WorldWideScience

Sample records for volatile liquid positive

  1. Experimental Study of the Influence of Operating Position on the Behavior of an Electromechanical Actuator with Volatile Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NITAN Ilie

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study of the influence of operating position on the behavior of an electrochemical actuator with volatile liquid. In the introduction, the operating principle of electromechanical actuators with volatile liquid is described. Are then presented experimental stand used, the study results and conclusions drawn from the studies.

  2. Liquidity, Volatility and Stock Price Adjustment: Evidence from Seasoned Equity Offerings in an Emerging Market

    OpenAIRE

    Chia-Cheng Ho; Chin-Chuan Lee; Chien-Ting Lin; C. Edward Wang

    2005-01-01

    Using data from the Taiwanese stock market, an emerging market, this paper documents positive changes in liquidity and volatility around seasoned equity offerings (SEOs). These findings are consistent with the uncertain signal hypothesis that investors with diverse views on the information content of SEOs are likely to induce larger trading activity and subsequent higher stock return volatility. We also provide direct evidence that changes in liquidity is positively associated with stock pric...

  3. Molecular Beam Studies of Volatile Liquids and Fuel Surrogates Using Liquid Microjets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-18

    Molecular Beam Studies of Volatile Liquids and Fuel Surrogates Using Liquid Microjets Gilbert Nathanson, Department of Chemistry University of...alter the dynamics of evaporation from the commercial jet fuel Jet A. These results are outlined below. Exploring Fuels in Vacuum using Liquid ...hydrocarbon liquids inside a vacuum chamber. These jets, narrower than a human hair, are typically 10 – 40 µm in diameter. Their small surface area and

  4. Turbulence effects on volatilization rates of liquids and solutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.-F.; Chao, H.-P.; Chiou, C.T.; Manes, M.

    2004-01-01

    Volatilization rates of neat liquids (benzene, toluene, fluorobenzene, bromobenzene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, o-xylene, o-dichlorobenzene, and 1-methylnaphthalene) and of solutes (phenol, m-cresol, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-xylene, and ethylene dibromide) from dilute water solutions have been measured in the laboratory over a wide range of air speeds and water-stirring rates. The overall transfer coefficients (KL) for individual solutes are independent of whether they are in single- or multi-solute solutions. The gas-film transfer coefficients (kG) for solutes in the two-film model, which have hitherto been estimated by extrapolation from reference coefficients, can now be determined directly from the volatilization rates of neatliquids through anew algorithm. The associated liquid-film transfer coefficients (KL) can then be obtained from measured KL and kG values and solute Henry law constants (H). This approach provides a novel means for checking the precision of any kL and kG estimation methods for ultimate prediction of KL. The improved kG estimation enables accurate K L predictions for low-volatility (i.e., low-H) solutes where K L and kGH are essentially equal. In addition, the prediction of KL values for high-volatility (i.e., high-H) solutes, where KL ??? kL, is also improved by using appropriate reference kL values.

  5. Non-Equilibrium Gibbs' Criterion for Completely Wetting Volatile Liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Tsoumpas, Yannis; Galvagno, Mariano; Rednikov, Alexey; Ottevaere, Heidi; Thiele, Uwe; Colinet, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    During the spreading of a liquid over a solid substrate, the contact line can stay pinned at sharp edges until the contact angle exceeds a critical value. At (or sufficiently near) equilibrium, this is known as Gibbs' criterion. Here, we show both experimentally and theoretically that for completely wetting volatile liquids there also exists a dynamically-produced critical angle for depinning, which increases with the evaporation rate. This suggests that one may introduce a simple modification of the Gibbs' criterion for (de)pinning, that accounts for the non-equilibrium effect of evaporation.

  6. Vapor condensation onto a non-volatile liquid drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inci, Levent; Bowles, Richard K., E-mail: richard.bowles@usask.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5C9 (Canada)

    2013-12-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations of miscible and partially miscible binary Lennard–Jones mixtures are used to study the dynamics and thermodynamics of vapor condensation onto a non-volatile liquid drop in the canonical ensemble. When the system volume is large, the driving force for condensation is low and only a submonolayer of the solvent is adsorbed onto the liquid drop. A small degree of mixing of the solvent phase into the core of the particles occurs for the miscible system. At smaller volumes, complete film formation is observed and the dynamics of film growth are dominated by cluster-cluster coalescence. Mixing into the core of the droplet is also observed for partially miscible systems below an onset volume suggesting the presence of a solubility transition. We also develop a non-volatile liquid drop model, based on the capillarity approximations, that exhibits a solubility transition between small and large drops for partially miscible mixtures and has a hysteresis loop similar to the one observed in the deliquescence of small soluble salt particles. The properties of the model are compared to our simulation results and the model is used to study the formulation of classical nucleation theory for systems with low free energy barriers.

  7. Characteristics of a non-volatile liquid propellant in liquid-fed ablative pulsed plasma thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, William Yeong Liang; Schönherr, Tony; Koizumi, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    In the past several decades, the use of electric propulsion in spacecraft has experienced tremendous growth. With the increasing adoption of small satellites in the kilogram range, suitable propulsion systems will be necessary in the near future. Pulsed plasma thrusters (PPTs) were the first form of electric propulsion to be deployed in orbit, and are highly suitable for small satellites due to their inherent simplicity. However, their lifetime is limited by disadvantages such as carbon deposition leading to thruster failure, and complicated feeding systems required due to the conventional use of solid propellants (usually polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)). A promising alternative to solid propellants has recently emerged in the form of non-volatile liquids that are stable in vacuum. This study presents a broad comparison of the non-volatile liquid perfluoropolyether (PFPE) and solid PTFE as propellants on a PPT with a common design base. We show that liquid PFPE can be successfully used as a propellant, and exhibits similar plasma discharge properties to conventional solid PTFE, but with a mass bit that is an order of magnitude higher for an identical ablation area. We also demonstrate that the liquid PFPE propellant has exceptional resistance to carbon deposition, completely negating one of the major causes of thruster failure, while solid PTFE exhibited considerable carbon build-up. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was used to examine the elemental compositions of the surface deposition on the electrodes and the ablation area of the propellant (or PFPE encapsulator). The results show that based on its physical characteristics and behavior, non-volatile liquid PFPE is an extremely promising propellant for use in PPTs, with an extensive scope available for future research and development.

  8. A reexamination of the relationship between volatility, liquidity and trading activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khine Kyaw

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo investiga si la relación entre actividad negociadora en el mercado de acciones, la liquidez del mercado y la volatilidad a nivel de cartera, es similar a dicha relación a nivel deacciones individuales. Para las carteras de empresas de mayor tamaño, la mayor actividad negociadora está relacionada con mayor liquidez y más volatilidad. Sin embargo, a pesar de quela relación volatilidad-liquidez es la misma para las carteras de acciones pequeñas, encontramos que la mayor actividad negociadora está negativamente asociada con la liquidez para estaagrupación. Este contraste en las relaciones está causado por las interrelaciones dinámicas entre las tres variables y una vez que se controla por esas interrelaciones, dicho contraste en losresultados desparece. Estos hallazgos contribuyen al debate sobre el comportamiento del mercado, que ha adquirido un renovado interés en los últimos años.We investigate whether the relationship between equity trading activity, market liquidity and return volatility at the portfolio level is similar to the relationship at the individual security level. For the very largest firm-size portfolio, higher trading activity is positively associated with greater liquidity and more volatile returns. However, despite the volatility-liquidity relationship being the same for smaller equity portfolios, we find that higher trading activity is negatively associated with liquidity for this grouping. These contrasting relationships are shown to be caused by the interdynamics between all three variables and once we control for these interrelationships, the contrasting results disappear. The findings contribute to the debate on market behaviour that has taken on renewed vigour in recent years.

  9. Determination of the solubility of low volatility liquid organic compounds in water using volatile-tracer assisted headspace gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Xin; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Barnes, Donald G

    2016-02-26

    This study reports a new headspace gas chromatographic method (HS-GC) for the determination of water solubility of low volatility liquid organic compounds (LVLOs). The HS-GC analysis was performed on a set of aqueous solutions containing a range of concentrations of toluene-spiked (as a tracer) LVLOs, from under-saturation to over-saturation. A plot of the toluene tracer GC signal vs. the concentration of the LVLO results in two lines of different slopes that intersect at the concentration corresponding to the compound's solubility in water. The results showed that the HS-GC method has good precision (RSD solubility of LVLOs at elevated temperatures. This approach should be of special interest to those concerned about the impact of the presence of low-volatility organic liquids in waters of environmental and biological systems.

  10. Insights into Mechanistic Models for Evaporation of Organic Liquids in the Environment Obtained by Position-Specific Carbon Isotope Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Maxime; Nun, Pierrick; Robins, Richard J; Remaud, Gérald S; Parinet, Julien; Höhener, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    Position-specific isotope effects (PSIEs) have been measured by isotope ratio monitoring (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry during the evaporation of 10 liquids of different polarities under 4 evaporation modes (passive evaporation, air-vented evaporation, low pressure evaporation, distillation). The observed effects are used to assess the validity of the Craig-Gordon isotope model for organic liquids. For seven liquids the overall isotope effect (IE) includes a vapor-liquid contribution that is strongly position-specific in polar compounds but less so in apolar compounds and a diffusive IE that is not position-specific, except in the alcohols, ethanol and propan-1-ol. The diffusive IE is diminished under forced evaporation. The position-specific isotope pattern created by liquid-vapor IEs is manifest in five liquids, which have an air-side limitation for volatilization. For the alcohols, undefined processes in the liquid phase create additional PSIEs. Three other liquids with limitations on the liquid side have a lower, highly position-specific, bulk diffusive IE. It is concluded that evaporation of organic pollutants creates unique position-specific isotope patterns that may be used to assess the progress of remediation or natural attenuation of pollution and that the Craig-Gordon isotope model is valid for the volatilization of nonpolar organic liquids with air-side limitation of the volatilization rate.

  11. Surface-tension-driven convection in pure liquid layers evaporating into ambient air: influence of liquid volatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvet, Fabien; Dehaeck, Sam; Colinet, Pierre

    2011-11-01

    The spontaneous surface-tension-driven convective patterns induced by evaporation of a pure liquid layer are studied experimentally. A volatile liquid layer placed in a cylindrical container is left free to evaporate into air at rest under ambient conditions. The thermal dynamics of the evaporating liquid layer is visualized using an infrared camera. Evaporation rate and liquid thickness are measured by weighting. We focus on the transition between the convective state and the conductive state appearing at a certain instant during the drying of the liquid layer. The critical Marangoni number Mac associated to this transition is estimated from evaporation rate and layer thickness measurements at this instant. The effect of the evaporation rate on Mac and kc (the critical wavenumber) has been investigated by changing the container height and, separately, the effect of the liquid volatility has been studied by using different liquids. Interestingly, it appears that Mac does not depend on the evaporation rate while it depends strongly on the liquid volatility. Given the typical uncertainties associated with liquid properties, a quite reasonable agreement is found with a ``one-sided'' linear stability analysis of this problem. Supported by ESA & BELSPO, by the EU, by ULB, and by FRS - FNRS.

  12. Pinning of a perfectly wetting volatile liquid at a sharp edge - experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoumpas, Yannis; Dehaeck, Sam; Rednikov, Alexey; Galvagno, Mariano; Thiele, Uwe; Colinet, Pierre

    2012-11-01

    It is well known that contact lines of drops, even those of wetting liquids, stay pinned at sharp edges of the substrate until the apparent contact angle exceeds a critical value. In the present study, we show that evaporation influences this effect. The edge of a circular groove is used as an example. Experiments with wetting liquids of different evaporation rate show indeed that not only the spreading of the liquid is adequately halted, but also that the pinning is enhanced for the more volatile cases. The experimental results are qualitatively compared with predictions of a thin film model in two dimensions. The approach employs an evolution equation for the height profile of an evaporating thin film (small contact angle droplet) on a substrate with a rounded edge, and enables one to predict the dependence of the apparent contact angle on the position of the contact line. The calculations confirm our experimental observations, namely that there exists a dynamically produced critical angle for depinning that increases with the evaporation rate. This suggests that one may introduce a simple modification of the Gibbs criterion for pinning that accounts for the non-equilibrium effect of evaporation. Supported by the Marie Curie MULTIFLOW Network, by ESA & BELSPO, and by FRS-FNRS.

  13. Contact line pinning of a perfectly wetting and volatile liquid at a sharp edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoumpas, Yannis; Dehaeck, Sam; Rednikov, Alexey; Colinet, Pierre

    2011-11-01

    According to the Gibbs' criterion, a sharp edge can act as an energy barrier during the spreading of a liquid drop on a rigid substrate. In this study, however, we are trying to determine experimentally whether Gibbs' criterion is also valid for the case of a perfectly wetting and volatile liquid. To this purpose, we constructed a groove of triangular cross section on a Plexiglas substrate. During the experiments liquid was injected in the region surrounded by the groove, which had a square shape with rounded corners. The results indicated that a microgroove edge can indeed prevent the spreading of the liquid drop up to a certain extent, with the maximum apparent contact angle being in close agreement with the one given by Gibbs' criterion. Nevertheless, the apparent contact angle at breakup was found to be significantly lower in the corner of our region. To study this further we developed a static model, which takes into account surface tension and gravity but not the evaporation. Both the simulations and the experiments have confirmed a remarkable behaviour of the contact line at the corner. Finally, to grasp the effect of evaporation, experiments have also been conducted with drops of equally wetting but less volatile liquids. Supported by ESA & BELSPO, by the EU, and by FRS-FNRS.

  14. Electric-field triggered controlled release of bioactive volatiles from imine-based liquid crystalline phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Andreas; Giuseppone, Nicolas; Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Application of an electric field to liquid crystalline film forming imines with negative dielectric anisotropy, such as N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline (MBBA, 1), results in the expulsion of compounds that do not participate in the formation of the liquid crystalline phase. Furthermore, amines and aromatic aldehydes undergo component exchange with the imine by generating constitutional dynamic libraries. The strength of the electric field and the duration of its application to the liquid crystalline film influence the release rate of the expelled compounds and, at the same time, modulate the equilibration of the dynamic libraries. The controlled release of volatile organic molecules with different chemical functionalities from the film was quantified by dynamic headspace analysis. In all cases, higher headspace concentrations were detected in the presence of an electric field. These results point to the possibility of using imine-based liquid crystalline films to build devices for the controlled release of a broad variety of bioactive volatiles as a direct response to an external electric signal.

  15. Positive and negative impacts of agricultural production of liquid biofuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, L.; Hester, R.E.; Harrison, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Agricultural production of liquid biofuels can have positive effects. It can decrease dependence on fossil fuels and increase farmers’ incomes. Agricultural production of mixed perennial biofuel crops may increase pollinator and avian richness. Most types of agricultural crop-based liquid biofuel pr

  16. Computational and experimental study of the interactions between ionic liquids and volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tingting; Andino, Jean M; Alvarez-Idaboy, J Raul

    2010-09-07

    Computational chemistry calculations were performed to investigate the interactions of ionic liquids with different classes of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, alkanes, alkenes, alkynes and aromatic compounds. At least one VOC was studied to represent each class. Initially, 1-butyl-3-methylimindazolium chloride (abbreviated as C(4)mimCl) was used as the test ionic liquid compound. Calculated interaction lengths between atoms in the ionic liquid and the VOC tested as well as thermodynamic data suggest that C(4)mimCl preferentially interacts with alcohols as compared to other classes of volatile organic compounds. The interactions of methanol with different kinds of ionic liquids, specifically 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromine (C(4)mimBr) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (C(4)mimBF(4)) were also studied. In comparing C(4)mimCl, C(4)mimBr, and C(4)mimBF(4), the computational results suggest that C(4)mimCl is more likely to interact with methanol. Laboratory experiments were performed to provide further evidence for the interaction between C(4)mimCl and different classes of VOCs. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to probe the ionic liquid surface before and after exposure to the VOCs that were tested. New spectral features were detected after exposure of C(4)mimCl to various alcohols. The new features are characteristic of the alcohols tested. No new IR features were detected after exposure of the C(4)mimCl to the aldehyde, ketone, alkane, alkene, alkyne or aromatic compounds studied. In addition, after exposing the C(4)mimCl to a multi-component mixture of various classes of compounds (including an alcohol), the only new peaks that were detected were characteristic of the alcohol that was tested. These experimental results demonstrated that C(4)mimCl is selective to alcohols, even in complex mixtures. The findings in this work provide information for future gas-phase alcohol sensor design.

  17. A volatile fluid assisted thermo-pneumatic liquid metal energy harvester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jianbo, E-mail: zhouyuan@mail.ipc.ac.cn, E-mail: jianbotang@mail.ipc.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Junjie; Liu, Jing; Zhou, Yuan, E-mail: zhouyuan@mail.ipc.ac.cn, E-mail: jianbotang@mail.ipc.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-01-11

    A close-cycle self-driving thermal energy harvester using liquid metal as energy carrier fluid has been proposed. The driving force that pushes the liquid metal against flow resistance and gravity is provided by a resistively heated volatile fluid based on thermo-pneumatic principle. The tested harvester prototype demonstrated its capability to extract thermal energy between small temperature gradient, at a scale of 10 °C. During a 5-h operation, it further demonstrated robust liquid metal recirculating performance at a time-average volume flow rate of 14 ml/min with a 12.25 W heating load. The prototype also managed to self-adjust to variable working conditions which indicated the reliability of this method. Advantages of this method include simple-structural design, rigid-motion free operation, and low-temperature actuation. These advantages make it uniquely suited for solar energy and low-grade heat harvesting, high heat flux electronics cooling, as well as autonomous machines actuating.

  18. SELFIES, EMOJIS, LIKES: VOLATILE REPRESENTATIONS AND LIQUID READINGS IN THE DIGITAL AGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane da Cruz Lima Ribeiro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at discussing the roles that hypermedia codes, such as selfies, emoji and likes, have played as representations and readings of self and other in the digital age, and how the school has behaved on this new outlook in dealing with volatile information and communication. The roads previously experienced by unilineal paths give way to the establishment of misshapen interconnective roads surrounding cyberspace and become unstable records of us and the reading we make of another person, constantly re-enacted by new records and, consequently, for new readings. Ubiquity, mediated mainly by mobile devices – mobile phones, smartphones and tablets –, provides this constant updating and metamorphoses, uninterruptedly, our representation in cyberspace. In this framework, the school is challenged to think about how to deal with these new perspectives of reading, since this is a reality brought by the student to the field of formal education. Therefore, we use the literature and took as a basis some theorists such as Santaella (2004; 2007; 2013, Hall (2006, Lévy (1994, Malini & Antoun (2013, among others, to bring to the discussion concepts of liquid identities, volatile representations, information and communication technologies and education.

  19. Volatile Compounds Detected in Coconut Shell Liquid Smoke through Pyrolysis at a Fractioning Temperature of 350-420 C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruslin Hadanu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the volatile components of liquid smoke from coconut shells obtained through the pyrolysis process at fraction 350-420 °C. The volatile compounds of liquid smoke from a coconut shell were analyzed using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Nineteen peaks were detected by GC-MS in the coconut shell liquid smoke, and 19 compounds also were identified. The volatile compounds were identified as follows based on their function group’s composition percentage: phenol (90.75%, carbonyl (3.71%, alcohol (1.81%, and benzene (3.73%, respectively. The liquid smoke contains a high ratio of phenol derivatives (90.75% in volatile profile. The phenol derivatives were the major volatile compounds found in the coconut shell liquid smoke.

  20. Orientational phase transition in cubic liquid crystals with positional order

    OpenAIRE

    Pokrovsky, V.L.; Saidachmetov, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    An electric field can give rise to a shear deformation of a cubic liquid crystal with long-range positional order fixed by two plates. The critical value of the field does not depend on the size of the system and depends crucially on the orientation.

  1. OPTIMIZED DETERMINATION OF TRACE JET FUEL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN HUMAN BLOOD USING IN-FIELD LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION WITH SUBSEQUENT LABORATORY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC-MASS SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS AND ON-COLUMN LARGE VOLUME INJECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    A practical and sensitive method to assess volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from JP-8 jet fuel in human whole blood was developed by modifying previously established liquid-liquid extraction procedures, optimizing extraction times, solvent volume, specific sample processing te...

  2. Evaporation of a Volatile Liquid Lens on the Surface of an Immiscible Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Yang, Fuqian

    2016-06-21

    The evaporation behavior of toluene and hexane lenses on the surface of deionized (DI) water is studied. The toluene and hexane lenses during evaporation experience an advancing stage and a receding stage. There exists a significant difference of the evaporation behavior between the toluene lenses and the hexane lenses. The lifetime and largest diameter of both the toluene and hexane lenses increase with increasing the initial volume of the lenses. For the evaporation of the toluene lenses, the lifetime and largest diameter of the lenses decrease with increasing the temperature of DI water. The effect of the residual of the oil molecules on the evaporation of toluene lenses at a temperature of 21 °C is investigated via the evaporation of a series of consecutive toluene lenses being placed on the same position of the surface of DI water. The temporal evolution of the toluene lenses placed after the first toluene lens deviates significantly from that of the first toluene lens. Significant increase of the receding speed occurs at the dimensionless time in a range 0.7-0.8.

  3. Quantitative prediction of the position and orientation for an octahedral nanoparticle at liquid/liquid interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wenxiong; Lee, Yih Hong; Ling, Xing Yi; Li, Shuzhou

    2017-08-10

    Shape-controlled polyhedral particles and their assembled structures have important applications in plasmonics and biosensing, but the interfacial configurations that will critically determine their resultant assembled structures are not well-understood. Hence, a reliable theory is desirable to predict the position and orientation of a polyhedron at the vicinity of a liquid/liquid interface. Here we demonstrate that the free energy change theory can quantitatively predict the position and orientation of an isolated octahedral nanoparticle at a liquid/liquid interface, whose vertices and facets can play crucial roles in biosensing. We focus on two limiting orientations of an octahedral nanoparticle, vertex up and facet up. Our proposed theory indicates that the surface wettability (hydrophilic/hydrophobic ratio) of the nanoparticle determines its most stable position and the preferred orientation at a water/oil interface. The surface wettability of an octahedron is adjusted from extremely hydrophobic to extremely hydrophilic by changing the amount of charge on the Ag surface in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The MD simulations results are in excellent agreement with our theoretical prediction for an Ag octahedral nanoparticle at a hexane/water interface. Our proposed theory bridges the gap between molecular-level simulations and equilibrium configurations of polyhedral nanoparticles in experiments, where insights from nanoparticle intrinsic wettability details can be used to predict macroscopic superlattice formation experimentally. This work advances our ability to precisely predict the final structures of the polyhedral nanoparticle assemblies at a liquid/liquid interface.

  4. Effect of Mono-and Di-ethanolammonium Formate Ionic Liquids on the Volatility of Water, Ethanol, and Methanol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雪梅; 沈冲; 李春喜

    2013-01-01

    Vapor pressures were measured for six binary systems containing water, ethanol, or methanol with one of the two ionic liquids (ILs) at different component concentrations and temperatures using a quasi-static ebulliometer, with the ILs mono-ethanolammonium formate ([HMEA][HCOO]) and di-ethanolammonium formate ([HDEA][HCOO]). The vapor pressures of the IL-containing binary systems are well correlated using the NRTL model with an overall average absolute relative deviation (AARD) of 0.0062. The effect of ILs on the vapor pressure depression of sol-vents at 0.050 mole fraction of IL is that [HDEA][HCOO]>[HMEA][HCOO], and the vapor pressure lowering de-gree follows the order of water>methanol>ethanol. Further, the activity coefficients of three solvents (viz. water, ethanol, and methanol) for the binary systems{solvent (1)+IL (2)}predicted based on the fitted NRTL parameters at T=333.15 K indicate that the two ILs generate a negative deviation from Raoult’s law for water and methanol and a positive deviation for ethanol to a varying degree, change the relative volatility of a solvent. [HMEA][HCOO] may be a promising entrainer to efficiently separate ethanol aqueous solutions by special rectification.

  5. Phase change events of volatile liquid perfluorocarbon contrast agents produce unique acoustic signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeran, Paul S.; Matsunaga, Terry O.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) provide a dynamic platform to approach problems in medical ultrasound (US). Upon US-mediated activation, the liquid core vaporizes and expands to produce a gas bubble ideal for US imaging and therapy. In this study, we demonstrate through high-speed video microscopy and US interrogation that PCCAs composed of highly volatile perfluorocarbons (PFCs) exhibit unique acoustic behavior that can be detected and differentiated from standard microbubble contrast agents. Experimental results show that when activated with short pulses PCCAs will over-expand and undergo unforced radial oscillation while settling to a final bubble diameter. The size-dependent oscillation phenomenon generates a unique acoustic signal that can be passively detected in both time and frequency domain using confocal piston transducers with an ‘activate high’ (8 MHz, 2 cycles), ‘listen low’ (1 MHz) scheme. Results show that the magnitude of the acoustic ‘signature’ increases as PFC boiling point decreases. By using a band-limited spectral processing technique, the droplet signals can be isolated from controls and used to build experimental relationships between concentration and vaporization pressure. The techniques shown here may be useful for physical studies as well as development of droplet-specific imaging techniques.

  6. Role of Aerosol Liquid Water in Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Volatile Organic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Jennifer A; Wong, Jenny P S; Lee, Alex K Y; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2017-02-07

    A key mechanism for atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation occurs when oxidation products of volatile organic compounds condense onto pre-existing particles. Here, we examine effects of aerosol liquid water (ALW) on relative SOA yield and composition from α-pinene ozonolysis and the photooxidation of toluene and acetylene by OH. Reactions were conducted in a room-temperature flow tube under low-NOx conditions in the presence of equivalent loadings of deliquesced (∼20 μg m(-3) ALW) or effloresced (∼0.2 μg m(-3) ALW) ammonium sulfate seeds at exactly the same relative humidity (RH = 70%) and state of wall conditioning. We found 13% and 19% enhancements in relative SOA yield for the α-pinene and toluene systems, respectively, when seeds were deliquesced rather than effloresced. The relative yield doubled in the acetylene system, and this enhancement was partially reversible upon drying the prepared SOA, which reduced the yield by 40% within a time scale of seconds. We attribute the high relative yield of acetylene SOA on deliquesced seeds to aqueous partitioning and particle-phase reactions of the photooxidation product glyoxal. The observed range of relative yields for α-pinene, toluene, and acetylene SOA on deliquesced and effloresced seeds suggests that ALW plays a complicated, system-dependent role in SOA formation.

  7. Evaporation release behavior of volatile fission products from liquid sodium pool to the inert cover gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagiri, T.; Miyahara, S. [Oarai Engineering Center, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oaraimachi, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    In fuel failure of sodium cooled fast breeder reactors, released volatile fission products (VFPs) such as iodine and cesium from the fuel will be dissolved into the liquid sodium coolant and transferred to the cover vaporization. In the cover gas system of the reactor, natural convection occurs due to temperature differences between the sodium pool and the gas phase. The release rates of VFPs together with sodium vaporization are considered to be controlled by the convection. In this study, three analytical models are developed and examined to calculate the transient release rates using the equilibrium partition coefficients of VFPs. The calculated release rates are compared with experimental results for sodium and sodium iodide. The release rate of sodium is closest to the calculation by the heterogeneous nucleation theory. The release rate of sodium iodide obtained from the experiment is between the release rates calculated by the model based on heat-and-mass transfer analogy and the Hill`s theory. From this study, it is confirmed that the realistic release rate of sodium is able to be calculated by the model based on the heterogeneous nucleation theory. The conservative release rate of sodium iodide is able to be calculated by the model based on the Hill`s theory using the equilibrium partition coefficient of sodium iodide. (author) 7 figs., 1 tab., 3 refs.

  8. Discharge characteristics of an ablative pulsed plasma thruster with non-volatile liquid propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, William Yeong Liang; Schönherr, Tony; Koizumi, Hiroyuki

    2017-07-01

    Pulsed plasma thrusters (PPTs) are a form of electric spacecraft propulsion. They have an extremely simple structure and are highly suitable for nano/micro-spacecraft with weights in the kilogram range. Such small spacecraft have recently experienced increased growth but still lack suitable efficient propulsion systems. PPTs operate in a pulsed mode (one discharge = one shot) and typically use solid polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) as a propellant. However, new non-volatile liquids in the perfluoropolyether (PFPE) family have recently been found to be promising alternatives. A recent study presented results on the physical characteristics of PFPE vs. PTFE, showing that PFPE is superior in terms of physical characteristics such as its resistance to carbon deposition. This letter will examine the electrical discharge characteristics of PFPE vs. PTFE. The results demonstrate that PFPE has excellent shot-to-shot repeatability and a lower discharge resistance when compared with PTFE. Taken together with its physical characteristics, PFPE appears to be a strong contender to PTFE as a PPT propellant.

  9. Selection of ionic liquids for enhancing the gas solubility of volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Miquel, Maria; Palomar, Jose; Rodriguez, Francisco

    2013-01-10

    A systematic thermodynamic analysis has been carried out for selecting cations and anions to enhance the absorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at low concentration in gaseous streams by ionic liquids (ILs), using COSMO-RS methodology. The predictability of computational procedure was validated by comparing experimental and COSMO-RS calculated Henry's law constant data over a sample of 125 gaseous solute-IL systems. For more than 2400 solute-IL mixtures evaluated, including 9 solutes and 270 ILs, it was found that the lower the activity coefficient at infinite dilution (γ(∞)) of solutes in the ILs, the more the exothermic excess enthalpy (H(E)) of the equimolar IL-solute mixtures. Then, the solubility of a representative sample of VOC solutes, with very different chemical nature, was screened in a wide number of ILs using COSMO-RS methodology by means of γ(∞) and H(E) parameters, establishing criteria to select the IL structures that promote favorable solute-solvent intermolecular interactions. As a result of this analysis, an attempt of classification of VOCs respect to their potential solubility in ILs was proposed, providing insights to rationally select the cationic and anionic species for a possible development of absorption treatments of VOC pollutants based on IL systems.

  10. Stability of a volatile liquid film spreading along a heterogeneously-heated substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Naveen; Davis, Jeffrey M

    2011-03-01

    The dynamics and stability of a thin, viscous film of volatile liquid flowing under the influence of gravity over a non-uniformly heated substrate are investigated using lubrication theory. Attention is focused on the regime in which evaporation balances the flow due to gravity. The film terminates above the heater at an apparent contact line, with a microscopically thin precursor film adsorbed due to the disjoining pressure. The film develops a weak thermocapillary ridge due to the Marangoni stress at the upstream edge of the heated region. As for spreading films, a more significant ridge is formed near the apparent contact line. For weak Marangoni effects, the film evolves to a steady profile. For stronger Marangoni effects, the film evolves to a time-periodic state. Results of a linear stability analysis reveal that the steady film is unstable to transverse perturbations above a critical value of the Marangoni parameter, leading to finger formation at the contact line. The streamwise extent of the fingers is limited by evaporation. The time-periodic profiles are always unstable, leading to the formation of periodically-oscillating fingers. For rectangular heaters, the film profiles after instability onset are consistent with images from published experimental studies.

  11. INFLUENCE OF INVESTORS’ ATTENTION ON STOCK RETURN, LIQUIDITY, AND RETURN VOLATILITY COMPARISON BETWEEN MANUFACTURE COMPANIES IN INDONESIA AND INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Puspita Sari, Noviana Icha

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to examine the influence of investors’ attention of company stock on stock return, liquidity, and return volatility comparison between manufacture companies in Indonesia and India in the year of 2011-2013. Investors’ attention is measured by a direct proxy which is Google Search Volume Index from Google trends. This research uses secondary data and processed by regression analysis. The samples are gathered from Indonesia stock exchange and India stock exchange. The result o...

  12. Volatile organic compounds over Eastern Himalaya, India: temporal variation and source characterization using Positive Matrix Factorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Sarkar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A first ever study on the characterization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs has been made over a Himalayan high altitude station in India. A total of 18 VOCs (mono aromatics-BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, non-BTEX substituted aromatics and halocarbon have been measured over Darjeeling (27.01° N, 88.15° E, 2200 m a.s.l. in the eastern Himalaya in India during the period of July 2011–June 2012. The annual average concentration of the sum of 18 target VOCs (TVOC was 376.3 ± 857.2 μg m−3. Monoaromatics had the highest contribution (72% followed by other substituted aromatics (22% and halocarbon (6% compounds. Toluene was the most abundant VOC in the atmosphere of Darjeeling with the contribution of ~37% to TVOC followed by benzene (~21%, ethylbenzene (~9% and xylenes (~6%. TVOC concentrations were highest during the postmonsoon season with minimum solar radiation and lowest during the premonsoon season with maximum solar radiation. Anthropogenic activities related mainly to tourists like diesel and gasoline emissions, biomass and coal burning, use of solvent and solid waste emissions were almost equal in both the seasons. Seasonal variation in TVOCs over Darjeeling was mainly governed by the incoming solar radiation rather than the emission sources. Source apportionment study using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF model indicated that major fraction of (~60% TVOC were contributed by diesel and gasoline exhausts followed by solvent evaporation (18% and other sources. Diesel exhaust was also found to have the maximum potential in tropospheric ozone formation. The atmospheric loading of BTEX over Darjeeling was found to be comparable with several Indian metro cities and much higher than other cities around the world.

  13. Simultaneous Distillation Extraction of Some Volatile Flavor Components from Pu-erh Tea Samples—Comparison with Steam Distillation-Liquid/Liquid Extraction and Soxhlet Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xungang; Zhang, Zhengzhu; Wan, Xiaochun; Ning, Jingming; Yao, Chengcheng; Shao, Wanfang

    2009-01-01

    A simutaneous distillation extraction (SDE) combined GC method was constructed for determination of volatile flavor components in Pu-erh tea samples. Dichloromethane and ethyl decylate was employed as organic phase in SDE and internal standard in determination, respectively. Weakly polar DB-5 column was used to separate the volatile flavor components in GC, 10 of the components were quantitatively analyzed, and further confirmed by GC-MS. The recovery covered from 66.4%–109%, and repeatability expressed as RSD was in range of 1.44%–12.6%. SDE was most suitable for the extraction of the anlytes by comparing with steam distillation-liquid/liquid extraction and Soxhlet extraction. Commercially available Pu-erh tea samples, including Pu-erh raw tea and ripe tea, were analyzed by the constructed method. the high-volatile components, such as benzyl alcohol, linalool oxide, and linalool, were greatly rich in Pu-erh raw teas, while the contents of 1,2,3-Trimethoxylbenzene and 1,2,4-Trimethoxylbenzene were much high in Pu-erh ripe teas. PMID:20169174

  14. A universal bubble-growth equation for pure liquids and binary solutions with a non-volatile solute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyatake, Osamu [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Tanaka, Itsuo [Gifu Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Biological Production System; Lior, N. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics

    1996-12-31

    A simple equation suitable for predicting the growth rate of a vapor bubble in uniformly-superheated pure liquids and in binary solutions with a non-volatile solute was developed. The equation also improves on the popular pure-liquid bubble growth expression of Mikie et al. (1970) in that it is valid throughout the bubble growth history, i.e., in the surface-tension-, inertia-, and heat-transfer-controlled regimes, it accounts for bubble growth acceleration effects, and uses correctly-related and variable fluid properties. It was found to agree very well with experimental data for pure water and for aqueous NaCl solutions. As the bubble growth in superheated solutions with a non-volatile solute was found to be quite insensitive to diffusion and non-equilibrium effects in a broad range of common solution properties, this equation is likely to be universally valid for many liquids and solutions. Bubble growth in superheated fluids is of key interest in boiling phenomena in general and in flash evaporation in particular. Applications include a wide variety of separation processes such as water desalination, and energy conversion processes such as ocean-thermal energy conversion, geothermal power generation, and nuclear reactor safety.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Volatile Impurities in Diallyldimethylammonium Chloride Monomer Solution by Gas Chromatography Coupled with Liquid-Liquid Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative analysis method for volatile impurities in diallyldimethylammonium chloride (DADMAC monomer solution was established in this paper. The volatile impurities were quantitatively analyzed with trichloromethane as extraction solvent and n-hexane as internal standard by using gas chromatography (GC coupled with solvent extraction, and the chromatographic conditions, quantitative methods, and extraction conditions were systematically investigated in detail. The results showed that excellent linear relationships of 5 volatile impurities (dimethylamine, allyldimethylamine, allyl chloride, allyl alcohol, and allyl aldehyde were obtained in the range of 1–100 mg·L−1. The method also showed good specificity, recovery (95.0%–107.5%, and relative standard deviation (RSD, 1.40%–7.67%. This method could accurately detect the whole volatile impurities in DADMAC monomer solution quantitatively in one time with a low detection limit. Furthermore, this method is conducive to the preparation of highly pure DADMAC monomer and the development of national and international standards of the DADMAC monomer product quality, and the results could provide a strong foundation for the regulation and mechanism research of impurities on monomer reactivity in polymerization.

  16. Extraction and Esterification of Low-Titer Short-Chain Volatile Fatty Acids from Anaerobic Fermentation with Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Stephen J; Berton, Jan K E T; Naert, Pieter; Gildemyn, Sylvia; Rabaey, Korneel; Stevens, Christian V

    2016-08-23

    Ionic liquids can both act as a solvent and mediate esterification to valorize low-titer volatile fatty acids and generate organic solvents from renewable carbon sources including biowaste and CO2 . In this study, four phosphonium ionic liquids were tested for single-stage extraction of acetic acid from a dilute stream and esterification to ethyl acetate with added ethanol and heat. The esterification proceeded with a maximum conversion of 85.9±1.3 % after 30 min at 75 °C at a 1:1 stoichiometric ratio of reactants. Extraction and esterification can be tailored using mixed-anion ionic liquids; this is demonstrated herein using a common trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium cation and a mixed chloride and bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide anion ionic liquid. As a further proof-of-concept, ethyl acetate was generated from an ionic liquid-driven esterification of an acetic acid extractant generated using CO2 as the only carbon source by microbial electrosynthesis.

  17. Position Paper on Practicable Performance Criteria for the Removal Efficiency of Volatile Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. T. Jubin; N. Soelberg; D. M. Strachan

    2012-03-01

    As a result of fuel reprocessing, volatile radionuclides may be released from the facility stack if no processes are put in place to remove them. The radionuclides that are of concern in this document are 3H, 14C, 85Kr, and 129I. The question we attempted to answer is how efficient must this removal process be for each of these radionuclides? To answer this question, we examined the three regulations that may impact the degree to which these radionuclides must be reduced before process gases can be released from the facility. These regulations are 40 CFR 61 (EPA 2010a), 40 CFR 190(EPA 2010b), and 10 CFR 20 (NRC 2012). These regulations apply to the total radionuclide release and to a particular organ - the thyroid. Because these doses can be divided amongst all the radionuclides in different ways and even within the four radionuclides in question, we provided several cases. We first looked at the inventories for these radionuclides for three fuel types (PWR UOX, PWR MOX, and AHTGR), several burn-up values, and time out of reactor extending to 200 y. We calculated doses to the maximum exposed individual (MEI) with the EPA code CAP-88 (Rosnick 1992). Finally, we looked at two dose cases. Allocating all of the allowable dose to be used by the volatile radionuclides is one case, but, perhaps, unrealistic. In lieu of this, we arbitrarily selected a value of 10% of the allowable dose to be assigned to the volatile radionuclides. We calculated the required decontamination factors (DFs) for both of these cases, including the case for the thyroid dose for which 14C and 129I were the main contributors. With respect to 129I doses, we found that the highest dose was calculated with iodine as a fine particulate. The dose scaled as the fraction of the total 129I that was particulate. Therefore, we assumed for all of our calculations that 100% of the 129I was particulate and allow the user of the results given here to scale our calculated doses to their needs.

  18. Simultaneous determination of volatile and non-volatile nitrosamines in processed meat products by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation and electrospray ionisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Susan Strange; Duedahl-Olesen, Lene; Granby, Kit

    2014-01-01

    A sensitive, selective and generic method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of the contents (μgkg−1 range) of both volatile nitrosamines (VNA) and non-volatile nitrosamines (NVNA) in processed meat products. The extraction procedure only requires basic laboratory equipment and...

  19. Cash on Demand: A Framework for Managing a Cash Liquidity Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, John H.

    1995-01-01

    A well-run college or university will seek to accumulate and maintain an appropriate cash reserve or liquidity position. A rigorous analytic process for estimating the size and cost of a liquidity position, based on judgments about the institution's operating risks and opportunities, is outlined. (MSE)

  20. Cash on Demand: A Framework for Managing a Cash Liquidity Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, John H.

    1995-01-01

    A well-run college or university will seek to accumulate and maintain an appropriate cash reserve or liquidity position. A rigorous analytic process for estimating the size and cost of a liquidity position, based on judgments about the institution's operating risks and opportunities, is outlined. (MSE)

  1. Rising and boiling of a drop of volatile liquid in a heavier one: application to the LMFBR severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigny, Sylvain L.; Coste, Pierre F. [DEN/DER/SSTH, CEA/Grenoble, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The rising and, simultaneously the boiling, of a droplet of volatile liquid in a heavier one is computation-ally investigated. Our calculations are performed with the help of the SIMMER code, in which a specific DNS algorithm is developed, to represent surface tension between the different media in an explicit way. This is required to represent the physical contact that occurs between two liquids and the vapor from the lighter one, since interfacial heat transfers, and therefore boiling kinetics, merely depend on it. The behavior of the three fluids system is of interest as a key phenomenon related to the transition phase of LMFBR severe accidents, before the formation of a fully developed bubble column. The driven force due to the boiling of steel drops can play a major role in the relocation, and, consequently, the recriticality of UO{sub 2} fuel. The problem is investigated focusing first on analytical experiments, built-up with simulating materials, and for which accurate experimental results are provided. The dependence of results with regard to thermodynamical and physical properties is underlined. This point is of interest in view of some uncertainties in the knowledge of data concerning the materials present in the reactor at high temperature. The pressure level is a key parameter in the accident scenarios: its influence is uppermost on the volumic mass of the gas. It is also outlined. (authors)

  2. Analysis of beer volatiles by polymeric imidazolium-solid phase microextraction coatings: Synthesis and characterization of polymeric imidazolium ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Álvarez, Jaime; Blanco-Gomis, Domingo; Arias-Abrodo, Pilar; Pello-Palma, Jairo; Ríos-Lombardía, Nicolás; Busto, Eduardo; Gotor-Fernández, Vicente; Gutiérrez-Álvarez, María Dolores

    2013-08-30

    Two polymeric ionic liquids, 3-(but-3″-en-1″-yl)-1-[2'-hydroxycyclohexyl]-1H-imidazol-3-ium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (IL-1) and 1-(2'-hydroxycyclohexyl)-3-(4″-vinylbenzyl)-1H-imidazol-3-ium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (IL-2), have been synthesized by a free radical polymerization reaction and used as coatings for solid-phase microextraction (SPME). These new fibers exhibit good film stability, high thermal stability (270-290°C) and long lifetimes, and are used for the extraction of volatile compounds in lemon beer using gas chromatography separation and flame ionization detection. The scanning electron micrographs of the fiber surface revealed a polymeric ionic liquid (PIL) film, which is distributed homogeneously on the fiber. The developed PIL fiber showed good linearity between 50 and 2000μg/L with regression coefficients in the range of 0.996-0.999. The relative standard deviations (RSD) obtained in the peak area were found to vary between 1% and 12%, which assured that adequate repeatability was achieved. The spiked recoveries for three beer samples ranged from 78.4% to 123.6%. Experimental design has been employed in the optimization of extraction factors and robustness assessment. The polymeric IL-1 butenyl fiber showed a greater efficiency compared to the PDMS-DVB (65μm) and CAR-PDMS (75μm) for the extraction of all of the analytes studied.

  3. Controlling the volatility of the written optical state in electrochromic DNA liquid crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Kai; Varghese, Justin; Gerasimov, Jennifer Y.; Polyakov, Alexey O.; Shuai, Min; Su, Juanjuan; Chen, Dong; Zajaczkowski, Wojciech; Marcozzi, Alessio; Pisula, Wojciech; Noheda, Beatriz; Palstra, Thomas T. M.; Clark, Noel A.; Herrmann, Andreas

    Liquid crystals are widely used in displays for portable electronic information display. To broaden their scope for other applications like smart windows and tags, new material properties such as polarizer-free operation and tunable memory of a written state become important. Here, we describe an

  4. Prediction of the vapor-liquid distribution constants for volatile nonelectrolytes in water up to its critical temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plyasunov, Andrey V.; Shock, Everett L.

    2003-12-01

    The distribution of solutes between coexisting liquid and vapor phases of water can be expressed by the distribution constant, K D, defined as K D= limitlim x→0y/x, where y and x stand for the mole fraction concentrations of a solute in vapor and liquid phases, respectively. Research reported here is concerned with the prediction of this property, K D, for volatile nonelectrolytes, over the whole temperature range of existence of the vapor-liquid equilibrium for water, i.e. from 273 K to the critical temperature at 647.1 K. A simple empirical method is proposed to extrapolate the values of K D from 298 K to 500-550 K. Calculations at higher temperatures are based on the theoretical relation that establishes the proportionality between RTlnK D and the Krichevskii parameter, A Kr, which is the single most important property of a solute at near-critical conditions, and can be evaluated using the method proposed here. The comparison of predicted and experimental values of K D and A Kr for a few well-studied solutes reveals the satisfactory performance of the proposed method. It appears that the accuracy of predictions in the framework of this method is limited mainly by the accuracy of the values of the thermodynamic functions of hydration of solutes at 298 K, and that the best way to improve the quality of predictions of K D and A Kr is to increase the inventory of accurate calorimetric enthalpy and heat capacity data for aqueous solutes at 298 K. We stress that the values of the Krichevskii parameter, such as those generated in this study, are of crucial importance for reliable predictions of the chemical potential and its derivatives (V 2o, Cp 2o) for aqueous solutes at near-critical and supercritical conditions. Values of K D and A Kr are predicted for many inorganic volatile nonelectrolytes and some halogenated derivatives of methane and ethene. We show that both ln K D and A Kr for aqueous organic solutes follow group additivity systematics, and we derive a set

  5. Position for determining gas-phase volatile organic compound concentrations in transuranic waste containers. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, M.J.; Liekhus, K.J. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; Djordjevic, S.M.; Loehr, C.A.; Spangler, L.R. [Benchmark Environmental Corp. (United States)

    1998-06-01

    In the conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) imposed certain conditions on the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding gas phase volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the void space of transuranic (TRU) waste containers. Specifically, the EPA required the DOE to ensure that each waste container has no layer of confinement that contains flammable mixtures of gases or mixtures of gases that could become flammable when mixed with air. The EPA also required that sampling of the headspace of waste containers outside inner layers of confinement be representative of the entire void space of the container. The EPA stated that all layers of confinement in a container would have to be sampled until DOE can demonstrate to the EPA that sampling of all layers is either unnecessary or can be safely reduced. A test program was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to demonstrate that the gas phase VOC concentration in the void space of each layer of confinement in vented drums can be estimated from measured drum headspace using a theoretical transport model and that sampling of each layer of confinement is unnecessary. This report summarizes the studies performed in the INEEL test program and extends them for the purpose of developing a methodology for determining gas phase VOC concentrations in both vented and unvented TRU waste containers. The methodology specifies conditions under which waste drum headspace gases can be said to be representative of drum gases as a whole and describes a method for predicting drum concentrations in situations where the headspace concentration is not representative. The methodology addresses the approach for determining the drum VOC gas content for two purposes: operational period drum handling and operational period no-migration calculations.

  6. Determination of volatile components of saffron by optimised ultrasound-assisted extraction in tandem with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereshti, Hassan; Heidari, Reza; Samadi, Soheila

    2014-01-15

    In the present research, a combined extraction method of ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) in conjunction with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was applied to isolation and enrichment of saffron volatiles. The extracted components of the saffron were separated and determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) technique. The mixture of methanol/acetonitrile was chosen for the extraction of the compounds and chloroform was used at the preconcentration stage. The important parameters, such as composition of extraction solvent, volume of preconcentration solvent, ultrasonic applying time, and salt concentration were optimised by using a half-fraction factorial central composite design (CCD). Under the optimal conditions, the linear dynamic ranges (LDRs) were 10-10,000mgL(-)(1). The determination coefficients (R(2)) were from 0.9990 to 0.9997. The limits of detection (LODs) and limits of quantification (LOQs) for the extracted compounds were 6-123mgL(-)(1) and 20-406mgL(-)(1), respectively. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 2.48-9.82% (n=3). The enhancement factors (EFs) were 3.6-41.3.

  7. Synthesis and toxicity evaluation of hydrophobic ionic liquids for volatile organic compounds biodegradation in a two-phase partitioning bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Castillo, Alfredo Santiago [Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Rennes, CNRS, UMR 6226, 11 Allée de Beaulieu, CS 50837, 35708 Rennes Cedex 7 (France); Université européenne de Bretagne (France); Guihéneuf, Solène, E-mail: solene.guiheneuf@wanadoo.fr [Université européenne de Bretagne, Université de Rennes 1, Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, UMR, CNRS 6226, Groupe Ingénierie Chimique & Molécules Pour le Vivant (ICMV), Bât. 10A, Campus de Beaulieu, Avenue du Général Leclerc, CS 74205, 35042 Rennes cedex (France); Le Guével, Rémy [Plate-forme ImPACcell Structure Fédérative de Recherche BIOSIT Université de Rennes 1, Bat. 8, Campus de Villejean, 2 Avenue du Pr. Leon Bernard, CS 34317, 35043 Rennes Cedex (France); Biard, Pierre-François [Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Rennes, CNRS, UMR 6226, 11 Allée de Beaulieu, CS 50837, 35708 Rennes Cedex 7 (France); Université européenne de Bretagne (France); and others

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Description of a VOC depollution system suitable with industrial processes, TPPB. • Novel association of TPPB and hydrophobic ionic liquids. • Synthesis of several hydrophobic ionic liquids designed to fit desired properties. • Toxicity evaluation of these ILs towards cells, animals and bacteria. - Abstract: Synthesis of several hydrophobic ionic liquids (ILs), which might be selected as good candidates for degradation of hydrophobic volatile organic compounds in a two-phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB), were carried out. Several bioassays were also realized, such as toxicity evaluation on activated sludge and zebrafish, cytotoxicity, fluoride release in aqueous phase and biodegradability in order to verify their possible effects in case of discharge in the aquatic environment and/or human contact during industrial manipulation. The synthesized compounds consist of alkylimidazoliums, functionalized imidazoliums, isoqinoliniums, triazoliums, sulfoniums, pyrrolidiniums and morpholiniums and various counter-ions such as: PF{sub 6}{sup −}, NTf{sub 2}{sup −} and NfO{sup −}. Toxicity evaluation on activated sludge of each compound (5% v/v of IL) was assessed by using a glucose uptake inhibition test. Toxicity against zebrafish and cytotoxicity were evaluated by the ImPACCell platform of Rennes (France). Fluoride release in water was estimated by regular measurements using ion chromatography equipment. IL biodegradability was determined by measuring BOD{sub 28} of aqueous samples (compound concentration,1 mM). All ILs tested were not biodegradable; while some of them were toxic toward activated sludge. Isoquinolinium ILs were toxic to human cancerous cell lines. Nevertheless no toxicity was found against zebrafish Danio rerio. Only one IL released fluoride after long-time agitation.

  8. Volatile heavy metal mobility in silicate liquids: Implications for volcanic degassing and eruption prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Jason M.; Canil, Dante

    2008-05-01

    The volatilization of Cd, Re, Tl, Pb, Sb and Te from melts in the system CaO-MgO-Al 2O 3-SiO 2 (CMAS) and Na 2O-MgO-Al 2O 3-SiO 2 (NMAS) has been investigated at 0.1 MPa and 1200-1350 °C. Experiments were conducted in air using metal-doped melts in Pt crucibles. Analysis of quenched glasses by Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) normal to the melt/gas interface produced concentration profiles for Cd, Re, Tl, Pb, Sb and Te to which a semi-infinite one-dimensional diffusion model could be applied to extract diffusion coefficients ( D). The melt was also doped with Cu, Zn, In, Mo, Sn and W but concentration profiles for these metals did not develop. In the CMAS composition at 1300 °C, the fastest diffusing element was Cd having a log DCd = - 6.5 ± 0.2. The slowest element was Re with log DRe = - 7.5 ± 0.3. Diffusivities of Sb, Te, Pb and Tl have intermediate values where log DSb = - 7.1 ± 0.1, log DTe = - 7.2 ± 0.3, log DPb = - 7.1 ± 0.2, log DTl = - 7.0 ± 0.2 cm 2/s. In the NMAS composition, log DRe = - 6.5 ± 0.2, log DSb = - 6.0 ± 0.2, log DPb = - 6.1 ± 0.1, log DTl = - 5.8 ± 0.2 cm 2/s (values for Cd and Te were not determined). Differences in diffusivity of volatile heavy metal ions to a melt-gas interface lead to significant fractionation between these metals in magmas during degassing. Given the observed differences in Cd and Re diffusivities in the CMAS composition, we predict an increase in the normalized Cd/Re ratio in the gas phase with increasing bubble growth rate. Monitoring of the Cd/Re ratios in aerosols from degassing volcanoes may provide a tool for predicting volcanic eruption.

  9. LIQUID-LIQUID PHASE EQUILIBRIUM OF POLYMER SOLUTIONS AND POLYMER BLENDS UNDER POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE PRESSURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Attila R.Imre

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we would like to give a brief review about the extensibility of the liquid-liquid locus into the negative pressure region. Negative pressure states are hardly explored; most researchers believe that the pressure scale ends at p = 0.We would like to show that this is not true, thep = 0 point is not a special point for liquids, it can be "easily" crossed. We are going to give a few example, where the extension of liquid-liquid locus for polymer blends and solutions below p = 0 gives us some interesting results, like the merging of UCST and LCST branches in weakly interacting polymer solutions or the reason why most UCST blends exhibit pressure induced immiscibility. Also, we will see what happens with the immiscibility island of aqueous polymer solutions when - reaching the critical molar mass - it "disappears".

  10. Untargeted metabolomic analysis using liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry for non-volatile profiling of wines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbulu, M. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of the Basque Country, 01006 Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain); Sampedro, M.C. [Central Service of Analysis, SGIker, University of the Basque Country, 01006 Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain); Gómez-Caballero, A.; Goicolea, M.A. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of the Basque Country, 01006 Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain); Barrio, R.J., E-mail: r.barrio@ehu.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of the Basque Country, 01006 Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain)

    2015-02-09

    Highlights: • An untargeted metabolomic method for the non-volatile profile of the Graciano wine was developed. • 411 different metabolites in Graciano Vitis vinifera red wine were identified. • 15 compounds could serve to differentiate Graciano and Tempranillo wines. • An enological database (WinMet) with 2080 compounds was constructed. - Abstract: The current study presents a method for comprehensive untargeted metabolomic fingerprinting of the non-volatile profile of the Graciano Vitis vinifera wine variety, using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (LC–ESI-QTOF). Pre-treatment of samples, chromatographic columns, mobile phases, elution gradients and ionization sources, were evaluated for the extraction of the maximum number of metabolites in red wine. Putative compounds were extracted from the raw data using the extraction algorithm, molecular feature extractor (MFE). For the metabolite identification the WinMet database was designed based on electronic databases and literature research and includes only the putative metabolites reported to be present in oenological matrices. The results from WinMet were compared with those in the METLIN database to evaluate how much the databases overlap for performing identifications. The reproducibility of the analysis was assessed using manual processing following replicate injections of Vitis vinifera cv. Graciano wine spiked with external standards. In the present work, 411 different metabolites in Graciano Vitis vinifera red wine were identified, including primary wine metabolites such as sugars (4%), amino acids (23%), biogenic amines (4%), fatty acids (2%), and organic acids (32%) and secondary metabolites such as phenols (27%) and esters (8%). Significant differences between varieties Tempranillo and Graciano were related to the presence of fifteen specific compounds.

  11. Application of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry for the determination of oxygenated volatile organic compounds in effluents from the production of petroleum bitumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boczkaj, Grzegorz; Makoś, Patrycja; Przyjazny, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    We present a new procedure for the determination of oxygenated volatile organic compounds in samples of postoxidative effluents from the production of petroleum bitumens using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. The eight extraction parameters were optimized for 43 oxygenated volatile organic compounds. The detection limits obtained ranged from 0.07 to 0.82 μg/mL for most of the analytes, the precision was good (relative standard deviation below 2.91% at the 5 μg/mL level and 4.75% at the limit of quantification), the recoveries for the majority of compounds varied from 70.6 to 118.9%, and the linear range was wide, which demonstrates the usefulness of the procedure. The developed procedure was used for the determination of oxygenated volatile organic compounds in samples of raw postoxidative effluents and in effluents after chemical treatment. In total, 23 compounds at concentration levels from 0.37 to 32.95 μg/mL were identified in real samples. The same samples were also analyzed in the SCAN mode, which resulted in four more phenol derivatives being identified and tentatively determined. The studies demonstrated the need for monitoring volatile organic compounds content in effluents following various treatments due to the formation of secondary oxygenated volatile organic compounds.

  12. Exposure to volatile organic compounds and kidney dysfunction in thin film transistor liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD) workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ta-Yuan; Huang, Kuei-Hung; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Shie, Ruei-Hao; Chao, Keh-Ping; Hsu, Wen-Hsin; Bao, Bo-Ying

    2010-06-15

    Many volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are emitted during the manufacturing of thin film transistor liquid crystal displays (TFT-LCDs), exposure to some of which has been reported to be associated with kidney dysfunction, but whether such an effect exists in TFT-LCD industry workers is unknown. This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the association between exposure to VOCs and kidney dysfunction among TFT-LCD workers. The results showed that ethanol (1811.0+/-1740.4 ppb), acetone (669.0+/-561.0 ppb), isopropyl alcohol (187.0+/-205.3 ppb) and propylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate (PGMEA) (102.9+/-102.0 ppb) were the four dominant VOCs present in the workplace. The 63 array workers studied had a risk of kidney dysfunction 3.21-fold and 3.84-fold that of 61 cell workers and 18 module workers, respectively. Workers cumulatively exposed to a total level of isopropyl alcohol, PGMEA and propylene glycol monomethyl ether> or =324 ppb-year had a significantly higher risk of kidney dysfunction (adjusted OR=3.41, 95% CI=1.14-10.17) compared with those exposed to LCD industry, and cumulative exposure to specific VOCs might be associated with kidney dysfunction.

  13. Synthesis and toxicity evaluation of hydrophobic ionic liquids for volatile organic compounds biodegradation in a two-phase partitioning bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Castillo, Alfredo Santiago; Guihéneuf, Solène; Le Guével, Rémy; Biard, Pierre-François; Paquin, Ludovic; Amrane, Abdeltif; Couvert, Annabelle

    2016-04-15

    Synthesis of several hydrophobic ionic liquids (ILs), which might be selected as good candidates for degradation of hydrophobic volatile organic compounds in a two-phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB), were carried out. Several bioassays were also realized, such as toxicity evaluation on activated sludge and zebrafish, cytotoxicity, fluoride release in aqueous phase and biodegradability in order to verify their possible effects in case of discharge in the aquatic environment and/or human contact during industrial manipulation. The synthesized compounds consist of alkylimidazoliums, functionalized imidazoliums, isoqinoliniums, triazoliums, sulfoniums, pyrrolidiniums and morpholiniums and various counter-ions such as: PF6(-), NTf2(-) and NfO(-). Toxicity evaluation on activated sludge of each compound (5% v/v of IL) was assessed by using a glucose uptake inhibition test. Toxicity against zebrafish and cytotoxicity were evaluated by the ImPACCell platform of Rennes (France). Fluoride release in water was estimated by regular measurements using ion chromatography equipment. IL biodegradability was determined by measuring BOD28 of aqueous samples (compound concentration,1mM). All ILs tested were not biodegradable; while some of them were toxic toward activated sludge. Isoquinolinium ILs were toxic to human cancerous cell lines. Nevertheless no toxicity was found against zebrafish Danio rerio. Only one IL released fluoride after long-time agitation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantification approach for assessment of sparkling wine volatiles from different soils, ripening stages, and varieties by stir bar sorptive extraction with liquid desorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Elisabete; Coimbra, Manuel A; Nogueira, J M F; Rocha, Sílvia M

    2009-03-01

    Stir bar sorptive extraction with liquid desorption followed by large volume injection coupled to gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry (SBSE-LD/LVI-GC-qMS) was applied for the quantification of varietal and fermentative volatiles in sparkling wines. The analytical data were performed by using suitable standards of monoterpene hydrocarbons (alpha-pinene), monoterpenols (linalool), sesquiterpenoids (E,E-farnesol, Z-nerolidol, and guaiazulene), C(13) norisoprenoids (beta-ionone), aliphatic and aromatic alcohols (hexanol and 2-phenylethanol), and esters (hexyl acetate and ethyl decanoate) as model compounds. The wine volatiles were quantified using the structurally related standards. The methodology showed good linearity over the concentration range tested, with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.950 to 0.997, and a reproducibility of 9-18%. The SBSE-LD/LVI-GC-qMS methodology allowed, in a single run, the quantification of 71 wine volatiles that can be quantified accurately at levels lower than their respective olfactory thresholds. This methodology was used for assessment of sparkling wine volatiles from different soils, ripening stages, and varieties. The variety and soil influenced significantly the volatile composition of sparkling wines; lower effect was observed for the ripening stage of grapes picked up one week before or after the maturity state.

  15. A chromatographic approach to distinguish Gram-positive from Gram-negative bacteria using exogenous volatile organic compound metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Guízar, Susana; Sykes, Hannah; Perry, John D; Schwalbe, Edward C; Stanforth, Stephen P; Perez-Perez, Ma Cristina I; Dean, John R

    2017-06-09

    This paper utilized L-alanine aminopeptidase activity as a useful approach to distinguish between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. This was done using two enzyme substrates, specifically 2-amino-N-phenylpropanamide and 2-amino-N-(4-methylphenyl)propanamide which liberated the volatile compounds aniline and p-toluidine, respectively. Two complementary analytical techniques have been used to identify and quantify the VOCs, specifically static headspace multicapillary column gas chromatography ion mobility spectrometry (SHS-MCC-GC-IMS) and headspace solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS). Superior limits of detection were obtained using HS-SPME-GC-MS, typically by a factor of x6 such that the LOD for aniline was 0.02μg/mL and 0.01μg/mL for p-toluidine. In addition, it was also possible to determine indole interference-free by HS-SPME-GC-MS at an LOD of 0.01μg/mL. The approach was applied to a range of selected bacteria: 15 Gram-negative and 7 Gram-positive bacteria. Use of pattern recognition, in the form of Principal Component Analysis, confirmed that it is possible to differentiate between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using the enzyme generated VOCs, aniline and p-toluidine. The exception was Stenotrophomonas maltophilia which showed negligible VOC concentrations for both aniline and p-toluidine, irrespective of the analytical techniques used and hence was not characteristic of the other Gram-negative bacteria investigated. The developed methodology has the potential to be applied for clinical and food applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in urban air: How chemistry affects the interpretation of positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bin; Shao, Min; de Gouw, Joost; Parrish, David D.; Lu, Sihua; Wang, Ming; Zeng, Limin; Zhang, Qian; Song, Yu; Zhang, Jianbo; Hu, Min

    2012-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured online at an urban site in Beijing in August-September 2010. Diurnal variations of various VOC species indicate that VOCs concentrations were influenced by photochemical removal with OH radicals for reactive species and secondary formation for oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs). A photochemical age-based parameterization method was applied to characterize VOCs chemistry. A large part of the variability in concentrations of both hydrocarbons and OVOCs was explained by this method. The determined emission ratios of hydrocarbons to acetylene agreed within a factor of two between 2005 and 2010 measurements. However, large differences were found for emission ratios of some alkanes and C8 aromatics between Beijing and northeastern United States secondary formation from anthropogenic VOCs generally contributed higher percentages to concentrations of reactive aldehydes than those of inert ketones and alcohols. Anthropogenic primary emissions accounted for the majority of ketones and alcohols concentrations. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was also used to identify emission sources from this VOCs data set. The four resolved factors were three anthropogenic factors and a biogenic factor. However, the anthropogenic factors are attributed here to a common source at different stages of photochemical processing rather than three independent sources. Anthropogenic and biogenic sources of VOCs concentrations were not separated completely in PMF. This study indicates that photochemistry of VOCs in the atmosphere complicates the information about separated sources that can be extracted from PMF and the influence of photochemical processing must be carefully considered in the interpretation of source apportionment studies based upon PMF.

  17. Polymeric ionic liquid coatings versus commercial solid-phase microextraction coatings for the determination of volatile compounds in cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo-Rodríguez, María J; Yu, Honglian; Cole, William T S; Ho, Tien D; Pino, Verónica; Anderson, Jared L; Afonso, Ana M

    2014-04-01

    The extraction performance of four polymeric ionic liquid (PIL)-based solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coatings has been studied and compared to that of commercial SPME coatings for the extraction of 16 volatile compounds in cheeses. The analytes include 2 free fatty acids, 2 aldehydes, 2 ketones and 10 phenols and were determined by headspace (HS)-SPME coupled to gas chromatography (GC) with flame-ionization detection (FID). The PIL-based coatings produced by UV co-polymerization were more efficient than PIL-based coatings produced by thermal AIBN polymerization. Partition coefficients of analytes between the sample and the coating (Kfs) were estimated for all PIL-based coatings and the commercial SPME fiber showing the best performance among the commercial fibers tested: carboxen-polydimethylsyloxane (CAR-PDMS). For the PIL-based fibers, the highest K(fs) value (1.96 ± 0.03) was obtained for eugenol. The normalized calibration slope, which takes into account the SPME coating thickness, was also used as a simpler approximate tool to compare the nature of the coating within the determinations, with results entirely comparable to those obtained with estimated K(fs) values. The PIL-based materials obtained by UV co-polymerization containing the 1-vinyl-3-hexylimidazolium chloride IL monomer and 1,12-di(3-vinylimiazolium)dodecane dibromide IL crosslinker exhibited the best performance in the extraction of the select analytes from cheeses. Despite a coating thickness of only 7 µm, this copolymeric sorbent coating was capable of quantitating analytes in HS-SPME in a 30 to 2000 µg L(-1) concentration range, with correlation coefficient (R) values higher than 0.9938, inter-day precision values (as relative standard deviation in %) varying from 6.1 to 20%, and detection limits down to 1.6 µg L(-1).

  18. Optimization of dynamic headspace extraction system for measurement of halogenated volatile organic compounds in liquid or viscous samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniai, G.; Oda, H.; Kurihara, M.; Hashimoto, S.

    2010-12-01

    Halogenated volatile organic compounds (HVOCs) produced in the marine environment are thought to play a key role in atmospheric reactions, particularly those involved in the global radiation budget and the depression of tropospheric and stratospheric ozone. To evaluate HVOCs concentrations in the various natural samples, we developed an automated dynamic headspace extraction method for the determination of 15 HVOCs, such as chloromethane, bromomethane, bromoethane, iodomethane, iodoethane, bromochloromethane, 1-iodopropane, 2-iodopropane, dibromomethane, bromodichloromethane, chloroiodomethane, chlorodibromomethane, bromoiodomethane, tribromomethane, and diiodomethane. Dynamic headspace system (GERSTEL DHS) was used to purge the gas phase above samples and to trap HVOCs on the adsorbent column from the purge gas. We measured the HVOCs concentrations in the adsorbent column with gas chromatograph (Agilent 6890N)- mass spectrometer (Agilent 5975C). In dynamic headspace system, an glass tube containing Tenax TA or Tenax GR was used as adsorbent column for the collection of 15 HVOCs. The parameters for purge and trap extraction, such as purge flow rate (ml/min), purge volume (ml), incubation time (min), and agitator speed (rpm), were optimized. The detection limits of HVOCs in water samples were 1270 pM (chloromethane), 103 pM (bromomethane), 42.1 pM (iodomethane), and 1.4 to 10.2 pM (other HVOCs). The repeatability (relative standard deviation) for 15 HVOCs were < 9 % except chloromethane (16.2 %) and bromomethane (11.0 %). On the basis of the measurements for various samples, we concluded that this analytical method is useful for the determination of wide range of HVOCs with boiling points between - 24°C (chloromethane) and 181°C (diiodomethane) for the liquid or viscous samples.

  19. Simultaneous determination of volatile and non-volatile nitrosamines in processed meat products by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation and electrospray ionisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, S S; Duedahl-Olesen, L; Granby, K

    2014-02-21

    A sensitive, selective and generic method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of the contents (μgkg(-1) range) of both volatile nitrosamines (VNA) and non-volatile nitrosamines (NVNA) in processed meat products. The extraction procedure only requires basic laboratory equipment and a small volume of organic solvent. Separation and quantification were performed by the developed LC-(APCI/ESI)MS/MS method. The method was validated using spiked samples of three different processed meat products. Satisfactory recoveries (50-130%) and precisions (2-23%) were obtained for eight VNA and six NVNAs with LODs generally between 0.2 and 1μgkg(-1), though for a few analyte/matrix combinations higher LODs were obtained (3 to 18μgkg(-1)). The validation results show that results obtained for one meat product is not always valid for other meat products. We were not able to obtain satisfactory results for N-nitrosohydroxyproline (NHPRO), N-nitrosodibenzylamine (NDBzA) and N-nitrosodiphenylamine (NDPhA). Application of the APCI interface improved the sensitivity of the method, because of less matrix interference, and gave the method a wider scope, as some NAs were ionisable only by APCI. However, it was only possible to ionize N-nitroso-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (NTCA) and N-nitroso-2-methyl-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (NMTCA) by ESI. The validated method was applied for the analysis of processed meat products and contents of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR), N-nitrosomethylaniline (NMA), N-nitrosoproline (NPRO), NTCA, and NMTCA were found in one or several nitrite cured meat products, whereas none were detected in non-nitrite cured bacon.

  20. Simultaneous flame ionization and absorbance detection of volatile and nonvolatile compounds by reversed-phase liquid chromatography with a water mobile phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, C A; Ecker, S T; Synovec, R E

    1997-09-01

    A flame ionization detector (FID) is used to detect volatile organic compounds that have been separated by water-only reversed-phase liquid chromatography (WRP-LC). The mobile phase is 100% water at room temperature, without use of organic solvent modifiers. An interface between the LC and detector is presented, whereby a helium stream samples the vapor of volatile components from individual drops of the LC eluent, and the vapor-enriched gas stream is sent to the FID. The design of the drop headspace cell is simple because the water-only nature of the LC separation obviates the need to do any organic solvent removal prior to gas phase detection. Despite the absence of organic modifier, hydrophobic compounds can be separated in a reasonable time due to the low phase volume ratio of the WRP-LC columns. The drop headspace interface easily handles LC flows of 1 mL/min, and, in fact, compound detection limits are improved at faster liquid flow rates. The transfer efficiency of the headspace interface was estimated at 10% for toluene in water at 1 mL/min but varies depending on the volatility of each analyte. The detection system is linear over more than 5 orders of 1-butanol concentration in water and is able to detect sub-ppb amounts of o-xylene and other aromatic compounds in water. In order to analyze volatile and nonvolatile analytes simultaneously, the FID is coupled in series to a WRP-LC system with UV absorbance detection. WRP-LC improves UV absorbance detection limits because the absence of organic modifier allows the detector to be operated in the short-wavelength UV region, where analytes generally have significantly larger molar absorptivities. The selectivity the headspace interface provides for flame ionization detection of volatiles is demonstrated with a separation of 1-butanol, 1,1,2-trichloroethane (TCE), and chlorobenzene in a mixture of benzoic acid in water. Despite coelution of butanol and TCE with the benzoate anion, the nonvolatile benzoate anion

  1. Liquid Swine Manure Can Kill Verticillium dahliae Microsclerotia in Soil by Volatile Fatty Acid, Nitrous Acid, and Ammonia Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Kenneth L; Tenuta, Mario; Lazarovits, George

    2005-01-01

    ABSTRACT In previous studies, liquid swine manure (LSM) was sometimes shown to reduce Verticillium wilt of potato caused by Verticillium dahliae. We also observed that microsclerotia of this fungus died within 1 day, or between 3 and 6 weeks, after addition of LSM to some acid soils and within 1 week in some alkaline soils. In this study, we demonstrated that a volatile fatty acid (VFA) mixture with an identical concentration of VFAs as that found in an effective LSM reduced germination in an acid soil (pH 5.1) to the same extent as the LSM after 1 day of exposure. Germination was reduced by 45, 75, and 90% in the 10, 20, and 40% ([wt/wt] soil moisture) treatments, respectively, with the latter being equivalent to an application of 80 hl/ha. Addition to this acid soil of 19 LSMs (30% [wt/wt] soil moisture) collected from different producers resulted in complete kill of microsclerotia with 12 manures. Effective manures had a total concentration of nonionized forms of VFAs in soil solution of 2.7 mM or higher. In some acid soils (pH 5.8), addition of LSM (40% [wt/wt] soil moisture) did not kill microsclerotia until 3 to 6 weeks later. Here, a reduction in viability of microsclerotia was attributed to the accumulation of 0.06 mM nitrous acid in the soil solution at 4 weeks. When an LSM was added (40% [wt/wt] soil moisture) to an alkaline soil (pH 7.9) where VFAs are not toxic, microsclerotia germination was reduced by 80% after 1 week. Here the pH increased to 8.9 and the concentration of ammonia reached 30 mM in the soil solution. An ammonium chloride solution having an equivalent concentration of ammonium as the manure was shown to have the same spectrum of toxicity as the manure in assays ranging from pH 7 to 9, both in solutions and above the solutions. At pH 9, the concentration of ammonia reached 18 mM and 100% mortality of microsclerotia occurred. Thus, in acid soils, LSM can kill microsclerotia of V. dahliae by VFA and/or nitrous acid toxicity and in alkaline

  2. Prediction of positive and negative elastic dilatancy in 2D and 3D liquid foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognon, P.; Molino, F.; Gay, C.

    2010-05-01

    Liquid foams have been observed to behave like immersed granular materials in at least one respect: deformation tends to raise their liquid contents, a phenomenon called dilatancy. While experimental observations evidenced the effect of a continuous deformation rate (dynamic dilatancy), we present a geometrical interpretation of both main contributions to elastic dilatancy (during elastic deformation) in foams squeezed between two solid plates (2D GG foams), which contain pseudo Plateau borders along the plates, and in 3D foams. The positive contribution is related to the increase in total Plateau border length while the negative contribution reflects the increase in total surface area of the foam. In 2D, we show that the negative dilatancy predicted by Weaire and Hutzler (Philos. Mag., 83 (2003) 2747) at very low liquid fractions is specific to ideal 2D foams (with no glass plates). In 3D, we predict that dilatancy should be positive at low liquid fractions (below 1%) and negative at moderate liquid fractions (above 4%).

  3. Determination of volatile compounds in cider apple juices using a covalently bonded ionic liquid coating as the stationary phase in gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pello-Palma, Jairo; González-Álvarez, Jaime; Gutiérrez-Álvarez, María Dolores; Dapena de la Fuente, Enrique; Mangas-Alonso, Juan José; Méndez-Sánchez, Daniel; Gotor-Fernández, Vicente; Arias-Abrodo, Pilar

    2017-04-01

    A chromatographic method for the separation of volatile compounds in Asturian cider apple juices has been developed. For this separation purpose, a monocationic imidazolium-based ionic liquid bearing a reactive terminal iodine atom was synthesized by a quaternization-anion exchange chemical sequence. Next, the gas chromatography (GC) stationary phase was prepared by covalently linking the imidazolium monolith to the reactive silanol groups of the inner capillary wall at 70 °C. This coated GC column exhibited good thermal stability (290 °C), as well as good efficiency (2000 plates/m) in the separation of volatile compounds from Asturian apple cider juices, and was characterized using the Abraham solvation parameter model. The intra-day and inter-day precision of the chromatographic method was evaluated, obtaining relative standard deviations from 3.7 to 12.9% and from 7.4 to 18.0%, respectively. Furthermore, recoveries from 82.5 to 122% were achieved. Graphical Abstract Covalent bonding of an ionic liquid to inner column wall led to a great improvement of the separation efficiencies of stationary phases in gas chromatography.

  4. Organic liquids storage tanks volatile organic compounds (VOCS) emissions dispersion and risk assessment in developing countries: the case of Dar-es-Salaam City, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Msafiri M

    2006-05-01

    The emission estimation of nine volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from eight organic liquids storage tanks companies in Dar-es-Salaam City Tanzania has been done by using US EPA standard regulatory storage tanks emission model (TANKS 4.9b). Total VOCs atmospheric emission has been established to be 853.20 metric tones/yr. It has been established further that petrol storage tanks contribute about 87% of total VOCs emitted, while tanks for other refined products and crude oil were emitting 10% and 3% of VOCs respectively. Of the eight sources (companies), the highest emission value from a single source was 233,222.94 kg/yr and the lowest single source emission value was 6881.87 kg/yr. The total VOCs emissions estimated for each of the eight sources were found to be higher than the standard level of 40,000 kg/yr per source for minor source according to US EPA except for two sources, which were emitting VOCs below the standard level. The annual emissions per single source for each of the VOCs were found to be below the US EPA emissions standard which is 2,000 kg/yr in all companies except the emission of hexane from company F1 which was slightly higher than the standard. The type of tanks used seems to significantly influence the emission rate. Vertical fixed roof tanks (VFRT) emit a lot more than externally floating roof tanks (EFRT) and internally floating roof tanks (IFRT). The use of IFRT and EFRT should be encouraged especially for storage of petrol which had highest atmospheric emission contribution. Model predicted atmospheric emissions are less than annual losses measured by companies in all the eight sources. It is possible that there are other routes for losses beside atmospheric emissions. It is therefore important that waste reduction efforts in these companies are directed not only to reducing atmospheric emissions, but also prevention of the spillage and leakage of stored liquid and curbing of the frequently reported illegal siphoning of stored products

  5. For Noble Gases, Energy is Positive for the Gas Phase, Negative for the Liquid Phase

    CERN Document Server

    Asanuma, Nobu-Hiko

    2016-01-01

    We found from experimental data that for noble gases and H$_2$, the energy is positive for the gas phase, and negative for the liquid, possibly except the small vicinity of the critical point, about $(1- T/T_c) \\le 0.005$. The line $E=E_c$, in the supercritical region is found to lie close to the Widom line, where $E_c$ is the critical energy.

  6. Use of volatile organic solvents in headspace liquid-phase microextraction by direct cooling of the organic drop using a simple cooling capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiasvand, Ali Reza; Yazdankhah, Fatemeh; Hajipour, Somayeh

    2016-08-01

    A low-cost and simple cooling-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction device for the extraction and determination of 2,6,6-trimethyl-1,3 cyclohexadiene-1-carboxaldehyde (safranal) in Saffron samples, using volatile organic solvents, was fabricated and evaluated. The main part of the cooling-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction system was a cooling capsule, with a Teflon microcup to hold the extracting organic solvent, which is able to directly cool down the extraction phase while the sample matrix is simultaneously heated. Different experimental factors such as type of organic extraction solvent, sample temperature, extraction solvent temperature, and extraction time were optimized. The optimal conditions were obtained as: extraction solvent, methanol (10 μL); extraction temperature, 60°C; extraction solvent temperature, 0°C; and extraction time, 20 min. Good linearity of the calibration curve (R(2) = 0.995) was obtained in the concentration range of 0.01-50.0 μg/mL. The limit of detection was 0.001 μg/mL. The relative standard deviation for 1.0 μg/mL of safranal was 10.7% (n = 6). The proposed cooling-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction device was coupled (off-line) to high-performance liquid chromatography and used for the determination of safranal in Saffron samples. Reasonable agreement was observed between the results of the cooling-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction high-performance liquid chromatography method and those obtained by a validated ultrasound-assisted solvent extraction procedure.

  7. Numerical Modeling of Thermocapillary Deformation and Film Breakdown in a Locally Heated Thin Horizontal Volatile Liquid Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barakhovskaya Ella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of thermocapillary deformation and film breakdown in a thin horizontal layer of viscous incompressible liquid with a free surface is considered. The deformable liquid layer is locally heated. The problem of thermocapillary deformation of the locally heated horizontal liquid layer has been solved numerically for two-dimensional unsteady case. The lubrication approximation theory is used. Capillary pressure, viscosity and gravity are taken into account. Evaporating rate is supposed to be proportional to the temperature difference between the liquid and ambient. Heat transfer in the substrate is also simulated. The numerical algorithm for the joint solution of the energy equation and the evolution equation for the thickness of liquid layer has been developed. The model predicts the thermocapillary deformation of the liquid surface and the formation of dry spots. The dynamics of liquid surface, the dry spots formation and the velocity of the contact line have been calculated. The deformation of the free surface has been calculated for different values of the heating power and thickness of the liquid layer. The effect of surface tension coefficient and wetting contact angle on the velocity of the contact line motion has been analyzed. It has been obtained that the velocity of the contact line increases with the increase of the wetting contact angle value and of the surface tension coefficient.

  8. Optimized determination of trace jet fuel volatile organic compounds in human blood using in-field liquid-liquid extraction with subsequent laboratory gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis and on-column large-volume injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S; Pleil, J D

    2001-03-05

    A practical and sensitive method to assess volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from JP-8 jet fuel in human whole blood was developed by modifying previously established liquid-liquid extraction procedures, optimizing extraction times, solvent volume, specific sample processing techniques, and a new on-column large-volume injection method for GC-MS analysis. With the optimized methods, the extraction efficiency was improved by 4.3 to 20.1 times and the detection sensitivity increased up to 660 times over the standard method. Typical detection limits in the parts-per-trillion (ppt) level range were achieved for all monitored JP-8 constituents; this is sufficient for assessing human fuels exposures at trace environmental levels as well as occupational exposure levels. The sample extractions are performed in the field and only solvent extracts need to be shipped to the laboratory. The method is implemented with standard biological laboratory equipment and a modest bench-top GC-MS system.

  9. Hydroxypropyl Cellulose Based Non-Volatile Gel Polymer Electrolytes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Applications using 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium iodide ionic liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanmirzaei, Mohammad Hassan; Ramesh, S.; Ramesh, K.

    2015-12-01

    Gel polymer electrolytes using imidazolium based ionic liquids have attracted much attention in dye-sensitized solar cell applications. Hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC), sodium iodide (NaI), 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium iodide (MPII) as ionic liquid (IL), ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) are used for preparation of non-volatile gel polymer electrolyte (GPE) system (HPC:EC:PC:NaI:MPII) for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) applications. The highest ionic conductivity of 7.37 × 10-3 S cm-1 is achieved after introducing 100% of MPII with respect to the weight of HPC. Temperature-dependent ionic conductivity of gel polymer electrolytes is studied in this work. XRD patterns of gel polymer electrolytes are studied to confirm complexation between HPC polymer, NaI and MPII. Thermal behavior of the GPEs is studied using simultaneous thermal analyzer (STA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). DSSCs are fabricated using gel polymer electrolytes and J-V centeracteristics of fabricated dye sensitized solar cells were analyzed. The gel polymer electrolyte with 100 wt.% of MPII ionic liquid shows the best performance and energy conversion efficiency of 5.79%, with short-circuit current density, open-circuit voltage and fill factor of 13.73 mA cm-2, 610 mV and 69.1%, respectively.

  10. Hydroxypropyl Cellulose Based Non-Volatile Gel Polymer Electrolytes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Applications using 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium iodide ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanmirzaei, Mohammad Hassan; Ramesh, S; Ramesh, K

    2015-12-11

    Gel polymer electrolytes using imidazolium based ionic liquids have attracted much attention in dye-sensitized solar cell applications. Hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC), sodium iodide (NaI), 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium iodide (MPII) as ionic liquid (IL), ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) are used for preparation of non-volatile gel polymer electrolyte (GPE) system (HPC:EC:PC:NaI:MPII) for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) applications. The highest ionic conductivity of 7.37 × 10(-3) S cm(-1) is achieved after introducing 100% of MPII with respect to the weight of HPC. Temperature-dependent ionic conductivity of gel polymer electrolytes is studied in this work. XRD patterns of gel polymer electrolytes are studied to confirm complexation between HPC polymer, NaI and MPII. Thermal behavior of the GPEs is studied using simultaneous thermal analyzer (STA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). DSSCs are fabricated using gel polymer electrolytes and J-V centeracteristics of fabricated dye sensitized solar cells were analyzed. The gel polymer electrolyte with 100 wt.% of MPII ionic liquid shows the best performance and energy conversion efficiency of 5.79%, with short-circuit current density, open-circuit voltage and fill factor of 13.73 mA cm(-2), 610 mV and 69.1%, respectively.

  11. Bitcoin Piyasalarının Etkinliği, Likiditesi ve Oynaklığı - Efficiency, Liquidity and Volatility of Bitcoin Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şahnaz KOÇOĞLU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bitcoin is a virtual money and a new payment system which is not regulated by a central authority. Bitcoin became popular quickly and gained the ability of affecting the real economy. Being used extensively and seen as an investment tool, Bitcoin created its own market, users and investors. This study aims to shed light on Bitcoin market. To understand what Bitcoin is, the history of Bitcoin was summarized firstly and the Bitcoin system and how the protocol works was explained. Then Efficiency, Liquidity and Volatility of the Bitcoin Markets were analyzed. We concluded that the pricing of Bitcoin is too complicated; and the Bitcoin market is still vulnerable to many risks and speculation.

  12. Investigating the influence of risk management on earnings volatility of the listed companies in Tehran stock exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Akbari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This invetigation aims to examine the impact of risk management practices on earnings volatility of the listed companies in Tehran stock exchange. All listed companies in Tehran stock exchange were selected as the statistical population of the research during 2005 to 2015. Risk management, liquidity risk management and operational risk management, and earnings volatility were selected as the independent and dependent variables of the study, respectively. Dechow & Tang (2008 model is used for measuring earnings volatility in this research. 130 firms were selected as the statistical population based on the systematic elimination method. The obtained results show that risk management doesn’t impact on earnings volatility. As well, liquidity risk management significantly and negatively impact on earnings volatility, and operational risk management positively and significantly influence on earnings volatility.

  13. Liquid electrolyte positioning along the device channel influences the operation of Organic Electro-Chemical Transistors

    KAUST Repository

    D'angelo, Pasquale

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we show the influence of the liquid electrolyte adsorption by porous films made of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate), PEDOT:PSS, on the operation of an Organic Electro-Chemical Transistor with an active channel based on these polymeric films. In particular, the effect of film hydration on device performance is evaluated by studying its electrical response as a function of the spatial position between the electrolyte and the channel electrodes. This is done by depositing a PEDOT:PSS film on a super-hydrophobic surface aimed at controlling the electrolyte confinement next to the electrodes. The device response shows that the confinement of ionic liquids near to the drain electrode results in a worsening of the current modulation. This result has been interpreted in the light of studies dealing with the transport of ions in semiconducting polymers, indicating that the electrolyte adsorption by the polymeric film implies the formation of liquid pathways inside its bulk. These pathways, in particular, affect the device response because they are able to assist the drift of ionic species in the electrolyte towards the drain electrode. The effect of electrolyte adsorption on the device operation is confirmed by means of moving-front measurements, and is related to the reproducibility of the device operation curves by measuring repeatedly its electrical response.

  14. Numerical investigation of the interaction of positive streamers with bubbles floating on a liquid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu.; Naidis, George V.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-09-01

    Streamer discharges in air intersecting with liquids are being investigated to produce reactivity in the liquid. In this talk, we discuss results from a 2-d computational investigation of streamers in air intersecting an isolated liquid, air filled bubble floating on a liquid surface. The 15 mm diameter bubble is conducting water (ɛ /ɛ0 = 80 , σ = 7 . 5 ×10-4Ω-1cm-1) or transformer oil (ɛ /ɛ0 = 2 . 2 , σ = 1 . 5 ×10-13Ω-1cm-1). A needle electrode is positioned d =0-10 mm from the bubble center. With a water bubble (d =0) the streamer slides along the external surface but does not penetrate the bubble due to electric field screening by the conducting shell. If the electrode is shifted (d =3-10 mm) the streamer deviates from the vertical and adheres to the bubble. If the electrode is inserted inside the bubble, the streamer path depends on how deep the electrode penetrates. For shallow penetration, the streamer propagates along the inner surface of the bubble. For deep penetration the streamer takes the shortest path down through the gas. Due to the low conductivity of the oil bubble shell the electric field penetrates into the interior of the bubble. The streamer can then be re-initiated inside the bubble. Charge accumulation on both sides of the bubble shell and perforation of the shell will be also discussed. NYB, GVN supported by Russian Sci. Found. (14-12-01295). MJK by US Natl. Sci. Found. and Dept. of Energy.

  15. The Herbivore-Induced Plant Volatiles Methyl Salicylate and Menthol Positively affect Growth and Pathogenicity of Entomopathogenic Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yongwen; Qasim, Muhammad; Hussain, Mubasher; Akutse, Komivi Senyo; Avery, Pasco Bruce; Dash, Chandra Kanta; Wang, Liande

    2017-01-01

    Some herbivore-induced-plant volatiles (HIPVs) compounds are vital for the functioning of an ecosystem, by triggering multi-trophic interactions for natural enemies, plants and herbivores. However, the effect of these chemicals, which play a crucial role in regulating the multi-trophic interactions between plant-herbivore-entomopathogenic fungi, is still unknown. To fill this scientific gap, we therefore investigated how these chemicals influence the entomopathogenic fungi growth and efficacy. In this study, Lipaphis erysimi induced Arabidopsis thaliana HIPVs were collected using headspace system and detected with GC-MS, and then analyzed the effects of these HIPVs chemicals on Lecanicillium lecanii strain V3450. We found that the HIPVs menthol and methyl salicylate at 1 and 10 nmol·ml−1 improved many performance aspects of the fungus, such as germination, sporulation, appressorial formation as well as its pathogenicity and virulence. These findings are not only important for understanding the multi-trophic interactions in an ecosystem, but also would contribute for developing new and easier procedures for conidial mass production as well as improve the pathogenicity and virulence of entomopathogenic fungi in biological pest management strategies. PMID:28079180

  16. The Herbivore-Induced Plant Volatiles Methyl Salicylate and Menthol Positively affect Growth and Pathogenicity of Entomopathogenic Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yongwen; Qasim, Muhammad; Hussain, Mubasher; Akutse, Komivi Senyo; Avery, Pasco Bruce; Dash, Chandra Kanta; Wang, Liande

    2017-01-01

    Some herbivore-induced-plant volatiles (HIPVs) compounds are vital for the functioning of an ecosystem, by triggering multi-trophic interactions for natural enemies, plants and herbivores. However, the effect of these chemicals, which play a crucial role in regulating the multi-trophic interactions between plant-herbivore-entomopathogenic fungi, is still unknown. To fill this scientific gap, we therefore investigated how these chemicals influence the entomopathogenic fungi growth and efficacy. In this study, Lipaphis erysimi induced Arabidopsis thaliana HIPVs were collected using headspace system and detected with GC-MS, and then analyzed the effects of these HIPVs chemicals on Lecanicillium lecanii strain V3450. We found that the HIPVs menthol and methyl salicylate at 1 and 10 nmol·ml-1 improved many performance aspects of the fungus, such as germination, sporulation, appressorial formation as well as its pathogenicity and virulence. These findings are not only important for understanding the multi-trophic interactions in an ecosystem, but also would contribute for developing new and easier procedures for conidial mass production as well as improve the pathogenicity and virulence of entomopathogenic fungi in biological pest management strategies.

  17. Hydrolysis-acidogenesis of food waste in solid-liquid-separating continuous stirred tank reactor (SLS-CSTR) for volatile organic acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Obulisamy Parthiba; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2016-01-01

    The use of conventional continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) can affect the methane (CH4) recovery in a two-stage anaerobic digestion of food waste (FW) due to carbon short circuiting in the hydrolysis-acidogenesis (Hy-Aci) stage. In this research, we have designed and tested a solid-liquid-separating CSTR (SLS-CSTR) for effective Hy-Aci of FW. The working conditions were pH 6 and 9 (SLS-CSTR-1 and -2, respectively); temperature-37°C; agitation-300rpm; and organic loading rate (OLR)-2gVSL(-1)day(-1). The volatile fatty acids (VFA), enzyme activities and bacterial population (by qPCR) were determined as test parameters. Results showed that the Hy-Aci of FW at pH 9 produced ∼35% excess VFA as compared to that at pH 6, with acetic and butyric acids as major precursors, which correlated with the high enzyme activities and low lactic acid bacteria. The design provided efficient solid-liquid separation there by improved the organic acid yields from FW.

  18. Relaxation of contact-line singularities solely by the Kelvin effect and apparent contact angles for isothermal volatile liquids in contact with air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rednikov, Alexey; Colinet, Pierre

    2013-11-01

    The contact (triple) line of a volatile liquid on a flat solid is studied theoretically. Like with a pure-vapor atmosphere [Phys. Rev. E 87, 010401, 2013], but here for isothermal diffusion-limited evaporation/condensation in the presence of an inert gas, we rigorously show that the notorious contact-line singularities (related to motion or phase change itself) can be regularized solely on account of the Kelvin effect (curvature dependence of the saturation conditions). No disjoining pressure, precursor films or Navier slip are in fact needed to this purpose, and nor are they taken into consideration here (``minimalist'' approach). The model applies to both perfect (zero Young's angle) and partial wetting, and is in particular used to study the related issue of evaporation-induced contact angles. Their modification by the contact-line motion (either advancing or receding) is assessed. The formulation is posed for a distinguished immediate vicinity of the contact line (the ``microregion''), the corresponding problem decoupling to leading order, here up to one unknown coefficient, from what actually happens at the macroscale. The lubrication approximation (implying sufficiently small contact angles) is used in the liquid, coupled with the diffusion equation in the gaz phase. Supported by ESA and BELSPO PRODEX and F.R.S.-FNRS.

  19. Simple and specific colorimetric detection of Staphylococcus using its volatile 2-[3-acetoxy-4,4,14-trimethylandrost-8-en-17-yl] propanoic acid in the liquid phase and head space of cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranya, Raju; Aarthi, Raju; Sankaran, Krishnan

    2015-05-01

    Spread of drug-resistant Staphylococcus spp. into communities pose danger demanding effective non-invasive and non-destructive tools for its early detection and surveillance. Characteristic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by bacteria offer new diagnostic targets and novel approaches not exploited so far in infectious disease diagnostics. Our search for such characteristic VOC for Staphylococcus spp. led to the depiction of 2-[3-acetoxy-4,4,14-trimethylandrost-8-en-17-yl] propanoic acid (ATMAP), a moderately volatile compound detected both in the culture and headspace when the organism was grown in tryptone soya broth (TSB) medium. A simple and inexpensive colorimetric method (colour change from yellow to orange) using methyl red as the pH indicator provided an absolutely specific way for identifying Staphylococcus spp., The assay performed in liquid cultures (7-h growth in TSB) as well as in the headspace of plate cultures (grown for 10 h on TSA) was optimised in a 96-well plate and 12-well plate formats, respectively, employing a set of positive and negative strains. Only Staphylococcus spp. showed the distinct colour change from yellow to orange due to the production of the above VOC while in the case of other organisms, the reagent remained yellow. The method validated using known clinical and environmental strains (56 including Staphylococcus, Proteus, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Bacillus, Shigella and Escherichia coli) was found to be highly efficient showing 100% specificity and sensitivity. Such simple methods of bacterial pathogen identification are expected to form the next generation tools for the control of infectious diseases through early detection and surveillance of causative agents.

  20. Volatility Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Gustavo Fruet; Scherrer, Cristina; Papailias, Fotis

    The price discovery literature investigates how homogenous securities traded on different markets incorporate information into prices. We take this literature one step further and investigate how these markets contribute to stochastic volatility (volatility discovery). We formally show...... that the realized measures from homogenous securities share a fractional stochastic trend, which is a combination of the price and volatility discovery measures. Furthermore, we show that volatility discovery is associated with the way that market participants process information arrival (market sensitivity...

  1. Volatile Metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryl D. Rowan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (volatiles comprise a chemically diverse class of low molecular weight organic compounds having an appreciable vapor pressure under ambient conditions. Volatiles produced by plants attract pollinators and seed dispersers, and provide defense against pests and pathogens. For insects, volatiles may act as pheromones directing social behavior or as cues for finding hosts or prey. For humans, volatiles are important as flavorants and as possible disease biomarkers. The marine environment is also a major source of halogenated and sulfur-containing volatiles which participate in the global cycling of these elements. While volatile analysis commonly measures a rather restricted set of analytes, the diverse and extreme physical properties of volatiles provide unique analytical challenges. Volatiles constitute only a small proportion of the total number of metabolites produced by living organisms, however, because of their roles as signaling molecules (semiochemicals both within and between organisms, accurately measuring and determining the roles of these compounds is crucial to an integrated understanding of living systems. This review summarizes recent developments in volatile research from a metabolomics perspective with a focus on the role of recent technical innovation in developing new areas of volatile research and expanding the range of ecological interactions which may be mediated by volatile organic metabolites.

  2. Pricing Volatility of Stock Returns with Volatile and Persistent Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jie

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a two-component volatility model based on first moments of both components to describe the dynamics of speculative return volatility. The two components capture the volatile and the persistent part of volatility, respectively. The model is applied to 10 Asia-Pacific stock...... markets. Their in-mean effects on returns are tested. The empirical results show that the persistent component is much more important for the volatility dynamic process than is the volatile component. However, the volatile component is found to be a significant pricing factor of asset returns for most...... markets. A positive or risk-premium effect exists between the return and the volatile component, yet the persistent component is not significantly priced for the return dynamic process....

  3. Enhanced resolution of Mentha piperita volatile fraction using a novel medium-polarity ionic liquid gas chromatography stationary phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragonese, Carla; Sciarrone, Danilo; Grasso, Elisa; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    The evaluation of a novel medium-polarity ionic-liquid-based gas chromatography column, SLB-IL60, towards the analysis of a complex essential oil, namely, a peppermint essential oil sample, is reported. The SLB-IL60 30 m column was subjected to bleeding measurements, by means of conventional gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. The SLB-IL60 column was then evaluated in the analysis of pure standard compounds, chosen as typical constituents of peppermint essential oil. Resolution and peak symmetry (expressed as tailing factors at 10% of peak height) were measured and the results were compared to those obtained on the most widely used columns in such an application, namely a medium-polarity [100% poly(ethyleneglycol)] stationary phase, and an apolar 5% diphenyl/95% dimethyl siloxane. The final part of the evaluation was dedicated to the gas chromatography with mass spectrometry analysis of a peppermint essential oil sample and again the data were compared to those obtained on the 100% poly(ethyleneglycol) and the 5% diphenyl/95% dimethyl siloxane phase. Linear retention indices were determined for all the identified components on the ionic liquid capillary. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Pricing Volatility of Stock Returns with Volatile and Persistent Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jie

    In this paper a two-component volatility model based on the component's first moment is introduced to describe the dynamic of speculative return volatility. The two components capture the volatile and persistent part of volatility respectively. Then the model is applied to 10 Asia-Pacific stock m......, a positive or risk-premium effect exists between return and the volatile component, yet the persistent component is not significantly priced for return dynamic process.......In this paper a two-component volatility model based on the component's first moment is introduced to describe the dynamic of speculative return volatility. The two components capture the volatile and persistent part of volatility respectively. Then the model is applied to 10 Asia-Pacific stock...... markets. Their in-mean effects on return are also tested. The empirical results show that the persistent component accounts much more for volatility dynamic process than the volatile component. However the volatile component is found to be a significant pricing factor of asset returns for most markets...

  5. Dynamic Volatility Arbitrage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorn, Jochen

    profit on well-developed markets. Dynamic participation features on cross asset portfolios are at rst sight a remedy to that dilemma. Based on volatility thresholds and portfolio re-balancing, the fund engineers try to create a "volatility guaranteed" investment opportunity by surfing on the unusual high...... concepts, next to nothing is known about position reverting strategies and how, and -even more important- in which context they are applied in practice. In the recent market downturn only one sector generated signicant profits for the leading investment banks: Volatility trading activities, namely on Forex......, interest rates and commodities. If an investor positions himself on the (volatility) market within a long/short trading framework, he typically bets on a traditional mispricing arbitrage. However as this corresponds to a call spread with equal exercise prices, this strategy alone would not generate enough...

  6. Türkiye Hisse Senedi Piyasasında Likidite Ölçülerinin Karşılaştırılması ve Likidite Volatilitesi Hisse Senedi Getirisi Arasındaki İlişki (Comparison of Liquidity Measures and The Relationship Between Volatility of Liquidity and Stock Returns in Turkish Stock Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cüneyt AKAR

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to determine the relationship between stock returns and volatility of liquidity in Turkish Stock Market. It is also investigated whether various liquidity measures sort the stocks in the same way according to their liquidities. The data used in the study contains the closing prices, trading volumes and free floating of the stocks that are included in Borsa Istanbul 100 Index (BIST100 and covers the period from 28.02.2011 to 18.11.2014. Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity (GARCH and Autoregressive Moving Average models (ARMA are used to perform empirical analysis. According to the results, it can not be determined the clear significant relationship between stock returns and volatility of liquidity. Results also show that while stock size and Amihud illiquidity criteria sort the stocks in the same way, stock return standard deviation criterion produces different ranking.

  7. Virtual volatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, A. Christian; Prange, Richard E.

    2007-03-01

    We introduce the concept of virtual volatility. This simple but new measure shows how to quantify the uncertainty in the forecast of the drift component of a random walk. The virtual volatility also is a useful tool in understanding the stochastic process for a given portfolio. In particular, and as an example, we were able to identify mean reversion effect in our portfolio. Finally, we briefly discuss the potential practical effect of the virtual volatility on an investor asset allocation strategy.

  8. Virtual volatility

    OpenAIRE

    A. Christian Silva; Prange, Richard E.

    2006-01-01

    We introduce the concept of virtual volatility. This simple but new measure shows how to quantify the uncertainty in the forecast of the drift component of a random walk. The virtual volatility also is a useful tool in understanding the stochastic process for a given portfolio. In particular, and as an example, we were able to identify mean reversion effect in our portfolio. Finally, we briefly discuss the potential practical effect of the virtual volatility on an investor asset allocation st...

  9. Plant volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Ian T

    2010-05-11

    Plant volatiles are the metabolites that plants release into the air. The quantities released are not trivial. Almost one-fifth of the atmospheric CO2 fixed by land plants is released back into the air each day as volatiles. Plants are champion synthetic chemists; they take advantage of their anabolic prowess to produce volatiles, which they use to protect themselves against biotic and abiotic stresses and to provide information - and potentially disinformation - to mutualists and competitors alike. As transferors of information, volatiles have provided plants with solutions to the challenges associated with being rooted in the ground and immobile.

  10. 电子烟雾化液挥发性成分分析及开发思路探讨%Analysis and Discussion on Volatile Components in Electronic Cigarette Liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温光和; 杨雪燕; 潘红成; 马涛; 肯生叶; 姜正灯; 汤小民

    2016-01-01

    为了深入探索电子烟雾化液的挥发性成分,采用气相色谱-质谱联用(GC-MS)分析技术检测了4家公司生产的6种烟草口味电子烟雾化液产品,对样品中的挥发性成分进行了定性和半定量分析。在所有电子烟雾化液样品中,共检测出45种挥发性成分,并根据挥发性成分绘制了香味轮廓图。在此基础上,对比了电子烟雾化液与传统卷烟烟气的差异,提出了电子烟雾化液的开发思路,使其更接近传统卷烟的抽吸品质。%In order to further explore the volatile components in the electronic cigarette liquid, six kinds of tobacco flavor electronic cigarette liquids from four companies were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry(GC-MS), the volatile components in the samples were qualitatively and semi-quantitatively analyzed. Forty-five volatile components were detected, and according to the main volatile constituents, their aroma profiles were mapped. On the basis of the analytical results, the difference between the e-cigarette liquid and the traditional cigarette smoke was compared. Furthermore, some ideas that how to formulate e-cigarette liquids were discussed, so as to make the product with the quality of suction closer to that of traditional cigarettes.

  11. Non-volatile polymer electrolyte based on poly(propylene carbonate), ionic liquid, and lithium perchlorate for electrochromic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dan; Zhou, Rui; Chen, Chuanxiang; Yee, Wu-Aik; Kong, Junhua; Ding, Guoqiang; Lu, Xuehong

    2013-06-27

    A series of solvent-free ionic liquid (IL)-based polymer electrolytes composed of amorphous and biodegradable poly(propylene carbonate) (PPC) host, LiClO4, and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIM(+)BF4(-)) were prepared and characterized for the first time. FTIR studies reveal that the interaction between PPC chains and imidazolium cations weakens the complexation between PPC chains and Li(+) ions. Thermal analysis (DSC and TGA) results show that the incorporation of BMIM(+)BF4(-) into PPC/LiClO4 remarkably decreases the glass transition temperature and improves the thermal stability of the electrolytes. AC impedance results show that the ionic conductivities of the electrolytes are significantly increased with the increase of BMIM(+)BF4(-) amount, the ambient ionic conductivity of the electrolyte at a PPC/LiClO4/BMIM(+)BF4(-) weight ratio of 1/0.2/3 is 1.5 mS/cm, and the ionic transport behavior follows the Arrhenius equation. Both PPC/LiClO4/BMIM(+)BF4(-) and PPC/BMIM(+)BF4(-) electrolytes were applied in electrochromic devices with polyaniline as the electrochromic layer. The PPC/LiClO4/BMIM(+)BF4(-)-based device exhibits much better electrochromic performance in terms of optical contrast and switching time due to the presence of much smaller cations.

  12. A validated high performance liquid chromatography method for the analysis of thymol and carvacrol in Thymus vulgaris L. volatile oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Hajimehdipoor

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thymus vulgaris L. (Lamiaceae is a well-known medicinal plant that contains important compounds such as thymol and carvacrol and it has been used in many pharmaceutical dosage forms. Thymol and carvacrol in essential oils are often quantified by gas chromatography (GC technique but in this work, a validated and reliable high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC method has been developed for the analysis of these two components in T. vulgaris essential oil. The essential oil of the plant was analyzed by HPLC and GC techniques. The HPLC system consisted of ACE C 18 column and an isocratic acetonitrile:water (50:50 as the mobile phase which was kept at a flow rate of 1 ml/min. The method was validated for selectivity, linearity (r2 > 0.997 for both thymol and carvacrol, precision (intra-day 0.8-1.9, 1.7-2.6; and inter-day 3.5-4.5, 3.6-4.7 and recovery (97.7%, 97.6% for thymol and carvacrol, respectively. The limits of detection (LODs and limits of quantization (LOQs were calculated to be 2.8, 0.6 μg/ml and 8.6, 1.8 μg/ml for thymol and carvacrol, respectively. The GC system consisted of flame ionization detector (FID and CP-SIL 8 column. The concentrations of thymol and carvacrol in essential oil obtained by HPLC (41.2%, 4.3% and GC (40.7%, 4.2% were compared by statistical methods and they showed good agreement.

  13. A validated high performance liquid chromatography method for the analysis of thymol and carvacrol in Thymus vulgaris L. volatile oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajimehdipoor, H; Shekarchi, M; Khanavi, M; Adib, N; Amri, M

    2010-07-01

    Thymus vulgaris L. (Lamiaceae) is a well-known medicinal plant that contains important compounds such as thymol and carvacrol and it has been used in many pharmaceutical dosage forms. Thymol and carvacrol in essential oils are often quantified by gas chromatography (GC) technique but in this work, a validated and reliable high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method has been developed for the analysis of these two components in T. vulgaris essential oil. The essential oil of the plant was analyzed by HPLC and GC techniques. The HPLC system consisted of ACE C(18) column and an isocratic acetonitrile:water (50:50) as the mobile phase which was kept at a flow rate of 1 ml/min. The method was validated for selectivity, linearity (r(2) > 0.997 for both thymol and carvacrol), precision (intra-day 0.8-1.9, 1.7-2.6; and inter-day 3.5-4.5, 3.6-4.7) and recovery (97.7%, 97.6%) for thymol and carvacrol, respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) and limits of quantization (LOQs) were calculated to be 2.8, 0.6 µg/ml and 8.6, 1.8 µg/ml for thymol and carvacrol, respectively. The GC system consisted of flame ionization detector (FID) and CP-SIL 8 column. The concentrations of thymol and carvacrol in essential oil obtained by HPLC (41.2%, 4.3%) and GC (40.7%, 4.2%) were compared by statistical methods and they showed good agreement.

  14. Unstable volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casas, Isabel; Gijbels, Irène

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce the break-preserving local linear (BPLL) estimator for the estimation of unstable volatility functions for independent and asymptotically independent processes. Breaks in the structure of the conditional mean and/or the volatility functions are common i...

  15. Unstable volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casas, Isabel; Gijbels, Irène

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce the break-preserving local linear (BPLL) estimator for the estimation of unstable volatility functions for independent and asymptotically independent processes. Breaks in the structure of the conditional mean and/or the volatility functions are common i...

  16. Liquid based cytology improves the positive predictive value of glandular smears compared to conventional cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, R J; Errington, C A; Mansour, D J A

    2010-01-01

    To investigate whether the introduction of liquid-based cytology (LBC) in an urban setting decreases the diagnosis of glandular neoplasia (grade 6) and improves the positive predictive value (PPV) of cervical cytological screening. A retrospective database review was conducted identifying women with cervical cytological abnormalities including glandular neoplasia (grade 6) before and after the introduction of LBC. Following the introduction of LBC the rate of glandular neoplasia (grade 6) referrals fell from 1.08% to 0.69% of all cervical cytological abnormalities. There was a significant reduction in 'abnormal' cytological samples subsequently found to be associated with no invasive or preinvasive disease but no decrease in the number showing preinvasive or invasive disease. A significant decrease in number of patients having a final diagnosis of normal/inflammatory or wart changes was seen in those patients referred during the LBC period (p cytological glandular neoplasia referrals but not at the expense of missing preinvasive and invasive cancers. It has also increased the PPV of cervical sampling to detect preinvasive and invasive cancer from 59.6% to 76.0%.

  17. Erosion Effects of Liquid Water and Volatiles in a Former Lacustrine Environment - From Gale Crater to Death Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacob, R. H.; Bonaccorsi, R.; Iacob, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    During its first two years of exploration, Curiosity rover provided strong evidence of water activity at Gale Crater on Mars. While liquid water is not commonly present on the surface of Mars, large depressions such as Gale Crater hold evidence that water was collected in impact craters on Mars in the distant past. Specific features such as alluvial fans, inverted riverbeds, moat areas, and sedimentary formations, demonstrate strong water activity on low elevation regions of Mars. While surface water (gradually) disappeared as the climate and atmosphere of Mars changed, important water deposits formed underground, either as sub-surface ice shelves, or in the form of hydrated minerals, as demonstrated by MER and MSL. Although the presence of water ice under the ancient lake bed at the foothills of Mount Sharp is still to be determined, the area explored so far by Curiosity exhibits erosion features that can help describe the history of water activity along billions of years, e.g., river streams, lacustrine sedimentation, and later cycles of evaporation, frosting and sublimation. This presentation features a comparative study of water erosion processes at Gale Crater on Mars and Death Valley (DV) on Earth, from ancient water flows and lacustrine environments, through evaporation, dryness, and cyclic frosting and sublimation. Groundwater deposits in Death Valley offer best opportunities to study the process of minerals hydration, as well as landforms related to underground water percolation and evaporation, similar to those discovered by Curiosity at Yellowknife Bay. Furthermore, sedimentary processes in lacustrine proximal settings similar to those argued for Mount Sharp, or seen at Gale Crater's floor, have been studied in several locations of DV. These include, but are not limited to, younger dry lake beds of former lakes Manly and Panamint, carved badland formations of Furnace Creek Lake (Zabriskie Point) and older Tertiary lacustrine and fanglomeratic deposits

  18. Effect of Vertical Shoot-Positioned, Scott-Henry, Geneva Double-Curtain, Arch-Cane, and Parral Training Systems on the Volatile Composition of Albariño Wines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Vilanova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Viticultural practices influence both grape and wine quality. The influence of training systems on volatile composition was investigated for Albariño wine from Rías Baixas AOC in Northwest Spain. The odoriferous contribution of the compounds to the wine aroma was also studied. Volatile compounds belonging to ten groups (alcohols, C6-compounds, ethyl esters, acetates, terpenols, C13-norisoprenoids, volatile phenols, volatile fatty acids, lactones and carbonyl compounds were determined in Albariño wines from different training systems, Vertical Shoot-Positioned (VSP, Scott-Henry (SH, Geneva Double-Curtain (GDC, Arch-Cane (AC, and Parral (P during 2010 and 2011 vintages. Wines from GDC showed the highest total volatile composition with the highest concentrations of alcohols, ethyl esters, fatty acids, and lactones families. However, the highest levels of terpenes and C13-norisoprenoids were quantified in the SH system. A fruitier aroma was observed in Albariño wines from GDC when odor activity values were calculated.

  19. Determination of hydrogen sulfide and volatile thiols in air samples by mercury probe derivatization coupled with liquid chromatography-atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramanti, Emilia; D'Ulivo, Lucia; Lomonte, Cristina; Onor, Massimo; Zamboni, Roberto; Raspi, Giorgio; D'Ulivo, Alessandro

    2006-10-02

    A new procedure is proposed for the sampling and storage of hydrogen sulphide (H2S) and volatile thiols (methanethiol or methyl mercaptan, ethanethiol and propanethiol) for their determination by liquid chromatography. The sampling procedure is based on the trapping/pre-concentration of the analytes in alkaline aqueous solution containing an organic mercurial probe p-hydroxymercurybenzoate, HO-Hg-C6H4-COO- (PHMB), where they are derivatized to stable PHMB complexes based on mercury-sulfur covalent bonds. PHMB complexes are separated on a C18 reverse phase column, allowing their determination by liquid chromatography coupled with sequential non-selective UV-vis (DAD) and mercury specific (chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry, CVGAFS) on-line detectors. PHMB complexes, S(PHMB)2CH3S-PHMB, C2H5S-PHMB and C3H7S-PHMB, are stable alt least for 12 h at room temperature and for 3 months if stored frozen (-20 degrees C). The best analytical figures of merits in the optimized conditions were obtained by CVGAFS detection, with detection limits (LODc) of 9.7 microg L(-1) for H2S, 13.7 microg L(-1) for CH(3)SH, 17.7 microg L(-1) for C2H5SH and 21.7 microg L(-1) for C3H7SH in the trapping solution in form of RS-PHMB complexes, the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) ranging between 1.0 and 1.5%, and a linear dynamic range (LDR) between 10 and 9700 microg L(-1). Conventional UV absorbance detectors tuned at 254 nm can be employed as well with comparable R.S.D. and LDR, but with LODc one order of magnitude higher than AFS detector and lower specificity. The sampling procedure followed by LC-DAD-CVGAFS analysis has been validated, as example, for H2S determination by a certified gas permeation tube as a source of 3.071+/-0.154 microg min(-1) of H2S, giving a recovery of 99.8+/-7% and it has been applied to the determination of sulfur compounds in real gas samples (biogas and the air of a plant for fractional distillation of crude oil).

  20. Determination of hydrogen sulfide and volatile thiols in air samples by mercury probe derivatization coupled with liquid chromatography-atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bramanti, Emilia [Italian National Research Council, CNR-Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Laboratory of Instrumental Analytical Chemistry, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)]. E-mail: emilia@ipcf.cnr.it; D' Ulivo, Lucia [Italian National Research Council, CNR-Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Laboratory of Instrumental Analytical Chemistry, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Lomonte, Cristina [Italian National Research Council, CNR-Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Laboratory of Instrumental Analytical Chemistry, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Ambiente s.c.r.l., Via Frassina 21, 54033, Carrrara, Massa (Italy); Onor, Massimo [Italian National Research Council, CNR-Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Laboratory of Instrumental Analytical Chemistry, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Zamboni, Roberto [Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, University of Pisa, Via Risorgimento 35, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Raspi, Giorgio [Italian National Research Council, CNR-Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Laboratory of Instrumental Analytical Chemistry, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); D' Ulivo, Alessandro [Italian National Research Council, CNR-Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Laboratory of Instrumental Analytical Chemistry, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2006-10-02

    A new procedure is proposed for the sampling and storage of hydrogen sulphide (H{sub 2}S) and volatile thiols (methanethiol or methyl mercaptan, ethanethiol and propanethiol) for their determination by liquid chromatography. The sampling procedure is based on the trapping/pre-concentration of the analytes in alkaline aqueous solution containing an organic mercurial probe p-hydroxymercurybenzoate, HO-Hg-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-COO{sup -} (PHMB), where they are derivatized to stable PHMB complexes based on mercury-sulfur covalent bonds. PHMB complexes are separated on a C{sub 18} reverse phase column, allowing their determination by liquid chromatography coupled with sequential non-selective UV-vis (DAD) and mercury specific (chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry, CVGAFS) on-line detectors. PHMB complexes, S(PHMB){sub 2}CH{sub 3}S-PHMB, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}S-PHMB and C{sub 3}H{sub 7}S-PHMB, are stable alt least for 12 h at room temperature and for 3 months if stored frozen (-20 deg. C). The best analytical figures of merits in the optimized conditions were obtained by CVGAFS detection, with detection limits (LODc) of 9.7 {mu}g L{sup -1} for H{sub 2}S, 13.7 {mu}g L{sup -1} for CH{sub 3}SH, 17.7 {mu}g L{sup -1} for C{sub 2}H{sub 5}SH and 21.7 {mu}g L{sup -1} for C{sub 3}H{sub 7}SH in the trapping solution in form of RS-PHMB complexes, the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) ranging between 1.0 and 1.5%, and a linear dynamic range (LDR) between 10 and 9700 {mu}g L{sup -1}. Conventional UV absorbance detectors tuned at 254 nm can be employed as well with comparable R.S.D. and LDR, but with LODc one order of magnitude higher than AFS detector and lower specificity. The sampling procedure followed by LC-DAD-CVGAFS analysis has been validated, as example, for H{sub 2}S determination by a certified gas permeation tube as a source of 3.071 {+-} 0.154 {mu}g min{sup -1} of H{sub 2}S, giving a recovery of 99.8 {+-} 7% and it has been applied to the determination of

  1. Three-dimensional positioning and control of colloidal objects utilizing engineered liquid crystalline defect networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, H; Asakura, K; Fukuda, J; Ozaki, M

    2015-05-21

    Topological defects in liquid crystals not only affect the optical and rheological properties of the host, but can also act as scaffolds in which to trap nano or micro-sized colloidal objects. The creation of complex defect shapes, however, often involves confining the liquid crystals in curved geometries or adds complex-shaped colloidal objects, which are unsuitable for device applications. Using topologically patterned substrates, here we demonstrate the controlled generation of three-dimensional defect lines with non-trivial shapes and even chirality, in a flat slab of nematic liquid crystal. By using the defect lines as templates and the electric response of the liquid crystals, colloidal superstructures are constructed, which can be reversibly reconfigured at a voltage as low as 1.3 V. Three-dimensional engineering of the defect shapes in liquid crystals is potentially useful in the fabrication of self-healing composites and in stabilizing artificial frustrated phases.

  2. Position Reconstruction of Bubble Formation in Liquid Nitrogen using Piezoelectric Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Lenardo, Brian; Manalaysay, Aaron; Morad, James; Payne, Chrisman; Stephenson, Scott; Szydagis, Matthew; Tripathi, Mani

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic liquids, particularly liquid xenon and argon, are of interest as detector media for experiments in nuclear and particle physics. Here we present a new detector diagnostic technique using piezoelectric sensors to detect bubbling of the liquid. Bubbling can indicate locations of excess heat dissipation e.g., in immersed electronics. They can also interfere with normal event evolution by scattering of light or by interrupting the drift of ionization charge. In our test apparatus, four sensors are placed in the vacuum space of a double-walled dewar of liquid nitrogen and used to detect and locate a source of bubbling inside the liquid volume. Utilizing the differences in transmitted frequencies through the different media present in the experiment, we find that sound traveling in a direct path from the source to the sensor can be isolated with appropriate filtering. The location of the source is then reconstructed using the time difference of arrivals (TDOA) information. The reconstruction algorithm is ...

  3. Creditor Protection, Contagion, and Stock Market Price Volatility

    OpenAIRE

    Hale, Galina B; Razin, Assaf; Tong, Hui

    2008-01-01

    We study a mechanism through which strong creditor protection affect positively the level, and negatively the volatility, of the aggregate stock market price. In a Tobin-q model with liquidity and productivity shocks, two channels are at work: (1) Creditor protection raises the stock value in a credit-constraint regime; (2) Creditor protection lowers the probability of the credit crunch. We confront the key predictions of the model to a panel of 40 countries over the period from 1984 to 2004....

  4. DOES ENERGY CONSUMPTION VOLATILITY AFFECT REAL GDP VOLATILITY? AN EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS FOR THE UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rashid

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper empirically examines the relation between energy consumption volatility and unpredictable variations in real gross domestic product (GDP in the UK. Estimating the Markov switching ARCH model we find a significant regime switching in the behavior of both energy consumption and GDP volatility. The results from the Markov regime-switching model show that the variability of energy consumption has a significant role to play in determining the behavior of GDP volatilities. Moreover, the results suggest that the impacts of unpredictable variations in energy consumption on GDP volatility are asymmetric, depending on the intensity of volatility. In particular, we find that while there is no significant contemporaneous relationship between energy consumption volatility and GDP volatility in the first (low-volatility regime, GDP volatility is significantly positively related to the volatility of energy utilization in the second (high-volatility regime.

  5. Ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadruple time-of-flight with MS(E) technology used for qualitative analysis of non-volatile oxidation markers in sliced packed mushrooms (Agaricus Bisporus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrona, Magdalena; Pezo, Davinson; Canellas, Elena; Nerín, Cristina

    2016-02-05

    61 different non-volatile compounds were determined in Agaricus Bisporus sliced mushrooms using UHPLC/Q-TOF with MS(E) technology. Both positive and negative electrospray ionization were applied. Chemical profile of three parts of mushroom was created: cap, gills and stipe. The analysed mushrooms were oxidized to identify the non-volatile markers in their parts. MarkerLynx(®) was proposed as a powerful tool to distinguish mushrooms purchased in different countries (Spain and Portugal) by determining their non-volatile markers. Some metabolites were identified. Surprisingly a mix of polyethylene glycols (PEGs) was detected in cap and gills of mushrooms. Whole mushrooms were considered as vegetable resistant to migration from packaging compounds. Additionally migration tests were performed to determine the source of migrating compounds.

  6. Chasing volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caporin, Massimiliano; Rossi, Eduardo; Santucci de Magistris, Paolo

    The realized volatility of financial returns is characterized by persistence and occurrence of unpreditable large increments. To capture those features, we introduce the Multiplicative Error Model with jumps (MEM-J). When a jump component is included in the multiplicative specification, the condi...... models, the introduction of the jump component provides a sensible improvement in the fit, as well as for in-sample and out-of-sample volatility tail forecasts....

  7. Volatility Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiguang Wang

    2009-01-01

    Classical capital asset pricing theory tells us that riskaverse investors would require higher returns to compensate for higher risk on an investment. One type of risk is price (return) risk, which reflects uncertainty in the price level and is measured by the volatility (standard deviation) of asset returns. Volatility itself is also known to be random and hence is perceived as another type of risk. Investors can bear price risk in exchange for a higher return. But are investors willing to p...

  8. 烟草味电子烟油中挥发性成分分析%Analysis of the Volatile Components in Tobacco Flavor Electronic Cigarette Liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王萍娟; 冯守爱; 吴彦; 黄天辉; 刘绍华; 黄东业; 黄世杰; 李小兰; 田兆福

    2014-01-01

    采用二氯甲烷对3家公司的5种电子烟油样品进行萃取,并用气-质联用(GC-MS)法鉴定。通过对 NIST 11谱库的检索,对5种样品中挥发性成分进行了比较分析。结果表明5种样品中的挥发性成分差别较大,共鉴定出40种挥发性成分,依据作用或来源分为雾化剂、烟叶提取物和薄荷提取物三类。其中相对含量水平较高且在5种样品中都检出的成分是丙二醇、烟碱和甘油。3家公司的5种烟草味电子烟油在抽吸品质上有所差异,C 公司样品在抽吸感官感受上相较其他两家公司样品具有明显优势,其中样品 C1又略好于 C2。比较发现,C 公司电子烟油的挥发性成分中含特有的8种多甘醇类化合物,可能是这些物质的协同作用而改善了抽吸品质。%Five kinds of tobacco flavor electronic cigarette liquids origin from three companies were extracted by dichlorometh-ane,40 volatile components were identified by GC-MS.Results indicated that the differences were significant among five kinds of tobacco flavor electronic cigarette liquids.All components were sorted to three groups according their function and origin:fogging agent,tobacco extracts and mint extracts.There were three common compounds with higher content in five samples, including propylene glycol,nicotine and glycerin.There were significant differences in smoking quality of samples from three companies,company C′s showed a notable advantage over the other two companies,sample C1 was slightly better than sample C2.Meanwhile,there were 8 kinds of distinctive multiethylene glycol compound that only existed in samples from company C, but not found in samples from companies A or B.It was probably the combined effect of these substances that improved the sensory quality of tobacco flavor electronic cigarette liquids.

  9. Determination of hydroxycinnamic acids and volatile phenols in wort and beer by isocratic high-performance liquid chromatography using electrochemical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbeneden, Nele; Delvaux, Filip; Delvaux, Freddy R

    2006-12-15

    The suitability of a simple and rapid isocratic RP-HPLC method with amperometric electrochemical detection for the simultaneous detection and quantification of hydroxycinnamic acids and their corresponding aroma-active volatile phenols in wort and beer is reported. The technique gives good specificity and sensitivity, and can therefore be used for routine monitoring of hydroxycinnamic acids in wort and the development of volatile phenolic flavour compounds during the beer production process and subsequent conservation.

  10. A New Method for Ultrasound Detection of Interfacial Position in Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Rizental Coutinho

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic measurement techniques for velocity estimation are currently widely used in fluid flow studies and applications. An accurate determination of interfacial position in gas-liquid two-phase flows is still an open problem. The quality of this information directly reflects on the accuracy of void fraction measurement, and it provides a means of discriminating velocity information of both phases. The algorithm known as Velocity Matched Spectrum (VM Spectrum is a velocity estimator that stands out from other methods by returning a spectrum of velocities for each interrogated volume sample. Interface detection of free-rising bubbles in quiescent liquid presents some difficulties for interface detection due to abrupt changes in interface inclination. In this work a method based on velocity spectrum curve shape is used to generate a spatial-temporal mapping, which, after spatial filtering, yields an accurate contour of the air-water interface. It is shown that the proposed technique yields a RMS error between 1.71 and 3.39 and a probability of detection failure and false detection between 0.89% and 11.9% in determining the spatial-temporal gas-liquid interface position in the flow of free rising bubbles in stagnant liquid. This result is valid for both free path and with transducer emitting through a metallic plate or a Plexiglas pipe.

  11. Dynamic Volatility Arbitrage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorn, Jochen

    concepts, next to nothing is known about position reverting strategies and how, and -even more important- in which context they are applied in practice. In the recent market downturn only one sector generated signicant profits for the leading investment banks: Volatility trading activities, namely on Forex...

  12. The Trade-off between Liquidity and Precision of Position in Option Contracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Alexander; Lazarov, Zdravetz

    2007-01-01

    More liquid financial contracts are claimed to draw trading volume from contracts for which they are close substitutes. We provide the first analysis of how trading volume across existing financial contracts is affected by changes in the factors that govern the degree to which they are substitutes...

  13. The Trade-off between Liquidity and Precision of Position in Option Contracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Alexander; Lazarov, Zdravetz

    2007-01-01

    More liquid financial contracts are claimed to draw trading volume from contracts for which they are close substitutes. We provide the first analysis of how trading volume across existing financial contracts is affected by changes in the factors that govern the degree to which they are substitutes...

  14. Managing liquidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pokutta, Sebastian; Schmaltz, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Large banking groups face the question of how to optimally allocate and generate liquidity: in a central liquidity hub or in many decentralized branches. We translate this question into a facility location problem under uncertainty. We show that volatility is the key driver behind (de...... above which it is advantageous to open a liquidity center and show that it is a function of the volatility and the characteristic of the bank network. Finally, we discuss the n-branch model for real-world banking groups (10-60 branches) and show that it can be solved with high granularity (100 scenarios...

  15. The january effect across volatility regimes

    OpenAIRE

    Agnani, Betty; Aray, Henry

    2007-01-01

    Using a Markov regime switching model, this article presents evidence on the well-known January effect on stock returns. The specification allows a distinction to be drawn between two regimes, one with high volatility and other with low volatility. We obtain a time-varying January effect that is, in general, positive and significant in both volatility regimes. However, this effect is larger in the high volatility regime. In sharp contrast with most previous literature we find two major result...

  16. Discrimination of Cross-Market Price Manipulations in Stock Index Futures Market:Evidences from Volatility and Liquidity%从波动性和流动性判别股指期货跨市场价格操纵行为

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张维; 韦立坚; 熊熊; 李根; 马正欣

    2011-01-01

    股指期货价格操纵一般具有期现跨市场联合操纵的特点,仅按单一市场从波动性分析去判别价格操纵行为是不够充分的。本文引入流动性分析为判别提供了更充分的依据:首先运用GARCH模型分析被操纵资产在波动性的异常变化,判断价格序列偏离了"自然特性",具有被操纵的嫌疑;然后利用日交易量、日持仓量和Amivest流动性比率等指标分析流动性的异常变化,发现与根据跨市场操纵过程推测的变化一致,从而构成价格操纵行为的事实依据。%This paper aims to expand the method that we usually discriminate price manipulation behavior in accordance with the analysis of market volatility in the single market in view of the fact that stock index futures price manipulation bears the characteristics of cross-market.This paper firstly uses GARCH model to analyze the abnormal changes concerning the volatility of the manipulated assets,then comes to the conclusion that the price series deviate from the"natural characteristics" and are suspected of being manipulated.Following this,it analyses the abnormal change of volatility by use of the daily trading volume daily positions and Amivest liquidity ratios indicators and finds out that price manipulation behavior exerts a big impact upon the liquidity changes.And then,it comes to the final conclusion that the liquidity changes are consistent with the manipulation processes,so it forms the factual basis of the existence of the price manipulation behavior.

  17. Liquid crystal hyperbolic metamaterial for wide-angle negative-positive refraction and reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlik, G; Tarnowski, K; Walasik, W; Mitus, A C; Khoo, I C

    2014-04-01

    We show that nanosphere dispersed liquid crystal (NDLC) metamaterial can be characterized in near IR spectral region as an indefinite medium whose real parts of effective ordinary and extraordinary permittivities are opposite in signs. Based on this fact we designed an electro-optic effect: an external electric-field-driven switch between normal refraction, negative refraction, and reflection of TM incident electromagnetic wave from the boundary vacuum/NDLC. A detailed analysis of its functionality is given based on effective medium theory combined with a study of negative refraction in anisotropic metamaterials and finite elements simulations.

  18. Observation of Algebraic Decay of Positional Order in a Smectic Liquid Crystal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Litster, J. D.; Birgeneau, R. J.;

    1980-01-01

    A smectic-A liquid crystal in three dimensions has been predicted to exhibit algebraic decay of the layer correlations rather than true long-range order. As a consequence, the smectic Bragg peaks are expected to be power-law singularities of the form q∥-2+η and q⊥-4+2η, where ∥(⊥) is along...... (perpendicular to) the smectic density wave vector direction, rather than δ function peaks. Observation of these phenomena requires very high instrumental resolution together with a resolution function with wings which drop off much more rapidly than q∥-2(q⊥-4). We show that these requirements may be met...

  19. High flux, positively charged loose nanofiltration membrane by blending with poly (ionic liquid) brushes grafted silica spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Liang [School of Chemical Engineering and Energy, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Zhang, Yatao, E-mail: zhangyatao@zzu.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Energy, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); UNESCO Center for Membrane Science and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Wang, Yuanming; Zhang, Haoqin [School of Chemical Engineering and Energy, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Liu, Jindun, E-mail: liujindun@zzu.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Energy, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China)

    2015-04-28

    Highlights: • SiO{sub 2} spheres were modified by poly (ionic liquid) brushes via RATRP. • Positively charged NF membranes were fabricated by incorporation of SiO{sub 2}-PIL. • The membranes exhibited higher rejection for dyes and superior penetration for salts. - Abstract: Silica spheres modified by poly (ionic liquid) brushes, a novel positively charged nanomaterial is prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). A high flux positively charged loose nanofiltration membrane is fabricated via “blending-phase inversion” method. The morphology structures, hydrophilicity, thermal and mechanical properties, permeation performance of these membranes are investigated in detail. The results reveal that the hybrid membranes have enhanced surface hydrophilicity, water permeability, thermal stability, and mechanical properties. Characterization of membrane separation properties shows that the hybrid membranes possess higher salt permeability and relatively higher rejection for reactive dyes, which may open opportunities for the recycling of reactive dyes wastewater. Moreover, such hybrid membranes have an outstanding operational stability and salts concentration showed little effect on the separation properties.

  20. Rapid identification of volatile constituents of Kangbingdu oral liquid by GC-MS%GC-MS法对抗病毒口服液中挥发性成分的快速鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施法; 侯峰; 孙苓苓; 刘晓秋

    2011-01-01

    目的:分析鉴定抗病毒口服液中挥发性成分.方法:采用水蒸气蒸馏法从抗病毒口服液及其处方药材中提取挥发油,GC-MS法鉴定挥发油类成分.结果:抗病毒口服液中共检出28个色谱峰,鉴定22个化合物,并对其进行归属,占挥发油总量的93.51%,其中含量最高的是4-松油醇,约占总量的42.03%.结论:首次建立GC-MS法鉴定抗病毒口服液中挥发性成分,方法简便、快速、准确,为该制剂的质量控制提供依据.%Objective : To analyze the volatile constituents of Kangbingdu oral liquid. Methods : The volatile oil was extracted from Kangbingdu oral liquid and medicinal matenals in prescription by warer - steam distillation method and separated by capillary column chromatography. The components were quantitatively determined with normalization method and identified by GC - MS. Results :28 chromatografic peeks were detected and 22 compounds were identified and assigned, which were composed of 93. 51% of the total essential oil. The highest constituent in essential oil was 4 - terpineol, which was composed of 42. 03% of the total essential oil. Conclusions : The GC - MS method to identify the essential oil of Kangbingdu oral liquid is reported for the first time. The established method is simple,rapid and accurate. The study provides basis for quality control of the preparation.

  1. Coexistence of positive and negative refractive index sensitivity in the liquid-core photonic crystal fiber based plasmonic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Binbin; Xia, Li; Liu, Deming

    2012-11-05

    We present and numerically characterize a liquid-core photonic crystal fiber based plasmonic sensor. The coupling properties and sensing performance are investigated by the finite element method. It is found that not only the plasmonic mode dispersion relation but also the fundamental mode dispersion relation is rather sensitive to the analyte refractive index (RI). The positive and negative RI sensitivity coexist in the proposed design. It features a positive RI sensitivity when the increment of the SPP mode effective index is larger than that of the fundamental mode, but the sensor shows a negative RI sensitivity once the increment of the fundamental mode gets larger. A maximum negative RI sensitivity of -5500nm/RIU (Refractive Index Unit) is achieved in the sensing range of 1.50-1.53. The effects of the structural parameters on the plasmonic excitations are also studied, with a view of tuning and optimizing the resonant spectrum.

  2. High flux, positively charged loose nanofiltration membrane by blending with poly (ionic liquid) brushes grafted silica spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liang; Zhang, Yatao; Wang, Yuanming; Zhang, Haoqin; Liu, Jindun

    2015-04-28

    Silica spheres modified by poly (ionic liquid) brushes, a novel positively charged nanomaterial is prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). A high flux positively charged loose nanofiltration membrane is fabricated via "blending-phase inversion" method. The morphology structures, hydrophilicity, thermal and mechanical properties, permeation performance of these membranes are investigated in detail. The results reveal that the hybrid membranes have enhanced surface hydrophilicity, water permeability, thermal stability, and mechanical properties. Characterization of membrane separation properties shows that the hybrid membranes possess higher salt permeability and relatively higher rejection for reactive dyes, which may open opportunities for the recycling of reactive dyes wastewater. Moreover, such hybrid membranes have an outstanding operational stability and salts concentration showed little effect on the separation properties.

  3. The noncavitating performance and life of a small vane-type positive displacement pump in liquid hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbricht, T. E.; Hemminger, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The low flow rate and high head rise requirements of hydrogen/oxygen auxiliary propulsion systems make the application of centrifugal pumps difficult. Positive displacement pumps are well-suited for these flow conditions, but little is known about their performance and life characteristics in liquid hydrogen. An experimental and analytical investigation was conducted to determine the performance and life characteristics of a vane-type, positive displacement pump. In the experimental part of this effort, mass flow rate and shaft torque were determined as functions of shaft speed and pump pressure rise. Since liquid hydrogen offers little lubrication in a rubbing situation, pump life is an issue. During the life test, the pump was operated intermittently for 10 hr at the steady-state point of 0.074 lbm/sec (0.03 kg/sec) flow rate, 3000 psid (2.07 MPa) pressure rise, and 9000 rpm (938 rad/sec) shaft speed. Pump performance was monitored during the life test series and the results indicated no loss in performance. Material loss from the vanes was recorded and wear of the other components was documented. In the analytical part of this effort, a comprehensive pump performance analysis computer code, developed in-house, was used to predict pump performance. The results of the experimental investigation are presented and compared with the results of the analysis. Results of the life test are also presented.

  4. Financial Development, Financial Structure, and Macroeconomic Volatility: Evidence from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wei

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Using annual data from 1997–2014 of 30 provinces, municipalities, and autonomous regions, subdividing trended and cyclical volatility of macroeconomics and inflation, considering different indicators of financial development and financial structure, this paper investigated the impact of financial development and financial structure on macroeconomic volatility. The empirical results found that (1 the trended and cyclical volatility of the previous macroeconomic period had a significantly positive impact on that of the current period, and the impact of trended volatility was greater than that of cyclical volatility; (2 financial development had a significantly negative impact on macroeconomic cyclical volatility through inflation cyclical volatility, but inflation trended volatility would amplify macroeconomic volatility; financial markets have no significant effect on macroeconomic volatility; financial structure measured with the ratio of stock market turnover and the efficiency of the financial development had a significant positive impact on macroeconomic cyclical volatility; and (3 inflation trended volatility had a significantly negative impact on macroeconomic cyclical volatility and trended volatility, while inflation cyclical volatility had a significantly positive impact on macroeconomic cyclical volatility.

  5. Equilibrium shape and location of a liquid drop acoustically positioned in a resonant rectangular chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, H. W.; Barmatz, M.; Shipley, C.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a standing wave field in a rectangular chamber on the shape and location of an acoustically positioned drop or bubble is calculated. The sample deformation and equilibrium position are obtained from an analysis of the spherical harmonic projections of the total surface stress tensor. The method of calculation relies on the assumed condition that the sample is only slightly distorted from a spherical form. The equilibrium location of a levitated drop is combined with a formula introduced by Hasegawa (1979) to calcualte the ka dependence of the radiation force function. The present theory is valid for large as well as small ka values. Calculations in the small ka limit agree with previous theories and experimental results. Examples are presented for nonplane-wave modes as well as plane-wave rectangular modes.

  6. Pricing Volatility Referenced Assets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan De Genaro Dario

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Volatility swaps are contingent claims on future realized volatility. Variance swaps are similar instruments on future realized variance, the square of future realized volatility. Unlike a plain vanilla option, whose volatility exposure is contaminated by its asset price dependence, volatility and variance swaps provide a pure exposure to volatility alone. This article discusses the risk-neutral valuation of volatility and variance swaps based on the framework outlined in the Heston (1993 stochastic volatility model. Additionally, the Heston (1993 model is calibrated for foreign currency options traded at BMF and its parameters are used to price swaps on volatility and variance of the BRL / USD exchange rate.

  7. The direct determination of double bond positions in lipid mixtures by liquid chromatography/in-line ozonolysis/mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Chenxing; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan [Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2P5 (Canada); Curtis, Jonathan M., E-mail: jcurtis1@ualberta.ca [Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2P5 (Canada)

    2013-01-31

    Highlights: ► An ozonolysis reactor was coupled in-line with mass spectrometry (O{sub 3}-MS). ► Double bond positions in FAME were determined unambiguously without standards. ► LC directly connected to O{sub 3}-MS allowed double bond localization in lipid mixtures. ► LC/O{sub 3}-MS applied to bovine fat demonstrated practical use in lipid analysis. -- Abstract: The direct determination of double bond positions in unsaturated lipids using in-line ozonolysis-mass spectrometry (O{sub 3}-MS) is described. In this experiment, ozone penetrates through the semi-permeable Teflon AF-2400 tubing containing a flow of a solution of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). Unsaturated FAME are thus oxidized by the ozone and cleaved at the double bond positions. The ozonolysis products then flow directly into the atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) source of a mass spectrometer for analysis. Aldehyde products retaining the methyl ester group are indicative of the double bond positions in unsaturated FAME. For the first time, O{sub 3}-MS is able to couple directly to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), making the double bond localization in lipid mixtures possible. The application of LC/O{sub 3}-MS has been demonstrated for a fat sample from bovine adipose tissue. A total of 9 unsaturated FAME including 6 positional isomers were identified unambiguously, without comparison to standards. The in-line ozonolysis reaction apparatus is applicable to most mass spectrometers without instrumental modification; it is also directly compatible with various LC columns. The LC/O{sub 3}-MS method described here is thus a practical, versatile and easy to use new approach to the direct determination of double bond positions in lipids, even in complex mixtures.

  8. Mycobacterial DNA extraction for whole-genome sequencing from early positive liquid (MGIT) cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votintseva, Antonina A; Pankhurst, Louise J; Anson, Luke W; Morgan, Marcus R; Gascoyne-Binzi, Deborah; Walker, Timothy M; Quan, T Phuong; Wyllie, David H; Del Ojo Elias, Carlos; Wilcox, Mark; Walker, A Sarah; Peto, Tim E A; Crook, Derrick W

    2015-04-01

    We developed a low-cost and reliable method of DNA extraction from as little as 1 ml of early positive mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) cultures that is suitable for whole-genome sequencing to identify mycobacterial species and predict antibiotic resistance in clinical samples. The DNA extraction method is based on ethanol precipitation supplemented by pretreatment steps with a MolYsis kit or saline wash for the removal of human DNA and a final DNA cleanup step with solid-phase reversible immobilization beads. The protocol yielded ≥0.2 ng/μl of DNA for 90% (MolYsis kit) and 83% (saline wash) of positive MGIT cultures. A total of 144 (94%) of the 154 samples sequenced on the MiSeq platform (Illumina) achieved the target of 1 million reads, with 90% coverage achieved. The DNA extraction protocol, therefore, will facilitate fast and accurate identification of mycobacterial species and resistance using a range of bioinformatics tools. Copyright © 2015, Votintseva et al.

  9. Identification of non-volatile compounds and their migration from hot melt adhesives used in food packaging materials characterized by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Paula; Canellas, Elena; Nerín, Cristina

    2013-05-01

    The identification of unknown non-volatile migrant compounds from adhesives used in food contact materials is a very challenging task because of the number of possible compounds involved, given that adhesives are complex mixtures of chemicals. The use of ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/QTOF) is shown to be a successful tool for identifying non-targeted migrant compounds from two hot melt adhesives used in food packaging laminates. Out of the seven migrants identified and quantified, five were amides and one was a compound classified in Class II of the Cramer toxicity. None of the migration values exceeded the recommended Cramer exposure values.

  10. Capillary gas-liquid chromatography separation of phenethylamines in amphetamine-positive urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePace, A; Verebey, K; elSohly, M

    1990-11-01

    Good gas chromatography (GC) separation of molecules is essential for clean gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) confirmation of compounds. The trifluoro derivatives of ephedrine (E) and methamphetamine (MA) coelute on dimethyl silicone capillary columns, such as DB-1, which are most commonly used by chromatographers. Methods are described to separate E and MA to aid GC/MS confirmations of methamphetamine, ephedrine, or both E and MA together, whichever may be present in Enzyme Immunoassay (EIA)-analyzed amphetamine-positive urine samples. The use of the heptafluoro derivatives of E and MA on a DB-1 column, or the trifluoro derivatives of E and MA on a DB-17 column, is suggested for good gas chromatographic separation.

  11. Transient flickering behavior in fringe-field switching liquid crystal mode analyzed by positional asymmetric flexoelectric dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Jin; Shim, Gyu-Yeop; Choi, Jun-Chan; Park, Ji-Sub; Lee, Joun-Ho; Baek, Ji-Ho; Choi, Hyun Chul; Ha, Yong Min; Ranjkesh, Amid; Kim, Hak-Rin

    2015-12-28

    We analyzed a transient blinking phenomenon in a fringe-field switching liquid crystal (LC) mode that occurred at the moment of frame change even in the optimized DC offset condition for minimum image flicker. Based on the positional dynamic behaviors of LCs by using a high-speed camera, we found that the transient blink is highly related to the asymmetric responses of the splay-bend transitions caused by the flexoelectric (FE) effect. To remove the transient blink, the elastic property adjustment of LCs was an effective solution because the FE switching dynamics between the splay-enhanced and bend-enhanced deformations are highly dependent on the elastic constants of LCs, which is the cause of momentary brightness drop.

  12. Selectivity of Brij-35 in Micellar Liquid Chromatographic Separation of Positional Isomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najma Memon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of Brij-35, a nonionic surfactant, as a mobile phase for separation of positional isomers is investigated. Chromolith C-18 SpeedROD is used as a stationary phase. The effect of surfactant and organic modifier (propanol concentration on the separation of some selected isomers is studied and evaluated in terms of linear solvation energy relationship (LSER. Shape selectivity is assessed by α value of sorbic and benzoic acid, which is found to be 1.339 by using mobile phase composed of 0.5% aqueous solutions of Brij-35 and propanol in 9 : 1. Isomers of parabens, nitroanilines, nitrophenols, and quinolinols are successfully separated using mobile phases composed of various percentages of surfactant and propanol. System constants for nonionic MLC using LSER analysis show that hydrogen bond basicity and dipolarity may be major contributors to selectivity, while excess molar refraction helps fine-tuning the separation which also imparts unique selectivity to nonionic surfactants as compared to ionic ones.

  13. Performance of the Cellslide® automated liquid-based cytology system amongst HIV-positive women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Michelow

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many women undergoing cervical screening as part of a national South African screening programme may be positive for HIV. The performance of liquid-based cytology (LBC on samples from HIV-positive women needs to be determined.Objectives: The performance of the Cellslide® automated LBC system was evaluated as a possible alternative to conventional cytology in a national cervical cancer screening programme.Methods: Split samples from 348 HIV-positive women attending an HIV treatment clinic in Johannesburg, South Africa were examined by conventional cytology and monolayer LBC methods. All samples were stained, examined and reported in the same manner. Cytotechnologists were blinded to the conventional smear diagnosis if the LBC smear was screened and vice versa.Results: The same percentage of inadequate smears (1.4% was obtained by conventional cytology and LBC. Atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance were observed in 5.2% of conventional smears and 4.0% of LBC smears. Low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions were found in 35.6% of conventional smears and 32.7% of LBC smears. Only one conventional smear was categorised as atypical squamous cells – cannot exclude a high-grade lesion, whereas five such cases were identified on LBC. High-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions were seen in 21.6% of conventional smears and 23.3% LBC smears. No invasive carcinoma was identified.Conclusion: The performance of the Cellslide® LBC system was similar to that of conventional cytology in this population of high-risk HIV-positive women, indicating that it may be introduced successfully as part of a cervical cancer screening programme.

  14. DOES VOLATILITY RESPOND ASYMMETRIC TO PAST SHOCKS?

    OpenAIRE

    Claudiu Botoc

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of the paper is to examine if the stock market volatility exhibits asymmetric or an asymmetric response to past shocks, for certain CEE countries (Romania,Hungary, Bulgaria, Poland) over the period May 2004 - September 2014. For the stock marketsfrom East Europe the results are in line with the symmetric volatility, i.e. volatility is similaraffected by both positive and negative returns with the same magnitude. For the stock marketsfrom Central Europe the results are consistent ...

  15. Money, banks and endogenous volatility

    OpenAIRE

    Pere Gomis-Porqueras

    2000-01-01

    In this paper I consider a monetary growth model in which banks provide liquidity, and the government fixes a constant rate of money creation. There are two underlying assets in the economy, money and capital. Money is dominated in rate of return. In contrast to other papers with a larger set of government liabilities, I find a unique equilibrium when agents' risk aversion is moderate. However, indeterminacies and endogenous volatility can be observed when agents are relatively risk averse.

  16. Volatile profile of wine Teran PTP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena BAŠA ČESNIK

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Teran PTP is a protected wine with a recognized traditional denomination produced from a grapevine variety ‘Refošk’ in winegrowing district Kras in Slovenia (European Union, 2009; Pravilnik, 2008. The aromatic profile of 82 Teran PTP wines produced in years 2011, 2012 and 2013 was monitored. Intotal the content of 16 volatile compounds was determined. The volatile compounds from wine were extracted following the liquid-liquid extraction and determined with a GC-MS method. The odour activity values and relative odour contributions were calculated for each volatile compound identified. Among sensorial important volatiles the highest odour activity values were determined for ethyl octanoate, ethyl hexanoate, isoamyl acetate and ethyl butyrate. Other research papers also showed, that all red wines investigated except one contained ethyl octanoate, ethyl hexanoate, isoamyl acetate and ethyl butyrate above sensory thresholds.

  17. [Diagnosis of anaerobic infection of the pleural fluid using gas-liquid chromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, M; Rojo, P; Latorre, M; Herrero, O; Arriaga, I; Merino, J M; Cisterna, R

    1993-02-01

    An assessment of the efficacy of the detection of volatile and non-volatile fatty acids that are produced by microorganisms aimed at the possible diagnosis of pleural empyema. 106 pleural fluids were examined by gas-liquid chromatography in contrast to conventional aerobic and anaerobic cultures. The sample previously prepared (1 microliter) was injected in an Hewlett-Packard 5890 chromatograph, that was equipped with a fused silica capillary column and a flame ionization detector. Growth of aerobic or anaerobic microorganisms was obtained in 13 (12.3%) of the samples, and volatile or non-volatile fatty acids were detected in all of them (sensitivity = 1). No growth was obtained in the 93 samples, but volatile or non-volatile fatty acids were detected in 64 (68.8%) of them (specificity = 0.31). A positive predictive value of 0.17 and a negative predictive value of 1 were obtained. Growth of anaerobic microorganisms was obtained in 9 samples (8.5%) and volatile fatty acids were detected in all of them (sensitivity = 1). Anaerobic microorganisms did not grow in 97 samples, however volatile fatty acids were detected in 2 (2.1%) of them. A positive predictive value of 0.82 and a negative of 1 were obtained. Referring to pleural fluid samples, the detection of volatile and non-volatile fatty acids by gas-liquid chromatography is a highly sensitive method, that may be used to quickly reject negative samples in about 30 mins. Furthermore, when anaerobic microorganisms exist, the high specificity of gas-liquid chromatography will make it possible to confirm their presence in the sample, mainly if there is a clinical suspect of anaerobic infection. Thus, the utilization of this sensitive method may also change the therapeutic behaviour.

  18. Positively charged imidazolium-based ionic liquid-protected silver nanoparticles: a promising disinfectant in root canal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadegan, A; Nabavizadeh, M; Gholami, A; Aleyasin, Z S; Dorostkar, S; Saliminasab, M; Ghasemi, Y; Hemmateenejad, B; Sharghi, H

    2015-08-01

    To synthesize and characterize silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) with different surface charges in order to evaluate their cytotoxicity and antibacterial activity in the absence and presence of dentine compared with NaOCl and CHX. Ag NPs with positive, negative and neutral surface charges were synthesized and characterized. The first phase of the experiment determined the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of NPs against planktonic E. faecalis and compared them with that of NaOCl and CHX. The second phase tested the elimination of E. faecalis at different contact times (5, 20 and 60 min and 4 and 24 h), and the role of dentine in their inactivation was assessed. In the third phase, the most effective Ag NP solution was selected for cytocompatibility assessment. An MTT-based cytotoxicity assay was used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of the selected NP solution in different concentrations on L929 fibroblasts compared to that of 2.5% NaOCl and 0.2% CHX. Student's t-test and repeated measures manova approach were used for statistical analyses. The characterization revealed synthesis of colloidal NPs in the size range of 5-10 nm in diameter. The results indicated that Ag NP with a positive surface charge had the smallest MIC against planktonic E. faecalis, and it was active in very lower concentrations compared to NaOCl, CHX and the other tested AgNPs. Positive-charged Ag NPs at 5.7 × 10(-10)  mol L(-1) completely prevented the growth of E. faecalis after 5 min of contact time, a finding comparable to 0.025% NaOCl. Dentine powder had variable inhibitory effects on all tested materials after 1 h incubation period, but after 24 h, NaOCl and the positive-charged Ag NPs were not inhibited by dentine at any concentration used. CHX was the most and the positively charged Ag NP solution was the least toxic solutions to L929 fibroblasts (P < 0.001). Ag NP surface charge was important in bactericidal efficacy against E. faecalis. The positively charged

  19. Measurements of gas and volatile element production rates from an irradiated molten lead and lead-bismuth spallation target with proton beams of 1 and 1.4 GeV; Mesures de taux de production d'elements gazeux et volatiles lors de reactions induites par des protons de 1 et 1,4 GeV sur des cibles epaisses de plomb et plomb-bismuth liquides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tall, Y

    2008-03-15

    The integrated project EUROTRANS (European Research Programme for the Transmutation of High Level Nuclear Waste in an Accelerator Driven System) of the 6. EURATOM Framework Programme aims to demonstrate the transmutation of radioactive waste in ADS (Accelerator Driven Sub-critical system). It will carry out a first advanced design of an experimental facility to demonstrate the technical feasibility of transmutation, and will produce a conceptual design of an industrial facility dedicated to transmutation. An ADS consists of three fundamental elements: the accelerator of protons, the sub-critical core and the spallation target. SUBATECH (physique Sub-Atomique et des Technologies associees) laboratory is involved to the study of the chosen liquid lead-bismuth as a spallation ADS target. The irradiation of liquid lead-bismuth target with energetic proton beam generates in addition to neutrons, volatile and radioactive residues. In order to determine experimentally the production rates of gas and volatile elements following a spallation reaction in a lead-bismuth target, the experiment IS419 was performed at the ISOLDE facility at CERN (Centre Europeen de la Recherche Nucleaire). This experiment constitutes the frame of the thesis whose main objective is to assess and study the production and release rates of many gas and volatile element from the irradiated lead-bismuth target with an energetic proton beam. The obtained data are compared to Monte Carlo simulation code (MCNPX) results in order to test the intranuclear cascade model of Bertini and of Cugnon, and the evaporation options of Dresner and Schmidt. (author)

  20. Search for Non-Volatile Components with Low Polarity Characterizing Tobacco Leaves Using Liquid Chromatography / Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishida Naoyuki

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Alors que les regards se sont principalement tournés sur les composants à faible polarité dans la résine de feuilles de tabac en raison de leur lien probable avec le goût et l’arôme des produits du tabac, l’absence d’une méthode praticable et d’un outil analytique a longtemps fait obstacle à l’identification des composants non-volatils à faible polarité. L’auteur a, en l’occurrence, porté son attention sur l’analyse recourant à la chromatographie en phase inverse non aqueuse couplée à un détecteur à barrettes de photodiodes et à un détecteur de spectrométrie de masse par ionisation chimique à pression atmosphérique. Cette analyse fut considérée applicable à la séparation des composants nonvolatils significatifs mais inconnus. Son application a permis, avec succès, de séparer, détecter et quantifier simultanément plus de 100 composants non-volatils présentant des polarités faibles et différenciées. Ces composantes furent, entre autres, des solanésols, des triacylglycérides, des phytostérols et des chlorophylles. Cependant, les données concernant les différences de composition parmi les diverses feuilles de tabac demeurent encore partielles et basées sur une analyse ciblée plutôt que globales et basées sur une analyse exhaustive. Aucune étude n’a été, à ce jour, accomplie qui recense les composants essentiels permettant de distinguer, parmi les feuilles de tabac, les différents goûts, arômes, variétés, cultivars, processus de séchage et régions de culture. Par conséquent, toutes les données de quantification ont été consolidées dans le but de former une matrice multidimensionnelle complète et ont subi un traitement statistique qui a mis en exergue les catégories et les composants-clés des diverses feuilles de tabac grâce à une analyse en composantes principales et une classification hiérarchique. Les feuilles de tabac ont, dans un premier temps, été ventilées en

  1. Micellar and sub-micellar ultra-high performance liquid chromatography of hydroxybenzoic acid and phthalic acid positional isomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasciano, Jennifer M; Danielson, Neil D

    2016-03-18

    Micellar liquid chromatography (MLC) has been used primarily for the separation of neutral analytes of varying polarities, most commonly phenols and polyaromatic hydrocarbons, but does not seem to have been used to study aromatic hydroxy acids in detail. We have studied the separation of hydroxybenzoic acid mixtures, including monohydroxybenzoic and dihydroxybenzoic acid positional isomers by MLC. Sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) is investigated as the modifying surfactant on a C18 ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) column (100 × 2.1mm, 1.8 μm). The addition of only SDS (no organic solvent) to the mobile phase reduced the influence of hydrophobic interactions while improving the retention times, resolution, and peak shapes, even at concentrations below the critical micellization concentration (CMC). The UHPLC separation of 7 hydroxybenzoic acids, including 6 dihydroxybenzoic acid positional isomers and one trihydroxybenzoic acid, is achieved with high efficiency using 0.1% SDS in 1.84 mM sulfuric acid (pH 2.43) mobile phase, in less than 6 min with a flow rate of 0.3 mL min(-1), and in less than four min with a flow rate of 0.7 mL min(-1). Six monohydroxybenzoic acid isomers are also effectively separated by MLC, using a 0.5% SDS mobile phase modifier, in less than 20 min with a flow rate of 0.3 mL min(-1), and in less than 14 min with a flow rate of 0.7 mL min(-1). The 3 phthalic acid isomers could be separated using a similar mobile phase and flow rates in less than 6 and 4 min. Solute-micelle equilibrium constants and partition coefficients are calculated for 6 monohydroxybenzoic acids based on a plot of MLC retention factor vs. mobile phase micelle concentration. All aromatic acid isomers studied can be classified as binding solutes in the MLC retention mechanism. Less effective separations are observed with shorter chain surfactants, leading to higher retention times and poor peak shapes. It is concluded that increasing chain length led to more

  2. Influence of hydroxyl group position and temperature on thermophysical properties of tetraalkylammonium hydroxide ionic liquids with alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attri, Pankaj; Baik, Ku Youn; Venkatesu, Pannuru; Kim, In Tae; Choi, Eun Ha

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we have explored the thermophysical properties of tetraalkylammonium hydroxide ionic liquids (ILs) such as tetrapropylammonium hydroxide (TPAH) and tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH) with isomers of butanol (1-butanol, 2-butanol and 2-methyl-2-propanol) within the temperature range 293.15-313.15 K, with interval of 5 K and over the varied concentration range of ILs. The molecular interactions between ILs and butanol isomers are essential for understanding the function of ILs in related measures and excess functions are sensitive probe for the molecular interactions. Therefore, we calculated the excess molar volume (V(E) ) and the deviation in isentropic compressibility (Δκs ) using the experimental values such as densities (ρ) and ultrasonic sound velocities (u) that are measured over the whole compositions range at five different temperatures (293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15 and 313.15 K) and atmospheric pressure. These excess functions were adequately correlated by using the Redlich-Kister polynomial equation. It was observed that for all studied systems, the V(E) and Δκs values are negative for the whole composition range at 293.15 K. And, the excess function follows the sequence: 2-butanol>1-butanol>2-methyl-2-propanol, which reveals that (primary or secondary or tertiary) position of hydroxyl group influence the magnitude of interactions with ILs. The negative values of excess functions are contributions from the ion-dipole interaction, hydrogen bonding and packing efficiency between the ILs and butanol isomers. Hence, the position of hydroxyl group plays an important role in the interactions with ILs. The hydrogen bonding features between ILs and alcohols were analysed using molecular modelling program by using HyperChem 7.

  3. Influence of hydroxyl group position and temperature on thermophysical properties of tetraalkylammonium hydroxide ionic liquids with alcohols.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Attri

    Full Text Available In this work, we have explored the thermophysical properties of tetraalkylammonium hydroxide ionic liquids (ILs such as tetrapropylammonium hydroxide (TPAH and tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH with isomers of butanol (1-butanol, 2-butanol and 2-methyl-2-propanol within the temperature range 293.15-313.15 K, with interval of 5 K and over the varied concentration range of ILs. The molecular interactions between ILs and butanol isomers are essential for understanding the function of ILs in related measures and excess functions are sensitive probe for the molecular interactions. Therefore, we calculated the excess molar volume (V(E and the deviation in isentropic compressibility (Δκs using the experimental values such as densities (ρ and ultrasonic sound velocities (u that are measured over the whole compositions range at five different temperatures (293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15 and 313.15 K and atmospheric pressure. These excess functions were adequately correlated by using the Redlich-Kister polynomial equation. It was observed that for all studied systems, the V(E and Δκs values are negative for the whole composition range at 293.15 K. And, the excess function follows the sequence: 2-butanol>1-butanol>2-methyl-2-propanol, which reveals that (primary or secondary or tertiary position of hydroxyl group influence the magnitude of interactions with ILs. The negative values of excess functions are contributions from the ion-dipole interaction, hydrogen bonding and packing efficiency between the ILs and butanol isomers. Hence, the position of hydroxyl group plays an important role in the interactions with ILs. The hydrogen bonding features between ILs and alcohols were analysed using molecular modelling program by using HyperChem 7.

  4. Polar Positioning of Phase-Separated Liquid Compartments in Cells Regulated by an mRNA Competition Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shambaditya; Weber, Christoph A; Nousch, Marco; Adame-Arana, Omar; Hoege, Carsten; Hein, Marco Y; Osborne-Nishimura, Erin; Mahamid, Julia; Jahnel, Marcus; Jawerth, Louise; Pozniakovski, Andrej; Eckmann, Christian R; Jülicher, Frank; Hyman, Anthony A

    2016-09-08

    P granules are non-membrane-bound RNA-protein compartments that are involved in germline development in C. elegans. They are liquids that condense at one end of the embryo by localized phase separation, driven by gradients of polarity proteins such as the mRNA-binding protein MEX-5. To probe how polarity proteins regulate phase separation, we combined biochemistry and theoretical modeling. We reconstitute P granule-like droplets in vitro using a single protein PGL-3. By combining in vitro reconstitution with measurements of intracellular concentrations, we show that competition between PGL-3 and MEX-5 for mRNA can regulate the formation of PGL-3 droplets. Using theory, we show that, in a MEX-5 gradient, this mRNA competition mechanism can drive a gradient of P granule assembly with similar spatial and temporal characteristics to P granule assembly in vivo. We conclude that gradients of polarity proteins can position RNP granules during development by using RNA competition to regulate local phase separation.

  5. Spiral mining for lunar volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, H. H.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Sviatoslavsky, I. N.; Carrier, W. D., III

    Lunar spiral mining, extending outward from a periodically mobile central power and processing station represents an alternative for comparison with more traditional mining schemes. In this concept, a mining machine would separate regolith fines and extract the contained volatiles. Volatiles then would be pumped along the miner's support arm to the central station for refining and for export or storage. The basic architecture of the central processing station would be cylindrical. A central core area could house the power subsystem of hydrogen-oxygen engines or fuel cells. Habitat sections and other crew occupied areas could be arranged around the power generation core. The outer cylinder could include all volatile refining subsystems. Solar thermal power collectors and reflectors would be positioned on top of the central station. Long term exploitation of a volatile resource region would begin with establishment of a support base at the center of a long boundary of the region. The mining tract for each spiral mining system would extend orthogonal to this boundary. New spiral mining systems would be activated along parallel tracts as demand for lunar He-3 and other solar wind volatiles increased.

  6. Chirospecific analysis of plant volatiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkachev, A V [N.N. Vorozhtsov Novosibirsk Institute of Organic Chemistry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2007-10-31

    Characteristic features of the analysis of plant volatiles by enantioselective gas (gas-liquid) chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry are discussed. The most recent advances in the design of enantioselective stationary phases are surveyed. Examples of the preparation of the most efficient phases based on modified cyclodextrins are given. Current knowledge on the successful analytical resolution of different types of plant volatiles (aliphatic and aromatic compounds and mono-, sesqui- and diterpene derivatives) into optical antipodes is systematically described. Chiral stationary phases used for these purposes, temperature conditions and enantiomer separation factors are summarised. Examples of the enantiomeric resolution of fragrance compounds and components of plant extracts, wines and essential oils are given.

  7. Chirospecific analysis of plant volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachev, A. V.

    2007-10-01

    Characteristic features of the analysis of plant volatiles by enantioselective gas (gas-liquid) chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry are discussed. The most recent advances in the design of enantioselective stationary phases are surveyed. Examples of the preparation of the most efficient phases based on modified cyclodextrins are given. Current knowledge on the successful analytical resolution of different types of plant volatiles (aliphatic and aromatic compounds and mono-, sesqui- and diterpene derivatives) into optical antipodes is systematically described. Chiral stationary phases used for these purposes, temperature conditions and enantiomer separation factors are summarised. Examples of the enantiomeric resolution of fragrance compounds and components of plant extracts, wines and essential oils are given.

  8. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us Share Volatile Organic Compounds' Impact on Indoor Air Quality On this page: Introduction Sources Health Effects Levels in Homes Steps to Reduce Exposure Standards or Guidelines Additional Resources Introduction Volatile organic compounds ( ...

  9. Zero-field NMR of nematic liquid crystals with positive and negative magnetic susceptibility anisotropies. [Propyl-, pentyl-, and heptylbicyclo-hexylcarbonitriles, p-ethoxybenzylidene-p-butylaniline (EBBA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, A.M.; Luzar, M.; Pines, A.

    1987-04-09

    Nematic liquid crystal systems with positive and negative magnetic susceptibility anisotropies are studied by NMR in high and zero magnetic fields. The behavior of the system in zero field is dictated by the form of the zero-field Hamiltonian, the symmetry of the liquid crystal phase, and the initial state of the magnetization. Zero-field evolution is initiated both with and without the use of dc pulsed fields in the field cycle. Pulsed dc fields are also used to remove the effects of residual field inhomogeneities by zero-field spin echoes. The order parameters measured in an applied field and in the absence of a field are found to be the same within experimental error for both types of liquid crystal.

  10. Separation and Identification of Volatile Flavor Compounds in High-Salt Liquid State-Fermented Soy Sauce%高盐稀态酱油挥发性风味物质的分离与鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高献礼; 赵谋明; 崔春; 曹鸣凯; 李丹

    2009-01-01

    分别采用固相微萃取(SPME)、同时蒸馏萃取(VSDE)和直接溶剂萃取(DSE)法对高盐稀态酱油挥发性风味物质进行分离、浓缩,并利用气质联用色谱(GC-MS)对其挥发性风味物质进行鉴定.试验共鉴定出147种风味化合物,其中酸类17种、醇类12种、醛类16种、酯类36种、呋喃(酮)类12种、酮类13种、杂环化合物14种、酚类8种、吡喃(酮)类6种、吡嗪类4种、吡咯(酮)类3种、含硫化合物6种.研究结果表明,主要挥发性风味化合物为酯、酸、醛、杂环化合物和醇类,其中酯类化合物的数量和相对含量最多;此外,有16种日式和韩式酱油中的关键风味化合物在国产高盐稀态酱油中被检出.%In this paper, such technologies as solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME), simultaneous steam distillation-extraction (VSDE) and direct solvent extraction (DSE) were employed to separate and concentrate the volatile flavor compounds in high-salt liquid state-fermented soy sauce, and the extracts were identified by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). 147 flavor compounds, including 17 kinds of acids, 12 kinds of alcohols, 16 kinds of aldehydes, 36 kinds of esters, 12 kinds of furan(one)s, 13 kinds of ketones, 14 kinds of he-〖JP2〗 terocyclic compounds, 8 kinds of phenols, 6 kinds of pyran(one)s, 4 kinds of pyrazines, 3 kinds of pyrrol(idon)es〖JP〗 and 6 kinds of sulfur-containing compounds, were then identified. The results indicate that, in the dominant volatile flavor compounds in the soy sauce, namely, esters, acids, alcohols, aldehydes and heterocyclic compounds, esters are of the most species and of the highest relative content; and that 16 aroma-impact compounds of Japanese and Korean soy sauces were detected from Chinese high-salt liquid state-fermented soy sauce.

  11. A time-to-event pharmacodynamic model describing treatment response in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis using days to positivity in automated liquid mycobacterial culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigutsa, Emmanuel; Patel, Kashyap; Denti, Paolo; Visser, Marianne; Maartens, Gary; Kirkpatrick, Carl M J; McIlleron, Helen; Karlsson, Mats O

    2013-02-01

    Days to positivity in automated liquid mycobacterial culture have been shown to correlate with mycobacterial load and have been proposed as a useful biomarker for treatment responses in tuberculosis. However, there is currently no quantitative method or model to analyze the change in days to positivity with time on treatment. The objectives of this study were to describe the decline in numbers of mycobacteria in sputum collected once weekly for 8 weeks from patients on treatment for tuberculosis using days to positivity in liquid culture. One hundred forty-four patients with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis were recruited from a tuberculosis clinic in Cape Town, South Africa. A nonlinear mixed-effects repeated-time-to-event modeling approach was used to analyze the time-to-positivity data. A biexponential model described the decline in the estimated number of bacteria in patients' sputum samples, while a logistic model with a lag time described the growth of the bacteria in liquid culture. At baseline, the estimated number of rapidly killed bacteria is typically 41 times higher than that of those that are killed slowly. The time to kill half of the rapidly killed bacteria was about 1.8 days, while it was 39 days for slowly killed bacteria. Patients with lung cavitation had higher bacterial loads than patients without lung cavitation. The model successfully described the increase in days to positivity as treatment progressed, differentiating between bacteria that are killed rapidly and those that are killed slowly. Our model can be used to analyze similar data from studies testing new drug regimens.

  12. Volatility at Karachi Stock Exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Aslam Farid; Javed Ashraf

    1995-01-01

    Frequent “crashes” of the stock market reported during the year 1994 suggest that the Karachi bourse is rapidly converting into a volatile market. This cannot be viewed as a positive sign for this developing market of South Asia. Though heavy fluctuations in stock prices are not an unusual phenomena and it has been observed at almost all big and small exchanges of the world. Focusing on the reasons for such fluctuations is instructive and likely to have important policy implications. Proponen...

  13. 40 CFR 60.112b - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds... organic compounds (VOC). (a) The owner or operator of each storage vessel either with a design capacity... for Volatile Organic Liquid Storage Vessels (Including Petroleum Liquid Storage Vessels) for...

  14. Emerging Equity Market Volatility

    OpenAIRE

    Geert Bekaert; Harvey, Campbell R.

    1995-01-01

    Returns in emerging capital markets are very different from returns in developed markets. While most previous research has focused on average returns, we analyze the volatility of the returns in emerging equity markets. We characterize the time-series of volatility in emerging markets and explore the distributional foundations of the variance process. Of particular interest is evidence of asymmetries in volatility and the evolution of the variance process after periods of capital market refor...

  15. Volatility in Equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Sizova, Natalia; Tauchen, George

    Stock market volatility clusters in time, carries a risk premium, is fractionally inte- grated, and exhibits asymmetric leverage effects relative to returns. This paper develops a first internally consistent equilibrium based explanation for these longstanding empirical facts. The model is cast......, and the dynamic cross-correlations of the volatility measures with the returns calculated from actual high-frequency intra-day data on the S&P 500 aggregate market and VIX volatility indexes....

  16. THREE-POINT VOLATILITY SMILE CLASSIFICATION: EVIDENCE FROM THE WARSOW STOCK EXCHANGE DURING VOLATILE SUMMER 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Machado, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the behavior of the smile in the Warsaw Stock Exchange (WSE during the volatile summer of 2011.We investigate the volatility smile derived from liquid call and put options on the Polish WIG20 index which option series expired on September 2011. In this period, the polish index has dropped about 20% in two weeks time. By linear interpolation, implied volatilities for moneyness points needed were calculated, then we construct 355 smile curves for calls and puts options to study and make some kind of smile-types classification. We propose seventeen types-smiles which represent all possible cases of three points (three moneynesses graphical patterns. This classification is made basing upon relationship higher/equal/lower values of implied volatility for each of three points. Furthermore, we distinguish the convexity of pattern. We can note that smiles, smirks and ups are convex in shape, while reversed ones and downs are concave functions.

  17. Rapid discrimination of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in liquid samples by using NaOH-sodium dodecyl sulfate solution and flow cytometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Wada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For precise diagnosis of urinary tract infections (UTI, and selection of the appropriate prescriptions for their treatment, we explored a simple and rapid method of discriminating gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria in liquid samples. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We employed the NaOH-sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS solution conventionally used for plasmid extraction from Escherichia coli and the automated urine particle analyzer UF-1000i (Sysmex Corporation for our novel method. The NaOH-SDS solution was used to determine differences in the cell wall structures between gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, since the tolerance to such chemicals reflects the thickness and structural differences of bacterial cell walls. The UF-1000i instrument was used as a quantitative bacterial counter. We found that gram-negative bacteria, including E. coli, in liquid culture could easily be lysed by direct addition of equal volumes of NaOH-SDS solution. In contrast, Enterococcus faecalis, which is a gram-positive bacterium, could not be completely lysed by the solution. We then optimized the reaction time of the NaOH-SDS treatment at room temperature by using 3 gram-positive and 4 gram-negative bacterial strains and determined that the optimum reaction time was 5 min. Finally, in order to evaluate the generalizability of this method, we treated 8 gram-positive strains and 8 gram-negative strains, or 4 gram-positive and 4 gram-negative strains incubated in voluntary urine from healthy volunteers in the same way and demonstrated that all the gram-positive bacteria were discriminated quantitatively from gram negative bacteria using this method. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using our new method, we could easily discriminate gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria in liquid culture media within 10 min. This simple and rapid method may be useful for determining the treatment course of patients with UTIs, especially for those without a prior history

  18. Fast and simple screening for the simultaneous analysis of seven metabolites derived from five volatile organic compounds in human urine using on-line solid-phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Wen-Chieh; Chen, Chao-Yu; Lee, Ting-Chen; Lee, Hui-Ling; Lin, Yu-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the International Agency for Research on cancer classified outdoor air pollution and particulate matter from outdoor air pollution as carcinogenic to humans (IARC Group 1), based on sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in humans and experimental animals and strong mechanistic evidence. In particular, a wide variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are volatized or released into the atmosphere and can become ubiquitous, as they originate from many different natural and anthropogenic sources, such as paints, pesticides, vehicle exhausts, cooking fumes, and tobacco smoke. Humans may be exposed to VOCs through inhalation, ingestion, or dermal contact, which may increase the risk of leukemia, birth defects, neurocognitive impairment, and cancer. Therefore, the focus of this study was the development of a simple, effective and rapid sample preparation method for the simultaneous determination of seven metabolites (6 mercaptic acids+t,t-muconic acid) derived from five VOCs (acrylamide, 1,3-butadiene, acrylonitrile, benzene, and xylene) in human urine by using automated on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) coupled with liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). An aliquot of each diluted urinary sample was directly injected into an autosampler through a trap column to reduce contamination, and then the retained target compounds were eluted by back-flush mode into an analytical column for separation. Negative electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was utilized for quantification. The coefficients of correlation (r(2)) for the calibration curves were greater than 0.995. Reproducibility was assessed by the precision and accuracy of intra-day and inter-day precision, which showed results for coefficient of variation (CV) that were low 0.9 to 6.6% and 3.7 to 8.5%, respectively, and results for recovery that ranged from 90.8 to 108.9% and 92.1 to 107.7%, respectively. The limits of detection (LOD) and limits of

  19. Liquid biofuel production from volatile fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinbusch, K.J.J.

    2010-01-01

    The production of renewable fuels and chemicals reduces the dependency on fossil fuels and limits the increase of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere only if a sustainable feedstock and an energy efficient process are used. The thesis assesses the possibility to use municipal and industrial waste as

  20. Mantle Volatiles - Distribution and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luth, R. W.

    2003-12-01

    Volatiles in the mantle have, for many years, been the subject of intensive study from a number of perspectives. They are of interest because of their potential effects on melting relationships, on transport of major and trace elements, and on the rheological and other physical properties of the mantle. By convention, "volatiles" in this context are constituents that are liquid or gaseous at normal Earth surface conditions. This review will look at the behavior of C-O-H-S-halogen volatiles, beginning with H2O and C-O volatiles.There have been tremendous strides made recently towards understanding how volatiles in general and water in particular is transported and stored in the mantle. This progress is based on research on a number of fronts: studies of mantle-derived samples have provided insight into the nature and occurrence of hydrous phases such as amphibole, mica, and chlorite, and have provided constraints on the capacity of nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) such as olivine, pyroxenes, and garnet to contain "water" by a variety of substitution mechanisms. Experimental studies on mantle-derived magmas have provided constraints on volatile contents in their source regions. Other studies have constrained the pressure, temperature, and composition conditions over which hydrous phases are stable in the mantle.Fundamental questions remain about the geochemical cycling of volatiles in the mantle, and between the mantle and the surface. Much attention has focused on the capability of hydrous phases such as amphibole, mica, serpentine, chlorite, and a family of "dense hydrous magnesian silicates" (DHMSs) to act as carriers of water in subducting slabs back into the mantle. It has been clear since the work of Ito et al. (1983) that there is a discrepancy between the amount of volatiles subducted into the mantle and those returned to the surface by arc magmatism. A recent overview of volatile cycling in subduction systems by Bebout (1996) suggests that 5-15% of the H2

  1. Understanding Financial Market Volatility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Opschoor (Anne)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Volatility has been one of the most active and successful areas of research in time series econometrics and economic forecasting in recent decades. Loosely speaking, volatility is defined as the average magnitude of fluctuations observed in some phenomenon over time. Wi

  2. Improving Garch Volatility Forecasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, F.J.G.M.

    1998-01-01

    Many researchers use GARCH models to generate volatility forecasts. We show, however, that such forecasts are too variable. To correct for this, we extend the GARCH model by distinguishing two regimes with different volatility levels. GARCH effects are allowed within each regime, so that our model

  3. Understanding Financial Market Volatility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Opschoor (Anne)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Volatility has been one of the most active and successful areas of research in time series econometrics and economic forecasting in recent decades. Loosely speaking, volatility is defined as the average magnitude of fluctuations observed in some phenomenon over

  4. Volatile metabolites from actinomycetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholler, C.E.G.; Gurtler, H.; Pedersen, R.

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-six Streptomyces spp. were screened for their volatile production capacity on yeast starch agar. The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were concentrated on a porous polymer throughout an 8-day growth period. VOCs were analyzed by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection and ident...

  5. Synthesis of a new cyclosporine-based stationary phase and separation behaviors toward aromatic positional isomers by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-na; Fan, Jun; Lin, Chun; Zheng, Sheng-run; Zhang, Wei-guang

    2015-04-01

    A new cyclosporine-bonded stationary phase has been synthesized through the Staudinger reaction between azido cyclosporine A (CsA) and aminopropyl silica gel and applied in separations of six disubstituted aromatic analytes by high-performance liquid chromatography. For dimethyl phthalate, nitroaniline and chloronitrobenzene, their positional isomers were well-separated on this CsA stationary phase, in which the separation factor for m-/o-dimethyl phthalates was the biggest. For nitrotoluene, dichlorobenzene and benzenediol, the m-/o-isomers were co-eluted. Then, effects of chromatographic conditions (such as types and content of alcoholic modifiers) on separation of nitroaniline positional isomers have been investigated. Retention behaviors of nitroaniline isomers on the column exhibited the strengthening trend along with increasing carbon number of alcohols, from ethanol to 1-propanol, and to 1-butanol. A similar phenomenon was observed by lowering the content of alcohol.

  6. Idiosyncratic Volatility Puzzle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslanidis, Nektarios; Christiansen, Charlotte; Lambertides, Neophytos;

    from a large pool of macroeconomic and Önancial variables. Cleaning for macro-Önance e§ects reverses the puzzling negative relation between returns and idiosyncratic volatility documented previously. Portfolio analysis shows that the e§ects from macro-Önance factors are economically strong......In this paper, we scrutinize the cross-sectional relation between idiosyncratic volatility and stock returns. As a novelty, the idiosyncratic volatility is obtained by conditioning upon macro-Önance factors as well as upon traditional asset pricing factors. The macro-Önance factors are constructed...

  7. One Hundred False-Positive Amphetamine Specimens Characterized by Liquid Chromatography Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Stephanie J.; Doyle, Kelly; Chang, Annie; Concheiro-Guisan, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Johnson-Davis, Kamisha L.

    2016-01-01

    Some amphetamine (AMP) and ecstacy (MDMA) urine immunoassay (IA) kits are prone to false-positive results due to poor specificity of the antibody. We employed two techniques, high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and an in silico structure search, to identify compounds likely to cause false-positive results. Hundred false-positive IA specimens for AMP and/or MDMA were analyzed by an Agilent 6230 time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. Separately, SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts) was used as an in silico structure search to generate a library of compounds that are known to cross-react with AMP/MDMA IAs. Chemical formulas and exact masses of 145 structures were then compared against masses identified by TOF. Compounds known to have cross-reactivity with the IAs were identified in the structure-based search. The chemical formulas and exact masses of 145 structures (of 20 chemical formulas) were compared against masses identified by TOF. Urine analysis by HRMS correlates accurate mass with chemical formulae, but provides little information regarding compound structure. Structural data of targeted antigens can be utilized to correlate HRMS-derived chemical formulas with structural analogs. PMID:26342055

  8. One Hundred False-Positive Amphetamine Specimens Characterized by Liquid Chromatography Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Stephanie J; Doyle, Kelly; Chang, Annie; Concheiro-Guisan, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A; Johnson-Davis, Kamisha L

    2016-01-01

    Some amphetamine (AMP) and ecstacy (MDMA) urine immunoassay (IA) kits are prone to false-positive results due to poor specificity of the antibody. We employed two techniques, high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and an in silico structure search, to identify compounds likely to cause false-positive results. Hundred false-positive IA specimens for AMP and/or MDMA were analyzed by an Agilent 6230 time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. Separately, SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts) was used as an in silico structure search to generate a library of compounds that are known to cross-react with AMP/MDMA IAs. Chemical formulas and exact masses of 145 structures were then compared against masses identified by TOF. Compounds known to have cross-reactivity with the IAs were identified in the structure-based search. The chemical formulas and exact masses of 145 structures (of 20 chemical formulas) were compared against masses identified by TOF. Urine analysis by HRMS correlates accurate mass with chemical formulae, but provides little information regarding compound structure. Structural data of targeted antigens can be utilized to correlate HRMS-derived chemical formulas with structural analogs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. On guidance and volatility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Billings, M.B.; Jennings, R.; Lev, B.

    2013-01-01

    Survey evidence suggests that managers voluntarily disclose information, particularly earnings guidance, with an aim toward dampening share price volatility. Yet, consultants and influential institutions advise against providing guidance — citing fears of litigation and market penalties associated w

  10. It’s all about volatility of volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grassi, Stefano; Santucci de Magistris, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    for the realized volatility series. It emerges that during the recent financial crisis the relative weight of the daily component dominates over the monthly term. The estimates of the two factor stochastic volatility model suggest that the change in the dynamic structure of the realized volatility during...... the financial crisis is due to the increase in the volatility of the persistent volatility term. A set of Monte Carlo simulations highlights the robustness of the methodology adopted in tracking the dynamics of the parameters....

  11. Non-volatile memories

    CERN Document Server

    Lacaze, Pierre-Camille

    2014-01-01

    Written for scientists, researchers, and engineers, Non-volatile Memories describes the recent research and implementations in relation to the design of a new generation of non-volatile electronic memories. The objective is to replace existing memories (DRAM, SRAM, EEPROM, Flash, etc.) with a universal memory model likely to reach better performances than the current types of memory: extremely high commutation speeds, high implantation densities and retention time of information of about ten years.

  12. 凉液垫在手术体位摆放中的应用%Application of cool liquid cushion in operative position placement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雪清; 左育涛; 刘燕梅; 刘金秀

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To probe into the application effect of cool liquid cushion in the placement of operation po-sition.Methods:Each 60 cases of patients were selected whose surgical positions in operating room in our hospi-tal were respectively supine position,lateral position,lithotomy position,prone position and the placed time more than 4 hours,a total of 240 cases.They were randomly divided into control group and experimental group, 120 cases in each.The patients in control group were treated by routine methods to put the operation position, and the conventional cushion protection was given in compressed sponge.In experimental group,different speci-fications of cool liquid cushion was placed in pressure areas to protect,then to compare the pressure ulcer condi-tions and required physiological bending in posture compliance between two groups of patients.Results:The in-cidence of pressure sores in experimental group patients was lower than that in control group,the compliance rate of physiological curve required for position was higher than that in control group,and there was statistically significant difference (P<0.05).Conclusion:The cool liquid cushion applied for protecting pressured parts in position placement of operation patients can reded the incidence of pressure sore and increase the compliance rate of patient’s posture physiology bending and improve patients’comfort.%[目的]探讨凉液垫在手术体位摆放中的应用效果。[方法]选取在我院手术室手术体位分别是仰卧位、侧卧位、截石位、俯卧位且摆放时间超过4 h的病人各60例,共240例,随机分为对照组和试验组各120例。对照组按常规方法摆放手术体位,受压处常规给予海绵垫保护;试验组应用不同规格的凉液垫放置在受压部位进行保护,比较两组病人压疮发生情况及体位所需的生理弯曲符合情况。[结果]试验组病人压疮发生率低于对照组,体位所需的生理弯曲符合率高

  13. The multivariate supOU stochastic volatility model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole; Stelzer, Robert

    structure of the volatility, the log returns, as well as their "squares" are discussed in detail. Moreover, we give several examples in which long memory effects occur and study how the model as well as the simple Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type stochastic volatility model behave under linear transformations......Using positive semidefinite supOU (superposition of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type) processes to describe the volatility, we introduce a multivariate stochastic volatility model for financial data which is capable of modelling long range dependence effects. The finiteness of moments and the second order...

  14. Theoretical and experimental investigation into the explosive boiling potential of thermally stratified liquid-liquid systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabiano, B.; Kersten, R.J.A.; Opschoor, G.; Pastorino, R.

    2002-01-01

    The occurrence of a rapid phase transition, or so-called explosive boiling, when a cold volatile liquid comes into contact with a hot liquid or hot surface is a potential hazard in industry. This study was focused on the explosive boiling potential of thermally stratified liquid-liquid systems that

  15. A comparative study between conventional and liquid-based cytology in screening for anal intraepithelial lesions in HIV-positive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Livia Bravo; Marinho, Larissa Cardoso; Wanderley Paes Barbosa, Tania; Batalha Filho, Eronides Salustiano; Ribeiro Velasco, Lara Franciele; Garcia Costa, Patrícia Godoy; Carneiro, Fabiana Pirani; de Oliveira, Paulo Gonçalves

    2014-10-01

    Anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) is associated with HPV infection and can be detected by cytological screening. While conventional exfoliative cytology (CC) is a low-cost and nonaggressive method, liquid-based cytology (LBC) tends to give clearer readings. Although studies of the efficacy of anal cancer screening methods would be of great importance for groups at high risk for AIN, few such studies have been conducted. The aim of the present study was to assess the concordance of CC and LBC in diagnosing anal pre-neoplastic lesions, and to compare cytological results with anoscopy, histopathological, and molecular biology findings. Comparative study involving 33 HIV-positive patients, who underwent anoscopy and biopsy of suspected lesions. Concordance between the two cytology methods was calculated, as were the associations between cytology results and findings from other screening methods. A total of 54.5% of cases were considered AIN-negative by CC and LBC, and concordance between the two methods was statistically significant (P liquid-based cytology are equally effective in screening for anal preneoplastic lesions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Oil and stock market volatility: A multivariate stochastic volatility perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vo, Minh, E-mail: minh.vo@metrostate.edu

    2011-09-15

    This paper models the volatility of stock and oil futures markets using the multivariate stochastic volatility structure in an attempt to extract information intertwined in both markets for risk prediction. It offers four major findings. First, the stock and oil futures prices are inter-related. Their correlation follows a time-varying dynamic process and tends to increase when the markets are more volatile. Second, conditioned on the past information, the volatility in each market is very persistent, i.e., it varies in a predictable manner. Third, there is inter-market dependence in volatility. Innovations that hit either market can affect the volatility in the other market. In other words, conditioned on the persistence and the past volatility in their respective markets, the past volatility of the stock (oil futures) market also has predictive power over the future volatility of the oil futures (stock) market. Finally, the model produces more accurate Value-at-Risk estimates than other benchmarks commonly used in the financial industry. - Research Highlights: > This paper models the volatility of stock and oil futures markets using the multivariate stochastic volatility model. > The correlation between the two markets follows a time-varying dynamic process which tends to increase when the markets are more volatile. > The volatility in each market is very persistent. > Innovations that hit either market can affect the volatility in the other market. > The model produces more accurate Value-at-Risk estimates than other benchmarks commonly used in the financial industry.

  17. Rapid confirmation of enzyme multiplied immunoassay technique (EMIT) cocaine positive urine samples by capillary gas-liquid chromatography/nitrogen phosphorus detection (GLC/NPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verebey, K; DePace, A

    1989-01-01

    A rapid gas-liquid chromatographic (GLC) method was developed for the confirmation of benzoylecgonine (BE) positive urine samples screened by the enzyme multiplied immunoassay technique (EMIT) assay. The procedure is performed by solvent extraction of BE from 0.1 or 0.2 mL of urine, followed by an aqueous wash of the solvent and evaporation. The dried residue was derivatized with 50 microL of pentafluoropropionic anhydride and 25 microL of pentafluoropropropanol at 90 degrees C for 15 min. The derivatizing reagents were evaporated to dryness, and the derivatized BE, and cocaine if present, were reconstituted and injected into the gas chromatograph. The column was a 15-m by 0.2-mm fused silica capillary column, coated with 0.25 micron of DB-1, terminating in a nitrogen phosphorus detector (NPD). Cocaine and the pentafluoro BE derivatives retention times were 3.2 and 2.6 min, respectively. Nalorphine was used as reference or internal standard with a retention time of 4.78 min. The complete procedure can be performed in approximately 1.5 h. The EMIT cutoff between positive and negative urine samples is 300 ng/mL of BE. The lower limit of sensitivity of this method is 25 ng of BE extracted from urine. Validation studies resulted in confirmation of 101 out of 121 EMIT cocaine positive urine samples that could not be confirmed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC). This represents 84% confirmation efficiency.

  18. A Big Data Approach to Analyzing Market Volatility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Kesheng; Bethel, E. Wes; Gu, Ming; Leinweber, David; Ruebel, Oliver

    2013-06-05

    Understanding the microstructure of the financial market requires the processing of a vast amount of data related to individual trades, and sometimes even multiple levels of quotes. Analyzing such a large volume of data requires tremendous computing power that is not easily available to financial academics and regulators. Fortunately, public funded High Performance Computing (HPC) power is widely available at the National Laboratories in the US. In this paper we demonstrate that the HPC resource and the techniques for data-intensive sciences can be used to greatly accelerate the computation of an early warning indicator called Volume-synchronized Probability of Informed trading (VPIN). The test data used in this study contains five and a half year?s worth of trading data for about 100 most liquid futures contracts, includes about 3 billion trades, and takes 140GB as text files. By using (1) a more efficient file format for storing the trading records, (2) more effective data structures and algorithms, and (3) parallelizing the computations, we are able to explore 16,000 different ways of computing VPIN in less than 20 hours on a 32-core IBM DataPlex machine. Our test demonstrates that a modest computer is sufficient to monitor a vast number of trading activities in real-time ? an ability that could be valuable to regulators. Our test results also confirm that VPIN is a strong predictor of liquidity-induced volatility. With appropriate parameter choices, the false positive rates are about 7percent averaged over all the futures contracts in the test data set. More specifically, when VPIN values rise above a threshold (CDF > 0.99), the volatility in the subsequent time windows is higher than the average in 93percent of the cases.

  19. Volatiles Which Increase Magma Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S.

    2015-12-01

    The standard model of an erupting volcano is one in which the viscosity of a decompressing magma increases as the volatiles leave the melt structure to form bubbles. It has now been observed that the addition of the "volatiles" P, Cl and F result in an increase in silicate melt viscosity. This observation would mean that the viscosity of selected degassing magmas would decrease rather than increase. Here we look at P, Cl and F as three volatiles which increase viscosity through different structural mechanisms. In all three cases the volatiles increase the viscosity of peralkaline composition melts, but appear to always decrease the viscosity of peraluminous melts. Phosphorus causes the melt to unmix into a Na-P rich phase and a Na-poor silicate phase. Thus as the network modifying Na (or Ca) are removed to the phosphorus-rich melt, the matrix melt viscosity increases. With increasing amounts of added phosphorus (at network modifying Na ~ P) the addition of further phosphorus causes a decrease in viscosity. The addition of chlorine to Fe-free aluminosilicate melts results in an increase in viscosity. NMR data on these glass indicates that the chlorine sits in salt-like structures surrounded by Na and/or Ca. Such structures would remove network-modifying atoms from the melt structure and thus result in an increase in viscosity. The NMR spectra of fluorine-bearing glasses shows that F takes up at least 5 different structural positions in peralkaline composition melts. Three of these positions should result in a decrease in viscosity due to the removal of bridging oxygens. Two of the structural positons of F, however, should result in an increase in viscosity as they require the removal of network-modifying atoms from the melt structure (with one of the structures being that observed for Cl). This would imply that increasing amounts of F might result in an increase in viscosity. This proposed increase in viscosity with increasing F has now been experimentally confirmed.

  20. Understanding Interest Rate Volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volker, Desi

    This thesis is the result of my Ph.D. studies at the Department of Finance of the Copenhagen Business School. It consists of three essays covering topics related to the term structure of interest rates, monetary policy and interest rate volatility. The rst essay, \\Monetary Policy Uncertainty...... and Interest Rates", examines the role of monetary policy uncertainty on the term structure of interest rates. The second essay, \\A Regime-Switching A ne Term Structure Model with Stochastic Volatility" (co-authored with Sebastian Fux), investigates the ability of the class of regime switching models...... with and without stochastic volatility to capture the main stylized features of U.S. interest rates. The third essay, \\Variance Risk Premia in the Interest Rate Swap Market", investigates the time-series and cross-sectional properties of the compensation demanded for holding interest rate variance risk. The essays...

  1. Volatiles in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Pontoppidan, Klaus M; Bergin, Edwin A; Brittain, Sean; Marty, Bernard; Mousis, Olvier; Oberg, Karin L

    2014-01-01

    Volatiles are compounds with low sublimation temperatures, and they make up most of the condensible mass in typical planet-forming environments. They consist of relatively small, often hydrogenated, molecules based on the abundant elements carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. Volatiles are central to the process of planet formation, forming the backbone of a rich chemistry that sets the initial conditions for the formation of planetary atmospheres, and act as a solid mass reservoir catalyzing the formation of planets and planetesimals. This growth has been driven by rapid advances in observations and models of protoplanetary disks, and by a deepening understanding of the cosmochemistry of the solar system. Indeed, it is only in the past few years that representative samples of molecules have been discovered in great abundance throughout protoplanetary disks - enough to begin building a complete budget for the most abundant elements after hydrogen and helium. The spatial distributions of key volatiles are being mapped...

  2. Stochastic volatility selected readings

    CERN Document Server

    Shephard, Neil

    2005-01-01

    Neil Shephard has brought together a set of classic and central papers that have contributed to our understanding of financial volatility. They cover stocks, bonds and currencies and range from 1973 up to 2001. Shephard, a leading researcher in the field, provides a substantial introduction in which he discusses all major issues involved. General Introduction N. Shephard. Part I: Model Building. 1. A Subordinated Stochastic Process Model with Finite Variance for Speculative Prices, (P. K. Clark). 2. Financial Returns Modelled by the Product of Two Stochastic Processes: A Study of Daily Sugar Prices, 1961-7, S. J. Taylor. 3. The Behavior of Random Variables with Nonstationary Variance and the Distribution of Security Prices, B. Rosenberg. 4. The Pricing of Options on Assets with Stochastic Volatilities, J. Hull and A. White. 5. The Dynamics of Exchange Rate Volatility: A Multivariate Latent Factor ARCH Model, F. X. Diebold and M. Nerlove. 6. Multivariate Stochastic Variance Models. 7. Stochastic Autoregressive...

  3. Volatility jumps and their economic determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caporin, Massimiliano; Rossi, Eduardo; Santucci de Magistris, Paolo

    that there is a positive probability of jumps in volatility. A common factor in the volatility jumps is shown to be related to a set of financial covariates (such as variance risk premium, S&P500 volume, credit-default swap, and federal fund rates). The credit-default swap on US banks and variance risk premium have...... predictive power on expected jump moves, thus confirming the common interpretation that sudden and large increases in equity volatility can be anticipated by credit deterioration of the US bank sector as well as changes in the market expectations of future risks. Finally, the model is extended to incorporate...... the credit-default swap and the variance risk premium in the dynamics of the jump size and intensity....

  4. Volatility transmission and volatility impulse response functions in European electricity forward markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pen, Yannick [Institut d' Economie et de Management de Nantes - IAE, Universite de Nantes, Chemin de la Censive du Tertre, BP 52231, 44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Sevi, Benoit [Universite d' Angers (GRANEM), Faculte de Droit, Economie et Gestion, Universite d' Angers, 13 allee Francois Mitterrand, BP 13633, 49036 Angers cedex 01 (France)

    2010-07-15

    Using daily data from March 2001 to June 2005, we estimate a VAR-BEKK model and find evidence of return and volatility spillovers between the German, the Dutch and the British forward electricity markets. We apply Hafner and Herwartz [2006, Journal of International Money and Finance 25, 719-740] Volatility Impulse Response Function (VIRF) to quantify the impact of shock on expected conditional volatility. We observe that a shock has a high positive impact only if its size is large compared to the current level of volatility. The impact of shocks are usually not persistent, which may be a consequence of the non-storability of power. Finally, we estimate the density of the VIRF at different forecast horizons. These fitted distributions are asymmetric and show that large increases in expected conditional volatilities are possible even if their probability is low. These results have interesting implications for market participants whose risk management policy depends on option prices which themselves depend on the characteristics of volatility. (author)

  5. Stock markets liberalization affects volatility?

    OpenAIRE

    Ioan Alin NISTOR; Maria-Lenuţa CIUPAC-ULICI; GHERMAN Mircea-Cristian

    2012-01-01

    Regarding the impact of liberalization, the results show that, in general, market opening is accompanied by a significant increase in market volatility. In particular, volatility tends to decrease due to large capital inflows and domestic growth.The study analyzes the impact of stock market liberalization on volatility in six emerging stock markets by using GARCH methodology. Theory on the effects of financial liberalization on volatility has been ambiguous, and empirical work has yielded con...

  6. The exploitation of volatile oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Teng; ZHANG Da; TENG Xiangjin; LINing; HAO Zaibin

    2007-01-01

    Rose is a kind of favorite ornamental plant. This article briefly introduced the cultivation and the use of rose around the world both in ancient time and nowadays. Today, volatile oil becomes the mainstream of the rose industry. People pay attention to the effect of volatile oil; meanwhile, they speed up their research on extracting volatile oil and the ingredients.

  7. Plant volatiles and the environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loreto, F.; Dicke, M.; Schnitzler, J.P.; Turlings, T.C.J.

    2014-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds emitted by plants represent the largest part of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) released into our atmosphere. Plant volatiles are formed through many biochemical pathways, constitutively and after stress induction. In recent years, our understanding of the func

  8. Latent Integrated Stochastic Volatility, Realized Volatility, and Implied Volatility: A State Space Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Christian; Christensen, Bent Jesper

    We include simultaneously both realized volatility measures based on high-frequency asset returns and implied volatilities backed out of individual traded at the money option prices in a state space approach to the analysis of true underlying volatility. We model integrated volatility as a latent...... fi…rst order Markov process and show that our model is closely related to the CEV and Barndorff-Nielsen & Shephard (2001) models for local volatility. We show that if measurement noise in the observable volatility proxies is not accounted for, then the estimated autoregressive parameter in the latent...... process is downward biased. Implied volatility performs better than any of the alternative realized measures when forecasting future integrated volatility. The results are largely similar across the stock market (S&P 500), bond market (30-year U.S. T-bond), and foreign currency exchange market ($/£ )....

  9. Positive effect of reduced aeration rate on growth and stereospecificity of DL-malic acid consumption by Azospirillum brasilense: improving the shelf life of a liquid inoculant formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Espinosa, Karen; García-Cabrera, Ramsés I; Bedoya-López, Andrea; Trujillo-Roldán, Mauricio A; Valdez-Cruz, Norma A

    2015-02-10

    Azospirillum brasilense has significance as a growth promoter in plants of commercial interest. Two industrial native strains (Start and Calf), used as a part of an inoculant formulation in Mexico during the last 15 years, were incubated in laboratory-scale pneumatic bioreactors at different aeration rates. In both strains, the positive effect of decreased aeration was observed. At the lowest (0.1 vvm, air volume/liquid volume×minute), the highest biomass were obtained for Calf (7.8 × 10(10)CFU/ml), and Start (2.9 × 10(9)CFU/ml). These were higher in one magnitude order compared to cultures carried out at 0.5 vvm, and two compared to those at 1.0 vvm. At lower aeration, both stereoisomeric forms of malic acid were consumed, but at higher aeration, just L-malate was consumed. A reduction in aeration allows an increase of the shelf life and the microorganism saved higher concentrations of polyhydroxybutyrate. The selected fermentation conditions are closely related to those prevalent in large-scale bioreactors and offer the possibility of achieving high biomass titles with high shelf life at a reduced costs, due to the complete use of a carbon source at low aeration of a low cost raw material as DL-malic acid mixture in comparison with the L-malic acid stereoisomer.

  10. Increasing the isolated quantities and purities of volatile compounds by using a triple Deans-switch multidimensional preparative gas chromatographic system with an apolar-wax-ionic liquid stationary-phase combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciarrone, Danilo; Pantò, Sebastiano; Ragonese, Carla; Tranchida, Peter Quinto; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2012-08-21

    A novel preparative-scale triple gas chromatographic system, equipped with three Deans-switch devices, is herein described. The isolation of volatile compounds was achieved by using a lab-made collection system. Considerations are made on the possibility to inject high volumes of neat sample, maintaining, at the same time, high resolution levels. The degree of recovery of a series of compounds, characterized by a differing volatility, is also reported. In this respect, different collection conditions were evaluated, namely, the presence (or not) of packing material as well as CO(2) cooling, in various combinations. Finally, the interconnected features, that is time requirements and the isolation of "acceptable" analyte quantities (e.g., milligram level for NMR characterization), are related to parameters such as analyte concentration, injected volume, collection conditions, and number of GC runs. The results herein reported will demonstrate the need for a high-resolution GC step, prior to analyte collection, in the prep-GC analysis of complex samples.

  11. Isolation and quantification of volatiles in fish by dynamic headspace sampling and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Hanne; Haahr, Anne-Mette; Jensen, Benny

    1999-01-01

    determined by use of this sample preparation method and for samples chewed for 10 s. Effects of sampling time, temperature, and purge flow on level of volatiles were tested. Purging at 340 mL/min for 30 min at 45 degrees C was found to be optimal. Detection Emits for a number of aldehydes were 0.2-2.7 mu g......A dynamic headspace sampling method for isolation of volatiles in fish has been developed. The sample preparation involved freezing of fish tissue in liquid nitrogen, pulverizing the tissue, and sampling of volatiles from an aqueous slurry of the fish powder. Similar volatile patterns were...

  12. Scaling Foreign Exchange Volatility

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan Batten; Craig Ellis

    2001-01-01

    When asset returns are normally distributed the risk of an asset over a long return interval may be estimated by scaling the risk from shorter return intervals. While it is well known that asset returns are not normally distributed a key empirical question concerns the effect that scaling the volatility of dependent processes will have on the pricing of related financial assets. This study provides an insight into this issue by investigating the return properties of the most important currenc...

  13. Highly sensitive derivatization reagents possessing positively charged structures for the determination of oligosaccharides in glycoproteins by high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Jun Zhe; Nagai, Keisuke; Shi, Qing; Zhou, Wenjun; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Inoue, Koichi; Lee, Yong-Ill; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2016-09-23

    We have developed three kinds of novel derivatization reagents (4-CEBTPP, 4-CBBTPP, 5-COTPP) with triphenylphosphine (TPP) as a basic structure carrying a permanent positive charge for resolution of the oligosaccharides in glycoprotein using high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). The synthesized reagents reacted with the sialylglycosylamine of the sialylglycopeptide after treatment by PNGase F. The final derivatives were analyzed by ESI-MS and sensitively detected in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. Furthermore, the limits of detection (S/N=3) on the SRM chromatograms were at the fmol level (30fmol). Therefore, we used the limit of detection of the reagent products detected by the SRM and evaluated the utility of each reagent. Among the reagents, the positively charged 4-CEBTPP derivative's peak area was the highest; 4-CEBTPP with a positively charged structure showed about a 20 times greater sensitivity for the glycosylamine of the SGP product compared to the conventional fluorescence reagent, Fmoc-Cl. In addition, various fragment ions based on the carbohydrate units also appeared in the MS/MS spectra. Among the fragment ions, m/z 627.37 (CE=40eV) corresponding to 4-CEBTPP-GlcNAc and m/z 120.09 (CE=100eV) corresponding to 4-CEBTPP are the most important ones for identifying the oligosaccharide. 4-CEBTPP-SGA was easily identified by the selected-ion chromatogram in the product ion scan (m/z 120.09) and in the precursor ion scan (m/z 627.37) by MS/MS detection. The derivatized analytes have a high ionization efficiency and they are detected with a high sensitivity in the electrospray ionization. The novel derivatization reagent with a multi-function provided a higher sensitivity for the oligosaccharide analysis, as well as a better specificity and feasibility. Furthermore, several oligosaccharides in fetuin and ribonuclease B were successfully identified by the proposed procedure.

  14. [Screening and identification of an endophytic fungus from Atractylodes lancea which utilizes volatile oil selectively].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Liu, Fu-yan; Ren, Cheng-gang; Dai, Chuan-chao

    2012-10-01

    In order to transform main active ingredient of volatile oil, endophytic fungi were screened from the root of Atractylodes lancea. Transformation method was used in vitro. The changes of volatile oil were traced by gas chromatography. One endophytic fungus (strain ALG-13) which could uitilize volatile oil selectively was screened. Single factor experiment were conducted for exploring the effects of various factors that including kinds of carbon source, speed, liquid volume, pH and concentration of plant tissue on degradation by this strain. Subsequently, the main affecting factors carbon source, speed, pH and liquid volume were optimized using orthogonal array design. Results showed that endophytic fungus ALG-13 selectively used the volatile oil, change the relative percentage of the main components of volatile oil, Atractylon and Atractydin were increased, While, beta-eudesmol and Atractylol decreased. After selectively degradation by fungus, volatile oil components percentage were closer to the geo-herbs. Strain ALG-13 was identified as Bionectria ochroleuca according to its morphological characteristics and systematic analysis of ITS sequence. The optimal conditions were as follows: sucrose used as carbon source, rotating speed was 200 r x min(-1), initial pH for medium was 4.5, 50 mL liquid was added in 250 mL flask. The endophytic fungus ALG-13 could degrade the volatile oil selectively, which was benefit for forming geoherbs A. lancea volatile oil composition.

  15. Determination of non-volatile and volatile organic acids in Korean traditional fermented soybean paste (Doenjang).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Shruti; Choi, Tae Bong; Park, Hae-Kyong; Kim, Myunghee; Lee, In Koo; Kim, Jong-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    Organic acids are formed in food as a result of metabolism of large molecular mass compounds. These organic acids play an important role in the taste and aroma of fermented food products. Doenjang is a traditional Korean fermented soybean paste product that provides a major source of protein. The quantitative data for volatile and non-volatile organic acid contents of 18 samples of Doenjang were determined by comparing the abundances of each peak by gas (GC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The mean values of volatile organic acids (acetic acid, butyric acid, propionic acid and 3-methyl butanoic acid), determined in 18 Doenjang samples, were found to be 91.73, 29.54, 70.07 and 19.80 mg%, respectively, whereas the mean values of non-volatile organic acids, such as oxalic acid, citric acid, lactic acid and succinic acid, were noted to be 14.69, 5.56, 9.95 and 0.21 mg%, respectively. Malonic and glutaric acids were absent in all the tested samples of Doenjang. The findings of this study suggest that determination of organic acid contents by GC and HPLC can be considered as an affective approach to evaluate the quality characteristics of fermented food products.

  16. Volatilization of zinc and lead in direct recycling of stainless steel making dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Ji(彭及); PENG Bing(彭兵); YU Di(余笛); TANG Mo-tang(唐谟堂); J.Lobel; J.A.Kozinski

    2004-01-01

    The volatilization of zinc and lead from the stainless steel making dust pellets in the direct recycling procedure was conducted by using a thermo-gravimetric analyzer and a Tamman furnace in the nitrogen atmosphere respectively. The results show that the temperature has a significant effect on the volatilization rates of zinc and lead,and the carbon content in the pellets has no effect on the volatilization process. The volatilization of zinc is controlled by the chemical reaction between zinc oxide and carbon monoxide, while the volatilization of lead is controlled by the evaporation front liquid phase to the atmosphere. The volatilization of zinc and lead mainly happen at about 1 000 ℃according to non-isothermal experiment.

  17. Effect on microorganisms of volatile compounds released from germinating seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, S; Stotzky, G

    1975-10-01

    Volatile compounds evolved from germinating seeds of slash pine, bean, cabbage, corn, cucumber, and pea were evaluated for their ability to support growth of microorganisms in liquid mineral salts media lacking a carbon source. Growth of eight bacteria was measured turbidimetrically and of six fungi as dry weight of mycelium. Volatiles caused increased growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens, Bacillus cereus, Erwinia carotovora, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, A. radiobacter, Rhizobium japonicum, Mucor mucedo, Fusarium oxysporum f. conglutinans, Trichoderma viride, and Penicillium vermiculatum but not of Sarcina lutea, Serratia marcescens, Chaetomium globosum, or Schizophyllum commune. Spores of Trichoderma viride showed higher germination in the presence of volatiles. Effects on growth were apparent only during the first 3 or 4 days after planting the seeds. Killed or dried seeds had no effect. The volatiles did not support microbial growth in the absence of nitrogen nor did they supply growth factors. Passing volatiles through KMnO4 or hydrazone reduced growth of the bacteria, indicating that oxidizable organic compounds, primarily aldehydes, were the active components. The volatiles were not absorbed by sterile soil, clay minerals, or water, but they were absorbed by non-steril soil and activated charcoal.

  18. Option Pricing using Realized Volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stentoft, Lars Peter

    In the present paper we suggest to model Realized Volatility, an estimate of daily volatility based on high frequency data, as an Inverse Gaussian distributed variable with time varying mean, and we examine the joint properties of Realized Volatility and asset returns. We derive the appropriate...... benchmark model estimated on return data alone. Hence the paper provides evidence on the value of using high frequency data for option pricing purposes....

  19. Option Pricing using Realized Volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stentoft, Lars Peter

    In the present paper we suggest to model Realized Volatility, an estimate of daily volatility based on high frequency data, as an Inverse Gaussian distributed variable with time varying mean, and we examine the joint properties of Realized Volatility and asset returns. We derive the appropriate d...... benchmark model estimated on return data alone. Hence the paper provides evidence on the value of using high frequency data for option pricing purposes....

  20. Liquids and liquid mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Rowlinson, J S; Baldwin, J E; Buckingham, A D; Danishefsky, S

    2013-01-01

    Liquids and Liquid Mixtures, Third Edition explores the equilibrium properties of liquids and liquid mixtures and relates them to the properties of the constituent molecules using the methods of statistical thermodynamics. Topics covered include the critical state, fluid mixtures at high pressures, and the statistical thermodynamics of fluids and mixtures. This book consists of eight chapters and begins with an overview of the liquid state and the thermodynamic properties of liquids and liquid mixtures, including vapor pressure and heat capacities. The discussion then turns to the thermodynami

  1. Establishment of a thermogravimetry/differential thermal analysis-Cambridge filter-absorption bottle trapping unit-high performance liquid chromatography and its applicaton in volatile phenols%热重逸出气中挥发酚类物质的剑桥滤片-吸收瓶捕集和HPLC测定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢岚; 杨柳; 吴亿勤; 杨继; 孟昭宇; 牟定荣

    2012-01-01

    建立了热重/差热分析(TG/DTA)-剑桥滤片-吸收瓶捕集-高效液相色谱(HPLC)联用装置,将该联用装置应用于热重逸出气体中七种挥发酚物质的定量研究,并验证了其可靠性.首先在10℃/min升温速率、300mL/min的氮气流量下对烟丝进行热失重分析,根据TG和DTG曲线得到其主要热失重区间为室温~ 600℃之间,然后采用剑桥滤片-吸收瓶对该温度区间内逸出气体中的七种挥发酚物质捕集,用HPLC进行定性和定量分析.结果表明,联用装置中剑桥滤片和吸收瓶两种不同的捕集方式有选择性地捕集了逸出气体中的挥发酚物质,剑桥滤片更利于对-苯二酚、间-苯二酚、邻-苯二酚的捕集,而吸收液更利于苯酚、间,对-甲酚、邻-甲酚的捕集;同样条件下热重逸出气体中的酚类物质含量不同,苯酚和对-苯二酚的含量较高,分别为1.858、1.675mg/g;间-苯二酚的含量最低,为0.032mg/g.5次平行实验得到各挥发酚物质生成量的相对标准偏差(RSD)均在10%以内,由此验证了该联用装置的可靠性,可用于程序升温下样品裂解逸出气体中挥发酚物质的定量研究.%A new combination system of therrnogravimetry/differential thermal analysis(TG/DTA)-Cambridge filter-absorption bottle trapping unit-high performance liquid chromatography(HPLC)was established and applied to analysis the seven volatile phenols in evolved pyrolysis products and the reliability of the new system. Firstly,the main weight loss temperature(MWLT)of pipe tobacco was obtained according to the TG and DTG curves at 10 t/min heating rate and 300 mL/min of nitrogen flow,which was from room temperature to 600% , then the seven volatile phenols was trapped and analysed qualitatively and quantitatively using the combination system in MWLT. Results indicated that volatile phenols in evolved gas was trapped selectively by the two different trapping ways,Cambridge filter was more inclined to trap

  2. Volatile signals during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaglio, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Scents play a key role in mediating reproductive interactions in many vertebrates including mammals. Nowadays, several studies indicate that humans seem to use remarkably olfactory communication and are even able to produce and perceive pheromones. Furthermore, over the past several years, it became increasingly clear that pheromone-like chemical signals probably play a role in offspring identification and mother recognition. Recently developed technical procedures (solid-phase microextraction and dynamic headspace extraction) now allow investigators to characterize volatile compounds with high reliability. We analyzed the volatile compounds in sweat patch samples collected from the para-axillary and nipple-areola regions of women during pregnancy and after childbirth. We hypothesized that, at the time of birth and during the first weeks of life, the distinctive olfactory pattern of the para-axillary area is probably useful to newborn babies for recognizing and distinguishing their own mother, whereas the characteristic pattern of the nipple-areola region is probably useful as a guide to nourishment.

  3. Molecular plant volatile communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holopainen, Jarmo K; Blande, James D

    2012-01-01

    Plants produce a wide array of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which have multiple functions as internal plant hormones (e.g., ethylene, methyl jasmonate and methyl salicylate), in communication with conspecific and heterospecific plants and in communication with organisms of second (herbivores and pollinators) and third (enemies of herbivores) trophic levels. Species specific VOCs normally repel polyphagous herbivores and those specialised on other plant species, but may attract specialist herbivores and their natural enemies, which use VOCs as host location cues. Attraction of predators and parasitoids by VOCs is considered an evolved indirect defence, whereby plants are able to indirectly reduce biotic stress caused by damaging herbivores. In this chapter we review these interactions where VOCs are known to play a crucial role. We then discuss the importance of volatile communication in self and nonself detection. VOCs are suggested to appear in soil ecosystems where distinction of own roots from neighbours roots is essential to optimise root growth, but limited evidence of above-ground plant self-recognition is available.

  4. Core-Mantle Partitioning of Volatile Siderophile Elements and the Origin of Volatile Elements in the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickodem, K.; Righter, K.; Danielson, L.; Pando, K.; Lee, C.

    2012-01-01

    There are currently several hypotheses on the origin of volatile siderophile elements in the Earth. One hypothesis is that they were added during Earth s accretion and core formation and mobilized into the metallic core [1], others claim multiple stage origin [2], while some hypothesize that volatiles were added after the core already formed [3]. Several volatile siderophile elements are depleted in Earth s mantle relative to the chondrites, something which continues to puzzle many scientists. This depletion is likely due to a combination of volatility and core formation. The Earth s core is composed of Fe and some lighter constituents, although the abundances of these lighter elements are unknown [4]. Si is one of these potential light elements [5] although few studies have analyzed the effect of Si on metal-silicate partitioning, in particular the volatile elements. As, In, Ge, and Sb are trace volatile siderophile elements which are depleted in the mantle but have yet to be extensively studied. The metal-silicate partition coefficients of these elements will be measured to determine the effect of Si. Partition coefficients depend on temperature, pressure, oxygen fugacity, and metal and silicate composition and can constrain the concentrations of volatile, siderophile elements found in the mantle. Reported here are the results from 13 experiments examining the partitioning of As, In, Ge, and Sb between metallic and silicate liquid. These experiments will examine the effect of temperature, and metal-composition (i.e., Si content) on these elements in or-der to gain a greater understanding of the core-mantle separation which occurred during the Earth s early stages. The data can then be applied to the origin of volatile elements in the Earth.

  5. Ionic liquids in tribology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Ichiro

    2009-06-24

    Current research on room-temperature ionic liquids as lubricants is described. Ionic liquids possess excellent properties such as non-volatility, non-flammability, and thermo-oxidative stability. The potential use of ionic liquids as lubricants was first proposed in 2001 and approximately 70 articles pertaining to fundamental research on ionic liquids have been published through May 2009. A large majority of the cations examined in this area are derived from 1,3-dialkylimidazolium, with a higher alkyl group on the imidazolium cation being beneficial for good lubrication, while it reduces the thermo-oxidative stability. Hydrophobic anions provide both good lubricity and significant thermo-oxidative stability. The anions decompose through a tribochemical reaction to generate metal fluoride on the rubbed surface. Additive technology to improve lubricity is also explained. An introduction to tribology as an interdisciplinary field of lubrication is also provided.

  6. Ionic Liquids in Tribology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Minami

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Current research on room-temperature ionic liquids as lubricants is described. Ionic liquids possess excellent properties such as non-volatility, non-flammability, and thermo-oxidative stability. The potential use of ionic liquids as lubricants was first proposed in 2001 and approximately 70 articles pertaining to fundamental research on ionic liquids have been published through May 2009. A large majority of the cations examined in this area are derived from 1,3-dialkylimidazolium, with a higher alkyl group on the imidazolium cation being beneficial for good lubrication, while it reduces the thermo-oxidative stability. Hydrophobic anions provide both good lubricity and significant thermo-oxidative stability. The anions decompose through a tribochemical reaction to generate metal fluoride on the rubbed surface. Additive technology to improve lubricity is also explained. An introduction to tribology as an interdisciplinary field of lubrication is also provided.

  7. Consistent ranking of volatility models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Reinhard; Lunde, Asger

    2006-01-01

    We show that the empirical ranking of volatility models can be inconsistent for the true ranking if the evaluation is based on a proxy for the population measure of volatility. For example, the substitution of a squared return for the conditional variance in the evaluation of ARCH-type models can...

  8. Political institutions and economic volatility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, Jeroen; de Haan, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    We examine the effect of political 'institutions' on economic growth volatility, using data from more than 100 countries over the period 1960 to 2005, taking into account various control variables as suggested in previous studies. Our indicator of volatility is the relative standard deviation of the

  9. Solvent desorption dynamic headspace sampling of fermented dairy product volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, S A

    2001-01-01

    A method was developed based on solvent desorption dynamic headspace analysis for the identification and relative quantification of volatiles significant to the study of fermented dairy product aroma. Descriptions of applications of this method are presented including the measurement of diacetyl and acetoin in fermented milk, the evaluation of volatile-hydrocolloid interactions in dairy-based matrices, and the identification of volatiles in cheeses for canonical discriminative analysis. Advantages of this method include rapid analysis, minimal equipment investment, and the ability to analyze samples with traditional GC split/splitless inlet systems. Limitations of this method are that the sample must be in the liquid state and the inherent analytical limitation to those compounds that do not coelute with the solvent or solvent impurity peaks.

  10. Emerging non-volatile memories

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Seungbum; Wouters, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the fundamentals of emerging non-volatile memories and provides an overview of future trends in the field. Readers will find coverage of seven important memory technologies, including Ferroelectric Random Access Memory (FeRAM), Ferromagnetic RAM (FMRAM), Multiferroic RAM (MFRAM), Phase-Change Memories (PCM), Oxide-based Resistive RAM (RRAM), Probe Storage, and Polymer Memories. Chapters are structured to reflect diffusions and clashes between different topics. Emerging Non-Volatile Memories is an ideal book for graduate students, faculty, and professionals working in the area of non-volatile memory. This book also: Covers key memory technologies, including Ferroelectric Random Access Memory (FeRAM), Ferromagnetic RAM (FMRAM), and Multiferroic RAM (MFRAM), among others. Provides an overview of non-volatile memory fundamentals. Broadens readers' understanding of future trends in non-volatile memories.

  11. Governmentally amplified output volatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funashima, Yoshito

    2016-11-01

    Predominant government behavior is decomposed by frequency into several periodic components: updating cycles of infrastructure, Kuznets cycles, fiscal policy over business cycles, and election cycles. Little is known, however, about the theoretical impact of such cyclical behavior in public finance on output fluctuations. Based on a standard neoclassical growth model, this study intends to examine the frequency at which public investment cycles are relevant to output fluctuations. We find an inverted U-shaped relationship between output volatility and length of cycle in public investment. This implies that periodic behavior in public investment at a certain frequency range can cause aggravated output resonance. Moreover, we present an empirical analysis to test the theoretical implication, using the U.S. data in the period from 1968 to 2015. The empirical results suggest that such resonance phenomena change from low to high frequency.

  12. Performance evaluation of a versatile multidimensional chromatographic preparative system based on three-dimensional gas chromatography and liquid chromatography-two-dimensional gas chromatography for the collection of volatile constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantò, Sebastiano; Sciarrone, Danilo; Maimone, Mariarosa; Ragonese, Carla; Giofrè, Salvatore; Donato, Paola; Farnetti, Sara; Mondello, Luigi

    2015-10-23

    The present research deals with the multi-collection of the most important sesquiterpene alcohols belonging to sandalwood essential oil, as reported by the international regulations: (Z)-α-santalol, (Z)-α-trans bergamotol, (Z)-β-santalol, epi-(Z)-β-santalol, α-bisabolol, (Z)-lanceol, and (Z)-nuciferol. A versatile multidimensional preparative system, based on the hyphenation of liquid and gas chromatography techniques, was operated in the LC-GC-GC-prep or GC-GC-GC-prep configuration, depending on the concentration to be collected from the sample, without any hardware or software modification. The system was equipped with a silica LC column in combination with polyethylene glycol-poly(5% diphenyl/95% dimethylsiloxane)-medium polarity ionic liquid or β-cyclodextrin based GC stationary phases. The GC-GC-GC-prep configuration was exploited for the collection of four components, by using a conventional split/splitless injector, while the LC-GC-GC-prep approach was applied for three low abundant components (87%).

  13. Volatility Exposure for Strategic Asset Allocation

    OpenAIRE

    Briere, Marie; Burgues, Alexandre; Signori, Ombretta

    2010-01-01

    The authors examine the advantages of incorporating strategic exposure to equity volatility into the investment opportunity set of a long-term equity investor. They consider two standard volatility investments: implied volatility and volatility risk premium strategies. An analytical framework, which offers pragmatic solutions for long-term investors who seek exposure to volatility, is used to calibrate and assess the risk-return profiles of portfolios. The benefit of volatility exposure for a...

  14. Reduced Heart Rate Volatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Eric L.; Morris, John A.; Norris, Patrick R.; France, Daniel J.; Ozdas, Asli; Stiles, Renée A.; Harris, Paul A.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Speroff, Theodore

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine if using dense data capture to measure heart rate volatility (standard deviation) measured in 5-minute intervals predicts death. Background: Fundamental approaches to assessing vital signs in the critically ill have changed little since the early 1900s. Our prior work in this area has demonstrated the utility of densely sampled data and, in particular, heart rate volatility over the entire patient stay, for predicting death and prolonged ventilation. Methods: Approximately 120 million heart rate data points were prospectively collected and archived from 1316 trauma ICU patients over 30 months. Data were sampled every 1 to 4 seconds, stored in a relational database, linked to outcome data, and de-identified. HR standard deviation was continuously computed over 5-minute intervals (CVRD, cardiac volatility–related dysfunction). Logistic regression models incorporating age and injury severity score were developed on a test set of patients (N = 923), and prospectively analyzed in a distinct validation set (N = 393) for the first 24 hours of ICU data. Results: Distribution of CVRD varied by survival in the test set. Prospective evaluation of the model in the validation set gave an area in the receiver operating curve of 0.81 with a sensitivity and specificity of 70.1 and 80.0, respectively. CVRD predict death as early as 24 hours in the validation set. Conclusions: CVRD identifies a subgroup of patients with a high probability of dying. Death is predicted within first 24 hours of stay. We hypothesize CVRD is a surrogate for autonomic nervous system dysfunction. PMID:15319726

  15. A model for steady flows of magma-volatile mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Belan, Marco

    2012-01-01

    A general one-dimensional model for the steady adiabatic motion of liquid-volatile mixtures in vertical ducts with varying cross-section is presented. The liquid contains a dissolved part of the volatile and is assumed to be incompressible and in thermomechanical equilibrium with a perfect gas phase, which is generated by the exsolution of the same volatile. An inverse problem approach is used -- the pressure along the duct is set as an input datum, and the other physical quantities are obtained as output. This fluid-dynamic model is intended as an approximate description of magma-volatile mixture flows of interest to geophysics and planetary sciences. It is implemented as a symbolic code, where each line stands for an analytic expression, whether algebraic or differential, which is managed by the software kernel independently of the numerical value of each variable. The code is versatile and user-friendly and permits to check the consequences of different hypotheses even through its early steps. Only the las...

  16. Accuracy of a Low Priced Liquid-Based Method for Cervical Cytology in 632 Women Referred for Colposcopy After a Positive Pap Smear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hemel, B. M.; Buikema, H. J.; Groen, H.; Suurmeijer, A. J. H.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this quality controlling study was to determine the accuracy of liquid-based cytology (LBC) with the Turbitec (R) cytocentrifuge technique. Cervical smears of 632 Women, Who were referred to our CIN outpatient department, after at least two smears with ASCUS or higher were evaluated and c

  17. Accuracy of a Low Priced Liquid-Based Method for Cervical Cytology in 632 Women Referred for Colposcopy After a Positive Pap Smear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hemel, B. M.; Buikema, H. J.; Groen, H.; Suurmeijer, A. J. H.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this quality controlling study was to determine the accuracy of liquid-based cytology (LBC) with the Turbitec (R) cytocentrifuge technique. Cervical smears of 632 Women, Who were referred to our CIN outpatient department, after at least two smears with ASCUS or higher were evaluated and c

  18. Spread, volatility, and volume relationship in financial markets and market making profit optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkissian, Jack

    2016-01-01

    We study the relationship between price spread, volatility and trading volume. We find that spread forms as a result of interplay between order liquidity and order impact. When trading volume is small adding more liquidity helps improve price accuracy and reduce spread, but after some point additional liquidity begins to deteriorate price. The model allows to connect the bid-ask spread and high-low bars to measurable microstructural parameters and express their dependence on trading volume, v...

  19. A Computer Model for Analyzing Volatile Removal Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Boyun

    2010-01-01

    A computer model simulates reactional gas/liquid two-phase flow processes in porous media. A typical process is the oxygen/wastewater flow in the Volatile Removal Assembly (VRA) in the Closed Environment Life Support System (CELSS) installed in the International Space Station (ISS). The volatile organics in the wastewater are combusted by oxygen gas to form clean water and carbon dioxide, which is solved in the water phase. The model predicts the oxygen gas concentration profile in the reactor, which is an indicator of reactor performance. In this innovation, a mathematical model is included in the computer model for calculating the mass transfer from the gas phase to the liquid phase. The amount of mass transfer depends on several factors, including gas-phase concentration, distribution, and reaction rate. For a given reactor dimension, these factors depend on pressure and temperature in the reactor and composition and flow rate of the influent.

  20. Isolation and preconcentration of volatile organic compounds from water; Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namiesnik, J.; Gorecki, T.; Biziuk, M.; Torres, L. (Technical Univ. of Gdansk (Poland) Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie, Toulouse (France))

    1990-10-01

    Methods for the isolation and/or concentration of volatile organic compounds from water samples for trace organic analysis by gas chromatography are reviewed. The following basic groups of methods are discussed: liquid-liquid extraction, adsorption on solid sorbents, extraction with gas (gas stripping and static and dynamic headspace techniques) and membrane processes. The theoretical bases of these methods are discussed. Experimental arrangements for the isolation and/or concentration of volatile compounds from water are presented and discussed with respect to their efficiency. The applicability of the described methods to the isolation and/or concentration of various organic compounds from waters of various origins is discussed. 26 figs., 7 tabs., 695 refs.

  1. Marine Vibrio Species Produce the Volatile Organic Compound Acetone

    OpenAIRE

    Nemecek-Marshall, M; Wojciechowski, C; Kuzma, J.; Silver, G. M.; Fall, R.

    1995-01-01

    While screening aerobic, heterotrophic marine bacteria for production of volatile organic compounds, we found that a group of isolates produced substantial amounts of acetone. Acetone production was confirmed by gas chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and high-performance liquid chromatography. The major acetone producers were identified as nonclinical Vibrio species. Acetone production was maximal in the stationary phase of growth and was stimulated by addition of l-leucine...

  2. Isolation and quantification of volatiles in fish by dynamic headspace sampling and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refsgaard, H H; Haahr, A M; Jensen, B

    1999-03-01

    A dynamic headspace sampling method for isolation of volatiles in fish has been developed. The sample preparation involved freezing of fish tissue in liquid nitrogen, pulverizing the tissue, and sampling of volatiles from an aqueous slurry of the fish powder. Similar volatile patterns were determined by use of this sample preparation method and for samples chewed for 10 s. Effects of sampling time, temperature, and purge flow on level of volatiles were tested. Purging at 340 mL/min for 30 min at 45 degrees C was found to be optimal. Detection limits for a number of aldehydes were 0.2-2.7 microg/kg. Levels of volatiles are given for fresh salmon, cod, saithe, mackerel, and redfish.

  3. Changes in volatile composition of Madeira wines during their oxidative ageing

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The influence of the age in the volatile composition of Madeira wines made with Boal, Malvazia, Sercial and Verdelho varieties and aged in oak barrel during 1, 11 and 25 years old was been studied. For this purpose, the evolution of volatile compounds: higher alcohols, ethyl esters, fatty acids, furan compounds, enolic compounds, γ-lactones, dioxanes and dioxolanes, of the four most utilised varieties were determined using liquid–liquid extraction with dichloromeihane. Octan-3-ol was used as ...

  4. Volatility Forecasting: Downside Risk, Jumps and Leverage Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Audrino

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We provide empirical evidence of volatility forecasting in relation to asymmetries present in the dynamics of both return and volatility processes. Using recently-developed methodologies to detect jumps from high frequency price data, we estimate the size of positive and negative jumps and propose a methodology to estimate the size of jumps in the quadratic variation. The leverage effect is separated into continuous and discontinuous effects, and past volatility is separated into “good” and “bad”, as well as into continuous and discontinuous risks. Using a long history of the S & P500 price index, we find that the continuous leverage effect lasts about one week, while the discontinuous leverage effect disappears after one day. “Good” and “bad” continuous risks both characterize the volatility persistence, while “bad” jump risk is much more informative than “good” jump risk in forecasting future volatility. The volatility forecasting model proposed is able to capture many empirical stylized facts while still remaining parsimonious in terms of the number of parameters to be estimated.

  5. Stochastic volatility and stochastic leverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veraart, Almut; Veraart, Luitgard A. M.

    This paper proposes the new concept of stochastic leverage in stochastic volatility models. Stochastic leverage refers to a stochastic process which replaces the classical constant correlation parameter between the asset return and the stochastic volatility process. We provide a systematic...... treatment of stochastic leverage and propose to model the stochastic leverage effect explicitly, e.g. by means of a linear transformation of a Jacobi process. Such models are both analytically tractable and allow for a direct economic interpretation. In particular, we propose two new stochastic volatility...... models which allow for a stochastic leverage effect: the generalised Heston model and the generalised Barndorff-Nielsen & Shephard model. We investigate the impact of a stochastic leverage effect in the risk neutral world by focusing on implied volatilities generated by option prices derived from our new...

  6. On forecasting Exchange Rate Volatility.

    OpenAIRE

    Hafner, Christian

    2003-01-01

    In an efficient market, foreign exchange rates have to guarantee absence of triangular arbitrage. This note shows that the no-arbitrage condition can be exploited for forecasting the volatility of a single rate by using the information contained in the other rates. Linearly transforming the volatility forecasts of a bivariate model is shown to be more efficient than using a univariate model for the cross-rate.

  7. Analytical performance of three commonly used extraction methods for the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of wine volatile compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andujar-Ortiz, I; Moreno-Arribas, M V; Martín-Alvarez, P J; Pozo-Bayón, M A

    2009-10-23

    The analytical performance of three extraction procedures based on cold liquid-liquid extraction using dicloromethane (LLE), solid phase extraction (SPE) using a styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer and headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME) using a carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane coated fibre has been evaluated based on the analysis of 30 representative wine volatile compounds. From the comparison of the three procedures, LLE and SPE showed very good linearity covering a wide range of concentrations of wine volatile compounds, low detection limits, high recovery for most of the volatile compounds under study and higher sensitivity compared to the headspace-SPME procedure. The latter showed in general, poor recovery for polar volatile compounds. Despite some drawbacks associated with the LLE and SPE procedures such as the more tedious sampling treatment and the use of organic solvents, the analytical performance of both procedures showed that they are more adequate for the analysis of wine volatiles.

  8. The Effect of Long Memory in Volatility on Stock Market Fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bent Jesper; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard

    2007-01-01

    Recent empirical evidence demonstrates the presence of an important long memory component in realized asset return volatility. We specify and estimate multivariate models for the joint dynamics of stock returns and volatility that allow for long memory in volatility without imposing this property...... on returns. Asset pricing theory imposes testable cross-equation restrictions on the system that are not rejected in our preferred specifications, which include a strong financial leverage effect. We show that the impact of volatility shocks on stock prices is small and short-lived, in spite of a positive...

  9. Asymmetry of cross-correlations between intra-day and overnight volatilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadourian, Rubina; Grassberger, Peter

    2017-04-01

    We point out a stunning time asymmetry in the short-time cross-correlations between intra-day and overnight volatilities (absolute values of log-returns of stock prices). While overnight volatility is significantly (and positively) correlated with the intra-day volatility during the following day (allowing thus non-trivial predictions), it is much less correlated with the intra-day volatility during the preceding day. While the effect is not unexpected in view of previous observations, its robustness and extreme simplicity are remarkable.

  10. The Effect of Long Memory in Volatility on Stock Market Fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bent Jesper; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard

    Recent empirical evidence demonstrates the presence of an important long memory component in realized asset return volatility. We specify and estimate multivariate models for the joint dynamics of stock returns and volatility that allow for long memory in volatility without imposing this property...... on returns. Asset pricing theory imposes testable cross-equation restrictions on the system that are not rejected in our preferred specifications, which include a strong financial leverage effect. We show that the impact of volatility shocks on stock prices is small and short-lived, in spite of a positive...

  11. Can economic policy uncertainty help to forecast the volatility: A multifractal perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhicao; Ye, Yong; Ma, Feng; Liu, Jing

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we investigate whether economic policy uncertainty (EPU) can impact on future volatility based on the multifractal insight. Our estimation results show that the impact of EPU on future volatility is significantly positive, which indicate that EPU can aggravate the future market risk. Moreover, Out-of-sample results tell us that adding EPU as explanatory variable to volatility models can indeed improve the forecasting performance. Furthermore, we also find evidence that the multifractal volatility models can beat the GARCH-class models in forecasting.

  12. Impact of Oil Price Shocks and Exchange Rate Volatility on Stock Market Behavior in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adedoyin I. Lawal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The impact of exchange rate and oil prices fluctuation on the stock market has been a subject of hot debate among researchers. This study examined the impact of both the exchange rate volatility and oil price volatility on stock market volatility in Nigeria, so as to guide policy formulation based on the fact that the nation’s economy was foreign induced and mono-cultured with heavy dependence on oil. EGARCH estimation techniques were employed to examine if either the volatility in exchange rate, oil price volatility or both experts on stock market volatility in Nigeria. The result shows that share price volatility is induced by both the exchange rate volatility and oil price volatility. Thus, it is recommended that policymakers should pursue policies that tend to stabilize the exchange rate regime on the one hand, and guarantee the net oil exporting position for the economy, that market practitioners should formulate portfolio strategies in such a way that volatility in both exchange rates and oil price will be factored in time when investment decisions are being made.

  13. The Effect of Long Memory in Volatility on Stock Market Fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bent Jesper; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard

    on returns. Asset pricing theory imposes testable cross- equation restrictions on the system that are not rejected in our preferred specifications, which include a strong financial leverage effect. We show that the impact of volatility shocks on stock prices is small and short-lived, in spite of a positive...... risk-return trade-off and long memory in volatility....

  14. Recent Advances in Volatiles of Teas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Qiang Zheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Volatile compounds are important components of tea aroma, a key attribute of sensory quality. The present review examines the formation of aromatic volatiles of various kinds of teas and factors influencing the formation of tea volatiles, including tea cultivar, growing environment and agronomic practices, processing method and storage of tea. The determination of tea volatiles and the relationship of active-aroma volatiles with the sensory qualities of tea are also discussed in the present paper.

  15. Ultrasonic time-of-flight monitoring of the position of the liquid/solid interface during the Bridgman growth of germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, John N.; Lam, Alex; Schleich, Donald M.

    1992-01-01

    Ultrasound has been used to track the movement of the solid/liquid interface during the vertical Bridgman growth of germanium. Digitally processed data representing the received ultrasonic signal indicated a time lag prior to crystal growth, and showed a growth rate close to the pulling rate of the furnace. No effect of the ultrasonic energy on the growth of the crystal or on the formation of defects was observed. The interface was located to within 0.3 mm in the presence of substantial temperature gradients. An extension of the work presented could lead to a tomographic reconstruction of the interface shape.

  16. Trivariate support of flat-volatility forward Libor rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamshidian, Farshid

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the multivariate support of forward Libor rates in the onefactor, constant volatilities Libor market model. The comparatively simple bivariate case was solved in Jamshidian (2008) in connection to the recent finding by Davis and Mataix-Pastor (2007) of positive probability of

  17. Trivariate support of flat-volatility forward Libor rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamshidian, Farshid

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the multivariate support of forward Libor rates in the one-factor, constant volatilities Libor market model. The comparatively simple bivariate case was solved in Jamshidian [2] in connection to the recent finding by Davis and Mataix-Pastor [1] of positive probability of nega

  18. Trivariate support of flat-volatility forward Libor rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamshidian, F.

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the multivariate support of forward Libor rates in the one-factor, constant volatilities Libor market model. The comparatively simple bivariate case was solved in Jamshidian [2] in connection to the recent finding by Davis and Mataix-Pastor [1] of positive probability of

  19. 改良破伤风皮试液配制方法对皮试阳性率的影响%Impact of improved tetanus skin test liquid dispensing method on skin test positive rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜红宇; 龚牡丽; 吴素蓉; 王文艺; 纪军

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨改良破伤风皮试液配制方法对皮试阳性率的影响。方法选取2012年3月—2014年11月井冈山大学医务所收治的外伤患者159例,随机分为观察组(81例)与对照组(78例)。对照组患者予以传统破伤风皮试液配制方法,观察组患者予以改良皮试液配制方法。观察两组患者皮试阳性率。结果观察组患者皮试阳性率低于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P ﹤0.05)。结论改良破伤风皮试液配制方法能降低患者皮试阳性率,减轻患者的痛苦。%Objective To explore the impact of improved tetanus skin test liquid dispensing method on skin test posi-tive rate. Methods A total of 159 patients with trauma were selected in Clinic of Jinggangshan University from March 2012 to November 2014,they were randomly divided into observation group(81 cases)and control group(78 cases). Control group were given traditional tetanus skin test liquid dispensing method,observation group were given improved tetanus skin test liquid dispensing method. Skin reaction positive rate between the two groups was compared. Results Skin reaction positive rate of ob-servation group was lower than that of control group(P ﹤ 0. 05). Conclusion Improved tetanus skin test liquid dispensing method can reduce the skin test positive rate and reduce the pain of the patients.

  20. Forecasting Performance of Asymmetric GARCH Stock Market Volatility Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojin Lee

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the asymmetry between positive and negative returns in their effect on conditional variance of the stock market index and incorporate the characteristics to form an out-of-sample volatility forecast. Contrary to prior evidence, however, the results in this paper suggest that no asymmetric GARCH model is superior to basic GARCH(1,1 model. It is our prior knowledge that, for equity returns, it is unlikely that positive and negative shocks have the same impact on the volatility. In order to reflect this intuition, we implement three diagnostic tests for volatility models: the Sign Bias Test, the Negative Size Bias Test, and the Positive Size Bias Test and the tests against the alternatives of QGARCH and GJR-GARCH. The asymmetry test results indicate that the sign and the size of the unexpected return shock do not influence current volatility differently which contradicts our presumption that there are asymmetric effects in the stock market volatility. This result is in line with various diagnostic tests which are designed to determine whether the GARCH(1,1 volatility estimates adequately represent the data. The diagnostic tests in section 2 indicate that the GARCH(1,1 model for weekly KOSPI returns is robust to the misspecification test. We also investigate two representative asymmetric GARCH models, QGARCH and GJR-GARCH model, for our out-of-sample forecasting performance. The out-of-sample forecasting ability test reveals that no single model is clearly outperforming. It is seen that the GJR-GARCH and QGARCH model give mixed results in forecasting ability on all four criteria across all forecast horizons considered. Also, the predictive accuracy test of Diebold and Mariano based on both absolute and squared prediction errors suggest that the forecasts from the linear and asymmetric GARCH models need not be significantly different from each other.

  1. RICE PRICE VOLATILITY IN EAST JAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wati R.Y.E.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is analyzing the volatility and volatility spillover of monthly price of paddy at the level of farmers and consumers in 2010-2016. ARCH/GARCH used to analyze volatility and GARCH BEKK-model is used to analyze the volatility spillover. The results of the analysis show that price volatility at the farmer level is very high (extremely high volatility, price volatility at the consumer level is low (low volatility, and volatility spillover does not occur between the farmers and the consumers market. The need to guarantee an effective floor price as well as information disclosure related to the market commodity prices so that the pattern of prices transmission among interrelated markets can be symmetrical.

  2. The price of fixed income market volatility

    CERN Document Server

    Mele, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Fixed income volatility and equity volatility evolve heterogeneously over time, co-moving disproportionately during periods of global imbalances and each reacting to events of different nature. While the methodology for options-based "model-free" pricing of equity volatility has been known for some time, little is known about analogous methodologies for pricing various fixed income volatilities. This book fills this gap and provides a unified evaluation framework of fixed income volatility while dealing with disparate markets such as interest-rate swaps, government bonds, time-deposits and credit. It develops model-free, forward looking indexes of fixed-income volatility that match different quoting conventions across various markets, and uncovers subtle yet important pitfalls arising from naïve superimpositions of the standard equity volatility methodology when pricing various fixed income volatilities. The ultimate goal of the authors´ efforts is to make interest rate volatility standardization a valuable...

  3. On the source of stochastic volatility: Evidence from CAC40 index options during the subprime crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slim, Skander

    2016-12-01

    This paper investigates the performance of time-changed Lévy processes with distinct sources of return volatility variation for modeling cross-sectional option prices on the CAC40 index during the subprime crisis. Specifically, we propose a multi-factor stochastic volatility model: one factor captures the diffusion component dynamics and two factors capture positive and negative jump variations. In-sample and out-of-sample tests show that our full-fledged model significantly outperforms nested lower-dimensional specifications. We find that all three sources of return volatility variation, with different persistence, are needed to properly account for market pricing dynamics across moneyness, maturity and volatility level. Besides, the model estimation reveals negative risk premium for both diffusive volatility and downward jump intensity whereas a positive risk premium is found to be attributed to upward jump intensity.

  4. Trichloroethylene Volatilization Enhancement by the Addition of a Brine Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irizarry, M. L.; Padilla, I. Y.

    2008-12-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is one of the most widely detected organic contaminants at National Priority List (NPL) sites. In many sites, TCE is trapped as a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in formations of low permeability, and serves as long-term source of contamination. Cost effective remediation technologies that can be applied to tight formations need to be developed. This study investigates the enhancement of TCE volatilization from unsaturated clayey soils by adding a NaCl brine solution. It is postulated that the overall effect of the brine solution causing structured water around soil particles, increased relative permeability, and increased fugacity into the vapor phase, is to enhance TCE volatilization. TCE removal through the soil vapor extraction (SVE) technique can then be enhanced. Preliminary experimental work involves the use of static and dynamic flux reactors, containing TCE, water and clay. NaCl brine solution is added at different concentrations to evaluate the effect on TCE concentrations and volatilization rates. In the static flux mode, vapor concentrations in the headspace of sealed reactors are measured after a two-day period. In the dynamic flux mode, air is swept through the headspace of the reactors and TCE vapor concentrations are measured over time. Plots relating static TCE vapor concentration to brine concentration are used to show the effect of brine concentrations on TCE fugacity. Temporal concentration distributions of TCE show the effect of brine on the rate of volatilization. Keywords: Trichloroethylene (TCE), Soil vapor extraction (SVE), clay

  5. Where do herbivore-induced plant volatiles go?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmo K. Holopainen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Herbivore induced plant volatiles (HIPV are specific volatile organic compounds (VOC that a plant produces in response to herbivory. Some HIPVs are only produced after damage, while others are also produced by intact plants, but in lower quantities. Among the known functions of HIPVs are within plant volatile signalling to activate systemic plant defences, the priming and activation of defences in neighbouring plants and the attraction of natural enemies of herbivores. When released into the atmosphere a plant’s control over the produced compounds ends. However, many of the HIPVs are highly reactive with atmospheric oxidants and their atmospheric life times could be relatively short, often only a few minutes. We summarise the potential ecological and atmospheric processes that involve the reaction products of HIPVs in their gaseous, liquid and solid secondary organic aerosol (SOA forms, both in the atmosphere and after deposition on plant surfaces. A potential negative feedback loop, based on the reactions forming SOA from HIPV and the associated stimulation of sun screening cloud formation is presented. This hypothesis is based on recent field surveys in the geographical areas facing greatest degree of global warming and insect outbreaks. Furthermore, we discuss how these processes could benefit the individual plant or conspecifics that originally released the HIPVs into the atmosphere. Further ecological studies should aim to elucidate the possible reasons for biosynthesis of short-lived volatile compounds to have evolved as a response to external biotic damage to plants.

  6. The Research Progress of CO2 Capture with Ionic Liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵志军; 董海峰; 张香平

    2012-01-01

    Due to their negligible volatility, reasonable thermal stability, strong dissolubility, wide liquid range and tunability of structure and property, ionic liquids have been regarded as emerging candidate reagents for CO2 cap- ture from industries gases. In this review, the research progresses in CO2 capture using conventional ionic liquids,functionalized ionic liquids, supported ionic-liquids membranes, polymerized ionic liquids and mixtures of ionic liquids with some molecular solvents were investigated and reviewed. Discussion of relevant research fields was presented and the future developments were suggested.

  7. Observability of market daily volatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroni, Filippo; Serva, Maurizio

    2016-02-01

    We study the price dynamics of 65 stocks from the Dow Jones Composite Average from 1973 to 2014. We show that it is possible to define a Daily Market Volatility σ(t) which is directly observable from data. This quantity is usually indirectly defined by r(t) = σ(t) ω(t) where the r(t) are the daily returns of the market index and the ω(t) are i.i.d. random variables with vanishing average and unitary variance. The relation r(t) = σ(t) ω(t) alone is unable to give an operative definition of the index volatility, which remains unobservable. On the contrary, we show that using the whole information available in the market, the index volatility can be operatively defined and detected.

  8. Consistent ranking of volatility models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Reinhard; Lunde, Asger

    2006-01-01

    result in an inferior model being chosen as "best" with a probability that converges to one as the sample size increases. We document the practical relevance of this problem in an empirical application and by simulation experiments. Our results provide an additional argument for using the realized...... variance in out-of-sample evaluations rather than the squared return. We derive the theoretical results in a general framework that is not specific to the comparison of volatility models. Similar problems can arise in comparisons of forecasting models whenever the predicted variable is a latent variable.......We show that the empirical ranking of volatility models can be inconsistent for the true ranking if the evaluation is based on a proxy for the population measure of volatility. For example, the substitution of a squared return for the conditional variance in the evaluation of ARCH-type models can...

  9. Characterization of cis- and trans-octadecenoic acid positional isomers in edible fat and oil using gas chromatography-flame ionisation detector equipped with highly polar ionic liquid capillary column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Kazuaki; Asanuma, Masaharu; Mizobe, Hoyo; Kojima, Koichi; Nagai, Toshiharu; Beppu, Fumiaki; Gotoh, Naohiro

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the characterisation of all cis- and trans-octadecenoic acid (C18:1) positional isomers in partially hydrogenated vegetable oil (PHVO) and milk fat, which contain several cis- and trans-C18:1 positional isomers, was achieved by gas chromatography-flame ionisation detector equipped with a highly polar ionic liquid capillary column (SLB-IL111). Prior to analysis, the cis- and trans-C18:1 fractions in PHVO and milk fat were separated using a silver-ion cartridge. The resolution of all cis-C18:1 positional isomers was successfully accomplished at the optimal isothermal column temperature of 120 °C. Similarly, the positional isomers of trans-C18:1, except for trans-6-C18:1 and trans-7-C18:1, were separated at 120 °C. The resolution of trans-6-C18:1 and trans-7-C18:1 isomers was made possible by increasing the column temperature to 160 °C. This analytical method is suitable for determining the cis- and trans-C18:1 positional isomers in edible fats and oils.

  10. Liquidity Determinants of Moroccan Banking Industry

    OpenAIRE

    FERROUHI, El Mehdi; LEHADIRI, Abderrassoul

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the behavior of Moroccan bank’s liquidity during the period 2001 – 2012. The research aims to identify the determinants of Moroccan bank’s liquidity. We first evaluate Moroccan banks’ liquidity positions through different liquidity ratios to determine the effects of financial crisis on bank’s liquidity. We then highlight the effect of banks’ size on banks’ liquidity. Finally, we identify determinants of Moroccan bank’s liquidity using panel data regression. From results ob...

  11. Oil Volatility Risk and Expected Stock Returns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Pan, Xuhui (Nick)

    After the financialization of commodity futures markets in 2004-05 oil volatility has become a strong predictor of returns and volatility of the overall stock market. Furthermore, stocks' exposure to oil volatility risk now drives the cross-section of expected returns. The difference in average...... return between the quintile of stocks with low exposure and high exposure to oil volatility is significant at 0.66% per month, and oil volatility risk carries a significant risk premium of -0.60% per month. In the post-financialization period, oil volatility risk is strongly related with various measures...

  12. Rhenium volatilization in waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Kai; Pierce, David A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Hrma, Pavel, E-mail: pavel.hrma@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Schweiger, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Kruger, Albert A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Re did not volatilize from a HLW feed until 1000 °C. • Re began to volatilize from LAW feeds at ∼600 °C. • The vigorous foaming and generation of gases from salts enhanced Re evaporation in LAW feeds. • The HLW glass with less foaming and salts is a promising medium for Tc immobilization. - Abstract: We investigated volatilization of rhenium (Re), sulfur, cesium, and iodine during the course of conversion of high-level waste melter feed to glass and compared the results for Re volatilization with those in low-activity waste borosilicate glasses. Whereas Re did not volatilize from high-level waste feed heated at 5 K min{sup −1} until 1000 °C, it began to volatilize from low-activity waste borosilicate glass feeds at ∼600 °C, a temperature ∼200 °C below the onset temperature of evaporation from pure KReO{sub 4}. Below 800 °C, perrhenate evaporation in low-activity waste melter feeds was enhanced by vigorous foaming and generation of gases from molten salts as they reacted with the glass-forming constituents. At high temperatures, when the glass-forming phase was consolidated, perrhenates were transported to the top surface of glass melt in bubbles, typically together with sulfates and halides. Based on the results of this study (to be considered preliminary at this stage), the high-level waste glass with less foaming and salts appears a promising medium for technetium immobilization.

  13. Child mortality, commodity price volatility and the resource curse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhlouf, Yousef; Kellard, Neil M; Vinogradov, Dmitri

    2017-04-01

    Given many developing economies depend on primary commodities, the fluctuations of commodity prices may imply significant effects for the wellbeing of children. To investigate, this paper examines the relationship between child mortality and commodity price movements as reflected by country-specific commodity terms-of-trade. Employing a panel of 69 low and lower-middle income countries over the period 1970-2010, we show that commodity terms-of-trade volatility increases child mortality in highly commodity-dependent importers suggesting a type of 'scarce' resource curse. Strikingly however, good institutions appear able to mitigate the negative impact of volatility. The paper concludes by highlighting this tripartite relationship between child mortality, volatility and good institutions and posits that an effective approach to improving child wellbeing in low to lower-middle income countries will combine hedging, import diversification and improvement of institutional quality. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Effect of Se treatment on the volatile compounds in broccoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jiayu; Wu, Jie; Zuo, Jinhua; Fan, Linlin; Shi, Junyan; Gao, Lipu; Li, Miao; Wang, Qing

    2017-02-01

    Broccoli contains high levels of bioactive compounds but deteriorates and senesces easily. In the present study, freshly harvested broccoli was treated with selenite and stored at two different temperatures. The effect of selenite treatment on sensory quality and postharvest physiology were analyzed. Volatile components were assessed by HS-SPME combined with GC-MS and EN. The metabolism of Se and S was also examined. Results indicated that Se treatment had a significant effect on maintaining the sensory quality, suppressing the respiration intensity and ethylene production, as well as increasing the content of Se and decreasing the content of S. In particular, significant differences in the composition of volatile compounds were present between control and Se-treated. The differences were mainly due to differences in alcohols and sulfide compounds. These results demonstrate that Se treatment can have a positive effect on maintaining quality and enhancing its sensory quality through the release of volatile compounds.

  15. Stock Returns, Volatility, and Cointegration among Chinese Stock Markets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QiZhou; ZhongguoZhou

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines stock returns, volatility, and cointegration among three Chinese stock markets before and after Hong Kong's return to China. The average daily returns are much higher during the first sub-period (from April 1991 to June 1997) and significantly lower or even negative during the second sub-period (from July 1997 to December 2002). The mean adjusted change in volatility is negatively and significantly correlated with the lagged returns. This negative relation is mainly caused by a contemporaneous and significantly positive correlation between returns and volatility in the first sub-period. This significant relationship disappears for the Shanghai and Shenzhen Stock Exchanges and is even negative for the Hong Kong Stock Exchange during the second sub-period. Three Chinese stock markets are cointegrated over the entire sample period and become more closely related after Hong Kong's return to China. Our results have important implications for both policy makers and individual investors.

  16. High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talcott, Stephen

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has many applications in food chemistry. Food components that have been analyzed with HPLC include organic acids, vitamins, amino acids, sugars, nitrosamines, certain pesticides, metabolites, fatty acids, aflatoxins, pigments, and certain food additives. Unlike gas chromatography, it is not necessary for the compound being analyzed to be volatile. It is necessary, however, for the compounds to have some solubility in the mobile phase. It is important that the solubilized samples for injection be free from all particulate matter, so centrifugation and filtration are common procedures. Also, solid-phase extraction is used commonly in sample preparation to remove interfering compounds from the sample matrix prior to HPLC analysis.

  17. Analysis of volatile compounds of Malaysian Tualang (Koompassia excelsa) honey using gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurul Syazana, M S; Gan, S H; Halim, A S; Shah, Nurul Syazana Mohamad; Gan, Siew Hua; Sukari, Halim Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    The constituents of honey's volatile compounds depend on the nectar source and differ depending on the place of origin. To date, the volatile constituents of Tualang honey have never been investigated. The objective of this study was to analyze the volatile compounds in local Malaysian Tualang honey. A continuous extraction of Tualang honey using five organic solvents was carried out starting from non-polar to polar solvents and the extracted samples were analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Overall, 35 volatile compounds were detected. Hydrocarbons constitute 58.5% of the composition of Tualang honey. Other classes of chemical compounds detected included acids, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, terpenes, furans and a miscellaneous group. Methanol yielded the highest number of extracted compounds such as acids and 5-(Hydroxymethyl) furfural (HMF). This is the first study to describe the volatile compounds in Tualang honey. The use of a simple one tube, stepwise, non-thermal liquid-liquid extraction of honey is a advantageous as it prevents sample loss. Further research to test the clinical benefits of these volatile compounds is recommended.

  18. Factors affecting the volatilization of volatile organic compounds from wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junya Intamanee

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to understand the influence of the wind speed (U10cm, water depth (h and suspended solids (SS on mass transfer coefficient (KOLa of volatile organic compounds (VOCs volatilized from wastewater. The novelty of this work is not the method used to determine KOLa but rather the use of actual wastewater instead of pure water as previously reported. The influence of U10cm, h, and SS on KOLa was performed using a volatilization tank with the volume of 100-350 L. Methyl Ethyl Ketone (MEK was selected as a representative of VOCs investigated here in. The results revealed that the relationship between KOLa and the wind speeds falls into two regimes with a break at the wind speed of 2.4 m/s. At U10cm 2.4 m/s, KOLa increased more rapidly. The relationship between KOLa and U10cm was also linear but has a distinctly higher slope. For the KOLa dependency on water depth, the KOLa decreased significantly with increasing water depth up to a certain water depth after that the increase in water depth had small effect on KOLa. The suspended solids in wastewater also played an important role on KOLa. Increased SS resulted in a significant reduction of KOLa over the investigated range of SS. Finally, the comparison between KOLa obtained from wastewater and that of pure water revealed that KOLa from wastewater were much lower than that of pure water which was pronounced at high wind speed and at small water depth. This was due the presence of organic mass in wastewater which provided a barrier to mass transfer and reduced the degree of turbulence in the water body resulting in low volatilization rate and thus KOLa. From these results, the mass transfer model for predicting VOCs emission from wastewater should be developed based on the volatilization of VOCs from wastewater rather than that from pure water.

  19. Determination of Sudan I and a newly synthesized Sudan III positional isomer in the color additive D&C Red No. 17 using high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, Adrian; James, India C; Tae, Christian J; Ridge, Clark D; Ito, Yoichiro

    2017-07-12

    Specifications in the Code of Federal Regulations for the color additive D&C Red No. 17 (Colour Index 26100) limit the levels of two subsidiary colors, 1-(phenylazo)-2-naphthol (Sudan I) and 1-[[2-(phenylazo)phenyl]azo]-2-naphthalenol (Sudan III o-isomer), to 3% and 2%, respectively. The present work reports the development of a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for the quantitative determination of these subsidiary colors. Since Sudan III o-isomer needed to be synthesized for use as a reference material, a two-step procedure was devised: (i) preparative-scale synthesis of the intermediate 2-aminoazobenzene (2AAB) and its purification by counter-current chromatography and (ii) diazotization of 2AAB and coupling with 2-naphthol. Characterization of the newly synthesized Sudan III o-isomer is also reported. Sudan I and Sudan III o-isomer were quantified by using five-point calibration curves with data points ranging from 0.108 to 3.240% and 0.077 to 2.227% by weight, respectively. The HPLC method is rapid (14 min for the total analysis cycle) and simple to implement. It was applied to the analysis of test portions from 25 batches of D&C Red No. 17 submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) for certification, and it has recently been implemented by USFDA for routine batch certification of that color additive.

  20. Accuracy of a low priced liquid-based method for cervical cytology in 632 women referred for colposcopy after a positive Pap smear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hemel, B M; Buikema, H J; Groen, H; Suurmeijer, A J H

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this quality controlling study was to determine the accuracy of liquid-based cytology (LBC) with the Turbitec cytocentrifuge technique. Cervical smears of 632 women, who were referred to our CIN outpatient department, after at least two smears with ASCUS or higher were evaluated and compared with the histological outcome. In 592 cases the smears revealed abnormalities of squamous epithelium, and in 40 cases the abnormalities of glandular epithelium. In the group of squamous epithelium abnormalities, the sensitivity for LSIL was 39.7% and the specificity was 89.2%; for the LSIL+ group, these values were 89.4% and 91.4%, respectively. For HSIL the sensitivity was 68.3% and the specificity 92.8%, for the HSIL+ group 82.3% and 92.3%, respectively. The ASCUS rate was low (2.4%). The Turbitec cytocentrifuge method was proved to be a very good LBC method for cervical smears. Because of a comparable accuracy together with a lower price, this LBC method outweighs commercial alternatives.

  1. Characterization of metabolites of meisoindigo in male and female rat kidney microsomes by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with positive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Meng; Choo, Lip-Wee; Ho, Paul C

    2008-12-01

    Meisoindigo has been effectively applied for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Although the metabolic profile of meisoindigo has been studied in liver, information relevant to extrahepatic metabolism of meisoindigo is absent in kidney so far. In this study, the metabolism of meisoindigo in rat kidney microsomes was qualitatively and quantitatively investigated by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), in terms of metabolite identification, metabolic stability, metabolite formation and gender effect. The metabolic profiling was accomplished by integration of multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) with conventional full MS scan followed by MS/MS methodology. The major in vitro metabolites of meisoindigo in rat kidney microsomes were identified as stereoselective 3,3' double-bond reduced meisoindigo, whereas the minor metabolites were regioselective phenyl monohydroxylmeisoindigo. An LC/MS/MS method for quantification of meisoindigo in rat kidney microsomes was also developed and validated. The calculated in vitro half-life (t(1/2)) values of meisoindigo in male and female rat kidney microsomes were 107.8 +/- 17.0 min and 130.0 +/- 12.9 min, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between different genders in the metabolic stability profiles of meisoindigo. The reductive metabolite-formation profiles of meisoindigo in male and female rat kidney microsomes were plotted semi-quantitatively as well. The information regarding in vitro renal metabolism of meisoindigo provided a better understanding of the role of the kidney in the disposition of meisoindigo.

  2. Identification of acylated xanthone glycosides by liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry in positive and negative modes from the lichen Umbilicaria proboscidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezanka, Tomás; Dembitsky, Valery M

    2003-05-01

    The xanthoside composition of the crude extract of Umbilicaria proboscidea (L.) Schrader was characterized using LC-UV diode array detection and LC-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) MS methods. The presence of acylated xanthone-O-glucosides was determined by both positive and negative ion LC-APCI-MS methods. Based on UV and MS spectral data and NMR spectroscopy, a total of 14 compounds (6-O-acylated umbilicaxanthosides A and B) were identified in U. proboscidea for the first time. In order to further develop the applicability of LC-MS techniques in phytochemical characterization, the effect of different ionization energy on fragmentation was studied using APCI. The optimal ionization conditions were achieved in positive ion APCI by using ammonium acetate buffer and in negative ion APCI by using formic acid (pH 4).

  3. [Emission model of volatile organic compounds from materials used indoors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, K

    1998-11-30

    Various materials, such as wall-paper, floor-wax, paint, multicolor wall-coat, air freshener and mothball were experimented in a simulated test chamber under constant selected temperature, humidity and air exchange rate. The relation between the total VOCs concentration and time was regressed by four emission models and the surface emission rate was calculated. The regressed results indicated the similarity among four emission models for the liquid materials with volatile-solvent such as paint and multicolor wall-coat. But for low volatile solid materials, such as wall-paper, floor-wax, mothball, the sink model and the empirical model were better than the dilution model and vapor pressure model. Only for air freshener, it was improper to the total VOCs concentration as a parameter.

  4. Modeling the Volatility in Global Fertilizer Prices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P-Y. Chen (Ping-Yu); C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin); C-C. Chen (Chi-Chung); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe main purpose of this paper is to estimate the volatility in global fertilizer prices. The endogenous structural breakpoint unit root test and alternative volatility models, including the generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (GARCH) model, Exponential GARCH (EGARC

  5. Fluctuation behaviors of financial return volatility duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Hongli; Wang, Jun; Lu, Yunfan

    2016-04-01

    It is of significantly crucial to understand the return volatility of financial markets because it helps to quantify the investment risk, optimize the portfolio, and provide a key input of option pricing models. The characteristics of isolated high volatility events above certain threshold in price fluctuations and the distributions of return intervals between these events arouse great interest in financial research. In the present work, we introduce a new concept of daily return volatility duration, which is defined as the shortest passage time when the future volatility intensity is above or below the current volatility intensity (without predefining a threshold). The statistical properties of the daily return volatility durations for seven representative stock indices from the world financial markets are investigated. Some useful and interesting empirical results of these volatility duration series about the probability distributions, memory effects and multifractal properties are obtained. These results also show that the proposed stock volatility series analysis is a meaningful and beneficial trial.

  6. A Fractionally Integrated Wishart Stochastic Volatility Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Asai (Manabu); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThere has recently been growing interest in modeling and estimating alternative continuous time multivariate stochastic volatility models. We propose a continuous time fractionally integrated Wishart stochastic volatility (FIWSV) process. We derive the conditional Laplace transform of

  7. Stochastic Volatility and DSGE Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Martin Møller

    This paper argues that a specification of stochastic volatility commonly used to analyze the Great Moderation in DSGE models may not be appropriate, because the level of a process with this specification does not have conditional or unconditional moments. This is unfortunate because agents may...

  8. Effects of liquid positive and negative balance on severe acute pancreatitis after resuscitation%容量复苏后液体正负平衡对急性重症胰腺炎的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    娄雪萍; 郑贞苍; 余玲丽; 陈鹏

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of liquid positive and negative balance on severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) after resuscitation. Methods A total of 42 patients with SAP treated by continuous renal replacement therapy(CR-RT) were randomly divided into positive balance group and negative balance group according to liquid intake and output after 48 hours of resuscitation. The haemodynamic indexes, extravascular lung water index (EVLWI), pulmonary vascular permeability index, oxygenation index(PO2/FiO2), bladder pressure(ICP), B-type natriuretic peptide(BNP), blood lactic acid, liquid intake and output every 24 hours and the length of ICU stay, mechanical ventilation and CRRT were recorded and compared. Results Length of ICU stay, mechanical ventilation in negative balance group was shorter than those in the positive balance group (t=2.04,2.26,P0.05). At 24 hours and 48 hours after resuscitation, EVLWI, ICP and blood lactic acid in negative balance group were significantly lower than those in the positive balance group(t=4.00,4.43,2.13, 2.90,3.03,3.68,P<0.05)while PO2/FiO2 was significantly higher than that in the positive balance group (t=2.84,2.25,P<0.05). The BNP in negative balance group was significantly lower than that in the positive balance group at 48 hours (t=2.13,P<0.05). Conclusion It should take liquid negative balance for SAP after resuscitation to standard.%目的:探讨容量复苏达标后液体正负平衡对急性重症胰腺炎(SAP)的影响。方法选择经持续肾替代治疗(CRRT)的SAP患者42例,根据复苏达标后48 h液体出入量分为正平衡组及负平衡组,记录并比较复苏达标后0 h、24 h、48 h血流动力学指标、血管外肺水指数(EVLWI)、肺血管通透性指数、氧合指数(PO2/FiO2)、膀胱压(IAP)、心室脑钠肽(BNP)、血乳酸及每24小时液体出入量、ICU住院日、机械通气时间、CRRT时间。结果负平衡组ICU住院日、机械通气时间

  9. Business Cycles, Financial Crises, and Stock Volatility

    OpenAIRE

    G. William Schwert

    1989-01-01

    This paper shows that stock volatility increases during recessions and financial crises from 1834-1987. The evidence reinforces the notion that stock prices are an important business cycle indicator. Using two different statistical models for stock volatility, I show that volatility increases after major financial crises. Moreover. stock volatility decreases and stock prices rise before the Fed increases margin requirements. Thus, there is little reason to believe that public policies can con...

  10. Decomposing European bond and equity volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Charlotte

    The paper investigates volatility spillover from US and aggregate European asset markets into European national asset markets. A main contribution is that bond and equity volatilities are analyzed simultaneously. A new model belonging to the "volatilityspillover" family is suggested: The conditio...... (stock) volatilities are mainly influenced by bond (stock) effects. Global, regional, and local volatility effects are all important. The introduction of the euro is associated with a structural break....

  11. Exponential Smoothing, Long Memory and Volatility Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proietti, Tommaso

    Extracting and forecasting the volatility of financial markets is an important empirical problem. The paper provides a time series characterization of the volatility components arising when the volatility process is fractionally integrated, and proposes a new predictor that can be seen as extensi...... methods for forecasting realized volatility, and that the estimated model confidence sets include the newly proposed fractional lag predictor in all occurrences....

  12. Possible Sources of Polar Volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, P. H.

    2011-12-01

    Extensive analyses of returned Apollo samples demonstrated that the Moon is extremely volatile poor. While this conclusion remains true, various measurements since the late 90's implicated the presence of water: e.g., enhanced reflection of circularly polarized radar signals and suppression of epithermal neutrons near the poles. More recently, traces of H2O have been discovered inside volcanic glass, along with more significant amounts residing in hydrous minerals (apatite) returned from both highland and mare landing sites. Three recent lunar missions (DIXI, M3, Cassini) identified hydrous phases on/near the lunar surface, whereas the LCROSS probe detected significant quantities of volatiles (OH, H2O and other volatiles) excavated by the Centaur impact. These new mission results and sample studies, however, now allow testing different hypotheses for the generation, trapping, and replenishment of these volatiles. Solar-proton implantation must contribute to the hydrous phases in the lunar regolith in order to account for the observed time-varying abundances and occurrence near the lunar equator. This also cannot be the entire story. The relatively low speed LCROSS-Centaur impact (2.5km/s) could not vaporize such hydrous minerals, yet emissions lines of OH (from the thermal disassociation of H2O), along with other compounds (CO2, NH2) were detected within the first second, before ejecta could reach sunlight. Telescopic observations by Potter and Morgan (1985) discovered a tenuous lunar atmosphere of Na, but the LCROSS UV/Vis spectrometer did not detect the Na-D line until after the ejecta reached sunlight (along with a line pair attributed to Ag). With time, other volatile species emerged (OH, CO). The LAMP instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter had a different viewpoint from the side (rather than from above) and detected many other atomic species release by the LCROSS-Centaur impact. Consequently, it appears that there is a stratigraphy for trapped species

  13. Asymmetric conditional volatility in international stock markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Nuno B.; Menezes, Rui; Mendes, Diana A.

    2007-08-01

    Recent studies show that a negative shock in stock prices will generate more volatility than a positive shock of similar magnitude. The aim of this paper is to appraise the hypothesis under which the conditional mean and the conditional variance of stock returns are asymmetric functions of past information. We compare the results for the Portuguese Stock Market Index PSI 20 with six other Stock Market Indices, namely the SP 500, FTSE 100, DAX 30, CAC 40, ASE 20, and IBEX 35. In order to assess asymmetric volatility we use autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity specifications known as TARCH and EGARCH. We also test for asymmetry after controlling for the effect of macroeconomic factors on stock market returns using TAR and M-TAR specifications within a VAR framework. Our results show that the conditional variance is an asymmetric function of past innovations raising proportionately more during market declines, a phenomenon known as the leverage effect. However, when we control for the effect of changes in macroeconomic variables, we find no significant evidence of asymmetric behaviour of the stock market returns. There are some signs that the Portuguese Stock Market tends to show somewhat less market efficiency than other markets since the effect of the shocks appear to take a longer time to dissipate.

  14. Asymmetric Conditional Volatility in International Stock Markets

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, N B; Menezes, R; Ferreira, Nuno B.; Mendes, Diana A.; Menezes, Rui

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies show that a negative shock in stock prices will generate more volatility than a positive shock of similar magnitude. The aim of this paper is to appraise the hypothesis under which the conditional mean and the conditional variance of stock returns are asymmetric functions of past information. We compare the results for the Portuguese Stock Market Index PSI 20 with six other Stock Market Indices, namely the S&P 500, FTSE100, DAX 30, CAC 40, ASE 20, and IBEX 35. In order to assess asymmetric volatility we use autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity specifications known as TARCH and EGARCH. We also test for asymmetry after controlling for the effect of macroeconomic factors on stock market returns using TAR and M-TAR specifications within a VAR framework. Our results show that the conditional variance is an asymmetric function of past innovations raising proportionately more during market declines, a phenomenon known as the leverage effect. However, when we control for the effect of chan...

  15. Oil Volatility Risk and Expected Stock Returns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Pan, Xuhui (Nick)

    After the financialization of commodity futures markets in 2004-05 oil volatility has become a strong predictor of returns and volatility of the overall stock market. Furthermore, stocks' exposure to oil volatility risk now drives the cross-section of expected returns. The difference in average r...

  16. Volatiles in inter-specific bacterial interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tyc, O.; Zweers, H.; De Boer, W.; Garbeva, P.V.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of volatile organic compounds for functioning of microbes is receiving increased research attention. However, to date very little is known on how inter-specific bacterial interactions effect volatiles production as most studies have been focused on volatiles produced by monocultures o

  17. Volatiles in inter-specific bacterial interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tyc, O.; Zweers, H.; De Boer, W.; Garbeva, P.V.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of volatile organic compounds for functioning of microbes is receiving increased research attention. However, to date very little is known on how inter-specific bacterial interactions effect volatiles production as most studies have been focused on volatiles produced by monocultures

  18. Ammonia volatilization from intensively managed dairy pastures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bussink, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of this thesis are (i) to quantify NH 3 volatilization from grassland, (ii) to gain understanding of the NH3 volatilization processes on grassland and (iii) to study measures how to reduce NH 3 volatilization from gra

  19. Oil Volatility Risk and Expected Stock Returns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Pan, Xuhui (Nick)

    After the financialization of commodity futures markets in 2004-05 oil volatility has become a strong predictor of returns and volatility of the overall stock market. Furthermore, stocks' exposure to oil volatility risk now drives the cross-section of expected returns. The difference in average r...

  20. Cost Linkages Transmit Volatility Across Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Daniel Xuyen; Schaur, Georg

    to link the domestic and export supply costs. This theoretical contribution has two new implications for the exporting firm. First, the demand volatility in the foreign market now directly affects the firm's domestic sales volatility. Second, firms hedge domestic demand volatility with exports. The model...

  1. Volatility of organic aerosol and its components in the megacity of Paris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciga, Andrea; Karnezi, Eleni; Kostenidou, Evangelia; Hildebrandt, Lea; Psichoudaki, Magda; Engelhart, Gabriella J.; Lee, Byong-Hyoek; Crippa, Monica; Prévôt, André S. H.; Baltensperger, Urs; Pandis, Spyros N.

    2016-02-01

    Using a mass transfer model and the volatility basis set, we estimate the volatility distribution for the organic aerosol (OA) components during summer and winter in Paris, France as part of the collaborative project MEGAPOLI. The concentrations of the OA components as a function of temperature were measured combining data from a thermodenuder and an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis. The hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) had similar volatility distributions for the summer and winter campaigns with half of the material in the saturation concentration bin of 10 µg m-3 and another 35-40 % consisting of low and extremely low volatility organic compounds (LVOCs with effective saturation concentrations C* of 10-3-0.1 µg m-3 and ELVOCs C* less or equal than 10-4 µg m-3, respectively). The winter cooking OA (COA) was more than an order of magnitude less volatile than the summer COA. The low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA) factor detected in the summer had the lowest volatility of all the derived factors and consisted almost exclusively of ELVOCs. The volatility for the semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA) was significantly higher than that of the LV-OOA, containing both semi-volatile organic components (SVOCs with C* in the 1-100 µg m-3 range) and LVOCs. The oxygenated OA (OOA) factor in winter consisted of SVOCs (45 %), LVOCs (25 %) and ELVOCs (30 %). The volatility of marine OA (MOA) was higher than that of the other factors containing around 60 % SVOCs. The biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor contained components with a wide range of volatilities with significant contributions from both SVOCs (50 %) and LVOCs (30 %). Finally, combining the bulk average O : C ratios and volatility distributions of the various factors, our results are placed into the two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS) framework. The OA factors cover a broad spectrum of volatilities with no direct link between the average volatility and

  2. Fast and sensitive method for detecting volatile species in liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trimarco, Daniel Bøndergaard; Pedersen, Thomas; Hansen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    to a mass spectrometer through a narrow capillary without the use of differential pumping. This method inherits features from differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) and membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS), but brings the best of both worlds, i.e., the fast time-response of a DEMS system...

  3. A device for extracting volatile species from a liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    ) which provides a significant pressure reduction, e.g. from atmospheric pressure in the chamber (4) to near-vacuum suitable for an MS. The invention combines the best of two worlds, i.e. the fast time-response of a DEMS system and the high sensitivity of a MIMS system, since a differential pumping stage...

  4. Experimental Measurements of Spreading of Volatile Liquid Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Neng-Li; Chao, David F.

    2001-01-01

    Based on the laser shadowgraphic system used by the first author of the present paper, a simple optical system, which combined the laser shadowgraphy and the direct magnified-photography, has been developed to measure the contact angle, the spreading speed, and the evaporation rate. Additionally, the system can also visualize thermocapillary convection inside of a sessile drop simultaneously. The experimental results show that evaporation/condensation and thermocapillary convection in the sessile drop induced by the evaporation strongly affects the wetting and spreading of the drop. Condensation always promotes the wetting and spreading of the drop. Evaporation may increase or decrease the contact angle of the evaporating sessile drops, depending on the evaporation rate. The thermocapillary convection in the drop induced by the evaporation enhances the effects of evaporation to suppress the spreading.

  5. Quantifying the volatility of organic aerosol in the southeastern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Provat K.; Khlystov, Andrey; Yahya, Khairunnisa; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Lu; Ng, Nga L.; Grieshop, Andrew P.

    2017-01-01

    The volatility of organic aerosols (OA) has emerged as a property of primary importance in understanding their atmospheric life cycle, and thus abundance and transport. However, quantitative estimates of the thermodynamic (volatility, water solubility) and kinetic parameters dictating ambient-OA gas-particle partitioning, such as saturation concentrations (C∗), enthalpy of evaporation (ΔHvap), and evaporation coefficient (γe), are highly uncertain. Here, we present measurements of ambient-OA volatility at two sites in the southeastern US, one at a rural setting in Alabama dominated by biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) as part of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in June-July 2013, and another at a more anthropogenically influenced urban location in North Carolina during October-November 2013. These measurements applied a dual-thermodenuder (TD) system, in which temperature and residence times are varied in parallel to constrain equilibrium and kinetic aerosol volatility properties. Gas-particle partitioning parameters were determined via evaporation kinetic model fits to the dual-TD observations. OA volatility parameter values derived from both datasets were similar despite the fact that measurements were collected in distinct settings and seasons. The OA volatility distributions also did not vary dramatically over the campaign period or strongly correlate with OA components identified via positive matrix factorization of aerosol mass spectrometer data. A large portion (40-70 %) of measured ambient OA at both sites was composed of very-low-volatility organics (C∗ ≤ 0.1 µg m-3). An effective ΔHvap of bulk OA of ˜ 80-100 kJ mol-1 and a γe value of ˜ 0.5 best describe the evaporation observed in the TDs. This range of ΔHvap values is substantially higher than that typically assumed for simulating OA in atmospheric models (30-40 kJ mol-1). TD data indicate that γe is on the order of 0.1 to 0.5, indicating that repartitioning

  6. Level Shifts in Volatility and the Implied-Realized Volatility Relation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bent Jesper; de Magistris, Paolo Santucci

    to the multivariate case of the univariate level shift technique by Lu and Perron (2008). An application to the S&P500 index and a simulation experiment show that the recently documented empirical properties of strong persistence in volatility and forecastability of future realized volatility from current implied...... volatility, which have been interpreted as long memory (or fractional integration) in volatility and fractional cointegration between implied and realized volatility, are accounted for by occasional common level shifts....

  7. Liquidity and Risk Management

    OpenAIRE

    Holmström, Bengt; Tirole, Jean

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a model of the interaction between risk-management practices and market liquidity. On one hand, tighter risk management reduces the maximum position an institution can take, thus the amount of liquidity it can offer to the market. On the other hand, risk managers can take into account that lower liquidity amplifies the effective risk of a position by lengthening the time it takes to sell it. The main result of the paper is that a feedback effect can arise: tighter risk man...

  8. Free float and stochastic volatility: the experience of a small open economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selçuk, Faruk

    2004-11-01

    Following a dramatic collapse of a fixed exchange rate based inflation stabilization program, Turkey moved into a free floating exchange rate system in February 2001. In this paper, an asymmetric stochastic volatility model of the foreign exchange rate in Turkey is estimated for the floating period. It is shown that there is a positive relation between the exchange return and its volatility. Particularly, an increase in the return at time t results in an increase in volatility at time t+1. However, the effect is asymmetric: a decrease in the exchange rate return at time t causes a relatively less decrease in volatility at time t+1. The results imply that a central bank with a volatility smoothing policy would be biased in viewing the shocks to the exchange rate in favor of appreciation. The bias would increase if the bank is also following an inflation targeting policy.

  9. Direct numerical simulation of gaseous mixing layers laden with multicomponent-liquid drops: liquid-specific effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Clercq, Patrick C.; Bellan, Josette

    2005-06-01

    A representation of multicomponent-liquid (MC-liquid) composition as a linear combination of two single-Gamma probability distribution functions (PDFs) is used to describe a large number of MC-liquid drops evaporating in a gas flow. The PDF, called the double-Gamma PDF, depends on the molar mass. The gas-phase conservation equations are written in an Eulerian frame and the drops are described in a Lagrangian frame. Gas conservation equations for mass, momentum, species and energy are combined with differential conservation equations for the first four moments of the gas-composition PDF and coupled to the perfect gas equation of state. Source terms in all conservation equations account for the gas/drop interaction. The drop governing equations encompass differential conservation statements for position, mass, momentum, energy and four moments of the liquid-composition PDF. Simulations are performed for a three-dimensional mixing layer whose lower stream is initially laden with drops colder than the surrounding gas. Initial perturbations excite the layer to promote the double pairing of its four initial spanwise vortices to an ultimate vortex. During the layer evolution, the drops heat and evaporate. The results address the layer evolution, and the state of the gas and drops when layers reach a momentum-thickness maximum past the double vortex pairing. Of interest is the influence of the liquid composition on the development of the vortical features of the flow, on the vortical state reached after the second pairing, and on the gas temperature and composition. The MC-liquid simulations are initiated with a single-Gamma PDF composition so as to explore the development of the double-Gamma PDF. Examination of equivalent simulations with n-decane, diesel and three kerosenes as the liquid, permits assessment of the single-species versus the MC-liquid aspect, and of mixture composition specific effects. Global layer growth and global rotational characteristics are

  10. The economic value of realized volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter; Feunou, Bruno; Jacobs, Kris

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have documented that daily realized volatility estimates based on intraday returns provide volatility forecasts that are superior to forecasts constructed from daily returns only. We investigate whether these forecasting improvements translate into economic value added. To do so, we...... develop a new class of affine discrete-time option valuation models that use daily returns as well as realized volatility. We derive convenient closed-form option valuation formulas, and we assess the option valuation properties using Standard & Poor’s (S&P) 500 return and option data. We find...... that realized volatility reduces the pricing errors of the benchmark model significantly across moneyness, maturity, and volatility levels....

  11. DOES CURRENCY SUBSTITUTION AFFECT EXCHANGE RATE VOLATILITY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisao Kumamoto

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the impacts of the degree of currency substitution on nominal exchange rate volatility in seven countries (Indonesia, the Philippines, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Argentina, and Peru. We use the Threshold ARCH model to consider the ratchet effect of currency substitution and sample periods in the 2000s, during which time the economies of the sample countries stabilized, while the U.S. dollar and euro depreciated against other major currencies following the recent global financial crisis. The presented empirical analyses show that the degree of currency substitution has significant positive effects on the conditional variance of the depreciation rate of the nominal exchange rate in most sample countries. Moreover, a shock to the depreciation rate of the nominal exchange rate has asymmetric effects on the conditional variance, depending on the sign. One possible explanation for these differential effects is the existence of the ratchet effect of currency substitution.

  12. [Analysis of human tissue samples for volatile fire accelerants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treibs, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    In police investigations of fires, the cause of a fire and the fire debris analysis regarding traces of fire accelerants are important aspects for forensic scientists. Established analytical procedures were recently applied to the remains of fire victims. When examining lung tissue samples, vapors inhaled from volatile ignitable liquids could be identified and differentiated from products of pyrolysis caused by the fire. In addition to the medico-legal results this evidence allowed to draw conclusions as to whether the fire victim was still alive when the fire started.

  13. Tequila volatile characterization and ethyl ester determination by solid phase microextraction gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda; González-Córdova, Aarón Fernando; del Carmen Estrada-Montoya, María

    2004-09-08

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography were used for tequila volatile characterization and ethyl ester quantitation. Several factors determined the differences in tequila volatile profiles obtained by the SPME technique, namely, sampling mode, fiber coating, and fiber exposure time. Each of these factors determined the most suitable conditions for the analysis of volatile profiles in tequila. Volatile extraction consisted of placing 40 mL of tequila in a sealed vial kept at 40 degrees C. A poly(dimethylsiloxane) fiber was immersed in the liquid for 60 min and desorbed for 5 min into the gas chromatograph. The identified volatiles by mass spectrometry were mainly alcohols, esters, and ketones. The calibration curves for ethyl hexanoate, octanoate, and decanoate followed linear relationships with highly significant (p tequila samples. Quantitative differences in ethyl esters were found for the four most commonly known tequila types: silver, gold, aged, and extra-aged.

  14. Behavior of hydrophobic ionic liquids as liquid membranes on phenol removal: Experimental study and optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Ng, Y S; Hashim, M A

    2014-01-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids show potential as an alternative to conventional organic membrane solvents mainly due to their properties of low vapor pressure, low volatility and they are often stable. In the present work, the technical feasibilities of room temperature ionic liquids as bulk liquid membranes for phenol removal were investigated experimentally. Three ionic liquids with high hydrophobicity were used and their phenol removal efficiency, membrane stability and membrane loss were studied. Besides that, the effects of several parameters, namely feed phase pH, feed concentration, NaOH concentration and stirring speeds on the performance of best ionic liquid membrane were also evaluated. Lastly, an optimization study on bulk ionic liquid membrane was conducted and the maximum phenol removal efficiency was compared with the organic liquid membranes. The preliminary study shows that high phenol extraction and stripping efficiencies of 96.21% and 98.10%, respectively can be achieved by ionic liquid memb...

  15. Arbitrage and Volatility in Chinese Stock's Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shu Quan; Ito, Takao; Zhang, Jianbo

    From the point of view of no-arbitrage pricing, what matters is how much volatility the stock has, for volatility measures the amount of profit that can be made from shorting stocks and purchasing options. With the short-sales constraints or in the absence of options, however, high volatility is likely to mean arbitrage from stock market. As emerging stock markets for China, investors are increasingly concerned about volatilities of Chinese two stock markets. We estimate volatility's models for Chinese stock markets' indexes using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method and GARCH. We find that estimated values of volatility parameters are very high for all data frequencies. It suggests that stock returns are extremely volatile even at long term intervals in Chinese markets. Furthermore, this result could be considered that there seems to be arbitrage opportunities in Chinese stock markets.

  16. Forecasting volatility of crude oil markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sang Hoon [Department of Business Administration, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, 660-701 (Korea); Kang, Sang-Mok; Yoon, Seong-Min [Department of Economics, Pusan National University, Busan, 609-735 (Korea)

    2009-01-15

    This article investigates the efficacy of a volatility model for three crude oil markets - Brent, Dubai, and West Texas Intermediate (WTI) - with regard to its ability to forecast and identify volatility stylized facts, in particular volatility persistence or long memory. In this context, we assess persistence in the volatility of the three crude oil prices using conditional volatility models. The CGARCH and FIGARCH models are better equipped to capture persistence than are the GARCH and IGARCH models. The CGARCH and FIGARCH models also provide superior performance in out-of-sample volatility forecasts. We conclude that the CGARCH and FIGARCH models are useful for modeling and forecasting persistence in the volatility of crude oil prices. (author)

  17. Delineating Effects of Ionic Strength and Suspended Solids on Ammonia Volatilization from Dairy Manure Slurry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koirala, K.

    2014-12-01

    Ammonia emission is a major concern due to its adverse effects on animal and human health. Ionic strength and suspended solids play key roles in the ammonia volatilization process. These two parameters, however, are usually lumped together in form of total solids. The objective of this study was to separate the contribution of suspended solids (SS) from that of ionic strength (IS) on ammonia volatilization in liquid dairy manure. A two-way factorial experiment was conducted to simultaneously test the effects of IS and SS on ammonium dissociation: a key element of the ammonia volatilization process. The fraction of ammonia (β) in total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN) was experimentally determined in a convective emission chamber, for each level of SS and IS, at a constant wind speed of 1.5 m s-1, and air and liquid temperature of 25°C. The two way analysis of variance showed a significant effect of SS concentration (p = 0.04) on fraction of ammonia in the liquid dairy manure, while the effect of ionic strength was marginal (p = 0.05). The highest dissociation of ammonium was observed in manure with the lowest SS concentration (0%) and the lowest ionic strength (0.10 mol L-1). Significant increases in suspended solids concentration and ionic strength were necessary to influence the ammonium dissociation in dairy manure. Results revealed that substantially high content of suspended solids (> 3.0%) or relatively high dilution of manure with water (30%) were necessary for these two parameters to play significant roles in the ammonia volatilization mechanism in liquid dairy manure. Results also showed that the β was more sensitive to the changes in suspended solids concentration than in the changes in ionic strength within the ranges of SS and IS examined in this study. Overall, the SS and IS effects on ammonium dissociation (and by extension on ammonia volatilization process) were thus found negligible within the normal ranges of liquid dairy manure characteristics.

  18. Volatiles in Inter-Specific Bacterial Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyc, Olaf; Zweers, Hans; de Boer, Wietse; Garbeva, Paolina

    2015-01-01

    The importance of volatile organic compounds for functioning of microbes is receiving increased research attention. However, to date very little is known on how inter-specific bacterial interactions effect volatiles production as most studies have been focused on volatiles produced by monocultures of well-described bacterial genera. In this study we aimed to understand how inter-specific bacterial interactions affect the composition, production and activity of volatiles. Four phylogenetically different bacterial species namely: Chryseobacterium, Dyella, Janthinobacterium, and Tsukamurella were selected. Earlier results had shown that pairwise combinations of these bacteria induced antimicrobial activity in agar media whereas this was not the case for monocultures. In the current study, we examined if these observations were also reflected by the production of antimicrobial volatiles. Thus, the identity and antimicrobial activity of volatiles produced by the bacteria were determined in monoculture as well in pairwise combinations. Antimicrobial activity of the volatiles was assessed against fungal, oomycetal, and bacterial model organisms. Our results revealed that inter-specific bacterial interactions affected volatiles blend composition. Fungi and oomycetes showed high sensitivity to bacterial volatiles whereas the effect of volatiles on bacteria varied between no effects, growth inhibition to growth promotion depending on the volatile blend composition. In total 35 volatile compounds were detected most of which were sulfur-containing compounds. Two commonly produced sulfur-containing volatile compounds (dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide) were tested for their effect on three target bacteria. Here, we display the importance of inter-specific interactions on bacterial volatiles production and their antimicrobial activities.

  19. Volatiles in inter-specific bacterial interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf eTyc

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance of volatile organic compounds for functioning of microbes is receiving increased research attention. However, to date very little is known on how inter-specific bacterial interactions effect volatiles production as most studies have been focused on volatiles produced by monocultures of well described bacterial genera. In this study we aimed to understand how inter-specific bacterial interactions affect the composition, production and activity of volatiles. Four phylogenetically different bacterial species namely: Chryseobacterium, Dyella, Janthinobacterium and Tsukamurella were selected. Earlier results had shown that pairwise combinations of these bacteria induced antimicrobial activity in agar media whereas this was not the case for monocultures. In the current study, we examined if these observations were also reflected by the production of antimicrobial volatiles. Thus, the identity and antimicrobial activity of volatiles produced by the bacteria were determined in monoculture as well in pairwise combinations. Antimicrobial activity of the volatiles was assessed against fungal, oomycetal and bacterial model organisms. Our results revealed that inter-specific bacterial interactions affected volatiles blend composition. Fungi and oomycetes showed high sensitivity to bacterial volatiles whereas the effect of volatiles on bacteria varied between no effects, growth inhibition to growth promotion depending on the volatile blend composition. In total 35 volatile compounds were detected most of which were sulfur-containing compounds. Two commonly produced sulfur-containing volatile compounds (dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide were tested for their effect on three target bacteria. Here we display the importance of inter-specific interactions on bacterial volatiles production and their antimicrobial activities.

  20. Comparing possible proxies of corporate bond liquidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Houweling (Patrick); A.A. Mentink; A.C.F. Vorst (Ton)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWe consider eight different proxies (issued amount, coupon, listed, age, missing prices, yield volatility, number of contributors and yield dispersion) to measure corporate bond liquidity and use a five-variable model to control for interest rate risk, credit risk, maturity, rating and c

  1. How to measure Corporate Bond Liquidity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Houweling (Patrick); A.A. Mentink; A.C.F. Vorst (Ton)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWe consider eight different measures (issued amount, coupon, listed, age, missing prices, price volatility, number of contributors and yield dispersion) to approximate corporate bond liquidity and use a five-variable model to control for maturity, credit and currency differences between

  2. Method validation for the analysis of 169 pesticides in soya grain, without clean up, by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using positive and negative electrospray ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzutti, Ionara R; de Kok, André; Zanella, Renato; Adaime, Martha B; Hiemstra, Maurice; Wickert, Cristine; Prestes, Osmar D

    2007-02-23

    Part of a comprehensive study on the comparison of different extraction methods, GC-MS(/MS) and LC-MS/MS detection methods and modes, for the analysis of soya samples is described in this paper. The validation of an acetone-based extraction method for analysis of 169 pesticides in soya, using LC-MS/MS positive and negative electrospray ionisation (ESI) mode, is reported. Samples (5 g) were soaked with 10 g water and subsequently extracted with 100 mL of a mixture of acetone, dichloromethane and light petroleum (1:1:1), in the presence of 15 g anhydrous sodium sulphate. After centrifugation, aliquots of the extract were evaporated and reconstituted in 1.0 mL of methanol, before direct injection of the final extract (corresponding with 0.05 g soya mL(-1)) into the LC-MS/MS system. Linearity, r(2) of calibration curves, instrument limit of detection/quantitation (LOD/LOQ) and matrix effect were evaluated, based on seven concentrations measured in 6-fold. Good linearity (at least r(2)> or =0.99) of the calibration curves was obtained over the range from 0.1 or 0.25 to 10.0 ng mL(-1), corresponding with pesticide concentrations in soya bean extract of 2 or 5-200 microg kg(-1). Instrument LOD values generally were 0.1 or 0.25 ng mL(-1). Matrix effects were negligible for approximately 90% of the pesticides. The accuracy, precision and method LOQ were determined via recovery experiments, spiking soya at 10, 50, 100 microg kg(-1), six replicates per level. In both ESI modes, method LOQ values were mostly 10 or 50 microg kg(-1) and more than 70% of pesticides analysed by each mode met the acceptability criteria of recovery (70-120%) and RSD (soya, without cleanup.

  3. Human skin volatiles: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormont, Laurent; Bessière, Jean-Marie; Cohuet, Anna

    2013-05-01

    Odors emitted by human skin are of great interest to biologists in many fields; applications range from forensic studies to diagnostic tools, the design of perfumes and deodorants, and the ecology of blood-sucking insect vectors of human disease. Numerous studies have investigated the chemical composition of skin odors, and various sampling methods have been used for this purpose. The literature shows that the chemical profile of skin volatiles varies greatly among studies, and the use of different sampling procedures is probably responsible for some of these variations. To our knowledge, this is the first review focused on human skin volatile compounds. We detail the different sampling techniques, each with its own set of advantages and disadvantages, which have been used for the collection of skin odors from different parts of the human body. We present the main skin volatile compounds found in these studies, with particular emphasis on the most frequently studied body regions, axillae, hands, and feet. We propose future directions for promising experimental studies on odors from human skin, particularly in relation to the chemical ecology of blood-sucking insects.

  4. Volatile and non-volatile/semi-volatile compounds and in vitro bioactive properties of Chilean Ulmo (Eucryphia cordifolia Cav.) honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Francisca; Torres, Paulina; Oomah, B Dave; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Massarioli, Adna Prado; Martín-Venegas, Raquel; Albarral-Ávila, Vicenta; Burgos-Díaz, César; Ferrer, Ruth; Rubilar, Mónica

    2017-04-01

    Ulmo honey originating from Eucryphia cordifolia tree, known locally in the Araucania region as the Ulmo tree is a natural product with valuable nutritional and medicinal qualities. It has been used in the Mapuche culture to treat infections. This study aimed to identify the volatile and non-volatile/semi-volatile compounds of Ulmo honey and elucidate its in vitro biological properties by evaluating its antioxidant, antibacterial, antiproliferative and hemolytic properties and cytotoxicity in Caco-2 cells. Headspace volatiles of Ulmo honey were isolated by solid-phase microextraction (SPME); non-volatiles/semi-volatiles were obtained by removing all saccharides with acidified water and the compounds were identified by GC/MS analysis. Ulmo honey volatiles consisted of 50 compounds predominated by 20 flavor components. Two of the volatile compounds, lyrame and anethol have never been reported before as honey compounds. The non-volatile/semi-volatile components of Ulmo honey comprised 27 compounds including 13 benzene derivatives accounting 75% of the total peak area. Ulmo honey exhibited weak antioxidant activity but strong antibacterial activity particularly against gram-negative bacteria and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the main strain involved in wounds and skin infections. At concentrations >0.5%, Ulmo honey reduced Caco-2 cell viability, released lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in a dose dependent manner in the presence of foetal bovine serum (FBS). The wide array of volatile and non-volatile/semi-volatile constituents of Ulmo honey rich in benzene derivatives may partly account for its strong antibacterial and antiproliferative properties important for its therapeutic use. Our results indicate that Ulmo honey can potentially inhibit cancer growth at least partly by modulating oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Robust and versatile ionic liquid microarrays achieved by microcontact printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, Christian A.; Ge, Mengchen; Zhao, Chuan

    2014-04-01

    Lab-on-a-chip and miniaturized systems have gained significant popularity motivated by marked differences in material performance at the micro-to-nano-scale realm. However, to fully exploit micro-to-nano-scale chemistry, solvent volatility and lack of reproducibility need to be overcome. Here, we combine the non-volatile and versatile nature of ionic liquids with microcontact printing in an attempt to establish a facile protocol for high throughput fabrication of open microreactors and microfluidics. The micropatterned ionic liquid droplets have been demonstrated as electrochemical cells and reactors for microfabrication of metals and charge transfer complexes, substrates for immobilization of proteins and as membrane-free high-performance amperometric gas sensor arrays. The results suggest that miniaturized ionic liquid systems can be used to solve the problems of solvent volatility and slow mass transport in viscous ionic liquids in lab-on-a-chip devices, thus providing a versatile platform for a diverse number of applications.

  6. EPA Method 8321B (SW-846): Solvent-Extractable Nonvolatile Compounds by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Thermospray-Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-TS-MS) or Ultraviolet (UV) Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Method 8321B describes procedures for preparation and analysis of solid, aqueous liquid, drinking water and wipe samples using high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry for extractable non-volatile compounds.

  7. Glutathione protects Candida albicans against horseradish volatile oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertóti, Regina; Vasas, Gábor; Gonda, Sándor; Nguyen, Nhat Minh; Szőke, Éva; Jakab, Ágnes; Pócsi, István; Emri, Tamás

    2016-10-01

    Horseradish essential oil (HREO; a natural mixture of different isothiocyanates) had strong fungicide effect against Candida albicans both in volatile and liquid phase. In liquid phase this antifungal effect was more significant than those of its main components allyl, and 2-phenylethyl isothiocyanate. HREO, at sublethal concentration, induced oxidative stress which was characterized with elevated superoxide content and up-regulated specific glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase and superoxide dismutase activities. Induction of specific glutathione S-transferase activities as marker of glutathione (GSH) dependent detoxification was also observed. At higher concentration, HREO depleted the GSH pool, increased heavily the superoxide production and killed the cells rapidly. HREO and the GSH pool depleting agent, 1-chlore-2,4-dinitrobenzene showed strong synergism when they were applied together to kill C. albicans cells. Based on all these, we assume that GSH metabolism protects fungi against isothiocyanates. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Substitution of carcinogenic solvent dichloromethane for the extraction of volatile compounds in a fat-free model food system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayot, Nathalie; Lafarge, Céline; Bou-Maroun, Elias; Cayot, Philippe

    2016-07-22

    Dichloromethane is known as a very efficient solvent, but, as other halogenated solvents, is recognized as a hazardous product (CMR substance). The objective of the present work is to propose substitution solvent for the extraction of volatile compounds. The most important physico-chemical parameters in the choice of an appropriate extraction solvent of volatile compounds are reviewed. Various solvents are selected on this basis and on their hazard characteristics. The selected solvents, safer than dichloromethane, are compared using the extraction efficiency of volatile compounds from a model food product able to interact with volatile compounds. Volatile compounds with different hydrophobicity are used. High extraction yields were positively correlated with high boiling points and high Log Kow values of volatile compounds. Mixtures of solvents such as azeotrope propan-2-one/cyclopentane, azeotrope ethyl acetate/ethanol, and mixture ethyl acetate/ethanol (3:1, v/v) gave higher extraction yields than those obtained with dichloromethane.

  9. Dynamic Volatility Arbitrage: The advents of long/short trading strategies with dynamic participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorn, Jochen

    not generate enough profit On well-developed markets. Dynamic participation features on cross asset portfolios are at first sight a remedy to that dilemma. Based on volatility thresholds and portfolio re-balancing, the fund engineers try to create a "volatility guaranteed" investment opportunity by surfing...... concepts, next to nothing is known about position reverting strategies and how, and -even more important- in which context they are applied in practice. In the recent market downturn only one sector generated significant profits for the leading investment banks: Volatility trading activities, namely...... on Forex, interest rates and commodities. If an investor positions himself on the (volatility) market within a long/short trading framework, he typically bets on a traditional mispricing arbitrage. However as this corresponds to a call spread with equal exercise prices, this strategy alone would...

  10. IMPAC OF VOLATILITY EXCHANGE RATES ON INDONESIAN ELECTRONIC IMPORTS FROM INTRA AND EXTRA ASEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Muklis

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the effects of exchange rates volatility and Gross Domestic Product (GDP onelectronic commodity import demand in Indonesia from intra and extra ASEAN. It applies an ErrorCorrection Model along with Dickey-Fuller and Augmented Dickey-Fuller tests. It finds that Indonesianimport demand for electronic commodity is significantly affected by GDP only in the shortrun. It also finds that exchange rates volatility in the short run have a negative effect on import demandfrom intra ASEAN and have a positive effect from extra ASEAN. In the long term, Indonesianimport demand from extra ASEAN is positively affected only by exchange rates volatility.Keywords: Exchange rates volatility, error correction model, gross domestic product, ASEANJEL classification numbers: F14, F31

  11. Origin of Volatiles in Earth: Indigenous Versus Exogenous Sources Based on Highly Siderophile, Volatile Siderophile, and Light Volatile Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Danielson, L.; Pando, K. M.; Marin, N.; Nickodem, K.

    2015-01-01

    Origin of Earth's volatiles has traditionally been ascribed to late accretion of material after major differentiation events - chondrites, comets, ice or other exogenous sources. A competing theory is that the Earth accreted its volatiles as it was built, thus water and other building blocks were present early and during differentiation and core formation (indigenous). Here we discuss geochemical evidence from three groups of elements that suggests Earth's volatiles were acquired during accretion and did not require additional sources after differentiation.

  12. Intensified tuberculosis case-finding in HIV-positive adults managed at Ethiopian health centers: diagnostic yield of Xpert MTB/RIF compared with smear microscopy and liquid culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taye T Balcha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Detection of active tuberculosis (TB before antiretroviral therapy (ART initiation is important, but optimal diagnostic methods for use in resource-limited settings are lacking. We assessed the prevalence of TB, evaluated the diagnostic yield of Xpert MTB/RIF in comparison with smear microscopy and culture, and the impact of Xpert results on clinical management in HIV-positive adults eligible for ART at health centers in a region of Ethiopia. METHODS: Participants were prospectively recruited and followed up at 5 health centers. Trained nurses collected data on socio-demographic characteristics, medical history and symptoms, and performed physical examination. Two paired morning sputum samples were obtained, and lymph node aspirates in case of lymphadenopathy. Diagnostic yield of Xpert MTB/RIF in sputum was compared with smear microscopy and liquid culture. RESULTS: TB was diagnosed in 145/812 participants (17.9%, with bacteriological confirmation in 137 (16.9%. Among bacteriologically confirmed cases, 31 were smear-positive (22.6%, 96 were Xpert-positive (70.1%, and 123 were culture-positive (89.8%. Xpert MTB/RIF increased the TB detection rate by 64 cases (47.4% compared with smear microscopy. The overall sensitivity of Xpert MTB/RIF was 66.4%, and was not significantly lower when testing one compared with two samples. While Xpert MTB/RIF was 46.7% sensitive among patients with CD4 cell counts >200 cells/mm(3, this increased to 82.9% in those with CD4 cell counts ≤100 cells/mm(3. Compared with Xpert-positive TB patients, Xpert-negative cases had less advanced HIV and TB disease characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: Previously undiagnosed TB is common among HIV-positive individuals managed in Ethiopian health centers. Xpert MTB/RIF increased TB case detection, especially in patients with advanced immunosuppression. An algorithm based on the use of a single morning sputum sample for individuals with negative sputum smear microscopy could

  13. Intensified tuberculosis case-finding in HIV-positive adults managed at Ethiopian health centers: diagnostic yield of Xpert MTB/RIF compared with smear microscopy and liquid culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcha, Taye T; Sturegård, Erik; Winqvist, Niclas; Skogmar, Sten; Reepalu, Anton; Jemal, Zelalem Habtamu; Tibesso, Gudeta; Schön, Thomas; Björkman, Per

    2014-01-01

    Detection of active tuberculosis (TB) before antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation is important, but optimal diagnostic methods for use in resource-limited settings are lacking. We assessed the prevalence of TB, evaluated the diagnostic yield of Xpert MTB/RIF in comparison with smear microscopy and culture, and the impact of Xpert results on clinical management in HIV-positive adults eligible for ART at health centers in a region of Ethiopia. Participants were prospectively recruited and followed up at 5 health centers. Trained nurses collected data on socio-demographic characteristics, medical history and symptoms, and performed physical examination. Two paired morning sputum samples were obtained, and lymph node aspirates in case of lymphadenopathy. Diagnostic yield of Xpert MTB/RIF in sputum was compared with smear microscopy and liquid culture. TB was diagnosed in 145/812 participants (17.9%), with bacteriological confirmation in 137 (16.9%). Among bacteriologically confirmed cases, 31 were smear-positive (22.6%), 96 were Xpert-positive (70.1%), and 123 were culture-positive (89.8%). Xpert MTB/RIF increased the TB detection rate by 64 cases (47.4%) compared with smear microscopy. The overall sensitivity of Xpert MTB/RIF was 66.4%, and was not significantly lower when testing one compared with two samples. While Xpert MTB/RIF was 46.7% sensitive among patients with CD4 cell counts >200 cells/mm(3), this increased to 82.9% in those with CD4 cell counts ≤100 cells/mm(3). Compared with Xpert-positive TB patients, Xpert-negative cases had less advanced HIV and TB disease characteristics. Previously undiagnosed TB is common among HIV-positive individuals managed in Ethiopian health centers. Xpert MTB/RIF increased TB case detection, especially in patients with advanced immunosuppression. An algorithm based on the use of a single morning sputum sample for individuals with negative sputum smear microscopy could be considered for intensified case finding in patients

  14. Chemical Compositions and Aroma Evaluation of Volatile Oil from the Industrial Cultivation Medium of Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Toshirou; Usami, Atsushi; Nakaya, Satoshi; Maeba, Keisuke; Yonejima, Yasunori; Toyoda, Masanori; Ikeda, Atsushi; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is one of the major lactic acid bacterium (LAB) species colonizing the intestines of animals and humans. The characteristic odor of the volatile oils obtained from both the liquid medium after incubation (MAI) and liquid medium before incubation (MBI) in the cultivation process of E. faecalis was investigated to determine the utility of the liquid medium. In total, fifty-six and thirty-two compounds were detected in the volatile oils from the MAI (MAI oil) and MBI (MBI oil), respectively. The principle components of MAI oil were 2,5-dimethylpyrazine (19.3%), phenylacetaldehyde (19.3%), and phenylethyl alcohol (9.3%). The aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) method was performed using gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O). The total number of aroma-active compounds identified in the volatile oil from MBI and MAI was thirteen compounds; in particular, 5-methyl-2-furanmethanol, phenylacetaldehyde, and phenylethyl alcohol were the most primary aroma-active compounds in MAI oil. These results imply that the industrial cultivation medium after incubation of E. faecalis may be utilized as a source of volatile oils.

  15. Influence of foam structure on the release kinetics of volatiles from espresso coffee prior to consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dold, Susanne; Lindinger, Christian; Kolodziejczyk, Eric; Pollien, Philippe; Ali, Santo; Germain, Juan Carlos; Perin, Sonia Garcia; Pineau, Nicolas; Folmer, Britta; Engel, Karl-Heinz; Barron, Denis; Hartmann, Christoph

    2011-10-26

    The relationship between the physical structure of espresso coffee foam, called crema, and the above-the-cup aroma release was studied. Espresso coffee samples were produced using the Nespresso extraction system. The samples were extracted with water with different levels of mineral content, which resulted in liquid phases with similar volatile profiles but foams with different structure properties. The structure parameters foam volume, foam drainage, and lamella film thickness at the foam surface were quantified using computer-assisted microscopic image analysis and a digital caliper. The above-the-cup volatile concentration was measured online by using PTR-MS and headspace sampling. A correlation study was done between crema structure parameters and above-the-cup volatile concentration. In the first 2.5 min after the start of the coffee extraction, the presence of foam induced an increase of concentration of selected volatile markers, independently if the crema was of high or low stability. At times longer than 2.5 min, the aroma marker concentration depends on both the stability of the crema and the volatility of the specific aroma compounds. Mechanisms of above-the-cup volatile release involved gas bubble stability, evaporation, and diffusion. It was concluded that after the initial aroma burst (during the first 2-3 min after the beginning of extraction), for the present sample space a crema of high stability provides a stronger aroma barrier over several minutes.

  16. Fast Ignition and Sustained Combustion of Ionic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Prakash B. (Inventor); Piper, Lawrence G. (Inventor); Oakes, David B. (Inventor); Sabourin, Justin L. (Inventor); Hicks, Adam J. (Inventor); Green, B. David (Inventor); Tsinberg, Anait (Inventor); Dokhan, Allan (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A catalyst free method of igniting an ionic liquid is provided. The method can include mixing a liquid hypergol with a HAN (Hydroxylammonium nitrate)-based ionic liquid to ignite the HAN-based ionic liquid in the absence of a catalyst. The HAN-based ionic liquid and the liquid hypergol can be injected into a combustion chamber. The HAN-based ionic liquid and the liquid hypergol can impinge upon a stagnation plate positioned at top portion of the combustion chamber.

  17. Mutual Fund Flight-to-Liquidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rzeznik, Aleksandra

    of their portfolio towards more liquid assets in order to meet potential redemptions. This causal chain is consistent with Vayanos (2004), who argues that fund managers are investors with time-varying liquidity preferences due to threat of withdrawal. Aggregated over funds, the effect is substantial: a one standard......This paper examines the liquidity choices of mutual funds during times of market uncertainty. I find that when markets are uncertain, mutual funds actively increase the liquidity of their portfolio { often referred to as a `flight-to-liquidity.' In aggregate, mutual fund behaviour has implications...... for the market; the market driven flight-toliquidity places upward pressure on the liquidity premium. I examine the underlying mechanisms driving fund behaviour. I show that market volatility is associated with lower fund performance and withdrawals, which causes funds to adjust the composition...

  18. Volatile accretion history of the Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, B J; Halliday, A N; Rehkämper, M

    2010-10-28

    It has long been thought that the Earth had a protracted and complex history of volatile accretion and loss. Albarède paints a different picture, proposing that the Earth first formed as a dry planet which, like the Moon, was devoid of volatile constituents. He suggests that the Earth's complement of volatile elements was only established later, by the addition of a small veneer of volatile-rich material at ∼100 Myr (here and elsewhere, ages are relative to the origin of the Solar System). Here we argue that the Earth's mass balance of moderately volatile elements is inconsistent with Albarède's hypothesis but is well explained by the standard model of accretion from partially volatile-depleted material, accompanied by core formation.

  19. Volatile communication in plant-aphid interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Martin; Jander, Georg

    2010-08-01

    Volatile communication plays an important role in mediating the interactions between plants, aphids, and other organisms in the environment. In response to aphid infestation, many plants initiate indirect defenses through the release of volatiles that attract ladybugs, parasitoid wasps, and other aphid-consuming predators. Aphid-induced volatile release in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana requires the jasmonate signaling pathway. Volatile release is also induced by infection with aphid-transmitted viruses. Consistent with mathematical models of optimal transmission, viruses that are acquired rapidly by aphids induce volatile release to attract migratory aphids, but discourage long-term aphid feeding. Although the ecology of these interactions is well-studied, further research is needed to identify the molecular basis of aphid-induced and virus-induced changes in plant volatile release.

  20. Modeling of ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatlipinar, Hasan

    2017-02-01

    Ionic liquids are very important entry to industry and technology. Because of their unique properties they may classified as a new class of materials. IL usually classified as a high temperature ionic liquids (HTIL) and room temperature ionic liquids (RTIL). HTIL are molten salts. There are many research studies on molten salts such as recycling, new energy sources, rare elements mining. RTIL recently become very important in daily life industry because of their "green chemistry" properties. As a simple view ionic liquids consist of one positively charged and one negatively charged components. Because of their Coulombic or dispersive interactions the local structure of ionic liquids emerges. In this presentation the local structural properties of the HTIL are discussed via correlation functions and integral equation theories. RTIL are much more difficult to do modeling, but still general consideration for the modeling of the HTIL is valid also for the RTIL.

  1. Can clouds enhance long-range transport of low volatile, ionizable and surface-active chemicals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Antonio; Trapp, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    were run for a constant emission to the atmospheric boundary layer to identify key model inputs. The degradation rate, the duration of dry and wet periods and the parameters describing air-water bulk partitioning (KAW and T) and ionization (pKa and pH) determine the residence time in the ABL....... The longer residence time predicted for some compounds in the LMT is due to the capacity of clouds to sorb non-volatile molecules in the liquid water and at the interface of cloud droplets. The efficiency of wet deposition to remove low volatile organic pollutants from the atmosphere is limited primarily...

  2. Isolation and characterization of total volatile components from leaves of citrus limon linn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadambari Tomer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The isolation of the essential oil of whole fresh leaves of Citrus lemon by steam distillation is described. The chemical composition of the oil was investigated by means of Gas-Liquid Chromatography (GLC, Column Chromatography (CC and coupled Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS. The 27 most important volatile components were identified. The volatile components were identified by comparing their retention times of GC chromatograph with those of literature. Further identification was done by GC- MS. The components of the oil, percentage of each constituent, their RI values and their Eight Peak Index were also summarized and reviewed with standard available literature.

  3. Simultaneous Microwave Extraction and Separation of Volatile and Non-Volatile Organic Compounds of Boldo Leaves. From Lab to Industrial Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Petigny

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Microwave extraction and separation has been used to increase the concentration of the extract compared to the conventional method with the same solid/liquid ratio, reducing extraction time and separate at the same time Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC from non-Volatile Organic Compounds (NVOC of boldo leaves. As preliminary study, a response surface method has been used to optimize the extraction of soluble material and the separation of VOC from the plant in laboratory scale. The results from the statistical analysis revealed that the optimized conditions were: microwave power 200 W, extraction time 56 min and solid liquid ratio of 7.5% of plants in water. Lab scale optimized microwave method is compared to conventional distillation, and requires a power/mass ratio of 0.4 W/g of water engaged. This power/mass ratio is kept in order to upscale from lab to pilot plant.

  4. Milk Price Volatility and its Determinants

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Fengxia; Du, Xiaodong; Gould, Brian W.

    2011-01-01

    The classified pricing of fluid milk under the Federal Milk Marketing Orders (FMMO) system combined with the cash settlement feature of Class IIII milk futures contracts generate a unique volatility pattern of these futures markets in the sense that the volatility gradually decreases as the USDA price announcement dates approaching in the month. Focusing on the evolution of volatility in Class III milk futures market, this study quantifies the relative importance of a set of factors driving m...

  5. The Determinants of Public Deficit Volatility

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This paper empirically analyzes the political, institutional and economic sources of public deficit volatility. Using the system-GMM estimator for linear dynamic panel data models and a sample of 125 countries analyzed from 1980 to 2006, we show that higher public deficit volatility is typically associated with higher levels of political instability and less democracy. In addition, public deficit volatility tends to be magnified for small countries, in the outcome of hyper-inflation episodes ...

  6. Exchange Rate Volatility in BRICS Countries

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This paper measures the impact of bilateral exchange rates, the world agricultural GDP and third-country exchange rate volatilities (Yen/USD and Euro/USD) on the BRICS agricultural exports using a vector autoregressive (VAR) model. Two measures of volatility are used: the standard deviation and the coefficient of variation of the rates of change of the real exchange rates. We found that most variables are integrated of order two except the third-country exchange rate volatilities which are st...

  7. Volatile halogenated hydrocarbons in foods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyahara, Makoto; Toyoda, Masatake; Saito, Yukio [National Institute of Health Services, Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1995-02-01

    Volatile halogenated organic compounds were determined in foods. Statistical treatment of the data for 13 sampled from 20 families living in suburban Tokyo (Saitama prefecture) indicated that the foods were contaminated by water pollution and/or substances introduced by the process of food production. Butter and margarine were contaminated by chlorinated ethylene, ethane, and related compounds released by dry cleaning and other operations. Soybean sprouts and tofu (soybean curd) contained chloroform and related trihalomethanes absorbed during the production process. 27 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Volatile Constituents of Zhumaria Majdae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazdanparst

    1993-07-01

    Full Text Available Capillary gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC- MS analyses of a sample of essential oil of zhumaria Linalool ned by simple water distillation of the pulverized air - dired leaves and flowers of the plant indicated that Linalool and comphor are the two major constituents of the volatile oil. Sylvestrene , y -terpinene, a- Pinene, b - carene, camphene, and Epiborneol constitute the other main components of the essential oil. The GC - MS chromatogram indicated the presence of more than fifty - components in the oil, most of them were present in trace amounts. In this study, the chemical structures of twenty of these consti tuents were elucidated using GC - MS analysis.

  9. Mars Accreted a Volatile Element-Depleted Late Veneer Indicating Early Delivery of Martian Volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, H.; Wang, Z.

    2016-08-01

    Chalcophile elements in SNC meteorites are used to constrain abundances in the Martian mantle. Strong depletion of Te relative to highly siderophile elements suggests a volatile element-depleted late veneer, requiring that volatiles arrived earlier.

  10. Clinical observation of liquid nitrogen cryotherapy in the treatment of patients with herpes zoster and positive anti-HIV%液氮冷冻治疗带状疱疹合并抗-HIV阳性患者临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐蕾; 廖志敏

    2016-01-01

    目的:观察液氮冷冻治疗带状疱疹合并抗⁃HIV 阳性患者的临床疗效.方法:选取四川省凉山彝族自治州第二人民医院2012-03/2015-12收治的带状疱疹合并抗⁃HIV 阳性患者50例作为研究对象,将其随机分为冷冻组(n =24)和对照组(n=26),两组均予抗病毒、止痛、营养神经基础治疗,冷冻组同时给予液氮冷冻治疗,分别于治疗第7日、14日对两组患者进行疗效评估.结果:冷冻组与对照组第7日综合疗效比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),冷冻组第14日综合疗效优于对照组,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论:液氮冷冻治疗带状疱疹合并抗⁃HIV 阳性患者疗效肯定,值得应用推广.%AIM: To observe the curative effect of liquid nitro⁃gen cryotherapy in the treatment of patients with herpes zoster and positive anti⁃HIV. METHODS: A total of 50 patients with herpes zoster and positive anti⁃HIV admitted into The Second Peoples Hospital of Liangshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture from March 2012 to December 2015 were selected as objects of study and randomly divided into freezing group( n = 24) and control group( n = 26), both of which received basic treatment such as antiviral, analge⁃sic, and neurotrophic treatments. The freezing group also received liquid nitrogen cryotherapy. The curative effect was evaluated on 7 and 14 days after the treatment respectively. RESULTS: For the comprehensive therapeutic effect on 7 days after the treatment, there was no statistically significant difference between the freez⁃ing group and control group (P>0.05). While the comprehensive therapeutic effect in freezing group on 14 days after the treatment was better than the control group, and the difference was statisti⁃cally significant ( P < 0. 05). CONCLUSION: Liquid nitrogen cryotherapy is an effective method for treating herpes zoster with positive anti⁃HIV patients, which is worthy of

  11. In Arabidopsis thaliana codon volatility scores reflect GC3 composition rather than selective pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connell Mary J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synonymous codon usage bias has typically been correlated with, and attributed to translational efficiency. However, there are other pressures on genomic sequence composition that can affect codon usage patterns such as mutational biases. This study provides an analysis of the codon usage patterns in Arabidopsis thaliana in relation to gene expression levels, codon volatility, mutational biases and selective pressures. Results We have performed synonymous codon usage and codon volatility analyses for all genes in the A. thaliana genome. In contrast to reports for species from other kingdoms, we find that neither codon usage nor volatility are correlated with selection pressure (as measured by dN/dS, nor with gene expression levels on a genome wide level. Our results show that codon volatility and usage are not synonymous, rather that they are correlated with the abundance of G and C at the third codon position (GC3. Conclusions Our results indicate that while the A. thaliana genome shows evidence for synonymous codon usage bias, this is not related to the expression levels of its constituent genes. Neither codon volatility nor codon usage are correlated with expression levels or selective pressures but, because they are directly related to the composition of G and C at the third codon position, they are the result of mutational bias. Therefore, in A. thaliana codon volatility and usage do not result from selection for translation efficiency or protein functional shift as measured by positive selection.

  12. [Solidification of volatile oil with graphene oxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hong-Mei; Jia, Xiao-Bin; Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Sun, E; Xu, Yi-Hao

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the properties of solidifying volatile oil with graphene oxide, clove oil and zedoary turmeric oil were solidified by graphene oxide. The amount of graphene oxide was optimized with the eugenol yield and curcumol yield as criteria. Curing powder was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of graphene oxide on dissolution in vitro and thermal stability of active components were studied. The optimum solidification ratio of graphene oxide to volatile oil was 1:1. Dissolution rate of active components had rare influence while their thermal stability improved after volatile oil was solidified. Solidifying herbal volatile oil with graphene oxide deserves further study.

  13. CAM Stochastic Volatility Model for Option Pricing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanwan Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The coupled additive and multiplicative (CAM noises model is a stochastic volatility model for derivative pricing. Unlike the other stochastic volatility models in the literature, the CAM model uses two Brownian motions, one multiplicative and one additive, to model the volatility process. We provide empirical evidence that suggests a nontrivial relationship between the kurtosis and skewness of asset prices and that the CAM model is able to capture this relationship, whereas the traditional stochastic volatility models cannot. We introduce a control variate method and Monte Carlo estimators for some of the sensitivities (Greeks of the model. We also derive an approximation for the characteristic function of the model.

  14. Assessing Relative Volatility/Intermittency/Energy Dissipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole E.; Pakkanen, Mikko; Schmiegel, Jürgen

    We introduce the notion of relative volatility/intermittency and demonstrate how relative volatility statistics can be used to estimate consistently the temporal variation of volatility/intermittency even when the data of interest are generated by a non-semimartingale, or a Brownian semistationary...... process in particular. While this estimation method is motivated by the assessment of relative energy dissipation in empirical data of turbulence, we apply it also to energy price data. Moreover, we develop a probabilistic asymptotic theory for relative power variations of Brownian semistationary...... processes and Ito semimartingales and discuss how it can be used for inference on relative volatility/intermittency....

  15. Rapid 2nd-tier test for measurement of 3-OH-propionic and methylmalonic acids on dried blood spots: reducing the false-positive rate for propionylcarnitine during expanded newborn screening by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    la Marca, Giancarlo; Malvagia, Sabrina; Pasquini, Elisabetta; Innocenti, Marzia; Donati, Maria Alice; Zammarchi, Enrico

    2007-07-01

    The expansion of newborn screening programs has increased the number of newborns diagnosed with inborn errors of metabolism in the presymptomatic phase, but it has also increased the number of costly, stress-producing false-positive results. Because propionylcarnitine (C3) is one of the analytes most frequently responsible for false-positive results, we aimed to develop a rapid liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to identify free methylmalonic (MMA) and 3-OH propionic (3OH-PA) acids in blood spots. We studied newborn screening spots from 250 healthy controls; 124 from infants with abnormal C3, of whom only 5 (4%) were truly affected; 124 from infants with altered isolated methylmalonylcarnitine; and 4 from clinically diagnosed patients. Whole blood was eluted from a 3.2-mm dried blood spot by a CH(3)CN/H(2)O 7:3 and 5 mL/L formic. This extract was injected into a LC-MS/MS equipped with pneumatically assisted electrospray without derivatization. Total analysis time was 5 min per sample. The assays were linear up to 3300 nmol/L for both metabolites. Intra- and interassay imprecision data were 3.6%-8% and 3.1%-6%, respectively, for MMA and 5.2%-20% and 3.6%-17% for 3OH-PA. Limit of detection and limit of quantitation were 1.95 and 4.2 micromol/L, respectively, for MMA and 8 and 10 micromol/L for 3OH-PA. The recoveries were 92.9%-106.1%. No deterioration was noted on the columns after 500 chromatographic runs. If the new method had been used as a 2nd-tier test for the 124 samples, only the 5 true positives would have been recalled for additional samples, and the positive predictive value would have been 100%. This method has the potential to markedly reduce false-positive results and the associated costs and anxiety. It may also be suitable for diagnosing and routinely monitoring blood spots for methylmalonic aciduria and propionic acidemia.

  16. Investigating sulfur partitioning between nominally volatile-free minerals and silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzoli, A.; Callegaro, S.; Baker, D. R.; Geraki, K.; Maneta, V.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the key role played by volatile species in magmatic systems, it is still challenging to quantify their concentrations in ancient melts. We suggested a quantitative approach for estimating S contents in basaltic melts (Callegaro et al., 2014), based on direct measurement of S on clinopyroxene and calculation of its concentration in the melt through an experimentally determined partition coefficient (KD). We further investigated the partitioning of sulfur between silicate melts and nominally volatile-free minerals (olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, and plagioclase), as well as between melt and amphibole. Partitioning experiments were performed with basaltic, andesitic and dacitic bulk compositions, at hydrous and anhydrous conditions, and at high and low oxygen fugacities (fO2), where sulfur in the melt is dominantly present as an S6+ or S2- species, respectively (Wilke et al., 2011). Sulfur concentrations in melts were measured by electron microprobe and in crystals by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence. At low fO2 the average crystal/liquid KDs for sulfur vary from 0.0004 (at a maximum) for olivine, to 0.003 (another maximum) for orthopyroxene, to 0.03 for clinopyroxene, and to 0.07 for plagioclase. The KDs correlate positively with the cation-oxygen bond lengths in the crystals. At high fO2 the KDs drop to approximately one-third of those observed at low fO2. These observations suggest that S2- replaces oxygen in the crystal structure. Water has no measureable influence on the crystal/melt partitioning of sulfur. Clinopyroxene/melt KDs are correlated with the Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratio of the crystal, but appear insensitive to the IVAl in the structure. Plagioclase/melt S partitioning appears unaffected by anorthite content and iron concentration in the crystal. These new KDs allow the determination of sulfur concentration in the igneous melts co-existing with these crystals and provide insights into the volatile concentrations of ancient magmas and their possible

  17. Complex dynamics of evaporation-driven convection in liquid layers

    CERN Document Server

    Chauvet, F; Colinet, P

    2010-01-01

    The spontaneous convective patterns induced by evaporation of a pure liquid layer are studied experimentally. A volatile liquid layer placed in a cylindrical container is left free to evaporate into air at rest under ambient conditions. The liquid/gas interface of the evaporating liquid layer is visualized using an infrared (IR) camera. The phenomenology of the observed convective patterns is qualitatively analysed, showing in particular that the latter can be quite complex especially at moderate liquid thicknesses. Attention is also paid to the influence of the container diameter on the observed patterns sequence.

  18. Effect of oil price on Nigeria’s food price volatility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ijeoma C. Nwoko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the effect of oil price on the volatility of food price in Nigeria. It specifically considers the long-run, short-run, and causal relationship between these variables. Annual data on oil price and individual prices of maize, rice, sorghum, soya beans, and wheat spanning from 2000 to 2013 were used. The price volatility for each crop was obtained using Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedascity (GARCH (1, 1 model. Our measure of oil price is the Refiner acquisition cost of imported crude oil. The Augmented Dickey–Fuller and Phillip–Perron unit root tests show that all the variables are integrated of order one, I (1. Therefore, we use the Johansen co-integration test to examine the long-run relationship. Our results show that there is no long-run relationship between oil price and any of the individual food price volatility. Thus, we implement a VAR instead of a VECM to investigate the short-run relationship. The VAR model result revealed a positive and significant short-run relationship between oil price and each of the selected food price volatility with exception of that of rice and wheat price volatility. These results were further confirmed by the impulse response functions. The Granger causality test result indicates a unidirectional causality from oil price to maize, soya bean, and sorghum price volatilities but does not show such relationship for rice and wheat price volatilities. We draw some policy implications of these findings.

  19. Volatile oils of Chinese crude medicines exhibit antiparasitic activity against human Demodex with no adverse effects in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ji-Xin; Sun, Yan-Hong; Li, Chao-Pin

    2015-04-01

    Demodex is a type of permanent obligatory parasite, which can be found on the human body surface. Currently, drugs targeting Demodex usually result in adverse effects and have a poor therapeutic effect. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the use of Chinese crude medicine volatile oils for targeting and inhibiting Demodex in vitro. The volatile oils of six Chinese crude medicines were investigated, including clove, orange fruit, Manchurian wildginger, cinnamon bark, Rhizome Alpiniae Officinarum and pricklyash peel, which were extracted using a distillation method. The exercise status of Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis and the antiparasitic effects of the volatile oils against the two species were observed using microscopy. A skin irritation test was used to examine the irritation intensity of the volatile oils. In addition, an acute toxicity test was utilized to observe the toxicity effects of the volatile oils on the skin. Xin Fumanling ointment was employed as a positive control to identify the therapeutic effects of the volatile oils. The results indicated that all six volatile oils were able to kill Demodex efficiently. In particular, the clove volatile oil was effective in inducing optimized anti-Demodex activity. The lethal times of the volatile oils were significantly decreased compared with the Xin Fumanling ointment (PDemodex activity and were able to kill Demodex effectively and safely in vivo.

  20. Gas-liquid chromatography in lunar organic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    Gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) is a powerful and sensitive method for the separation and detection of organic compounds at nanogram levels. The primary requirement for successful analyses is that the compounds of interest must be volatile under the chromatographic conditions employed. Nonvolatile organic compounds must be converted to volatile derivatives prior to analysis. The derivatives of choice must be both amenable to chromatographic separation and be relatively stable. The condition of volatility necessitates the development of efficient derivatization reactions for important groups of compounds as amino acids, carbohydrates, nucleosides, etc. Trimethylsilylation and trifluoroacetylation represent specific areas of recent prominence. Some relevant practical aspects of GLC are discussed.

  1. Determination of Four Major Saponins in Skin and Endosperm of Seeds of Horse Chestnut (Aesculus Hippocastanum L.) Using High Performance Liquid Chromatography with Positive Confirmation by Thin Layer Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abudayeh, Zead Helmi Mahmoud; Al Azzam, Khaldun Mohammad; Naddaf, Ahmad; Karpiuk, Uliana Vladimirovna; Kislichenko, Viktoria Sergeevna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To separate and quantify four major saponins in the extracts of the skin and the endosperm of seeds of horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L.) using ultrasonic solvent extraction followed by a high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) with positive confirmation by thin layer chromatography (TLC). Methods: The saponins: escin Ia, escin Ib, isoescin Ia and isoescin Ib were extracted using ultrasonic extraction method. The optimized extraction conditions were: 70% methanol as extraction solvent, 80 °C as extraction temperature, and the extraction time was achieved in 4 hours. The HPLC conditions used: Zorbax SB-ODS-(150 mm × 2.1 mm, 3 μm) column, acetonitrile and 0.10% phosphoric acid solution (39:61 v/v) as mobile phase, flow rate was 0.5 mL min−1 at 210 nm and 230 nm detection. The injection volume was 10 μL, and the separation was carried out isothermally at 30 °C in a heated chamber. Results: The results indicated that the developed HPLC method is simple, sensitive and reliable. Moreover, the content of escins in seeds decreased by more than 30% in endosperm and by more than 40% in skin upon storage for two years. Conclusion: This assay can be readily utilized as a quality control method for horse chestnut and other related medicinal plants. PMID:26819933

  2. Optimisation of a selective method for the determination of organophosphorous triesters in outdoor particulate samples by pressurised liquid extraction and large-volume injection gas chromatography-positive chemical ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, José Benito; Rodil, Rosario; López-Mahía, Purificación; Muniategui-Lorenzo, Soledad; Prada-Rodríguez, Darío

    2007-07-01

    A selective analytical method for the determination of nine organophosphate triesters and triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO) in outdoor particulate matter is presented. It involves a fully automated pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) step, integrating an alumina clean-up process, and subsequent determination by large-volume injection gas chromatography-positive chemical ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (LVI-GC-PCI-MS/MS). The extraction variables (solvent, amount of adsorbent, temperature, time and number of cycles) were optimised using a multicriteria strategy which implements a desirability function that maximises both extraction and clean-up efficiencies while searching for the best-compromise PLE conditions. The final method affords quantification limits of between 0.01 and 0.3 microg g(-1) and recoveries of >80%, with the exceptions of the most polar analytes, TCEP and TPPO (~65%) for both urban dust and PM10 samples. Moreover, the method permitted the levels of these compounds in dust deposited outdoors (between LOD and 0.5 microg g(-1) for TEHP) and PM10 samples (between LOD and 2.4 microg m(-3) for TiBP) to be measured and reported for the first time.

  3. Multi-mycotoxin Analysis of Finished Grain and Nut Products Using Ultrahigh-Performance Liquid Chromatography and Positive Electrospray Ionization-Quadrupole Orbital Ion Trap High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chia-Ding; Wong, Jon W; Zhang, Kai; Yang, Paul; Wittenberg, James B; Trucksess, Mary W; Hayward, Douglas G; Lee, Nathaniel S; Chang, James S

    2015-09-23

    Ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography using positive electrospray ionization and quadrupole orbital ion trap high-resolution mass spectrometry was evaluated for analyzing mycotoxins in finished cereal and nut products. Optimizing the orbital ion trap mass analyzer in full-scan mode using mycotoxin-fortified matrix extracts gave mass accuracies, δM, of mycotoxin-dependent, ranging from 0.02 to 11.6 μg/kg. Mean recoveries and standard deviations for mycotoxins from acetonitrile/water extraction at their relevant fortification levels were 91 ± 10, 94 ± 10, 98 ± 12, 91 ± 13, 99 ± 15, and 93 ± 17% for corn, rice, wheat, almond, peanut, and pistachio, respectively. Nineteen mycotoxins with concentrations ranging from 0.3 (aflatoxin B1 in peanut and almond) to 1175 μg/kg (fumonisin B1 in corn flour) were found in 35 of the 70 commercial grain and nut samples surveyed. Mycotoxins could be identified at δM mycotoxins in finished grain and nut products.

  4. Simultaneous determination of banned acid orange dyes and basic orange dyes in foodstuffs by liquid chromatography-tandem electrospray ionization mass spectrometry via negative/positive ion switching mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Guozhen; Wu, Yu; Dong, Xiaomeng; Liu, Cuicui; He, Shaoyuan; Wang, Shuo

    2013-04-24

    Simultaneous detection of two classes of dyes possessing different chemical properties is difficult. In this study, through negative/positive ion switching mode, simultaneous determination of four typical acid orange dyes and three typical basic orange dyes was achieved by a single high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method, and the analytical efficiency of multiresidues identification was greatly improved. To enhance detection sensitivity, the sample pretreatment conditions and HPLC-MS/MS determining conditions were carefully optimized. Under optimal conditions, good linearity was obtained over the range of 5-500 μg L(-1) with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) >0.9998. Limits of detection (LODs) and limits of quantification (LOQs) of the seven dyes were 0.5-3.0 and 2.0-6.0 μg kg(-1), respectively. The recoveries of the seven dyes in soybean products and marinated eggs were 74-126% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 2.22-25.4%, suggesting the developed method is promising for the accurate quantification of the seven dyes at trace levels in foods.

  5. Belief biases and volatility of assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei-Sun, Wen-Zou, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Based on an overlapping generation model, this paper introduces the noise traders with belief biases and rational traders. With an equilibrium analysis, this paper examines the volatility of risky asset. The results show that the belief biases, the probability of economy state, and the domain capability are all the factors that have effects on the volatility of the market.

  6. Explaining output volatility: The case of taxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posch, Olaf

    empirical link between e ective tax rates and output volatility, with some evidence of a cointegrating relationship. In accordance with theory, taxes on labor income and corporate income empirically are found to be negatively related to volatility of macro aggregates whereas the capital tax ratio has...

  7. Effects of Idiosyncratic Volatility in Asset Pricing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luís Leite

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to evaluate the effects of the aggregate market volatility components - average volatility and average correlation - on the pricing of portfolios sorted by idiosyncratic volatility, using Brazilian data. The study investigates whether portfolios with high and low idiosyncratic volatility - in relation to the Fama and French model (1996 - have different exposures to innovations in average market volatility, and consequently, different expectations for return. The results are in line with those found for US data, although they portray the Brazilian reality. Decomposition of volatility allows the average volatility component, without the disturbance generated by the average correlation component, to better price the effects of a worsening or an improvement in the investment environment. This result is also identical to that found for US data. Average variance should thus command a risk premium. For US data, this premium is negative. According to Chen and Petkova (2012, the main reason for this negative sign is the high level of investment in research and development recorded by companies with high idiosyncratic volatility. As in Brazil this type of investment is significantly lower than in the US, it was expected that a result with the opposite sign would be found, which is in fact what occurred.

  8. Some recent developments in stochastic volatility modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Nicolato, Elisa; Shephard, N.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reviews and puts in context some of our recent work on stochastic volatility (SV) modelling for financial economics. Here our main focus is on: (i) the relationship between subordination and SV, (ii) OU based volatility models, (iii) exact option pricing, (iv) realized power variation...

  9. Volatility Determination in an Ambit Process Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole; Graversen, Svend-Erik

    The probability limit behaviour of normalised quadratic variation is studied for a simple tempo-spatial ambit process, with particular regard to the question of volatility memorylessness.......The probability limit behaviour of normalised quadratic variation is studied for a simple tempo-spatial ambit process, with particular regard to the question of volatility memorylessness....

  10. Analyzing volatile compounds in dairy products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volatile compounds give the first indication of the flavor in a dairy product. Volatiles are isolated from the sample matrix and then analyzed by chromatography, sensory methods, or an electronic nose. Isolation may be performed by solvent extraction or headspace analysis, and gas chromatography i...

  11. Stock market volatility and macroeconomic uncertainty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, I.J.M.; Vrugt, E.B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides empirical evidence on the link between stock market volatility and macroeconomic uncertainty. We show that US stock market volatility is significantly related to the dispersion in economic forecasts from SPF survey participants over the period from 1969 to 1996. This link is much

  12. Stock market volatility and macroeconomic uncertainty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, I.J.M.; Vrugt, E.B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides empirical evidence on the link between stock market volatility and macroeconomic uncertainty. We show that US stock market volatility is significantly related to the dispersion in economic forecasts from SPF survey participants over the period from 1969 to 1996. This link is much

  13. Fundamental uncertainty and stock market volatility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, I.J.M.; Vrugt, E.B.

    2008-01-01

    We provide empirical evidence on the link between stock market volatility and macroeconomic uncertainty. We show that US stock market volatility is significantly related to the dispersion in economic forecasts from participants in the Survey of Professional Forecasters over the period 1969 to 1996.

  14. Current status of fluoride volatility method development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlir, J.; Marecek, M.; Skarohlid, J. [UJV - Nuclear Research Institute, Research Centre Rez, CZ-250 68 Husinec - Rez 130 (Czech Republic)

    2013-07-01

    The Fluoride Volatility Method is based on a separation process, which comes out from the specific property of uranium, neptunium and plutonium to form volatile hexafluorides whereas most of fission products (mainly lanthanides) and higher transplutonium elements (americium, curium) present in irradiated fuel form nonvolatile tri-fluorides. Fluoride Volatility Method itself is based on direct fluorination of the spent fuel, but before the fluorination step, the removal of cladding material and subsequent transformation of the fuel into a powdered form with a suitable grain size have to be done. The fluorination is made with fluorine gas in a flame fluorination reactor, where the volatile fluorides (mostly UF{sub 6}) are separated from the non-volatile ones (trivalent minor actinides and majority of fission products). The subsequent operations necessary for partitioning of volatile fluorides are the condensation and evaporation of volatile fluorides, the thermal decomposition of PuF{sub 6} and the finally distillation and sorption used for the purification of uranium product. The Fluoride Volatility Method is considered to be a promising advanced pyrochemical reprocessing technology, which can mainly be used for the reprocessing of oxide spent fuels coming from future GEN IV fast reactors.

  15. Analysis of volatiles of malt whisky by solid-phase microextraction and stir bar sorptive extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demyttenaere, Jan C R; Martínez, Jorge I Sánchez; Verhé, Roland; Sandra, Pat; De Kimpe, Norbert

    2003-01-24

    Blended Scotch whisky was analysed by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) to study the composition of the volatiles. For SPME analysis, three different fibres were compared, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) (100 microm). poly(acrylate) (PA) (85 microm) and divinylbenzene-Carboxen on poly(dimethylsiloxane) (DVB-CAR-(PDMS) (50/30 microm). It was found that the PDMS and DVB-CAR-PDMS fibres showed a higher enrichment capacity than PA as well as a better reproducibility. The influence of sampling time, temperature and salt addition on the enrichment of volatiles as well as the difference between liquid and headspace SPME were studied. An optimum SPME method was developed. Finally a more recent sample preparation technique, namely SBSE was evaluated to extract whisky volatiles.

  16. Market Liquidity and Funding Liquidity

    OpenAIRE

    Brunnermeier, Markus K; Lasse Heje Pedersen

    2007-01-01

    We provide a model that links an asset's market liquidity - i.e., the ease with which it is traded - and traders' funding liquidity - i.e., the ease with which they can obtain funding. Traders provide market liquidity, and their ability to do so depends on their availability of funding. Conversely, traders' funding, i.e., their capital and the margins they are charged, depend on the assets' market liquidity. We show that, under certain conditions, margins are destabilizing and market liquidit...

  17. Market Liquidity and Funding Liquidity

    OpenAIRE

    Markus K. Brunnermeier; Lasse Heje Pedersen

    2007-01-01

    We provide a model that links an asset's market liquidity - i.e., the ease with which it is traded - and traders' funding liquidity - i.e., the ease with which they can obtain funding. Traders provide market liquidity, and their ability to do so depends on their availability of funding. Conversely, traders' funding, i.e., their capital and the margins they are charged, depend on the assets' market liquidity. We show that, under certain conditions, margins are destabilizing and market liquidit...

  18. A STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF INFORMATION FLOWSON PRICE VOLATILITY IN CHINA'S STOCK MARKET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YuePan; ShinongWu

    2004-01-01

    By using GARCH and EGARCH models, the authors examine the relationship between price volatility and new information flow, represented by trading volume, and past information flow, represented by the ARCH effect, in the Shanghai Stock Market for the three different periods from July 1998 to December 2002: the soft period, the bull period, and the bear period. The empirical results show that: (1) there exists a 'leverage effect' in the stock market; that is, negative news had a greater impact on stock price volatility than did positive news in the soft period and bear period, but in the bull period the 'leverage effect' behaves differently; (2) there is a significantly positive relationship between trading volume and stock price volatility, and such a relationship is even more significant in the bear period; (3) it turns out that in the three periods, the relationships between stock price volatility and information flow, both past and new, are not the same; that is, in both the soft and bull periods, both the ARCH effect, reflecting 'past information flow', and trading volume,reflecting 'new information flow', explain price volatility simultaneously, but in the bear period, the ARCH effect is substantially reduced. These findings provide key evidence for understanding, explaining, and tracking the characteristics of price volatility and the changing rules of the stock market in China more comprehensively.

  19. Price volatility in wind dominant electricity markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farashbashi-Astaneh, Seyed-Mostafa; Chen, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    High penetration of intermittent renewable energy sources causes price volatility in future electricity markets. This is specially the case in European countries that plan high penetration levels. This highlights the necessity for revising market regulations and mechanisms in accordance to genera......High penetration of intermittent renewable energy sources causes price volatility in future electricity markets. This is specially the case in European countries that plan high penetration levels. This highlights the necessity for revising market regulations and mechanisms in accordance...... electricity markets. High price volatility is unappreciated because it imposes high financial risk levels to both electricity consumers and producers. Additionally high price variations impede tracking price signals by consumers in future smart grid and jeopardize implementation of demand response concepts....... The main contribution of this paper is to quantify volatility patterns of electricity price, as penetration level of wind power increases. Results explain a direct relationship between wind penetration and electricity price volatility in a quantitative manner....

  20. Relations Between Serial Correlation and Volatility: Is There a LeBaron Effect in Brazil?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regis Augusto Ely

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the relation between serial correlation and volatility of the Ibovespa index returns and extends the empirical evidence of the LeBaron effect for higher orders of serial correlation. We employ an exponential general autoregressive conditional heteroskedastic model to estimate volatility and an automatic variance ratio statistic to calculate serial correlation. The results support some stylized facts from behavioral finance and help us to explain evidences from empirical studies. We show that (i serial correlation in weekly returns are negative related with volatility, (ii this negative relation is found in daily returns only if we use first order serial correlation, and (iii the effect for weekly returns was not intensified by the 2008 crisis, but a positive relation between volatility and serial correlation for daily returns was identified during that time.

  1. EXCHANGE RATE VOLATILITY AND U.S. AUTO-INDUSTRY EXPORTS: A PANEL COINTEGRATION APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veysel Avsar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate goods are often neglected in the empirical studies of the impact of exchange rate volatility on bilateral trade flows. Using import unit values of 58 motor vehicle products and 193 auto-parts, which are classified by the 10-digit level of Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS, this study examines the impact of exchange rate volatility on the U.S. automotive industry exports and imports (both motor-vehicle products and auto-parts from 37 major trading partners for the period of 1996.01 to 2008.4 by using panel data cointegration techniques. We obtain substantial heterogeneity in terms of the impact of exchange rate volatility for final and intermediate goods. We also find support for the positive hypothesis that exchange rate volatility may lead to greater levels of trade.

  2. FDI Inflows, Price and Exchange Rate Volatility: New Empirical Evidence from Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Dal Bianco

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the impact of price and real exchange rate volatility on Foreign Direct Investment (FDI inflows in a panel of 10 Latin American and Caribbean countries, observed between 1990 and 2012. Both price and exchange rate volatility series are estimated through the Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity model (GARCH. Our results obtained, employing the Fixed Effects estimator, confirm the theory of hysteresis and option value, in so far as a statistically significant negative effect of exchange rate volatility on FDI is found. Price volatility, instead, turns out to be positive but insignificant. Moreover, we show that human capital and trade openness are key for attracting foreign capital. From the policy perspective, our analysis suggests the importance of stabilization policies as well as the policy of government credibility in promoting trade openness and human capital formation.

  3. Volatility smile as relativistic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakushadze, Zura

    2017-06-01

    We give an explicit formula for the probability distribution based on a relativistic extension of Brownian motion. The distribution (1) is properly normalized and (2) obeys the tower law (semigroup property), so we can construct martingales and self-financing hedging strategies and price claims (options). This model is a 1-constant-parameter extension of the Black-Scholes-Merton model. The new parameter is the analog of the speed of light in Special Relativity. However, in the financial context there is no ;speed limit; and the new parameter has the meaning of a characteristic diffusion speed at which relativistic effects become important and lead to a much softer asymptotic behavior, i.e., fat tails, giving rise to volatility smiles. We argue that a nonlocal stochastic description of such (Lévy) processes is inadequate and discuss a local description from physics. The presentation is intended to be pedagogical.

  4. Clustered volatility in multiagent dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Youssefmir, M; Youssefmir, Michael; Huberman, Bernardo

    1995-01-01

    Large distributed multiagent systems are characterized by vast numbers of agents trying to gain access to limited resources in an unpredictable environment. Agents in these system continuously switch strategies in order to opportunistically find improvements in their utilities. We have analyzed the fluctuations around equilibrium that arise from strategy switching and discovered the existence of a new phenomenon. It consists of the appearance of sudden bursts of activity that punctuate the fixed point, and is due to an effective random walk consistent with overall stability. This clustered volatility is followed by relaxation to the fixed point but with different strategy mixes from the previous one. This phenomenon is quite general for systems in which agents explore strategies in search of local improvements.

  5. Forecasting Exchange Rate Volatility in the Presence of Jumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch, Thomas; Christensen, Bent Jesper; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard

    of exchange rate futures options, allowingcalculation of option implied volatility. We find that implied volatility is an informationallyefficient but biased forecast of future realized exchange rate volatility. Furthermore,we show that log-normality is an even better distributional approximation...... for impliedvolatility than for realized volatility in this market. Finally, we show that the jump componentof future realized exchange rate volatility is to some extent predictable, and thatoption implied volatility is the dominant forecast of the future jump component....

  6. Position of guide vane trailing edge of nuclear reactor coolant pump under gas-liquid two phase condition%气液两相条件下核主泵导叶出口边安放位置

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱荣生; 习毅; 袁寿其; 付强; 龙云

    2013-01-01

    为了研究气液两相条件下,不同导叶出口边安放位置对核主泵内部压力脉动、含气率脉动的影响,并最终找出最佳的导叶出口边安放位置,采用三维数值模拟软件CFX模拟泵内部的瞬态流场,在泵壳内壁面和出口不同位置设置监测点,以了解各模型内部不同时刻、不同位置的压力、含气率分布.对比不同模型相同点的压力脉动、含气率脉动的时域、频域图可以发现:导叶出口边在泵壳中心平面(C-C平面)时,泵壳壁面上各点所受压力较小且较平稳,即压力脉动引起的振动、噪声较小,从安全性方面考虑,此时导叶出口边安放位置最佳;泵壳壁面上的压力脉动主要受叶轮的转动影响;除了类似隔舌处外,叶轮的转动对泵壳壁面和出口含气率脉动的影响不大,沿着液体绕流方向泵壳内壁面上的含气率逐渐增大,到出口达到最大.%To study the influence of different positions of guide vane trailing edge on the pressure fluctuation and gas fraction fluctuation in volute wall of nuclear reactor coolant pump under gas-liquid phase condition,and find a best position of guide vane trailing edge,the three-dimensional numerical software CFX was used to simulate the internal transient flow field of pump,with monitoring points set in different positions,in the hope of learning pressures and gas fraction distributions at different times and different positions within each model pump.By comparing pressure fluctuations,frequency domains and time domains at the same position of each model,it was found that the pressure is lower and steadier when the guide vane trailing edge is in the center plane of volute.In another word,the vibration and noise caused by pressure fluctuation were lower; it is the best position for safety.At the same time,it was also found that the fluctuation frequency of volute wall was influenced by impeller rotation frequency.Except similar tongue,impeller rotation

  7. Characteristics of volatile compounds removal in biogas slurry of pig manure by ozone oxidation and organic solvents extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yujun Wang; Lianshuang Feng; Xiaosong Zhao; Xiulan Ma; Jingmin Yang; Huiqing Liu; Sen Dou

    2013-01-01

    Biogas slurry is not suitable for liquid fertilizer due to its high amounts of volatile materials being of complicated composition and peculiar smell.In order to remove volatiles from biogas slurry efficiently,the dynamic headspace and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to clear the composition of volatiles.Nitrogen stripping and superfluous ozone were also used to remove volatiles from biogas slurry.The results showed that there were 21 kinds of volatile compounds in the biogas slurry,including sulfur compounds,organic amines,benzene,halogen generation of hydrocarbons and alkanes,some of which had strong peculiar smell.The volatile compounds in biogas slurry can be removed with the rate of 53.0% by nitrogen stripping and with rate of 81.7% by the oxidization and stripping of the superfluous ozone.On this basis,the removal rate of the volatile compounds reached 99.2%by chloroform and n-hexane extraction,and almost all of odor was eliminated.The contents of some dissolved organic compounds decreased obviously and however main plant nutrients had no significant change in the biogas slurry after being treated.

  8. Chemical composition of volatiles in Sardinian myrtle (Myrtus communis L.) alcoholic extracts and essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberoso, Carlo I G; Barra, Andrea; Angioni, Alberto; Sarritzu, Erika; Pirisi, Filippo M

    2006-02-22

    The chemical composition of the volatile fraction of myrtle (Myrtus communis L.) alcoholic extracts and essential oils from leaves and berries collected in different places in Sardinia (Italy) was studied. A simple and rapid liquid-liquid extraction method was used to isolate volatile compounds from myrtle alcoholic extracts followed by GC and GC-MS analysis allowing the detection of 24 compounds. The volatile fraction was characterized by the terpenes fraction corresponding to that of the essential oils and by a fatty acid ethyl esters fraction. The variation during extraction of the volatile fraction in alcoholic extracts of berries and leaves was evaluated. Essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation, and the yields were on average 0.52 +/- 0.03% (v/w dried weight) and 0.02 +/- 0.00% for leaves and berries, respectively. The essential oils were analyzed by GC and GC-MS, and a total of 27 components were detected, accounting for 90.6-98.7% of the total essential oil composition. Strong chemical variability depending on the origin of the samples was observed. The major compounds in the essential oils were alpha-pinene (30.0 and 28.5%), 1,8-cineole (28.8 and 15.3%), and limonene (17.5 and 24.1%) in leaves and berries, respectively, and were characterized by the lack of myrtenyl acetate.

  9. Antioxidant activity and characterization of volatile constituents of Taheebo (Tabebuia impetiginosa Martius ex DC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byeoung-Soo; Lee, Kwang-Geun; Shibamoto, Takayuki; Lee, Sung-Eun; Takeoka, Gary R

    2003-01-01

    Volatiles were isolated from the dried inner bark of Tabebuia impetiginosa using steam distillation under reduced pressure followed by continuous liquid-liquid extraction. The extract was analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The major volatile constituents of T. impetiginosa were 4-methoxybenzaldehyde (52.84 microg/g), 4-methoxyphenol (38.91 microg/g), 5-allyl-1,2,3-trimethoxybenzene (elemicin; 34.15 microg/g), 1-methoxy-4-(1E)-1-propenylbenzene (trans-anethole; 33.75 microg/g), and 4-methoxybenzyl alcohol (30.29 microg/g). The antioxidant activity of the volatiles was evaluated using two different assays. The extract exhibited a potent inhibitory effect on the formation of conjugated diene hydroperoxides (from methyl linoleate) at a concentration of 1000 microg/mL. The extract also inhibited the oxidation of hexanal for 40 days at a level of 5 microg/mL. The antioxidative activity of T. impetiginosa volatiles was comparable with that of the well-known antioxidants, alpha-tocopherol, and butylated hydroxytoluene.

  10. Graphene-ionic liquid composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksay, Ilhan A.; Korkut, Sibel; Pope, Michael; Punckt, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Method of making a graphene-ionic liquid composite. The composite can be used to make elec-trodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and supercapacitors. Dis-closed and claimed herein is method of making a graphene-ionic liquid com-posite, comprising combining a graphene source with at least one ionic liquid and heating the combination at a temperature of at least about 130 .degree. C.

  11. Mesures de taux de production d'éléments gazeux et volatiles lors de réactions induites par des protons de 1 et 1,4 GeV sur des cibles épaisses de plomb-bismuth liquides

    CERN Document Server

    Tall, Yoro

    2008-01-01

    The integrated project EUROTRANS (European Research Programme for the Transmutation of High Level Nuclear Waste in an Accelerator Driven System) of the 6th Euratom Framework Programme aims to demonstrate the transmutation of radioactive waste in ADS (Accelerator Driven Sub-critical system). It will carry out a first advanced design of an experimental facility to demonstrate the technical feasibility of transmutation, and will produce a conceptual design of an industrial facility dedicated to transmutation. An ADS consists of three fundamental elements: the accelerator of protons, the sub-critical core and the spallation target which one molten lead-bismuth concept is studied by the SUBATECH (physique SUBAtomique et des TECHnologies associées) laboratory in Nantes. The irradiation of molten lead-bismuth target with energetic proton beam generates volatile and radioactive residues. In order to determine experimentally the production rates of gas and volatile elements following a spallation reaction in a lead-b...

  12. Bifurcation in a thin liquid film flowing over a locally heated surface

    CERN Document Server

    Katkar, Harshwardhan H

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the non-linear dynamics of a two-dimensional film flowing down a finite heater, for a non-volatile and a volatile liquid. An oscillatory instability is predicted beyond a critical value of Marangoni number using linear stability theory. Continuation along the Marangoni number using non-linear evolution equation is used to trace bifurcation diagram associated with the oscillatory instability. Hysteresis, a characteristic attribute of a sub-critical Hopf bifurcation, is observed in a critical parametric region. The bifurcation is universally observed for both, a non-volatile film and a volatile film.

  13. IN SITU MEASUREMENTS OF C2-C10 VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ABOVE A SIERRA NEVADA PONDEROSA PINE PLANTATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    A fully automated GC-FID system was designed and built to measure ambient concentrations of C2-C10 volatile organic compounds, including many oxygenated compounds, without using liquid cryogen. It was deployed at Blodgett Forest Research Station in Georgetown, CA USA, 38 deg 53' ...

  14. Potential Signatures of Semi-volatile Compounds Associated With Nuclear Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Probasco, Kathleen M.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Maughan, A. D.

    2002-06-01

    Semi-volatile chemicals associated with nuclear processes (e.g., the reprocessing of uranium to produce plutonium for nuclear weapons, or the separation of actinides from processing waste streams), can provide sticky residues or signatures that will attach to piping, ducting, soil, water, or other surface media. Volatile compounds, that are more suitable for electro-optical sensing, have been well studied. However, the semi-volatile compounds have not been well documented or studied. A majority of these semi-volatile chemicals are more robust than typical gaseous or liquid chemicals and can have lifetimes of several weeks, months, or years in the environment. However, large data gaps exist concerning these potential signature compounds and more research is needed to fill these data gaps so that important signature information is not overlooked or discarded. This report investigates key semi-volatile compounds associated with nuclear separations, identifies available chemical and physical properties, and discusses the degradation products that would result from hydrolysis, radiolysis and oxidation reactions on these compounds.

  15. Ammonia volatilization from nitrogen fertilizers in no-till wheat and maize in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Viero

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Crop residues on the soil surface of no-till systems can intensify ammonia volatilization from N fertilizers applied to cereal crops. This study assessed the magnitude of N losses through ammonia volatilization from urea applied to no-till winter (wheat and summer crops (maize on a Typic Hapludox in the south-central region of Paraná, southern Brazil. In addition, the potential of alternative N sources (urea with urease inhibitor, liquid fertilizer, ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfate and different urea managements (fertilizer applied in the morning or afternoon were evaluated. Two experiments with maize and wheat were carried out for two years, arranged in a randomized block design with four replications. Nitrogen volatilization losses were assessed with a semi-open static collector until 21 days after fertilization. In winter, the losses were low (<5.5 % of applied N for all N sources, which were not distinguishable, due to the low temperatures. In the summer, volatilization rates from urea were higher than in the winter, but did not exceed 15 % of applied N. The main factor decreasing N losses in the summer was the occurrence of rainfall in the first five days after fertilization. Urea with urease inhibitor, nitrate and ammonium sulfate were efficient to decrease ammonia volatilization in maize, whereas the application time (morning or afternoon had no influence.

  16. State of Liquidity Management in Islamic Financial Institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Ali, Salman

    2013-01-01

    Liquidity position and liquidity risk of Islamic financial institutions has been changing over time. Using three measures of liquidity this paper analyses the state of liquidity and the risk management practices of Islamic banks across countries and regions and compares them with conventional banks. It calls for creating new instruments and infrastructure for liquidity risk management and proposes fresh approaches to manage this risk.

  17. State of Liquidity Management in Islamic Financial Institutions

    OpenAIRE

    SYED ALI, SALMAN

    2013-01-01

    Liquidity position and liquidity risk of Islamic financial institutions has been changing over time. Using three measures of liquidity this paper analyses the state of liquidity and the risk management practices of Islamic banks across countries and regions and compares them with conventional banks. It calls for creating new instruments and infrastructure for liquidity risk management and proposes fresh approaches to manage this risk.

  18. Chemically-resolved aerosol volatility measurements from two megacity field studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Huffman

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The volatilities of different chemical species in ambient aerosols are important but remain poorly characterized. The coupling of a recently developed rapid temperature-stepping thermodenuder (TD, operated in the range 54–230°C with a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS during field studies in two polluted megacities has enabled the first direct characterization of chemically-resolved urban particle volatility. Measurements in Riverside, CA and Mexico City are generally consistent and show ambient nitrate as having the highest volatility of any AMS standard aerosol species while sulfate showed the lowest volatility. Total organic aerosol (OA showed volatility intermediate between nitrate and sulfate, with an evaporation rate of 0.6%·K−1 near ambient temperature, although OA dominates the residual species at the highest temperatures. Different types of OA were characterized with marker ions, diurnal cycles, and positive matrix factorization (PMF and show significant differences in volatility. Reduced hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, a surrogate for primary OA, POA, oxygenated OA (OOA, a surrogate for secondary OA, SOA, and biomass-burning OA (BBOA separated with PMF were all determined to be semi-volatile. The most aged OOA-1 and its dominant ion, CO2+, consistently exhibited the lowest volatility, with HOA, BBOA, and associated ions for each among the highest. The similar or higher volatility of HOA/POA compared to OOA/SOA contradicts the current representations of OA volatility in most atmospheric models and has important implications for aerosol growth and lifetime. A new technique using the AMS background signal was demonstrated to quantify the fraction of species up to four orders-of-magnitude less volatile than those detectable in the MS mode, which for OA represent ~5% of the non-refractory (NR OA signal. Our results strongly imply that all OA types should be considered

  19. Liquid Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qutaiba A. Tawfic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mammals have lungs to breathe air and they have no gills to breath liquids. When the surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the lung increases, as in acute lung injury, scientists started to think about filling the lung with fluid instead of air to reduce the surface tension and facilitate ventilation. Liquid ventilation (LV is a technique of mechanical ventilation in which the lungs are insufflated with an oxygenated perfluorochemical liquid rather than an oxygen-containing gas mixture. The use of perfluorochemicals, rather than nitrogen, as the inert carrier of oxygen and carbon dioxide offers a number of theoretical advantages for the treatment of acute lung injury. In addition, there are non-respiratory applications with expanding potential including pulmonary drug delivery and radiographic imaging. The potential for multiple clinical applications for liquid-assisted ventilation will be clarified and optimized in future. Keywords: Liquid ventilation; perfluorochemicals; perfluorocarbon; respiratory distress; surfactant.

  20. Liquid micro pulsed plasma thruster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szelecka Agnieszka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A new type of pulsed plasma thruster (PPT for small satellite propulsion is investigated, of which the most innovative aspect is the use of a non-volatile liquid propellant. The thruster is based on an open capillary design. The thruster achieved a thrust-to-power ratio above 45 μN/W, which constitutes a 5-fold improvement over the water-propelled pulsed plasma thruster, and which is also slightly above the performance of a similarly sized PPT with a solid propellant.

  1. Flower volatiles, crop varieties and bee responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn K Klatt

    Full Text Available Pollination contributes to an estimated one third of global food production, through both the improvement of the yield and the quality of crops. Volatile compounds emitted by crop flowers mediate plant-pollinator interactions, but differences between crop varieties are still little explored. We investigated whether the visitation of crop flowers is determined by variety-specific flower volatiles using strawberry varieties (Fragaria x ananassa Duchesne and how this affects the pollination services of the wild bee Osmia bicornis L. Flower volatile compounds of three strawberry varieties were measured via headspace collection. Gas chromatography showed that the three strawberry varieties produced the same volatile compounds but with quantitative differences of the total amount of volatiles and between distinct compounds. Electroantennographic recordings showed that inexperienced females of Osmia bicornis had higher antennal responses to all volatile compounds than to controls of air and paraffin oil, however responses differed between compounds. The variety Sonata was found to emit a total higher level of volatiles and also higher levels of most of the compounds that evoked antennal responses compared with the other varieties Honeoye and Darselect. Sonata also received more flower visits from Osmia bicornis females under field conditions, compared with Honeoye. Our results suggest that differences in the emission of flower volatile compounds among strawberry varieties mediate their attractiveness to females of Osmia bicornis. Since quality and quantity of marketable fruits depend on optimal pollination, a better understanding of the role of flower volatiles in crop production is required and should be considered more closely in crop-variety breeding.

  2. Ionic liquids, electrolyte solutions including the ionic liquids, and energy storage devices including the ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gering, Kevin L.; Harrup, Mason K.; Rollins, Harry W.

    2015-12-08

    An ionic liquid including a phosphazene compound that has a plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units and at least one pendant group bonded to each phosphorus atom of the plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units. One pendant group of the at least one pendant group comprises a positively charged pendant group. Additional embodiments of ionic liquids are disclosed, as are electrolyte solutions and energy storage devices including the embodiments of the ionic liquid.

  3. Volatile constituents and polyphenol composition of Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Mill from Morocco

    OpenAIRE

    jihane OUMATOU; Saadia ZRIRA; Petretto, Giacomo L.; Bouchta SAIDI; Mariaelena SALARIS; Giorgio PINTORE

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is the extraction and the identification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and total phenolic compounds of three Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Mill., species from Morocco, namely Dellahia, Aissa and Shoul. The VOCs were extracted with Solid-Phase Microextraction (SPME) associated to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The antioxidant compounds in extracts were determined by liquid- Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS). The study allowed the identifi...

  4. Fast analysis of volatile organic compounds and disinfection by-products in drinking water using solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niri, Vadoud H; Bragg, Leslie; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2008-08-08

    A fast method was developed for the extraction and analysis of volatile organic compounds, including disinfection by-products (DBPs), with headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) techniques. A GC/time-of-flight (TOF)-MS instrument, which had fast acquisition rates and powerful deconvolution software, was used. Under optimum conditions total runtime was 45s. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including purgeable A and B compounds (listed in US Environmental Protection Agency method 624), were identified in standard water samples. Extraction times were 1min for more volatile compounds and 2min for less volatile compounds. The method was applied to the analysis of water samples treated under different disinfection processes and the results were compared with those from a liquid-liquid extraction method.

  5. Identification of molecular species of simple lipids by normal phase liquid chromatography-positive electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, and application of developed methods in comprehensive analysis of low erucic acid rapeseed oil lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalo, P. J.; Ollilainen, V.; Rocha, J. M.; Malcata, F. X.

    2006-07-01

    Mono-, di- and triacylglycerol (MAG, DAG, TAG), sterol ester (SE), free sterol (S) and free fatty acid (FFA) standards were analyzed in the presence of ammonium ions and ammonia by flow injection MS2 and MS3, and by normal phase-liquid chromatography (NP-LC) MS2 positive electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS). The MS data recorded for ammonium adducts ([M + NH4]+) of TAGs, DAGs, and MAGs were consistent with stepwise fragmentation mechanisms. In the first step, ammonium ion in [M + NH4]+ donates proton to acylglycerol and ammonia is released. In the second step, FFA is cleaved from protonated TAG, water from protonated 1,3-DAG and MAG, both FFA and water from protonated 1,2-DAG, hence leading to formation of [DAG]+ ion from TAG and 1,3-DAG, [DAG]+ and [MAG]+ ions from 1,2-DAG, and [MAG]+ ion from MAG. In the third step, [DAG]+ ion of TAG is fragmented to yield [Acyl]+, [Acyl + 74]+, [DAG - 74]+ ions, [DAG] ion of 1,3-DAG to [Acyl]+ ions, and [MAG]+ ion of MAG to protonated FAs, which are decomposed to water and [Acyl]+ ions in the fourth step. A stepwise mechanism for fragmentation of FFA was also evident from MS2 and MS3 data. Molecular species of low erucic acid rapeseed oil simple lipids were identified from characteristic ions produced in the NP-LC-ESI-MS2 of [M + NH4]+ ions. The percentage composition of the molecular species of each lipid class was calculated from integrated extracted ion chromatograms of [(M + NH4)]+ ions of SE, TAG, MAG, and FFA, of the sum of [(M + NH4)]+ and [(M + NH4) - NH3 - H2O]+ ions of both regioisomers of DAGs, and of sterol fragment ions of S.

  6. Stock Return and Cash Flow Predictability: The Role of Volatility Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Xu, Lai; Zhou, Hao

    We examine the joint predictability of return and cash flow within a present value framework, by imposing the implications from a long-run risk model that allow for both time-varying volatility and volatility uncertainty. We provide new evidence that the expected return variation and the variance...... risk premium positively forecast both short-horizon returns and dividend growth rates. We also confirm that dividend yield positively forecasts long-horizon returns, but that it cannot forecast dividend growth rates. Our equilibrium-based “structural” factor GARCH model permits much more accurate...

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis volatiles for diagnosis of tuberculosis by Cricetomys rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mgode, Georgies F; Weetjens, Bart J; Nawrath, Thorben; Lazar, Doris; Cox, Christophe; Jubitana, Maureen; Mahoney, Amanda; Kuipers, Dian; Machang'u, Robert S; Weiner, January; Schulz, Stefan; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2012-11-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis in regions with limited resources depends on microscopy with insufficient sensitivity. Rapid diagnostic tests of low cost but high sensitivity and specificity are needed for better point-of-care management of TB. Trained African giant pouched rats (Cricetomys sp.) can diagnose pulmonary TB in sputum but the relevant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-specific volatile compounds remain unknown. We investigated the odour volatiles of Mtb detected by rats in reference Mtb, nontuberculous mycobacteria, Nocardia sp., Streptomyces sp., Rhodococcus sp., and other respiratory tract microorganisms spiked into Mtb-negative sputum. Thirteen compounds were specific to Mtb and 13 were shared with other microorganisms. Rats discriminated a blend of Mtb-specific volatiles from individual, and blends of shared, compounds (P = 0.001). The rats' sensitivity for typical TB-positive sputa was 99.15% with 92.23% specificity and 93.14% accuracy. These findings underline the potential of trained Cricetomys rats for rapid TB diagnosis in resource-limited settings, particularly in Africa where Cricetomys rats occur widely and the burden of TB is high. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Volatility Forecast in Crises and Expansions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergii Pypko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We build a discrete-time non-linear model for volatility forecasting purposes. This model belongs to the class of threshold-autoregressive models, where changes in regimes are governed by past returns. The ability to capture changes in volatility regimes and using more accurate volatility measures allow outperforming other benchmark models, such as linear heterogeneous autoregressive model and GARCH specifications. Finally, we show how to derive closed-form expression for multiple-step-ahead forecasting by exploiting information about the conditional distribution of returns.

  9. Modelling of volatility in monetary transmission mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobešová, Anna; Klepáč, Václav; Kolman, Pavel [Department of Statistics and Operation Analysis, Faculty of Business and Economics, Mendel University in Brno, Zemědělská 1, 61300, Brno (Czech Republic); Bednářová, Petra [Institute of Technology and Business, Okružní 517/10, 370 01, České Budějovice (Czech Republic)

    2015-03-10

    The aim of this paper is to compare different approaches to modeling of volatility in monetary transmission mechanism. For this purpose we built time-varying parameter VAR (TVP-VAR) model with stochastic volatility and VAR-DCC-GARCH model with conditional variance. The data from three European countries are included in the analysis: the Czech Republic, Germany and Slovakia. Results show that VAR-DCC-GARCH system captures higher volatility of observed variables but main trends and detected breaks are generally identical in both approaches.

  10. Securing non-volatile memory regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraboschi, Paolo; Ranganathan, Parthasarathy; Muralimanohar, Naveen

    2013-08-20

    Methods, apparatus and articles of manufacture to secure non-volatile memory regions are disclosed. An example method disclosed herein comprises associating a first key pair and a second key pair different than the first key pair with a process, using the first key pair to secure a first region of a non-volatile memory for the process, and using the second key pair to secure a second region of the non-volatile memory for the same process, the second region being different than the first region.

  11. Encapsulation of liquid smoke flavoring in ca-alginate and ca-alginate-chitosan beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Guillermo; Gianelli, María Pia; Bugueño, Graciela; Celan, Raymond; Pavez, Constanza; Orellana, Patricio

    2014-01-01

    Encapsulation is a technique used in foods that may protect some compounds with sensory impact, in particular flavoring as liquid smoke. We used the dripping method, obtaining two different layers for encapsulation of liquid smoke: calcium alginate and calcium alginate-chitosan. The results show that the load capacity of liquid smoke encapsulation reached values above 96 %. The beads exhibit syneresis at room temperature, but in opposite side, refrigeration temperature stabilizes the hydrogel of beads, allowing the samples loss weight less than 3 % after 72 h. Heated capsules with liquid smoke released several volatile compounds in the headspace and may identify 66 compounds. Among these volatile compounds, phenols derivatives can be considered sensory descriptors to contribute to the specific flavor of smoke. We conclude that the dripping method is highly efficient to encapsulate liquid smoke and released several volatile compounds, although it is necessary to minimize syneresis at room temperature.

  12. "Juice Monsters": Sub-Ohm Vaping and Toxic Volatile Aldehyde Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talih, Soha; Salman, Rola; Karaoghlanian, Nareg; El-Hellani, Ahmad; Saliba, Najat; Eissenberg, Thomas; Shihadeh, Alan

    2017-09-29

    An emerging category of electronic cigarettes (ECIGs) is sub-Ohm devices (SODs) that operate at ten or more times the power of conventional ECIGs. Because carcinogenic volatile aldehyde (VA) emissions increase sharply with power, SODs may expose users to greater VAs. In this study, we compared VA emissions from several SODs and found that across device, VAs and power were uncorrelated unless power was normalized by coil surface area. VA emissions and liquid consumed were correlated highly. Analyzed in light of EU regulations limiting ECIG liquid nicotine concentration, these findings suggest potential regulatory levers and pitfalls for protecting public health.

  13. Liquid crystalline dihydroazulene photoswitches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anne Ugleholdt; Jevric, Martyn; Mandle, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    A large selection of photochromic dihydroazulene (DHA) molecules incorporating various substituents at position 2 of the DHA core was prepared and investigated for their ability to form liquid crystalline phases. Incorporation of an octyloxy-substituted biphenyl substituent resulted in nematic...

  14. Volatile Survival on Near-Earth Asteroid 2008 EV5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Leos; Britt, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Asteroid 2008 EV5 is currently one of the possible targets of NASA Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). The objective of this mission is to recover a boulder from the surface of an asteroid. The selection of the final target requires understanding the physical characteristics of the asteroid such as the size-frequency distribution of boulders on the asteroid's surface, the presence of volatiles on the surface and below, the strength of the surface materials and the degree of their alteration. In our work, we focus on the second criterion, the possibility of volatiles presence on 2008 EV5. These can be expected to survive embedded within the crystal lattice of various phyllosilicates. The positive presence of volatiles on the surface of and inside the asteroid is important especially for ISRU hardware demonstrations. Spectral data suggest that 2008 EV5 is a member of CI chondrite group which is characterized by high phyllosilicate content (~70%) but there is also the possibility of it being a CR chondrite where the phyllosilicate content ranges significantly, from samples with negligible phyllosilicate content to samples with almost 70% phyllosilicate content. If the dynamical history of the asteroid brought it close enough to the Sun, the lattice of phyllosilicates could have disintegrated and released the volatiles (water) and the material could have dehydrated. The depth at which the dehydration might have taken place depends on the characteristic depth of heat wave penetration which in turn depends on material characteristics such as density, heat capacity and heat conductivity. These are in turn are closely linked to the porosity. The characteristic heat penetration depth also depends on orbital geometry and rotational and orbital periods. Besides the temperature itself, the dehydration is also affected by the duration of the crystal lattice breakup temperatures. We use thermal model in conjunction with available experimental data on the dehydration of clays and

  15. Method of using polysilane positive photoresist materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrah, L.A.; Zeigler, J.M.

    1986-05-06

    A method is described of photopatterning a positive image onto a substrate coated with polysilane, comprising irradiating the coated substrate with actinic radiation forming a pattern of the positive image on the substrate, whereby the portions of the polysilane coating on which the radiation impinges are photodepolymerized to form products which volatilize and whereby the substrate becomes uncoated in the pattern of the positive image.

  16. Methodology for the detection of contamination by hydrocarbons and further soil sampling for volatile and semi-volatile organic enrichment in former petrol stations, SE Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa María Rosales Aranda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimal detection and quantification of contamination plumes in soil and groundwater by petroleum organic compounds, gasoline and diesel, is critical for the reclamation of hydrocarbons contaminated soil at petrol stations. Through this study it has been achieved a sampling stage optimization in these scenarios by means of the location of potential contamination areas before sampling with the application of the 2D electrical resistivity tomography method, a geophysical non destructive technique based on resistivity measurements in soils. After the detection of hydrocarbons contaminated areas, boreholes with continuous coring were performed in a petrol station located in Murcia Region (Spain. The drillholes reached depths down to 10 m and soil samples were taken from each meter of the drilling. The optimization in the soil samples handling and storage, for both volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds determinations, was achieved by designing a soil sampler to minimize volatilization losses and in order to avoid the manual contact with the environmental samples during the sampling. The preservation of soil samples was performed according to Europe regulations and US Environmental Protection Agency recommendations into two kinds of glass vials. Moreover, it has been taken into account the determination techniques to quantify the hydrocarbon pollution based on Gas Chromatography with different detectors and headspace technique to reach a liquid-gas equilibrium for volatile analyses.

  17. Asset liquidity, corporate investment, and endogenous financing costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flor, Christian Riis; Hirth, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    We analyze how the liquidity of real and financial assets affects corporate investment. The trade-off between liquidation costs and underinvestment costs implies that low-liquidity firms exhibit negative investment sensitivities to liquid funds, whereas high-liquidity firms have positive sensitiv......We analyze how the liquidity of real and financial assets affects corporate investment. The trade-off between liquidation costs and underinvestment costs implies that low-liquidity firms exhibit negative investment sensitivities to liquid funds, whereas high-liquidity firms have positive...... sensitivities. If real assets are not divisible in liquidation, firms with high financial liquidity optimally avoid external financing and instead cut new investment. If real assets are divisible, firms use external financing, which implies a lower sensitivity. In addition, asset redeployability decreases...... the investment sensitivity. Our findings demonstrate that asset liquidity is an important determinant of corporate investment....

  18. Volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in laboratory peat fire emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Ingrid J.; Black, Robert R.; Geron, Chris D.; Aurell, Johanna; Hays, Michael D.; Preston, William T.; Gullett, Brian K.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, volatile and semi-volatile organic compound (VOCs and SVOCs) mass emission factors were determined from laboratory peat fire experiments. The peat samples originated from two National Wildlife Refuges on the coastal plain of North Carolina, U.S.A. Gas- and particle-phase organic compounds were quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and by high pressure liquid chromatography. Hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) accounted for a large fraction (∼60%) of the speciated VOC emissions from peat burning, including large contributions of acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, benzene, toluene, and chloromethane. In the fine particle mass (PM2.5), the following organic compound classes were dominant: organic acids, levoglucosan, n-alkanes, and n-alkenes. Emission factors for the organic acids in PM2.5 including n-alkanoic acids, n-alkenoic acids, n-alkanedioic acids, and aromatic acids were reported for the first time for peat burning, representing the largest fraction of organic carbon (OC) mass (11-12%) of all speciated compound classes measured in this work. Levoglucosan contributed to 2-3% of the OC mass, while methoxyphenols represented 0.2-0.3% of the OC mass on a carbon mass basis. Retene was the most abundant particulate phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). Total HAP VOC and particulate PAH emissions from a 2008 peat wildfire in North Carolina were estimated, suggesting that peat fires can contribute a large fraction of state-wide HAP emissions.

  19. Volatile diterpene emission from dominant conifers in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Matsunaga

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Reactive volatile organic compounds (VOCs are known to affect atmospheric chemistry, especially biogenic VOCs (BVOCs which have a significant impact on regional air quality due to their large emission rates and high reactivities. Diterpenes (Kaur-16-ene and a diterpene likely to be Hibaene were detected in all of the 205 enclosure air samples collected over multiple seasons at two different sites from Cryptomeria japonica and Chamaecyparis obtusa trees, the dominant coniferous trees in Japan. The emission rate of Kaur-16-ene, was determined to be from 0.01 to 7.1 μg dwg−1 h−1 (average: 0.61 μg dwg−1 h−1 by branch enclosure measurements and solid phase – liquid extraction techniques. The emission rate was an order of magnitude higher than that of monoterpenes which are known to comprise a major portion of total BVOC emissions. In addition, total emission of Kaur-16-ene at 30 °C was estimated to be comparable to that of total anthropogenic VOC emissions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of volatile diterpene emissions from trees.

  20. Volatile diterpene emission from dominant conifers in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, S. N.; Chatani, S.; Nakatsuka, S.; Kusumoto, D.; Kubota, K.; Utsumi, Y.; Enoki, T.; Tani, A.; Hiura, T.

    2011-07-01

    Reactive volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are known to affect atmospheric chemistry, especially biogenic VOCs (BVOCs) which have a significant impact on regional air quality due to their large emission rates and high reactivities. Diterpenes (Kaur-16-ene and a diterpene likely to be Hibaene) were detected in all of the 205 enclosure air samples collected over multiple seasons at two different sites from Cryptomeria japonica and Chamaecyparis obtusa trees, the dominant coniferous trees in Japan. The emission rate of Kaur-16-ene, was determined to be from 0.01 to 7.1 μg dwg-1 h-1 (average: 0.61 μg dwg-1 h-1) by branch enclosure measurements and solid phase - liquid extraction techniques. The emission rate was an order of magnitude higher than that of monoterpenes which are known to comprise a major portion of total BVOC emissions. In addition, total emission of Kaur-16-ene at 30 °C was estimated to be comparable to that of total anthropogenic VOC emissions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of volatile diterpene emissions from trees.

  1. Realized volatility and absolute return volatility: a comparison indicating market risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zeyu; Qiao, Zhi; Takaishi, Tetsuya; Stanley, H Eugene; Li, Baowen

    2014-01-01

    Measuring volatility in financial markets is a primary challenge in the theory and practice of risk management and is essential when developing investment strategies. Although the vast literature on the topic describes many different models, two nonparametric measurements have emerged and received wide use over the past decade: realized volatility and absolute return volatility. The former is strongly favored in the financial sector and the latter by econophysicists. We examine the memory and clustering features of these two methods and find that both enable strong predictions. We compare the two in detail and find that although realized volatility has a better short-term effect that allows predictions of near-future market behavior, absolute return volatility is easier to calculate and, as a risk indicator, has approximately the same sensitivity as realized volatility. Our detailed empirical analysis yields valuable guidelines for both researchers and market participants because it provides a significantly clearer comparison of the strengths and weaknesses of the two methods.

  2. Study on Volatile Organic Components from Chinese Fir Wood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Luohua; QIN Tefu; OHIRA Tatsuro

    2006-01-01

    The volatile organic compounds(VOCs) are emitted by a wide array of products, which include a variety of chemicals, some of them may have short- and long-term adverse health effects. Several analytical instrument including gas chromatograph, high preferment liquid chromatograph, mass spectrometry and solid phase microextraction (SPME) technique were used in this study. The results showed the aldehyde and ketone components of Chinese fir wood were little composed of formaldehyde, syn-acetaldehyde, anti-acetadehyde and acrolein, VOCs obtained by Tenax GR absorber consisted of the major component cedrene (42.92%) and another 28 components, and the major components of the VOCs from the sample by using solid phase microextraction (SPME) technique were cedrene and cedrol.

  3. Hygroscopicity and ammonia volatilization losses from nitrogen sources in coated urea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia de Abreu Faria

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hygroscopic fertilizers tend to absorb moisture from the air and may have undesirable characteristics such as moistness, clumping and lower fluidity, hampering the application. The increasing use of urea is due to its numerous advantages, although this nitrogen (N source is highly susceptible to volatilization losses, particularly when applied to the soil surface of management systems with conservation of crop residues. The volatilization losses can be minimized by slow or controlled-release fertilizers, with controlled water solubility of the urea-coating materials; and by stabilized fertilizers, which prolong the period during which N remains in the amide or ammonia forms by urease inhibitors. This study evaluated the hygroscopicity of and ammonia volatilization from urea coated with boric acid and copper sulfate or with sulfur. The hygroscopicity of the sources was evaluated over time after exposure to five levels of relative humidity (RH and volatilization evaluated after application to the soil surface covered with sugarcane trash. Ammonium nitrate has a low potential for volatilization losses, but is highly hygroscopic. Although coating with boric acid and copper sulfate or elemental sulfur reduced the critical humidity level of urea, the delay in the volatilization process is a potential positive factor.

  4. Mindfulness predicts lower affective volatility among African Americans during smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Claire E; Chen, Minxing; Guo, Lin; Lam, Cho Y; Stewart, Diana W; Correa-Fernández, Virmarie; Cano, Miguel A; Heppner, Whitney L; Vidrine, Jennifer Irvin; Li, Yisheng; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S; Cinciripini, Paul M; Wetter, David W

    2014-06-01

    Recent research suggests that mindfulness benefits emotion regulation and smoking cessation. However, the mechanisms by which mindfulness affects emotional and behavioral functioning are unclear. One potential mechanism, lower affective volatility, has not been empirically tested during smoking cessation. This study examined longitudinal associations among mindfulness and emotional responding over the course of smoking cessation treatment among predominantly low-socioeconomic status (SES) African American smokers, who are at high risk for relapse to smoking and tobacco-related health disparities. Participants (N = 399, 51% female, mean age = 42, 48% with annual income mindfulness. Negative affect, positive affect, and depressive symptoms were assessed at five time points during smoking cessation treatment (up to 31 days postquit). Volatility indices were calculated to quantify within-person instability of emotional symptoms over time. Over and above demographic characteristics, nicotine dependence, and abstinence status, greater baseline trait mindfulness predicted lower volatility of negative affect and depressive symptoms surrounding the quit attempt and up to 1 month postquit, ps mindfulness and smoking cessation, these results are the first to show that mindfulness is linked to lower affective volatility (or greater stability) of negative emotions during the course of smoking cessation. The present study suggests that mindfulness is linked to greater emotional stability and augments the study of mindfulness in diverse populations. Future studies should examine the effects of mindfulness-based interventions on volatility and whether lower volatility explains effects of mindfulness-based treatments on smoking cessation.

  5. A Markov switching model of the conditional volatility of crude oil futures prices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, Wai Mun; See, Kim Hock [Department of Finance and Accounting, National University of Singapore, 119260 Kent Ridge Cresent (Singapore)

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines the temporal behaviour of volatility of daily returns on crude oil futures using a generalised regime switching model that allows for abrupt changes in mean and variance, GARCH dynamics, basis-driven time-varying transition probabilities and conditional leptokurtosis. This flexible model enables us to capture many complex features of conditional volatility within a relatively parsimonious set-up. We show that regime shifts are clearly present in the data and dominate GARCH effects. Within the high volatility state, a negative basis is more likely to increase regime persistence than a positive basis, a finding which is consistent with previous empirical research on the theory of storage. The volatility regimes identified by our model correlate well with major events affecting supply and demand for oil. Out-of-sample tests indicate that the regime switching model performs noticeably better than non-switching models regardless of evaluation criteria. We conclude that regime switching models provide a useful framework for the financial historian interested in studying factors behind the evolution of volatility and to oil futures traders interested short-term volatility forecasts.

  6. Does Energy Consumption Volatility Affect Real GDP Volatility? An Empirical Analysis for the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Rashid; Ozge Kandemir Kocaaslan

    2013-01-01

    This paper empirically examines the relation between energy consumption volatility and unpredictable variations in real gross domestic product (GDP) in the UK. Estimating the Markov switching ARCH model we find a significant regime switching in the behavior of both energy consumption and GDP volatility. The results from the Markov regime-switching model show that the variability of energy consumption has a significant role to play in determining the behavior of GDP volatilities. Moreover, the...

  7. Lunar In-Situ Volatile Extraction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A method of extracting volatile resources from the Lunar regolith is proposed to reduce the launch mass and cost of bringing such resources from the Earth to enable...

  8. Food commodity price volatility and food insecurity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alexander Sarris

    2013-01-01

      The paper first reviews several issues relevant to global food commodity market volatility as it pertains to food security, and food importing developing countries, and then discusses international...

  9. Volatility and the natural resource curse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, F.; Poelhekke, S.

    2009-01-01

    We provide cross-country evidence that rejects the traditional interpretation of the natural resource curse. First, growth depends negatively on volatility of unanticipated output growth independent of initial income, investment, human capital, trade openness, natural resource dependence, and popula

  10. Volatile compounds in meat and meat products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika KOSOWSKA

    Full Text Available Abstract Meaty flavor is composed of a few hundreds of volatile compounds, only minor part of which are responsible for the characteristic odor. It is developed as a result of multi-directional reactions proceeding between non-volatile precursors contained in raw meat under the influence of temperature. The volatile compounds are generated upon: Maillard reactions, lipid oxidation, interactions between Maillard reaction products and lipid oxidation products as well as upon thiamine degradation. The developed flavor is determined by many factors associated with: raw material (breed, sex, diet and age of animal, conditions and process of slaughter, duration and conditions of meat storage, type of muscle, additives applied and the course of the technological process. The objective of this review article is to draw attention to the issue of volatile compounds characteristic for meat products and factors that affect their synthesis.

  11. STOCK MARKET VOLATILITY: DEVELOPED AND EMERGING MARKETS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohammad Athar Noor; Mohd Asif Khan

    2012-01-01

      This paper examines the general patterns of recent global stock market returns and the volatility of such returns using 17 global stock indexes of countries classified into developed and emerging...

  12. International trade and exchange rate volatility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.A. Viaene (Jean-Marie); C.G. de Vries (Casper)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractFor currencies with well developed forward markets several papers have investigated the conjectured negative relationship between trade and short term exchange rate volatility, without being very successful. A theoretical explanation for the empirical anomalies is provided by solving

  13. Characterisation of selected volatile organic compounds in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kshale

    2013-05-15

    May 15, 2013 ... spectrometry. K. Shale1*, J. Mukamugema2, R. J. Lues1, P. Venter3 and K. K. Mokoena1 ..... Cajka T, Riddellova K, Tomaniova M, Hajslova J (2010). Recognition of ... volatile organic compounds of coniferous needle litter.

  14. Assessing relative volatility/intermittency/energy dissipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole E.; Pakkanen, Mikko S.; Schmiegel, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the notion of relative volatility/intermittency and demonstrate how relative volatility statistics can be used to estimate consistently the temporal variation of volatility/intermittency when the data of interest are generated by a non-semimartingale, or a Brownian semistationary...... process in particular. This estimation method is motivated by the assessment of relative energy dissipation in empirical data of turbulence, but it is also applicable in other areas. We develop a probabilistic asymptotic theory for realised relative power variations of Brownian semistationary processes......, and introduce inference methods based on the theory. We also discuss how to extend the asymptotic theory to other classes of processes exhibiting stochastic volatility/intermittency. As an empirical application, we study relative energy dissipation in data of atmospheric turbulence....

  15. Short communication: The effect of liquid storage on the flavor of whey protein concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Curtis W; Parker, Megan; Drake, MaryAnne

    2016-06-01

    Unit operations in dried dairy ingredient manufacture significantly influence sensory properties and, consequently, their use and consumer acceptance in a variety of ingredient applications. In whey protein concentrate (WPC) manufacture, liquid can be stored as whey or WPC before spray drying. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of storage, composition, and bleaching on the flavor of spray-dried WPC80. Liquid whey was manufactured and subjected to the following treatments: bleached or unbleached and liquid whey or liquid WPC storage. The experiment was replicated 3 times and included a no-storage control. All liquid storage was performed at 4°C for 24h. Flavor of the final spray-dried WPC80 was evaluated by a trained panel and volatile compound analyses. Storage of liquids increased cardboard flavor, decreased sweet aromatic flavor, and resulted in increased volatile lipid oxidation products. Bleaching altered the effect of liquid storage. Storage of unbleached liquid whey decreased sweet aromatic flavor and increased cardboard flavor and volatile lipid oxidation products compared with liquid WPC80 and no storage. In contrast, storage of bleached liquid WPC decreased sweet aromatic flavor and increased cardboard flavor and associated volatile lipid oxidation products compared with bleached liquid whey or no storage. These results confirm that liquid storage increases off-flavors in spray-dried protein but to a variable degree, depending on whether bleaching has been applied. If liquid storage is necessary, bleached WPC80 should be stored as liquid whey and unbleached WPC80 should be stored as liquid WPC to mitigate off-flavors.

  16. Subsidizing Liquidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinova, Katya; Park, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Facing increased competition over the last decade, many stock exchanges changed their trading fees to maker-taker pricing, an incentive scheme that rewards liquidity suppliers and charges liquidity demanders. Using a change in trading fees on the Toronto Stock Exchange, we study whether and why...

  17. Online measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds from aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Cross

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A detailed understanding of the climate and air quality impacts of aviation requires measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds (I/SVOCs from aircraft. Currently both the amount and chemical composition of aircraft I/SVOC emissions remain poorly characterized. Here we characterize I/SVOC emissions from aircraft, using a novel instrument for the online, quantitative measurement of the mass loading and composition of low-volatility organic vapors. Emissions from the NASA DC8 aircraft were sampled on the ground 143 m downwind of the engines and characterized as a function of engine power from idle (4% maximum rated thrust through 85% power. Results show that I/SVOC emissions are highest during engine idle operating conditions, with decreasing but non-zero I/SVOC emissions at higher engine powers. Comparison of I/SVOC emissions with total hydrocarbon (THC measurements, VOC measurements, and an established emissions profile indicates that I/SVOCs comprise 10–20% of the total organic gas-phase emissions at idle, and an increasing fraction of the total gas-phase organic emissions at higher powers. Positive matrix factorization of online mass spectra is used to identify three distinct types of I/SVOC emissions: aliphatic, aromatic and oxygenated. The volatility and chemical composition of the emissions suggest that unburned fuel is the dominant source of I/SVOCs at idle, while pyrolysis products make up an increasing fraction of the I/SVOCs at higher powers. Oxygenated I/SVOC emissions were detected at lower engine powers (≤30% and may be linked to cracked, partially oxidized or unburned fuel components.

  18. Online measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds from aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Cross

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A detailed understanding of the climate and air quality impacts of aviation requires detailed measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds (I/SVOCs from aircraft. Currently both the amount and chemical composition of aircraft I/SVOC emissions remain poorly characterized. Here we characterize I/SVOC emissions from aircraft, using a novel instrument for the online, quantitative measurement of the mass loading and composition of low-volatility organic vapors. Emissions from the NASA DC8 aircraft were sampled on the ground, 143 m downwind of the engines and characterized as a function of engine power from ground idle (~4% maximum rated thrust through 85% power. Results show that I/SVOC emissions are highest during engine-idle operating conditions, with decreasing but non-zero I/SVOC emissions at higher engine powers. Comparison of I/SVOC emissions with total hydrocarbon (THC measurements, VOC measurements, and an established emissions profile indicates that I/SVOCs comprise 10–20% of the total organic gas phase emissions at idle, and an increasing fraction of the total gas phase organic emissions at higher powers. Positive matrix factorization of online mass spectra is used to identify three distinct types of I/SVOC emissions: aliphatic, aromatic and oxygenated. The volatility and chemical composition of the emissions suggest that unburned fuel is the dominant source of I/SVOCs at idle, while pyrolysis products make up an increasing fraction of the I/SVOCs at higher powers. Oxygenated I/SVOC emissions were detected at lower engine powers (≤30% and may be linked to cracked, partially oxidized or unburned fuel components.

  19. Long memory and tail dependence in trading volume and volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, Eduardo; Santucci de Magistris, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between volatility, measured by realized volatility, and trading volume for 25 NYSE stocks. We show that volume and volatility are long memory but not fractionally cointegrated in most cases. We also find right tail dependence in the volatility and volume innovations...

  20. Long memory and tail dependence in trading volume and volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, Eduardo; Santucci de Magistris, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between volatility, measured by realized volatility, and trading volume for 25 NYSE stocks. We show that volume and volatility are long memory but not fractionally cointegrated in most cases. We also find right tail dependence in the volatility and volume innovations...

  1. Essays on Economic Volatility and Financial Frictions

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Hongyan

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation consists of three essays in macroeconomics. The first one essay discusses the reasons of Chinese huge foreign reserves holdings. It contributes to the literature of sudden stops, precautionary saving and foreign assets holdings. In the second essay, I study the price volatility of commodities and manufactured goods. I measure the price volatility of each individual goods but not on the aggregated level and therefore the results complete the related study. The third essay exp...

  2. Examining Moderate Volatile Loss through Lunar History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Prabal; Killen, Rosemary M.; Airapetian, Vladimir; Petro, Noah; Mandell, Avi

    2017-06-01

    While the Moon and bulk silicate earth (BSE) share many compositional similarities, a notable difference is the apparent depletion of moderate volatiles in lunar samples. Depletion of elements such as sodium and potassium relative to BSE composition has been observed in Apollo samples. The source of these depletions is poorly understood but may be a result of preferential accretion of volatile-rich melt in the inner disk to the Earth during Moon formation.However, recent Kepler data has indicated that stellar analogues to our Sun experience enhanced flare activity early in their evolution. This implies that the Sun may have had a higher frequency and energy of flares and associated Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) in its distant past. We examine the potential impacts of this increased activity on lunar exosphere generation and specifically on potential loss of moderate volatiles including sodium and potassium.We use a surface bounded exosphere model that incorporates multiple processes including photon stimulated desorption, kinetic sputtering and impact vaporization in order to study potential moderate volatile loss under a variety of different conditions. This model is informed by appropriate solar wind and CME properties, which includes CMEs of different energies. We also incorporate regolith overturn to determine ranges of potential bulk depletion of moderate volatiles from the lunar regolith.Our work is aimed at determining the potential impact of solar activity on the depletion of moderate volatiles in the lunar regolith. Such a contribution is important to ascertain in order to isolate the depletion of volatiles due to disk processes and may thus help constrain details of the Moon's formation. Finally, we also examine the potential of lunar abundances of moderate volatiles as an observational tracer of past solar activity.

  3. Anticipating Long-Term Stock Market Volatility

    OpenAIRE

    Conrad, Christian; Loch, Karin

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between long-term U.S. stock market risks and the macroeconomic environment using a two component GARCH-MIDAS model. Our results provide strong evidence in favor of counter-cyclical behavior of long-term stock market volatility. Among the various macro variables in our dataset the term spread, housing starts, corporate profits and the unemployment rate have the highest predictive ability for stock market volatility . While the term spread and housing starts are...

  4. Ammonia volatilization from sows on grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, S. G.; Søgaard, H. T.; Møller, H. B.; Morsing, S.

    According to regulations, sows with piglets on organic farms must graze on pastures. Volatilization of ammonia (NH 3) from urine patches may represent a significant source of nitrogen (N) loss from these farms. Inputs of N are low on organic farms and losses may reduce crop production. This study examined spatial variations in NH 3 volatilization using a movable dynamic chamber, and the pH and total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN) content in the topsoil of pastures with grazing sows was measured during five periods between June 1998 and May 1999. Gross NH 3 volatilization from the pastures was also measured with an atmospheric mass balance technique during seven periods from September 1997 until June 1999. The dynamic chamber study showed a high variation in NH 3 volatilization because of the distribution of urine; losses were between 0 and 2.8 g NH 3-N m -2 day -1. Volatilization was highest near the feeding area and the huts, where the sows tended to urinate. Ammonia volatilization rate was linearly related to the product of NH 3 concentration in the boundary layer and wind speed. The NH 3 in the boundary layer was in equilibrium with NH 3 in soil solution. Gross NH 3 volatilization was in the range 0.07-2.1 kg NH 3-N ha -1 day -1 from a pasture with 24 sows ha -1. Ammonia volatilization was related to the amount of feed given to the sows, incident solar radiation and air temperature during measuring periods, and also to temperature, incident solar radiation and rain 1-2 days before measurements. Annual ammonia loss was 4.8 kg NH 3-N sow -1.

  5. Ionic liquid based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of aromatic amines in water samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Chang Fan; Zheng Liang Hu; Mei Lan Chen; Chao Shen Tu; Yan Zhu

    2008-01-01

    In this work, a new microextraction method termed ionic liquid based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-DLLME) was demonstrated for the extraction of 2-methylaniline, 4-chloroaniline, 1-naphthylamine and 4-aminobiphenyl in aqueous matrices. After extraction the ionic liquid (IL) phase was injected directly into the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system for determination. Some parameters that might affect the extraction efficiency were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, good linear relationship, sensitivity and reproducibility were obtained. The limits of detection (LOD, S/N = 3) for the four analytes were in the range of 0.45-2.6 μg L-1. The relative standard deviations (R.S.D., n = 6) were in the range of 6.2-9.8%. This method was applied for the analysis of the real water samples. The recoveries ranged from 93.4 to 106.4%. The main advantages of the method are high speed, high recovery, good repeatability and volatile organic solvent-free.

  6. Determination of four heterocyclic insecticides by ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Zhao, Ercheng; Zhu, Wentao; Gao, Haixiang; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2009-02-01

    A novel microextraction method termed ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-DLLME) combining high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) was developed for the determination of insecticides in water samples. Four heterocyclic insecticides (fipronil, chlorfenapyr, buprofezin, and hexythiazox) were selected as the model compounds for validating this new method. This technique combines extraction and concentration of the analytes into one step, and the ionic liquid was used instead of a volatile organic solvent as the extraction solvent. Several important parameters influencing the IL-DLLME extraction efficiency such as the volume of extraction solvent, the type and volume of disperser solvent, extraction time, centrifugation time, salt effect as well as acid addition were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, good enrichment factors (209-276) and accepted recoveries (79-110%) were obtained for the extraction of the target analytes in water samples. The calibration curves were linear with correlation coefficient ranged from 0.9947 to 0.9973 in the concentration level of 2-100 microg/L, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs, n=5) were 4.5-10.7%. The limits of detection for the four insecticides were 0.53-1.28 microg/L at a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3.

  7. Liquid pearls

    CERN Document Server

    Bremond, Nicolas; Bibette, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    This fluid dynamics video reports how to form liquid core capsules having a thin hydrogel elastic membrane named liquid pearls. These fish-egg like structures are initially made of a millimetric liquid drop, aqueous or not, coated with an aqueous liquid film containing sodium alginate that gels once the double drop enters a calcium chloride bath. The creation of such pearls with micrometer thick membrane requires to suppress mixing until gelling takes place. Here, we show that superimposing a two dimensional surfactant precipitation at the interface confers a transient rigidity that can damp the shear induced instability at impact. Based on this, pearls containing almost any type of liquids can be created. The video focuses on the dynamics of the entry of the compound drop into the gelling bath.

  8. Toluene biodegradation in a solid/liquid system involving immobilized activated sludge and silicone oil as pollutant reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diz Castro, Manuel; Gómez-Díaz, Diego; Amrane, Abdeltif; Couvert, Annabelle

    2015-01-01

    A solid/liquid system involving activated sludge immobilized in an agar medium and a non-aqueous phase liquid containing the target pollutant has been considered to treat a model hydrophobic volatile organic compound, toluene. The positive impact of the use of a multiphase bioreactor is that the organic phase constitutes a pollutant reservoir and also helps to overcome possible pollutant toxicity. In addition and to overcome the drawbacks of the use of a solid organic phase (high pressure drop and low mass transfer) instead of a liquid organic phase, the considered solid phase was the aqueous. Consequently, silicone oil (polydimethylsiloxane) which showed its relevance for implementation in multiphase bioreactors was used. Promising results were observed from the analysis of toluene in the gaseous phase; for an initial amount of 2 g L(-1) related to the organic phase, a v/v ratio of 0.5 of the organic phase to the aqueous agar phase, total toluene consumption was observed in about 9 days, leading to a global biodegradation rate of approximately 3.1 mg L(-1) h(-1), namely in the range of values previously observed in liquid/liquid systems.

  9. Volatile flavor compounds in yogurt: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hefa

    2010-11-01

    Considerable knowledge has been accumulated on the volatile compounds contributing to the aroma and flavor of yogurt. This review outlines the production of the major flavor compounds in yogurt fermentation and the analysis techniques, both instrumental and sensory, for quantifying the volatile compounds in yogurt. The volatile compounds that have been identified in plain yogurt are summarized, with the few key aroma compounds described in detail. Most flavor compounds in yogurt are produced from lipolysis of milkfat and microbiological transformations of lactose and citrate. More than 100 volatiles, including carbonyl compounds, alcohols, acids, esters, hydrocarbons, aromatic compounds, sulfur-containing compounds, and heterocyclic compounds, are found in yogurt at low to trace concentrations. Besides lactic acid, acetaldehyde, diacetyl, acetoin, acetone, and 2-butanone contribute most to the typical aroma and flavor of yogurt. Extended storage of yogurt causes off-flavor development, which is mainly attributed to the production of undesired aldehydes and fatty acids during lipid oxidation. Further work on studying the volatile flavor compounds-matrix interactions, flavor release mechanisms, and the synergistic effect of flavor compounds, and on correlating the sensory properties of yogurt with the compositions of volatile flavor compounds are needed to fully elucidate yogurt aroma and flavor.

  10. Market volatility modeling for short time window

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mattos Neto, Paulo S. G.; Silva, David A.; Ferreira, Tiago A. E.; Cavalcanti, George D. C.

    2011-10-01

    The gain or loss of an investment can be defined by the movement of the market. This movement can be estimated by the difference between the magnitudes of two stock prices in distinct periods and this difference can be used to calculate the volatility of the markets. The volatility characterizes the sensitivity of a market change in the world economy. Traditionally, the probability density function (pdf) of the movement of the markets is analyzed by using power laws. The contributions of this work is two-fold: (i) an analysis of the volatility dynamic of the world market indexes is performed by using a two-year window time data. In this case, the experiments show that the pdf of the volatility is better fitted by exponential function than power laws, in all range of pdf; (ii) after that, we investigate a relationship between the volatility of the markets and the coefficient of the exponential function based on the Maxwell-Boltzmann ideal gas theory. The results show an inverse relationship between the volatility and the coefficient of the exponential function. This information can be used, for example, to predict the future behavior of the markets or to cluster the markets in order to analyze economic patterns.

  11. Separations of Metal Ions Using Ionic Liquids:The Challenges of Multiple Mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Ionic liquids are a distinct sub-set of liquids, comprising only of cations and anions, often with negligible vapor pressure. As a result of the low or non-volatility of these fluids, ionic liquids are often considered in liquid/liquid separation schemes where the goal is to replace volatile organic solvents. Unfortunately,it is often not yet recognized that the ionic nature of these solvents can result in a variety of extraction mechanisms, including solvent ion-pair extraction, ion exchange, and simultaneous combinations of these.This paper discusses current ionic liquid-based separations research where the effects of the nature of the solvent ions, ligands, and metal ion species were studied in order to be able to understand the nature of the challenges in utilizing ionic liquids for practical applications.

  12. Three essays on agricultural price volatility and the linkages between agricultural and energy markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Feng

    This dissertation contains three essays. In the first essay I use a volatility spillover model to find evidence of significant spillovers from crude oil prices to corn cash and futures prices, and that these spillover effects are time-varying. Results reveal that corn markets have become much more connected to crude oil markets after the introduction of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Furthermore, crude oil prices transmit positive volatility spillovers into corn prices and movements in corn prices become more energy-driven as the ethanol gasoline consumption ratio increases. Based on this strong volatility link between crude oil and corn prices, a new cross hedging strategy for managing corn price risk using oil futures is examined and its performance studied. Results show that this cross hedging strategy provides only slightly better hedging performance compared to traditional hedging in corn futures markets alone. The implication is that hedging corn price risk in corn futures markets alone can still provide relatively satisfactory performance in the biofuel era. The second essay studies the spillover effect of biofuel policy on participation in the Conservation Reserve Program. Landowners' participation decisions are modeled using a real options framework. A novel aspect of the model is that it captures the structural change in agriculture caused by rising biofuel production. The resulting model is used to simulate the spillover effect under various conditions. In particular, I simulate how increased growth in agricultural returns, persistence of the biofuel production boom, and the volatility surrounding agricultural returns, affect conservation program participation decisions. Policy implications of these results are also discussed. The third essay proposes a methodology to construct a risk-adjusted implied volatility measure that removes the forecasting bias of the model-free implied volatility measure. The risk adjustment is based on a closed

  13. Idiosyncratic Volatility, Stock Return and Investor Sentiment%股票特质波动率、股票收益与投资者情绪

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊伟; 陈浪南

    2015-01-01

    Systematic risk is priced only in the cross-sectional stock returns based on the traditional asset pricing models.Howev-er, idiosyncratic risk may not be fully diversified as market is imperfect and idiosyncratic risk is positively related to stock returns (Merton, 1987).Ang, Hodrick, Xing and Zhang (2006, 2009) suggest a negative relationship between idiosyncratic risk and stock returns, which makes idiosyncratic volatility one of the most popular asset pricing puzzles, called the“idiosyncratic volatili-ty puzzle”.Recent studies have re-examined the relationship between idiosyncratic volatility and stock returns, and reached con-tradictory conclusions.In emerging economies, like China, the capital markets are dominated by individual investors, where the stock prices are more likely to be affected by investor sentiment and noise trading.This paper investigates the dynamic relation-ship between the idiosyncratic volatility, the stock returns and the investor sentiment from both theoretical and empirical perspec-tives.First, this paper incorporates the noise traders affected by investor sentiment into the capital market equilibrium model with incomplete information of Merton (1987).The theoretical results indicate that the idiosyncratic volatility and the stock return are positively correlated, and the elasticity of expected excessive returns with respect to the idiosyncratic volatility is an increasing function of investor sentiment and noise traders.And then, we investigate the role of idiosyncratic risk as a systematic factor in the asset pricing process.Particularly, we present the idiosyncratic risk premium as a source of systematic risk factor capturing the returns of buying stocks with the highest idiosyncratic risk and selling stocks with the lowest idiosyncratic risk.The mid-term HaoDan Index, which is released by Stock Market Trend Analysis Weekly in China, is used as investor sentiment indicator.By employing the data from Shanghai Stock Exchange from

  14. Determination of Medronic Acid and Its Related Substances by Reversed-Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    An isocratic liquid chromatographic method with evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) was developed for the determination of medronic acid and its related substance. Volatile pentylamine was used as ion-pairing agent. Separations were performend

  15. Relationships between volatile compounds and sensory characteristics in virgin olive oil by analytical and chemometric approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procida, Giuseppe; Cichelli, Angelo; Lagazio, Corrado; Conte, Lanfranco S

    2016-01-15

    The volatile fraction of virgin olive oil is characterised by low molecular weight compounds that vaporise at room temperature. In order to obtain an aroma profile similar to natural olfactory perception, the composition of the volatile compounds was determined by applying dynamic headspace gas chromatography, performed at room temperature, with a cryogenic trap directly connected to a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer system. Samples were also evaluated according to European Union and International Olive Council official methods for sensory evaluation. In this paper, the composition of the volatile fraction of 25 extra virgin olive oils from different regions of Italy was analysed and some preliminary considerations on relationships between chemical composition of volatile fraction and sensory characteristics are reported. Forty-two compounds were identified by means of the particular analytical technique used. All the analysed samples, classified as extra virgin by the panel test, never present peaks whose magnitude is important enough in defected oils. The study was focused on the evaluation of volatile compounds responsible for the positive impact on olive odour properties ('green-fruity' and 'sweet') and olfactory perception. Chemometric evaluation of data, obtained through headspace analysis and the panel test evaluation, showed a correlation between chemical compounds and sensory properties. On the basis of the results, the positive attributes of virgin olive oil are divided into two separated groups: sweet types or green types. Sixteen volatile compounds with known positive impact on odour properties were extracted and identified. In particular, eight compounds seem correlated with sweet properties whereas the green sensation appears to be correlated with eight other different substances. The content of the compounds at six carbon atoms proves to be very important in defining positive attributes of extra virgin olive oils and sensory evaluation. © 2015

  16. Multifractal diffusion entropy analysis on stock volatility in financial markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingjing; Shang, Pengjian; Zhao, Xiaojun

    2012-11-01

    This paper introduces a generalized diffusion entropy analysis method to analyze long-range correlation then applies this method to stock volatility series. The method uses the techniques of the diffusion process and Rényi entropy to focus on the scaling behaviors of regular volatility and extreme volatility respectively in developed and emerging markets. It successfully distinguishes their differences where regular volatility exhibits long-range persistence while extreme volatility reveals anti-persistence.

  17. [Advances of poly (ionic liquid) materials in separation science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cuicui; Guo, Ting; Su, Rina; Gu, Yuchen; Deng, Qiliang

    2015-11-01

    Ionic liquids, as novel ionization reagents, possess beneficial characteristics including good solubility, conductivity, thermal stability, biocompatibility, low volatility and non-flammability. Ionic liquids are attracting a mass of attention of analytical chemists. Poly (ionic liquid) materials have common performances of ionic liquids and polymers, and have been successfully applied in separation science area. In this paper, we discuss the interaction mechanisms between the poly(ionic liquid) materials and analytes including hydrophobic/hydrophilic interactions, hydrogen bond, ion exchange, π-π stacking and electrostatic interactions, and summarize the application advances of the poly(ionic liquid) materials in solid phase extraction, chromatographic separation and capillary electrophoresis. At last, we describe the future prospect of poly(ionic liquid) materials.

  18. Neutron scattering in liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barocchi, F. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica

    1996-12-31

    Together with X-rays, thermal neutrons are the ideal probe to study the microscopic structure of condensed matter, however the precision attainable usually with neutrons for the measurement of atomic position correlation functions in liquids is, at least, one order of magnitude better than for X-rays. In order to measure properly the microscopic dynamics a wide range of momentum transfer with corresponding energy transfer must be available in the range of liquid state excitations. This again is only attainable, with good resolution, with neutrons. (author) 7 figs., 3 refs.

  19. High Birefringence Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Herman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Liquid crystals, compounds and mixtures with positive dielectric anisotropies are reviewed. The mesogenic properties and physical chemical properties (viscosity, birefringence, refractive indices, dielectric anisotropy and elastic constants of compounds being cyano, fluoro, isothiocyanato derivatives of biphenyl, terphenyl, quaterphenyl, tolane, phenyl tolane, phenyl ethynyl tolane, and biphenyl tolane are compared. The question of how to obtain liquid crystal with a broad range of nematic phases is discussed in detail. Influence of lateral substituent of different kinds of mesogenic and physicochemical properties is presented (demonstrated. Examples of mixtures with birefringence ∆n in the range of 0.2–0.5 are given.

  20. QSRR Study of GC Retention Indices of Volatile Compounds Emitted from Mosla chinensis Maxim by Multiple Linear Regression%QSRR Study of GC Retention Indices of Volatile Compounds Emitted from Mosla chinensis Maxim by Multiple Linear Regression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹慧; 李祖光; 陈小珍

    2011-01-01

    The volatile compounds emitted from Mosla chinensis Maxim were analyzed by headspace solid-phase micro- extraction (HS-SPME) and headspace liquid-phase microextraction (HS-LPME) combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The main volatiles from Mosla chinensis Maxim were studied in this paper. It can be seen that 61 compounds were separated and identified. Forty-nine volatile compounds were identified by SPME method, mainly including myrcene, a-terpinene, p-cymene, (E)-ocimene, thymol, thymol acetate and (E)-fl-farnesene. Forty-five major volatile compounds were identified by LPME method, including a-thujene, a-pinene, camphene, butanoic acid, 2-methylpropyl ester, myrcene, butanoic acid, butyl ester, a-terpinene, p-cymene, (E)-ocimene, butane, 1,1-dibutoxy-, thymol, thymol acetate and (E)-fl-farnesene. After analyzing the volatile compounds, multiple linear regression (MLR) method was used for building the regression model. Then the quantitative structure-retention relationship (QSRR) model was validated by predictive-ability test. The prediction results were in good agreement with the experimental values. The results demonstrated that headspace SPME-GC-MS and LPME-GC-MS are the simple, rapid and easy sample enrichment technique suitable for analysis of volatile compounds. This investigation provided an effective method for predicting the retention indices of new compounds even in the absence of the standard candidates.

  1. Application of Ionic Liquids in Hydrometallurgy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesik Park

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ionic liquids, low temperature molten salts, have various advantages manifesting themselves as durable and environmentally friendly solvents. Their application is expanding into various fields including hydrometallurgy due to their unique properties such as non-volatility, inflammability, low toxicity, good ionic conductivity, and wide electrochemical potential window. This paper reviews previous literatures and our recent results adopting ionic liquids in extraction, synthesis and processing of metals with an emphasis on the electrolysis of active/light, rare earth, and platinum group metals. Because the research and development of ionic liquids in this area are still emerging, various, more fundamental approaches are expected to popularize ionic liquids in the metal manufacturing industry.

  2. Affine processes on positive semidefinite matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Cuchiero, Christa; Mayerhofer, Eberhard; Teichmann, Josef

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides the mathematical foundation for stochastically continuous affine processes on the cone of positive semidefinite symmetric matrices. These matrix-valued affine processes have arisen from a large and growing range of useful applications in finance, including multi-asset option pricing with stochastic volatility and correlation structures, and fixed-income models with stochastically correlated risk factors and default intensities.

  3. Volatile profile, lipid oxidation and protein oxidation of irradiated ready-to-eat cured turkey meat products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xi; Ahn, Dong Uk

    2016-10-01

    Irradiation had little effects on the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values in ready-to-eat (RTE) turkey meat products, while it increased protein oxidation at 4.5 kGy. The volatile profile analyses indicated that the amount of sulfur compounds increased linearly as doses increased in RTE turkey meat products. By correlation analysis, a positive correlation was found between benzene/ benzene derivatives and alcohols with lipid oxidation, while aldehydes, ketones and alkane, alkenes and alkynes were positively correlated with protein oxidation. Principle component analysis showed that irradiated meat samples can be discriminated by two categories of volatile compounds: Strecker degradation products and radiolytic degradation products. The cluster analysis of volatile data demonstrated that low-dose irradiation had minor effects on the volatile profile of turkey sausages (<1.5 kGy). However, as the doses increased, the differences between the irradiated and non-irradiated cured turkey products became significant.

  4. Applications of Ionic Liquids in Electrochemical Sensors and Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Virendra V. Singh; Anil K. Nigam; Anirudh Batra; Mannan Boopathi; Beer Singh; Rajagopalan Vijayaraghavan

    2012-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are salt that exist in the liquid phase at and around 298 K and are comprised of a bulky, asymmetric organic cation and the anion usually inorganic ion but some ILs also with organic anion. ILs have attracted much attention as a replacement for traditional organic solvents as they possess many attractive properties. Among these properties, intrinsic ion conductivity, low volatility, high chemical and thermal stability, low combustibility, and wide electrochemical windows a...

  5. Ionic Liquids Development and Challenges in Industrial Application

    OpenAIRE

    Cvjetko Bubalo, M.; Radošević, K.; Radojčić Redovniković, I.; Halambek, J.; Vorkapić-Furač, J.; Gaurina Srček, V.

    2014-01-01

    Establishment of novel, highly productive, and sustainable processes for the production of industrially important compounds is becoming a growing area of research. Due to non-volatility, inflammability, great thermal, chemical and electrochemical stability and also recyclability, ionic liquids are extensively studied as possible green replacement for widely used conventional molecular solvents. Due to the extremely large number of possible chemical structures of ionic liquids, the ability to ...

  6. Nanosecond liquid crystalline optical modulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borshch, Volodymyr; Shiyanovskii, Sergij V.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2016-07-26

    An optical modulator includes a liquid crystal cell containing liquid crystal material having liquid crystal molecules oriented along a quiescent director direction in the unbiased state, and a voltage source configured to apply an electric field to the liquid crystal material wherein the direction of the applied electric field does not cause the quiescent director direction to change. An optical source is arranged to transmit light through or reflect light off the liquid crystal cell with the light passing through the liquid crystal material at an angle effective to undergo phase retardation in response to the voltage source applying the electric field. The liquid crystal material may have negative dielectric anisotropy, and the voltage source configured to apply an electric field to the liquid crystal material whose electric field vector is transverse to the quiescent director direction. Alternatively, the liquid crystal material may have positive dielectric anisotropy and the voltage source configured to apply an electric field to the liquid crystal material whose electric field vector is parallel with the quiescent director direction.

  7. Position Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Position Information Data Asset provides the ability to search for active SSA position descriptions using various search criteria. An individual may search by PD...

  8. Gas purge microsyringe extraction for quantitative direct gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of volatile and semivolatile chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cui; Piao, Xiangfan; Qiu, Jinxue; Wang, Xiaoping; Ren, Chunyan; Li, Donghao

    2011-03-25

    Sample pretreatment before chromatographic analysis is the most time consuming and error prone part of analytical procedures, yet it is a key factor in the final success of the analysis. A quantitative and fast liquid phase microextraction technique termed as gas purge microsyringe extraction (GP-MSE) has been developed for simultaneous direct gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of volatile and semivolatile chemicals without cleanup process. Use of a gas flowing system, temperature control and a conventional microsyringe greatly increased the surface area of the liquid phase micro solvent, and led to quantitative recoveries of both volatile and semivolatile chemicals within short extraction time of only 2 min. Recoveries of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and alkylphenols (APs) determined were 85-107%, and reproducibility was between 2.8% and 8.5%. In particular, the technique shows high sensitivity for semivolatile chemicals which is difficult to achieve in other sample pretreatment techniques such as headspace-liquid phase microextraction. The variables affecting extraction efficiency such as gas flow rate, extraction time, extracting solvent type, temperature of sample and extracting solvent were investigated. Finally, the technique was evaluated to determine PAHs, APs and OCPs from plant and soil samples. The experimental results demonstrated that the technique is economic, sensitive to both volatile and semivolatile chemicals, is fast, simple to operate, and allows quantitative extraction. On-site monitoring of volatile and semivolatile chemicals is now possible using this technique due to the simplification and speed of sample treatment.

  9. Exchange Rate Volatility and Trade among the Asia Pacific Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saang Joon Baak

    2004-06-01

    model is adopted. In addition, the test results show that the GDP of the importing country, the depreciation of the exporting country's currency value, the use of the same language and the membership of APEC have positive impacts on exports, while the distance between trading countries have negative impacts. Finally, it turns out that the negative impact of exchange rate volatility is much weaker among OECD countries than among non-OECD counties.

  10. Positive Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Positive psychology is a deliberate correction to the focus of psychology on problems. Positive psychology does not deny the difficulties that people may experience but does suggest that sole attention to disorder leads to an incomplete view of the human condition. Positive psychologists concern themselves with four major topics: (1) positive…

  11. The Impacts of Inflation Dynamics and Global Financial Crises on Stock Market Returns and Volatility: Evidence from Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    C.G Amaefula; B.K. Asare

    2014-01-01

    The paper investigates the impacts of inflation dynamics and global financial crises on Stock market returns and volatility in Nigeria.The data sets on monthly All Shares Index Prices of NSE, and consumers’ price index (CPI) cover the period of January, 1985 to December, 2010. The GARCH (1, 1) model with multivariate regressors were adopted and the result shows that in the conditional mean equation; inflation exerts insignificant positive impact on stock market returns, inflation volatility e...

  12. Characterization of volatile and non-volatile compounds of fresh pepper (Capsicum annuum)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggink, P.M.; Haanstra, J.P.W.; Tikunov, Y.M.; Bovy, A.G.; Visser, R.G.F.

    2010-01-01

    In this study volatile and non-volatile compounds and several agronomical important parameters were measured in mature fruits of elite sweet pepper breeding lines and hybrids and several genebank accessions from different Capsicum species. The sweet pepper breeding lines and hybrids were chosen to

  13. Modelling the Volatility-Return Trade-off when Volatility may be Nonstationary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Christian Møller; Iglesias, Emma M.

    In this paper a new GARCH-M type model, denoted the GARCH-AR, is proposed. In particular, it is shown that it is possible to generate a volatility-return trade-off in a regression model simply by introducing dynamics in the standardized disturbance process. Importantly, the volatility in the GARCH...

  14. Volatility Spillover and Multivariate Volatility Impulse Response Analysis of GFC News Events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Allen (David); M.J. McAleer (Michael); R.J. Powell (Robert); A.K. Singh (Abhay)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis paper applies two measures to assess spillovers across markets: the Diebold Yilmaz (2012) Spillover Index and the Hafner and Herwartz (2006) analysis of multivariate GARCH models using volatility impulse response analysis. We use two sets of data, daily realized volatility estimates

  15. An experimental study of evaporation waves in a superheated liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Larry G.

    1990-01-01

    leading edge, and any given region of the wavefront tends to propagate in surges associated with new nucleation and/or very fine-scale surface perturbations. Measurements of the instantaneous position of the upstream tip of the wavefront indicate that local velocity fluctuations are the same order as the mean velocity. The leading-edge bubble lifetimes and diameters are statistically distributed; mean values are of order 1 ms and 1 mm, respectively. The leading-edge bubbles are fragmented in violent "bursts" of aerosol. Bursts have a tendency to sweep over the leading-edge bubble layer in a wavelike manner: They are "large-scale structures" associated with the fragmentation of many bubbles.Fragmentation, rapid evaporation, flow acceleration, and pressure drop occur primarily within about 1 cm of the leading edge. Downstream of this region, the average speed and appearance of the flow are virtually constant. This developed flow is a highly nonuniform, two-phase spray containing streaklike structures. Its liquid phase is composed of drops (with a maximum diameter of about 100 [...]), as well as clusters and chains of bubbles (with a diameter of a few hundred microns). A thin liquid layer begins climbing the wall upon wave initiation. Its speed is a few m/s-significantly slower than that of the two-phase flow through the center. Exit pressure measurements indicate that the flow chokes for sufficiently low reservoir pressure; at higher reservoir pressures the flow is unchoked.The self-start threshold is not a propagation threshold, as waves are observed to propagate at somewhat lower superheats if started artificially. This is accomplished in Refrigerant 114 by "jump-starting" the wave, using the more volatile Refrigerant 12. For sufficiently high reservoir pressures, an "absolute" threshold is reached at which the quasi-steady rapid evaporation processes break down.Possible mechanisms for explosive boiling are discussed in light of the present results. While neither of the

  16. Ionic liquid foam floatation coupled with ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the separation and determination of estrogens in water samples by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Wang, Chuanliu; Yue, Qiaohong; Zhou, Tiecheng; Li, Na; Zhang, Hanqi; Hao, Xiaoke

    2014-11-01

    An ionic liquid foam floatation coupled with ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method was proposed for the extraction and concentration of 17-α-estradiol, 17-β-estradiol-benzoate, and quinestrol in environmental water samples by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. 1-Hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate was applied as foaming agent in the foam flotation process and dispersive solvent in microextraction. The introduction of the ion-pairing and salting-out agent NH4 PF6 was beneficial to the improvement of recoveries for the hydrophobic ionic liquid phase and analytes. Parameters of the proposed method including concentration of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, flow rate of carrier gas, floatation time, types and concentration of ionic liquids, salt concentration in samples, extraction time, and centrifugation time were evaluated. The recoveries were between 98 and 105% with relative standard deviations lower than 7% for lake water and well water samples. The isolation of the target compounds from the water was found to be efficient, and the enrichment factors ranged from 4445 to 4632. This developing method is free of volatile organic solvents compared with regular extraction. Based on the unique properties of ionic liquids, the application of foam floatation, and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was widened.

  17. The Impact of Jumps and Leverage in Forecasting Co-Volatility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Asai (Manabu); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The paper investigates the impact of jumps in forecasting co-volatility, accommodating leverage effects. We modify the jump-robust two time scale covariance estimator of Boudt and Zhang (2013) such that the estimated matrix is positive definite. Using this approach we

  18. The Impact of Jumps and Leverage in Forecasting Co-Volatility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Asai (Manabu); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The paper investigates the impact of jumps in forecasting co-volatility, accommodating leverage effects. We modify the jump-robust two time scale covariance estimator of Boudt and Zhang (2013)such that the estimated matrix is positive definite. Using this approach we ca

  19. The Effect of Long Memory in Volatility on Stock Market Fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bent Jesper; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard

    on returns. Asset pricing theory imposes testable cross- equation restrictions on the system that are not rejected in our preferred specifications, which include a strong financial leverage effect. We show that the impact of volatility shocks on stock prices is small and short-lived, in spite of a positive...

  20. The Effect of Long Memory in Volatility on Stock Market Fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bent Jesper; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard

    on returns. Asset pricing theory imposes testable cross-equation restrictions on the system that are not rejected in our preferred specifications, which include a strong financial leverage effect. We show that the impact of volatility shocks on stock prices is small and short-lived, in spite of a positive...

  1. An approach to the use of fixed carbon-volatile matter graph

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radovanović, Milan; Jankes, Goran

    1986-01-01

    The use of the fixed carbon-volatile matter (FC-VM) graph for quick calculations of proximate analysis data, as well as for simple presentation of coal classification is illustrated. From the position of the VM and FC values of a coal on the graph (on an ‘as received’ basis) it is possible to determ

  2. Dynamic Volatility Arbitrage: The advents of long/short trading strategies with dynamic participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorn, Jochen

    on Forex, interest rates and commodities. If an investor positions himself on the (volatility) market within a long/short trading framework, he typically bets on a traditional mispricing arbitrage. However as this corresponds to a call spread with equal exercise prices, this strategy alone would...

  3. An Empirical Study on Liquidity and Bank Lending

    OpenAIRE

    Koray Alper; Timur Hulagu; Gursu Keles

    2012-01-01

    In this study, by using a panel data of Turkish banks, we empirically analyze whether monetary policies that are able to manipulate liquidity positions of banks can affect bank lending. Our results suggest that bank specific liquidity is important in credit supply. Moreover, in determining their lending, banks consider not only their individual liquidity position but also the systemic liquidity. Hence, any monetary policy which can alter liquidity is potentially effective on credit supply.

  4. Liquidity, Information, and the Overnight Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Ewerhart, Christian; Nuno CASSOLA; Ejerskov, Steen; Valla, Natacha

    2004-01-01

    We model the interbank market for overnight credit with heterogeneous banks and asymmetric information. An unsophisticated bank just trades to compensate its liquidity imbalance, while a sophisticated bank will exploit its private information about the liquidity situation in the market. It is shown that with positive probability, the liquidity effect (Hamilton, 1997) is reversed, i.e., a liquidity drainage from the banking system may generate an overall decrease in the market rate. The phenom...

  5. Ubiquitous positioning

    CERN Document Server

    Mannings, Robin

    2008-01-01

    This groundbreaking resource offers a practical, in-depth understanding of Ubiquitous Positioning - positioning systems that identify the location and position of people, vehicles and objects in time and space in the digitized networked economy. The future and growth of ubiquitous positioning will be fueled by the convergence of many other areas of technology, from mobile telematics, Internet technology, and location systems, to sensing systems, geographic information systems, and the semantic web. This first-of-its-kind volume explores ubiquitous positioning from a convergence perspective, of

  6. Liquid crystalline thermosetting polymers as protective coatings for aerospace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerriero, G.L.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental regulations are driving the development of new aerospace coating systems, mainly to eliminate chromates and reduce volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. Among the various potential options for new coating materials, liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs) are attractive due to their un

  7. determination of lipophilic extractives in ionic liquid extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    liquids are biodegradable and non-volatile, this approach of analysis is definitely a highly green process ... oxidation reaction (Freire et al 2006b,. Gutiérrez ... In this paper, we report the results of the ..... Structural changes evidenced by FTIR.

  8. Combination of volatile and non-volatile functions in a single memory cell and its scalability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungjin; Hwang, Sungmin; Lee, Jong-Ho; Park, Byung-Gook

    2017-04-01

    A single memory cell which combines volatile memory and non-volatile memory functions has been demonstrated with an independent asymmetric dual-gate structure. Owing to the second gate whose dielectric is composed of oxide/nitride/oxide layers, floating body effect was observed even on a fully depleted silicon-on-insulator device and the non-volatile memory function was measured. In addition, read retention characteristics of the volatile memory function depending on the non-volatile memory state were evaluated and analyzed. Further scalability in body thickness was also verified through simulation studies. These results indicate that the proposed device is a promising candidate for high-density embedded memory applications.

  9. Implicit Volatility versus Statistical Volatility: an Exercise Using Options and Telemar S.A. Stock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Savino Portugal

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The main goal this article was to find the best way of making forecast about future volatility using implicit or statistic forecast. The work is based on Telemar S.A. shares data from 21/09/1998 to 21/10/2002 and Telemar S.A. shares data from 2/10/2000 to 21/10/2002. The implicit volatility was obtained using back-out procedure from the Black-Scholes model. The statistics forecasts were obtained using weighted moving average models, GARCH, EGARCH and FIGARCH models. The Wald statistic shows that EGARCH and FIGARCH models are efficient and are not biased forecasts for Telemar S.A. absolute variation between t and t + 1. The volatility evaluation during the maturity time of an option, rejects the hypothesis that implicit volatility is the best forecast to future volatility and the Wald statistic show that FIGARCH model is an efficient and not biased forecast.

  10. Liquid explosives

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jiping

    2015-01-01

    The book drawing on the author's nearly half a century of energetic materials research experience intends to systematically review the global researches on liquid explosives. The book focuses on the study of the conception, explosion mechanism, properties and preparation of liquid explosives. It provides a combination of theoretical knowledge and practical examples in a reader-friendly style. The book is likely to be interest of university researchers and graduate students in the fields of energetic materials, blasting engineering and mining.

  11. Learning from Prices, Liquidity Spillovers, and Market Segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanni Cespa; Thierry Focault

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new mechanism that explains the transmission of liquidity shocks from one security to another (“liquidity spillovers”). Dealers use prices of other securities as a source of information. As prices of less liquid securities convey less precise information, a drop in liquidity for one security raises the uncertainty for dealers in other securities, thereby affecting their liquidity. The direction of liquidity spillovers is positive if the fraction of dealers with price information...

  12. Learning from Prices, Liquidity Spillovers, and Market Segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanni Cespa; Thierry Focault

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new mechanism that explains the transmission of liquidity shocks from one security to another ("liquidity spillovers"). Dealers use prices of other securities as a source of information. As prices of less liquid securities convey less precise information, a drop in liquidity for one security raises the uncertainty for dealers in other securities, thereby affecting their liquidity. The direction of liquidity spillovers is positive if the fraction of dealers with price information...

  13. Positioning consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkier, Bente; Keller, Margit

    2014-01-01

    positionings emerges based on empirical examples of research in parent–children consumption. Positionings are flexible discursive fixations of the relationship between the performances of the practitioner, other practitioners, media discourse and consumption activities. The basic positioning types...... are the practice maintenance and the practice change position, with different sorts of adapting in between. Media discourse can become a resource for a resistant position against social control or for an appropriating position in favour of space for action. Regardless of the current relation to a particular media...... discourse, practitioners attempt to maintain their self-positioning of competence when performing. This leads us, as researchers, to caution against any a priori anticipation of the anchoring power of media discourses within everyday activities....

  14. Evaporation of volatile organic compounds from human skin in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajjar, Rachna M; Miller, Matthew A; Kasting, Gerald B

    2013-08-01

    The specific evaporation rates of 21 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from either human skin or a glass substrate mounted in modified Franz diffusion cells were determined gravimetrically. The diffusion cells were positioned either on a laboratory bench top or in a controlled position in a fume hood, simulating indoor and outdoor environments, respectively. A data set of 54 observations (34 skin and 20 glass) was assembled and subjected to a correlation analysis employing 5 evaporative mass transfer relationships drawn from the literature. Models developed by Nielsen et al. (Prediction of isothermal evaporation rates of pure volatile organic compounds in occupational environments: a theoretical approach based on laminar boundary layer theory. Ann Occup Hyg 1995;39:497-511.) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Peress, Estimate evaporative losses from spills. Chem Eng Prog 2003; April: 32-34.) were found to be the most effective at correlating observed and calculated evaporation rates under the various conditions. The U.S. EPA model was selected for further use based on its simplicity. This is a turbulent flow model based only on vapor pressure and molecular weight of the VOC and the effective air flow rate u. Optimum values of u for the two laboratory environments studied were 0.23 m s(-1) (bench top) and 0.92 m s(-1) (fume hood).

  15. Optimal directional volatile transport in retronasal olfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Rui; Michalski, Mark H.; Brown, Elliott; Doan, Ngoc; Zinter, Joseph; Ouellette, Nicholas T.; Shepherd, Gordon M.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of humans to distinguish the delicate differences in food flavors depends mostly on retronasal smell, in which food volatiles entrained into the airway at the back of the oral cavity are transported by exhaled air through the nasal cavity to stimulate the olfactory receptor neurons. Little is known whether food volatiles are preferentially carried by retronasal flow toward the nasal cavity rather than by orthonasal flow into the lung. To study the differences between retronasal and orthonasal flow, we obtained computed tomography (CT) images of the orthonasal airway from a healthy human subject, printed an experimental model using a 3D printer, and analyzed the flow field inside the airway. The results show that, during inhalation, the anatomical structure of the oropharynx creates an air curtain outside a virtual cavity connecting the oropharynx and the back of the mouth, which prevents food volatiles from being transported into the main stream toward the lung. In contrast, during exhalation, the flow preferentially sweeps through this virtual cavity and effectively enhances the entrainment of food volatiles into the main retronasal flow. This asymmetrical transport efficiency is also found to have a nonmonotonic Reynolds number dependence: The asymmetry peaks at a range of an intermediate Reynolds number close to 800, because the air curtain effect during inhalation becomes strongest in this range. This study provides the first experimental evidence, to our knowledge, for adaptations of the geometry of the human oropharynx for efficient transport of food volatiles toward the olfactory receptors in the nasal cavity. PMID:26553982

  16. A bacterial volatile signal for biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria constantly monitor the environment they reside in and respond to potential changes in the environment through a variety of signal sensing and transduction mechanisms in a timely fashion. Those signaling mechanisms often involve application of small, diffusible chemical molecules. Volatiles are a group of small air-transmittable chemicals that are produced universally by all kingdoms of organisms. Past studies have shown that volatiles can function as cell-cell communication signals not only within species, but also cross-species. However, little is known about how the volatile-mediated signaling mechanism works. In our recent study (Chen, et al. mBio (2015, 6: e00392-15, we demonstrated that the soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis uses acetic acid as a volatile signal to coordinate the timing of biofilm formation within physically separated cells in the community. We also showed that the bacterium possesses an intertwined gene network to produce, secrete, sense, and respond to acetic acid, in stimulating biofilm formation. Interestingly, many of those genes are highly conserved in other bacterial species, raising the possibility that acetic acid may act as a volatile signal for cross-species communication.

  17. A bacterial volatile signal for biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun; Gozzi, Kevin; Chai, Yunrong

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria constantly monitor the environment they reside in and respond to potential changes in the environment through a variety of signal sensing and transduction mechanisms in a timely fashion. Those signaling mechanisms often involve application of small, diffusible chemical molecules. Volatiles are a group of small air-transmittable chemicals that are produced universally by all kingdoms of organisms. Past studies have shown that volatiles can function as cell-cell communication signals not only within species, but also cross-species. However, little is known about how the volatile-mediated signaling mechanism works. In our recent study (Chen, et al. mBio (2015), 6: e00392-15), we demonstrated that the soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis uses acetic acid as a volatile signal to coordinate the timing of biofilm formation within physically separated cells in the community. We also showed that the bacterium possesses an intertwined gene network to produce, secrete, sense, and respond to acetic acid, in stimulating biofilm formation. Interestingly, many of those genes are highly conserved in other bacterial species, raising the possibility that acetic acid may act as a volatile signal for cross-species communication.

  18. Modeling and forecasting petroleum futures volatility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadorsky, Perry [York Univ., Schulich School of Business, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2006-07-15

    Forecasts of oil price volatility are important inputs into macroeconometric models, financial market risk assessment calculations like value at risk, and option pricing formulas for futures contracts. This paper uses several different univariate and multivariate statistical models to estimate forecasts of daily volatility in petroleum futures price returns. The out-of-sample forecasts are evaluated using forecast accuracy tests and market timing tests. The TGARCH model fits well for heating oil and natural gas volatility and the GARCH model fits well for crude oil and unleaded gasoline volatility. Simple moving average models seem to fit well in some cases provided the correct order is chosen. Despite the increased complexity, models like state space, vector autoregression and bivariate GARCH do not perform as well as the single equation GARCH model. Most models out perform a random walk and there is evidence of market timing. Parametric and non-parametric value at risk measures are calculated and compared. Non-parametric models outperform the parametric models in terms of number of exceedences in backtests. These results are useful for anyone needing forecasts of petroleum futures volatility. (author)

  19. A conservative discontinuous target volatility strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Cirelli

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The asset management sector is constantly looking for a reliable investment strategy, which is able to keep its promises. One of the most used approaches is the target volatility strategy that combines a risky asset with a risk-free trying to maintain the portfolio volatility constant over time. Several analyses highlight that such target is fulfilled on average, but in periods of crisis, the portfolio still suffers market’s turmoils. In this paper, the authors introduce an innovative target volatility strategy: the discontinuous target volatility. Such approach turns out to be more conservative in high volatility periods. Moreover, the authors compare the adoption of the VIX Index as a risk measure instead of the classical standard deviation and show whether the former is better than the latter. In the last section, the authors also extend the analysis to remove the risk-free assumption and to include the correlation structure between two risky assets. Empirical results on a wide time span show the capability of the new proposed strategy to enhance the portfolio performance in terms of standard measures and according to stochastic dominance theory.

  20. Optimal directional volatile transport in retronasal olfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Rui; Michalski, Mark H; Brown, Elliott; Doan, Ngoc; Zinter, Joseph; Ouellette, Nicholas T; Shepherd, Gordon M

    2015-11-24

    The ability of humans to distinguish the delicate differences in food flavors depends mostly on retronasal smell, in which food volatiles entrained into the airway at the back of the oral cavity are transported by exhaled air through the nasal cavity to stimulate the olfactory receptor neurons. Little is known whether food volatiles are preferentially carried by retronasal flow toward the nasal cavity rather than by orthonasal flow into the lung. To study the differences between retronasal and orthonasal flow, we obtained computed tomography (CT) images of the orthonasal airway from a healthy human subject, printed an experimental model using a 3D printer, and analyzed the flow field inside the airway. The results show that, during inhalation, the anatomical structure of the oropharynx creates an air curtain outside a virtual cavity connecting the oropharynx and the back of the mouth, which prevents food volatiles from being transported into the main stream toward the lung. In contrast, during exhalation, the flow preferentially sweeps through this virtual cavity and effectively enhances the entrainment of food volatiles into the main retronasal flow. This asymmetrical transport efficiency is also found to have a nonmonotonic Reynolds number dependence: The asymmetry peaks at a range of an intermediate Reynolds number close to 800, because the air curtain effect during inhalation becomes strongest in this range. This study provides the first experimental evidence, to our knowledge, for adaptations of the geometry of the human oropharynx for efficient transport of food volatiles toward the olfactory receptors in the nasal cavity.

  1. Innovations in liquidity management of credit institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.E.Galjaeva

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. Article purpose is search and justification of new approaches to management of credit organization liquidity, and stable sources of attraction of available funds allocated for formation and reliable clients borrowers, and also providing demanded level of bank assets profitability.The results of the analysis. In article requirements to management system of credit organization liquidity are formulated. Theyare:ability to make short-term control of liquidity credit organization in the conditions of marketss high volatility;ability to organize strategic management of credit organization liquidity by means of trendss identification in the markets of money and capital, and also an assessment of chances and risks of the most significant clients borrowers and creditors;ability to carry out coordination of liquidity management in the decentralized structures of the credit organization and to estimate the liquiditys integrated risk.In the course of research the main problems that need to be solved for implementation of the concept of the coordinated liquidity management are revealed. They are:to coordinate financial politicians and to conclude agreements in the field of working capital structure optimization of the enterprises that will allow bank to attract the unused potential of enterprises liquidity as resource base, and to the enterprise to receive cheaper in comparison with the market access to the credits;to develop transition road map from the traditional relations between bank and the enterprise: creditor-borrower, to the business and partner relations in the field of the liquidity coordinated management on the basis of business processes transfer on liquiditys management in the service centers of joint access;to improve system risk of banks management as a whole as traditional approaches to liquidity risks management in the credit organization which don't consider feature of processes of liquidity coordinated management

  2. Effects of Daylight Saving Time changes on stock market volatility: a reply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berument, Hakan; Dogan, Nukhet

    2011-12-01

    There is a rich array of evidence that suggests that changes in sleeping patterns affect an individual's decision-making processes. A nationwide sleeping-pattern change happens twice a year when the Daylight Saving Time (DST) change occurs. Kamstra, Kramer, and Levi argued in 2000 that a DST change lowers stock market returns. This study presents evidence that DST changes affect the relationship between stock market return and volatility. Empirical evidence suggests that the positive relationship between return and volatility becomes negative on the Mondays following DST changes.

  3. AN EXAMINATION OF THE LEVERAGE EFFECT IN THE ISE WITH STOCHASTIC VOLATILITY MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YELİZ YALÇIN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is the asses the leverage effect of the Istanbul Stock Exchange within the Stochastic Volatility framework in the period 01.01.1990 – 11.08.2006. The relationship between risk and return is a well established phenomenon in Financial Econometerics. Both positive and negative relationship has been reported in the empirical literature. That use the conditional variance the empirical evidence provided in this paper from the Stochastic Volatility is to be negative feed back effect and statistically insignificant leverage effect.

  4. Interlaboratory test study for ASTM E 2008 volatility rate by thermogravimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwok, Q.S.M.; Vachon, M.; Jones, D.E.G.

    2003-11-01

    The Canadian Explosives Research Laboratory (CERL) led an interlaboratory test (ILT) to assess the stability of solids and liquids at given temperatures using thermogravimetry under specific experimental conditions.The objective was to determine the number of repetitive measurements needed on fresh specimens in order to satisfy end use requirements. The study involved isothermal constant heating rate tests to determine the volatility rates for camphor at 333 K and for squalane at 573 K using ASTM Standard Test Method E 2008 called Volatility Rate by Thermogravimetry. This paper listed the participating laboratories, the scientists, and their locations. Each laboratory conducted mass and temperature calibrations according to ASTME Standard E 1582 and manufacturer's recommendations. Five replicates were obtained from each laboratory and the volatility rates for water were determined at 323 and 353 K using the Method B Constant Heating Rate Test. The results from 8 laboratories were statistically analyzed using the ASTME E 691 Interlaboratory Data Analysis Software. The report includes a table of results for volatility rates for camphor, squalane, water at 323 K and water at 353 K. 4 tabs., 9 appendices.

  5. Sensory characteristics and related volatile flavor compound profiles of different types of whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo-Escamilla, F J; Kelly, A L; Delahunty, C M

    2005-08-01

    To characterize the flavor of liquid whey, 11 samples of whey representing a wide range of types were sourced from cheese and casein-making procedures, either industrial or from pilot-plant facilities. Whey samples were assessed for flavor by descriptive sensory evaluation and analyzed for headspace volatile composition by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). The sensory data clearly distinguished between the samples in relation to the processes of manufacture; that is, significant differences were apparent between cheese, rennet, and acid wheys. For Mozzarella and Quarg wheys, in which fermentation progressed to low pH values, the starter cultures used for cheese making had a significant influence on flavor. In comparison, Cheddar and Gouda wheys were described by milk-like flavors, and rennet casein wheys were described by "sweet" (oat-like and "sweet") and thermally induced flavors. The volatile compound data obtained by PTR-MS differentiated the samples as distinctive and reproducible "chemical fingerprints". On applying partial least squares regression to determine relationships between sensory and volatile composition data, sensory characteristics such as "rancid" and cheese-like odors and "caramelized milk," yogurt-like, "sweet," and oat-like flavors were found to be related to the presence and absence of specific volatile compounds.

  6. Removal Of Volatile Impurities From Copper Concentrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkel, L.; Schuler, A.; Frei, A.; Sturzenegger, M.

    2005-03-01

    To study the removal of volatile impurities from two different copper concentrates they have been heated on a thermo balance to temperatures between 900 and 1500 C. This sample treatment revealed that both concentrates undergo strong weight losses at 500 and 700 C. They were attributed to the removal of sulfur. Elemental analyses of the residues by ICP spectrometry have shown that the thermal treatment efficiently removes the volatile impurities. Already below 900 C most of the arsenic is removed by evaporation, the largest fraction of lead and zinc is removed in the temperature interval of 1300-1500 C. It was observed that quartz in the concentrate leads to the formation of a silicon-enriched phase besides a metal rich sulfide phase. The former is interpreted as an early stage of a silicate slag. Elemental analysis showed that the formation of this distinct slag phase does not hinder the efficient removal of volatile impurities. (author)

  7. Dynamic Factor Models for the Volatility Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Wel, Michel; Ozturk, Sait R.; Dijk, Dick van

    The implied volatility surface is the collection of volatilities implied by option contracts for different strike prices and time-to-maturity. We study factor models to capture the dynamics of this three-dimensional implied volatility surface. Three model types are considered to examine desirable...... features for representing the surface and its dynamics: a general dynamic factor model, restricted factor models designed to capture the key features of the surface along the moneyness and maturity dimensions, and in-between spline-based methods. Key findings are that: (i) the restricted and spline......-based models are both rejected against the general dynamic factor model, (ii) the factors driving the surface are highly persistent, (iii) for the restricted models option Delta is preferred over the more often used strike relative to spot price as measure for moneyness....

  8. The volatility of stock market prices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiller, R J

    1987-01-02

    If the volatility of stock market prices is to be understood in terms of the efficient markets hypothesis, then there should be evidence that true investment value changes through time sufficiently to justify the price changes. Three indicators of change in true investment value of the aggregate stock market in the United States from 1871 to 1986 are considered: changes in dividends, in real interest rates, and in a direct measure of intertemporal marginal rates of substitution. Although there are some ambiguities in interpreting the evidence, dividend changes appear to contribute very little toward justifying the observed historical volatility of stock prices. The other indicators contribute some, but still most of the volatility of stock market prices appears unexplained.

  9. Volatile components and continental material of planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florenskiy, K. P.; Nikolayeva, O. V.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the continental material of the terrestrial planets varies in composition from planet to planet according to the abundances and composition of true volatiles (H20, CO2, etc.) in the outer shells of the planets. The formation of these shells occurs very early in a planet's evolution when the role of endogenous processes is indistinct and continental materials are subject to melting and vaporizing in the absence of an atmosphere. As a result, the chemical properties of continental materials are related not only to fractionation processes but also to meltability and volatility. For planets retaining a certain quantity of true volatile components, the chemical transformation of continental material is characterized by a close interaction between impact melting vaporization and endogeneous geological processes.

  10. Volatile species retention during metallic fuel casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Randall S.; Porter, Douglas L.

    2013-10-01

    Metallic nuclear fuels are candidate transmutation fuel forms for advanced fuel cycles. Through the operation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II metallic nuclear fuels have been shown to be robust and easily manufactured. However, concerns have been raised concerning loss of americium during the casting process because of its high vapor pressure. In order to address these concerns a gaseous diffusion model was developed and a series of experiments using both manganese and samarium as surrogates for americium were conducted. The modeling results showed that volatility losses can be controlled to essentially no losses with a modest overpressure. Experimental results also showed volatile species retention down to no detectable losses through overpressure, and although the loss values varied from the model results the same trend was seen. Based on these results it is very probable that americium losses through volatility can be controlled to no detectable losses through application of a modest overpressure during casting.

  11. Highly sensitive electromembrane extraction for the determination of volatile organic compound metabolites in dried urine spot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Joon Hyuk; Eom, Han Young; Kim, Unyong; Kim, Junghyun; Cho, Hyun-Deok; Kang, Wonjae; Kim, Da Som; Han, Sang Beom

    2015-10-16

    Electromembrane extraction coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed for determination of ten volatile organic compound metabolites in dried urine spot samples. The dried urine spot approach is a convenient and economical sampling method, wherein urine is spotted onto a filter paper and dried. This method requires only a small amount of sample, but the analysis sometimes suffers from low sensitivity, which can lead to analytical problems in the detection of minor components in samples. The newly developed dried urine spot analysis using electromembrane extraction exhibited improved sensitivity and extraction, and enrichment of the sample was rapidly achieved in one step by applying an electric field. Aliquots of urine were spotted onto Bond Elut DMS cards and dried at room temperature. After drying, the punched out dried urine spot was eluted with water. Volatile organic compound metabolites were extracted from the sample through a supported liquid membrane into an alkaline acceptor solution inside the lumen of a hollow fiber with the help of an electric potential. The optimum extraction conditions were determined by using design of experiments (fractional factorial design and response surface methodology). Satisfactory sensitivity was achieved and the limits of quantification (LOQ) obtained were lower than the regulatory threshold limits. The method was validated by assessing the linearity, precision, accuracy, recovery, reproducibility, stability, and matrix effects. The results were acceptable, and the developed method was successfully applied to biological exposure monitoring of volatile organic compound metabolites in fifty human urine samples.

  12. Effects of herbivore-induced rice volatiles on the host selection behavior of brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    It has been suggested that herbivore would react to volatiles produced by herbivore infested plant due to potential change, either positive or negative, in the acceptability of the host plant. This hypothesis was tested for the brown planthopper (BPH) in the laboratory. Sixteen components of the headspace volatiles from rice seedlings with different treatments were collected with SPME and Tenax-TA trap and analyzed with GC and GC-MS. Significant differences in volatile emissions were observed for rice plants with different treatments. Undamaged control plants, mechanically damaged plants and the plants infested by BPH for 1 or 2 d emitted much lower amounts of volatiles compared to the plants infested by BPH for 3 or 5 d. The plants infested by BPH for 3 or 5 d emitted several volatiles that were not detected in undamaged control plants, mechanically damaged plants or the plants infested by BPH for 1 or 2 d. Spodoptera litura infested plants released much higher amounts of volatiles than those in all other treatments, and the contents of several green leaf volatiles, methyl salicylate and terpenoids increased dramatically. In dual-choice flight tunnel experiments, adult BPH females showed no significant preference between the untreated healthy plants and mechanically damaged plants or the plants infested by BPH adult females. However, rice plants damaged by S. litura had a clearly repellent effects on BPH adult females compared to healthy undamaged plants, mechanically damaged plants or the plants infested by BPH.

  13. Changes in dark chocolate volatiles during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, Lia M; Cadwallader, Keith R; Engeseth, Nicki J

    2012-05-09

    Chocolate storage is critical to the quality of the final product. Inadequate storage, especially with temperature fluctuations, may lead to a change in crystal structure, which may eventually cause fat bloom. Bloom is the main cause of quality loss in the chocolate industry. The impact of various storage conditions on the flavor quality of dark chocolate was determined. Dark chocolate was stored in different conditions leading to either fat or sugar bloom and analyzed at 0, 4, and 8 weeks of storage. Changes in chocolate flavor were determined by volatile analysis and descriptive sensory evaluation. Results were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA), cluster analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and linear partial least-squares regression analysis (PLS). Volatile concentration and loss were significantly affected by storage conditions. Chocolates stored at high temperature were the most visually and texturally compromised, but volatile concentrations were affected the least, whereas samples stored at ambient, frozen, and high relative humidity conditions had significant volatile loss during storage. It was determined that high-temperature storage caused a change in crystal state due to the polymorphic shift to form VI, leading to an increase in sample hardness. Decreased solid fat content (SFC) during high-temperature storage increased instrumentally determined volatile retention, although no difference was detected in chocolate flavor during sensory analysis, possibly due to instrumental and sensory sampling techniques. When all instrumental and sensory data had been taken into account, the storage condition that had the least impact on texture, surface roughness, grain size, lipid polymorphism, fat bloom formation, volatile concentrations, and sensory attributes was storage at constant temperature and 75% relative humidity.

  14. Different methods for volatile sampling in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kücklich, Marlen; Möller, Manfred; Marcillo, Andrea; Einspanier, Almuth; Weiß, Brigitte M; Birkemeyer, Claudia; Widdig, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies showed that olfactory cues are important for mammalian communication. However, many specific compounds that convey information between conspecifics are still unknown. To understand mechanisms and functions of olfactory cues, olfactory signals such as volatile compounds emitted from individuals need to be assessed. Sampling of animals with and without scent glands was typically conducted using cotton swabs rubbed over the skin or fur and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). However, this method has various drawbacks, including a high level of contaminations. Thus, we adapted two methods of volatile sampling from other research fields and compared them to sampling with cotton swabs. To do so we assessed the body odor of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) using cotton swabs, thermal desorption (TD) tubes and, alternatively, a mobile GC-MS device containing a thermal desorption trap. Overall, TD tubes comprised most compounds (N = 113), with half of those compounds being volatile (N = 52). The mobile GC-MS captured the fewest compounds (N = 35), of which all were volatile. Cotton swabs contained an intermediate number of compounds (N = 55), but very few volatiles (N = 10). Almost all compounds found with the mobile GC-MS were also captured with TD tubes (94%). Hence, we recommend TD tubes for state of the art sampling of body odor of mammals or other vertebrates, particularly for field studies, as they can be easily transported, stored and analysed with high performance instruments in the lab. Nevertheless, cotton swabs capture compounds which still may contribute to the body odor, e.g. after bacterial fermentation, while profiles from mobile GC-MS include only the most abundant volatiles of the body odor.

  15. Different methods for volatile sampling in mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Manfred; Marcillo, Andrea; Einspanier, Almuth; Weiß, Brigitte M.

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies showed that olfactory cues are important for mammalian communication. However, many specific compounds that convey information between conspecifics are still unknown. To understand mechanisms and functions of olfactory cues, olfactory signals such as volatile compounds emitted from individuals need to be assessed. Sampling of animals with and without scent glands was typically conducted using cotton swabs rubbed over the skin or fur and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). However, this method has various drawbacks, including a high level of contaminations. Thus, we adapted two methods of volatile sampling from other research fields and compared them to sampling with cotton swabs. To do so we assessed the body odor of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) using cotton swabs, thermal desorption (TD) tubes and, alternatively, a mobile GC-MS device containing a thermal desorption trap. Overall, TD tubes comprised most compounds (N = 113), with half of those compounds being volatile (N = 52). The mobile GC-MS captured the fewest compounds (N = 35), of which all were volatile. Cotton swabs contained an intermediate number of compounds (N = 55), but very few volatiles (N = 10). Almost all compounds found with the mobile GC-MS were also captured with TD tubes (94%). Hence, we recommend TD tubes for state of the art sampling of body odor of mammals or other vertebrates, particularly for field studies, as they can be easily transported, stored and analysed with high performance instruments in the lab. Nevertheless, cotton swabs capture compounds which still may contribute to the body odor, e.g. after bacterial fermentation, while profiles from mobile GC-MS include only the most abundant volatiles of the body odor. PMID:28841690

  16. Liquid Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Thermochromic liquid crystals, or TLCs, are a type of liquid crystals that react to changes in temperature by changing color. The Hallcrest/NASA collaboration involved development of a new way to visualize boundary layer transition in flight and in wind tunnel testing of aircraft wing and body surfaces. TLCs offered a new and potentially better method of visualizing the boundary layer transition in flight. Hallcrest provided a liquid crystal formulation technique that afforded great control over the sensitivity of the liquid crystals to varying conditions. Method is of great use to industry, government and universities for aerodynamic and hydrodynamic testing. Company's principal line is temperature indicating devices for industrial use, such as non-destructive testing and flaw detection in electric/electronic systems, medical application, such as diagnostic systems, for retail sale, such as room, refrigerator, baby bath and aquarium thermometers, and for advertising and promotion specials. Additionally, Hallcrest manufactures TLC mixtures for cosmetic applications, and liquid crystal battery tester for Duracell batteries.

  17. Polyphenols and Volatiles in Fruits of Two Sour Cherry Cultivars, Some Berry Fruits and Their Jams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branka Levaj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports about the content of polyphenols and volatiles in fresh fruits of two sour cherry cultivars (Marasca and Oblačinska, some berry fruits (strawberry Maya, raspberry Willamette and wild blueberry and the corresponding low sugar jams. Phenolic compounds (hydroxybenzoic and hydroxycinnamic acids, flavan 3-ols and flavonols were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Those found in the fruits were also found in the jams. Jams contained lower amounts of polyphenols than fresh fuits, but their overall retention in jams was relatively high. Among fruits, sour cherry Marasca had the highest level of polyphenols, while sour cherry Marasca jam and raspberry Willamette jam had the highest level of polyphenols among jams. The major flavonoid in all investigated fruits, except in sour cherry Oblačinska, was (–-epicatechin. Sour cherry Marasca had the highest level of (–-epicatechin (95.75 mg/kg, and it also contained very high amounts of flavonols, derivatives of quercetin and kaempferol. Hydroxybenzoic acids (HBAs were not found in sour cherries Marasca and Oblačinska, but were found in berry fruits and jams. Phenolic compound (+-gallocatechin was found only in Marasca fruit and jam. Ellagic acid was found in the highest concentration in raspberry Willamette fruit and jam. Hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs were found in all the investigated fruits, with the exception of a derivative of ferulic acid, which was not found in strawberry. Derivatives of caffeic, p-coumaric and chlorogenic acids were found in all the investigated fruits, with chlorogenic acid being the most abundant, especially in sour cherry Marasca. Volatiles were determined by gas chromatography (GC and expressed as the peak area of the identified compounds. All investigated volatiles of fresh fruit were also determined in the related jams with relatively high retention. Sour cherries Marasca and Oblačinska contained the same volatile compounds, but

  18. Volatile compound formation during argan kernel roasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Monfalouti, Hanae; Charrouf, Zoubida; Giordano, Manuela; Guillaume, Dominique; Kartah, Badreddine; Harhar, Hicham; Gharby, Saïd; Denhez, Clément; Zeppa, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Virgin edible argan oil is prepared by cold-pressing argan kernels previously roasted at 110 degrees C for up to 25 minutes. The concentration of 40 volatile compounds in virgin edible argan oil was determined as a function of argan kernel roasting time. Most of the volatile compounds begin to be formed after 15 to 25 minutes of roasting. This suggests that a strictly controlled roasting time should allow the modulation of argan oil taste and thus satisfy different types of consumers. This could be of major importance considering the present booming use of edible argan oil.

  19. Local Volatility Calibration Using An Adjoint Proxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel TURINICI

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We document the calibration of the local volatility in a framework similar to Coleman, Li and Verma. The quality of a surface is assessed through a functional to be optimized; the specificity of the approach is to separate the optimization (performed with any suitable optimization algorithm from the computation of the functional where we use an adjoint (as in L. Jiang et. al. to obtain an approximation; moreover our main calibration variable is the implied volatility (the procedure can also accommodate the Greeks. The procedure performs well on benchmarks from the literature and on FOREX data.

  20. Intraday volatility spillovers between spot and futures indices: Evidence from the Korean stock market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang Hoon; Cheong, Chongcheul; Yoon, Seong-Min

    2013-04-01

    This study provides empirical evidence of the relationship between spot and futures markets in Korea. In particular, the study focuses on the volatility spillover relationship between spot and futures markets by using three high-frequency (10 min, 30 min, and 1 h time-scales) intraday data sets of KOSPI 200 spot and futures contracts. The results indicate a strong bi-directional causal relationship between futures and spot markets, suggesting that return volatility in the spot market can influence that in the futures market and vice versa. Thus, the results indicate that new information is reflected in futures and spot markets simultaneously. This bi-directional causal relationship provides market participants with important guidance on understanding the intraday information transmission between the two markets. Thus, on a given trading day, there may be sudden and sharp increases or decreases in return volatility in the Korean stock market as a result of positive feedback and synchronization of spot and futures markets.