene volcanic edifices; main faults have been taken into account only in those cases where they could modified the superficial movement of magma. The application of kernel density estimation via a linear diffusion process for the volcanic susceptibility assessment has been applied successfully to Lanzarote and could be applied to other fissure volcanic fields worldwide since the results provide information about the probable area where an eruption could take place but also about the main direction of the probable volcanic fissures. PMID:27265878

  18. Quantitative volcanic susceptibility analysis of Lanzarote and Chinijo Islands based on kernel density estimation via a linear diffusion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, I.; Romero, M. C.; Sánchez, N.; Morales, J. M.

    2016-06-01

    Risk management stakeholders in high-populated volcanic islands should be provided with the latest high-quality volcanic information. We present here the first volcanic susceptibility map of Lanzarote and Chinijo Islands and their submarine flanks based on updated chronostratigraphical and volcano structural data, as well as on the geomorphological analysis of the bathymetric data of the submarine flanks. The role of the structural elements in the volcanic susceptibility analysis has been reviewed: vents have been considered since they indicate where previous eruptions took place; eruptive fissures provide information about the stress field as they are the superficial expression of the dyke conduit; eroded dykes have been discarded since they are single non-feeder dykes intruded in deep parts of Miocene-Pliocene volcanic edifices; main faults have been taken into account only in those cases where they could modified the superficial movement of magma. The application of kernel density estimation via a linear diffusion process for the volcanic susceptibility assessment has been applied successfully to Lanzarote and could be applied to other fissure volcanic fields worldwide since the results provide information about the probable area where an eruption could take place but also about the main direction of the probable volcanic fissures.

  19. Quantitative volcanic susceptibility analysis of Lanzarote and Chinijo Islands based on kernel density estimation via a linear diffusion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, I; Romero, M C; Sánchez, N; Morales, J M

    2016-06-06

    Risk management stakeholders in high-populated volcanic islands should be provided with the latest high-quality volcanic information. We present here the first volcanic susceptibility map of Lanzarote and Chinijo Islands and their submarine flanks based on updated chronostratigraphical and volcano structural data, as well as on the geomorphological analysis of the bathymetric data of the submarine flanks. The role of the structural elements in the volcanic susceptibility analysis has been reviewed: vents have been considered since they indicate where previous eruptions took place; eruptive fissures provide information about the stress field as they are the superficial expression of the dyke conduit; eroded dykes have been discarded since they are single non-feeder dykes intruded in deep parts of Miocene-Pliocene volcanic edifices; main faults have been taken into account only in those cases where they could modified the superficial movement of magma. The application of kernel density estimation via a linear diffusion process for the volcanic susceptibility assessment has been applied successfully to Lanzarote and could be applied to other fissure volcanic fields worldwide since the results provide information about the probable area where an eruption could take place but also about the main direction of the probable volcanic fissures.

  20. Multiple episodes of hydrothermal activity and epithermal mineralization in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and their relations to magmatic activity, volcanism and regional extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, S.I.; Noble, D.C.; Jackson, M.C. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Volcanic rocks of middle Miocene age and underlying pre-Mesozoic sedimentary rocks host widely distributed zones of hydrothermal alteration and epithermal precious metal, fluorite and mercury deposits within and peripheral to major volcanic and intrusive centers of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field (SWNVF) in southern Nevada, near the southwestern margin of the Great Basin of the western United States. Radiometric ages indicate that episodes of hydrothermal activity mainly coincided with and closely followed major magmatic pulses during the development of the field and together spanned more than 4.5 m.y. Rocks of the SWNVF consist largely of rhyolitic ash-flow sheets and intercalated silicic lava domes, flows and near-vent pyroclastic deposits erupted between 15.2 and 10 Ma from vent areas in the vicinity of the Timber Mountain calderas, and between about 9.5 and 7 Ma from the outlying Black Mountain and Stonewall Mountain centers. Three magmatic stages can be recognized: the main magmatic stage, Mountain magmatic stage (11.7 to 10.0 Ma), and the late magmatic stage (9.4 to 7.5 Ma).

  1. Aurorae and Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Thermal-IR Observations of Jupiter and Io with ISAAC at the VLT Summary Impressive thermal-infrared images have been obtained of the giant planet Jupiter during tests of a new detector in the ISAAC instrument on the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory (Chile). . They show in particular the full extent of the northern auroral ring and part of the southern aurora. A volcanic eruption was also imaged on Io , the very active inner Jovian moon. Although these observations are of an experimental nature, they demonstrate a great potential for regular monitoring of the Jovian magnetosphere by ground-based telescopes together with space-based facilities. They also provide the added benefit of direct comparison with the terrestrial magnetosphere. PR Photo 21a/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (L-band: 3.5-4.0 µm) . PR Photo 21b/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (Narrow-band 4.07 µm) . PR Photo 21c/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (Narrow-band 3.28 µm) . PR Photo 21d/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (Narrow-band 3.21 µm) . PR Photo 21e/01 : ISAAC image of the Jovian aurorae (false-colour). PR Photo 21f/01 : ISAAC image of volcanic activity on Io . Addendum : The Jovian aurorae and polar haze. Aladdin Meets Jupiter Thermal-infrared images of Jupiter and its volcanic moon Io have been obtained during a series of system tests with the new Aladdin detector in the Infrared Spectrometer And Array Camera (ISAAC) , in combination with an upgrade of the ESO-developed detector control electronics IRACE. This state-of-the-art instrument is attached to the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory. The observations were made on November 14, 2000, through various filters that isolate selected wavebands in the thermal-infrared spectral region [1]. They include a broad-band L-filter (wavelength interval 3.5 - 4.0 µm) as well as several narrow-band filters (3.21, 3.28 and 4.07 µm). The filters allow to record the light from different components of the Jovian atmosphere

  2. Combining observations and model simulations to reduce the hazard of Etna volcanic ash plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollo, Simona; Boselli, Antonella; Coltelli, Mauro; Leto, Giuseppe; Pisani, Gianluca; Prestifilippo, Michele; Spinelli, Nicola; Wang, Xuan; Zanmar Sanchez, Ricardo

    2014-05-01

    Etna is one of the most active volcanoes in the world with a recent activity characterized by powerful lava fountains that produce several kilometres high eruption columns and disperse volcanic ash in the atmosphere. It is well known that, to improve the volcanic ash dispersal forecast of an ongoing explosive eruption, input parameters used by volcanic ash dispersal models should be measured during the eruption. In this work, in order to better quantify the volcanic ash dispersal, we use data from the video-surveillance system of Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo, and from the lidar system together with a volcanic ash dispersal model. In detail, the visible camera installed in Catania, 27 km from the vent is able to evaluate the evolution of column height with time. The Lidar, installed at the "M.G. Fracastoro" astrophysical observatory (14.97° E, 37.69° N) of the Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica in Catania, located at a distance of 7 km from the Etna summit craters, uses a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser source operating at a 532-nm wavelength, with a repetition rate of 1 kHz. Backscattering and depolarization values measured by the Lidar system can give, with a certain degree of uncertainty, an estimation of volcanic ash concentration in atmosphere. The 12 August 2011 activity is considered a perfect test case because volcanic plume was retrieved by both camera and Lidar. We evaluated the mass eruption rate from the column height and used best fit procedures comparing simulated volcanic ash concentrations with those extracted by the Lidar data. During this event, powerful lava fountains were well visible at about 08:30 GMT and a sustained eruption column was produced since about 08:55 GMT. Ash emission completely ceased around 11:30 GMT. The proposed approach is an attempt to produce more robust ash dispersal forecasts reducing the hazard to air traffic during Etna volcanic crisis.

  3. Ground-based analysis of volcanic ash plumes using a new multispectral thermal infrared camera approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D.; Ramsey, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic plumes are complex mixtures of mineral, lithic and glass fragments of varying size, together with multiple gas species. These plumes vary in size dependent on a number of factors, including vent diameter, magma composition and the quantity of volatiles within a melt. However, determining the chemical and mineralogical properties of a volcanic plume immediately after an eruption is a great challenge. Thermal infrared (TIR) satellite remote sensing of these plumes is routinely used to calculate the volcanic ash particle size variations and sulfur dioxide concentration. These analyses are commonly performed using high temporal, low spatial resolution satellites, which can only reveal large scale trends. What is lacking is a high spatial resolution study specifically of the properties of the proximal plumes. Using the emissive properties of volcanic ash, a new method has been developed to determine the plume's particle size and petrology in spaceborne and ground-based TIR data. A multispectral adaptation of a FLIR TIR camera has been developed that simulates the TIR channels found on several current orbital instruments. Using this instrument, data of volcanic plumes from Fuego and Santiaguito volcanoes in Guatemala were recently obtained Preliminary results indicate that the camera is capable of detecting silicate absorption features in the emissivity spectra over the TIR wavelength range, which can be linked to both mineral chemistry and particle size. It is hoped that this technique can be expanded to isolate different volcanic species within a plume, validate the orbital data, and ultimately to use the results to better inform eruption dynamics modelling.

  4. Diffuse versus discrete venting at the Tour Eiffel vent site, Lucky Strike hydrothermal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Escartin, J.; Gracias, N.; Olive, J. L.; Barreyre, T.; Davaille, A. B.; Cannat, M.

    2010-12-01

    Two styles of fluid flow at the seafloor are widely recognized: (1) localized outflows of high temperature (>300°C) fluids, often black or grey color in color (“black smokers”) and (2) diffuse, lower temperature (Eiffel in the Lucky Strike hydrothermal field along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Fluid temperature and video data were acquired during the recent Bathyluck’09 cruise to the Lucky Strike hydrothermal field (September, 2009) by Victor aboard “Pourquoi Pas?” (IFREMER, France). Temperature measurements were made of fluid exiting discrete vents, of diffuse effluents immediately above the seafloor, and of vertical temperature gradients within discrete hydrothermal plumes. Video data allow us to calculate the fluid velocity field associated with these outflows: for diffuse fluids, Diffuse Flow Velocimetry tracks the displacement of refractive index anomalies through time; for individual hydrothermal plumes, Particle Image Velocimetry tracks eddies by cross-correlation of pixels intensities between subsequent images. Diffuse fluids exhibit temperatures of 8-60°C and fluid velocities of ~1-10 cm s-1. Discrete outflows at 204-300°C have velocities of ~1-2 m s-1. Combined fluid flow velocities, temperature measurements, and full image mosaics of the actively venting areas are used to estimate heat flux of both individual discrete vents and diffuse outflow. The total integrated heat flux and the partitioning between diffuse and discrete venting at Tour Eiffel, and its implications for the nature of hydrothermal activity across the Lucky Strike site are discussed along with the implications for crustal permeability, associated ecosystems, and mid-ocean ridge processes.

  5. A preliminary survey of the broadband seismic wavefield at Puu Oo, the active vent of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Okubo

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The seismic wavefield near an active volcanic vent consists of superimposed signals in a wide range of frequency bands from sources inside and outside the volcano. To characterize the broadband wavefield near Puu Oo, we deployed a profile of three three-component broadband sensors in a 200 m long line about 1.5 km WSW of the active vent. During this period, Puu Oo maintained a constant, but very low level of activity. The digital data logger recorded the wavefield continuously in the frequency band between 0.01 and 40 Hz between June 25 and July 9, 1994. At the same time, local wind conditions along with air temperature and pressure were monitored by a portable digital weather station. On the basis of characteristic elements, such as waveform, spatial coherence between stations, particle motion and power spectra, the wavefield can be divided into three bands. The dominant signals in the frequency band between 0.01 and 0.1 Hz are not coherent among the stations. Their ground velocities correlate with the wind speed. The signals in the 0.1 to 0.5 Hz band are coherent across the profile and most probably represent a superposition of volcanic tremor and microseisms from the Pacific Ocean. Much of the energy above 0.5 Hz can be attributed to activity at the vent. Power spectra from recordings of the transverse components show complex peaks between 0.5 and 3 Hz which vary in amplitude due to site effects and distance. On the other hand, power spectra calculated from the radial components show a clearly periodic pattern of peaks at 1 Hz intervals for some time segments. A further remarkable feature of the power spectra is that they are highly stationary.

  6. Recent seismicity detection increase in the Santorini volcanic island complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chouliaras

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Santorini is the most active volcanic complex in the South Aegean Volcanic Arc. To improve the seismological network detectability of the seismicity in this region, the Institute of Geodynamics of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA recently installed 4 portable seismological stations supplementary to the 3 permanent stations operating in the region. The addition of these stations has significantly improved the detectability and reporting of the local seismic activity in the NOA instrumental seismicity catalogue.

    In this study we analyze quantitatively the seismicity of the Santorini volcanic complex. The results indicate a recent significant reporting increase mainly for events of small magnitude and an increase in the seismicity rate by more than 100%. The mapping of the statistical significance of the rate change with the z-value method reveals that the rate increase exists primarily in the active fault zone perpendicular to the extensional tectonic stress regime that characterizes this region.

    The spatial distribution of the b-value around the volcanic complex indicates a low b-value distribution parallel to the extensional stress field, while the b-value cross section of the volcanic complex indicates relatively high b-values under the caldera and a significant b-value decrease with depth.

    These results are found to be in general agreement with the results from other volcanic regions and they encourage further investigations concerning the seismic and volcanic hazard and risk estimates for the Santorini volcanic complex using the NOA earthquake catalogue.

  7. DUCKS: Low cost thermal monitoring units for near-vent deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A.; Pirie, D.; Horton, K.; Garbeil, H.; Pilger, E.; Ramm, H.; Hoblitt, R.; Thornber, C.; Ripepe, M.; Marchetti, E.; Poggi, P.

    2005-01-01

    During 1999 we designed and tested a thermal monitoring system to provide a cheap, robust, modular, real-time system capable of surviving the hostile conditions encountered proximal to active volcanic vents. In November 2000 the first system was deployed at Pu'u 'O'o (Kilauea, Hawai'i) to target persistently active vents. Aside from some minor problems, such as sensor damage due to tampering, this system remained operational until January 2004. The success of the prototype system led us to use the blueprint for a second installation at Stromboli (Aeolian Islands, Italy). This was deployed, dug into a bomb-proof bunker, during May 2002 and survived the April 2003 paroxysmal eruption despite being located just 250 m from the vent. In both cases, careful waterproofing of connectors and selection of suitable protection has prevented water damage and corrosion in the harsh atmosphere encountered at the crater rim. The Pu'u 'O'o system cost ???US$10,000 and comprises four modules: sensors, transmission and power hub, repeater station and reception site. The sensor component consists of three thermal infrared thermometers housed in Pelican??? cases fitted with Germanium-Arsenide-Selenium windows. Two 1?? field of view (FOV) sensors allow specific vents to be targeted and a 60?? FOV sensor provides a crater floor overview. A hard wire connection links to a Pelican???-case-housed microprocessor, modem and power module. From here data are transmitted, via a repeater site, to a dedicated PC at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. Here data are displayed with a delay of ???3 s between acquisition and display. The modular design allows for great flexibility. At Stromboli, 1?? and 15?? FOV sensor modules can be switched depending changes in activity style and crater geometry. In addition a direct line of site to the Stromboli reception center negates the repeater site requirement, reducing the cost to US$5500 for a single sensor system. We have also constructed self-contained units

  8. The Biological Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vent as a Model to Study Carbon Dioxide Capturing Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premila D. Thongbam

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Deep sea hydrothermal vents are located along the mid-ocean ridge system, near volcanically active areas, where tectonic plates are moving away from each other. Sea water penetrates the fissures of the volcanic bed and is heated by magma. This heated sea water rises to the surface dissolving large amounts of minerals which provide a source of energy and nutrients to chemoautotrophic organisms. Although this environment is characterized by extreme conditions (high temperature, high pressure, chemical toxicity, acidic pH and absence of photosynthesis a diversity of microorganisms and many animal species are specially adapted to this hostile environment. These organisms have developed a very efficient metabolism for the assimilation of inorganic CO2 from the external environment. In order to develop technology for the capture of carbon dioxide to reduce greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, enzymes involved in CO2 fixation and assimilation might be very useful. This review describes some current research concerning CO2 fixation and assimilation in the deep sea environment and possible biotechnological application of enzymes for carbon dioxide capture.

  9. The biological deep sea hydrothermal vent as a model to study carbon dioxide capturing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minic, Zoran; Thongbam, Premila D

    2011-01-01

    Deep sea hydrothermal vents are located along the mid-ocean ridge system, near volcanically active areas, where tectonic plates are moving away from each other. Sea water penetrates the fissures of the volcanic bed and is heated by magma. This heated sea water rises to the surface dissolving large amounts of minerals which provide a source of energy and nutrients to chemoautotrophic organisms. Although this environment is characterized by extreme conditions (high temperature, high pressure, chemical toxicity, acidic pH and absence of photosynthesis) a diversity of microorganisms and many animal species are specially adapted to this hostile environment. These organisms have developed a very efficient metabolism for the assimilation of inorganic CO₂ from the external environment. In order to develop technology for the capture of carbon dioxide to reduce greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, enzymes involved in CO₂ fixation and assimilation might be very useful. This review describes some current research concerning CO₂ fixation and assimilation in the deep sea environment and possible biotechnological application of enzymes for carbon dioxide capture.

  10. Measurement of the velocity field behind the automotive vent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jedelský Jan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Passenger comfort in a personal vehicle cabin strongly depends on the appropriate function of the cabin ventilation system. Great attention is therefore paid to the effective functioning of the automotive vents. Various techniques can be employed to evaluate the proper formation of the flow behind the ventilation outlet. Constant Temperature Anemometry (CTA was used in our case for accurate measurement of the velocity field and consequent assessment of jet boundaries and jet axis. A novel methodology has been developed for the simulation of realistic conditions when using just a single vent under laboratory conditions instead of the complete vehicle ventilation system. A special technique has also been developed for determination of the terminal inclination angles of vent vanes for the particular vent type, which can be completely closed by the adjustable horizontal vanes. A two wire CTA probe was used for measurement of the actual velocity over predefined planes, which were specified according to smoke visualization. Mean velocities and the turbulence intensity were evaluated on the basis of the obtained data and are presented in a form of charts. Both jet boundary and orientation of the jet for a given setup of the vent are important characteristics of particular vent type. Effectiveness of different vents could be compared using our methodology and hence contribute to development of advanced ventilation system.

  11. Measurement of the velocity field behind the automotive vent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ležovič, Tomáš; Lízal, František; Jedelský, Jan; Jícha, Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Passenger comfort in a personal vehicle cabin strongly depends on the appropriate function of the cabin ventilation system. Great attention is therefore paid to the effective functioning of the automotive vents. Various techniques can be employed to evaluate the proper formation of the flow behind the ventilation outlet. Constant Temperature Anemometry (CTA) was used in our case for accurate measurement of the velocity field and consequent assessment of jet boundaries and jet axis. A novel methodology has been developed for the simulation of realistic conditions when using just a single vent under laboratory conditions instead of the complete vehicle ventilation system. A special technique has also been developed for determination of the terminal inclination angles of vent vanes for the particular vent type, which can be completely closed by the adjustable horizontal vanes. A two wire CTA probe was used for measurement of the actual velocity over predefined planes, which were specified according to smoke visualization. Mean velocities and the turbulence intensity were evaluated on the basis of the obtained data and are presented in a form of charts. Both jet boundary and orientation of the jet for a given setup of the vent are important characteristics of particular vent type. Effectiveness of different vents could be compared using our methodology and hence contribute to development of advanced ventilation system.

  12. Soil temperature and CO2 degassing, SO2 fluxes and field observations before and after the February 29, 2016 new vent inside Nyiragongo crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagizi, Charles M.; Yalire, Mathieu M.; Ciraba, Honoré M.; Kajeje, Vicky B.; Minani, Abel S.; Kinja, Annie B.; Kasereka, Marcellin M.

    2016-09-01

    Nyiragongo volcano threatens ˜1.5 million inhabitants of Goma (DR Congo) and Gisenyi (Rwanda) cities and people living in the surrounding villages. In 2002, the volcano produced lava flows which invaded Goma and destroyed the economic district of the city, forced a mass exodus of the population and caused the loss of several lives. Nyiragongo volcanic activity is therefore closely followed by the inhabitants, and any news related to increased activity agitates people in the area, especially those in Goma. Here, we report a short time series of soil temperature and carbon dioxide degassing for four locations, and plume sulphur dioxide fluxes preceding and following the opening of a new vent inside the main Nyiragongo crater on February 29, 2016. The observed sudden and unexpected changes in Nyiragongo activity raised the fear of a new volcanic eruption and led to panic in Goma and the surroundings, inducing some people to leaving the city. We use the dataset and field observations before and after the opening of the new vent, in conjunction with published information about Nyiragongo's eruptive mechanism and of the volcano's plumbing system geometry (mainly the crater), to show that the new vent was fed by magma intruded from the lava lake or the upper conduit.

  13. Volcanism on Mars. Chapter 41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Garry, W. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Crown, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft exploration has revealed abundant evidence that Mars possesses some of the most dramatic volcanic landforms found anywhere within the solar system. How did a planet half the size of Earth produce volcanoes like Olympus Mons, which is several times the size of the largest volcanoes on Earth? This question is an example of the kinds of issues currently being investigated as part of the space-age scientific endeavor called "comparative planetology." This chapter summarizes the basic information currently known about volcanism on Mars. The volcanoes on Mars appear to be broadly similar in overall morphology (although, often quite different in scale) to volcanic features on Earth, which suggests that Martian eruptive processes are not significantly different from the volcanic styles and processes on Earth. Martian volcanoes are found on terrains of different age, and Martian volcanic rocks are estimated to comprise more than 50% of the Martian surface. This is in contrast to volcanism on smaller bodies such as Earth's Moon, where volcanic activity was mainly confined to the first half of lunar history (see "Volcanism on the Moon"). Comparative planetology supports the concept that volcanism is the primary mechanism for a planetary body to get rid of its internal heat; smaller bodies tend to lose their internal heat more rapidly than larger bodies (although, Jupiter's moon Io appears to contradict this trend; Io's intense volcanic activity is powered by unique gravitational tidal forces within the Jovian system; see "Volcanism on Io"), so that volcanic activity on Mars would be expected to differ considerably from that found on Earth and the Moon.

  14. Felsic volcanism in a basic shield (El Hierro, Canary Islands). Implications in terms of volcanic hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrazzi, Dario; Becerril Carretero, Laura; Martí Molist, Joan; Meletlidis, Stavros; Galindo Jiménez, Inés

    2014-05-01

    El Hierro, the southwesternmost and smallest island of the Canary Archipelago, is a complex basaltic shield volcano characterized by mainly effusive volcanism with both Strombolian and Hawaiian activity. Explosive felsic volcanism is not a common feature of the archipelago and, so far, it has only been reported on the central islands of Tenerife and Gran Canaria, where it has been responsible for the formation of large central volcanic complexes. The presence of felsic rocks on the other islands of the archipelago and specifically on El Hierro is mostly restricted to subvolcanic intrusions and a few lava flows, generally associated with the oldest parts of the islands. We hereby report the presence of a trachytic pumice deposit on the island of El Hierro, referred to here as the Malpaso Member. A detailed stratigraphic, lithological, and sedimentological study was carried out on the deposits of this explosive episode of felsic composition, which is the only one found on the Canary Islands apart from those of Gran Canaria and Tenerife. Four different subunits were identified on the basis of their lithological and granulometrical characteristics. The products of the eruption correspond to a single eruptive event and cover an area of about 13 km2. This deposit originated from a base-surge-type explosive eruption with a subsequent radial emplacement of dilute PDC currents, was emplaced from the vent that would have been located in a similar position to the volcano of Tanganasoga. The low vesicularity of juvenile fragments and the morphological characteristics of the fine particles, as well as the high proportion of lithic fragments and the ash-rich nature of the deposit, suggest that magma/water interaction controlled the dynamics of the eruption. This study demonstrates that magmas from El Hierro could have the potential for producing an explosive eruption, in an environment in which the majority of the eruptions are basaltic and effusive in nature. Bearing in mind

  15. Visualization of the air flow behind the automotive benchmark vent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech, Ondrej; Jedelsky, Jan; Caletka, Petr; Jicha, Miroslav

    2015-05-01

    Passenger comfort in cars depends on appropriate function of the cabin HVAC system. A great attention is therefore paid to the effective function of automotive vents and proper formation of the flow behind the ventilation outlet. The article deals with the visualization of air flow from the automotive benchmark vent. The visualization was made for two different shapes of the inlet channel connected to the benchmark vent. The smoke visualization with the laser knife was used. The influence of the shape of the inlet channel to the airflow direction, its enlargement and position of air flow axis were investigated.

  16. Сombined Thermal Insulating Module of Mounted Vented Facades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryabukhina Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to define an optimum type of mounted vented facades among the existing ones, comparative analysis of two façade modules has been conducted. The first module type is a widespread standard module of hinged vented facade and the second type is less applicable combined thermal insulating module. Those two technologies were compared thermal engineering and energy efficiency parameters. It was defined that the application of a thermal insulating module with combined insulation system improves thermal engineering parameters of the building as well as leads to a substantial savings. This article exposes innovative materials and structure of vented facades which can be applied in modern construction.

  17. A Review of Flaring and Venting at UK Offshore Oilfields

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Jamie R

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to re-address the issue of flaring and venting of reproduced gases in carbon dioxide enhanced oil recovery (CO2EOR) projects. Whilst a number of studies have not recognised the impact of flaring/venting in CO2EOR developments, a study completed at Scottish Carbon Capture and Storage (SCCS) “Carbon Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Enhanced Oil Recovery” highlighted the significant control that flaring/venting of reproduced gases may have on a projects life cycle greenhouse gas emi...

  18. Visualization of the air flow behind the automotive benchmark vent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pech Ondrej

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Passenger comfort in cars depends on appropriate function of the cabin HVAC system. A great attention is therefore paid to the effective function of automotive vents and proper formation of the flow behind the ventilation outlet. The article deals with the visualization of air flow from the automotive benchmark vent. The visualization was made for two different shapes of the inlet channel connected to the benchmark vent. The smoke visualization with the laser knife was used. The influence of the shape of the inlet channel to the airflow direction, its enlargement and position of air flow axis were investigated.

  19. Volcanic Ash Nephelometer Probe Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced dropsondes that could effectively be guided through atmospheric regions of interest such as volcanic plumes may enable unprecedented observations of...

  20. Mitigating the consequences of extreme events on strategic facilities: evaluation of volcanic and seismic risk affecting the Caspian oil and gas pipelines in the Republic of Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquarè, F A; Tormey, D; Vezzoli, L; Okrostsvaridze, A; Tutberidze, B

    2011-07-01

    In this work we identify and quantify new seismic and volcanic risks threatening the strategic Caspian oil and gas pipelines through the Republic of Georgia, in the vicinity of the recent Abuli Samsari Volcanic Ridge, and evaluate risk reduction measures, mitigation measures, and monitoring. As regards seismic risk, we identified a major, NW-SE trending strike-slip fault; based on the analysis of fault planes along this major transcurrent structure, an about N-S trend of the maximum, horizontal compressive stress (σ1) was determined, which is in good agreement with data instrumentally derived after the 1986, M 5.6 Paravani earthquake and its aftershock. Particularly notable is the strong alignment of volcanic vents along an about N-S trend that suggests a magma rising controlled by the about N-S-directed σ1. The original pipeline design included mitigation measures for seismic risk and other geohazards, including burial of the pipeline for its entire length, increased wall thickness, block valve spacing near recognized hazards, and monitoring of known landslide hazards. However, the design did not consider volcanic risk or the specific seismic hazards revealed by this study. The result of our analysis is that the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan (BTC) oil pipeline, as well as the Baku-Tbilisi-Erzerum South Caucasian natural gas pipeline (SCP) were designed in such a way that they significantly reduce the risk posed by the newly-identified geohazards in the vicinity of the Abuli-Samsari Ridge. No new measures are recommended for the pipeline itself as a result of this study. However, since the consequences of long-term shut-down would be very damaging to the economies of Western Europe, we conclude that the regionally significant BTC and SCP warrant greater protections, described in the final section of or work. The overall objective of our effort is to present the results in a matrix framework that allows the technical information to be used further in the decision

  1. Des Vents et des Jets Astrophysiques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauty, C.

    well expected result from the theory. Although, collimation may be conical, paraboloidal or cylindrical (Part 4), cylindrical collimation is the more likely to occur. The shape of outflows may then be used as a tool to predict physical conditions on the flows or on their source. L'éjection continue de plasma autour d'objets massifs est un phénomène largement répandu en astrophysique, que ce soit sous la forme du vent solaire, de vents stellaires, de jets d'étoiles en formation, de jets stellaires autour d'objets compacts ou de jets extra-galactiques. Cette zoologie diversifiée fait pourtant l'objet d'un commun effort de modélisation. Le but de cette revue est d'abord de présenter qualitativement le développement, depuis leur origine, des diverses théories de vents (Partie 1) et l'inter disciplinarité dans ce domaine. Il s'agit d'une énumération, plus ou moins exhaustive, des idées proposées pour expliquer l'accélération et la morphologie des vents et des jets, accompagnée d'une présentation sommaire des aspects observationnels. Cette partie s'abstient de tout aspect faisant appel au formalisme mathématique. Ces écoulements peuvent être décrits, au moins partiellement, en résolvant les équations magnétohydrodynamiques, axisymétriques et stationnaires. Ce formalisme, à la base de la plupart des théories, est exposé dans la Partie 2. Il permet d'introduire quantitativement les intégrales premières qu'un tel système possède. Ces dernières sont amenées à jouer un rôle important dans la compréhension des phénomènes d'accélération ou de collimation, en particulier le taux de perte de masse, le taux de perte de moment angulaire ou l'énergie du rotateur magnétique. La difficulté de modélisation réside dans l'existence de points critiques, propres aux équations non linéaires, qu'il faut franchir. La nature physique et la localisation de ces points critiques fait l'objet d'un débat important car ils sont la clef de voute de la r

  2. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, A.

    2012-12-01

    Large volcanic eruptions inject sulfur gases into the stratosphere, which convert to sulfate aerosols with an e-folding residence time of about one year. The radiative and chemical effects of these aerosol clouds produce responses in the climate system. Observations and numerical models of the climate system show that volcanic eruptions produce global cooling and were the dominant natural cause of climate change for the past millennium, on timescales from annual to century. Major tropical eruptions produce winter warming of Northern Hemisphere continents for one or two years, while high latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere weaken the Asian and African summer monsoon. The Toba supereruption 74,000 years ago caused very large climate changes, affecting human evolution. However, the effects did not last long enough to produce widespread glaciation. An episode of four large decadally-spaced eruptions at the end of the 13th century C.E. started the Little Ice Age. Since the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines in 1991, there have been no large eruptions that affected climate, but the cumulative effects of small eruptions over the past decade had a small effect on global temperature trends. The June 13, 2011 Nabro eruption in Eritrea produced the largest stratospheric aerosol cloud since Pinatubo, and the most of the sulfur entered the stratosphere not by direct injection, but by slow lofting in the Asian summer monsoon circulation. Volcanic eruptions warn us that while stratospheric geoengineering could cool the surface, reducing ice melt and sea level rise, producing pretty sunsets, and increasing the CO2 sink, it could also reduce summer monsoon precipitation, destroy ozone, allowing more harmful UV at the surface, produce rapid warming when stopped, make the sky white, reduce solar power, perturb the ecology with more diffuse radiation, damage airplanes flying in the stratosphere, degrade astronomical observations, affect remote sensing, and affect

  3. System of Volcanic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. HÉDERVARI

    1972-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparison is made among the systems of B. G.
    Escher (3, of R. W. van Bemmelen (1 and that of the author (4. In this
    connection, on the basis of Esclier's classification, the terms of "constructiv
    e " and "destructive" eruptions are introduced into the author's system and
    at the same time Escher's concept on the possible relation between the depth
    of magma-chamber and the measure of the gas-pressure is discussed briefly.
    Three complementary remarks to the first paper (4 011 the subject of system
    of volcanic activity are added.

  4. Submarine Arc Volcanism in the Southern Mariana Arc: Results of Recent ROV studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, A. R.; Tamura, Y.; Stern, R. J.; Embley, R. W.; Hein, J. R.; Jordan, E.; Ribeiro, J. M.; Sica, N.; Kohut, E. J.; Whattam, S. A.; Hirahara, Y.; Senda, R.; Nunokawa, A.

    2009-12-01

    The submarine Diamante cross-arc volcanoes (~16°N) and the Sarigan-Zealandia Bank Multi-Volcano Complex (SZBMVC; ~16°45’N), north and south, respectively, of Anatahan Island in the southern Mariana Arc, were studied during several dives in June 2009 using the ROV Hyper-Dolphin, cruise NT09-08 (R/V Natsushima); neither has been studied in detail before. The data collected provide a new perspective on how the subduction factory operates to complement previous studies on other cross-arc volcanic chains in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc. The Diamante complex consists of three major edifices, two cones (West and Central Diamante) and a more complex caldera-like edifice at the volcanic front (East Diamante). West and Central Diamante are basaltic volcanoes but East Diamante has a more complex history. Our studies indicate initial construction of a basaltic volcano. Magmatic evolution led to a violent caldera-forming and quieter dome-building events. Post-caldera quiescence allowed a carbonate platform to grow, now preserved on the eastern caldera wall. Felsic magma or hot rock provides a heat source for an active hydrothermal field associated with felsic domes in the caldera, which NOAA investigators discovered in 2004. A new type of hydrothermal deposit was discovered in the hydrothermal field, consisting of large sulfide-sulfate mounds topped by bulbous constructions of low-temperature Fe and Mn oxides. Vents on the mounds were observed to emit shimmering water. The SZBMVC consists of six closely spaced edifices whose loci are aligned along two parallel trends, one along the volcanic front (Zealandia Bank, Sarigan and South Sarigan), and one about 15 km west towards the rear-arc (Northwest Zealandia, West Zealandia and West Sarigan). Zealandia Bank dives revealed that, as with East Diamante, initial activity was basaltic and became more evolved with time. The western half of Zealandia Bank is dominated by felsic lavas centered on a small (~2 km diameter) caldera and

  5. Petrologic and petrographic variation of youthful eruptive products in the Tuxtla Volcanic Field, Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, C. B.; Kobs Nawotniak, S. E.; Fredrick, K. C.; Espindola, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Tuxtla Volcanic Field (TVF) is located near the Gulf of Mexico in the southern part of the state of Veracruz, Mexico. Volcanism in the region began around 7 Ma and has continued until recent times with the volcano San Martín Tuxtla’s latest eruptions in AD 1664 and 1793. The TVF rocks are mainly of alkaline composition and have been divided into two separate volcanic series, an older and younger. The TVF is a structural high located between the Veracruz Basin to the southwest and the Gulf of Mexico to the northeast, characterized by relatively thin crust with the depth to the Moho around 28 to 34 km. The TVF is unique because it is isolated from the nearest volcanic fields (the Mexican Volcanic Belt, Central American Volcanic Belt and the Eastern Alkaline Province) by at least 230km and because of the on-going debate over its magmatic origin. Many models have been proposed to explain the TVF’s alkaline nature in a unique location with most linking it either to the subduction of the Cocos plate to the west of Mexico and/or to extensional faulting in the region. The purpose of our study was to determine systematic changes in the youthful volcanic deposits across the TVF. Regional and local mapping was conducted and lava and scoria samples were collected from seven sites associated with two vent clusters in the TVF. Mapping of the easternmost cluster of deposits suggests chronological emplacement of the deposits through superposition and vent location and morphology. The petrography of lava and tephra deposits may further indicate magmatic origins and other factors influencing the development of the field, including chronology and possible mixing and/or differentiation. Previous published studies analyzed samples near the San Martin Tuxtla volcanic center. Their data is used as a comparative reference for these samples, most of which were collected from another, younger cluster east of Laguna Catemaco. From this study, a better understanding of past eruptive

  6. 40 CFR 63.172 - Standards: Closed-vent systems and control devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... olfactory indications of leaks. (2) If the vapor collection system or closed-vent system is constructed of... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards: Closed-vent systems and... Standards: Closed-vent systems and control devices. (a) Owners or operators of closed-vent systems...

  7. Geology and geothermal potential of Alid Volcanic Center, Eritrea, Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clynne, M.A.; Duffield, W.A.; Fournier, R.O.; Janik, C.J. [and others

    1996-12-31

    Alid volcanic center is a 700-meter-tall mountain in Eritrea, northeast Africa. This mountain straddles the axis of an active crustal-spreading center called the Danakil Depression. Though volcanism associated with this crustal spreading is predominantly basaltic, centers of silicic volcanism, including Alid, are present locally. Silicic centers imply a magma reservoir in the crust and thus a possible potent shallow heat source for a hydrothermal-convection system. Boiling-temperature fumaroles are common on Alid, and their gas compositions indicate a reservoir temperature of at least 250{degrees}C. Alid is a 7-km x 5-km structural dome. The domed rocks, in decreasing age, are Precambrian schist and granite, a sequence of intercalated sedimentary rocks and basaltic lavas, and a sequence of basaltic and rhyolitic lava flows. Though isotopic ages are not yet determined, the domed volcanic rocks of Alid appear to be late Tertiary and/or Quaternary. Doming was likely caused by intrusion of relatively low density silicic magma into the upper crust. Subsequent to dome formation, a substantial volume of this magma was erupted from a vent near the west end of the summit area of the dome. This eruption produced a blanket of plinian rhyolite pumice over most, if not all, of the dome and fed pyroclastic flows that covered the part of the Danakil Depression around the base of the dome. The pumice deposits contain abundant inclusions of granophyric, miarolitic pyroxene granite, chemically indistinguishable from the pumice. This granite likely represents the uppermost part of the magma reservoir, which crystallized just prior to the pumice eruption.

  8. Western Eisila Regio, Venus - Radar properties of volcanic deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Bruce A.; Campbell, Donald B.

    1990-08-01

    The 1988 Arecibo Observatory dual-polarization radar images are presented for Western Eisila Regio, Venus. The polarization information and Pioneer-Venus Orbiter reflectivity and altimetry data are analyzed for volcanic deposits on two 400-500 km radius constructs, Sif and Gula Montes. Many of the large effusive deposits studied appear to require superposed flows or multiple vents to explain the observed progression of roughness along their length. High Fresnel reflectivity material may be present along the summit region of Gula Mons and in an embayed tessera-like region to the N. Radar-dark units on the flanks of Sif Mons are inferred to be pyroclastic deposits, but radar-dark features near the summits of both edifices are more consistent with very smooth lava flows. Higher spatial resolution Magellan data will be useful in testing these predictions.

  9. A 3D model of crustal magnetization at the Pinacate Volcanic Field, NW Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Abdeslem, Juan; Calmus, Thierry

    2015-08-01

    The Pinacate Volcanic Field (PVF) is located near the western border of the southern Basin and Range province, in the State of Sonora NW Mexico, and within the Gulf of California Extensional Province. This volcanic field contains the shield volcano Santa Clara, which mainly consists of basaltic to trachytic volcanic rocks, and reaches an altitude of ~ 1200 m. The PVF disrupts a series of discontinuous ranges of low topographic relief aligned in a NW direction, which consist mainly of Proterozoic metamorphic rocks and Proterozoic through Paleogene granitoids. The PVF covers an area of approximately 60 by 55 km, and includes more than 400 well-preserved cinder cones and vents and eight maar craters. It was active from about 1.7 Ma until about 13 ka. We have used the ages and magnetic polarities of the volcanic rocks, along with mapped magnetic anomalies and their inverse modeling to determine that the Pinacate Volcanic Field was formed during two volcanic episodes. The oldest one built the Santa Clara shield volcano of basaltic and trachytic composition, and occurred during the geomagnetic Matuyama Chron of reverse polarity, which also includes the normal polarity Jaramillo and Olduvai Subchrons, thus imprinting both normal and reverse magnetization in the volcanic products. The younger Pinacate series of basaltic composition represents monogenetic volcanic activity that extends all around the PVF and occurred during the subsequent geomagnetic Brunhes Chron of normal polarity. Magnetic anomalies toward the north of the Santa Clara volcano are the most intense in the PVF, and their inverse modeling indicates the presence of a large subsurface body magnetized in the present direction of the geomagnetic field. This suggests that the magma chambers at depth cooled below the Curie temperature during the Brunhes Chron.

  10. Volcan Reventador's Unusual Umbrella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, P.; Gioia, G.; Kieffer, S. W.

    2005-12-01

    In the past two decades, field observations of the deposits of volcanoes have been supplemented by systemmatic, and sometimes, opportunistic photographic documentation. Two photographs of the umbrella of the December 3, 2002 eruption of Volcan Reventador, Ecuador, reveal a prominently scalloped umbrella that is unlike any umbrella previously documented on a volcanic column. The material in the umbrella was being swept off a descending pyroclastic flow, and was, therefore, a co-ignimbrite cloud. We propose that the scallops are the result of a turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability with no precedents in volcanology. We ascribe the rare loss of buoyancy that drives this instability to the fact that the Reventador column fed on a cool co-ignimbrite cloud. On the basis of the observed wavelength of the scallops, we estimate a value for the eddy viscosity of the umbrella of 4000 ~m2/s. This value is consistent with a previously obtained lower bound (200 ~m2/s, K. Wohletz, priv. comm., 2005). We do not know the fate of the material in the umbrella subsequent to the photos. The analysis suggests that the umbrella was negatively buoyant. Field work on the co-ignimbrite deposits might reveal whether or not the material reimpacted, and if so, where and whether or not this material was involved in the hazardous flows that affected the main oil pipeline across Ecuador.

  11. Uranium series, volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Application of U-series dating to volcanic rocks provides unique and valuable information about the absolute timing of crystallization and differentiation of magmas prior to eruption. The 238U–230Th and 230Th-226Ra methods are the most commonly employed for dating the crystallization of mafic to silicic magmas that erupt at volcanoes. Dates derived from the U–Th and Ra–Th methods reflect crystallization because diffusion of these elements at magmatic temperatures is sluggish (Cherniak 2010) and diffusive re-equilibration is insignificant over the timescales (less than or equal to 10^5 years) typically associated with pre-eruptive storage of nearly all magma compositions (Cooper and Reid 2008). Other dating methods based on elements that diffuse rapidly at magmatic temperatures, such as the 40Ar/39Ar and (U–Th)/He methods, yield dates for the cooling of magma at the time of eruption. Disequilibrium of some short-lived daughters of the uranium series such as 210Po may be fractionated by saturation of a volatile phase and can be employed to date magmatic gas loss that is synchronous with volcanic eruption (e.g., Rubin et al. 1994).

  12. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGrande, Allegra N.; Anchukaitis, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions represent some of the most climatically important and societally disruptive short-term events in human history. Large eruptions inject ash, dust, sulfurous gases (e.g. SO2, H2S), halogens (e.g. Hcl and Hbr), and water vapor into the Earth's atmosphere. Sulfurous emissions principally interact with the climate by converting into sulfate aerosols that reduce incoming solar radiation, warming the stratosphere and altering ozone creation, reducing global mean surface temperature, and suppressing the hydrological cycle. In this issue, we focus on the history, processes, and consequences of these large eruptions that inject enough material into the stratosphere to significantly affect the climate system. In terms of the changes wrought on the energy balance of the Earth System, these transient events can temporarily have a radiative forcing magnitude larger than the range of solar, greenhouse gas, and land use variability over the last millennium. In simulations as well as modern and paleoclimate observations, volcanic eruptions cause large inter-annual to decadal-scale changes in climate. Active debates persist concerning their role in longer-term (multi-decadal to centennial) modification of the Earth System, however.

  13. Optical Detection of Organic Chemical Biosignatures at Hydrothermal Vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, P. G.; Lane, A. L.; Bhartia, R.; Hug, W. H.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a non-contact, optical life detection instrument that can detect organic chemical biosignatures in a number of different environments, including dry land, shallow aqueous, deep marine or in ice. Hence, the instrument is appropriate as a biosignature survey tool both for Mars exploration or in situ experiments in an ice-covered ocean such as one might wish to explore on Europa. Here, we report the results we obtained on an expedition aboard the Russian oceanographic vessel Akademik Mstislav Keldysh to hydrothermal vent sites in the Pacific Ocean using our life detection instrument MCDUVE, a multichannel, deep ultraviolet excitation fluorescence detector. MCDUVE detected organic material distribution on rocks near the vent, as well as direct detection of organisms, both microbial and microscopic. We also were able to detect organic material issuing directly from vent chimneys, measure the organic signature of the water column as we ascended, and passively observe the emission of light directly from some vents.

  14. Magmatic Evolution in the Los Tuxtlas Volcanic Field, Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, A.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    Magma evolution within the Los Tuxtlas Volcanic Field (LTVF) is poorly understood. The LTVF is a basaltic, monogenetic field in Veracruz, Mexico, that contains approximately 400 vents and has been active for the last 7 Ma, including a sub-Plinian eruption in 1793. The field is structurally controlled, with cones forming NW-SE lines consistent with local extension. By understanding magmatic evolution through ascent, storage, and mixing, it is possible to more accurately predict future trends in the system. Samples from two alignments of cinder cones located between San Martin Tuxtlas volcano and Laguna Catemaco were analyzed petrographically and geochemically. Geochemical data were plotted in Fenner and Harker diagrams to identify trends, including fractional crystallization and magma recharge. Mineral modes were calculated via point counting in thin sections, and micro-textural variations were noted. Cone morphometry was used as a rough proxy for age along with field relationships to develop an approximate order of events along the alignments. Preliminary data suggest that the aligned vents are part of a linked magmatic plumbing system undergoing periodic recharge.

  15. The Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruption from a microwave weather radar perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Marzano

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The sub-glacial Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruptions of April and May 2010 are analyzed and quantitatively interpreted by using ground-based weather radar data and volcanic ash radar retrieval (VARR technique. The Eyjafjöll eruptions have been continuously monitored by the Keflavík C-band weather radar, located at a distance of about 155 km from the volcano vent. Considering that the Eyjafjöll volcano is approximately 20 km far from the Atlantic Ocean and that the northerly winds stretched the plume toward the mainland Europe, weather radars are the only means to provide an estimate of the total ejected tephra. The VARR methodology is summarized and applied to available radar time series to estimate the plume maximum height, ash particle category, ash volume, ash fallout and ash concentration every 5 min near the vent. Estimates of the discharge rate of eruption, based on the retrieved ash plume top height, are provided together with an evaluation of the total erupted mass and volume. Deposited ash at ground is also retrieved from radar data by empirically reconstructing the vertical profile of radar reflectivity and estimating the near-surface ash fallout. Radar-based retrieval results cannot be compared with ground measurements, due to the lack of the latter, but further demonstrate the unique contribution of these remote sensing products to the understating and modelling of explosive volcanic ash eruptions.

  16. The Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruption from a microwave weather radar perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Marzano

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The sub-glacial Eyjafjöll explosive volcanic eruptions of April and May 2010 are analyzed and quantitatively interpreted by using ground-based weather radar data and the Volcanic Ash Radar Retrieval (VARR technique. The Eyjafjöll eruptions have been continuously monitored by the Keflavík C-band weather radar, located at a distance of about 155 km from the volcano vent. Considering that the Eyjafjöll volcano is approximately 20 km from the Atlantic Ocean and that the northerly winds stretched the plume toward the mainland Europe, weather radars are the only means to provide an estimate of the total ejected tephra. The VARR methodology is summarized and applied to available radar time series to estimate the plume maximum height, ash particle category, ash volume, ash fallout and ash concentration every 5 min near the vent. Estimates of the discharge rate of eruption, based on the retrieved ash plume top height, are provided together with an evaluation of the total erupted mass and volume. Deposited ash at ground is also retrieved from radar data by empirically reconstructing the vertical profile of radar reflectivity and estimating the near-surface ash fallout. Radar-based retrieval results cannot be compared with ground measurements, due to the lack of the latter, but further demonstrate the unique contribution of these remote sensing products to the understating and modelling of explosive volcanic ash eruptions.

  17. Crustal magnetization and the subseafloor structure of the ASHES vent field, Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge: Implications for the investigation of hydrothermal sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caratori Tontini, Fabio; Crone, Timothy J.; Ronde, Cornel E. J.; Fornari, Daniel J.; Kinsey, James C.; Mittelstaedt, Eric; Tivey, Maurice

    2016-06-01

    High-resolution geophysical data have been collected using the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Sentry over the ASHES (Axial Seamount Hydrothermal Emission Study) high-temperature (~348°C) vent field at Axial Seamount, on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Multiple surveys were performed on a 3-D grid at different altitudes above the seafloor, providing an unprecedented view of magnetic data resolution as a function of altitude above the seafloor. Magnetic data derived near the seafloor show that the ASHES field is characterized by a zone of low magnetization, which can be explained by hydrothermal alteration of the host volcanic rocks. Surface manifestations of hydrothermal activity at the ASHES vent field are likely controlled by a combination of local faults and fractures and different lava morphologies near the seafloor. Three-dimensional inversion of the magnetic data provides evidence of a vertical, pipe-like upflow zone of the hydrothermal fluids with a vertical extent of ~100 m.

  18. Retrieval and intercomparison of volcanic SO2 injection height and eruption time from satellite maps and ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardini, Federica; Burton, Mike; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Corradini, Stefano; Salerno, Giuseppe; Merucci, Luca; Di Grazia, Giuseppe

    2017-02-01

    Syneruptive gas flux time series can, in principle, be retrieved from satellite maps of SO2 collected during and immediately after volcanic eruptions, and used to gain insights into the volcanic processes which drive the volcanic activity. Determination of the age and height of volcanic plumes are key prerequisites for such calculations. However, these parameters are challenging to constrain using satellite-based techniques. Here, we use imagery from OMI and GOME-2 satellite sensors and a novel numerical procedure based on back-trajectory analysis to calculate plume height as a function of position at the satellite measurement time together with plume injection height and time at a volcanic vent location. We applied this new procedure to three Etna eruptions (12 August 2011, 18 March 2012 and 12 April 2013) and compared our results with independent satellite and ground-based estimations. We also compare our injection height time-series with measurements of volcanic tremor, which reflects the eruption intensity, showing a good match between these two datasets. Our results are a milestone in progressing towards reliable determination of gas flux data from satellite-derived SO2 maps during volcanic eruptions, which would be of great value for operational management of explosive eruptions.

  19. Depositional and Immersion-Mode Ice Nucleation of Fine-Grained Volcanic Ash Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloer, S.; Woods, T.; Genareau, K. D.

    2016-12-01

    Volcanic lightning is a common phenomenon during explosive eruptions; occurring as vent discharges, near-vent discharges, and plume lightning. Plume lightning is most similar to thunderstorm lightning, where volcanic ash may act as ice nuclei. Volcanic ash samples derived from eight volcanoes: Augustine, Crater Peak, Katmai, Okmok, Redoubt (Alaska, U.S.A.), Lathrop Well (Nevada, U.S.A.), Taupo (New Zealand), and Valles Caldera (New Mexico, U.S.A.); were used to determine what roles ash mineralogy, particularly Fe-oxide-bearing minerals and silica-enriched minerals, grain shape, and grain size have in the nucleation of ice, which can generate plume lightning. Depositional and immersion-mode ice nucleation experiments were performed using a Nicolet Almega XR Dispersive Raman spectrometer, following the methods of Schill et al. (2015), where samples were shaken for 24 h prior to experiments in ultra-pure water, then nebulized to super micron droplets. Depositional nucleation experiments were conducted from 225-235 K, and immersion-mode nucleation experiments were conducted from 233-278 K. A JEOL JSM 6010 Plus/LA scanning electron microscope (SEM), along with Image-J freeware, was used to quantify the number density of Fe-oxide mineral phases in backscattered electron images, with an x-ray diffractometer (XRD) used to determine bulk mineral abundance and an x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer to determine bulk ash composition. Based on previous studies, we hypothesize that all ash samples will efficiently form depositional ice nuclei; however, certain mineral phases will dictate the efficiency of immersion-mode ice nucleation including K or Na / Ca feldspars, which have been shown to be efficient nuclei, and Fe-oxide-bearing minerals. These results will shed new light on volcanic cloud dynamics and add new parameters for atmospheric models, which currently only address effects of mineral dust as ice nuclei and overlook the potential role of volcanic ash.

  20. Experimental Study of Effect of Vents in Thermal Ventilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Dong; LIU Xiao-yu; ZHUANG Jiang-ting; SHEN Hui

    2009-01-01

    The effects of vents on thermal ventilation to save energy in the cold roUing workshop of Baosteel were investigated.According to the scale modeling theory,a small chamber was established.The details about construction of experiment On thermal ventilation and the preparation and arrangement of apparatus were dis-cussed,and then the effects of vents on thermal ventilation were studied through experiments,which includes the temperature distribution,the volume of ventilation,the temperature difference between inlets and outlets,the neutral plane,and the effective thermal coefficient of thermal natural ventilation.Based on this,the effects of natural ventilation based on varied area of inlets and oudets and those of vents on one side and on different sides were compared.According to the experiments,the area of inlet vents and outlet vents affect the tempera-ture distribution in chamber, and their effects on ventilation volume are difierent,but the effects of vents in sin-gle side or different sides aare the same under the condition that only thermal ventilation is considered.

  1. Cryptic species of Archinome (Annelida: Amphinomida) from vents and seeps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borda, Elizabeth; Kudenov, Jerry D; Chevaldonné, Pierre; Blake, James A; Desbruyères, Daniel; Fabri, Marie-Claire; Hourdez, Stéphane; Pleijel, Fredrik; Shank, Timothy M; Wilson, Nerida G; Schulze, Anja; Rouse, Greg W

    2013-11-07

    Since its description from the Galapagos Rift in the mid-1980s, Archinome rosacea has been recorded at hydrothermal vents in the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Only recently was a second species described from the Pacific Antarctic Ridge. We inferred the identities and evolutionary relationships of Archinome representatives sampled from across the hydrothermal vent range of the genus, which is now extended to cold methane seeps. Species delimitation using mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) recovered up to six lineages, whereas concatenated datasets (COI, 16S, 28S and ITS1) supported only four or five of these as clades. Morphological approaches alone were inconclusive to verify the identities of species owing to the lack of discrete diagnostic characters. We recognize five Archinome species, with three that are new to science. The new species, designated based on molecular evidence alone, include: Archinome levinae n. sp., which occurs at both vents and seeps in the east Pacific, Archinome tethyana n. sp., which inhabits Atlantic vents and Archinome jasoni n. sp., also present in the Atlantic, and whose distribution extends to the Indian and southwest Pacific Oceans. Biogeographic connections between vents and seeps are highlighted, as are potential evolutionary links among populations from vent fields located in the east Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, and Atlantic and Indian Oceans; the latter presented for the first time.

  2. Payload bay atmospheric vent airflow testing at the Vibration and Acoustic Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James D., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Several concerns related to venting the Space Shuttle Orbiter payload bay during launch led to laboratory experiments with a flight-type vent box installed in the wall of a subsonic wind tunnel. This report describes the test setups and procedures used to acquire data for characterization of airflow through the vent box and acoustic tones radiated from the vent-box cavity. A flexible boundary-layer spoiler which reduced the vent-tone amplitude is described.

  3. Geochemical Patterns Classification of recent Mt. Etna Volcanic Products based on a synopsis of Kohonen Maps and Fuzzy Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, Rosa Anna; Falsaperla, Susanna; Langer, Horst

    2010-05-01

    were contemporaneously erupted. One magma type ascended from a deep portion of the plumbing system (> 5 km), and was emitted from the so called "Lower" (2001) and "Southern" vents (2002-03). Another one rose from a shallower reservoir (afore mentioned products. Volcanics emitted by the South-East crater during the fire fountains in 2000 belong to the same fuzzy cluster as the "Lower" and "Southern" vent lavas, however, a neat distinction with respect to 2001 and 2002-03 lavas becomes evident in the Kohonen Map. Besides this we observe differences in the seismic signal characteristics between the fire fountain events and flank eruptions, supporting the hypothesis that various eruptive sources were active on Mt Etna in 2000, 2001 and 2002-03. The relation of the products to eruptive sources is less clear in the time span between 1995 and 1999, when essentially only the summit craters were active.

  4. Friction in volcanic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic landscapes are amongst the most dynamic on Earth and, as such, are particularly susceptible to failure and frictional processes. In rocks, damage accumulation is frequently accompanied by the release of seismic energy, which has been shown to accelerate in the approach to failure on both a field and laboratory scale. The point at which failure occurs is highly dependent upon strain-rate, which also dictates the slip-zone properties that pertain beyond failure, in scenarios such as sector collapse and pyroclastic flows as well as the ascent of viscous magma. High-velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments have provided new opportunities to overcome the grand challenge of understanding faulting processes during volcanic phenomena. Work on granular ash material demonstrates that at ambient temperatures, ash gouge behaves according to Byerlee's rule at low slip velocities, but is slip-weakening, becoming increasingly lubricating as slip ensues. In absence of ash along a slip plane, rock-rock friction induces cataclasis and heating which, if sufficient, may induce melting (producing pseudotachylyte) and importantly, vesiculation. The viscosity of the melt, so generated, controls the subsequent lubrication or resistance to slip along the fault plane thanks to non-Newtonian suspension rheology. The shear-thinning behaviour and viscoelasticity of frictional melts yield a tendency for extremely unstable slip, and occurrence of frictional melt fragmentation. This velocity-dependence acts as an important feedback mechanism on the slip plane, in addition to the bulk composition, mineralogy and glass content of the magma, that all influence frictional behaviour. During sector collapse events and in pyroclastic density currents it is the frictional properties of the rocks and ash that, in-part, control the run-out distance and associated risk. In addition, friction plays an important role in the eruption of viscous magmas: In the conduit, the rheology of magma is integral

  5. Impact of major volcanic eruptions on stratospheric water vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, Michael; Brinkop, Sabine; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Volcanic eruptions can have a significant impact on the Earth's weather and climate system. Besides the subsequent tropospheric changes, the stratosphere is also influenced by large eruptions. Here changes in stratospheric water vapour after the two major volcanic eruptions of El Chichón in Mexico in 1982 and Mount Pinatubo on the Philippines in 1991 are investigated with chemistry-climate model simulations. This study is based on two simulations with specified dynamics of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Hamburg - Modular Earth Submodel System (ECHAM/MESSy) Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model, performed within the Earth System Chemistry integrated Modelling (ESCiMo) project, of which only one includes the long-wave volcanic forcing through prescribed aerosol optical properties. The results show a significant increase in stratospheric water vapour induced by the eruptions, resulting from increased heating rates and the subsequent changes in stratospheric and tropopause temperatures in the tropics. The tropical vertical advection and the South Asian summer monsoon are identified as sources for the additional water vapour in the stratosphere. Additionally, volcanic influences on tropospheric water vapour and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) are evident, if the long-wave forcing is strong enough. Our results are corroborated by additional sensitivity simulations of the Mount Pinatubo period with reduced nudging and reduced volcanic aerosol extinction.

  6. Birth of two volcanic islands in the southern Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Wenbin

    2015-05-26

    Submarine eruptions that lead to the formation of new volcanic islands are rare and far from being fully understood; only a few such eruptions have been witnessed since Surtsey Island emerged to the south of Iceland in the 1960s. Here we report on two new volcanic islands that were formed in the Zubair archipelago of the southern Red Sea in 2011–2013. Using high-resolution optical satellite images, we find that the new islands grew rapidly during their initial eruptive phases and that coastal erosion significantly modified their shapes within months. Satellite radar data indicate that two north–south-oriented dykes, much longer than the small islands might suggest, fed the eruptions. These events occurred contemporaneously with several local earthquake swarms of the type that typically accompany magma intrusions. Earthquake activity has been affecting the southern Red Sea for decades, suggesting the presence of a magmatically active zone that has previously escaped notice.

  7. Late-Pleistocene to precolumbian behind-the-arc mafic volcanism in the eastern Mexican Volcanic Belt; implications for future hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Lee; Carrasco-Núñez, Gerardo

    2002-06-01

    An area of widespread alkaline-to-subalkaline volcanism lies at the northern end of the Cofre de Perote-Citlaltépetl (Pico de Orizaba) volcanic chain in the eastern Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB). Two principal areas were active. About a dozen latest-Pleistocene to precolumbian vents form the 11-km-wide, E-W-trending Cofre de Perote vent cluster (CPVC) at 2300-2800 m elevation on the flank of the largely Pleistocene Cofre de Perote shield volcano and produced an extensive lava field that covers >100 km 2. More widely dispersed vents form the Naolinco volcanic field (NVF) in the Sierra de Chiconquiaco north of the city of Jalapa (Xalapa). Three generations of flows are delineated by cone and lava-flow morphology, degree of vegetation and cultivation, and radiocarbon dating. The flows lie in the behind-the-arc portion of the northeastern part of the MVB and show major- and trace-element chemical patterns transitional between intraplate and subduction zone environments. Flows of the oldest group originated from La Joya cinder cone (radiocarbon ages ˜42 000 yr BP) at the eastern end of the CPVC. This cone fed an olivine-basaltic flow field of ˜20 km 2 that extends about 14 km southeast to underlie the heavily populated northern outskirts of Jalapa, the capital city of the state of Veracruz. The Central Cone Group (CCG), of intermediate age, consists of four morphologically youthful cinder cones and associated vents that were the source of a lava field>27 km 2 of late-Pleistocene or Holocene age. The youngest group includes the westernmost flow, from Cerro Colorado, and a lava flow ˜2980 BP from the Rincón de Chapultepec scoria cone of the NVF. The latest eruption, from the compound El Volcancillo scoria cone, occurred about 870 radiocarbon years ago and produced two chemically and rheologically diverse lava flows that are among the youngest precolumbian flows in México and resemble paired aa-pahoehoe flows from Mauna Loa volcano. The El Volcancillo eruption

  8. Geology, sulfide geochemistry and supercritical venting at the Beebe Hydrothermal Vent Field, Cayman Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Alexander P.; Roberts, Stephen; Murton, Bramley J.; Hodgkinson, Matthew R. S.

    2015-09-01

    The Beebe Vent Field (BVF) is the world's deepest known hydrothermal system, at 4960 m below sea level. Located on the Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre, Caribbean, the BVF hosts high temperature (˜401°C) "black smoker" vents that build Cu, Zn and Au-rich sulfide mounds and chimneys. The BVF is highly gold-rich, with Au values up to 93 ppm and an average Au:Ag ratio of 0.15. Gold precipitation is directly associated with diffuse flow through "beehive" chimneys. Significant mass-wasting of sulfide material at the BVF, accompanied by changes in metal content, results in metaliferous talus and sediment deposits. Situated on very thin (2-3 km thick) oceanic crust, at an ultraslow spreading centre, the hydrothermal system circulates fluids to a depth of ˜1.8 km in a basement that is likely to include a mixture of both mafic and ultramafic lithologies. We suggest hydrothermal interaction with chalcophile-bearing sulfides in the mantle rocks, together with precipitation of Au in beehive chimney structures, has resulted in the formation of a Au-rich volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposit. With its spatial distribution of deposit materials and metal contents, the BVF represents a modern day analogue for basalt hosted, Au-rich VMS systems.

  9. Quaternary basaltic volcanism in the Payenia volcanic province, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina

    The extensive Quaternary volcanism in the Payenia volcanic province, Mendoza, Argentina, is investigated in this study by major and trace element analyses, Sr, Nd, Hf and Pb-isotopic analyses and Zr-Hf isotope dilution data on samples from almost the entire province. The samples are mainly...... in basalts from all the studied volcanic fields in Payenia is signs of lower crustal contamination indicating assimilation of, in some cases, large amounts of trace element depleted, mafic, plagioclase-bearing rocks. The northern Payenia is dominated by backarc basalts erupted between late Pliocene to late...

  10. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Jjj of... - Group 1 Batch Process Vents and Aggregate Batch Vent Streams-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Aggregate Batch Vent Streams-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements 7 Table 7 to Subpart JJJ... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins Pt. 63, Subpt. JJJ, Table 7 Table 7 to Subpart JJJ of Part 63—Group 1 Batch Process Vents and Aggregate Batch Vent Streams...

  11. NOAA Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas 2016: Volcanic arc and Backarc Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, R. J.; Brounce, M. N.; Chadwick, B.; Fryer, P. B.; Glickson, D.; Merle, S. G.

    2016-12-01

    Legs 1 and 3 of NOAA Okeanos Explorer EX1605 devoted a total of 17 ROV dives to exploring the Mariana magmatic arc and backarc basin (BAB). Dives were carried out on 11 submarine arc volcanoes, the submerged slopes of two volcanic islands, and at 3 BAB sites along 1000 km of the Mariana arc system. Four of the studied arc volcanoes are extinct, three are dormant, and six are active. All BAB dives were on the spreading ridge between 15-17°N, which is volcanically active. Geologic highpoints of these dives include: 1) discovery of an extinct hydrothermal chimney ( 15m tall) in Fina Nagu A (Leg 1, Dive 7; L1D7); 2) observations of very fresh (<3 years old) BAB pillow basalts (L1D9); 3) discovery of a very active BAB hydrothermal field (T 340°C, active chimneys up to 30m tall; L1D11); 4) examination of Esmeralda Bank crater floor (active venting but too murky to find vents; L1D19); 5) discovery of hydrothermal vents with vent fauna on Chamorro volcano (L3D7; T 30°C, active chimneys 2m tall); and 6) examination of active venting and S degassing at 500-350 m depth on Daikoku volcano (L3D9). Video clips of some of the most exciting discoveries and examinations will be presented. We plan to compare previous bathymetry over the active volcanoes with what was collected during EX1605 to quantify how these edifices have changed since when these were previously mapped, over the past 13 years or less. These dives also provided visual evidence in support of the hypothesis that individual edifices of the Fina Nagu Volcanic Complex increase in age from NE to SW, interpreted as due to the motion of actively-extending lithosphere of the southern Mariana BAB to the SW over a relatively fixed source of arc magma above the subducting Pacific plate (Brounce et al. G3 2016). Continuous interaction between biologists and geologists on EX1605 allowed us to identify regions of high faunal density on hard substrates around some active volcanoes, for example Esmeralda Bank, presumably

  12. Volcanic hazard assessment at Deception Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini, S.; Sobradelo, R.; Geyer, A.; Martí, J.

    2012-04-01

    Deception Island is the most active volcano of the South Shetland Islands (Antarctica) with more than twenty eruptions recognised over the past two centuries. The island was formed on the expansion axis of the Central Bransfield Strait and its evolution consists of constructive and destructive phases. A first a shield phase was followed by the construction of a central edifice and formation of the caldera with a final monogenetic volcanism along the caldera rim. The post-caldera magma composition varies from andesitic-basaltic to dacitic. The activity is characterised by monogenetic eruptions of low volume and short duration. The eruptions show a variable degree of explosivity, strombolian or phreatomagmatic, with a VEI 2 to 4, which have generated a wide variety of pyroclastic deposits and lavas. It is remarkable how many phases of phreatic explosive eruptions are associated to the emission of large ballistic blocks. Tephra record preserved in the glacier ice of Livingston Island or in marine sediments show the explosive power of the phreatomagmatic phases and the wide dispersal of its finest products in a great variety of directions of the prevailing winds. Also it is important to highlight the presence of different lahar deposits associated with some of these eruptions. In this contribution we present the guidelines to conduct a short-term and long-term volcanic hazard assessment at Deception Island. We apply probabilistic methods to estimate the susceptibility, statistical techniques to determine the eruption recurrence and eruptive scenario, and reproduce the effects of historical eruptions too. Volcanic hazard maps and scenarios are obtained using a Voris-based model tool (Felpeto et al., 2007) in a free Geographical Information System (GIS), a Quantum GIS.

  13. Analyse du vent sur l'aérodrome de Brasov-Ghimbav (Roumanie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Ilie Briceag

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cette analyse du vent est destinée à préciser les conditions météorologiques locales qui conditionnent le fonctionnement de l'aérodrome de Brasov-Ghimbav. En aviation, la direction et l'intensité du vent sont très importantes pour le décollage et plus encore pour l'atterrissage des aéronefs. L'étude de cet élément météorologique est réalisée à partir d'une analyse climatologique portant sur 39 années, de 1971 à 2009, et d'une analyse aérologique sur 10 années, de 2000 à 2009 (les observations météorologiques ont été fournies par l'Administration Nationale de la Météorologie. Les résultats obtenus montrent la distribution prédominante du vent selon certaines directions, les directions nord-ouest et sud-ouest, pour les observations visuelles anciennes, et les directions ouest-nord-ouest et sud-sud-ouest, pour les observations automatiques au cours des six dernières années. Quelle que soit la méthode d'observation, c'est le vent de travers (directions ouest qui atteint les vitesses les plus élevées sur la piste principale de l'aérodrome de Brasov-Ghimbav, comme du reste sur la piste projetée pour le futur aéroport international de Brasov. Cela constitue un problème pour les aéronefs les plus légers, dont les valeurs limites pour le vent de travers sont faibles. Dans ce contexte, la prévision des vents violents est très importante. La distribution horaire des vents sur la période 2000­2009, montre notamment qu'au printemps et en été, les vents de nord-ouest sont largement dominants durant le jour, en particulier pour les vitesses [10-15 m/s, avec une fréquence maximale entre 10 et 15 heures. L'analyse aérologique des situations météorologiques apporte des éléments d'explication à certaines observations. Ainsi les vitesses du vent ≥ 20 m/s ont été enregistrées majoritairement en présence du cyclone Islandais, lors du passage du front atmosphérique froid, le contraste barrique étant

  14. Galileo observations of volcanic plumes on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, P.E.; McMillan, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    Io's volcanic plumes erupt in a dazzling variety of sizes, shapes, colors and opacities. In general, the plumes fall into two classes, representing distinct source gas temperatures. Most of the Galileo imaging observations were of the smaller, more numerous Prometheus-type plumes that are produced when hot flows of silicate lava impinge on volatile surface ices of SO2. Few detections were made of the giant, Pele-type plumes that vent high temperature, sulfur-rich gases from the interior of Io; this was partly because of the insensitivity of Galileo's camera to ultraviolet wavelengths. Both gas and dust spout from plumes of each class. Favorably located gas plumes were detected during eclipse, when Io was in Jupiter's shadow. Dense dust columns were imaged in daylight above several Prometheus-type eruptions, reaching heights typically less than 100 km. Comparisons between eclipse observations, sunlit images, and the record of surface changes show that these optically thick dust columns are much smaller in stature than the corresponding gas plumes but are adequate to produce the observed surface deposits. Mie scattering calculations suggest that these conspicuous dust plumes are made up of coarse grained “ash” particles with radii on the order of 100 nm, and total masses on the order of 106 kg per plume. Long exposure images of Thor in sunlight show a faint outer envelope apparently populated by particles small enough to be carried along with the gas flow, perhaps formed by condensation of sulfurous “snowflakes” as suggested by the plasma instrumentation aboard Galileo as it flew through Thor's plume [Frank, L.A., Paterson, W.R., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. (Space Phys.) 107, doi:10.1029/2002JA009240. 31-1]. If so, the total mass of these fine, nearly invisible particles may be comparable to the mass of the gas, and could account for much of Io's rapid resurfacing.

  15. Io. [theories concerning volcanic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T. V.; Soderblom, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    A report on the continuing investigation of Io is presented. Gravitational resonance is discussed as the cause of Io's volcanism, and the volcanic activity is explained in terms of sulfur chemistry. Theories concerning the reasons for the two main types of volcanic eruptions on Io are advanced and correlated with geographical features of the satellite. The sulfur and silicate models of the calderas are presented, citing the strengths and weaknesses of each. Problems of the gravitational resonance theory of Io's heat source are then described. Finally, observations of Io planned for the Galileo mission are summarized.

  16. Triboelectric charging of volcanic ash from the 2011 Gr\\'{i}msv\\"{o}tn eruption

    OpenAIRE

    Houghton, Isobel M. P.; Aplin, Karen L.; Nicoll, Keri

    2013-01-01

    The plume from the 2011 eruption of Grímsvötn was highly electrically charged, as shown by the considerable lightning activity measured by the United Kingdom Met Office’s low-frequency lightning detection network. Previous measurements of volcanic plumes have shown that ash particles are electrically charged up to hundreds of kilometers away from the vent, which indicates that the ash continues to charge in the plume [R. G. Harrison, K. A. Nicoll, Z. Ulanowski, and T. A. Mather, Environ. Res....

  17. A geochemical reconnaissance of the Alid volcanic center and geothermal system, Danakil depression, Eritrea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, J. B.; Janik, C.J.; Fournier, R.O.; Tesfai, T.; Duffield, W.A.; Clynne, M.A.; Smith, James G.; Woldegiorgis, L.; Weldemariam, K.; Kahsai, G.

    1999-01-01

    Geological and geochemical studies indicate that a high-temperature geothermal system underlies the Alid volcanic center in the northern Danakil depression of Eritrea. Alid is a very late-Pleistocene structural dome formed by shallow intrusion of rhyolitic magma, some of which vented as lavas and pyroclastic flows. Fumaroles and boiling pools distributed widely over an area of ~10 km2 on the northern half of Alid suggest that an active hydrothermal system underlies much of that part of the mountain. Geothermometers indicate that the fumarolic gases are derived from a geothermal system with temperatures >225??C. The isotopic composition of condensed fumarolic steam is consistent with these temperatures and implies that the source water is derived primarily from either lowland meteoric waters or fossil Red Sea water, or both. Some gases vented from the system (CO2, H2S and He) are largely magmatic in origin. Permeability beneath the volcanic center may be high, given the amount of intrusion-related deformation and the active normal faulting within the Danakil depression.Geological and geochemical studies indicate that a high-temperature geothermal system underlies the Alid volcanic center in the northern Danakil depression of Eritrea. Alid is a very late-Pleistocene structural dome formed by shallow intrusion of rhyolitic magma, some of which vented as lavas and pyroclastic flows. Fumaroles and boiling pools distributed widely over an area of approx. 10 km2 on the northern half of Alid suggest that an active hydrothermal system underlies much of that part of the mountain. Geothermometers indicate that the fumarolic gases are derived from a geothermal system with temperatures >225??C. The isotopic composition of condensed fumarolic steam is consistent with these temperatures and implies that the source water is derived primarily from either lowland meteoric waters or fossil Red Sea water, or both. Some gases vented from the system (CO2, H2S and He) are largely

  18. Geologic and geophysical investigations of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ander, M. E.; Heiken, G.; Eichelberger, J.; Laughlin, A. W.; Huestis, S.

    1981-05-01

    A positive, northeast-trending gravity anomaly, 90 km long and 30 km wide, extends southwest from the Zuni uplift, New Mexico. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, an alignment of 74 basaltic vents, is parallel to the eastern edge of the anomaly. Lavas display a bimodal distribution of tholeiitic and alkalic compositions, and were erupted over a period from 4 Myr to present. A residual gravity profile taken perpendicular to the major axis of the anomaly was analyzed using linear programming and ideal body theory to obtain bounds on the density contrast, depth, and minimum thickness of the gravity body.

  19. Formation of Zn- and Fe-sulfides near hydrothermal vents at the Eastern Lau Spreading Center: implications for sulfide bioavailability to chemoautotrophs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucel Mustafa

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The speciation of dissolved sulfide in the water immediately surrounding deep-ocean hydrothermal vents is critical to chemoautotrophic organisms that are the primary producers of these ecosystems. The objective of this research was to identify the role of Zn and Fe for controlling the speciation of sulfide in the hydrothermal vent fields at the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC in the southern Pacific Ocean. Compared to other well-studied hydrothermal systems in the Pacific, the ELSC is notable for unique ridge characteristics and gradients over short distances along the north-south ridge axis. Results In June 2005, diffuse-flow ( 250°C vent fluids were collected from four field sites along the ELSC ridge axis. Total and filtered Zn and Fe concentrations were quantified in the vent fluid samples using voltammetric and spectrometric analyses. The results indicated north-to-south variability in vent fluid composition. In the high temperature vent fluids, the ratio of total Fe to total Zn varied from 39 at Kilo Moana, the most northern site, to less than 7 at the other three sites. The concentrations of total Zn, Fe, and acid-volatile sulfide indicated that oversaturation and precipitation of sphalerite (ZnS(s and pyrite (FeS2(s were possible during cooling of the vent fluids as they mixed with the surrounding seawater. In contrast, most samples were undersaturated with respect to mackinawite (FeS(s. The reactivity of Zn(II in the filtered samples was tested by adding Cu(II to the samples to induce metal-exchange reactions. In a portion of the samples, the concentration of labile Zn2+ increased after the addition of Cu(II, indicating the presence of strongly-bound Zn(II species such as ZnS clusters and nanoparticles. Conclusion Results of this study suggest that Zn is important to sulfide speciation at ELSC vent habitats, particularly at the southern sites where Zn concentrations increase relative to Fe. As the hydrothermal

  20. Paleoarchean trace fossils in altered volcanic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudigel, Hubert; Furnes, Harald; DeWit, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    Microbial corrosion textures in volcanic glass from Cenozoic seafloor basalts and the corresponding titanite replacement microtextures in metamorphosed Paleoarchean pillow lavas have been interpreted as evidence for a deep biosphere dating back in time through the earliest periods of preserved life on earth. This interpretation has been recently challenged for Paleoarchean titanite replacement textures based on textural and geochronological data from pillow lavas in the Hooggenoeg Complex of the Barberton Greenstone Belt in South Africa. We use this controversy to explore the strengths and weaknesses of arguments made in support or rejection of the biogenicity interpretation of bioalteration trace fossils in Cenozoic basalt glasses and their putative equivalents in Paleoarchean greenstones. Our analysis suggests that biogenicity cannot be taken for granted for all titanite-based textures in metamorphosed basalt glass, but a cautious and critical evaluation of evidence suggests that biogenicity remains the most likely interpretation for previously described titanite microtextures in Paleoarchean pillow lavas. PMID:26038543

  1. Paleoarchean trace fossils in altered volcanic glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudigel, Hubert; Furnes, Harald; DeWit, Maarten

    2015-06-02

    Microbial corrosion textures in volcanic glass from Cenozoic seafloor basalts and the corresponding titanite replacement microtextures in metamorphosed Paleoarchean pillow lavas have been interpreted as evidence for a deep biosphere dating back in time through the earliest periods of preserved life on earth. This interpretation has been recently challenged for Paleoarchean titanite replacement textures based on textural and geochronological data from pillow lavas in the Hooggenoeg Complex of the Barberton Greenstone Belt in South Africa. We use this controversy to explore the strengths and weaknesses of arguments made in support or rejection of the biogenicity interpretation of bioalteration trace fossils in Cenozoic basalt glasses and their putative equivalents in Paleoarchean greenstones. Our analysis suggests that biogenicity cannot be taken for granted for all titanite-based textures in metamorphosed basalt glass, but a cautious and critical evaluation of evidence suggests that biogenicity remains the most likely interpretation for previously described titanite microtextures in Paleoarchean pillow lavas.

  2. Imaging of volcanic activity on Jupiter's moon Io by Galileo during the Galileo Europa Mission and the Galileo Millennium Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszthelyi, L.; McEwen, A.S.; Phillips, C.B.; Milazzo, M.; Geissler, P.; Turtle, E.P.; Radebaugh, J.; Williams, D.A.; Simonelli, D.P.; Breneman, H.H.; Klaasen, K.P.; Levanas, G.; Denk, T.; Alexander, D.D.A.; Capraro, K.; Chang, S.-H.; Chen, A.C.; Clark, J.; Conner, D.L.; Culver, A.; Handley, T.H.; Jensen, D.N.; Knight, D.D.; LaVoie, S.K.; McAuley, M.; Mego, V.; Montoya, O.; Mortensen, H.B.; Noland, S.J.; Patel, R.R.; Pauro, T.M.; Stanley, C.L.; Steinwand, D.J.; Thaller, T.F.; Woncik, P.J.; Yagi, G.M.; Yoshimizu, J.R.; Alvarez, Del; Castillo, E.M.; Belton, M.J.S.; Beyer, R.; Branston, D.; Fishburn, M.B.; Mueller, B.; Ragan, R.; Samarasinha, N.; Anger, C.D.; Cunningham, C.; Little, B.; Arriola, S.; Carr, M.H.; Asphaug, E.; Moore, J.; Morrison, D.; Rages, K.; Banfield, D.; Bell, M.; Burns, J.A.; Carcich, B.; Clark, B.; Currier, N.; Dauber, I.; Gierasch, P.J.; Helfenstein, P.; Mann, M.; Othman, O.; Rossier, L.; Solomon, N.; Sullivan, R.; Thomas, P.C.; Veverka, J.; Becker, T.; Edwards, K.; Gaddis, L.; Kirk, R.; Lee, E.; Rosanova, T.; Sucharski, R.M.; Beebe, R.F.; Simon, A.; Bender, K.; Chuang, F.; Fagents, S.; Figueredo, P.; Greeley, R.; Homan, K.; Kadel, S.; Kerr, J.; Klemaszewski, J.; Lo, E.; Schwarz, W.; Williams, K.; Bierhaus, E.; Brooks, S.; Chapman, C.R.; Merline, B.; Keller, J.; Schenk, P.; Tamblyn, P.; Bouchez, A.; Dyundian, U.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Showman, A.; Spitale, J.; Stewart, S.; Vasavada, A.; Cunningham, W.F.; Johnson, T.V.; Jones, T.J.; Kaufman, J.M.; Magee, K.P.; Meredith, M.K.; Orton, G.S.; Senske, D.A.; West, A.; Winther, D.; Collins, G.; Fripp, W.J.; Head, J. W.; Pappalardo, R.; Pratt, S.; Procter, L.; Spaun, N.; Colvin, T.; Davies, M.; DeJong, E.M.; Hall, J.; Suzuki, S.; Gorjian, Z.; Giese, B.; Koehler, U.; Neukum, G.; Oberst, J.; Roatsch, T.; Tost, W.; Schuster, P.; Wagner, R.; Dieter, N.; Durda, D.; Greenberg, R.J.; Hoppa, G.; Jaeger, W.; Plassman, J.; Tufts, R.; Fanale, F.P.; Gran,

    2001-01-01

    The Solid-State Imaging (SSI) instrument provided the first high- and medium-resolution views of Io as the Galileo spacecraft closed in on the volcanic body in late 1999 and early 2000. While each volcanic center has many unique features, the majority can be placed into one of two broad categories. The "Promethean" eruptions, typified by the volcanic center Prometheus, are characterized by long-lived steady eruptions producing a compound flow field emplaced in an insulating manner over a period of years to decades. In contrast, "Pillanian" eruptions are characterized by large pyroclastic deposits and short-lived but high effusion rate eruptions from fissures feeding open-channel or open-sheet flows. Both types of eruptions commonly have ???100-km-tall, bright, SO2-rich plumes forming near the flow fronts and smaller deposits of red material that mark the vent for the silicate lavas. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Upstream petroleum industry flaring and venting report : industry performance for year ending December 31, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-06-15

    The Energy Resources Conservation Board (ERCB) has developed recommendations for a flaring and venting management framework for the province of Alberta. This report fulfilled the ERCB's information mandate regarding flaring and venting as part of a commitment made in Directive 060 for upstream petroleum industry flaring, incineration, and venting to make flaring and venting data more accessible. It included data on upstream petroleum industry flaring and venting with particular reference to solution gas conserved, flared and vented, from 1996 to 2008; solution gas flaring and venting performance; flaring from all upstream oil and gas sources, from 2000 to 2008; venting from all upstream oil and gas sources, from 2000 to 2008; solution gas flaring and venting maps; and solution gas emissions ranking of operators for 2007. The report also provided a summary of flaring and venting from various oil and gas industry sources, such as well tests, gas plants, gas gathering systems, transmission lines, and batteries. Ranking of companies was established based on solution gas flared plus vented; solution gas flared; and solution gas vented from crude oil and bitumen batteries. The data used in the preparation of this report was submitted by companies. The report revealed that considerable progress has been made in the reduction of flaring and venting volumes for all upstream oil and gas sources. The reduction can be attributed to the decline in new conventional oil production. It can also be correlated to the decline in volumes of solution gas formerly being flared, and now being vented. Solution gas vented in 2008 was 40.7 per cent less than the 2000 venting baseline. However, in 2008, there was a 25.9 per cent increase in venting from crude bitumen batteries which can be correlated to the increase in crude bitumen production. The ERCB is continuing to work with the Clean Air Strategic Alliance to examine options to further address solution gas venting. tabs., figs.

  4. Hazard assessment at Teide-Pico Viejo volcanic complex (Tenerife, Canary Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Joan; Sobradelo, Rosa; Felpeto, Alicia

    2010-05-01

    Mid to long-term hazard assessment is conducted at Teide-Pico Viejo volcanic complex as a first step to evaluate volcanic risk in Tenerife, a densely populated island that is one of the biggest tourist destinations in Europe. Teide-Pico Viejo stratovolcanoes started to grow up in the interior of the Las Cañadas caldera, in the central part of Tenerife, about 190 ka ago, after the formation of the youngest sector of the caldera. Since then they have produced more than 150 km3 of rocks which represent a complete basanite to phonolite series. Eruptive activity at Teide-Pico Viejo complex has been traditionally considered as mostly effusive, but new field data has revealed that explosive activity of phonolitic and basaltic magmas, including plinian and subplinian eruptions and the generation of a wide range of PDCs, has also been significant, particularly during the last 30 ka. Most of the Teide products have been emplaced towards the north, inside the Icod and La Orotava valleys, or at the interior of the caldera, while towards the south the caldera wall has stopped the emplacement of such products from going further. The last eruption from the Teide-Pico Viejo central vents, the Lavas Negras eruption, took place about 1000 years ago, but younger eruptive episodes have occurred along the flanks of these stratovolcanoes. Despite the occurrence of numerous eruptions during the last 30 ka and the existence of unequivocal signs of activity in historical times (fumaroles, seismicity) and, even, a clear unrest episode that started in 2004 and is still ongoing, Teide-Pico Viejo stratovolcanoes have not been considered as a major threat by some scientists and also by the local authorities who have dedicated minimum attention to them in the recently approved regional emergency plan. If this view prevails it is obvious that risk mitigation in Tenerife will not succeed. In order to contribute to change that view on the danger potential of Teide-Pico Viejo, and to insist on the

  5. Los volcanes y los hombres

    OpenAIRE

    García, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    Desde las entrañas de la tierra, los volcanes han creado la atmósfera, el agua de los océanos, y esculpido los relieves del planeta: son, pues, los zahoríes de la vida. Existen volcanes que los hombres explotan o cultivan, y otros sobre los cuales se han construido observatorios en los que se llevan a cabo avanzadas investigaciones científicas.

  6. Volcanic hazards and aviation safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, Thomas J.; Thompson, Theodore B.; Ewert, John W.; ,

    1996-01-01

    An aeronautical chart was developed to determine the relative proximity of volcanoes or ash clouds to the airports and flight corridors that may be affected by volcanic debris. The map aims to inform and increase awareness about the close spatial relationship between volcanoes and aviation operations. It shows the locations of the active volcanoes together with selected aeronautical navigation aids and great-circle routes. The map mitigates the threat that volcanic hazards pose to aircraft and improves aviation safety.

  7. Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham J. Weir

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A conceptual model of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ is developed, to a depth of 25 km, formed from three constant density layers. The upper layer is formed from eruption products. A constant rate of eruption is assumed, which eventually implies a constant rate of extension, and a constant rate of volumetric creation in the middle and bottom layers. Tectonic extension creates volume which can accomodate magmatic intrusions. Spreading models assume this volume is distributed throughout the whole region, perhaps in vertical dykes, whereas rifting models assume the upper crust is thinned and the volume created lies under this upper crust. Bounds on the heat flow from such magmatic intrusions are calculated. Heat flow calculations are performed and some examples are provided which match the present total heat output from the TVZ of about 4200 MW, but these either have extension rates greater than the low values of about 8 ± 4 mm/a being reported from GPS measurements, or else consider extension rates in the TVZ to have varied over time.

  8. Triboelectric charging of volcanic ash from the 2011 Gr\\'{i}msv\\"{o}tn eruption

    CERN Document Server

    Houghton, Isobel M P; Nicoll, Keri A

    2013-01-01

    Triboelectric charging of different size fractions of a sample of volcanic ash is studied experimentally. Laboratory experiments demonstrate that the normalised span of the particle size distribution plays an important role in the magnitude of charging generated. Previous measurements of the volcanic plumes have shown that ash particles are electrically charged up to hundreds of km away from the vent, which indicates the the ash particles continue to be charged in the plume through the mechanism of triboelectrification [Harrison et al., Env. Res. Lett. 5 024004 (2010), Hatakeyama J. Met. Soc. Japan 27 372 (1949)]. The influence of the normalised span on plume charging suggests that all ash plumes are likely to be charged, with implications for remote sensing and plume lifetime.

  9. Volcanic eruption volume flux estimations from very long period infrasound signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Taishi; Aoyama, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Takeshi; Iguchi, Masato; Hendrasto, Muhamad

    2017-01-01

    We examine very long period infrasonic signals accompanying volcanic eruptions near active vents at Lokon-Empung volcano in Indonesia, Aso, Kuchinoerabujima, and Kirishima volcanoes in Japan. The excitation of the very long period pulse is associated with an explosion, the emerging of an eruption column, and a pyroclastic density current. We model the excitation of the infrasound pulse, assuming a monopole source, to quantify the volume flux and cumulative volume of erupting material. The infrasound-derived volume flux and cumulative volume can be less than half of the video-derived results. A largely positive correlation can be seen between the infrasound-derived volume flux and the maximum eruption column height. Therefore, our result suggests that the analysis of very long period volcanic infrasound pulses can be helpful in estimating the maximum eruption column height.

  10. Age and location of volcanic centers less than or equal to 3. 0 Myr old in Arizona, New Mexico and the Trans-Pecos Area of West Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, M.J.; Laughlin, A.W.

    1981-04-01

    This map is one of a series of maps designed for hot dry rock geothermal assessment in Arizona, New Mexico, and the Trans-Pecos area of west Texas. The 3.0 m.y. cutoff age was selected because original heat has probably largely dissipated in older rocks. The location of volcanic centers is more important to geothermal resource assessment than the location of their associated volcanic rocks; however, ages have been determined for numerous flows far from their source. Therefore, the distribution of all volcanic rocks less than or equal to 3.0 m.y. old, for which there is at least one determined age, are shown. Location of the volcanic vents and rocks were taken from Luedke and Smith (1978).

  11. Risk-Free Volcano Observations Using an Unmanned Autonomous Helicopter: seismic observations near the active vent of Sakurajima volcano, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohminato, T.; Kaneko, T.; Koyama, T.; Yasuda, A.; Watanabe, A.; Takeo, M.; Honda, Y.; Kajiwara, K.; Kanda, W.; Iguchi, M.; Yanagisawa, T.

    2010-12-01

    Observations in the vicinity of summit area of active volcanoes are important not only for understanding physical processes in the volcanic conduit but also for eruption prediction and volcanic hazards mitigation. It is, however, challenging to install observation sensors near active vents because of the danger of sudden eruptions. We need safe and efficient ways of installing sensors near the summit of active volcanoes. We have been developing an volcano observation system based on an unmanned autonomous vehicle (UAV) for risk-free volcano observations. Our UAV is an unmanned autonomous helicopter manufactured by Yamaha-Motor Co., Ltd. The UAV is 3.6m long and weighs 84kg with maximum payload of 10kg. The UAV can aviate autonomously along a previously programmed path within a meter accuracy using real-time kinematics differential GPS equipment. The maximum flight time and distance from the operator are 90 minutes and 5km, respectively. We have developed various types of volcano observation techniques adequate for the UAV, such as aeromagnetic survey, taking infrared and visible images from onboard high-resolution cameras, volcanic ash sampling in the vicinity of active vents. Recently, we have developed an earthquake observation module (EOM), which is exclusively designed for the UAV installation in the vicinity of active volcanic vent. In order to meet the various requirements for UAV installation, the EOM is very compact, light-weight (5-6kg), and is solar-powered. It is equipped with GPS for timing, a communication device using cellular-phone network, and triaxial accelerometers. Our first application of the EOM installation using the UAV is one of the most active volcanoes in Japan, Sakurajima volcano. Since 2006, explosive eruptions have been continuing at the reopened Showa crater at the eastern flank near the summit of Sakurajima. Entering the area within 2 km from the active craters is prohibited, and thus there were no observation station in the vicinity

  12. QVAST: a new Quantum GIS plugin for estimating volcanic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini, S.; Cappello, A.; Martí, J.; Del Negro, C.

    2013-11-01

    One of the most important tasks of modern volcanology is the construction of hazard maps simulating different eruptive scenarios that can be used in risk-based decision making in land-use planning and emergency management. The first step in the quantitative assessment of volcanic hazards is the development of susceptibility maps (i.e., the spatial probability of a future vent opening given the past eruptive activity of a volcano). This challenging issue is generally tackled using probabilistic methods that use the calculation of a kernel function at each data location to estimate probability density functions (PDFs). The smoothness and the modeling ability of the kernel function are controlled by the smoothing parameter, also known as the bandwidth. Here we present a new tool, QVAST, part of the open-source geographic information system Quantum GIS, which is designed to create user-friendly quantitative assessments of volcanic susceptibility. QVAST allows the selection of an appropriate method for evaluating the bandwidth for the kernel function on the basis of the input parameters and the shapefile geometry, and can also evaluate the PDF with the Gaussian kernel. When different input data sets are available for the area, the total susceptibility map is obtained by assigning different weights to each of the PDFs, which are then combined via a weighted summation and modeled in a non-homogeneous Poisson process. The potential of QVAST, developed in a free and user-friendly environment, is here shown through its application in the volcanic fields of Lanzarote (Canary Islands) and La Garrotxa (NE Spain).

  13. Vent Control as a Means of Enhancing Airbag Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Zimmermann

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Typical automotive airbag systems have a fixed area vent for exiting gasses. The US Army Cockpit Airbag System (CABS is unvented to prolong the period during which the system can provide occupant protection during extended helicopter crash scenarios. In each application, system performance may be enhanced by providing a controlled vent area. This paper describes work conducted under a Phase I SBIR program sponsored by the NASA Langley Research Center. The work was focused on eventual inflatable restraint system applications in general aviation aircraft, and showed that appropriate vent control offers many enhancements. Two series of tests conducted during Phase I showed that inflatable restraint system size and weight can be reduced without degrading performance, injury potential in an out of position situation (OOPS deployment can be reduced, and peak bag pressures can be reduced (at any temperature during normal operation.

  14. Lichen Persistence and Recovery in Response to Varied Volcanic Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, P.; Wheeler, T. B.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions produce many ecological disturbances that structure vegetation. While lichens are sensitive to disturbances, little is known about their responses to volcanic disturbances, except for colonization of lava. We examined lichen community responses through time to different disturbances produced by the May 1, 2008 eruption of Volcan Chaiten in south-central Chile. Pre-eruption vegetation near the volcano was old-growth Valdivian temperate rainforest dominated by closed-canopy Nothofagus sp... In 2012, we installed thirteen 1-acre plots across volcanic disturbance zones on which a time-constrained search was done for all macrolichen species, each of which was assigned an approximate log10 categorical abundance. We also installed a 0.2 m2 quadrat on two representative trees per plot for repeat photography of lichen cover. We remeasured at least one plot per disturbance zone in 2014 and re-photographed tree quadrats in 2013 and 2014. We then analyzed species composition and abundance differences among disturbance zones. In 2012, the blast (pyroclastic density flow), scorch (standing scorched forest at the edge of the blast) and deep tephra (>10 cm) zones had the lowest lichen species richness (5-13 species), followed by reference (unimpacted) and shallow (lichen species since 2012 while the light tephra and reference were essentially unchanged. Gravel rain, gravel rain + pumice and flooded forest plots all had about the same number of species in 2014 as 2012. Lichen colonization and growth in tree quadrats varied widely, from very little colonization in the blast to prolific colonization in the gravel rain + pumice zone. Lichen's varied responses to different volcanic disturbances were attributable to varying degrees of mortality and subsequent availability of substrate, quantity of light and removal of competitors. While sensitive to disturbance, lichens are apparently resilient to and can quickly recolonize after a variety of large, violent volcanic

  15. Carbon Release in Italy through Volcanic, Tectonic and Other Styles of Degassing: Implication for Carbon Dioxide Sequestration and Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigi, S.; Lombardi, S.; Beaubien, S.; Graziani, S.; Tartarello, M. C.; Ruggiero, L.; Ciotoli, G.; Sacco, P.; De Angelis, D.; Annunziatellis, A.

    2014-12-01

    One of the key criteria for successful geological storage of CO2 is that the target reservoir must not leak the stored gases over extended periods. Due to the peculiarity of its geological and geodynamic setting, which results in the production, accumulation, and leakage of large volumes of natural CO2, the Italian peninsula can be used as a natural laboratory as it provides to study gas migration mechanisms in large-scale geological systems, as well as to determine whether and how much sequestered CO2 could hypothetically leak from a subsurface reservoir. Moving from west to east, the Italian peninsula includes several geodynamic settings: the Tyrrhenian back arc basin and associated volcanic arcs, the Apennines fold and thrust belt, and the Adriatic foredeep. All of them are characterized by a diffuse and/or massive degassing of deeply derived CO2, which is usually emitted by vents or dissolved and transported by large aquifers. In the volcanic islands, in the south of the Tyrrhenian Sea, large areas are characterized by leakage from the sea floor. Based on the statistical and geo-spatial interpretation of more than 40,000 soil gas samples collected in central and southern Italy by the Fluid Chemistry Laboratory of "La Sapienza" University of Rome over more than 30 years of activity, different migration patterns related to the different geodynamic settings are distinguished and described. This very large database has been organised and managed in a GIS environment that allows the calculation of fundamental statistical parameters, the analysis of distribution patterns, the study of spatial autocorrelation and spatial heterogeneity, and the elaboration of maps. The interpretation of these data allow us to define background values of CO2, strongly related to geological setting, and other minor (CH4) and trace gases (He and Rn), that characterise the different geological scenarios. A common feature is that anomalous gas concentrations occur in restricted zones, both

  16. Magnetic, structural and geochronologic evidence bearing on volcanic sources and Oligocene Deformation of Ash Flow Tuffs, northeast Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, H. C.; MacDonald, W. D.; Hayatsu, A.

    1991-02-01

    Magnetic properties of mid-Tertiary volcanic rocks west of Jiggs in northeast Nevada were investigated for the purposes of interpreting igneous, structural, and tectonic processes in this part of the Basin and Range province. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) patterns reflect flow fabrics and suggest previously unknown sources for these ash flow tuffs. Paleomagnetic and structural evidence suggest counterclockwise relative rotation of the southern part of the area with respect to the north. New stratigraphic, chemical and K-Ar isotopic data support these interpretations. Dacite to rhyolite ash flow tuffs of the Indian Well Formation were subdivided into two main units: the lower and predominant tuff of Jiggs (35.8-37.0 Ma) and the unconformably overlying but areally restricted tuff of Hackwood (30.8 Ma). The Jiggs unit has two polarities whereas the Hackwood has only a reversed polarity remanence. Together these units with tilt correction define a pole (92°E, 87°N, dp = 6°, dm = 8°) for approximately 30-37 Ma. This pole is concordant with coeval North American reference poles, indicating that this zone of approximately 30 km NS extent has not undergone significant vertical axis rotation relative to the North American reference. Andesite lavas of normal magnetic polarity and of 32.5-Ma age characterize the Diamond Hills immediately to the south. We interpret this region, from both structural evidence and discordant paleomagnetic direction, to have rotated approximately 25° counterclockwise relative to the Indian Well volcanic units to the north. The apparent rotation of the Diamond Hills is possibly the result of drag on the left-lateral Garcia fault which limits the Diamond Hills on the southwest. Analysis of AMS data suggests, by patterns of the K1 axes, two distinct sources for the Jiggs unit: a northern buried source and a central partially buried source. Lithologic evidence consistent with proximal vent facies is found near the latter source. An

  17. Characteristics of hydrothermal sedimentation process in the Yanchang Formation, south Ordos Basin, China: Evidence from element geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Cong; Ji, Liming; Wu, Yuandong; Su, Ao; Zhang, Mingzhen

    2016-11-01

    Hydrothermal sedimentation occurred in the Triassic Yanchang Formation, Ordos Basin, China. However, their macroscopic features at the scale of the stratum and hydrothermal sources still lack correlational research. This paper performed element geochemical study on a large number of core samples collected from the Yanchang Formation of a new drilling well located in the south Ordos Basin. The SiO2/(K2O + Na2O) vs. MnO/TiO2 crossplot and Fe vs. Mn vs. (Cu + Co + Ni) × 10 ternary diagram demonstrate that the Yanchang stratum in the study area has, in general, hydrothermal components. The Al/(Al + Fe + Mn) and (Fe + Mn)/Ti ratios of the core samples range from 0.34 to 0.84 and 4.81 to 50.54, averaging 0.66 and 10.67, respectively, indicating that the stratum is a set of atypical hydrothermal sedimentation with much terrigenous input. Data analysis shows that the hydrothermal source in the study area was from the deep North Qinling Orogen around the south margin of the basin, where some active tectonic and volcanic activities took place, rather than from the relatively stable internal basin. Early Indosinian movement and volcanic activities activated basement faults around the southern margin of the basin, providing vents for the deep hydrothermal fluid upwelling. The hydrothermal indicators suggest that the study area experienced 4 episodes of relatively stronger hydrothermal activity, namely during the Chang 10, Chang 9-1, Chang 7-3 and Chang 6-2 periods. We also propose a new hydrothermal sedimentation model of hydrothermal fluids overflowing from basin margin faults, for the Yanchang Formation, which is reported here for the first time.

  18. Numerical Study on Pressure Drop Factor in the Vent-Cap of CDQ Shaft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Song; Yanhui Feng; Xinxin Zhang

    2008-01-01

    In CDQ (Coke Dry Quenching) shaft, the vent-cap with complex structure is installed in the cone-shaped funnel under the cooling chamber. It acts to introduce cooling gas and support the descending coke in the chamber. The designing and installation of vent-cap aim to get relatively uniform gas distribution, to reduce the temperature fluctuation of cokes at outlet and realize stable operation of CDQ apparatus. In this paper, the turbulent flow of gas in vent-cap of 1:7 scale CDQ experimental shaft is numerically simulated by using CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) software, CFX. The velocity field, the outlet flux distribution and the pressure drop factor of each outlet under three kinds of vent-cap (called high vent-cap, low vent-cap and elliptic vent-cap) are analysed and compared. The results turn out that the pressure drop factor of elliptic vent-cap is larger than the other two vent-caps, and that the pressure drop factors of high vent-cap and low vent-cap almost have the same value.While for a specified vent-cap, the pressure drop factor with pressing brick is larger than that without pressing brick. The work in this paper is valuable for the designing of vent-cap for large-acale CDQ shaft.

  19. Analysis on Venting Time of Rarefaction Wave Gun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ying-ze; ZHANG Xiao-bing; YUAN Yax-iong

    2008-01-01

    Based on the operation principle of rarefaction wave gun, the selection and calculation methods for venting opportune moment are invastigated. Considering property of the rarefaction wave, taking the center of muzzle section as initial calculation point, supposing that at the moment projectile arrives to the muzzle, the rarefaction wave arrives to the base of projectile, the rarefaction wave velocity along the barrel can be obtained by fitting calculation of the interior ballis-tic data of the same closed gun and reverse deduction. And then, the optimal venting time can be found out correctly based on the rarefaction wave velocity.

  20. Hydrothermal Vents and Methane Seeps: Rethinking the Sphere of Influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Ann Levin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Although initially viewed as oases within a barren deep ocean, hydrothermal vent and methane seep communities are now recognized to interact with surrounding ecosystems on the sea floor and in the water column, and to affect global geochemical cycles. The importance of understanding these interactions is growing as the potential rises for disturbance from oil and gas extraction, seabed mining and bottom trawling. Here we synthesize current knowledge of the nature, extent and time and space scales of vent and seep interactions with background systems. We document an expanded footprint beyond the site of local venting or seepage with respect to elemental cycling and energy flux, habitat use, trophic interactions, and connectivity. Heat and energy are released, global biogeochemical and elemental cycles are modified, and particulates are transported widely in plumes. Hard and biotic substrates produced at vents and seeps are used by benthic background fauna for attachment substrata, shelter, and access to food via grazing or through position in the current, while particulates and fluid fluxes modify planktonic microbial communities. Chemosynthetic production provides nutrition to a host of benthic and planktonic heterotrophic background species through multiple horizontal and vertical transfer pathways assisted by flow, gamete release, animal movements, and succession, but these pathways remain poorly known. Shared species, genera and families indicate that ecological and evolutionary connectivity exists among vents, seeps, organic falls and background communities in the deep sea; the genetic linkages with inactive vents and seeps and background assemblages however, are practically unstudied. The waning of venting or seepage activity generates major transitions in space and time that create links to surrounding ecosystems, often with identifiable ecotones or successional stages. The nature of all these interactions is dependent on water depth, as

  1. Pressure Venting Tests of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosser, Max L.; Knutson, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    A series of tests was devised to investigate the pressure venting behavior of one of the candidate ablators for the Orion capsule heat shield. Three different specimens of phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA) were instrumented with internal pressure taps and subjected to rapid pressure changes from near vacuum to one atmosphere and simulated Orion ascent pressure histories. The specimens vented rapidly to ambient pressure and sustained no detectable damage during testing. Peak pressure differences through the thickness of a 3-inch-thick specimen were less than 1 psi during a simulated ascent pressure history.

  2. Hydrothermal vents and methane seeps: Rethinking the sphere of influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Lisa A.; Baco, Amy; Bowden, David; Colaco, Ana; Cordes, Erik E.; Cunha, Marina; Demopoulos, Amanda; Gobin, Judith; Grupe, Ben; Le, Jennifer; Metaxas, Anna; Netburn, Amanda; Rouse, Greg; Thurber, Andrew; Tunnicliffe, Verena; Van Dover, Cindy L.; Vanreusel, Ann; Watling, Les

    2016-01-01

    Although initially viewed as oases within a barren deep ocean, hydrothermal vent and methane seep communities are now recognized to interact with surrounding ecosystems on the sea floor and in the water column, and to affect global geochemical cycles. The importance of understanding these interactions is growing as the potential rises for disturbance from oil and gas extraction, seabed mining and bottom trawling. Here we synthesize current knowledge of the nature, extent and time and space scales of vent and seep interactions with background systems. We document an expanded footprint beyond the site of local venting or seepage with respect to elemental cycling and energy flux, habitat use, trophic interactions, and connectivity. Heat and energy are released, global biogeochemical and elemental cycles are modified, and particulates are transported widely in plumes. Hard and biotic substrates produced at vents and seeps are used by “benthic background” fauna for attachment substrata, shelter, and access to food via grazing or through position in the current, while particulates and fluid fluxes modify planktonic microbial communities. Chemosynthetic production provides nutrition to a host of benthic and planktonic heterotrophic background species through multiple horizontal and vertical transfer pathways assisted by flow, gamete release, animal movements, and succession, but these pathways remain poorly known. Shared species, genera and families indicate that ecological and evolutionary connectivity exists among vents, seeps, organic falls and background communities in the deep sea; the genetic linkages with inactive vents and seeps and background assemblages however, are practically unstudied. The waning of venting or seepage activity generates major transitions in space and time that create links to surrounding ecosystems, often with identifiable ecotones or successional stages. The nature of all these interactions is dependent on water depth, as well as

  3. Quaternary basaltic volcanism in the Payenia volcanic province, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina

    primitive basalts and trachybasalts but also more evolved samples from the retroarc region and the larger volcanoes Payún Matrú and Payún Liso are presented. The samples cover a broad range of compositions from intraplate lavas similar to ocean island basalts to arc andesites. A common feature found...... Pleistocene times. These basalts mark the end of a period of shallow subduction of the Nazca slab beneath the Payenia province and volcanism in the Nevado volcanic field apparently followed the downwarping slab in a north-northwest direction ending in the Northern Segment. The northern Payenia basalts...... the literature. The Nevado basalts have been modelled by 4-10 % melting of a primitive mantle added 1-5 % upper continental crust. In the southern Payenia province, intraplate basalts dominate. The samples from the Payún Matrú and Río Colorado volcanic fields are apparently unaffected by the subducting slab...

  4. Modeling Volcanic Eruption Parameters by Near-Source Internal Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripepe, M.; Barfucci, G.; de Angelis, S.; Delle Donne, D.; Lacanna, G.; Marchetti, E.

    2016-11-01

    Volcanic explosions release large amounts of hot gas and ash into the atmosphere to form plumes rising several kilometers above eruptive vents, which can pose serious risk on human health and aviation also at several thousands of kilometers from the volcanic source. However the most sophisticate atmospheric models and eruptive plume dynamics require input parameters such as duration of the ejection phase and total mass erupted to constrain the quantity of ash dispersed in the atmosphere and to efficiently evaluate the related hazard. The sudden ejection of this large quantity of ash can perturb the equilibrium of the whole atmosphere triggering oscillations well below the frequencies of acoustic waves, down to much longer periods typical of gravity waves. We show that atmospheric gravity oscillations induced by volcanic eruptions and recorded by pressure sensors can be modeled as a compact source representing the rate of erupted volcanic mass. We demonstrate the feasibility of using gravity waves to derive eruption source parameters such as duration of the injection and total erupted mass with direct application in constraining plume and ash dispersal models.

  5. Springs, streams, and gas vent on and near Mount Adams volcano, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathenson, Manuel; Mariner, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Springs and some streams on Mount Adams volcano have been sampled for chemistry and light stable isotopes of water. Spring temperatures are generally cooler than air temperatures from weather stations at the same elevation. Spring chemistry generally reflects weathering of volcanic rock from dissolved carbon dioxide. Water in some springs and streams has either dissolved hydrothermal minerals or has reacted with them to add sulfate to the water. Some samples appear to have obtained their sulfate from dissolution of gypsum while some probably involve reaction with sulfide minerals such as pyrite. Light stable isotope data for water from springs follow a local meteoric water line, and the variation of isotopes with elevation indicate that some springs have very local recharge and others have water from elevations a few hundred meters higher. No evidence was found for thermal or slightly thermal springs on Mount Adams. A sample from a seeping gas vent on Mount Adams was at ambient temperature, but the gas is similar to that found on other Cascade volcanoes. Helium isotopes are 4.4 times the value in air, indicating that there is a significant component of mantle helium. The lack of fumaroles on Mount Adams and the ambient temperature of the gas indicates that the gas is from a hydrothermal system that is no longer active.

  6. Beyond the vent: New perspectives on hydrothermal plumes and pelagic biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Brennan T.

    2017-03-01

    Submarine hydrothermal vent fields introduce buoyant plumes of chemically altered seawater to the deep-sea water column. Chemoautotrophic microbes exploit this energy source, facilitating seafloor-based primary production that evidence suggests may transfer to pelagic consumers. While most hydrothermal plumes have relatively small volumes, there are recent examples of large-scale plume events associated with periods of eruptive activity, which have had a pronounced effect on water-column biology. This correlation suggests that hydrothermal plumes may have influenced basin-scale ocean chemistry during periods of increased submarine volcanism during the Phanerozoic eon. This paper synthesizes a growing body of scientific evidence supporting the hypothesis that hydrothermal plumes are the energetic basis of unique deep-sea pelagic food webs. While many important questions remain concerning the biology of hydrothermal plumes, this discussion is not present in ongoing management efforts related to seafloor massive sulfide (SMS) mining. Increased research efforts, focused on high-resolution surveys of midwater biology relative to plume structures, are recommended to establish baseline conditions and monitor the impact of future mining-based disturbances to the pelagic biosphere.

  7. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Glasow, Roland

    2010-04-13

    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume, leading to extensive ozone destruction, that, depending on plume dispersal, can be maintained for several days. The very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume reduces the lifetime of the OH radical drastically, so that it is virtually absent in the volcanic plume. This would imply an increased lifetime of methane in volcanic plumes, unless reactive chlorine chemistry in the plume is strong enough to offset the lack of OH chemistry. A further effect of bromine chemistry in addition to ozone destruction shown by the model studies presented here, is the oxidation of mercury. This relates to mercury that has been coemitted with bromine from the volcano but also to background atmospheric mercury. The rapid oxidation of mercury implies a drastically reduced atmospheric lifetime of mercury so that the contribution of volcanic mercury to the atmospheric background might be less than previously thought. However, the implications, especially health and environmental effects due to deposition, might be substantial and warrant further studies, especially field measurements to test this hypothesis.

  8. Climatic impact of volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampino, Michael R.

    1991-01-01

    Studies have attempted to 'isolate' the volcanic signal in noisy temperature data. This assumes that it is possible to isolate a distinct volcanic signal in a record that may have a combination of forcings (ENSO, solar variability, random fluctuations, volcanism) that all interact. The key to discovering the greatest effects of volcanoes on short-term climate may be to concentrate on temperatures in regions where the effects of aerosol clouds may be amplified by perturbed atmospheric circulation patterns. This is especially true in subpolar and midlatitude areas affected by changes in the position of the polar front. Such climatic perturbation can be detected in proxy evidence such as decrease in tree-ring widths and frost rings, changes in the treeline, weather anomalies, severity of sea-ice in polar and subpolar regions, and poor grain yields and crop failures. In low latitudes, sudden temperature drops were correlated with the passage overhead of the volcanic dust cloud (Stothers, 1984). For some eruptions, such as Tambora, 1815, these kinds of proxy and anectdotal information were summarized in great detail in a number of papers and books (e.g., Post, 1978; Stothers, 1984; Stommel and Stommel, 1986; C. R. Harrington, in press). These studies lead to the general conclusion that regional effects on climate, sometimes quite severe, may be the major impact of large historical volcanic aerosol clouds.

  9. Fluid composition of the sediment-influenced Loki's Castle vent field at the ultra-slow spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumberger, Tamara; Früh-Green, Gretchen L.; Thorseth, Ingunn H.; Lilley, Marvin D.; Hamelin, Cédric; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Okland, Ingeborg E.; Pedersen, Rolf B.

    2016-08-01

    The hydrothermal vent field Loki's Castle is located in the Mohns-Knipovich bend (73°N) of the ultraslow spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) close to the Bear Island sediment fan. The hydrothermal field is venting up to 320° C hot black smoker fluids near the summit of an axial volcanic ridge. Even though the active chimneys have grown on a basaltic ridge, geochemical fluid data show a strong sedimentary influence into the hydrothermal circulation at Loki's Castle. Compelling evidence for a sediment input is given by high alkalinity, high concentrations of NH4+, H2, CH4, C2+ hydrocarbons as well as low Mn and Fe contents. The low δ13C values of CO2 and CH4 and the thermogenic isotopic pattern of the C2+ hydrocarbons in the high-temperature vent fluids clearly point to thermal degradation of sedimentary organic matter and illustrate diminution of the natural carbon sequestration in sediments by hydrothermal circulation. Thus, carbon-release to the hydrosphere in Arctic regions is especially relevant in areas where the active Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge system is in contact with the organic matter rich detrital sediment fans.

  10. Combining Geological and Geophysical Data in Volcanic Hazard Estimation for Dominica, Lesser Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, O.; Latchman, J. L.; Connor, C.; Malservisi, R.; Connor, L.

    2014-12-01

    Risk posed by volcanic eruptions are generally quantified in a few ways; in the short term geophysical data such as seismic activity or ground deformation are used to assess the state of volcanic unrest while statistical approaches such as spatial density estimates are used for long term hazard assessment. Spatial density estimates have been used in a number of monogenetic volcanic fields for hazard map generation and utilize the age, location and volumes of previous eruptions to calculate the probability of a new event occurring at a given location within this field. In a previously unpublished study, spatial density estimates of the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc showed the island of Dominica to have the highest likelihood of future vent formation. In this current study, this technique was used in combination with relocated seismic events occurring beneath Dominica within the last ~ 20 years as well as InSAR images of ground deformation to generate a hazard map which not only takes into consideration the past events but also the current state of unrest. Here, geophysical data serve as a weighting factor in the estimates with those centers showing more vigorous activity receiving stronger favorability in the assessment for future activity. In addition to this weighting, the bandwidth utilized in the 2D-radially symmetric kernel density function was optimized using the SAMSE method so as to find the value which best minimizes the error in the estimate. The end results of this study are dynamic volcanic hazards maps which will be readily updatable as changes in volcanic unrest occurs within the system.

  11. Volcanic Ash Hazards and Risk in Argentina: Scientific and Social Collaborative Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovere, E. I., II; Violante, R. A.; Vazquez Herrera, M. D.; Martinez Fernandez, M. D. L. P.

    2015-12-01

    Due to the absence of alerts or volcanic impacts during 60 years (from 1932, Quizapu-Descabezado Grande -one of the major eruptions of the XX Century- until 1991 Hudson eruption) there was mild remembrance of volcanic hazards in the collective memory of the Argentina citizens. Since then and until April 2015, the social perception changed according to different factors: age, location, education, culture, vulnerability. This variability produces a maze of challenges that go beyond the scientific knowledge. Volcanic health hazards began to be understood in 2008 after the eruption of Chaiten volcano. The particle size of ashfall (international flights for several weeks. The fear of another eruption did not wait long when Calbuco volcano started activity in April 2015, it came at a time when Villarrica volcano was also in an eruptive phase, and the SERNAGEOMIN Chile, through the Observatory OVDAS of the Southern Andes, faced multiple natural disasters at the same time, 3 volcanoes in activity, lahars, pyroclastic flows and floods in the North. In Argentina, critical infrastructure, farming, livestock and primary supplies were affected mainly in the western region. Copahue volcano, is increasing unstability on seismic and geochemistry data since 2012. Caviahue resort village, distant only 8 Km. from the active vent happens to be a high vulnerable location. In 2014 GEVAS (Geology, Volcanoes, Environment and Health) Network ARGENTINA Civil Association started collaborative activities with SEGEMAR and in 2015 with the IAPG (Geoethics, Argentina), intending to promote Best Practices in volcanic and geological hazards. Geoscientists and the volcano vulnerable population are aware about the governmental commitment to assume a strategic planning for mitigation, facing a volcanic emergency. Recently, university undergraduate students from Chile and Argentina are networking to acquire the skills needed for a better preparedness to the next volcanic eruption.

  12. Initializing HYSPLIT with satellite observations of volcanic ash: A case study of the 2008 Kasatochi eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Alice M.; Stunder, Barbara J. B.; Ngan, Fong; Pavolonis, Michael J.

    2016-09-01

    The current work focuses on improving volcanic ash forecasts by integrating satellite observations of ash into the Lagrangian transport and dispersion model, HYSPLIT. The accuracy of HYSPLIT output is dependent on the accuracy of the initialization: the initial position, size distribution, and amount of ash as a function of time. Satellite observations from passive infrared, IR, sensors are used both to construct the initialization term and for verification. Space-based lidar observations are used for further verification. We compare model output produced using different initializations for the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi in the Aleutian Islands. Simple source terms, such as a uniform vertical line or cylindrical source above the vent, are compared to initializations derived from satellite measurements of position, mass loading, effective radius, and height of the downwind ash cloud. Using satellite measurements of column mass loading of ash to constrain the source term produces better long-term predictions than using an empirical equation relating mass eruption rate and plume height above the vent. Even though some quantities, such as the cloud thickness, must be estimated, initializations which release particles at the position of the observed ash cloud produce model output which is comparable to or better than the model output produced with source terms located above and around the vent. Space-based lidar data, passive IR retrievals of ash cloud top height, and model output agree well with each other, and all suggest that the Kasatochi ash cloud evolved into a complex three-dimensional structure.

  13. Variation in the diets of hydrothermal vent gastropods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govenar, Breea; Fisher, Charles R.; Shank, Timothy M.

    2015-11-01

    A prevailing paradigm of hydrothermal vent ecology is that primary consumers feed on chemoautotrophic bacteria. However, for the purposes of reconstructing vent food webs and for tracking energy flow from the generation of rock and fluid chemistry through primary/ secondary productivity and consumption to the overlying water column, it remains unclear which consumers feed on which bacteria. In paired analyses of carbon and nitrogen tissue stable isotope values with unique 16S rRNA sequences from the stomach contents, we determined that two species of gastropod grazers appear to feed on epsilon-proteobacteria, while two other species have more diverse diets, including one species that consumes alpha-proteobacteria, planctomycetes, and non-green sulfur bacteria. Different carbon fixation pathways used by epsilon- and alpha-proteobacteria may account for the variation in the carbon stable isotope values among the consumers. Furthermore, our results indicate that trophic specialization and niche partitioning may contribute to the distribution and abundance of vent-endemic gastropods and support the hypothesis that consumers in the warmer habitats commonly feed on epsilon-proteobacteria that use the rTCA cycle, while in the cooler habitats they feed on additional bacteria that use the CBB cycle. These results suggest that the phylogenetic and metabolic diversity of free-living bacteria may play an important and previously overlooked role in facilitating species coexistence among primary consumers at hydrothermal vents and other chemosynthesis-based ecosystems.

  14. 76 FR 44457 - Application of Regulations on Fuel Venting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 34 Application of Regulations on Fuel Venting AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Policy determination. SUMMARY: This document advises the public of a recent decision by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) concerning the application...

  15. Ending emissions: Industry targets venting, while flaring progress lauded

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lea, N.

    2003-06-01

    The progress achieved by the multi-stakeholder solution gas flaring reduction program in Alberta is discussed. The program was initiated in 1999 by the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB); within the first three years upstream flaring of solution gas was reduced by 53 per cent. Progress has also been made in reducing volumes of solution gas venting: between 1996 and 2001, there has been a 32 per cent reduction in combined flared and vented volumes of solution gas. Well test flaring has also been reduced by reduced test durations and volumes, to wit: there has been a 3 per cent reduction in flaring volumes while well tests have increased by 23 per cent. At gas plants, the decrease in flaring and venting amounted to 19 per cent, attributed mostly to industry response to the EUB's Guide 60, which incorporates many of the recommendations of the 2002 report and recommendations of the Flaring/Venting Project Team of the Clean Air Strategic Alliance (CASA).

  16. 46 CFR 119.450 - Vent pipes for fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... flame arresters. The flame screens must consist of a single screen of corrosion resistant wire of at least 30×30 mesh. The flame screens or flame arresters must be of such size and design as to prevent... screens or arrester elements. (e) Where a flexible vent pipe section is necessary, suitable...

  17. Ephemerality of discrete methane vents in lake sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandella, Benjamin P.; Pillsbury, Liam; Weber, Thomas; Ruppel, Carolyn; Hemond, Harold F.; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas whose emission from sediments in inland waters and shallow oceans may both contribute to global warming and be exacerbated by it. The fraction of methane emitted by sediments that bypasses dissolution in the water column and reaches the atmosphere as bubbles depends on the mode and spatiotemporal characteristics of venting from the sediments. Earlier studies have concluded that hot spots—persistent, high-flux vents—dominate the regional ebullitive flux from submerged sediments. Here the spatial structure, persistence, and variability in the intensity of methane venting are analyzed using a high-resolution multibeam sonar record acquired at the bottom of a lake during multiple deployments over a 9 month period. We confirm that ebullition is strongly episodic, with distinct regimes of high flux and low flux largely controlled by changes in hydrostatic pressure. Our analysis shows that the spatial pattern of ebullition becomes homogeneous at the sonar's resolution over time scales of hours (for high-flux periods) or days (for low-flux periods), demonstrating that vents are ephemeral rather than persistent, and suggesting that long-term, lake-wide ebullition dynamics may be modeled without resolving the fine-scale spatial structure of venting.

  18. The impact of stratospheric volcanic aerosol on decadal-scale climate predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmreck, Claudia; Pohlmann, Holger; Illing, Sebastian; Kadow, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The possibility of a large future volcanic eruption provides arguably the largest uncertainty concerning the evolution of the climate system on the time scale of a few years; but also the greatest opportunity to learn about the behavior of the climate system, and our models thereof. So the question emerges how large will the uncertainty be for future decadal climate predictions if no volcanic aerosol is taken into account? And how strong has volcanic aerosol affected decadal prediction skill on annual and multi-year seasonal scales over the CMIP5 hindcast period? To understand the impact of volcanic aerosol on multi-year seasonal and decadal climate predictions we performed CMIP5-type hindcasts without volcanic aerosol using the German MiKlip prediction system system baseline 1 from 1961 to 1991 and compared them to the corresponding simulations including aerosols. Our results show that volcanic aerosol significantly affects the prediction skill for global mean surface air temperature in the first five years after strong volcanic eruptions. Also on the regional scale a volcanic imprint on decadal-scale variability is detectable. Neglecting volcanic aerosol leads to a reduced prediction skill over the tropical and subtropical Atlantic, Indic and West Pacific but to an improvement over the tropical East-Pacific, where the model has in general no skill. Multi-seasonal differences in the skill for seasonal-mean temperatures are evident over Continental Europe with significant skill loss due to neglection of volcanic aerosol in boreal winter over central Europe, Scandinavia and over south-eastern Europe and the East-Mediterranean in boreal summer.

  19. A multidisciplinary approach to quantify the permeability of the Whakaari/White Island volcanic hydrothermal system (Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Michael J.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Farquharson, Jamie I.; Ashworth, James; Mayer, Klaus; Letham-Brake, Mark; Reuschlé, Thierry; Gilg, H. Albert; Scheu, Bettina; Lavallée, Yan; Siratovich, Paul; Cole, Jim; Jolly, Arthur D.; Baud, Patrick; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-02-01

    hydrothermal system can result in increases (due to alteration-induced dissolution and fracturing) and decreases (due to hydrothermal precipitation) to permeability. Importantly, a decrease in permeability-be it due to fracture sealing in lava, pore-filling alunite precipitation in tuff, near-vent cementation by sulphur, and/or well-sorted layers of fine ash-can result in pore pressure augmentation. An increase in pore pressure could result in ground deformation, seismicity, jeopardise the stability of the volcanic slopes, and/or drive the wide variety of eruptions observed at Whakaari. Our systematic study offers the most complete porosity-permeability dataset for a volcanic hydrothermal system to date. These new data will inform and support modelling, unrest monitoring, and eruption characterisation at Whakaari and other hydrothermally modified volcanic systems worldwide.

  20. A geochemical reconnaissance of the Alid volcanic center and geothermal system, Danakil depression, Eritrea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowenstern, J.B.; Janik, C.J.; Fournier, R.O. [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (US)] [and others

    1999-04-01

    Geological and geochemical studies indicate that a high-temperature geothermal system underlies the Alid volcanic center in the northern Danakil depression of Eritrea. Alid is a very late-Pleistocene structural dome formed by shallow intrusion of rhyolitic magma, some of which vented as lavas and pyroclastic flows. Fumaroles and boiling pools distributed widely over an area of {approx} 10 km{sup 2} on the northern half of Alid suggest that an active hydrothermal system underlies much of that part of the mountain. Geothermometers indicate that the fumarolic gases are derived from a geothermal system with temperatures > 225{sup o}C. The isotopic composition of condensed fumarolic steam is consistent with these temperatures and implies that the source water is derived primarily from either lowland meteoric waters or fossil Red Sea water, or both. Some gases vented from the system (CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S and He) are largely magmatic in origin. Permeability beneath the volcanic center may be high, given the amount of intrusion-related deformation and the active normal faulting within the Danakil depression. (author)

  1. Radar polarization studies of volcanic and impact cratered terrains on the Earth, Venus, and the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Bruce Allan

    The results of four research projects which utilized imaging radar polarization data for remote sensing of volcanic and impact cratered terrains on the Earth, Venus, and the Moon are presented. The first project is an analysis of airborne multi-polarization radar data. A technique is developed for decomposing the polarized radar echo into components attributed to quasi-specular, small-perturbation, and 'dihedral' mechanisms. The second and third projects analyze the geomorphology and radar polarization properties of deposits on two volcanoes, Sif and Gula Montes, in western Eistla Regio, Venus. These analyses utilize radar images collected at Arecibo Observatory in 1988 (spatial resolution 1 km). Changes in the radar brightness of lava flows with downslope distance from possible vents are inconsistent with trends observed for single terrestrial lava flow. This observation, coupled with evidence of multiple eruptive vents, suggests that most of the large flows in western Eistla Regio are formed by coalescence of numerous smaller flows. The third project also compares the radar polarization properties of volcanic deposits on Sif and Gula Montes to data for terrestrial lava flows and a smooth desert area. The fourth project presents a study of lunar crater rays using high-resolution (30 m) radar images collected at Haystack Observatory, and focuses on the bright ray in Mare Serenitatis and ray segments attributed to Tycho and Copernicus craters.

  2. 40 CFR 63.491 - Batch front-end process vents-recordkeeping requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...)(2). (3) When using a flare to comply with § 63.487(a)(1): (i) The flare design (i.e., steam-assisted... process vents and § 63.490(e) for aggregate batch vent streams; (ii) For a boiler or process heater, a description of the location at which the vent stream is introduced into the boiler or process heater;...

  3. 30 CFR 250.1160 - When may I flare or vent gas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When may I flare or vent gas? 250.1160 Section... GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Requirements Flaring, Venting<