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Sample records for voivodeships mortality indices

  1. Diversification Synthetic Indicator for Evaluating the Financial Capacity of Local Government. The Case of Polish Voivodeships

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    Paweł Dziekański

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Financial situation is a fundamental issue for the local government. Financial problems could result in insolvency that is why the analysis of financial situation is essential not only for current management, but also for the protection against side effects of economic downturn. One of the most important determinants of the development of the local government unit is its financial situation, which has an undeniable impact on the whole activities conducted by the local government. The aim of the article is to present the financial situation of the territorial self‑government – the voivodeship, and its changes in the years 2009–2014. The voivodeships which are in good financial situation are more competitive and efficient in conducting development policy. The best voivodeships in 2014 and 2011 were Mazowieckie and Dolnośląskie, in 2009 – Mazowieckie and Łódzkie; in 2014 were Lubuskie and Opolskie, in 2011 – Kujawsko‑pomorskie and Warmińsko‑mazurskie, and in 2009 – Lubuskie and Warmińsko‑mazurskie. The value of the index in 2014 fluctuated between 0.16 and 0.59, in 2011 between 0.22–0.64, and in 2009 – 0.16–0.64. The resulting measure depends on the number and type of variables taken for testing. It allows you to identify weaker areas and improved functioning of the unit, if its own position in relation to competitors. The behavior indicated methodology, and partial variables, allows the assessment of individuals between countries.

  2. Typology and description of the endemic areas with a long-time and smallest colorectal mortality rates within Silesia voivodeship

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    Brunon Zemła

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the years 1999–2009, in Silesia voivodeship, 7339 males and 6635 females were died for the colorectal cancers (C18–C21, by ISCD&HRP, X revision. Mortality, especially among men increase. Mortality, among both sexes, is very unequal, taking into account a small administrative units (counties. Therefore an attempt looking for endemic areas with a long – time biggest and smallest mortality rates. Materials and methods: For the 13 974 cases of deaths because of the colorectal cancer, and at used demographic data, the following mortality rates were calculated to be average for 11 years period (in this two periods extreme, each 4-years: a age specific (for 5-years age groups, b crude rates („intensity rates” for all ages and a particular administrative unit type of counties, c age-adjusted (standardized rates by direct M. Spiegelman’s method and the age structure of „world population” according to M. Segi’s and M. Kurihara’s method and modified by R. Doll’s. Age – adjusted mortality rates for particular counties (R1 to the whole voivodeship (R2 were compared with used 95% confidence interval for the ratio (R1/R2 according to O.S. Miettinen’s method. Basing on the data the endemic areas with a biggest and smallest cancer colorectal rates were described. Results: In the years 1999–2009 within Silesia voivodeship 13974 patients died because of the colorectal cancers, i.e. 52.5% males and 47.5% females. Standardized mortality rate for whole Silesia voivodeship is 20.9 per 100 thousands among males and 12.1/100 thousands among females (at the small increase between two periods comparising, i.e. 1999–2002:2006–2009 for females, and bigger among males. Standardized, average minimum mortality rate for the colorectal cancers for the whole Silesia voivodeship and the period 1999–2009 is 17.1/100 thousands for males (bieruńsko-lędziński county and 10.0/100 thousands for females (myszkowski county; and maximum

  3. The Use of Joinpoint Regression Analysis in the Mortality Study of Developmental Age Population in the Podlaskie Voivodeship, 2003–2012

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    Genowska Agnieszka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The youngest population in society is recognized as that at the healthiest stage of life but is burdened by the occurrence of premature death that should be avoidable. There is a need to use adequate statistical methods in assessing the health status of the population of developmental age. The aim of the study was to analyze trends of mortality in children and adolescents by age and gender in the Podlaskie Voivodeship in the years 2003-2012 by joinpoint regression and to identify the causes of mortality. The mortality rate was analysed according to gender and the age groups: 0, 1-4, 5-9, 10-14 and 15-19 years in the Podlaskie Voivodeship. The data were obtained from the Central Statistical Office for the period 2003-2012. Differences in mortality levels between age and gender subgroups were obtained by the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Join- point regression was used to analyze the trends in mortality. The nomenclature of ICD-10 was used to assess the causes of mortality of children and adolescents. In the Podlaskie Voivodeship in the years 2003-2012 in the 0-19-year-old age group, the highest proportion of deaths (42.4% occurred during the first year of life. There were differences in mortality rates between boys (8.0/104 and girls (3.1/104 in the 15-19-year-old age group (p < 0.01, and also between the 1-14-year-old and 15-19-year-old age groups (p < 0.01, both among boys (2.1/104 vs. 8.0/104 and girls (1.5/104 vs. 3.1/104. Monotonous trends were shown regarding total mortality rates in infants. There was a drop in the mortality rate of infant girls (AAPC = 5.3%, p < 0.05 and boys (AAPC = 4.7%, p < 0.05. Changes in the direction of the total mortality rate trend were visible in the population of boys aged 1-14 years, in which, between 2003 and 2010, a significant reduction in mortality (AAPC = 9.5% was observed, while in the years 2010-2012 the trend was not significant. No statistical evidence was found that mortality changed among girls in the

  4. Polysomnographic indicators of mortality in stroke patients

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    Ponsaing, Laura B; Iversen, Helle K; Jennum, Poul

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to assess polysomnographic indicators of increased mortality risk in patients with stroke or a transient ischemic attack (TIA). METHODS: We performed polysomnographies in 63 acute stroke/TIA patients. Mortality data were collected from a national database after...... a 19-37-month follow-up period. RESULTS: Of the 57 stroke and 6 TIA patients, 9 stroke patients died during follow-up. All nine had moderate or severe sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBDs). Binarily divided, the group with the highest apnea hypopnea index (AHI) had an almost 10-fold higher.......92; 95 % CI 2.00-49.23; p = 0.005), and there was a trend toward a higher mortality risk with atrial fibrillation/flutter (HR 3.63; 95 % CI 0.97-13.51; p = 0.055). CONCLUSIONS: In stroke patients, the AHI and nocturnal wake time are indicators of increased mortality risk. SRBDs in stroke patients should...

  5. Organization of crop and animal production in dairy farms localised in three chosen regions of lubelskie voivodeship

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    Jolanta Bojarszczuk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of organization of crop and animal production in dairy farms localised in three regions in Lubelskie voivodeship was presented in the paper. The data source was questionnaire research. The study was trained in 145 farms. The provided analysis showed that cereals had significantly share in pattern system in tested farms. Researched farms are differentiated of occupied differentiation of cropping pattern and density livestock between farms localised in different regions of Lubelskie voivodeship caused different level of intensity of organization animal and crops production. The differentiation of indicators was especially significant between farms in Krasnystaw and Ryki.

  6. SELECTED ASPECTS OF ORGANIC FOOD MARKETING ON THE FARMS IN THE LUBLIN VOIVODESHIP

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    Agnieszka Siedlecka

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to analyse the use activities of selected elements of marketing mix by organic producers on farms in the Lubelskie Voivodeship. For that purpose, a survey was conducted on a group of 30 producers of organic food from the Lubelskie Voivodeship. Selection of the sample for testing was a deliberate choice. The respondents were among organic producers registered in the Lublin Agricultural Advisory Centre in Końskowola. This register is a list of certified producers from the area of Lublin who have demonstrated activity and sent their applications to the Centre. The conducted analysis and the obtained results indicate that respondent farmers expect aid for taking action in the field of promotion and distribution from organisations and institutions supporting development of organic production. They also expect help in reducing costs related to their organic production, as they are higher than in the case of traditional production.

  7. Spatial and temporal variability of bronchiectasis cases in Silesian voivodeship in 2006–2010

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    Ewa Niewiadomska

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Reports on an increasing number of hospitalizations in other European countries and the lack of epidemiological data on the prevalence of bronchiectasis in Poland constituted motivation for the authors to investigate temporal changes of the registered incidence and hospitalization due to bronchiectasis in Silesian voivodeship, and to evaluate spatial variability of the disease in the study region. Material and Methods: The study is a descriptive epidemiological project. Temporal and spatial variability of coefficients describing numbers of newly diagnosed cases and first time hospitalizations due to bronchiectasis (code J47 according to International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th revision (ICD-10 were evaluated based on the registered data available from the National Health Found (2006–2010 and the data from MZ/Szp-11 reports (2000–2011. The data concerned adults aged ≥ 19 years, inhabitants of Silesian voivodeship. Maps of incidence or hospitalization rates due to bronchiectasis were constructed by the use of a geographical information system ArcGIS. Results: The obtained results show a stable trend of reported new diseases, whereas the number of first time hospitalizations is increasing. Values of the standardized incidence were 19.9–25.1/100 000 inhabitants, and values of the standardized first-time hospitalization were 1.2–2.9/100 000 inhabitants. The reported rates of bronchiectasis indicate significant spatial differences in epidemiological situation in the study region. Conclusions: The findings showed territorial variability of the incidence and hospitalization of bronchiectasis recorded in Silesian voivodeship. The observed variability might result from regional differences in the availability of specialized medical services.

  8. The labour market of the Silesian voivodeship (Poland, and its determinants

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    Kłosowski Franciszek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterise the labour market of the Silesian voivodeship and its determinants between 2010 and 2012, although in order to show certain trends in changes data from the beginning of the 21st century are also used as a basis whereas from the more forward-looking perspective, projections up until 2020 were used. This market is very important from the nationwide perspective, and this is due to its complexity, size (it concentrates 2 million employed people, that is 14.4% of the whole workforce of Poland and specificity (industry still plays a crucial role. In order to achieve the objective indicated above, a set of measures relating to the number of employed people, business entities or GDP were used for the purpose of the analysis. The presented material shows the high volatility of the situation on the labour market both at the voivodeship level and individual communities – this is particularly true of the number of employed people and the rate of unemployment. An advantage of the newly created jobs over those that are shed which has been continuously recorded since 2008 and a decrease in the unemployment rate are positive symptoms. Katowice being the largest market and, moreover, characterised by the highest rank range of its impact and lowest unemployment rate have gained a dominant position in the regional labour market. Bielsko-Biała, Tychy, Gliwice and Bieruń-Lędziny County also clearly stand out against the background of other communities. The most difficult situation can be observed in Bytom, Świętochłowice, Piekary Śląskie and in the counties located in the northern part of the voivodeship, that is Częstochowa, Myszków and Zawiercie. Not only today but also in the coming decade, in terms of demand the labour market of the Silesian voivodeship will be strongly affected by its demographic situation; population decline, ageing population, migration, including, in particular, foreign migration will

  9. TROPHIC STATE OF SMALL RETENTION RESERVOIRS IN PODLASIE VOIVODESHIP

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    Joanna Szczykowska

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out using water samples from two small retention reservoirs located in the communes: Czarna Białostocka and Turośń Kościelna in Podlaskie Voivodeship. The main tasks of both reservoirs are to improve the water balance by means of regulating the levels and water outflow. Three characteristic measurement and control points were selected on both reservoirs in accordance to the water flow in the longitudinal section. The first and third points were located near the inflow and outflow of water, while the second in the middle of the reservoirs. Samples of water for the study were collected from the surface layer of the shore zone of the reservoirs once a month from March 2015 to February 2017 (water from two hydrological years was analyzed. Water samples were subject to determination of total phosphorus, total nitrogen, and chlorophyll “a” concentrations, as well as turbidity. Contamination of the water reservoirs with biogenic compounds is a common problem and at the same time difficult to eliminate due to the scattered nature of external sources of pollution, especially in the case of agricultural catchments, as well as the inflow of untreated sewage from areas directly adjacent to the reservoirs. Based on achieved results, high values of TSI (TN, TSI (TP, TSI (Chl, and overall TSI, clearly indicate the progressive degradation of water quality in analyzed reservoirs. Appearing water blooms due to the mass development of phytoplankton adversely affect the quality of water in the reservoirs and biochemical processes occurring both in water and bottom sediments, are conditioned by progressive eutrophication.

  10. Median age at death as an indicator of premature mortality

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    Jannerfeldt, Eric; Hörte, Lars-Gunnar

    1988-01-01

    The median age at death from certain diseases was calculated for each year for 1969-85 and compared with that at death from all causes. The results indicated the impact of these diseases in terms of premature mortality and changes over time. Cancer was a more important cause of premature mortality among women than among men. For cancer of the cervix the median age at death increased appreciably whereas for cancer of the lung in women it slightly decreased. The median age at death is easy to c...

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY OF FAMILY-OWNED AGRICULTURAL HOLDINGS IN THE PODLASKIE VOIVODESHIP

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    Zofia Kołoszko-Chomentowska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this paper is environmental sustainability assessment of agricultural holdings in the Podlaskie voivodeship, participating in the Farm Accountancy Data Network (FADN in the years 2007–2012. The assessment was conducted based on agro-ecological indicators and environmental burden (material pressure. The analysis was conducted according to a classification into agricultural holding types: field crops, dairy cattle, and mixed holdings. The factor with the strongest impact on the agro-ecological sustainability of the studied agricultural holdings was the holding type. Field crop and mixed holdings achieved more favorable environmental sustainability indicators. Holdings specializing in dairy cattle breeding pose a threat to the natural environment due to their excessive number of livestock.

  12. Renewable energy in the Kujawsko-Pomorskie Voivodeship (Poland)

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    Iglinski, Bartlomiej; Kujawski, Wojciech; Buczkowski, Roman; Cichosz, Marcin [Nicolaus Copernicus University, Gagarina 7, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2010-05-15

    In this article we presented the current state and prospects for development of renewable energy in the Kujawsko-Pomorskie Voivodeship, in which the greatest amount of renewable energy in Poland is obtained. In this area there are 96 wind power plants, 103 water power plants, 7 biogas power plants, 4 biofuel producing plants, 3 big energy willow (Salix viminalis) plantations as well as numerous biomass boilers (mostly using wood). In the near future it is planned to further develop renewable energy based on wind, water and biomass. (author)

  13. Osobennosti prigranichnogo sotrudnichestva Varmin'sko-Mazurskogo voevodstva i Kaliningradskoj oblasti v sfere turizma [Cross-border cooperation in tourism between the War-mian-Masurian voivodeship and the Kaliningrad region

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    Batyk Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The border location of the Warmian-Masurian voivodeship and the Kaliningrad region is a prerequisite for active cooperation at different institutional levels. The development of cross-border cooperation between the Kaliningrad region and the Warmian-Masurian voivodeship was launched in 1992, when the first agreements on international cooperation were signed. As of today, a high emphasis is placed on cross-border cooperation between the Warmian-Masurian voivodeship and the Kaliningrad region, which is manifested in a series of partner agreements and contracts. The local border traffic agreement between the Kaliningrad region and selected areas of the Republic of Poland should give an additional impetus for the developmentof the economies, services sectors, and tourism industries of the border territories and facilitate the development of these regions. The article makes an attempt to identify the determinants of cross-border cooperation between the Kaliningrad region and the Warmian-Masurian voivodeship that contribute to the development of tourism between the regions, as well as to outline the barriers to their cooperation. The results of the survey presented in the article indicate that the current activities aimed at the development of cross-border cooperation between the Kaliningrad region and the border regions of Poland are not sufficient. On the basis of the survey the authors identify the major barriers to cross-border cooperation as seen by the regions’ residents and authorities. The removal of these barriers can form the basis for developmental measures to improve the situation.

  14. Typology and description of the endemic areas with a long-time biggest and smallest colorectal incidence rates in the Silesia voivodeship populations

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    Brunon Zemła

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The colorectal cancers (C18–C21, by ICD – X revision = RJG, it a big social-clinical problem. The high level differentiation (dependent of particular countries and regions within them; for example: Silesia voivodeship common for frequency of incidence. Therefore an attempt looking for an endemic area with a longtime biggest and smallest incidence rates in the smaller population scale, what a make easy fight against cancers. Materials and methods: In the years 1999–2009 20682 persons were diagnosed for RJG. Basing on the data (as above and demographic data, the different type of rates were calculated. All statistic procedures were in detail described anywhere [4–6]. Results: In the years 1999– 2009, in Silesia voivodeship, 20 682 cases of RJG were diagnosed, i.e. 53.5% among males and 46.5% among females. Age-adjusted rate for the whole Silesia voivodeship is 31.4 per 100 thousands to men and 19.5/100 thousands to women. In comparison between two extremely periods (1999–2009 : 2006–2009, age – adjusted incidence rates among men increased about 2.9%, and among women decreased about 6.5%. The distribution of age-standardized colorectal cancer rates within Silesia voivodeship, in the years 1999–2009, taking into account 36 counties – was very unequal so among males and at the same among females. But the most important epidemiological problem was the endemic areas with significantly biggest incidence rates among males: towns on the law of county: Częstochowa, Katowice, Bielsko-Biała and counties: mikołowski and wodzisławski; among females the endemic areas of this type were Bielsko-Biała town and his county. Conclusions: 1 Within Silesia voivodeship were revealed the endemic areas at statistically significantly high or low (in a long-time then the overall incidence rate for the colorectal cancer among men and women. 2 The endemic areas with the biggest incidence colorectal rates (fig. 1D and 2D, it indications to

  15. [Mortality in 1990. Mortality levels as indicated in the 1990 population census].

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    Mina Valdes, A

    1992-01-01

    An abbreviated life table for Mexico is presented, based on findings of the 1990 census and deaths registered around 1990. The estimated life expectancy at birth in 1990 of 69.99 years was 3.5 years higher than the corresponding estimate based on the 1980 census. The gain in life expectancy averaged 3 years for ages 1-20 years, 2 years for ages 30-40 years, and 1-1.5 years for ages 45-65. The principal causes of general mortality were heart disease, accidents, malignant tumors, infectious intestinal diseases, and diabetes mellitus. The 5 principal causes of infant mortality were disorders arising in the perinatal period, infectious intestinal disorders, pneumonia and influenza, congenital anomalies, and nutritional deficiency disorders. Gains in life expectancy during the 1980s were significant because of the decline in infant mortality, but infant mortality levels remain high compared to those of other countries. Differentials in infant mortality rates in different states were significant, with 1990 rates ranging from 70/1000 in Oaxaca to 30 in the Federal District. The differentials in infant mortality rates were reflected in life expectancies. In the Federal District and the states of Nuevo Leon, Nayarit, and Tamaulipas, life expectancy exceeded the national average by 2-5 years. The proportion of deaths in the earliest age group that were not reported declined at the national level from around 20% in 1980 to around 10% in 1990. Census-based infant mortality estimates for 1990 were more reliable than those for 1980.

  16. Evolution of socioeconomic indicators and cardiovascular mortality in three Brazilian states.

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    Soares, Gabriel Porto; Brum, Júlia Dias; Oliveira, Gláucia Maria Moraes de; Klein, Carlos Henrique; Souza e Silva, Nelson Albuquerque

    2013-02-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the major cause of death in Brazil. To correlate cardiovascular mortality rates in the states of Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo and Rio Grande do Sul, and in their capitals, between 1980 and 2008, with socioeconomic indicators collected from 1949 onwards. Population and death data were obtained from the Brazilian Unified Health System databank (Datasus). Mortality rates due to the following were calculated and adjusted by use of the direct method and compensated for poorly defined causes: ischemic heart diseases; cerebrovascular diseases; cardiovascular diseases; poorly defined causes; and all causes. Child mortality data were obtained from state and municipal health secretariats and from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE). Information on gross domestic product (GDP) and educational level was obtained from the Brazilian Institute of Applied Economic Research (Ipea). The mortality rates and socioeconomic indicators were correlated by using the estimation of Pearson linear coefficients to determine optimized year lag. The inclination coefficients of the regression between the dependent variable "disease" and the independent variable "socioeconomic indicator" were estimated. The three states showed a reduction in mortality, which was especially due to a decrease in cardiovascular mortality, mainly of cerebrovascular diseases. The decrease in cardiovascular mortality was preceded by a reduction in child mortality, an elevation in the per capita GDP, and an increase in the educational level, and a strong correlation between indicators and mortality rates was observed. The three indicators showed an almost maximum correlation with the reduction in cardiovascular mortality. Such relationship indicates the importance of improving quality of life to reduce cardiovascular mortality.

  17. The use of instruments of logistics and marketing in transport enterprises in lubuskie voivodeship

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    Agnieszka Perzyńska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the article is to verify the logistics and marketing instruments used in transport enterprises in Lubuskie voivodeship. The article presents the results of surveys of transport companies. Based on these studies in transport enterprises in Lubuskie, the current level of the use of logistics and marketing instruments was determined. Logistics and marketing instruments were separated to study the needs of transport companies in Lubuskie voivodeship. The choice of these instruments gave rise to a study f the possibility of using them in the implementation of business operations. From the findings it can be inferred that they are useful for the voivodeship, and that such a system can be implemented in the whole country. Methods: The study was conducted in the second half of 2014 and 140 transport enterprises in Lubuskie. Based on the research results, classifications of instruments were developed using logistics and marketing division at their levels. Results: On the basis of these findings and observations, the authors have analysed the levels of identification instruments, logistics and marketing. On this basis, it was possible to identify the instruments used by logistics and marketing in these companies. Conclusions: Based on the study of transport companies in Lubuskie voivodeship, a selection of logistics and marketing instruments were identified, along with a classification of the logistics and marketing instruments used. With the implementation of the above steps to classify the usage level of logistics and marketing instruments, the ability to match these levels to data transport companies was established.

  18. Obtaining funds from the EU budget by rural communes of the Masovian voivodeship

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    Agnieszka Wojewódzka-Wiewiórska

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-repayable funds, including those offered within the framework of EU funds, constitute an important source of funding for activities undertaken by communes. The aim of the article is to define the level of absorption of funds from the EU budget by rural communes of the Masovian voivodeship in 2006-2009. The typology of the communes was done on the basis of the level of their socio-economic development (synthetic index zi and the amount of funds obtained (absorption index Wa. The statistical data came from the Local Data Bank (BDL of the Central Statistical Office (GUS. Rural communes of the Masovian voivodeship are highly varied in terms of obtaining funds from the EU budget. In the case of 10.5% of the rural communes in the analysed voivodeship no funds were obtained from the EU in the period in question. Almost one third of the rural communes is characterised by a low level of development and a medium level of funds absorption. The least numerous (7% are communes with a high level of devel-opment and low absorption. Communes with a low level of development and low absorp-tion of EU funds exist in every subregion of the voivodeship.

  19. [Methods to smooth mortality indicators: application to analysis of inequalities in mortality in Spanish cities [the MEDEA Project

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    Barceló, M Antònia; Saez, Marc; Cano-Serral, Gemma; Martínez-Beneito, Miguel Angel; Martínez, José Miguel; Borrell, Carme; Ocaña-Riola, Ricardo; Montoya, Imanol; Calvo, Montse; López-Abente, Gonzalo; Rodríguez-Sanz, Maica; Toro, Silvia; Alcalá, José Tomás; Saurina, Carme; Sánchez-Villegas, Pablo; Figueiras, Adolfo

    2008-01-01

    Although there is some experience in the study of mortality inequalities in Spanish cities, there are large urban centers that have not yet been investigated using the census tract as the unit of territorial analysis. The coordinated project MEDEA project> was designed to fill this gap, with the participation of 10 groups of researchers in Andalusia, Aragon, Catalonia, Galicia, Madrid, Valencia, and the Basque Country. The MEDEA project has four distinguishing features: a) the census tract is used as the basic geographical area; b) statistical methods that include the geographical structure of the region under study are employed for risk estimation; c) data are drawn from three complementary data sources (information on air pollution, information on industrial pollution, and the records of mortality registrars), and d) a coordinated, large-scale analysis, favored by the implantation of coordinated research networks, is carried out. The main objective of the present study was to explain the methods for smoothing mortality indicators in the context of the MEDEA project. This study focusses on the methodology and the results of the Besag, York and Mollié model (BYM) in disease mapping. In the MEDEA project, standardized mortality ratios (SMR), corresponding to 17 large groups of causes of death and 28 specific causes, were smoothed by means of the BYM model; however, in the present study this methodology was applied to mortality due to cancer of the trachea, bronchi and lung in men and women in the city of Barcelona from 1996 to 2003. As a result of smoothing, a different geographical pattern for SMR in both genders was observed. In men, a SMR higher than unity was found in highly deprived areas. In contrast, in women, this pattern was observed in more affluent areas.

  20. DIFFERENTIATION OF DISTRICTS OF THE MAŁOPOLSKIE VOIVODESHIP WITH RESPECT TO CHOSEN SOCIAL PROBLEMS

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    Jadwiga Bożek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of unemployment and exacerbating demographic situation can be seen as major social problem of nowadays in Poland. The paper is an attempt to compare districts of the Małopolskie voivodeship with respect to chosen features characterizing these phenomena. On the basis of the data from the Central Statistical Offi ce and with the help of taxonomic methods, grouping of districts has been carried out with respect to the level of features under investigation. The procedure allowed for distinguishing 5 groups of signifi - cant inter-group diff erentiation. The application of taxonomic methods resulted in obtaining a general and, at the same time, accurate picture of diff erentiation of the Małopolskie voivodeship with respect to social problems being analysed and distinction of districts with the most diffi cult situation in this area.

  1. The relationship of income inequality to mortality: does the choice of indicator matter?

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    Kawachi, I; Kennedy, B P

    1997-10-01

    Ecologic studies in the U.S. and elsewhere in the world have demonstrated that income inequality is strongly related to mortality and life expectancy: the greater the dispersion of income within a given society, the lower the life expectancy. However, these empirical studies have been criticized on the grounds that the choice of indicator may have influenced positive findings. Using a cross-sectional, ecologic design, we tested the relationships of six different income inequality indicators to total mortality rates in the 50 U.S. states. The following summary measures of income distribution were examined: the Gini coefficient; the decile ratio; the proportions of total income earned by the bottom 50%, 60%, and 70% of households; the Robin Hood Index; the Atkinson Index; and Theil's entropy measure. All were highly correlated with each other (Pearson r > or = 0.94), and all were strongly associated with mortality (Pearson r ranging from 0.50 to 0.66), even after adjustment for median income and poverty. Thus, the choice of income distribution measure does not appear to alter the conclusion that income inequality is linked to higher mortality. Furthermore, adjustment for taxes and transfers, as well as household size (using equivalence scales), made no difference to the income inequality/mortality association. From a policy perspective, the alternative income distribution measures perform differently under varying types of income transfers, so that theoretical considerations should guide the selection of an indicator to assess the impact of social and economic policies that address income inequality.

  2. Fatness and muscularity as risk indicators of child mortality in rural Congo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van den Broeck; R. Eeckels; A.C.S. Hokken-Koelega (Anita)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: To examine the relationship of anthropometrical indicators of fatness and muscularity with mortality in children in a rural African community. BACKGROUND: A prospective cohort study was carried out in the rural health zone of Bwamanda, Northern Congo using a

  3. Indicators of "avoidable" mortality in health administrative areas in Sweden 1974-1985.

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    Westerling, R

    1993-09-01

    When comparing health administrative areas in Sweden the variation in death rates for 13 suggested indicators of avoidable mortality was analysed for the time periods 1974-79 and 1980-85. For most indicators the variation was significant. The level of systematic (nonrandom) variance differed between the sexes for certain conditions. According to the theory of mass-significance it would be appropriate to use a sharpened significance test of high SMRs. For certain health policy indicators it was possible to detect areas accounting for nearly all the deviation above the national standard using a sharpened test (p positive warning signals. Epidemiological surveillance of indicators of avoidable mortality should be the starting point for in-depth studies.

  4. Directions of development for areas with unfavourable conditions for agricultural production, an example of the podlaskie voivodeship (Poland

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    Kazimierz Niewiadomski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is dedicated to the directions of development of rural areas, primarily agricultural areas of the Podlaskie voivodeship, which in light of current criteria has been qualified almost entirely as problem area (ONW. Results presented are culmination of research related to issues of problem areas primarily in the area of the Podlaskie voivodeship by the author of the herewith paper during last few years. In conclusion to the results of the research it can be said that the primary direction of the development of rural areas in the Podlaskie voivodeship will be modern, large-scale farms able to adjust to current conditions, in particular environmental and soil conditions. In problem areas these will be mostly farms focusing on production of cattle and milk, developing production based on very high share of grassland areas. Complementary role in relation to conventional agriculture will be fulfilled by farms developing organic farming and agro-touristic farms. More intensive development of conventional tourism in rural areas can be expected once new tourism products and services have been developed. Assessment of the current economic development parameters of the Podlaskie voivodeship does not point at the convergence with other regions and possibility of decreasing the distance between the Podlaskie voivodeship and average results for Poland in the near future. However, some positive trends in terms of convergence with other regions in Poland can be observed in agriculture, primarily due to relatively good results in production of cattle and milk.

  5. Benchmarking statewide trauma mortality using Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's patient safety indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Darwin; McKenney, Mark; Norwood, Scott; Kurek, Stanley; Kimbrell, Brian; Liu, Huazhi; Ziglar, Michele; Hurst, James

    2015-09-01

    Improving clinical outcomes of trauma patients is a challenging problem at a statewide level, particularly if data from the state's registry are not publicly available. Promotion of optimal care throughout the state is not possible unless clinical benchmarks are available for comparison. Using publicly available administrative data from the State Department of Health and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) patient safety indicators (PSIs), we sought to create a statewide method for benchmarking trauma mortality and at the same time also identifying a pattern of unique complications that have an independent influence on mortality. Data for this study were obtained from State of Florida Agency for Health Care Administration. Adult trauma patients were identified as having International Classification of Disease ninth edition codes defined by the state. Multivariate logistic regression was used to create a predictive inpatient expected mortality model. The expected value of PSIs was created using the multivariate model and their beta coefficients provided by the AHRQ. Case-mix adjusted mortality results were reported as observed to expected (O/E) ratios to examine mortality, PSIs, failure to prevent complications, and failure to rescue from death. There were 50,596 trauma patients evaluated during the study period. The overall fit of the expected mortality model was very strong at a c-statistic of 0.93. Twelve of 25 trauma centers had O/E ratios <1 or better than expected. Nine statewide PSIs had failure to prevent O/E ratios higher than expected. Five statewide PSIs had failure to rescue O/E ratios higher than expected. The PSI that had the strongest influence on trauma mortality for the state was PSI no. 9 or perioperative hemorrhage or hematoma. Mortality could be further substratified by PSI complications at the hospital level. AHRQ PSIs can have an integral role in an adjusted benchmarking method that screens at risk trauma centers in the state

  6. Do self-reported health indicators predict mortality? Evidence from Matlab, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaque, Abdur; Mustafa, A H M G; Streatfield, Peter Kim

    2014-09-01

    In order to understand current and changing patterns of population health, there is a clear need for high-quality health indicators. The World Health Organization Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health (SAGE) survey platform and the International Network for the Demographic Evaluation of Populations and Their Health in developing countries (INDEPTH) generated data for this study. A total of 4300 people aged 50 years or older were selected randomly from the Matlab Health and Demographic Surveillance System of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh. The health indicators derived from these survey data are self-rated general health, overall health state, quality of life and disability levels. The outcome of the study is mortality over a 2-year follow-up since the survey. Among the four health indicators, only self-rated health was significantly associated with subsequent mortality irrespective of sex: those who reported bad health had higher mortality than those who reported good health, even after controlling for socio-demographic factors. For all other three health indicators, such associations exist but are significant only for males, while for females it is significant only for 'quality of life'.

  7. The association between BMI and mortality using offspring BMI as an indicator of own BMI: large intergenerational mortality study

    OpenAIRE

    Davey Smith, George; Sterne, Jonathan AC; Fraser, Abigail; Tynelius, Per; Lawlor, Debbie A; Rasmussen, Finn

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To obtain valid estimates of the association between body mass index (BMI) and mortality by using offspring BMI as an instrumental variable for own BMI. Design Cohort study based on record linkage, with 50 years of follow-up for mortality. Associations of offspring BMI with all cause and cause specific maternal and paternal mortality were estimated as hazard ratios per standard deviation of offspring BMI. Setting A large intergenerational prospective population based database cover...

  8. Pre-hospital antibiotic treatment and mortality caused by invasive meningococcal disease, adjusting for indication bias

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    Matute-Cruz Petra

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mortality from invasive meningococcal disease (IMD has remained stable over the last thirty years and it is unclear whether pre-hospital antibiotherapy actually produces a decrease in this mortality. Our aim was to examine whether pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy reduces mortality from IMD, adjusting for indication bias. Methods A retrospective analysis was made of clinical reports of all patients (n = 848 diagnosed with IMD from 1995 to 2000 in Andalusia and the Canary Islands, Spain, and of the relationship between the use of pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy and mortality. Indication bias was controlled for by the propensity score technique, and a multivariate analysis was performed to determine the probability of each patient receiving antibiotics, according to the symptoms identified before admission. Data on in-hospital death, use of antibiotics and demographic variables were collected. A logistic regression analysis was then carried out, using death as the dependent variable, and pre-hospital antibiotic use, age, time from onset of symptoms to parenteral antibiotics and the propensity score as independent variables. Results Data were recorded on 848 patients, 49 (5.72% of whom died. Of the total number of patients, 226 had received oral antibiotics before admission, mainly betalactams during the previous 48 hours. After adjusting the association between the use of antibiotics and death for age, time between onset of symptoms and in-hospital antibiotic treatment, pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy remained a significant protective factor (Odds Ratio for death 0.37, 95% confidence interval 0.15–0.93. Conclusion Pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy appears to reduce IMD mortality.

  9. Watermills – a Forgotten River Valley Heritage – selected examples from the Silesian voivodeship, Poland

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    Fajer Maria

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is an attempt to describe the current condition of the watermills situated in the river valleys of the Silesian voivodeship. Changes in the number and distribution of mills from the late 18th century until the 20th century have been presented (as exemplified by the Liswarta River basin in the northern part of the voivodeship. Watermills have been discussed both as industrial monuments that document the history of the milling industry and as tourist attractions. Currently, working mills that serve the local population in rural areas are a rarity, and working watermills are unique sites that should be protected as industrial monuments that constitute an important part of our cultural heritage. They are among those industrial monuments that are particularly vulnerable to destruction. Such mills increasingly attract the interest of industrial tourism promoters. Activities aimed at promoting watermills as cultural heritage sites and leading to their protection and preservation as part of the river valley landscape have also been discussed. In the Silesian voivodeship, there are many watermills that deserve attention; some of these are listed in the register of monuments maintained by the National Heritage Board of Poland. Unfortunately, most disused mills are falling into disrepair and are slowly disappearing; only a few have been preserved in good condition. Many of these have long histories and they are also situated in areas attractive for tourists. There is no doubt that watermills should be preserved. Their inclusion in open-air museums is not the only solution – any form of protection in situ by putting them to different uses is also valuable. Changing the function of a mill to serve as a hotel, restaurant, cultural centre, etc. makes it possible to maintain these sites as parts of river valley landscapes.

  10. [Overview of mortality in Mexico through four indicators from 1990 to 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossío-Torres, Patricia Elizabeth; Padrón-Salas, Aldanely; Gutiérrez-Mendoza, Luis Meave; Yanes-Lane, Mercedes

    2017-01-01

    To describe the behavior of mortality in Mexico through four indicators from 1990 to 2012. The official mortality and population records of Mexico were used. An advance was achieved for children under five years of age, with a decrease in mortality, although there was an increase in the years of potential life lost (YPLL) from 2008 for this age group. For children under one year of age, there was no advance since 2002 in the index of YPLL and in the productive years of life lost (PYLL). Since 2008 there has been an increase in the rates of mortality, YPLL, and PYLL in the group from 10 to 29 years of age. There has been a sustained increase in YPLL in the age group from 40 to 69. It is relevant to evaluate the health policies in Mexico for the different age groups; even though there have been positive results in some of them, these are not across all the age groups, which could put some sectors of the population at risk, such as children and young people from 10 to 29 years of age.

  11. Knowledge of cross-compliance among farmers from the łódź voivodeship

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The article made an appraisal of acquaintances of requirements being included in the cross-compliance rules (a cross-compliance) amongst farmers of drivers of the household in the Łódź voivodeship. Examinations were conducted in 2012 on the group of 300 farmers and demonstrated, that level of the knowledge of Łódź farming producers in the scope of cross-compliance is incomplete and requires replenishment. Examinations were carried out in the framework of the large research project, which aim ...

  12. [Amenable mortality as indicator of effectiveness of health care services in Spain before and after transferences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrasa Villar, J I; Castán Ruiz, S; Estupiñán Romero, F R; Valderrama Rodríguez, M; Moliner Lahoz, F J

    2013-01-01

    To describe the evolution of amenable mortality (MRASS) in Spain and to evaluate differences in trend patterns before and after health care services were transferred to local authorities. MRASS was defined from a list of causes of death used in other studies. We analyzed the change in sex-age-standardized death rates of MRASS in two periods: 1999-2001 and 2006-2008, just before, and five years after, the health care transfers were completed. MRASS represented 24% of deaths in persons from 0 to 74 years old. MRASS has seen a reduction (19.4%) between the two periods over and above other causes of mortality (14.5%). The group of causes of mortality which showed most reduction: ischemic heart disease (28%), other vascular disease (27%), surgical conditions and surgical-medical errors (26%), and diabetes (22.5%). Although there were differences between the districts, health care transfers have not created significant variations in MRASS. Navarra and Madrid showed lower rates of MRASS, and the Canary Islands, Asturias, Andalusia, Ceuta and Melilla had higher rates. The Balearic Islands showed the greatest reduction in MRASS. MRASS constitutes an important proportion of trends of mortality in persons between 0-74 years. It has declined in all districts. Even though there were large differences between districts, there does not appear to be any direct influence due to health care transfer in amenable mortality trends. In spite of limitations, MRASS is an indicator to be considered when monitoring and detecting weaknesses in the effectiveness of health care systems. Copyright © 2012 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. [Quality of life and mortality of patients in intensive care. Indices of quality of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, D; Galguera, F; Jam, M R; Vilar, S; Castella, X; Artigas, A

    1998-01-01

    At present there is no single practical standardized scale for measuring quality of life (QL). Any proposal should include the patient's physical impairment, level of independence, and subjective perception of happiness. We combined three previously published scales to define a quality of life index (QLI) that we propose as a standard quantitative instrument. The applicability and usefulness of QLI for the measurement of the level of deterioration of patients after admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) was examined. We prospectively evaluated QL before patient admission to determine if it influences mortality, as well as long-term changes in the QL and the factors conditioning te deterioration of patients released from the UCI as evaluated by QL indicators. To calculate QLI, we combined the Karnofsky scale, daily life activities index, and the perception of quality of life scale. The resulting percentage (QLI) was used to evaluate 536 patients after admission to the ICU and 6 and 12 months after release. QLI was compared with the severity of disease (Apache II), probability of death (MPM), diagnostic group, and socioeconomic variables. Using multivariate methods, four significant variables related with mortality were identified: Apache II--MPM, duration of the stay in the unit, age, and QLI. Our analysis of long-term deterioration showed that advanced age, high QLI before admission, and the patient's diagnostic group explained the degree of deterioration. QLI was a useful instrument for obtaining a quantitative estimate of the QL of critically ill patients.

  14. Agriculture of the Podlaskie voivodeship after integration to the European Union

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    Zofia Tomczonek

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the changes in the agriculture of the Podlaskie voivodeship between 2002-2010. During the period of time chosen for the analysis the number of agricultural holdings decreased by 13.4%, while the average area of arable land in the agricultural holdings increased to 10.29 ha (in the holdings above 1 ha – 14.77 ha. 86.6% of the holdings were involved only in agricultural activity, and 2.4% in activity other than agricultural activity, but directly linked with the agricultural holding. Almost a half of the holdings (46.7% stated that agricultural activity was their main source of income. There were 2033 ecological holdings functioning in 2010. The holdings became better equipped in terms of machines and agricultural devices. There were also positive changes in farmers’ education level and vocational preparation.

  15. Moisture Content Impact on Mechanical Properties of Selected Cohesive Soils from the Wielkopolskie Voivodeship Southern Part

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    Pezowicz Piotr

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Results of investigations of shearing resistance and compressibility of fine-grained cohesive soil from the southern part of the wielkopolskie voivodeship in relation to the increasing moisture content are presented. The analysis of two series of samples, using soil paste for the consistency index of 0.9 and 0.4–0.3 was carried out. The results imply that the increasing moisture content causes a decrease in the angle of shearing resistance and cohesion and is also reflected in the higher compressibility of the soil. It was observed that regardless of the soil consistency, the angle of shearing resistance decreases and the cohesion value and the oedometric modulus of primary (consolidation and secondary compressibility grows with the increase in the clay fraction.

  16. Knowledge of cross-compliance among farmers from the łódź voivodeship

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    Małgorzata Borkowska

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article made an appraisal of acquaintances of requirements being included in the cross-compliance rules (a cross-compliance amongst farmers of drivers of the household in the Łódź voivodeship. Examinations were conducted in 2012 on the group of 300 farmers and demonstrated, that level of the knowledge of Łódź farming producers in the scope of cross-compliance is incomplete and requires replenishment. Examinations were carried out in the framework of the large research project, which aim is to know the level of the knowledgeabout the scope cross-compliance amongst farmers from south-west and central Poland. So far articles have been printed on the knowledge ofcross- -compliance amongst the Lower Silesia and Opole farming producers.

  17. La mortalidad infantil, indicador de excelencia Infant mortality, an indicator of excellence

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    Yurima Díaz Elejalde

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available La mortalidad infantil es un indicador de gran importancia para el Sistema Nacional de Salud cubano y a nivel mundial. Es utilizado para evaluar el estado de salud de la población, por lo que se realizó un estudio descriptivo, retrospectivo y longitudinal con el objetivo de caracterizar el comportamiento de la mortalidad infantil en el municipio de Guanabacoa, desde el 1º de enero de 2000 al 30 de junio de 2005. Se estudió una muestra de 48 defunciones a través de variables maternas y del recién nacido, con la información obtenida de los registros médicos e historias clínicas. Se encontró que la tasa de mortalidad infantil de nuestro municipio, fundamentalmente en los 4 años iniciales, es irregular con tendencia decreciente, siendo las principales causas de muerte las infecciones (37,5 %, la sepsis (14,5 %, la asfixia (10,4 % y las malformaciones congénitas (10,4 %. Las variables maternas afectadas fueron los factores de riesgo en el embarazo: bajo peso materno, la moniliasis vaginal y la anemia ferropénica ; y en el recién nacido, el componente neonatal precoz y el sexo masculino.Infant mortality is an indicator of great importance for the Cuban National Health System and for the world. It is used to evaluate the health status of the population. A descriptive, retrospective and longitudinal study was conducted aimed at characterizing the behavior of infant mortality in the municipality of Guanabacoa from January 1st, 2000 to June 30th, 2005. A sample of 48 deaths was studied through variables of the mother and the newborn obtained from the medical registries and histories. It was found that infant mortality rate in our municipality, mainly in the 4 initial years is irregular with a decreasing trend. The main causes of death are infections (37.5 %, sepsis (14.5 %, asphyxia (10.4 % and congenital malformations (10.4 %. The affected maternal variables were the risk factors during pregnancy: maternal low weight, vaginal moniliasis

  18. Using In-Hospital Mortality as an Indicator of Quality Care and Hospital Performance

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    Badia BISBIS

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The in-hospital mortality (MIH is used as a performance indicator and quality healthcare in hospital. However, the majority of deaths resulted from an inevitable disease process (severity of cases and / or co-morbidity, and not medical errors or changes in the quality of care. This work aims to make a distribution of deaths in the Regional Hospital of Eastern, Al Farabi hospital and to highlight that more studies on the MIH are required consistently with detailed clinical data at the admission. The MIH showed its limitation as a health care  indicator. The overall rate of in-hospital deaths within the Al Farabi hospital has averaged 2.4%, with 8.4% in the emergency unit, 28% in intensive care unit, 22% Neonatology unit, 1.6% in pediatric unit. The MIH may depend, firstly, on the condition of patients before hospitalization and secondly, on the conditions of their transfer from one institution to another that supports them as a last resort. Al Farabi hospital supports patients transferred from the provinces of the eastern region. Thus, 6% of patients who died in 2014 come from Berkane, 2% from  Nador, 2% from Bouarfa, 4% from  Taourirt and 2% from Jerrada. One might question about  the procedures and the conditions of such transfers. In conclusion, the overall MIH measured from routine data do not allow proper comparison between hospitals or the assessment of the quality of care and patient safety in the hospital. To do so, we should ideally have detailed clinical data on admission (e.g. type of admission, age of patient, sex, comorbidity, .... The MIH is however an important indicator to consider as a tool to detect potential  problems related to admission procedures and to suspect an area of "non-quality" in healthcare . The MIH is interesting for the patient and for the hospital because it serves the improvement of quality healthcare.

  19. One-year mortality in patients with bone and soft tissue sarcomas as an indicator of delay in presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandra, R; Hwang, N; Matharu, G S; Reddy, K; Grimer, R

    2015-09-01

    For many cancers, one-year mortality following diagnosis is a reflection of either advanced stage at diagnosis, multiple co-morbidities and/or complications of treatment. One-year mortality has not been reported for soft tissue or bone sarcomas. This study reports 1-year sarcoma mortality data over a 25-year period, investigates prognostic factors and considers whether a delay in presentation affects 1-year mortality. A total of 4,945 newly diagnosed bone sarcoma and soft tissue sarcoma patients were identified from a prospectively maintained, single institution oncology database. Of these, 595 (12%) died within 1 year of diagnosis. Both patient factors and tumour characteristics available at diagnosis were analysed for effect. There was significant variation in one-year mortality between different histological subtypes. There has been no significant change in mortality rate during the last 25 years (mean: 11.7%, standard deviation: 2.8 percentage points). Soft tissue sarcoma patients who survived over one year reported a longer duration of symptoms preceding diagnosis than those who died (median: 26 vs 20 weeks, pyear mortality in bone and soft tissue sarcoma patients is easy to measure, and could be a proxy for late presentation and therefore a potential performance indicator, similar to other cancers. It is possible to predict the risk of one-year mortality using factors available at diagnosis. Death within one year does not correlate with a long history but is associated with advanced disease at diagnosis.

  20. [The age and sex indicators of mortality of population and years of life lost as a result of premature mortality in the Russian Federation in 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiytsov, S A; Samorodskaya, I V

    2014-01-01

    The age-specific mortality coefficients and years of life lost as a result of premature mortality are among important medical demographic characteristics of population health. The study analyzed age and sex indicators of mortality of population in the Russian Federation. The number of years of life lost as a result of premature mortality is calculated. The comparison of values of years of life lost in various subjects of the Russian Federation was carried out. The data of Rosstat concerning population size and number of the deceased in year age groups in the Russian Federation and subjects of the Russian Federation in 2012 was used. The indicator was calculated on the basis of technique included into "The global burden of diseases report" (2010). The minimal indicators of mortality of males are noted at the age of 11 years (25.4 per 100 000 of population) and females at the age of 10 years (18.2 per 100 000 of population). The maximal differences in indicators of mortality of males and females are marked in the age group 20-29 years (314.5 of males and 92.3 of females per 100 000 of population). The percentage of deceased prior 70 years consists 63.2% among males and 29.9% among females. The total number of years of life lost in the Russian Federation consisted 36 864 309 and out of them 24 321 992 (65.9%) as a result of death of males and 12 542 317 (34.1%) as a result of death of females. The maximum percentage of years of life lost among males is marked in the age group of 51-60 years (24.61%) and among females in the age group of 71-80 years (22.38%). The indicator of years of life lost per 100 000 of population consisted 25769 for total population, 36 753 for male population and 16 314 for female population. The highest rate of indicator of years of life lost is marked in the Chukchi Autonomous Okrug and the lowest rate in the Republics of the Northern Caucasus and Moscow. However, in all subjects of the Russian Federation indicator of years of life lost is

  1. THE PRESENT CONDITION OF SMALL WATER RETENTION AND THE PROSPECTS OF ITS DEVELOPMENT USING THE EXAMPLE OF THE PODLASKIE VOIVODESHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Szczykowska

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The necessity and purposefulness of the investments related to water retention are justified mostly due to the preservation of the environment equilibrium as well as due to its farming, anti-flood, landscape and recreation aspects. Reasonable water management where various forms of retention are used gives large chances for the mitigation of the effects of unfavorable phenomena related to its insufficient amount. The creation of plans regarding the formation of reservoirs accumulating water is not necessarily synonymous with their realization. The reason of problems connected with the implementation of plans regarding the formation of new reservoirs lies mainly in financial measures and in problems with obtaining them. Water deficit in Poland is the reason for which the principles of its national usage need to be complied with. Realization of plans at both Voivodeship and municipality level that are focused on small retention will contribute to considerable increase in the retention capacity and will enable considerable increase in available resources in hydrographic catchments of both the characterized area and the entire country. The paper presents the characteristics of the present state and assumes the perspective development of small water retention in the Podlaskie Voivodeship using the example of the Podlaskie Voivodeship.

  2. [Trends and social indicators of both mortality breast cancer and cervical cancer in Antioquia, Colombia, 2000-2007].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena, Armando; Almonte, Maribel; Valencia, Marta Lía; Martínez, Santiago; Quintero, Katherine; Sánchez, Gloria I

    2011-01-01

    To estimate the mortality age-standardized rates (ASR) for breast and cervical cancer from 2000-2007 and explore social indicators that explain the variability of rates in Antioquia. The ASR was estimated by the direct method and linear regression was used to relate social indicators with rates by subregion. Breast and cervical cancer mortality ASRs in Antioquia were 11.3 and 9.1 per 100 000 woman-years respectively. In Medellin, the breast cancer mortality ASR was 12.5, 1.8 times the rate of cervical cancer. A decrease of cervical cancer ASR between 2000 and 2007 was observed in Medellin (p-value=0.03) but not in the rest of Antioquia. Cervical cancer mortality ASR was related to the percentage of poverty (p-value=0.0003). Mortality due to these neoplasms has remained constant in Antioquia. The wide variation in mortality from cervical cancer between regions seems to be associated with poverty.

  3. POSSIBILITIES OF ACQUIRING AND ENERGETIC USE OF BIOMASS IN COMMUNES IN MAŁOPOLSKA VOIVODESHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Sroka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This analysis touches upon an evaluation and estimation of the potential of communes in Małopolska voivodeship in terms of energetic use of plant biomass. The research results showed that if biomass, in the form of straw and hay not used in agriculture and willow (salix cultivated on lands out of agricultural production, was marked for energetic aims, the generation of about 8.3 PJ of energy would be possible. It was also pinpointed that within the group of communes with the highest potential of hay and willow for energetic use (25% of communes, environmental (the quality of production space and economic factors (the area structure, and confi guration, etc. will hinder the development of the biomass market. The same conditions which contributed to the regress of agriculture are seen as an obstacle to eff ective and profi table biomass production. The only real opportunity for development of the biomass market is seen in straw, which can be acquired in communes with the best natural and economic conditions.

  4. FUNCTIONING OF A FARM ADVISORY SYSTEM ACCORDING TO THE FARMERS OF THE OPOLE VOIVODESHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisława Sokołowska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Farm advisory system is a unique form of long-lasting education of framers and rural area dwellers. This attribute is significant as far as a transformation of European agriculture is concerned which resulted in creating a farm advisory system for the territorial scope Europe. The effectiveness of the system depends on many factors mainly, however, on active trust of farmers in the knowledge they acquire. The case study uses a questionnaire data collecting method in the households of the Opole voivodeship. On their basis the place and aim of a farm advisory organisation in the system of both agricultural knowledge and information have been determined as well as kinds of knowledge sought by farmers. The respondents’ evaluation of the significance of this institutional structure in the development of households and in the local development has also been presented. A question of the use of regional internet platforms in the realisation of farm advisory system tasks has been considered. The case study ends with conclusions and recommendation referring to the challenges to be faced by the regional structures of a farm advisory system.

  5. The results of intradermal skin tests (IDST) in dogs with atopic dermatitis from the Lublin voivodeship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taszkun, I

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the positive immediate reactions received from intradermal skin tests (IDST) which confirmed the presence of IgE-dependent hypersensitivity in dogs with atopic dermatitis, which were patients of the Dermatology Consulting Section at the University of Life Sciences in Lublin between 2007 and 2009. Intradermal skin tests were performed on 142 dogs (72 females and 70 males) from the Lublin voivodeship of different breeds ranging in age from 1 to 6 years (average 2.8 years). The allergen set used in this study was the Artuvetrin Test (ARTU Biologicals Europe B.V, Holland). The owners of 84 dogs observed the presence of skin lesions all year round regardless of season, while 58 dog owners noted them only in spring and summer. Most immediate positive reactions were ascertained from mite allergens (70.61%), fewer from pollen allergens (19.55%), and the fewest from animal (4.15%) and mould allergens (1.66%). Immediate positive reactions for a flea allergen (4.03% of all positive reactions) were also ascertained. In 98.6% of dogs polysensitization was found.

  6. [Activities of voivodeship occupational medicine centers in workplace health promotion in 2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goszczyńska, Eliza

    2010-01-01

    The paper aims to present the activities of the largest Voivodeship Occupational Medicine Centers (VOMCs) in Poland in the area of workplace health promotion in 2008. It was compiled on the basis of written reports concerning these activities sent by the Centers to the Polish National Center for Workplace Health Promotion, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Łódź. Their analysis shows a greatly varied level of engagement in and understanding of health promotion--from simple single actions (in the field of health education and screening) to long-running programs, including various ways of influencing people the programs are addressed to. In 2008, there were 78 such programs in the country, the most popular of them were those focused on occupational voice disorders and tobacco smoke). VOMCs perceive external factors, unfavorable or indifferent attitudes towards promoting health of their employees on the part of employers as well as financial constraints, as the most common obstacles in undertaking activities in the field of workplace health promotion. At the same time, they link achievements in this field mostly with their own activities, including effective cooperation with various partners and their well qualified and experienced employees.

  7. SPATIAL DIFFERENTIATION OF THE SEASONAL UNEMPLOYMENT. AN EXAMPLE OF COASTAL DISTRICTS OF ZACHODNIOPOMORSKIE VOIVODESHIP IN POLAND

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    Maria Klonowska-Matynia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this article is to analyse and asses spatial diversity and seasonality of unemployment rate on labour market in selected seaside districts (rural, urban and rural-urban in the Zachodniopomorskie voivodeship in Poland. The following thesis was formulated: the location of the examined districts in the coastal zone determines their nature tourism and similar behaviour in the observed seasonal unemployment changes. Seasonal changes of the monthly unemployment rate were studied in the period 2001--2012. Data from the Central Statistical Office, Regional Data Bank and the Regional Labour Office in Szczecin were used in research process. The results confirm the authors’ assumptions about a relatively high sensitivity of the surveyed markets to seasonal changes, which is determined by the tourist nature of the area of the surveyed districts. There is no reason to assess that all the coastal districts react in a similar way. It has been observed that rural markets are more sensitive to seasonal unemployment changes in relation to the urban markets.

  8. Is thrombocytosis a valid indicator of advanced stage and high mortality of gynecological cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christen Bertel L; Eskelund, Christian W.; Siersma, Volkert Dirk;

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Thrombocytosis has been associated with higher stage and mortality of cancer, however, the evidence is conflicting. We examined the stage distribution and prognosis of gynecologic cancer according to levels of prediagnostic platelet count. Methods: In a primary care resource with blood...... cell counts from more than 500,000 individuals, we identified 581 women with a primary diagnosis of gynecological cancer. We divided the pre-diagnostic mean platelet count derived from the 3-year period prior to cancer diagnosis into three categories of thrombocytosis (no, 150–400 × 109 /L; mild, N400......–550 × 109 /L; severe, N550 × 109 /L). Logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for the association of prediagnostic platelet counts with stage at diagnosis. Subsequently, we estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause or gynecological cancer-specific mortality by level...

  9. The Lyme disease as the increasing health problem in Małopolskie voivodeship compared with Poland in 1998-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandoła, Katarzyna; Koperny, Magdalena; Seweryn, Michał; Żak, Jacek; Bała, Małgorzata M

    Lyme disease is one of the most known tick borne diseases in Poland caused by spirochetes of the genus Borrelia burgdorferi. Most cases of Lyme disease are diagnosed in the northeastern Poland and the south of Poland, in Śląskie, Małopolskie, Podkarpackie voivodeship. The aim of the study was to evaluate epidemiological data of Lyme disease in Małopolskie voivodeship and other voivodeships in Poland and frequency analysis of the Lyme disease as an occupational disease. The authors analyzed prevalence from 1998 to 2014. Incidence of the Lyme disease was evaluated through review data from „Choroby zakaźne i zatrucia” Bulletin and Lyme disease as an occupational disease obtained data from the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine in Łódź. It is estimated that the number of Lyme disease cases in Poland increased 18 times between 1998 and 2014 year (2,0 to 36 per 100,000 population), in the same period it was over 35 times of sudden rise in Lyme disease incidence in Małopolskie voivodeship. In years 2005-2014 the number of cases of Lyme disease as an occupational disease fluctuated with a slight upward trend both in Poland and Małopolskie voivoideship. In Poland number of reported cases is systematically increasing. Podlaskie and Warmińsko- Mazurskie voivodeships are areas of high prevalence. Exponential increase in the number of cases is observed in southern Poland, especially in Małopolskie voivodeship from 2013.

  10. Social aspects of revitalization of rural areas. Implementation of the rural revival programme in lodzkie voivodeship. Assumptions for sociological research

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    Pamela Jeziorska-Biel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Essential elements of the process of rural renovation programme are: stimulating activity of local communities, cooperation for development, while preserving social identity, cultural heritage and natural environment. Implementing a rural revival programme in Poland: Sectoral Operational Programme “The Restructuring and Modernisation of the Food Sector and the Development of Rural Areas in 2004-2006” (action 2.3 “Rural renovation and protection and preservation of cultural heritage” evokes criticism. A wide discussion is carried amongst researchers, politicians, social activists, and local government practitioners. The main question remains: “is rural renovation process in Poland conducted in accordance with the rules in European countries or it is only a new formula of rural modernisation with the use of European funds?” The authors are joining the discussion and in the second part of the article they are presenting the assumption of sociological research. The aim of the analysis is to grasp the essence of revitalization of rural areas located in Łódzkie voivodeship, and analyse the question of specificity of rural Revival Programmes. What is the scope and manner of use of local capital? If so, are the results obtained from implementing a rural revival programme in 2004-2006 within the scope of sustainable development? What activities are predominant in the process of project implementation? Is it rural modernisation, revitalization of the rural areas, barrier removal and change in Infrastructure, or creation of social capital and subjectivity of the local community? Has the process of rural renovation in Łódzkie voivodeship got the so called “social face” and if so, to what extent? The major assumption is that rural renovation programme in Łódzkie voivodeship relates more to revitalization material aspects than “spirituality”.

  11. [Contamination of soil with geohelminth eggs on vegetable organic farms in the Lublin voivodeship, Poland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłapeć, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    Organic farming, despite being more difficult and labour consuming than traditional farming, gains increasingly more followers among farmers. Currently in Poland there are approximately 10 000 organic farms. Pure, uncontaminated soil in the Lublin voivodeship makes this area an ideal location for organic agriculture production. In 2006-2007, 102 soil samples were examined from 40 organic farms specializing in vegetables and berries. Farms for the study were selected by ecology- and food-production specialists from the Lublin Agriculture Advisory Centre in Końskowola. The following plants were cultivated on the farms examined: berry-bearing plants, carrots, parsley, zucchini, cabbage, lettuce, cucumbers, cauliflowers, leeks, onions, kidney beans, beetroots, potatoes, pumpkins, broad beans, rhubarb and herbs. The presently reported parasitological survey was performed on 102 soil samples. Each sample consisted of 100 g of soil and the methodology followed that of the Polish Standard PN-Z-19000-4 (flotation method by Quinn et al.). The survey yielded eggs of parasites representing genera: Ascaris, Trichuris and Toxocara. Contamination with eggs of intestinal parasites was noted in 43 (42.16%) soil samples. Toxocara spp. eggs were found in 24 samples (55.81%). Eggs of Ascaris spp. were detected in 18 samples (41.86%) while eggs of Trichuris spp were present in one sample (2.32%). In total, 29 eggs of Toxocara spp., 19 eggs of Ascaris spp., and 1 egg of Trichuris spp. were found. The largest amount of soil for examination was taken across the plantations of berry-bearing plants - 57 samples. In the group examined, plantations of raspberries and strawberries dominated. The soil was contaminated with the eggs of Toxocara spp. and Ascaris spp. No eggs of Trichuris spp. were detected. The presence of eggs of intestinal parasites in soil poses a threat of geohelminthoses to people who eat contaminated fresh fruits and vegetables.

  12. The history of the integration between Russia’s Kaliningrad region and Poland’s northeastern voivodeships: A programme approach

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    Mironyuk D. A.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the development of integration between Russia’s Kaliningrad region and Poland’s northeastern voivodeships in 1946—2016. The authors set out to identify the main results of Russian-Polish cross-border cooperation in the context of the changing historical and political paradigms in the Baltic region. The authors conduct a brief historical analysis of this sphere of international relations. The genesis of integration at the regional level is explored by identifying the major areas and tools for collaboration. The authors address research works of Russian (Soviet and Polish researchers, intergovernmental agreements, EU-Russia crossborder cooperation programmes, expert interviews, and relevant analytical reports. Special attention is paid to programme-based interregional and cross-border cooperation as the most efficient form of collaboration for accelerating integration and socio-economic development in border areas. Based on their evaluation of the major achievements, the authors conclude that Russian-Polish cross-border cooperation has been successful. Yet, there is a need for developing a long-term empirical model of Russian-Polish relations in view of the many-years’ collaboration between the Kaliningrad region and the Polish voivodeships.

  13. Indications, Results and Mortality of Pulmonary Artery Banding Procedure: a Brief Review and Five- year Experiences

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    Hamid Hoseinikhah

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Pulmonary artery banding (PAB is a technique of palliative surgical therapy used by congenital heart surgeons as a staged approach to operative correction of congenital heart defects. Materials and Methods We report 5- year experiences from January 2011 to January 2016 of Imam Reza Hospital center (a tertiary referral hospital in Mashhad city, North East of Iran that consist of 50 patients with congenital heart disease with left to right shunt that pulmonary artery banding procedure was performed for them were studied. Results Age of patients (n=50 was 1to 9 months (mean=4.6 + 1.3. In this study, the most common disease that need to PAB procedure was Ventricular septal defect (VSD with twenty-eight patients (56%. Mean of extubation time (hour was 10.4 + 0.8 and mean of hospital stay (day was 13.3 + 2.4 respectively. Conclusion Although the number of pulmonary artery banding palliation surgery was decreased, but in selected group of congenital heart disease, this palliation to reduce over circulation of Pulmonary system, can use successfully with acceptable results and low mortality. We suggest pulmonary artery banding palliative surgery in these selected patients.

  14. MATERNAL NEAR MISS AND MATERNAL MORTALITY AS HEALTH INDICATORS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

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    Simarpreet

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available : OBJECTIVES: To assess the various causes and incidence of maternal near miss (MNM and maternal deaths (MD and to define the limitations and to search the level of delay. METHODS: A prospective and observational study, including women who were admitted in emergency from April 2012 to March 2013 with severe maternal complications and who fulfilled any of the WHO criteria of MNM. Results: A total of 6008 live births (LB and 156 severe maternal outcomes (25.9/1000 LB were observed, consisting of 140 MNM (23.3/1000 LB and 16 MD(266/100, 000 LB. The maternal near miss/mortality ratio was 8.75. Hypertensive disorders accounted for the most common event of MNM (50.6%, followed by haemorrhagic disorders (38.6%. Majority of maternal deaths were due to hypertensive disorders (31.2% and sepsis (25%. CONCLUSION: Reduction of present MNM and MD may be achieved by strictly following management protocols for hypertension and haemorrhage.

  15. Association of Radiologic Indicators of Frailty With 1-Year Mortality in Older Trauma Patients: Opportunistic Screening for Sarcopenia and Osteopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Stephen J; Pham, Tam N; Arbabi, Saman; Gross, Joel A; Damodarasamy, Mamatha; Bentov, Itay; Taitsman, Lisa A; Mitchell, Steven H; Reed, May J

    2017-02-15

    Assessment of physical frailty in older trauma patients admitted to the intensive care unit is often not feasible using traditional frailty assessment instruments. The use of opportunistic computed tomography (CT) scans to assess sarcopenia and osteopenia as indicators of underlying frailty may provide complementary prognostic information on long-term outcomes. To determine whether sarcopenia and/or osteopenia are associated with 1-year mortality in an older trauma patient population. A retrospective cohort constructed from a state trauma registry was linked to the statewide death registry and Comprehensive Hospital Abstract Reporting System for readmission data analyses. Admission abdominopelvic CT scans from patients 65 years and older admitted to the intensive care unit of a single level I trauma center between January 2011 and May 2014 were analyzed to identify patients with sarcopenia and/or osteopenia. Patients with a head Injury Severity Score of 3 or greater, an out-of-state address, or inadequate CT imaging or who died within 24 hours of admission were excluded. Sarcopenia and/or osteopenia, assessed via total cross-sectional muscle area and bone density at the L3 vertebral level, compared with a group with no sarcopenia or osteopenia. One-year all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes included 30-day all-cause mortality, 30-day readmission, hospital length of stay, hospital cost, and discharge disposition. Of the 450 patients included in the study, 269 (59.8%) were male and 394 (87.6%) were white. The cohort was split into 4 groups: 74 were retrospectively diagnosed with both sarcopenia and osteopenia, 167 with sarcopenia only, 48 with osteopenia only, and 161 with no radiologic indicators. Among the 408 who survived to discharge, sarcopenia and osteopenia were associated with higher risks of 1-year mortality alone and in combination. After adjustment, the hazard ratio was 9.4 (95% CI, 1.2-75.4; P = .03) for sarcopenia and osteopenia, 10.3 (95% CI, 1

  16. Influence of metabolic indicators, smoking, alcohol and socioeconomic position on mortality after breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Signe Benzon; Kroman, Niels; Ibfelt, Else Helene

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Factors differently distributed among social groups like obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, smoking, and alcohol intake predict survival after breast cancer diagnosis and therefore might mediate part of the observed social inequality in survival. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We conducted...... as outcome. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 9.6 years [interquartile range (IQR), 2.2-17.0 years]. The hazard ratio (HR) for death from all causes increased with lower education (p for trend, 0.01). Adjustment for disease-related prognostic factors, comorbidity and metabolic indicators measured as BMI, waist...... circumference and diabetes, and smoking and alcohol affected but did not explain the social gradient. CONCLUSION: The findings indicate that these factors explain some but not all the social inequality in survival after breast cancer and that improvement of lifestyle to some extent would improve survival among...

  17. High abundances of viruses in a deep-sea hydrothermal vent system indicates viral mediated microbial mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortmann, Alice C.; Suttle, Curtis A.

    2005-08-01

    Little is known about the distribution and abundance of viruses at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Based on estimates made using epifluorescence microscopy and the dye YoPro-1, much higher viral abundances were observed at active hydrothermal vents than in the surrounding deep sea. This indicates that viral production was occurring and that viruses were a source of microbial mortality. Samples collected from three actively venting sites (Clam Bed, S&M and Salut) within the Endeavour Ridge system off the west coast of North America had viral abundances ranging from 1.45×10 5 to 9.90×10 7 ml -1, while the abundances of prokaryotes ranged from 1.30×10 5 to 4.46×10 6 ml -1. The abundances of viruses and prokaryotes in samples collected along the neutrally buoyant plume associated with the Main Endeavour Field were lower than at actively venting sites, with a mean of 5.3×10 5 prokaryotes ml -1 (s.d. 2.9×10 5, n=64) and 3.50×10 6 viruses ml -1 (s.d. 1.89×10 6, n=64), but were higher than non-plume samples (2.7×10 5 prokaryotes ml -1, s.d. 5.0×10 4, n=15 and 2.94×10 6 viruses ml -1, s.d. 1.08×10 6, n=15). Prokaryotic and viral abundances in non-hydrothermal regions were as much as 10-fold higher than found in previous studies, in which sample fixation likely resulted in underestimates. This suggests that viral infection may be a greater source of prokaryotic mortality throughout the deep sea than previously recognized. Overall, our results indicate that virus-mediated mortality of prokaryotes at these hydrothermal-vent environments is significant and may reduce energy flow to higher trophic levels.

  18. Prognostic indicators associated with early mortality of wild raptors admitted to a wildlife rehabilitation centre in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-López, Rafael A; Casal, Jordi; Darwich, Laila

    2015-03-01

    Assessment of the prognostic indicators of wildlife casualties is critical in wildlife rehabilitation practice, to optimize the use of economical resources, and to protect animal welfare. Few studies have been conducted in this field. To identify the prognostic indicators associated with raptor mortality during the first week of hospitalization. Complete medical records of 1722 wild raptor cases admitted to a wildlife rehabilitation centre from 1995 to 2007 were used. Regression models were created to determine mortality-related factors for different variables (order, sex, body condition (BC), clinical signs, and available haematological and biochemical parameters). In the bivariate analysis, the presence of nervous (OR = 11.9, 95%CI:5.1-27.6) or musculoskeletal (OR = 12.1, 95%CI:5.8-25.3) signs, a poor BC (OR = 32.9, 95%CI:19-81.2), and low values of packed cell volume (PCV), haemoglobin or total solids (TS), were all associated with early mortality. After adjusting variables in the multivariate model, BC was excluded due to co-linearity with other variables, and alteration of the nervous system was the only significant risk factor (OR = 4.0; 95%CI:1.9-8.8). In species specific analysis, poor prognosis was related to neurological signs in Athene noctua, poor BC in Strix aluco, trauma in Acciptiter nisus and Tyto alba, low PCV in Buteo buteo and Falco tinnunculus and low TS in Falco tinnunculus. Raptors with a poor BC, low values of PCV and those presenting with neurological signs, had the highest risk of dying in the first days of admittance. Thus, either medical care or humane euthanasia for poor prognosis should be performed to address animal welfare.

  19. The impact of demographic factors on the level of knowledge about primary and secondary prevention of cervical cancer among patients in Lublin voivodeship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Puzio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cervical cancer (CC is among the most-commonly detected cancers affecting women worldwide. The primary means of preventing CC is the Human Papillomavirus (HPV vaccine. Moreover, CC can be detected early by a screening test, which is available free of charge in Poland for women in the 25–59 year-old age group (i.e., those at the greatest risk of CC. Objectives. To assess the level of knowledge among patients in Lublin voivodeship, Poland, concerning both the primary and secondary prevention of CC; to analyze the impact of demographic factors on participation in CC screening. Material and methods. The study was carried out on a group of patients (n = 230, who filled out a questionnaire including questions on the primary and secondary prevention of CC. Participation was voluntary and anonymous. The data was analyzed using Statistica 10.0 software (StatSoft, USA . Results . It was shown that subjects from small towns and rural areas formed the largest group of women who indicated that they had fewer than one gynecological visit per year. 40% (n = 28 of the inhabitants of rural areas, 29% (n = 9 of the inhabitants of small towns and 70% (n = 57 of the inhabitants of cities reported that they had had a cytological test at least once in their life. 25% (n = 57 of all respondents had been vaccinated against HPV. Among rural inhabitants, 83% (n = 58 reported that they had not received a HPV vaccination. Conclusions . Currently, the priority is to focus on prevention campaigns in rural areas and small towns, where the level of knowledge about the risk of CC is much lower than in larger cities.

  20. Development and evaluation of three mortality prediction indices for cold-stunned Kemp's ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy, N. I.; Innis, C. J.; Hernandez, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Kemp's ridley sea turtle is an endangered species found in the Gulf of Mexico and along the east coast of the USA. Cold-stunned Kemp's ridley turtles are often found stranded on beaches of Massachusetts and New York in November and December each year. When found alive, turtles are transported to rehabilitation centres for evaluation and treatment. Blood gas and chemistry analytes of major clinical relevance in sea turtles were selected to develop mortality prediction indices (MPI)s. Testing the diagnostic performance of various combinations of blood gas and chemistry analytes by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis resulted in the development of three mortality prediction indices. The sensitivity and specificity of the best performing MPI (based on three blood analytes: pH, pO2, and potassium) was 88 and 80%, respectively. Using ROC analysis, the area under the curve = 0.896 (95% confidence interval = 0.83–0.94). The use of validated MPIs based on four blood analytes (pH, pCO2, pO2, and potassium) could be useful for better diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of cold-stunned sea turtles when admitted to rehabilitation facilities. PMID:27293587

  1. [The estimation of intake of selected and permissible preservatives used in food industry among people from Podlaskie voivodeship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczerbiński, Robert; Karczewski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The work aimed at estimating intake of food containing permissible preservatives. The data was comprised of food samples from 14 poviats of Podlaskie voivodeship taken to detect presence of preservatives (sodium nitrate, nitrite, benzoic acid and its salt, sorbic acid and its salt). The samples were collected between 2004 and 2007 by food inspection agency. Data concerning consumption of food provided results for an average consumption of some foodstuffs in households in which consumption of given foodstuff has been recorded by Polish Central Statistical Office, whereas data concerning consumption of soft drinks was provided by the report from March, 2008 (soft drinks market in Poland). It was stated that an average intake of the considered preservatives with an average diet is not a threat to people. Taking into account the fact data concerning consumption of foodstuffs in households is limited, it is advised to create databases comprising consumption of foodstuffs which would help in more precise evaluation of the intake.

  2. The colorectal cancer mortality-to-incidence ratio as an indicator of global cancer screening and care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Vasu; Hébert, James R

    2015-05-15

    Disparities in cancer screening, incidence, treatment, and survival are worsening globally. The mortality-to-incidence ratio (MIR) has been used previously to evaluate such disparities. The MIR for colorectal cancer is calculated for all Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries using the 2012 GLOBOCAN incidence and mortality statistics. Health system rankings were obtained from the World Health Organization. Two linear regression models were fit with the MIR as the dependent variable and health system ranking as the independent variable; one included all countries and one model had the "divergents" removed. The regression model for all countries explained 24% of the total variance in the MIR. Nine countries were found to have regression-calculated MIRs that differed from the actual MIR by >20%. Countries with lower-than-expected MIRs were found to have strong national health systems characterized by formal colorectal cancer screening programs. Conversely, countries with higher-than-expected MIRs lack screening programs. When these divergent points were removed from the data set, the recalculated regression model explained 60% of the total variance in the MIR. The MIR proved useful for identifying disparities in cancer screening and treatment internationally. It has potential as an indicator of the long-term success of cancer surveillance programs and may be extended to other cancer types for these purposes. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  3. Differentiation of financial condition in local goverments of Wielkopolska voivodeship Zróżnicowanie sprawności finansowej gmin województwa wielkopolskiego

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Średzińska

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the typology of financial condition in the Wielkopolska voivodeship according to the criterion of local governments. The analysis was realized on financial data from Statistical Office (BDR 2006. The results confirmed a big differentiation. Local governments in the Poznański subregion had the largest financial efficiency. This research should be continued in the future, considering the amount of money that will come from the European Union to the budgets of gminas.

  4. A simple indicator to rapidly assess the short-term impact of heat waves on mortality within the French heat warning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antics, Annamaria; Pascal, Mathilde; Laaidi, Karine; Wagner, Vérène; Corso, Magali; Declercq, Christophe; Beaudeau, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    We propose a simple method to provide a rapid and robust estimate of the short-term impacts of heat waves on mortality, to be used for communication within a heat warning system. The excess mortality during a heat wave is defined as the difference between the observed mortality over the period and the observed mortality over the same period during the N preceding years. This method was tested on 19 French cities between 1973 and 2007. In six cities, we compared the excess mortality to that obtained using a modelling of the temperature-mortality relationship. There was a good agreement between the excess mortalities estimated by the simple indicator and by the models. Major differences were observed during the most extreme heat waves, in 1983 and 2003, and after the implementation of the heat prevention plan in 2006. Excluding these events, the mean difference between the estimates obtained by the two methods was of 13 deaths [1:45]. A comparison of mortality with the previous years provides a simple estimate of the mortality impact of heat waves. It can be used to provide early and reliable information to stakeholders of the heat prevention plan, and to select heat waves that should be further investigated.

  5. Comparison of UTCI with other thermal indices in the assessment of heat and cold effects on cardiovascular mortality in the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Ales; Kyselý, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Several studies have compared various human thermal comfort indices as to their applications in evaluating heat-related mortality. Much less attention has been devoted to application of thermal indices in evaluating cold-related mortality. So far, only a few studies have examined performance of the Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI), one of the most advanced indicators of biometeorological conditions, in assessing heat- and cold-related mortality. We compare UTCI and other selected thermal indices in analysing heat- and cold-related effects on cardiovascular (CVD) mortality in two different (urban and rural) regions in the Czech Republic during the 16-year period of 1994-2009. Excess mortality is represented by the number of deaths above expected daily values, the latter being adjusted for long-term changes, annual and weekly cycles, and epidemics of influenza/acute respiratory infections. The association between excess CVD mortality and air temperature, UTCI, Physiologically Equivalent Temperature (PET), and Apparent Temperature (AT) is analyzed using Poisson generalized additive models (GAMs). Heat- / cold-stress days are identified by percentiles of (equivalent) temperature distribution in summer / winter. We found air temperature (as the most widely used proxy for ambient thermal conditions in environmental epidemiology) comparable to thermal indices in assessing heat-related mortality. On the other hand, air temperature provides a weak cold effect in comparison with the thermal indices in both regions and its application may underestimate the magnitude of cold-related mortality. These findings are important when possible climate change effects on heat- and cold-related mortality are estimated. AT and PET appear to be more universal predictors of heat- and cold- related mortality than UTCI when both urban and rural environments are of concern. UTCI tends to select windy rather than freezing days in winter, though these show little effect on mortality in the

  6. [GeSIDA quality care indicators associated with mortality and hospital admission for the care of persons infected by HIV/AIDS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Mejía, Elena; Frontera-Juan, Guillem; Murillas-Angoiti, Javier; Campins-Roselló, Antoni Abdon; Gil-Alonso, Leire; Peñaranda-Vera, María; Ribas Del Blanco, María Angels; Martín-Pena, María Luisa; Riera-Jaume, Melchor

    2017-02-01

    In 2010, the AIDS Study Group (Grupo de Estudio del SIDA [GESIDA]) developed 66 quality care indicators. The aim of this study is to determine which of these indicators are associated with mortality and hospital admission, and to perform a preliminary assessment of a prediction rule for mortality and hospital admission in patients on treatment and follow-up. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in the Hospital Universitario Son Espases (Palma de Mallorca, Spain). Eligible participants were patients with human immunodeficiency syndrome≥18 years old who began follow-up in the Infectious Disease Section between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2012. A descriptive analysis was performed to evaluate anthropometric variables, and a logistic regression analysis to assess the association between GESIDA indicators and mortality/admission. The mortality probability model was built using logistic regression. A total of 1,944 adults were eligible (median age: 37 years old, 78.8% male). In the multivariate analysis, the quality of care indicators associated with mortality in the follow-up patient group were the items 7, 16 and 20, and in the group of patients on treatment were 7, 16, 20, 35, and 38. The quality of care indicators associated with hospital admissions in the follow-up patients group were the same as those in the mortality analysis, plus number 31. In the treatment group the associated quality of care indicators were items 7, 16, 20, 35, 38, and 40. Some GeSIDA quality of care indicators were associated with mortality and/or hospital admissions. These indicators are associated with delayed diagnosis, regular monitoring, prevention of infections, and control of comorbidities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  7. Association between mortality and indicators of traffic-related air pollution in the Netherlands: A cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, G.; Brunekreef, B.; Goldbohm, S.; Fischer, P.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2002-01-01

    Background: Long-term exposure to particulate matter air pollution has been associated with increased cardiopulmonary mortality in the USA. We aimed to assess the relation between traffic-related air pollution and mortality in participants of the Netherlands Cohort study on Diet and Cancer (NLCS), a

  8. Science-Economy-Technology Concordance Matrix for Development and Implementation of Regional Smart Specializations in the Silesian Voivodeship, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoliński, Adam; Bondaruk, Jan; Pichlak, Magdalena; Trząski, Leszek; Uszok, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    The regional smart specializations include the innovative activities within a common science-economy-technology sector, which open the opportunities to gain a competitive advantage. The original procedure of science-economy-technology concordance matrix development on an example of smart specializations of the Silesian Voivodeship was presented in the paper. The procedure developed includes recognition of the research and economic components of the regional smart specialization and the connection between the economic components of the regional specialization and the technological innovation through the international patent classification. It also comprises recognition of key enabling technologies (KETs) and high technologies (of high R&D intensity) other than KET in the economic and technological dimensions of innovation as well as the high R&D intensity services in the economic dimension of innovation. The in-depth expert analyses with the application of the Delphi method were also taken into account. The methodological approach developed and the visualization method applied are both of cognitive and practical importance since they contribute significantly to the creation of efficient development policies, to the enhancement and facilitation of cross-sectoral cooperation, and to the focusing on the fields of key importance in terms of the competitive advantage of a region.

  9. Bereavement, multimorbidity and mortality: a population-based study using bereavement as an indicator of mental stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, A; Fenger-Grøn, M; Davydow, D S

    2017-01-01

    . Prospectively recorded register data were obtained for civil and vital status, 39 mental and physical diagnoses, and socioeconomic factors. RESULTS: In total, 389 316 bereaved individuals were identified and 137 247 died during follow-up. Bereaved individuals had higher all-cause mortality than non......BACKGROUND: Mental stress is associated with higher mortality, but it remains controversial whether the association is causal or a consequence of a higher physical disease burden in those with a high mental stress load. Understanding causality is important when developing targeted interventions. We...... aimed to estimate the effect of mental stress on mortality by performing a 'natural' experiment using spousal bereavement as a disease-independent mental stressor. METHODS: We followed a population-based matched cohort, including all individuals in Denmark bereaved in 1997-2014, for 17 years...

  10. Female breast cancer in Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship in 1999–2012. New cases and the incidence of invasive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Błaszkiewicz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Breast cancer is the most common malignant tumour among women in Poland. In 2012 invasive breast cancer was diagnosed in 17,000 Polish women. The effective fight against breast cancer is based on activities to prevent its occurrence or to enable early detection of the disease and then its effective treatment (cure. Aim of the research: To assess the prevalence of invasive breast cancer in women in Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship in 1999–2012. Material and methods: A total of 6079 new female invasive breast cancer cases were analysed. Crude rates (CRs and age-standarised rates (ASRs per 100,000 population were calculated. The total value of incidence rates was analysed for all ages (0–85+ and in separate age groups (15–49, 50–69, and 70–85+. Results : In 1999–2012 in Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship 6079 new invasive female breast cancer cases were diagnosed. Fifty-three percent of them were in the age group of 50–69 years, 25.0% in the age group 70–85+, and 21.5% in the age group 15–49 years. The incidence of BC in general (0–85+ increased from 41.2/105 in 1999 to 43.8/105 in 2012. In the women aged 15–49 years the value of ASRs of incidence increased. In the age group of 50–69 years the value of ASRs increased from 146.6/105 in 1999 to 163.5/105 in 2012. The increase in the incidence of breast cancer was reported among women in perimenopausal age and in premenopausal women. The decrease in breast cancer cases was observed among young, premenopausal women (15–49 years as well as among women over 70 years of age. Conclusions: Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship is a region in Poland with moderate risk of breast cancer.

  11. Alcohol and mortality. Results from the EPOZ (Epidemiologic Study of Cardiovascular Risk Indicators) follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.M. Berberian; C.M. van Duijn (Cock); A.W. Hoes (Arno); H.A. Valkenburg (Hans); A. Hofman (Albert)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractTo investigate the association of alcohol intake with mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer and other causes (e.g., accidents, violence, suicide), we performed an analysis of data obtained in a prospective follow-up study conducted in the Netherlands since 1977.

  12. Penalized regression techniques for prediction: a case study for predicting tree mortality using remotely sensed vegetation indices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazaridis, D.C.; Verbesselt, J.; Robinson, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    Constructing models can be complicated when the available fitting data are highly correlated and of high dimension. However, the complications depend on whether the goal is prediction instead of estimation. We focus on predicting tree mortality (measured as the number of dead trees) from change metr

  13. Preoperative red cell distribution width: Not a useful prognostic indicator for 30-day mortality in patients who undergo major- or ultra-major noncardiac surgery

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    Yik-Nang Cheung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Red cell distribution width (RDW has been shown to be associated with mortality in cardiac surgical patients. This study investigates the association of RDW with the 30-day mortality for those patients who undergo major- or ultra-major noncardiac surgery. Methods: Patients who received major- or ultra-major noncardiac surgery between July 2012 and May 2013 were included in the study and patients those with preoperative hemoglobin 13.35% (P = 0.025, odds ratio [OR]: 1.52, INR (P = 0.008, OR: 4.49, albumin level (P < 0.001, OR: 1.10, use of antihypertensives (P = 0.001, OR: 1.82, and preoperative pulse rate (P = 0.006, OR: 1.02 independently predicted the 30-day mortality. However, the area under receiver operating characteristic curve for the prediction of 30-day mortality using RDW was only 0.614. Conclusions: Although preoperative RDW independently predicted 30-day mortality in patients who underwent major- or ultra-major noncardiac surgery, it may not serve as an influential prognostic indicator in view of its low sensitivity and specificity.

  14. Standardised mortality ratio based on the sum of age and percentage total body surface area burned is an adequate quality indicator in burn care: An exploratory review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinvall, Ingrid; Elmasry, Moustafa; Fredrikson, Mats; Sjoberg, Folke

    2016-02-01

    Standardised Mortality Ratio (SMR) based on generic mortality predicting models is an established quality indicator in critical care. Burn-specific mortality models are preferred for the comparison among patients with burns as their predictive value is better. The aim was to assess whether the sum of age (years) and percentage total body surface area burned (which constitutes the Baux score) is acceptable in comparison to other more complex models, and to find out if data collected from a separate burn centre are sufficient for SMR based quality assessment. The predictive value of nine burn-specific models was tested by comparing values from the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) and a non-inferiority analysis using 1% as the limit (delta). SMR was analysed by comparing data from seven reference sources, including the North American National Burn Repository (NBR), with the observed mortality (years 1993-2012, n=1613, 80 deaths). The AUC values ranged between 0.934 and 0.976. The AUC 0.970 (95% CI 0.96-0.98) for the Baux score was non-inferior to the other models. SMR was 0.52 (95% CI 0.28-0.88) for the most recent five-year period compared with NBR based data. The analysis suggests that SMR based on the Baux score is eligible as an indicator of quality for setting standards of mortality in burn care. More advanced modelling only marginally improves the predictive value. The SMR can detect mortality differences in data from a single centre. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  15. Insulin, macronutrient intake, and physical activity: are potential indicators of insulin resistance associated with mortality from breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borugian, Marilyn J; Sheps, Samuel B; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Van Patten, Cheri; Potter, John D; Dunn, Bruce; Gallagher, Richard P; Hislop, T Gregory

    2004-07-01

    High levels of insulin have been associated with increased risk of breast cancer, and poorer survival after diagnosis. Data and sera were collected from 603 breast cancer patients, including information on diet and physical activity, medical history, family history, demographic, and reproductive risk factors. These data were analyzed to test the hypothesis that excess insulin and related factors are directly related to mortality after a diagnosis of breast cancer. The cohort was recruited from breast cancer patients treated at the British Columbia Cancer Agency between July 1991 and December 1992. Questionnaire and medical record data were collected at enrollment and outcomes were ascertained by linkage to the BC Cancer Registry after 10 years of follow-up. The primary outcome of interest was breast cancer-specific mortality (n = 112). Lifestyle data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression models to relate risk factors to outcomes, controlling for potential confounders, such as age and stage at diagnosis. Data for biological variables were analyzed as a nested case-control study due to limited serum volumes, with at least one survivor from the same cohort as a control for each breast cancer death, matched on stage and length of follow-up. High levels of insulin were associated with poorer survival for postmenopausal women [odds ratio, 1.9; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.7-6.6, comparing highest to lowest tertile, P trend = 0.10], while high dietary fat intake was associated with poorer survival for premenopausal women (relative risk, 4.8; 95% CI, 1.3-18.1, comparing highest to lowest quartile). Higher dietary protein intake was associated with better survival for all women (relative risk, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8, comparing highest to lowest quartile).

  16. Reducing maternal mortality: better monitoring, indicators and benchmarks needed to improve emergency obstetric care. Research summary for policymakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collender, Guy; Gabrysch, Sabine; Campbell, Oona M R

    2012-06-01

    Several limitations of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) indicators and benchmarks are analysed in this short paper, which synthesises recent research on this topic. A comparison between Sri Lanka and Zambia is used to highlight the inconsistencies and shortcomings in current methods of monitoring EmOC. Recommendations are made to improve the usefulness and accuracy of EmOC indicators and benchmarks in the future.

  17. DETERMINANTS OF CHOICE OF ECOLOGICAL FOOD ACCORDING TO CONSUMERS FROM THE PODKARPACKIE VOIVODESHIP

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    Magdalena Konieczny

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the determinants of the choice of organic foods in the opinion of consumers of the Podkarpackie Voivodship. The study was conducted in the second quarter of 2015 by the means of a questionnaire. The subjects of the research were 308 consumers of organic food in Podkarpackie Voivodship. It was discovered that the consumers perceive organic food as an element of the food category that guarantees health security and excellent taste. Despite the desire to buy such food, the consumers who are supplying themselves with organic products think that the range of products available on the market is insufficient. A very high percentage of the respondents indicated a preference for purchasing food produced in their own country, preferably in their own region, and buying directly from a manufacturer. More than a third of the respondents, especially under 35 years old, is supplying themselves with organic products in specialist stores and supermarkets. The primary barrier in buying organic foods is its too high price. 

  18. The Impact Of Shopping Centers In Rural Areas And Small Towns In The Outer Metropolitan Zone (The Example Of The Silesian Voivodeship

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    Heffner Krystian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Shopping centers in the Silesian Voivodeship have a significant impact on smaller settlement units located in outer areas of agglomerations. It consists mainly in changes related to social, economic, as well as functional and spatial spheres. Studies shows that shopping centers take over more and more functions of higher order (services, public culture, administration and restrict the economic activity in rural areas outer areas of agglomerations. At the stage of the irrepressible process of suburbanisation of rural areas surrounding large urban agglomerations and structural changes in towns, it is difficult to conclusively assess the consequences of the operation of shopping centers in outer metropolitan areas. The impact of shopping centers on small towns and rural areas is a very dynamic process and requires systematic research.

  19. Exploration of Key Success Factors that Influence Business Performance: The Experiences of Women Micro-entrepreneurs from Mazovia Voivodeship of Poland

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    Leszczyński Dariusz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Women-owned businesses are one of the fastest growing categories of firms in the world, but they are greatly understudied in countries from the Central and Eastern Europe (CEE [Zapalska et al., 2005]. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between business success predictors and the performance of female-owned micro-enterprises from the Mazovia Voivodeship in Poland during the period 2011–2013, using an Internet-based survey questionnaire. The data were collected by the CAWI (computer assisted web interview and CATI (computer assisted telephone interview methods. Exploratory factor analysis, correlation coefficients analysis and multivariate regression models were deployed to investigate the empirical data.

  20. Prognostic capacity of a clinically indicated exercise test for cardiovascular mortality is enhanced by combined analysis of exercise capacity, heart rate recovery and T-wave alternans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkkinen, Mikko; Nieminen, Tuomo; Verrier, Richard L; Leino, Johanna; Lehtimäki, Terho; Viik, Jari; Lehtinen, Rami; Nikus, Kjell; Kööbi, Tiit; Turjanmaa, Väinö; Kähönen, Mika

    2015-09-01

    Exercise capacity, heart rate recovery and T-wave alternans are independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality. We tested whether these parameters contain supplementary prognostic information. A total of 3609 consecutive patients (2157 men) referred for a routine, clinically indicated bicycle exercise test were enrolled in the Finnish Cardiovascular Study (FINCAVAS). Exercise capacity was measured in metabolic equivalents, heart rate recovery as the decrease in heart rate from maximum to one minute post-exercise, and T-wave alternans by time-domain Modified Moving Average method. During 57-month median follow-up (interquartile range 35-78 months), 96 patients died of cardiovascular causes (primary endpoint) and 233 from any cause. All three parameters were independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality when analysed as continuous variables. Adding metabolic equivalents (p heart rate recovery (p = 0.002) or T-wave alternans (p = 0.01) to the linear model improved its predictive power for cardiovascular mortality. The combination of low exercise capacity (heart rate recovery (≤12 beats/min) and elevated T-wave alternans (≥60 μV) yielded the highest hazard ratio for cardiovascular mortality of 16.5 (95% confidence interval 4.0-67.7, p heart rate recovery and ≥60 μV for T-wave alternans). The prognostic capacity of the clinical exercise test is enhanced by combined analysis of exercise capacity, heart rate recovery and T-wave alternans. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  1. Sensitivity and specificity of blood leukocyte counts as an indicator of mortality in horses after colic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salciccia, A; Sandersen, C; Grulke, S; de la Rebière de Pouyade, G; Caudron, I; Serteyn, D; Detilleux, J

    2013-09-21

    The objectives of this study were to describe and relate perioperative changes in blood leukocyte counts to the outcome of surgical colic horses, determine a cut-off value in the early postoperative period to obtain an indicator of the outcome, and compare the obtained value to a validation population of horses. Fifty-three horses undergoing colic surgery were included in the descriptive part of the study. Total leukocyte counts were performed before, during and serially after surgery. A receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed on the leukocyte counts of 45 of these horses to determine a cut-off value for the outcome. The results obtained were validated on a second set of 50 horses that underwent colic surgery in similar conditions. The kinetics of blood leukocytes in survivors was higher than in non-survivors during the first days. Non-survivor horses were more likely to have at least one blood leukocyte count ≤ 3.9 × 10(3)/mm(3) between 28 and 60 hours after surgery than survivor horses. This cut-off value was confirmed in the validation population. These results suggest that routine values of blood leukocyte counts can be used as an additional prognostic indicator after colic surgery alongside other predictors previously associated with the outcome.

  2. Mortalidade hospitalar como indicador de qualidade: uma revisão Hospital mortality as an indicator of clinical performance: a review

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    Claudia Travassos

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo visa a discutir as principais questões metodológicas relacionadas à mortalidade hospitalar como indicador de qualidade. Variações nos valores deste indicador se devem a inúmeros fatores, associados ao doente e à doença, que devem ser examinados para que possamos utilizá-lo como medida de desempenho. Presença de comorbidades e a gravidade do caso estão associadas à chance de morrer . Aspectos metodológicos, relevantes para a construção deste indicador, incluem a qualidade das fontes de dados, o intervalo de tempo no qual elas são calculadas e os diferentes tipos de agregação. São discutidos diversos modelos, tanto para classificação da gravidade, quanto para o ajuste das taxas de mortalidade entre serviços. São examinados ainda modelos explicativos para a variação de mortalidade. Conclui-se que nas condições em que a morte não é um evento raro, o emprego de taxas de mortalidade hospitalar representa uma ferramenta útil para indicar serviços com eventuais problemas de qualidade.This article discusses the principal methodological problems related to hospital mortality as an indicator of clinical performance. Hospital mortality rates variation are due to various factors associated with patients' characteristics and to the specific diseases they are suffering. Socio-demographic variables, presence of comorbidity and severity may define case-mixes were chances of dying are not associated to technology deployed or quality of care. Relevant methodological aspects for calculating the rates include the quality of the source of data, time period and aggregation criteria. Various models that exist both for classifying severity of cases and for risk adjustment are presented and discussed. Explanatory models for mortality rates variation are also examined. The authors conclude that outcome indicators can be used as tool for health care service evaluation. For those conditions which death is not a rare event hospital

  3. Adjusted indices of multiple deprivation to enable comparisons within and between constituent countries of the UK including an illustration using mortality rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Gary A; Barclay, Matthew E; Payne, Rupert A

    2016-11-15

    Social determinants can have a major impact on health and as a consequence substantial inequalities are seen between and within countries. The study of inequalities between countries relies on having accurate and consistent measures of deprivation across the country borders. However, in the UK most socioeconomic deprivation measures are not comparable between countries. We give a method of adjusting the Indices of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) for use across the UK, describe the deprivation of each UK country, and show the problems introduced by naïvely using country-specific deprivation measures in a UK-wide analysis of mortality rates. 42 148 geographic areas covering the population of the UK. Adjusted IMD scores based on the income and employment domains of country-specific IMD scores, adjusting for the contribution of other domains. The mortality rate among people aged under 75 years standardised to the UK age structure was compared between country-specific and UK-adjusted IMD quintiles. Of the constituent countries of the UK, Northern Ireland was the most deprived with 37% of the population living in areas in the most deprived fifth of the UK, followed by Wales with 22% of the population living in the most deprived fifth of the UK. England and Scotland had similar levels of deprivation. Deprivation-specific mortality rates were similar in England and Wales. Northern Ireland had lower mortality rates than England for each deprivation group, with similar differences for each group. Scotland had higher mortality rates than England for each deprivation group, with larger differences for more deprived groups. Analyses of between-country and within-country inequalities by socioeconomic position should use consistent measures; failing to use consistent measures may give misleading results. The published adjusted IMD scores we describe allow consistent analysis across the UK. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  4. Differences between adiposity indicators for predicting all-cause mortality in a representative sample of United States non-elderly adults.

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    Henry S Kahn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adiposity predicts health outcomes, but this relationship could depend on population characteristics and adiposity indicator employed. In a representative sample of 11,437 US adults (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988-1994, ages 18-64 we estimated associations with all-cause mortality for body mass index (BMI and four abdominal adiposity indicators (waist circumference [WC], waist-to-height ratio [WHtR], waist-to-hip ratio [WHR], and waist-to-thigh ratio [WTR]. In a fasting subsample we considered the lipid accumulation product (LAP; [WC enlargement*triglycerides]. METHODS AND FINDINGS: For each adiposity indicator we estimated linear and categorical mortality risks using sex-specific, proportional-hazards models adjusted for age, black ancestry, tobacco exposure, and socioeconomic position. There were 1,081 deaths through 2006. Using linear models we found little difference among indicators (adjusted hazard ratios [aHRs] per SD increase 1.2-1.4 for men, 1.3-1.5 for women. Using categorical models, men in adiposity midrange (quartiles 2+3; compared to quartile 1 were not at significantly increased risk (aHRs1.1, especially black men assessed by WTR (aHR 1.9 [1.4-2.6] and black women by LAP (aHR 2.2 [1.4-3.5]. Quartile 4 of WC or WHtR carried no significant risk for diabetic persons (aHRs 0.7-1.1, but elevated risks for those without diabetes (aHRs>1.5. For both sexes, quartile 4 of LAP carried increased risks for tobacco-exposed persons (aHRs>1.6 but not for non-exposed (aHRs<1.0. CONCLUSIONS: Predictions of mortality risk associated with top-quartile adiposity vary with the indicator used, sex, ancestry, and other characteristics. Interpretations of adiposity should consider how variation in the physiology and expandability of regional adipose-tissue depots impacts health.

  5. Dementia incidence and mortality in middle-income countries, and associations with indicators of cognitive reserve: a 10/66 Dementia Research Group population-based cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Martin; Acosta, Daisy; Ferri, Cleusa P; Guerra, Mariella; Huang, Yueqin; Rodriguez, Juan J Llibre; Salas, Aquiles; Sosa, Ana Luisa; Williams, Joseph D; Dewey, Michael E; Acosta, Isaac; Jotheeswaran, Amuthavalli T; Liu, Zhaorui

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Results of the few cohort studies from countries with low incomes or middle incomes suggest a lower incidence of dementia than in high-income countries. We assessed incidence of dementia according to criteria from the 10/66 Dementia Research Group and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) IV, the effect of dementia at baseline on mortality, and the independent effects of age, sex, socioeconomic position, and indicators of cognitive reserve. Methods We did a population-based cohort study of all people aged 65 years and older living in urban sites in Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Venezuela, and rural and urban sites in Peru, Mexico, and China, with ascertainment of incident 10/66 and DSM-IV dementia 3–5 years after cohort inception. We used questionnaires to obtain information about age in years, sex, educational level, literacy, occupational attainment, and number of household assets. We obtained information about mortality from all sites. For participants who had died, we interviewed a friend or relative to ascertain the likelihood that they had dementia before death. Findings 12 887 participants were interviewed at baseline. 11 718 were free of dementia, of whom 8137 (69%) were reinterviewed, contributing 34 718 person-years of follow-up. Incidence for 10/66 dementia varied between 18·2 and 30·4 per 1000 person-years, and were 1·4–2·7 times higher than were those for DSM-IV dementia (9·9–15·7 per 1000 person-years). Mortality hazards were 1·56–5·69 times higher in individuals with dementia at baseline than in those who were dementia-free. Informant reports suggested a high incidence of dementia before death; overall incidence might be 4–19% higher if these data were included. 10/66 dementia incidence was independently associated with increased age (HR 1·67; 95% CI 1·56–1·79), female sex (0·72; 0·61–0·84), and low education (0·89; 0·81–0·97), but not with occupational attainment (1

  6. Prognostic indicators and generation of novel risk equations for estimation of 10-year and 20-year mortality following acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magri, Caroline J; Debono, Roberto; Calleja, Neville; Galea, Joseph; Fava, Stephen

    2017-05-01

    Although risk assessment is an integral part of management, there are currently no risk calculators of long-term mortality after acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The aim was to provide risk equations for 10-year and 20-year mortality following ACS. Patients hospitalised with ACS from December 1990 to June 1994 were recruited and followed up through 31 December 2012. The study followed 881 patients for 10 years and 712 patients for 20 years. Using Cox regression analysis, 20-year all-cause mortality was associated with myocardial infarction (MI) in the index admission, age and diabetes mellitus (DM). Twenty-year cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cardiac mortality were both associated with MI in the index admission, age, DM and female gender. 10-year all-cause mortality was associated with age and total cholesterol levels; age, DM and total cholesterol levels were found to be independent predictors of 10-year CVD and cardiac mortality. Risk equations were consequently generated for 10-year and 20-year cardiac, cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, with age and DM emerging as the strongest and most consistent predictors of all outcomes studied. Novel risk equations for all-cause, cardiovascular and cardiac mortality at 10 and 20 years were generated using follow-up data in a large patient population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Determinants of personality and risky road behaviors at work in drivers of medical transport vehicles in the Wielkopolska (Greater Poland Voivodeship

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    Marcin Cybulski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Personality determinants are an important predicator of road behaviors in drivers. The main objective of the study was to determine the relationship between personality determinants (neuroticism, extraversion, level of anxiety – features and distinguishable risky behaviors of drivers of medical transport vehicles. Material and Methods: The study covered 106 male drivers from the Wielkopolskie Voivodeship, working in health care, having a license to drive emergency vehicles. To achieve the research objectives a questionnaire was developed and applied. It concerned risky road behaviors among drivers of medical transport. The personality suitability was determined using the questionnaire methods on self-assessment: Polish versions of Eysenck Personality Questionnaire – Revised (EPQ-R and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI questionnaire. Results: It was shown that drivers with introverted characteristics declare driving vehicles of reduced technical efficiency more often than extroverts. The level of the anxiety as a trait A-characteristic affects the display of distracting behaviors, making decisions about driving a vehicle that is inefficient, driving in a bad psychophysical condition, as well as maintaining too small distance from the preceding vehicle. The higher the intensity of anxiety characteristics, the higher the intensity of given behaviors. Conclusions: Based on the study results, it can be assumed that there is a relationship between determinants of personality and the display of risky behaviors of drivers of medical transport vehicles. Thus it can be concluded that the level of extraversion and anxiety as a trait are the differentiating characteristics of respondents. Med Pr 2014;65(4:485–496

  8. Performance of hospitals according to the ESC ACCA quality indicators and 30-day mortality for acute myocardial infarction: national cohort study using the United Kingdom Myocardial Ischaemia National Audit Project (MINAP) register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebb, Owen; Hall, Marlous; Fox, Keith A A; Dondo, Tatendashe B; Timmis, Adam; Bueno, Hector; Schiele, François; Gale, Chris P

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the application of the European Society of Cardiology Acute Cardiovascular Care Association quality indicators (QI) for acute myocardial infarction for the study of hospital performance and 30-day mortality. National cohort study (n = 118,075 patients, n = 211 hospitals, MINAP registry), 2012-13. Overall, 16 of the 20 QIs could be calculated. Eleven QIs had a significant inverse association with GRACE risk adjusted 30-day mortality (all P < 0.005). The association with the greatest magnitude was high attainment of the composite opportunity-based QI (80-100%) vs. zero attainment (odds ratio 0.04, 95% confidence interval 0.04-0.05, P < 0.001), increasing attainment from low (0.42, 0.37- 0.49, P < 0.001) to intermediate (0.15, 0.13-0.16, P < 0.001) was significantly associated with a reduced risk of 30-day mortality. A 1% increase in attainment of this QI was associated with a 3% reduction in 30-day mortality (0.97, 0.97-0.97, P < 0.001). The QI with the widest hospital variation was 'fondaparinux received among NSTEMI' (interquartile range 84.7%) and least variation 'centre organisation' (0.0%), with seven QIs depicting minimal variation (<11%). GRACE risk score adjusted 30-day mortality varied by hospital (median 6.7%, interquartile range 5.4-7.9%). Eleven QIs were significantly inversely associated with 30-day mortality. Increasing patient attainment of the composite quality indicator was the most powerful predictor; a 1% increase in attainment represented a 3% decrease in 30-day standardised mortality. The ESC QIs for acute myocardial infarction are applicable in a large health system and have the potential to improve care and reduce unwarranted variation in death from acute myocardial infarction.

  9. Altered mental status is an indicator of mortality and associated with both infectious and non-communicable disease in Lilongwe, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Bryna; Kyriakos Vorkas, Charles; Kanyama, Cecilia; Ngoma, Jonathan; Hoffman, Irving; Hosseinipour, Mina C

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about diseases associated with altered mental status (AMS) in resource-limited settings. We studied adult medicine patients presenting with AMS in Lilongwe, Malawi and found that AMS and HIV infection were each significantly associated with mortality. It is therefore critical that evaluation and management in this patient population is improved.

  10. Tourist attractiveness of rural communes of natural values in the Warmińsko-mazurskie and Podlaskie voivodeships

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    Milena Bera

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The condition of the natural environment is seen as one of the most important factors shaping the size and structure of tourism in the commune. To protect the natural diversity of the most valuable areas, protected areas are created. They require specific treatments to reduce the negative impact of tourists on the natural environment. On the other hand, represent an opportunity for the community, to achieve economic results through the development of the supply of tourist services. Research was carried on communes located in the Warmia-Mazury and Podlasie carried area where a national / landscape park exists or a commune area of minimum 50% area included in the Natura 2000 program. To analyse the tourist attractiveness of respondents communes a set of three measures was used: Baretje and Defert’s indicator, Charvát’s and Schneider’s indicator. An opportunity for a comprehensive development of these communities is the proper management of valuable natural areas according to the concept of sustainable development.

  11. Looking for new measures of local government debt. Case study of an example of repayment period of communes of Kujawsko-Pomorskie voivodeship in the years 2002–2015

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    Daniel Jurewicz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The debt of local government units is, to a large extent, the sum of repayment of commitments contracted to carry out investment projects. It is not surprising that in the literature of the subject local government debt is presented mainly as good, profitable or constructive. Commitment to repayment obligations is always associated with the possibility of an occurrence of negative effects which often appear to be underestimated. In numerous scientific and public publications, the indebtedness of the Polish self-governments is assessed first of all by the prism of its relation to earned incomes. However, it is imperative to look for metrics and data sources to look at this debt from new perspectives. The purpose of this study is to present the results of research conducted in the communes of the Kujawsko-Pomorskie voivodeship using new measures of their debt.

  12. Tendencias e indicadores sociales de la mortalidad por cáncer de mama y cuello uterino: Antioquia, Colombia, 2000-2007 Trends and social indicators of both mortality breast cancer and cervical cancer in Antioquia, Colombia, 2000-2007

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    Armando Baena

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estimar tasas estandarizadas por edad (TEE de mortalidad por cáncer de mama y cérvix 2000-2007 y explorar indicadores sociales que expliquen la variabilidad de las tasas. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Las TEE de mortalidad se estimaron por el método directo y mediante regresión lineal se relacionaron con indicadores sociales por subregión. RESULTADOS: La TEE de cáncer de mama en Antioquia fue 11.3 por 100 000 mujeres-año y para cáncer cervical 9.1. En Medellín, la TEE de cáncer de mama fue 12.5, 1.8 veces la tasa de cáncer cervical. Se observó una disminución del cáncer cervical en Medellín (valor-p=0.03 entre 2000 y 2007, pero no en el resto de Antioquia. La mortalidad de cáncer cervical se relacionó con el porcentaje de miseria (valor-p=0.0003. CONCLUSIONES: La mortalidad por estas neoplasias ha permanecido constante en Antioquia, con una amplia variación de la mortalidad por cáncer cervical por subregión asociada con niveles de pobreza.OBJECTIVE: To estimate the mortality age-standardized rates (ASR for breast and cervical cancer from 2000-2007 and explore social indicators that explain the variability of rates in Antioquia. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The ASR was estimated by the direct method and linear regression was used to relate social indicators with rates by subregion. RESULTS: Breast and cervical cancer mortality ASRs in Antioquia were 11.3 and 9.1 per 100 000 woman-years respectively. In Medellin, the breast cancer mortality ASR was 12.5, 1.8 times the rate of cervical cancer. A decrease of cervical cancer ASR between 2000 and 2007 was observed in Medellin (p-value=0.03 but not in the rest of Antioquia. Cervical cancer mortality ASR was related to the percentage of poverty (p-value=0.0003. CONCLUSIONS: Mortality due to these neoplasms has remained constant in Antioquia. The wide variation in mortality from cervical cancer between regions seems to be associated with poverty.

  13. Occupational mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This paper aims to present the methods and main results from the Danish occupational mortality studies, and to set the Danish studies into the international context of occupational mortality studies. RESEARCH TOPICS: The first Danish occupational mortality study from 1970...

  14. Evolução de indicadores socioeconômicos e da mortalidade cardiovascular em três estados do Brasil Evolution of socioeconomic indicators and cardiovascular mortality in three brazilian states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Porto Soares

    2013-02-01

    Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo and Rio Grande do Sul, and in their capitals, between 1980 and 2008, with socioeconomic indicators collected from 1949 onwards. METHODS: Population and death data were obtained from the Brazilian Unified Health System databank (Datasus. Mortality rates due to the following were calculated and adjusted by use of the direct method and compensated for poorly defined causes: ischemic heart diseases; cerebrovascular diseases; cardiovascular diseases; poorly defined causes; and all causes. Child mortality data were obtained from state and municipal health secretariats and from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE. Information on gross domestic product (GDP and educational level was obtained from the Brazilian Institute of Applied Economic Research (Ipea. The mortality rates and socioeconomic indicators were correlated by using the estimation of Pearson linear coefficients to determine optimized year lag. The inclination coefficients of the regression between the dependent variable "disease" and the independent variable "socioeconomic indicator" were estimated. RESULTS: The three states showed a reduction in mortality, which was especially due to a decrease in cardiovascular mortality, mainly of cerebrovascular diseases. The decrease in cardiovascular mortality was preceded by a reduction in child mortality, an elevation in the per capita GDP, and an increase in the educational level, and a strong correlation between indicators and mortality rates was observed. CONCLUSIONS: The three indicators showed an almost maximum correlation with the reduction in cardiovascular mortality. Such relationship indicates the importance of improving quality of life to reduce cardiovascular mortality.

  15. Indicators of fishing mortality on reef-shark populations in the world's first shark sanctuary: the need for surveillance and enforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna, Gabriel M. S.; Meekan, Mark G.; Ruppert, Jonathan L. W.; Bornovski, Tova H.; Meeuwig, Jessica J.

    2016-09-01

    Shark sanctuaries are promoted as a management tool to achieve conservation goals following global declines of shark populations. We assessed the status of reef-shark populations and indicators of fishing pressure across the world's first shark sanctuary in Palau. Using underwater surveys and stereophotogrammetry, we documented large differences in abundance and size structure of shark populations across the sanctuary, with a strong negative relationship between shark densities and derelict fishing gear on reefs. Densities of 10.9 ± 4.7 (mean ± SE) sharks ha-1 occurred on reefs adjacent to the most populated islands of Palau, contrasting with lower densities of 1.6 ± 0.8 sharks ha-1 on remote uninhabited reefs, where surveillance and enforcement was limited. Our observations suggest that fishing still remains a major factor structuring shark populations in Palau, demonstrating that there is an urgent need for better enforcement and surveillance that targets both illegal and licensed commercial fisheries to provide effective protection for sharks within the sanctuary.

  16. La mortalidad evitable: lista de consenso para la actualización del indicador en España Avoidable mortality: a consensus list of causes to update the indicator in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Gispert

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Los indicadores de mortalidad podrían reflejar el efecto de las intervenciones sanitarias sobre la salud de la población, aunque no hay acuerdo sobre el más adecuado. El objetivo del trabajo fue obtener una lista de causas de mortalidad evitable que pueda ser de uso común en España. Métodos: Se ha realizado un proceso de consenso entre médicos asistenciales, elaboradores y usuarios de indicadores sanitarios, basado en las publicaciones sobre el tema y las aportaciones de los expertos participantes. Se ha valorado el grado de acuerdo obtenido en los distintos ítems. Resultados: Se han consensuado 34 causas de mortalidad evitable, así como el tipo de intervenciones que podrían evitar la muerte. El consenso fue medio o alto en la mayor parte de causas e intervenciones (sólo en 4 fue bajo, así como para el conjunto de la lista y sublistas (de servicios sanitarios y de políticas intersectoriales elaboradas. El consenso fue mayor en relación a la evitabilidad de las causas de muerte que al tipo de intervenciones que la pueden evitar. La discrepancia fue mayor en las intervenciones del ámbito asistencial que en las de políticas intersectoriales. Conclusiones: La reflexión y la discusión a que ha sido sometida esta lista de mortalidad evitable, así como la publicitación de los criterios y del procedimiento seguido, supone un valor añadido. La lista mejora la comparabilidad de los datos y de los resultados entre los distintos sistemas de salud del territorio, por lo cual se recomienda su utilización en el contexto español.Objective: Mortality indicators could reflect the effect of health services interventions on the population's health, although there is no agreement about which indicator would be the most appropriate. The objective of this study was to obtain a consensus list of causes of avoidable mortality that could be used as a reference in Spain. Methods: Based on existing publications and participants' knowledge

  17. Transgranichnoe sotrudnichestvo nepravitel'stvennyh organizacij v Pomorskom i Varmin'sko-Mazurskom voevodstvah [Cross-border cooperation between nongovernmental organisations in the Pomeranian and Warmian-Masurian voivodeships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomulka Christina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the issues of cross-border cooperation carried out by agents resident in the Pomeranian and Warmian-Masurian voivodeships. Among such agents there are non-governmental organizations. This article aims to identify the role of NGOs in cross-border cooperation and the predominant fields of their cooperation, as well as to assess their activity in attracting funding from European budgets. The article widely applies the results of surveys of NGOs conducted by the author, compares the results of performance reports submitted by these organisations within international projects, and offers the data presented in relevant publications (Euroregion Baltic documents and Phare CBC reports, Interreg IIIA and, Interreg IIIB, NMF, and Polish-Swiss Cooperation reports, as well as the data of the Central Department of Statistics. The research covers the period from the late 90s to 2012. The article highlights the difficulties agents face in forging and implementing cross-border cooperation, resulting from the mismatching definitions of the tertiary sector in Poland’s neighbour states.

  18. Déficit de base à admissão na unidade de terapia intensiva: um indicador de mortalidade precoce Base deficit at intensive care unit admission: an early mortality indicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iara Serra Azul Machado Bezerra

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: O déficit de base é considerado um indicador de lesão tissular, choque e reanimação. O objetivo deste estudo foi estabelecer uma associação entre o déficit de base na admissão dos pacientes internados em unidade de terapia intensiva (UTI e seu prognóstico. MÉTODO: Estudo retrospectivo com análise de 110 pacientes admitidos consecutivamente na UTI, durante o período de 01 de junho a 31 de dezembro de 2006. RESULTADOS: Houve predomínio do sexo feminino, com idade média de 54,2 ± 18,7 anos. O tempo médio de permanência foi 6,5 ± 7,4 dias e o APACHE médio foi de 21 ± 8,1 pontos. A razão de mortalidade padronizada foi 0,715. A mortalidade dos pacientes com déficit de base superior a 6 mEq/L foi maior (38,9% que a daqueles com déficit menor (ou excesso (20,6%; p BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Base deficit is considered an indicator of tissue injury, shock and resuscitation. The objective of this study was to establish an association between base deficit obtained on the admission of patients in intensive care unit (ICU and their prognosis. METHODS: A retrospective study with analysis of 110 patients admitted consecutively in the ICU, during the period of June to December 2006. RESULTS: There was a predominance of women, with age mean 54.2 ± 18.7 years old. Length of stay in ICU was 6.5 ± 7.4 days and the mean APACHE II score was 21 ± 8.1 points. The standardized mortality ratio was 0.715. Mortality was higher in patients with base deficit > 6 mEq/L (38.9% than in those with base deficit 6 mEq/L is a marker of significant mortality.

  19. Mortality investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Franson, J. Christian; Friend, Milton; Gibbs, Samantha E.J.; Wild, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife mortality events usually occur unannounced and may find management agencies unaware. These events can become highly visible and politically charged affairs, depending upon the scale or species involved. The public, media, and (or) politicians may pressure managers, field investigators, and diagnosticians to quickly identify the cause or to comment on potential causes, the significance of the event, what is being done about it, and a resolution. It may be common during such events for speculation to rage, and for conflicting theories to be advanced to explain either the environmental conditions that led to the mortality or the actual cause of death.

  20. Mortality Implications of Mortality Plateaus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Missov, T. I.; Vaupel, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to describe in a unified framework all plateau-generating random effects models in terms of (i) plausible distributions for the hazard (baseline mortality) and the random effect (unobserved heterogeneity, frailty) as well as (ii) the impact of frailty on the baseline hazard. Mor...

  1. Insect-related tree mortality in south-central Alaska may be controlled by prior drought stress as indicated by δ13C and δ18O in tree rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A. E.; Csank, A. Z.; Sherriff, R.; Berg, E.; Welker, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Increasing temperatures at high latitudes have resulted in reduced growth and increased mortality across large areas of the northern boreal forest. A recent spruce beetle outbreak that killed over 1.5M ha of trees in south-central and southwest Alaska is thought to have been triggered by a series of warm summers that facilitated the accumulation of the beetle populations in already-physiologically stressed trees. Whether trees killed by the spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) showed evidence of temperature-induced drought stress prior to death was examined by using tree-ring chronologies and δ13C & δ18O isotopic values in cellulose from paired live and dead trees at four sites in south-central Alaska. We also tested whether surviving trees differed from dead trees in their growth response and temperature sensitivity. Our results indicate that the trees killed by spruce beetle show reduced radial growth up to 20 years prior to death, relative to surviving trees, and that this is true across age and DBH classes (n=48 pairs; Ptree-growth indices from a mesic forest site shows that whereas growth in surviving trees was only weakly correlated with temperature until roughly 10 years before the beetle outbreak, growth in the dead trees was positively correlated with spring-summer temperatures, particularly June mean temperature (r=0.5; Ptree death, growth in the dead trees became decoupled from temperature. This is in contrast to δ13C & δ18O values in dead trees from the site that show a strong positive correlation between δ13C and mean June maximum temperature (r2 = 0.35; Ptree death, the δ13C-temperature relationship became highly significant in trees killed by spruce beetle attack (June-July r2=0.61; Ptrees. Temperature-induced drought stress is the likely cause for the June-July temperature signals seen in the δ13C and also explains the decoupling of temperature and growth in trees that were killed during the outbreak. The spring temperature signal is more

  2. Gender difference in child mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, F A

    1990-12-01

    1976 census data and data on births to 8788 ever married women from the 1980 Egyptian Fertility Survey were analyzed to determine if son preference was responsible for higher mortality among girls than among boys and what factors were associated with this higher mortality. During 0-3 years, boys were more likely to die than females. For example, the overall male-female sex ratio for the 1st year was 118:100. At ages 5, 10, 15, and 2 0, however, girls were more likely to die. The sex rations for these years were 98, 95, 93, and 91. In fact, the excess mortality among illiterate mothers accounted for most of the overall excess mortality. As mother's educational level rose, the excess mortality of girls fell, so that by university level boys experienced excess mortality (130, 111, 112, 105). Less educated mothers breast fed sons longer and waited more months after birth of a son to have another child indicating son preference, but these factors did not necessarily contribute to excess mortality. The major cause of female excess mortality in Egypt was that boys received favored treatment of digestive and respiratory illnesses as indicated by accessibility to a pharmacy (p.01). Norms/traditions and religion played a significant role in excess mortality. The effect of norms/traditions was greater than religion, however. Mother's current and past employment strongly contributed to reducing girls' mortality levels (p.01). These results indicated that Egypt should strive to increase the educational level of females and work opportunities for women to reduce female child mortality. Further, it should work to improve women's status which in turn will reduce norms/traditions that encourage son preference and higher mortality level for girls.

  3. Child health and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Arifeen, Shams

    2008-09-01

    Bangladesh is currently one of the very few countries in the world, which is on target for achieving the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 4 relating to child mortality. There have been very rapid reductions in mortality, especially in recent years and among children aged over one month. However, this rate of reduction may be difficult to sustain and may impede the achievement of MDG 4. Neonatal deaths now contribute substantially (57%) to overall mortality of children aged less than five years, and reductions in neonatal mortality are difficult to achieve and have been slow in Bangladesh. There are some interesting attributes of the mortality decline in Bangladesh. Mortality has declined faster among girls than among boys, but the poorest have not benefited from the reduction in mortality. There has also been a relative absence of a decline in mortality in urban areas. The age and cause of death pattern of under-five mortality indicate certain interventions that need to be scaled up rapidly and reach high coverage to achieve MDG 4 in Bangladesh. These include skilled attendance at delivery, postnatal care for the newborn, appropriate feeding of the young infant and child, and prevention and management of childhood infections. The latest (2007) Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey shows that Bangladesh has made sustained and remarkable progress in many areas of child health. More than 80% of children are receiving all vaccines. The use of oral rehydration solution for diarrhoea is high, and the coverage of vitamin A among children aged 9-59 months has been consistently increasing. However, poor quality of care, misperceptions regarding the need for care, and other social barriers contribute to low levels of care-seeking for illnesses of the newborns and children. Improvements in the health system are essential for removing these barriers, as are effective strategies to reach families and communities with targeted messages and information. Finally, there are

  4. The mortality of companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daepp, Madeleine I. G.; Hamilton, Marcus J.; West, Geoffrey B.; Bettencourt, Luís M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The firm is a fundamental economic unit of contemporary human societies. Studies on the general quantitative and statistical character of firms have produced mixed results regarding their lifespans and mortality. We examine a comprehensive database of more than 25 000 publicly traded North American companies, from 1950 to 2009, to derive the statistics of firm lifespans. Based on detailed survival analysis, we show that the mortality of publicly traded companies manifests an approximately constant hazard rate over long periods of observation. This regularity indicates that mortality rates are independent of a company's age. We show that the typical half-life of a publicly traded company is about a decade, regardless of business sector. Our results shed new light on the dynamics of births and deaths of publicly traded companies and identify some of the necessary ingredients of a general theory of firms. PMID:25833247

  5. Maternal mortality due to trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Vivian Carolina; Pearlman, Mark

    2012-02-01

    Maternal mortality is an important indicator of adequacy of health care in our society. Improvements in the obstetric care system as well as advances in technology have contributed to reduction in maternal mortality rates. Trauma complicates up to 7% of all pregnancies and has emerged as the leading cause of maternal mortality, becoming a significant concern for the public health system. Maternal mortality secondary to trauma can often be prevented by coordinated medical care, but it is essential that caregivers recognize the unique situation of providing simultaneous care to 2 patients who have a complex physiologic relationship. Optimal management of the pregnant trauma victim requires a multidisciplinary team, where the obstetrician plays a central role. This review focuses on the incidence of maternal mortality due to trauma, the mechanisms involved in traumatic injury, the important anatomic and physiologic changes that may predispose to mortality due to trauma, and finally, preventive strategies that may decrease the incidence of traumatic maternal death.

  6. Métodos para la suavización de indicadores de mortalidad: aplicación al análisis de desigualdades en mortalidad en ciudades del Estado español (Proyecto MEDEA Methods to smooth mortality indicators: application to analysis of inequalities in mortality in Spanish cities (the MEDEA Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Antònia Barceló

    2008-12-01

    observa en las zonas con un mayor nivel socioeconómico.Although there is some experience in the study of mortality inequalities in Spanish cities, there are large urban centers that have not yet been investigated using the census tract as the unit of territorial analysis. The coordinated project «Socioeconomic and environmental inequalities in mortality in Spanish cities. The MEDEA project» was designed to fill this gap, with the participation of 10 groups of researchers in Andalusia, Aragon, Catalonia, Galicia, Madrid, Valencia, and the Basque Country. The MEDEA project has four distinguishing features: a the census tract is used as the basic geographical area; b statistical methods that include the geographical structure of the region under study are employed for risk estimation; c data are drawn from three complementary data sources (information on air pollution, information on industrial pollution, and the records of mortality registrars, and d a coordinated, large-scale analysis, favored by the implantation of coordinated research networks, is carried out. The main objective of the present study was to explain the methods for smoothing mortality indicators in the context of the MEDEA project. This study focusses on the methodology and the results of the Besag, York and Mollié model (BYM in disease mapping. In the MEDEA project, standardized mortality ratios (SMR, corresponding to 17 large groups of causes of death and 28 specific causes, were smoothed by means of the BYM model; however, in the present study this methodology was applied to mortality due to cancer of the trachea, bronchi and lung in men and women in the city of Barcelona from 1996 to 2003. As a result of smoothing, a different geographical pattern for SMR in both genders was observed. In men, a SMR higher than unity was found in highly deprived areas. In contrast, in women, this pattern was observed in more affluent areas.

  7. Mortal assets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, Geoffrey R.; Zablotska, Lydia B.; Fix, John J.; Egel, John N.; Buchanan, Jeffrey A.

    2005-11-01

    Workers employed in 15 utilities that generate nuclear power in the United States have been followed for up to 18 years between 1979 and 1997. Their cumulative dose from whole-body ionizing radiation has been determined from the dose records maintained by the facilities themselves and the REIRS and REMS systems maintained by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy, respectively. Mortality in the cohort from a number of causes has been analyzed with respect to individual radiation doses. The cohort displays a very substantial healthy worker effect, i.e. considerably lower cancer and noncancer mortality than the general population. Based on 26 and 368 deaths, respectively, positive though statistically nonsignificant associations were seen for mortality from leukemia (excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia) and all solid cancers combined, with excess relative risks per sievert of 5.67 (95% confidence interval (CI) -2.56, 30.4) and 0.596 (95% CI -2.01, 4.64), respectively. These estimates are very similar to those from the atomic bomb survivors study, though the wide confidence intervals are also consistent with lower or higher risk estimates. A strong positive and statistically significant association between radiation dose and deaths from arteriosclerotic heart disease including coronary heart disease was also observed in the cohort, with an ERR of 8.78 (95% CI 2.10, 20.0). Whle associations with heart disease have been reported in some other occupational studies, the magnitude of the present association is not consistent with them and therefore needs cautious interpretation and merits further attention. At present, the relatively small number of deaths and the young age of the cohort (mean age at end of follow-up is 45 years) limit the power of the study, but further follow-up is 45 years) limit the power of the study, but further follow-up and the inclusion of the present data in an ongoing IARC combined analysis of nuclear workers from 15

  8. Stillbirth and Infant Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, Ellen Aagaard

    2012-01-01

    mechanisms behind these associations remain largely unknown. Although maternal obesity is associated with a wide range of complications in the mother and neonate that may impair fetal and infant survival, the increased risk of stillbirth and infant mortality is virtually unchanged when accounting...... indicating that some of the excess risk may have a placental origin. To further understand the associations between maternal obesity and late fetal and infant death, we need better and more detailed clinical data, which is difficult to obtain on a population level given the rarity of the outcomes. The best...

  9. [Mortality as an index of social development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illanes, J P

    1984-01-01

    The author examines the use of measures of mortality as indicators of social development. Separate consideration is given to general mortality, infant mortality, and life expectancy. He concludes that the Chilean and Latin American mortality data cannot be analyzed separately from the available social data as a whole, and that the traditional health indicators for the measurement of social development continue to be valid. Comments by Ernesto Medina, Dagmar Raczynski, Juan P. Illanes, and Tarsicio Castaneda are included (pp. 107-14), as well as a reply to these comments by the author (pp. 114-6).

  10. Migrant mortality from diabetes mellitus across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandenheede, Hadewijch; Deboosere, Patrick; Stirbu, Irina

    2012-01-01

    mortality registers. Subsequently, to examine the second hypothesis, we introduced gross domestic product (GDP) per capita of COB in the models, as an indicator of socio-economic circumstances. The overall pattern shows higher diabetes mortality in migrant populations compared to local-born populations....... Mortality rate ratios (MRRs) were highest in migrants originating from either the Caribbean or South Asia. MRRs for the migrant population as a whole were 1.9 (95% CI 1.8-2.0) and 2.2 (95% CI 2.1-2.3) for men and women respectively. We furthermore found a consistently inverse association between GDP of COB...... and diabetes mortality. Most migrant groups have higher diabetes mortality rates than the local-born populations. Mortality rates are particularly high in migrants from North Africa, the Caribbean, South Asia or low-GDP countries. The inverse association between GDP of COB and diabetes mortality suggests...

  11. Mortality table construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutawanir

    2015-12-01

    Mortality tables play important role in actuarial studies such as life annuities, premium determination, premium reserve, valuation pension plan, pension funding. Some known mortality tables are CSO mortality table, Indonesian Mortality Table, Bowers mortality table, Japan Mortality table. For actuary applications some tables are constructed with different environment such as single decrement, double decrement, and multiple decrement. There exist two approaches in mortality table construction : mathematics approach and statistical approach. Distribution model and estimation theory are the statistical concepts that are used in mortality table construction. This article aims to discuss the statistical approach in mortality table construction. The distributional assumptions are uniform death distribution (UDD) and constant force (exponential). Moment estimation and maximum likelihood are used to estimate the mortality parameter. Moment estimation methods are easier to manipulate compared to maximum likelihood estimation (mle). However, the complete mortality data are not used in moment estimation method. Maximum likelihood exploited all available information in mortality estimation. Some mle equations are complicated and solved using numerical methods. The article focus on single decrement estimation using moment and maximum likelihood estimation. Some extension to double decrement will introduced. Simple dataset will be used to illustrated the mortality estimation, and mortality table.

  12. Challenge of Fetal Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reports from the National Medical Care Utilization and Expenditure Survey Clearinghouse on Health Indexes Statistical Notes for ... Fetal mortality is a major, but often overlooked, public health problem. Fetal mortality refers to spontaneous intrauterine ...

  13. Excess mortality in hyperthyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelm Brandt Kristensen, Frans; Pedersen, Dorthe Almind; Christensen, Kaare

    2012-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is associated with severe comorbidity, such as stroke, and seems to confer increased mortality. However, it is unknown whether this increased mortality is explained by hyperthyroidism per se, comorbidity, and/or genetic confounding.......Hyperthyroidism is associated with severe comorbidity, such as stroke, and seems to confer increased mortality. However, it is unknown whether this increased mortality is explained by hyperthyroidism per se, comorbidity, and/or genetic confounding....

  14. Occupational Mortality, Background on

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth

    2016-01-01

    The study of occupational mortality involves the systematic tabulation of mortality by occupational or socioeconomic groups. Three main methods are used to conduct these studies: cross-sectional studies, death certificate studies, and follow-up studies. Cross-sectional studies were undertaken in ...... the mortality rates of blue- and white-collar workers....

  15. SOCIOECONOMIC DISPARITIES IN MORTALITY AMONG CHINESE ELDERLY*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Weixiang; Xie, Yu

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the association of three different SES indicators (education, economic independence, and household per-capita income) with mortality, using a large, nationally representative longitudinal sample of 12,437 Chinese ages 65 and older. While the results vary by measures used, we find overall strong evidence for a negative association between SES and all-cause mortality. Exploring the association between SES and cause-specific mortality, we find that SES is more strongly related to a reduction of mortality from more preventable causes (i.e., circulatory disease and respiratory disease) than from less preventable causes (i.e., cancer). Moreover, we consider mediating causal factors such as support networks, health-related risk behaviors, and access to health care in contributing to the observed association between SES and mortality. Among these mediating factors, medical care is of greatest importance. This pattern holds true for both all-cause and cause-specific mortality. PMID:25098961

  16. Phenomenological theory of mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azbel, Mark Ya.

    1997-09-01

    Extensive demographic studies relate aging to the increase in mortality, terminated by the species-specific lifespan limit. Meanwhile, recent experiments demonstrate that medfly mortality decreases at older ages, and challenge a limited lifespan paradigm. This paper proves that there exists a genetically programmed probability to die at any given age, and presents its phenomenological theory. The implications of the universal mortality law crucially depend on the cohort heterogeneity. For relatively high heterogeneity the law predicts unitarily vanishing old age mortality; this is verified with medfly data. For relatively low heterogeneity it predicts a precipitous drop in mortality fluctuations in old age. This is verified with demographic data. If comprehensive studies verify a species-specific characteristic age, then that age may be genetically manipulated. If the studies verify a unitary law of mortality, the results may be generalized to all species. A phenomenological model of mortality is presented.

  17. Environmental temperature and mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Näyhä, Simo

    2005-01-01

    In Finland, mortality increases steeply in autumn, reaches a peak during the Christhmas holidays and declines slowly towards a trough in August. The relative excess in daily mortality (peak vs. trough) is 30% for coronary heart disease, 40% for cerebral vascular accidents and 90% for diseases of the respiratory organs. There is a secondary peak in Midsummer, especially in coronary deaths of working aged men. Mortality is lowest at mean daily temperature of +14 degrees C, and it increases slow...

  18. Maternal mortality from hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeri, Sina; Dildy, Gary A

    2012-02-01

    Hemorrhage remains as one of the top 3 obstetrics related causes of maternal mortality, with most deaths occurring within 24-48 hours of delivery. Although hemorrhage related maternal mortality has declined globally, it continues to be a vexing problem. More specifically, the developing world continue to shoulder a disproportionate share of hemorrhage related deaths (99%) compared with industrialized nations (1%). Given the often preventable nature of death from hemorrhage, the cornerstone of effective mortality reduction involves risk factor identification, quick diagnosis, and timely management. In this monograph we will review the epidemiology, etiology, and preventative measures related to maternal mortality from hemorrhage.

  19. Mortality and GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Laursen, Torben;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the mortality in Denmark in patients suffering from GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Mortality was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Patients were divided into chil......OBJECTIVE: To estimate the mortality in Denmark in patients suffering from GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Mortality was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Patients were divided...

  20. Waste indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall, O.; Lassen, C.; Hansen, E. [Cowi A/S, Lyngby (Denmark)

    2003-07-01

    The Waste Indicator Project focuses on methods to evaluate the efficiency of waste management. The project proposes the use of three indicators for resource consumption, primary energy and landfill requirements, based on the life-cycle principles applied in the EDIP Project. Trial runs are made With the indicators on paper, glass packaging and aluminium, and two models are identified for mapping the Danish waste management, of which the least extensive focuses on real and potential savings. (au)

  1. Quality indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth-Andersen, Christian

    1991-01-01

    In recent literature it has been suggested that consumers need have no knowledge of product quality as a number of quality indicators (or signals) may be used as substitutes. Very little attention has been paid to the empirical verification of these studies. The present paper is devoted...... to the issue of how well these indicators perform, using market data provided by consumer magazines from 3 countries. The results strongly indicate that price is a poor quality indicator. The paper also presents some evidence which suggests that seller reputation and easily observable characteristics are also...

  2. Morbidity and Mortality in Sarcoidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Alicia K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Chronic sarcoidosis is a complex disease with numerous comorbid conditions and can be fatal in some cases. Recognizing causes of morbidity and mortality is important to effectively select treatments, manage symptoms, and improve outcomes. The purpose of this review is to examine emerging knowledge on morbidity and mortality in sarcoidosis. Recent Findings Approximately one to five percent of patients with sarcoidosis die from complications of sarcoidosis. Recent population studies indicate that mortality may be increasing over the past decade. The reasons behind these trends are unclear, but could include increasing incidence, detection rates, severity of disease, or age of the population. Morbidity of sarcoidosis is reflected by a trend of increased hospitalizations over recent years and increased use of healthcare resources. Morbidity can be caused by organ damage from granulomatous inflammation, treatment complications, and psychosocial effects of the disease. Recent studies are focused on morbidity related to cardiopulmonary complications, bone health, and aging within the sarcoidosis population. Last, sarcoidosis is associated with autoimmune diseases, pulmonary embolism, and malignancy; however, the underlying mechanisms linking diseases continue to be debated. Summary Morbidity in sarcoidosis is significant and multifactorial. Mortality is infrequent, but may be increasing over the years. PMID:25029298

  3. Mortality in ankylosing spondylitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Exarchou, Sofia; Lie, Elisabeth; Lindström, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Information on mortality in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is scarce. Our study therefore aimed to assess: (1) mortality in AS versus the general population, and (2) predictors of death in the AS population. METHODS: Nationwide cohorts of patients with AS diagnosed at rheumatology...

  4. Mortality associated with phaeochromocytoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prejbisz, A.; Lenders, J.W.M.; Eisenhofer, G.; Januszewicz, A.

    2013-01-01

    Two major categories of mortality are distinguished in patients with phaeochromocytoma. First, the effects of excessive circulating catecholamines may result in lethal complications if the disease is not diagnosed and/or treated timely. The second category of mortality is related to development of m

  5. Diagnostic interval and mortality in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Marie Louise; Frydenberg, Morten; Hamilton, William;

    2012-01-01

    Objective To test the theory of a U-shaped association between time from the first presentation of symptoms in primary care to the diagnosis (the diagnostic interval) and mortality after diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Study Design and Setting Three population-based studies in Denmark...... presentation, the association between the length of the diagnostic interval and 5-year mortality rate after the diagnosis of CRC was the same for all three types of data: displaying a U-shaped association with decreasing and subsequently increasing mortality with longer diagnostic intervals. Conclusion Unknown...... confounding and in particular confounding by indication is likely to explain the counterintuitive findings of higher mortality among patients with very short diagnostic intervals, but cannot explain the increasing mortality with longer diagnostic intervals. The results support the theory that longer...

  6. The healthy immigrant effect and mortality rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Edward

    2011-12-01

    According to the 2006 Census, almost the Canadian population were foreign-born, a percentage that is projected to reach at least 25% by 2031. Studies based on age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) have found a healthy immigrant effect, with lower overall rates among immigrants. A duration effect has also been observed-immigrants' mortality advantage lessened as their time in Canada increased. ASMRs based on the 1991 to 2001 census mortality follow-up study indicate a healthy immigrant effect and a duration effect at the national level for all-cause mortality for both sexes. However, at the national level, the mortality rate among women from the United States and from Sub-Saharan Africa was similar to that of Canadian-born women. For the three largest Census Metropolitan Areas (Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver), a healthy immigrant effect was not observed among women or among most men from the United States or Sub-Saharan Africa.

  7. VSRR - Quarterly provisional estimates for selected indicators of mortality

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Provisional estimates of death rates. Estimates are presented for each of the 15 leading causes of death plus estimates for deaths attributed to drug overdose, falls...

  8. Solar Indices

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  9. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers.

  10. Tempo effects in mortality: An appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Guillot

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the existence of tempo effects in mortality and evaluates the procedure developed by Bongaarts and Feeney for calculating a tempo-adjusted life expectancy. It is shown that Bongaarts and Feeney's index can be interpreted as an indicator reflecting current mortality conditions under specific assumptions regarding the effects of changing period mortality conditions on the timing of future cohort deaths. It is argued, however, that currently there is no clear evidence about the existence of such effects in actual populations. This paper concludes that until the existence of these effects can be demonstrated, it is preferable to continue using the conventional life expectancy as an indicator of current mortality conditions.

  11. Mortality after shoulder arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amundsen, Alexander; Rasmussen, Jeppe Vejlgaard; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The primary aim was to quantify the 30-day, 90-day, and 1-year mortality rates after primary shoulder replacement. The secondary aims were to assess the association between mortality and diagnoses and to compare the mortality rate with that of the general population. METHODS: The study...... included 5853 primary operations reported to the Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry between 2006 and 2012. Information about deaths was obtained from the Danish Cause of Death Register and the Danish Civil Registration System. Age- and sex-adjusted control groups were retrieved from Statistics Denmark...

  12. Mortality in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Although the general trend in mortality between 1950 and 1975 in South and East Asia has been downward, there is considerable country-to-country variation in the rate of decline. In countries where combined economic, social, and political circumstances resulted in controlling the disease spectrum (e.g., China, Malaysia, Sri Lanka), mortality levels declined to those seen in low-mortality countries. In most of the large countries of the region however, mortality declined at a slower rate, even slowing down considerably in the 1970's while the death rates remained high (e.g., India, Bangladesh, Thailand, Philippines); this slowing down of mortality level is attributed essentially to the poverty-stricken masses of society which were not able to take advantage of social, technological, and health-promoting behavioral changes conducive to mortality decline. Infant mortality levels, although declining since 1950, followed the same dismal pattern of the general mortality level. The rate varies from less than 10/1000 live births (Japan) to more than 140/1000 (Bangladesh, Laos, Nepal). Generally, rural areas exhibited higher infant mortality than urban areas. The level of child mortality declines with increases in the mother's educational level in Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, and Thailand. The largest decline in child mortality occurs when at least 1 parent has secondary education. The premature retardation of mortality decline is caused by several factors: economic development, nutrition and food supply, provision and adequacy of health services, and demographic trends. The outlook for the year 2000 for most of Asia's countries will depend heavily on significant population increases. In most countries, particularly in South Asia, population is expected to increase by 75%, much of it in rural areas and among poorer socioeconomic groups. In view of this, Asia's health planners and policymakers will have to develop health policies which will strike a balance

  13. Social Welfare Expenditures and Infant Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effects of social welfare expenditures on infant mortality (deaths younger than age 1 per 1,000 live births) across 19 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries from 1980 to 2010. Data are obtained from various sources including the OECD, World Health Organization, and World Bank. The findings indicate that among three social welfare expenditure measures for families, the expenditures on family cash allowances are predicted to reduce infant mortality. However, the other two measures-the expenditures on parental and maternity leave and expenditures on family services-have no significant effects on infant mortality.

  14. Under-Five Mortality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    children under five are still not reached and disparities are observed in ... while malnutrition and HIV/AIDS are both the cause and contributor. ... prosperity, a number of internal and external factors including a ... mortality and its determinants.

  15. Increased mortality in narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohayon, Maurice M; Black, Jed; Lai, Chinglin; Eller, Mark; Guinta, Diane; Bhattacharyya, Arun

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the mortality rate in patients with narcolepsy. Data were derived from a large database representative of the US population, which contains anonymized patient-linked longitudinal claims for 173 million individuals. Symphony Health Solutions (SHS) Source Lx, an anonymized longitudinal patient dataset. All records of patients registered in the SHS database between 2008 and 2010. None. Identification of patients with narcolepsy was based on ≥ 1 medical claim with the diagnosis of narcolepsy (ICD-9 347.xx) from 2002 to 2012. Dates of death were acquired from the Social Security Administration via a third party; the third party information was encrypted in the same manner as the claims data such that anonymity is ensured prior to receipt by SHS. Annual all-cause mortality rates for 2008, 2009, and 2010 were calculated retrospectively for patients with narcolepsy and patients without narcolepsy in the database, and standardized mortality ratios (SMR) were calculated. Mortality rates were also compared with the general US population (Centers for Disease Control data). SMRs of the narcolepsy population were consistent over the 3-year period and showed an approximate 1.5-fold excess mortality relative to those without narcolepsy. The narcolepsy population had consistently higher mortality rates relative to those without narcolepsy across all age groups, stratified by age decile, from 25-34 years to 75+ years of age. The SMR for females with narcolepsy was lower than for males with narcolepsy. Narcolepsy was associated with approximately 1.5-fold excess mortality relative to those without narcolepsy. While the cause of this increased mortality is unknown, these findings warrant further investigation.

  16. Mortality in spondylarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prati, Clément; Claudepierre, Pascal; Pham, Thao; Wendling, Daniel

    2011-10-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease that can lead to chronic pain in axial and peripheral joints and to functional impairments after several years. Excess mortality has been reported in patients with AS. We reviewed recent studies of patients with AS who were treated and monitored according to the improved methods developed in the past few years, without radiation therapy. Our results do not support excess mortality in these patients. Long-term follow-up data from patients enrolled in biologics registries will provide additional information. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients with AS, as in the general population. However, the cardiovascular mortality rate may be slightly increased in patients with AS, probably as a result of dyslipidemia and early endothelial dysfunction. Similarly, and as expected, there is excess mortality related to the spinal disease itself and to renal and gastrointestinal disease. More surprisingly, alcohol abuse and injury or suicide cause excess mortality compared to the general population. In the absence of radiation or radium-224 therapy, and regardless of the other treatments used, the evidence does not support an increased rate of lymphoma or other malignancies compared to the general population. In this review, we discuss the causes and rates of mortality in patients with AS.

  17. Geography of child mortality clustering within African families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuate-Defo, Barthélémy; Diallo, Khassoum

    2002-06-01

    After decades of sustained child mortality reductions, infant and early childhood mortality levels in Africa remain high. This can partly be ascribed to the concentration of child mortality within particular families, communities or geographic localities. Strong mortality clustering is indicative of marked social inequality and of an unequal distribution of health and health-related resources and infrastructures. It also signifies a concentration of nutritional and sanitary behaviors harmful to the good health and longevity of children. Finally, it likely points to the existence of particular genetic problems in certain families, or environmental problems within specific communities. Using nationally representative family level data from all sub-regions of Africa, two important findings emerge from this study. First, levels of mortality have generally declined in all countries over time, and as mortality decreases, mortality clustering tends to follow the same trend. Second, bio-demographic covariates have a more important effect on familial mortality clustering risks than socio-economic ones.

  18. Social indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, E B; Parke, R

    1975-05-16

    The notions of social indicators and social accounting, expressed by analogy with the national economic accounts, generated excitement in the 1960's, and the interest continues to grow if we may judge from governmental activity and the publication of programmatic and research papers. But the concepts which focused much of the early enthusiasm gave exaggerated promise of policy applications and provided an unproductive basis for research. The essential theoretical prerequisites for developing a system of social accounts-defining the variables and the interrelationships among them-are missing. It is now realized that evaluation research, particularly experimentation, must be relied on for evaluation of government programs. Through the development and analysis of descriptive time series and the modeling of social processes, we will be able to describe the state of the society and its dynamics and thus improve immensely our ability to state problems in a productive fashion, obtain clues as to promising lines of endeavor, and ask good questions. But these activities cannot measure program effectiveness. Finally, we must be skeptical about definitions of the social indicators enterprise which confine it to social engineering efforts. The issue is not whether social indicators are useful for policy but, rather, how this usefulness comes about. The interest in social indicators has stimulated a revival of interest in quantitative, comparative, social analysis (60), in the analysis of social change, in conceptual and measurement work on such topics as prejudice, crime, and learning, and in the development of models of social processes. The fruit of these efforts will be more directly a contribution to the policy-maker's cognition than to his decisions. Decision emerges from a mosaic of inputs, including valuational and political, as well as technical components. The work we have described deals with only one type of input; it is a contribution to the intellectual mapping

  19. Disparities in cervical and breast cancer mortality in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vania Reis Girianelli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze cervical and breast cancer mortality in Brazil according to socioeconomic and welfare indicators. METHODS Data on breast and cervical cancer mortality covering a 30-year period (1980-2010 were analyzed. The data were obtained from the National Mortality Database, population data from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics database, and socioeconomic and welfare information from the Institute of Applied Economic Research. Moving averages were calculated, disaggregated by capital city and municipality. The annual percent change in mortality rates was estimated by segmented linear regression using the joinpoint method. Pearson’s correlation coefficients were conducted between average mortality rate at the end of the three-year period and selected indicators in the state capital and each Brazilian state. RESULTS There was a decline in cervical cancer mortality rates throughout the period studied, except in municipalities outside of the capitals in the North and Northeast. There was a decrease in breast cancer mortality in the capitals from the end of the 1990s onwards. Favorable socioeconomic indicators were inversely correlated with cervical cancer mortality. A strong direct correlation was found with favorable indicators and an inverse correlation with fertility rate and breast cancer mortality in inner cities. CONCLUSIONS There is an ongoing dynamic process of increased risk of cervical and breast cancer and attenuation of mortality because of increased, albeit unequal, access to and provision of screening, diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Mortalidade perinatal por sífilis congênita: indicador da qualidade da atenção à mulher e à criança Perinatal mortality due to congenital syphilis: a quality-of-care indicator for women's and children's healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Saraceni

    2005-08-01

    perinatal mortality rate due to congenital syphilis be used as an impact indicator for activities to control and eliminate congenital syphilis, based on the investigational reports for fetal and neonatal deaths. Such reports could be extended to the surveillance of other avoidable perinatal disease outcomes.

  1. Fetal, Infant, and Maternal Mortality During Periods of Economic Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    One of the most sensitive indicators of the general socioeconomic level of a nation is the infant mortality rate. Evidence indicates that economic recessions and upswings have played a significant role in fetal, infant, and maternal mortality in the last 45 years. (RJ)

  2. Gallstone disease and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel Mønsted; Sørensen, Lars Tue; Jørgensen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this cohort study was to determine whether subjects with gallstone disease identified by screening of a general population had increased overall mortality when compared to gallstone-free participants and to explore causes of death. METHODS: The study population (N...... = 5928) was examined 1982-1992 and included an abdominal ultrasound examination to assess gallstone status, a physical examination, blood samples, and a questionnaire about medical history. Participants were followed up through national registers until 2015. Multiple adjusted Cox regression models were...... built. RESULTS: Gallstone disease was present in 10%. Mortality was 46% during median 24.7 years of follow-up with 1% lost. Overall mortality and death from cardiovascular diseases were significantly associated to gallstone disease. Death from unknown causes was significantly associated to gallstone...

  3. [Mortality by avoidable causes in preschool children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurán, Albenia; López, Elizabeth; Pinilla, Consuelo; Sierra, Pedro

    2009-03-01

    The infant-mortality rate in children aged less than five is an indicator of the general state of health of a population and directly reflects the quality of life and the level of socio-economic development of a country. Avoidable mortality was assessed in preschool children as a reflection of Colombia quality of life and socio-economic development. Mortality trends were analyzed in preschool children aged less than five throughout Colombia during a 20-year period from 1985-2004, and focused on mortality causes that were considered avoidable. This was a descriptive, retrospective study; the sources of information were Departamento Administrativo Nacional de Estadística records of deaths and population projections 1985-2004. Mortality rate due to avoidable causes was the statistical indicator. In children aged less than one, the reducible mortality due to "early diagnosis and medical treatment" occupied the first place amongst causes for every year of the study period and accounted for more than 50% of recorded deaths. In children aged 1 to 4, the category "other important reducible causes" was associated with 40% of recorded deaths-deaths due mainly to respiratory diseases. Over the 20-year period, the avoidable mortality rate decreased by 34% in children aged less than one, in children 1-4, it decreased by 23%. Although the infant-mortality rate in preschool children was reduced, the decrease was small, from 80% to 77%. The situation requires more analysis with respect to strategies in public health, particularly concerning preventable diseases of the infancy.

  4. [Differential mortality in women of reproductive age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelos, J B; Ehrenfeld, N

    1994-01-01

    "This paper begins by reviewing some conceptual frameworks for the study of female mortality and indicates some of its application problems. Next it presents results of mortality of women in reproductive-age classified by age, causes of death, and socio-demographic traits (marital status, schooling, and occupation) for ten states [in Mexico] differentiated according to level of development and well-being. The data suggests differences according to age, marital status, and schooling. Finally, testing of the mutual independence and partial independence hypotheses indicates that age, marital status, and schooling correlate to the degree of development of each state." (SUMMARY IN ENG) excerpt

  5. maternal mortality in Malawi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malawi; however there has been a lack of effective imple- mentation. ... the SWAp Programme of Work. 3”. Methods ... the current maternal mortality strategy may be implement- ... point of delivery. ... include the cost of a new chitenje (sarong) necessary for child- ..... nomic status and access to care for TB in urban Lilongwe.

  6. Affine stochastic mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.F. Schrager

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new model for stochastic mortality. The model is based on the literature on affine term structure models. It satisfies three important requirements for application in practice: analytical tractibility, clear interpretation of the factors and compatibility with financial option pricing m

  7. [Mortality in metropolitan regions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes Ccds

    1980-01-01

    Data from the 1970 census and a 1974-1975 survey carried out in Brazil by the Fundacao Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatistica are used to examine recent mortality trends in urban areas. Specifically, life expectancy in nine metropolitan areas is analyzed in relation to income, diet, and sanitary facilities in the home.

  8. Mortality Dynamics of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Immatures in Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varella, Andrea Corrêa; Menezes-Netto, Alexandre Carlos; Alonso, Juliana Duarte de Souza; Caixeta, Daniel Ferreira; Peterson, Robert K D; Fernandes, Odair Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the dynamics of mortality factors affecting immature developmental stages of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Multiple decrement life tables for egg and early larval stages of S. frugiperda in maize (Zea mays L.) fields were developed with and without augmentative releases of Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) from 2009 to 2011. Total egg mortality ranged from 73 to 81% and the greatest egg mortality was due to inviability, dislodgement, and predation. Parasitoids did not cause significant mortality in egg or early larval stages and the releases of T. remus did not increase egg mortality. Greater than 95% of early larvae died from predation, drowning, and dislodgment by rainfall. Total mortality due to these factors was largely irreplaceable. Results indicate that a greater effect in reducing generational survival may be achieved by adding mortality to the early larval stage of S. frugiperda.

  9. Statistical Analysis of Factors Affecting Child Mortality in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Zoya; Kamal, Asifa; Kamal, Asma

    2016-06-01

    Child mortality is a composite indicator reflecting economic, social, environmental, healthcare services, and their delivery situation in a country. Globally, Pakistan has the third highest burden of fetal, maternal, and child mortality. Factors affecting child mortality in Pakistan are investigated by using Binary Logistic Regression Analysis. Region, education of mother, birth order, preceding birth interval (the period between the previous child birth and the index child birth), size of child at birth, and breastfeeding and family size were found to be significantly important with child mortality in Pakistan. Child mortality decreased as level of mother's education, preceding birth interval, size of child at birth, and family size increased. Child mortality was found to be significantly higher in Balochistan as compared to other regions. Child mortality was low for low birth orders. Child survival was significantly higher for children who were breastfed as compared to those who were not.

  10. Mortality Dynamics of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Immatures in Maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varella, Andrea Corrêa; Menezes-Netto, Alexandre Carlos; Alonso, Juliana Duarte de Souza; Caixeta, Daniel Ferreira; Peterson, Robert K. D.; Fernandes, Odair Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the dynamics of mortality factors affecting immature developmental stages of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Multiple decrement life tables for egg and early larval stages of S. frugiperda in maize (Zea mays L.) fields were developed with and without augmentative releases of Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) from 2009 to 2011. Total egg mortality ranged from 73 to 81% and the greatest egg mortality was due to inviability, dislodgement, and predation. Parasitoids did not cause significant mortality in egg or early larval stages and the releases of T. remus did not increase egg mortality. Greater than 95% of early larvae died from predation, drowning, and dislodgment by rainfall. Total mortality due to these factors was largely irreplaceable. Results indicate that a greater effect in reducing generational survival may be achieved by adding mortality to the early larval stage of S. frugiperda. PMID:26098422

  11. Revision and update of the EGIB land-use database using the airborne laser scanning point cloud - the case study of Tuklecz village in 'wietokrzyskie voivodeship. (Polish Title: Weryfikacja i aktualizacja bazy klaso-użytków EGIB w oparciu o analizy chmury punktów z lotniczego skanowania laserowego na przykładzie wsi Tuklęcz w województwie świętokrzyskim)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wężyk, P.; Gęca, T.

    2013-12-01

    Dynamic economic and social changes taking place for the past 20 years in Poland, effects often of such loss of extensive agriculture and abandonment of agricultural activities particularly on small and narrow plots , usually on the soils of poor grading. Even before the Polish accession to the EU, set - aside and fallow areas cover approx. 2.3 million ha (in 2002), but in subsequent years the area drastically decreased from 1.3 million ha (in 2004) , by 1.0 million ha ( 2 005 ) to 0.4 million hectares (2011). As a result of cessation of mowing meadows, grazing pastures and agricultural measures , we can observed the phenomenon of secondary forest succession ( plant communities of a forest properties ) leading to changes in land use and land cover classes structure . Recording changes in the agro - forestry space, update reference registers of the land and building (EGiB) and control granted to farmers subsidies ( direct EU payments) requires an efficient and automated technology acquisition, processing and analysis of spatial data. In addition to the used by ARiMR (in the LPIS system) vector data and aerial orthophotomaps , there is still a need to strengthen the decision - making process such as update of current ranges of land - use cla sses. One of the GI technologies that could be a real breakthrough is the Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) . The study area cover 137.17 ha in the village Tuklęcz (commune Rytwiany, Staszów County , ?więtokrzyskie Voivodeship ). The EGiB geo data came from PODGiK in Staszów. They were two ALS point cloud data sets: one provided by the RZGW in Krakow (from airborne campaign Nov. 2009; density ~ 2 pts / m2) and the second from ISOK project (Nov. 2012; density ~ 4 pts / m2 ). The Terrasolid and FUSION (USDA Forest Service) and ArcGIS Esri software were used in the study . Detection of vegetation was carried out in 4 variants differ in the "height above ground" of the class "succession" (thresholds: from 0.4m , 1m, 2m and 3m ). The

  12. [Maternal mortality: levels, trends, and differentials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, A; Lozano, R; Hernandez, B

    1993-01-01

    , maternal mortality is one of the most revealing indicators of social inequality.

  13. [AIDS mortality in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, F; Maguin, P; Nicaud, V; Renaud, G

    1986-01-01

    A study about mortality by AIDS had been undertaken since July 1st 1983, in the Service of Information on Medical causes of Death (INSERM SC8), which is in charge of developing mortality statistics in France. From July 1st 1983 to September 30th 1985, 243 deaths due to AIDS were recorded. Only the cases where this diagnosis was clearly mentioned were selected; more than 90% were notified by hospitals and mainly by highly specialized services. The number of deaths, which was low and varied rather irregularly at the beginning, then increased by successive stages. The first year, during which a tenth of deaths was recorded every three months, was followed by a great increase, doubling, then tripling the initial numbers. Lastly, a second and sudden rise occurred during the third trimester of 1985, the trimestrial number of deaths due to AIDS reaching 80.

  14. HIV and maternal mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathrop, Eva; Jamieson, Denise J; Danel, Isabella

    2014-11-01

    The majority of the 17 million women globally that are estimated to be infected with HIV live in Sub-Saharan Africa. Worldwide, HIV-related causes contributed to 19 000-56 000 maternal deaths in 2011 (6%-20% of maternal deaths). HIV-infected pregnant women have two to 10 times the risk of dying during pregnancy and the postpartum period compared with uninfected pregnant women. Many of these deaths can be prevented with the implementation of high-quality obstetric care, prevention and treatment of common co-infections, and treatment of HIV with ART. The paper summarizes what is known about HIV disease progression in pregnancy, specific causes of HIV-related maternal deaths, and the potential impact of treatment with antiretroviral therapy on maternal mortality. Recommendations are proposed for improving maternal health and decreasing maternal mortality among HIV-infected women based on existing evidence.

  15. Deciphering infant mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrut, Sylvie; Pouillard, Violette; Richmond, Peter; Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2016-12-01

    This paper is about infant mortality. In line with reliability theory, "infant" refers to the time interval following birth during which the mortality (or failure) rate decreases. This definition provides a systems science perspective in which birth constitutes a sudden transition falling within the field of application of the Transient Shock (TS) conjecture put forward in Richmond and Roehner (2016c). This conjecture provides predictions about the timing and shape of the death rate peak. It says that there will be a death rate spike whenever external conditions change abruptly and drastically and also predicts that after a steep rise there will be a much longer hyperbolic relaxation process. These predictions can be tested by considering living organisms for which the transient shock occurs several days after birth. Thus, for fish there are three stages: egg, yolk-sac and young adult phases. The TS conjecture predicts a mortality spike at the end of the yolk-sac phase and this timing is indeed confirmed by observation. Secondly, the hyperbolic nature of the relaxation process can be tested using very accurate Swiss statistics for postnatal death rates spanning the period from one hour immediately after birth through to age 10 years. It turns out that since the 19th century despite a significant and large reduction in infant mortality, the shape of the age-specific death rate has remained basically unchanged. Moreover the hyperbolic pattern observed for humans is also found for small primates as recorded in the archives of zoological gardens. Our overall objective is to identify a series of cases which start from simple systems and move step by step to more complex organisms. The cases discussed here we believe represent initial landmarks in this quest.

  16. Pelvic fractures and mortality.

    OpenAIRE

    K.H. Chong; DeCoster, T.; Osler, T.; Robinson, B.

    1997-01-01

    A retrospective study of all patients (N = 343) with pelvic fractures admitted to our trauma service was conducted to evaluate the impact of pelvic fractures on mortality. All patients sustained additional injuries with an average Injury Severity Score (ISS) of twenty. Thirty-six patients died. This group had more severe pelvic fractures as graded by the Tile classification as well as a greater number and severity of associated injuries. Six patients died as a direct result of pelvic hemorrha...

  17. Telomere Length and Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimura, Masayuki; Hjelmborg, Jacob V B; Gardner, Jeffrey P

    2008-01-01

    telomeres predicted the death of the first co-twin better than the mTRFL did (mTRFL: 0.56, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.49, 0.63; mTRFL(50): 0.59, 95% CI: 0.52, 0.66; mTRFL(25): 0.59, 95% CI: 0.52, 0.66; MTRFL: 0.60, 95% CI: 0.53, 0.67). The telomere-mortality association was stronger in years 3-4 than......Leukocyte telomere length, representing the mean length of all telomeres in leukocytes, is ostensibly a bioindicator of human aging. The authors hypothesized that shorter telomeres might forecast imminent mortality in elderly people better than leukocyte telomere length. They performed mortality...... analysis in 548 same-sex Danish twins (274 pairs) aged 73-94 years, of whom 204 pairs experienced the death of one or both co-twins during 9-10 years of follow-up (1997-2007). From the terminal restriction fragment length (TRFL) distribution, the authors obtained the mean TRFL (mTRFL) and the mean values...

  18. Sex differences in mortality by ethnic background

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oksuzyan, Anna; Drefahl, Sven; Jacobsen, Rune

    2016-01-01

    migrant effect and predominantly male migration from non-Western countries to Denmark and Sweden in 1960-70s, as well as high fertility in their female spouses, we expect to find even smaller sex differential mortality among migrants than in the ethnic Danish and Swedish populations. We use high....... In this study we address whether the substantial differences in the gender gap that are observed between countries can also be observed for different immigrant groups. Previous research has indicated that migrants enjoy better health and lower mortality compared with the host population. Considering the healthy...

  19. Excess Early Mortality in Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Thomas Munk; Nordentoft, Merete; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is often referred to as one of the most severe mental disorders, primarily because of the very high mortality rates of those with the disorder. This article reviews the literature on excess early mortality in persons with schizophrenia and suggests reasons for the high mortality as ...

  20. Leisure Time Physical Activity and Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Nina Føns; Ekblond, Annette; Thomsen, Birthe Lykke

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some studies indicate that a large part of the beneficial effect of physical activity on mortality is confined to a threshold effect of participation. METHODS: Self-reported physical activity was investigated in relation to all-cause mortality in the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health...... cohort, including 29,129 women and 26,576 men aged 50-64 years at baseline 1993-1997. Using Cox proportional hazards models we investigated the associations between mortality rate and leisure time physical activity by exploring 1) participation (yes/no) in each type of activity; 2) a simple dose...... in specific leisure time physical activities, but not with more time spent on those activities. This could suggest that avoiding a sedative lifestyle is more important than a high volume of activity. Nonparticipation in these types of physical activity may be considered as risk factors....

  1. [Regional early mortality in relation to social and hospital structure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obladen, M

    1985-01-01

    Detailed analysis of governmental mortality statistics yields information on regional differences in the care for preterm infants in West Germany. 68% of newborn infants dying within the first 7 days of life are of low birth weight. In the 11 states, highest/lowest early neonatal mortality fell from 11.6/6.0 to 6.2/3.1 during the years 1978 to 1982. In the 31 administrative districts, a small negative correlation (r = -0.37) exists for neonatal mortality and tax revenue. Increased regional mortality indicates diminished regionalization of perinatal care for preterm infants.

  2. Drought-mortality relationships for tropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Oliver L; van der Heijden, Geertje; Lewis, Simon L; López-González, Gabriela; Aragão, Luiz E O C; Lloyd, Jon; Malhi, Yadvinder; Monteagudo, Abel; Almeida, Samuel; Dávila, Esteban Alvarez; Amaral, Iêda; Andelman, Sandy; Andrade, Ana; Arroyo, Luzmila; Aymard, Gerardo; Baker, Tim R; Blanc, Lilian; Bonal, Damien; de Oliveira, Atila Cristina Alves; Chao, Kuo-Jung; Cardozo, Nallaret Dávila; da Costa, Lola; Feldpausch, Ted R; Fisher, Joshua B; Fyllas, Nikolaos M; Freitas, Maria Aparecida; Galbraith, David; Gloor, Emanuel; Higuchi, Niro; Honorio, Eurídice; Jiménez, Eliana; Keeling, Helen; Killeen, Tim J; Lovett, Jon C; Meir, Patrick; Mendoza, Casimiro; Morel, Alexandra; Vargas, Percy Núñez; Patiño, Sandra; Peh, Kelvin S-H; Cruz, Antonio Peña; Prieto, Adriana; Quesada, Carlos A; Ramírez, Fredy; Ramírez, Hirma; Rudas, Agustín; Salamão, Rafael; Schwarz, Michael; Silva, Javier; Silveira, Marcos; Slik, J W Ferry; Sonké, Bonaventure; Thomas, Anne Sota; Stropp, Juliana; Taplin, James R D; Vásquez, Rodolfo; Vilanova, Emilio

    2010-08-01

    *The rich ecology of tropical forests is intimately tied to their moisture status. Multi-site syntheses can provide a macro-scale view of these linkages and their susceptibility to changing climates. Here, we report pan-tropical and regional-scale analyses of tree vulnerability to drought. *We assembled available data on tropical forest tree stem mortality before, during, and after recent drought events, from 119 monitoring plots in 10 countries concentrated in Amazonia and Borneo. *In most sites, larger trees are disproportionately at risk. At least within Amazonia, low wood density trees are also at greater risk of drought-associated mortality, independent of size. For comparable drought intensities, trees in Borneo are more vulnerable than trees in the Amazon. There is some evidence for lagged impacts of drought, with mortality rates remaining elevated 2 yr after the meteorological event is over. *These findings indicate that repeated droughts would shift the functional composition of tropical forests toward smaller, denser-wooded trees. At very high drought intensities, the linear relationship between tree mortality and moisture stress apparently breaks down, suggesting the existence of moisture stress thresholds beyond which some tropical forests would suffer catastrophic tree mortality.

  3. Estimating spatial inequalities of urban child mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Weeks

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Recent studies indicate that the traditional rural-urban dichotomy pointing to cities as places of better health in the developing world can be complicated by poverty differentials. Knowledge of spatial patterns is essential to understanding the processes that link individual demographic outcomes to characteristics of a place. A significant limitation, however, is the lack of spatial data and methods that offer flexibility in data inputs. OBJECTIVE This paper tackles some of the issues in calculating intra-urban child mortality by combining multiple data sets in Accra, Ghana and applying a new method developed by Rajaratnam et al. (2010 that efficiently uses summary birth histories for creating local-level measures of under-five child mortality (5q0. Intra-urban 5q0 rates are then compared with characteristics of the environment that may be linked to child mortality. METHODS Rates of child mortality are calculated for 16 urban zones within Accra for birth cohorts from 1987 to 2006. Estimates are compared to calculated 5q0 rates from full birth histories. 5q0 estimates are then related to zone measures of slum characteristics, housing quality, health facilities, and vegetation using a simple trendline R2 analysis. RESULTS Results suggest the potential value of the Rajaratnam et al. method at the micro-spatial scale. Estimated rates indicate that there is variability in child mortality between zones, with a spread of up to 50 deaths per 1,000 births. Furthermore, there is evidence that child mortality is connected to environmental factors such as housing quality, slum-like conditions, and neighborhood levels of vegetation.

  4. Osteoporosis-Related Mortality: Time-Trends and Predictive Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly Ziadé

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is one of the leading causes of handicap worldwide and a major contributor to the global burden of diseases. In particular, osteoporosis is associated with excess mortality. We reviewed the impact of osteoporosis on mortality in a population by defining three categories: mortality following hip fractures, mortality following other sites of fractures, and mortality associated with low bone mineral density (BMD. Hip fractures, as well as other fractures at major sites are all associated with excess mortality, except at the forearm site. This excess mortality is higher during the first 3-6 months after the fracture and then declines over time, but remains higher than the mortality of the normal population up to 22 years after the fracture. Low BMD is also associated with high mortality, with hazard ratios of around 1.3 for every decrease in 1 standard deviation of bone density at 5 years, independently of fractures, reflecting a more fragile population. Finally predictors of mortality were identified and categorised in demographic known factors (age and male gender and in factors reflecting a poor general health status such as the number of comorbidities, low mental status, or level of social dependence. Our results indicate that the management of a patient with osteoporosis should include a multivariate approach that could be based on predictive models in the future.

  5. Decomposition Socioeconomic Inequality in Infant Mortality in EMRO Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Emamgholipour Sefiddashti

    2015-07-01

    The findings indicate that socioeconomic inequality in infant mortality in EMRO countries is determined not only by health system functions but also by factors beyond the scope of health authorities such as education system, and economic variables.

  6. Thymus development and infant and child mortality in rural Bangladesh

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Sophie E; Fulford, Anthony J C; Wagatsuma, Yukiko; Persson, Lars Å; Arifeen, Shams E; Prentice, Andrew M

    2014-01-01

    Data from West Africa indicate that a small thymus at birth and at 6 months of age is a strong and independent risk factor for infection-related mortality up to 24 and 36 months of age, respectively...

  7. Child mortality after Hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Robert K

    2010-03-01

    Age-specific pediatric health consequences of community disruption after Hurricane Katrina have not been analyzed. Post-Katrina vital statistics are unavailable. The objectives of this study were to validate an alternative method to estimate child mortality rates in the greater New Orleans area and compare pre-Katrina and post-Katrina mortality rates. Pre-Katrina 2004 child mortality was estimated from death reports in the local daily newspaper and validated by comparison with pre-Katrina data from the Louisiana Department of Health. Post-Katrina child mortality rates were analyzed as a measure of health consequences. Newspaper-derived estimates of mortality rates appear to be valid except for possible underreporting of neonatal rates. Pre-Katrina and post-Katrina mortality rates were similar for all age groups except infants. Post-Katrina, a 92% decline in mortality rate occurred for neonates (Katrina decline in infant mortality rate exceeds the pre-Katrina discrepancy between newspaper-derived and Department of Health-reported rates. A declining infant mortality rate raises questions about persistent displacement of high-risk infants out of the region. Otherwise, there is no evidence of long-lasting post-Katrina excess child mortality. Further investigation of demographic changes would be of interest to local decision makers and planners for recovery after public health emergencies in other regions.

  8. Life Potential as a Basic Demographic Indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerlich, Francisco J.; Soler, Angel

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes an indicator that integrates life expectancy with the demographic structure of the population for a given society. By doing this, we have a simple indicator of mortality and aging combined, which could be very useful for developed societies. As is widely known, life expectancy at birth is independent of the demographic…

  9. Mortality after hemorrhagic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    González-Pérez, Antonio; Gaist, David; Wallander, Mari-Ann

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate short-term case fatality and long-term mortality after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) using data from The Health Improvement Network database. METHODS: Thirty-day case fatality was stratified by age, sex, and calendar year after ICH...... during the first year of follow-up compared with controls (ICH: hazard ratio [HR] 2.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.09-3.24, p year (ICH: HR 2.02, 95% CI 1.75-2.32, p ... and SAH using logistic regression. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to estimate the risk of death during the first year of follow-up and survivors at 1 year. RESULTS: Case fatality after ICH was 42.0%, compared with 28.7% after SAH. It increased with age (ICH: 29.7% for 20-49 years...

  10. Adult mortality in preindustrial Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudine Lacroix - - - Bertrand Desjardins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the main results of a detailed study on adult mortality in French Canadians born before 1750 and having married inthe colony of New France. Using data from parish registers, mortality is studied using abridged life tables, with staggered entries according to age at first marriage. Survival tables and log-Rank tests are used to support the results. Three features were selected for the study of differential mortality: gender, type of residence area (urban or rural, and cohort. The mortality of French Canadians is compared to that of their French contemporaries.

  11. Vulnerability to temperature-related mortality in Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Ji-Young; Lee, Jong-Tae; Anderson, G. Brooke; Bell, Michelle L.

    2011-07-01

    Studies indicate that the mortality effects of temperature may vary by population and region, although little is known about the vulnerability of subgroups to these risks in Korea. This study examined the relationship between temperature and cause-specific mortality for Seoul, Korea, for the period 2000-7, including whether some subgroups are particularly vulnerable with respect to sex, age, education and place of death. The authors applied time-series models allowing nonlinear relationships for heat- and cold-related mortality, and generated exposure-response curves. Both high and low ambient temperatures were associated with increased risk for daily mortality. Mortality risk was 10.2% (95% confidence interval 7.43, 13.0%) higher at the 90th percentile of daily mean temperatures (25 °C) compared to the 50th percentile (15 °C). Mortality risk was 12.2% (3.69, 21.3%) comparing the 10th (-1 °C) and 50th percentiles of temperature. Cardiovascular deaths showed a higher risk to cold, whereas respiratory deaths showed a higher risk to heat effect, although the differences were not statistically significant. Susceptible populations were identified such as females, the elderly, those with no education, and deaths occurring outside of a hospital for heat- and cold-related total mortality. Our findings provide supportive evidence of a temperature-mortality relationship in Korea and indicate that some subpopulations are particularly vulnerable.

  12. Mortality Causes in Children 1-59 Months in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Sanaei-Shoar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mortality rate indicator for children under 5 years old is one of the important indicators in countries' development. Identifying the most common causes of mortality is one of the most important attempts to reduce mortality in children less than 5 years. The purpose of this study was to identify distribution of the mortality causes in Iranian children less than 5 years.Methods: This cross-sectional study has been carried out based on the results of data from the Child Mortality Surveillance System since 2007 to 2008. To determine the causes of death questionnaires have been designed which include personal data of the deceased child, medical history, and information on procedures at the time of hospitalization or death.Results: Of 5926 deaths on children under 5 years which the questionnaires were filled out, 63.2% were postneonatal deaths (1-11 month. Totally 60% of mortalities occurred in the rural areas and 52% of them had been among boys. The most common causes of mortality were the congenital and chromosomal abnormalities with 23.4%. The most incidences among diseases were respiratory system diseases.Conclusions: Carrying out more epidemiologic studies, providing health programs to control and prevent diseases with high incidences and delivering more specialized health facilities and services could be the proper strategies to reduce under 5 mortality rates in Iran.

  13. Siberian Pine Decline and Mortality in Southern Siberian Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharuk, V. I.; Im, S. T.; Oskorbin, P. A.; Petrov, I. A.; Ranson, K. J.

    2013-01-01

    The causes and resulting spatial patterns of Siberian pine mortality in eastern Kuznetzky Alatau Mountains, Siberia were analyzed based on satellite (Landsat, MODIS) and dendrochronology data. Climate variables studied included temperature, precipitation and Standardized Precipitation-Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI) drought index. Landsat data analysis showed that stand mortality was first detected in the year 2006 at an elevation of 650 m, and extended up to 900 m by the year 2012. Mortality was accompanied by a decrease in MODIS derived vegetation index (EVI).. The area of dead stands and the upper mortality line were correlated with increased drought. The uphill margin of mortality was limited by elevational precipitation gradients. Dead stands (i.e., >75% tree mortality) were located mainly on southern slopes. With respect to slope, mortality was observed within a 7 deg - 20 deg range with greatest mortality occurring on convex terrain. Tree radial incrementmeasurements correlate and were synchronous with SPEI (r sq = 0.37, r(sub s) = 80). Increasing synchrony between tree ring growth and SPEI indicates that drought has reduced the ecological niche of Siberian pine. The results also showed the primary role of drought stress on Siberian pine mortality. A secondary role may be played by bark beetles and root fungi attacks. The observed Siberian pine mortality is part of a broader phenomenon of "dark needle conifers" (DNC, i.e., Siberian pine, fir and spruce) decline and mortality in European Russia, Siberia, and the Russian Far East. All locations of DNC decline coincided with areas of observed drought increase. The results obtained are one of the first observations of drought-induced decline and mortality of DNC at the southern border of boreal forests. Meanwhile if model projections of increased aridity are correct DNC, within the southern part of its range may be replaced by drought-resistant Pinus silvestris and Larix sibirica.

  14. Political party affiliation, political ideology and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabayo, Roman; Kawachi, Ichiro; Muennig, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Ecological and cross-sectional studies have indicated that conservative political ideology is associated with better health. Longitudinal analyses of mortality are needed because subjective assessments of ideology may confound subjective assessments of health, particularly in cross-sectional analyses. Data were derived from the 2008 General Social Survey-National Death Index data set. Cox proportional analysis models were used to determine whether political party affiliation or political ideology was associated with time to death. Also, we attempted to identify whether self-reported happiness and self-rated health acted as mediators between political beliefs and time to death. In this analysis of 32,830 participants and a total follow-up time of 498,845 person-years, we find that political party affiliation and political ideology are associated with mortality. However, with the exception of independents (adjusted HR (AHR)=0.93, 95% CI 0.90 to 0.97), political party differences are explained by the participants' underlying sociodemographic characteristics. With respect to ideology, conservatives (AHR=1.06, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.12) and moderates (AHR=1.06, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.11) are at greater risk for mortality during follow-up than liberals. Political party affiliation and political ideology appear to be different predictors of mortality. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. IMF-lending programs and suicide mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulas, Eleftherios; Zervoyianni, Athina

    2016-03-01

    While the economic consequences of IMF programs have been extensively analyzed in the literature, much less is known about how key welfare indicators, including suicide-mortality rates, correlate with countries' participation in such programs. This paper examines the impact of IMF lending on suicide mortality, using data from 30 developing and transition countries that received non-concessionary IMF loans during 1991-2008. Our results support the hypothesis of a positive causal relationship between suicide mortality and participation in IMF programs but reveal no systematic suicide-increasing effect from the size of IMF loans. This holds after accounting for self-selection into programs, resulting from the endogeneity of a country's decision to resort to the IMF for funding, and after controlling for standard socio-economic influences on suicidal behaviour. In particular, we find a positive aggregate suicide-mortality differential due to IMF-program participation of between 4 and 14 percentage points. We also find that the positive association between suicides and program participation is stronger and more robust among males. Comparing age groups, individuals belonging to the age group 45-to-64 exhibit the highest increase in suicide due to program-participation, which amounts to over 18 percentage points. Overall, our results imply that when countries are exposed to IMF programs in an attempt to resolve their economic problems, social-safety nets need to be designed to protect the adversely-affected part of the population.

  16. Indonesia lowers infant mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, S

    1991-11-01

    Indonesia's success in reaching World Health Organization (WHO) universal immunization coverage standards is described as the result of a strong national program with timely, targeted donor support. USAID/Indonesia's Expanded Program for Immunization (EPI) and other USAID bilateral cooperation helped the government of Indonesia in its goal to immunize children against diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, polio, tuberculosis, and measles by age 1. The initial project was to identify target areas and deliver vaccines against the diseases, strengthen the national immunization organization and infrastructure, and develop the Ministry of Health's capacity to conduct studies and development activities. This EPI project spanned the period 1979-90, and set the stage for continued expansion of Indonesia's immunization program to comply with the full international schedule and range of immunizations of 3 DPT, 3 polio, 1 BCG, and 1 measles inoculation. The number of immunization sites has increased from 55 to include over 5,000 health centers in all provinces, with additional services provided by visiting vaccinators and nurses in most of the 215,000 community-supported integrated health posts. While other contributory factors were at play, program success is at least partially responsible for the 1990 infant mortality rate of 58/1,000 live births compared to 72/1,000 in 1985. Strong national leadership, dedicated health workers and volunteers, and cooperation and funding from UNICEF, the World Bank, Rotary International, and WHO also played crucially positive roles in improving immunization practice in Indonesia.

  17. Correlation Between Human Development Index and Infant Mortality Rate Worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alijanzadeh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Infant mortality rate (per 1000 live births is a vital index to monitor the standard of health and social inequality which is related to human development dimensions worldwide. Human development index (HDI includes basic social indicators such as life expectancy, education and income. Objectives The current study aimed to find the correlation between human development index and infant mortality rate. Patients and Methods This descriptive study that represents the relationship of infant mortality rate with human development index and human development index dimensions was performed on the profiles of 135 countries worldwide [Africa (35 countries, America (26 countries, Asia (30 countries, the Pacific (2 countries and Europe (42 countries]. Two databases were used in the study: the world health organization (WHO database (2010 and human development database (2010. Data were analyzed using Pearson correlation test by SPSS software. Results The study found that socio-economic factors or human development dimensions are significantly correlated with risk of chance mortality in the world. The per capita income (r = -0.625, life expectancy (r = -0.925 and education (r = -0.843 were negatively correlated with the infant mortality rate; human development index (r = -0.844 was also negatively correlated with the infant mortality rate (P < 0.01. Conclusions Human development index is one of the best indicators and predictors to perceive healthcare inequities. Worldwide improvement of these indicators, especially the education level, might promote infant life expectancy and decrease infant mortality.

  18. Past Decline Versus Current eGFR and Subsequent Mortality Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naimark, David M. J.; Grams, Morgan E.; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Black, Corri; Drion, Iefke; Fox, Caroline S.; Inker, Lesley A.; Ishani, Areef; Jee, Sun Ha; Kitamura, Akihiko; Lea, Janice P.; Nally, Joseph; Peralta, Carmen Alicia; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Ryu, Seungho; Tonelli, Marcello; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Coresh, Josef; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Warnock, David G.; Woodward, Mark; de Jong, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    A single determination of eGFR associates with subsequent mortality risk. Prior decline in eGFR indicates loss of kidney function, but the relationship to mortality risk is uncertain. We conducted an individual-level meta-analysis of the risk of mortality associated with antecedent eGFR slope, adjus

  19. Income inequality, social capital and self-inflicted injury and violence-related mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, M.; Oldehinkel, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The objective of the study was to investigate the relation of income inequality and indicators of social capital to self-inflicted injury mortality (suicide) and violence-related mortality, and to the share of total mortality that is due to these two causes of death in 35 developed count

  20. Road traffic related mortality in Vietnam: Evidence for policy from a national sample mortality surveillance system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngo Anh D

    2012-07-01

    deaths occurring on-site or prior to hospital admission indicates a need for effective pre-hospital first aid services and timely access to emergency facilities. In the absence of standardised death certification, sustained efforts are needed to strengthen mortality surveillance sites supplemented by VA to support evidence based monitoring and control of RTI mortality.

  1. Conflict-related mortality: an analysis of 37 datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha-Sapir, Debarati; Panhuis, Willem Gijsbert

    2004-12-01

    Mortality rates are among the main indicators of the human impact of armed conflict and many surveys have assessed this impact both for targeting and evaluating humanitarian aid programmes. Almost no epidemiological analysis such as calculating relative risk was performed nor were reference values clearly described. Here the aim is to review published mortality rates for a better understanding of age-specific mortality in armed conflict. Published mortality rates from conflict situations were collected and pre-conflict reference rates composed. We calculated the relative risk of dying in conflict compared to pre-conflict for children under 5 and people older than five years old. Although limited by reporting inadequacies, the results confirm the high vulnerability of children or = 5 year olds. Although not entirely new, this observation is not fully understood. Further systematic epidemiological research is needed to estimate and understand the impact of armed conflict on mortality.

  2. Egg mortality: predation and hydrography in the central Baltic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, R.; Hinrichsen, H.-H.; Stepputtis, D.;

    2011-01-01

    during the egg phase to be of critical importance. Two years of extensive field investigations in the Bornholm Basin, central Baltic Sea, were undertaken. In 2002, a typical stagnation situation characterized by low salinity and poor oxygen conditions was investigated, and in early 2003, a major inflow...... of North Sea water completely changed the hydrographic conditions by increasing salinity and oxygen content, thereby altering ecological conditions. The goal was to quantify egg mortality caused by predation and hydrography, and to compare these estimates with independent estimates based on cohort analysis....... Results indicated high intra-annual variability in egg mortality. Cod and sprat egg mortality responded differently to the major Baltic inflow: mortality related to hydrographic conditions increased for sprat and decreased for cod. On the other hand, predation mortality during peak spawning decreased...

  3. Stressful social relations and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rikke; Christensen, Ulla; Nilsson, Charlotte Juul

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies have examined the relationship between stressful social relations in private life and all-cause mortality. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between stressful social relations (with partner, children, other family, friends and neighbours, respectively) and all...... men and women aged 36-52 years, linked to the Danish Cause of Death Registry for information on all-cause mortality until 31 December 2011. Associations between stressful social relations with partner, children, other family, friends and neighbours, respectively, and all-cause mortality were examined...... hazards model. RESULTS: Frequent worries/demands from partner or children were associated with 50-100% increased mortality risk. Frequent conflicts with any type of social relation were associated with 2-3 times increased mortality risk. Interaction between labour force participation and worries...

  4. Old age mortality in Eastern and South-Eastern Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danan Gu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eastern and South-Eastern Asian countries have witnessed a marked decline in old age mortality in recent decades. Yet no studies have investigated the trends and patterns in old age morality and cause-of-death in the region. Objective: We reviewed the trends and patterns of old age mortality and cause-of-death for countries in the region. Methods: We examined data on old age mortality in terms of life expectancy at age 65 and age-specific death rates from the 2012 Revision of the World Population Prospects for 14 countries in the region (China, Hong Kong, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Indonesia, Japan, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Myanmar, Malaysia, Mongolia, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Singapore, Thailand, and Viet Nam and data on cause-of-death from the WHO for five countries (China, Hong Kong, Japan, Republic of Korea, and Singapore from 1980 to 2010. Results: While mortality transitions in these populations took place in different times, and at different levels of socioeconomic development and living environment, changes in their age patterns and sex differentials in mortality showed certain similarities: women witnessed a similar decline to men in spite of their lower mortality, and young elders had a larger decline than the oldest-old. In all five countries examined for cause-of-death, most of the increases in life expectancy at age 65 in both men and women were attributable to declines in mortality from stroke and heart disease. GDP per capita, educational level, and urbanization explained much of the variations in life expectancy and cause-specific mortality, indicating critical contributions of these basic socioeconomic development indicators to the mortality decline over time in the region. Conclusions: These findings shed light on the relationship between epidemiological transition, changing age patterns of mortality, and improving life expectancy in these populations.

  5. [Political crises in Africa and infant and child mortality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garenne, M

    1997-01-01

    Many African countries experienced severe political crises after independence, and in a number of cases the crises had significant demographic consequences, especially for child mortality. Data based on maternity histories allowed the reconstruction of child mortality trends over the past 20-30 years in Uganda, Ghana, Rwanda, Madagascar, and Mozambique. The indicator used was the child mortality quotient (number of deaths of under-5 children per 1000 births). Uganda's child mortality declined from 227/1000 in 1960 to 154/1000 in 1970, but the trend was reversed in 1971, when Idi Amin Dada came to power, and the rate reached 204/1000 in 1982 before beginning to decline again. The level of mortality remained high, however, and was still 160/1000 in 1988. Ghana suffered a political and economic crisis during 1979-84. Child mortality rose from 130/1000 in 1978 to 175/1000 in 1983. Mortality rates began a rapid decline after structural adjustment programs were begun, possibly due to improved management of health services. The child mortality rate in Rwanda increased from around 220/1000 in 1960 to 240/1000 in 1975, before beginning a decline in the late 1970s that reached 140/1000 by 1990. The period of political stability and relative prosperity during the 15-year reign of Juvenal Habyarimana was associated with the decline. Political crises marked by student and peasant uprisings were associated with Madagascar's child mortality rate increase from about 145/1000 in 1960 to 185/1000 in 1985. Mozambique was beset by civil war after independence, in which destruction of the health infrastructure was a strategy. The child mortality rate increased from 270/1000 to 470/1000 between 1975 and 1986, a peak war year. The factors by which political crises affect mortality so profoundly remain to be explained, but particular attention should be given to studying the health sector.

  6. Heat Mortality Versus Cold Mortality: A Study of Conflicting Databases in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, P. G.; Brommer, D. M.; Hedquist, B. C.; Kalkstein, A. J.; Goodrich, G. B.; Walter, J. C.; Dickerson, C. C., IV; Penny, S. J.; Cerveny, R. S.

    2005-07-01

    Studies, public reports, news reports, and Web sites cite a wide range of values associated with deaths resulting from excessive heat and excessive cold. For example, in the United States, the National Climatic Data Center's Storm Data statistics of temperature- related deaths are skewed heavily toward heat-related deaths, while the National Center for Health Statistics Compressed Mortality Database indicates the reverse—4 times more people die of “excessive cold” conditions in a given year than of “excessive heat.” In this study, we address the fundamental differences in the various temperature-related mortality databases, assess their benefits and limitations, and offer suggestions as to their use. These datasets suffer from potential incompleteness of source information, long compilation times, limited quality control, and the subjective determination of a direct versus indirect cause of death. In general, these separate mortality datasets should not be combined or compared, particularly with regard to policy determination. The use of gross mortality numbers appears to be one of the best means of determining temperature-related mortality, but those data must be detrended into order to remove a persistent winter-dominant death maximum and are difficult to obtain on a regional daily basis.

  7. Socioeconomic inequalities in mortality in Barcelona: a study based on census tracts (MEDEA Project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Serral, Gemma; Azlor, Enric; Rodríguez-Sanz, Maica; Pasarín, M Isabel; Martínez, José Miguel; Puigpinós, Rosa; Muntaner, Carles; Borrell, Carme

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study is to describe inequalities in socioeconomic indicators and in mortality by sex in the census tracts of Barcelona city during the period 1996-2003. The results show that there is excess mortality in coastal and northern areas. This distribution is similar to that of socioeconomic deprivation and therefore there is an association between mortality and socioeconomic indicators, not only for total mortality but also for the specific causes of death studied. This type of analysis can be useful for planning of public health policy since it allows small areas with high mortality risk to be detected.

  8. [Infant mortality in the indigenous population: backwardness and contrasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez Ham, P

    1993-01-01

    Some 6.4 million speakers of indigenous languages were enumerated in the 1990 Mexican census. The same census provided the basis for an indirect estimate of infant mortality using data on the numbers of live born and surviving children. Municipios with 40% or more of the population speaking an indigenous language were studied. The overall estimated infant mortality rate for indigenous municipios was 55.1/1000 live births, the equivalent of the Mexican infant mortality rate around 1982. Mexico's national infant mortality rate in 1990 was 34.8/1000. Great contrasts were found in indigenous infant mortality rates. Campeche, Quintana Roo, and Yucatan, the states of the Mayan region, had a low rate of 35.09/1000, very close to the national average. Infant mortality levels were relatively low in the indigenous populations of Hidalgo, the state of Mexico, and Michoacan, with rates of 44 to 48. Chiapas, Oaxaca, Puebla, Durango, Guerrero, and San Luis Potosi had rates of 55 to 65. The highest rates were in states with few indigenous municipios, including Chihuahua, Jalisco, and Nayarit. The Huichol of Jalisco had the highest rate at 100.01/1000. Infant mortality levels were found to be correlated in different degrees with socioeconomic indicators. The highest infant mortality rates were in the indigenous regions with the poorest socioeconomic conditions.

  9. Rising mortality from cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, I; Britton, J; Kinnear, W; Logan, R

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the pattern of mortality ascribed to cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis and to identify factors that might be important in the aetiology of the disease; and to assess the validity of death certification of the disease. DESIGN--A retrospective examination of mortality ascribed to cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis in England and Wales between 1979 and 1988 with analysis, by multiple logistic regression, of independent effects of age, sex, region of residence, and social class as indicated by occupation on data for 1979-87; also a retrospective review of hospital records of patients certified as having died of cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis in Nottingham and of the certified cause of death of patients known to have had the disease. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Time trends in mortality nationally; effects on mortality of age, sex, and region of residence; validity of death certification in Nottingham. RESULTS--The annual number of deaths ascribed to cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis doubled from 336 in 1979 to 702 in 1988, the increase occurring mainly at ages over 65. Mortality standardised for age for both sexes likewise increased steadily over the period. Deaths due to cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis were commoner in men (odds ratio 2.24, 95% confidence interval 2.11 to 2.33) and increased substantially with age, being 7.84 (7.24 to 8.49) times higher in subjects aged much greater than 75 than those aged 45-64. Odds ratios of death due to cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis adjusted for age and sex were increased in the traditionally industrialised central areas of England and Wales (p less than 0.02, maximum odds ratio between regions 1.25), but no significant increase in odds of death was found for manual occupations. Of 23 people whose deaths were registered in Nottingham as having been due to cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis, 19 were ascertained from clinical records to have had the disease. Only 17 of 45 patients known to have had cryptogenic

  10. Improving the measurement of maternal mortality: the sisterhood method revisited.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Merdad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over the past several decades the efforts to improve maternal survival and the consequent demand for accurate estimates of maternal mortality have increased. However, measuring maternal mortality remains a difficult task especially in developing countries with weak information systems. Sibling histories included in household surveys (most notably the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS have emerged as an important source of maternal mortality data. Data have been mainly collected from women and have not been widely collected from men due to concerns about data quality. We assess data quality of histories obtained from men and the potential to improve the efficiency of surveys measuring maternal mortality by collecting such data. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used data from 10 Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS that have included a full sibling history in both their women's and men's questionnaires. We estimated adult and maternal mortality indicators from histories obtained from men and women. We assessed the completeness and accuracy of these histories using several indicators of data quality. Our study finds that mortality estimates based on sibling histories obtained from men do not systematically or significantly differ from those obtained from women. Quality indicators were similar when comparing data from men and women. Pooling data obtained from men and women produced narrower confidence intervals. CONCLUSION: From experience across nine developing countries, sibling history data obtained from men appear to be a reliable source of information on adult and maternal mortality. Given that there are no significant differences between mortality estimates based on data obtained from men and women, data can be pooled to increase efficiency. This finding improves the feasibility for countries to generate robust empirical estimates of adult and maternal mortality from surveys. Further we recommend that male sibling histories be collected

  11. [Asthma mortality trends in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas Ramírez, M; Segura Méndez, N H; Martínez-Cairo Cueto, S

    1994-04-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to estimate mortality and morbidity from asthma in Mexico by federative entity (state) of residence, age, and sex during the period between 1960 and 1988. Statistics published by the National Institute of Statistics, Geography, and Information Science were reviewed, as were vital statistics and information from other sources. Data were selected on mortality, hospital admissions, and outpatient visits, as well as population by federative entity, age, and sex. Mortality and morbidity rates were adjusted for age using the direct method. From 1960 to 1987, mortality decreased for both sexes. The groups with the highest asthma mortality were those under 4 years of age and those over 50. From 1960 to the present, the state with the highest mortality was Tlaxcala. Hospitalizations increased from 10 to 140 per 100,000 population for the country as a whole. When both outpatient visits and hospitalizations were considered, the morbidity rates rose from 180 to 203.4 per 100,000 between 1960 and 1970. In 1970, hospital morbidity was higher among males than females. From 1960 up to the 1990s, the highest rates of hospitalization and outpatient visits were registered among those under 4 and those over 60. The states with the highest asthma hospitalization rates were Morelos, Baja California Sur, Nuevo León, Durango, and Tamaulipas. It is concluded that asthma mortality in Mexico is showing a downward trend, while morbidity is increasing considerably, especially among adolescents.

  12. Trends in child mortality in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, A S

    2013-01-08

    To assess Indias recent trends in child mortality rates and disparities and identify ways to reduce child mortality and wealth-related health disparities, we analyzed three years of data from Indias National Family Health Survey related to child mortality. Nationally, declines in average child mortality were statistically significant, but declines in inequality were not. Urban areas had lower child mortality rates than rural areas but higher inequalities. Interstate differences in child mortality rates were significant, with rates in the highest-mortality states four to six times higher than in the lowest-mortality states. However, child mortality in most states declined.

  13. The law of mortality revisited: interspecies comparisons of mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshansky, S J

    2010-01-01

    In 1825 the British actuary Benjamin Gompertz believed he had discovered a consistency in the timing of death in people that was so important that he labelled his observation a 'law of mortality'. To Gompertz, this 'law' was equivalent in importance to Newton's law of gravity because he believed it would be observed in all living things. Gompertz's quest for the 'law' eventually failed, as did similar efforts by other scientists in the 19th and most of the 20th century. However, the search for the law of mortality was successfully resolved in 1996 when my colleagues and I discovered that the only way to 'see' Gompertz's law expressed as common age patterns of death across species was to partition total mortality into its intrinsic and extrinsic components, and examine mortality schedules on a uniform time scale. Scientists had been unable to reveal the law of mortality in the past not only because they could not partition total mortality, but also because of the previous anthropocentric perspective that forced some scientists to view duration of life along a single time scale - one based on human measurements of chronological time. The law of mortality is relevant today not only because it links the epidemiology of disease, ageing and death across species, but because it creates a window into the future for those who study disease epidemiology in animals that now live long enough in protected environments to experience the biological consequences of ageing. In this paper I summarize the historical search for the law of mortality, explain why the solution could only be found by linking two seemingly unconnected scientific disciplines (evolution biology and actuarial/demographics), explain why age patterns of disease and death in humans may be used to understand and predict disease epidemiology in other species, and describe how a new scientific discipline has arisen in the modern era as a result of this research.

  14. Occupational physical activity and mortality among Danish workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, Andreas; Burr, Hermann; Hansen, Jørgen V;

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The relationship between occupational physical activity (OPA) and mortality has mainly been studied among males and shows conflicting results. This study examines this relationship in a cohort of both male and female workers. METHODS: OPA was determined by 4 self-reported questions...... in a representative sample of 5,839 Danish workers aged 18-59 years at baseline. A 19-year follow-up on mortality was assessed by linkage with the national death registry. Gender-stratified Cox regression models were used to determine the effect of high OPA on all-cause mortality while controlling for age, BMI.......79, CI: 1.19-2.70), but not among female workers (HR: 0.99, CI: 0.65-1.49) compared with workers in the lowest quartile of OPA. Among females, indications of a u-shaped relationship between occupational physical activity and all-cause mortality were found. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that high...

  15. A Case for Developing Community Drug Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughran, Hilda; McCann, Mary Ellen

    2011-01-01

    The EU Action Plan on Drugs (2005-2008) calls for member states of the European Union to provide information on five key epidemiological indicators. These are: general population surveys, prevalence and patterns of problem drug use, drug related infectious diseases, drug related deaths and mortality of drug users, and demand for drug treatment.…

  16. CDC WONDER: Mortality - Infant Deaths

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mortality - Infant Deaths (from Linked Birth / Infant Death Records) online databases on CDC WONDER provide counts and rates for deaths of children under 1 year...

  17. Contextual determinants of maternal mortality in rural Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midhet, F; Becker, S; Berendes, H W

    1998-06-01

    Maternal mortality is high in Pakistan, particularly in the rural areas which have poor access to health services. We investigated the risk factors associated with maternal mortality in sixteen rural districts of Balochistan and the North-West Frontier (NWFP) provinces of Pakistan. We designed a nested case-control study comprising 261 cases (maternal deaths reported during last five years) and 9135 controls (women who survived a pregnancy during last five years). Using contextual analysis, we estimated the interactions between the biological risk factors of maternal mortality and the district-level indicators of health services. Women under 19 or over 39 yr of age, those having their first birth, and those having a previous history of fetal loss were at greater risk of maternal death. Staffing patterns of peripheral health facilities in the district and accessibility of essential obstetric care (EOC) were significantly associated with maternal mortality. These indicators also modified the effects of the biological risk factors of maternal mortality. For example, nulliparous women living in the under-served districts were at greater risk than those living in the better-served districts. Our results are consistent with several studies which have pointed out the role of health services in the causation of maternal mortality. Many such studies have implicated distance to hospital (an indicator of access to EOC) and lack of prenatal care as major determinants of maternal mortality. We conclude that better staffing of peripheral health facilities and improved access to EOC could reduce the risk of maternal mortality among women in rural Balochistan and the NWFP.

  18. [Maternal mortality in France, 2007-2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucedo, M; Deneux-Tharaux, C; Bouvier-Colle, M-H

    2013-11-01

    To monitor the maternal mortality which is an indicator of the quality of obstetric and intensive care, France has a specific approach since 1996. Recently linkages have been introduced to improve the inclusion of cases. Here are the results for the 2007 to 2009 period. The identification of the pregnancy associated deaths is lying on different data bases that are medical causes of death, birth register and hospital discharges. To document the cases, confidential enquiries are conducted by two assessors on the field; a committee of medical experts analyses the documents, select the underlying cause and assess the quality of health care. Two hundred and fifty-four obstetric deaths were identified from 2007 to 2009 giving the maternal mortality ratio (MMR) of 10.3 per 100,000 births. The maternal age and nationality, the region of deaths are associated to the MMR. The haemorrhages are the leading cause but their ratio is 1.9 versus 2.5 previously; this decrease results from the postpartum haemorrhage by uterine atony going down. The suboptimal care are still frequent (60%) but slightly less than before. The linkage method should be pursued. Maternal mortality is rather stable in France. We may reach more reduction as deaths due to atony decreased as suboptimal care did.

  19. The effect of neighbourhood mortality shocks on fertility preferences: a spatial econometric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owoo, Nkechi S; Agyei-Mensah, Samuel; Onuoha, Emily

    2015-07-01

    According to the demographic transition theory, fertility rates fall in response to declines in child mortality rates. Although national statistics indicate that child mortality rates have been declining over time, Ghana's fertility rates appear to have stalled. This paper hypothesises that women's fertility behaviours may be more responsive to child mortality experiences at more localised levels. Using all rounds of the Ghana Demographic and Health Surveys (1988-2008) and employing a variety of spatial and empirical estimation techniques, results indicate that in addition to own-child mortality, neighbourhood child mortality shocks are also a determinant of women's fertility in Ghana. Women in neighbourhoods with large child mortality shocks may desire more children as an "insurance" against future losses, as a result of their increased perceptions of own-child mortality risks.

  20. Predictors of inhospital mortality in patients with infective endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batool Al-Mogheer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in therapy, infective endocarditis (IE remains a serious disease with high mortality. We evaluated 155 Egyptian patients with Duke definite/possible IE to determine incidence, causes and predictors of inhospital mortality. The mean time from symptoms onset to diagnosis was 66.4 ± 97 days. The causes of mortality (38.7% included congestive heart failure (CHF, sepsis, surgery related, stroke, cerebral hemorrhage, pulmonary embolism, sudden cardiac death, and hyperkalemia. Predictors of mortality on univariate analysis were duration of symptoms before hospital admission (p = 0.017, health care associated endocarditis (p = 0.039, CHF (p < 0.001, fulminant sepsis (p < 0.001, embolization (p = 0.011, need for dialysis (p = 0.003, need for cardiac surgery (p = 0.027, unperformed indicated cardiac surgery (p = 0.002 and higher C-reactive protein level (p = 0.05. In multivariate analysis, only CHF remained an independent predictor of mortality (p = 0.033. IE mortality was high in this cohort probably due to delayed diagnosis. Patients having these mortality predictors especially CHF deserve more aggressive treatment.

  1. Cancer mortality patterns among Turkish immigrants in four European countries and in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallek, Jacob; Arnold, Melina; Razum, Oliver; Juel, Knud; Rey, Grégoire; Deboosere, Patrick; Mackenbach, Johan Pieter; Kunst, Anton Eduard

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study on cancer mortality among Turkish immigrants, for the first time, traditional comparisons in migrant health research have been extended simultaneously in two ways. First, comparisons were made to cancer mortality from the immigrants' country of origin and second, cancer mortality among Turkish immigrants across four host countries (Belgium, Denmark, France and the Netherlands) was compared. Population-based cancer mortality data from these countries were included. Age-standardized mortality rates were computed for the local-born and Turkish population of each country. Relative differences in cancer mortality were examined by fitting country-specific Poisson regression models. Globocan data on cancer mortality in Turkey from 2008 were used in order to compare mortality rates of Turkish immigrants with those from their country of origin. Turkish immigrants had lower all-cancer mortality than the local-born populations of their host countries, and mortality levels comparable to all-cancer mortality rates in Turkey. In the Netherlands and France breast cancer mortality was consistently lower in Turkish immigrants women than among local-born women. Lung cancer mortality was slightly lower in Turkish immigrants in the Netherlands and France but varied considerably between migrants in these two host countries. Stomach cancer mortality was significantly higher in Turkish immigrants when compared to local-born French and Dutch. Our findings indicate that exposures both in the country of origin and in the host country can have an effect on the cancer mortality of immigrants. Despite limitations affecting any cross-country comparison of mortality, the innovative multi-comparison approach is a promising way to gain further insights into determinants of trends in cancer mortality of immigrants.

  2. [Liver cirrhosis mortality in Mexico. II. Excess mortality and pulque consumption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narro-Robles, J; Gutiérrez-Avila, J H; López-Cervantes, M; Borges, G; Rosovsky, H

    1992-01-01

    Over the years high cirrhosis mortality rates have been reported in Mexico City and in the surrounding states (Hidalgo, Tlaxcala, Puebla and the State of Mexico); on the contrary, well defined areas, such as the northern states, have shown a considerably lower mortality rate. This situation may indicate that some factors such as the pattern of alcoholic intake and other environmental characteristics could explain this striking difference. To determine the role of alcohol, the availability and consumption of alcohol at regional and state level were compared with cirrhosis mortality rates. A high and statistically significant correlation was found with pulque availability and consumption (r = 72-92%, p less than 0.01) in all periods of time under examination. On the contrary, a statistically significant negative association was observed with beer consumption and a positive, but not significant correlation, with distilled alcoholic beverages. Infectious hepatitis incidence, prevalence of exclusive use of native languages (as an indirect index of ethnic background) and nutritional deficiencies were also studied as possible risk factors. Nutritional deficiencies and the prevalence of exclusive use of náhuatl and otomí languages were positively correlated. These results can be useful to conduct further epidemiological studies still needed to determine the etiologic role of pulque consumption as well as of the other risk factors. Nonetheless, the current data stress the need to implement public health programs to reduce alcohol consumption, especially pulque, and to minimize the impact of these risk factors in high mortality areas.

  3. Maternal mortality in Bijapur district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya A. Thobbi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objectives of this study is to evaluate the incidence of maternal deaths, causes responsible for maternal mortality, direct and indirect factors, and various preventable methods to reduce maternal mortality rate. Background: 95% of maternal deaths occur in Asia and Africa. The need for undertaking this study is to know the maternal mortality rate, analyze the causes and preventable factors of death occurring in the district of Bijapur, Karnataka, India. Methodology: It is a study of 2years from the Records of District Health Office and Institutions on maternal mortality from June 2011 to May 2013 in Bijapur. Results: In two years there were fifty eight maternal deaths and seventy nine thousand five hundred and sixty six live births, hence maternal mortality ratio was seventy three per lakh live births. Eighty two percent of maternal deaths occurred in families who belonged to Below Poverty Line. Prevalence of anemia in pregnancy was 79.3%. Severe anemia (Hemoglobin <7g% seen in 5.1% was the most common indirect cause of death. Forty three percent of the deaths occurred at private setups. Hemorrhage, Septicemia and Preeclampsia & Eclampsia were responsible for 44.82%, 15.51% and 6.89% respectively. Conclusion: Majority of the maternal deaths are preventable if these four delays are avoided: a Delay in identifying the problem. b Delay in seeking care. c Delay in reaching the referral institute. d Delay in getting treatment on reaching the referral institute.

  4. Educational Inequality in Obesity-Related Mortality in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has been increasing worldwide, which raises concerns about the disease burden associated with obesity. Socioeconomic status (SES) has been suggested to be associated with obesity and obesity related diseases. This study aimed to evaluate the time trend in socioeconomic inequality in obesity-related mortality over the last decade in Korean population. We evaluated the influence of education level, as an indicator of SES, on obesity-related mortality using death data from the Cause of Death Statistics and the Korean Population and Housing Census databases. The rate ratio of the mortality of people at the lowest education level as compared with those at the highest education level (relative index of inequality [RII]) was estimated using Poisson regression analysis. Between 2001 and 2011, RII (95% confidence interval) for overall obesity-related disease mortality increased from 2.10 (2.02–2.19) to 6.50 (6.19–6.82) in men, and from 1.94 (1.79–2.10) to 3.25 (3.05–3.45) in women, respectively. Cause-specifically, the same trend in RII was found for cardiovascular mortality and mortality from diabetes mellitus, whereas the RII of mortality from obesity-related cancers in men did not show the similar trend. Subgroup analysis stratified by age revealed that the RII of obesity-related mortality was much higher in younger people than in older people. In conclusion, there has been persistent socioeconomic inequality in obesity-related mortality in Korea, which was more evident in younger people than in older people and has been deepened over the last decade especially for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. PMID:28145639

  5. An appraisal of the maternal mortality decline in Nepal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Hussein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A decline in the national maternal mortality ratio in Nepal has been observed from surveys conducted between 1996 and 2008. This paper aims to assess the plausibility of the decline and to identify drivers of change. METHODS: National and sub-national trends in mortality data were investigated using existing demographic and health surveys and maternal mortality and morbidity surveys. Potential drivers of the variation in maternal mortality between districts were identified by regressing district-level indicators from the Nepal demographic health surveys against maternal mortality estimates. RESULTS: A statistically significant decline of the maternal mortality ratio from 539 maternal deaths to 281 per 100,000 (95% CI 91,507 live births between 1993 and 2003 was demonstrated. The sub-national changes are of similar magnitude and direction to those observed nationally, and in the terai region (plains the differences are statistically significant with a reduction of 361 per 100,000 live births (95% CI 36,686 during the same time period. The reduction in fertility, changes in education and wealth, improvements in components of the human development index, gender empowerment and anaemia each explained more than 10% of the district variation in maternal mortality. A number of limitations in each of the data sources used were identified. Of these, the most important relate to the underestimation of numbers of deaths. CONCLUSION: It is likely that there has been a decline in Nepal's maternal mortality since 1993. This is good news for the country's sustained commitments in this area. Conclusions on the magnitude, pattern of the change and drivers of the decline are constrained by lack of data. We recommend close tracking of maternal mortality and its determinants in Nepal, attention to the communication of future estimates, and various options for bridging data gaps.

  6. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma incidence and mortality in China in 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kuang-Rong Wei; Rong-Shou Zheng; Si-Wei Zhang; Zhi-Heng Liang; Zhi-Xiong Ou; Wan-Qing Chen

    2014-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is common in South China. Although regional epidemiological data on NPC in China is available, national epidemiological data have been unavailable up to now. The goal of this study was to analyze the NPC incidence and mortality data in some domestic cancer registries, estimate these rates in China in 2010, and provide scientific information that can be harnessed for NPC control and prevention. To accomplish this goal, NPC incidence and mortality data for 2010 were col ected from 145 Chinese cancer registries from which data were included in the 2013 National Cancer Registry Annual Report. Such indices as its incident and death numbers, crude rates, age-standardized rates and truncated rates were calculated and analyzed. The incidence and mortality in China and constituent areas were estimated according to the national population in 2010. An estimated 41,503 new cases and 20,058 deaths were attributed to NPC in China in 2010, accounting for 1.34%of al new cancer cases and 1.03% of all cancer-related deaths that year in China. Crude incidence and mortality were 3.16/100,000 and 1.53/100,000, respectively. World age-standardized incidence and mortality were 2.44/100,000 and 1.18/100,000, respectively. Incidence and mortality were higher among males than among females and slightly higher in urban areas than in rural areas. Among seven Chinese administrative regions, NPC incidence and mortality were obviously higher in South China than in other regions and lowest in North China. The male and female age-specific incidence and mortality both rose quickly from age 25-29 years, but peaked at different ages and varied by location. These results demonstrated that NPC incidence and mortality in China especially in South China were at high levels in the world, and suggested that control and prevention efforts should be enhanced.

  7. The influence of neighborhood unemployment on mortality after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unrath, Michael; Wellmann, Jürgen; Diederichs, Claudia; Binse, Lisa; Kalic, Marianne; Heuschmann, Peter Ulrich; Berger, Klaus

    2014-07-01

    Few studies have investigated the impact of neighborhood characteristics on mortality after stroke. Aim of our study was to analyze the influence of district unemployment as indicator of neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES-NH) on poststroke mortality, and to compare these results with the mortality in the underlying general population. Our analyses involve 2 prospective cohort studies from the city of Dortmund, Germany. In the Dortmund Stroke Register (DOST), consecutive stroke patients (N=1883) were recruited from acute care hospitals. In the Dortmund Health Study (DHS), a random general population sample was drawn (n=2291; response rate 66.9%). Vital status was ascertained in the city's registration office and information on district unemployment was obtained from the city's statistical office. We performed multilevel survival analyses to examine the association between district unemployment and mortality. The association between neighborhood unemployment and mortality was weak and not statistically significant in the stroke cohort. Only stroke patients exposed to the highest district unemployment (fourth quartile) had slightly higher mortality risks. In the general population sample, higher district unemployment was significantly associated with higher mortality following a social gradient. After adjustment for education, health-related behavior and morbidity was made the strength of this association decreased. The impact of SES-NH on mortality was different for stroke patients and the general population. Differences in the association between SES-NH and mortality may be partly explained by disease-related characteristics of the stroke cohort such as homogeneous lifestyles, similar morbidity profiles, medical factors, and old age. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Educational Inequality in Obesity-Related Mortality in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Hyun; Jung-Choi, Kyunghee; Ko, Hyeonyoung; Song, Yun Mi

    2017-03-01

    The prevalence of obesity has been increasing worldwide, which raises concerns about the disease burden associated with obesity. Socioeconomic status (SES) has been suggested to be associated with obesity and obesity related diseases. This study aimed to evaluate the time trend in socioeconomic inequality in obesity-related mortality over the last decade in Korean population. We evaluated the influence of education level, as an indicator of SES, on obesity-related mortality using death data from the Cause of Death Statistics and the Korean Population and Housing Census databases. The rate ratio of the mortality of people at the lowest education level as compared with those at the highest education level (relative index of inequality [RII]) was estimated using Poisson regression analysis. Between 2001 and 2011, RII (95% confidence interval) for overall obesity-related disease mortality increased from 2.10 (2.02-2.19) to 6.50 (6.19-6.82) in men, and from 1.94 (1.79-2.10) to 3.25 (3.05-3.45) in women, respectively. Cause-specifically, the same trend in RII was found for cardiovascular mortality and mortality from diabetes mellitus, whereas the RII of mortality from obesity-related cancers in men did not show the similar trend. Subgroup analysis stratified by age revealed that the RII of obesity-related mortality was much higher in younger people than in older people. In conclusion, there has been persistent socioeconomic inequality in obesity-related mortality in Korea, which was more evident in younger people than in older people and has been deepened over the last decade especially for cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

  9. From past to present. Effect of lifecourse on mortality, and social class differences in mortality in middle adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiina Pensola

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Social class differences in mortality are larger in middle adulthood than at any other time of life. Circumstances over the lifecourse may contribute to these adult social class differences. However, it is only rarely that the lifecourse approach has been applied to mortality studies among persons in their middle adulthood. The aim of this thesis is to disentangle the effects of the living conditions in the parental home and major transition in youth on social class differences in mortality from various causes of death among women and men aged 31-42 at death, and to evaluate whether the effect of the past circumstances on mortality is through latency, accumulation or pathway mechanisms. This thesis (papers II-V is based on the 1990 census data for all Finnish persons born in 1956-60 linked with death records (4369 deaths for 1991-98 and with information on lifecourse circumstances from the 1970, 1975, 1980 and 1985 censuses. These aggregated cross-tables are analysed by means of Poisson regression. Parental home had an association with disease mortality from age 20 onwards, indicating a latency effect. However, the direct effect of the parental home on mortality was minor, and therefore the contribution of latency model to differential mortality remained small. An indication for the accumulative effect of disadvantageous social class was found for cardiovascular diseases and alcohol-related causes. The living conditions in the parental home, i.e. the manual class and one-parent family, had an effect on the transitions a person experienced in youth, and thus contributed to the effect youth paths exerted on adult social class differences in mortality from various causes of death. Youth paths had a substantial effect (about 60-90% over and above the preceding effect of living conditions in the parental home on mortality. The higher mortality in the lower social classes was mainly attributable to disadvantageous educational path. Moreover, both

  10. Universal mortality law and immortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azbel', Mark Ya.

    2004-10-01

    Well-protected human and laboratory animal populations with abundant resources are evolutionarily unprecedented. Physical approach, which takes advantage of their extensively quantified mortality, establishes that its dominant fraction yields the exact law, which is universal for all animals from yeast to humans. Singularities of the law demonstrate new kinds of stepwise adaptation. The law proves that universal mortality is an evolutionary by-product, which at any given age is reversible, independent of previous life history, and disposable. Life expectancy may be extended, arguably to immortality, by minor biological amendments in the animals. Indeed, in nematodes with a small number of perturbed genes and tissues it increased 6-fold (to 430 years in human terms), with no apparent loss in health and vitality. The law relates universal mortality to specific processes in cells and their genetic regulation.

  11. Electrocardiographic Predictors of Cardiovascular Mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Mozos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are the main causes of mortality. Sudden cardiac death may also appear in athletes, due to underlying congenital or inherited cardiac abnormalities. The electrocardiogram is used in clinical practice and clinical trials, as a valid, reliable, accessible, inexpensive method. The aim of the present paper was to review electrocardiographic (ECG signs associated with cardiovascular mortality and the mechanisms underlying those associations, providing a brief description of the main studies in this area, and consider their implication for clinical practice in the general population and athletes. The main ECG parameters associated with cardiovascular mortality in the present paper are the P wave (duration, interatrial block, and deep terminal negativity of the P wave in V1, prolonged QT and Tpeak-Tend intervals, QRS duration and fragmentation, bundle branch block, ST segment depression and elevation, T waves (inverted, T wave axes, spatial angles between QRS and T vectors, premature ventricular contractions, and ECG hypertrophy criteria.

  12. Decline in breast cancer mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njor, Sisse Helle; Schwartz, Walter; Blichert-Toft, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: When estimating the decline in breast cancer mortality attributable to screening, the challenge is to provide valid comparison groups and to distinguish the screening effect from other effects. In Funen, Denmark, multidisciplinary breast cancer management teams started before screening...... was introduced; both activities came later in the rest of Denmark. Because Denmark had national protocols for breast cancer treatment, but hardly any opportunistic screening, Funen formed a "natural experiment", providing valid comparison groups and enabling the separation of the effect of screening from other...... factors. METHODS: Using Poisson regression we compared the observed breast cancer mortality rate in Funen after implementation of screening with the expected rate without screening. The latter was estimated from breast cancer mortality in the rest of Denmark controlled for historical differences between...

  13. Mortality rates among wild chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K; Boesch, C; Goodall, J; Pusey, A; Williams, J; Wrangham, R

    2001-05-01

    In order to compare evolved human and chimpanzees' life histories we present a synthetic life table for free-living chimpanzees, derived from data collected in five study populations (Gombe, Taï, Kibale, Mahale, Bossou). The combined data from all populations represent 3711 chimpanzee years at risk and 278 deaths. Males show higher mortality than females and data suggest some inter-site variation in mortality. Despite this variation, however, wild chimpanzees generally have a life expectancy at birth of less than 15 years and mean adult lifespan (after sexual maturity) is only about 15 years. This is considerably lower survival than that reported for chimpanzees in zoos or captive breeding colonies, or that measured among modern human hunter-gatherers. The low mortality rate of human foragers relative to chimpanzees in the early adult years may partially explain why humans have evolved to senesce later than chimpanzees, and have a longer juvenile period.

  14. Impact of surgical volume on nationwide hospital mortality after pancreaticoduodenectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chul-Gyu Kim; Sungho Jo; Jae Sun Kim

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the impact of surgical volume on nationwide hospital mortality after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) for periampullary tumors in South Korea.METHODS:Periampullary cancer patients who underwent PD between 2005 and 2008 were analyzed from the database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service of South Korea.A total of 126 hospitals were divided into 5 categories,each similar in terms of surgical volume for each category.We used hospital mortality as a quality indicator,which was defined as death during the hospital stay for PD,and calculated adjusted mortality through multivariate logistic models using several confounder variables.RESULTS:A total of eligible 4975 patients were enrolled in this study.Average annual surgical volume of hospitals was markedly varied,ranging from 215 PDs in the very-high-volume hospital to < 10 PDs in the verylow-volume hospitals.Admission route,type of medical security,and type of operation were significantly different by surgical volume.The overall hospital mortality was 2.1% and the observed hospital mortality by surgical volume showed statistical difference.Surgical volume,age,and type of operation were independent risk factors for hospital death,and adjusted hospital mortality showed a similar difference between hospitals with observed mortality.The result of the HosmerLemeshow test was 5.76 (P =0.674),indicating an acceptable appropriateness of our regression model.CONCLUSION:The higher-volume hospitals showed lower hospital mortality than the lower-volume hospitals after PD in South Korea,which were clarified through the nationwide database.

  15. Targeted interventions and infant mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovel, H

    1989-01-01

    The main causes of infant mortality in 71% of the cases are diarrhea, measles, acute respiratory infection, and neonatal tetanus. A UN child survival strategy includes growth monitoring, oral rehydration, breast feeding, immunization, fertility, food and female literacy (GOBI-FFF). Previous research has shown a correlation between low levels of infant mortality and high levels of female literacy. Educated women are more likely to delay marriage, and childbearing. Child mortality is much higher for those born to women under 20 years old and also much higher for those born within 1 or 2 after the previous birth. Maternal mortality is also higher for mothers under 20 and with closely spaced births of 3 or more children. The majority of adults in developing countries have knowledge of family planning but teen pregnancy is a concern. Better nutrition during pregnancy would decrease infant deaths. Growth monitoring is another way to reduce infant mortality and morbidity. The difficulties are in the reluctance to adapt programs to local traditional methods of growth monitoring and going to direct recording scales. Immunization is estimated to have prevented over 3 million deaths from measles, tetanus, whooping cough and polio in 1984 alone. In spite of progress, only 50% of children in developing countries are immunized against diphtheria, pertussis, polio, and tetanus by the age of 1 year. these activities must be integrated into primary health care and community development projects to make better contact with people needing this service. oral rehydration therapy not only reduces mortality from diarrhea but can reduce morbidity by reducing the duration of the illness and by increasing the weight gain. Breast feeding has been shown in many studies to reduce the risk of deaths of infants. The promotion of breast feeding includes the issues of maternity leave, job security, and child care at the work place.

  16. Child mortality estimation: accelerated progress in reducing global child mortality, 1990-2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Hill

    Full Text Available Monitoring development indicators has become a central interest of international agencies and countries for tracking progress towards the Millennium Development Goals. In this review, which also provides an introduction to a collection of articles, we describe the methodology used by the United Nations Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation to track country-specific changes in the key indicator for Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG 4, the decline of the under-five mortality rate (the probability of dying between birth and age five, also denoted in the literature as U5MR and (5q(0. We review how relevant data from civil registration, sample registration, population censuses, and household surveys are compiled and assessed for United Nations member states, and how time series regression models are fitted to all points of acceptable quality to establish the trends in U5MR from which infant and neonatal mortality rates are generally derived. The application of this methodology indicates that, between 1990 and 2010, the global U5MR fell from 88 to 57 deaths per 1,000 live births, and the annual number of under-five deaths fell from 12.0 to 7.6 million. Although the annual rate of reduction in the U5MR accelerated from 1.9% for the period 1990-2000 to 2.5% for the period 2000-2010, it remains well below the 4.4% annual rate of reduction required to achieve the MDG 4 goal of a two-thirds reduction in U5MR from its 1990 value by 2015. Thus, despite progress in reducing child mortality worldwide, and an encouraging increase in the pace of decline over the last two decades, MDG 4 will not be met without greatly increasing efforts to reduce child deaths.

  17. Is cancer mortality increasing in France?

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, C.; Jan, P; Doyon, F

    2001-01-01

    Long-term trends in cancer mortality are reported by site. Overall, cancer mortality has been decreasing in France since 1987 in the male population and since 1968 in the female population. Improvement in treatments and diagnosis should lead to persistently declining mortality rates, unless the tobacco epidemic reverses the trend in female mortality. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com

  18. Mortality in adult congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, Carianne L.; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; van der Velde, Enno T.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Pieper, Petronella G.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Mortality in adults with congenital heart disease is known to be increased, yet its extent and the major mortality risks are unclear. The Dutch CONCOR national registry for adult congenital heart disease was linked to the national mortality registry. Cox's regression was used to assess mortality pre

  19. Mortality among ethylene oxide workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, R W; Claxton, K W; Divine, B J; Kaplan, S D; Harris, V B

    1981-11-01

    Because of reports linking an increased risk of leukemia with exposure to ethylene oxide, a mortality study of workers with potential exposure to ethylene oxide at the Texaco Chemical Company Plant in Port Neches, Tex., was undertaken. A total of 767 males with potential exposure to ethylene oxide were identified. Forty-six deaths occurred in this cohort with 80 expected (standardized mortality ratio; SMR = 58). No deaths from leukemia were seen, nor were there any statistically significant excesses from any specific causes of death.

  20. Immunization coverage and infant mortality rate in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimouchi, A; Ozasa, K; Hayashi, K

    1994-01-01

    We examined whether immunization coverage (IMC) is one of the predictors of infant mortality rate (IMR), as a single indicator representing the availability of primary health care (PHC) services in developing countries. Multiple regression analysis showed that partial correlation coefficients for IMR with immunization coverage (-0.224), logarithm of per capita GNP (-0.294), total fertility rate (0.269), and adult literacy rate (-0.325) were all statistically significant (p immunization coverage is one of the main predictors of the infant mortality rate. It represents one of the health intervention components which can be used as a proxy indicator of the availability of PHC service in developing countries.

  1. Mortality in Central Java: results from the indonesian mortality registration system strengthening project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irianto Joko

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mortality statistics from death registration systems are essential for health policy and development. Indonesia has recently mandated compulsory death registration across the entire country in December 2006. This article describes the methods and results from activities to ascertain causes of registered deaths in two pilot registration areas in Central Java during 2006-2007. The methods involved several steps, starting with adaptation of international standards for reporting causes of registered deaths for implementation in two sites, Surakarta (urban and Pekalongan (rural. Causes for hospital deaths were certified by attending physicians. Verbal autopsies were used for home deaths. Underlying causes were coded using ICD-10. Completeness of registration was assessed in a sample of villages and urban wards by triangulating data from the health sector, the civil registration system, and an independent household survey. Finally, summary mortality indicators and cause of death rankings were developed for each site. Findings A total of 10,038 deaths were registered in the two sites during 2006-2007; yielding annual crude death rates of 5.9 to 6.8 per 1000. Data completeness was higher in rural areas (72.5% as compared to urban areas (52%. Adjusted life expectancies at birth were higher for both males and females in the urban population as compared to the rural population. Stroke, ischaemic heart disease and chronic respiratory disease are prominent causes in both populations. Other important causes are diabetes and cancer in urban areas; and tuberculosis and diarrhoeal diseases in rural areas. Conclusions Non-communicable diseases cause a significant proportion of premature mortality in Central Java. Implementing cause of death reporting in conjunction with death registration appears feasible in Indonesia. Better collaboration between health and registration sectors is required to improve data quality. These are the first local

  2. Maternal mortality ratio in Lebanon in 2008: a hospital-based reproductive age mortality study (RAMOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobeika, Elie; Abi Chaker, Samer; Harb, Hilda; Rahbany Saad, Rita; Ammar, Walid; Adib, Salim

    2014-01-01

    International agencies have recently assigned Lebanon to the group H of countries with "no national data on maternal mortality," and estimated a corresponding maternal mortality ratio (MMR) of 150 per 100,000 live births. The Ministry of Public Health addressed the discrepancy perceived between the reality of the maternal mortality ratio experience in Lebanon and the international report by facilitating a hospital-based reproductive age mortality study, sponsored by the World Health Organization Representative Office in Lebanon, aiming at providing an accurate estimate of a maternal mortality ratio for 2008. The survey allowed a detailed analysis of maternal causes of deaths. Reproductive age deaths (15-49 years) were initially identified through hospital records. A trained MD traveled to each hospital to ascertain whether recorded deaths were in fact maternal deaths or not. ICD10 codes were provided by the medical controller for each confirmed maternal deaths. There were 384 RA death cases, of which 13 were confirmed maternal deaths (339%) (numerator). In 2008, there were 84823 live births in Lebanon (denominator). The MMR in Lebanon in 2008 was thus officially estimated at 23/100,000 live births, with an "uncertainty range" from 153 to 30.6. Hemorrhage was the leading cause of death, with double the frequency of all other causes (pregnancy-induced hypertension, eclampsia, infection, and embolism). This specific enquiry responded to a punctual need to correct a clearly inadequate report, and it should be relayed by an on-going valid surveillance system. Results indicate that special attention has to be devoted to the management of peri-partum hemorrhage cases. Arab, postpartum hemorrhage, development, pregnancy management, verbal autopsy

  3. Mortality from diabetic renal disease: a hidden epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Chalapati; Adair, Timothy; Bain, Chris; Doi, Suhail A R

    2012-04-01

    Population-level mortality indicators can be useful outcome measures of diabetes care. Death registration systems serve as the main source of data for such measures. However, standard mortality indicators based on underlying causes do not adequately reflect the burden from diabetic renal disease. This article presents findings from analysis of multiple causes of death available from death registration data for Australia and USA. Both countries use an automated system that applies prescribed rules to select and code the underlying cause for each registered death. Deaths with diabetes as underlying cause were grouped according to their diabetic complications as defined by the International Classification of Diseases. Age-standardized mortality rates were calculated for the underlying cause rubric 'diabetes with renal complications'. These were contrasted with rates calculated using additional deaths where diabetes was the underlying cause and renal failure was listed as a consequence. These analyses identified that current automated programmes code three-fourths of all diabetes deaths to 'diabetes without complications', despite additional factors being listed. Estimated multiple cause death rates from diabetic renal disease are four to nine times higher than underlying cause rates for 'diabetes with renal complications' in both countries; and show a rising trend in contrast to the latter. These findings indicate that routine underlying cause statistics for USA and Australia grossly under estimate mortality from diabetic renal disease. Clear guidelines on the certification, coding and statistical presentation of diabetes mortality are needed for epidemiology and health policy.

  4. Child mortality in rural India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van der Klaauw (Bas); L. Wang (Lihong)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis paper focuses on infant and child mortality in rural areas of India. We construct a flexible duration model, which allows for frailty at multiple levels and interactions between the child's age and individual, socioeconomic, and environmental characteristics. The model is estimated

  5. America's Infant-Mortality Puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberstadt, Nicholas

    1991-01-01

    Conventional explanations attributing the high infant mortality rate in United States to the prevalence of poverty and lack of adequate health care do not tell the whole story. Contributions of parental behavior, lifestyles, and public health care availability versus utilization must be examined in determining public policies to address the…

  6. Infant Mortality: The Shared Concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heagarty, Margaret C.

    1990-01-01

    Addresses the causes for and implications of infant mortality. Besides the more immediate causes such as disease, nutrition, and lifestyle, there are the additional hurdles of government bureaucracy, lack of funds, and institutional attitudes that block access to prenatal care. Suggests structural solutions, including a consistent, individual,…

  7. Predictors of paediatric injury mortality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Wesley Guild Hospital Unit, Obafemi Awolowo University ... 90% of global deaths due to injuries in children occur in low-income ... sought and obtained by carefully explaining the purpose and benefits ..... terms of mortality and development of neurological sequelae.4-7,16 In.

  8. Excess mortality following hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, B; van Staa, T; Ariely, R;

    2009-01-01

    Summary This systematic literature review has shown that patients experiencing hip fracture after low-impact trauma are at considerable excess risk for death compared with nonhip fracture/community control populations. The increased mortality risk may persist for several years thereafter, highlig...

  9. Testosterone deficiency and cardiovascular mortality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abraham Morgentaler

    2015-01-01

    New concerns have been raised regarding cardiovascular (CV) risks with testosterone (T) therapy (TTh). These concerns are based primarily on two widely reported retrospective studies. However, methodological flaws and data errors invalidate both studies as credible evidence of risk. One showed reduced adverse events by half in T‑treated men but reversed this result using an unproven statistical approach. The authors subsequently acknowledged serious data errors including nearly 10% contamination of the dataset by women. The second study mistakenly used the rate of T prescriptions written by healthcare providers to men with recent myocardial infarction (MI) as a proxy for the naturally occurring rate of MI. Numerous studies suggest T is beneficial, including decreased mortality in association with TTh, reduced MI rate with TTh in men with the greatest MI risk prognosis, and reduced CV and overall mortality with higher serum levels of endogenous T. Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated benefits of TTh in men with coronary artery disease and congestive heart failure. Improvement in CV risk factors such as fat mass and glycemic control have been repeatedly demonstrated in T‑deficient men treated with T. The current evidence does not support the belief that TTh is associated with increased CV risk or CV mortality. On the contrary, a wealth of evidence accumulated over several decades suggests that low serum T levels are associated with increased risk and that higher endogenous T, as well as TTh itself, appear to be beneficial for CV mortality and risk.

  10. Geomagnetic Indices Bulletin (GIB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Geomagnetic Indices Bulletin is a one page sheet containing the magnetic indices Kp, Ap, Cp, An, As, Am and the provisional aa indices. The bulletin is published...

  11. Perinatal mortality at pre-Columbian Teotihuacan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, R

    1986-04-01

    The skeletal population of 166 individuals from a low-status apartment compound of the pre-Columbian city of Teotihuacan contained 52 perinatal individuals. The most perilous time of the lifespan was around birth, as revealed by life table analysis. Femur length was not increasing during the last month of gestation, and individuals were probably shorter somatically at birth than modern standards or historic-period Arikara skeletal controls. The possibility of intrauterine growth retardation is investigated through paleo-pathological indicators of prenatal growth arrest. The evidence of prenatal stress and the high rate of mortality at birth seem to indicate that this New World preindustrial urban population faced similar health and nutritional stresses as Old World preindustrial cities.

  12. The Stranding Anomaly as Population Indicator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peltier, Helene; Baagøe, Hans J.; Camphuysen, Kees C.J.

    2013-01-01

    Ecological indicators for monitoring strategies are expected to combine three major characteristics: ecological significance, statistical credibility, and cost-effectiveness. Strategies based on stranding networks rank highly in cost-effectiveness, but their ecological significance and statistical...... credibility are disputed. Our present goal is to improve the value of stranding data as population indicator as part of monitoring strategies by constructing the spatial and temporal null hypothesis for strandings. The null hypothesis is defined as: small cetacean distribution and mortality are uniform...... surveys, mostly SCANS surveys (1994 and 2005). This new indicator could be applied to cetacean populations across the world and more widely to marine megafauna....

  13. Homoarginine, cardiovascular risk, and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    März, Winfried; Meinitzer, Andreas; Drechsler, Christiane; Pilz, Stefan; Krane, Vera; Kleber, Marcus E; Fischer, Joachim; Winkelmann, Bernhard R; Böhm, Bernhard O; Ritz, Eberhard; Wanner, Christoph

    2010-09-07

    Homoarginine is an amino acid derivative that may increase nitric oxide availability and enhance endothelial function. The effect of the level of homoarginine on cardiovascular outcome and mortality is unknown. We assessed cardiovascular and all-cause mortality according to homoarginine levels in a cohort of 3,305 subjects referred for coronary angiography from the LUdwigshafen RIsk and Cardiovascular Health (LURIC) Study. After investigating the relation of homoarginine with kidney function and markers of endothelial dysfunction, we explored its effects on adverse outcomes in a second high-risk cohort of 1244 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus receiving maintenance hemodialysis (4D study [Die Deutsche Diabetes Dialyse Studie]). In the LURIC study, mean serum homoarginine levels were 2.6+/-1.1 micromol/L. During a median follow-up of 7.7 years, 766 patients died. After adjustments for age and sex, patients in the lowest quartile (4-fold higher rate of dying of cardiovascular disease (hazard ratio 4.1, 95% confidence interval 3.0 to 5.7) than patients in the highest quartile (>3.1 micromol/L). Lower homoarginine levels were associated with lower estimated glomerular filtration rate and higher levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1. Hemodialysed patients had lower mean homoarginine levels of 1.2+/-0.5 micromol/L and experienced a 5-fold increased mortality rate compared with LURIC patients (608 deaths during a median follow-up of 4 years). Homoarginine consistently affected mortality, which was 2-fold higher in 4D study patients in the lowest quartile (1.4 micromol/L). Homoarginine levels are independently associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in patients referred for coronary angiography and in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Future studies are needed to elucidate the underlying pathomechanisms.

  14. Short-term mortality and prognostic factors related to status epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Gustavo Stelzer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective Status epilepticus (SE is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and there is some controversy concerning predictive indicators of outcome. Our main goal was to determine mortality and to identify factors associated with SE prognosis. Method This prospective study in a tertiary-care university hospital, included 105 patients with epileptic seizures lasting more than 30 minutes. Mortality was defined as death during hospital admission. Results The case-fatality rate was 36.2%, which was higher than in previous studies. In univariate analysis, mortality was associated with age, previous epilepsy, complex focal seizures; etiology, recurrence, and refractoriness of SE; clinical complications, and focal SE. In multivariate analysis, mortality was associated only with presence of clinical complications. Conclusions Mortality associated with SE was higher than reported in previous studies, and was not related to age, specific etiology, or SE duration. In multivariate analysis, mortality was independently related to occurrence of medical complications.

  15. Discrimination ability of comorbidity, frailty, and subjective health to predict mortality in community-dwelling older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusumastuti, Sasmita; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Lund, Rikke

    2017-01-01

    to discriminate mortality risks was assessed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Three-year mortality risks, hazard ratios, change in individual mortality risks, three-year area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). RESULTS: Three-year mortality risks increased 41-folds within an age span of 50years......%, both upwards and downwards, each adding discriminative power. The added discrimination ability of all health indicators gradually declined from an extra 4% at age 50-59 to ..., and household income. CONCLUSION: Calendar age encompasses most of the discrimination ability to predict mortality. The added value of comorbidity, frailty, and subjective health to mortality predictions decreases with increasing age....

  16. Does reservoir host mortality enhance transmission of West Nile virus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foppa Ivo M

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since its 1999 emergence in New York City, West Nile virus (WNV has become the most important and widespread cause of mosquito-transmitted disease in North America. Its sweeping spread from the Atlantic to the Pacific coast was accompanied by widespread mortality among wild birds, especially corvids. Only sporadic avian mortality had previously been associated with this infection in the Old World. Here, we examine the possibility that reservoir host mortality may intensify transmission, both by concentrating vector mosquitoes on remaining hosts and by preventing the accumulation of "herd immunity". Results Inspection of the Ross-Macdonald expression of the basic reproductive number (R0 suggests that this quantity may increase with reservoir host mortality. Computer simulation confirms this finding and indicates that the level of virulence is positively associated with the numbers of infectious mosquitoes by the end of the epizootic. The presence of reservoir incompetent hosts in even moderate numbers largely eliminated the transmission-enhancing effect of host mortality. Local host die-off may prevent mosquitoes to "waste" infectious blood meals on immune host and may thus facilitate perpetuation and spread of transmission. Conclusion Under certain conditions, host mortality may enhance transmission of WNV and similarly maintained arboviruses and thus facilitate their emergence and spread. The validity of the assumptions upon which this argument is built need to be empirically examined.

  17. Does reservoir host mortality enhance transmission of West Nile virus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foppa, Ivo M; Spielman, Andrew

    2007-05-11

    Since its 1999 emergence in New York City, West Nile virus (WNV) has become the most important and widespread cause of mosquito-transmitted disease in North America. Its sweeping spread from the Atlantic to the Pacific coast was accompanied by widespread mortality among wild birds, especially corvids. Only sporadic avian mortality had previously been associated with this infection in the Old World. Here, we examine the possibility that reservoir host mortality may intensify transmission, both by concentrating vector mosquitoes on remaining hosts and by preventing the accumulation of "herd immunity". Inspection of the Ross-Macdonald expression of the basic reproductive number (R0) suggests that this quantity may increase with reservoir host mortality. Computer simulation confirms this finding and indicates that the level of virulence is positively associated with the numbers of infectious mosquitoes by the end of the epizootic. The presence of reservoir incompetent hosts in even moderate numbers largely eliminated the transmission-enhancing effect of host mortality. Local host die-off may prevent mosquitoes to "waste" infectious blood meals on immune host and may thus facilitate perpetuation and spread of transmission. Under certain conditions, host mortality may enhance transmission of WNV and similarly maintained arboviruses and thus facilitate their emergence and spread. The validity of the assumptions upon which this argument is built need to be empirically examined.

  18. Breastfeeding and the risk for diarrhea morbidity and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victora Cesar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lack of exclusive breastfeeding among infants 0-5 months of age and no breastfeeding among children 6-23 months of age are associated with increased diarrhea morbidity and mortality in developing countries. We estimate the protective effects conferred by varying levels of breastfeeding exposure against diarrhea incidence, diarrhea prevalence, diarrhea mortality, all-cause mortality, and hospitalization for diarrhea illness. Methods We systematically reviewed all literature published from 1980 to 2009 assessing levels of suboptimal breastfeeding as a risk factor for selected diarrhea morbidity and mortality outcomes. We conducted random effects meta-analyses to generate pooled relative risks by outcome and age category. Results We found a large body of evidence for the protective effects of breastfeeding against diarrhea incidence, prevalence, hospitalizations, diarrhea mortality, and all-cause mortality. The results of random effects meta-analyses of eighteen included studies indicated varying degrees of protection across levels of breastfeeding exposure with the greatest protection conferred by exclusive breastfeeding among infants 0-5 months of age and by any breastfeeding among infants and young children 6-23 months of age. Specifically, not breastfeeding resulted in an excess risk of diarrhea mortality in comparison to exclusive breastfeeding among infants 0-5 months of age (RR: 10.52 and to any breastfeeding among children aged 6-23 months (RR: 2.18. Conclusions Our findings support the current WHO recommendation for exclusive breastfeeding during the first 6 months of life as a key child survival intervention. Our findings also highlight the importance of breastfeeding to protect against diarrhea-specific morbidity and mortality throughout the first 2 years of life.

  19. Climate-induced mortality of spruce stands in Belarus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Im, Sergei T.; Dvinskaya, Maria L.; Golukov, Alexei S.; Ranson, Kenneth J.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work is an analysis of the causes of spruce (Picea abies L.) decline and mortality in Belarus. The analysis was based on forest inventory and Landsat satellite (land cover classification, climate variables (air temperature, precipitation, evaporation, vapor pressure deficit, SPEI drought index)), and GRACE-derived soil moisture estimation (equivalent of water thickness anomalies, EWTA). We found a difference in spatial patterns between dead stands and all stands (i.e., before mortality). Dead stands were located preferentially on relief features with higher water stress risk (i.e., higher elevations, steeper slopes, south and southwestern exposure). Spruce mortality followed a series of repeated droughts between 1990 and 2010. Mortality was negatively correlated with air humidity (r = -0.52), and precipitation (r = -0.57), and positively correlated with the prior year vapor pressure deficit (r = 0.47), and drought increase (r = 0.57). Mortality increased with the increase in occurrence of spring frosts (r = 0.5), and decreased with an increase in winter cloud cover (r = -0.37). Spruce mortality was negatively correlated with snow water accumulation (r = -0.81) and previous year anomalies in water soil content (r = -0.8). Weakened by water stress, spruce stands were attacked by pests and phytopathogens. Overall, spruce mortality in Belarussian forests was caused by drought episodes and drought increase in synergy with pest and phytopathogen attacks. Vast Picea abies mortality in Belarus and adjacent areas of Russia and Eastern Europe is a result of low adaptation of that species to increased drought. This indicates the necessity of spruce replacement by drought-tolerant indigenous (e.g., Pinus sylvestris, Querqus robur) or introduced (e.g., Larix sp. or Pseudotsuga menzieslii) species to obtain sustainable forest growth management.

  20. Climate-Induced Mortality of Spruce Stands in Belarus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Im, Sergei T.; Dvinskaya, Maria L.; Golukov, Alexei S.; Ranson, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is an analysis of the causes of spruce (Picea abies L.) decline and mortality in Belarus. The analysis was based on forest inventory and Landsat satellite (land cover classification, climate variables (air temperature, precipitation, evaporation, vapor pressure deficit, SPEI drought index)), and GRACE-derived soil moisture estimation (equivalent of water thickness anomalies, EWTA). We found a difference in spatial patterns between dead stands and all stands (i.e., before mortality). Dead stands were located preferentially on relief features with higher water stress risk (i.e., higher elevations, steeper slopes, south and southwestern exposure). Spruce mortality followed a series of repeated droughts between 1990 and 2010. Mortality was negatively correlated with air humidity (r = -0.52), and precipitation (r = -0.57), and positively correlated with the prior year vapor pressure deficit (r = 0.47), and drought increase (r = 0.57). Mortality increased with the increase in occurrence of spring frosts (r = 0.5), and decreased with an increase in winter cloud cover (r = -0.37). Spruce mortality was negatively correlated with snow water accumulation (r = -0.81) and previous year anomalies in water soil content (r = -0.8). Weakened by water stress, spruce stands were attacked by pests and phytopathogens. Overall, spruce mortality in Belarussian forests was caused by drought episodes and drought increase in synergy with pest and phytopathogen attacks. Vast Picea abies mortality in Belarus and adjacent areas of Russia and Eastern Europe is a result of low adaptation of that species to increased drought. This indicates the necessity of spruce replacement by drought-tolerant indigenous (e.g., Pinus sylvestris, Querqus robur) or introduced (e.g., Larix sp. or Pseudotsuga menzieslii) species to obtain sustainable forest growth management.

  1. Country-level correlates of cervical cancer mortality in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Scalabrino, Ana; Almonte, Maribel; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    To identify country-level correlates of geographical variations in cervical cancer (CC) mortality in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). CC mortality rates for LAC countries (n=26) were examined in relation to country-specific socio-economic indicators (n=58) and Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) prevalence using linear regression models. High mortality at ages <5 years, low per capita total expenditure on health, and low proportion of the population with access to sanitation were identified as the best independent predictors of CC mortality (R² =77%). In the subset of countries (n=10) with HPV prevalence estimates, these socio-economic indicators together with high-risk HPV prevalence explained almost all the between-country variability in CC mortality (R² =98%). The findings suggest that continuing socioeconomic improvements in LAC countries will be associated with further reductions in CC mortality even in the absence of organised population-based screening and vaccination programmes.

  2. Does selection of mortality model make a difference in projecting population ageing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Scherbov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In low mortality countries, assessing future ageing depends to a large extent on scenarios of future mortality reduction at old age. Often in population projections mortality reduction is implemented via life expectancy increases that do not specify mortality change at specific age groups. The selection of models that translate life expectancy into age-specific mortality rates may be of great importance for projecting the older age groups of future populations and indicators of ageing. Objective: We quantify how the selection of mortality models, assuming similar life expectancy scenarios, affects projected indices of population ageing. Methods: Using the cohort-component method, we project the populations of Italy, Japan, Russia, Sweden, and the USA. For each country, the given scenario of life expectancy at birth is translated into age-specific death rates by applying four alternative mortality models (variants of extrapolations of the log-mortality rates, the Brass relational model, and the Bongaarts shifting model. The models are contrasted according to their produced future age-specific mortality rates, population age composition, life expectancy at age 65, age at remaining life expectancy 15 years, and conventional and prospective old-age dependency ratios. Conclusions: We show strong differences between the alternative mortality models in terms of mortality age pattern and ageing indicators. Researchers of population ageing should be as careful about their choice of model of age patterns of future mortality as about scenarios of future life expectancy. The simultaneous extrapolation of age-specific death rates may be a better alternative to projecting life expectancy first and then deriving the age patterns of mortality in the second step.

  3. Effects of economic downturns on mortality of wild African elephants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittemyer, George

    2011-10-01

    Declines in economic activity and associated changes in human livelihood strategies can increase threats of species overexploitation. This is exemplified by the effects of economic crises, which often drive intensification of subsistence poaching and greater reliance on natural resources. Whereas development theory links natural resource use to social-economic conditions, few empirical studies of the effect of economic downturns on wild animal species have been conducted. I assessed the relations between African elephant (Loxodonta africana) mortality and human-caused wounds in Samburu, Kenya and (1) livestock and maize prices (measures of local economic conditions), (2) change in national and regional gross domestic product (GDP) (measures of macroeconomic conditions), and (3) the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) (a correlate of primary productivity). In addition, I analyzed household survey data to determine the attitudes of local people toward protected areas and wild animals in the area. When cattle prices in the pastoralist study region were low, human-caused wounds to and adult mortality of elephants increased. The NDVI was negatively correlated with juvenile mortality, but not correlated with adult mortality. Changes in Kenyan and East Asian (primary market for ivory) GDP did not explain significant variation in mortality. Increased human wounding of elephants and elephant mortality during periods of low livestock prices (local economic downturns) likely reflect an economically driven increase in ivory poaching. Local but not macroeconomic indices explained significant variation in mortality, likely due to the dominance of the subsistence economy in the study area and its political and economic isolation. My results suggest economic metrics can serve as effective indicators of changes in human use of and resulting effects on natural resources. Such information can help focus management approaches (e.g., antipoaching effort or proffering of

  4. Comparing pandemic to seasonal influenza mortality: moderate impact overall but high mortality in young children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaard, C.C. van den; Asten, L. van; Koopmans, M.P.G.; Pelt, W. van; Nagelkerke, N.J.D.; Wielders, C.C.H.; Lier, A. van; Hoek, W. van der; Meijer, A.; Donker, G.A.; Dijkstra, F.; Harmsen, C.; Sande, M.A.B. van der; Kretzschmar, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: We assessed the severity of the 2009 influenza pandemic by comparing pandemic mortality to seasonal influenza mortality. However, reported pandemic deaths were laboratory-confirmed - and thus an underestimation - whereas seasonal influenza mortality is often more inclusively estimated. F

  5. Excess mortality among the unmarried: a case study of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, N; Hu, Y

    1993-02-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that mortality patterns by marital status in Japan are different from corresponding patterns in other industrialized countries. Most notably, the magnitude of the excess mortality experienced by single Japanese has been staggering. For example, estimates of life expectancy for the mid-1900s indicate that single Japanese men and women had life expectancies between 15 and 20 years lower than their married counterparts. In addition, gender differences among single Japanese have been smaller than elsewhere, while those among divorced persons have been unanticipatedly large; and, the excess mortality of the Japanese single population has been decreasing over the past few decades in contrast to generally increasing differentials elsewhere. In this paper, we use a variety of data sources to explore several explanations for these unique mortality patterns in Japan. Undeniably, the traditional Japanese system of arranged marriages makes the process of selecting a spouse a significant factor. Evidence from anthropological studies and attitudinal surveys indicates that marriage is likely to have been and probably continues to be more selective with regard to underlying health characteristics in Japan than in other industrialized countries. However, causal explanations related to the importance of marriage and the family in Japanese society may also be responsible for the relatively high mortality experienced by singles and by divorced men.

  6. Mortality level, trends and differentials in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamuleni, M E

    1994-01-01

    "This article examines the levels, and trends and differentials in mortality in Malawi.... The study has shown that (i) the level of mortality is very high in Malawi; (ii) mortality has declined during the period under review; (iii) there was reduction in the rate of mortality decline in the seventies; and (iv) [there are] interesting differences in mortality in terms of rural-urban localities, regions and age-sex differentials. The observed levels, trends and differentials in mortality are however consistent with the level of social and economic development in the country."

  7. Long-term particulate matter exposure and mortality: a review of European epidemiological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boffetta Paolo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies considered the relation between long-term exposure to particulate matter (PM and total mortality, as well as mortality from cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Our aim was to provide a comprehensive review of European epidemiological studies on the issue. Methods We searched the Medline database for epidemiological studies on air pollution and health outcomes published between January 2002 and December 2007. We also examined the reference lists of individual papers and reviews. Two independent reviewers classified the studies according to type of air pollutant, duration of exposure and health outcome considered. Among European investigations that examined long-term PM exposure we found 4 cohort studies (considering total and cardiopulmonary mortality, 1 case-control study (considering mortality from myocardial infarction, and 4 ecologic studies (2 studies considering total and cardiopulmonary mortality and 2 studies focused on cardiovascular mortality. Results Measurement indicators of PM exposure used in European studies, including PM10, PM2.5, total suspended particulate and black smoke, were heterogeneous. This notwithstanding, in all analytic studies total mortality was directly associated with long-term exposure to PM. The excesses in mortality were mainly due to cardiovascular and respiratory causes. Three out of 4 ecologic studies found significant direct associations between PM indexes and mortality. Conclusion European studies on long-term exposure to PM indicate a direct association with mortality, particularly from cardiovascular and respiratory diseases.

  8. Educational inequalities in diabetes mortality across Europe in the 2000s: the interaction with gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenheede, Hadewijch; Deboosere, Patrick; Espelt, Albert; Bopp, Matthias; Borrell, Carme; Costa, Giuseppe; Eikemo, Terje Andreas; Gnavi, Roberto; Hoffmann, Rasmus; Kulhanova, Ivana; Kulik, Margarete; Leinsalu, Mall; Martikainen, Pekka; Menvielle, Gwenn; Rodriguez-Sanz, Maica; Rychtarikova, Jitka; Mackenbach, Johan P

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate educational inequalities in diabetes mortality in Europe in the 2000s, and to assess whether these inequalities differ between genders. Data were obtained from mortality registries covering 14 European countries. To determine educational inequalities in diabetes mortality, age-standardised mortality rates, mortality rate ratios, and slope and relative indices of inequality were calculated. To assess whether the association between education and diabetes mortality differs between genders, diabetes mortality was regressed on gender, educational rank and 'gender × educational rank'. An inverse association between education and diabetes mortality exists in both genders across Europe. Absolute educational inequalities are generally larger among men than women; relative inequalities are generally more pronounced among women, the relative index of inequality being 2.8 (95 % CI 2.0-3.9) in men versus 4.8 (95 % CI 3.2-7.2) in women. Gender inequalities in diabetes mortality are more marked in the highest than the lowest educated. Education and diabetes mortality are inversely related in Europe in the 2000s. This association differs by gender, indicating the need to take the socioeconomic and gender dimension into account when developing public health policies.

  9. Social inequality in infant mortality: what explains variation across low and middle income countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajizadeh, Mohammad; Nandi, Arijit; Heymann, Jody

    2014-01-01

    Growing work demonstrates social gradients in infant mortality within countries. However, few studies have compared the magnitude of these inequalities cross-nationally. Even fewer have assessed the determinants of social inequalities in infant mortality across countries. This study provides a comprehensive and comparative analysis of social inequalities in infant mortality in 53 low-and-middle-income countries (LMICs). We used the most recent nationally representative household samples (n = 874,207) collected through the Demographic Health Surveys (DHS) to calculate rates of infant mortality. The relative and absolute concentration indices were used to quantify social inequalities in infant mortality. Additionally, we used meta-regression analyses to examine whether levels of inequality in proximate determinants of infant mortality were associated with social inequalities in infant mortality across countries. Estimates of both the relative and the absolute concentration indices showed a substantial variation in social inequalities in infant mortality among LMICs. Meta-regression analyses showed that, across countries, the relative concentration of teenage pregnancy among poorer households was positively associated with the relative concentration of infant mortality among these groups (beta = 0.333, 95% CI = 0.115 0.551). Our results demonstrate that the concentration of infant deaths among socioeconomically disadvantaged households in the majority of LMICs remains an important health and social policy concern. The findings suggest that policies designed to reduce the concentration of teenage pregnancy among mothers in lower socioeconomic groups may mitigate social inequalities in infant mortality.

  10. Comparative analysis of premature mortality among urban immigrants in Bremen, Germany: a retrospective register-based linkage study

    OpenAIRE

    Makarova, Nataliya; Brand, Tilman; Brünings-Kuppe, Claudia; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Luttmann, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The main objective of this study was to explore differences in mortality patterns among two large immigrant groups in Germany: one from Turkey and the other from the former Soviet Union (FSU). To this end, we investigated indicators of premature mortality. Design This study was conducted as a retrospective population-based study based on mortality register linkage. Using mortality data for the period 2004–2010, we calculated age-standardised death rates (SDR) and standardised morta...

  11. Perinatal Mortality in Southern Nigeria; less than half a decade to the Millennium Developmental Goals

    OpenAIRE

    Ibekwe, PC; Ugboma, HU; Onyire, N; Muoneke, U

    2011-01-01

    Background: Perinatal mortality is one of the essential indicators of the health status of a country and by extension its state of development. Reduction in perinatal mortality rate is an important aspect of the MDGs. Objectives: To determine the perinatal mortality rate (PMR) in 2 tertiary institutions in Southern Nigeria and the factors responsible for the deaths. Methods: This was a retrospective, observational study conducted amongst 2 groups of subjects (A and B) located in 2 tertiary ho...

  12. An examination of black/white differences in the rate of age-related mortality increase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Fenelon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The rate of mortality increase with age among adults is typically used as a measure of the rate of functional decline associated with aging or senescence. While black and white populations differ in the level of mortality, mortality also rises less rapidly with age for blacks than for whites, leading to the well-known black/white mortality "crossover". OBJECTIVE This paper investigates black/white differences in the rate of mortality increase with age for major causes of death in order to examine the factors responsible for the black/white crossover. METHODS The analysis considers two explanations for the crossover: selective survival and age misreporting. Mortality is modeled using a Gompertz model for 11 causes of death from ages 50-84 among blacks and whites by sex. RESULTS Mortality increases more rapidly with age for whites than for blacks for nearly all causes of death considered. The all-cause mortality rate of mortality increase is nearly two percentage points higher for whites. The analysis finds evidence for both selective survival and age misreporting, although age misreporting is a more prominent explanation among women. CONCLUSIONS The black/white mortality crossover reflects large differences in the rate of age-related mortality increase. Instead of reflecting the impact of specific causes of death, this pattern exists across many disparate disease conditions, indicating the need for a broad explanation.

  13. Lifespan and Aggregate Size Variables in Specifications of Mortality or Survivorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelbaum, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A specification of mortality or survivorship provides respective explicit details about mortality's or survivorship's relationships with one or more other variables (e.g., age, sex, etc.). Previous studies have discovered and analyzed diverse specifications of mortality or survivorship; these discoveries and analyses suggest that additional specifications of mortality or survivorship have yet to be discovered and analyzed. In consistency with previous research, multivariable limited powered polynomials regression analyses of mortality and survivorship of selected humans (Swedes, 1760–2008) and selected insects (caged medflies) show age-specific, historical-time-specific, environmental-context-specific, and sex-specific mortality and survivorship. These analyses also present discoveries of hitherto unknown lifespan-specific, contemporary-aggregate-size-specific, and lifespan-aggregate-size-specific mortality and survivorship. The results of this investigation and results of previous research help identify variables for inclusion in regression models of mortality or survivorship. Moreover, these results and results of previous research strengthen the suggestion that additional specifications of mortality or survivorship have yet to be discovered and analyzed, and they also suggest that specifications of mortality and survivorship indicate corresponding specifications of frailty and vitality. Furthermore, the present analyses reveal the usefulness of a multivariable limited powered polynomials regression model-building approach. This article shows that much has yet to be learned about specifications of mortality or survivorship of diverse kinds of individuals in diverse times and places. PMID:24454719

  14. Psychological distress and mortality in systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelle, Aline J; Pedersen, Susanne S.; Schiffer, Angélique A

    2010-01-01

    Depression, anxiety, and type D ("distressed") personality (tendency to experience negative emotions paired with social inhibition) have been associated with poor prognosis in coronary heart disease, but little is known about their role in chronic heart failure. Therefore, we investigated whether...... these indicators of psychological distress are associated with mortality in chronic heart failure....

  15. Risk factors for mortality among tuberculosis patients on treatment at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Gunda

    About one third of the worlds' population is estimated to be infected with M. ... report indicate that 9.6 million people were newly diagnosed with TB globally with mortality ..... known to have a disrupted immunity due to ageing process on top of ...

  16. Educational differences in cardiovascular mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøllesdal, M. K. R.; Ariansen, I.; Mortensen, L. H.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To explore the confounding effects of early family factors shared by siblings and cardiovascular risk factors in midlife on the educational differences in mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods: Data from national and regional health surveys in Norway (1974–2003) were linked...... with data from the Norwegian Family Based Life Course Study, the National Educational Registry and the Cause of Death Registry. The study population consisted of participants with at least one full sibling among the health survey participants (n=271,310). Data were available on CVD risk factors, including...... weight, height, blood pressure, total cholesterol and smoking. Results: The hazards ratio (HR) of CVD mortality was 3.44 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.98–3.96) in the lowest educational group relative to the highest. The HRs were little altered in the within-sibship analyses. Adjusted for risk factors...

  17. Physical Inactivity and Mortality Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kokkinos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years a plethora of epidemiologic evidence accumulated supports a strong, independent and inverse, association between physical activity and the fitness status of an individual and mortality in apparently healthy individuals and diseased populations. These health benefits are realized at relatively low fitness levels and increase with higher physical activity patterns or fitness status in a dose-response fashion. The risk reduction is at least in part attributed to the favorable effect of exercise or physical activity on the cardiovascular risk factors, namely, blood pressure, diabetes mellitus and obesity. In this review, we examine evidence from epidemiologic and interventional studies in support of the association between exercise and physical activity and health. In addition, we present the exercise effects on the aforementioned risk factors. Finally, we include select dietary approaches and their impact on risk factors and overall mortality risk.

  18. Testosterone Therapy and Mortality Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Michael L.; Li, Shufeng; Herder, Danielle; Lamb, Dolores J.; Lipshultz, Larry I.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Recent data suggests and increased risk of cardiovascular events and mortality in men on testosterone therapy (TT). To date there are no long term, prospective studies to determine safety. In such cases, retrospective observational studies can be helpful. We examined our patient database to determine if TT altered a man’s risk of all cause mortality. METHODS We queried our hormone database for all men with a serum testosterone level and then examined charts to determine testosterone status. In all, 509 men had charts available for review. We linked our patient records to the National Death Index to determine morality. RESULTS Of the 509 men who met inclusion criteria, 284 were on testosterone therapy and 225 did not use testosterone. Age (mean 54 years) and follow up time (mean 10 years) were similar for both groups. In all, 19 men died—10 (4.4%) of the men not on TT and 9 (3.2%) of the men on TT. After adjusting for age and year of evaluation, there was no significant difference in the risk of death based on TT (HR 1.0, 95% CI 0.39 – 2.57, p=1.0). CONCLUSIONS There appears to be no change in mortality risk overall for men utilizing long-term testosterone therapy. PMID:25078049

  19. CREDIT Performance Indicator Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Anne Kathrine; Bertelsen, Niels Haldor; Haugbølle, Kim

    2010-01-01

    During the past two years the Nordic Baltic research project CREDIT (Construction and Real Estate – Developing Indicators for Transparency) has worked with the aim to improve transparency of value creation in building and real estate. One of the central deliverables of the CREDIT project...... was a framework of indicators relevant in building and real estate and applicable in the Nordic and Baltic countries as well as a proposal for a set of key indicators. The study resulting in CREDIT Performance Indicator Framework has been based on 28 case studies of evaluation practises in the building and real...... regulations in the countries participating in CREDIT. The Performance Indicator Framework encompassed 187 indicators grouped in 7 main groups of indicators and 42 sub-groups. Based on the CREDIT case studies it was concluded that there neither is link between certain indicators and specific building types...

  20. Geomagnetic aa Indices

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The geomagnetic aa indices are the continuation of the series beginning in the year 1868. A full description of these indices is given in the International...

  1. Altimeter Setting Indicator

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Altimeter Setting Indicator (ASI) is an aneroid system used at airports to provide an altimeter setting for aircraft altimeters. This indicator may be an analog...

  2. Alternative Solar Indices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantz, L.J.

    1980-07-01

    Possible alternative Solar Indices which could either be a perturbation from the currently defined Solar Index or possible indices based on current technologies for other media markets are discussed. An overview is given of the current project, including the logic that was utilized in defining its current structure and then alternative indices and definitions are presented and finally, recommendations are made for adopting alternative indices.

  3. CDC WONDER: Mortality - Multiple Cause of Death

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mortality - Multiple Cause of Death data on CDC WONDER are county-level national mortality and population data spanning the years 1999-2009. Data are based on...

  4. CDC WONDER: Mortality - Multiple Cause of Death

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mortality - Multiple Cause of Death data on CDC WONDER are county-level national mortality and population data spanning the years 1999-2006. These data are...

  5. CDC WONDER: Mortality - Underlying Cause of Death

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CDC WONDER Mortality - Underlying Cause of Death online database is a county-level national mortality and population database spanning the years since 1979. Data...

  6. Mortality hazard rates and life expectancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.S. Cramer; R. Kaas

    2013-01-01

    We consider the relation between mortality hazards and life expectancy for men and women in the Netherlands and in England. Halving the lifetime mortality hazards increases life expectancy at birth by only 9%.

  7. Competing risks to breast cancer mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Marjorie A

    2006-01-01

    Simulation models analyzing the impact of treatment interventions and screening on the level of breast cancer mortality require an input of mortality from causes other than breast cancer, or competing risks. This chapter presents an actuarial method of creating cohort life tables using published data that removes breast cancer as a cause of death. Mortality from causes other than breast cancer as a percentage of all-cause mortality is smallest for women in their forties and fifties, as small as 85% of the all-cause rate, although the level and percentage of the impact varies by birth cohort. This method produces life tables by birth cohort and by age that are easily included as a common input by the various CISNET modeling groups to predict mortality from other causes. Attention to removing breast cancer mortality from all-cause mortality is worthwhile, because breast cancer mortality can be as high as 15% at some ages.

  8. Snakebite Mortality in India: A Nationally Representative Mortality Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Bijayeeni; Warrell, David A.; Suraweera, Wilson; Bhatia, Prakash; Dhingra, Neeraj; Jotkar, Raju M.; Rodriguez, Peter S.; Mishra, Kaushik; Whitaker, Romulus; Jha, Prabhat

    2011-01-01

    Background India has long been thought to have more snakebites than any other country. However, inadequate hospital-based reporting has resulted in estimates of total annual snakebite mortality ranging widely from about 1,300 to 50,000. We calculated direct estimates of snakebite mortality from a national mortality survey. Methods and Findings We conducted a nationally representative study of 123,000 deaths from 6,671 randomly selected areas in 2001–03. Full-time, non-medical field workers interviewed living respondents about all deaths. The underlying causes were independently coded by two of 130 trained physicians. Discrepancies were resolved by anonymous reconciliation or, failing that, by adjudication. A total of 562 deaths (0.47% of total deaths) were assigned to snakebites. Snakebite deaths occurred mostly in rural areas (97%), were more common in males (59%) than females (41%), and peaked at ages 15–29 years (25%) and during the monsoon months of June to September. This proportion represents about 45,900 annual snakebite deaths nationally (99% CI 40,900 to 50,900) or an annual age-standardised rate of 4.1/100,000 (99% CI 3.6–4.5), with higher rates in rural areas (5.4/100,000; 99% CI 4.8–6.0), and with the highest state rate in Andhra Pradesh (6.2). Annual snakebite deaths were greatest in the states of Uttar Pradesh (8,700), Andhra Pradesh (5,200), and Bihar (4,500). Conclusions Snakebite remains an underestimated cause of accidental death in modern India. Because a large proportion of global totals of snakebites arise from India, global snakebite totals might also be underestimated. Community education, appropriate training of medical staff and better distribution of antivenom, especially to the 13 states with the highest prevalence, could reduce snakebite deaths in India. PMID:21532748

  9. Use of tylosin to prevent early mortality in bobwhite quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J E; Hughes, B L; Mulliken, W E

    1976-05-01

    Two experiments were conducted to study the effect of treating day-old quail by drenching either with a soluble tylosin, tartrate solution or plain water, or medicating for five days with tylosin in the drinking water. Diagnosis of dead birds indicated ulcerative enteritis infection. Quail drenched with plain water or tylosine had less (P less than .01) mortality than those given tylosin in the drinking water or the untreated control birds. There was no difference between quail drenched with plain water or tylosin. Birds given tylosin in the drinking water resisted mortality significantly better (P less than .01) than the control birds.

  10. Mortality versus Morbidity in the Demographic Transition

    OpenAIRE

    Aksan, Anna-Maria; Chakraborty, Shankha

    2014-01-01

    The link between the mortality and epidemiological transitions is used to identify the effect of the former on the fertility transition: a mortality transition that is not accompanied by improving morbidity causes slower demographic and economic change. In a model where children may die from infectious disease, childhood health affects human capital and noninfectious-disease-related adult mortality. When child mortality falls from lower prevalence, as it did in western Europe, labor productiv...

  11. High mortality in the Thule cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, K

    1994-01-01

    The objective was to study mortality in the Thule cohort in order to clarify whether it is a selected population and to ascertain the possibility of misinterpretation when national mortality rates are used as reference in the analysis of occupational mortality....

  12. Advance Report of Final Mortality Statistics, 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monthly Vital Statistics Report, 1987

    1987-01-01

    This document presents mortality statistics for 1985 for the entire United States. Data analysis and discussion of these factors is included: death and death rates; death rates by age, sex, and race; expectation of life at birth and at specified ages; causes of death; infant mortality; and maternal mortality. Highlights reported include: (1) the…

  13. Human mortality improvement in evolutionary context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burger, Oskar; Baudisch, Annette; Vaupel, James W

    2012-01-01

    has not been placed in a broad evolutionary context. We quantify the rate and amount of mortality reduction by comparing a variety of human populations to the evolved human mortality profile, here estimated as the average mortality pattern for ethnographically observed hunter-gatherers. We show...

  14. Mortality in adult congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. Verheugt (Carianne); C.S.P.M. Uiterwaal (Cuno); E.T. van der Velde (Enno); F.J. Meijboom (Folkert); P.G. Pieper (Petronella); A.P.J. van Dijk (Arie); H.W. Vliegen (Hubert); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); B.J.M. Mulder (Barbara)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAimsMortality in adults with congenital heart disease is known to be increased, yet its extent and the major mortality risks are unclear.Methods and resultsThe Dutch CONCOR national registry for adult congenital heart disease was linked to the national mortality registry. Cox's regressio

  15. Mortality in adult congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. Verheugt (Carianne); C.S.P.M. Uiterwaal (Cuno); E.T. van der Velde (Enno); F.J. Meijboom (Folkert); P.G. Pieper (Petronella); A.P.J. van Dijk (Arie); H.W. Vliegen (Hubert); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); B.J.M. Mulder (Barbara)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAimsMortality in adults with congenital heart disease is known to be increased, yet its extent and the major mortality risks are unclear.Methods and resultsThe Dutch CONCOR national registry for adult congenital heart disease was linked to the national mortality registry. Cox's

  16. Mortality in adult congenital heart disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, C.L.; Uiterwaal, C.S.; Velde, E.T. van der; Meijboom, F.J.; Pieper, P.G.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Vliegen, H.W.; Grobbee, D.E.; Mulder, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: Mortality in adults with congenital heart disease is known to be increased, yet its extent and the major mortality risks are unclear. METHODS AND RESULTS: The Dutch CONCOR national registry for adult congenital heart disease was linked to the national mortality registry. Cox's regression was

  17. Residential mobility, well-being, and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Shigehiro; Schimmack, Ulrich

    2010-06-01

    We tested the relation between residential mobility and well-being in a sample of 7,108 American adults who were followed for 10 years. The more residential moves participants had experienced as children, the lower the levels of well-being as adults. As predicted, however, the negative association between the number of residential moves and well-being was observed among introverts but not among extraverts. We further demonstrated that the negative association between residential mobility and well-being among introverts was explained by the relative lack of close social relationships. Finally, we found that introverts who had moved frequently as children were more likely to have died during the 10-year follow-up. Among extraverts, childhood residential mobility was unrelated to their mortality risk as adults. These findings indicate that residential moves can be a risk factor for introverts and that extraversion can be an interpersonal resource for social relationships and well-being in mobile societies.

  18. Anxiety Predicts Mortality in ICD Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kikkenborg Berg, Selina; Caspar Thygesen, Lau; Hastrup Svendsen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although highly effective in preventing arrhythmic death, patients receiving an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) may still experience psychological difficulties such as anxiety, depression, and reduced quality of life. The objectives of this study were to describe patient...... receiving ICD between January 1, 2011 and June 30, 2011 (n = 499). The following instruments were used: SF-36, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HeartQoL, EQ-5D, and the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory. RESULTS: The response rate was 72%. Mean age was 65.5 years and 82% patients were males. Fifty...... of perceived health, quality of life, and fatigue; for example, physical health 39.8 versus 44.3 points, compared to secondary prevention indication. Anxiety, poor perceived health, fatigue, and low quality of life were all predictors of mortality, anxiety being the strongest with an adjusted odds ratio of 4...

  19. Temperature Variability and Mortality: A Multi-Country Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuming; Gasparrini, Antonio; Armstrong, Ben G.; Tawatsupa, Benjawan; Tobias, Aurelio; Lavigne, Eric; Coelho, Micheline de Sousa Zanotti Stagliorio; Pan, Xiaochuan; Kim, Ho; Hashizume, Masahiro; Honda, Yasushi; Guo, Yue Leon; Wu, Chang-Fu; Zanobetti, Antonella; Schwartz, Joel D.; Bell, Michelle L.; Overcenco, Ala; Punnasiri, Kornwipa; Li, Shanshan; Tian, Linwei; Saldiva, Paulo; Williams, Gail; Tong, Shilu

    2016-01-01

    Background: The evidence and method are limited for the associations between mortality and temperature variability (TV) within or between days. Objectives: We developed a novel method to calculate TV and investigated TV-mortality associations using a large multicountry data set. Methods: We collected daily data for temperature and mortality from 372 locations in 12 countries/regions (Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Japan, Moldova, South Korea, Spain, Taiwan, Thailand, the United Kingdom, and the United States). We calculated TV from the standard deviation of the minimum and maximum temperatures during the exposure days. Two-stage analyses were used to assess the relationship between TV and mortality. In the first stage, a Poisson regression model allowing over-dispersion was used to estimate the community-specific TV-mortality relationship, after controlling for potential confounders. In the second stage, a meta-analysis was used to pool the effect estimates within each country. Results: There was a significant association between TV and mortality in all countries, even after controlling for the effects of daily mean temperature. In stratified analyses, TV was still significantly associated with mortality in cold, hot, and moderate seasons. Mortality risks related to TV were higher in hot areas than in cold areas when using short TV exposures (0–1 days), whereas TV-related mortality risks were higher in moderate areas than in cold and hot areas when using longer TV exposures (0–7 days). Conclusions: The results indicate that more attention should be paid to unstable weather conditions in order to protect health. These findings may have implications for developing public health policies to manage health risks of climate change. Citation: Guo Y, Gasparrini A, Armstrong BG, Tawatsupa B, Tobias A, Lavigne E, Coelho MS, Pan X, Kim H, Hashizume M, Honda Y, Guo YL, Wu CF, Zanobetti A, Schwartz JD, Bell ML, Overcenco A, Punnasiri K, Li S, Tian L, Saldiva P, Williams

  20. Early-Life Origins of the Race Gap in Men's Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, David F.; Hayward, Mark D.

    2006-01-01

    Using a life course framework, we examine the early life origins of the race gap in men's all-cause mortality. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Older Men (1966-1990), we evaluate major social pathways by which early life conditions differentiate the mortality experiences of blacks and whites. Our findings indicate that early life…

  1. Effects of the APOE ε2 Allele on Mortality and Cognitive Function in the Oldest Old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune; Tan, Qihua; Mengel-From, Jonas;

    2013-01-01

    Some studies indicate that the APOE ε2 allele may have a protective effect on mortality and mental health among the elderly adults. We investigated the effect of the APOE ε2 allele on cognitive function and mortality in 1651 members of the virtually extinct Danish 1905 birth cohort. We found...

  2. Impact of the Grameen Bank on childhood mortality in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M; Davanzo, J; Sutradhar, S C

    1996-01-01

    The Grameen Bank (GB) is a highly innovative and well-supervised credit program for the rural poor in Bangladesh. About 95% of over 2 million participants are women. GB can positively affect child survival among its participants through its income-generation and consciousness-raising activities. The study examines if GB influences childhood mortality among its participants. An integrated family life survey was carried out during 1993-94 among about 2500 married women in landless households who are eligible for membership in GB. The survey was carried out among randomly selected married women regardless of GB membership in 3 thanas of Tangail district and 1 thana of Mymensingh district. The study permits an analysis in a "before-after" and "treatment-comparison" framework for measuring the impact of GB on childhood mortality. Estimation was done through proportional hazards models, where the effects of confounding factors like calendar year, maternal age, parity, maternal education, economic conditions, and areal variation were controlled for. There was a 34% and significant reduction in childhood (under-5) mortality after the mothers joined the GB. Similar effects of other NGOs on childhood mortality were also observed. Childhood mortality was similar between the GB members before joining the Bank and never-members, indicating that the GB members were not from a selective group. Childhood mortality was 21% and significantly lower among women who worked for income generation than those women who did not work. Income generation and social development programs modeled after the GB and other NGOs can reduce childhood mortality in Bangladesh and similar settings.

  3. Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality risk factors in peritoneal dialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Dijana B.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular (CVS morbidity and mortality in the endstage renal disease (ESRD patients on peritoneal dialysis therapy is 10-30 folds higher than in general population. The prevalence of well known traditional risk factors such as age, sex, race, arterial hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, smoking, physical inactivity is higher in the uraemic patients. Besides these, there are specific, nontraditional risk factors for dialysis patients. Mild inflammation present in peritoneal dialysis (PD patients which can be confirmed by specific inflammatory markers is the cause of CVS morbidity and mortality in these patients. Hypoalbuminaemia, hyperhomocysteinaemia and a higher level of leptin are important predictors of vascular complications as well as CVS events in the PD patients. Plasma norepinephrine, an indicator of sympathetic activity, is high in the ESRD patients and higher in the PD patients than in the patients on haemodialysis (HD. Therefore, norepinephrine may be a stronger risk factor in the PD patients. The same applies to asymmetric dimethylargine (ADMA, an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, which is an important risk factor of CVS morbidity and mortality 15 % higher in the PD than the HD patients. Hyperphosphataemia, secondary hyperparathyroidism and high calcium x phosphate product have been associated with the progression of the coronary artery calcification and valvular calcifications and predict all-cause CVS mortality in the PD patients. Residual renal function (RRF declines with time on dialysis but is slower in the PD than the HD patients. RRF decline is associated with the rise of proinflammatory cytokines and the onset of hypervolaemia and hypertension which increase the risk of CVS diseases, mortality in general and CVS mortality. In conclusion, it is very important to establish all CVS risk factors in the PD patients to prevent CVS diseases and CVS mortality in this population.

  4. Incidence and mortality of liver cancer in China, 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kuang-Rong Wei; Xia Yu; Rong-Shou Zheng; Xia-Biao Peng; Si-Wei Zhang; Ming-Fang Ji; Zhi-Heng Liang; Zhi-Xiong Ou; Wan-Qing Chen

    2014-01-01

    Liver cancer is a common malignant tumor in China and a major health concern. We aimed to estimate the liver cancer incidence and mortality in China in 2010 using liver cancer data from some Chinese cancer registries and provide reference for liver cancer prevention and treatment. We col ected and evaluated the incidence and mortality data of liver cancer in 2010 from 145 cancer registries, which were included in the 2013 Chinese Cancer Registry Annual Report, calculated crude, standardized, and truncated incidences and mortalities, and estimated new liver cancer cases and deaths from liver cancer throughout China and in different regions in 2010 from Chinese practical population. The estimates of new liver cancer cases and deaths were 358,840 and 312,432, respectively, in China in 2010. The crude incidence, age-standardized rate by Chinese standard population (ASR China), and age-standardized rate by world standard population (ASR world) were 27.29/100,000, 21.35/100,000, and 20.87/100,000, respectively;the crude, ASR China, and ASR world mortalities were 23.76/100,000, 18.43/100,000, and 18.04/100,000, respectively. The incidence and mortality were the highest in western regions, higher in rural areas than in urban areas, and higher in males than in females. The age-specific incidence and mortality of liver cancer showed a rapid increase from age 30 and peaked at age 80-84 or 85+. Our results indicated that the 2010 incidence and mortality of liver cancer in China, especial y in undeveloped rural areas and western regions, were among high levels worldwide. The strategy for liver cancer prevention and treatment should be strengthened.

  5. Education and Mortality in the Rome Longitudinal Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cacciani

    Full Text Available A large body of evidence supports an inverse association between socioeconomic status and mortality. We analysed data from a large cohort of residents in Rome followed-up between 2001 and 2012 to assess the relationship between individual education and mortality. We distinguished five causes of death and investigated the role of age, gender, and birthplace.From the Municipal Register we enrolled residents of Rome on October 21st 2001 and collected information on educational level attained from the 2001 Census. We selected Italian citizens aged 30-74 years and followed-up their vital status until 2012 (n = 1,283,767, identifying the cause of death from the Regional Mortality Registry. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs for overall and cause-specific mortality in relation to education. We used age, gender, and birthplace for adjusted or stratified analyses. We used the inverse probability weighting approach to account for right censoring due to emigration.We observed an inverse association between education (none vs. post-secondary+ level and overall mortality (HRs(95%CIs: 2.1(1.98-2.17, males; 1.5(1.46-1.59, females varying according to demographic characteristics. Cause-specific analysis also indicated an inverse association with education, in particular for respiratory, digestive or circulatory system related-mortality, and the youngest people seemed to be more vulnerable to low education.Our results confirm the inverse association between education and overall or cause-specific mortality and show differentials particularly marked among young people compared to the elderly. The findings provide further evidence from the Mediterranean area, and may contribute to national and cross-country comparisons in Europe to understand the mechanisms generating socioeconomic differentials especially during the current recession period.

  6. Sex differences in health and mortality in Moscow and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oksuzyan, A; Shkolnikova, M; Vaupel, J W;

    2014-01-01

    and a male advantage in self-rated health, physical functioning, and depression symptomatology. Only on cognitive tests males performed similarly to or worse than women. Nevertheless, Muscovite males had more than twice higher mortality at ages 55-69 years compared to Muscovite women, almost double the ratio...... data were obtained from the Study of Middle-Aged Danish Twins (n = 4,314), the Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins (n = 4,731), and the study of Stress, Aging, and Health in Russia (n = 1,800). In both Moscow and Denmark there was a consistent female advantage at ages 55-89 years in survival...... in Denmark. The present study showed that despite similar directions of sex differences in health and mortality in Moscow and Denmark, the male-female health-survival paradox is very pronounced in Moscow suggesting a stronger sex-specific disconnect between health indicators and mortality among middle-aged...

  7. Mortality of therapeutic fish Garra rufa caused by Aeromonas sobria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juraj Majtn; Jaroslaverny; Alena Ofkan; Peter Tak; Milan Koznek

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate a case of mass mortality of Garra rufa (G. rufa) from a fish hatchery farm in Slovakia. Methods: Causative bacterial agent was swabbing out of affected fish skin area and subsequently identified using commercial test system. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method. Results: Infected G. rufa was characterized by abnormal swimming behaviour, bleeding of skin lesions and local haemorrhages. Despite of using recommended aquatic antibiotic treatment no improvement was achieved and Aeromonas sobria (A. sobria) was identified as a causative agent of fish mortality. Due to massive fish mortality, antibiotic susceptibility of pure isolated culture of A. sobria was evaluated employing eight antibiotics against human infections. A. sobria was resistant only against one antibiotic, namely ampicilin. Conclusions: These results indicate that A. sobria can act as a primary pathogen of G. rufa and may be a potential risk factor for immunodeficient or immunoincompetent patients during the ichthyotherapy.

  8. Russian mortality beyond vital statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of routine data have established that the extreme mortality fluctuations among young and middle-aged men are the most important single component of both temporal changes in Russian life expectancy at birth and in the gap between male and female life expectancy. It is also responsible for the largest share of the life expectancy gap between Russia and other industrialised countries. A case-control study has been used to identify factors associated with mortality among men aged 20 to 55 in the five major cities of the Udmurt Republic in 1998-99. Men dying from external causes and circulatory disease are taken as cases. Matched controls were selected from men of the same age living in the same neighbourhood of residence. Information about characteristics of cases and controls was obtained by interviewing proxies who were family members or friends of the subjects. After exclusion of those deaths for which proxy informant could not be identified, a total of 205 circulatory disease and 333 external cause cases were included together with the same number of controls. Educational level was significantly associated with mortality from circulatory diseases and external causes in a crude analysis. However, this could largely be explained by adjustment for employment, marital status, smoking and alcohol consumption. Smoking was associated with mortality from circulatory disease (crude OR=2.44, 95% CI 1.36-4.36, this effect being slightly attenuated after adjustment for socio-economic factors and alcohol consumption. Unemployment was associated with a large increase in the risk of death from external causes (crude OR=3.63, 95% CI 2.17-6.08, an effect that was still substantial after adjustment for other variables (adjusted OR=2.52, 95% CI 1.43-4.43. A reported history of periods of heavy drinking was linked to both deaths from circulatory disease (crude OR=4.21, 95% CI 2.35-7.55 and external cause mortality (crude OR=2.65, 95% CI 1

  9. The role of marriage in the causal pathway from economic conditions early in life to mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Gerard J; Gupta, Sumedha

    2015-03-01

    This paper analyzes the interplay between early-life conditions and marital status, as determinants of adult mortality. We use individual data from Dutch registers (years 1815-2000), combined with business cycle conditions in childhood as indicators of early-life conditions. The empirical analysis estimates bivariate duration models of marriage and mortality, allowing for unobserved heterogeneity. Results show that conditions around birth and school going ages are important for marriage and mortality. Men typically enjoy a protective effect of marriage, whereas women suffer during childbearing ages. However, having been born under favorable economic conditions reduces female mortality during childbearing ages.

  10. [Socioeconomic inequalities and infant mortality in Bolivia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maydana, Edgar; Serral, Gemma; Borrell, Carme

    2009-05-01

    To evaluate socioeconomic inequalities and its relation to infant mortality in Bolivia's municipalities in 2001. An ecological study based on data from the 2001 National Census on Population and Housing (Censo Nacional de Población y Vivienda) covering the 327 municipalities in Bolivia's nine departments. The dependent variable was the infant mortality rate (IMR); the independent variables were indirect socioeconomic indicators (the percentage of illiterates older than 15 years of age, and the building materials and sanitation features of the houses). The geographic distribution of each indicator was determined and the associations between IMR and each socioeconomic indicator were calculate using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and adjusted with Poisson regression models. The resulting IMR for Bolivia in 2001 was 67 per 1000 live births. Rates ranged from <0.1 per 1000 live births in the Magdalena municipality, Beni department, to 170.0 per 1000 live births in the Caripuyo municipality, Potosí department. The mean rate of illiteracy per municipality was 17.5%; the mean percentage of houses without running water was 90.4%, and for those lacking sanitation services, 67.6%. The IMR was inversely associated with all of the socioeconomic indicators studied. The highest relative risk was found in housing without sanitation services. Multifactorial models adjusted for illiteracy showed that the following indicators were still strongly associated with the IMR: no sanitation services (Relative risk (RR)=1.54; 95% Confidence Interval (95%CI)=1.38-1.66); adobe, stone, or mud walls (RR=1.54; 95%CI: 1.43-1.67); and, corrugated metal, straw, or palm branch roof (RR=1.34; 95%CI: 1.26-1.43). A significant association was found between poor socioeconomic status and high IMR in Bolivia's municipalities in 2001. The municipalities in the country's central and southeastern areas had lower socioeconomic status and higher IMR. The lack of education, absence of basic sanitation

  11. The mortality of elder mistreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachs, M S; Williams, C S; O'Brien, S; Pillemer, K A; Charlson, M E

    1998-08-05

    Although elder mistreatment is suspected to be life threatening in some instances, little is known about the survival of elderly persons who have been mistreated. To estimate the independent contribution of reported elder abuse and neglect to all-cause mortality in an observational cohort of community-dwelling older adults. Prospective cohort study with at least 9 years of follow-up. The New Haven Established Population for Epidemiologic Studies in the Elderly cohort, which included 2812 community-dwelling adults who were older than 65 years in 1982, a subset of whom were referred to protective services for the elderly. All-cause mortality among (1) elderly persons for whom protective services were used for corroborated elder mistreatment (elder abuse, neglect, and/or exploitation), or (2) elderly persons for whom protective services were used for self-neglect. In the first 9 years after cohort inception, 176 cohort members were seen by elderly protective services for verified allegations; 10 (5.7%) of these were for abuse, 30 (17.0%) for neglect, 8 (4.5%) for exploitation, and 128 (72.7%) for self-neglect. At the end of a 13-year follow-up period from cohort inception, cohort members seen for elder mistreatment at any time during the follow-up had poorer survival (9%) than either those seen for self-neglect (17%) or other noninvestigated cohort members (40%) (Pself-neglect (odds ratio, 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.5), when compared with other members of the cohort. Reported and corroborated elder mistreatment and self-neglect are associated with shorter survival after adjusting for other factors associated with increased mortality in older adults.

  12. eHealth indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    HYPPÖNEN, Hannele; AMMENWERTH, Elske; Nøhr, Christian;

    2012-01-01

    eHealth indicators are needed to measure defined aspects of national eHealth implementations. However, until now, eHealth indicators are ambiguous or unclear. Therefore, an expert workshop "Towards an International Minimum Dataset for Monitoring National Health Information System Implementations......" was organized. The objective was to develop ideas for a minimum eHealth indicator set. The proposed ideas for indicators were classified based on EUnetHTA and De-Lone & McClean, and classification was compared with health IT evaluation criteria classification by Ammenwerth & Keizer. Analysis of the workshop...... results emphasized the need for a common methodological framework for defining and classifying eHealth indicators. It also showed the importance of setting the indicators into context. The results will benefit policy makers, developers and researchers in pursuit of provision and use of evidence...

  13. Endogenous fertility, mortality and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, K; Cipriani, G P

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a model that illustrates the joint determination of population and development. "Economic and demographic outcomes are determined jointly in a choice-theoretic model of fertility, mortality and capital accumulation.... In addition to choosing savings and births, parents may reduce (infant) deaths by incurring expenditures on health-care which is also provided by the government. A generalised production technology accounts for long-run endogenous growth with short-run transitional dynamics. The analysis yields testable time series and cross-section implications which accord with the empirical evidence on the relationship between demography and development."

  14. Indicators for environmental sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Yan; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2017-01-01

    Decision making on sustainable consumption and production requires scientifically based information on sustainability. Different environmental sustainability targets exist for specific decision problems. To observe how well these targets are met, relevant environmental indicators are needed....... In this study, we reviewed indicators applied in life cycle assessment (LCA), planetary boundary framework (PB), and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) developed under United Nation. The aim is to 1) identify their applications and relevant decision context; 2) Review their indicators and categorize them...

  15. Indicators for environmental sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Yan; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2017-01-01

    Decision making on sustainable consumption and production requires scientifically based information on sustainability. Different environmental sustainability targets exist for specific decision problems. To observe how well these targets are met, relevant environmental indicators are needed....... In this study, we reviewed indicators applied in life cycle assessment (LCA), planetary boundary framework (PB), and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) developed under United Nation. The aim is to 1) identify their applications and relevant decision context; 2) Review their indicators and categorize them...

  16. Bone Marrow Pathology Predicts Mortality in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hao Weng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A bone marrow biopsy is a useful procedure for the diagnosis and staging of various hematologic and systemic diseases. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the findings of bone marrow studies can predict mortality in chronic hemodialysis patients. Methods. Seventy-eight end-stage renal disease patients on maintenance hemodialysis underwent bone marrow biopsies between 2000 and 2011, with the most common indication being unexplained anemia followed by unexplained leukocytosis and leukopenia. Results. The survivors had a higher incidence of abnormal megakaryocyte distribution P=0.001, band and segmented cells P=0.021, and lymphoid cells P=0.029 than the nonsurvivors. The overall mortality rate was 38.5% (30/78, and the most common cause of mortality was sepsis (83.3% followed by respiratory failure (10%. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, both decreased (OR 3.714, 95% CI 1.671–8.253, P=0.001 and absent (OR 9.751, 95% CI 2.030–45.115, P=0.004 megakaryocyte distribution (normal megakaryocyte distribution as the reference group, as well as myeloid/erythroid ratio (OR 1.054, CI 1.012–1.098, P=0.011, were predictive of mortality. Conclusion. The results of a bone marrow biopsy can be used to assess the pathology, and, in addition, myeloid/erythroid ratio and abnormal megakaryocyte distribution can predict mortality in chronic hemodialysis patients.

  17. Mortality from endometrial cancer in female population of Belgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantović Vesna R.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Data about mortality from malignant tumors of endometrium were analyzed in the Belgrade area during the period 1975-2000. The obtained results showed that the average percentage of endometrial cancer in mortality structure from all the cancers of female population was 2.65%. During the observed 26-years period, malignant tumors of endometrium constituted 17.38% of all the tumors of gynecological localization. The standardized mortality rate in 1975 (population worldwide used as a standard 7.06/100 000 population while in 2000 it was 1.78/100 000 population, respectively, which showed almost fourfold mortality decline during the observed period (y=4.72-0.16x. A trend of declining risk of dying from endometrial cancer was present in all the age groups. The obtained results indicated that in the observed period the average mortality rates ranged from 0.14/100 000 population in females aged up to 34 years (y=0.30-0.01x, and reached the highest value in females aged 65-74 years (14.57/100 000; y=23.43-0.66x, and 75 years of age and over (19.62/100 000; y=31.17-0.85x.

  18. Airborne pollen and suicide mortality in Tokyo, 2001-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickley, Andrew; Sheng Ng, Chris Fook; Konishi, Shoko; Koyanagi, Ai; Watanabe, Chiho

    2017-05-01

    Prior research has indicated that pollen might be linked to suicide mortality although the few studies that have been undertaken to date have produced conflicting findings and been limited to Western settings. This study examined the association between the level of airborne pollen and suicide mortality in Tokyo, Japan in the period from 2001 to 2011. The daily number of suicide deaths was obtained from the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, with pollen data being obtained from the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Public Health. A time-stratified case-crossover study was performed to examine the association between different levels of pollen concentration and suicide mortality. During the study period there were 5185 male and 2332 female suicides in the pollen season (February to April). For men there was no association between airborne pollen and suicide mortality. For women, compared to when there was no airborne pollen, the same-day (lag 0) pollen level of 30 to suicide (e.g. 30 to suicide mortality in Tokyo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Mortality by homicides in Colombia, 1998-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro-Narváez, Pablo; Cotes-Cantillo, Karol; León-Quevedo, Willian; Castañeda-Orjuela, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    Homicide is a universal indicator of social violence with large public health consequences. To describe mortality by homicides and to analyze its trends and geographic distribution in Colombia between 1998 and 2012. We conducted a descriptive study of deaths by homicide in Colombia between 1998 and 2012 using official mortality databases and the population projections of the Departamento Administrativo Nacional de Estadística, DANE. We calculated age- and sex-specific mortality rates, and we analyzed the geographical distribution of mean-adjusted homicide mortality rates at municipal level. Between 1998 and 2012, 331,470 homicides were reported in Colombia. The mean crude rate was 51.5 per 100,000 inhabitants: 95.9 in men and 8.2 in women. Since 2003, a decrease in the number of deaths and rates was observed; 91.9% of the victims were men and the highest mortality rates were reported in the 20-29 years old group. The most frequently involved mechanism was the firearm: Eight of 10 homicides in men, and seven of 10 homicides in women. Out of 1,122 municipalities, 186 were in the highest quintile, accumulating 50.1% of all deaths. In Colombia, homicides have been one of the leading causes of death with a trend towards reduction since 2002. Its geographical distribution has been heterogeneous. To continue addressing this public health issue we must recur to multidisciplinary analytical methodologies for a better understanding of the phenomenon.

  20. Morbidity and Mortality after Gut Resection and Anastomosis Western Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pius MUSAU

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the morbidity and mortality after gut resection and anastomosis in a tertiary centre in Kenya. To do this a retrospective, hospital-based study, cohort study of patients who underwent resection and anastomosis in the period 2002 - 2006, both years inclusive. The general surgical wards of Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital (MTRH, a 750 teaching and referral hospital in the Western region of Kenya was used for the study. Two hundred and twenty patients of all ages underwent gut resection and anastomosis for various reasons over the period of study. The primary outcome measures were morbidity and mortality in this group of patients. Morbidity was considered in terms of postoperative complications and hospital length stay. The secondary outcome measures were the patient demography, vital signs at admission and delay in surgery. The morbidity rate was 22.7 % while the mortality rate was 15.9 %. The principal indicators of morbidity were the intra-abdominal pathology, the duration from onset of symptoms to surgery and the type of anastomosis. The patient’s age, type of anastomosis and postoperative complications were key determinants of mortality. In conclusion, pre-operative resuscitation in patients who underwent gut resection and anastomosis influenced morbidity and mortality. Delay in surgery and the type of anastomosis done were determinants of post-operative complications which in turn influenced the outcome of treatment.

  1. Mortality patterns following downsizing at Pan American World Airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenland, Kyle; Pinkerton, Lynne E

    2008-01-01

    There are only a small number of studies on the health effects of involuntary unemployment (e.g., downsizing), and results are contradictory. The authors studied the mortality through 2002 of 13,370 Pan American World Airways employees who were born before 1940 and whose records were available after the company's bankruptcy in 1991. The cohort was divided into those who left work voluntarily (55%), involuntarily (39%), and because of illness (6%). The mean year of first employment was 1963, the mean year of last employment was 1987, and the mean age at leaving the company was 55 years. Of those who left involuntarily, 56% left at the time of bankruptcy in December 1991 or later. Twenty-two percent of the cohort died during follow-up, which began at the time of leaving the company. Standardized mortality ratios relative to the US population for all causes for those who left voluntarily, involuntarily, and because of illness were 0.72 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.69, 0.76), 0.69 (95% CI: 0.65, 0.74), and 2.40 (95% CI: 2.22, 2.60), respectively. Ischemic heart disease mortality showed a similar pattern. Internal analyses comparing involuntary to voluntary leavers after adjusting for age, race, sex, calendar time, and education yielded all-cause and ischemic heart disease rate ratios of 0.96 (95% CI: 0.87, 1.07) and 1.11 (95% CI: 0.93, 1.35), respectively. Subanalyses of those who left involuntarily at age >/=60 years, or those who left involuntarily at the time of bankruptcy, did not indicate any excess mortality (all-cause standardized mortality ratios = 0.69 and 0.64, respectively). These data do not indicate that mortality among those who left involuntarily was higher than for those who left voluntarily. Both groups showed a strong healthy worker effect.

  2. Impacts of Austrian Climate Variability on Honey Bee Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switanek, Matt; Brodschneider, Robert; Crailsheim, Karl; Truhetz, Heimo

    2015-04-01

    Global food production, as it is today, is not possible without pollinators such as the honey bee. It is therefore alarming that honey bee populations across the world have seen increased mortality rates in the last few decades. The challenges facing the honey bee calls into question the future of our food supply. Beside various infectious diseases, Varroa destructor is one of the main culprits leading to increased rates of honey bee mortality. Varroa destructor is a parasitic mite which strongly depends on honey bee brood for reproduction and can wipe out entire colonies. However, climate variability may also importantly influence honey bee breeding cycles and bee mortality rates. Persistent weather events affects vegetation and hence foraging possibilities for honey bees. This study first defines critical statistical relationships between key climate indicators (e.g., precipitation and temperature) and bee mortality rates across Austria, using 6 consecutive years of data. Next, these leading indicators, as they vary in space and time, are used to build a statistical model to predict bee mortality rates and the respective number of colonies affected. Using leave-one-out cross validation, the model reduces the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) by 21% with respect to predictions made with the mean mortality rate and the number of colonies. Furthermore, a Monte Carlo test is used to establish that the model's predictions are statistically significant at the 99.9% confidence level. These results highlight the influence of climate variables on honey bee populations, although variability in climate, by itself, cannot fully explain colony losses. This study was funded by the Austrian project 'Zukunft Biene'.

  3. Data Quality and Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Matute

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study highlights the importance of collecting good quality data from multidisciplinary studies. Bias in data may be the result of instrument inaccuracies, imprecise data recording techniques, inaccurate data entry to computers or inappropriate statistical analysis and presentation. Recommendations for good data quality control are given. Different types of data are discussed: raw data, simple indicators and complex indicators. It is shown how measurements from the components of multidisciplinary systems can be combined to form complex indicators and a specific example is given using Z-scores and dot charts. Finally the accumulated effect of bias in the individual component measurements upon the combined indicator is shown.

  4. Scopus' SNIP Indicator

    CERN Document Server

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2010-01-01

    Rejoinder to Moed [arXiv:1005.4906]: Our main objection is against developing new indicators which, like some of the older ones (for example, the "crown indicator" of CWTS), do not allow for indicating error because they do not provide a statistics, but are based, in our opinion, on a violation of the order of operations. The claim of validity for the SNIP indicator is hollow because the normalizations are based on field classifications which are not valid. Both problems can perhaps be solved by using fractional counting.

  5. CREDIT Performance Indicator Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Anne Kathrine; Bertelsen, Niels Haldor; Haugbølle, Kim

    2010-01-01

    During the past two years the Nordic Baltic research project CREDIT (Construction and Real Estate – Developing Indicators for Transparency) has worked with the aim to improve transparency of value creation in building and real estate. One of the central deliverables of the CREDIT project was a fr......During the past two years the Nordic Baltic research project CREDIT (Construction and Real Estate – Developing Indicators for Transparency) has worked with the aim to improve transparency of value creation in building and real estate. One of the central deliverables of the CREDIT project...... was a framework of indicators relevant in building and real estate and applicable in the Nordic and Baltic countries as well as a proposal for a set of key indicators. The study resulting in CREDIT Performance Indicator Framework has been based on 28 case studies of evaluation practises in the building and real...... regulations in the countries participating in CREDIT. The Performance Indicator Framework encompassed 187 indicators grouped in 7 main groups of indicators and 42 sub-groups. Based on the CREDIT case studies it was concluded that there neither is link between certain indicators and specific building types...

  6. Climate Change Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presents information, charts and graphs showing measured climate changes across 40 indicators related to greenhouse gases, weather and climate, oceans, snow and ice, heath and society, and ecosystems.

  7. Spatial patterns of mortality in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, A H; Huq, S M; Mesbah-us-Saleheen

    1993-05-01

    This paper depicts the spatial patterns of mortality of the administrative upazilas of Bangladesh. Due to the absence of adequate data on mortality rates from across the country, the mortality rates of the upazilas are calculated from the age sex structure of the population of the respective upazilas employing the standardized mortality rates of divisional headquarters. Crude death rates are used to determine spatial patterns of mortality in Bangladesh. The patterns portray strong regional differences. Such differentiation is accounted for by traditional differences in demographic and socio-economic factors. Also, regression analysis is used to assist in explaining spatial variations.

  8. Phenomenological theory of mortality and aginge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azbel', Mark Ya.

    There are many theories of mortality, but no consensus even on the basic problem: is it genetically determined? In a general case, the problem is mathematically unsolvable. Yet, in the case of mortality, a physical approach yields its universal law. The law predicts, e.g., that mortality and senescence may decrease with age. Experiments verify it. I suggest experiments, which are supposed to produce genetic Methuselas, who live, e.g., over 20 η ( η is the mean life span), but whose biological age is less than η/2. If the universal mortality law is convincingly proven, it may lead to a quantitative model and theory of mortality and aging.

  9. Patterns and drivers of tree mortality in iberian forests: climatic effects are modified by competition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Ruiz-Benito

    Full Text Available Tree mortality is a key process underlying forest dynamics and community assembly. Understanding how tree mortality is driven by simultaneous drivers is needed to evaluate potential effects of climate change on forest composition. Using repeat-measure information from c. 400,000 trees from the Spanish Forest Inventory, we quantified the relative importance of tree size, competition, climate and edaphic conditions on tree mortality of 11 species, and explored the combined effect of climate and competition. Tree mortality was affected by all of these multiple drivers, especially tree size and asymmetric competition, and strong interactions between climate and competition were found. All species showed L-shaped mortality patterns (i.e. showed decreasing mortality with tree size, but pines were more sensitive to asymmetric competition than broadleaved species. Among climatic variables, the negative effect of temperature on tree mortality was much larger than the effect of precipitation. Moreover, the effect of climate (mean annual temperature and annual precipitation on tree mortality was aggravated at high competition levels for all species, but especially for broadleaved species. The significant interaction between climate and competition on tree mortality indicated that global change in Mediterranean regions, causing hotter and drier conditions and denser stands, could lead to profound effects on forest structure and composition. Therefore, to evaluate the potential effects of climatic change on tree mortality, forest structure must be considered, since two systems of similar composition but different structure could radically differ in their response to climatic conditions.

  10. Mortality study update of ethylene oxide workers in chemical manufacturing: a 15 year update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaen, Gerard M H; Burns, Carol; Teta, Jane M; Bodner, Kenneth; Keenan, Dave; Bodnar, Catherine M

    2009-06-01

    To investigate the long-term mortality patterns of workers with past exposure to ethylene oxide (EO). We redefined and updated a cohort of male workers employed in industrial facilities where EO was produced or used. All 2063 men were employed between 1940 and the end of 1988 and were observed for mortality through 2003. Cause specific Standardized Mortality Ratios were calculated. Internal analyses were made by applying Cox proportional hazards models to the data. No indications were found for excess cancer risks from EO exposures, including the lymphohematopoietic malignancies. There were 11 leukemia deaths and 11.8 expected and 12 non-Hodgkin lymphoma deaths and 11.5 expected. Proportional hazards modeling for all cause, leukemia and lymphoid malignancies mortality revealed no trends or associations with cumulative exposure. Despite the relatively high EO exposures in the past and extensive mortality follow-up, the cause specific mortality rates are comparable with those of the general US population. The Standardized Mortality Ratio analyses and the proportional hazards modeling for all cause mortality, leukemia and lymphoid malignancies mortality do not indicate exposure related effects in this cohort.

  11. Asthma mortality in Danish children and young adults, 1973-1994

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, I M; Bülow, S; Jensen, V B

    2000-01-01

    Several reports indicate that asthma mortality has increased during the last few decades. International comparisons reveal some striking differences in the pattern of asthma mortality. The authors investigated the asthma mortality rate in the Danish child and youth population 1973-1994 and studied...... the validity of death certificates. The authors reviewed all death certificates coded as asthma death in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD 8-ICD 10 (1994)) and adjacent respiratory code numbers for the age group 1-19 yrs. Hospital records and autopsy reports were assessed to validate the cause...... of death. Age-standardized and age-specific mortality rates were calculated. From 1973 to 1987 there was a significant upward trend in the mortality. On subdivision, this trend was limited to the age group 15-19 yrs. Generally the mortality rate decreased from 1988 to 1994. Four per cent coded as asthma...

  12. Indicators of sustainable tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovičić Dobrica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The indicators, precisely describing the linkages between tourism and the environment, social and cultural base, are not easily available. How ever, some relevant organizations (WTO, EU, OECD, etc., institutions and experts, have been hardly working to create the indicators of sustainable tourism. Whereas the economic objectives are easily defined by the use of the traditional indicators used in national and business economics, it is very difficult to identify widely applicable environmental, social and cultural indicators. In order to stimulate and alleviate the process of sustainable tourism development, EU created the list of comparative indicators of sustainable tourism. In preparing this list, special attention is paid to identification of valid indicators of real tourism impacts on the social and cultural environment (the entire set of traditions, customs, history, hospitality and culture that characterize a given area, that is a very complex task. Assuming the fact that the related indicators have been analyzed in many European countries, this paper is focused on applying the related indicators in research of tourism development in villages of the Kosjerić community. .

  13. Indicators of coal metamorphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proskuryakov, A.E.

    1982-06-01

    Important in determining metamorphism of coal is the reliability of indicators of coalification. Both the reflection of vitrinite and emission of volatile matter have been used for this purpose. To determine which indicator more accurately characterizes metamorphism of coal, their conformity to the following demands was established: 1. uniformity in direction of change of parameters with degree of metamorphism; 2. independence of the indicator of the genetic characteristics of coal (petrographic composition, reduction and oxidation of coal); 3. sensitivity of indicator. Both indicators conform to the first requirement. Emission of volatile substance decreases and reflective capacity of vitrinite increases uniformly with degree of metamorphism. However, the reflectivity of vitrinite is not influenced by petrographic composition of coals and is less dependent on the oxidation and reduction of coal than emission of volatile matter. It is also a more sensitive indicator distinguishing more degrees of metamorphism than emission of volatile matter. Reflectivity of vitrinite is a more reliable indicator of metamorphism than emission of volatile matter. However, in many laboratories this indicator is not measured with sufficient accuracy. To correct this, measuring equipment must be standardized.

  14. Key performance indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses how organisations can use OSH performance indicators. This is an important way to mainstream OSH into business management. Key performance indicators (KPIs) should provide objective data on the OSH situation. It is often said that ‘what gets measured gets managed’. Without

  15. Key performance indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses how organisations can use OSH performance indicators. This is an important way to mainstream OSH into business management. Key performance indicators (KPIs) should provide objective data on the OSH situation. It is often said that ‘what gets measured gets managed’. Without infor

  16. [Mortality by poisoning in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Híjar, M; Blanco, J; Carrillo, C; Rascón, A

    1998-01-01

    To determine the standing of mortality by poisoning in children in the Mexican Republic, in the years from 1979-1994. Secondary sources were employed. Analyzed variables were: age, sex, year, external cause of trauma and poisoning according to the 9th International Classification of Diseases: E850-E858, E860-E869 and E905. Tendencies by specific causes were analyzed with a Poisson regression model and relative risk by age, sex and district were obtained. A total of 11,272 children under 15 years of age were recorded. The main causes were poisoning and toxic reactions caused by venomous plants or animals (E905); accidental poisoning by household gas or carbon monoxide (E868); and accidental poisoning by other drugs (E858). The relative risk was highest in age group Aguascalientes consistently presented the highest risk values and the state of Nuevo Leon, the lowest. Poisoning is an important cause of child mortality. Considering that most of these deaths can potentially be prevented since they occur at home it is recommended that responsible adults can build protection into their environment and into the way society operates. Prevention should involve a multidisciplinary approach since the phenomenon has multiple causes and possible solutions.

  17. VP Ellipsis without Indices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardt, Daniel; Asher, Nicholas; Hunter, Julie

    2013-01-01

    This paper compares two views on the status of indices in syntactic and logical representations. On a structural view, indices are syntactic formants on a par with node labels and phrase bracketings, and are thus a part of the logical forms that are derived from syntactic representations....... On the process view, an index is not a syntactic object at all, but rather, an indication of the output of a resolution process.In this paper we argue that a recent body of data provides a clear empirical basis for distinguishing between these two views of indices. We argue that cases of sloppy VP ellipsis pose...... insurmountable problems for the structural view of indices, while these problems do not arise for the process view. Furthermore, we show that this resolution process is constrained by the semantics of various discourse relations....

  18. Evaluating Living Standard Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birčiaková Naďa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the evaluation of selected available indicators of living standards, divided into three groups, namely economic, environmental, and social. We have selected six countries of the European Union for analysis: Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Luxembourg, France, and Great Britain. The aim of this paper is to evaluate indicators measuring living standards and suggest the most important factors which should be included in the final measurement. We have tried to determine what factors influence each indicator and what factors affect living standards. We have chosen regression analysis as our main method. From the study of factors, we can deduce their impact on living standards, and thus the value of indicators of living standards. Indicators with a high degree of reliability include the following factors: size and density of population, health care and spending on education. Emissions of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere also have a certain lower degree of reliability.

  19. The radon indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsson, L.

    2005-11-01

    The radon indicator is an efficient instrument for measuring the radon daughter concentrations in a house or dwelling. Physics or environmental science students could build a radon indicator as a student project. Another possibility would be to use a radon indicator in a student investigation of radon levels in different houses. Finally the radon indicator is an excellent device for producing a radioactive source, free of charge, for the study of α-, β- and γ-radiation. The half-life of the activity collected is approximately 40 min. The radon indicator makes use of an electrostatic method by which charged particles are drawn to a small aluminium plate with a high negative voltage (-5 kV), thus creating a strong electric field between the plate and a surrounding copper wire. The radioactivity on the plate is subsequently measured by a GM-counter and the result calculated in Bq m-3. The collecting time is just 5.5 min and therefore the instrument is only suitable for use in a short-time method for indicating the radon concentration. An improved diagram, ground-radon and/or wall-radon in houses, is presented on the basis of the author's measurements recorded with the radon indicator over many years. This diagram is very useful when discussing how to reduce radiation levels in homes.

  20. Income Inequality and Child Mortality in Wealthy Nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, David

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents evidence of a relationship between child mortality data and socio-economic factors in relatively wealthy nations. The original study on child mortality that is reported here, which first appeared in a UK medical journal, was undertaken in a school of business by academics with accounting and finance backgrounds. The rationale explaining why academics from such disciplines were drawn to investigate these issues is given in the first part of the chapter. The findings related to child mortality data were identified as a special case of a wide range of social and health indicators that are systematically related to the different organisational approaches of capitalist societies. In particular, the so-called Anglo-American countries show consistently poor outcomes over a number of indicators, including child mortality. Considerable evidence has been adduced in the literature to show the importance of income inequality as an explanation for such findings. An important part of the chapter is the overview of a relatively recent publication in the epidemiological literature entitled The Spirit Level: Why Equality Is Better for Everyone, which was written by Wilkinson and Pickett. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Epidemiology of early neonatal mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, N K; Bharambe, M S; Garg, B S; Mathur, J S; Goswami, K

    1994-01-01

    During 1981-1991 at a rural teaching hospital (Kasturba Hospital) of Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences in Sevagram, Wardha, India, 454 of 13,939 newborns died during the early neonatal period for an early neonatal mortality rate (ENMR) of 33.7/1000 live births. The ENMR for boys was not significantly different from that for girls (36.1 vs. 28.6). Community medicine specialists analyzed data on these early neonatal deaths to examine distribution of early neonatal mortality, especially its relationship with prematurity, low birth weight, birth order, and by sex. They calculated average percent deaths (APD) per hour to examine the dynamics in early neonatal mortality. The mean age at death was lower among newborns of birth order greater than 2 than those of birth order less than 2 (23.47 vs. 26.85 hours; p 0.001). ENMR was higher for newborns of birth order greater than 2 than those of birth order less than 2 (41.74% vs. 27.35%; P 0.001). The mean age at death increased as gestation increased (10.34 for 28 weeks; 24.27 for 28-33 weeks, 31.53 for 33-37 weeks, and 34.43 for 37 weeks; p 0.001). ENMR decreased as gestation increased (850 for 28 weeks; 375 for 28-33 weeks, 147.02 for 33-37 weeks, and 8.77 for 37 weeks; p 0.001). The mean age at death increased as birth weight increased for newborns weighing less than 1500 gms through 2000-2500 gms (23.36-37.13 hours; p 0.001). It was lowest among those weighing more 3000 gms (11.55 gms). ENMR fell as birth weight increased (614.33 for 1500 gms, 116.19 for 1500-2000 gms, 19.38 for 2000-2500 gms, 10.99 for 2500-3000 gms, and 5.41 for 3000 gms; p 0.001). The APD/hour for the first hour of life was 3.74% for a relative risk of 12.9. It decreased steadily as the hours of life increased (3.08% for 1-6 hours, 1.19% for 6-24 hours, 0.67% for 24-72 hours, and 0.29% for 72-168 hours). Knowledge of time of likely death can help providers know where they need to focus their attention to prevent early neonatal deaths.

  2. Solar Indices Bulletin

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Solar Indices Bulletin is a prompt monthly information product that is distributed within two weeks after the observation month closes. For the month just ended,...

  3. Solar Indices - Solar Corona

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  4. Indicators and SEA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Jingjing; Kørnøv, Lone; Christensen, Per

    Abstract: Indicators are widely used in SEA to measure, communicate and monitor impacts from a proposed policy, plan or programme, and can improve the effectiveness for the SEA by simplifying the complexity of both assessment and presentation. Indicators can be seen as part of the implementation...... process helping to understand, communicate and, integrate important environmental issues in planning and decision-making. On the other hand, use of indicators can also limit SEA effectiveness, if the ones chosen are biased or limited, if the aggregation gives incorrect interpretation...... and if the information requirement for different target groups is not addressed. Indicators are widely used in SEA to measure, communicate and monitor impacts from a proposed policy, plan or programme, and can improve the effectiveness for the SEA by simplifying the complexity of both assessment and presentation...

  5. NOHSS Adult Indicators

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2012-2014 (even years). Data from BRFSS for indicators of adult oral health for even years from 2012 through 2014. National estimates are represented by the median...

  6. NOHSS Child Indicators

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Data for School year-end 1994 through year-end 2017. State oral health surveys are the data sources for these indicators. States periodically conduct independent...

  7. NOHSS Child Indicators

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Data for School year-end 1994 through year-end 2016. State oral health surveys are the data sources for these indicators. States periodically conduct independent...

  8. Indicators: Sediment Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediment enzymes are proteins that are produced by microorganisms living in the sediment or soil. They are indicators of key ecosystem processes and can help determine which nutrients are affecting the biological community of a waterbody.

  9. NOHSS Child Indicators

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Data for School year-end 1994 through year-end 2016. State oral health surveys are the data sources for these indicators. States periodically conduct independent...

  10. NOHSS Adult Indicators

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2012-2014 (even years). Data from BRFSS for indicators of adult oral health for even years from 2012 through 2014. National estimates are represented by the median...

  11. Fishery Performance Indicators

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Performance indicators for landings, effort, revenue and distribution of revenue are collected for various fisheries nation-wide. The fisheries include catch and...

  12. Solar Indices - Solar Flares

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  13. Solar Indices - Sunspot Numbers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  14. Solar Indices - Plage Regions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  15. Solar Indices - Solar Irradiance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  16. Solar Indices - Solar Ultraviolet

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  17. ENSO Indices and Analyses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhiren; WU Dexing; CHEN Xue'en; QIAO Ran

    2013-01-01

    New ENSO indices were developed and the spatial variability and temporal evolution of ENSO were analyzed based on the new indices and modeling experiments,as well as multiple data resources.The new indices,after being defined,were validated with their good diagnostic characteristics and correlation with wind and SST.In the analysis after the definition and validation of the new indices,ENSO feedbacks from wind,heat fluxes,and precipitation were spatially and temporally examined in order to understand ENSO variability and evolution with some emphasized points such as the interaction among the feedbacks,the role of westerly wind bursts and the transformation between zonal and meridional circulations in an ENSO cycle,and the typical pattern of modern ENSO.

  18. AFSC/RACE/GAP/Conrath: Delayed discard mortality of the North Pacific giant octopus

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The majority of octopus bycatch occurs in Pacific cod pot fisheries and recent data collected by North Pacific Groundfish Observers indicate that immediate mortality...

  19. Transferrin saturation ratio and risk of total and cardiovascular mortality in the general population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stack, A G

    2014-08-01

    The transferrin saturation (TSAT) ratio is a commonly used indicator of iron deficiency and iron overload in clinical practice but precise relationships with total and cardiovascular mortality are unclear.

  20. [The analysis of maternal mortality in the Republic of Sakha (Yakutiya)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savvina, N V; Yavorskiy, A A; Platonova, M V

    2014-01-01

    In the Republic of Sakha (Yakutiya) a stable increase of indicator of birth rate was marked during 1990-2012. Against the background of increase of indicator of birth rate the indicator of maternal mortality has a positive tendency to decrease. During 1990-2012, indicator of maternal mortality decreased from 560.8 to 29.4 per 100 000 of born alive. In the structure of causes of maternal mortality the percentage of direct obstetric causes of death decreased i.e. toxicosis on 18%, bleeding on 82%, sepsis on 9.1%. During 2007-2012 no death case was detected. The increase of specific weight of unavoidable causes made up to 25% of obstetrical embolism, 5% in the structure of causes of maternal mortality was attached to extra-genital diseases in 2007-2012. The percentage of deceased because of complications of anesthesia increased (1.5-5%).

  1. QT-Interval Duration and Mortality Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiyi; Post, Wendy S.; Dalal, Darshan; Blasco-Colmenares, Elena; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Guallar, Eliseo

    2012-01-01

    Background Extreme prolongation or reduction of the QT interval predisposes patients to malignant ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, but the association of variations in the QT interval within a reference range with mortality end points in the general population is unclear. Methods We included 7828 men and women from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Baseline QT interval was measured via standard 12-lead electrocardiographic readings. Mortality end points were assessed through December 31, 2006 (2291 deaths). Results After an average follow-up of 13.7 years, the association between QT interval and mortality end points was U-shaped. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios comparing participants at or above the 95th percentile of age-, sex-, race-, and R-R interval–corrected QT interval (≥439 milliseconds) with participants in the middle quintile (401 to <410 milliseconds) were 2.03 (95% confidence interval, 1.46-2.81) for total mortality, 2.55 (1.59-4.09) for mortality due to cardiovascular disease (CVD), 1.63 (0.96-2.75) for mortality due to coronary heart disease, and 1.65 (1.16-2.35) for non-CVD mortality. The corresponding hazard ratios comparing participants with a corrected QT interval below the fifth percentile (<377 milliseconds) with those in the middle quintile were 1.39 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.88) for total mortality, 1.35 (0.77-2.36) for CVD mortality, 1.02 (0.44-2.38) for coronary heart disease mortality, and 1.42 (0.97-2.08) for non-CVD mortality. Increased mortality also was observed with less extreme deviations of QT-interval duration. Similar, albeit weaker, associations also were observed with Bazett-corrected QT intervals. Conclusion Shortened and prolonged QT-interval durations, even within a reference range, are associated with increased mortality risk in the general population. PMID:22025428

  2. Laterality and reproductive indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalichman, Leonid; Kobyliansky, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    Several previous studies support the association between manual dominance and age at menarche or age at menopause. The aim of the present study was to estimate the association between indices of laterality and reproductive indices. The studied sample comprised 650 Chuvashian women aged 18 to 80 years (mean, 46.9; SD = 16.2). The independent-sample t test was used to compare the age at menarche or age at menopause between individuals with right or left dominance of handedness, dominant eye, hand clasping, and arm folding. No significant differences in age at menarche or age at menopause between women with right and left dominance in any of the studied laterality indices were found. This is the first study that simultaneously evaluates the association between dominance in four laterality indices (handedness, dominant eye, hand clasping, and arm folding) and two reproductive indices (age at menarche and age at menopause). Result of our study do not support the hypothesis of a possible association between handedness (and other indices of laterality) and an early age at menarche or age at natural menopause.

  3. Lower lung cancer mortality in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Chi C; Lam, Tai H; Yew, Wing W; Chan, Wai M; Law, Wing S; Tam, Cheuk M

    2011-02-01

    Malignancy is the leading cause of death in Hong Kong, and lung cancer tops the list of all cancer deaths. A cohort of clients aged ≥65 years, enrolled at 18 elderly health centres in Hong Kong from 2000 to 2003, was followed up prospectively through linkage with the territory-wide death registry for causes of death until 31 December 2008, using the identity card number as unique identifier. All subjects with suspected cancer, significant weight loss of >5% within past 6 months or obstructive lung disease at the baseline were excluded. After a total of 423 061 person-years of follow-up, 932, 690 and 1433 deaths were caused by lung cancer, other tobacco-related malignancies and non-tobacco-related malignancies, respectively. Body mass index (BMI) was independently (and negatively) associated with death from lung cancer after adjustment for other baseline variables, whereas there was only a minor or no effect for other smoking-related malignancies and non-tobacco-related malignancies. Obesity with BMI ≥30 [adjusted hazard ratio (HR), 0.55, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.38-0.80] was associated with reduced lung cancer mortality, which was more prominent than the opposing effect of underweight (adjusted HR, 1.38, 95% CI 1.05-1.79). Consistent effects of BMI were observed after stratification into never-smokers and ever-smokers and in sensitivity analysis after excluding deaths within the first 3 years. Obesity was associated with lower lung cancer mortality in this prospective cohort analysis. As the effect was rather specific for lung cancer, further studies are indicated to explore the underlying mechanism.

  4. Vitamin D, cardiovascular disease and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilz, Stefan; Tomaschitz, Andreas; März, Winfried; Drechsler, Christiane; Ritz, Eberhard; Zittermann, Armin; Cavalier, Etienne; Pieber, Thomas R; Lappe, Joan M; Grant, William B; Holick, Michael F; Dekker, Jacqueline M

    2011-11-01

    A poor vitamin D status, i.e. low serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], is common in the general population. This finding is of concern not only because of the classic vitamin D effects on musculoskeletal outcomes, but also because expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and vitamin D metabolizing enzymes in the heart and blood vessels suggests a role of vitamin D in the cardiovascular system. VDR-knockout mice suffer from cardiovascular disease (CVD), and various experimental studies suggest cardiovascular protection by vitamin D, including antiatherosclerotic, anti-inflammatory and direct cardio-protective actions, beneficial effects on classic cardiovascular risk factors as well as suppression of parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels. In epidemiological studies, low levels of 25(OH)D are associated with increased risk of CVD and mortality. Data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are sparse and have partially, but not consistently, shown some beneficial effects of vitamin D supplementation on cardiovascular risk factors (e.g. arterial hypertension). We have insufficient data on vitamin D effects on cardiovascular events, but meta-analyses of RCTs indicate that vitamin D may modestly reduce all-cause mortality. Despite accumulating data suggesting that a sufficient vitamin D status may protect against CVD, we still must wait for results of large-scale RCTs before raising general recommendations for vitamin D in the prevention and treatment of CVD. In current clinical practice, the overall risks and costs of vitamin D supplementation should be weighed against the potential adverse consequences of untreated vitamin D deficiency.

  5. Classification differences and maternal mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salanave, B; Bouvier-Colle, M H; Varnoux, N

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the ways maternal deaths are classified in national statistical offices in Europe and to evaluate the ways classification affects published rates. METHODS: Data on pregnancy-associated deaths were collected in 13 European countries. Cases were classified by a European panel....... This change was substantial in three countries (P deaths to obstetric causes. In the other countries, no differences were detected. According to official published data, the aggregated maternal mortality rate for participating countries was 7.7 per...... 100,000 live births, but it increased to 8.7 after classification by the European panel (P deaths differs between European countries. These differences in coding contribute to variations in the reported numbers of maternal deaths...

  6. Socioeconomic differentials in the immediate mortality effects of the national Irish smoking ban.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sericea Stallings-Smith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Consistent evidence has demonstrated that smoking ban policies save lives, but impacts on health inequalities are uncertain as few studies have assessed post-ban effects by socioeconomic status (SES and findings have been inconsistent. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the national Irish smoking ban on ischemic heart disease (IHD, stroke, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD mortality by discrete and composite SES indicators to determine impacts on inequalities. METHODS: Census data were used to assign frequencies of structural and material SES indicators to 34 local authorities across Ireland with a 2000-2010 study period. Discrete indicators were jointly analysed through principal component analysis to generate a composite index, with sensitivity analyses conducted by varying the included indicators. Poisson regression with interrupted time-series analysis was conducted to examine monthly age and gender-standardised mortality rates in the Irish population, ages ≥35 years, stratified by tertiles of SES indicators. All models were adjusted for time trend, season, influenza, and smoking prevalence. RESULTS: Post-ban mortality reductions by structural SES indicators were concentrated in the most deprived tertile for all causes of death, while reductions by material SES indicators were more equitable across SES tertiles. The composite indices mirrored the results of the discrete indicators, demonstrating that post-ban mortality decreases were either greater or similar in the most deprived when compared to the least deprived for all causes of death. CONCLUSIONS: Overall findings indicated that the national Irish smoking ban reduced inequalities in smoking-related mortality. Due to the higher rates of smoking-related mortality in the most deprived group, even equitable reductions across SES tertiles resulted in decreases in inequalities. The choice of SES indicator was influential in the measurement of

  7. Sleep duration and ischemic heart disease and all-cause mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Anne Helene; Hansen, Åse Marie; Holtermann, Andreas;

    2013-01-01

    This prospective study aimed to examine if sleep duration is a risk indicator for ischemic heart disease (IHD) and all-cause mortality, and how perceived stress during work and leisure time and use of tranquilizers/hypnotics modifies the association.......This prospective study aimed to examine if sleep duration is a risk indicator for ischemic heart disease (IHD) and all-cause mortality, and how perceived stress during work and leisure time and use of tranquilizers/hypnotics modifies the association....

  8. Antipsychotic prescription and mortality in hospitalized older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, Deborah; Marengoni, Alessandra; Nobili, Alessandro; Tettamanti, Mauro; Pasina, Luca; Franchi, Carlotta; Djade, Codjo D; Corrao, Salvatore; Salerno, Francesco; Marcucci, Maura; Romanelli, Giuseppe; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2017-06-06

    Recent scientific reports have shown that older persons treated with antipsychotics for dementia-related behavioural symptoms have increased mortality. However, the impact of these drugs prescribed during hospitalization has rarely been assessed. We aimed to investigate whether antipsychotics are associated with an increased risk of mortality during hospitalization and at 3-month follow-up in elderly inpatients. We analyzed data gathered during two waves (2010 and 2012) by the REPOSI (Registro Politerapie Società Italiana Medicina Interna). All new prescriptions of antipsychotic drugs during hospitalization, whether maintained or discontinued at discharge, were collected, and logistic regression models were used to analyze their association with in-hospital and 3-month mortality. Covariates were age, sex, the Short Blessed Test (SBT) score, and the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale. Among 2703 patients included in the study, 135 (5%) received new prescriptions for antipsychotic drugs. The most frequently prescribed antipsychotic during hospitalization and eventually maintained at discharge was haloperidol (38% and 36% of cases, respectively). Patients newly prescribed with antipsychotics were older and had a higher Cumulative Illness Rating Scale comorbidity index both at admission and at discharge compared to those who did not receive a prescription. Of those prescribed antipsychotics, 71% had an SBT score ≥10 (indicative of dementia), 12% had an SBT score of 5-9 (indicative of questionable dementia); and 17% had an SBT score <5 (indicative of normal cognition). In-hospital mortality was slightly higher in patients prescribed antipsychotic drugs (14.3% vs 9.4%; P = 0.109), but in multivariate analysis only male sex, older age, and higher SBT scores were significantly related to mortality during hospitalization. At 3-month follow-up, only male sex, older age, and higher SBT scores were associated with mortality. We found that the prescription of antipsychotic

  9. Cause-specific mortality among spouses of Parkinson disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Malene; Hansen, Johnni; Ritz, Beate; Nordahl, Helene; Schernhammer, Eva; Wermuth, Lene; Rod, Naja Hulvej

    2014-03-01

    Caring for a chronically ill spouse is stressful, but the health effects of caregiving are not fully understood. We studied the effect on mortality of being married to a person with Parkinson disease. All patients in Denmark with a first-time hospitalization for Parkinson disease between 1986 and 2009 were identified, and each case was matched to five population controls. We further identified all spouses of those with Parkinson disease (n = 8,515) and also the spouses of controls (n = 43,432). All spouses were followed in nationwide registries until 2011. Among men, being married to a Parkinson disease patient was associated with a slightly higher risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio = 1.06 [95% confidence interval = 1.00-1.11]). Mortality was particularly high for death due to external causes (1.42 [1.09-1.84]) including suicide (1.89 [1.05-3.42]) and death from undefined symptoms/abnormal findings (1.25 [1.07-1.47]). Censoring at the time of death of the patient attenuated the findings for all-cause mortality in husbands (1.02 [0.95-1.09]), indicating that part of the association is with bereavement. Still, living with a person with Parkinson disease 5 years after first Parkinson hospitalization was associated with higher risk of all-cause mortality for both husbands (1.15 [1.07-1.23]) and wives (1.11 [1.04-1.17]). Caring for a spouse with a serious chronic illness is associated with a slight but consistent elevation in mortality risk.

  10. Postoperative mortality after inpatient surgery: Incidence and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karamarie Fecho

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Karamarie Fecho1, Anne T Lunney1, Philip G Boysen1, Peter Rock2, Edward A Norfleet11Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 2Department of Anesthesiology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, USAPurpose: This study determined the incidence of and identified risk factors for 48 hour (h and 30 day (d postoperative mortality after inpatient operations.Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using Anesthesiology’s Quality Indicator database as the main data source. The database was queried for data related to the surgical procedure, anesthetic care, perioperative adverse events, and birth/death/operation dates. The 48 h and 30 d cumulative incidence of postoperative mortality was calculated and data were analyzed using Chi-square or Fisher’s exact test and generalized estimating equations.Results: The 48 h and 30 d incidence of postoperative mortality was 0.57% and 2.1%, respectively. Higher American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status scores, extremes of age, emergencies, perioperative adverse events and postoperative Intensive Care Unit admission were identified as risk factors. The use of monitored anesthesia care or general anesthesia versus regional or combined anesthesia was a risk factor for 30 d postoperative mortality only. Time under anesthesia care, perioperative hypothermia, trauma, deliberate hypotension and invasive monitoring via arterial, pulmonary artery or cardiovascular catheters were not identified as risk factors.Conclusions: Our findings can be used to track postoperative mortality rates and to test preventative interventions at our institution and elsewhere.Keywords: postoperative mortality, risk factors, operations, anesthesia, inpatient surgery

  11. Ethnic inequalities in mortality: the case of Arab-Americans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman M El-Sayed

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although nearly 112 million residents of the United States belong to a non-white ethnic group, the literature about differences in health indicators across ethnic groups is limited almost exclusively to Hispanics. Features of the social experience of many ethnic groups including immigration, discrimination, and acculturation may plausibly influence mortality risk. We explored life expectancy and age-adjusted mortality risk of Arab-Americans (AAs, relative to non-Arab and non-Hispanic Whites in Michigan, the state with the largest per capita population of AAs in the US. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Data were collected about all deaths to AAs and non-Arab and non-Hispanic Whites in Michigan between 1990 and 2007, and year 2000 census data were collected for population denominators. We calculated life expectancy, age-adjusted all-cause, cause-specific, and age-specific mortality rates stratified by ethnicity and gender among AAs and non-Arab and non-Hispanic Whites. Among AAs, life expectancies among men and women were 2.0 and 1.4 years lower than among non-Arab and non-Hispanic White men and women, respectively. AA men had higher mortality than non-Arab and non-Hispanic White men due to infectious diseases, chronic diseases, and homicide. AA women had higher mortality than non-Arab and non-Hispanic White women due to chronic diseases. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Despite better education and higher income, AAs have higher age-adjusted mortality risk than non-Arab and non-Hispanic Whites, particularly due to chronic diseases. Features specific to AA culture may explain some of these findings.

  12. The National Family Planning Program: its impact on perinatal mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshat, H; Kader, H A; Ali, J; Noor Laily Abu Bakar

    1984-12-01

    The aim of this investigation is to study the effect of family planning on declining maternal and infant mortality rates in Malaysia since the National Family Planning Program began operation in May, 1967. Data were derived from the registration of vital events and reports from the Malaysian Family Life Survey conducted in 1978, and demonstrate declines in maternal and infant mortality rates. Although this is a result of a combination of factors (e.g., socioeconomic development, high quality health and medical services) the contribution of family planning is significant. Between 1957 and 1980 the maternal mortality rate declined by 80%. High risk births declined from 10.2% to 8.2% for mothers under age 20, and from 15% to 13.7% for mothers over age 35 during the 1967-1977 decade. From 1955 - 1980 the infant mortality rate declined by 68.2% to a level of 24.9/1000 live births; this may be partly due to the shift to lower order births (and therefore low risk) as a result of better family planning. Perinatal mortality declined 6.7% in the pre-implementation years (1957 - 1967) and 19.8% in the post-implementation years (1967 - 1977). Low birthweight is a significant correlate of infant survival, and data from this study indicate that birthweights increase with maternal age up to 30-34 years, then begin to decrease. Birthweights are also lower (and infant mortality higher) for babies born at birth intervals of less than 15 months. Therefore, concerted efforts in family planning education need to be directed to vulnerable groups such as young mothers (under 19) and older mothers (over 40).

  13. Particulate air pollution and daily mortality in Bangkok

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajanapoom, Nitaya

    1999-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the association between PM10 and visibility, and to determine whether the variations in daily mortality were associated with fluctuations in daily PM10 and visibility levels, in Bangkok during 1992-1997. Mortality data were extracted from death certificates, provided by the Bureau of Registration Administration. PM10 data were obtained from three monitoring stations operated by the Pollution Control Department, and visibility data were obtained from two monitoring stations operated by the Department of Meteorology. PM10 was regressed on visibility using multiple regression. Inverse and significant association was found between PM10 and visibility, after controlling for relative humidity, minimum temperature, and winter indicator variable. Positive association was found between total mortality and PM10, in Poisson regression model while controlling for long-term trends, season, and variations in weather. Five-day moving average of PM10 was significantly and most strongly associated with total mortality from non-external causes; a 2.3% (95% CI = 1.3, 3.3) increase in mortality was estimated for one interquartile range (30 μg/m3) increase in PM10. When PM10 was replaced with visibility, a 1.3% (95% CI = 0.4, 2.3) increase in mortality was estimated for one interquartile range (1.5 km) decrease in visibility. Lagged effects up to three day lags prior to death with similar patterns were observed for both PM10 and visibility. The findings suggest the possibility of using visibility as a surrogate for fine particulate matter. This approach is feasible because visibility data are usually routinely recorded at airports throughout the world. On the other hand, given the large number of population living in Bangkok, the small but significant percent excess deaths attributable to airborne particle exposure is an important public health concern.

  14. Global justice, poverty and maternal mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flor de María Cáceres M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Global justice is currently situated in an ambiance of tension and debate, facing a series of statements attempting to explain relationships among countries, based on the background of agreements already accomplished by supranational agencies. This network of relationships, not always fair nor equitable, has resulted in an increased accumulation of wealth in just a few hands and poverty in a growing number of people in poor countries and geographic areas with restrictions to access both to resources and to technological and scientific advances. Poverty, exclusion and inequalities limit all together the opportunities for development in these communities, with the outcome of serious consequences such as the deterioration in basic indicators of development. Maternal mortality rate (mm is considered a sentinel indicator since it belongs in most cases to premature deaths which would be avoidable through proper measures in education, health promotion and timely access to quality health services. The purpose of this essay is to defend the thesis that the lack of global justice has limited the scope of the goals related to poverty and mm reduction

  15. Mortality and reduced growth hormone secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Christiansen, Jens; Laursen, Torben

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data regarding the mortality rates of patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD), whether or not treated with growth hormone (GH), are limited, but an increased mortality rate among hypopituitary patients compared with the general population has been documented. Cardiovascular...... disease has been suggested as a primary cause of death, whereas cancer statistics might be influenced by the number of malignancies causing the pituitary disease. Furthermore, differences in mortality rates in females and males have been reported. METHODS: Epidemiological studies of mortality......-onset GHD might also exist. Two studies showed a normal mortality rate in GHD patients treated with GH compared with the general population. CONCLUSIONS: Although an increased mortality rate in hypopituitary patients is well documented, further research is needed to provide more reliable estimates...

  16. Determinants of Maternal Mortality in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahida Abbasi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Maternal mortality refers to the death of a woman who dies during pregnancy or within six weeks after delivery. A number of factors contribute to the high maternal mortality ratio around the globe, particularly, in underdeveloped countries. Pakistan has the highest mortality ratio (260 per 100,000 live births in the region and is one of the developing countries which have committed to decrease maternal mortality by 2015, according to the millennium developing goals (MDG 5. However, there are number of factors which made Pakistan unable to achieve the MDG 5 by 2015. In Pakistan there are many factors such as biological, socio-economic, cultural and poor quality of Reproductive Health Services (RHS, which contribute to the alarming figure of Maternal Mortality.. This paper aimed to do an in-depth analysis of the determinants of maternal mortality in Pakistan.

  17. Publication point indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elleby, Anita; Ingwersen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    with novel publication point indicators (PPIs) that are formalized and exemplified. Two diachronic citation windows are applied: 2006-07 and 2006-08. Web of Science (WoS) as well as Google Scholar (GS) are applied to observe the cite delay and citedness for the different document types published by DIIS......The paper presents comparative analyses of two publication point systems, The Norwegian and the in-house system from the interdiscplinary Danish Institute for International Studies (DIIS), used as case in the study for publications published 2006, and compares central citation-based indicators......; the Cumulated Publication Point Indicator (CPPI), which graphically illustrates the cumulated gain of obtained vs. ideal points, both seen as vectors; and the normalized Cumulated Publication Point Index (nCPPI) that represents the cumulated gain of publication success as index values, either graphically...

  18. The injury mortality burden in Guinea

    OpenAIRE

    Mamady Keita; Yao Hongyan; Zhang Xujun; Xiang Huiyun; Tan Hongzhuan; Hu Guoqing

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The injury mortality burden of Guinea has been rarely addressed. The paper aimed to report patterns of injury mortality burden in Guinea. Methods We retrieved the mortality data from the Guinean Annual Health Statistics Report 2007. The information about underlying cause of deaths was collected based on Guinean hospital discharge data, Hospital Mortuary and City Council Mortuary data. The causes of death are coded in the 9th International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9)...

  19. Environmental indicators for buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammann, Sven

    2004-01-01

    Environmental Indicators for Buildings are studied using two different perspectives: with a technological, environmental scientific departing point and with a social scientific departing point. Different relevant groups in the building sector are identified and analysed, using the Social...... Construction Of Technology theory as a frame for the studies. It is concluded that it is not possible to develop a common set of indicators that all the central actors in the building sector find acceptable - at least not in a near future. Different sets of solutions are, however, outlined in the thesis...

  20. Environmental indicators for buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammann, Sven

    Environmental Indicators for Buildings are studied using two different perspectives: with a technological, environmental scientific departing point and with a social scientific departing point. Different relevant groups in the building sector are identified and analysed, using the Social...... Construction Of Technology theory as a frame for the studies. It is concluded that it is not possible to develop a common set of indicators that all the central actors in the building sector find acceptable - at least not in a near future. Different sets of solutions are, however, outlined in the thesis...

  1. The Effects of Age, Period, and Cohort on Mortality from Ischemic Heart Disease in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jie; Li, Boyang; Li, Jingjing; Sun, Yang

    2017-01-01

    In contrast with most developed countries, mortality due to ischemic heart disease (IHD) continues to rise in China. We examined the effects of age, period, and cohort on IHD mortality in urban and rural populations from 1987 to 2013 to identify the drivers of this trend. Region-specific data on annual IHD mortality among adults aged 20 to 84 years and corresponding population statistics were collected. We then tested for age, period, and cohort effects using the Intrinsic Estimator approach. Our results indicated that IHD mortality in China increased significantly over the three decades studied. There was a log-linear increase in the age effect on IHD mortality as those aged 80–84 showed 277 and 161 times greater IHD mortality risk than those aged 20–24 in urban and rural populations, respectively. While there was an upward trend in the period effect in both populations, the influence of the cohort effect on mortality decreased over time for those born from 1904 to 1993. The age, period, and cohort effects on mortality in China were generally comparable between urban and rural populations. The results suggest that population aging is a major driver behind the rapid rise in IHD mortality. Increased exposure to air pollution may also have played a role in driving the period effect

  2. Treatment Factors That Influence Mortality in Acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, John; Ayuk, John; Sherlock, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Acromegaly is a rare condition characterized by excessive secretion of growth hormone (GH), which is almost always due to a pituitary adenoma. Acromegaly is associated with significant morbidity such as hypertension, type 2 diabetes, cardiomyopathy, obstructive sleep apnoea, malignancy and musculoskeletal abnormalities. Acromegaly has also been associated with increased mortality in several retrospective studies. This review will focus on the epidemiological data relating to mortality rates in acromegaly, the relationship between acromegaly and malignancy, the role of GH and insulin-like growth factor-I in assessing the risk of future mortality, and the impact of radiotherapy and hypopituitarism on mortality.

  3. The gestational age pattern of human mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schöley, Jonas; Vaupel, James W.; Jacobsen, Rune

    of a "birth hump" peaking week 38. The absolute rate of decline slows down over age. The observed gestational age pattern of the force of mortality is consistent with three hypotheses concerning the causes for ontogenescense: 1) Adaptation: as the organism growths it becomes more resilient towards death, 2......) transitional timing: the transition of birth is a stressful event and momentarily increases the force of mortality, 3) mortality selection: The frailest die first, resulting in the mean force of mortality to decline with age. In order to quantify the relative importance of these three processes I fit a three...

  4. The Gestational Age Pattern of Human Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schöley, Jonas; Vaupel, James W.; Jacobsen, Rune

    of a "birth hump" peaking week 38. The absolute rate of decline slows down over age. The observed gestational age pattern of the force of mortality is consistent with three hypotheses concerning the causes for ontogenescense: 1) Adaptation: as the organism growths it becomes more resilient towards death, 2......) transitional timing: the transition of birth is a stressful event and momentarily increases the force of mortality, 3) mortality selection: The frailest die first, resulting in the mean force of mortality to decline with age. In order to quantify the relative importance of these three processes I fit a three...

  5. Mortality in Central and Eastern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available While, during several decades, unfavourable trends in mortality were quite similar in Central Europe and in the former USSR, in the most recent years, these two parts of Europe are diverging. In most Central European countries, life expectancy is now increasing mainly thanks to a decline in cardiovascular mortality. Conversely, cardiovascular mortality is still increasing in Russia and Ukraine and its negative impact is reinforced by a worsening of violent deaths and infectious mortality. The situation of Baltic countries is still uncertain but it is not impossible that these countries soon resume with sustainable progress in life expectancy.

  6. Infection increases mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werge, Mikkel; Novovic, Srdjan; Schmidt, Palle N

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the influence of infection on mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis. METHODS: Eligible prospective and retrospective studies were identified through manual and electronic searches (August 2015). The risk of bias was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Meta...... sterile necrosis and organ failure was associated with a mortality of 19.8%. If the patients had infected necrosis without organ failure the mortality was 1.4%. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with necrotizing pancreatitis are more than twice as likely to die if the necrosis becomes infected. Both organ failure...... and infected necrosis increase mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis....

  7. Consistent Predictions of Future Forest Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, N. G.

    2014-12-01

    We examined empirical and model based estimates of current and future forest mortality of conifers in the northern hemisphere. Consistent water potential thresholds were found that resulted in mortality of our case study species, pinon pine and one-seed juniper. Extending these results with IPCC climate scenarios suggests that most existing trees in this region (SW USA) will be dead by 2050. Further, independent estimates of future mortality for the entire coniferous biome suggest widespread mortality by 2100. The validity and assumptions and implications of these results are discussed.

  8. Migrant mortality from diabetes mellitus across Europe: the importance of socio-economic change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenheede, Hadewijch; Deboosere, Patrick; Stirbu, Irina; Agyemang, Charles O; Harding, Seeromanie; Juel, Knud; Rafnsson, Snorri Björn; Regidor, Enrique; Rey, Grégoire; Rosato, Michael; Mackenbach, Johan P; Kunst, Anton E

    2012-02-01

    The first objective of this study was to determine and quantify variations in diabetes mortality by migrant status in different European countries. The second objective was to investigate the hypothesis that diabetes mortality is higher in migrant groups for whom the country of residence (COR) is more affluent than the country of birth (COB). We obtained mortality data from 7 European countries. To assess migrant diabetes mortality, we used direct standardization and Poisson regression. First, migrant mortality was estimated for each country separately. Then, we merged the data from all mortality registers. Subsequently, to examine the second hypothesis, we introduced gross domestic product (GDP) per capita of COB in the models, as an indicator of socio-economic circumstances. The overall pattern shows higher diabetes mortality in migrant populations compared to local-born populations. Mortality rate ratios (MRRs) were highest in migrants originating from either the Caribbean or South Asia. MRRs for the migrant population as a whole were 1.9 (95% CI 1.8-2.0) and 2.2 (95% CI 2.1-2.3) for men and women respectively. We furthermore found a consistently inverse association between GDP of COB and diabetes mortality. Most migrant groups have higher diabetes mortality rates than the local-born populations. Mortality rates are particularly high in migrants from North Africa, the Caribbean, South Asia or low-GDP countries. The inverse association between GDP of COB and diabetes mortality suggests that socio-economic change may be one of the key aetiological factors.

  9. Indications, Results and Mortality of Pulmonary Artery Banding Procedure: a Brief Review and Five- year Experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Hamid Hoseinikhah; Aliasghar Moeinipour; Ahmadreza Zarifian; Mohammad Sobhan Sheikh Andalibi; Yasamin Moeinipour; Mohammad Abbassi Teshnisi; Abbas Bahreini

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary artery banding (PAB) is a technique of palliative surgical therapy used by congenital heart surgeons as a staged approach to operative correction of congenital heart defects. Materials and Methods We report 5- year experiences from January 2011 to January 2016 of Imam Reza Hospital center (a tertiary referral hospital in Mashhad city, North East of Iran) that consist of 50 patients with congenital heart disease with left to right shunt that pulmonary artery banding proced...

  10. "Healthy" Human Development Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineer, Merwan; Roy, Nilanjana; Fink, Sari

    2010-01-01

    In the Human Development Index (HDI), life expectancy is the only indicator used in modeling the dimension "a long and healthy life". Whereas life expectancy is a direct measure of quantity of life, it is only an indirect measure of healthy years lived. In this paper we attempt to remedy this omission by introducing into the HDI the morbidity…

  11. Pain indicators in newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasojević Slobodan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Definition of pain. The International Association for the Study of Pain has defined pain as "an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage or described in terms of such damage." The interpretation of pain is subjective. Each person forms an internal construct of pain through encountered injury. Pain and newborn. The issue of pain perception in newborns, its management and prevention has been neglected for decades. The inability of "self-report" of painful experience has contributed significantly to misunderstanding of the importance of this problem and in­adequate treatment. The main characteristic of this 'critical window of brain development' period is rapid enlargement of brain volume and its great plasticity. Harmful short-term and long-term consequences can arise as a consequence of disturbance of the sophisticated balance between newborn and its surrounding. Neonatal pain indicators. As a response to a present painful stimulus, the newborn adapts to this acute stress with changes in endocrine, vegetative, immune and behavioral area. An ideal pain indicator in neonatal period does not exist. There are several different groups o them, namely contextual and developmental indicators (gestational age, contributed illness, medication, for example, physiological (heart rate, vagal tone, breathing rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, transcutaneous partial pressures of oxygen and carbon-dioxide, intracranial pressure, palm sweating and behavioral ones (face expression, movements of limbs, cry, several neonatal pain scales were constructed on the basis of these indicators. .

  12. "Healthy" Human Development Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineer, Merwan; Roy, Nilanjana; Fink, Sari

    2010-01-01

    In the Human Development Index (HDI), life expectancy is the only indicator used in modeling the dimension "a long and healthy life". Whereas life expectancy is a direct measure of quantity of life, it is only an indirect measure of healthy years lived. In this paper we attempt to remedy this omission by introducing into the HDI the morbidity…

  13. Indicators for energy security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, B.; van Vuuren, D.P.; de Vries, H.J.M.; Groenenberg, H.

    2009-01-01

    The concept of energy security is widely used, yet there is no consensus on its precise interpretation. In this research, we have provided an overview of available indicators for long-term security of supply (SOS). We distinguished four dimensions of energy security that relate to the availability,

  14. Publication point indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elleby, Anita; Ingwersen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    with novel publication point indicators (PPIs) that are formalized and exemplified. Two diachronic citation windows are applied: 2006-07 and 2006-08. Web of Science (WoS) as well as Google Scholar (GS) are applied to observe the cite delay and citedness for the different document types published by DIIS...

  15. Maslov indices and monodromy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullin, H.R.; Robbins, J.M.; Waalkens, H.; Creagh, S.C.; Tanner, G.

    2005-01-01

    We prove that for a Hamiltonian system on a cotangent bundle that is Liouville-integrable and has monodromy the vector of Maslov indices is an eigenvector of the monodromy matrix with eigenvalue 1. As a corollary, the resulting restrictions on the monodromy matrix are derived.

  16. Environmental health indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Posada de la Paz

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This presentation gives a general overview of the project titled Environmental Health Indicators, coordinated by WHO and managed by the Research Centre on the Toxic Oil Syndrome and Rare Diseases in Spain. The presentations describes the objectives of the project, the steps taken and the results obtained during the feasibility study. The project aims to develop an environmental health information system that will allow the monitoring of public health and its health determinants and make international comparisons, develop environmental policies and facilitate communication with citizens. WHO developed a methodology for the development of these indicators within the conceptual framework of DPSEEA (Driving Force, Pressure, State, Exposure, Effect, Action and selected a total of 55 indicators (which included 168 variables in 10 environmental health areas. The feasibility study predicted the successful gathering of 89% of the indicators. However, data recollection proved difficult due to the frequent incompatibility of some variables in the Spanish information systems with the WHO defined variables. On a management level, the greatest difficulty arose from the disperse distribution of responsibilities in environmental health matters. In addition to the technical contribution of this project to Environmental Health in Spain, an added value has been to establish a close collaboration with the different Ministries involved.

  17. The logarithmic hypervolume indicator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrich, Tobias; Bringmann, Karl; Voß, Thomas;

    2011-01-01

    It was recently proven that sets of points maximizing the hypervolume indicator do not give a good multiplicative approximation of the Pareto front. We introduce a new “logarithmic hypervolume indicator” and prove that it achieves a close-to-optimal multiplicative approximation ratio. This is exp...

  18. Trends in cancer mortality in Mexico: 1990–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Rizo-Ríos

    2015-04-01

    Discussion: In Mexico, cancer is a major public health problem. Although mortality is an indicator of the access and effectiveness of medical care, it is necessary to create population-based cancer registries to have basic information in the planning and quality assessment of medical services such as prevention, early diagnosis and treatment, as well as to develop strategies to allocate resources and necessities to fulfil the population's demand for medical assistance.

  19. Perinatal Complications and Aging Indicators by Midlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspi, Avshalom; Ambler, Antony; Belsky, Daniel W.; Chapple, Simon; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Israel, Salomon; Poulton, Richie; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Rivera, Christine D.; Sugden, Karen; Williams, Benjamin; Wolke, Dieter; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perinatal complications predict increased risk for morbidity and early mortality. Evidence of perinatal programming of adult mortality raises the question of what mechanisms embed this long-term effect. We tested a hypothesis related to the theory of developmental origins of health and disease: that perinatal complications assessed at birth predict indicators of accelerated aging by midlife. METHODS: Perinatal complications, including both maternal and neonatal complications, were assessed in the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study cohort (N = 1037), a 38-year, prospective longitudinal study of a representative birth cohort. Two aging indicators were assessed at age 38 years, objectively by leukocyte telomere length (TL) and subjectively by perceived facial age. RESULTS: Perinatal complications predicted both leukocyte TL (β = −0.101; 95% confidence interval, −0.169 to −0.033; P = .004) and perceived age (β = 0.097; 95% confidence interval, 0.029 to 0.165; P = .005) by midlife. We repeated analyses with controls for measures of family history and social risk that could predispose to perinatal complications and accelerated aging, and for measures of poor health taken in between birth and the age-38 follow-up. These covariates attenuated, but did not fully explain the associations observed between perinatal complications and aging indicators. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings provide support for early-life developmental programming by linking newborns’ perinatal complications to accelerated aging at midlife. We observed indications of accelerated aging “inside,” as measured by leukocyte TL, an indicator of cellular aging, and “outside,” as measured by perceived age, an indicator of declining tissue integrity. A better understanding of mechanisms underlying perinatal programming of adult aging is needed. PMID:25349321

  20. Systematic Literature Review and Meta-Analysis of the Association of Sarcopenia With Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Fang; Lin, Pei-Ling

    2016-04-01

    The World Health Organization (2002) indicates that the prevention of frailty is a key indicator of successful aging, and the assessment of the muscular system is the core for determining the frailty syndrome in older adults. Sarcopenia in older adults will affect more than 50 million people and will affect more than 200 million people after 40 years. Systematic literature reviews have yet to focus on the association between sarcopenia and mortality. The aims of this study were to determine the correlation between sarcopenia and mortality by using various evaluation methods and to analyze any differences among the resulting correlations of the different assessment tools. This study conducted a systematic review of relevant studies in four databases (Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and Ovid). The inclusion criteria were prospective research, the results included mortality or death, and risk estimates included risk ratio or hazard ratio estimates and 95% confidence intervals. Exclusion criteria included studies that provided no sarcopenia data, the risk of mortality or death, or data indicating deaths from cancers and in hospitals. This study identified 10 studies that have investigated the association between sarcopenia and mortality with an average follow up of 4.17 years. In total, these studies have sampled 3,797 people and recorded 1,010 deaths. The result suggested that the risk of mortality in the sarcopenia group was higher than that in the nonsarcopenia group. Although the results of evidence-based studies have suggested that sarcopenia is a geriatric syndrome associated with increased mortality, few studies have focused on decreasing sarcopenia mortality. Therefore, nurse practitioners must be aware of the correlation between sarcopenia and the mortality rate and become actively involved in developing intervention methods for reducing the mortality risk of sarcopenia. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  1. Serbia within the European context: An analysis of premature mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinkovic Jelena

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on the global predictions majority of deaths will be collectively caused by cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and traffic accidents over the coming 25 years. In planning future national health policy actions, inter – regional assessments play an important role. The purpose of the study was to analyze similarities and differences in premature mortality between Serbia, EURO A, EURO B, and EURO C regions in 2000. Methods Mortality and premature mortality patterns were analysed according to cause of death, by gender and seven age intervals. The study results are presented in relative (% and absolute terms (age-specific and age-standardized death rates per 100,000 population, and age-standardized rates of years of life lost – YLL per 1,000. Direct standardization of rates was undertaken using the standard population of Europe. The inter-regional comparison was based on a calculation of differences in YLL structures and with a ratio of age-standardized YLL rates per 1,000. A multivariate generalized linear model was used to explore mortality of Serbia and Europe sub-regions with ln age-specific death rates. The dissimilarity was achieved with a p ≤ 0.05. Results According to the mortality pattern, Serbia was similar to EURO B, but with a lower average YLL per death case. YLL patterns indicated similarities between Serbia and EURO A, while SRR YLL had similarities between Serbia and EURO B. Compared to all Europe sub-regions, Serbia had a major excess of premature mortality in neoplasms and diabetes mellitus. Serbia had lost more years of life than EURO A due to cardiovascular, genitourinary diseases, and intentional injuries. Yet, Serbia was not as burdened with communicable diseases and injuries as were EURO B and EURO C. Conclusion With a premature mortality pattern, Serbia is placed in the middle position of the Europe triangle. The main excess of YLL in Serbia was due to cardiovascular, malignant diseases, and

  2. The unfinished health agenda: Neonatal mortality in Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Rathmony; Ahn, Pauline Yongeun; Rathavy, Tung; Gauthier, Ludovic; Hong, Rathavuth; Laillou, Arnaud

    2017-01-01

    mother's last child. Between 2000 and 2014, Cambodia achieved a considerable reduction in neonatal mortality (46% reduction rate). By 2014, gender inequities became almost non-existent (for all measures of equality); inequity related to mother’s education decreased for all time periods; improvements were observed for differences in neonatal mortality by preceding birth interval; and a reduction in neonatal mortality rates could be noted among all the regional subgroups. Inequities increased between mothers who had limited antenatal care and those who received more than four antenatal care visits. In most scale indicators, the Slope Index of Inequality and Relative Index of Inequality estimates for all four rounds of the survey suggest inequity exacerbated in deprived communities. Also, wealth and residence (urban/rural divide) continued to be major determinants in neonatal mortality rates and related inequity trends. Conclusion Analysis highlighted some of the complex patterns and determinants of neonatal mortality, in Cambodia. There has been a considerable decline in neonatal mortality which echoes global trends. Our analysis reveals that despite these advances, additional socio-economic and demographic characteristics considerably affected neonatal mortality rates and its inequities. There continue to be pockets of vulnerable groups that are lagging behind. This analysis highlights the determinants along the urban-rural and rich-poor divides in neonatal mortality inequities and how these affect access to and utilization of quality basic health services. This calls for future policy and programming efforts to be deliberate in their equity approach. Quality improvements in health services and targeted interventions for specific socio-economic groups will be required to further accelerate progress in reducing neonatal mortality and address Cambodia’s pressing unfinished agenda in health. PMID:28323854

  3. RISK FACTORS OF MORTALITY IN NEONATAL ILLNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeyanthi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Infant Mortality Rate (IMR is high in India. Identification of risk factors of mortality in neonatal illness is essential to reduce Neonatal Mortality Rate (NMR and ultimately the IMR. AIM To identify the risk factors of mortality in neonatal illness. SETTING AND DESIGN It was a nested case control study done at the sick neonatal unit of urban tertiary referral centre. METHODS AND MATERIALS After obtaining ethical committee approval, retrospective analysis of 150 out born neonatal case records of babies admitted during the period from October 2015 to December 2015 was done. Data such as demographic features, maternal details, referral details, perinatal events, clinical features, laboratory reports and outcome were recorded. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS These risk factors were subjected to univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis and P value calculated for the same to find out significant risk factors of mortality in neonatal illness. RESULTS Neonatal mortality rate was 22%. Male-to-female ratio was 2:1, death occurred more commonly in female neonates (23.1%. Home deliveries carried more risk of mortality. Birth order 4 and above had 25% mortality. Neonates of mother who had primary education and below had higher mortality. Perinatal asphyxia and sepsis were the most common causes of neonatal mortality. By univariate analysis, preterms had 4.9 times increased risk of mortality than term babies. Apnoeic spells, chest retractions and shock had 8 times, 3 times and 3.6 times increased risk of mortality respectively. By multivariate analysis, birth weight below 2 kilograms (kg carried 11.8 times more risk of mortality with a p value 0.00 (95% C.I 3.2, 30.4 and poor maternal intake of iron and folic acid tablets was 3.9 times more risk p value 0.003 (95% C.I 1.6, 9.6, apnoeic spells were 5.8 times more risk of mortality with p value 0.02 (95% C.I 1.3, 26.2. CONCLUSION Birth weight below 2 kg, poor maternal intake of iron and folic

  4. Mortality among Norwegian doctors 1960-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hem Erlend

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the mortality pattern of Norwegian doctors, people in human service occupations, other graduates and the general population during the period 1960-2000 by decade, gender and age. The total number of deaths in the study population was 1 583 559. Methods Census data from 1960, 1970, 1980 and 1990 relating to education were linked to data on 14 main causes of death from Statistics Norway, followed up for two five-year periods after census, and analyzed as stratified incidence-rate data. Mortality rate ratios were computed as combined Mantel-Haenzel estimates for each sex, adjusting for both age and period when appropriate. Results The doctors had a lower mortality rate than the general population for all causes of death except suicide. The mortality rate ratios for other graduates and human service occupations were 0.7-0.8 compared with the general population. However, doctors have a higher mortality than other graduates. The lowest estimates of mortality for doctors were for endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases, diseases in the urogenital tract or genitalia, digestive diseases and sudden death, for which the numbers were nearly half of those for the general population. The differences in mortality between doctors and the general population increased during the periods. Conclusions Between 1960 and 2000 mortality for doctors converged towards the mortality for other university graduates and for people in human service occupations. However, there was a parallel increase in the gap between these groups and the rest of the population. The slightly higher mortality for doctors compared with mortality for other university graduates may be explained by the higher suicide rate for doctors.

  5. Smoking-Attributable Mortality, Morbidity, and Economic Costs (SAMMEC) - Smoking-Attributable Mortality (SAM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2005-2009. SAMMEC - Smoking-Attributable Mortality, Morbidity, and Economic Costs. Smoking-attributable mortality (SAM) is the number of deaths caused by cigarette...

  6. Smoking-Attributable Mortality, Morbidity, and Economic Costs (SAMMEC) - Smoking-Attributable Mortality (SAM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2005-2009. SAMMEC - Smoking-Attributable Mortality, Morbidity, and Economic Costs. Smoking-attributable mortality (SAM) is the number of deaths caused by cigarette...

  7. Success in reducing maternal and child mortality in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasooly, Mohammad Hafiz; Govindasamy, Pav; Aqil, Anwer; Rutstein, Shea; Arnold, Fred; Noormal, Bashiruddin; Way, Ann; Brock, Susan; Shadoul, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    After the collapse of the Taliban regime in 2002, Afghanistan adopted a new development path and billions of dollars were invested in rebuilding the country's economy and health systems with the help of donors. These investments have led to substantial improvements in maternal and child health in recent years and ultimately to a decrease in maternal and child mortality. The 2010 Afghanistan Mortality Survey (AMS) provides important new information on the levels and trends in these indicators. The AMS estimated that there are 327 maternal deaths for every 100,000 live births (95% confidence interval = 260-394) and 97 deaths before the age of five years for every 1000 children born. Decreases in these mortality rates are consistent with changes in key determinants of mortality, including an increasing age at marriage, higher contraceptive use, lower fertility, better immunisation coverage, improvements in the percentage of women delivering in health facilities and receiving antenatal and postnatal care, involvement of community health workers and increasing access to the Basic Package of Health Services. Despite the impressive gains in these areas, many challenges remain. Further improvements in health services in Afghanistan will require sustained efforts on the part of both the Government of Afghanistan and international donors.

  8. The Impact of Anemia on Child Mortality: An Updated Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel P. Scott

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anemia and child mortality are public health problems requiring urgent attention. However, the degree to which iron deficiency anemia contributes to child mortality is unknown. Here, we utilized an exhaustive article search and screening process to identify articles containing both anemia and mortality data for children aged 28 days to 12 years. We then estimated the reduction in risk of mortality associated with a 1-g/dL increase in hemoglobin (Hb. Our meta-analysis of nearly 12,000 children from six African countries revealed a combined odds ratio of 0.76 (0.62–0.93, indicating that for each 1-g/dL increase in Hb, the risk of death falls by 24%. The feasibility of a 1-g/dL increase in Hb has been demonstrated via simple iron supplementation strategies. Our finding suggests that ~1.8 million deaths in children aged 28 days to five years could be avoided each year by increasing Hb in these children by 1 g/dL.

  9. [Trends in yellow fever mortality in Colombia, 1998-2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Ángela María; Cardona, Doris; Garzón, María Osley

    2013-09-01

    Yellow fever is a neglected tropical disease, thus, knowing the trends in mortality from this disease in Colombia is an important source of information for decision making and identifying public health interventions. To analyze trends in yellow fever mortality in Colombia during the 1998-2009 period and the differences in the morbidity and mortality information sources for the country, which affect indicators such as the lethality one. This is a descriptive study of deaths by yellow fever according to the Departamento Administrativo Nacional de Estadística and the incidence of the disease according to the Instituto Nacional de Salud . We used secondary sources of information in the calculation of proportions of socio-demographic characteristics of the deceased and epidemiological measures of lethality, incidence and mortality from yellow fever by department of residence of the deceased. Yellow fever deaths occur primarily in men of working age residing in scattered rural areas, who were members of the regimen vinculado, and who were living in the eastern, southeastern, northern and central zones in the country. We observed inconsistencies in the reports that affect the comparative analysis. The inhabitants of the departments located in national territories and Norte de Santander have an increased risk of illness and death from yellow fever, but this information could be underestimated, according to the source of information used for its calculation.

  10. [Abortion-related mortality in Brazil: decrease in spatial inequality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, B G

    2000-03-01

    Abortion is not only a major cause of obstetric hospitalization in poor countries, but it also represents the failure of the public health system to provide enough information about contraceptive methods and thus prevent pregnancies. In Brazil, the high utilization rates of health facilities due to abortions reflect the ongoing difficulties with family planning and contraception. In addition, mortality resulting from abortions serves as an indicator of the quality of abortion procedures, an important point in a country where the practice is illegal and therefore done clandestinely. In this study, we analyzed the rates of mortality resulting from abortions among women 10 to 54 years old, including women who died from spontaneous and induced abortion, from 1980 to 1995, for the various regions of the country. The information we used came from the mortality data bank of the public health system of the Ministry of Health. Population data were obtained from the Brazilian Institute for Geography and Statistics. We studied 2,602 deaths, 15% of which were due to missed abortion, spontaneous abortion, or legally permitted induced abortion. The other 85% of the deaths were due to illegal induced abortions or to nonspecified abortions. The mortality rates from abortion-related causes have steadily decreased in all the regions of Brazil, but this improvement has been unevenly distributed in the country. The region with the smallest decrease in this rate (38% over 15 years) was the Northeast. The age of women dying from abortions progressively declined over the period studied.

  11. Abdominal obesity in Japanese-Brazilians: which measure is best for predicting all-cause and cardiovascular mortality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marselle Rodrigues Bevilacqua

    Full Text Available This study aimed to verify which anthropometric measure of abdominal obesity was the best predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in Japanese-Brazilians. The study followed 1,581 subjects for 14 years. Socio-demographic, lifestyle, metabolic, and anthropometric data were collected. The dependent variable was vital status (alive or dead at the end of the study, and the independent variable was presence of abdominal obesity according to different baseline measures. The mortality rate was estimated, and Poisson regression was used to obtain mortality rate ratios with abdominal obesity, adjusted simultaneously for the other variables. The mortality rate was 10.68/thousand person-years. Male gender, age > 60 years, and arterial hypertension were independent risk factors for mortality. The results indicate that prevalence of abdominal obesity was high among Japanese-Brazilians, and that waist/hip ratio was the measure with the greatest capacity to predict mortality (especially cardiovascular mortality in this group.

  12. GRB as luminosity indicator

    CERN Document Server

    Basak, Rupal

    2014-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are found at much higher redshifts (z>6) than Supernova Ia (z~1), and hence, they can be used to probe very primitive universe. However, radiation mechanism of GRB remains a puzzle, unlike Supernova Ia. Through comprehensive description, both empirical and physical, we shall discuss the most likely way to use the constituent pulses of a GRB to find the radiation mechanism as well as using the pulses as luminosity indicators.

  13. Indicators for Knowledge Economy

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The Lisbon European Council conclusion was that in 2010 Europe will become 'the most competitive and dynamic knowledge-based economy in the world, capable of sustained economic growth with more and better jobs and greater social cohesion'. The knowledge economy concept is a part of modern society. This paper examines the knowledge economy concept and indicators for measuring the performance of the knowledge economy

  14. Indicators of Ecological Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-03

    Wang et al. (2003) and earlier those of Chapra and Di Toro (1991). Wang et al. (2003) termed their approach the extreme value method and used it to...Thesis, Auburn University, Auburn, AL. 210 pp. Chapra , S. C., Di Toro, D. M., 1991. Delta method for estimating primary production, respiration, and...characteristics, The challenge in using ecological indicators is determining which of the numerous measures of ecological systems best characterize

  15. Simplicial Indicator Kriging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R Tolosana-Delgado; V Pawlowsky-Glahn; J J Egozcue

    2008-01-01

    Indicator kriging (IK) is a spatial interpolation technique devised for estimating a conditional cumulative distribution function at an unsampled location. The result is a discrete approximation, and its corresponding estimated probability density function can be viewed as a composition in the simplex. This fact suggested a compositional approach to IK which, by construction, avoids all its standard drawbacks (negative predictions, not-ordered or larger than one). Here, a simple algorithm to develop the procedure is presented.

  16. Indicators of Ecological Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    measures Leaf area Branch evaluations Plant diversity Ozone bioindicators Lichen diversity Visible damage Vegetation structure Forest type...composition, and physiological status (measured as signature lipid/ DNA biomarkers) as a quick and easy indicator of changes in soil quality as a...Cryptophyte Geophyte Forb 0.17 0.45 Blazing star RL Liatris tenuafolia Asteraceae Cryptophyte Geophyte Forb 0.11 0.36 Blazing star RM Lichens Lichens 0.61

  17. Maternal mortality in Kassala State - Eastern Sudan: community-based study using Reproductive age mortality survey (RAMOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abdalla A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The maternal mortality ratio in Sudan was estimated at 750/100,000 live births. Sudan was one of eleven countries that are responsible for 65% of global maternal deaths according to a recent World Health Organization (WHO estimate. Maternal mortality in Kassala State was high in national demographic surveys. This study was conducted to investigate the causes and contributing factors of maternal deaths and to identify any discrepancies in rates and causes between different areas. Methods A reproductive age mortality survey (RAMOS was conducted to study maternal mortality in Kassala State. Deaths of women of reproductive age (WRA in four purposively selected areas were identified by interviewing key informants in each village followed by verbal autopsy. Results Over a three-year period, 168 maternal deaths were identified among 26,066 WRA. Verbal autopsies were conducted in 148 (88.1% of these cases. Of these, 64 (43.2% were due to pregnancy and childbirth complications. Maternal mortality rates and ratios were 80.6 per 100,000 WRA and 713.6 per 100,000 live births (LB, respectively. There was a wide discrepancy between urban and rural maternal mortality ratios (369 and 872100,000 LB, respectively. Direct obstetric causes were responsible for 58.4% of deaths. Severe anemia (20.3% and acute febrile illness (9.4% were the major indirect causes of maternal death whereas obstetric hemorrhage (15.6%, obstructed labor (14.1% and puerperal sepsis (10.9% were the major obstetric causes. Of the contributing factors, we found delay of referral in 73.4% of cases in spite of a high problem recognition rate (75%. 67.2% of deaths occurred at home, indicating under utilization of health facilities, and transportation problems were found in 54.7% of deaths. There was a high illiteracy rate among the deceased and their husbands (62.5% and 48.4%, respectively. Conclusions Maternal mortality rates and ratios were found to be high, with a wide

  18. Regional differences in Dutch maternal mortality.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, J. de; Schutte, J.; Poeran, J.; Roosmalen, J. van; Bonsel, G.; Steegers, E.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: de Graaf J, Schutte J, Poeran J, van Roosmalen J, Bonsel G, Steegers E. Regional differences in Dutch maternal mortality. BJOG 2012;119:582-588. Objective To study regional differences in maternal mortality in the Netherlands. Design Confidential inquiry into the causes of

  19. Maternal Mortality in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Anne S.

    1977-01-01

    Figures from 1800 through 1973 are used to demonstrate that black women have had substantially higher rates of death in childbirth than white women. As mortality has declined, the relative difference between whites and blacks has actually increased. Factors affecting mortality and future prospects for reducing maternal deaths are discussed. (GC)

  20. Predictive Factors of Mortality in Burn Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Fazeli; Karami-Matin; Kakaei; Pourghorban; Safari-Faramani

    2014-01-01

    Background: Burn injuries impose a considerable burden on healthcare systems in Iran. It is among the top ten causes of mortality and a main cause of disability. Objectives: This study aimed to examine factors influencing mortality in burn patients admitted to the main educational tertiary referral hospital in Kermanshah. Patients and Methods: All patients admitted to the Imam Khom...

  1. Computational Intelligence. Mortality Models for the Actuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemse, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis applies computational intelligence to the field of actuarial (insurance) science. In particular, this thesis deals with life insurance where mortality modelling is important. Actuaries use ancient models (mortality laws) from the nineteenth century, for example Gompertz' and Makeham's la

  2. Rise in maternal mortality in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Schutte; E.A.P. Steegers; N.W.E. Schuitemaker; J.G. Santema; K. de Boer; M. Pel; G. Vermeulen; W. Visser; J. van Roosmalen

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess causes, trends and substandard care factors in maternal mortality in the Netherlands. Design Confidential enquiry into the causes of maternal mortality. Setting Nationwide in the Netherlands. Population 2,557,208 live births. Methods Data analysis of all maternal deaths in the pe

  3. VSRR - Quarterly provisional estimates for infant mortality

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Provisional estimates of infant mortality (deaths of infants under 1 year per 1,000 live births), neonatal mortality (deaths of infants aged 0-27 days per 1,000 live...

  4. 29 CFR 4044.53 - Mortality assumptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ASSETS IN SINGLE-EMPLOYER PLANS Valuation of Benefits and Assets Trusteed Plans 4044.53 Mortality... retirement benefit for any reason other than a change in the participant's health status. (2) Non-Social... the participant's health status. (g) Contingent annuitant mortality during deferral period. If...

  5. The Gestational Age Pattern of Human Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schöley, Jonas

    I present a lifetable by gestational age from week 23 until week 100 after the last menstrual period of the mother. The lifetable shows the pre-natal, peri-natal and post-natal mortality levels for US fetus/infants conceived in the year 2009. The observed age pattern of the force of mortality...

  6. Trends in mortality decrease and economic growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, G.; Melenberg, B.

    2014-01-01

    The vast literature on extrapolative stochastic mortality models focuses mainly on the extrapolation of past mortality trends and summarizes the trends by one or more latent factors. However, the interpretation of these trends is typically not very clear. On the other hand, explanation methods are t

  7. Mortality analysis in hip fracture patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, N B; Kehlet, H

    2005-01-01

    Patients with hip fractures are usually frail and elderly with a 30-day mortality in excess of 10% in European series. Perioperative morbidity is often multifactorial in nature, and unimodal interventions will not necessarily decrease mortality. The purpose of this prospective study was to analys...

  8. Mortality in patients with Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wermuth, L; Stenager, E; Boldsen, J

    1995-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: After the introduction of L-dopa the mortality rate in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients has changed, but is still higher than in the background population. MATERIAL & METHODS: Mortality, age at death and cause of death in a group of PD patients compared with the background population...

  9. Maternal Mortality Trend in Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjorn

    it generally indicates the urgent need of improving the quality of maternal health services; scaling up evidence based interventions ... inadequate care, inefficient management of delivery, and ... There are many factors that affect the outcome of.

  10. Modeling mortality : Empirical studies on the effect of mortality on annuity markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hari, N.

    2007-01-01

    Chapter 3 of the dissertation models the macro-longevity risk and introduces a stochastic model for human mortality rates. Chapter 4 analyzes the importance of mortality improvement and mortality risk (macro- and micro-longevity risk and parameter uncertainty) on solvency positions of pension funds

  11. [Alcohol sales and pulmonary tuberculosis mortality in the Republic of Belarus in 1981 to 2001].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razvodovskiĭ, Iu E

    2006-01-01

    The fact that there is an association of alcohol abuse with pulmonary tuberculosis is well documented. The effect of alcohol sales per capita on tuberculosis mortality rates is considerably less known. The aim of the study was to evaluate the beverage-specific effect of alcohol on pulmonary tuberculosis mortality rates. Trends in pulmonary tuberculosis mortality rates in Belarus from 1981 to 2001 were analyzed in relation to those in the level of sales of various alcoholic beverages per capita, by applying the time series analysis. The analysis demonstrated a positive and statistically significant effect of changes in per capita alcohol sale levels on pulmonary tuberculosis mortality rates. It suggests that a 1% increase in alcohol sales per capita might cause 0.49 and 0.36% increases in pulmonary tuberculosis mortality rates in males and females, respectively. This study also indicates that tuberculosis prevention programs should place more emphasis on alcohol problems.

  12. Evolution of inequalities in mortality in Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil, 1991/2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Shirley Andrade; Vieira-da-Silva, Ligia Maria; Costa, Maria da Conceição Nascimento; Paim, Jairnilson Silva

    2011-01-01

    An ecological study was carried out with the aim of analyzing the evolution of inequalities in mortality in Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil, between 1991 and 2006. The city was divided into four social strata from 95 geographic Information Zones. The variables used for social stratification were education level and income of heads of households. Crude and age-standardized mortality rates, age specific mortality rates, proportional Infant mortality and the proportional mortality ratio, were calculated for each zone and social strata. Data was obtained from Death Certificates and the Populational Census. Although differences between strata were smaller in 2000 than in 1991, they persist and are still high, ranging from 28.7% to 65.5%. The differences between Information Zones were as much as 575%. The authors discuss the shortcomings of information systems, recommending that health indicators should be estimated by social classes and pointing out the limits and possibilities of the methodology used here.

  13. [Maternal mortality among black women in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Alaerte Leandro

    2006-11-01

    Every minute a woman dies in the world due to labor or complications of pregnancy. Maternal mortality is a public health problem in Brazil and affects the country's various regions unequally. Researchers agree that maternal death occurs mainly in women with lower income and less schooling. The racial issue emerges in the midst of socioeconomic issues. The analysis is hampered by the difficulty in understanding Brazil's official classification of race/color, which often impedes recording this information. Various Maternal Mortality Committees are applying the color item and reviewing their data. The current article analyzes various Maternal Mortality Committee reports, showing that the risk of maternal mortality is greater among black women (which encompasses two census categories, negra, or black, and parda, or brown), thus representing a major expression of social inequality. The article concludes with a review of political and technical recommendations to decrease maternal mortality.

  14. Antigua/Barbuda Cancer Mortality Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GS Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the cancer mortality rates in Antigua and Barbuda in an effort to enhance the profile of the country’s cancer burden. Method: Available data for 2001 to 2005 were analysed to obtain cancer mortality rates. Analysis was also made of the mortality/incidence ratios. Results: There were 354 cancer deaths – 208 males (age standardized rates (ASR 111.9 and 146 females (ASR 66.3. The main causes were prostate (ASR 53 and breast (ASR 22. The mortality rates for cancers of the lung (ASR 5.09 males, 2.49 females and brain/nervous system (ASR 0.45 males, 1.7 females were significantly lower than those in the Caribbean. Conclusion: Mortality rates were highest for sex-specific cancers, accounting for more than 50% of cancer deaths.

  15. Vitamin D with calcium reduces mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rejnmark, Lars; Avenell, Alison; Masud, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    Introduction:Vitamin D may affect multiple health outcomes. If so, an effect on mortality is to be expected. Using pooled data from randomized controlled trials, we performed individual patient data (IPD) and trial level meta-analyses to assess mortality among participants randomized to either...... vitamin D alone or vitamin D with calcium.Subjects and Methods:Through a systematic literature search, we identified 24 randomized controlled trials reporting data on mortality in which vitamin D was given either alone or with calcium. From a total of 13 trials with more than 1000 participants each, eight......,528 randomized participants (86.8% females) with a median age of 70 (interquartile range, 62-77) yr. Vitamin D with or without calcium reduced mortality by 7% [hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.88-0.99]. However, vitamin D alone did not affect mortality, but risk of death was reduced if vitamin...

  16. Mortality in mothers after perinatal loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidtjørn, D; Wu, C; Schendel, D

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether mothers who lost a child from stillbirth or in the first week of life have an increased overall mortality and cause-specific mortality. DESIGN: A population based follow-up study. SETTING: Data from Danish national registers. POPULATION: All mothers in Denmark were...... included in the cohort at time of their first delivery from 1 January 1980 to 31 December 2008 and followed until 31 December 2009 or death, whichever came first. METHODS: The association between perinatal loss and total and cause-specific mortality in mothers was estimated with hazard ratios (HR) and 95......% confidence intervals (95% CI) calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Overall mortality and cause-specific mortality. RESULTS: During the follow-up period, 838 331 mothers in the cohort gave birth to one or more children and 7690 mothers (0.92%) experienced...

  17. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and early mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkston, W K; Smith, O J; Walden, J M

    1990-12-01

    To assess morbidity, mortality, and benefit associated with percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy (PEG), we retrospectively studied 42 patients who had had PEG. Mortality was exceptionally high during the first 60 days after PEG (43%), and then stabilized. In nearly half of the cases (20/42) the PEG tube was removed during the first 60 days because of either death or improvement. Patients with malignancy had a significantly higher morbidity and 60-day mortality than the neurologically impaired. We concluded that patients should be carefully selected for PEG because early mortality is high; a 60-day trial of soft nasogastric feedings should be considered before PEG, and could reduce by nearly half the number of patients failing to receive long-term benefit; and patients with malignancy have significantly greater morbidity and mortality after PEG and may not receive the same advantage from the procedure.

  18. Mortality in anesthesia: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Gobbo Braz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This systematic review of the Brazilian and worldwide literature aims to evaluate the incidence and causes of perioperative and anesthesia-related mortality. Studies were identified by searching the Medline and Scielo databases, followed by a manual search for relevant articles. Our review includes studies published between 1954 and 2007. Each publication was reviewed to identify author(s, study period, data source, perioperative mortality rates, and anesthesia-related mortality rates. Thirty-three trials were assessed. Brazilian and worldwide studies demonstrated a similar decline in anesthesia-related mortality rates, which amounted to fewer than 1 death per 10,000 anesthetics in the past two decades. Perioperative mortality rates also decreased during this period, with fewer than 20 deaths per 10,000 anesthetics in developed countries. Brazilian studies showed higher perioperative mortality rates, from 19 to 51 deaths per 10,000 anesthetics. The majority of perioperative deaths occurred in neonates, children under one year, elderly patients, males, patients of ASA III physical status or poorer, emergency surgeries, during general anesthesia, and cardiac surgery followed by thoracic, vascular, gastroenterologic, pediatric and orthopedic surgeries. The main causes of anesthesia-related mortality were problems with airway management and cardiocirculatory events related to anesthesia and drug administration. Our systematic review of the literature shows that perioperative mortality rates are higher in Brazil than in developed countries, while anesthesia-related mortality rates are similar in Brazil and in developed countries. Most cases of anesthesia-related mortality are associated with cardiocirculatory and airway events. These data may be useful in developing strategies to prevent anesthesia-related deaths.

  19. Green space and mortality following ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilker, Elissa H; Wu, Chih-Da; McNeely, Eileen; Mostofsky, Elizabeth; Spengler, John; Wellenius, Gregory A; Mittleman, Murray A

    2014-08-01

    Residential proximity to green space has been associated with physical and mental health benefits, but whether green space is associated with post-stroke survival has not been studied. Patients ≥ 21 years of age admitted to the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) between 1999 and 2008 with acute ischemic stroke were identified. Demographics, presenting symptoms, medical history and imaging results were abstracted from medical records at the time of hospitalization for stroke onset. Addresses were linked to average Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, distance to roadways with more than 10,000 cars/day, and US census block group. Deaths were identified through June 2012 using the Social Security Death Index. There were 929 deaths among 1645 patients with complete data (median follow up: 5 years). In multivariable Cox models adjusted for indicators of medical history, demographic and socioeconomic factors, the hazard ratio for patients living in locations in the highest quartile of green space compared to the lowest quartile was 0.78 (95% Confidence Interval: 0.63-0.97) (p-trend = 0.009). This association remained statistically significant after adjustment for residential proximity to a high traffic road. Residential proximity to green space is associated with higher survival rates after ischemic stroke in multivariable adjusted models. Further work is necessary to elucidate the underlying mechanisms for this association, and to better understand the exposure-response relationships and susceptibility factors that may contribute to higher mortality in low green space areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Survival and mortality in ESRD patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantrel, F; de Cornelissen, F; Deloumeaux, J; Lange, C; Lassalle, M

    2013-09-01

    This chapter provides a set of indicators on survival, life expectancy and causes of death of patients in chronic renal failure treated by dialysis or transplantation beginning a first replacement therapy between 2002 and 2011. Age strongly influences survival on dialysis. Thus, one year survival of patients under age 65 is over 90%. After 5 years, among patients over 85 years, it is more than 15%. The presence of diabetes or one or more cardiovascular comorbidities also significantly worse patient survival. In terms of trend, we do not find significant improvement in the 2-year survival between patients in the cohort 2006-2007 and the 2008-2009 cohort. Cardiovascular diseases account for 27% of causes of death to infectious diseases (12%) and cancer (10%). Life expectancy of patients is highly dependent on their treatment. Thus, a transplant patient aged 30 has a life expectancy of 41 years versus 23 years for a dialysis patient. Transplant patients have a mortality rate much lower than those of dialysis patients. Thus, between 60 and 69 years, for 1000 patients in dialysis in 2011, 127 died within the year. For 1000 patients of the same age, who have a functioning kidney transplant, 24 died within the year. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. The contribution of competition to tree mortality in old-growth coniferous forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, A.; Battles, J.; Stephenson, N.L.; van Mantgem, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Competition is a well-documented contributor to tree mortality in temperate forests, with numerous studies documenting a relationship between tree death and the competitive environment. Models frequently rely on competition as the only non-random mechanism affecting tree mortality. However, for mature forests, competition may cease to be the primary driver of mortality.We use a large, long-term dataset to study the importance of competition in determining tree mortality in old-growth forests on the western slope of the Sierra Nevada of California, U.S.A. We make use of the comparative spatial configuration of dead and live trees, changes in tree spatial pattern through time, and field assessments of contributors to an individual tree's death to quantify competitive effects.Competition was apparently a significant contributor to tree mortality in these forests. Trees that died tended to be in more competitive environments than trees that survived, and suppression frequently appeared as a factor contributing to mortality. On the other hand, based on spatial pattern analyses, only three of 14 plots demonstrated compelling evidence that competition was dominating mortality. Most of the rest of the plots fell within the expectation for random mortality, and three fit neither the random nor the competition model. These results suggest that while competition is often playing a significant role in tree mortality processes in these forests it only infrequently governs those processes. In addition, the field assessments indicated a substantial presence of biotic mortality agents in trees that died.While competition is almost certainly important, demographics in these forests cannot accurately be characterized without a better grasp of other mortality processes. In particular, we likely need a better understanding of biotic agents and their interactions with one another and with competition. ?? 2011.

  2. Are the Poor Dying Younger in Malaysia? An Examination of the Socioeconomic Gradient in Mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeevitha Mariapun

    Full Text Available Socioeconomic inequalities in health represent unfairness in the health distribution of a population. Efforts to produce information on mortality distributions in many low and middle income countries (LMICs are mostly hampered by lack of data disaggregated by socioeconomic groups. In this paper we describe how mortality statistics obtained from multiple data sources were combined to provide an evaluation of the socioeconomic distribution of mortality in Malaysia, a LMIC located in the Asia Pacific region.This study has an ecological design. As a measure of socioeconomic status, we used principal component analysis to construct a socioeconomic index using census data. Districts were ranked according to the standardised median index of households and assigned to each individual in the 5-year mortality data. The mortality indicators of interest were potential years of life lost (PYLL, standardised mortality ratio (SMR, infant mortality rate (IMR and under-5 mortality rate (U5MR. Both socioeconomic status and mortality outcomes were used compute the concentration index which provided the summary measure of the magnitude of inequality.Socially disadvantaged districts were found to have worse mortality outcomes compared to more advantaged districts. The values of the concentration index for the overall population of the Peninsula are C = -0.1334 (95% CI: -0.1605 to -0.1063 for the PYLL, C = -0.0685 (95% CI: -0.0928 to -0.0441 for the SMR, C = -0.0997 (95% CI: -0.1343 to -0.0652 for the IMR and C = -0.1207 (95% CI: -0.1523 to -0.0891 for the U5MR. Mortality outcomes within ethnic groups were also found to be less favourable among the poor.The findings of this study suggest that socioeconomic inequalities disfavouring the poor exist in Malaysia.

  3. Comparing trends in mortality from cardiovascular disease and cancer in the United Kingdom, 1983-2013: joinpoint regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lauren; Bhatnagar, Prachi; Townsend, Nick

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to study the time trends underlying a change from cardiovascular disease (CVD) to cancer as the most common cause of age-standardized mortality in the UK between 1983 and 2013. A retrospective trend analysis of the World Health Organization mortality database for mortality from all cancers, all CVDs, and their three most common types, by sex and age. Age-standardized mortality rates were adjusted to the 2013 European Standard Population and analyzed using joinpoint regression analysis for annual percent changes. The difference in mortality rate between total CVD and cancer narrowed over the study period as age-standardized mortality from CVD decreased more steeply than cancer in both sexes. We observed higher overall rates for both diseases in men compared to women, with high mortality rates from ischemic heart disease and lung cancer in men. Joinpoint regression analysis indicated that trends of decreasing rates of CVD have increased over time while decreasing trends in cancer mortality rates have slowed down since the 1990s. The lowest improvements in mortality rates were for cancer in those over 75 years of age and lung cancer in women. In 2011, the age-standardized mortality rate for cancer exceeded that of CVD in both sexes in the UK. These changing trends in mortality may support evidence for changes in policy and resource allocation in the UK.

  4. Extended effects of air pollution on cardiopulmonary mortality in Vienna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuberger, Manfred; Rabczenko, Daniel; Moshammer, Hanns

    BackgroundCurrent standards for fine particulates and nitrogen dioxide are under revision. Patients with cardiovascular disease have been identified as the largest group which need to be protected from effects of urban air pollution. MethodsWe sought to estimate associations between indicators of urban air pollution and daily mortality using time series of daily TSP, PM 10, PM 2.5, NO 2, SO 2, O 3 and nontrauma deaths in Vienna (Austria) 2000-2004. We used polynomial distributed lag analysis adjusted for seasonality, daily temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure and incidence of influenza as registered by sentinels. ResultsAll three particulate measures and NO 2 were associated with mortality from all causes and from ischemic heart disease and COPD at all ages and in the elderly. The magnitude of the effect was largest for PM 2.5 and NO 2. Best predictor of mortality increase lagged 0-7 days was PM 2.5 (for ischemic heart disease and COPD) and NO 2 (for other heart disease and all causes). Total mortality increase, lagged 0-14 days, per 10 μg m -3 was 2.6% for PM 2.5 and 2.9% for NO 2, mainly due to cardiopulmonary and cerebrovascular causes. ConclusionAcute and subacute lethal effects of urban air pollution are predicted by PM 2.5 and NO 2 increase even at relatively low levels of these pollutants. This is consistent with results on hospital admissions and the lack of a threshold. While harvesting (reduction of mortality after short increase due to premature deaths of most sensitive persons) seems to be of minor importance, deaths accumulate during 14 days after an increase of air pollutants. The limit values for PM 2.5 and NO 2 proposed for 2010 in the European Union are unable to prevent serious health effects.

  5. Fir Decline and Mortality in the Southern Siberian Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Im, Sergei T.; Petrov, Ilya A.; Dvinskaya, Mariya, L.; Fedotova, Elena V.; Ranson, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Increased dieback and mortality of dark needle conifer (DNC) stands (composed of fir (Abies sibirica),Siberian pine (Pinus sibirica) and spruce (Picea obovata))were documented in Russia during recent decades. Here we analyzed spatial and temporal patterns of fir decline and mortality in the southern Siberian Mountains based on satellite, in situ and dendrochronological data. The studied stands are located within the boundary between DNC taiga to the north and forest-steppe to the south. Fir decline and mortality were observed to originate where topographic features contributed to maximal water-stress risk, i.e., steep (1825),convex, south-facing slopes with a shallow well-drained root zone. Fir regeneration survived droughts and increased stem radial growth, while upper canopy trees died. Tree ring width(TRW) growth negatively correlated with vapor pressure deficit (VPD), drought index and occurrence of late frosts, and positively with soil water content. Previous year growth conditions (i.e., drought index, VPD, soil water anomalies)have a high impact on current TRW (r 0.600.74). Fir mortality was induced by increased water stress and severe droughts (as a primary factor) in synergy with bark-beetles and fungi attacks (as secondary factors). Dendrochronology data indicated that fir mortality is a periodic process. In a future climate with increased aridity and drought frequency, fir (and Siberian pine) may disappear from portions of its current range (primarily within the boundary with the forest steppe)and is likely to be replaced by drought-tolerant species such as Pinus sylvestris and Larix sibirica.

  6. History of Foot Ulcer Increases Mortality Among Individuals With Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Marjolein M.; Tell, Grethe S.; Riise, Trond; Hanestad, Berit R.; Østbye, Truls; Graue, Marit; Midthjell, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare mortality rates for individuals with diabetes with and without a history of foot ulcer (HFU) and with that for the nondiabetic population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This population-based study included 155 diabetic individuals with an HFU, 1,339 diabetic individuals without an HFU, and 63,632 nondiabetic individuals who were all followed for 10 years with mortality as the end point. RESULTS During the follow-up period, a total of 49.0% of diabetic individuals with an HFU died, compared with 35.2% of diabetic individuals without an HFU and 10.5% of those without diabetes. In Cox regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, education, current smoking, and waist circumference, having an HFU was associated with more than a twofold (2.29 [95% CI 1.82–2.88]) hazard risk for mortality compared with that of the nondiabetic group. In corresponding analyses comparing diabetic individuals with and without an HFU, an HFU was associated with 47% increased mortality (1.47 [1.14–1.89]). Significant covariates were older age, male sex, and current smoking. After inclusion of A1C, insulin use, microalbuminuria, cardiovascular disease, and depression scores in the model, each was significantly related to life expectancy. CONCLUSIONS AN HFU increased mortality risk among community-dwelling adults and elderly individuals with diabetes. The excess risk persisted after adjustment for comorbidity and depression scores, indicating that close clinical monitoring might be warranted among individuals with an HFU, who may be particularly vulnerable to adverse outcomes. PMID:19729524

  7. Mortality at an automotive stamping and assembly complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, R; Krebs, J; Mirer, F

    1994-10-01

    Mortality among workers with 2 or more years employment at an automotive stamping and assembly complex was analyzed using standardized mortality ratio (SMR), proportional mortality ratio (PMR), and mortality odds ratio (MOR) methods. The stamping plant all-cause SMR was considerably less than expected (for white men, SMR = 0.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.54, 0.79; for black men, SMR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.45, 1.13), indicating a strong "healthy worker effect." However, six stomach cancer deaths produced an SMR of 4.4 (95% CI = 1.62, 9.6) and a PMR of 6.8 (95% CI = 2.5, 15). Based on small numbers of cases, stomach cancer risk increased with duration in stamping and tool and die departments where exposures included drawing compound and other metalworking fluids. Stamping plant lung cancer mortality was elevated among production welders (MOR = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.2, 6.3), and increased with duration. Welding was performed on sheet metal sometimes coated with drawing compound, primer, or epoxy resin adhesive. As was observed for the stamping plant, the all-cause SMR for the two assembly plants was unusually low (for white men, SMR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.56, 0.73; for black men, SMR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.43, 0.75). The lung cancer SMR was not elevated but the MOR was (MOR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.1, 2.4) and increased with assembly plant duration (MOR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.02, 3.1, at mean duration of cases). In the assembly plants, paint oven stack emissions had been reintroduced into the plant by the ventilation system.

  8. Bioclimatic Extremes Drive Forest Mortality in Southwest, Western Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley John Evans

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Extreme and persistent reductions in annual precipitation and an increase in the mean diurnal temperature range have resulted in patch scale forest mortality following the summer of 2010–2011 within the Forest study area near Perth, Western Australia. The impacts of 20 bioclimatic indicators derived from temperature, precipitation and of actual and potential evapotranspiration are quantified. We found that spatially aggregated seasonal climatologies across the study area show 2011 with an annual mean of 17.7 °C (± 5.3 °C was 1.1 °C warmer than the mean over recent decades (1981–2011,- 16.6 °C ± 4.6 °C and the mean has been increasing over the last decade. Compared to the same period, 2010–2011 summer maximum temperatures were 1.4 °C (31.6 °C ± 2.0 °C higher and the annual mean diurnal temperature range (Tmax−Tmin was 1.6 °C higher (14.7 °C ± 0.5 °C. In 2009, the year before the forest mortality began, annual precipitation across the study area was 69% less (301 mm ± 38 mm than the mean of 1981–2010 (907 mm ± 69 mm. Using Système Pour l'Observation de la Terre mission 5 (SPOT-5 satellite imagery captured after the summer of 2010–2011 we map a broad scale forest mortality event across the Forested study area. This satellite-climatology based methodology provides a means of monitoring and mapping similar forest mortality events- a critical contribution to our understanding the dynamical bioclimatic drivers of forest mortality events.

  9. Handgrip Strength: Indications of Paternal Inheritance in Three European Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cournil, Amandine; Jeune, Bernard; Skytthe, Axel

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Handgrip strength is an indicator of overall muscle strength. Poor handgrip strength is a risk factor for disability and mortality. We aimed to investigate the pattern of inheritance of handgrip strength in a sample of parent-offspring pairs from three different European regions in De...

  10. Teriparatide - Indications beyond osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn Lee Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a condition of impaired bone strength that results in an increased risk of fracture. The current and most popular pharmacological options for the treatment of osteoporosis include antiresorptive therapy, in particular, oral bisphosphonates (alendronate, risedronate, ibandronate. Anabolic agents like teriparatide have widened our therapeutic options. They act by directly stimulating bone formation and improving bone mass quantity and quality. Two forms of recombinant human parathyroid hormone (PTH are available : full-length PTH (PTH 1-84; approved in the EU only and the 1-34 N-terminal active fragment of PTH (teriparatide, US FDA approved. This review aims to discuss the benefits of teriparatide beyond the currently licensed indications like fracture healing, dental stability, osteonecrosis of jaw, hypoparathyroidism, and hypocalcemia.

  11. INDICATORS OF TERRITORIAL COHESION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA VASILESCU (DUMITRASCU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In a world of globalization generating geographical concentration, relocation of activities, thus inducing territorial disparities, territorial cohesion has become a prerequisite for achieving sustainable economic growth and implementing social and economic cohesion. The ratification of Lisbon Treaty represents the moment when “Territorial Cohesion” has been added as an official policy aim of the EU to its previous aims of economic and social cohesion. Thus, the process of defining this concept of “Territorial Cohesion” has become the task of the Commission and EU Member States. Based on a literature review, the paper describes, in the first section, the polysemantic nature of territorial cohesion. The main objective of the next section is to address the main indicators, directly related to territorial objectives, that could be used to support policy makers in measuring and monitoring territorial cohesion related to European territorial development.

  12. Environmental indicators for buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammann, S.

    Whenever we shop, the products we consider buying are labelled with the economical price we have to pay if we want to purchase them - an important parameter in our decisions as purchasers. The increrasing awareness for environmental limits and backlashes of human activities also in the building...... sector have fostered the wish to define 'the ecological price' of a building as a help for environmental conscious decision-making. In a social constructivist approach this Ph.D. thesis looks across and beyond the manifold existing approaches for environmental indicators for buildings. It acknowledges...... that among the relevant actors in the building sector the scientific view is only one perspective among others. This study combines natural-scientific knowledge with social-scientific knowledge, obtained in a close co-operation with actors in the building sector in Denmark and a research period...

  13. Vitamin D and cancer mortality: systematic review of prospective epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilz, Stefan; Kienreich, Katharina; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Ritz, Eberhard; Lerchbaum, Elisabeth; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Matzi, Veronika; Lindenmann, Joerg; März, Winfried; Gandini, Sara; Dekker, Jacqueline M

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence from experimental and epidemiological studies suggests that vitamin D deficiency might be a causal risk factor for cancer and therewith associated mortality. We performed a systematic review in Medline up to February 2012 to identify prospective studies on 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) and cancer mortality as well as on 25(OH)D and survival in cancer patients. Our search retrieved 13 studies on cancer-specific mortality and 20 studies on overall mortality in cancer patients. Data on 25(OH)D and cancer mortality were mainly derived from general populations. The results were inconsistent and yielded either no, inverse or positive associations. By contrast, the majority of studies in cancer patients showed that patients with higher 25(OH)D levels had a decreased risk of mortality. This relationship was particularly evident in cohorts of colorectal cancer patients. In contrast, there was no indication for increased mortality risk with higher vitamin D levels in any cancer cohort. In conclusion, the relationship of vitamin D status and cancerspecific mortality is still unclear and warrants further studies. Our results provide a strong rationale to perform prospective randomized controlled studies to document a potential effect of vitamin D supplementation on survival in cancer patients.

  14. Review of avian mortality studies at concentrating solar power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Clifford K.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reviews past and current avian mortality studies at concentrating solar power (CSP) plants and facilities including Solar One in California, the Solar Energy Development Center in Israel, Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in California, Crescent Dunes in Nevada, and Gemasolar in Spain. Findings indicate that the leading causes of bird deaths at CSP plants are from collisions (primarily with reflective surfaces; i.e., heliostats) and singeing caused by concentrated solar flux. Safe irradiance levels for birds have been reported to range between 4 and 50 kW/m2. Above these levels, singeing and irreversible damage to the feathers can occur. Despite observations of large numbers of "streamers" in concentrated flux regions and reports that suggest these streamers indicate complete vaporization of birds, analyses in this paper show that complete vaporization of birds is highly improbable, and the observed streamers are likely due to insects flying into the concentrated flux. The levelized avian mortality rate during the first year of operation at Ivanpah was estimated to be 0.7 - 3.5 fatalities per GWh, which is less than the levelized avian mortality reported for fossil fuel plants but greater than that for nuclear and wind power plants. Mitigation measures include acoustic, visual, tactile, and chemosensory deterrents to keep birds away from the plant, and heliostat aiming strategies that reduce the solar flux during standby.

  15. Occupational injury mortality: New Mexico 1998-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulloy, Karen B; Moraga-McHaley, Stephanie; Crandall, Cameron; Kesler, Denece O

    2007-12-01

    The current study characterizes patterns of occupational injury fatalities in New Mexico for the 5-year period 1998-2002. The study applied methods developed by the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (CSTE/NIOSH) Occupational Health Indicator Work Group and compared the relative strength and weakness of two different datasets (CFOI and NMVRHS) for occupational injury fatality surveillance. Annual occupational injury mortality rates ranged from 4.4 to 7.6 per 100,000 employed persons aged 16 and over compared to annual US rates of 4.0-4.6 per 100,000. Risk factors for higher mortality rates included age over 65 years, self-employment, non-US citizenship, being African-American or Hispanic, and occurrence in rural counties. The top industry for fatality rate was mining followed by transportation, public utilities, agriculture, and construction. Applying CSTE/NIOSH Occupational Health Indicator protocol and using both CFOI and NMVRHS data improved the characterization of occupational injury mortality and the setting of priorities for prevention intervention.

  16. Serbia within the European context: An analysis of premature mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santric Milicevic, Milena; Bjegovic, Vesna; Terzic, Zorica; Vukovic, Dejana; Kocev, Nikola; Marinkovic, Jelena; Vasic, Vladimir

    2009-08-05

    Based on the global predictions majority of deaths will be collectively caused by cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and traffic accidents over the coming 25 years. In planning future national health policy actions, inter - regional assessments play an important role. The purpose of the study was to analyze similarities and differences in premature mortality between Serbia, EURO A, EURO B, and EURO C regions in 2000. Mortality and premature mortality patterns were analysed according to cause of death, by gender and seven age intervals. The study results are presented in relative (%) and absolute terms (age-specific and age-standardized death rates per 100,000 population, and age-standardized rates of years of life lost - YLL per 1,000). Direct standardization of rates was undertaken using the standard population of Europe. The inter-regional comparison was based on a calculation of differences in YLL structures and with a ratio of age-standardized YLL rates per 1,000. A multivariate generalized linear model was used to explore mortality of Serbia and Europe sub-regions with ln age-specific death rates. The dissimilarity was achieved with a p death case. YLL patterns indicated similarities between Serbia and EURO A, while SRR YLL had similarities between Serbia and EURO B. Compared to all Europe sub-regions, Serbia had a major excess of premature mortality in neoplasms and diabetes mellitus. Serbia had lost more years of life than EURO A due to cardiovascular, genitourinary diseases, and intentional injuries. Yet, Serbia was not as burdened with communicable diseases and injuries as were EURO B and EURO C. With a premature mortality pattern, Serbia is placed in the middle position of the Europe triangle. The main excess of YLL in Serbia was due to cardiovascular, malignant diseases, and diabetes mellitus. The results may be used for assessment of unacceptable social risks resulting from health inequalities. Within intentions to reduce an unfavourable premature

  17. Municipal distribution of breast cancer mortality among women in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Pérez Javier

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spain has one of the lowest rates of breast cancer in Europe, though estimated incidence has risen substantially in recent decades. Some years ago, the Spanish Cancer Mortality Atlas showed Spain as having a heterogeneous distribution of breast cancer mortality at a provincial level. This paper describes the municipal distribution of breast cancer mortality in Spain and its relationship with socio-economic indicators. Methods Breast cancer mortality was modelled using the Besag-York-Molliè autoregressive spatial model, including socio-economic level, rurality and percentage of population over 64 years of age as surrogates of reproductive and lifestyle risk factors. Municipal relative risks (RRs were independently estimated for women aged under 50 years and for those aged 50 years and over. Maps were plotted depicting smoothed RR estimates and the distribution of the posterior probability of RR>1. Results In women aged 50 years and over, mortality increased with socio-economic level, and was lower in rural areas and municipalities with higher proportion of old persons. Among women aged under 50 years, rurality was the only statistically significant explanatory variable. For women older than 49 years, the highest relative risks were mainly registered for municipalities located in the Canary Islands, Balearic Islands, the Mediterranean coast of Catalonia and Valencia, plus others around the Ebro River. In premenopausal women, the pattern was similar but tended to be more homogeneous. In mainland Spain, a group of municipalities with high RRs were located in Andalusia, near the left bank of the Guadalquivir River. Conclusion As previously observed in other contexts, mortality rates are positively related with socio-economic status and negatively associated with rurality and the presence of a higher proportion of people over age 64 years. Taken together, these variables represent the influence of lifestyle factors which have

  18. Factors affecting mortality in patients with burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Erbiş

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The increase in life quality and expectancy causes an increase in the elderly population. Improvements in burn treatment resulted in decreased mortality in children and young adults but in elderly patients burns are still an important trauma that should be handed differently than other age groups. The aim of this study was to evaluate the factors effecting mortality in patients with burns over 45 years old. Methods: Fifty-eight patients over 45 years of age, who were treated in our burns unit in the last 3 years were included in our study. Their age, burn percentage and depth, coexisting diseases and mortality rates were examined retrospectively. Results: The average age of surviving patients was 57.4 years while it was 70 years for nonsurviving patients (p=0.002. The width of burn area was 21.1 % in surviving and 50 % in nonsurviving patients (p<0.01. The effect of additional coexistent diseases on mortality was significant (p=0.001. The most common reasons of mortality were sepsis and congestive heart failure. Conclusion: We found out that the age, percentage of burns and coexistent diseases had a negative effect on success of treatment and mortality. Mortality rates will decrease in these cases with careful follow-up and a multidisciplinary approach. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6 (3: 240-243

  19. Epilepsy and mortality in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalaya, Alejandro L; Tellez-Zenteno, Jose F; Steven, David A; Burneo, Jorge G

    2015-02-01

    To assess the mortality related to epilepsy in Latin America. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and LILACS from inception to December 2013 for articles evaluating mortality in patients with epilepsy in Latin America. Studies were included if they evaluated any mortality outcome, included a population of subjects with recurrent seizures or epilepsy, and contained original data analysis. The search strategy yielded 177 publications in MEDLINE and EMBASE, and 59 publications in LILACS; of which 18 met inclusion criteria for our overall review of epilepsy and mortality in Latin America. Most excluded studies did not report the mortality or lacked original data. We also included two references obtained from 2 non-systematic reviews fulfilling our inclusion criteria, and able to provide data for our analyses. Five studies reported Standardized Mortality Ratio (SMR), and demonstrated that people with epilepsy had a higher risk of death than the general population. The SMRs reported in two community-based studies were 1.34 and 2.45. The information about mortality in epilepsy in Latin America is very scarce. Comparisons cannot be made among studies due to methodological differences. More studies are needed. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dengue mortality in Colombia, 1985-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro-Narváez, Pablo; León-Quevedo, Willian; Castañeda-Orjuela, Carlos Andrés

    2016-02-11

    Dengue in Colombia is an important public health problem due to the huge economic and social costs it has caused, especially during the disease outbreaks.  To describe the behavior of dengue mortality in Colombia between 1985 and 2012.  We conducted a descriptive study. Information was obtained from mortality and population projection databases provided by the Departamento Administrativo Nacional de Estadística (DANE) for the 1985-2012 period. Mortality rates, rate ratios, and case fatality rates were estimated.  A total of 1,990 dengue deaths were registered during this period in Colombia. Dengue mortality rates presented an increasing trend with statistical significance between 1985 and 1998. Higher mortality rates were reported in men both younger than 5 years and older than 65 years. Between 1995 and 2012, category 1 to 4 municipalities reported the highest mortality rates. Case fatality rates varied during the period between 0.01% and 0.39%.  Dengue is an avoidable disease that should disappear from mortality statistics as a cause of death. The event is avoidable if the proposed activities from the Estrategia de Gestión Integrada (EGI)-Dengue are implemented and evaluated. We recommend encouraging the development of an informational culture to contribute to decision making and prioritizing resource allocation.

  1. Conifer Decline and Mortality in Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharuk, V.; Im, S.; Ranson, K.

    2015-12-01

    "Dark needle conifer" (DNC: Abies sibirica, Pinus sibirica and Picea obovata) decline and mortality increase were documented in Russia during recent decades. Here we analyzed causes and scale of Siberian pine and fir mortality in Altai-Sayan and Baikal Lake Regions and West Siberian Plane based on in situdata and remote sensing (QuickBird, Landsat, GRACE). Geographically, mortality began on the margins of the DNC range (i.e., within the forest-steppe and conifer-broadleaf ecotones) and on terrain features with maximal water stress risk (narrow-shaped hilltops, convex steep south facing slopes, shallow well-drained soils). Within ridges, mortality occurred mainly along mountain passes, where stands faced drying winds. Regularly mortality was observed to decrease with elevation increase with the exception of Baikal Lake Mountains, where it was minimal near the lake shore and increased with elevation (up to about 1000 m a.s.l.). Siberian pine and fir mortality followed a drying trend with consecutive droughts since the 1980s. Dendrochronology analysis showed that mortality was correlated with vapor pressure deficit increase, drought index, soil moisture decrease and occurrence of late frosts. In Baikal region Siberian pine mortality correlated with Baikal watershed meteorological variables. An impact of previous year climate conditions on the current growth was found (r2 = 0.6). Thus, water-stressed trees became sensitive to bark beetles and fungi impact (including Polygraphus proximus and Heterobasidion annosum). At present, an increase in mortality is observed within the majority of DNC range. Results obtained also showed a primary role of water stress in that phenomenon with a secondary role of bark beetles and fungi attacks. In future climate with increased drought severity and frequency Siberian pine and fir will partly disappear from its current range, and will be substituted by drought-tolerant species (e.g., Pinus silvestris, Larix sibirica).

  2. Mortality and suicide among Danish women with cosmetic breast implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Poul Harboe; Hölmich, Lisbet R; McLaughlin, Joseph K

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies indicate that women with cosmetic breast implants have a significantly increased risk of suicide. Our objectives were to examine mortality among Danish women who underwent cosmetic breast implant surgery and to evaluate the baseline prevalence of psychopathological...... disorders as measured by admission to a psychiatric hospital among women seeking cosmetic surgery. METHODS: Cohort study of 2761 women who underwent cosmetic breast implant surgery at private clinics of plastic surgery or public hospitals, 7071 women who underwent breast reduction surgery at public...... hospitals, and 1736 women who attended private clinics for cosmetic surgery other than breast implantation, between 1973 and 1995. Causes of death through 1999 were identified through the Danish Mortality Files. Information on admission to psychiatric hospitals prior to cosmetic surgery was obtained from...

  3. Causes of Mortality and Diseases in Farmed Deer in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Sieber

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate diseases and causes of mortality in Swiss farmed deer, deer found dead or shot due to diseased condition between March 2003 and December 2004 were requested for a complete postmortem examination. One hundred and sixty-two animals were submitted. Perinatal mortality, necrobacillosis in 3 week to 6 month old deer, and endoparasitosis in 6 month to 2 year old deer were identified as the most important causes of loss, followed by ruminal acidosis, which was diagnosed in 22% of deer older than 1 year. Congenital malformations were observed in 15% of deer less than 6 months old. Reportable infectious diseases known as major problems in deer farming in other countries were rare (yersiniosis, malignant catarrhal fever or not observed (tuberculosis, chronic wasting disease. Overall, the results indicate that the Swiss deer population does not present major health problems of concern for domestic animals.

  4. Lithium in Tap Water and Suicide Mortality in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Terao

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Lithium has been used as a mood-stabilizing drug in people with mood disorders. Previous studies have shown that natural levels of lithium in drinking water may protect against suicide. This study evaluated the association between lithium levels in tap water and the suicide standardized mortality ratio (SMR in 40 municipalities of Aomori prefecture, which has the highest levels of suicide mortality rate in Japan. Lithium levels in the tap water supplies of each municipality were measured using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. After adjusting for confounders, a statistical trend toward significance was found for the relationship between lithium levels and the average SMR among females. These findings indicate that natural levels of lithium in drinking water might have a protective effect on the risk of suicide among females. Future research is warranted to confirm this association.

  5. The effect of women's status on infant and child mortality in four rural areas of Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mian B; Phillips, James F; Pence, Brian

    2007-05-01

    In South Asia women are often the primary decision-makers regarding child health care, family health and nutrition. This paper examines the proposition that constraints on women's status adversely affect the survival of their children. Survey data are used to construct indices of women's household autonomy and authority, which are then linked to longitudinal data on survival of their children. Proportional hazard models indicate that enhanced autonomy significantly decreases post-neonatal mortality. Enhanced household authority significantly decreases child mortality. A simulation based on estimated effects of eliminating gender inequality suggests that achieving complete gender equality could reduce child mortality by nearly fifty per cent and post-neonatal mortality by one-third.

  6. Mortality patterns among workers exposed to acrylamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, J.J.; Swaen, G.M.; Marsh, G.M.; Utidjian, H.M.; Caporossi, J.C.; Lucas, L.J. (American Cyanamid Co., Wayne, NJ (USA))

    1989-07-01

    A cohort of 8854 men, 2293 of whom were exposed to acrylamide, was examined from 1925 to 1983 for mortality. This cohort consisted of four plant populations in two countries: the United States and The Netherlands. No statistically significant excess of all-cause or cause-specific mortality was found among acrylamide workers. Analysis by acrylamide exposure levels showed no trend of increased risk of mortality from several cancer sites. These results do not support the hypothesis that acrylamide is a human carcinogen.

  7. INFANT MORTALITY MAR URAL POPULATION OF MEERUT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Prakash

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available A cross sectional study was conducted in eight selected villages of Meerut District [UJP.} to find out infant mortality rate alongwith other various health care delivery practices associated with this. An infant mortality rate of 106.7/1000 LB was found in the study population. Infant mortality was higher in female infants, infants of mothers not availed antenatal care, not received tetanus toxoid, delivered by untrained personnel and where cow-dung was applied to cord stump. Among the causes of infant deaths prematurity or low birth weight was the commonest cause followed by respiratory infections, diarrhoeal diseases and tetanus neonatorum

  8. Mortality Rates Among Arab Americans in Michigan

    OpenAIRE

    Dallo, Florence J.; Schwartz, Kendra; Ruterbusch, Julie J.; Booza, Jason; Williams, David R.

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) calculate age-specific and age-adjusted cause-specific mortality rates for Arab Americans; and (2) compare these rates with those for blacks and whites. Mortality rates were estimated using Michigan death certificate data, an Arab surname and first name list, and 2000 U.S. Census data. Age-specific rates, age-adjusted all-cause and cause-specific rates were calculated. Arab Americans (75+) had higher mortality rates than whites and blacks. Among men, ...

  9. Mortality associated with cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, J B; Harper, J L; Jauch, E C

    1996-09-01

    Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis is a rare infection but still occurs and carries a mortality rate up to 60%. It is a polymicrobial infection that is characterized by diffuse necrosis of fascial planes and subcutaneous tissues. Diagnosing early stages of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis in relationship to other soft tissue infections of odontogenic origin is difficult and leads to less aggressive treatment with resulting increased morbidity and mortality. To prevent this significant mortality and morbidity associated with cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis early presentation, recognition and treatment by health care provider is essential.

  10. Infant mortality: an insured population perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Daniel D; Roudebush, Brad

    2012-01-01

    Many insurers offer life coverage to individuals during the first year of life. The policies tend to have small face values, but frequently contain premium waiver or additional purchase options. General population mortality is significantly higher at this age relative to older children and even middle-aged adults. This article presents the mortality experience of an insured cohort in which death occurred under 1 year of age. In summary, the insured population's mortality rate was significantly lower and the leading causes of death were different than the general population.

  11. Risk factors associated with on-farm mortality in Swedish dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvåsen, K.; Jansson Mörk, M.; Dohoo, I. R.

    2014-01-01

    Dairy cow mortality (unassisted death and euthanasia) has increased, worldwide and in Sweden. On-farm mortality indicates suboptimal herd health or welfare and causes financial loss for the dairy producer. The objective of this study was to identify cow-level risk factors associated with on......). The effects of potential risk factors on on-farm cow mortality were analysed using a Weibull proportional hazard model with a gamma distributed frailty effect common to cows within herd. The event of interest (failure) was euthanasia or unassisted death. An observation was right censored if the cow...

  12. Maternal bereavement: the heightened mortality of mothers after the death of a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Javier; Evans, William N

    2013-07-01

    Using a 9-year follow-up of 69,224 mothers aged 20-50 from the National Longitudinal Mortality Survey, we investigate whether there is heightened mortality of mothers after the death of a child. Results from Cox proportional hazard models indicate that the death of a child produces a statistically significant hazard ratio of 2.3. There is suggestive evidence that the heightened mortality is concentrated in the first two years after the death of a child. We find no difference in results based on mother's education or marital status, family size, the child's cause of death or the gender of the child.

  13. Phenomenological features of mortality and morbidity dynamics in Tomsk versus heliogeophysical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodin, A. S.; Tuzhilkin, D. A.; Gudina, M. V.; Vladimirsky, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    The influence of heliogeophysical activity on the morbidity and mortality of the population in Tomsk is studied epidemiologically on the basis of regional data. The biological effectiveness of heliogeophysical factors selected on the basis of the Karhunen-Loeve method from epidemiological data on the morbidity and mortality in Tomsk in 1990-2008 is estimated. An analysis of the impact of variations in heliogeophysical activity on morbidity and mortality (according to the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health, ICD-10) showed the existence of common factors within different nosological classes that reliably correlate with the major components of variations in characteristic indices of heliogeophysical activity.

  14. Risk factors associated with on-farm mortality in Swedish dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvåsen, K.; Jansson Mörk, M.; Dohoo, I. R.

    2014-01-01

    Dairy cow mortality (unassisted death and euthanasia) has increased, worldwide and in Sweden. On-farm mortality indicates suboptimal herd health or welfare and causes financial loss for the dairy producer. The objective of this study was to identify cow-level risk factors associated with on......). The effects of potential risk factors on on-farm cow mortality were analysed using a Weibull proportional hazard model with a gamma distributed frailty effect common to cows within herd. The event of interest (failure) was euthanasia or unassisted death. An observation was right censored if the cow...

  15. Exogenous determinants of early-life conditions, and mortality later in life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Berg, Gerard J; Doblhammer, Gabriele; Christensen, Kaare

    2009-01-01

    We analyze causal effects of conditions early in life on the individual mortality rate later in life. Conditions early in life are captured by transitory features of the macro-environment around birth, notably the state of the business cycle around birth, but also food price deviations, weather......) then the mortality rate later in life is lower. The implied effect on the median lifetime of those who survive until age 35 is about 10 months. A systematic empirical exploration of all macro-indicators reveals that economic conditions in the first years after birth also affect mortality rates later in life....

  16. Entanglement–breaking indices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lami, L. [Scuola Normale Superiore, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Giovannetti, V. [NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore and Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, I-56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    We study a set of new functionals (called entanglement–breaking indices) which characterize how many local iterations of a given (local) quantum channel are needed in order to completely destroy the entanglement between the system of interest over which the transformation is defined and an external ancilla. The possibility of contrasting the noisy effects introduced by the channel iterations via the action of intermediate (filtering) transformations is analyzed. We provide some examples in which our functionals can be exactly calculated. The differences between unitary and non-unitary filtering operations are analyzed showing that, at least for systems of dimension d larger than or equal to 3, the non-unitary choice is preferable (the gap between the performances of the two cases being divergent in some cases). For d = 2 (qubit case), on the contrary, no evidences of the presence of such gap is revealed: we conjecture that for this special case unitary filtering transformations are optimal. The scenario in which more general filtering protocols are allowed is also discussed in some detail. The case of a depolarizing noise acting on a two–qubit system is exactly solved in a general case.

  17. Per capita alcohol consumption and ischaemic heart disease mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemström, O

    2001-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that alcohol consumption is inversely related to ischaemic heart disease (IHD) mortality at the population level. Most individual-level studies find a reduced risk of IHD with a moderate level of alcohol consumption, but it is as yet unknown whether this association also exists at the aggregate level. The study period was approximately 1950 to 1995; 14 EU countries and Norway were included. Time series analyses on different data were utilized, and age-standardized IHD mortality for men and women in the age groups 30-44, 45-59, 60-74 and 30-74 years was measured. The effects of alcohol (sales per capita) were controlled for a weighted lag of per capita sales of cigarettes. There was a random distribution of insignificant negative and positive alcohol effect estimates. A slight indication of a cardioprotective effect of alcohol among 30- to 44-year-old women in high consumption countries could be observed (significant for Italy). Mean alcohol effect estimates were nearly exactly zero (absent alcohol effect) among men and weakly positive among women. Because changes in cigarette consumption were often significantly and positively related to subsequent changes in IHD mortality, poor validity in the IHD time series cannot explain the unsystematic findings. Including a 6-year weighted lag of alcohol consumption changed the weak positive effect among women to an absent alcohol effect. A brief analysis of abstinence rates indicated no particular relationship to IHD mortality. The alleged cardioprotective alcohol effect is absent at the population level, and great caution should be taken concerning alcohol policies for cardioprotective purposes.

  18. Microbes as forensic indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan, G; Sarah, J P

    2012-09-01

    The forensic potential of microorganisms is becoming increasingly apparent as a consequence of advances in molecular sciences and genomics. This review discusses instances in which microbes, and in particular bacteria, can impact upon forensic investigations. There is increasing evidence that humans have an extremely diverse 'microbiome' that may prove useful in determining ethnicity, country of origin, and even personal identity. The human microbiome differs between regions of the body and may prove useful for determining the nature of stains such as those caused by saliva and vaginal fluid: it may even be possible to link the stains to the person responsible for them. Similarly, the composition of the microbiome present in a soil sample may prove a useful indicator of geographic origin or as a means of linking people, animals, or objects together or to a specific location. Microorganisms are important in the decay process and also influence the presence and concentration of alcohol, drugs, and other chemicals of forensic relevance. There is also a possibility that the entry of microorganisms into the body during the agonal period may prove useful for the diagnosis of drowning. The transmission of infectious diseases, and in particular sexually-transmitted diseases, can provide evidence linking a victim and a suspect. Microorganisms that cause fatal infections are not always identified at the time of death and may lead to the death being considered 'suspicious'. If a fatal infection can be linked to a hospital or medical procedure it can lead to prosecutions and therefore it is important to determine when and where an infection was acquired. Similarly, naturally acquired infections need to be distinguished from those that result from malicious transmission. Microorganisms can therefore provide evidence in many different forensic scenarios but most of the work is still at the experimental stage and there are therefore many opportunities for further research.

  19. Solar Indices Forecasting Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henney, Carl John; Shurkin, Kathleen; Arge, Charles; Hill, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Progress to forecast key space weather parameters using SIFT (Solar Indices Forecasting Tool) with the ADAPT (Air Force Data Assimilative Photospheric flux Transport) model is highlighted in this presentation. Using a magnetic flux transport model, ADAPT, we estimate the solar near-side field distribution that is used as input into empirical models for predicting F10.7(solar 10.7 cm, 2.8 GHz, radio flux), the Mg II core-to-wing ratio, and selected bands of solar far ultraviolet (FUV) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance. Input to the ADAPT model includes the inferred photospheric magnetic field from the NISP ground-based instruments, GONG & VSM. Besides a status update regarding ADAPT and SIFT models, we will summarize the findings that: 1) the sum of the absolute value of strong magnetic fields, associated with sunspots, is shown to correlate well with the observed daily F10.7 variability (Henney et al. 2012); and 2) the sum of the absolute value of weak magnetic fields, associated with plage regions, is shown to correlate well with EUV and FUV irradiance variability (Henney et al. 2015). This work utilizes data produced collaboratively between Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and the National Solar Observatory (NSO). The ADAPT model development is supported by AFRL. The input data utilized by ADAPT is obtained by NISP (NSO Integrated Synoptic Program). NSO is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation (NSF). The 10.7 cm solar radio flux data service, utilized by the ADAPT/SIFT F10.7 forecasting model, is operated by the National Research Council of Canada and National Resources Canada, with the support of the Canadian Space Agency.

  20. Child Malnutrition and Mortality in Developing Countries: Evidence from a Cross-Country Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriele, Alberto; Schettino, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we propose and test an interpretative framework on the social and economic determinants of child malnutrition and child mortality, two key human development indicators. The paper is organized as follows. Section 1 illustrates the main economic and social factors causing child malnutrition and mortality. Section 2 identifies the main clusters of food insecure and vulnerable households and briefly describes their livelihood profiles. Section 3 exposes our cross-country estimatio...

  1. Genetic and environmental influences on the relation between parental social class and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Petersen, L.; Prescott, Eva Irene Bossano;

    2006-01-01

    Genetic and maternal prenatal environmental factors as well as the post-natal rearing environment may contribute to the association between childhood socioeconomic circumstances and later mortality. In order to disentangle these influences, we studied all-cause and cause-specific mortality in a c...... in a cohort of adoptees, in whom we estimated the effects of their biological and adoptive fathers' social classes as indicators of the genetic and/or prenatal environmental factors and the post-natal environment, respectively....

  2. Long-term mortality experience of steelworkers. VIII. Mortality patterns of open hearth steelworkers (a preliminary report).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, C K; Gustin, J; Kamon, E

    1975-01-01

    The findings in this report of a deficit in mortality from cardiovascular diseases and an excess in diseases of the digestive system among open hearth workers indicate the need for further study of men working in hot environments. In future reports we hope to refine the comparisons by obtaining data which will enable classification of workers more precisely by intensity and duration of exposure within the open hearth. Of particular importance in future work are the evaluation of possible relationships between the actual levels of heat exposure and subsequent morbidity and mortality, as well as possible interactions between heat stress and physical exertion in terms of the incidence of heart disease and other select diseases.

  3. Electronic health indicators in the selected countries: Are these indicators the best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshari, Somaye; Khorasani, Elahe; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Atighechian, Golrokh; Darab, Mohsen Ghaffari

    2013-01-01

    Many changes have been made in different sciences by developing and advancing information and communication technology in last two decades. E-health is a very broad term that includes many different activities related to the use of electronic devices, software as well as hardware in health organizations. The aim of this study is comparing electronic health indicators in the selected countries and discussion on the best indicators. This study has chosen 12 countries randomly based on the regional division of the WHO. The relevant numbers of health indicators and general indicators and information technology indicators are extracted of these countries. We use data from the Bitarf's comparative study, which is conducted by the Iranian Supreme Council of Information Technology in 2007. By using Pearson correlation test, the relations between health general indicators and IT indicators are studied. Data was analyzed based on the research objectives using SPSS software and in accordance with research questions Pearson correlation test were used. The findings show that there is a positive relation between indicators related to IT and "Total per capita health, healthy life expectancy, percent literacy". Furthermore, there is a mutual relation between IT indicators and "mortality indicator". This study showed differences between selective indicators among different countries. The modern world, with its technological advances, is not powerless in the face of these geographic and health disparity challenges. Researchers must not rely on the available indicators. They must consider indicators like e-business companies, electronic data internet, medical supplies, health electronic record, health information system, etc., In future, continuous studies in this field, to provide the exact and regular reports of amount of using of these indicators through different countries must be necessary.

  4. Full loss of residual renal function causes higher mortality in dialysis patients; findings from a marginal structural model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, W.M. van der; Noordzij, M.; Dekker, F.W.; Boeschoten, E.W.; Krediet, R.T.; Korevaar, J.C.; Geskus, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Declining residual renal function, as indicated by the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), is associated with an increased mortality risk in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on dialysis. METHODS: We monitored GFR and mortality in 1800 haemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis

  5. Excess mortality in patients diagnosed with hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thvilum, Marianne; Brandt, Frans; Pedersen, Dorthe Almind

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although hypothyroidism is associated with increased morbidity, an association with increased mortality is still debated. Our objective was to investigate, at a nationwide level, whether a diagnosis of hypothyroidism influences mortality. Methods: In an observational cohort study from...... January 1, 1978 until December 31, 2008 using record-linkage data from nationwide Danish health registers, 3587 singletons and 682 twins diagnosed with hypothyroidism were identified. Hypothyroid individuals were matched 1:4 with nonhypothyroid controls with respect to age and gender and followed over...... a mean period of 5.6 years (range 0-30 years). The hazard ratio (HR) for mortality was calculated using Cox regression analyses. Comorbidity was evaluated using the Charlson score (CS). Results: In singletons with hypothyroidism, the mortality risk was increased (HR 1.52; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1...

  6. Epidemiology of Maternal Mortality in Malawi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maternal Mortality Programme Assessment), based at the University of Aberdeen, ...... observed in districts with higher female literacy rates. Number of years of .... urine sampling to detect protein and diabetes blood sampling for syphilis.

  7. Illness Human - MDC_InfantMortality2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Polygon feature class based on Zip Code boundaries showing the rate of infant mortality per 1000 births in Miami-Dade County, 2006. Rate does not include out of...

  8. Excess mortality in giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgård, C; Sloth, H; Keiding, Niels

    1991-01-01

    A 13-year departmental sample of 34 patients with definite (biopsy-verified) giant cell arteritis (GCA) was reviewed. The mortality of this material was compared to sex-, age- and time-specific death rates in the Danish population. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was 1.8 (95% confidence...... with respect to SMR, sex distribution or age. In the group of patients with department-diagnosed GCA (definite + probable = 180 patients), the 95% confidence interval for the SMR of the women included 1.0. In all other subgroups there was a significant excess mortality. Excess mortality has been found in two...... of seven previous studies on survival in GCA. The prevailing opinion that steroid-treated GCA does not affect the life expectancy of patients is probably not correct....

  9. MATERNAL MORTALITY IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpreet

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Maternal Mortality in A Tertiary Care Centre. OBJECTIVE: To study maternal mortality and the complications leading to maternal death. METHODS: A retrospective study of hospital record to study maternal mortality and its causes over 3 years from January 2010 to December 2012. RESULTS: There were a total of 58 maternal deaths out of 2823 live births giving a maternal mortality ratio of 2054.55 per one lakh live births. Unbooked and late referrals account for 77.58% of maternal deaths. The majority of deaths around 75.86% were in 20-30 years age group. Haemorrhage was the commonest causes of death (24.12% followed by sepsis (18.96% and pregnancy induced hypertension 15.51% Anemia contributed to the most common indirect cause of maternal morality. CONCLUSION: Haemorrhage, sepsis and pregnancy induced hypertension including eclampsia were the direct major causes of death. Anaemia and cardiac diseases were other indirect causes of death.

  10. Increased mortality among people with anxiety disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Sandra M; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mors, Ole

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorders and depression are the most common mental disorders worldwide and have a striking impact on global disease burden. Although depression has consistently been found to increase mortality; the role of anxiety disorders in predicting mortality risk is unclear. AIMS......: To assess mortality risk in people with anxiety disorders. METHOD: We used nationwide Danish register data to conduct a prospective cohort study with over 30 million person-years of follow-up. RESULTS: In total, 1066 (2.1%) people with anxiety disorders died during an average follow-up of 9.7 years....... The risk of death by natural and unnatural causes was significantly higher among individuals with anxiety disorders (natural mortality rate ratio (MRR) = 1.39, 95% CI 1.28-1.51; unnatural MRR = 2.46, 95% CI 2.20-2.73) compared with the general population. Of those who died from unnatural causes, 16.5% had...

  11. Trends in mortality decrease and economic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Geng; Melenberg, Bertrand

    2014-10-01

    The vast literature on extrapolative stochastic mortality models focuses mainly on the extrapolation of past mortality trends and summarizes the trends by one or more latent factors. However, the interpretation of these trends is typically not very clear. On the other hand, explanation methods are trying to link mortality dynamics with observable factors. This serves as an intermediate step between the two methods. We perform a comprehensive analysis on the relationship between the latent trend in mortality dynamics and the trend in economic growth represented by gross domestic product (GDP). Subsequently, the Lee-Carter framework is extended through the introduction of GDP as an additional factor next to the latent factor, which provides a better fit and better interpretable forecasts.

  12. Association between Integration Policies and Immigrants' Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ikram, Umar Z; Malmusi, Davide; Juel, Knud;

    2015-01-01

    confounders and data comparability issues (e.g., French cross-sectional data) may affect the findings, this study suggests that different macro-level policy contexts may influence immigrants' mortality. Comparable mortality registration systems across Europe along with detailed socio-demographic information......BACKGROUND: To integrate immigrants into their societies, European countries have adopted different types of policies, which may influence health through both material and psychosocial determinants. Recent studies have suggested poorer health outcomes for immigrants living in countries with poorly...... rated integration policies. OBJECTIVE: To analyse mortality differences of immigrants from the same country of origin living in countries with distinct integration policy contexts. METHODS: From the mortality dataset collected in the Migrant Ethnic Health Observatory (MEHO) project, we chose...

  13. Reducing Maternal Mortality from Unsafe Abortion among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reducing Maternal Mortality from Unsafe Abortion among Adolescents in Africa. ... including the provision of appropriate sexuality education and information as well as supportive services to allow adolescents to prevent unwanted pregnancy.

  14. Relative Deprivation, Poor Health Habits and Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibner, Christine E.; Evans, William N.

    2005-01-01

    The results of the study conducted, using the data from National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) (BRFSS), to find the relationship between the relative deprivation and mortality, while controlling individual income and reference group fixed effects, are presented.

  15. Infant mortality and crisis in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfman, M

    1992-01-01

    Data derived from the Encuesta Nacional de Fecundidad y Salud (ENFES) confirm that overall levels of infant mortality in Mexico have been steadily declining. However, a more specific analysis furnishes evidence that this decline has occurred at varying rates within different social groups, reflecting an increase in social inequalities. The analytical strategy used in this article leads to three basic conclusions: (1) the impact of the economic crisis on infant mortality is reflected not in a reversal of the declining trend but an increase in social inequalities; (2) certain variables universally accepted as determinants of infant mortality, such as mother's education, seem nonsignificant for some social sectors; and (3) certain biodemographic characteristics assumed to have a uniform mortality-related behavior vary among sectors, suggesting that even these constants are determined by social factors.

  16. Association of Cardiometabolic Multimorbidity With Mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Kaptoge, Stephen; Wormser, David; Willeit, Peter; Butterworth, Adam S; Bansal, Narinder; O'Keeffe, Linda M; Gao, Pei; Wood, Angela M; Burgess, Stephen; Freitag, Daniel F; Pennells, Lisa; Peters, Sanne A; Hart, Carole L; Håheim, Lise Lund; Gillum, Richard F; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Psaty, Bruce M; Yeap, Bu B; Knuiman, Matthew W; Nietert, Paul J; Kauhanen, Jussi; Salonen, Jukka T; Kuller, Lewis H; Simons, Leon A; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Selmer, Randi; Crespo, Carlos J; Rodriguez, Beatriz; Verschuren, W M Monique; Salomaa, Veikko; Svärdsudd, Kurt; van der Harst, Pim; Björkelund, Cecilia; Wilhelmsen, Lars; Wallace, Robert B; Brenner, Hermann; Amouyel, Philippe; Barr, Elizabeth L M; Iso, Hiroyasu; Onat, Altan; Trevisan, Maurizio; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Cooper, Cyrus; Kavousi, Maryam; Welin, Lennart; Roussel, Ronan; Hu, Frank B; Sato, Shinichi; Davidson, Karina W; Howard, Barbara V; Leening, Maarten J G; Leening, Maarten; Rosengren, Annika; Dörr, Marcus; Deeg, Dorly J H; Kiechl, Stefan; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Nissinen, Aulikki; Giampaoli, Simona; Donfrancesco, Chiara; Kromhout, Daan; Price, Jackie F; Peters, Annette; Meade, Tom W; Casiglia, Edoardo; Lawlor, Debbie A; Gallacher, John; Nagel, Dorothea; Franco, Oscar H; Assmann, Gerd; Dagenais, Gilles R; Jukema, J Wouter; Sundström, Johan; Woodward, Mark; Brunner, Eric J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Whitsel, Eric A; Njølstad, Inger; Hedblad, Bo; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Engström, Gunnar; Rosamond, Wayne D; Selvin, Elizabeth; Sattar, Naveed; Thompson, Simon G; Danesh, John

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: The prevalence of cardiometabolic multimorbidity is increasing. OBJECTIVE: To estimate reductions in life expectancy associated with cardiometabolic multimorbidity. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Age- and sex-adjusted mortality rates and hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using indi

  17. Immunisation and infant mortality in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Z

    1993-01-01

    Pakistan has been engaged with the Expanded Program on Immunization since 1982. In January 1991 an evaluation was conducted in order to ascertain coverage results for children aged 12-23 months of age, tetanus toxoid coverage for mothers of infants aged 0-11 months of age, and to review management of the program at all levels. The survey was based on information provided in the mother's history of children aged 12-23 months and by the immunization card in urban and rural clusters. Coverage included 8651 households in 240 clusters, 1968 children aged 12-23 months, and 1965 mothers of infants aged 0-11 months. The results showed high coverage in Punjab, Northwest Frontier Province, and Azad Jammu and Kashmir. Tetanus toxoid coverage of mothers could be improved. Provinces which had low coverage included Sindh and Balochistan. Between 1984-85 and 1990-91 infant mortality was reduced from 106.4 deaths/1000 live births to 100.9 deaths/1000 live births. In the Punjab immunization coverage among children aged 0-11 months was 56.3% in urban areas and 93.8% in rural areas with outreach and a mobile team. Hospital administration of vaccines was lower in rural areas (4.8%) compared to urban areas (22.1%) in the Punjab. Most children were immunized through outreach or a mobile team (56.3% in urban and 93.8% in rural areas of the Punjab). Outreach in Northwest Frontier Province was 30.6% in urban areas and 70.7% in rural areas. Hospital coverage was 36.5% in urban areas and 24.4% in rural areas. Coverage in Balochistan was 64.9% by outreach, 24.7% for health centers, and 9.1% for hospitals. Among partially immunized children, 10.3% indicated lack of awareness of need and 15.0% indicated lack of awareness of need for a subsequent visit. Fear of side effects affected 3.1% of those partially vaccinated. Lack of information affected 33.0%. Motivation was a reason for 4.1%. 62.9% indicated obstacles such as distance, time, health personnel absent, busy mother, family problems, and

  18. Socioeconomic differentials and mortality from colorectal cancer in large cities in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreira, Viviane Gomes; Meira, Karina Cardoso; Guimarães, Raphael Mendonça

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the mortality pattern of colorectal cancer according to the social development profile of the large Brazilian cities. This was an ecological study that used as units of analysis Brazilian municipalities that were considered to be large (i.e. over 100,000 inhabitants). The social indicators adopted were obtained from the Atlas of Human Development in Brazil. Mortality data came from the Mortality Information System (MIS), represented by codes C18, C19, and C20. For data analysis, municipalities were characterised according to the indicator profile used by multivariate classification cluster analysis. It was observed that the Southeast, South, and Midwest regions concentrated over 90% of cities in the group of more developed municipalities, while the North and Northeast regions were represented by 60% of cities in the group of less developed municipalities. The mortality pattern of colorectal cancer in both groups was different, with a higher average mortality rate from colorectal cancer for populations living in cities from the more developed group (p = 0.02). The mortality rate from this cancer was shown to be directly proportional to the Municipal Human Developlemnt Index (MHDI) and inversely proportional to the inequality indicator (p < 0.001); therefore the highest means were observed among the municipalities with better socioeconomic conditions. It is important to consider social disparities to ensure equity in healthcare policy management.

  19. [Interactive mortality atlas in Andalusia, Spain (AIMA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña-Riola, Ricardo; Mayoral-Cortés, José María; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Carmen; Toro-Cárdenas, Silvia; Fernández-Ajuria, Alberto; Méndez-Martínez, Camila

    2008-01-01

    Until now, mortality atlases have been static. Most of them describe the geographical distribution of mortality using count data aggregated over time and standardized mortality rates. However, this methodology has several limitations. Count data aggregated over time produce a bias in the estimation of death rates. Moreover, this practice difficult the study of temporal changes in geographical distribution of mortality. On the other hand, using standardized mortality hamper to check differences in mortality among groups. The Interactive Mortality Atlas in Andalusia (AIMA) is an alternative to conventional static atlases. It is a dynamic Geographical Information System that allows visualizing in web-site more than 12.000 maps and 338.00 graphics related to the spatio-temporal distribution of the main death causes in Andalusia by age and sex groups from 1981. The objective of this paper is to describe the methods used for AIMA development, to show technical specifications and to present their interactivity. The system is available from the link products in www.demap.es. AIMA is the first interactive GIS that have been developed in Spain with these characteristics. Spatio-temporal Hierarchical Bayesian Models were used for statistical data analysis. The results were integrated into web-site using a PHP environment and a dynamic cartography in Flash. Thematic maps in AIMA demonstrate that the geographical distribution of mortality is dynamic, with differences among year, age and sex groups. The information nowadays provided by AIMA and the future updating will contribute to reflect on the past, the present and the future of population health in Andalusia.

  20. Socioeconomic trajectories affect mortality in Klinefelter syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, Anders; Krag, Kirstine Stochholm; Juul, Svend

    2011-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is associated with male infertility, hypogonadism, and learning disability. Morbidity and mortality are increased and the causes behind remain unknown. Is it the chromosome aberration or is it caused by postulated poorer socioeconomic status?......Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is associated with male infertility, hypogonadism, and learning disability. Morbidity and mortality are increased and the causes behind remain unknown. Is it the chromosome aberration or is it caused by postulated poorer socioeconomic status?...

  1. Rate and time trend of perinatal, infant, maternal mortality, natality and natural population growth in kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azemi, Mehmedali; Gashi, Sanije; Berisha, Majlinda; Kolgeci, Selim; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora

    2012-01-01

    THE AIM OF WORK HAS BEEN THE PRESENTATION OF THE RATE AND TIME TRENDS OF SOME INDICATORS OF THE HEATH CONDITION OF MOTHERS AND CHILDREN IN KOSOVO: fetal mortality, early neonatal mortality, perinatal mortality, infant mortality, natality, natural growth of population etc. The treated patients were the newborn and infants in the post neonatal period, women during their pregnancy and those 42 days before and after the delivery. THE DATA WERE TAKEN FROM: register of the patients treated in the Pediatric Clinic of Prishtina, World Health Organization, Mother and Child Health Care, Reproductive Health Care, Ministry of Health of the Republic of Kosovo, Statistical Department of Kosovo, the National Institute of Public Health and several academic texts in the field of pediatrics. Some indicators were analyzed in a period between year 1945-2010 and 1950-2010, whereas some others were analyzed in a time period between year 2000 and 2011. The perinatal mortality rate in 2000 was 29.1‰, whereas in 2011 it was 18.7‰. The fetal mortality rate was 14.5‰ during the year 2000, whereas in 2011 it was 11.0‰, in 2000 the early neonatal mortality was 14.8‰, in 2011 it was 7.5‰. The infant mortality in Kosovo was 164‰ in 1950, whereas in 2010 it was 20.5‰. The most frequent causes of infant mortality have been: lower respiratory tract infections, acute infective diarrhea, perinatal causes, congenital malformations and unclassified conditions. Maternal death rate varied during this time period. Maternal death in 2000 was 23 whereas in 2010 only two cases were reported. Regarding the natality, in 1950 it reached 46.1 ‰, whereas in 2010 it reached 14‰, natural growth of population rate in Kosovo was 29.1‰ in 1950, whereas in 2011 it was 11.0‰. Perinatal mortality rate in Kosovo is still high in comparison with other European countries (Turkey and Kyrgyzstan have the highest perinatal mortality rate), even though it is in a continuous decrease. Infant mortality

  2. An innovative aerial assessment of Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem mountain pine beetle-caused whitebark pine mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, William W; Logan, Jesse A; Kern, Wilson R

    2013-03-01

    An innovative aerial survey method called the Landscape Assessment System (LAS) was used to assess mountain pine beetle (MPB; Dendroctonus ponderosae)-caused mortality of whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) across the species distribution in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE; 894 774 ha). This large-scale implementation of the LAS method consisted of 8673 km of flight lines, along which 4653 geo-tagged, oblique aerial photos were captured at the catchment level (a subset of 12-digit USGS hydrologic units) and geographic information system (GIS) processed. The Mountain Pine Beetle-caused Mortality Rating System, a landscape-scale classification system designed specifically to measure the cumulative effects of recent and older MPB attacks on whitebark pine, was used to classify mortality with a rating from 0 to 6 based on the amount of red (recent attack) and gray (old attack) trees visible. The approach achieved a photo inventory of 79% of the GYE whitebark pine distribution. For the remaining 21%, mortality levels were estimated based on an interpolated surface. Results that combine the photo-inventoried and interpolated mortality indicate that nearly half (46%) of the GYE whitebark pine distribution showed severe mortality (3-4 or 5.3-5.4 rating), 36% showed moderate mortality (2-2.9 rating), 13% showed low mortality (1-1.9 rating), and 5% showed trace levels of mortality (0-0.9). These results reveal that the proliferation of MPB in the subalpine zone of the GYE due to climate warming has led to whitebark pine mortality that is more severe and widespread than indicated from either previous modeling research or USDA Forest Service Aerial Detection surveys. Sixteen of the 22 major mountain ranges of the GYE have experienced widespread moderate-to-severe mortality. The majority of catchments in the other six mountain ranges show low-to-moderate mortality. Refugia from MPB outbreaks, at least for now, also exist and correspond to locations that have colder

  3. Space and time clustering of mortality in rural South Africa (Agincourt HDSS, 1992–2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benn Sartorius

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Detailed information regarding the spatial and/or spatial–temporal distribution of mortality is required for the efficient implementation and targeting of public health interventions. Objectives: Identify high risk clusters of mortality within the Agincourt subdistrict for targeting of public health interventions, and highlight areas for further research. Design: Mortality data were extracted from the Agincourt health and socio-demographic surveillance system (HDSS for the period 1992–2007. Mortality rates by age group and time were calculated assuming a Poisson distribution and using precise person-time contribution estimates. A spatial scan statistic (Kulldorff was used to test for clusters of age group specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality both in space and time. Results: Many statistically significant clusters of higher all-cause and cause-specific mortality were identified both in space and time. Specific areas were consistently identified as high risk areas; namely, the east/south- east and upper east central regions. This corresponds to areas with higher mortality due to communicable causes (especially HIV/TB and diarrheal disease and indicates a non-random element to the distribution of potential underlying causative factors e.g. settlements comprising former Mozambican refugees in east/south-east of the site, corresponding higher poverty areas, South African villages with higher HIV prevalence, etc. Clusters of older adult mortality were also observed indicating potential non-random distribution of non-communicable disease mortality. Conclusion: This study has highlighted distinct clusters of all-cause and cause-specific mortality within the Agincourt subdistrict. It is a first step in prioritizing areas for further, more detailed research as well as for future public health follow-on efforts such as targeting of vertical prevention of HIV/TB and antiretroviral rollout in significant child and adult mortality

  4. Entrenched geographical and socioeconomic disparities in child mortality: trends in absolute and relative inequalities in Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Jimenez-Soto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cambodia has made considerable improvements in mortality rates for children under the age of five and neonates. These improvements may, however, mask considerable disparities between subnational populations. In this paper, we examine the extent of the country's child mortality inequalities. METHODS: Mortality rates for children under-five and neonates were directly estimated using the 2000, 2005 and 2010 waves of the Cambodian Demographic Health Survey. Disparities were measured on both absolute and relative scales using rate differences and ratios, and where applicable, slope and relative indices of inequality by levels of rural/urban location, regions and household wealth. FINDINGS: Since 2000, considerable reductions in under-five and to a lesser extent in neonatal mortality rates have been observed. This mortality decline has, however, been accompanied by an increase in relative inequality in both rates of child mortality for geography-related stratifying markers. For absolute inequality amongst regions, most trends are increasing, particularly for neonatal mortality, but are not statistically significant. The only exception to this general pattern is the statistically significant positive trend in absolute inequality for under-five mortality in the Coastal region. For wealth, some evidence for increases in both relative and absolute inequality for neonates is observed. CONCLUSION: Despite considerable gains in reducing under-five and neonatal mortality at a national level, entrenched and increased geographical and wealth-based inequality in mortality, at least on a relative scale, remain. As expected, national progress seems to be associated with the period of political and macroeconomic stability that started in the early 2000s. However, issues of quality of care and potential non-inclusive economic growth might explain remaining disparities, particularly across wealth and geography markers. A focus on further addressing key

  5. Disease-based mortality after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: utility of the enterprise data warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulose, Benjamin K; Kaiser, Joan; Beck, William C; Jackson, Pearlie; Nealon, William H; Sharp, Kenneth W; Holzman, Michael D

    2013-11-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) remains a mainstay of enteral access. Thirty-day mortality for PEG has ranged from 16 to 43 %. This study aims to discern patient groups that demonstrate limited survival after PEG placement. The Enterprise Data Warehouse (EDW) concept allows an efficient means of integrating administrative, clinical, and quality-of-life data. On the basis of this concept, we developed the Vanderbilt Procedural Outcomes Database (VPOD) and analyzed these data for evaluation of post-PEG mortality over time. Patients were identified using the VPOD from 2008 to 2010 and followed for 1 year after the procedure. Patients were categorized according to common clinical groups for PEG placement: stroke/CNS tumors, neuromuscular disorders, head and neck cancers, other malignancies, trauma, cerebral palsy, gastroparesis, or other indications for PEG. All-cause mortality at 30, 60, 90, 180, and 360 days was determined by linking VPOD information with the Social Security Death Index. Chi-square analysis was used to determine significance across groups. Nine hundred fifty-three patients underwent PEG placement during the study period. Mortality over time (30-, 60-, 90-, 180-, and 360-day mortality) was greatest for patients with malignancies other than head and neck cancer (29, 45, 57, 66, and 72 %) and least for cerebral palsy or patients with gastroparesis (7 % at all time points). Patients with neuromuscular disorders had a similar mortality curve as head and neck cancer patients. Stroke/CNS tumor patients and patients with other indications had the second highest mortality, while trauma patients had low mortality. PEG mortality was much higher in patients with malignancies other than head and neck cancer compared to previously published rates. PEG should be used with great caution in this and other high-risk patient groups. This study demonstrates the power of an EDW-based database to evaluate large numbers of patients with clinically meaningful

  6. Drought characteristics drive patterns in widespread aspen forest mortality across the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderegg, W.; Anderegg, L.; Abatzoglou, J. T.; Berry, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Widespread drought-induced forest mortality has been documented across the globe in the last few decades and influences land-atmosphere interactions, biodiversity, carbon sequestration, and biophysical and biogeochemical feedbacks to climate change. These rapid mortality events are currently not well-captured in current vegetation models, limiting the ability to predict them. While many studies have focused on the plant physiological mechanisms that mediate vegetation mortality, the characteristics of drought seasonality, sequence, severity and duration that drive mortality events have received much less attention. These characteristics are particularly relevant in light of changing precipitation regimes, changes to snowpack and snowmelt, and increasing temperature stress associated with climate change. We examine the characteristics of drought associated with the recent widespread mortality of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) across much of the western United States. We combine a regional model of watershed-level aspen mortality with in situ tissue isotopic analysis of water source to analyze the roles of drought seasonality, severity, and duration in this mortality event, including raw climate variables, derived drought indices, and variables generated by a climate envelope approach. We found that variables pertaining to spring temperatures and spring-summer water deficit, especially during the peak severity of drought, best capture regional mortality patterns, though multi-year drought variables did improve the model. Field water isotopic analysis of aspen water source over a growing season and during moderate seasonal water stress corroborate the regional model by indicating that aspen clones generally utilize surface water with little plasticity during drought stress. These results suggest that drought characteristics can play an important role in mediating widespread forest mortality and have implications for the future vulnerability of trembling aspen

  7. Mortality and Life Expectancies in EU Acceding Countries – Long-term Outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Tcholakov

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The European Union has just expanded to include ten new countries. Another two, Bulgaria and Romania, are expected to join in 2007. Croatia and Turkey are strong favourites to follow suit soon. All these add new dimensions to the demography of the Union, because the acceding countries show different levels and patterns of mortality and life expectancy. So far the EU15 had a relatively coherent mortality behaviour with high life expectancies and low infant and child mortalities. The new members add some variation in all indicators and acceding Bulgaria and Romania should enlarge the diversity even more. It is not easy to relate all differences in particular factors such as history, religion, nationality, ethnicity, tradition, political influence, climate and ecological conditions, economic growth and social welfare, income and living standard, healthcare and hygiene, etc. The new EU members and the acceding countries have followed diverse historical paths in the last couple of centuries and mortality indicators show some similarities along with many significant differences. Following the EC and EUROSTAT long-term mortality scenarios this paper examines the prospects of mortality and life expectancy in the EU after the enlargement and tries to draft some main directions of development. As it appears, four countries fit well into the current EU mainstream – Malta, Cyprus, Slovenia and the Czech Republic. Croatia is not very far, despite the political turmoil in the country in 1990s. Poland, Slovakia and Hungary reveal some deficiencies in life expectancy, but it is the Baltic countries that have extremely low life expectancies for males. Bulgaria and Romania must overcome their very high infant and child mortalities in a relatively short time and it is difficult to expect that they will soon join the EU main trend. Turkey with an even higher infant mortality is projected to soon close the divide with these two countries and all three should try

  8. [Mortality attributable to excess weight in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Ramiro, José Javier; Álvarez-Martín, Elena; Gil-Prieto, Ruth

    2014-06-16

    Estimate the mortality attributable to higher than optimal body mass index in the Spanish population in 2006. Excess body weight prevalence data were obtained from the 2006 National Health Survey, while data on associated mortality were extracted from the National Statistic Institute. Population attributable fractions were applied and mortality attributable to higher than optimal body mass index was calculated for people between 35 and 79 years. In 2006, among the Spanish population aged 35-79 years, 25,671 lives (16,405 males and 9,266 women) were lost due to higher than optimal body mass index. Mortality attributable was 15.8% of total deaths in males and 14.8% in women, but if we refer to those causes where excess body weight is a risk factor, it is about a 30% of mortality (31.6% in men and 28% in women). The most important individual cause was cardiovascular disease (58%), followed by cancer. The individual cause with a major contribution to deaths was type 2 diabetes; nearly 70% in males and 80% in women. Overweight accounted for 54.9% deaths in men and 48.6% in women. Excess body weight is a major public health problem, with an important associated mortality. Attributable deaths are a useful tool to know the real situation and to monitor for disease control interventions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. Alcohol Consumption and Pancreatitis Mortality in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury E Razvodovsky

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Context Pancreatitis is a major public health problem with high associated economic costs. The incidence of pancreatitis has increased in many European countries in recent decade. Accumulated research and empirical evidence suggests that excessive alcohol consumption is a major risk factor for both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Objective The aim of this study was to examine the aggregate-level relation between the alcohol consumption and pancreatitis mortality rates in Russia. Method Age-standardized sex-specific male and female pancreatitis mortality data for the period 1970-2005 and data on overall alcohol consumption were analyzed by means ARIMA (autoregressive integrated moving average time series analysis. Alcohol consumption was significantly associated with both male and female pancreatitis mortality rates: a 1 liter increase in overall alcohol consumption would result in a 7.0% increase in the male pancreatitis mortality rate and in 2.3% increase in the female mortality rate. The results of the analysis suggest that 63.1% of all male pancreatitis deaths and 26.8% female deaths in Russia could be attributed to alcohol. Conclusions The outcomes of this study provide indirect support for the hypothesisthat unfavorable mixture of higher overall level of alcohol consumption and binge drinking pattern is an important contributor to the pancreatitis mortality rate in Russian Federation.

  10. A biologically motivated partitioning of mortality.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnes, B. A.; Olshansky, S. J.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Univ. of Chicago

    1997-01-01

    For over a century, actuaries and biologists working independently of each other have presented arguments for why total mortality needs to be partitioned into biologically meaningful subcomponents. These mortality partitions tended to overlook genetic diseases that are inherited because the partitions were motivated by a paradigm focused on aging. In this article, we combine and extend the concepts from these disciplines to develop a conceptual partitioning of total mortality into extrinsic and intrinsic causes of death. An extrinsic death is either caused or initiated by something that originates outside the body of an individual, while an intrinsic death is either caused or initiated by processes that originate within the body. It is argued that extrinsic mortality has been a driving force in determining why we die when we do from intrinsic causes of death. This biologically motivated partitioning of mortality provides a useful perspective for researchers interested in comparative mortality analyses, the consequences of population aging, limits to human life expectancy, the progress made by the biomedical sciences against lethal diseases, and demographic models that predict the life expectancy of future populations.

  11. Doctors' strikes and mortality: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Solveig Argeseanu; Mitchell, Kristina; Narayan, K M; Yusuf, Salim

    2008-12-01

    A paradoxical pattern has been suggested in the literature on doctors' strikes: when health workers go on strike, mortality stays level or decreases. We performed a review of the literature during the past forty years to assess this paradox. We used PubMed, EconLit and Jstor to locate all peer-reviewed English-language articles presenting data analysis on mortality associated with doctors' strikes. We identified 156 articles, seven of which met our search criteria. The articles analyzed five strikes around the world, all between 1976 and 2003. The strikes lasted between nine days and seventeen weeks. All reported that mortality either stayed the same or decreased during, and in some cases, after the strike. None found that mortality increased during the weeks of the strikes compared to other time periods. The paradoxical finding that physician strikes are associated with reduced mortality may be explained by several factors. Most importantly, elective surgeries are curtailed during strikes. Further, hospitals often re-assign scarce staff and emergency care was available during all of the strikes. Finally, none of the strikes may have lasted long enough to assess the effects of long-term reduced access to a physician. Nonetheless, the literature suggests that reductions in mortality may result from these strikes.

  12. Mortality in patients with pituitary disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sherlock, Mark

    2010-06-01

    Pituitary disease is associated with increased mortality predominantly due to vascular disease. Control of cortisol secretion and GH hypersecretion (and cardiovascular risk factor reduction) is key in the reduction of mortality in patients with Cushing\\'s disease and acromegaly, retrospectively. For patients with acromegaly, the role of IGF-I is less clear-cut. Confounding pituitary hormone deficiencies such as gonadotropins and particularly ACTH deficiency (with higher doses of hydrocortisone replacement) may have a detrimental effect on outcome in patients with pituitary disease. Pituitary radiotherapy is a further factor that has been associated with increased mortality (particularly cerebrovascular). Although standardized mortality ratios in pituitary disease are falling due to improved treatment, mortality for many conditions are still elevated above that of the general population, and therefore further measures are needed. Craniopharyngioma patients have a particularly increased risk of mortality as a result of the tumor itself and treatment to control tumor growth; this is a key area for future research in order to optimize the outcome for these patients.

  13. Mortality rates among Arab Americans in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallo, Florence J; Schwartz, Kendra; Ruterbusch, Julie J; Booza, Jason; Williams, David R

    2012-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) calculate age-specific and age-adjusted cause-specific mortality rates for Arab Americans; and (2) compare these rates with those for blacks and whites. Mortality rates were estimated using Michigan death certificate data, an Arab surname and first name list, and 2000 U.S. Census data. Age-specific rates, age-adjusted all-cause and cause-specific rates were calculated. Arab Americans (75+) had higher mortality rates than whites and blacks. Among men, all-cause and cause-specific mortality rates for Arab Americans were in the range of whites and blacks. However, Arab American men had lower mortality rates from cancer and chronic lower respiratory disease compared to both whites and blacks. Among women, Arab Americans had lower mortality rates from heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes than whites and blacks. Arab Americans are growing in number. Future study should focus on designing rigorous separate analyses for this population.

  14. Mortality tempo-adjustment: An empirical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Luy

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The number of scholars following the tempo approach in fertility continues to grow, whereas tempo-adjustment in mortality generally still is rejected. This rejection is irrational in principle, as the basic idea behind the tempo approach is independent of the kind of demographic event. Providing the first empirical application to a substantial problem, this paper shows that mortality tempo-adjustment can paint a different picture of current mortality conditions compared to conventional life expectancy. An application of the Bongaarts and Feeney method to the analysis of mortality differences between western and eastern Germany shows that the eastern German disadvantages still are considerably higher and that the mortality gap between the two entities began to narrow some years later than trends in conventional life expectancy suggest. Thus, the picture drawn by tempo-adjusted life expectancy fits the expected trends of changing mortality and also the self-reported health conditions of eastern and western Germans better than that painted by conventional life expectancy.

  15. Mortality by sickle cell disease in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduini, Giovanna Abadia Oliveira; Rodrigues, Letícia Pinto; Trovó de Marqui, Alessandra Bernadete

    This work aimed to characterize mortality by sickle cell disease in Brazil. The MEDLINE electronic database was searched using the terms 'mortality' and 'sickle cell disease' and 'Brazil' for articles published in the last five years aiming to provide a current analysis of the subject in question. Eight studies on mortality by sickle cell disease were carried out in the Brazilian states of Maranhão, Bahia, Minas Gerais, Rio de Janeiro and Mato Grosso do Sul. The majority of the deaths occurred in patients with sickle cell anemia, which is the most common genotype and causes the most severe clinical manifestation of the disease. In summary, there are few published studies on mortality related to sickle cell disease in Brazil, and most are from the state of Minas Gerais. This study emphasizes the importance of developing more studies on sickle cell disease mortality, so that it may be possible to profile gene carriers and give health professionals more data to strategize the delivery of more effective assistance to these individuals. Despite the early diagnosis of sickle cell disease by the Neonatal Screening Program and the use of preventive and therapeutic measures (penicillin, immunization and hydroxyurea), mortality by sickle cell disease on the world stage is still significant.

  16. Religious Affiliation, Religious Service Attendance, and Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jibum; Smith, Tom W; Kang, Jeong-han

    2015-12-01

    Very few studies have examined the effects of both religious affiliation and religiosity on mortality at the same time, and studies employing multiple dimensions of religiosity other than religious attendance are rare. Using the newly created General Social Survey-National Death Index data, our report contributes to the religion and mortality literature by examining religious affiliation and religiosity at the same time. Compared to Mainline Protestants, Catholics, Jews, and other religious groups have lower risk of death, but Black Protestants, Evangelical Protestants, and even those with no religious affiliation are not different from Mainline Protestants. While our study is consistent with previous findings that religious attendance leads to a reduction in mortality, we did not find other religious measures, such as strength of religious affiliation, frequency of praying, belief in an afterlife, and belief in God to be associated with mortality. We also find interaction effects between religious affiliation and attendance. The lowest mortality of Jews and other religious groups is more apparent for those with lower religious attendance. Thus, our result may emphasize the need for other research to focus on the effects of religious group and religious attendance on mortality at the same time.

  17. Indications for and results of liver retransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, A; Torres-Quevedo, R; San Juan, F; Montalvá, E; López-Andújar, R; Pareja, E; De Juan, M; Vila, J J; Berenguer, M; Aguilera, V; Mir, J

    2009-01-01

    Liver retransplantation (LRT) is the only therapeutic option for the irreversible failure of a hepatic graft. The aim of this study was to evaluate our rate, indications, postoperative morbidity and mortality and patient survival at one and 5 years after LRT. 1,260 liver transplants (LT) were performed between 1991 and 2006, 79 were LRT (6.3%). During the first LT, there were no apparent differences between patients who did or did not require LRT. The most common reasons for LRT were hepatic artery thrombosis (31.6%), recurrence of hepatitis C virus cirrhosis (30.4%) and primary graft non function (21.5%). The actuarial survival rates at one and 5 years were 83% and 69% among those without LRT versus 71% and 61% among those with early LRT, and 64% and 34% among those with late LRT (p < 0.001). Although high morbidity and mortality were associated with LRT, it seems that this therapeutic option is valid for patients with early hepatic loss, although not when the graft loss is late. It becomes necessary to define the minimal acceptable results so that patients can benefit from LRT.

  18. [Inequalities in mortality by cardiovascular diseases in the Colombian Coffee Growing Region, 2009-2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Dora; Cerezo, María Del Pilar; Parra, Hernán; Quintero, Liliana; Muñoz, Liliana; Cifuentes, Olga Lucía; Vélez, Silvia Clemencia

    2015-01-01

    The impact of mortality from cardiovascular diseases requires the measurement of the relationship between the local socioeconomic conditions and these death causes. To determine the inequality in mortality from cardiovascular diseases in the municipalities of the Colombian Coffee Growing Region (2009-2011). We conducted an ecological study to compare the mortality from cardiovascular diseases (hypertensive, ischemic, cerebrovascular) in municipalities and their economic situation. Mortality rates and the index of unsatisfied basic needs were obtained from the Colombian Departamento Administrativo Nacional de Estadística (DANE) vital statistics, while the municipal gross domestic product per capita was estimated for this study. The inequality indices were calculated using regression models, and concentration and Theil indices with Epidat 3.1. The death risk resulting from ischemic or hypertensive diseases was greater in those municipalities with a higher index of unsatisfied basic needs. Mortality due to hypertensive disease tended to concentrate in municipalities with a higher level of unsatisfied basic needs. The municipalities with a lower gross domestic product showed a higher rate of deaths due to hypertensive disease in years 2009 and 2010, and due to ischemic disease in years 2010 and 2011. Nevertheless, this indicator does not measure the gap existing among poor communities. Disaggregated inequality indicators at municipal level are lacking. Suggested indicators are estimated only for country and provincial levels and they do not favor the characterization of health social inequalities at territorial level.

  19. Public health approach to address maternal mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Sanjay K; Anand, K; Misra, Puneet; Kant, Shashi; Upadhyay, Ravi Prakash

    2012-01-01

    Reducing maternal mortality is one of the major challenges to health systems worldwide, more so in developing countries that account for nearly 99% of these maternal deaths. Lack of a standard method for reporting of maternal death poses a major hurdle in making global comparisons. Currently much of the focus is on documenting the "number" of maternal deaths and delineating the "medical causes" behind these deaths. There is a need to acknowledge the social correlates of maternal deaths as well. Investigating and in-depth understanding of each maternal death can provide indications on practical ways of addressing the problem. Death of a mother has serious implications for the child as well as other family members and to prevent the same, a comprehensive approach is required. This could include providing essential maternal care, early management of complications and good quality intrapartum care through the involvement of skilled birth attendants. Ensuring the availability, affordability, and accessibility of quality maternal health services, including emergency obstetric care (EmOC) would prove pivotal in reducing the maternal deaths. To increase perceived seriousness of the community regarding maternal health, a well-structured awareness campaign is needed with importance be given to avoid adolescent pregnancy as well. Initiatives like Janani Surakhsha Yojna (JSY) that have the potential to improve maternal health needs to be strengthened. Quality assessments should form an essential part of all services that are directed toward improving maternal health. Further, emphasis needs to be given on research by involving multiple allied partners, with the aim to develop a prioritized, coordinated, and innovative research agenda for women's health.

  20. Public health approach to address maternal mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay K Rai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reducing maternal mortality is one of the major challenges to health systems worldwide, more so in developing countries that account for nearly 99% of these maternal deaths. Lack of a standard method for reporting of maternal death poses a major hurdle in making global comparisons. Currently much of the focus is on documenting the "number" of maternal deaths and delineating the "medical causes" behind these deaths. There is a need to acknowledge the social correlates of maternal deaths as well. Investigating and in-depth understanding of each maternal death can provide indications on practical ways of addressing the problem. Death of a mother has serious implications for the child as well as other family members and to prevent the same, a comprehensive approach is required. This could include providing essential maternal care, early management of complications and good quality intrapartum care through the involvement of skilled birth attendants. Ensuring the availability, affordability, and accessibility of quality maternal health services, including emergency obstetric care (EmOC would prove pivotal in reducing the maternal deaths. To increase perceived seriousness of the community regarding maternal health, a well-structured awareness campaign is needed with importance be given to avoid adolescent pregnancy as well. Initiatives like Janani Surakhsha Yojna (JSY that have the potential to improve maternal health needs to be strengthened. Quality assessments should form an essential part of all services that are directed toward improving maternal health. Further, emphasis needs to be given on research by involving multiple allied partners, with the aim to develop a prioritized, coordinated, and innovative research agenda for women′s health.