WorldWideScience

Sample records for voice communication effects

  1. Helping people to keep their voices healthy and to communicate effectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comins, R

    1998-01-01

    Voice is essential for all spoken languages. The mechanism of voice is taken for granted and its potential in human communication is overlooked. The combined expertise of specialist speech and language therapists and voice teachers in the Voice Care Network is focused on disseminating knowledge about care, development and effective use of the speaking voice. They cooperate, exchange ideas and develop practical voice workshops to prevent vocal problems and to support teachers, lecturers and others who depend on voice. A countrywide network of tutors runs workshops in universities and schools. Feedback shows appreciation of the overall benefits.

  2. Synchronous-Voice Computer-Mediated Communication: Effects on Pronunciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno Alastuey, Maria Camino

    2010-01-01

    Communicative competence is the ultimate goal of most learners of a second language and intelligible pronunciation a fundamental part of it. Unfortunately, learners often lack the opportunity to explore how intelligible their speech is for different audiences. Our research investigates whether synchronous-voice computer-mediated communication…

  3. Adolescent Male-to-Female Transgender Voice and Communication Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Adrienne; Helenius, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Current research to describe and evaluate effectiveness of voice and communication therapy for male-to-female transgender people is limited to adults. This paper provides rationale, procedures, and outcomes from voice and communication therapy for a male-to-female transgender adolescent 15 years of age. Treatment addressed vocal hygiene, breath…

  4. Voice Deviations and Coexisting Communication Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Louis, Kenneth O.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study examined the coexistence of other communicative disorders with voice disorders in about 3,400 children in grades 1-12 at 100 sites throughout the United States. The majority of voice-disordered children had coexisting articulation deviations and also differed from controls on two language measures and mean pure-tone hearing thresholds.…

  5. Effects of Medications on Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENT Doctor Near You Effects of Medications on Voice Effects of Medications on Voice Patient Health Information ... entnet.org . Could Your Medication Be Affecting Your Voice? Some medications including prescription, over-the-counter, and ...

  6. Voice communications over packet radio networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, M. M.

    1985-03-01

    The use of packet virtual circuit technique for voice communications in military radio networks was investigated. The work was concerned with various aspects of networking which include network modeling, communications techniques, traffic analysis and network control. An attempt has been made to develop a simple yet efficient time slot assignment algorithm . This was analyzed under a variety of slot depths and networks topologies using computer simulation. The Erlang' B results were used to provide more insight into the channel characteristics of the packet radio networks. The capabilities of implementing TDMA/CDMA hybrid schemes in the system were scrutinized. A method to estimate the transmission capacity of the inter-node links was found. We demonstrate its effectiveness in controlling local congestion by computer simulation. Graphical results were presented to highlight the behavior of the proposed packet radio networks. We concluded that an appropriate link weight function would provide efficient and reliable network services.

  7. New Voices: Communication through Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exceptional Parent, 1983

    1983-01-01

    The article recalls working with young severely disabled children able to communicate only through eye movements or specially developed communication boards. These children could now be helped by sophisticated computerized technology, standard and specialized forms of which are described. The influence of positioning, portability, and other…

  8. Scientific Bases of Human-Machine Communication by Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Ronald W.

    1995-10-01

    The scientific bases for human-machine communication by voice are in the fields of psychology, linguistics, acoustics, signal processing, computer science, and integrated circuit technology. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the basic scientific and technological issues in human-machine communication by voice and to point out areas of future research opportunity. The discussion is organized around the following major issues in implementing human-machine voice communication systems: (i) hardware/software implementation of the system, (ii) speech synthesis for voice output, (iii) speech recognition and understanding for voice input, and (iv) usability factors related to how humans interact with machines.

  9. Voice Communications Effectiveness of the All-Purpose MCU-2/P Chemical Defense Protective Mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    the display. The vowel sounds appear along the lower portion of the panels and the consonant sounds in the middle and upper regions of the panels. The...Another observation is that the vowel sounds in the lower portions of the panels, unlike the consonant energy, appeared to be effectively transmitted by...energy across most of the audio frequency speech spectrum. The small voicemitter shows 5 to 10 decibels more energy loss than the large voicemitter in

  10. A new VOX technique for reducing noise in voice communication systems. [voice operated keying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, C. F.; Morgan, W. C.; Shack, P. E.

    1974-01-01

    A VOX technique for reducing noise in voice communication systems is described which is based on the separation of voice signals into contiguous frequency-band components with the aid of an adaptive VOX in each band. It is shown that this processing scheme can effectively reduce both wideband and narrowband quasi-periodic noise since the threshold levels readjust themselves to suppress noise that exceeds speech components in each band. Results are reported for tests of the adaptive VOX, and it is noted that improvements can still be made in such areas as the elimination of noise pulses, phoneme reproduction at high-noise levels, and the elimination of distortion introduced by phase delay.

  11. Voice and Communication Therapy for Transgender/Transsexual Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Voice and Communication Therapy for Clients Who Are Transgender [ en Español ] What does the speech-language pathologist do when working with clients who are transgender? What organizations have more information? What does the ...

  12. Open Communication: Having Your Voice Heard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Communication is the use of language to exchange information to one another. African slaves used to embark on communication by means of using common symbols and speech, telling stories, singing spirituals, writing poems. As time revolved, blacks valued education. Education and the ability to read write and effectively would give them the skill or…

  13. Internet-Based System for Voice Communication With the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, James; Myers, Gerry; Clem, David; Speir, Terri

    2005-01-01

    The Internet Voice Distribution System (IVoDS) is a voice-communication system that comprises mainly computer hardware and software. The IVoDS was developed to supplement and eventually replace the Enhanced Voice Distribution System (EVoDS), which, heretofore, has constituted the terrestrial subsystem of a system for voice communications among crewmembers of the International Space Station (ISS), workers at the Payloads Operations Center at Marshall Space Flight Center, principal investigators at diverse locations who are responsible for specific payloads, and others. The IVoDS utilizes a communication infrastructure of NASA and NASArelated intranets in addition to, as its name suggests, the Internet. Whereas the EVoDS utilizes traditional circuitswitched telephony, the IVoDS is a packet-data system that utilizes a voice over Internet protocol (VOIP). Relative to the EVoDS, the IVoDS offers advantages of greater flexibility and lower cost for expansion and reconfiguration. The IVoDS is an extended version of a commercial Internet-based voice conferencing system that enables each user to participate in only one conference at a time. In the IVoDS, a user can receive audio from as many as eight conferences simultaneously while sending audio to one of them. The IVoDS also incorporates administrative controls, beyond those of the commercial system, that provide greater security and control of the capabilities and authorizations for talking and listening afforded to each user.

  14. Effects on vocal range and voice quality of singing voice training: the classically trained female voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabon, Peter; Stallinga, Rob; Södersten, Maria; Ternström, Sten

    2014-01-01

    A longitudinal study was performed on the acoustical effects of singing voice training under a given study program, using the voice range profile (VRP). Pretraining and posttraining recordings were made of students who participated in a 3-year bachelor singing study program. A questionnaire that included questions on optimal range, register use, classification, vocal health and hygiene, mixing technique, and training goals was used to rate and categorize self-assessed voice changes. Based on the responses, a subgroup of 10 classically trained female voices was selected, which was homogeneous enough for effects of training to be identified. The VRP perimeter contour was analyzed for effects of voice training. Also, a mapping within the VRP of voice quality, as expressed by the crest factor, was used to indicate the register boundaries and to monitor the acoustical consequences of the newly learned vocal technique of "mixed voice." VRPs were averaged across subjects. Findings were compared with the self-assessed vocal changes. Pre/post comparison of the average VRPs showed, in the midrange, (1) a decrease in the VRP area that was associated with the loud chest voice, (2) a reduction of the crest factor values, and (3) a reduction of maximum sound pressure level values. The students' self-evaluations of the voice changes appeared in some cases to contradict the VRP findings. VRPs of individual voices were seen to change over the course of a singing education. These changes were manifest also in the average group. High-resolution computerized recording, complemented with an acoustic register marker, allows a meaningful assessment of some effects of training, on an individual basis and for groups that comprise singers of a specific genre. It is argued that this kind of investigation is possible only within a focused training program, given by a faculty who has agreed on the goals. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Citizen voices performing public participation in science and environment communication

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalho, Anabela; Doyle, Julie

    2012-01-01

    How is "participation" ascribed meaning and practised in science and environment communication? And how are citizen voices articulated, invoked, heard, marginalised or silenced in those processes? Citizen Voices takes its starting point in the so-called dialogic or participatory turn in scientific and environmental governance in which practices claiming to be based on principles of participation, dialogue and citizen involvement have proliferated. The book goes beyond the buzzword of "participation" in order to give empirically rich, theoretically informed and critical accounts of how citizen participation is understood and enacted in mass mediation and public engagement practices. A diverse series of studies across Europe and the US are presented, providing readers with empirical insights into the articulation of citizen voices in different national, cultural and institutional contexts. Building bridges across media and communication studies, science and technology studies, environmental studies and urban pl...

  16. Critical Communicative Methodology: Including Vulnerable Voices in Research through Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puigvert, Lidia; Christou, Miranda; Holford, John

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how Critical Communicative Methodology (CCM) has been used successfully to analyse educational inequalities in ways that generate real transformation towards social justice. We begin by arguing that educational research today should employ new methodological approaches that can ensure the inclusion of different voices in…

  17. Speaking in Character: Voice Communication in Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadley, Greg; Gibbs, Martin R.

    This chapter summarizes 5 years of research on the implications of introducing voice communication systems to virtual worlds. Voice introduces both benefits and problems for players of fast-paced team games, from better coordination of groups and greater social presence of fellow players on the positive side, to negative features such as channel congestion, transmission of noise, and an unwillingness by some to use voice with strangers online. Similarly, in non-game worlds like Second Life, issues related to identity and impression management play important roles, as voice may build greater trust that is especially important for business users, yet it erodes the anonymity and ability to conceal social attributes like gender that are important for other users. A very different mixture of problems and opportunities exists when users conduct several simultaneous conversations in multiple text and voice channels. Technical difficulties still exist with current systems, including the challenge of debugging and harmonizing all the participants' voice setups. Different groups use virtual worlds for very different purposes, so a single modality may not suit all.

  18. SIP APIs for Voice and Video Communications on the Web

    CERN Document Server

    Davids, Carol; Singh, Kundan; Sinnreich, Henry; Wimmreuter, Wilhelm

    2011-01-01

    Existing standard protocols for the web and Internet telephony fail to deliver real-time interactive communication from within a web browser. In particular, the client-server web protocol over reliable TCP is not always suitable for end-to-end low latency media path needed for interactive voice and video communication. To solve this, we compare the available platform options using the existing technologies such as modifying the web programming language and protocol, using an existing web browser plugin, and a separate host resident application that the web browser can talk to. We argue that using a separate application as an adaptor is a promising short term as well as long-term strategy for voice and video communications on the web. Our project aims at developing the open technology and sample implementations for web-based real-time voice and video communication applications. We describe the architecture of our project including (1) a RESTful web communication API over HTTP inspired by SIP message flows, (2)...

  19. Influences on Intercultural Classroom Communication: Student Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarp, Gertrud

    2017-01-01

    The case study is an attempt to understand how students experience intercultural classroom communication and what kind of competence they need to cope in intercultural classroom communication. The context is a supplementary course in English for university enrolment in Denmark. It is a multinational student body and all the students have finished…

  20. Two Factors Related to Effective Voice Interpreting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, T. Alan

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-two interpreters for the deaf were measured on accuracy and quality of voice interpreting of the same story in two different sign language types: Pidgin Signed English and American Sign Language. Results indicated that previous experience interpreting was significantly related to the effectiveness of voice interpreting both languages.…

  1. Neural circuits underlying mother's voice perception predict social communication abilities in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Daniel A; Chen, Tianwen; Odriozola, Paola; Cheng, Katherine M; Baker, Amanda E; Padmanabhan, Aarthi; Ryali, Srikanth; Kochalka, John; Feinstein, Carl; Menon, Vinod

    2016-05-31

    The human voice is a critical social cue, and listeners are extremely sensitive to the voices in their environment. One of the most salient voices in a child's life is mother's voice: Infants discriminate their mother's voice from the first days of life, and this stimulus is associated with guiding emotional and social function during development. Little is known regarding the functional circuits that are selectively engaged in children by biologically salient voices such as mother's voice or whether this brain activity is related to children's social communication abilities. We used functional MRI to measure brain activity in 24 healthy children (mean age, 10.2 y) while they attended to brief (social function. Compared to female control voices, mother's voice elicited greater activity in primary auditory regions in the midbrain and cortex; voice-selective superior temporal sulcus (STS); the amygdala, which is crucial for processing of affect; nucleus accumbens and orbitofrontal cortex of the reward circuit; anterior insula and cingulate of the salience network; and a subregion of fusiform gyrus associated with face perception. The strength of brain connectivity between voice-selective STS and reward, affective, salience, memory, and face-processing regions during mother's voice perception predicted social communication skills. Our findings provide a novel neurobiological template for investigation of typical social development as well as clinical disorders, such as autism, in which perception of biologically and socially salient voices may be impaired.

  2. Effective communication with patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Evelyn R

    2005-09-01

    This brief article aims at heightening awareness about communication with various patients, including strategies to assist in improving communicative effectiveness. It assists us as health care professionals to go back to basics and reflect on how we communicate. Several researchers have provided insight into ways that communication may be enhanced. Walter, Bundy, and Donan (2005) suggested personally greeting the patient, introducing oneself, engaging in talk about clinical concerns, and then discussing next steps toward healthcare solutions. Schillinger (2003) implored that health related jargon be avoided and that all messages be clear and simple. Illustrations in the form of black-white line drawn pictures also tend to assist in patient comprehension. Lawton and Carroll (2005) suggested that effective communication requires assessing what the patient knows about their illness. Seidel's model (2004) stated that healthcare providers listen to the patient's story and elicit information through questioning with sufficient time allotted to provide answers. He also discussed the importance of providing a short summary of what the patient conveyed and giving additional information so they learn more about what is happening to them and can become an active participant in making decisions. It is important that patients understand what we as healthcare professionals say to them. Wisner (1999) further conveyed that it is not words alone that communicate. Body language, facial expressions, and tone of voice often provide additional clues influencing communicative effectiveness. Without a doubt, communication, directly impacts service delivery and quality of care in healthcare today. Listen to your patients, they have much to say.

  3. Effects of Voice on Emotional Arousal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Psyche eLoui

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Music is a powerful medium capable of eliciting a broad range of emotions. Although the relationship between language and music is well documented, relatively little is known about the effects of lyrics and the voice on the emotional processing of music and on listeners’ preferences. In the present study, we investigated the effects of vocals in music on participants’ perceived valence and arousal in songs. Participants (N = 50 made valence and arousal ratings for familiar songs that were presented with and without the voice. We observed robust effects of vocal content on perceived arousal. Furthermore, we found that the effect of the voice on enhancing arousal ratings is independent of familiarity of the song and differs across genders and age: females were more influenced by vocals than males; furthermore these gender effects were enhanced among older adults. Results highlight the effects of gender and aging in emotion perception and are discussed in terms of the social roles of music.

  4. Effect of Religiosity on Voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Abdul-Latif; Khneisser, Gebran; Dowli, Alex; Ziade, Georges; Tamim, Hani

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between religiosity and phonatory behavior. A total of 186 participants participated in a survey that included four sections: demographic data, extent of religiosity, history of dysphonia, phonatory behavior and laryngeal manipulation, in addition to the Voice Handicap Index (VHI-10). There was no significant association between the prevalence of phonatory symptoms and any of the religiosity questions. There was no significant association between phonatory behavior, history of laryngeal manipulation and any of the religiosity questions. There was also no significant association between the score of the Voice Handicap Index and any of the five religiosity questions. There is no association between religiosity and prevalence of phonatory disturbances, phonotraumatic behavior and/or history of laryngeal manipulation.

  5. Response time effects of alerting tone and semantic context for synthesized voice cockpit warnings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, C. A.; Williams, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Some handbooks and human factors design guides have recommended that a voice warning should be preceded by a tone to attract attention to the warning. As far as can be determined from a search of the literature, no experimental evidence supporting this exists. A fixed-base simulator flown by airline pilots was used to test the hypothesis that the total 'system-time' to respond to a synthesized voice cockpit warning would be longer when the message was preceded by a tone because the voice itself was expected to perform both the alerting and the information transfer functions. The simulation included realistic ATC radio voice communications, synthesized engine noise, cockpit conversation, and realistic flight routes. The effect of a tone before a voice warning was to lengthen response time; that is, responses were slower with an alerting tone. Lengthening the voice warning with another work, however, did not increase response time.

  6. Voice and endocrinology

    OpenAIRE

    KVS Hari Kumar; Anurag Garg; Ajai Chandra, N. S.; Singh, S. P.; Rakesh Datta

    2016-01-01

    Voice is one of the advanced features of natural evolution that differentiates human beings from other primates. The human voice is capable of conveying the thoughts into spoken words along with a subtle emotion to the tone. This extraordinary character of the voice in expressing multiple emotions is the gift of God to the human beings and helps in effective interpersonal communication. Voice generation involves close interaction between cerebral signals and the peripheral apparatus consistin...

  7. Unfamiliar voice identification: Effect of post-event information on accuracy and voice ratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet Mary Jessica Smith

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study addressed the effect of misleading post-event information (PEI on voice ratings, identification accuracy, and confidence, as well as the link between verbal recall and accuracy. Participants listened to a dialogue between male and female targets, then read misleading information about voice pitch. Participants engaged in verbal recall, rated voices on a feature checklist, and made a lineup decision. Accuracy rates were low, especially on target-absent lineups. Confidence and accuracy were unrelated, but the number of facts recalled about the voice predicted later lineup accuracy. There was a main effect of misinformation on ratings of target voice pitch, but there was no effect on identification accuracy or confidence ratings. As voice lineup evidence from earwitnesses is used in courts, the findings have potential applied relevance.

  8. Communicating Science in the Capitol: The Graduate Student Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glembo, Tyler

    2015-03-01

    Fundamental scientific research, as a majority federally funded initiative, is becoming more deeply embedded in politics. Since the end of the Space Race, funding of basic physical sciences research as a percent GDP has continuously declined, indicating that policy makers see funding scientific research as less of a priority than they once did. A lack of understanding about both science and how science is done amongst members of Congress has led to both reduced prioritization and also to misguided attempts at regulation, such as making peer review a public process and considering Congressional oversight for specific grants. Here we will examine a few current issues in science policy, the effect on graduate students, and why the student voice is effective. We will also consider the positive or negative effects such public engagement may have on our scientific careers and ways in which you can get involved.

  9. Secure digital voice communications in the Defense Data Network (DDN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernet, M.; Gan, D.; Oesterreicher, C.

    1985-03-01

    This final report has investigated and validated one of the fourteen key features of the future, all-digital World-wide Digital Systems Architecture (WWDSA), namely the enhanced 2.4 Kbps secure voice survivability through the use of packetized voice and the use of packetized voice and the interconnection between the voice survivability through the use of packetized voice and the interconnection between the voice (DSN) phase implementation plan in the report, Secure Voice, as provided by the STU-IIs, can be implemented in the DDN in the late 1980s time-frame with no technical and minimum schedule risk. VIUs are proposed to interconnect, the family of secure voice terminals, called STU-IIs, to the DDN. VIUs contain modan, signalling and supervision (S/S), and processor modules and are supported by the implementation model of the protocol architecture that (with the TAC as processor module) was proposed in the report. An optimum system-level architecture employing the VIUs and the proposed in the implementation plan based on an extensive evaluation.

  10. Voice analysis during bad news discussion in oncology: reduced pitch, decreased speaking rate, and nonverbal communication of empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, Monica; Parker, Patricia A; Baile, Walter F; Lenzi, Renato

    2012-05-01

    This study was designed to determine if differences exist in the speaking rate and pitch of healthcare providers when discussing bad news versus neutral topics, and to assess listeners' ability to perceive voice differences in the absence of speech content. Participants were oncology healthcare providers seeing patients with cancer of unknown primary. The encounters were audio recorded; the information communicated by the oncologist to the patient was identified as neutral or bad news. At least 30 seconds of both bad news and neutral utterances were analyzed; provider voice pitch and speaking rate were measured. The same utterances were subjected to low pass filtering that maintained pitch contours and speaking rate, but eliminated acoustic energy associated with consonants making the samples unintelligible, but with unchanged intonation. Twenty-seven listeners (graduate students in a voice disorders class) listened to the samples and rated them on three features: caring, sympathetic, and competent. All but one provider reduced speaking rate, the majority also reduced pitch in the bad news condition. Listeners perceived a significant difference between the nonverbal characteristics of the providers' voice when performing the two tasks and rated speech produced with the reduced rate and lower pitch as more caring and sympathetic. These results suggest that simultaneous assessment of verbal content and multiparameter prosodic analysis of speech is necessary for a more thorough understanding of the expression and perception of empathy. This information has the potential to contribute to the enhancement of communication training design and of oncologists' communication effectiveness.

  11. Effect of tonsillectomy on the adult voice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Heffernan, Colleen B

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES AND HYPOTHESIS: Anecdotal evidence suggests that tonsillectomy has no deleterious consequences on a person\\'s voice under normal vocal demand. However, whether the enlarged dimensions of the oropharynx after tonsillectomy impair the quality of a professional voice user remains unclear. Therefore, we designed a study to determine whether adult tonsillectomy altered the resonance characteristics of the vocal tract in any way and whether these changes were transient or permanent. STUDY DESIGN: This is a prospective observational study with full institutional ethical approval. METHODS: All adult patients presenting for tonsillectomy for recurrent tonsillitis in our institution were recruited. Their voice was recorded preoperatively, postoperatively, and at 4 weeks postoperatively. The values of the first four formants were calculated in all recordings. The oropharyngeal dimensions were measured preoperatively and postoperatively. Tonsillar weights and volumes were also measured. RESULTS: The first formant was noted to rise postoperatively. The average value of F2 and F3 did not alter postoperatively or at 4 weeks. However, it was noted that the fourth formant was not universally present preoperatively but was present in all patients postoperatively and at 4 weeks. CONCLUSIONS: Altering the dimensions of the oropharynx after tonsillectomy causes the first formant to rise but has no effect on the third and fourth formants. However, the fourth formant appears in patients who previously did not demonstrate it. The fourth formant was present in a greater proportion of male patients preoperatively than female patients, but it was universally present postoperatively and at 4 weeks in both sexes. This suggests that increasing the horizontal dimensions of the oropharynx has a nontransient effect on the higher order formants of the voice.

  12. Introducing Contemporary Voices of Music Therapy: Communication, Culture, and Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brynjulf Stige

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Essays, reports, and columns from Voices have been collected in an anthology. The book is published by Unipub, and will be possible to purchase in forthcoming international congresses. It will of course also be possible to order the book via the Voices website, to order it from the publisher, or to buy it in an ordinary or Internet bookstore. The editors (Carolyn Kenny and Brynjulf Stige are taking no royalties for this book and all income from the sales will support Voices (which is a non-profit enterprise. National or regional associations of music therapy will be given a special discount rate if they order more than 10 copies. Such arrangements may also be made with universities or other institutions.

  13. Voice Communications over 802.11 Ad Hoc Networks: Modeling, Optimization and Call Admission Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Changchun; Xu, Yanyi; Liu, Gan; Liu, Kezhong

    Supporting quality-of-service (QoS) of multimedia communications over IEEE 802.11 based ad hoc networks is a challenging task. This paper develops a simple 3-D Markov chain model for queuing analysis of IEEE 802.11 MAC layer. The model is applied for performance analysis of voice communications over IEEE 802.11 single-hop ad hoc networks. By using the model, we finish the performance optimization of IEEE MAC layer and obtain the maximum number of voice calls in IEEE 802.11 ad hoc networks as well as the statistical performance bounds. Furthermore, we design a fully distributed call admission control (CAC) algorithm which can provide strict statistical QoS guarantee for voice communications over IEEE 802.11 ad hoc networks. Extensive simulations indicate the accuracy of the analytical model and the CAC scheme.

  14. The illusion of nonmediation in telecommunication: voice intensity biases distance judgments to a communication partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Lakens, Daniël; IJsselsteijn, Wijnand A

    2015-05-01

    The illusion of nonmediation is an experience in mediated communication where individuals respond as if the medium is not there. It is frequently associated with advanced media technology, such as virtual environments and teleconference systems. In this paper, we investigate whether people experience an illusion of nonmediation during interactions as simple as making a phone call. In three experiments, participants were asked to listen to someone's voice on a mobile phone (Experiment 1) or through VoIP software (Experiment 2 and 3) before guessing the location of the person and indicating this location on a map. Results consistently demonstrated that louder voices were judged to be closer, as if the technical mediation was ignored. Combining the three experiments, a small-scale meta-analysis yielded an effect size estimate of d=0.37 for the 'louder-as-closer' effect. Implications of the results and suggestions for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of irradiation on alaryngeal voice of totally laryngectomized patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izdebski, K.; Fontanesi, J.; Ross, J.C.; Hetzler, D.

    1988-06-01

    The effects of radiation therapy on the ability of totally laryngectomized patients to produce voice and speech were examined using objective non-invasive methods. Moderate to severe losses were noted in patients producing voice with all types of alaryngeal modalities: tracheoesophageal, esophageal, and electrolaryngeal. Voice and speech losses were related to the impaired motility and vibratory capability of the esophageal wall and mucosa, to fibrosis of the submandibular region and to trismus. Tracheoesophageal and esophageal voice was recovered some weeks after completion of irradiation. No voice losses were observed in alaryngeal speakers who did not undergo voice restoration until after irradiation. All irradiated patients also showed various degrees of dysphagia during the treatment.

  16. The Provision of Feedback Types to EFL Learners in Synchronous Voice Computer Mediated Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Chao-Jung

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between Synchronous Voice Computer Mediated Communication (SVCMC) interaction and the use of feedback types, especially pronunciation feedback types, in distance tutoring contexts. The participants, divided into two groups (explicit and recast), were twelve beginning/low-intermediate level English as a Foreign…

  17. Individual versus Interactive Task-Based Performance through Voice-Based Computer-Mediated Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granena, Gisela

    2016-01-01

    Interaction is a necessary condition for second language (L2) learning (Long, 1980, 1996). Research in computer-mediated communication has shown that interaction opportunities make learners pay attention to form in a variety of ways that promote L2 learning. This research has mostly investigated text-based rather than voice-based interaction. The…

  18. Communication in Change - Voice over IP in Safety and Security Critical Communication Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, Heimo; Sevcik, Berndt; Turek, Thomas; Zucker, Gerhard

    During the last decade communication technology has changed rapidly. Due to its decreasing costs and rising expansion, IP (Internet Protocol) technology has found its way to areas that have long been the domain of public-switched telephone networks (PSTN). Voice over IP (VoIP) applications are widely used not only for phone calls or common Internet conferences, but also tend to be used for safety critical communication applications. Hence security and safety topics arise, which pose new challenges in this area of research. The authors are convinced that new issues on the network layer as well as on the application layer require detailed analysis. Hence this paper gives an overview on latest developments in this area, and states the authors’ view on this topic. Thereby safety and security issues are faced from different abstraction layers. On the one hand the network layer and on the other hand the application layer focusing on middleware systems in the area of service oriented architectures (SOAs).

  19. The Moderating Effect of Frequent Singing on Voice Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lortie, Catherine L; Rivard, Julie; Thibeault, Mélanie; Tremblay, Pascale

    2017-01-01

    The effects of aging on voice production are well documented, including changes in loudness, pitch, and voice quality. However, one important and clinically relevant question that remains concerns the possibility that the aging of voice can be prevented or at least delayed through noninvasive methods. Indeed, discovering natural means to preserve the integrity of the human voice throughout aging could have a major impact on the quality of life of elderly adults. The objective of this study was therefore to examine the potentially positive effect of singing on voice production. To this aim, a group of 72 healthy nonsmoking adults (20-93 years old) was recruited and separated into three groups based on their singing habits. Several voice parameters were assessed (fundamental frequency [f0] mean, f0 standard deviation [SD], f0 minimum and f0 maximum, mean amplitude and amplitude SD, jitter, shimmer, and harmonic-to-noise ratio) during the sustained production of vowel /a/. Other parameters were assessed during standardized reading passage (speaking f0, speaking f0 SD). As was expected, age effects were found on most acoustic parameters with significant sex differences. Importantly, moderation analyses revealed that frequent singing moderates the effect of aging on most acoustic parameters. Specifically, in frequent singers, there was no decrease in the stability of pitch and amplitude with age, suggesting that the voice of frequent singers remains more stable in aging than the voice of non-singers, and more generally, providing empirical evidence for a positive effect of singing on voice in aging. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Native voice, self-concept and the moral case for personalized voice technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanson, Esther

    2017-01-01

    Purpose (1) To explore the role of native voice and effects of voice loss on self-concept and identity, and survey the state of assistive voice technology; (2) to establish the moral case for developing personalized voice technology. Methods This narrative review examines published literature on the human significance of voice, the impact of voice loss on self-concept and identity, and the strengths and limitations of current voice technology. Based on the impact of voice loss on self and identity, and voice technology limitations, the moral case for personalized voice technology is developed. Results Given the richness of information conveyed by voice, loss of voice constrains expression of the self, but the full impact is poorly understood. Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices facilitate communication but, despite advances in this field, voice output cannot yet express the unique nuances of individual voice. The ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence and equality of opportunity establish the moral responsibility to invest in accessible, cost-effective, personalized voice technology. Conclusions Although further research is needed to elucidate the full effects of voice loss on self-concept, identity and social functioning, current understanding of the profoundly negative impact of voice loss establishes the moral case for developing personalized voice technology. Implications for Rehabilitation Rehabilitation of voice-disordered patients should facilitate self-expression, interpersonal connectedness and social/occupational participation. Proactive questioning about the psychological and social experiences of patients with voice loss is a valuable entry point for rehabilitation planning. Personalized voice technology would enhance sense of self, communicative participation and autonomy and promote shared healthcare decision-making. Further research is needed to identify the best strategies to preserve and strengthen identity and sense of

  1. Communication Management Unit : Single Solution of Voice and Data Routing Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Shankar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Challenges faced by present avionics systems are low weight, less power, low volume, high mean time between failure and low mean time to repair. This paper is a feasibility study for single solution of voice and data switching/routing unit. This paper presents a new architecture for voice and data switching unit in the form of communication management unit.  The proposed solution is obtained on integrated modular avionics architecture using commercial-off-the-shelf  hardware. A single board computer is used as a processing engine with add-on audio boards to convert analog voice input and output signals into digital signals.Defence Science Journal, 2013, 63(2, pp.181-185, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.63.4261

  2. Ageing Voices: The Effect of Changes in Voice Parameters on ASR Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravichander Vipperla

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available With ageing, human voices undergo several changes which are typically characterized by increased hoarseness and changes in articulation patterns. In this study, we have examined the effect on Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR and found that the Word Error Rates (WER on older voices is 10% absolute higher compared to those of adult voices. Subsequently, we compared several voice source parameters including fundamental frequency, jitter, shimmer, harmonicity, and cepstral peak prominence of adult and older males. Several of these parameters show statistically significant difference for the two groups. However, artificially increasing jitter and shimmer measures do not effect the ASR accuracies significantly. Artificially lowering the fundamental frequency degrades the ASR performance marginally but this drop in performance can be overcome to some extent using Vocal Tract Length Normalisation (VTLN. Overall, we observe that the changes in the voice source parameters do not have a significant impact on ASR performance. Comparison of the likelihood scores of all the phonemes for the two age groups show that there is a systematic mismatch in the acoustic space of the two age groups. Comparison of the phoneme recognition rates show that mid vowels, nasals, and phonemes that depend on the ability to create constrictions with tongue tip for articulation are more affected by ageing than other phonemes.

  3. Voices of the Heart in Small Group Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Leanne O.

    Values can and should be a part of small group communication instruction. Discourse is value laden and to understand the communication process, the role of values must be understood. Many students come to the classroom not understanding values, and not being aware of the role of values in decision-making. Their lack of understanding requires that…

  4. Increase in Organization Effectiveness Using Voice Analysis: The System Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Bartkienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this article is to analyze literature related to the system theory and to present the system of increase in organization effectiveness using voice analysis. The concepts of the system approach were analyzed, the definition of the system, its components and classification were discussed. Following the principles of the system theory, the system of increase in organization effectiveness using voice analysis was designed. Each element was briefly discussed, i.e. processes influencing the employee, the environment, voice analysis system, expert system, prime and final organizational effectiveness. In addition, the relations between these elements were indentified. Article in Lithuanian

  5. Voice in political decision-making: the effect of group voice on perceived trustworthiness of decision makers and subsequent acceptance of decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terwel, Bart W; Harinck, Fieke; Ellemers, Naomi; Daamen, Dancker D L

    2010-06-01

    The implementation of carbon dioxide capture and storage technology (CCS) is considered an important climate change mitigation strategy, but the viability of this technology will depend on public acceptance of CCS policy decisions. The results of three experiments with students as participants show that whether or not interest groups receive an opportunity to express their opinions in the decision-making process (i.e., group voice) affects acceptance of CCS policy decisions, with inferred trustworthiness of the decision maker mediating this effect. Decision-making procedures providing different interest groups with equal opportunities to voice their opinions instigate more trust in the decision maker and, in turn, lead to greater willingness to accept decisions compared to no-voice procedures (i.e., unilateral decision-making-Study 1) and unequal group-voice procedures (i.e., when one type of interest group receives voice, but another type of interest group does not-Study 2). Study 3 further shows that an individual's own level of knowledge about CCS moderates the desire for an opportunity for members of the general public to voice opinions in the decision-making process, inferred trustworthiness of decision makers, and policy acceptance. These results imply that people care about voice in decision-making even when they are not directly personally involved in the decision-making process. We conclude that people tend to use procedural information when deciding to accept or oppose policy decisions on political complex issues; hence, it is important that policymakers use fair group-voice procedures and that they communicate to the public how they arrive at their decisions. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Joint Communications Support Element: The Voice Heard Round the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    selected STEP locations. In the airborne domain, JCSE enables mobility through its Joint Airborne Com- munications System ( JACS ) and Joint Air- borne...Communications Center/Command Post (JACC/CP). JACS provides an airborne radio relay connection for VHF and UHF communications range extension and...relay. JACS Version 2 operates from either a C-12 or C-130 airframe. JACS Version 3 (V3) increases operational flexibility by operating from an

  7. Voice restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgers, F.J.M.; Balm, A.J.M.; van den Brekel, M.W.M.; Tan, I.B.; Remacle, M.; Eckel, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical prosthetic voice restoration is the best possible option for patients to regain oral communication after total laryngectomy. It is considered to be the present "gold standard" for voice rehabilitation of laryngectomized individuals. Surgical prosthetic voice restoration, in essence, is alwa

  8. Familiar Voices: Using Ebonics Communication Techniques in the Primary Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Anita Perna

    2003-01-01

    Presents classroom vignettes illustrating an African American first grade teacher's use of selected Ebonics communication techniques that celebrate African American oral traditions while supporting diverse students' academic success. Identifies five common Ebonics rhetorical devices (use of repetitive, rhythmic phrasing for emphasis; call and…

  9. New Voices in the Workplace: Research Directions in Multicultural Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Marlene G.

    1991-01-01

    Develops a two-step framework (resistance to privileged discourse followed by harmonic discourse) for understanding multicultural communication in organizations based on the assumption of cultural difference. Suggests four directions for future research to create the data base that would allow development of a model of multicultural communication…

  10. Effect of Voicing on Spacial Indices of Consonants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Keyhani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: For better using of electropalatography in assessment and treatment procedures it is important to know normal tongue to palate contact patterns. Several factors can change consonant’s articulatory patterns. One of them is voicing. In addition to determine amount of spacial indices of studied consonants, this research aimed to study tongue behavior related to change in voicing. Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive analytic study. Consonant linguapalatal contacts were studied using reading electropalatography by recording 4 normal Persian speaking adults (aged between 21-25 repeating CVCV syllables (C=/s,z,t,d/, V=/a/ ten times. Contact patterns were examined for total number of electrodes contacted and other spatial indices. Comparisons were made across voicing contrast.Results: In this study amount of spacial indices of studied consonants determined. It’s found that there was not significant difference between voiced and voiceless cognate according to number of contact and other special indices.Conclusion: The findings of this study are in according with previous studies in other languages about the effect of voicing upon linguapalatal contact patterns. Difference in voicing does not make clear change in spacial indices related to tongue contact pattern. Compared to other parts, Tip of the tongue seem to be more sensitive for change in voicing and oral air pressure.

  11. Effect of testosterone therapy on the female voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, R.; York, A.; Dimitrakakis, C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives This prospective study was designed to investigate the effect of testosterone, delivered by subcutaneous implants, on the female voice. Methods Ten women who had opted for testosterone therapy were recruited for voice analysis. Voices were recorded prior to treatment and at 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months while on testosterone therapy. Acoustic samples were collected with subjects reading a sentence, reading a paragraph, and participating in a conversation. Significant changes in the voice over time were investigated using a repeated-measures analysis of variance with the fundamental frequency (F 0) as a response variable. Demographic variables associated with characteristics of the voice were assessed. Results There were no significant differences in average F 0 related to smoking history, menopausal status, weight, or body mass index. There was no difference in average fundamental speaking frequency (sentence, paragraph, conversation) between the pre-treatment group and any post-treatment group at 3 and 12 months. There was an increase in sentence speech F 0 at 6 months. Two of three patients with lower than expected F 0 at baseline improved on testosterone therapy. Conclusion Therapeutic levels of testosterone, delivered by subcutaneous implant, had no adverse affect on the female voice including lowering or deepening of the voice. PMID:26857354

  12. AN EFFICIENT VOICE SCRAMBLING TECHNIQUE FOR NEXT GENERATION COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanya G

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The OFDM scrambler is most widely used for secure communication. In order to eliminate the intelligibility of speech, speech scrambling is used. Many of the scrambling techniques shows poor performance, to improve the efficiency of the scrambler an efficient speech scrambling technique, random permutation with pseudorandom- generator under multipath fading is proposed. The Common Intelligibility Scale (CIS and Speech Transmission Index (STI are used to predict the intelligibility of speech. Also to evaluate the performance of speech the BER (Bit Error Rate and the SINR (Signal to Interference plus Noise Ratio was used. By the measurement of PESQ (Perceptual Evaluation of Speech Quality the recovered speech quality was observed. The simulations show that OFDM scrambler is a best technique for providing extremely high data security for 4G mobile communication when compared to a conventional technique.

  13. Effects of coda voicing and aspiration on Hindi vowels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampp, Claire; Reklis, Heidi

    2004-05-01

    This study reexamines the well-attested coda voicing effect on vowel duration [Chen, Phonetica 22, 125-159 (1970)], in conjunction with the relationship between vowel duration and aspiration of codas. The first step was to replicate the results of Maddieson and Gandour [UCLA Working Papers Phonetics 31, 46-52 (1976)] with a larger, language-specific data set. Four nonsense syllables ending in [open-o] followed by [k, kh, g, gh] were read aloud in ten different carrier sentences by four native speakers of Hindi. Results confirm that longer vowels precede voiced word-final consonants and aspirated word-final consonants. Thus, among the syllables, vowel duration would be longest when preceding the voiced aspirate [gh]. Coda voicing, and thus, vowel duration, have been shown to correlate negatively to vowel F1 in English and Arabic [Wolf, J. Phonetics 6, 299-309 (1978); de Jong and Zawaydeh ibid, 30, 53-75 (2002)]. It is not known whether vowel F1 depends directly on coda voicing, or is determined indirectly via duration. Since voicing and aspiration both increase duration, F1 measurements of this data set (which will be presented) may answer that question.

  14. A Noise Reduction Preprocessor for Mobile Voice Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Martin

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe a speech enhancement algorithm which leads to significant quality and intelligibility improvements when used as a preprocessor to a low bit rate speech coder. This algorithm was developed in conjunction with the mixed excitation linear prediction (MELP coder which, by itself, is highly susceptible to environmental noise. The paper presents novel as well as known speech and noise estimation techniques and combines them into a highly effective speech enhancement system. The algorithm is based on short-time spectral amplitude estimation, soft-decision gain modification, tracking of the a priori probability of speech absence, and minimum statistics noise power estimation. Special emphasis is placed on enhancing the performance of the preprocessor in nonstationary noise environments.

  15. The Effects of Customer Voice on Hotel Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assaf, A. George; Josiassen, Alexander; Cvelbar, Ljubica Knežević

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of two critical customer voice variables on hotel performance. Specifically, the research provides a customer equity model in which the influences of both customer satisfaction and complaints are considered. The impact of the customer voice variables on hotel...... performance is investigated while considering the potential for moderating effects by hotel size and star rating. We use a more robust approach to measure firm performance than is traditionally used in satisfaction-performance studies. Finally the paper reports on the results of these investigations...

  16. The applicability of the dysphonia severity index and the voice handicap index in evaluating effects of voice therapy and phonosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkesteegt, Marieke M; Brocaar, Michael P; Wieringa, Marjan H

    2010-03-01

    The objective was to investigate the applicability of the Dysphonia Severity Index (DSI) and the Voice Handicap Index (VHI) in evaluating effects of intervention between groups of patients and for intrasubject differences and whether DSI and VHI are complementing measurements. Analyses of measurement data before and after intervention of 171 patients with voice disorders. The voice quality was measured objectively with the DSI. The perceived voice handicap was measured with the VHI. Three groups of patients were used: patients who had voice therapy, phonosurgery, or no intervention. DSI and VHI improved significantly after intervention in the voice therapy and the surgery group (median difference DSI 1.19 and 3.03, VHI -8 and -26, respectively). The intrasubject results were analyzed based on the test-retest variability of DSI and VHI. Significant better DSI and VHI scores after intervention were found in, respectively, 22% and 38% of the patients with voice therapy, and 56% and 78% of the patients with surgery. In the no intervention group, this was 11% and 12%. In 37% of the patients, the differences before and after intervention in DSI and VHI were in discordance. The DSI and VHI are able to show significant differences after intervention for voice disorders between groups of patients. The DSI and VHI can be used to determine a significant intrasubject result of intervention. The DSI and VHI measure each different aspects of the voice and are complementing measurements. The DSI is therefore applicable in clinical practice for objective evaluation of voice quality and the VHI for subjective evaluation of the perceived handicap by the patient self.

  17. Voice and endocrinology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KVS Hari Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Voice is one of the advanced features of natural evolution that differentiates human beings from other primates. The human voice is capable of conveying the thoughts into spoken words along with a subtle emotion to the tone. This extraordinary character of the voice in expressing multiple emotions is the gift of God to the human beings and helps in effective interpersonal communication. Voice generation involves close interaction between cerebral signals and the peripheral apparatus consisting of the larynx, vocal cords, and trachea. The human voice is susceptible to the hormonal changes throughout life right from the puberty until senescence. Thyroid, gonadal and growth hormones have tremendous impact on the structure and function of the vocal apparatus. The alteration of voice is observed even in physiological states such as puberty and menstruation. Astute clinical observers make out the changes in the voice and refer the patients for endocrine evaluation. In this review, we shall discuss the hormonal influence on the voice apparatus in normal and endocrine disorders.

  18. Effective Voice Calls Admission for Authorized User in Inter VOIP Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subashri T

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available IP based voice transmission technology is a flexible, simpler and a cost effective implementation of voicetransmission. It provides a real convergence of various networks. This voice transmission technology doesnot support a quality that is equivalent to digitized voice, which is available in the existing PSTN networks.In addition to this, data network vulnerabilities affect the VOIP service causing a drop in the utilization ofvoice communication. In this paper, the quality of service for voice calls is ensured with the integration ofCAC mechanism with the bandwidth link utilization which makes an estimation of the demandedbandwidth. In terms of security, prevention of ARP cache poisoning attack is achieved by use of the signedMAC address response in local area networks. It makes the network confident that the admitted user is anauthorized user and also it verifies that only the authorized users’ information is exchanged over the localarea network. Also an approach that makes it difficult for the hacker’s to hack the data exchanged over thequality channel has been proposed.

  19. The effects of stress on singing voice accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrouy-Maestri, Pauline; Morsomme, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    The quality of a music performance can be lessened or enhanced if the performer experiences stressful conditions. In addition, the quality of a sung performance requires control of the fundamental frequency of the voice, which is particularly sensitive to stress. The present study aimed to clarify the effects of stress on singing voice accuracy. Thirty-one music students were recorded in a stressful condition (ie, a music examination) and a nonstressful condition. Two groups were defined according to the challenge level of the music examination (first and second music levels). Measurements were made by self-reported state anxiety (CSAI-2R questionnaire) and by observing heart rate activity (electrocardiogram) during each performance. In addition, the vocal accuracy of the sung performances was objectively analyzed. As expected, state anxiety and heart rate were significantly higher on the day of the music examination than in the nonstressful condition for all the music students. However, the effect of stress was positive for the first-year students but negative for the second-year students, for whom the music examination was particularly challenging. In addition, highly significant correlations were found between the intensity of cognitive symptoms and the vocal accuracy criteria. This study highlights the contrasting effects of stress on singing voice accuracy but also the need to consider the challenge level and perception of the symptoms in experimental and pedagogical settings. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of Vocal Fry on Voice and on Velopharyngeal Sphincter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias, Vanessa Santos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction It is known that the basal sound promotes shortening and adduction of the vocal folds and leaves the mucosa looser. However there are few studies that address the supralaryngeal physiological findings obtained using the technique. Objective To check the effectiveness of using vocal fry on the voice and velopharingeal port closure of five adult subjects, whose cleft palate has been corrected with surgery. Methods Case study with five subjects who underwent otolaryngology examination by means of nasopharyngoscopy for imaging and measurement of the region of velopharyngeal port closure before and after using the vocal fry technique for three minutes. During the exam, the subjects sustained the isolated vowel /a:/ in their usual pitch and loudness. The emission of the vowel /a:/ was also used for perceptual analysis and spectrographic evaluation of their voices. Results Four subjects had an improvement in the region of velopharyngeal port closure; the results of the spectrographic evaluation were indicative of decreased hypernasality, and the results of the auditory-perceptual analysis suggested improved overall vocal quality, adequacy of loudness, decreased hypernasality, improvement of type of voice and decreased hoarseness. Conclusion This study showed a positive effect of vocal fry on voice and greater velopharyngeal port closure.

  1. The relation of vocal fold lesions and voice quality to voice handicap and psychosomatic well-being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, R.; Marres, H.A.; Jong, F. de

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Voice disorders have a multifactorial genesis and may be present in various ways. They can cause a significant communication handicap and impaired quality of life. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of vocal fold lesions and voice quality on voice handicap and psychosomatic well-being. METH

  2. Effect of Spinal Manipulative Therapy on the Singing Voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fachinatto, Ana Paula A; Duprat, André de Campos; Silva, Marta Andrada E; Bracher, Eduardo Sawaya Botelho; Benedicto, Camila de Carvalho; Luz, Victor Botta Colangelo; Nogueira, Maruan Nogueira; Fonseca, Beatriz Suster Gomes

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) on the singing voice of male individuals. Randomized, controlled, case-crossover trial. Twenty-nine subjects were selected among male members of the Heralds of the Gospel. This association was chosen because it is a group of persons with similar singing activities. Participants were randomly assigned to two groups: (A) chiropractic SMT procedure and (B) nontherapeutic transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) procedure. Recordings of the singing voice of each participant were taken immediately before and after the procedures. After a 14-day period, procedures were switched between groups: participants who underwent SMT on the first day were subjected to TENS and vice versa. Recordings were subjected to perceptual audio and acoustic evaluations. The same recording segment of each participant was selected. Perceptual audio evaluation was performed by a specialist panel (SP). Recordings of each participant were randomly presented thus making the SP blind to intervention type and recording session (before/after intervention). Recordings compiled in a randomized order were also subjected to acoustic evaluation. No differences in the quality of the singing on perceptual audio evaluation were observed between TENS and SMT. No differences in the quality of the singing voice of asymptomatic male singers were observed on perceptual audio evaluation or acoustic evaluation after a single spinal manipulative intervention of the thoracic and cervical spine. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Effects of Synchronous CMC on Speaking Proficiency and Anxiety: Text versus Voice Chat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satar, H. Muge; Ozdener, Nesrin

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on a study investigating the use of 2 synchronous computer-mediated communication tools: text and voice chat. The experimental design employed 3 groups (text, voice, and control), each consisting of 30 novice-level secondary school learners of English as a foreign language. Over a 4-week period, the participants in the…

  4. Perceived Benefits and Drawbacks of Synchronous Voice-Based Computer-Mediated Communication in the Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno Alastuey, M. C.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the benefits and drawbacks of synchronous voice-based computer-mediated communication (CMC) in a blended course of English for specific purposes. Quantitative and qualitative data from two groups following the same syllabus, except for the oral component, were compared. Oral tasks were carried out face-to-face with same L1…

  5. Perceived Benefits and Drawbacks of Synchronous Voice-Based Computer-Mediated Communication in the Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno Alastuey, M. C.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the benefits and drawbacks of synchronous voice-based computer-mediated communication (CMC) in a blended course of English for specific purposes. Quantitative and qualitative data from two groups following the same syllabus, except for the oral component, were compared. Oral tasks were carried out face-to-face with same L1…

  6. Communicating the past into the present. Young voices about communism and communists in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca PETRE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available More than two decades have passed since the fall of communism; meanwhile, a new generation has come to age in the post-communist countries, with no direct experience of the past, yet still influenced by it. In the pages to follow I try to bring the voice of young Romanians to the fore, for it is a voice which has scarcely been heard. How do young people communicate about a past that they did not experience but which nevertheless influences them? How do they appropriate the past and what does it mean for them? The hypothesis emerging from empirical exploration is that “communist” is the term that the youth uses to mark their distinction and rebellion against the adult generation. It is not as much a political category but an everyday term that would silence the “other” of youth, the adults. “Communists” are described as authoritarian, dictatorial, limited, rigid, and indoctrinated. While “communist” is a term that seems easy to describe, there is no clear and coherent opinion when it comes to “communism”. More often than not, young people adopt the standardised version of history textbooks and combine it with the stories heard from their parents. It is to be pointed out that often the two versions collide, the textbooks presenting the recent past in dark colours as abusive, dictatorial, totalitarian, while many parents emphasise the safety of work and lodgings.

  7. Differing Roles of the Face and Voice in Early Human Communication: Roots of Language in Multimodal Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuna Jhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Seeking roots of language, we probed infant facial expressions and vocalizations. Both have roles in language, but the voice plays an especially flexible role, expressing a variety of functions and affect conditions with the same vocal categories—a word can be produced with many different affective flavors. This requirement of language is seen in very early infant vocalizations. We examined the extent to which affect is transmitted by early vocal categories termed “protophones” (squeals, vowel-like sounds, and growls and by their co-occurring facial expressions, and similarly the extent to which vocal type is transmitted by the voice and co-occurring facial expressions. Our coder agreement data suggest infant affect during protophones was most reliably transmitted by the face (judged in video-only, while vocal type was transmitted most reliably by the voice (judged in audio-only. Voice alone transmitted negative affect more reliably than neutral or positive affect, suggesting infant protophones may be used especially to call for attention when the infant is in distress. By contrast, the face alone provided no significant information about protophone categories. Indeed coders in VID could scarcely recognize the difference between silence and voice when coding protophones in VID. The results suggest that partial decoupling of communicative roles for face and voice occurs even in the first months of life. Affect in infancy appears to be transmitted in a way that audio and video aspects are flexibly interwoven, as in mature language.

  8. White House Communications Agency (WHCA) Presidential Voice Communications Rack Mount System Mechanical Drawing Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Harris , 117G, communications, White House Communications Agency 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18...used by WHCA. The customer desired to upgrade their comms equipment from Harris 117F radios to 117G radios. These radios offer a smaller package with...rack unit (9U) chassis that did not use a fiber optic modem and instead used direct radio frequency (RF) output from the Harris 117F radio. The

  9. S3: Smart Session Selection for Voice Communications in Next Generation Wireless Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tein-Yaw; Yuan, Fong-Ching; Chen, Yung-Mu; Liu, Baw-Jhiune

    Selecting transparently a proper network connection for voice communication will be a fundamental requirement in future multimode heterogeneous wireless network. This paper presented a smart session selection (S3) scheme to meet this requirement. Instead of selecting a best access network as in conventional Always Best Connected (ABC) paradigm, S3 enables users to select a best network connection, which consists of source and destination access network pair, to satisfy quality constraint and users' preference. To support S3, we develop a user profile to specify network connection priority. Meanwhile IP multimedia subsystem (IMS) is extended to make smart decision for users. Finally, Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) is used to recommend a network connection with assistance of user profile and IMS signaling. An example is illustrated to show that AHP can successfully select a good network connection that fulfills the requirement of users.

  10. The effect of singing training on voice quality for people with quadriplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamplin, Jeanette; Baker, Felicity A; Buttifant, Mary; Berlowitz, David J

    2014-01-01

    Despite anecdotal reports of voice impairment in quadriplegia, the exact nature of these impairments is not well described in the literature. This article details objective and subjective voice assessments for people with quadriplegia at baseline and after a respiratory-targeted singing intervention. Randomized controlled trial. Twenty-four participants with quadriplegia were randomly assigned to a 12-week program of either a singing intervention or active music therapy control. Recordings of singing and speech were made at baseline, 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 6 months postintervention. These deidentified recordings were used to measure sound pressure levels and assess voice quality using the Multidimensional Voice Profile and the Perceptual Voice Profile. Baseline voice quality data indicated deviation from normality in the areas of breathiness, strain, and roughness. A greater percentage of intervention participants moved toward more normal voice quality in terms of jitter, shimmer, and noise-to-harmonic ratio; however, the improvements failed to achieve statistical significance. Subjective and objective assessments of voice quality indicate that quadriplegia may have a detrimental effect on voice quality; in particular, causing a perception of roughness and breathiness in the voice. The results of this study suggest that singing training may have a role in ameliorating these voice impairments. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effectively Communicating Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponterotto, Joseph G.; Grieger, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    This article is a guide for counseling researchers wishing to communicate the methods and results of their qualitative research to varied audiences. The authors posit that the first step in effectively communicating qualitative research is the development of strong qualitative research skills. To this end, the authors review a process model for…

  12. Emotional expressions in voice and music: same code, same effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoffier, Nicolas; Zhong, Jidan; Schirmer, Annett; Qiu, Anqi

    2013-08-01

    Scholars have documented similarities in the way voice and music convey emotions. By using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) we explored whether these similarities imply overlapping processing substrates. We asked participants to trace changes in either the emotion or pitch of vocalizations and music using a joystick. Compared to music, vocalizations more strongly activated superior and middle temporal cortex, cuneus, and precuneus. However, despite these differences, overlapping rather than differing regions emerged when comparing emotion with pitch tracing for music and vocalizations, respectively. Relative to pitch tracing, emotion tracing activated medial superior frontal and anterior cingulate cortex regardless of stimulus type. Additionally, we observed emotion specific effects in primary and secondary auditory cortex as well as in medial frontal cortex that were comparable for voice and music. Together these results indicate that similar mechanisms support emotional inferences from vocalizations and music and that these mechanisms tap on a general system involved in social cognition.

  13. Speaking up in groups: a cross-level study of group voice climate and voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Elizabeth Wolfe; Wheeler-Smith, Sara L; Kamdar, Dishan

    2011-01-01

    Despite a growing body of research on employee voice—defined as the discretionary communication of ideas, suggestions, or opinions intended to improve organizational or unit functioning—the effects of shared or collective-level cognitions have received scant attention. There has also been relatively little research on voice within work groups. Our goal in this study was to address these important gaps by focusing on the effects of group-level beliefs about voice (i.e., group voice climate) on individual voice behavior within work groups. We conducted a cross-level investigation of voice behavior within 42 groups of engineers from a large chemical company. Consistent with our hypotheses, group voice climate was highly predictive of voice and explained variance beyond the effects of individual-level identification and satisfaction, and procedural justice climate. Also consistent with predictions, the effect of identification on voice was stronger in groups with favorable voice climates. These findings provide evidence that voice is shaped not just by individual attitudes and perceptions of the work context, as past research has shown, but also by group-level beliefs. The results also highlight the importance of broadening our conceptual models of voice to include shared cognitions and of conducting additional cross-level research on voice.

  14. a Summer at Voice of America: Communicating Science to the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    Efforts to communicate the importance of science to the general public have typically been domestic initiatives: scientific organizations reaching out to American audiences through a variety of media to deepen their appreciation for the many ways science affects our lives. As federal and state budgets shrink, and programs affecting critical issues like the environment and health come under pressure, it becomes even more important that the public understand what is at stake. At the same time, in our increasingly interconnected world, it is becoming more important for science communicators to reach out to people in other countries, especially in parts of the world where science plays a life-or-death role in preventing famine or curing disease. Knowledge of science and technology is vital to understanding and tackling complex development challenges, making informed public policy decisions, and responding to a fast-changing world beyond U.S. borders. That is why the mission of the science desk at the Voice of America (VOA) in Washington DC is so crucial. This team of science journalists reports every day on new developments in science to a global audience, via radio, television and the web. VOA broadcasts both U.S. and international science news to an estimated 123 million listeners, viewers and web visitors in 44 languages. This presentation will discuss the motivation, challenges, experiences and benefits of writing for an international audience on the VOA Science Desk as an American Association for the Advancement in Science Mass Media Fellow, funded by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Speaking and Nonspeaking Voice Professionals: Who Has the Better Voice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitguppi, Chandala; Raj, Anoop; Meher, Ravi; Rathore, P K

    2017-04-18

    Voice professionals can be classified into two major subgroups: the primarily speaking and the primarily nonspeaking voice professionals. Nonspeaking voice professionals mainly include singers, whereas speaking voice professionals include the rest of the voice professionals. Although both of these groups have high vocal demands, it is currently unknown whether both groups show similar voice changes after their daily voice use. Comparison of these two subgroups of voice professionals has never been done before. This study aimed to compare the speaking voice of speaking and nonspeaking voice professionals with no obvious vocal fold pathology or voice-related complaints on the day of assessment. After obtaining relevant voice-related history, voice analysis and videostroboscopy were performed in 50 speaking and 50 nonspeaking voice professionals. Speaking voice professionals showed significantly higher incidence of voice-related complaints as compared with nonspeaking voice professionals. Voice analysis revealed that most acoustic parameters including fundamental frequency, jitter percent, and harmonic-to-noise ratio were significantly higher in speaking voice professionals, whereas videostroboscopy did not show any significant difference between the two groups. This is the first study of its kind to analyze the effect of daily voice use in the two subgroups of voice professionals with no obvious vocal fold pathology. We conclude that voice professionals should not be considered as a homogeneous group. The detrimental effects of excessive voice use were observed to occur more significantly in speaking voice professionals than in nonspeaking voice professionals. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Voice Rehabilitation After Radiation Therapy for Laryngeal Cancer: A Randomized Controlled Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuomi, Lisa, E-mail: lisa.tuomi@vgregion.se [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Andréll, Paulin [Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine/Multidisciplinary Pain Center, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Finizia, Caterina [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2014-08-01

    Background: Patients treated with radiation therapy for laryngeal cancer often experience voice problems. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to assess the efficacy of voice rehabilitation for laryngeal cancer patients after having undergone radiation therapy and to investigate whether differences between different tumor localizations with regard to rehabilitation outcomes exist. Methods and Materials: Sixty-nine male patients irradiated for laryngeal cancer participated. Voice recordings and self-assessments of communicative dysfunction were performed 1 and 6 months after radiation therapy. Thirty-three patients were randomized to structured voice rehabilitation with a speech-language pathologist and 36 to a control group. Furthermore, comparisons with 23 healthy control individuals were made. Acoustic analyses were performed for all patients, including the healthy control individuals. The Swedish version of the Self Evaluation of Communication Experiences after Laryngeal Cancer and self-ratings of voice function were used to assess vocal and communicative function. Results: The patients who received vocal rehabilitation experienced improved self-rated vocal function after rehabilitation. Patients with supraglottic tumors who received voice rehabilitation had statistically significant improvements in voice quality and self-rated vocal function, whereas the control group did not. Conclusion: Voice rehabilitation for male patients with laryngeal cancer is efficacious regarding patient-reported outcome measurements. The patients experienced better voice function after rehabilitation. Patients with supraglottic tumors also showed an improvement in terms of acoustic voice outcomes. Rehabilitation with a speech-language pathologist is recommended for laryngeal cancer patients after radiation therapy, particularly for patients with supraglottic tumors.

  17. Voice health of teachers in the north of Portugal: epidemiological indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Santos,Marisa; Araújo, André; Andrade,Ana; Amaro, Joana

    2016-01-01

    Effective communication is a fundamental requisite for teachers and other professionals in the education field. Teachers are considered professional voice users, as voice quality is central to their speech and communicative profile. In the last decades, teachers have been shown to be a risk group concerning voice disorders. Several studies have already identified specific risk factors within this population, and proposed voice health promotion measures, including prevention actions, and labou...

  18. The distress of voice-hearing: the use of simulation for awareness, understanding and communication skill development in undergraduate nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Fiona; Kellehear, Kevin; Armari, Elizabeth; Pearson, Arana; Holmes, Douglas

    2013-11-01

    Role-play scenarios are frequently used with undergraduate nursing students enrolled in mental health nursing subjects to simulate the experience of voice-hearing. However, role-play has limitations and typically does not involve those who hear voices. This collaborative project between mental health consumers who hear voices and nursing academics aimed to develop and assess simulated voice-hearing as an alternative learning tool that could provide a deeper understanding of the impact of voice-hearing, whilst enabling students to consider the communication skills required when interacting with voice-hearers. Simulated sounds and voices recorded by consumers on mp3 players were given to eighty final year nursing students undertaking a mental health elective. Students participated in various activities whilst listening to the simulations. Seventy-six (95%) students completed a written evaluation following the simulation, which assessed the benefits of the simulation and its implications for clinical practice. An analysis of the students' responses by an external evaluator indicated that there were three major learning outcomes: developing an understanding of voice-hearing, increasing students' awareness of its impact on functioning, and consideration of the communication skills necessary to engage with consumers who hear voices.

  19. Effective research communication

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, J.; Walkington, H.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter begins by outlining the nature of research, identifying the key steps that both comprise the research process and help you to plan the presentation of your research. It highlights the advantages that can be gained as a geography student if you complete the research process right through to communication of your findings. The chapter makes explicit the principles of effective research communication in a variety of oral, visual and written formats, including checklists that you mig...

  20. Effects of voice training and voice hygiene education on acoustic and perceptual speech parameters and self-reported vocal well-being in female teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilomaki, Irma; Laukkanen, Anne-Maria; Leppanen, Kirsti; Vilkman, Erkki

    2008-01-01

    Voice education programs may help in optimizing teachers' voice use. This study compared effects of voice training (VT) and voice hygiene lecture (VHL) in 60 randomly assigned female teachers. All 60 attended the lecture, and 30 completed a short training course in addition. Text reading was recorded in working environments and analyzed for fundamental frequency (F0), equivalent sound level (Leq), alpha ratio, jitter, shimmer, and perceptual quality. Self-reports of vocal well-being were registered. In the VHL group, increased F0 and difficulty of phonation and in the VT group decreased perturbation, increased alpha ratio, easier phonation, and improved perceptual and self-reported voice quality were found. Both groups equally self-reported increase of voice care knowledge. Results seem to indicate improved vocal well-being after training.

  1. Short-term effects of endotracheal intubation on voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Abdul-Latif; Sibai, Abla; Rameh, Charbel; Kanazeh, Ghassan

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the vocal symptoms and acoustic changes perceived in the short period after endotracheal intubation, and to find the association between these changes and the endotracheal tube parameters. A total of 35 subjects were included. They were examined preoperatively, and 2 and 24 hours postoperatively. The vocal symptoms of hoarseness, vocal fatigue, loss of voice, throat clearing, globus pharyngeus, throat pain, and the acoustic variables mainly average fundamental frequency, relative average perturbation, shimmer, noise to harmony ratio, voice turbulence index, habitual pitch, and maximum phonation time (MPT) were assessed as such and in relation to the following endotracheal tube parameters: duration of anesthesia, number of intubation attempts, size of the tube, cuff volume, cuff mean pressure, and the emergence. The association between anesthesia parameters with incidence of vocal complaints and changes in acoustic parameters were examined using logistic and linear regression. Vocal fatigue was associated significantly with the increase in cuff volume and the number of intubation attempts. Throat clearing was associated significantly with the increase in cuff mean pressure. Only the increase in habitual pitch was associated significantly with the increase in cuff volume. The acute short-term effect of endotracheal intubation on voice is significant. The most important endotracheal tube parameters that affect the vocal changes are the cuff mean pressure and volume. The laryngeal contribution to these vocal changes seems to be minimal. All vocal symptoms increased significantly except for globus pharyngeus at 2 hours postoperatively. The acoustic parameters did not change significantly except for a decrease in MPT. At 24 hours postoperatively, all vocal symptoms subsided with no significant difference to baseline value. The habitual pitch increased significantly, and the rest of the parameters remained comparable to baseline

  2. Investigating the Effects of Smoking on Young Adult Male Voice by Using Multidimensional Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinar, Dogan; Cincik, Hakan; Erkul, Evren; Gungor, Atila

    2016-11-01

    Smoking is one of the most common harmful habits in the world, especially common among young adult male population in Turkey. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of smoking on the young adults' male voice using multidimensional voice assessment methods. This is a case-control study. The study included 109 young adult men, 51 nonsmokers and 58 smokers between the ages of 20 and 34 years. The voice evaluation protocol consisted of voice handicap index (VHI), maximum phonation time (MPT), and perceptual, acoustic, and videostroboscopic analyses. A statistically significant increase for physical, physiological, and total scores of VHI was found in smokers group (P smoking and increased vocal fold erythema (P smoking habits. Subjective symptoms of smoking on voice appear to occur earlier than objective findings. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Is there an effect of dysphonic teachers' voices on children's processing of spoken language?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogerson, Jemma; Dodd, Barbara

    2005-03-01

    There is a vast body of literature on the causes, prevalence, implications, and issues of vocal dysfunction in teachers. However, the educational effect of teacher vocal impairment is largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of impaired voice quality on children's processing of spoken language. One hundred and seven children (age range, 9.2 to 10.6, mean 9.8, SD 3.76 months) listened to three video passages, one read in a control voice, one in a mild dysphonic voice, and one in a severe dysphonic voice. After each video passage, children were asked to answer six questions, with multiple-choice answers. The results indicated that children's perceptions of speech across the three voice qualities differed, regardless of gender, IQ, and school attended. Performance in the control voice passages was better than performance in the mild and severe dysphonic voice passages. No difference was found between performance in the mild and severe dysphonic voice passages, highlighting that any form of vocal impairment is detrimental to children's speech processing and is therefore likely to have a negative educational effect. These findings, in light of the high rate of vocal dysfunction in teachers, further support the implementation of specific voice care education for those in the teaching profession.

  4. Voice Activated Cockpit Management Systems: Voice-Flight NexGen Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Speaking to the cockpit as a method of system management in flight can become an effective interaction method, since voice communication is very efficient. Automated...

  5. Effect of Intensive Voice Treatment on Tone-Language Speakers with Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehill, Tara L.; Wong, Lina L. -N.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of intensive voice therapy on Cantonese speakers with Parkinson's disease. The effect of the treatment on lexical tone was of particular interest. Four Cantonese speakers with idiopathic Parkinson's disease received treatment based on the principles of Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT).…

  6. Short term effect of hubble-bubble smoking on voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, A-L; Sibai, A; Mahfoud, L; Oubari, D; Ashkar, J; Fuleihan, N

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the short term effect of hubble-bubble smoking on voice. Prospective study. Eighteen non-dysphonic subjects (seven men and 11 women) with a history of hubble-bubble smoking and no history of cigarette smoking underwent acoustic analysis and laryngeal video-stroboscopic examination before and 30 minutes after hubble-bubble smoking. On laryngeal video-stroboscopy, none of the subjects had vocal fold erythema either before or after smoking. Five patients had mild vocal fold oedema both before and after smoking. After smoking, there was a slight increase in the number of subjects with thick mucus between the vocal folds (six, vs four before smoking) and with vocal fold vessel dilation (two, vs one before smoking). Acoustic analysis indicated a drop in habitual pitch, fundamental frequency and voice turbulence index after smoking, and an increase in noise-to-harmonics ratio. Even 30 minutes of hubble-bubble smoking can cause a drop in vocal pitch and an increase in laryngeal secretions and vocal fold vasodilation.

  7. The electrolarynx: voice restoration after total laryngectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Rachel; Tang, Christopher G; Sinclair, Catherine F

    2017-01-01

    The ability to speak and communicate with one's voice is a unique human characteristic and is fundamental to many activities of daily living, such as talking on the phone and speaking to loved ones. When the larynx is removed during a total laryngectomy (TL), loss of voice can lead to a devastating decrease in a patient's quality of life, and precipitate significant frustration over their inability to communicate with others effectively. Over the past 50 years there have been many advances in techniques of voice restoration after TL. Currently, there are three main methods of voice restoration: the electrolarynx, esophageal speech, and tracheoesophageal speech through a tracheoesophageal puncture (TEP) with voice prosthesis. Although TEP voice is the current gold standard for vocal rehabilitation, a significant minority of patients cannot use or obtain TEP speech for various reasons. As such, the electrolarynx is a viable and useful alternative for these patients. This article will focus on voice restoration using an electrolarynx with the following objectives: 1) To provide an understanding of the importance of voice restoration after total laryngectomy. 2) To discuss how the electrolarynx may be used to restore voice following total laryngectomy. 3) To outline some of the current electrolarynx devices available, including their mechanism of action and limitations. 4) To compare pros and cons of electrolaryngeal speech to TEP and esophageal speech.

  8. The effects of semantic context on voicing neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles-Luce, J

    1993-01-01

    The present study examined regressive voice assimilation in Catalan in an attempt to determine a systematic explanation of complete versus incomplete voicing neutralization. Two types of contexts were constructed. In one type, semantic information was present to bias the meaning of target words. In the other type, no semantic information was present. The results showed that vowel duration distinguished underlying voicing in the neutral context only. The results suggest that neutralization occurs when semantic information is present, but that a voicing contrast is realized when it is absent.

  9. Ambulatory Voice Biofeedback: Relative Frequency and Summary Feedback Effects on Performance and Retention of Reduced Vocal Intensity in the Daily Lives of Participants with Normal Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Stan, Jarrad H.; Mehta, Daryush D.; Sternad, Dagmar; Petit, Robert; Hillman, Robert E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Ambulatory voice biofeedback has the potential to significantly improve voice therapy effectiveness by targeting carryover of desired behaviors outside the therapy session (i.e., retention). This study applies motor learning concepts (reduced frequency and delayed, summary feedback) that demonstrate increased retention to ambulatory voice…

  10. Effects of Intensive Voice Treatment (the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment [LSVT]) on Vowel Articulation in Dysarthric Individuals with Idiopathic Parkinson Disease: Acoustic and Perceptual Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir, Shimon; Spielman, Jennifer L.; Ramig, Lorraine O.; Story, Brad H.; Fox, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of intensive voice treatment targeting vocal loudness (the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment [LSVT]) on vowel articulation in dysarthric individuals with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Method: A group of individuals with PD receiving LSVT (n = 14) was compared to a group of individuals with PD not receiving LSVT…

  11. Effects of Intensive Voice Treatment (the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment [LSVT]) on Vowel Articulation in Dysarthric Individuals with Idiopathic Parkinson Disease: Acoustic and Perceptual Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir, Shimon; Spielman, Jennifer L.; Ramig, Lorraine O.; Story, Brad H.; Fox, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of intensive voice treatment targeting vocal loudness (the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment [LSVT]) on vowel articulation in dysarthric individuals with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Method: A group of individuals with PD receiving LSVT (n = 14) was compared to a group of individuals with PD not receiving LSVT…

  12. Effects of the Interaction of Caffeine and Water on Voice Performance: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franca, Maria Claudia; Simpson, Kenneth O.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this "pilot" investigation was to study the effects of the interaction of caffeine and water intake on voice as evidenced by acoustic and aerodynamic measures, to determine whether ingestion of 200 mg of caffeine and various levels of water intake have an impact on voice. The participants were 48 females ranging in age…

  13. The effect of visual feedback and training in auditory-perceptual judgment of voice quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barsties, Ben; Beers, Mieke; Ten Cate, Liesbeth; Van Ballegooijen, Karin; Braam, Lilian; De Groot, Merel; Van Der Kant, Marieke; Kruitwagen, Cas|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304826790; Maryn, Youri

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the effect of visual feedback on rating voice quality severity level and the reliability of voice quality judgment by inexperienced listeners. For this purpose two training programs were created, each lasting 2 hours. In total 37 undergraduate spe

  14. The effect of oxandrolone on voice frequency in growth hormone-treated girls with Turner syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menke, L.A.; Sas, T.C.J.; Koningsbrugge, S.H. van; Ridder, M.A. de; Zandwijken, G.R.; Boersma, B.; Dejonckere, P.H.; Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S.M.P.F. de; Otten, B.J.; Wit, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Oxandrolone (Ox) increases height gain but may also cause voice deepening in growth hormone (GH)-treated girls with Turner syndrome (TS). We assessed the effect of Ox on objective and subjective speaking voice frequency in GH-treated girls with TS. STUDY DESIGN: A multicenter,

  15. Effects of Masking Noise on Laryngeal Resistance for Breathy, Normal, and Pressed Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, Elizabeth U.; Abbott, Katherine Verdolini; Lee, Timothy D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to explore the effects of masking noise on laryngeal resistance for breathy, normal, and pressed voice in vocally trained women. Method: Eighteen vocally trained women produced breathy, normal, and pressed voice across 7 fundamental frequencies during a repeated CV utterance of /pi/ under normal and…

  16. Vocal effectiveness of speech-language pathology students: Before and after voice use during service delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Couch

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: As a professional voice user, it is imperative that a speech-language pathologist’s(SLP vocal effectiveness remain consistent throughout the day. Many factors may contribute to reduced vocal effectiveness, including prolonged voice use, vocally abusive behaviours,poor vocal hygiene and environmental factors.Objectives: To determine the effect of service delivery on the perceptual and acoustic features of voice.Method: A quasi-experimental., pre-test–post-test research design was used. Participants included third- and final-year speech-language pathology students at the University of Pretoria(South Africa. Voice parameters were evaluated in a pre-test measurement, after which the participants provided two consecutive hours of therapy. A post-test measurement was then completed. Data analysis consisted of an instrumental analysis in which the multidimensional voice programme (MDVP and the voice range profile (VRP were used to measure vocal parameters and then calculate the dysphonia severity index (DSI. The GRBASI scale wasused to conduct a perceptual analysis of voice quality. Data were processed using descriptive statistics to determine change in each measured parameter after service delivery.Results: A change of clinical significance was observed in the acoustic and perceptual parameters of voice.Conclusion: Guidelines for SLPs in order to maintain optimal vocal effectiveness were suggested.

  17. Classroom Conditions for Effective Learning: Hearing the Voice of Key Stage 3 Pupils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This article argues that accessing and taking note of the voice of pupils is critical in working towards removing barriers to effective learning. Pupil voice was accessed using an innovative form of group interview incorporating an Ishikawa or fishbone tool and card sorting exercise. The data were collected from 132 pupils, from Years 7 to 9 (aged…

  18. The effects of hands free communication devices on clinical communication: balancing communication access needs with user control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Joshua E; Richardson, Joshua Edwin; Ash, Joan S; Ash, Joan

    2008-11-06

    Hands Free Communication Device (HFCD) systems are a relatively new information and communication technology. HFCD systems enable clinicians to directly contact and communicate with one another using wearable, voice-controlled badges that are VoIP-based (voice-over IP) and are linked to one another over a wireless local area network (WLAN). This qualitative study utilized a grounded theory, multiple perspectives approach to understand how the use of HFCDs affected communication in the hospitals that implemented them. The study generated five themes revolving around HFCDs impact on communication. This paper specifically focuses on two of those themes: Communication Access and Control.

  19. The Effect of Menstrual Cycle on Singing Voice: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunjawate, Dhanshree R; Aithal, Venkataraja U; Ravi, Rohit; Venkatesh, Bhumika T

    2017-03-01

    Research has reported the difference in a woman's voice across the different stages of the menstrual cycle. A review of the studies in singers on the influence of menstruation on the singing voice will enable a better understanding of these changes. A systematic literature search was carried out on PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, Cochrane, and regional electronic databases. The keywords "menstrual cycle," "voice change," and "singer" were used in different combinations. Only those articles that discussed the effect of menstrual cycle on the singing voice were included in the final review. Six studies in the English language were identified and included in the review. Hormonal variations occur to a great extent during menstrual cycle, and these variations can influence the voice of singers. A great variability was found in the included studies. There are limited studies that have been carried out exploring the relationship between menstrual cycle and the singing voice. Even though the studies included in the review point out toward the changes in the singing voice associated with menstrual cycle, there is a need for more studies to be carried out in diverse singing populations and in different outcome measures. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Re-Examination of Mixed Media Communication: The Impact of Voice, Data Link, and Mixed Air Traffic Control Environments on the Flight Deck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Melisa; McGann, Alison; Mackintosh, Margaret-Anne; Lozito, Sandra; Ashford, Rose (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A simulation in the B747-400 was conducted at NASA Ames Research Center that compared how crews handled voice and data link air traffic control (ATC) messages in a single medium versus a mixed voice and data link ATC environment The interval between ATC messages was also varied to examine the influence of time pressure in voice, data link, and mixed ATC environments. For messages sent via voice, transaction times were lengthened in the mixed media environment for closely spaced messages. The type of environment did not affect data link times. However, messages times were lengthened in both single and mixed-modality environments under time pressure. Closely spaced messages also increased the number of requests for clarification for voice messages in the mixed environment and review menu use for data link messages. Results indicated that when time pressure is introduced, the mix of voice and data link does not necessarily capitalize on the advantages of both media. These findings emphasize the need to develop procedures for managing communication in mixed voice and data link environments.

  1. Transgender Voice and Communication Treatment: A Retrospective Chart Review of 25 Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Adrienne B.; Garabedian, Laura M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: People transitioning from male to female (MTF) gender seek speech-language pathology services when they feel their voice is betraying their genuine self or perhaps is the last obstacle to representing their authentic gender. Speaking fundamental frequency (pitch) and resonance are most often targets in treatment because the combination…

  2. Effect of singing training on total laryngectomees wearing a tracheoesophageal voice prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofre, Fernanda; Ricz, Hilton Marcos Alves; Takeshita-Monaretti, Telma Kioko; Prado, Maria Yuka de Almeida; Aguiar-Ricz, Lílian Neto

    2013-02-01

    To assess the effect of a program of singing training on the voice of total laryngectomees wearing tracheoesophageal voice prosthesis, considering the quality of alaryngeal phonation, vocal extension and the musical elements of tunning and legato. Five laryngectomees wearing tracheoesophageal voice prosthesis completed the singing training program over a period of three months, with exploration of the strengthening of the respiratory muscles and vocalization and with evaluation of perceptive-auditory and singing voice being performed before and after 12 sessions of singing therapy. After the program of singing voice training, the quality of tracheoesophageal voice showed improvement or the persistence of the general degree of dysphonia for the emitted vowels and for the parameters of roughness and breathiness. For the vowel "a", the pitch was displaced to grave in two participants and to acute in one, and remained adequate in the others. A similar situation was observed also for the vowel "i". After the singing program, all participants presented tunning and most of them showed a greater presence of legato. The vocal extension improved in all participants. Singing training seems to have a favorable effect on the quality of tracheoesophageal phonation and on singing voice.

  3. The voices of seduction: cross-gender effects in processing of erotic prosody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethofer, Thomas; Wiethoff, Sarah; Anders, Silke; Kreifelts, Benjamin; Grodd, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Gender specific differences in cognitive functions have been widely discussed. Considering social cognition such as emotion perception conveyed by non-verbal cues, generally a female advantage is assumed. In the present study, however, we revealed a cross-gender interaction with increasing responses to the voice of opposite sex in male and female subjects. This effect was confined to erotic tone of speech in behavioural data and haemodynamic responses within voice sensitive brain areas (right middle superior temporal gyrus). The observed response pattern, thus, indicates a particular sensitivity to emotional voices that have a high behavioural relevance for the listener. PMID:18985138

  4. Effective Business Communication requires effective practices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨福明

    2011-01-01

    @@ The topic of this essay is that effective businees communication requires effective practices.This essay will focus on communication practices that can assist an organi- zation in reaching its strategic goals and objectives.This article will present this topic by analyzing the communication theory, writing process and business writing style, team building and interpersonal communication, negotiation and persuasion tech- niques and intercultural communication.

  5. Effects of hearing loss on the voice in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolfan-Stosic, Natalija; Simunjak, Boris

    2007-04-01

    The object of this paper is to report on preliminary acoustic characteristics obtained from a group of 10 to 12 year old males from special institution from Zagreb with more than mild sensorineural hearing losses. The study was structured as an investigation of voice and resonance characteristics of Croatian children with and without sensorineural hearing loss, using sustained phonation of the vowel /a/ which was recorded using a high-quality tape recorder carried out by two voice clinicians. The samples were digitized and analyzed for frequency and spectral characteristics by EZVoice and Bruel & Kjaer Real-time Frequency Analyzer and high quality sound level meter (mouth-to-microphone distance = 30 cm). Differences were observed in perturbation measures; F0 variability; vocal intensity. Spectral deviations were also observed. Discussion focuses on application of these findings by Croatian speech and hearing specialists with the hearing impaired population. Results indicated the following: measures of jitter were significantly elevated in the hearing loss group as compared to the normal controls. A similar result was observed for measures of shimmer. Lack of voice professional's awareness of importance for making pleasant voice quality of hearing-impaired individuals was the initial idea of this study. Patients with hearing losses have been reported to show a wide variety of voice disturbances.

  6. Effective communication with older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Louise

    2017-06-07

    Communication is an essential aspect of life, yet it can be taken for granted. Its centrality to being in the world and in professional practice often becomes evident when nurses and older adults encounter communication difficulties. The factors that can affect nurses' communication with older adults relate to the older adult, the nurse, sociocultural considerations and the environment, and the interactions between these factors. In adopting a person-centred approach to communicating with older adults, it is necessary to get to know the person as an individual and ensure communication meets their needs and abilities. Effective communication is essential in nursing practice and requires professional competence and engagement. This article can be used by nurses to support effective communication with older adults across the continuum of care.

  7. Communicative interactions between visually impaired mothers and their sighted children: analysis of gaze, facial expressions, voice and physical contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, S; Galati, D; Schmidt, S

    2015-11-01

    Social and emotional development of infants and young children is largely based on the communicative interaction with their mother, or principal caretaker (Trevarthen ). The main modalities implied in this early communication are voice, facial expressions and gaze (Stern ). This study aims at analysing early mother-child interactions in the case of visually impaired mothers who do not have access to their children's gaze and facial expressions. Spontaneous play interactions between seven visually impaired mothers and their sighted children aged between 6 months and 3 years were filmed. These dyads were compared with a control group of sighted mothers and children analysing four modalities of communication and interaction regulation: gaze, physical contacts, verbal productions and facial expressions. The visually impaired mothers' facial expressions differed from the ones of sighted mothers mainly with respect to forehead movements, leading to an impoverishment of conveyed meaning. Regarding the other communicative modalities, results suggest that visually impaired mothers and their children use compensatory strategies to guaranty harmonic interaction despite the mother's impairment: whereas gaze results the main factor of interaction regulation in sighted dyads, physical contacts and verbal productions assume a prevalent role in dyads with visually impaired mothers. Moreover, visually impaired mother's children seem to be able to differentiate between their mother and sighted interaction partners, adapting differential modes of communication. The results of this study show that, in spite of the obvious differences in the modes of communication, visual impairment does not prevent a harmonious interaction with the child. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Multidimensional effects of voice therapy in patients affected by unilateral vocal fold paralysis due to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelos, Camila Barbosa; Silveira, Paula Angélica Lorenzon; Guedes, Renata Lígia Vieira; Gonçalves, Aline Nogueira; Slobodticov, Luciana Dall'Agnol Siqueira; Angelis, Elisabete Carrara-de

    2017-08-24

    Patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis may demonstrate different degrees of voice perturbation depending on the position of the paralyzed vocal fold. Understanding the effectiveness of voice therapy in this population may be an important coefficient to define the therapeutic approach. To evaluate the voice therapy effectiveness in the short, medium and long-term in patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis and determine the risk factors for voice rehabilitation failure. Prospective study with 61 patients affected by unilateral vocal fold paralysis enrolled. Each subject had voice therapy with an experienced speech pathologist twice a week. A multidimensional assessment protocol was used pre-treatment and in three different times after voice treatment initiation: short-term (1-3 months), medium-term (4-6 months) and long-term (12 months); it included videoendoscopy, maximum phonation time, GRBASI scale, acoustic voice analysis and the portuguese version of the voice handicap index. Multiple comparisons for GRBASI scale and VHI revealed statistically significant differences, except between medium and long term (p<0.005). The data suggest that there is vocal improvement over time with stabilization results after 6 months (medium term). From the 28 patients with permanent unilateral vocal fold paralysis, 18 (69.2%) reached complete glottal closure following vocal therapy (p=0.001). The logistic regression method indicated that the Jitter entered the final model as a risk factor for partial improvement. For every unit of increased jitter, there was an increase of 0.1% (1.001) of the chance for partial improvement, which means an increase on no full improvement chance during rehabilitation. Vocal rehabilitation improves perceptual and acoustic voice parameters and voice handicap index, besides favor glottal closure in patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis. The results were also permanent during the period of 1 year. The Jitter value, when elevated, is

  9. Toward a trustworthy voice: increasing the effectiveness of automated outreach calls to promote colorectal cancer screening among African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Karen; Richardson, Terri; Kempe, Karin L; Wallace, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening rates are lower among African-American members of Kaiser Permanente Colorado (KPCO) than among members of other races and ethnicities. This study evaluated use of a linguistically congruent voice in interactive voice response outreach calls about colorectal cancer screening as a strategy to increase call completion and response. After an initial discussion group to assess cultural acceptability of the project, 6 focus groups were conducted with 33 KPCO African-American members. Participants heard and discussed recordings of 5 female voices reading the same segment of the standard-practice colorectal cancer message using interactive voice response. The linguistic palette included the voices of a white woman, a lightly accented Latina, and 3 African-American women. Participants strongly preferred the African-American voices, particularly two voices. Participants considered these voices the most trustworthy and reported that they would be the most effective at increasing motivation to complete an automated call. Participants supported the use of African-American voices when designing outgoing automated calls for African Americans because the sense of familiarity engendered trust among listeners. Participants also indicated that effective automated messages should provide immediate clarity of purpose; explain why the issue is relevant to African Americans; avoid sounding scripted; emphasize that the call is for the listener's benefit only; sound personable, warm, and positive; and not create fear among listeners. Establishing linguistic congruence between African Americans and the voices used in automated calls designed to reach them may increase the effectiveness of outreach efforts.

  10. Interaction Effect between Handedness and CNTNAP2 Polymorphism (rs7794745 genotype on Voice-specific Frontotemporal Activity in Healthy Individuals: An fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihiko eKoeda

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that Contactin-associated protein-like2 (CNTNAP2 polymorphisms affect left-hemispheric function of language processing in healthy individuals, but no study has investigated the influence of these polymorphisms on right-hemispheric function involved in human voice perception. Further, although recent reports suggest that determination of handedness is influenced by genetic effect, the interaction effect between handedness and CNTNAP2 polymorphisms for brain activity in human voice perception and language processing has not been revealed. We aimed to investigate the interaction effect of handedness and CNTNAP2 polymorphisms in respect to brain function for human voice perception and language processing in healthy individuals. Brain function of 108 healthy volunteers (74 right-handed and 34 non-right-handed was examined while they were passively listening to reverse sentences (rSEN, identifiable non-vocal sounds (SND, and sentences (SEN. Full factorial design analysis was calculated by using three factors: 1 rs7794745 (A/A or A/T, 2 rs2710102 (G/G or A carrier (A/G and A/A, and 3 voice-specific response (rSEN or SND. The main effect of rs7794745 (A/A or A/T was significantly revealed at the right middle frontal gyrus (MFG and bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG. This result suggests that rs7794745 genotype affects voice-specific brain function. Furthermore, interaction effect was significantly observed among MFG-STG activations by human voice perception, rs7794745 (A/A or A/T, and handedness. These results suggest that CNTNAP2 polymorphisms could be one of the important factors in the neural development related to vocal communication and language processing in both right-handed and non-right-handed healthy individuals.

  11. Dialogue on dialogues Multi-voiced dialogues (dialogism) as means for the co-production of knowledge in and on leadership communicative practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Ann

    2013-01-01

    The article elaborates on a theoretical understanding of dialogue as a means for the co-production of knowledge in and on leadership communicative practices through ongoing research collaboration that involves leaders, researchers and master students at Aalborg University. Dialogue is viewed from...... a dissensus perspective, which draws on Bakhtin’s dynamic thoughts on the heteroglossic nature of interaction and on multi-voiced dialogues as battles between centrifugal and centripetal forces. The concept multi-voiced dialogues is posited as a means for opening up dialogical moments of change in order...... to cultivate the creative and transformational powers of dialogues in which new meanings, voices and forms of knowledge emerge. I discuss how this way of framing the dialogical co-production of knowledge challenges the mainstream understanding of dialogical practices by embracing relational, conflictual...

  12. Effects of an Extended Version of the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment on Voice and Speech in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielman, Jennifer; Ramig, Lorraine O.; Mahler, Leslie; Halpern, Angela; Gavin, William J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The present study examined vocal SPL, voice handicap, and speech characteristics in Parkinson's disease (PD) following an extended version of the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT), to help determine whether current treatment dosages can be altered without compromising clinical outcomes. Method: Twelve participants with idiopathic PD…

  13. Early development of polyphonic sound encoding and the high voice superiority effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Céline; Trainor, Laurel J

    2014-05-01

    Previous research suggests that when two streams of pitched tones are presented simultaneously, adults process each stream in a separate memory trace, as reflected by mismatch negativity (MMN), a component of the event-related potential (ERP). Furthermore, a superior encoding of the higher tone or voice in polyphonic sounds has been found for 7-month-old infants and both musician and non-musician adults in terms of a larger amplitude MMN in response to pitch deviant stimuli in the higher than the lower voice. These results, in conjunction with modeling work, suggest that the high voice superiority effect might originate in characteristics of the peripheral auditory system. If this is the case, the high voice superiority effect should be present in infants younger than 7 months. In the present study we tested 3-month-old infants as there is no evidence at this age of perceptual narrowing or specialization of musical processing according to the pitch or rhythmic structure of music experienced in the infant׳s environment. We presented two simultaneous streams of tones (high and low) with 50% of trials modified by 1 semitone (up or down), either on the higher or the lower tone, leaving 50% standard trials. Results indicate that like the 7-month-olds, 3-month-old infants process each tone in a separate memory trace and show greater saliency for the higher tone. Although MMN was smaller and later in both voices for the group of sixteen 3-month-olds compared to the group of sixteen 7-month-olds, the size of the difference in MMN for the high compared to low voice was similar across ages. These results support the hypothesis of an innate peripheral origin of the high voice superiority effect.

  14. Dimensionality in voice quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bele, Irene Velsvik

    2007-05-01

    This study concerns speaking voice quality in a group of male teachers (n = 35) and male actors (n = 36), as the purpose was to investigate normal and supranormal voices. The goal was the development of a method of valid perceptual evaluation for normal to supranormal and resonant voices. The voices (text reading at two loudness levels) had been evaluated by 10 listeners, for 15 vocal characteristics using VA scales. In this investigation, the results of an exploratory factor analysis of the vocal characteristics used in this method are presented, reflecting four dimensions of major importance for normal and supranormal voices. Special emphasis is placed on the effects on voice quality of a change in the loudness variable, as two loudness levels are studied. Furthermore, the vocal characteristics Sonority and Ringing voice quality are paid special attention, as the essence of the term "resonant voice" was a basic issue throughout a doctoral dissertation where this study was included.

  15. Hoarseness in School-Aged Children and Effectiveness of Voice Therapy in International Classification of Functioning Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akın Şenkal, Özgül; Özer, Cem

    2015-09-01

    The hoarseness in school-aged children disrupts the educational process because it affects the social progress, communication skills, and self-esteem of children. Besides otorhinolaryngological examination, the first treatment option is voice therapy when hoarseness occurs. The aim of the study was to determine the factors increasing the hoarseness in school-aged children by parental interview and to know preferable voice therapy on school-aged children within the frame of International Classification of Functioning (ICF). Retrospective analysis of data gathered from patient files. A total of 75 children (56 boys and 19 girls) were examined retrospectively. The age range of school-aged children is 7-14 years and average is 10.86 ± 2.51. A detailed history was taken from parents of children involved in this study. Information about vocal habits of children was gathered within the frame of ICF and then the voice therapies of children were started by scheduling appointments by an experienced speech-language pathologist. The differences between before and after voice therapy according to applied voice therapy methods, statistically significant differences were determined between maximum phonation time values and s/z rate. The relationship between voice therapy sessions and s/z rate with middle degree significance was found with physiological voice therapy sessions. According to ICF labels, most of voice complaints are matching with "body functions" and "activity and limitations." The appropriate voice therapy methods for hoarseness in school-aged children must be chosen and applied by speech-language therapists. The detailed history, which is received from family during the examination, within the frame of ICF affects the processes of choosing the voice therapy method and application of them positively. Child's family is very important for a successful management. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Closed rhinoplasty:effects and changes on voice - a preliminary report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giuseppe Guarro; Romano Mafifa; Barbara Rasile; Carmine Alfano

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Effects of rhinoplasty were already studied from many points of view: otherwise poor is scientific production focused on changes of voice after rhinoplasty. This preliminary study analyzed objectively and subjectively these potential effects on 19 patients who underwent exclusively closed rhinoplasty.Methods: This preliminary evaluation was conducted from September 2012 to May 2013 and 19 patients have undergone primary rhinoplasty with exclusively closed approach (7 males, 12 females). All patients were evaluated before and 6 months after surgery. Each of them answered to a questionnaire (Voice Handicap Index Score) and the voice was recorded for spectrographic analysis: this system allowed to perform the measurement of the intensity and frequency of vowels (“A” and “E”) and nasal consonants (“N” and “M”) before and after surgery. Data were analysed with the Mann-Whitney test.Results: Sixteen patients showed statistically significant differences after surgery. It was detected in 69% of cases an increased frequency of emission of the consonant sounds (P = 0.046), while in 74% of cases the same phenomenon was noticed for vowel sounds (P = 0.048).Conclusion: Many patients who undergo rhinoplasty think that the intervention only leads to anatomical changes and improvement of respiratory function. The surgeon should instead accurately inform patients about the potential effects on the voice. This preliminary study reveals the significant effects of closed rhinoplasty on the human voice.

  17. Flow Control and Routing in an Integrated Voice and Data Communication Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    arbitrarily small values since this is one way of avoiding congestion. Recall that the voice flow control algorithm operates as follows: nif (i) if Pm (,n...dvn(m) , it increases m if m < am; (ii) if pm( n) < dvn(m), it decreases nif En > 0 ; mm m m n ivn n and (iii) if pm(m) v d(m), it leaves unchanged.m m...n.zn if 0 <t - Za < ai aa t if Oa ni Za j An a1 if. n _~ z n> a. Zf a Z a- ɘ n0n ifO< n < ra-nr Xa ra-r xa <r rn rd if rn -n Xa> rda a a a r a-a

  18. An Analysis of Communication Between Program Managers and Contracting Officers and Its Effect on the Performance of the Defense Acquisition System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Overlapping Field of Experience Communication ....................................55 Figure 20. PBUSE PPSS Re- compete Timeline 2012... communication is occurring and, if so, its level of effectiveness, will be further investigated in Chapters III and IV. Second , competition is required in...using “electronic badges that collected data on their individual [participants] communication behavior - tone of voice, body language , whom they

  19. WiFi Voice Communication System Based on QT%基于QT的WiFi语音通信系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵付轩; 杨斌

    2012-01-01

    Aiming at speech signal acquisition in embedded system, the design uses UDP protocol for data transmission, uses Socket programming to ensure the reliability of data transmission and realizes LAN speech communication from end to end. This paper describes how to design and develop LAN real-time voice communication software based on QT and Linux development platform by using existing audio programming and network programming knowledge.%针对嵌入式系统语音信号的采集,采用UDP协议进行数据传输,运用Socket编程保证数据传输的可靠性,实现局域网里端到端的语音通信.主要阐述了如何在Linux开发平台上,利用现有的音频编程和网络编程知识,设计和开发局域网里基于QT的实时语音通信软件.

  20. Temporary threshold shifts at 1500 and 2000 Hz induced by loud voice signals communicated through earphones in the pinball industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idota, Nozomi; Horie, Seichi; Tsutsui, Takao; Inoue, Jinro

    2010-10-01

    To assess the risk of hearing loss among workers using earphones as communication devices at noisy worksites, we compared temporary threshold shifts (TTS) between ears on which workers wore earphones and ears on which no earphones were worn. We measured ambient noise and personal noise exposure as well as noise generated by and passed through earphones by applying frequency analysis at three pinball facilities during their hours of actual operation. We assessed hearing levels before and after a work shift (prework and postwork) of 54 workers by pure tone audiometry at six frequencies. The time-weighted averages for ambient noise and personal noise exposure exceeded 85 dB(A) and 90 dB(A), respectively. Overall sound pressure levels generated by and passing through earphones reached 109 dB(A). The one-third octave band spectrum of the earphone noise during the shift exceeded 90 dB(SPL) in the range of 315-2000 Hz. The number of ears demonstrating a TTS, defined as a shift of 10 dB or more in postwork over prework hearing thresholds, was significantly greater at 1500 and 2000 Hz among ears with earphones (P communication devices in noisy environments are exposed to high risk of hearing loss, particularly at the frequencies of 1500 and 2000 Hz. Ideally, hearing conservation programs for such workers should account for potential hearing losses at frequencies of 2000 Hz or lower frequencies induced by amplified voice signals.

  1. Communicating risk effectively

    OpenAIRE

    Piening, Sigrid

    2013-01-01

    Dit proefschrift richt zich op risicocommunicatie over bijwerkingen van geneesmiddelen. Nadat geneesmiddel op de markt worden toegelaten kunnen zich ernstige veiligheidsproblemen voordoen, mogelijk leidend tot ziekenhuisopnamen, handicaps, of zelfs overlijden van patiënten. Zorgverleners worden van deze bijwerkingen op de hoogte gebracht door middel van papieren waarschuwingsbrieven; zogenaamde Direct Healthcare Professional Communications (DHPC’s). DHPC’s zijn hierin echter niet altijd succe...

  2. Communicating risk effectively

    OpenAIRE

    Piening, Sigrid

    2013-01-01

    Dit proefschrift richt zich op risicocommunicatie over bijwerkingen van geneesmiddelen. Nadat geneesmiddel op de markt worden toegelaten kunnen zich ernstige veiligheidsproblemen voordoen, mogelijk leidend tot ziekenhuisopnamen, handicaps, of zelfs overlijden van patiënten. Zorgverleners worden van deze bijwerkingen op de hoogte gebracht door middel van papieren waarschuwingsbrieven; zogenaamde Direct Healthcare Professional Communications (DHPC’s). DHPC’s zijn hierin echter niet altijd succe...

  3. Effect of adenoid hypertrophy on the voice and laryngeal mucosa in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Mohammed A; Mohammed, Haitham M; Abdalla, Adel A; Nasr, Dalia M

    2013-12-01

    The adenoids, or pharyngeal tonsils, are lymphatic tissue localized at the mucous layer of the roof and posterior wall of nasopharynx. Dysphonia defined as perceptual audible change of a patient's habitual voice as self judged or judged by his or her listeners. The diagnosis of dysphonia relies on clinical judgment based on phoniatric symptoms, auditory perceptual assessment of voice (APA) and full laryngeal examination. Our study was conducted to evaluate the effect of adenoid hypertrophy on voice and laryngeal mucosa. The study sample composed of sixty children, forty of them had adenoid hypertrophy (patient's group) and twenty healthy children (control group). Patient's group composed of 17 boys (42.5%) and 23 girls (57.5%), while control group consists of 8 males (40%) and 12 females (60%). All patients and control group subjected to history taking, clinical examination, lateral soft tissue X-ray on the nasopharynx, APA based on the modified GRBAS scale and full laryngeal examination. The data are collected and analyzed statistically by using software SPSS. Our results showed that there is a significant association between adenoid hypertrophy and, degree of dysphonia, leaky voice, pitch of voice and laryngeal lesion. Adenoid hypertrophy did not associate with loudness of voice, as well as character (irregular, breathy and strained). Laryngeal lesions were detected in thirteen children from patient group (32.5%): nodules (n = 6), thickening (n = 5), congestion (n = 2), while one child only out of 20 children of the control group had congestion (5.0%). Our results showed the importance of the assessment of voice and laryngeal examination in patients with adenoid hypertrophy, also treating the minimal mucosal lesions that results from adenoid hypertrophy should be taken in consideration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effective Communication and Neurolinguistic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahsan Bashir (Corresponding Author

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Importance of effective communication can hardly be ignored in any sphere of life. This is achieved through various means. One such instrument is Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP which has now taken roots in various aspects of learning and education. Its potential spans education and learning, language teaching, business management and marketing, psychology, law, and several other fields. In our work, we will briefly explore various facets of NLP with special reference to effective communication.

  5. The Voice of Silence in Communication-from cross-culture perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹琪雯

    2014-01-01

    This paper makes a study of silence from cross-culture perspective and holds that silence is an indispensable compo-nent of human communication without which the proper decoding of the information would be impossible.

  6. Acute effects of radioiodine therapy on the voice and larynx of basedow-Graves patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isolan-Cury, Roberta Werlang; Cury, Adriano Namo [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Medical Science School (FCMSCSP); Monte, Osmar [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Physiology Department; Silva, Marta Assumpcao de Andrada e [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Medical Science School (FCMSCSP). Speech Therapy School; Duprat, Andre [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Medical Science School (FCMSCSP). Otorhinolaryngology Department; Marone, Marilia [Nuclimagem - Irmanity of the Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Nuclear Medicine Unit; Almeida, Renata de; Iglesias, Alexandre [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Medical Science School (FCMSCSP). Otorhinolaryngology Department. Endocrinology and Metabology Unit

    2008-07-01

    Graves's disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. There are three current therapeutic options: anti-thyroid medication, surgery, and radioactive iodine (I 131). There are few data in the literature regarding the effects of radioiodine therapy on the larynx and voice. The aim of this study was: to assess the effect of radioiodine therapy on the voice of Basedow-Graves patients. Material and method: A prospective study was done. Following the diagnosis of Grave's disease, patients underwent investigation of their voice, measurement of maximum phonatory time (/a/) and the s/z ratio, fundamental frequency analysis (Praat software), laryngoscopy and (perceptive-auditory) analysis in three different conditions: pre-treatment, 4 days, and 20 days post-radioiodine therapy. Conditions are based on the inflammatory pattern of thyroid tissue (Jones et al. 1999). Results: No statistically significant differences were found in voice characteristics in these three conditions. Conclusion: Radioiodine therapy does not affect voice quality. (author)

  7. THE EU’S VOICE BEYOND ITS BORDERS: THE EUROPEAN UNION’S EXTERNAL COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminita SOPRONI

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The EU’s developing global role demands a new approach to communications outside the Union. Besides communicating its policies to its citizens in order to enhance their trust in the idea of the United Europe, it is also extremely important to provide information regarding its policies and actions beyond its borders, to non-member countries and also to various international entities and organizations. This approach is necessary because the strength of an organization’ (in our case the European Union’s external reputation depends not only on the core values embedded in its domestic culture, but also on the way how it communicates them to various target publics.The paper analyses the external communication of the European Union (lines of action, actors involved, and communication realized through different policies and how it affects the external image of the region, demonstrating the need for a coherent communication strategy that combines the interests of Member States with those of the European institutions and the needs of internal public with those of external public.

  8. How abusive supervisors influence employees' voice and silence: the effects of interactional justice and organizational attribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Jiang, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    In this research we investigated the influence of abusive supervision on employees' prosocial voice and silence, as well as clarified the roles of interactional justice (as a mediator) and organizational attribution (as a moderator). Moreover, we examined a mediated moderating model stipulating that interactional justice mediated the moderating effect of organizational attribution on the focal relationship. A scenario experiment was employed in Study 1, and after analyzing data from 196 employees, we found that abusive supervision influenced employees' prosocial voice and silence via interactional justice. In Study 2, data were collected from 379 employees in two waves separated by 1 week. The results not only replicated the findings of Study 1 but also indicated that organizational attribution buffered the abusive supervision-voice and silence relationship, and that interactional justice mediated this moderating effect.

  9. Immediate acoustic effects of straw phonation exercises in subjects with dysphonic voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Marco; Higueras, Diego; Fincheira, Catherine; Muñoz, Daniel; Guajardo, Carlos; Dowdall, Jayme

    2013-04-01

    Abstract This study sought to measure any acoustic changes in the speaking voice immediately after phonation exercises involving plastic straws versus phonation exercises with the open vowel /a/. Forty-one primary school teachers with slightly dysphonic voices were asked to participate in four phonatory tasks. Phonetically balanced text at habitual intensity level and speaking fundamental frequency was recorded. Acoustical analysis with long-term average spectrum was performed. Significant changes after therapy for the experimental group include the alpha ratio, L1-L0 ratio and ratio between 1-5 kHz and 5-8 kHz. The results indicate that the use of phonatory tasks with straw exercises can have immediate therapeutic acoustic effects in dysphonic voices. Long-term effects were not assessed in this study.

  10. Atmospheric effects on voice command intelligibility from acoustic hail and warning devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostron, Jason H; Brungart, Timothy A; Barnard, Andrew R; McDevitt, Timothy E

    2011-04-01

    Voice command sound pressure levels (SPLs) were recorded at distances up to 1500 m. Received SPLs were related to the meteorological condition during sound propagation and compared with the outdoor sound propagation standard ISO 9613-2. Intelligibility of received signals was calculated using ANSI S3.5. Intelligibility results for the present voice command indicate that meteorological condition imposes little to no effect on intelligibility when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is low (0 dB). In these two cases the signal is firmly unintelligible or intelligible, respectively. However, at moderate SNRs, variations in received SPL can cause a fully intelligible voice command to become unintelligible, depending on the meteorological condition along the sound propagation path. These changes in voice command intelligibility often occur on time scales as short as minutes during upward refracting conditions, typically found above ground during the day or upwind of a sound source. Reliably predicting the intelligibility of a voice command in a moderate SNR environment can be challenging due to the inherent variability imposed by sound propagation through the atmosphere.

  11. The effect of speakers' sex on voice onset time in Mandarin stops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangfang

    2013-02-01

    The goal of the present study is to examine the effect of speakers' gender on voice onset time in Mandarin speakers' stop productions. Word-initial lingual stops were elicited from 10 male and 10 female Mandarin speakers using a word-repetition task. The results revealed differentiated voice onset time (VOT) patterns between the two genders for all four lingual stops on raw VOT values. After factoring out speech rate variation, gender-related differences remained for voiced stops only with females' VOTs being shorter than males. The results, together with previous findings from other languages, suggest a sociolinguistic/stylistic account on the relation between gender and VOT that vary in a language-specific manner.

  12. Voice restoration following total laryngectomy by tracheoesophageal prosthesis: Effect on patients' quality of life and voice handicap in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wreikat Mahmoud M

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little has been reported about the impact of tracheoesophageal (TE speech on individuals in the Middle East where the procedure has been gaining in popularity. After total laryngectomy, individuals in Europe and North America have rated their quality of life as being lower than non-laryngectomized individuals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in quality of life and degree of voice handicap reported by laryngectomized speakers from Jordan before and after establishment of TE speech. Methods Twelve male Jordanian laryngectomees completed the University of Michigan Head & Neck Quality of Life instrument and the Voice Handicap Index pre- and post-TE puncture. Results All subjects showed significant improvements in their quality of life following successful prosthetic voice restoration. In addition, voice handicap scores were significantly reduced from pre- to post-TE puncture. Conclusion Tracheoesophageal speech significantly improved the quality of life and limited the voice handicap imposed by total laryngectomy. This method of voice restoration has been used for a number of years in other countries and now appears to be a viable alternative within Jordan.

  13. Effects of native language on perception of voice quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiman, Jody; Gerratt, Bruce R; Khan, Sameer Ud Dowla

    2010-10-01

    Little is known about how listeners judge phonemic versus allophonic (or freely varying) versus post-lexical variations in voice quality, or about which acoustic attributes serve as perceptual cues in specific contexts. To address this issue, native speakers of Gujarati, Thai, and English discriminated among pairs of voices that differed only in the relative amplitudes of the first versus second harmonics (H1-H2). Results indicate that speakers of Gujarati (which contrasts H1-H2 phonemically) were more sensitive to changes than are speakers of Thai or English. Further, sensitivity was not affected by the overall source spectral slope for Gujarati speakers, unlike Thai and English speakers, who were most sensitive when the spectrum fell away steeply. In combination with previous findings from Mandarin speakers, these results suggest a continuum of sensitivity to H1-H2. In Gujarati, the independence of sensitivity and spectral context is consistent with use of H1-H2 as a cue to the language's phonemic phonation contrast. Speakers of Mandarin, in which creaky phonation occurs in conjunction with the low dipping Tone 3, apparently also learn to hear these contrasts, but sensitivity is conditioned by spectral context. Finally, for Thai and English speakers, who vary phonation only post-lexically, sensitivity is both lower and contextually-determined, reflecting the smaller role of H1-H2 in these languages.

  14. An Analysis of Voice Communication in a Simulated Approach Control Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    elements involved the Request speech act. 3.3 Analysis of Irregular Communications. The Wald - Wolfowitz Runs Test9, a nonparametric test of the null...0% 3% 28% 52% 17% 3% 0% 0% For brevity, the Wald -Walfowitz Runs Test will be referred to as The Runs Test. " Runs are defined as: any

  15. Connecting Classrooms and Community: Engaged Scholarship, Nonacademic Voices, and Organizational Communication Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Johny T.; Barnes, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Organizations have changed dramatically over the last decade as globalization, new technology, and generational shifts shape almost every aspect of twenty-first century American society. Ideally, communication education would prepare students for experiences in the workplaces they will join after they graduate, but some have suggested that…

  16. Voice over IP: how computing technology is being used in mobile communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William

    2005-01-01

    This article explains how computing technology was used to address the need for mobile communications among nursing staff. In 2004, nursing staff at Fauquier Hospital relocated from one nursing floor in an older building to two floors in a new structure. This resulted in complaints and supervision issues as nursing managers, who had previously been relatively sedentary, now became quite mobile as they attempted to control nursing operations on two separate floors. Complaints arose from several sources. Nursing staff and managers both complained about the increased difficulty in communicating with each other Physicians expressed frustration to hospital administration at playing "telephone tag" with managers. The solution involved Internet Protocol technology that is in widespread use on most computer networks. The article details how this technology was selected over several other communications technologies and used to implement wireless telephony over the hospital's existing computer network. It reviews key standards and technologies and issues surrounding their use. Finally, the article demonstrates how this computing technology improved patient care by facilitating mobile communications.

  17. Reflecting on Western TESOL Training and Communicative Language Teaching: Bangladeshi Teachers' Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Raqib; Ha, Phan Le

    2008-01-01

    The increasing demand for competent users of English in the era of globalisation has had a significant impact on English Language Teaching (ELT) in Bangladesh. Among a number of changes to improve the quality of ELT, teachers of English have been encouraged, even required, to adopt a communicative language teaching (CLT) approach. To facilitate…

  18. Social Network Sites and Student-Lecturer Communication: An Academic Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Joanna; Gaffney-Rhys, Ruth; Jones, Edward

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a synthesis of existing ideas relating to the use of social network sites by faculty within higher education institutions (HEIs) to communicate with the student body. As previous research has been from a student-centric perspective, importantly this study explores the use of social networks for student-faculty communication…

  19. Explaining the high voice superiority effect in polyphonic music: evidence from cortical evoked potentials and peripheral auditory models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Laurel J; Marie, Céline; Bruce, Ian C; Bidelman, Gavin M

    2014-02-01

    Natural auditory environments contain multiple simultaneously-sounding objects and the auditory system must parse the incoming complex sound wave they collectively create into parts that represent each of these individual objects. Music often similarly requires processing of more than one voice or stream at the same time, and behavioral studies demonstrate that human listeners show a systematic perceptual bias in processing the highest voice in multi-voiced music. Here, we review studies utilizing event-related brain potentials (ERPs), which support the notions that (1) separate memory traces are formed for two simultaneous voices (even without conscious awareness) in auditory cortex and (2) adults show more robust encoding (i.e., larger ERP responses) to deviant pitches in the higher than in the lower voice, indicating better encoding of the former. Furthermore, infants also show this high-voice superiority effect, suggesting that the perceptual dominance observed across studies might result from neurophysiological characteristics of the peripheral auditory system. Although musically untrained adults show smaller responses in general than musically trained adults, both groups similarly show a more robust cortical representation of the higher than of the lower voice. Finally, years of experience playing a bass-range instrument reduces but does not reverse the high voice superiority effect, indicating that although it can be modified, it is not highly neuroplastic. Results of new modeling experiments examined the possibility that characteristics of middle-ear filtering and cochlear dynamics (e.g., suppression) reflected in auditory nerve firing patterns might account for the higher-voice superiority effect. Simulations show that both place and temporal AN coding schemes well-predict a high-voice superiority across a wide range of interval spacings and registers. Collectively, we infer an innate, peripheral origin for the higher-voice superiority observed in human

  20. Effect of Voice-Part Training and Music Complexity on Focus of Attention to Melody or Harmony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lindsey R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible effects of choral voice-part training/experience and music complexity on focus of attention to melody or harmony. Participants (N = 150) were members of auditioned university choral ensembles divided by voice-part (sopranos, n = 44; altos, n = 33; tenors, n = 35; basses, n = 38). The music…

  1. Examining the Effectiveness of Extensive Speaking Practice via Voice Blogs in a Foreign Language Learning Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-Chih

    2012-01-01

    Educational blogs have drawn the growing interest of researchers and language teachers due to the user-friendly interfaces as well as the powerful archiving features. The purpose of the current study is two-fold: (1) to examine the effectiveness of extensive speaking practice on speaking performance in voice blogs, and (2) to examine learners'…

  2. Voice training in teacher education: the effect of adding an individualized microteaching session of 30 minutes to the regular 6-hour voice training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, B; Coveliers, Y; Wuyts, F L; Van Looy, L

    2012-09-01

    In a previous study, we investigated the effect of a twofold voice-training module in student teachers. In the present study, the original training module of 3 hours of indirect and 3 hours of direct group training was expanded with a 30-minute individual counseling session for each participant. The main focus was on the effects of this threefold training paradigm on the voice of the participants. The subjects were 81 students at the academic teaching program at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. The trained group (n=51) received the entire voice-training program, whereas the control group (n=30) received no voice training at all. A multidimensional test battery consisting of subjective evaluation and objective measurements was applied to both the groups at the study onset and again 4 months later to assess training results. Other than an improvement in the parameter strain, no significant change was observed for the subjective judgments. Several of the objective parameters did however improve in the trained group only, most significantly in female subjects. The impact of the 30-minute individual counseling session was small and differed for males and females. However, the results support the effectiveness of this training module and favor its introduction in the education of student teachers.

  3. A systematic, holistic and integrative process of self-control for voicing with optimal coping effects in teachers. 1. A process of awareness--an expert's opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Opstal, Magda J M Carola

    2010-01-01

    A learning strategy is presented for eustress-euvoicing, which prevails over distress-disvoicing. It is based on the understanding of the mechanisms of stress-voicing, conceived as a dynamic circular process of interacting entities, i.e. stressors/signals-arousal/activation-emotion-coping-effects (SAECE), which is the rationale for a multidisciplinary approach in coaching professional voice users. A systematic, holistic and integrative process of self-control (SHIPS) is directed by functional analysis and consists of awareness and change. Emotion, a mixture of appraisal, affect and movement, is the pivot in SHIPS. SHIPS with (student) teachers aims at the competence of voicing (V) in an optimal (O) way of coping (C), which means vocal communication that is effective (E) to meet a balance in physical, interpersonal and existential wellness when responding to demands and challenges in the individual teacher's (T) field of communication (VOCE-T). The process of awareness intends to understand the course of multiple interactions in SAECE that condition eustressors and distressors related to (non)-integrated coping. The (student) teacher and coach are conscious and active participants in the process of awareness that is dynamic and evolving and aims at the preparedness to change non-desirable habits and skill modes into VOCE-T.

  4. A systematic, holistic and integrative process of self-control for voicing with optimal coping effects in teachers. 2. A process of change--an expert's opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Opstal, Magda J M Carola

    2010-01-01

    A learning strategy is presented for eustress-euvoicing, which prevails over distress-disvoicing. It is based on the understanding of the mechanisms of stress-voicing, conceived as a dynamic circular process of interacting entities, i.e. stressors/signals-arousal/activation-emotion-coping-effects (SAECE), which is the rationale for a multidisciplinary approach in coaching professional voice users. A systematic, holistic and integrative process of self-control (SHIPS) is directed by functional analysis and consists of awareness and change. Emotion, a mixture of appraisal, affect and movement, is the pivot in SHIPS. SHIPS with (student) teachers aims at the competence of voicing (V) in an optimal (O) way of coping (C), which means vocal communication that is effective (E) to meet a balance in physical, interpersonal and existential wellness when responding to demands and challenges in the individual teacher's (T) field of communication (VOCE-T). The process of change intends to influence the course of multiple interactions in SAECE. SHIPS (de)conditions distressors and eutressors related to (non)-integrated coping. The (student) teacher and coach are conscious and active participants in the process of change that aims at (un)learning of attitudes and skills for coping by VOCE-T.

  5. Effect of singing on respiratory function, voice, and mood after quadriplegia: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamplin, Jeanette; Baker, Felicity A; Grocke, Denise; Brazzale, Danny J; Pretto, Jeffrey J; Ruehland, Warren R; Buttifant, Mary; Brown, Douglas J; Berlowitz, David J

    2013-03-01

    To explore the effects of singing training on respiratory function, voice, mood, and quality of life for people with quadriplegia. Randomized controlled trial. Large, university-affiliated public hospital, Victoria, Australia. Participants (N=24) with chronic quadriplegia (C4-8, American Spinal Injury Association grades A and B). The experimental group (n=13) received group singing training 3 times weekly for 12 weeks. The control group (n=11) received group music appreciation and relaxation for 12 weeks. Assessments were conducted pre, mid-, immediately post-, and 6-months postintervention. Standard respiratory function testing, surface electromyographic activity from accessory respiratory muscles, sound pressure levels during vocal tasks, assessments of voice quality (Perceptual Voice Profile, Multidimensional Voice Profile), and Voice Handicap Index, Profile of Mood States, and Assessment of Quality of Life instruments. The singing group increased projected speech intensity (P=.028) and maximum phonation length (P=.007) significantly more than the control group. Trends for improvements in respiratory function, muscle strength, and recruitment were also evident for the singing group. These effects were limited by small sample sizes with large intersubject variability. Both groups demonstrated an improvement in mood (P=.002), which was maintained in the music appreciation and relaxation group after 6 months (P=.017). Group music therapy can have a positive effect on not only physical outcomes, but also can improve mood, energy, social participation, and quality of life for an at-risk population, such as those with quadriplegia. Specific singing therapy can augment these general improvements by improving vocal intensity. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effective communication during difficult conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, Jacquelyn M

    2013-06-01

    A strong interest and need exist in the workplace today to master the skills of conducting difficult conversations. Theories and strategies abound, yet none seem to have found the magic formula with universal appeal and success. If it is such an uncomfortable skill to master is it better to avoid or initiate such conversations with employees? Best practices and evidence-based management guide us to the decision that quality improvement dictates effective communication, even when difficult. This brief paper will offer some suggestions for strategies to manage difficult conversations with employees. Mastering the skills of conducting difficult conversations is clearly important to keeping lines of communication open and productive. Successful communication skills may actually help to avert confrontation through employee engagement, commitment and appropriate corresponding behavior

  7. Effectiveness of voice rehabilitation on vocalisation in postlaryngectomy patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Shuxin

    2010-12-01

    Laryngeal cancer is one of the most common malignant neoplasia of the head and neck. Its incidence has been increasing steadily all over the world. Many patients will undergo total laryngectomy with or without radical neck dissection after being diagnosed. After this surgery, normal speech is lost, and a permanent stoma in the middle of the neck is left. Therefore, voice rehabilitation is one of the most difficult challenges that these patients must overcome. In order to support the patients, otolaryngologists, nursing specialists and speech pathologists have explored several different methods for voice rehabilitation. Variations exist on the approaches of rehabilitation and indicators selected to measure the effectiveness. There is a need to undertake a systematic review to provide a plan of care and ascertain the effectiveness regarding different voice rehabilitation programs for postlaryngectomy patients. REVIEW OBJECTIVE: To critically analyse the literature and present the best available evidence related to the effectiveness of voice rehabilitation program on postlaryngectomy patients. A three-step search strategy was utilised. An initial limited search of MEDLINE and CINAHL databases was undertaken followed by an analysis of the text words contained in the title and abstract to identify the optimal index terms. A second extensive search using all identified key words and index terms was then undertaken. Third, the reference list and bibliographies of all identified reports and articles were searched for additional studies. The measurement index included voice intelligibility, volume, clarity, quality of voice, patients' satisfaction, quality of life, etc. The search included reports in English and Chinese. The review considered any randomised controlled trials that addressed voice rehabilitation methods in postlaryngectomy patients. In the absence of randomised controlled trials, other quantitative research designs, such as non-randomised controlled trials

  8. Plethysmogram and EEG: Effects of Music and Voice Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Tiejun; Oyama-Higa, Mayumi; Sato, Sadaka; Kojima, Junji; Lin, Juan; Reika, Sato

    2011-06-01

    We studied a relation of chaotic dynamics of finger plethysmogram to complexity of high cerebral center in both theoretical and experimental approaches. We proposed a mathematical model to describe emergence of chaos in finger tip pulse wave, which gave a theoretical prediction indicating increased chaoticity in higher cerebral center leading to an increase of chaos dynamics in plethysmograms. We designed an experiment to observe scalp-EEG and finger plethysmogram using two mental tasks to validate the relationship. We found that scalp-EEG showed an increase of the largest Lyapunov exponents (LLE) during speaking certain voices. Topographical scalp map of LLE showed enhanced arise around occipital and right cerebral area. Whereas there was decreasing tendency during listening music, where LLE scalp map revealed a drop around center cerebral area. The same tendency was found for LLE obtained from finger plethysmograms as ones of EEG under either speaking or listening tasks. The experiment gave results that agreed well with the theoretical relation derived from our proposed model.

  9. The Technology of ZigBee for Builiding Wireless Voice Communications Network%ZigBee无线语音通信组网技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈海燕; 张晨

    2012-01-01

    Whereas most of the low security intercom equipment, signal instability, conflict-prone, frequency of use license and other issues, the paper design of a ZigBee as communication technology to voice intercom system, significantly improved the above-mentioned problems. Terminal to the system microcontroller MSP430F149 microprocessor, provided through the use of TI CC2430 RF chip, ZigBee wireless communication standard, application technology related to the node in design, hardware test platform, the formation of ZigBee star network realization voice communication, of the entire system tests. Test results show that, using the ZigBee wireless technology has the advantages of voice communication, and meet the WSN network of power and transmission requirements.%鉴于目前多数对讲设备安全性低、信号不稳定、易冲突、使用频率许可等问题,设计了一种以ZigBee为通信技术的语音对讲系统.明显改善了上述问题.该系统终端以单片机MSP430F149为微处理器,通过使用TI公司提供的CC2430射频芯片,应用ZigBee无线通信标准相关技术,在所设计的节点硬件试验平台上,组建ZigBee星型网络实现语音通信,并且对整个系统进行测试.测试结果表明,利用ZigBee技术进行无线语音通信是具有优越性的,并且满足了无线个域网网络对功耗和传输的要求.

  10. Finding a Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Schools have struggled for decades to provide expensive augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) resources for autistic students with communication challenges. Clunky voice output devices, often included in students' individualized education plans, cost about $8,000, a difficult expense to cover in hard times. However, mobile technology is…

  11. SMS versus voice messaging to deliver MNCH communication in rural Malawi: assessment of delivery success and user experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Jessica; Larsen-Cooper, Erin; Jezman, Zachariah; Cunningham, Stacey C; Bancroft, Emily

    2014-02-01

    To determine the difference in delivery success of health messages delivered through pushed SMS, pushed voice messages sent to personal phones, and voice messages retrieved from a community phone ("retrieved voice messaging"), as well as the difference in quality of the user experience. We analyzed the project's electronic monitoring data between September 2011 and June 2013, including demographics, enrollment data, and messages sent and successfully delivered. We also collected and analyzed information from quarterly phone-based surveys with users to assess quality of the user experience, including acceptability, comprehension, new information learned, and reported behavior change. More than half of subscribers enrolled in the retrieved voice messaging service while nearly one-third enrolled in the pushed SMS service and less than 10% in pushed voice messaging. Message delivery success was highest among pushed SMS subscribers and lowest among retrieved voice subscribers. Overall, 99% of survey respondents reported trusting messages they received, and about 75% of respondents recalled the last message they received and learned something new. Almost 75% of respondents reported that they had already changed or intended to change their behavior based on received messages. Intended or actual behavior change was significantly higher among pushed SMS enrollees than among pushed or retrieved voice messaging enrollees (P = .01). All message modalities led to high levels of satisfaction, comprehension, and new information learned. Due to lower cost, higher delivery success, and higher levels of intended or actual behavior change, SMS is the preferred delivery modality. However, the majority of users included in this study did not have access to a personal phone, and retrieved voice messages provided an opportunity to access a population that otherwise could not be served. Providing multiple methods by which users could access the service was crucial in extending reach

  12. The effect of melody and technique on the singing voice accuracy of trained singers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrouy-Maestri, Pauline; Magis, David; Morsomme, Dominique

    2014-10-01

    A previous study highlighted the effect of vocal technique on the singing voice accuracy of trained singers. The intervals' precision between the notes of the tune was altered when the singers used Western operatic singing technique. In order better to understand these results, we have recorded two different melodies sung with two different vocal techniques. A large panel of trained singers (n = 50) participated in the study. The analytical method described in the reference paper has been applied. The results confirm the effect of vocal technique on the vocal accuracy of trained singers. In addition, these results provide an answer about the melodic effect and guide future work on the perception process of operatic voices.

  13. Delivering effective science communication: advice from a professional science communicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Sam

    2017-04-12

    Science communication is becoming ever more prevalent, with more and more scientists expected to not only communicate their research to a wider public, but to do so in an innovative and engaging manner. Given the other commitments that researchers and academics are required to fulfil as part of their workload models, it is unfair to be expect them to also instantly produce effective science communication events and activities. However, by thinking carefully about what it is that needs to be communicated, and why this is being done, it is possible to develop high-quality activities that are of benefit to both the audience and the communicator(s). In this paper, I present some practical advice for developing, delivering and evaluating effective science communication initiatives, based on over a decade of experience as being a professional science communicator. I provide advice regarding event logistics, suggestions on how to successfully market and advertise your science communication initiatives, and recommendations for establishing effective branding and legacy. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effectively executing a comprehensive marketing communication strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombeski, William R; Taylor, Jan; Piccirilli, Ami; Cundiff, Lee; Britt, Jason

    2007-01-01

    Marketers are under increasing scrutiny from their management to demonstrate accountability for the resources they receive. Three models are presented to help marketers execute their customer communication activities more effectively. Benefits of using the "Identification of Strategic Communication Elements," "Business Communication" and "Communications Management Process" models include (1) more effective upfront strategic and tactical planning, (2) ensuring key communication principles are addressed, (3) easier communication program communication, (4) provides a framework for program evaluation and market research and (5) increases the creative thinking marketers need when addressing the major marketing challenges. The ultimate benefit is the greater likelihood of more positive marketing results.

  15. Effects of task performance, helping, voice, and organizational loyalty on performance appraisal ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Steven W; Podsakoff, Philip M; Pierce, Jason R

    2008-01-01

    Despite the fact that several studies have investigated the relationship between organizational citizenship behavior and performance appraisal ratings, the vast majority of these studies have been cross-sectional, correlational investigations conducted in organizational settings that do not allow researchers to establish the causal nature of this relationship. To address this lack of knowledge regarding causality, the authors conducted 2 studies designed to investigate the effects of task performance, helping behavior, voice, and organizational loyalty on performance appraisal evaluations. Findings demonstrated that each of these forms of behavior has significant effects on performance evaluation decisions and suggest that additional attention should be directed at both voice and organizational loyalty as important forms of citizenship behavior aimed at the organization.

  16. Communicate and Motivate: The School Leader's Guide to Effective Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneson, Shelly

    2011-01-01

    Develop the skills you need to communicate effectively and in ways that motivate your faculty towards success. Written especially for principals and other administrators, this book will empower you to communicate well as you work to promote a student-centered environment best suited to schoolwide achievement. Learn to approach one-on-one…

  17. The effect of voice rest on the outcome of phonosurgery for benign laryngeal lesions: preliminary results of a prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiagiadaki, Devora; Remacle, Marc; Lawson, George; Bachy, Vincent; Van der Vorst, Sebastien

    2015-05-01

    According to the literature, voice rest following phonosurgery, as recommended in clinical practice, varies between 3 and 7 days. However, up until now, no randomized trials have been published comparing voice rest of short versus long duration. This is an ongoing prospective randomized study, comparing strict voice rest of 5 versus 10 days on the voice following phonosurgery. Thirty-one elective patients operated on for benign laryngeal lesions were randomized. They completed pre- and postoperative assessments, including perceptual voice quality (Grade, Roughness, Breathiness, Asthenia, Strain, Instability scale), Voice Handicap Index total score, and voice analysis with both acoustic and aerodynamic measurements. Additional factors such as smoking, vocal abuse, reflux, and preoperative speech therapy were also taken into account. Sixteen patients were randomized to follow 5 days' voice rest and 15 patients were randomized to 10 days' voice rest. Statistical analysis showed no significant differences in pre- or postoperative measurements between the 2 groups. However, multilinear regression analysis for the effect of voice rest duration on postoperative values showed a significant improvement in maximum phonation time (MPT) with 10 days' voice rest. Preliminary results show a benefit of prolonged voice rest (10 days' duration) on MPT. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. LEOcom: communication system for low earth orbit satellites for voice, data and facsimile; LEOcom - sistema de comunicacao por satelites de orbita terrestre baixa para voz, dados e facsimile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giacaglia, G.E.O.; Lamas, W.Q. [Universidade de Taubate (UNITAU), SP (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica], E-mail: giorgio@unitau.br; Ceballos, D.C. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Pereira, J.J. [Comando-Geral de Tecnologia Aeroespacial (CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This paper provides a basic description of a Communication System for Low Earth Orbit Satellites that can provide voice, data and facsimile to hundreds of countries located in equatorial land between + and - 20 deg latitude, reaching higher latitudes, depending on the location of the onshore terminal. As a point high, it emphasizes its opportunity to support the control of networks transmission of electricity, in any area, and plants generation, located in remote areas, and support any type of operation in these regions. It is the aim of this work to reactivate a good project for Brazil and the tropical world.

  19. Dialogue on dialogues Multi-voiced dialogues (dialogism) as means for the co-production of knowledge in and on leadership communicative practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Ann

    2013-01-01

    The article elaborates on a theoretical understanding of dialogue as a means for the co-production of knowledge in and on leadership communicative practices through ongoing research collaboration that involves leaders, researchers and master students at Aalborg University. Dialogue is viewed from...... to cultivate the creative and transformational powers of dialogues in which new meanings, voices and forms of knowledge emerge. I discuss how this way of framing the dialogical co-production of knowledge challenges the mainstream understanding of dialogical practices by embracing relational, conflictual...

  20. [Doctor patient communication: which skills are effective?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Philippa; Gómez, Gricelda; Kurtz, Suzanne; Vargas, Alex

    2010-08-01

    Effective Communication Skills form part of what is being a good doctor. There is a solid evidence base that defines the components of effective communication. This article offers a practical conceptual framework to improve physician patient communication to a professional level of competence. There are six goals that physicians and patients work to achieve through their communication with each other. These are to construct a relationship, structure an interview, start the interview, gather information, explain, plan and close the interview. The outcomes that can be improved with an effective communication and the "first principles" of communication are described. A brief look at the historical context that has influenced our thinking about communication in health care is carried out. Finally, the Calgary Cambridge Guide, an approach for delineating and organizing the specific skills required of an effective communication with patients is described. It is clear from the literature that better communication skills improve patient satisfaction and clinical outcomes.

  1. Leveraging voice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    researchers improve our practices and how could digital online video help offer more positive stories about research and higher education? How can academics in higher education be better to tell about our research, thereby reclaiming and leveraging our voice in a post-factual era? As higher education......This paper speculates on how researchers share research without diluting our credibility and how to make strategies for the future. It also calls for consideration of new traditions and practices for communicating knowledge to a wider audience across multiple media platforms. How might we...... continues to engage with digital and networked technologies it becomes increasingly relevant to question why and how academics could (re) position research knowledge in the digital and online media landscape of today and the future. The paper highlights methodological issues that arise in relation...

  2. The effect of speaking context on spectral- and cepstral-based acoustic features of normal voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Soren Y; Hylkema, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    The effect of speaking context on four cepstral- and spectral-based acoustic measures was investigated in 20 participants with normal voice. Speakers produced three different continuous speaking tasks that varied in duration and phonemic content. Cepstral and spectral measures that can be validly derived from continuous speech were computed across the three speaking contexts. Cepstral peak prominence (CPP), low/high spectral ratio, and the standard deviation (SD) of the low/high spectral ratio did not significantly differ across speaking contexts, and correlations for the first two measures were strong among the three speaking tasks. The SD of the CPP showed significant task differences, and relationships between the speaking contexts were generally moderate. These findings suggest that in speakers with normal voice, the differing phonemic content across several frequently used speaking stimuli minimally impacted group means for three clinically relevant cepstral- and spectral-based acoustic measures.

  3. Voice Therapy Practices and Techniques: A Survey of Voice Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Peter B.; Larson, George W.

    1992-01-01

    Eighty-three voice disorder therapists' ratings of statements regarding voice therapy practices indicated that vocal nodules are the most frequent disorder treated; vocal abuse and hard glottal attack elimination, counseling, and relaxation were preferred treatment approaches; and voice therapy is more effective with adults than with children.…

  4. The effect of visual feedback and training in auditory-perceptual judgment of voice quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsties, Ben; Beers, Mieke; Ten Cate, Liesbeth; Van Ballegooijen, Karin; Braam, Lilian; De Groot, Merel; Van Der Kant, Marieke; Kruitwagen, Cas; Maryn, Youri

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the effect of visual feedback on rating voice quality severity level and the reliability of voice quality judgment by inexperienced listeners. For this purpose two training programs were created, each lasting 2 hours. In total 37 undergraduate speech-language therapy students participated in the study and were divided into a visual plus auditory-perceptual feedback group (V + AF), an auditory-perceptual feedback group (AF), and a control group with no feedback (NF). All listeners completed two rating sessions judging overall severity labeled as grade (G), roughness (R), and breathiness (B). The judged voice samples contained the concatenation of continuous speech and sustained phonation. No significant rater reliability changes were found in the pre- and posttest between the three groups in every GRB-parameter (all p > 0.05). There was a training effect seen in the significant improvement of rater reliability for roughness within the NF and AF groups (all p visual and auditory anchors while rating as well as longer training sessions may be required to draw a firm conclusion.

  5. Machine Translation Effect on Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mika Yasuoka; Bjørn, Pernille

    2011-01-01

    Intercultural collaboration facilitated by machine translation has gradually spread in various settings. Still, little is known as for the practice of machine-translation mediated communication. This paper investigates how machine translation affects intercultural communication in practice. Based...... determines communication process largely, our data indicates communication relies more on a dynamic process where participants establish common ground than on reproducibility and grammatical accuracy.......Intercultural collaboration facilitated by machine translation has gradually spread in various settings. Still, little is known as for the practice of machine-translation mediated communication. This paper investigates how machine translation affects intercultural communication in practice. Based...... on communication in which multilingual communication system is applied, we identify four communication types and its’ influences on stakeholders’ communication process, especially focusing on establishment and maintenance of common ground. Different from our expectation that quality of machine translation results...

  6. Multimedia Astronomy Communication: Effectively Communicate Astronomy to the Desired Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Star Cartier, Kimberly Michelle; Wright, Jason

    2017-01-01

    A fundamental aspect of our jobs as scientists is communicating our work to others. In this, the field of astronomy holds the double-edged sword of ubiquitous fascination: the topic has been of interest to nearly the entire global population at some point in their lives, yet the learning curve is steep within any subfield and rife with difficult-to-synthesize details. Compounding this issue is the ever-expanding array of methods to reach people in today's Communications Era. Each communication medium has its own strengths and weaknesses, is appropriate in different situations, and requires its own specific skillset in order to maximize its functionality. Despite this, little attention is given to training astronomers in effective communication techniques, often relying on newcomers to simply pick up the ability by mimicking others and assuming that a firm grasp on the subject matter will make up for deficiencies in communication theory. This can restrict astronomers to a narrow set of communication methods, harming both the communicators and the audience who may struggle to access the information through those media.Whether writing a research paper to academic peers or giving an astronomy talk to a pubic audience, successfully communicating a scientific message requires more than just an expert grasp on the topic. A communicator must understand the makeup and prior knowledge of the desired audience, be able to break down the salient points of the topic into pieces that audience can digest, select and maximize upon a medium to deliver the message, and frame the message in a way that hooks the audience and compels further interest. In this work we synthesize the requirements of effective astronomy communication into a few key questions that every communicator needs to answer. We then discuss some of the most common media currently used to communicate astronomy, give both effective and poor examples of utilizing these media to communicate astronomy, and provide key

  7. Performance Analysis of Power Saving Class of Type I for Voice Service in Two-Way Communication in IEEE 802.16e

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eunju; Kim, Kyung Jae; Choi, Bong Dae

    In IEEE 802.16e, power saving is one of the important issues for battery-powered mobile stations (MSs). We present a performance analysis of power saving class (PSC) of type I in IEEE 802.16e standard for voice over Internet protocol (VoIP) service with silence suppression in two-way communication. On-off pattern of a voice user in two-way communication is characterized by the modified Brady model, which includes short silence gaps less than 200ms and talkspurt periods shorter than 15ms, and so differs from the Brady model. Our analysis of PSC I follows the standard-based procedure for the deactivation of the sleep mode, where a uplink packet arrival during a mutual silence period wakes up the MS immediately while a downlink packet arrival waits to be served until the next listening window. We derive the delay distribution of the first downlink packet arriving during a mutual silence period, and find the dropping probability of downlink packets since a voice packet drops if it is not transmitted within maximum delay constraint. In addition, we calculate the average power consumption under the modified Brady model. Analysis and simulation results show that the sleep mode operation for the MS with VoIP service yields 32 ∼ 39% reduction in the power consumption of the MS. Finally we obtain the optimal initial/final-sleep windows that yield the minimum average power consumption while satisfying QoS constraints on the packet dropping probability and the maximum delay.

  8. Voice Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voice is the sound made by air passing from your lungs through your larynx, or voice box. In your larynx are your vocal cords, ... to make sound. For most of us, our voices play a big part in who we are, ...

  9. Every Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Penny

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses how the author develops an approach that allows her students, who are part of the marginalized population, to learn the power of their own voices--not just their writing voices, but their oral voices as well. The author calls it "TWIST": Thoughts, Writing folder, Inquiring mind, Supplies, and Teamwork. It is where…

  10. Every Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Penny

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses how the author develops an approach that allows her students, who are part of the marginalized population, to learn the power of their own voices--not just their writing voices, but their oral voices as well. The author calls it "TWIST": Thoughts, Writing folder, Inquiring mind, Supplies, and Teamwork. It is where…

  11. Can we respond mindfully to distressing voices? A systematic review of evidence for engagement, acceptability, effectiveness and mechanisms of change for mindfulness-based interventions for people distressed by hearing voices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara eStrauss

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Adapted mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs could be of benefit for people distressed by hearing voices. This paper presents a systematic review of studies exploring this possibility and we ask five questions: (1 Is trait mindfulness associated with reduced distress and disturbance in relation to hearing voices? (2 Are MBIs feasible for people distressed by hearing voices? (3 Are MBIs acceptable and safe for people distressed by hearing voices? (4 Are MBIs effective at reducing distress and disturbance in people distressed by hearing voices? (5 If effective, what are the mechanisms of change through which MBIs for distressing voices work?Fifteen studies were identified through a systematic search (n=479. In relation to the five review questions: (1 data from cross-sectional studies showed an association between trait mindfulness and distress and disturbance in relation to hearing voices; (2 evidence from qualitative studies suggested that people distressed by hearing voices could engage meaningfully in mindfulness practice; (3 MBIs were seen as acceptable and safe; (4 there were no adequately powered RCTs allowing conclusions about effectiveness to be drawn; and (5 it was not possible to draw on robust empirical data to comment on potential mechanisms of change although findings from the qualitative studies identified three potential change processes; (i reorientation of attention; (ii decentring; and (iii acceptance of voices. This review provided evidence that MBIs are engaging, acceptable and safe. Evidence for effectiveness in reducing distress and disturbance is lacking however. We call for funding for adequately powered RCTs that will allow questions of effectiveness, maintenance of effects, mechanisms of change and moderators of outcome to be definitively addressed.

  12. Examining the effects of variation in emotional tone of voice on spoken word recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krestar, Maura L; McLennan, Conor T

    2013-09-01

    Emotional tone of voice (ETV) is essential for optimal verbal communication. Research has found that the impact of variation in nonlinguistic features of speech on spoken word recognition differs according to a time course. In the current study, we investigated whether intratalker variation in ETV follows the same time course in two long-term repetition priming experiments. We found that intratalker variability in ETVs affected reaction times to spoken words only when processing was relatively slow and difficult, not when processing was relatively fast and easy. These results provide evidence for the use of both abstract and episodic lexical representations for processing within-talker variability in ETV, depending on the time course of spoken word recognition.

  13. Values and options in cancer care (VOICE): study design and rationale for a patient-centered communication and decision-making intervention for physicians, patients with advanced cancer, and their caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerger, Michael; Epstein, Ronald M; Winters, Paul C; Fiscella, Kevin; Duberstein, Paul R; Gramling, Robert; Butow, Phyllis N; Mohile, Supriya G; Kaesberg, Paul R; Tang, Wan; Plumb, Sandy; Walczak, Adam; Back, Anthony L; Tancredi, Daniel; Venuti, Alison; Cipri, Camille; Escalera, Gisela; Ferro, Carol; Gaudion, Don; Hoh, Beth; Leatherwood, Blair; Lewis, Linda; Robinson, Mark; Sullivan, Peter; Kravitz, Richard L

    2013-04-09

    Communication about prognosis and treatment choices is essential for informed decision making in advanced cancer. This article describes an investigation designed to facilitate communication and decision making among oncologists, patients with advanced cancer, and their caregivers. The Values and Options in Cancer Care (VOICE) Study is a National Cancer Institute sponsored randomized controlled trial conducted in the Rochester/Buffalo, NY and Sacramento, CA regions. A total of 40 oncologists, approximately 400 patients with advanced cancer, and their family/friend caregivers (one per patient, when available) are expected to enroll in the study. Drawing upon ecological theory, the intervention uses a two-pronged approach: oncologists complete a multifaceted tailored educational intervention involving standardized patient instructors (SPIs), and patients and caregivers complete a coaching intervention to facilitate prioritizing and discussing questions and concerns. Follow-up data will be collected approximately quarterly for up to three years. The intervention is hypothesized to enhance patient-centered communication, quality of care, and patient outcomes. Analyses will examine the effects of the intervention on key elements of physician-patient-caregiver communication (primary outcomes), the physician-patient relationship, shared understanding of prognosis, patient well-being, and health service utilization (secondary outcomes). Clinical Trials Identifier: NCT01485627.

  14. Effective communication skills in nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramhall, Elaine

    2014-12-09

    This article highlights the importance of effective communication skills for nurses. It focuses on core communication skills, their definitions and the positive outcomes that result when applied to practice. Effective communication is central to the provision of compassionate, high-quality nursing care. The article aims to refresh and develop existing knowledge and understanding of effective communication skills. Nurses reading this article will be encouraged to develop a more conscious style of communicating with patients and carers, with the aim of improving health outcomes and patient satisfaction.

  15. Text and Voice: Complements, Substitutes or Both?

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Kjetil; Foros, Øystein; Steen, Frode

    2006-01-01

    Text messaging has become an important revenue component for European and Asian mobile operators. We develop a simple model of demand for mobile services incorporating the existence of call externalities and network effects. We show that when incoming messages and calls stimulate outgoing communications, services that are perceived as substitutes, such as mobile text and voice, may evolve into complements in terms of the price effect when the network size becomes large. We esti...

  16. Effective communication with the patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Booker

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The chronic and slowly progressive nature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD can create difficulties in effective communication between healthcare provider and patient. Such barriers, which include the personal beliefs of both caregiver and patient, need to be understood and addressed if the aims of the consultation are to be met. Patients with COPD may feel guilty, depressed and angry about their condition. Many patients with COPD are elderly and/or from lower socio-economic groups, both of which pose challenges to the caregiver, as does the stigma the disease carries, which stems from its strong link with smoking. Humanity, respect and people orientation are vital to good communication with COPD patients. Physicians and nurses should try to avoid patient misunderstanding and uncertainty, involve the patient in decision-making and achieve a shared understanding (concordance, as well as encourage the patient to accept responsibility for the actions agreed. This should improve management decisions made by healthcare professionals and ensure a more satisfied patient. Greater patient satisfaction may improve concordance and so bring about better patient outcomes.

  17. Voice integrated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, P. Mike

    1977-01-01

    The program at Naval Air Development Center was initiated to determine the desirability of interactive voice systems for use in airborne weapon systems crew stations. A voice recognition and synthesis system (VRAS) was developed and incorporated into a human centrifuge. The speech recognition aspect of VRAS was developed using a voice command system (VCS) developed by Scope Electronics. The speech synthesis capability was supplied by a Votrax, VS-5, speech synthesis unit built by Vocal Interface. The effects of simulated flight on automatic speech recognition were determined by repeated trials in the VRAS-equipped centrifuge. The relationship of vibration, G, O2 mask, mission duration, and cockpit temperature and voice quality was determined. The results showed that: (1) voice quality degrades after 0.5 hours with an O2 mask; (2) voice quality degrades under high vibration; and (3) voice quality degrades under high levels of G. The voice quality studies are summarized. These results were obtained with a baseline of 80 percent recognition accuracy with VCS.

  18. Effect of voice therapy in sulcus vocalis: A single case study

    OpenAIRE

    R. Rajasudhakar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sulcus vocalis is a structural deformity of the vocal ligament. It is the focal invagination of the epithelium deeply attaching to the vocal ligament. There is a dearth of literature on the outcome of voice therapy in sulcus vocalis condition.Objective: The primary objective of this study was to document voice characteristics of sulcus vocalis and the secondary objective was to establish the efficacy of voice therapy in a patient with sulcus vocalis.Method: A trial of voice therap...

  19. Mechanics of human voice production and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyan

    2016-01-01

    As the primary means of communication, voice plays an important role in daily life. Voice also conveys personal information such as social status, personal traits, and the emotional state of the speaker. Mechanically, voice production involves complex fluid-structure interaction within the glottis and its control by laryngeal muscle activation. An important goal of voice research is to establish a causal theory linking voice physiology and biomechanics to how speakers use and control voice to communicate meaning and personal information. Establishing such a causal theory has important implications for clinical voice management, voice training, and many speech technology applications. This paper provides a review of voice physiology and biomechanics, the physics of vocal fold vibration and sound production, and laryngeal muscular control of the fundamental frequency of voice, vocal intensity, and voice quality. Current efforts to develop mechanical and computational models of voice production are also critically reviewed. Finally, issues and future challenges in developing a causal theory of voice production and perception are discussed. PMID:27794319

  20. Effects of vocal intensity and vowel type on cepstral analysis of voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Shaheen N; Giovinco, Ashley; Owens, Jennifer

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to specifically examine the effects of vocal loudness/intensity condition and vowel type on cepstral analysis measurements. Experimental, mixed design. Sustained vowel samples of /i/, /ɑ/, /u/, and /æ/ were elicited from 92 healthy male and female subjects between the ages of 18 and 30 years at three different vocal loudness conditions: (1) "Comfortable pitch and loudness," (2) "As softly as possible without whispering," and (3) "As loudly as possible, without screaming/straining the voice or tensing of the neck region." Recordings were made using a calibrated headset microphone and digitized to computer. Vowel samples were analyzed for vocal intensity (decibels), fundamental frequency (F0 in Hertzz), and relative amplitude of the smoothed cepstral peak prominence (CPPs in decibels). Significant main effects of loudness condition (with a significant increase in CPPs from quiet to comfortable to loud voice) and gender (males having significantly greater mean CPPs than females) were observed. In addition, results indicated that vowel type had a significant effect on the CPP (greater CPPs for low vowels [/ɑ/ and /æ/] vs high vowels [/i/ and /u/]). The results of this study indicate that both the loudness/intensity of vowel elicitation and vowel type should be monitored closely in both research and clinical situations. Changes in the mode of phonation, as well supraglottal changes that effect vocal tract resonances and vocal intensity, appear to combine to result in substantial differences in the CPPs for different vocal loudness/intensity conditions and vowel types. These results indicate that separate cepstral norms are necessary for vowel type, as well as for gender, when using cepstral analysis as a clinical tool. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Subjective voice quality, communicative ability and swallowing after definitive radio(chemo)therapy, laryngectomy plus radio(chemo)therapy, or organ conservation surgery plus radio(chemo)therapy for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szuecs, Marcella; Kuhnt, Thomas; Punke, Christoph; Witt, Gabriele; Klautke, Gunther; Kramp, Burkhard; Hildebrandt, Guido

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective analysis focusses on the impact of therapy on perceived long-term post-cancer treatment function. A validated questionnaire including items and components for the assessment of communicative ability, quality of voice and swallowing was sent to 129 patients. All patients were treated between 1998 and 2007. A total of 76 patients (58.9%) with carcinoma of the larynx or hypopharynx replied to the questionnaire. Data was evaluated retrospectively. Therapy delivered was definitive radio(chemo)therapy (defchRT/RT) (21/76, 28%), laryngectomy + radio(chemo)therapy (LE + chRT/RT) (28/76, 37%), or larynx conservation surgery + radio(chemo)therapy (LCS + chRT/RT) (27/76, 36%). Radiotherapy was administered using 2D- or 3D-conformal planning. The most common concomitant chemotherapy delivered was cisplatin + 5FU. For statistical analyses of the components, averages were calculated and tested using the Kruskal-Wallis test and the U-test of Mann and Whitney. Differences were assessed by the Monte Carlo method or Fisher's exact test. The single item rates were compared with Fisher's exact test. Mean follow-up was 56.7 months (range, 8-130 months). After defchRT/RT, patients trended towards more substantial-strong hoarseness compared with LCS + chRT/RT (P = 0.2). After LE, patients were dissatisfied with their artificial larynx/electrolarynx and the tone of their voice (P = 0.3, P = 0.07) and communicative ability (P = 0.005, P = 0.008) compared with those treated with defchRT/RT and LCS + chRT/RT, respectively. Dysphagia and additional percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) feeding were more frequent after defchRT/RT in comparison with the other two groups (P < 0.05). Voice quality and communicative ability were slightly worse after defchRT/RT and LE + chRT/RT, but satisfying with all treatment modalities. Further development of the therapy approach is necessary to reduce long-term side effects, with measures of post-treatment function as important endpoints.

  2. Effective communication and teamwork promotes patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluyas, Heather

    2015-08-05

    Teamwork requires co-operation, co-ordination and communication between members of a team to achieve desired outcomes. In industries with a high degree of risk, such as health care, effective teamwork has been shown to achieve team goals successfully and efficiently, with fewer errors. This article introduces behaviours that support communication, co-operation and co-ordination in teams. The central role of communication in enabling co-operation and co-ordination is explored. A human factors perspective is used to examine tools to improve communication and identify barriers to effective team communication in health care.

  3. What the voice reveals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ko, Sei Jin

    2007-01-01

    Given that the voice is our main form of communication, we know surprisingly little about how it impacts judgment and behavior. Furthermore, the modern advancement in telecommunication systems, such as cellular phones, has meant that a large proportion of our everyday interactions are conducted voca

  4. What the voice reveals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ko, Sei Jin

    2007-01-01

    Given that the voice is our main form of communication, we know surprisingly little about how it impacts judgment and behavior. Furthermore, the modern advancement in telecommunication systems, such as cellular phones, has meant that a large proportion of our everyday interactions are conducted voca

  5. The Effect of Holy Quran Voice on Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjoob, Monireh; Nejati, Jalil; Hosseini, Alireaza; Bakhshani, Noor Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of Quran listening without its musical tone (Tartil) on the mental health of personnel in Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, southeast of Iran. The results showed significant differences between the test and control groups in their mean mental health scores after Quran listening (P = 0.037). No significant gender differences in the test group before and after intervention were found (P = 0.806). These results suggest that Quran listening could be recommended by psychologists for improving mental health and achieving greater calm.

  6. "Dammed Taxi Cab"--How Silent Communication in Questionnaires Can Be Understood and Used to Give Voice to Children's Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alerby, E.; Kostenius, C.

    2011-01-01

    "Dammed taxi cab"--a 12-year-old boy wrote these words in the margins of a questionnaire, and within this paper they will serve as a point of departure for the discussion of the use of questionnaires as a way to voice children's experiences. The overall aim of this paper is to enable understanding of and discuss the use of questionnaires as a way…

  7. "Dammed Taxi Cab"--How Silent Communication in Questionnaires Can Be Understood and Used to Give Voice to Children's Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alerby, E.; Kostenius, C.

    2011-01-01

    "Dammed taxi cab"--a 12-year-old boy wrote these words in the margins of a questionnaire, and within this paper they will serve as a point of departure for the discussion of the use of questionnaires as a way to voice children's experiences. The overall aim of this paper is to enable understanding of and discuss the use of questionnaires as a way…

  8. The impact of voice on speech realization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelka Breznik

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study discusses spoken literary language and the impact of voice on speech realization. The voice consists of a sound made by a human being using the vocal folds for talking, singing, laughing, crying, screaming… The human voice is specifically the part of human sound production in which the vocal folds (vocal cords are the primary sound source. Our voice is our instrument and identity card. How does the voice (voice tone affect others and how do they respond, positively or negatively? How important is voice (voice tone in communication process? The study presents how certain individuals perceive voice. The results of the research on the relationships between the spoken word, excellent speaker, voice and description / definition / identification of specific voices done by experts in the field of speech and voice as well as non-professionals are presented. The study encompasses two focus groups. One consists of amateurs (non-specialists in the field of speech or voice who have no knowledge in this field and the other consists of professionals who work with speech or language or voice. The questions were intensified from general to specific, directly related to the topic. The purpose of such a method of questioning was to create relaxed atmosphere, promote discussion, allow participants to interact, complement, and to set up self-listening and additional comments.

  9. The Effect of a Voice Activity Detector on the Speech Enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Torsten; Catic, Jasmina; Buchholz, Jörg;

    2010-01-01

    A multimicrophone speech enhancement algorithm for binaural hearing aids that preserves interaural time delays was proposed recently. The algorithm is based on multichannel Wiener filtering and relies on a voice activity detector (VAD) for estimation of second-order statistics. Here, the effect...... of a VAD on the speech enhancement of this algorithm was evaluated using an envelopebased VAD, and the performance was compared to that achieved using an ideal error-free VAD. The performance was considered for stationary directional noise and nonstationary diffuse noise interferers at input SNRs from −10...

  10. Strategies for communicating contraceptive effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Laureen M; Steiner, Markus; Grimes, David A; Hilgenberg, Deborah; Schulz, Kenneth F

    2013-04-30

    Knowledge of contraceptive effectiveness is crucial to making an informed choice. The consumer has to comprehend the pros and cons of the contraceptive methods being considered. Choice may be influenced by understanding the likelihood of pregnancy with each method and factors that influence effectiveness. To review all randomized controlled trials comparing strategies for communicating to consumers the effectiveness of contraceptives in preventing pregnancy. Through February 2013, we searched the computerized databases of MEDLINE, POPLINE, CENTRAL, PsycINFO and CINAHL, ClinicalTrials.gov, and ICTRP. Previous searches also included EMBASE. We also examined references lists of relevant articles. For the initial review, we wrote to known investigators for information about other published or unpublished trials. We included randomized controlled trials that compared methods for communicating contraceptive effectiveness to consumers. The comparison could be usual practice or an alternative to the experimental intervention.Outcome measures were knowledge of contraceptive effectiveness, attitude about contraception or toward any particular contraceptive, and choice or use of contraceptive method. For the initial review, two authors independently extracted the data. One author entered the data into RevMan, and a second author verified accuracy. For the update, an author and a research associate extracted, entered, and checked the data.For dichotomous variables, we calculated the Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals (CI). For continuous variables, we computed the mean difference (MD) with 95% CI. Seven trials met the inclusion criteria and had a total of 4526 women. Five were multi-site studies. Four trials were conducted in the USA, while Nigeria and Zambia were represented by one study each, and one trial was done in both Jamaica and India.Two trials provided multiple sessions for participants. In one study that examined contraceptive choice, women in

  11. Effective Communication in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    The intent for this paper is to show that communication within the higher education field is a current problem. By looking first at the different styles, forms, and audiences for communication, the reader will hopefully gain perspective as to why this is such a problem in higher education today. Since the Millennial generation is the newest set of…

  12. American and Swedish children's acquisition of vowel duration: Effects of vowel identity and final stop voicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buder, Eugene H.; Stoel-Gammon, Carol

    2002-04-01

    Vowel durations typically vary according to both intrinsic (segment-specific) and extrinsic (contextual) specifications. It can be argued that such variations are due to both predisposition and cognitive learning. The present report utilizes acoustic phonetic measurements from Swedish and American children aged 24 and 30 months to investigate the hypothesis that default behaviors may precede language-specific learning effects. The predicted pattern is the presence of final consonant voicing effects in both languages as a default, and subsequent learning of intrinsic effects most notably in the Swedish children. The data, from 443 monosyllabic tokens containing high-front vowels and final stop consonants, are analyzed in statistical frameworks at group and individual levels. The results confirm that Swedish children show an early tendency to vary vowel durations according to final consonant voicing, followed only six months later by a stage at which the intrinsic influence of vowel identity grows relatively more robust. Measures of vowel formant structure from selected 30-month-old children also revealed a tendency for children of this age to focus on particular acoustic contrasts. In conclusion, the results indicate that early acquisition of vowel specifications involves an interaction between language-specific features and articulatory predispositions associated with phonetic context.

  13. Reliable jitter and shimmer measurements in voice clinics: the relevance of vowel, gender, vocal intensity, and fundamental frequency effects in a typical clinical task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, Meike; Drinnan, Michael J; Storck, Claudio; Carding, Paul N

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine vowel and gender effects on jitter and shimmer in a typical clinical voice task while correcting for the confounding effects of voice sound pressure level (SPL) and fundamental frequency (F(0)). Furthermore the relative effect sizes of vowel, gender, voice SPL, and F(0) were assessed, and recommendations for clinical measurements were derived. With this cross-sectional single cohort study, 57 healthy adults (28 women, 29 men) aged 20-40 years were investigated. Three phonations of /a/, /o/, and /i/ at "normal" voice loudness were analyzed using Praat (software). The effects of vowel, gender, voice SPL, and F(0) on jitter and shimmer were assessed using descriptive and inferential (analysis of covariance) statistics. The effect sizes were determined with the eta-squared statistic. Vowels, gender, voice SPL, and F(0), each had significant effects either on jitter or on shimmer, or both. Voice SPL was the most important factor, whereas vowel, gender, and F(0) effects were comparatively small. Because men had systematically higher voice SPL, the gender effects on jitter and shimmer were smaller when correcting for SPL and F(0). Surprisingly, in clinical assessments, voice SPL has the single biggest impact on jitter and shimmer. Vowel and gender effects were clinically important, whereas fundamental frequency had a relatively small influence. Phonations at a predefined voice SPL (80 dB minimum) and vowel (/a/) would enhance measurement reliability. Furthermore, gender-specific thresholds applying these guidelines should be established. However, the efficiency of these measures should be verified and tested with patients. Copyright © 2011 The Voice Foundation. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of voice timbre and accompaniment on working memory as measured by sequential monosyllabic digit recall performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J; Schwartzberg, Edward T

    2014-01-01

    Information is often paired with music in an attempt to facilitate recall and enhance learning. However, there is a lack of basic research investigating how music carrying information might facilitate recall and subsequent learning. The purpose of the current study was to determine the effects of voice timbre and accompaniment on working memory as measured by recall performance on a sequential digit recall task. Specific research questions were as follows: (a) How might female and male voice timbres affect serial recall? (b) How might piano, guitar, and no accompaniment affect serial recall? (c) Do music majors have enhanced recall accuracy when compared to nonmusic majors? The recall of information paired with six different melodies was tested on 60 university students. Melodies were composed and recorded using female and male voices with three levels of accompaniment: guitar, piano, and no accompaniment. Participants had more accurate recall during the male voice and piano and no accompaniment conditions and least accurate recall during the female voice and guitar accompaniment conditions. As participants had most accurate recall during the male voice and with piano or no accompaniment, clinicians are encouraged to consider using no accompaniment or piano accompaniment when initially teaching social and academic information paired with music for later recall. When possible, vocal timbre (i.e., the potential benefit of male voicing) should also be considered. Implications for clinical practice, limitations of the study, and suggestions for future research are provided. © the American Music Therapy Association 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. AN EMPIRICAL STUDY OF MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS EFFECTIVENESS IN SLOVENIAN MARKET

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Damjana Jerman; Bruno ZavršniK

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the value or more specifically, the contribution of marketing communications strategy to effectiveness of marketing communications and hypothesizes that marketing communications...

  16. Effects of nasalance on the acoustical properties of the tenor passaggio and the head voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, Nicholas Kevin

    This study aims to measure the effect that nasality has on the acoustical properties of the tenor passaggio and head voice. Not to be confused with forward resonance, nasality here will be defined as nasalance, the reading of a Nasometer, or the percentage of nasal and oral airflow during phonation. A previous study by Peer Birch et al. has shown that professional tenors used higher percentages of nasalance through their passaggio. They hypothesized that tenors used nasalance to make slight timbral adjustments as they ascended through passaggio. Other well respected authors including Richard Miller and William McIver have claimed that teaching registration issues is the most important component of training young tenors. It seemed logical to measure the acoustic effects of nasalance on the tenor passaggio and head voice. Eight professional operatic tenors participated as subjects performing numerous vocal exercises that demonstrated various registration events. These examples were recorded and analyzed using a Nasometer and Voce Vista Pro Software. Tenors did generally show an increase of nasalance during an ascending B-flat major scale on the vowels [i] and [u]. Perhaps the most revealing result was that six of seven tenors showed at least a 5-10% increase in nasalance on the note after their primary register transition on the vowel of [a]. It is suggested that this phenomenon receive further empirical scrutiny, because, if true, pedagogues could use nasalance as a tool for helping a young tenor ascend through his passaggio.

  17. Effects of melody and technique on acoustical and musical features of western operatic singing voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrouy-Maestri, Pauline; Magis, David; Morsomme, Dominique

    2014-05-01

    The operatic singing technique is frequently used in classical music. Several acoustical parameters of this specific technique have been studied but how these parameters combine remains unclear. This study aims to further characterize the Western operatic singing technique by observing the effects of melody and technique on acoustical and musical parameters of the singing voice. Fifty professional singers performed two contrasting melodies (popular song and romantic melody) with two vocal techniques (with and without operatic singing technique). The common quality parameters (energy distribution, vibrato rate, and extent), perturbation parameters (standard deviation of the fundamental frequency, signal-to-noise ratio, jitter, and shimmer), and musical features (fundamental frequency of the starting note, average tempo, and sound pressure level) of the 200 sung performances were analyzed. The results regarding the effect of melody and technique on the acoustical and musical parameters show that the choice of melody had a limited impact on the parameters observed, whereas a particular vocal profile appeared depending on the vocal technique used. This study confirms that vocal technique affects most of the parameters examined. In addition, the observation of quality, perturbation, and musical parameters contributes to a better understanding of the Western operatic singing technique. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Shared identity is key to effective communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenaway, Katharine H; Wright, Ruth G; Willingham, Joanne; Reynolds, Katherine J; Haslam, S Alexander

    2015-02-01

    The ability to communicate with others is one of the most important human social functions, yet communication is not always investigated from a social perspective. This research examined the role that shared social identity plays in communication effectiveness using a minimal group paradigm. In two experiments, participants constructed a model using instructions that were said to be created by an ingroup or an outgroup member. Participants made models of objectively better quality when working from communications ostensibly created by an ingroup member (Experiments 1 and 2). However, this effect was attenuated when participants were made aware of a shared superordinate identity that included both the ingroup and the outgroup (Experiment 2). These findings point to the importance of shared social identity for effective communication and provide novel insights into the social psychology of communication. © 2014 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  19. Effect of voice therapy in sulcus vocalis: A single case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rajasudhakar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sulcus vocalis is a structural deformity of the vocal ligament. It is the focal invagination of the epithelium deeply attaching to the vocal ligament. There is a dearth of literature on the outcome of voice therapy in sulcus vocalis condition.Objective: The primary objective of this study was to document voice characteristics of sulcus vocalis and the secondary objective was to establish the efficacy of voice therapy in a patient with sulcus vocalis.Method: A trial of voice therapy was given to the client who was diagnosed as having sulcus vocalis. Boon’s facilitation techniques were used in voice therapy along with other techniques such as breath holding and push and pull approach prior to surgery. Acoustic, aerodynamic, perceptual, quantitative measures of voice quality and self-rating measurements were performed before and after voice therapy.Results: Improvement was noticed in 10/10 acoustic, 4/4 aerodynamic, perceptual, dysphonia severity index and voice handicap index scores, which hinted that voice therapy can be an option critically for clients with sulcus vocalis in the initial stage.Conclusion: Voice therapy showed promising improvement in the study and it must be recommended as the initial treatment option before any surgical management.

  20. Building Relationship Communication Skills for Transformational Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiola, Edward O.

    1995-01-01

    The most important skill for the transformational leader is building relationships through positive and effective communication. Provides guidelines for supporting and encouraging group members, setting the tone for the group, modeling communication behaviors, use of voice patterns, active listening, reflective communication (paraphrasing),…

  1. Effects of vocal training on singing and speaking voice characteristics in vocally healthy adults and children based on choral and nonchoral data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siupsinskiene, Nora; Lycke, Hugo

    2011-07-01

    This prospective cross-sectional study examines the effects of voice training on vocal capabilities in vocally healthy age and gender differentiated groups measured by voice range profile (VRP) and speech range profile (SRP). Frequency and intensity measurements of the VRP and SRP using standard singing and speaking voice protocols were derived from 161 trained choir singers (21 males, 59 females, and 81 prepubescent children) and from 188 nonsingers (38 males, 89 females, and 61 children). When compared with nonsingers, both genders of trained adult and child singers exhibited increased mean pitch range, highest frequency, and VRP area in high frequencies (PVRP area. The logistic regression analysis showed that VRP pitch range, highest frequency, maximum voice intensity, and maximum-minimum intensity range, and SRP slope of speaking curve were the key predictors of voice training. Age, gender, and voice training differentiated norms of VRP and SRP parameters are presented. Significant positive effect of voice training on vocal capabilities, mostly singing voice, was confirmed. The presented norms for trained singers, with key parameters differentiated by gender and age, are suggested for clinical practice of otolaryngologists and speech-language pathologists. Copyright © 2011 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of electronic communication in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kam, WJ; Moorman, PW; Koppejan-Mulder, MJ

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To obtain insight into the effects of electronic communication on GPs by studying those publications in literature describing the effects of structured electronic clinical communication in general practice. Methods: We retrieved all publications in the English language indexed in MEDLINE

  3. Effectiveness of communication strategies for deaf or hard of hearing workers in group settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Scott

    2014-01-01

    In group settings, background noise and an obstructed view of the speaker are just a few of the issues that can make workplace communication difficult for an individual who is deaf or hard of hearing. Accommodation strategies such as amplification of the speaker's voice or the use of text-based alternatives exist to address these issues. However, recent studies have shown that there are still unmet needs related to workplace communication in group settings for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. Identify the most common strategies used by individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to improve communication in group settings and gauge the perceived effectiveness of those strategies. An online survey was conducted with individuals who self-identified as deaf or hard of hearing. The survey presented specific communication strategies based on three functional approaches (aural/oral, text, visual). The strategies applied to both receptive and expressive communication in five different meeting types ranging in size and purpose. 161 adults (age 22-90 yrs.) with limited hearing ability completed the survey. Text-based strategies were typically the least frequently used strategies in group settings, yet they ranked high in perceived effectiveness for receptive and expressive communication. Those who used an interpreter demonstrated a strong preference for having a qualified interpreter present in the meeting rather than an interpreter acting remotely. For expressive communication, participants in general preferred to use their own voice or signing abilities and ranked those strategies as highly effective. A more accessible workplace for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing would incorporate more ubiquitous text-based strategy options. Also, qualified interpreters, when used, should be present in the meeting for maximum effectiveness.

  4. The effect of vowel height on Voice Onset Time in stop consonants in CV sequences in spontaneous Danish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Johannes; Tøndering, John

    2013-01-01

    Voice onset time has been reported to vary with the height of vowels following the stop consonant. This paper investigates the effects of vowel height on VOT in Danish CV sequences with stop consonants in Danish spontaneous speech. A significant effect of vowel height on VOT was found...

  5. The Effects of Communication Modality on Presence, Cognitive Load and Retention in Second Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Stephany Filimon

    2009-01-01

    This thesis reports findings from a study (N = 60) of the impact of three communication modalities (voice only, text only, and voice and text simultaneously) on cognitive load, as measured by subjective reports of mental effort; on learning, as measured by tests of recall and retention; and on perceptions of presence as measured by a Presence…

  6. Emotional Effects of Positive Forms of Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Светлана Валентиновна Ионова

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the problem of emotional significance of a positive form of speech. Based on the methodology of emotions linguistics, linguoecology, communicative linguistics and the methods of description, comparison and discourse analysis, the author distinguishes some types of speech situations that demonstrate visible differences between positive expression of emotions and their content and the pragmatic effect. The difference between the notions of “positive communication” and “positive form of communication” is demonstrated. Special attention is given to the following types of positive emotional communication: tolerant emotional communication, emotional emphasis, emotional neglect, and emotional tabooing. The utterances in situations of real and textual communication demonstrate negative effects of statements expressed in a positive form and identify the specifics of positive forms of emotional communication in comparison with rational communication.

  7. Intensive foreign language learning reveals effects on categorical perception of sibilant voicing after only 3 weeks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Andreas Højlund; Horn, Nynne Thorup; Derdau Sørensen, Stine

    2015-01-01

    of training. Results from immersion studies are inconclusive, but some suggest continued effects on non-native speech perception after 6-8 years of experience. We investigated this apparent discrepancy in the timing of adaptation to foreign speech sounds in a longitudinal study of foreign language learning......Models of speech learning suggest that adaptations to foreign language sound categories take place within 6-12 months of exposure to a foreign language. Results from laboratory language training show effects of very targeted training on non-native speech contrasts within only one to three weeks...... (T0), after three weeks (T1), six months (T2), and 19 months (T3). We used a phonemic Arabic contrast (pharyngeal vs. glottal frication) and a phonemic Dari contrast (sibilant voicing) as stimuli. We observed an effect of learning on the Dari learners’ identification of the Dari stimuli already after...

  8. The content of the message matters: The differential effects of promotive and prohibitive team voice on team productivity and safety performance gains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Alex Ning; Liao, Hui; Tangirala, Subrahmaniam; Firth, Brady M

    2017-08-01

    We propose that it is important to take the content of team voice into account when examining its impact on team processes and outcomes. Drawing on regulatory focus theory (Higgins, 1997), we argue that promotive team voice and prohibitive team voice help teams achieve distinct collective outcomes-that is, team productivity performance gains and team safety performance gains, respectively. Further, we identify mechanisms through which promotive and prohibitive team voices uniquely influence team outcomes as well as boundary conditions for such influences. In data collected from 88 production teams, we found that promotive team voice had a positive association with team productivity performance gains. By contrast, prohibitive team voice had a positive association with team safety performance gains. The relationship between promotive team voice and team productivity performance gains was mediated by team innovation, and the relationship between prohibitive team voice and team safety performance gains was mediated by team monitoring. In addition, the indirect effect of prohibitive team voice on team safety performance gains via team monitoring was stronger when prior team safety performance was lower. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of these findings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. The Effect of Voice Thread® Integration on High School Students' Anxiety and Oral Proficiency in the Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Melanie Gail

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the asynchronous voice-conferencing technology, "Voice Thread"®, on the anxiety and oral proficiency of high school students in their third year of studying Spanish as a foreign language. In this quasi-experimental study students' foreign language anxiety levels and oral proficiency…

  10. Effects of Conditioning Voices as Reinforcers for Listener Responses on Rate of Learning, Awareness, and Preferences for Listening to Stories in Preschoolers with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, R. Douglas; Pistoljevic, Nirvana; Cahill, Claire; Du, Lin

    2011-01-01

    We used a delayed non-concurrent pre- and post-intervention probe design to test the effects of a voice conditioning protocol (VCP) with 3 preschoolers with autism on (a) rate of acquisition of listener curricular objectives, (b) observing voices and the presence of adults across 3 settings, (c) selecting to listen to adults tell stories in free…

  11. Temporal voice areas exist in autism spectrum disorder but are dysfunctional for voice identity recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiak, Kamila; von Kriegstein, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    The ability to recognise the identity of others is a key requirement for successful communication. Brain regions that respond selectively to voices exist in humans from early infancy on. Currently, it is unclear whether dysfunction of these voice-sensitive regions can explain voice identity recognition impairments. Here, we used two independent functional magnetic resonance imaging studies to investigate voice processing in a population that has been reported to have no voice-sensitive regions: autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Our results refute the earlier report that individuals with ASD have no responses in voice-sensitive regions: Passive listening to vocal, compared to non-vocal, sounds elicited typical responses in voice-sensitive regions in the high-functioning ASD group and controls. In contrast, the ASD group had a dysfunction in voice-sensitive regions during voice identity but not speech recognition in the right posterior superior temporal sulcus/gyrus (STS/STG)—a region implicated in processing complex spectrotemporal voice features and unfamiliar voices. The right anterior STS/STG correlated with voice identity recognition performance in controls but not in the ASD group. The findings suggest that right STS/STG dysfunction is critical for explaining voice recognition impairments in high-functioning ASD and show that ASD is not characterised by a general lack of voice-sensitive responses. PMID:27369067

  12. The effect of fatigue on interlimb communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gervasio, Sabata; Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    was to investigate the possible effect of muscular fatigue on interlimb communication. Eight amateur male soccer players took part to two recording sessions in which they either performed a 90-minute simulated soccer match (SAFT90) or rested (control session). Interlimb communication was investigated by quantifying...

  13. Information and Language for Effective Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitoy, Sammy P.

    2012-01-01

    Information and Language for Effective Communication (ILEC) is a language teaching approach emphasizing learners' extensive exposure in different language communicative sources. In ILEC, the language learners will first receive instructions of ILEC principles and application. Afterwards, they will receive autonomous, direct, purposeful, and…

  14. Cultural Effects and Uses of Communication Satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Wilbur

    The communication satellite already has developed a mature technology. It carries a substantial part of the world's long range communication, and is now useable for special cultural and educational purposes. Major cultural effects come from its contribution to increasing enormously the flow of information in the world. It will increase human…

  15. An Evaluation of "Effective Communication Skills" Coursebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shameem

    2016-01-01

    In Communicative Language Teaching situation, role of material is not only important but also inevitable. In the traditional context of English teaching textbooks are considered the main source of materials. This paper will provide an evaluation of "Effective Communication Skills" ("ECS") coursebook that has been introduced as…

  16. Efficacy of conservative voice treatment in male-to-female transsexuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mészáros, Krisztina; Vitéz, Lajos Csokonai; Szabolcs, István; Góth, Miklós; Kovács, László; Görömbei, Zoltán; Hacki, Tamás

    2005-01-01

    A voice assessment was performed before and after conservative voice treatment in 3 male-to-female transsexuals and in 2 nontreated transsexuals serving as control persons. The characteristics studied were voice quality, habitual speaking pitch, vocal pitch range, vocal intensity range, maximum phonation time and 'communicative impairment', a subjective self-estimation by the patient. Based on these parameters the Friedrich dysphonia index (DI) was calculated. The habitual speaking pitch of the 3 transsexuals who had received voice treatment became female, in contrast to that of the nontreated transsexuals, which remained in the so-called 'indifferent pitch range'. The DI of the treated patients was close to the normal value, in contrast to the DI of controls, which continued to be pathological. Even based on this small population, study results reflected the effectiveness of voice therapy in transsexuals.

  17. PatientVOICE: development of a preparatory, pre-chemotherapy online communication tool for older patients with cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, S. van; Driesenaar, J.A.; Weert, J.C.M. van; Osch, M. van; Noordman, J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Good communication around cancer treatment is essential in helping patients cope with their disease and related care, especially when this information is tailored to one’s needs. Despite its importance, communication is often complex, in particular in older patients (aged 65 years or

  18. PatientVOICE: Development of a preparatory, pre-chemotherapy online communication tool for older patients with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dulmen, S.; Driesenaar, J.A.; van Weert, J.C.M.; van Osch, M.; Noordman, J.

    Background: Good communication around cancer treatment is essential in helping patients cope with their disease and related care, especially when this information is tailored to one’s needs. Despite its importance, communication is often complex, in particular in older patients (aged 65 years or

  19. Communicating effectively with deaf patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAleer, Monica

    This article explores the communication needs of deaf patients who use British Sign Language as their first or preferred language. It would appear that these needs are not being met, particularly in acute hospital settings. Practical advice is provided for nurses to improve the quality of care that deaf patients receive.

  20. The VOICES/VOCES Success Story: Effective Strategies for Training, Technical Assistance and Community-Based Organization Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdallah, Myriam; Vargo, Sue; Herrera, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions (DEBI) project successfully disseminated VOICES/VOCES, a brief video-based HIV risk reduction intervention targeting African American and Latino heterosexual men and women at risk for HIV infection. Elements of the dissemination strategy included a…

  1. Work-related voice disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Eduardo Przysiezny; Luciana Tironi Sanson Przysiezny

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Dysphonia is the main symptom of the disorders of oral communication. However, voice disorders also present with other symptoms such as difficulty in maintaining the voice (asthenia), vocal fatigue, variation in habitual vocal fundamental frequency, hoarseness, lack of vocal volume and projection, loss of vocal efficiency, and weakness when speaking. There are several proposals for the etiologic classification of dysphonia: functional, organofunctional, organic, and work-related...

  2. The effects of thematic context and presentation mode on memory for sentence voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, N H; Butler, S F; Maykuth, P L; Delis, D

    1982-05-01

    A sentence in discourse may appear in the passive voice to emphasize the logical object rather than the logical subject when it is thematically more important. Two experiments are reported that explore the impact of this textual function of voice on sentence memory. The first experiment required subjects to listen to prose passages and then recall them. Sentences were recalled predominantly in the active voice regardless of voice or thematic focus in the prose passage, showing that the English-language bias for the active voice was a more important determinant of sentence reconstruction than was the experiment manipulation of thematic context. The second experiment required subjects to listen to or read either prose passages or lists of unrelated sentences and then to try to recognize "key" sentences that were either unchanged or changed lexically, semantically, or in voice. Recognition, both overall and specifically for voice, was better for sentences that were read than for those that were heard, and recognition for semantic change was consistently higher than for any other. Only when passages were read was there evidence in support of a thematic textual influence on memory for sentence voice.

  3. Sex differences in voice onset time: A developmental study of phonetic context effects in British English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Sandra P.; Henry, Luisa; Dobbin, Rachel

    2004-08-01

    Voice onset time (VOT) data for the plosives /p b t d k g/ in two vowel contexts (eye opena) for 5 groups of 46 boys and girls aged 5; 8 (5 years, 8 months) to 13;2 years were investigated to examine patterns of sex differences. Results indicated that there was some evidence of females displaying longer VOT values than the males. In addition, these were found to be most marked for the data of the 13;2-year olds. Furthermore, the sex differences in the VOT values displayed phonetic context effects. For example, the greatest sex differences were observed for the voiceless plosives, and within the context of the vowel /i/.

  4. "Voice Forum" The Human Voice as Primary Instrument in Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard; Storm, Sanne

    2009-01-01

    Aspects will be drawn on the human voice as tool for embodying our psychological and physiological state, and attempting integration of feelings. Presentations and dialogues on different methods and techniques in "Therapy related body-and voice work.", as well as the human voice as a tool for non...... for nonverbal orientation and information both to our selves and others. Focus on training on the voice instrument, the effect and impact of the human voice, and listening perspectives...

  5. AN EMPIRICAL STUDY OF MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS EFFECTIVENESS IN SLOVENIAN MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjana Jerman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the value or more specifically, the contribution of marketing communications strategy to effectiveness of marketing communications and hypothesizes that marketing communications strategy correlate with the effectiveness of marketing communications. The paper consists of two parts: the theoretical framework for the role of marketing communications strategy for the effectiveness of the marketing communications and the empirical analysis, based on the primary data collected. The concept of the marketing communication effectiveness assumes that there are variables that can have a positive influence on the effectiveness of marketing communications, which incorporates facets of the marketing communication strategy and bidirectional communications. The results suggest that Slovenian organisations which design and implement marketing communication strategy, also have more effective marketing communications. The development of marketing communications strategy was correlated with increased effectiveness of marketing communications in their organisation. Managerial implications are discussed along with directions for further research.

  6. Doing right versus getting ahead: the effects of duty and achievement orientations on employees' voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangirala, Subrahmaniam; Kamdar, Dishan; Venkataramani, Vijaya; Parke, Michael R

    2013-11-01

    Using role theory as the overarching framework, we propose that employees' voice has contrasting relationships with the traits of duty orientation, or employees' dispositional sense of moral and ethical obligation at the workplace, and achievement orientation, or the extent of their ingrained personal ambition to get ahead professionally. Using data from 262 employees and their managers, we demonstrate that duty and achievement orientations are, respectively, positively and negatively related to voice through their impact on voice role conceptualization or the extent to which employees consider voice as part of their personal responsibility at work. Further, we delineate how employees' beliefs about their efficacy to engage in voice and judgments about psychological safety in the organization can moderate these relationships. We discuss the implications of these findings for theory and practice. (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. Study the Effect of Base Frequency on the Performance of WiMAX Network Carrying Voice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassam F.Gumaidah

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available WiMAX is stand for Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access. (WiMAX embodies the IEEE 802.16 family of standards that provide wireless broadband access to residential and commercial Internet subscribers. This technology takes the first position among the technologies these days. WiMAX can offers or adds some qualifications to the wireless technologies like high data rate, long coverage area and offers several types Quality of service to the customers. The long coverage area of WiMAX coming from the high transmit power and from the architecture of the network which is similar to mobile network, wherethe WiMAX base station architecture, is similar to GSM base station, need tower and can be sectorized,etc. One of the feature of WiMAX devises is the wide range of base frequency from 2 to 66 GHz, on both licensed and free licensed spectrum [1] .In this paper the effect of base frequency on the WiMAX network performance will be studied .we concern on three famous frequency (2.4,3.5 and 5.8GHz [2],which most of the WiMAX devises work on them. OPNET MODELER is a simulation program used to simulate the work of networks with different values of base frequency. We use the modeler to study network of 12 WiMAX workstation connect and call each other by one WiMAX base station during 300 second. The results show that the higher the base frequency the higher the Signal to Noise Ratio ,that lead to high throughput ,low packet end to end delay, finally lead to high mean opinion score (MOS which mean good quality of voice. In the same time the results show that increase in the coverage area will lead to drop in Signal to Noise Ratio and MOS which will effect negatively in the quality of voice.

  8. Effects of an Open Jaw Posture on Vowel Perception in the Aging Voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mautner, Helene D

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to verify through an auditory-perceptual approach, whether an "open jaw" posture would result in improved speech quality for older adults. Forty normal-hearing listeners (20 males; 20 females) aged between 18 and 47 listened to vowel segments and performed two separate tasks: identifying vowels and comparing vowel clarity. Stimuli included vowels segmented from a sentence ("We saw two cars.") produced using a normal and an open jaw posture by 40 individuals aged between 30s and 80s. Three types of stimuli were presented: variable length and intensity, fixed length and variable intensity, and fixed length and normalized intensity. Mixed model analyses of variance were used to determine whether there was a jaw posture effect on the percentage of correct vowel identification. Chi-square tests were used to determine whether vowels produced with an open jaw posture were more likely to be identified as being "clearer." Open jaw posture resulted in higher rates of correct vowel identification, and vowels from contrast pairs were consistently judged as being "clearer" than vowels produced in normal jaw posture. Investigations on the effect of stimulus type revealed that the jaw-related improvement in speech quality was not solely due to an increase in intensity or length induced by an open jaw posture. Listeners assessing vowel identification and clarity in the aging voice were able to better differentiate among vowels spoken using an open jaw posture, and a greater number of vowels produced in an open jaw posture were perceived as sounding clearer. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of Information Communications Technology on Cataloguing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Information Communications Technology on Cataloguing and ... Data was collected through the use of questionnaire designed for the study. ... at anytime and from any terminal and expect the computer to react and reply immediately.

  10. Effect of Information Communication Technology Facilities on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Information Communication Technology Facilities on Students' Performance: ... Results indicated a significant difference in performance in both tests between ... ICT facilities in all secondary schools to enhance teaching and learning.

  11. Handshakes in Cyberspace: Bridging the Cultural Differences through Effective Intercultural Communication and Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. Y. Janey

    In the online learning environment, communication and collaboration occur from a distance. In the absence of non-verbal communication cues (such as facial expressions, gestures, and tone of voice), understanding, communication, and interaction rest largely on individual assumptions and interpretations. The magnitude of these communication…

  12. Recommendable Practices for Effective Nuclear Crisis Communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Ju; Hah, Yeon Hee [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    'Crisis communication' refers one of the activities done by the Nuclear Regulatory Organizations (NROs) in order to protect the public and the environment from the possible harmful effects. As denoted by the BMU, German NRO, crisis communication is not only 'public information' or 'information for the public', but also communication between authorities in order to guarantee that public information is consistent. This study proposes some recommendable practices for developing a guideline of well-prepared nuclear crisis communication system, including its management framework, and for introducing good insights, based on the study of international aspects provided by relevant OECD/NEA WPGC (Working Group on Public Communication for Nuclear Regulatory Organizations)i working group

  13. Effects of an artificially lengthened vocal tract on the glottal closed quotient in untrained male voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskill, Christopher Somers

    The use of hard-walled narrow tubes, often called resonance tubes, for the purpose of voice therapy and voice training has a historical precedent and some theoretical support, but the mechanism of any potential benefit from the application of this technique has remained poorly understood. Fifteen vocally untrained male participants produced a series of spoken /a / vowels at a modal pitch and constant loudness, followed by a minute of repeated phonation into a hard-walled glass tube at the same pitch and loudness targets. The tube parameters and tube phonation task criteria were selected according to theoretical calculations predicting an increase in the acoustic load such that phonation would occur under conditions of near-maximum inertive reactance. Following tube phonation, each participant repeated a similar series of spoken /a/ vowels. Electroglottography (EGG) was used to measure the glottal closed quotient (CQ) during each phase of the experiment. A single-subject, multiple-baseline design with direct replication across subjects was used to identify any changes in CQ across the phases of the experiment. Single-subject analysis using the method of Statistical Process Control (SPC) revealed statistically significant changes in CQ during tube phonation, but with no discernable pattern across the 15 participants. These results indicate that the use of resonance tubes can have a distinct effect on glottal closure, but the mechanism behind this change remains unclear. The implication is that vocal loading techniques such as this need to be studied further with specific attention paid to the underlying mechanism of any measured changes in glottal behavior, and especially to the role of instruction and feedback in the therapeutic and pedagogical application of these techniques.

  14. Voices of fear and anxiety and sadness and depression: the effects of speech rate and loudness on fear and anxiety and sadness and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegman, A W; Boyle, S

    1993-08-01

    Two studies investigated the role of expressive vocal behavior (specifically, speech rate and loudness) in fear and anxiety and in sadness and depression. In the first study, participants spoke about personally experienced fear and anxiety-arousing and neutral events using 3 different voice styles: fast and loud, normal, and slow and soft. In the second study, participants spoke about personally experienced sad or depressing and neutral events using the same 3 voice styles. In both studies, the participants' highest levels of subjective affective and cardiovascular (CV) arousal occurred when they spoke about the emotional events in a mood-congruent voice style: fast and loud in the case of fear and anxiety, and slow and soft in the case of sadness or depression. Mood-incongruent voice styles canceled the heightened levels of CV arousal normally associated with these negative emotions. The voice-style manipulation had no significant effect on the participants' levels of CV arousal during the neutral discussions.

  15. Speaking up behaviours (safety voices) of healthcare workers: A metasynthesis of qualitative research studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Kelly J; Gustavson, Allison M; Jones, Jacqueline

    2016-12-01

    A critical characteristic of effective teams in any setting is when each member is willing to speak up to share thoughts and ideas to improve processes. In spite of attempts by healthcare systems to encourage employees to speak up, employee silence remains a common cause of communication breakdowns, contributing to errors and suboptimal care delivery. Nurses in particular have reported low confidence in their communication abilities, and cite the belief that speaking up will not make a difference. To develop an understanding of how nurses and other healthcare workers relate to safety voice behaviors and how this might influence clinical practice. A search of the PubMed, CINAHL, and Academic Search Premier databases was conducted using keywords employee, nurse, qualitative, speak up, silence, safety, voice, and safety voice identified 372 articles with 11 retained after a review of the abstracts. Studies took place in Australia, Bulgaria, Canada, Hong Kong, East Africa, Ireland, Korea, New Zealand, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States representing 504 healthcare workers including 354 nurses. This interpretive meta-synthesis of 11 qualitative articles published from 2005 to 2015 was conducted using a social constructivist approach with thematic analysis. The four themes identified are: 1) hierarchies and power dynamics negatively affect safety voice, 2) open communication is unsafe and ineffective, 3) embedded expectations of nurse behavior affect safety voice, and 4) nurse managers have a powerful positive or negative affect on safety voice. Healthcare workers worldwide report multiple social and hierarchy related fears surrounding the utilization of safety voice behaviors. Hesitance to speak up is pervasive among nurses, as is low self-efficacy related to safety voice. The presence of caring leaders, peer support, and an organizational commitment to safe, open cultures, may improve safety voice utilization among nurses and other healthcare workers. Copyright

  16. Speaker's voice as a memory cue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campeanu, Sandra; Craik, Fergus I M; Alain, Claude

    2015-02-01

    Speaker's voice occupies a central role as the cornerstone of auditory social interaction. Here, we review the evidence suggesting that speaker's voice constitutes an integral context cue in auditory memory. Investigation into the nature of voice representation as a memory cue is essential to understanding auditory memory and the neural correlates which underlie it. Evidence from behavioral and electrophysiological studies suggest that while specific voice reinstatement (i.e., same speaker) often appears to facilitate word memory even without attention to voice at study, the presence of a partial benefit of similar voices between study and test is less clear. In terms of explicit memory experiments utilizing unfamiliar voices, encoding methods appear to play a pivotal role. Voice congruency effects have been found when voice is specifically attended at study (i.e., when relatively shallow, perceptual encoding takes place). These behavioral findings coincide with neural indices of memory performance such as the parietal old/new recollection effect and the late right frontal effect. The former distinguishes between correctly identified old words and correctly identified new words, and reflects voice congruency only when voice is attended at study. Characterization of the latter likely depends upon voice memory, rather than word memory. There is also evidence to suggest that voice effects can be found in implicit memory paradigms. However, the presence of voice effects appears to depend greatly on the task employed. Using a word identification task, perceptual similarity between study and test conditions is, like for explicit memory tests, crucial. In addition, the type of noise employed appears to have a differential effect. While voice effects have been observed when white noise is used at both study and test, using multi-talker babble does not confer the same results. In terms of neuroimaging research modulations, characterization of an implicit memory effect

  17. Keeping Your Voice Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Keeping Your Voice Healthy Keeping Your Voice Healthy Patient Health Information ... heavily voice-related. Key Steps for Keeping Your Voice Healthy Drink plenty of water. Moisture is good ...

  18. The design of a digital voice data compression technique for orbiter voice channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Voice bandwidth compression techniques were investigated to anticipate link margin difficulties in the shuttle S-band communication system. It was felt that by reducing the data rate on each voice channel from the baseline 24 (or 32) Kbps to 8 Kbps, additional margin could be obtained. The feasibility of such an alternate voice transmission system was studied. Several factors of prime importance that were addressed are: (1) achieving high quality voice at 8 Kbps; (2) performance in the presence of the anticipated shuttle cabin environmental noise; (3) performance in the presence of the anticipated channel error statistics; and (4) minimal increase in size, weight, and power over the current baseline voice processor.

  19. Effective communication with primary care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karen

    2014-08-01

    Effective communication requires direct interaction between the hospitalist and the primary care provider using a standardized method of information exchange with the opportunity to ask questions and assign accountability for follow-up roles. The discharge summary is part of the process but does not provide the important aspects of handoff, such as closed loop communication and role assignments. Hospital discharge is a significant safety risk for patients, with more than half of discharged patients experiencing at least one error. Hospitalist and primary care providers need to collaborate to develop a standardized system to communicate about shared patients that meets handoff requirements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Building Effective Marketing Communications in Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorlevskaya Liudmila

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the world of rapid technological evolution and economy of digitalization, consumers are continuously changing. Tourists are among the first. Their behaviour, media consumption, engagement level and expectations must influence on transformation of applied communication tools. In recent decades, the pace of change became faster. Media consumption has shifted to Internet, Mobile and innovative mediums. The paper proposes modern forms of communication tools on different stages of making-decision process and describes role of each to build marketing communications of tourism industry actors in a more effective way.

  1. English Language Constructs Preceding Communication Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenifer Raymond R. Tallungan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Educational managers transport information, thoughts and attitudes through a system of verbal and nonverbal language. What differs across diverse personalities is the level of communication effectiveness which ascertains the success in the flow of messages not only at the organizational level but also in the classroom where learning takes place. This study, which aimed to disclose correlations between language constructs and communication effectiveness, puts the light to the randomly selected educational management students of a state university in Cagayan Valley. Using a language test and a questionnaire, it was revealed that the level of language proficiency of the respondents as to correct usage, presentation and writing is very satisfactory, and as to subject-verb agreement, vocabulary, reading comprehension, listening comprehension, and action research, satisfactory; while their level of communication effectiveness along using non-verbal language, transmitting messages and receiving messages is high. At 0.05 level analysis, significant correlations exist between communication effectiveness (along using nonverbal language and receiving messages and language proficiency along reading. These findings provided insights in enhancing communication in classroom management, organizational management as well as in communication management instruction..

  2. Design of Explosion-proof Non-central Switch Voice Communication System in Coal Mine%煤矿井下防爆型无主机语音通信系统设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏春华

    2012-01-01

    An explosion-proof non-central switch voice communication systems is introduced in this article for the disadvantage of the slow rate of communication, the small bandwidth, the bad tone and the big SNR. The system consist of high voice encode and de- code chip CMX618 based on Robust Advanced Low Complexity Waveform Interpolation. The main system adopts the low power STM32FI03RE controller and the communication bus of far distance uses the CAN bus. Experimental results indicate that the tone of the system is acceptable better and the stability and reliability of the system is good when the compression rate mode is 2400b/s. The designed system can satisfy the demand of voice communication bandwidth, the quality of voice, the system stability and reliability. It can be Popularized in the coal mine.%针对煤矿井下语音通信速率低,带宽小,音质差,噪声大等缺点,设计了一种煤矿井下防爆型低功耗无主机语音通信系统。该系统的语音编解码采用高压缩率算法RALCWI的CMX618,系统控制采用低功耗STM32F103RE控制器,语音的远距离通信采用CAN总线方式。试验结果表明,语音的压缩速率模式2400b/s时,音质较好,通信稳定可靠,满足煤矿井下语音通信带宽要求,语音质量,系统稳定与可靠性高的要求,易于在煤矿系统中推广。

  3. An Evaluation of Effective Communication Skills Coursebook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shameem Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In Communicative Language Teaching situation, role of material is not only important but also inevitable. In the traditional context of English teaching textbooks are considered the main source of materials. This paper will provide an evaluation of Effective Communication Skills (ECS coursebook that has been introduced as a pilot project implemented in 2011 by the Ministry of Higher Education, Malaysia. For the current study, data has been collected on the basis of materials study, and questionnaires. The qualitative analysis has been conducted with a total sample of around 214 students, and 3 instructors. The results show that in spite of some shortcomings, there is a general satisfaction about this textbook as it is exclusively produced by the local experts for the tertiary level. The study concludes with suggestions and recommendations for the improvement of the Effective Communication Skills. Keywords: Coursebook evaluation, communicative English, Pilot Project, ECS

  4. Differences in Access to Information and Communication Technologies: Voices of British Muslim Teenage Girls at Islamic Faith Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardaker, Glenn; Sabki, Aishah; Qazi, Atika; Iqbal, Javed

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Most research on information and communication technologies (ICT) differences has been related to gender and ethnicity, and to a lesser extent religious affiliation. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to this field of research by situating the discussion in the context of British Muslims and extending current research into ICT…

  5. VOICE QUALITY BEFORE AND AFTER THYROIDECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora CVELBAR

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Voice disorders are a well-known complication which is often associated with thyroid gland diseases and because voice is still the basic mean of communication it is very important to maintain its quality healthy. Objectives: The aim of this study referred to questions whether there is a statistically significant difference between results of voice self-assessment, perceptual voice assessment and acoustic voice analysis before and after thyroidectomy and whether there are statistically significant correlations between variables of voice self-assessment, perceptual assessment and acoustic analysis before and after thyroidectomy. Methods: This scientific research included 12 participants aged between 41 and 76. Voice self-assessment was conducted with the help of Croatian version of Voice Handicap Index (VHI. Recorded reading samples were used for perceptual assessment and later evaluated by two clinical speech and language therapists. Recorded samples of phonation were used for acoustic analysis which was conducted with the help of acoustic program Praat. All of the data was processed through descriptive statistics and nonparametric statistical methods. Results: Results showed that there are statistically significant differences between results of voice self-assessments and results of acoustic analysis before and after thyroidectomy. Statistically significant correlations were found between variables of perceptual assessment and acoustic analysis. Conclusion: Obtained results indicate the importance of multidimensional, preoperative and postoperative assessment. This kind of assessment allows the clinician to describe all of the voice features and provides appropriate recommendation for further rehabilitation to the patient in order to optimize voice outcomes.

  6. An Implementation of Mobile Wireless Ad Hoc Real-time Voice Communication System%一种移动无线自组网即时语音通信系统的实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李现涛; 郭达伟; 李杨

    2011-01-01

    Mobile Ad Hoc has been quickly developed recently, requirement for real - time voice communication based on the platform is increasingly shown. This paper gives out a way to realize the multi - hop real - time voice communication system, with the technology VOIP, RTP and so on. Through mobile tests, the system has shown a good performance,which is sentenced to be more than 3.5 by MOS standard under low speed mobile condition, this system could support instant voice communication.%近年来,移动无线自组织网络迅速发展,在该平台上实时语音通信的需求也日益显现.在linux平台下,利用VOIP和RTP等技术实现了无线移动自组织网络的多跳即时语音通信系统.并通过上网本组成的硬件实验平台进行了移动实验,在低速移动条件下的实时语音通信效果MOS评分在3.5以上,能够满足即时语音通信的需求.

  7. Cause-effect relationship between vocal fold physiology and voice production in a three-dimensional phonation model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zhaoyan

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study is to better understand the cause-effect relation between vocal fold physiology and the resulting vibration pattern and voice acoustics. Using a three-dimensional continuum model of phonation, the effects of changes in vocal fold stiffness, medial surface thickness in the vertical direction, resting glottal opening, and subglottal pressure on vocal fold vibration and different acoustic measures are investigated. The results show that the medial surface thickness has dom...

  8. Intensive Foreign Language Learning Reveals Effects on Categorical Perception of Sibilant Voicing After Only 3 Weeks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Højlund Nielsen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Models of speech learning suggest that adaptations to foreign language sound categories take place within 6 to 12 months of exposure to a foreign language. Results from laboratory language training show effects of very targeted training on nonnative speech contrasts within only 1 to 4 weeks of training. Results from immersion studies are inconclusive, but some suggest continued effects on nonnative speech perception after 6 to 8 years of experience. We investigated this apparent discrepancy in the timing of adaptation to foreign speech sounds in a longitudinal study of foreign language learning. We examined two groups of Danish language officer cadets learning either Arabic (Modern Standard Arabic and Egyptian Arabic or Dari (Afghan Farsi through intensive multifaceted language training. We conducted two experiments (identification and discrimination with the cadets who were tested four times: at the start (T0, after 3 weeks (T1, 6 months (T2, and 19 months (T3. We used a phonemic Arabic contrast (pharyngeal vs. glottal frication and a phonemic Dari contrast (sibilant voicing as stimuli. We observed an effect of learning on the Dari learners’ identification of the Dari stimuli already after 3 weeks of language training, which was sustained, but not improved, after 6 and 19 months. The changes in the Dari learners’ identification functions were positively correlated with their grades after 6 months. We observed no other learning effects at the group level. We discuss the results in the light of predictions from speech learning models.

  9. Intensive Foreign Language Learning Reveals Effects on Categorical Perception of Sibilant Voicing After Only 3 Weeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Andreas Højlund; Horn, Nynne Thorup; Sørensen, Stine Derdau; McGregor, William B; Wallentin, Mikkel

    2015-12-01

    Models of speech learning suggest that adaptations to foreign language sound categories take place within 6 to 12 months of exposure to a foreign language. Results from laboratory language training show effects of very targeted training on nonnative speech contrasts within only 1 to 4 weeks of training. Results from immersion studies are inconclusive, but some suggest continued effects on nonnative speech perception after 6 to 8 years of experience. We investigated this apparent discrepancy in the timing of adaptation to foreign speech sounds in a longitudinal study of foreign language learning. We examined two groups of Danish language officer cadets learning either Arabic (Modern Standard Arabic and Egyptian Arabic) or Dari (Afghan Farsi) through intensive multifaceted language training. We conducted two experiments (identification and discrimination) with the cadets who were tested four times: at the start (T0), after 3 weeks (T1), 6 months (T2), and 19 months (T3). We used a phonemic Arabic contrast (pharyngeal vs. glottal frication) and a phonemic Dari contrast (sibilant voicing) as stimuli. We observed an effect of learning on the Dari learners' identification of the Dari stimuli already after 3 weeks of language training, which was sustained, but not improved, after 6 and 19 months. The changes in the Dari learners' identification functions were positively correlated with their grades after 6 months. We observed no other learning effects at the group level. We discuss the results in the light of predictions from speech learning models.

  10. Effects of Consensus Training on the Reliability of Auditory Perceptual Ratings of Voice Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwarsson, Jenny; Petersen, Niels Reinholt

    2012-01-01

    a multidimensional protocol with four-point equal-appearing interval scales. The stimuli consisted of text reading by authentic dysphonic patients. The consensus training for each perceptual voice parameter included (1) definition, (2) underlying physiology, (3) presentation of carefully selected sound examples...... training, including use of a reference voice sample material, to calibrate, equalize, and stabilize the internal standards held in memory by the listeners....

  11. Is voice therapy an effective treatment for dysphonia? A randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    MacKenzie, K.; Millar, A; Wilson, J. A.; Sellars, C.; Deary, I. J.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the overall efficacy of voice therapy for dysphonia. DESIGN: Single blind randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Outpatient clinic in a teaching hospital. Participants: 204 outpatients aged 17-87 with a primary symptom of persistent hoarseness for at least two months. INTERVENTIONS: After baseline assessments, patients were randomised to six weeks of either voice therapy or no treatment. Assessments were repeated at six weeks on the 145 (71%) patients who continued to thi...

  12. Resonant communicators, effective communicators. Communicator’s flow and credibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene García-Ureta, Ph.D

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Communication studies have been integrating the latest developments in cognitive sciences and acknowledging the importance of understanding the subjective processes involved in communication. This article argues that communication studies should also take into account the psychology of the communicator. This article presents the theoretical basis and the results of a training programme designed for audiovisual communicators. The programme is based on the theories of self-efficacy and flow and seeks to improve students’ communication competencies through the use of presentation techniques and psychological skills to tackle communication apprehension. The programme involves an active methodology that is based on modelling, visualisation, immediate feedback and positive reinforcement. A repeated-measures ANOVA shows that the programme successfully decreases the level of communication apprehension, improves the perceived self-efficacy, improves the psychological state needed to perform better in front of the cameras (flow, and improves students’ communication skills. A path analysis proved that the perceived self-efficacy and anxiety levels predict the level of flow during the communication act. At the end of the training programme, those who experienced higher levels of flow and enjoyment during the communication task achieved higher quality levels in their communication exercise. It is concluded that the concepts of self-efficacy and flow facilitate advancing in the understanding of the factors that determine a communicator’s credibility and ability to connect with the audience.

  13. Invisible voices : understanding the sociocultural influences on adult migrantsʼ second language learning and communicative interaction

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation is a qualitative study exploring the sociocultural influences on adult migrants’ second language learning and the communicative interaction through which they use the language. Guided by a theoretical perspective based on the concepts of life-world, habitus, social capital, symbolic honor, game, and the idea of the interrelatedness of learning and using a second language, this study aims to understand how migrants’ everyday life context, attachments to the home country, and ...

  14. The Effectiveness of Voice Training for 30 Patients with Functional Dysphonia%嗓音训练治疗30例功能性嗓音障碍的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭嘉升; 祁斌时; 刘中良

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe the effectiveness of voice training for patients with functional dysphonia.Methods The voice therapy (voice health education, improvement of respiration and resonance enhancement) was performed for 30 patients who were diagnosed with functional dysphonia. The patients were assessed before and after the treatment to observe the effectiveness.Results The voice handicap index(VHI) decreased from 67.8±10.1 to 30.7±8.2 after the voice training and the difference was significant(P<0.01). The functional, physiological and emotional scores decreased significantly after the training. The maximum phonation time(MPT) increased significantly from 9.2±2.6 s to 13.5±3.1 s, jitter decreased was from 0.59%±0.07% to 0.42%±0.05%,shimmer decreased from 2.23±0.45 to 1.78±0.27 and noise-to-harmonic ratio (NHR) decreased from 0.185±0.088 to 0.142±0.065,all showing significant differences(P<0.05).Conclusion Voice training can effectively reduce the severity of voice dysphonia and enhance the voice quality of patients with functional dysphonia. This therapy can also improve the communicative and emotional skills of the patients so that they will be confident in daily communication.%目的:观察嗓音训练治疗功能性嗓音障碍的疗效。方法对30例诊断为功能性嗓音障碍的患者进行嗓音治疗(嗓音卫生教育、改善呼吸及增强共鸣),并在治疗前后进行评估。结果30例功能性嗓音障碍患者接受训练后嗓音障碍指数值(Voice Handicap Index,VHI)由67.8±10.1分降至30.7±8.2分,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01),患者在功能、生理和情感上均有明显改善;同时最长发声时间(Maximum Phonation Time,MPT)由9.2±2.6秒延长至13.5±3.1秒,基频微扰由0.59%±0.07%降至0.42%±0.05%,振幅微扰由2.23±0.45降至1.78±0.27,噪谐比由0.185±0.088降至0.142±0.065,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论嗓音训练能够降低嗓音障碍程度,改善嗓

  15. An empirical study of marketing communications effectiveness in Slovenian market

    OpenAIRE

    Damjana Jerman; Bruno ZavršniK

    2017-01-01

    This paper deals with the value or more specifically, the contribution of marketing communications strategy to effectiveness of marketing communications and hypothesizes that marketing communications strategy correlate with the effectiveness of marketing communications. The paper consists of two parts: the theoretical framework for the role of marketing communications strategy for the effectiveness of the marketing communications and the empirical analysis, based on the primary data collected...

  16. Organizational barriers to effective communication and how to overcome them

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何一民

    2013-01-01

    Effective communication has long been credited as a prime factor in achieving high levels of organizational effective-ness. In this essay, the author will discuss the five barriers to or-ganizational communication and the resolutions to overcome them. the author concludes that the overall ways to overcome communication barriers are communication audits and establish differentiated communication cultures to ensure two-way com-munication.

  17. AN EMPIRICAL STUDY OF MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS EFFECTIVENESS IN SLOVENIAN MARKET

    OpenAIRE

    Damjana Jerman; Bruno ZavršniK

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the value or more specifically, the contribution of marketing communications strategy to effectiveness of marketing communications and hypothesizes that marketing communications strategy correlate with the effectiveness of marketing communications. The paper consists of two parts: the theoretical framework for the role of marketing communications strategy for the effectiveness of the marketing communications and the empirical analysis, based on the primary data collected...

  18. Effects of Age, Sex and Syllable Number on Voice Onset Time: Evidence from Children's Voiceless Aspirated Stops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Vickie Y; De Nil, Luc F; Pang, Elizabeth W

    2015-06-01

    Voice onset time (VOT) is a temporal acoustic parameter that reflects motor speech coordination skills. This study investigated the patterns of age and sex differences across development of voice onset time in a group of 70 English-speaking children, ranging in age from 4.1 to 18.4 years, and 12 young adults. The effect of the number of syllables on VOT patterns was also examined. Speech samples were elicited by producing syllables /pa/ and /pataka/. Results supported previous findings showing that younger children produce longer VOT values with higher levels of variability. Markedly higher VOT values and increased variability were found for boys at ages between 8 and 11 years, confirming sex differences in VOT patterns and patterns of variability. In addition, all participants consistently produced shorter VOT with higher variability for multisyllables than monosyllables, indicating an effect of syllable number. Possible explanations for these findings and clinical implications are discussed.

  19. Her voice lingers on and her memory is strategic: effects of gender on directed forgetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hwajin; Yang, Sujin; Park, Giho

    2013-01-01

    The literature on directed forgetting has employed exclusively visual words. Thus, the potentially interesting aspects of a spoken utterance, which include not only vocal cues (e.g., prosody) but also the speaker and the listener, have been neglected. This study demonstrates that prosody alone does not influence directed-forgetting effects, while the sex of the speaker and the listener significantly modulate directed-forgetting effects for spoken utterances. Specifically, forgetting costs were attenuated for female-spoken items compared to male-spoken items, and forgetting benefits were eliminated among female listeners but not among male listeners. These results suggest that information conveyed in a female voice draws attention to its distinct perceptual attributes, thus interfering with retention of the semantic meaning, while female listeners' superior capacity for processing the surface features of spoken utterances may predispose them to spontaneously employ adaptive strategies to retain content information despite distraction by perceptual features. Our findings underscore the importance of sex differences when processing spoken messages in directed forgetting.

  20. Her voice lingers on and her memory is strategic: effects of gender on directed forgetting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwajin Yang

    Full Text Available The literature on directed forgetting has employed exclusively visual words. Thus, the potentially interesting aspects of a spoken utterance, which include not only vocal cues (e.g., prosody but also the speaker and the listener, have been neglected. This study demonstrates that prosody alone does not influence directed-forgetting effects, while the sex of the speaker and the listener significantly modulate directed-forgetting effects for spoken utterances. Specifically, forgetting costs were attenuated for female-spoken items compared to male-spoken items, and forgetting benefits were eliminated among female listeners but not among male listeners. These results suggest that information conveyed in a female voice draws attention to its distinct perceptual attributes, thus interfering with retention of the semantic meaning, while female listeners' superior capacity for processing the surface features of spoken utterances may predispose them to spontaneously employ adaptive strategies to retain content information despite distraction by perceptual features. Our findings underscore the importance of sex differences when processing spoken messages in directed forgetting.

  1. Voice Compression Technology in Wireless Through-the-earth Communication in Mines%矿井无线透地通信中语音压缩技术探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵红玉; 彭慧

    2015-01-01

    针对矿井透地无线通信中语音传输存在的噪声干扰大、传输信道窄、实际传输距离有限等特点,通过比较现阶段的语音压缩技术,提出增量调制(delta modulation,DM)及其改进方案自适应增量调制(adaptive delta modulation,ADM)不适宜作为透地无线通信语音压缩的压缩编码方案;语音压缩感知(Compressed Sensing)作为一种新近提出的压缩编码方案,能够以远低于奈奎斯特采样速率采样压缩信号,虽然语音重建质量有限,编码复杂,技术难度高,目前不适宜作为透地无线通信语音压缩编码的方案,但是可能成为未来无线通信压缩技术;码激励线性预测CELP(Code Excited Linear Prediction coding)比较适合作为透地无线通信语音压缩编码方案。%Voice transmission in wireless through-the-earth communication in mines has problems as high noise, narrow channel, and limited real transmission distance. Compared with the present voice compression technology, the study proposes delta modulation (DM) and its improvement scheme. Adaptive delta modulation (ADM) is not suitable for the compression coding in the voice compression. Compressing sensing of voice, as a new coding, could compress the signal with sampling rate much less than Nyquist rate, but it is not appropriate to be the voice compression coding in the wireless through-the-earth communication for the time being, with limited quality of reconstructed speech, complex coding, and difficult technology. However, it is promising in the future. Code excited linear prediction coding (CELP) is more appropriate to be the voice compression coding scheme for wireless through-the-earth communication.

  2. The effects of indwelling voice prosthesis on the quality of life, depressive symptoms, and self-esteem in patients with total laryngectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Beldan; Orhan, Kadir Serkan; Kesimli, Mustafa Caner; Gorgulu, Yasemin; Ulusan, Murat; Deger, Kemal

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of voice rehabilitation with indwelling voice prosthesis on quality of life, depression, anxiety, self-esteem, and sexual functions in laryngectomy patients. Provox-1 was applied to 30 patients who underwent total laryngectomy by opening a tracheoesophageal fistula. WHO Quality of Life-BREF, Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Arizona Sexual Experience Scale forms were asked to be filled out by the patients before voice prosthesis application. These tests were asked to be filled out again 3 months later after the voice prosthesis application. Paired samples and Wilcoxon tests were used to compare before and after operation values. Indwelling voice prosthesis was found to improve quality of life, self-esteem, and sexual function (p < 0.05). Additionally, symptoms of depression and anxiety were regressed (p < 0.05). Indwelling voice prosthesis was found to especially increase the quality of life and decrease depression (p < 0.05). This study is an uncontrolled single-arm study comparing patients' psychosocial statuses pre- and post-voice prosthesis.

  3. Control, Communication, and the Voice of the Leader. A ControlCharacter Analysis of the 2016 US Presidential Debate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márton Demeter

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the current research, we showed the strongest parts and the clouds of the speeches of the 2016 presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. A communication control analysis of this type could reveal the role control-characters play in assessing the performance of the actors of political communication. We also concluded that people want to be controlled in an easy but still total way. To make people think that there is a man who is able to do this: it was Donald Trump’s greatest asset. He was able to utter up to 37% more assertions than his opponent, clearly stressed the boundaries between ‘Us’ and ‘They’, and showed greater integrative complexity and objective control. As the result of our peculiar and detailed linguistic analyses, control direction and thematic role tests show that Trump was a man of ‘know’, ‘say’ and ‘take’, while Clinton was full of ‘think’ and ‘want.’

  4. Parallel Data Transfer with Voice Calls for Energy-Efficient Mobile Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurminen, Jukka K.; Nöyränen, Janne

    Battery consumption is one challenge for mobile applications and services. In this paper we explore the scenario where mobile phones delay the transfer of non-urgent data and perform the communication while a voice call is active. Our measurements show that data transfer during voice call requires only slightly over 10% additional power and that simultaneous voice call slows down the file transfer by 3%-14%. As a result we can save over 80% of energy in data transfer if we can delay the communication to a time when user is speaking at the mobile phone. For a user speaking 26 minutes a day this would allow 50MB of low energy data communication. A large class of applications can delay their data transfer without major effect to the user experience. The power saving mechanism can be implemented either in an application specific fashion or, preferably, at the middleware layer.

  5. 47 CFR 95.193 - (FRS Rule 3) Types of communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... information, transmit a brief text message, make a voice page, or to conduct a brief test. (b) Non-voice... of communications. (a) You may use an FRS unit to conduct two-way voice communications with another person. You may use an FRS unit to transmit one-way voice or non-voice communications only to...

  6. Nasal obstruction and human communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinoff, R; Moreno, C

    1989-04-01

    Nasal obstruction may cause a variety of communication disorders, particularly in children. The effects of nasal obstruction on hearing, speech, language, and voice are examined. Methods for assessing the effects of nasal obstruction are delineated, and recommendations for therapeutic interventions are described.

  7. Effect of Training and Level of External Auditory Feedback on the Singing Voice: Pitch Inaccuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottalico, Pasquale; Graetzer, Simone; Hunter, Eric J

    2017-01-01

    One of the most important aspects of singing is the control of fundamental frequency. The effects on pitch inaccuracy, defined as the distance in cents in equally tempered tuning between the reference note and the sung note, of the following conditions were evaluated: (1) level of external feedback, (2) tempo (slow or fast), (3) articulation (legato or staccato), (4) tessitura (low, medium, or high), and (5) semi-phrase direction (ascending or descending). The subjects were 10 nonprofessional singers and 10 classically trained professional or semi-professional singers (10 men and 10 women). Subjects sang one octave and a fifth arpeggi with three different levels of external auditory feedback, two tempi, and two articulations (legato or staccato). It was observed that inaccuracy was greatest in the descending semi-phrase arpeggi produced at a fast tempo and with a staccato articulation, especially for nonprofessional singers. The magnitude of inaccuracy was also relatively large in the high tessitura relative to the low and the medium tessitura for such singers. Contrary to predictions, when external auditory feedback was strongly attenuated by the hearing protectors, nonprofessional singers showed greater pitch accuracy than in the other external feedback conditions. This finding indicates the importance of internal auditory feedback in pitch control. With an increase in training, the singer's pitch inaccuracy decreases. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effective Communication with Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Patrick; Elliott, David

    2009-01-01

    The Australian Government established the Office for Youth (the Office) in September 2008 in an effort to engage with the young people of Australia. The Office will work with other government agencies to help young people reach their full potential; make effective transitions to adulthood as they continue to learn, start work, make decisions that…

  9. Effective Use of Strategic Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    disseminated to social networking sites like, MySpace, Twitter and Facebook.24 Judith McHale, the Undersecretary for Public Diplomacy and Public...Obama administration use of social networking sites and the simple posting of his speech on-line made for an effective way to disseminate the

  10. The effectiveness of voice therapy for patients with non-organic dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carding, P N; Horsley, I A; Docherty, G J

    1998-08-01

    Forty-five patients diagnosed as having non-organic dysphonia were assigned in rotation to one of three groups. Patients in one group received no treatment and acted as a control group. Patients in the other two groups received a programme of either 'indirect' therapy or 'direct with indirect' therapy, respectively. A self-report questionnaire of vocal performance, observed ratings of voice quality, and computer-derived acoustic measurements (signal-to-noise ratio, pitch perturbation and amplitude perturbation) were carried out on all patients before and after treatment to evaluate the changes in voice quality over time. There was a significant difference between the three groups on the self-report questionnaire, voice quality ratings and pitch perturbation measurements (P = < 0.05). Thirteen out of 15 control patients showed no significant change on any of the measures. Seven patients who received indirect treatment showed significant improvement in voice quality following treatment. Fourteen out of 15 patients who received direct treatment showed significant improvement in voice quality.

  11. Determinants of Effective Communication among Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anvari, Roya; Atiyaye, Dauda Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the relationship between effective communication and transferring information. In the present correlational study, a cross-sectional research design was employed, and data were collected using a questionnaire-based survey. 46 students were chosen based on random sampling and questionnaires were distributed among…

  12. Psychocultural Factors Affecting Intercultural Communication Effectiveness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HanYinyan

    2004-01-01

    In intercultural contexts, people do not always find it easy to put through the message they intend to convey to people of other cultures even when they speak the same language. There seems to be some non-linguistic obstacles standing in between them. Consequently, misinterpretation and misunderstanding occur and communication effectiveness can not be achieved.

  13. Pilot study: understanding the effects of voicing intervention on HFCC therapy in people with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Wha Jung; Braverman, Jane; Lee, Yong Wan; Hansen, Leland; Nozzarella, Mario

    2009-07-01

    The efficacy of High-Frequency Chest Compression (HFCC) airway clearance therapy is linked to the induced-peak expiratory airflow pulse (IPEF) at the patient's mouth. The authors' goal was to determine the conditions that yield the highest IPEF using HFCC running at 6Hz in conjunction with voicing intervention. A pilot experimental study was conducted in a laboratory setting. Six adults with moderate to mild cystic fibrosis (CF) and 10 healthy adults participated. When the component characteristics of voicing were disregarded in data analysis of four conditions, voicing only intervention (V(1)I(0)), HFCC only intervention (V(0)I(1)), voicing intervention and HFCC intervention combinations (V(1)I(1)) and nonintervention (V(0)I(0)), V(0)I(1) had significantly higher (PHFCC intervention (V(1)I(0) and V(1)I(1)), were examined. One condition in V(1)I(0) had significantly higher (P<0.000001) IPEF than other conditions in V(1)I(0) and V(1)I(1) in both experimental and control groups. Based on these findings, V(1)I(1) may yield higher IPEF than V(0)I(1). One condition of amplitude component of voicing and one condition of rhythm component of voicing had significantly higher (P<0.0001) IPEF than other conditions of amplitude and rhythm components in both CF and control subjects. Analysis of this combined condition of V(1)I(1) showed that this specific condition of V(1)I(1) had significantly higher (P<0.000001) IPEF than any other conditions in V(1)I(1) and V(0)I(1).

  14. Speakers comfort and voice use in different environments and babble-noise. What are the effects on effort and cognition?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyberg-Åhlander, Viveka; von Lochow, Heike; Brunskog, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Teachers often report voice problems related to the occupational environment, and voice problems are more prevalent in teaching than in other occupations. Relationships between objectively measurable acoustical parameters and voice use have been shown. Speakers have been shown to be able to predict...... the speaker-comfort of an environment. Teachers with voice problems use the room differently than their voice-healthy controls. The aim of this study was to investigate what vocal changes speakers do in different acoustical environments and noise conditions. Nine female speakers, voice patients, and voice......-healthy were exposed to four controlled, acoustical “environments” mounted in the same room: 1. stripped; 2. wall- and ceiling mounted absorbents; 3-4 as 2 but with extra ceiling absorbents and in two positions. The speakers were recorded with voice-accumulator and simultaneous voice recordings and spoke...

  15. Effective Climate Communication with Difficult Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, S.

    2015-12-01

    Climate communication is often fraught with ideological baggage ("noise") that makes it very difficult to connect to audiences. In these cases, it is helpful to use "best practices" known from other fields of communication. Engaging audiences with authenticity, using plain language, respecting cultural and political differences, and a sprinkling of humor can go a long way toward establishing a connection. It's important to avoid common but polarizing tropes from popular media, and often quite helpful to frame climate issues in novel or unexpected ways that cut across entrenched political discourse. Emerging social science research Beyond ideology, climate change is Simple, Serious, and Solvable. Effective communication of these three key ideas can succeed when the science argument is carefully framed to avoid attack of the audience's ethical identity. Simple arguments from common sense and everyday experience are more successful than data. Serious consequences to values that resonate with the audience can be avoided by solutions that don't threaten those values.

  16. Voice, Citizenship, and Civic Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tufte, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the world has experienced a resurgence in practices of bottom-up communication for social change, a plethora of agency in which claims for voice and citizenship through massive civic action have conquered center stage in the public debate. This resurgence has sparked a series...

  17. Effects of L1 prosody on segmental contrast in L2: The case of English stop voicing contrast produced by Korean speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jiyoun; Kim, Sahyang; Cho, Taehong

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated how the L1 phonetics-prosody interface transfers to L2 by examining prosodic strengthening effects (due to prosodic position and focus) on English voicing contrast (bad-pad) as produced by Korean vs English speakers. Under prosodic strengthening, Korean speakers showed a greater F0 difference due to voicing than English speakers, suggesting that their experience with the macroprosodic use of F0 in Korean transfers into L2. Furthermore, Korean speakers produced voiced stops with low F0 and short voice onset time as English speakers did, although such a cue pairing is absent in Korean, showing dissociation of cues from L1 segments for L2 production.

  18. Evaluation of Voice Disorders: Dysphonia Severity Index and Voice Handicap Index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Hakkesteegt (Marieke)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe voice is arguable still the most important tool of communication despite the growing importance of e-mails and text messaging (SMS) in daily contact. Indeed in modern society people are probably even more dependent on their voice than in the rural societies of old. Approximately one

  19. Making social robots more attractive: the effects of voice pitch, humor and empathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niculescu, Andreea; Dijk, van Betsy; Nijholt, Anton; Li, Haizhou; See, Swan Lan; Ge, S.S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we explore how simple auditory/verbal features of the spoken language, such as voice characteristics (pitch) and language cues (empathy/humor expression) influence the quality of interaction with a social robot receptionist. For our experiment two robot characters were created: Olivia,

  20. Emotional Prosody Measurement (EPM): A voice-based evaluation method for psychological therapy effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Bos, Lodewijk; Laxminarayan, Swamy; Marsh, Andy

    2004-01-01

    The voice embodies three sources of information: speech, the identity, and the emotional state of the speaker (i.e., emotional prosody). The latter feature is resembled by the variability of the F0 (also named fundamental frequency of pitch) (SD F0). To extract this feature, Emotional Prosody

  1. Overcoming the ten most common barriers to effective team communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Communication is at the heart of medical practice management. Yet there are many barriers to effective communication that can interfere with the smooth running of the practice. This article describes the 10 most common barriers to effective medical practice team communication and offers six steps the practice manager can take to break them down. This article also suggests that the practice develop a team communication strategy. It suggests 10 communication principles readers can share directly with their teams and describes three hallmarks of effective team communication. Finally, this article provides a list of 25 practical questions practice managers can use to improve their team's communication.

  2. Effect of Ionosphere on Geostationary Communication Satellite Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Esra; Arikan, Feza; Gulgonul, Senol

    2016-07-01

    ionosphere using IRI-Plas-G software. One of the outstanding features of IONOLAB-RAY is the opportunity of Global Ionospheric Map-Total Electron Content (GIM-TEC) assimilation. This feature enables more realistic representation of ionosphere, especially for the times when ionosphere deviates from the generalized models, such as during geomagnetic storms. This feature is critical to examine the effect of ionosphere on satellite signals under ionospheric storm conditions. In this study TURKSAT satellite data is used to compare the results of IONOLAB-RAY and evaluate the effect of ionosphere. TURKSAT is one of the world's leading companies providing all sorts of satellite communications through the satellites of TURKSAT as well as the other satellites. Providing services for voice, data, internet, TV, and radio broadcasting through the satellites across a wide area extending from Europe to Asia. The latest satellite of TURKSAT, namely Turksat 4B was launched on October 2015, before that various versions of TURKSAT satellites are launched since 1994. In the future enlargement of broadcasting area towards equatorial region is aimed, where the ionospheric anomalies and storms are highly expected. In the future this study can be applied to the satellite signals in equatorial regions and effects of ionosphere especially under storm conditions can be discussed. This study is supported by TUBITAK 114E541, 115E915 and Joint TUBITAK 114E092 and AS CR 14/001 projects.

  3. Sperry Univac speech communications technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medress, Mark F.

    1977-01-01

    Technology and systems for effective verbal communication with computers were developed. A continuous speech recognition system for verbal input, a word spotting system to locate key words in conversational speech, prosodic tools to aid speech analysis, and a prerecorded voice response system for speech output are described.

  4. The Effects of Globalisation on Corporate Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanden, Guro Refsum

    presented by the multilingual workforce, MNCs may try to implement various language policies or strategies to regulate the internal communicative environment, for example by adopting a common corporate language, or deploy language management tools such as language training for employees or use...... of translation services. However, these language policies may have consequences unanticipated by the management, and could possibly affect the company in ways far beyond the scope of the linguistic-communicative area. This paper attempts to examine the role of corporate language policies and their effects......One important effect of globalisation for the multinational corporation (MNC) is the increasing diversity of the workforce, which becomes clear through the variety of different language backgrounds found among employees at all levels of the organisation. In order to overcome the linguistic barriers...

  5. Effective communication and supervision in the biomedical engineering department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y; Wald, A; Cappiello, J

    1997-01-01

    It is important for biomedical engineering supervisors to master the art of effective communication. Supervisors who have effective communication skills can successfully initiate creative programs and generate a harmonious working atmosphere. Using effective communication, they can promote good working conditions, such as high morale, worker initiative and loyalty to the department, which are almost impossible to measure but imperative for a successful department. However, effective communication tends to be neglected by supervisors who are either functional specialists or managerial generalists. This paper presents several cases of what effective communication truly is and discusses some potential factors that may lead to ineffective communication.

  6. The Role of the Electronic Portfolio in Enhancing Information and Communication Technology and English Language Skills: The Voices of Six Malaysian Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thang, Siew Ming; Lee, Yit Sim; Zulkifli, Nurul Farhana

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the construction and development of electronic portfolios (e-portfolios) on a small user population at a public university in Malaysia. The study was based on a three-month Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and language learning course offered to the undergraduates of the university. One of the…

  7. Shared language:Towards more effective communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Joyce; McDonagh, Deana

    2013-01-01

    The ability to communicate to others and express ourselves is a basic human need. As we develop our understanding of the world, based on our upbringing, education and so on, our perspective and the way we communicate can differ from those around us. Engaging and interacting with others is a critical part of healthy living. It is the responsibility of the individual to ensure that they are understood in the way they intended.Shared language refers to people developing understanding amongst themselves based on language (e.g. spoken, text) to help them communicate more effectively. The key to understanding language is to first notice and be mindful of your language. Developing a shared language is an ongoing process that requires intention and time, which results in better understanding.Shared language is critical to collaboration, and collaboration is critical to business and education. With whom and how many people do you connect? Your 'shared language' makes a difference in the world. So, how do we successfully do this? This paper shares several strategies.Your sphere of influence will carry forward what and how you are communicating. Developing and nurturing a shared language is an essential element to enhance communication and collaboration whether it is simply between partners or across the larger community of business and customers. Constant awareness and education is required to maintain the shared language. We are living in an increasingly smaller global community. Business is built on relationships. If you invest in developing shared language, your relationships and your business will thrive.

  8. Shared language:Towards more effective communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to communicate to others and express ourselves is a basic human need. As we develop our understanding of the world, based on our upbringing, education and so on, our perspective and the way we communicate can differ from those around us. Engaging and interacting with others is a critical part of healthy living. It is the responsibility of the individual to ensure that they are understood in the way they intended.Shared language refers to people developing understanding amongst themselves based on language (e.g. spoken, text to help them communicate more effectively. The key to understanding language is to first notice and be mindful of your language. Developing a shared language is an ongoing process that requires intention and time, which results in better understanding.Shared language is critical to collaboration, and collaboration is critical to business and education. With whom and how many people do you connect? Your 'shared language' makes a difference in the world. So, how do we successfully do this? This paper shares several strategies.Your sphere of influence will carry forward what and how you are communicating. Developing and nurturing a shared language is an essential element to enhance communication and collaboration whether it is simply between partners or across the larger community of business and customers. Constant awareness and education is required to maintain the shared language. We are living in an increasingly smaller global community. Business is built on relationships. If you invest in developing shared language, your relationships and your business will thrive.

  9. Lexical frequency and voice assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernestus, Mirjam; Lahey, Mybeth; Verhees, Femke; Baayen, R Harald

    2006-08-01

    Acoustic duration and degree of vowel reduction are known to correlate with a word's frequency of occurrence. The present study broadens the research on the role of frequency in speech production to voice assimilation. The test case was regressive voice assimilation in Dutch. Clusters from a corpus of read speech were more often perceived as unassimilated in lower-frequency words and as either completely voiced (regressive assimilation) or, unexpectedly, as completely voiceless (progressive assimilation) in higher-frequency words. Frequency did not predict the voice classifications over and above important acoustic cues to voicing, suggesting that the frequency effects on the classifications were carried exclusively by the acoustic signal. The duration of the cluster and the period of glottal vibration during the cluster decreased while the duration of the release noises increased with frequency. This indicates that speakers reduce articulatory effort for higher-frequency words, with some acoustic cues signaling more voicing and others less voicing. A higher frequency leads not only to acoustic reduction but also to more assimilation.

  10. The effect of voice quality and competing speakers in a passage comprehension task: perceived effort in relation to cognitive functioning and performance in children with normal hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Lochow, Heike; Lyberg-Åhlander, Viveka; Sahlén, Birgitta; Kastberg, Tobias; Brännström, K Jonas

    2017-04-03

    The study investigates the effect of voice quality and competing speakers on perceived effort in a passage comprehension task in relation to cognitive functioning. In addition, it explores if perceived effort was related to performance. A total of 49 children (aged 7:03 to 12:02 years) with normal hearing participated. The children performed an auditory passage comprehension task presented with six different listening conditions consisting of a typical voice or a dysphonic voice presented in quiet, with one competing speaker, and with four competing speakers. After completing the task, they rated their perceived effort on a five-grade scale. The children also performed tasks measuring working memory capacity (WMC) and executive functioning. The results show that voice quality had no direct effect on perceived effort but the children's ratings of perceived effort were related to their executive functioning. A significant effect was seen for background listening condition indicating higher perceived effort for background listening conditions with competing speakers. The effects of background listening condition were mainly related to the children's WMC but also their executive functioning. It can be concluded that the individual susceptibility to the effect of the dysphonic voice is related to the child's executive functioning. The individual susceptibility to the presence of competing speakers is related to the child's WMC and executive functioning.

  11. [Effective communication with talkative patients: 10 tips].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroldi, Esther; Veldhuijzen, Wemke; Bareman, Frits; Bueving, Herman; van der Weijden, Trudy; van der Vleuten, Cees; Muris, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Consultations with talkative patients present a challenge to doctors. It is difficult to gather all the necessary information within the available time, without damaging the doctor-patient relationship. Based on the listed existing literature and doctors' experiences, we present ten tips for gathering information from talkative patients in an effective manner whilst maintaining a good therapeutic alliance. In consultations with talkative patients, it is important to explore the cause of patients' talkativeness and to adapt one's communication approach accordingly.- Familiar communication strategies such as 'summarizing' can still be applied. When taking this route, a more directive communication approach--e.g. by means of a 'closed-ended summary'--can prevent the patient interrupting the doctor or departing from his subject. There are strategies aimed at avoiding a damaging effect to the doctor-patient relationship when applying this approach: don't be overly directive, make the patient co-responsible for efficient time management in the consultation, and make use of empathic interrupting and humour.

  12. Real-Time Talking Avatar on the Internet Using Kinect and Voice Conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Nose

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We have more chances to communicate via the in-ternet. We often use text/video chat, but there are some problems, such as a lack of communication and anonymity. In this paper, we propose and implement a real-time talking avatar, where we can communicate with each other by synchronizing character’s voice and motion from ours while keeping anonymity by using a voice conversion technique. For the voice conversion, we improve accuracy of the voice conversion by specializing to the target character’s voice. Finally, we conduct subjective experiments and show the possibility of a new style of communication on the internet.

  13. Effective Communication Modes in Multilingual Encounters: Comparing Alternatives in Computer Mediated Communication (CMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mulken, Margot; Hendriks, Berna

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on an experimental study investigating alternative communication modes to English as a Lingua Franca. The purpose was to examine the effectiveness of different modes of communication and to gain insight in communication strategies used by interlocutors to solve referential conflicts. Findings show that ELF may not necessarily be…

  14. Effect of Race, Sex, Nonverbal Communication and Verbal Communication of Perception of Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitter, A. George; And Others

    1975-01-01

    A 2X2X2X2 study tested the effect of a) nonverbal communication (NVC), b) verbal communication (VC), 3) race of communicator, and d) sex of perceiver on the perception of leadership. Results indicated that when one pits NVC against VC, NVC proved to be more potent in the perception of leadership. (Author/NQ)

  15. Effective Communication Modes in Multilingual Encounters: Comparing Alternatives in Computer Mediated Communication (CMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mulken, Margot; Hendriks, Berna

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on an experimental study investigating alternative communication modes to English as a Lingua Franca. The purpose was to examine the effectiveness of different modes of communication and to gain insight in communication strategies used by interlocutors to solve referential conflicts. Findings show that ELF may not necessarily be…

  16. 47 CFR 95.181 - Permissible communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... with a voice communication. If the tone is subaudible (300 Hertz or less) it may be communicated during the entire voice message. If the tone is audible (more than 300 Hertz) it may be communicated for no... receiver. A selective calling tone or tone operated squelch may be used in conjunction with a voice...

  17. Effect of subthalamic stimulation on voice and speech in Parkinson´s disease: for the better or worse ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine eSkodda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus, although highly effective for the treatment of motor impairment in Parkinson´s disease, can induce speech deterioration in a subgroup of patients. The aim of the current study was to survey 1 if there are distinctive stimulation effects on the different parameters of voice and speech and 2 if there is a special pattern of preexisting speech abnormalities indicating a risk for further worsening under stimulation. Methods: N = 38 patients with Parkinson´s disease had to perform a speech test without medication with stimulation ON and OFF. Speech samples were analysed: 1 according to a four-dimensional perceptual speech score and 2 by acoustic analysis to obtain quantifiable measures of distinctive speech parameters.Results: Quality of voice was ameliorated with stimulation ON, and there were trends to increased loudness and better pitch variability. N = 8 patients featured a deterioration of speech with stimulation ON, caused by worsening of articulation or/and fluency. These patients had more severe overall speech impairment with characteristic features of articulatory slurring and articulatory acceleration already under StimOFF condition.Conclusion: The influence of subthalamic stimulation on Parkinsonian speech differs considerably between individual patients, however, there is a trend to amelioration of voice quality and prosody. Patients with stimulation-associated speech deterioration featured higher overall speech impairment and showed a distinctive pattern of articulatory abnormalities at baseline. Further investigations to confirm these preliminary findings are necessary to allow neurologists to pre-surgically estimate the individual risk of deterioration of speech under stimulation.

  18. Effects of Bel Canto Training on Acoustic and Aerodynamic Characteristics of the Singing Voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, Monica A; Evans, Joseph; Powitzky, Eric

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to assess the impact of 2 years of operatic training on acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of the singing voice. This is a longitudinal study. Participants were 21 graduate students and 16 undergraduate students. They completed a variety of tasks, including laryngeal videostroboscopy, audio recording of pitch range, and singing of syllable trains at full voice in chest, passaggio, and head registers. Inspiration, intraoral pressure, airflow, and sound pressure level (SPL) were captured during the syllable productions. Both graduate and undergraduate students significantly increased semitone range and SPL. The contributions to increased SPL were typically increased inspiration, increased airflow, and reduced laryngeal resistance, although there were individual differences. Two graduate students increased SPL without increased airflow and likely used supraglottal strategies to do so. Students demonstrated improvements in both acoustic and aerodynamic components of singing. Increasing SPL primarily through respiratory drive is a healthy strategy and results from intensive training. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cause-effect relationship between vocal fold physiology and voice production in a three-dimensional phonation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyan

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study is to better understand the cause-effect relation between vocal fold physiology and the resulting vibration pattern and voice acoustics. Using a three-dimensional continuum model of phonation, the effects of changes in vocal fold stiffness, medial surface thickness in the vertical direction, resting glottal opening, and subglottal pressure on vocal fold vibration and different acoustic measures are investigated. The results show that the medial surface thickness has dominant effects on the vertical phase difference between the upper and lower margins of the medial surface, closed quotient, H1-H2, and higher-order harmonics excitation. The main effects of vocal fold approximation or decreasing resting glottal opening are to lower the phonation threshold pressure, reduce noise production, and increase the fundamental frequency. Increasing subglottal pressure is primarily responsible for vocal intensity increase but also leads to significant increase in noise production and an increased fundamental frequency. Increasing AP stiffness significantly increases the fundamental frequency and slightly reduces noise production. The interaction among vocal fold thickness, stiffness, approximation, and subglottal pressure in the control of F0, vocal intensity, and voice quality is discussed.

  20. Voice pedagogy-what do we need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Brian P; Herbst, Christian T

    2016-12-01

    The final keynote panel of the 10th Pan-European Voice Conference (PEVOC) was concerned with the topic 'Voice pedagogy-what do we need?' In this communication the panel discussion is summarized, and the authors provide a deepening discussion on one of the key questions, addressing the roles and tasks of people working with voice students. In particular, a distinction is made between (1) voice building (derived from the German term 'Stimmbildung'), primarily comprising the functional and physiological aspects of singing; (2) coaching, mostly concerned with performance skills; and (3) singing voice rehabilitation. Both public and private educators are encouraged to apply this distinction to their curricula, in order to arrive at more efficient singing teaching and to reduce the risk of vocal injury to the singers concerned.

  1. Occupational voice demands and their impact on the call-centre industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duffy OM

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the last decade there has been a growth in the call-centre industry in the UK, with a growing awareness of the voice as an important tool for successful communication. Occupational voice problems such as occupational dysphonia, in a business which relies on healthy, effective voice as the primary professional communication tool, may threaten working ability and occupational health and safety of workers. While previous studies of telephone call-agents have reported a range of voice symptoms and functional vocal health problems, there have been no studies investigating the use and impact of vocal performance in the communication industry within the UK. This study aims to address a significant gap in the evidence-base of occupational health and safety research. The objectives of the study are: 1. to investigate the work context and vocal communication demands for call-agents; 2. to evaluate call-agents' vocal health, awareness and performance; and 3. to identify key risks and training needs for employees and employers within call-centres. Methods and design This is an occupational epidemiological study, which plans to recruit call-centres throughout the UK and Ireland. Data collection will consist of three components: 1. interviews with managers from each participating call-centre to assess their communication and training needs; 2. an online biopsychosocial questionnaire will be administered to investigate the work environment and vocal demands of call-agents; and 3. voice acoustic measurements of a random sample of participants using the Multi-dimensional Voice Program (MDVP. Qualitative content analysis from the interviews will identify underlying themes and issues. A multivariate analysis approach will be adopted using Structural Equation Modelling (SEM, to develop voice measurement models in determining the construct validity of potential factors contributing to occupational dysphonia. Quantitative data will be

  2. Emotional cues during simultaneous face and voice processing: electrophysiological insights.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taosheng Liu

    Full Text Available Both facial expression and tone of voice represent key signals of emotional communication but their brain processing correlates remain unclear. Accordingly, we constructed a novel implicit emotion recognition task consisting of simultaneously presented human faces and voices with neutral, happy, and angry valence, within the context of recognizing monkey faces and voices task. To investigate the temporal unfolding of the processing of affective information from human face-voice pairings, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs to these audiovisual test stimuli in 18 normal healthy subjects; N100, P200, N250, P300 components were observed at electrodes in the frontal-central region, while P100, N170, P270 were observed at electrodes in the parietal-occipital region. Results indicated a significant audiovisual stimulus effect on the amplitudes and latencies of components in frontal-central (P200, P300, and N250 but not the parietal occipital region (P100, N170 and P270. Specifically, P200 and P300 amplitudes were more positive for emotional relative to neutral audiovisual stimuli, irrespective of valence, whereas N250 amplitude was more negative for neutral relative to emotional stimuli. No differentiation was observed between angry and happy conditions. The results suggest that the general effect of emotion on audiovisual processing can emerge as early as 200 msec (P200 peak latency post stimulus onset, in spite of implicit affective processing task demands, and that such effect is mainly distributed in the frontal-central region.

  3. Emotional cues during simultaneous face and voice processing: electrophysiological insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Taosheng; Pinheiro, Ana; Zhao, Zhongxin; Nestor, Paul G; McCarley, Robert W; Niznikiewicz, Margaret A

    2012-01-01

    Both facial expression and tone of voice represent key signals of emotional communication but their brain processing correlates remain unclear. Accordingly, we constructed a novel implicit emotion recognition task consisting of simultaneously presented human faces and voices with neutral, happy, and angry valence, within the context of recognizing monkey faces and voices task. To investigate the temporal unfolding of the processing of affective information from human face-voice pairings, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) to these audiovisual test stimuli in 18 normal healthy subjects; N100, P200, N250, P300 components were observed at electrodes in the frontal-central region, while P100, N170, P270 were observed at electrodes in the parietal-occipital region. Results indicated a significant audiovisual stimulus effect on the amplitudes and latencies of components in frontal-central (P200, P300, and N250) but not the parietal occipital region (P100, N170 and P270). Specifically, P200 and P300 amplitudes were more positive for emotional relative to neutral audiovisual stimuli, irrespective of valence, whereas N250 amplitude was more negative for neutral relative to emotional stimuli. No differentiation was observed between angry and happy conditions. The results suggest that the general effect of emotion on audiovisual processing can emerge as early as 200 msec (P200 peak latency) post stimulus onset, in spite of implicit affective processing task demands, and that such effect is mainly distributed in the frontal-central region.

  4. Studies in interactive communication. II - The effects of four communication modes on the linguistic performance of teams during cooperative problem solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapanis, A.; Parrish, R. N.; Ochsman, R. B.; Weeks, G. D.

    1977-01-01

    Two-man teams solved credible, 'real world' problems for which computer assistance has been or could be useful. Conversations were carried on in one of four modes of communication: typewriting, handwriting, voice, and natural unrestricted communication. Performance was assessed on three classes of dependent measures: time to solution, behavioral measures of activity, and linguistic measures. Significant differences among the communication modes were found in each of the three classes. This paper is concerned mainly with the results of the linguistic analyses. Linguistic performance was assessed with 182 measures, most of which turned out to be redundant and some of which were useless or meaningless. Those that remain show that although problems can be solved faster in the oral modes than in the hard-copy modes, the oral modes are characterized by many more messages, sentences, words, and unique words; much higher communication rates; but lower type-token ratios. Although a number of significant problem and job-role effects were found, there were relatively few significant interactions of modes with thsse variables. It appears, therefore, that the mode effects hold for both problems and for both job roles assigned to the subjects.

  5. A Brief Study of Body Language in Effective Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡梦蓉

    2008-01-01

    Body language is a key note of non-verbal communication and shaped by culture. The article illustrates sign meaning of bodylanguage and devotes to a comparison and contrast of body language so as to achieve effective communication.

  6. Voice Habits and Behaviors: Voice Care Among Flamenco Singers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzón García, Marina; Muñoz López, Juana; Y Mendoza Lara, Elvira

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the vocal behavior of flamenco singers, as compared with classical music singers, to establish a differential vocal profile of voice habits and behaviors in flamenco music. Bibliographic review was conducted, and the Singer's Vocal Habits Questionnaire, an experimental tool designed by the authors to gather data regarding hygiene behavior, drinking and smoking habits, type of practice, voice care, and symptomatology perceived in both the singing and the speaking voice, was administered. We interviewed 94 singers, divided into two groups: the flamenco experimental group (FEG, n = 48) and the classical control group (CCG, n = 46). Frequency analysis, a Likert scale, and discriminant and exploratory factor analysis were used to obtain a differential profile for each group. The FEG scored higher than the CCG in speaking voice symptomatology. The FEG scored significantly higher than the CCG in use of "inadequate vocal technique" when singing. Regarding voice habits, the FEG scored higher in "lack of practice and warm-up" and "environmental habits." A total of 92.6% of the subjects classified themselves correctly in each group. The Singer's Vocal Habits Questionnaire has proven effective in differentiating flamenco and classical singers. Flamenco singers are exposed to numerous vocal risk factors that make them more prone to vocal fatigue, mucosa dehydration, phonotrauma, and muscle stiffness than classical singers. Further research is needed in voice training in flamenco music, as a means to strengthen the voice and enable it to meet the requirements of this musical genre. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Employee Communicative Actions and Companies' Communication Strategies to Mitigate the Negative Effects of Crises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzei, Alessandra; Ravazzani, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Can communication with employees lessen the negative effects of a crisis? In the pre-crisis stage, employee communication can strengthen internal commitment, while in the crisis stage it can reinforce the commitment by means of accommodative crisis communication strategies. Employee...... communication strategies during the 2009 global economic crisis, based on a model on possible strategies that range from most accommodative to defensive. The main empirical results show that companies have mostly used defensive internal communication strategies that may damage their intangible assets, namely...

  8. Voice Collection under Different Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Li

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available According to the short-time Fourier transform theory and principle of digital filtering, this paper established a mathematical model called collection of voice signal collection at different spectrum. The voice signal was a non-stationary process, while the standard Fourier transform only applied to the periodic signal, transient signals or stationary random signal. Therefore, the standard Fourier transform could not be directly used for the speech signal. By controlling the input different types and parameters, this paper analyzed the collected original voice signal spectrum with the use of MATLAB software platform. At the same time, it realized the extraction, recording and playback of the speech signal at different frequencies. Therefore, the waveforms could be displayed obviously on the graphic user interface and voice effect could be more clearly. Meanwhile, the result was verified by the hardware platforms, which consisted of TMS320VC5509A [1] chip and TLV320AIC23 voice chip. The results showed that the extraction of voice signal under different spectrum model was scientific, rational and effective.

  9. Child voice and noise: a pilot study of noise in day cares and the effects on 10 children's voice quality according to perceptual evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Anita M; Granqvist, Svante; Sjölander, Peta; Sundberg, Johan

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study children's exposure to background noise at the ears during a normal day at the day care center and also to relate this to a perceptual evaluation of voice quality. Ten children, from three day care centers, with no history of hearing and speech problems or frequent infections were selected as subjects. A binaural recording technique was used with two microphones placed on both sides of the subject's head, at equal distance from the mouth. A portable digital audio tape (DAT) recorder (Sony TCD-D 100, Stockholm, Sweden) was attached to the subject's waist. Three recordings were made for each child during the day. Each recording was calibrated and started with three repetitions of three sentences containing only sonorants. The recording technique allowed separate analyses of the background noise level and of the sound pressure level (SPL) of each subjects' own voice. Results showed a mean background noise level for the three day care centers at 82.6dBA Leq, ranging from 81.5 to 83.6dBA Leq. Day care center no. 2 had the highest mean value and also the highest value at any separate recording session with a mean background noise level of 85.4dBA Leq during the noontime recordings. Perceptual evaluation showed that the children attending this day care center also received higher values on the following voice characteristics: hoarseness, breathiness, and hyperfunction. Girls increased their loudness level during the day, whereas for boys no such change could be observed.

  10. Space-Based Voice over IP Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Sam P.; Okino, Clayton; Walsh, William; Clare, Loren

    2007-01-01

    In human space exploration missions (e.g. a return to the Moon and for future missions to Mars), there will be a need to provide voice communications services. In this work we focus on the performance of Voice over IP (VoIP) techniques applied to space networks, where long range latencies, simplex links, and significant bit error rates occur. Link layer and network layer overhead issues are examined. Finally, we provide some discussion on issues related to voice conferencing in the space network environment.

  11. Game-based Training of Listening Skills: The Effects of Degraded Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clint Bowers

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Many important tasks depend upon the ability of personnel to be able to extract information from verbal communication in suboptimal conditions. However, there is little guidance in how best to train people to improve this skill, specifically regarding the most effective combination of human or synthesized speech with or without text captions.  In this study, we examined two competing theories, the cognitive theory of multimedia learning versus resilient listening, to determine best practices for designing a game to train active listening skills in complex environments. One-hundred and nineteen U.S. Navy recruits (53% male, average age of 21.5 years participated in this study.  The results indicated that games with degraded auditory conditions did not improve listening abilities in a transfer condition.  Games using recorded human voices resulted in the best performance.

  12. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 492: Effective patient-physician communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Perhaps the greatest contemporary challenge in implementing the principles of effective communication lies in our current health care environment that demands increasing physician productivity and less time with each patient. Effective patient-physician communication with the use of patient-centered interviewing, caring communication skills, and shared decision making will help. The use of physician extenders and, in select situations, e-mail communication with established patients also can be beneficial.

  13. The effect of recorded maternal voice on perioperative anxiety and emergence in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S J; Oh, Y J; Kim, K J; Kwak, Y L; Na, S

    2010-11-01

    This study was performed to test if hearing a recorded maternal voice reduces anxiety, emergence agitation and anaesthetic requirements in children. With written informed consent, children scheduled for cardiac catheterisation under intravenous ketamine anaesthesia and their mothers (n = 46) were randomly assigned to either the mother-voice (MV) or control group. While the MV group (n = 23) listened via headphones to a recording of their mothers' voices during the perioperative period, the control group (n = 23) wore headphones with no auditory stimulation. Ketamine requirements and haemodynamics were recorded. Anxiety of the patients and the parents were measured before and after the procedure with the modified Yale preoperative anxiety scale and Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, respectively. Emergence agitation was graded. The demographic and haemodynamic data were comparable, except for a longer procedure time in the MV group. Mothers' State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was not different preoperatively between the groups. Mothers' state and trait anxiety was lower after the procedure in the MV group compared with the preoperative values. In the control group only maternal state anxiety was diminished after the procedure. There was no significant group difference with respect to ketamine requirement (5.1 +/- 1.9 mg vs 4.9 +/- 1.6 mg, P = 0.645). The anxiety score of children was lower in the MV group before the procedure (modified Yale preoperative anxiety scale score 35 +/- 12 vs 28 +/- 9, P = 0.038), but there was no significant difference postoperatively. Emergence agitation was attenuated in the MV group (P = 0.005).

  14. Personality as a predictor of the value of voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Derek R

    2003-09-01

    The opportunity for workers to provide input, also known as voice, has received extensive study. The contrasting relational and instrumental theories of voice have stimulated research investigating why people value voice. However, researchers have yet to assess individual differences in the actual value that people place on voice. This consideration is particularly important because the effect of voice on perceived procedural fairness varies according to the value of voice. This laboratory study is an examination of the Big Five (extraversion, agreeableness, openness to experience, neuroticism, and conscientiousness; L. Goldberg, 1992) and core self-evaluations (neuroticism, self-esteem, self-efficacy, and locus of control; T. Judge, E. Locke, & C. Durham, 1997) as predictors of the value of voice for 96 undergraduates. Although both the Big Five and core self-evaluations accounted for significant variance in the value of voice, only 2 individual components (extraversion and self-efficacy) significantly predicted the value of voice.

  15. Feeling voices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Ammirante

    Full Text Available Two experiments investigated deaf individuals' ability to discriminate between same-sex talkers based on vibrotactile stimulation alone. Nineteen participants made same/different judgments on pairs of utterances presented to the lower back through voice coils embedded in a conforming chair. Discrimination of stimuli matched for F0, duration, and perceived magnitude was successful for pairs of spoken sentences in Experiment 1 (median percent correct = 83% and pairs of vowel utterances in Experiment 2 (median percent correct = 75%. Greater difference in spectral tilt between "different" pairs strongly predicted their discriminability in both experiments. The current findings support the hypothesis that discrimination of complex vibrotactile stimuli involves the cortical integration of spectral information filtered through frequency-tuned skin receptors.

  16. The effect of an artificially lengthened vocal tract on estimated glottal contact quotient in untrained male voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskill, Christopher S; Erickson, Molly L

    2010-01-01

    The use of hard-walled narrow tubes, often called resonance tubes, for the purpose of voice therapy and voice training has a historical precedent and some theoretical support, but the mechanism of any potential benefit from the application of this technique is not well understood. Fifteen vocally untrained male participants produced a series of spoken /a/ vowels at a modal pitch and constant loudness, before and after a minute of repeated phonation into a 50-cm hard-walled glass tube at the same pitch and loudness targets. Electroglottography was used to measure the glottal contact quotient (CQ) during each phase of the experiment. Single-subject analysis revealed statistically significant changes in CQ during tube phonation, but with no discernable pattern across the 15 participants. These results indicate that the use of resonance tubes can have a distinct effect on glottal closure, but the mechanism behind this change remains unclear. The implication is that vocal loading techniques such as this need to be studied further with specific attention paid to the underlying mechanism of any measured changes in glottal behavior, and especially to the role of instruction and feedback in the therapeutic and pedagogical application of these techniques.

  17. Applications of VoiceThread(©) Technology in Graduate Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Mary K; Kverno, Karan S; Belcher, Anne E; Ledebur, Lindsay R; Gerson, Linda D

    2016-11-01

    Online graduate courses provide opportunities for faculty to use technology and digital applications to enhance student learning and learning environments. In nursing education, as we become increasingly dependent on technology, it is important to ensure that both faculty and students add digital literacy to their repertoire of knowledge and skills. VoiceThread(©), one type of Web-based digital application tool, allows students and faculty to verbally communicate and collaborate asynchronously. This article discusses the use of VoiceThread technology in graduate nursing education and offers four examples of VoiceThread teaching methods: personal introductions, issues discussions, case presentations, and the elevator speech. Student participation in VoiceThread assignments is evaluated using leveled rubrics. A poll of the students in one of the graduate courses showed high overall satisfaction with VoiceThread in the online classroom. Strategies for effective use of VoiceThread technology to enhance student engagement and learning are recommended. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(11):655-658.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Employee Communicative Actions and Companies' Communication Strategies to Mitigate the Negative Effects of Crises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzei, Alessandra; Ravazzani, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Can communication with employees lessen the negative effects of a crisis? In the pre-crisis stage, employee communication can strengthen internal commitment, while in the crisis stage it can reinforce the commitment by means of accommodative crisis communication strategies. Employee...... commitment is at the basis of positive employee communicative actions, like advocacy and positive referrals, which finally protect the company’s reputation. After a theoretical exploration of these issues, this chapter presents first a case study showing how continuous internal communication efforts...... and factual communication based on managers’ and company’s actions are crucial in order to build quality relationships with employees. In turn, this leads to positive employee communicative actions when a crisis occurs. Second, it illustrates a survey of Italian companies which examined internal crisis...

  19. Effective communication in HR – management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia, Oksana

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights some aspects of vertical and horizontal intra-organizational communication in personnel management system, the basic problems and ways of forming a communication strategy within the organization, analyzed the most prevalent forms of communication interaction.

  20. Hargrave's communications dictionary

    CERN Document Server

    Hargrave, Frank

    2001-01-01

    Communications terms, definitions, acronyms, charts, equations and related information important to readers in industry, government and academia. Voice and data communications terms are included as well as terminology from peripheral disciplines including optics, computer science, data networks and the Internet.

  1. Delay related issues in integrated voice and data networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, J. G.

    1981-06-01

    The described investigation is concerned with the problem of transmitting voice with data in a computer communications network. The motivations for considering mixed voice and data traffic in such a shared network environment include the advent of new voice related applications with the technology now existing to economically support them, and the desire to plan for and design future integrated networks for reasons of economy and flexibility. Attention is given to the problem of variable delays in a shared network environment handling voice traffic. Previous work in packetized voice, as well as various approaches to integrated voice and data transmission, are reviewed. These approaches may be regarded as enhanced versions of circuit, packet, and hybrid switching. The impact of network interfacing and delay considerations for voice traffic is discussed.

  2. Conservative approaches to the management of voice disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruse, Eberhard

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a voice disorder not only affects social interaction but potentially also has a major impact on the work environment. The latter is becoming more important given the increasing demands employers make in terms of competency in both communication skills and adequacy of phonation. The development of newer and more precise phono-microsurgical techniques for the treatment of an increasing variety of voice disorders has not entirely replaced a conservative approach to voice rehabilitation. Nevertheless, conservative methods have to demonstrate an higher effectiveness in comparison with the microsurgical intervention given the alternative indications. This would be especially true for the more specific and systematically a given individual glottic pathophysiology could be changed in direction of individual phonatory physiology or supplementary phonation mechanism. This desired changing depends not only on the theoretical concepts but also on maintaining strict therapeutic principles during their clinical application. Conservative management of voice disorders has to be intensive and comprehensive, especially in the case of accepting our model of Larnygeal Double Phonation Function and the existence of a phonatory feedback loop.

  3. Perceived Changes in Communication as an Effect of STN Surgery in Parkinson's Disease: A Qualitative Interview Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Ahlberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to explore four individuals' perspective of the way their speech and communication changed as a result of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation treatment for Parkinson's disease. Interviews of two men and two women were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Three themes emerged as a result of the analysis. The first theme included sub-themes describing both increased and unexpected communication difficulties such as a more vulnerable speech function, re-emerging stuttering and cognitive difficulties affecting communication. The second theme comprised strategies to improve communication, using different speech techniques and communicative support, as well as trying to achieve changes in medical and stimulation parameters. The third theme included descriptions of mixed feelings surrounding the surgery. Participants described the surgery as an unavoidable dramatic change, associated both with improved quality of life but also uncertainty and lack of information, particularly regarding speech and communication changes. Despite negative effects on speech, the individuals were generally very pleased with the surgical outcome. More information before surgery regarding possible side effects on speech, meeting with a previously treated patient and possibly voice and speech therapy before or after surgery are suggested to facilitate the adjustment to the new speech conditions.

  4. Exploring effectiveness of team communication: Balancing synchronous and asynchronous communication in design teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    den Otter, Ad; Emmitt, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Effective teams use a balance of synchronous and asynchronous communication. Team communication is dependent on the communication acts of team members and the ability of managers to facilitate, stimulate and motivate them. Team members from organizations using different information systems tend...... to have different understanding, opinions, and rates of adoption and skills levels regarding specific IT tools. The purpose of this paper is to explore the effective use of tools for communication in design teams and the strategies for the use of specific tools....

  5. The Effects of Language Experience and Speech Context on the Phonetic Accommodation of English-accented Spanish Voicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llanos, Fernando; Francis, Alexander L

    2017-03-01

    Native speakers of Spanish with different amounts of experience with English classified stop-consonant voicing (/b/ versus /p/) across different speech accents: English-accented Spanish, native Spanish, and native English. While listeners with little experience with English classified target voicing with an English- or Spanish-like voice onset time (VOT) boundary, predicted by contextual VOT, listeners familiar with English relied on an English-like VOT boundary in an English-accented Spanish context even in the absence of clear contextual cues to English VOT. This indicates that Spanish listeners accommodated English-accented Spanish voicing differently depending on their degree of familiarization with the English norm.

  6. New Media Technology in Developing Effective Organizational Internal Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Kholisoh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article was intended to investigate various benefits of Whatsapp Messenger application for an effective intenal communication in PT Euro Management Indonesia. In addition, this research also aimed to map the organizational internal communication pattern through the use of Whatsapp Messenger application. The research used theories of organizaional communication, new media communication pattern, and computer mediated communication (CMC. Moreover, paradigm used in the research was constructivist with qualitative approach and the research method was case study. The research result finds that the use of new media Whatsapp Messenger as a tool of communication can build effective internal communication in PT Euro Management Indonesia. Moreover, it also shows that the internal organizational communication pattern in PT Euro Management Indonesia used in Whatsapp Messenger application is conversation pattern.

  7. How Effective Is Communication Training For Aircraft Crews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Charlotte; Goguen, Joseph; Devenish, Linda

    1992-01-01

    Report surveys communication training for aircraft crews. Intended to alleviate problems caused or worsened by poor communication and coordination among crewmembers. Focuses on two training methods: assertiveness training and grid-management training. Examines theoretical background of methods and attempts made to validate their effectiveness. Presents criteria for evaluating applicability to aviation environment. Concludes communication training appropriate for aircraft crews.

  8. Messaging and Voice Conferencing through Wi-Fi Network

    OpenAIRE

    Miss. Nayana H S,; Dr. M C Padma

    2014-01-01

    The use of Wi-Fi enabled android phones as IP phones, and their communication within a local wireless LAN is discussed in this paper. This proposed model is a form of telecommunication that allows exchange of data and voice via Wi-Fi network. The phones, which are Wi-Fi enabled and have android operating system, can be used to communicate with each other through the Wi-Fi communication channel. Proposed system incorporates messaging (Text and voice), conferencing (group conver...

  9. Gender-Differentiated Language and Effective Inter-gender Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Bing

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses firstly the main differences between men’s and women’s speech in everyday communication among English native speakers, and then analyses the effects on inter-gender communication. It reduces English learners in China barriers when they communicate with English native speakers in different situations and gives domestic English teachers some en-lightenment when they foster students’communication competence.

  10. [Effects of acaoustic adaptation of classrooms on the quality of verbal communication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulski, Witold

    2013-01-01

    Voice organ disorders among teachers are caused by excessive voice strain. One of the measures to reduce this strain is to decrease background noise when teaching. Increasing the acoustic absorption of the room is a technical measure for achieving this aim. The absorption level also improves speech intelligibility rated by the following parameters: room reverberation time and speech transmission index (STI). This article presents the effects of acoustic adaptation of classrooms on the quality of verbal communication, aimed at getting the speech intelligibility at the good or excellent level. The article lists the criteria for evaluating classrooms in terms of the quality of verbal communication. The parameters were defined, using the measurement methods according to PN-EN ISO 3382-2:2010 and PN-EN 60268-16:2011. Acoustic adaptations were completed in two classrooms. After completing acoustic adaptations the reverberation time for the frequency of 1 kHz was reduced: in room no. 1 from 1.45 s to 0.44 s and in room no. 2 from 1.03 s to 0.37 s (maximum 0.65 s). At the same time, the speech transmission index increased: in room no. 1 from 0.55 (satisfactory speech intelligibility) to 0.75 (speech intelligibility close to excellent); in room no. 2 from 0.63 (good speech intelligibility) to 0.80 (excellent speech intelligibility). Therefore, it can be stated that prior to completing acoustic adaptations room no. 1 did not comply and room no. 2 barely complied with the criterion (speech transmission index of 0.62). After completing acoustic adaptations both rooms meet the requirements.

  11. Effects of acaoustic adaptation of classrooms on the quality of verbal communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Mikulski

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Voice organ disorders among teachers are caused by excessive voice strain. One of the measures to reduce this strain is to decrease background noise when teaching. Increasing the acoustic absorption of the room is a technical measure for achieving this aim. The absorption level also improves speech intelligibility rated by the following parameters: room reverberation time and speech transmission index (STI. This article presents the effects of acoustic adaptation of classrooms on the quality of verbal communication, aimed at getting the speech intelligibility at the good or excellent level. Material and Methods: The article lists the criteria for evaluating classrooms in terms of the quality of verbal communication. The parameters were defined, using the measurement methods according to PN-EN ISO 3382-2:2010 and PN-EN 60268-16:2011. Acoustic adaptations were completed in two classrooms. Results: After completing acoustic adaptations the reverberation time for the frequency of 1 kHz was reduced: in room no. 1 from 1.45 s to 0.44 s and in room no. 2 from 1.03 s to 0.37 s (maximum 0.65 s. At the same time, the speech transmission index increased: in room no. 1 from 0.55 (satisfactory speech intelligibility to 0.75 (speech intelligibility close to excellent; in room no. 2 from 0.63 (good speech intelligibility to 0.80 (excellent speech intelligibility. Therefore, it can be stated that prior to completing acoustic adaptations room no. 1 did not comply and room no. 2 barely complied with the criterion (speech transmission index of 0.62. After completing acoustic adaptations both rooms meet the requirements. Med Pr 2013;64(2:207–215

  12. Bodies, Spaces, Voices, Silences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Mazzoleni

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A good architecture should not only allow functional, formal and technical quality for urban spaces, but also let the voice of the city be perceived, listened, enjoyed. Every city has got its specific sound identity, or “ISO” (R. O. Benenzon, made up of a complex texture of background noises and fluctuation of sound figures emerging and disappearing in a game of continuous fadings. For instance, the ISO of Naples is characterized by a spread need of hearing the sound return of one’s/others voices, by a hate of silence. Cities may fall ill: illness from noise, within super-crowded neighbourhoods, or illness from silence, in the forced isolation of peripheries. The proposal of an urban music therapy denotes an unpublished and innovative enlarged interdisciplinary research path, where architecture, music, medicine, psychology, communication science may converge, in order to work for rebalancing spaces and relation life of the urban collectivity, through the care of body and sound dimensions.

  13. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 587: Effective patient-physician communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Physicians' ability to effectively and compassionately communicate information is key to a successful patient-physician relationship. The current health care environment demands increasing clinical productivity and affords less time with each patient, which can impede effective patient-physician communication. The use of patient-centered interviewing, caring communication skills, and shared decision making improves patient-physician communication. Involving advanced practice nurses or physician assistants may improve the patient's experience and understanding of her visit. Electronic communication with established patients also can enhance the patient experience in select situations.

  14. Communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sigafoos, J.; Lancioni, G.E.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Lang, R.; Singh, N.N.; Didden, H.C.M.; Green, V.A.; Marschik, P.B.

    2016-01-01

    Communication disorders are common among people with intellectual disabilities. Consequently, enhancing the communication skills of such individuals is a major intervention priority. This chapter reviews the nature and prevalence of the speech, language, and communication problems associated with

  15. EFFECTIVE MARKETING AT EDUCATION: IMPORTANCE OF COMMUNICATION MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remziye Terkan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Communication is defined as human activities. It is set of circumstances during the people’s lives. Communication is emerged with the emergence of humanity. Communication is production and exchange of meanings verbally, as well as via visual and written materials. Marketing is an exchange processes. Production and design of products & services, pricing, promotion and places are key factors for marketing. Written and visual communications are effective for people in every area. Written and visual communication materials are effective also in marketing, they are like impressive tools and also they are influential for every organization even in higher education in the world. The significance of written and visual communication materials in educational institutions is evaluated in that study. The role and importance of visual and written materials in marketing process of education sector and show communication materials effectiveness on educational institutions achievement is investigated.

  16. Effective Protocols for Mobile Communications and Networking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza, J.; Sholander, P.; Van Leeuwen, B,

    1998-12-01

    This report examines methods of mobile communications with an emphasis on mobile computing and wireless communications. Many of the advances in communications involve the use of Internet Protocol (IP), Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM), and ad hoc network protocols. However, many of the advances in these protocols have been focused on wired communications. Recently much focus has been directed at advancing communication technology in the area of mobile wireless networks. This report discusses various protocols used in mobile communications and proposes a number of extensions to existing protocols. A detailed discussion is also included on desirable protocol characteristics and evaluation criteria. In addition, the report includes a discussion on several network simulation tools that maybe used to evaluate network protocols.

  17. [The effect of smoking and forced use of the voice to development of the vocal polyps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnjatic, M; Stankovic, P; Djukić, V

    2009-01-01

    Dysphonia is often caused by polyps which are benign changes of pseudotumors. With their presence they are hampering with glotis oclusion. Laryngomicroscopy of general and endotracheal anaesthesia has been preformed on all of the patients. Microsurgical technique has been used to remove the polyps. Bioptic material was analyzed in pathophysiological laboratory of clinic of pathology in Banjaluka. All of the results were presented through tables and graphic representations. Frequency of polyps through age and sex groups, along with the examination of ethyological factors in emergence of polyps of vocal cords. Results are in accordance with the results of other authors who were involved in similar problematics. Through analysis of our data we percieve that the abuse of voice is part of ethiological factors that lead not only to emergence of vocal fold lesions but aswell as other benign changes.

  18. Selected indicators for evaluating the effectiveness of marketing communication

    OpenAIRE

    Aneta Olejniczak; Darko Tomorad

    2015-01-01

    The issue of the evaluation of marketing activity in each institution most often refers to marketing communications and therefore promotional activities of the company. Whereas measuring the effectiveness of marketing communications results, we can use many tools-indicators, the use of which will track the progress and assess the effectiveness of our institution run by marketing communications. With a view to implementing effective marketing strategy we must be able to measure our success. In...

  19. Spelling: A Fundamental Skill for Effective Business Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulbert, Jack E.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the importance of effective written communication to the successful management of business enterprises. Examines the significance of correct spelling and the development of spelling competence. (CT)

  20. Comparing the Effectiveness of GPS-Enhanced Voice Guidance for Pedestrians with Metric- and Landmark-Based Instruction Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehrl, Karl; Häusler, Elisabeth; Leitinger, Sven

    This paper reports on a field experiment comparing two different kinds of verbal turn instructions in the context of GPS-based pedestrian navigation. The experiment was conducted in the city of Salzburg with 20 participants. Both instruction sets were based on qualitative turn direction concepts. The first one was enhanced with metric distance information and the second one was enhanced with landmark-anchored directions gathered from participants of a previous field experiment. The results show that in context of GPS-enhanced pedestrian navigation both kinds of instruction sets lead to similar navigation performance. Results also demonstrate that effective voice-only guidance of pedestrians in unfamiliar environments at a minimal error rate and without stopping the walk is feasible. Although both kinds of instructions lead to similar navigation performance, participants clearly preferred landmark-enhanced instructions.

  1. Work-related voice disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Eduardo Przysiezny

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Dysphonia is the main symptom of the disorders of oral communication. However, voice disorders also present with other symptoms such as difficulty in maintaining the voice (asthenia, vocal fatigue, variation in habitual vocal fundamental frequency, hoarseness, lack of vocal volume and projection, loss of vocal efficiency, and weakness when speaking. There are several proposals for the etiologic classification of dysphonia: functional, organofunctional, organic, and work-related voice disorder (WRVD.OBJECTIVE: To conduct a literature review on WRVD and on the current Brazilian labor legislation.METHODS: This was a review article with bibliographical research conducted on the PubMed and Bireme databases, using the terms "work-related voice disorder", "occupational dysphonia", "dysphonia and labor legislation", and a review of labor and social security relevant laws.CONCLUSION: WRVD is a situation that frequently is listed as a reason for work absenteeism, functional rehabilitation, or for prolonged absence from work. Currently, forensic physicians have no comparative parameters to help with the analysis of vocal disorders. In certain situations WRVD may cause, work disability. This disorder may be labor-related, or be an adjuvant factor to work-related diseases.

  2. The Mechanism and Effect of Abusive Supervision on the Voice Behavior%辱虐管理对建言行为影响及机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严丹; 黄培伦

    2012-01-01

    尽管建言行为对于组织变革与发展的意义重大,然而现实中许多员工的建言行为通常并不尽如人意,管理者领导行为的辱虐方式应是非常重要的影响因素之一.本文旨在研究辱虐管理对员工建言行为的影响,并以社会认同理论和文化及价值观为基础,研究组织认同和组织自尊在以上关系所起的中介作用,员工权利距离感在其中的调节作用.研究以广州一家大型制造型企业中302名员工和78名管理者作为研究对象,采用层级回归分析对问卷调查所获得的匹配数据进行分析.结果表明:辱虐管理对员工的建言行为有显著的负向影响,员工的组织认同和组织自尊在其中起完全中介作用;员工的权力距离感越大,辱虐管理对员工的组织认同和组织自尊的负面影响越小.%The voice behavior is important for significant organizational change and development, but in reality many employees are often reluctant to make suggestions. Managers' abusive supervision is one of the most important factors accounting for the voice behavior of employees. This paper mainly explores the mechanism which can help understand how abusive supervision impact voice behavior, as well as proposes and verifies the mediating effect of organizational identification/organization-based self-esteem on the relationship between abusive supervision and employee voice behavior. The paper mainly answers three research questions; Does abusive supervision affect an employee's voice behavior? What is the mechanism influencing the relationship? What individual traits can affect the process of abusive supervision that can influence an employee's voice behavior? Our literature review leads to theoretical development, and clarifies connotation and extension of variables, division of dimensions, and existing research related to the logical relationships from abusive supervision to organizational identification/organization-based self

  3. Wildland fire and fuel management: principles for effective communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric Toman; Bruce Shindler

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we discuss four principles identified through recent research for effective citizen-agency communication and examine their use in accomplishing fire management objectives. Principles include the following: (1) effective communication is a product of effective planning; (2) both unidirectional (one-way) and interactive approaches are part of successful...

  4. Effective horizons for quantum communication in a Schwarzschild spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Hosler, Dominic; Kok, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    Communication between a free-falling observer and an observer hovering above the Schwarzschild horizon of a black hole suffers from Unruh-Hawking noise, which degrades communication channel capacities. Ignoring time dilation, which affects all channels equally, we show that for bosonic communication using single and dual rail encoding the classical channel capacity reaches a finite value and the quantum channel capacity falls off exponentially. The latter defines an effective horizon, beyond which quantum communication becomes exponentially resource inefficient. The characteristic length scale associated with this quantum horizon depends on the mass of the black hole and the frequency of the communication channel.

  5. Voice box (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The larynx, or voice box, is located in the neck and performs several important functions in the body. The larynx is involved in swallowing, breathing, and voice production. Sound is produced when the air which ...

  6. Voice and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dramatic voice changes are those during childhood and adolescence. The larynx (or voice box) and vocal cord tissues do not fully mature until late teenage years. Hormone-related changes during adolescence are ...

  7. Effective Listening: Key to Intimate Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiquist, Jack

    Intended for those who teach dyadic communication, this paper argues that each partner in an intimate relationship has two primary communication needs: (1) to listen, look at, and pay attention to the "self" in order to attain clear awareness as a source of information for self-disclosure; and (2) to listen, look at, and pay attention to…

  8. Effective communication: a powerful risk management tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husserl, F

    1993-01-01

    Physicians can employ communication techniques to improve patient diagnoses, outcomes, and satisfaction and ultimately to decrease their risk of malpractice suit. The skills outlined in this article form the basis of the Miles Program for Physician-Patient Communication of which the author is a participant.

  9. Effective Communication between Preservice and Cooperating Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawley, Ji Ji; Moore, Jenifer; Smajic, Almir

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews research on communication between preservice and cooperating teachers during a teacher internship. The research reveals that poor communication between preservice teachers and cooperating teachers can cause barriers to planning lessons, feedback, and teaching experiences. Additionally, research indicates that…

  10. Effectively Communicating Science to Extension Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the concept of "framing" within the context of relevant communication and psychological research and considers its potential applicability to Extension science communication. Examples of research-based support for the framing of scientific issues are presented, along with a literature-based discussion of the…

  11. Communication Planning for Effective Nutrition Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, Royal D.

    Primary health and nutrition have been linked with communication in a variety of well-publicized projects. This partnership between communication and nutrition was made necessary by the confrontation between an expanded demand for services and limited resources for meeting the demand. Senior officials have a substantial role to play in seeing that…

  12. Effective Communication between Preservice and Cooperating Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawley, Ji Ji; Moore, Jenifer; Smajic, Almir

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews research on communication between preservice and cooperating teachers during a teacher internship. The research reveals that poor communication between preservice teachers and cooperating teachers can cause barriers to planning lessons, feedback, and teaching experiences. Additionally, research indicates that…

  13. Cognitive Load in Voice Therapy Carry-Over Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwarsson, Jenny; Morris, David Jackson; Balling, Laura Winther

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The cognitive load generated by online speech production may vary with the nature of the speech task. This article examines 3 speech tasks used in voice therapy carry-over exercises, in which a patient is required to adopt and automatize new voice behaviors, ultimately in daily spontaneous communication. Method: Twelve subjects produced…

  14. Why Voice Matters: Culture and Politics After Neoliberalism

    OpenAIRE

    Couldry, Nick

    2010-01-01

    For more than thirty years neoliberalism has declared that market functioning trumps all other social, political and economic values. In this book, Nick Couldry passionately argues for voice, the effective opportunity for people to speak and be heard on what affects their lives, as the only value that can truly challenge neoliberal politics. But having voice is not enough: we need to know our voice matters. Insisting that the answer goes much deeper than simply calling for 'more voices', whet...

  15. DLMS Voice Data Entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    between operator and computer displayed on ADM-3A 20c A-I Possible Hardware Configuration for a Multistation Cartographic VDES ...this program a Voice Recognition System (VRS) which can be used to explore the use of voice data entry ( VDE ) in the DIMS or other cartographic data...Multi-Station Cartographic Voice Data Entry System An engineering development model voice data entry system ( VDES ) could be most efficiently

  16. 46 CFR 32.30-1 - Voice tubes or telephone equipment-T/ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Sound Powered Telephone, Voice Tube, and Engine Order Telegraph Systems § 32.30-1 Voice tubes or telephone equipment—T/ALL. Each tankships must have communication equipment... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Voice tubes or telephone equipment-T/ALL....

  17. Can You Hear Me Now? The Impact of Voice in an Online Gaming Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Dmitri; Caplan, Scott; Xiong, Li

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a controlled field experiment in which voice communication was introduced into an existing online community (online gaming guilds within the popular game "World of Warcraft"), comparing a mix of voice and text with text only. Quantitative results suggest increases in liking and trust due to the addition of voice,…

  18. Voice Range Profiles of Middle School and High School Choral Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    Vocal demands of teaching are significant, and this challenge is compounded for choral directors who depend on the voice for communicating information or demonstrating music concepts. The purpose of this study is to examine the frequency and intensity of middle and high school choral directors' voices and to compare choral directors' voices with…

  19. 'Inner voices': the cerebral representation of emotional voice cues described in literary texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brück, Carolin; Kreifelts, Benjamin; Gößling-Arnold, Christina; Wertheimer, Jürgen; Wildgruber, Dirk

    2014-11-01

    While non-verbal affective voice cues are generally recognized as a crucial behavioral guide in any day-to-day conversation their role as a powerful source of information may extend well beyond close-up personal interactions and include other modes of communication such as written discourse or literature as well. Building on the assumption that similarities between the different 'modes' of voice cues may not only be limited to their functional role but may also include cerebral mechanisms engaged in the decoding process, the present functional magnetic resonance imaging study aimed at exploring brain responses associated with processing emotional voice signals described in literary texts. Emphasis was placed on evaluating 'voice' sensitive as well as task- and emotion-related modulations of brain activation frequently associated with the decoding of acoustic vocal cues. Obtained findings suggest that several similarities emerge with respect to the perception of acoustic voice signals: results identify the superior temporal, lateral and medial frontal cortex as well as the posterior cingulate cortex and cerebellum to contribute to the decoding process, with similarities to acoustic voice perception reflected in a 'voice'-cue preference of temporal voice areas as well as an emotion-related modulation of the medial frontal cortex and a task-modulated response of the lateral frontal cortex.

  20. Evidence-based treatment of voice and speech disorders in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Leslie A; Ramig, Lorraine O; Fox, Cynthia

    2015-06-01

    Voice and speech impairments are present in nearly 90% of people with Parkinson disease and negatively impact communication and quality of life. This review addresses the efficacy of Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT) LOUD to improve vocal loudness (as measured by vocal sound pressure level vocSPL) and functional communication in people with Parkinson disease. The underlying physiologic mechanisms of Parkinson disease associated with voice and speech changes and the strength of the current treatment evidence are discussed with recommendations for best clinical practice. Two randomized control trials demonstrated that participants who received LSVT LOUD were significantly better on the primary outcome variable of improved vocSPL posttreatment than alternative and no treatment groups. Treatment effects were maintained for up to 2 years. In addition, improvements have been demonstrated in associated outcome variables, including speech rate, monotone, voice quality, speech intelligibility, vocal fold adduction, swallowing, facial expression and neural activation. Advances in technology-supported treatment delivery are enhancing treatment accessibility. Data support the efficacy of LSVT LOUD to increase vocal loudness and functional communication in people with Parkinson disease. Timely intervention is essential for maximizing quality of life for people with Parkinson disease.

  1. National Strategic Research Plan, 1994-1995: Language and Language Impairments, Balance and Balance Disorders, Voice and Voice Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. on Deafness and Other Communications Disorders, Bethesda, MD.

    This report is the result of three expert panels (on language and language impairments, balance and balance disorders, and voice and voice disorders) which met in 1994 and 1995 and reported research accomplishments, federal program goals, and research opportunities to the National Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Advisory Board. For…

  2. Writing with Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesler, Ted

    2012-01-01

    In this Teaching Tips article, the author argues for a dialogic conception of voice, based in the work of Mikhail Bakhtin. He demonstrates a dialogic view of voice in action, using two writing examples about the same topic from his daughter, a fifth-grade student. He then provides five practical tips for teaching a dialogic conception of voice in…

  3. Tips for Healthy Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... social interaction as well as for most people’s occupation. Proper care and use of your voice will give you the best chance for having a healthy voice for your entire lifetime. Hoarseness or roughness in your voice is often ...

  4. A Unique Wavelet Steganography Based Voice Biometric Protection Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjaypande M. B

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Voice biometric is an easy and cost effective biometric technique which requires minimalistic hardware and software complexity. General voice biometric needs a voice phrase by user which is processed with Mel Filter and Vector Quantized features are extracted. Vector quantization reduces the codebook size but decreases the accuracy of recognition. Therefore we propose a voice biometric system where voice file's non quantized code books are matched with spoken phrase. In order to ensure security to such direct voice sample we embed the voice file in a randomly selected image using DWT technique. Imposters are exposed to only images and are unaware of the voice files. We show that the technique produces better efficiency in comparison to VQ based technique.

  5. Physician communication coaching effects on patient experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Adrianne; Knee, Alexander; Shaaban, Reham; Bryson, Christine; Paadam, Jasmine; Harvey, Rohini; Igarashi, Satoko; LaChance, Christopher; Benjamin, Evan; Lagu, Tara

    2017-01-01

    Excellent communication is a necessary component of high-quality health care. We aimed to determine whether a training module could improve patients' perceptions of physician communication behaviors, as measured by change over time in domains of patient experience scores related to physician communication. We designed a comprehensive physician-training module focused on improving specific "etiquette-based" physician communication skills through standardized simulations and physician coaching with structured feedback. We employed a quasi-experimental pre-post design, with an intervention group consisting of internal medicine hospitalists and residents and a control group consisting of surgeons. The outcome was percent "always" scores for questions related to patients' perceptions of physician communication using the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey and a Non-HCAHPS Physician-Specific Patient Experience Survey (NHPPES) administered to patients cared for by hospitalists. A total of 128 physicians participated in the simulation. Responses from 5020 patients were analyzed using HCAHPS survey data and 1990 patients using NHPPES survey data. The intercept shift, or the degree of change from pre-intervention percent "always" responses, for the HCAHPS questions of doctors "treating patients with courtesy" "explaining things in a way patients could understand," and "overall teamwork" showed no significant differences between surgical control and hospitalist intervention patients. Adjusted NHPPES percent excellent survey results increased significantly post-intervention for the questions of specified individual doctors "keeping patient informed" (adjusted intercept shift 9.9% P = 0.019), "overall teamwork" (adjusted intercept shift 11%, P = 0.037), and "using words the patient could understand" (adjusted intercept shift 14.8%, p = 0.001). A simulation based physician communication coaching method focused on specific "etiquette

  6. Implicit Coordination Strategies for Effective Team Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butchibabu, Abhizna; Sparano-Huiban, Christopher; Sonenberg, Liz; Shah, Julie

    2016-06-01

    We investigated implicit communication strategies for anticipatory information sharing during team performance of tasks with varying degrees of complexity. We compared the strategies used by teams with the highest level of performance to those used by the lowest-performing teams to evaluate the frequency and methods of communications used as a function of task structure. High-performing teams share information by anticipating the needs of their teammates rather than explicitly requesting the exchange of information. As the complexity of a task increases to involve more interdependence among teammates, the impact of coordination on team performance also increases. This observation motivated us to conduct a study of anticipatory information sharing as a function of task complexity. We conducted an experiment in which 13 teams of four people performed collaborative search-and-deliver tasks with varying degrees of complexity in a simulation environment. We elaborated upon prior characterizations of communication as implicit versus explicit by dividing implicit communication into two subtypes: (a) deliberative/goal information and (b) reactive status updates. We then characterized relationships between task structure, implicit communication, and team performance. We found that the five teams with the fastest task completion times and lowest idle times exhibited higher rates of deliberative communication versus reactive communication during high-complexity tasks compared with the five teams with the slowest completion times and longest idle times (p = .039). Teams in which members proactively communicated information about their next goal to teammates exhibited improved team performance. The findings from our work can inform the design of communication strategies for team training to improve performance of complex tasks. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  7. Voice, Genre, and Intentionality: An Integrated Methods Study of Voice Criteria in the Evaluation of Secondary Students' Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Jill V.

    2010-01-01

    "Voice" is widely considered to be a feature of effective writing. It's no surprise, then, that voice criteria frequently appear on rubrics used to score student essays in large-scale writing assessments. However, composition theorists hold vastly different views regarding voice and how it should be applied in the evaluation of student writing, if…

  8. Age at voice break in Danish boys: effects of pre-pubertal body mass index and secular trend

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Magnusdottir, Steinunn; Scheike, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    in the boys choir and pre-pubertal body mass index (BMI)] by survival analysis techniques based on retrospective analyses of age at voice break in 463 Danish choir boys who were studied over a 10-year period. We found an overall median age at voice break of 14.0 [13.9-14.6] years, and a statistically...... significant downwards trend in age at voice break in the 10-year period (1994-2003) (log-rank test p = 0.0146). There was a statistically significant difference in age at voice break between boys in the different BMI quartiles in pre-puberty (p = 0.00822) with a tendency towards early voice break...... with increasing BMI standard deviation scores. Thus boys in the heaviest quartile at 8 years of age had an increased risk of early voice break (RR of 1.74 [1.14-2.65]) approximately 6 years later, compared with boys in the thinnest quartile. The earlier voice break seen during the 10-year observation period could...

  9. Body expressions influence recognition of emotions in the face and voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Stock, Jan; Righart, Ruthger; de Gelder, Beatrice

    2007-08-01

    The most familiar emotional signals consist of faces, voices, and whole-body expressions, but so far research on emotions expressed by the whole body is sparse. The authors investigated recognition of whole-body expressions of emotion in three experiments. In the first experiment, participants performed a body expression-matching task. Results indicate good recognition of all emotions, with fear being the hardest to recognize. In the second experiment, two alternative forced choice categorizations of the facial expression of a compound face-body stimulus were strongly influenced by the bodily expression. This effect was a function of the ambiguity of the facial expression. In the third experiment, recognition of emotional tone of voice was similarly influenced by task irrelevant emotional body expressions. Taken together, the findings illustrate the importance of emotional whole-body expressions in communication either when viewed on their own or, as is often the case in realistic circumstances, in combination with facial expressions and emotional voices.

  10. Deciding to help: effects of risk and crisis communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Marije H.; Kerstholt, José H.; Giebels, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to gain insight into the (combined) effects of risk and crisis communication on adequate behaviour during a crisis situation. In addition, it adds to the existing literature by examining the effects of risk and crisis communication on psychological factors that are involved in decis

  11. Effect of fundamental frequency at voice onset on vocal attack time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Ben C; Baken, R J; Roark, Rick M; Reid, Stephanie; Ribeiro, Melissa; Tsai, Weilyn

    2013-05-01

    To examine vocal attack time (VAT) values associated with the production of low, mid, and high rates of vocal fold vibration in normal speakers. Sound pressure (SP) and electroglottographic (EGG) recordings were obtained for eight female and five male subjects while producing multiple tokens of the sustained vowels /ɑ/, /i/, and /u/ at comfortable loudness and at mid, low (-3 semitones), and high (+6 semitones) rates of vocal fold vibration. Generalized sinusoidal models of the SP and EGG signals were computed to compare rates of amplitude change. VAT was computed from the time lag of the cross-correlation function. Adjusted mean VAT for the high frequency condition was smaller than the adjusted mean VAT values for the low- and mid-frequency conditions. There was no significant difference between the mid and low frequency conditions. Findings reveal an association of the VAT measure with increases in vocal fold tension associated with the production of high rates of vocal fold vibration. Copyright © 2013 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Segmental and prosodic effects on intervocalic voiced stop reduction in connected speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouavichith, Dominique; Davidson, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    De scriptions of lenition have often assumed that connected speech reductions are the phonetic precursors of phonological lenition processes. In this article, production of intervocalic voiced stops during reading in American English is examined to determine whether connected speech reduction processes mirror the stages of lenition that have been posited in the phonological literature. The first result shows that American English speakers never lenite to fricatives or debuccalize to [h] or glottal stop, but rather produce approximants whenever reduction occurs. Second, stress plays an essential role: 51% of stops are produced as approximants when stress is on the preceding syllable (e.g. 'yoga'), but only 7% of stops weaken when stress is on the following syllable (e.g. 'lagoon'). Approximant productions are longer and higher in intensity than stop productions when stress precedes the target consonant, but when stress follows the target consonant, the stop cues are enhanced. These acoustic findings suggest that English speakers prioritize the realization of acoustic cues to stress, including the robust production of stop consonants, over pressures to reduce or weaken consonants in intervocalic position. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Social Barriers to Effective Communication in Old Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sanecka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Some communication barriers apply particularly to elderly people. The social barriers to effective communication in old age are the barriers caused by stereotypes of old age/elderly people and the barriers arising from limitations in using mass communication by seniors. Stereotypes of old age/elderly people embrace views regarding old people’s communication skills and the ideas about the correct way of communication with them. Therefore the communication problems of old people are correlated with the little and poor communication processes they are participating in. This seems to be a result of impetuses of poor quality sent to seniors by their communication partners. Not only face to face communication but also mass communication is very important for the elderly population. Therefore limitations in using new technologies and new communication channels as well as a limited presence in the mass media of content created by seniors and for seniors have an impact on their life, their well-being, and their interpersonal relationships. These problems are especially important when we faced with the ever growing population of elderly people.

  14. Ocean Variability Effects on Underwater Acoustic Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-30

    B is about 6 dB higher than that during enviromental case A. Due to the large aperture and deployment range of the MPL array, the channel impulse...coherence. IMPACT /APPLICATIONS The developed receiver is a robust structure for high data rate underwater digital communications at high frequencies...H.-C. Song, W. S. Hodgkiss, M. B. Porter, and the KauaiEx group, “ Impact of Ocean Variability on Coherent Underwater Acoustic Communications

  15. Unvoiced/voiced classification and voiced harmonic parameters estimation using the third-order statistics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YING Na; ZHAO Xiao-hui; DONG Jing

    2007-01-01

    Unvoiced/voiced classification of speech is a challenging problem especially under conditions of low signal-to-noise ratio or the non-white-stationary noise environment. To solve this problem, an algorithm for speech classification, and a technique for the estimation of pairwise magnitude frequency in voiced speech are proposed. By using third order spectrum of speech signal to remove noise, in this algorithm the least spectrum difference to get refined pitch and the max harmonic number is given. And this algorithm utilizes spectral envelope to estimate signal-to-noise ratio of speech harmonics. Speech classification, voicing probability, and harmonic parameters of the voiced frame can be obtained.Simulation results indicate that the proposed algorithm, under complicated background noise, especially Gaussian noise, can effectively classify speech in high accuracy for voicing probability and the voiced parameters.

  16. Qos and Voice Over IP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian GHENCEA

    Full Text Available As Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP technology matures, companies are increasingly adopting it to cut costs, improve efficiency and enhance customer service. Using the Internet as an existing network for integrating data and telecom systems through intelligent VoIP, a range of benefits results: lower long distance costs, cost cuts in cabling processes and more flexible telephony management. However, as voice over IP services grow in popularity, major threats arise: this rapid growth leads to traffic congestion, security is jeopardizedand the poor quality of calls affects communication. The objective of this article is to present all the elements that can affect voicequality in a VoIP network and to provide methods for solving them. A detailed analysis to minimize the impact of implementation of QoS will be made, and at the end solutions to management strategies will be proposed.

  17. Effective Interpersonal Communication: A Practical Guide to Improve Your Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertino, Kathleen A

    2014-09-30

    Use of effective interpersonal communication strategies by nurses in both personal and professional settings, may reduce stress, promote wellness, and therefore, improve overall quality of life. This article briefly explores the concept of interpersonal communication as it relates to Maslow's hierarchy of human needs; describes personal variables and the interaction of internal and external variables that can impact communication; and discusses possible causes and consequences of ineffective communication. Drawing on both the literature and experiences as a longtime provider of care in the mental health field, the author offers multiple practical strategies, with specific examples of possible responses for effective communication. Recommendations in this article are intended for nurses to consider as they seek healthy communication strategies that may be useful in both their personal and professional lives.

  18. Voice handicap in singers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murry, Thomas; Zschommler, Anne; Prokop, Jan

    2009-05-01

    The study aimed to determine the differences in responses to the Voice Handicap Index (VHI-10) between singers and nonsingers and to evaluate the ranked order differences of the VHI-10 statements for both groups. The VHI-10 was modified to include statements related to the singing voice for comparison to the original VHI-10. Thirty-five nonsingers with documented voice disorders responded to the VHI-10. A second group, consisting of 35 singers with voice complaints, responded to the VHI-10 with three statements added specifically addressing the singing voice. Data from both groups were analyzed in terms of overall subject self-rating of voice handicap and the rank order of statements from least to most important. The difference between the mean VHI-10 for the singers and nonsingers was not statistically significant, thus, supporting the validity of the VHI-10. However, the 10 statements were ranked differently in terms of their importance by both groups. In addition, when three statements related specifically to the singing voice were substituted in the original VHI-10, the singers judged their voice problem to be more severe than when using the original VHI-10. The type of statements used to assess self-perception of voice handicap may be related to the subject population. Singers with voice problems do not rate their voices to be more handicapped than nonsingers unless statements related specifically to singing are included.

  19. Effectiveness of information communication technology in rural insurance

    OpenAIRE

    Varadaraju Thamodaran; Mahalingam Ramesh

    2010-01-01

    Information and communications technologies are a device set of technological tools and resources used to communicate rural people about to disseminate awareness, create interest and to stimulate enroll intentions of insurance. It has enabled countries to leapfrog traditional modes of service delivery and make manifold improvements in process effectiveness and efficiency. Widespread adoption and application of information communication technology across the different fields of society and the...

  20. Effects of Videotaped Role Playing on Nurses' Therapeutic Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kay F.; Kroth, Jerome A.

    1976-01-01

    Research determining the effectiveness of videotape recorded (VTR) role playing as a teaching technique was conducted on nurses attending continuing education classes in verbal and nonverbal therapeutic communication skills. VTR appears to be an effective technique. (LH)

  1. The effect of buttermilk consumption on biofilm formation on silicone rubber voice prostheses in an artificial throat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, HJ; Bruinsma, G; van Meissenbruch, R; Leunisse, C; van der Mei, HC; Dijk, F; Albers, FVJ

    Biofilm formation on indwelling silicone rubber voice prostheses in laryngectomized patients is still the main reason for dysfunction of the valve, leading to frequent replacements. Within patient support groups in The Netherlands, laryngectomees have suggested that the consumption of buttermilk

  2. The effect of different navigation voices on trust and attention while using in-vehicle navigation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large, David R; Burnett, Gary E

    2014-06-01

    Automobiles are suffused with computers and technology designed to support drivers at all levels of the driving hierarchy. Classic secondary devices, such as in-vehicle navigation systems (IVNS), present strategic and tactical information to drivers. In order to mitigate the potential distraction and workload when interacting with these devices while driving, IVNS often employ voices to deliver navigational instructions. In contrast, voices are used during interpersonal encounters to engage the listener, provide clues about the speaker's personality and make judgments about them, for example, whether to like them and to trust them. A study conducted within a fixed-based medium-fidelity driving simulator investigated if drivers made similar 'personality' attributions to voices emanating from an IVNS and if this subsequently affected how they engaged with the device while driving. Twenty-nine experienced drivers and IVNS users drove to a specified destination with a simulated IVNS and authentically reproduced UK road signage to support their route-finding. Either of two navigation voices were used; one considered 'high-trust' and the other 'low-trust.' Presented with a conflict scenario, where the verbal route guidance differed to the road signs, 22 drivers followed the IVNS instruction rather than the road signs. Of these, the majority were using the 'high-trust' voice. A post-drive questionnaire revealed that, despite the fact that message content and delivery remained equivalent, participants recognized different attributes ('personalities') associated with each of the navigation voices. This influenced their attitudes towards them, including how much they liked them, their preferences for use, and the level of trust that they associated with each voice. While these, so-called, social responses may be invited and indeed encouraged in other contexts, in the automotive domain they are likely to conflict with the intended benefits of using a voice to deliver route

  3. Effects of emotional and perceptual-motor stress on a voice recognition system's accuracy: An applied investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poock, G. K.; Martin, B. J.

    1984-02-01

    This was an applied investigation examining the ability of a speech recognition system to recognize speakers' inputs when the speakers were under different stress levels. Subjects were asked to speak to a voice recognition system under three conditions: (1) normal office environment, (2) emotional stress, and (3) perceptual-motor stress. Results indicate a definite relationship between voice recognition system performance and the type of low stress reference patterns used to achieve recognition.

  4. The voice handicap of student-teachers and risk factors perceived to have a negative influence on the voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, George; Kooijman, Piet G C; Donders, A Rogier T; Cremers, W R J; de Jong, Felix I C R S

    2007-05-01

    A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed. The objectives of the study were to assess the psychosocial impact of current voice complaints as perceived by student-teachers with voice complaints in comparison with student-teachers without voice complaints, and to observe the pattern of risk factors in relation to their voice handicap. Subjects in the general population without a voice-demanding profession were selected as a reference group for limited comparison with the total group of student-teachers (future professional voice users). The respondents to the questionnaires were anonymous. Among the student-teachers, 17.2% reported current voice complaints in comparison with 9.7% of the reference group, and the odds ratio was 1.94, which showed the relative risk. Student-teachers had significantly greater total Voice Handicap Index (VHI) scores than the reference group (P = 0.034). The VHI subscale scores were not significantly different (P > 0.05). Student-teachers who reported current voice complaints had a significantly higher total VHI and subscale scores than student teachers without voice complaints (P VHI scores greater than the 75th percentile. These persons may be neglecting their voice handicap and probably represent the false-negative cases in the estimation of voice complaints. Logistic regression analysis of each of the given risk factors with the VHI as the independent variable showed that the perceived negative influence of the given risk factors on their voices was significantly greater with increasing VHI scores across the VHI range. A significant correlation was observed between the number of perceived risk factors and increasing VHI scores across the VHI range. An increased awareness of risk factors in relation to their voice handicap would serve to motivate student-teachers to change factors that contributed to their voice problem. Attention to all risk factors, which the subjects perceive to be a risk, would aid in effective management

  5. Exploring multiliteracies, student voice, and scientific practices in two elementary classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Elizabeth Rowland

    This study explored the voices of children in a changing world with evolving needs and new opportunities. The workplaces of rapidly moving capitalist societies value creativity, collaboration, and critical thinking skills which are of growing importance and manifesting themselves in modern K-12 science classroom cultures (Gee, 2000; New London Group, 2000). This study explored issues of multiliteracies and student voice set within the context of teaching and learning in 4th and 5th grade science classrooms. The purpose of the study was to ascertain what and how multiliteracies and scientific practices (NGSS Lead States, 2013c) are implemented, explore how multiliteracies influence students' voices, and investigate teacher and student perceptions of multiliteracies, student voice, and scientific practices. Grounded in a constructivist framework, a multiple case study was employed in two elementary classrooms. Through observations, student focus groups and interviews, and teacher interviews, a detailed narrative was created to describe a range of multiliteracies, student voice, and scientific practices that occurred with the science classroom context. Using grounded theory analysis, data were coded and analyzed to reveal emergent themes. Data analysis revealed that these two classrooms were enriched with multiliteracies that serve metaphorically as breeding grounds for student voice. In the modern classroom, defined as a space where information is instantly accessible through the Internet, multiliteracies can be developed through inquiry-based, collaborative, and technology-rich experiences. Scientific literacy, cultivated through student communication and collaboration, is arguably a multiliteracy that has not been considered in the literature, and should be, as an integral component of overall individual literacy in the 21st century. Findings revealed four themes. Three themes suggest that teachers address several modes of multiliteracies in science, but identify

  6. Are pharmaceutical marketing decisions calibrated to communications effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavusgil, Erin; Calantone, Roger

    2011-10-01

    Marketing managers continually struggle with how to maximize the effects of an integrated marketing communications strategy. The growing number of available communication outlets, as well as highly varying competitive landscapes, adds further complexity to this challenge. This empirical study examines the differential impact within a pharmaceutical market therapeutic category where both "push" and "pull" communication strategies operate on consumers and gatekeepers alike, in an atmosphere of unrelenting product innovation and broad competition. Furthermore, we explore how two contingency variables-(a) the competitive landscape, and (b) the product's length of time on the market-interact with these communication efforts and affect brand and category sales.

  7. VOICE RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE IN INDIVIDUALS WITH DEVIATED NASAL SEPTUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Deviated nasal septum (DNS is a common disorder which alters the nasal cavity anatomically and physiologically and results in nasal obstruction for breathing, nasal blockage, allergies, allergic rhinitis, and dryness of throat, thus influencing the person’s quality of life. Literature indicates that acoustic and resonatory characteristics of voice are negatively influenced in individuals with DNS due to the compensation by laryngeal system to the blockage in the resonatory chamber. In this context, the present study was aimed to investigate the voice related quality of life in individuals with deviated nasal septum. Forty individuals with severely deviated nasal septum confirmed by an Otorhinolaryngologist through anterior rhinoscopy, computerized tomography and twenty five age and gender matched controls filled the Kannada version of Voice Handicap Index-10 (VHI questionnaire. Results indicated significant impact of deviated nasal septum on voice related quality of life in 55% of the participants with DNS. Results of Mann-Whitney U test indicated significant effect of DNS on VHI scores in individuals with DNS compared to controls (p<0.001. With respect to response to the individual questions under VHI, although response was negative to most of the questions, two questions that received highest score belong to physical domain of VHI and are related to breathing difficulty and variations in voice throughout the day, indicating that they have more difficulty due to nasal blockage to airflow per se than their day-to-day functionality or communication.

  8. Linking pre-meeting communication to meeting effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, J.A.; Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Landowski, N.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The present study investigates the importance of communication that occurs just before workplace meetings (i.e., pre-meeting talk). We explore how pre-meeting talk impacts meeting effectiveness through the” ripple effect”, allowing before meeting communication/behaviors to ripple into and

  9. Creating the Conditions for Effective Communication and Learning in Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Monica

    2008-01-01

    The author believes that effective communication is an essential factor in overcoming differences and creating an environment where people can come together to learn, work, or play. Communication on the surface seems a straightforward endeavour. In practice, it is fraught with a multitude of issues that are dependent on the parties involved, who…

  10. Focal Event, Contextualization, and Effective Communication in the Mathematics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Per; Ryve, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to develop analytical tools for studying mathematical communication in collaborative activities. The theoretical construct of contextualization is elaborated methodologically in order to study diversity in individual thinking in relation to effective communication. The construct of contextualization highlights issues of…

  11. Effectiveness of communication skills training for dental students.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Horst, G.; Leeds, J.G.; Hoogstraten, J.

    1984-01-01

    27 1st-yr dental students participated in a 3-day communication-skills training, and 39 nonparticipating 1st-yr dental students served as controls, to investigate the short-term effects of the training on participating Ss' communication skills. The general objective of the training was to advance Ss

  12. Effectiveness of communication skills training for dental students.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Horst, G.; Leeds, J.G.; Hoogstraten, J.

    1984-01-01

    27 1st-yr dental students participated in a 3-day communication-skills training, and 39 nonparticipating 1st-yr dental students served as controls, to investigate the short-term effects of the training on participating Ss' communication skills. The general objective of the training was to advance Ss

  13. Neuro-Linguistics Programming: Developing Effective Communication in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Cresencio; Katz, Judy H.

    1983-01-01

    Students and teachers experience the world primarily through visual, kinesthetic, or auditory representational systems. If teachers are aware of their own favored system and those of their students, classroom communication will improve. Neurolinguistic programing can help teachers become more effective communicators. (PP)

  14. Focal Event, Contextualization, and Effective Communication in the Mathematics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Per; Ryve, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to develop analytical tools for studying mathematical communication in collaborative activities. The theoretical construct of contextualization is elaborated methodologically in order to study diversity in individual thinking in relation to effective communication. The construct of contextualization highlights issues of…

  15. Effectiveness of communication skills training for dental students.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Horst, G.; Leeds, J.G.; Hoogstraten, J.

    1984-01-01

    27 1st-yr dental students participated in a 3-day communication-skills training, and 39 nonparticipating 1st-yr dental students served as controls, to investigate the short-term effects of the training on participating Ss' communication skills. The general objective of the training was to advance

  16. An Activity for Teaching the Effects of Nonverbal Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Whitney Botsford; King, Eden B.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a novel teaching activity that allows students in diversity, leadership, and communication courses to observe the powerful effects of nonverbal communication. The nonverbal experiences female leaders may encounter as they rise through the ranks of organizations are simulated and consequences discussed. Two student volunteers…

  17. Teaching Listening: Voices from the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcraft, Nikki, Ed.; Tran, Anh, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Listening is the most important of the four language skills and is used most often in everyday communication. Teachers need innovative ways to address the particular listening problems emerging in their own contexts. "Teaching Listening: Voices From the Field" shares successful practices employed by teachers at different levels of education around…

  18. Voices of Disability on the Radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Mary Pat

    2008-01-01

    Background: While much commentary exists in relation to the portrayal of disabled people in the media, very little research examines the talk itself in any detail. This paper examines the how people with communication disabilities and disabled people are dealt with in the talk of a radio programme about disability. Aims: To show how the voices of…

  19. Secure voice for mobile satellite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaisnys, Arvydas; Berner, Jeff

    The initial system studies are described which were performed at JPL on secure voice for mobile satellite applications. Some options are examined for adapting existing Secure Telephone Unit III (STU-III) secure telephone equipment for use over a digital mobile satellite link, as well as for the evolution of a dedicated secure voice mobile earth terminal (MET). The work has included some lab and field testing of prototype equipment. The work is part of an ongoing study at JPL for the National Communications System (NCS) on the use of mobile satellites for emergency communications. The purpose of the overall task is to identify and enable the technologies which will allow the NCS to use mobile satellite services for its National Security Emergency Preparedness (NSEP) communications needs. Various other government agencies will also contribute to a mobile satellite user base, and for some of these, secure communications will be an essential feature.

  20. Secure voice for mobile satellite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaisnys, Arvydas; Berner, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    The initial system studies are described which were performed at JPL on secure voice for mobile satellite applications. Some options are examined for adapting existing Secure Telephone Unit III (STU-III) secure telephone equipment for use over a digital mobile satellite link, as well as for the evolution of a dedicated secure voice mobile earth terminal (MET). The work has included some lab and field testing of prototype equipment. The work is part of an ongoing study at JPL for the National Communications System (NCS) on the use of mobile satellites for emergency communications. The purpose of the overall task is to identify and enable the technologies which will allow the NCS to use mobile satellite services for its National Security Emergency Preparedness (NSEP) communications needs. Various other government agencies will also contribute to a mobile satellite user base, and for some of these, secure communications will be an essential feature.

  1. Speakers’ comfort and voice level variation in classrooms: Laboratory research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelegrin Garcia, David; Brunskog, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    Teachers adjust their voice levels under different classroom acoustics conditions, even in the absence of background noise. Laboratory experiments have been conducted in order to understand further this relationship and to determine optimum room acoustic conditions for speaking. Under simulated...... from 0.93 dB/dB, with free speech, to 0.1 dB/dB with other less demanding communication tasks as reading and talking at short distances. The room effect for some individuals can be as strong as 1.7 dB/dB. A questionnaire investigation showed that the acoustic comfort for talking in classrooms...

  2. Future communications satellite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagwell, James W.

    1992-01-01

    The point of view of the research is made through the use of viewgraphs. It is suggested that future communications satellite applications will be made through switched point to point narrowband communications. Some characteristics of which are as follows: small/low cost terminals; single hop communications; voice compatible; full mesh networking; ISDN compatible; and possible limited use of full motion video. Some target applications are as follows: voice/data networks between plants and offices in a corporation; data base networking for commercial and science users; and cellular radio internodal voice/data networking.

  3. Communicative and remedial effects of social blushing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Three experiments (N = 90; N = 78; N = 52) examined the communicative and remedial properties of blushing. in Experiments 1 and 2, participants read scripts describing incidents that took place in shops. Following the mishap the actor left while displaying a blush (target condition), left the shop w

  4. Effective Chemistry Communication in Informal Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Chemistry plays a critical role in daily life, impacting areas such as medicine and health, consumer products, energy production, the ecosystem, and many other areas. Communicating about chemistry in informal environments has the potential to raise public interest and understanding of chemistry around the world. However, the chemistry community…

  5. Explaining dysfunctional effects of lexicographical communication

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The theory that is introduced in this article allows for formal representa- .... promising for application to lexicographical communication and accommoda- tion in the TLC is the ... A further motivation for this step lies in the principle of expressibility, introduced ... Therefore, il is constructed in LMl for the lexicographer: (9) il[LMl].

  6. Exploring Effective Communication for Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Eric John

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore experiences and perceptions of organizational leaders regarding organizational change communication to improve change results in an organizational setting. Building on a conceptual framework of organizational theory, 25 full-time online faculty at an institution of higher learning in the southwestern…

  7. Challenges for effective counter-terrorism communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekilde, Lasse; Parker, David; Pearce, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Growing concerns about small-scale, low sophistication terrorist attacks, and the difficulties they present for security services, make public coproduction of security increasingly necessary. Communication to ensure that the public(s) is aware of the role they can play will be central to this. Th...

  8. Effective Chemistry Communication in Informal Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Chemistry plays a critical role in daily life, impacting areas such as medicine and health, consumer products, energy production, the ecosystem, and many other areas. Communicating about chemistry in informal environments has the potential to raise public interest and understanding of chemistry around the world. However, the chemistry community…

  9. Exploring Effective Communication for Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Eric John

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore experiences and perceptions of organizational leaders regarding organizational change communication to improve change results in an organizational setting. Building on a conceptual framework of organizational theory, 25 full-time online faculty at an institution of higher learning in the southwestern…

  10. Assessing Preservice Teachers' Presentation Capabilities: Contrasting the Modes of Communication with the Constructed Impression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Matt G.; Moloney, Robyn A.; Cavanagh, Michael S.; Sweller, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    A research-based understanding of how to develop and assess classroom presentation skills is vital for the effective development of pre-service teacher communication capabilities. This paper identifies and compares two different models of assessing pre-service teachers' presentation performance--one based on the Modes of Communication (voice,…

  11. Performance Assessment of Communication Enhancement Devices TEA HI Threat Headset

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Helmet TEA HI Threat w/ Ops-Core & Oakley 3.0 TEA HI Threat w/ Ops-Core & Oakley 2.0 TEA HI Threat w/ Ops-Core & ARC IP IL (d B) Average Impulsive...4 1.5 1.5 TEA HI Threat 10.2 4.6 4.4 Figure 23. Average response time (seconds) 3.7 Speech Intelligibility The AFRL VOice Communication...designed to evaluate voice communication effectiveness in operationally- realistic acoustic environments. The facility consisted of a programmable, high

  12. Exploring communication pathways to better health: Clinician communication of expectations for acupuncture effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Richard L.; Cox, Vanessa; Kallen, Michael A.; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study tested a pathway whereby acupuncturists’ communication of optimism for treatment effectiveness would enhance patients’ satisfaction during treatment, which in turn would contribute to better pain and function outcomes for patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Methods Secondary analysis from a 2 arm (real vs. sham acupuncture, high vs. neutral expectations) RCT. 311 patients with knee osteoarthritis received acupuncture over 10–12 sessions. Coders rated the degree to which acupuncturists communicated optimism for the treatment’s effectiveness. Satisfaction with acupuncture was assessed 4 weeks into treatment. Pain and function were assessed 6 weeks following treatment. Results Patients experiencing better outcomes were more satisfied with acupuncture during treatment, were younger, and had better baseline pain and function scores. Satisfaction during treatment was greater when patients interacted with more optimistic clinicians and had higher pretreatment expectations for acupuncture efficacy. Conclusion Acupuncturists’ communication of optimism about treatment effectiveness contributed to pain and function outcomes indirectly through its effect on satisfaction during treatment. Future research should model pathways through which clinician-patient communication affects mediating variables that in turn lead to improved health outcomes. Practical Implications While clinicians should not mislead patients, communicating hope and optimism for treatment effectiveness has therapeutic value for patients. PMID:22857778

  13. Passing crisis and emergency risk communications: the effects of communication channel, information type, and repetition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edworthy, Judy; Hellier, Elizabeth; Newbold, Lex; Titchener, Kirsteen

    2015-05-01

    Three experiments explore several factors which influence information transmission when warning messages are passed from person to person. In Experiment 1, messages were passed down chains of participants using five different modes of communication. Written communication channels resulted in more accurate message transmission than verbal. In addition, some elements of the message endured further down the chain than others. Experiment 2 largely replicated these effects and also demonstrated that simple repetition of a message eliminated differences between written and spoken communication. In a final field experiment, chains of participants passed information however they wanted to, with the proviso that half of the chains could not use telephones. Here, the lack of ability to use a telephone did not affect accuracy, but did slow down the speed of transmission from the recipient of the message to the last person in the chain. Implications of the findings for crisis and emergency risk communication are discussed.

  14. Effective Interpersonal Communication for Foreign Managers to Indonesian - CO Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Respati Wulandari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal communication tends to guide the way of management in companies worldwide. For multinational company, where expatriate is exist to blend with local partners or employee, the way they communicate to each other will determine the future of their company communication activities. The result of this research could be utilized by foreign managers and their Indonesian colleagues. Based on this research, which is supported by qualitative and literature methods, it can be found the effective method of communication to enhance job performance. The purpose of qualitative method that used by the author is to gain much information from employees and foreign managers in several companies. Besides interviewing them, author also joined in their interpersonal. The effective way of interpersonal communication to improve employee working performance is to form a sharing forum, informal meetings or communities of practice.

  15. Selected indicators for evaluating the effectiveness of marketing communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Olejniczak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The issue of the evaluation of marketing activity in each institution most often refers to marketing communications and therefore promotional activities of the company. Whereas measuring the effectiveness of marketing communications results, we can use many tools-indicators, the use of which will track the progress and assess the effectiveness of our institution run by marketing communications. With a view to implementing effective marketing strategy we must be able to measure our success. In this article, has been made a review of selected indicators to evaluate the effectiveness of marketing communications. Cited indicators are commonly used. According to the authors, each institution should create its own set of indicators by which the effects of its operations will be best measured.

  16. Singing voice outcomes following singing voice therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastolfo-Hromack, Christina; Thomas, Tracey L; Rosen, Clark A; Gartner-Schmidt, Jackie

    2016-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe singing voice therapy (SVT), describe referred patient characteristics, and document the outcomes of SVT. Retrospective. Records of patients receiving SVT between June 2008 and June 2013 were reviewed (n = 51). All diagnoses were included. Demographic information, number of SVT sessions, and symptom severity were retrieved from the medical record. Symptom severity was measured via the 10-item Singing Voice Handicap Index (SVHI-10). Treatment outcome was analyzed by diagnosis, history of previous training, and SVHI-10. SVHI-10 scores decreased following SVT (mean change = 11, 40% decrease) (P singing lessons (n = 10) also completed an average of three SVT sessions. Primary muscle tension dysphonia (MTD1) and benign vocal fold lesion (lesion) were the most common diagnoses. Most patients (60%) had previous vocal training. SVHI-10 decrease was not significantly different between MTD and lesion. This is the first outcome-based study of SVT in a disordered population. Diagnosis of MTD or lesion did not influence treatment outcomes. Duration of SVT was short (approximately three sessions). Voice care providers are encouraged to partner with a singing voice therapist to provide optimal care for the singing voice. This study supports the use of SVT as a tool for the treatment of singing voice disorders. 4 Laryngoscope, 126:2546-2551, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. Voice problems of future speech-language pathologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottliebson, Renee Ogle; Lee, Linda; Weinrich, Barbara; Sanders, Jessica

    2007-11-01

    Students training to be educators frequently exhibit voice disorders prior to employment. To date, there exist no similar studies of future speech-language pathologists (SLPs). The study is designed as a prospective, nonrandomized survey. The objective of this study is to determine the voice problems of first year graduate students training to be SLPs. Participants were 104 first year graduate students majoring in speech-language pathology at two universities. The Quick Screen for Voice was administered. Participants who failed completed a questionnaire regarding voice problems, medical history, daily habits, and voice use. When responses further indicated voice-related problems, endoscopic examination was completed. Fourteen percent (N=15) of the participants failed the screening by demonstrating two or more abnormal voice characteristics. These included persistent glottal fry (present in all who failed), low habitual pitch, juvenile resonance, hoarse, breathy, or strained phonation, abnormally low pitch on sustained vowels, and voice breaks during the frequency range. Twelve percent (N=12) failed both the screening and follow-up questionnaire. Responses included self-reported dysphonia, medical history with voice-related side effects, difficulty with excessive voice use, and voice problems occurring daily or weekly. Endoscopic evaluation showed one participant with bilateral vocal nodules. The results suggest that voice problems among future SLPs (12%) are more common than the 3-9% reported in the general population and similar to the 11% previously reported for teachers. However, future SLP voice problems are less frequent than those reported among education majors (21%) and all college students (17%). Faculty should identify students with voice problems and emphasize optimal voice use in classroom and clinical settings.

  18. Introduction to the Special Issue on Voice and Representation of Marginal Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Shelley; Scullion, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Advertising, Marketing, Public Relations and contemporary News: in these potentially powerful forms of cultural communication whose voices do we hear and which of these voices command most attention? This special edition of the Journal of Promotional Communication offers some tentative answers to these important societal questions.\\ud \\ud Thus in this issue the subject of voice and both its re-presentation and representation are addressed and rightly afforded critical importance within the re...

  19. Emoticon recommendation system for effective communication

    OpenAIRE

    Urabe, Yuki; Rzepka, Rafal; Araki, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    The existence of social media has made computer- mediated communication more widespread among users around the world. This paper describes the development of an emoticon recommendation system that allows users to express their feelings with their input. In order to develop this system, an innovative emoticon database consisting of a table of emoticons with points expressed from each of 10 distinctive emotions was constructed. An evaluation experiment showed that 71.3% of user-selected emotico...

  20. Silence and Voicing Accumulations in Italian Primary School Teachers With and Without Voice Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottalico, Pasquale; Graetzer, Simone; Astolfi, Arianna; Hunter, Eric J

    2017-03-01

    The relationship between the silence and voicing accumulations of primary school teachers and the teachers' clinical status was examined to determine whether more voicing accumulations and fewer silence accumulations were measured for the vocally unhealthy subjects than for the healthy subjects, which would imply more vocal loading and fewer short-term recovery moments. Twenty-six Italian primary school teachers were allocated by clinicians to three groups: (1) with organic voice disorders, (2) with subjectively mild organic alteration or functional voice symptoms, and (3) normal voice quality and physiology. Continuous silence and voicing periods were measured with the APM3200 during the teachers' 4-hour workdays. The accumulations were grouped into seven time intervals, ranging from 0.03-0.9 to 3.16-10 seconds, according to Italian prosody. The effects of group on silence and voicing accumulations were evaluated. Regarding silence accumulations, Group 1 accumulated higher values in intervals between 0.1 and 3.15 seconds than other groups, whereas Groups 2 and 3 did not differ from each other. Voicing accumulations between 0.17 and 3.15 seconds were higher for subjects with a structural disorder. A higher time dose was accumulated by these subjects (40.6%) than other subjects (Group 2, 31.9%; Group 3, 32.3%). Although previous research has suggested that a rest period of a few seconds may produce some vocal fatigue recovery, these results indicate that periods shorter than 3.16 seconds may not have an observable effect on recovery. The results provide insight into how vocal fatigue and vocal recovery may relate to voice disorders in occupational voice users. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical Voices - an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Weed, Ethan

    Anomalous aspects of speech and voice, including pitch, fluency, and voice quality, are reported to characterise many mental disorders. However, it has proven difficult to quantify and explain this oddness of speech by employing traditional statistical methods. In this talk we will show how the t...... the temporal dynamics of the voice in Asperger's patients enable us to automatically reconstruct the diagnosis, and assess the Autism quotient score. We then generalise the findings to Danish and American children with autism....

  2. Netiquette: The Rules of the Road for Effective Internet Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnaly, Gene

    1997-01-01

    Presents guidelines for effective Internet communication. Discusses rules for creating e-mail messages; posting messages to online discussion groups and newsgroups; and using initialism and "emoticons." Presents a glossary of common Internet terms. (AEF)

  3. Cartoons, Cartoonists and Effective Communication in the Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    This paper takes a critical look at the effectiveness of cartoons in print media communication and the ... Premised on the Agenda setting theory, the paper ... Marcuse (The Frankfurt School) and other Marxist scholars like Stuart. Hall and John ...

  4. Attentive Listening Is the Key to Effective Oral Business Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Thomas

    1978-01-01

    The author states that effective listening is vital to oral communications in business and a leading contributor to good human relations. He lists major barriers to listening comprehension as distractions, preconceptions, dullness, note-taking, and fatigue. (MF)

  5. Examining the (in)effectiveness of personalized communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maslowska, E.; Smit, E.; van den Putte, B.; Eisend, M.; Langner, T.

    2011-01-01

    Personalized communication has become a very popular marketing strategy, but the research on its effectiveness is still limited. This study examined the persuasiveness of personalized digital newsletters in terms of increased attention, cognitive activity, evaluation, attitude, intention, and behavi

  6. Effects of gynaecological education on interpersonal communication skills.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, A.M. van; Weert, J.C.M. van

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of an experimental communication course on how gynaecologists handle psychosocial issues in gynaecological consultation. Design: Pre-post testing. Multilevel analysis was used to take into account the similarity among encounters with the same gynaecologist.

  7. Voice quality variations in English sentences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Melissa

    2002-05-01

    This study examines the predictability of changes in voice quality at the sentence level in English. Sentence-level effects can only be isolated once the effects of linguistic factors (e.g., glottalization before a glottalized consonant), social or dialectal, and individual factors have been eliminated. In this study, these effects were controlled by obtaining a baseline value for each measurement for each word of the corpus. Voice quality variations were tracked using quantitative measurements derived from the LF model of the glottal source, and also qualitative descriptions of the waveforms. Preliminary results indicate that there are consistent voice quality differences at the sentence level and that pitch contours and sentence accent also produce predictable effects on voice quality.

  8. Investigating Modern Communication Technologies: The effect of Internet-based Communication Technologies on the Investigation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Phillip Simon

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Communication technologies are commonplace in modern society. For many years there were only a handful of communication technologies provided by large companies, namely the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN and mobile telephony; these can be referred to as traditional communication technologies. Over the lifetime of traditional communication technologies has been little technological evolution and as such, law enforcement developed sound methods for investigating targets using them. With the advent of communication technologies that use the Internet – Internet-based or contemporary communication technologies – law enforcement are faced with many challenges. This paper discusses these challenges and their potential impact. It first looks at what defines the two technologies then explores the laws and methods used for their investigation. It then looks at the issues of applying the current methodologies to the newer and fundamentally different technology. The paper concludes that law enforcement will be required to update their methods in order to remain effective against the current technology trends.

  9. APLLICATION OF ENGINEERING ETHICS THROUGH EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION: ISSUES AND CHALLENGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen K MEHTA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The profession of Engineering is one of the highly acclaimed professions. As the active members of this profession, engineers are expected to possess and practice ethical standards. The invaluable services offered by professionals require honesty, impartiality, fairness, integrity and equity. They should devote themselves for allround social welfare. Engineers should perform their duties with utmost care and concern. Through effective communication, Engineering Professionals can promote ethical practices. This paper explores application engineering ethics through effective communication.

  10. Controlled English for Effective Communication during Coalition Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    simplified and common form of expression in English , which is not only user- friendly in nature but is also restricted in vocabulary and grammar for clear...18th ICCRTS C2 in Underdeveloped, Degraded and Denied Operational Environments Title of Paper: Controlled English for Effective Communication...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Controlled English for Effective Communication during Coalition Operations 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  11. Using Voice Boards: pedagogical design, technological implementation, evaluation and reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Yaneske

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a case study to evaluate the use of a Wimba Voice Board to support asynchronous audio discussion. We discuss the learning strategy and pedagogic rationale when a Voice Board was implemented within an MA module for language learners, enabling students to create learning objects and facilitating peer-to-peer learning. Previously students studying the module had communicated using text-based synchronous and asynchronous discussion only. A common criticism of text-based media is the lack of non-verbal communication. Audio communication is a richer medium where use of pitch, tone, emphasis and inflection can increase personalisation and prevent misinterpretation. Feedback from staff and students on the affordances and constraints of voice communication are presented. Evaluations show that while there were several issues with the usability of the Wimba Voice Board, both staff and students felt the use of voice communication in an online environment had many advantages, including increased personalisation, motivation, and the opportunity to practice speaking and listening skills. However, some students were inhibited by feelings of embarrassment. The case study provides an in-depth study of Voice Boards, which makes an important contribution to the learning technology literature.

  12. Voice-Controlled Artificial Handspeak System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Fonda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A man-machine interaction project is described which aims to establish an automated voice to sign language translator for communication with the deaf using integrated open technologies. The first prototype consists of a robotic hand designed with OpenSCAD and manufactured with a low-cost 3D printer ─which smoothly reproduces the alphabet of the sign language controlled by voice only. The core automation comprises an Arduino UNO controller used to activate a set of servo motors that follow instructions from a Raspberry Pi mini-computer having installed the open source speech recognition engine Julius. We discuss its features, limitations and possible future developments.

  13. Effects of clinical communication interventions in hospitals: a systematic review of information and communication technology adoptions for improved communication between clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Robert C; Tran, Kim; Lo, Vivian; O'Leary, Kevin J; Morra, Dante; Quan, Sherman D; Perrier, Laure

    2012-11-01

    To conduct a systematic review of the literature to identify, describe and assess interventions of information and communication technology on the processes of communication and associated patient outcomes within hospital settings. Studies published from the years 1996 to 2010 were considered and were selected if they described an evaluation of information and communication technology interventions to improve clinical communication within hospitals. Two authors abstracted data from full text articles, and the quality of individual articles were appraised. Results of interventions were summarized by their effect. There were 18 identified studies that evaluated the use of interventions that included alphanumeric paging, hands-free communication devices, mobile phones, smartphones, task management systems and a display based paging system. Most quantitative studies used a before and after study design and were of lower quality. Of all the studies, there was only one prospective randomized study, but this study used only simulated communication events. Quantitative studies identified improved perceptions of communication and some improvement in communication metrics. Qualitative studies described improvements in efficiency of communication but also issues of loss of control and reliability. Despite the rapid advancement in information and communications technology over the last decade, there is limited evidence suggesting improvements in the ability of health professionals to communicate effectively. Given the critical nature of communication, we advocate further evaluation of information and communication technology designed to improve communication between clinicians. Outcome measures should include measures of patient-oriented outcomes and efficiency for clinicians. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Developing Tools and Techniques to Increase Communication Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Linda A.; Peterson, Doug

    1997-01-01

    The Public Affairs Office (PAO) of the Johnson Space Center (JSC) is responsible for communicating current JSC Space Program activities as well as goals and objectives to the American Public. As part of the 1996 Strategic Communications Plan, a review of PAO' s current communication procedures was conducted. The 1996 Summer Faculty Fellow performed research activities to support this effort by reviewing current research concerning NASA/JSC's customers' perceptions and interests, developing communications tools which enable PAO to more effectively inform JSC customers about the Space Program, and proposing a process for developing and using consistent messages throughout PAO. Note that this research does not attempt to change or influence customer perceptions or interests but, instead, incorporates current customer interests into PAO's communication process.

  15. Health communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mariann B.

    communication changes from information to conversation and negotiation of a chared understanding and challenges the concept of professionalism. The success of conversations depends on the interactions and the capacity to deal with several voices in a complex context. The study discusses the opportunity...

  16. Health communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mariann B.

    communication changes from information to conversation and negotiation of a chared understanding and challenges the concept of professionalism. The success of conversations depends on the interactions and the capacity to deal with several voices in a complex context. The study discusses the opportunity...... to develop this “skill” in health education and to refine the capacity in practice using creativity and artistic approaches....

  17. Voice Use Among Music Theory Teachers: A Voice Dosimetry and Self-Assessment Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Isabel S; Morsomme, Dominique; Remacle, Angélique

    2017-07-25

    This study aimed (1) to investigate music theory teachers' professional and extra-professional vocal loading and background noise exposure, (2) to determine the correlation between vocal loading and background noise, and (3) to determine the correlation between vocal loading and self-evaluation data. Using voice dosimetry, 13 music theory teachers were monitored for one workweek. The parameters analyzed were voice sound pressure level (SPL), fundamental frequency (F0), phonation time, vocal loading index (VLI), and noise SPL. Spearman correlation was used to correlate vocal loading parameters (voice SPL, F0, and phonation time) and noise SPL. Each day, the subjects self-assessed their voice using visual analog scales. VLI and self-evaluation data were correlated using Spearman correlation. Vocal loading parameters and noise SPL were significantly higher in the professional than in the extra-professional environment. Voice SPL, phonation time, and female subjects' F0 correlated positively with noise SPL. VLI correlated with self-assessed voice quality, vocal fatigue, and amount of singing and speaking voice produced. Teaching music theory is a profession with high vocal demands. More background noise is associated with increased vocal loading and may indirectly increase the risk for voice disorders. Correlations between VLI and self-assessments suggest that these teachers are well aware of their vocal demands and feel their effect on voice quality and vocal fatigue. Visual analog scales seem to represent a useful tool for subjective vocal loading assessment and associated symptoms in these professional voice users. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of post menopausal voice changes across professional and non-professional users of the voice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Vishwas Sovani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Menopause effects a permanent change in certain body functions, one of them being voice. Moreover, if the voice is used continuously as a part of one’s occupation, this may further impact postmenopausal voice changes. The present study investigated the impact of menopause and professional voice use, and their interaction effect, on the voice. 92 women were classified into reproductive (52 and postmenopausal (40. Each group was divided into Level II (teachers and Level IV (clerks of Koufman and Isaacson’s (1991 classification. Acoustic parameters were analyzed using the VisiPitch III software. Aerodynamic parameters were manually calculated. The VHI (Voice Handicap Index was also included to improve the face validity of the study. Results suggest that Fo, SFo and MPT reduce post menopause while NHR and VTI increase. Some changes are accelerated in teachers as compared to clerks while some are decelerated. VHI scores of teachers are significantly greater than clerks, though not significantly different across menopause. Thus the presence or absence of voice use in one’s profession differentially affects postmenopausal changes. The study has implications in improving the condition of teachers in India, developing norms for menopausal changes and modifying allowable limits for voice recognition systems in future.

  19. Environmental effects of information and communications technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Eric

    2011-11-16

    The digital revolution affects the environment on several levels. Most directly, information and communications technology (ICT) has environmental impacts through the manufacturing, operation and disposal of devices and network equipment, but it also provides ways to mitigate energy use, for example through smart buildings and teleworking. At a broader system level, ICTs influence economic growth and bring about technological and societal change. Managing the direct impacts of ICTs is more complex than just producing efficient devices, owing to the energetically expensive manufacturing process, and the increasing proliferation of devices needs to be taken into account.

  20. Intercultural communication. Prerequisites for translation effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titela Vîlceanu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is intended to raise awareness of some recurrent problems related to cultural and linguistic security in translation alongside strategies of achieving it. Globalisation means global thinking, individual accountability and the development of new sensitivities and capabilities. Different models of Intercultural Communicative Competence are scrutinised in an attempt to identify a common core of generalisable traits, which could be further applied to a wide range of translation situations. The (intercultural load is of paramount importance in translation being, more often than not, the cause of serious misunderstanding if the translator does not adequately equate the two cultures or bridge the cultural gap.

  1. A study on the effects of marketing communication using integrated marketing communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solmaz Sellahvarzi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC is one of the needed concepts in competitive edge. IMC is defined as a cross functional process for creating and nourishing profitable relationships with customers and other stakeholders by strategically controlling or impacting all messages sent to these groups. It ensures that all forms of communications and messages are carefully linked together. This study investigates the effectiveness of marketing communication in an Iranian automaker named Khodro using IMC system. The study tries to audit the rate of marketing relationship integrity and its outcome on organization performance. The study designs a questionnaire and distributes it among 384 randomly selected people who use this firm’s services and Cronbach alpha has been calculated as 0.974. Hypotheses of this survey are exanimated by Pearson correlation test as well as pairwise t-student tests. The results show the effects of integrated marketing Communication on organization performance. In addition, there is a significant positive correlation relationship between integrated marketing communication with mission marketing, Cross functional Strategic Planning and Interactivity. Finally, there is a significant positive correlation relationship between dimensions of IMC.

  2. The Use of Post-Purchase Communication to Reduce Dissonance and Improve Direct Marketing Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliman, Ronald E.; Decker, Phillip J.

    1990-01-01

    Demonstrates the use and potentially positive effects of postpurchase communication on order refund requests and reorder rates. Finds that dissonance was effectively reduced through postpurchase communication. (MG)

  3. Effects of age of learning on voice onset time: categorical perception of Swedish stops by near-native L2 speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stölten, Katrin; Abrahamsson, Niclas; Hyltenstam, Kenneth

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the effects of age of onset (AO) of L2 acquisition on the categorical perception of the voicing contrast in Swedish word-initial stops varying in voice onset time (VOT). Three voicing continua created on the basis of natural Swedish word pairs with /p-b/, /t-d/, /k-/ in initial position were presented to 41 Spanish early (AO 12) near-native speakers of L2 Swedish. Fifteen native speakers of Swedish served as controls. Categorizations were influenced by AO and listener status as L1/L2 speaker, in that the late learners deviated the most from native-speaker perception. In addition, only a small minority of the late learners perceived the voicing contrast in a way comparable to native-speaker categorization, while most early L2 learners demonstrated nativelike categorization patterns. However, when the results were combined with the L2 learners' production of Swedish voiceless stops (Stölten, 2005; Stölten, Abrahamsson & Hyltenstam, in press), nativelike production and perception was never found among the late learners, while a majority of the early learners still exhibited nativelike production and perception. It is concluded that, despite their being perceived as mother-tongue speakers of Swedish by native listeners, the late learners do not, after detailed phonetic scrutiny, exhibit a fully nativelike command of Swedish VOT. Consequently, being near-native rather than nativelike speakers of their second language, these individuals do not constitute the evidence necessary to reject the hypothesis of one or several critical (or sensitive) periods for language acquisition.

  4. [The paradoxical effect of persuasive communication in health education sessions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piperini, Marie-Christine

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the communication dynamics leading to the adoption of new attitudes and cognitions in health education sessions. We examined the verbal interactions at work in persuasive communication in 16 health education sessions. The study found that the medical expertise of the educator and the initial level of commitment of the participants had a positive effect on adherence to recommendations. However, persuasive communication in health education sessions appears to involve a paradoxical process in which criticism of the message can go hand in hand with the expression of an intention to implement new risk-reducing behaviors.

  5. Effective communication: the key to career success and great leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelman, Bonnie

    2009-01-01

    Good communication is the key to educating, creating, and negotiating with others, and is especially important for security professionals whose jobs involve dealing with an employee having problems, negotiating with another department to get something we need, educating our bosses about hardening our targets or trying to de-escalate a family or patient who is upset or out of control, the author points out. Developing your own communication style, based on your understanding of what is involved in effective communications, will stand you in good stead in succeeding as a leader and advancing your career, she says.

  6. Taking Your Talents to Business Communications: Analyzing Effective Communication through LeBron James's Career Moves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manisaligil, Alperen; Bilimoria, Diana

    2016-01-01

    We describe an in-class activity that helps students improve their skills in media selection and use to reinforce effective communication. The activity builds on media richness and channel expansion theories through an examination of the media selection and use of NBA athlete LeBron James and Cleveland Cavaliers majority owner Dan Gilbert during…

  7. Taking Your Talents to Business Communications: Analyzing Effective Communication through LeBron James's Career Moves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manisaligil, Alperen; Bilimoria, Diana

    2016-01-01

    We describe an in-class activity that helps students improve their skills in media selection and use to reinforce effective communication. The activity builds on media richness and channel expansion theories through an examination of the media selection and use of NBA athlete LeBron James and Cleveland Cavaliers majority owner Dan Gilbert during…

  8. Career Skills Workshop: Achieving Your Goals Through Effective Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Physics students graduate with a huge array of transferrable skills, which are extremely useful to employers (particularly in the private sector, which is the largest employment base of physicists at all degree levels). However, the key to successfully connecting with these opportunities lies in how well graduates are able to communicate their skills and abilities to potential employers. The ability to communicate effectively is a key professional skill that serves scientists in many contexts, including interviewing for jobs, applying for grants, or speaking with law and policy makers. In this interactive workshop, Crystal Bailey (Careers Program Manager at APS) and Gregory Mack (Government Relations Specialist at APS) will lead activities to help attendees achieve their goals through better communication. Topics will include writing an effective resume, interviewing for jobs, and communicating to different audiences including Congress, among others. Light refreshments will be served.

  9. A Retrospective Study Concerning the Psychosocial Impact of Voice Disorders : Voice Handicap Index Change in Patients With Benign Voice Disorders After Treatment (Measured With the Dutch Version of the VHI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwers, Frans; Dikkers, Frederik G.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to gain better understanding of psychosocial effects of benign voice problems as measured with the Dutch version of the Voice Handicap Index (VHI). The effect of voice problems on daily life differs from person to person. Over the last few decades there has been a growing

  10. Voiced Reading and Rhythm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹艳萍

    2007-01-01

    Since voiced reading is an important way in learning English,rhythm is the most critical factor that enables to read beautifully.This article illustrates the relationship between rhythm and voiced reading,the importance of rhythm,and the methods to develop the sense of rhythm.

  11. Clinical Voices - an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Weed, Ethan

    Anomalous aspects of speech and voice, including pitch, fluency, and voice quality, are reported to characterise many mental disorders. However, it has proven difficult to quantify and explain this oddness of speech by employing traditional statistical methods. In this talk we will show how...

  12. Borderline Space for Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Denise

    2012-01-01

    Being on the borderline as a student in higher education is not always negative, to do with marginalisation, exclusion and having a voice that is vulnerable. Paradoxically, being on the edge also has positive connections with integration, inclusion and having a voice that is strong. Alternative understandings of the concept of borderline space can…

  13. Face the voice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønstrup, Ansa

    2014-01-01

    will be based on a reception aesthetic and phenomenological approach, the latter as presented by Don Ihde in his book Listening and Voice. Phenomenologies of Sound , and my analytical sketches will be related to theoretical statements concerning the understanding of voice and media (Cavarero, Dolar, La...

  14. Ontario's Student Voice Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Jean

    2014-01-01

    This article describes in some detail aspects of the Student Voice initiative funded and championed by Ontario's Ministry of Education since 2008. The project enables thousands of students to make their voices heard in meaningful ways and to participate in student-led research. Some students from grades 7 to 12 become members of the Student…

  15. Resistance to Change among Veteran Teachers: Providing Voice for More Effective Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Richard R.

    2017-01-01

    Effective implementation of change remains a crucial concern for educational leaders in the 21st Century. One of the factors affecting effective implementation of reform is resistance to change. Veteran teachers in particular present unique challenges, and stereotypically the greatest resistance, for effective implementation of change. This study…

  16. Health literacy and its importance for effective communication. Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Veronica; Keogh, Deborah

    2014-05-01

    This is the second of two articles exploring the concept of health literacy, an often hidden barrier to effective healthcare communication. Part 1 was published in April ( Lambert and Keogh 2014 ). This article explains how to detect low levels of health literacy among parents and children, and outlines the challenges to assessing health literacy levels, including the stigma and discrimination some people experience. Some basic healthcare communication strategies for supporting health literacy in practice are suggested.

  17. Nonverbal Communication: How Important Is It for the Language Teacher?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, W. Jane

    1997-01-01

    Argues that nonverbal communication in the language classroom can have dramatic results for the students' appreciation for the subject and in the cognitive domain. Notes that the personality and expectations of the teachers, their gestures, tone of voice, and facial expressions have an important effect on language acquisition. (29 references)…

  18. The Effect of Communication Strategy Training on the Development of EFL Learners' Strategic Competence and Oral Communicative Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabab'ah, Ghaleb

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the effect of communication strategy instruction on EFL students' oral communicative ability and their strategic competence. In a 14-week English as a Foreign Language (EFL) course (English Use II) based on Communicative Language Teaching approach, 80 learners were divided into two groups. The strategy training group (n = 44)…

  19. The effects of scenario-based communication training on nurses' communication competence and self-efficacy and myocardial infarction knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Ling; Huang, Ya-Hsuan; Hsieh, Suh-Ing

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effects of a simulated communication training course on nurses' communication competence, self-efficacy, communication performance, myocardial infarction knowledge, and general satisfaction with their learning experience. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with a pre-test and two post-tests. The experimental group underwent simulated communication training course and the control group received a case-based communication training course. The experimental group made more significant improvement in competence and self-efficacy in communication from pre-test to the second post-test than the control group. Although both groups' satisfaction with their learning experience significantly increased from the first post-test to the second post-test, the experimental group was found to be more satisfied with their learning experience than the control group. No significant differences in communication performance and myocardial infarction knowledge between the two groups were identified. Scenario-based communication training can be more fully incorporated into in-service education for nurses to boost their competence and self-efficacy in communication and enhance their communication performance in myocardial infarction patient care. Introduction of real-life communication scenarios through multimedia in communication education could make learners more motivated to practice communication, hence leading to improved communication capacity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mediatization: a concept, multiple voices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Gilberto GOMES

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mediatization has become increasingly a key concept, fundamental, essential to describe the present and the history of media and communicative change taking place. Thus, it became part of a whole, one can not see them as a separate sphere. In this perspective, the media coverage is used as a concept to describe the process of expansion of the different technical means and consider the interrelationships between the communicative change, means and sociocultural change. However, although many researchers use the concept of mediatization, each gives you the meaning that best suits your needs. Thus, the concept of media coverage is treated with multiple voices. This paper discusses this problem and present a preliminary pre-position on the matter.

  1. EasyVoice: Integrating voice synthesis with Skype

    CERN Document Server

    Condado, Paulo A

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents EasyVoice, a system that integrates voice synthesis with Skype. EasyVoice allows a person with voice disabilities to talk with another person located anywhere in the world, removing an important obstacle that affect these people during a phone or VoIP-based conversation.

  2. Listening to Children's Voices: Literature and the Arts as Means of Responding to the Effects of War, Terrorism, and Disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangi, Jane M.; Barowsky, Ellis

    2009-01-01

    More and more children are forced to deal with crushing hardships. The responsibilities of adults worldwide to attend to the affected children have never been greater. In this article, the authors first give an overview of the psychological risks for children who experience war, terrorism, and disaster. They then listen to the voices of children…

  3. Listening to Children's Voices: Literature and the Arts as Means of Responding to the Effects of War, Terrorism, and Disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangi, Jane M.; Barowsky, Ellis

    2009-01-01

    More and more children are forced to deal with crushing hardships. The responsibilities of adults worldwide to attend to the affected children have never been greater. In this article, the authors first give an overview of the psychological risks for children who experience war, terrorism, and disaster. They then listen to the voices of children…

  4. The effect of buttermilk consumption on biofilm formation on silicone rubber voice prostheses in an artificial throat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, HJ; Bruinsma, G; van Meissenbruch, R; Leunisse, C; van der Mei, HC; Dijk, F; Albers, FVJ

    1998-01-01

    Biofilm formation on indwelling silicone rubber voice prostheses in laryngectomized patients is still the main reason for dysfunction of the valve, leading to frequent replacements. Within patient support groups in The Netherlands, laryngectomees have suggested that the consumption of buttermilk pro

  5. Voice vs. Text-Based Discussion Forums: An Implementation of Wimba Voice Boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Philip; Hiscock, Jane

    This paper reports on a two-year exploratory study to determine the viability of voice-based threaded discussions forums as a means of stimulating discussion and understanding of weekly readings as part of a large undergraduate communications course. From March to June 2001, 600 students participating in a large introduction to communication…

  6. Utilization of Internet Protocol-Based Voice Systems in Remote Payload Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, jim; Bradford, Bob; Best, Susan; Nichols, Kelvin

    2002-01-01

    Due to limited crew availability to support science and the large number of experiments to be operated simultaneously, telescience is key to a successful International Space Station (ISS) science program. Crew, operations personnel at NASA centers, and researchers at universities and companies around the world must work closely together to per orm scientific experiments on-board ISS. The deployment of reliable high-speed Internet Protocol (IP)-based networks promises to greatly enhance telescience capabilities. These networks are now being used to cost-effectively extend the reach of remote mission support systems. They reduce the need for dedicated leased lines and travel while improving distributed workgroup collaboration capabilities. NASA has initiated use of Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) to supplement the existing mission voice communications system used by researchers at their remote sites. The Internet Voice Distribution System (IVoDS) connects remote researchers to mission support "loopsll or conferences via NASA networks and Internet 2. Researchers use NODS software on personal computers to talk with operations personnel at NASA centers. IVoDS also has the ;capability, if authorized, to allow researchers to communicate with the ISS crew during experiment operations. NODS was developed by Marshall Space Flight Center with contractors & Technology, First Virtual Communications, Lockheed-Martin, and VoIP Group. NODS is currently undergoing field-testing with full deployment for up to 50 simultaneous users expected in 2002. Research is being performed in parallel with IVoDS deployment for a next-generation system to qualitatively enhance communications among ISS operations personnel. In addition to the current voice capability, video and data/application-sharing capabilities are being investigated. IVoDS technology is also being considered for mission support systems for programs such as Space Launch Initiative and Homeland Defense.

  7. Effective radiological communications with the public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, C.G. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Roessler, G.S. [Healthy Physics Society, Elysian, MN (United States); Brent, R.L. [Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Environmental and Clinical Teratology Lab., Wilmington, DE (United States)

    2004-07-01

    About the Health Physics Society. The Health Physics Society (HPS) is a professional organization whose mission is excellence in the science and practice of radiation safety. Since its formation in 1956, the Society has grown to approximately 6,000 scientists, physicians, engineers, lawyers, and other professionals representing academia, industry, government, national laboratories, and other organizations. Society activities include encouraging research in radiation science, developing standards, and disseminating radiation safety information. Society members are involved in understanding, evaluating, and controlling the potential risks from radiation relative to the benefits. Although the Society already was publishing the Health Physics Journal and Newsletter, in 1996, as part of furthering the HPS mission of information communication and radiological protection education, an HPS Web site was created at www.hps.org to disseminate information on the Society's activities, objectives, membership, news and events, publications, education, and public information. In September 2001, Web structure for the site was further developed and refined, and it was during this development phase that the concept of the ask the experts (ATE) feature was born. (orig.)

  8. How does wireless phones effect communication and treatment in hospitals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paasch, Bettina Sletten

    2013-01-01

    The use of wireless phones in hospital units are increasing, inducing practitioners to carry a working phone each. A study performed in a medical hospital unit demonstrates that wireless phones can impair communication between health care practitioners and patients (Paasch, in press). Also wireless...... phones can compromise patient safety, both by disturbing the practitioners’ concentration, causing mistakes, and by transporting bacteria between patients. This qualitative Ph.D.-study wishes to further investigate the effect of wireless phones on communication and treatment in hospital units, using...... participant observations, ethnographic interviews and video observations. The study will explore how wireless phones mediate and is mediated by practitioners communication with each other and patients. As hospitals are constructed and reconstructed by all communication within, this insight will enable...

  9. Effectiveness of information communication technology in rural insurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varadaraju Thamodaran

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Information and communications technologies are a device set of technological tools andresources used to communicate rural people about to disseminate awareness, create interest andto stimulate enroll intentions of insurance. It has enabled countries to leapfrog traditional modesof service delivery and make manifold improvements in process effectiveness and efficiency.Widespread adoption and application of information communication technology across thedifferent fields of society and the economy is presently considered to be the key factor behindboosting competitiveness and developing an informed society. In general, informationcommunication technology and its tools that people use to share, distribute, informationgathering and to communicate with insurance providers, or in groups, through the use of mediasuch as print, visual and interconnected computer networks.

  10. Lunar Surface Propagation Modeling and Effects on Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwu, Shian U.; Upanavage, Matthew; Sham, Catherine C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the lunar terrain effects on the signal propagation of the planned NASA lunar wireless communication and sensor systems. It is observed that the propagation characteristics are significantly affected by the presence of the lunar terrain. The obtained results indicate that the terrain geometry, antenna location, and lunar surface material are important factors determining the propagation characteristics of the lunar wireless communication systems. The path loss can be much more severe than the free space propagation and is greatly affected by the antenna height, operating frequency, and surface material. The analysis results from this paper are important for the lunar communication link margin analysis in determining the limits on the reliable communication range and radio frequency coverage performance at planned lunar base worksites. Key Words lunar, multipath, path loss, propagation, wireless.

  11. How does wireless phones effect communication and treatment in hospitals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paasch, Bettina Sletten

    2013-01-01

    phones can compromise patient safety, both by disturbing the practitioners’ concentration, causing mistakes, and by transporting bacteria between patients. This qualitative Ph.D.-study wishes to further investigate the effect of wireless phones on communication and treatment in hospital units, using......The use of wireless phones in hospital units are increasing, inducing practitioners to carry a working phone each. A study performed in a medical hospital unit demonstrates that wireless phones can impair communication between health care practitioners and patients (Paasch, in press). Also wireless...... participant observations, ethnographic interviews and video observations. The study will explore how wireless phones mediate and is mediated by practitioners communication with each other and patients. As hospitals are constructed and reconstructed by all communication within, this insight will enable...

  12. Promoting effective communication for patients receiving mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossbach, Irene; Stranberg, Sarah; Chlan, Linda

    2011-06-01

    Communicating effectively with ventilator-dependent patients is essential so that various basic physiological and psychological needs can be conveyed and decisions, wishes, and desires about the plan of care and end-of-life decision making can be expressed. Numerous methods can be used to communicate, including gestures, head nods, mouthing of words, writing, use of letter/picture boards and common words or phrases tailored to meet individualized patients' needs. High-tech alternative communication devices are available for more complex cases. Various options for patients with a tracheostomy tube include partial or total cuff deflation and use of a speaking valve. It is important for nurses to assess communication needs; identify appropriate alternative communication strategies; create a customized care plan with the patient, the patient's family, and other team members; ensure that the care plan is visible and accessible to all staff interacting with the patient; and continue to collaborate with colleagues from all disciplines to promote effective communication with nonvocal patients.

  13. Voice-controlled Debugging of Spreadsheets

    CERN Document Server

    Flood, Derek

    2008-01-01

    Developments in Mobile Computing are putting pressure on the software industry to research new modes of interaction that do not rely on the traditional keyboard and mouse combination. Computer users suffering from Repetitive Strain Injury also seek an alternative to keyboard and mouse devices to reduce suffering in wrist and finger joints. Voice-control is an alternative approach to spreadsheet development and debugging that has been researched and used successfully in other domains. While voice-control technology for spreadsheets is available its effectiveness has not been investigated. This study is the first to compare the performance of a set of expert spreadsheet developers that debugged a spreadsheet using voice-control technology and another set that debugged the same spreadsheet using keyboard and mouse. The study showed that voice, despite its advantages, proved to be slower and less accurate. However, it also revealed ways in which the technology might be improved to redress this imbalance.

  14. Voice Savers for Music Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookman, Starr

    2012-01-01

    Music teachers are in a class all their own when it comes to voice use. These elite vocal athletes require stamina, strength, and flexibility from their voices day in, day out for hours at a time. Voice rehabilitation clinics and research show that music education ranks high among the professionals most commonly affected by voice problems.…

  15. Neural mechanisms for voice recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andics, A.V.; McQueen, J.M.; Petersson, K.M.; Gal, V.; Rudas, G.; Vidnyanszky, Z.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated neural mechanisms that support voice recognition in a training paradigm with fMRI. The same listeners were trained on different weeks to categorize the mid-regions of voice-morph continua as an individual's voice. Stimuli implicitly defined a voice-acoustics space, and training expli

  16. [The effect of a scenario-based simulation communication course on improving the communication skills of nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya-Hsuan; Hsieh, Suh-Ing; Hsu, Li-Ling

    2014-04-01

    Limited disease knowledge is frequently the cause of disease-related anxiety in myocardial infarction patients. The ability to communicate effectively serves multiple purposes in the professional nursing practice. By communicating effectively with myocardial infarction patients, nurses may help reduce their anxiety by keeping them well informed about their disease and teaching them self-care strategies. This research evaluates the communication skills of nurses following scenario-based simulation education in the context of communication with myocardial infarction patients. This study used an experimental design and an educational intervention. The target population comprised nurses of medicine (clinical qualified level N to N2 for nursing) working at a municipal hospital in Taipei City, Taiwan. A total 122 participants were enrolled. Stratified block randomization divided participants into an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group received clinical scenario-based simulation education for communication. The control group received traditional class-based education for communication. Both groups received a pre-test and a Communication Skills Checklist post-test assessment. Results were analyzed using SPSS 17.0 for Windows software. A t-test showed significant increases in communication skills (p communication skills following the education intervention. The results indicate that clinical scenario-based simulation education for communication is significantly more effective than traditional class-based education in enhancing the ability of nurses to communicate effectively with myocardial infarction patients.

  17. The value of visualizing tone of voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullin, Graham; Cook, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    Whilst most of us have an innate feeling for tone of voice, it is an elusive quality that even phoneticians struggle to describe with sufficient subtlety. For people who cannot speak themselves this can have particularly profound repercussions. Augmentative communication often involves text-to-speech, a technology that only supports a basic choice of prosody based on punctuation. Given how inherently difficult it is to talk about more nuanced tone of voice, there is a risk that its absence from current devices goes unremarked and unchallenged. Looking ahead optimistically to more expressive communication aids, their design will need to involve more subtle interactions with tone of voice-interactions that the people using them can understand and engage with. Interaction design can play a role in making tone of voice visible, tangible, and accessible. Two projects that have already catalysed interdisciplinary debate in this area, Six Speaking Chairs and Speech Hedge, are introduced together with responses. A broader role for design is advocated, as a means to opening up speech technology research to a wider range of disciplinary perspectives, and also to the contributions and influence of people who use it in their everyday lives.

  18. Getting the message across: perceived effectiveness of political campaign communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spanje, J.; Boomgaarden, H.G.; Elenbaas, M.; Vliegenthart, R.; Azrout, R.; Schuck, A.R.T.; de Vreese, C.H.

    2013-01-01

    Do political actors communicate effectively during electoral campaigns? We introduce a novel concept in electoral research, the "perceived effectiveness of political parties' election campaigns." This evaluation concentrates on the extent to which a party is seen as getting its message across to the

  19. The Effects of Information and Communication Technologies on Accessibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, R.

    2015-01-01

    It is expected that information and communication technology (ICT) can have great impacts on traveler’s accessibility. However, understanding of the effects of ICT on accessibility is still limited. Consequently, this thesis aims to increase the understanding of such effects. The thesis develops a

  20. The Effects of Information and Communication Technologies on Accessibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, R.

    2015-01-01

    It is expected that information and communication technology (ICT) can have great impacts on traveler’s accessibility. However, understanding of the effects of ICT on accessibility is still limited. Consequently, this thesis aims to increase the understanding of such effects. The thesis develops a g

  1. The "Mozart Effect II" and Other Communication/Learning Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selman, Victor; Selman, Ruth Corey; Selman, Jerry; Selman, Elsie

    2007-01-01

    While exploring the development of Communication and Learning Aids in all venues, particularly the effect of music on learning, several different tracks were followed. The therapeutic use of music is for relaxation and stress reduction, which apparently helps the body to access and discharge deeply locked-in material. The Mozart Effect track which…

  2. The "Mozart Effect II" and Other Communication/Learning Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selman, Victor; Selman, Ruth Corey; Selman, Jerry; Selman, Elsie

    2007-01-01

    While exploring the development of Communication and Learning Aids in all venues, particularly the effect of music on learning, several different tracks were followed. The therapeutic use of music is for relaxation and stress reduction, which apparently helps the body to access and discharge deeply locked-in material. The Mozart Effect track which…

  3. The singer's voice range profile: female professional opera soloists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, Anick; Ternström, Sten; Pabon, Peter

    2010-07-01

    This work concerns the collection of 30 voice range profiles (VRPs) of female operatic voice. We address the questions: Is there a need for a singer's protocol in VRP acquisition? Are physiological measurements sufficient or should the measurement of performance capabilities also be included? Can we address the female singing voice in general or is there a case for categorizing voices when studying phonetographic data? Subjects performed a series of structured tasks involving both standard speech voice protocols and additional singing tasks. Singers also completed an extensive questionnaire. Physiological VRPs differ from performance VRPs. Two new VRP metrics, the voice area above a defined level threshold and the dynamic range independent from the fundamental frequency (F(0)), were found to be useful in the analysis of singer VRPs. Task design had no effect on performance VRP outcomes. Voice category differences were mainly attributable to phonation frequency-based information. Results support the clinical importance of addressing the vocal instrument as it is used in performance. Equally important is the elaboration of a protocol suitable for the singing voice. The given context and instructions can be more important than task design for performance VRPs. Yet, for physiological VRP recordings, task design remains critical. Both types of VRPs are suggested for a singer's voice evaluation. Copyright (c) 2010 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Communication - An Effective Tool for Implementing ISO 14001/EMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachel Damewood; Bowen Huntsman

    2004-04-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) received ISO 14001/EMS certification in June 2002. Communication played an effective role in implementing ISO 14001/EMS at the INEEL. This paper describes communication strategies used during the implementation and certification processes. The INEEL achieved Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) and Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Star status in 2001. ISMS implemented a formal process to plan and execute work. VPP facilitated worker involvement by establishing geographic units at various facilities with employee points of contact and management champions. The INEEL Environmental Management System (EMS) was developed to integrate the environmental functional area into its ISMS and VPP. Since the core functions of ISMS, VPP, and EMS are interchangeable, they were easy to integrate. Communication is essential to successfully implement an EMS. (According to ISO 14001 requirements, communication interacts with 12 other elements of the requirements.) We developed communication strategies that integrated ISMS, VPP, and EMS. For example, the ISMS, VPP, and EMS Web sites communicated messages to the work force, such as “VPP emphasizes the people side of doing business, ISMS emphasizes the system side of doing business, and EMS emphasizes the systems to protect the environment; but they all define work, identify and analyze hazards, and mitigate the hazards.” As a result of this integration, the work force supported and implemented the EMS. In addition, the INEEL established a cross-functional communication team to assist with implementing the EMS. The team included members from the Training and Communication organizations, VPP office, Pollution Prevention, Employee and Media Relations, a union representative, facility environmental support, and EMS staff. This crossfunctional team used various communication strategies to promote our EMS to all organization levels and successfully implemented EMS

  5. Education techniques for lifelong learning: giving a PowerPoint presentation: the art of communicating effectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jannette

    2004-01-01

    Effectiveness of an oral presentation depends on the ability of the speaker to communicate with the audience. An important part of this communication is focusing on two to five key points and emphasizing those points during the presentation. Every aspect of the presentation should be purposeful and directed at facilitating learners' achievement of the objectives. This necessitates that the speaker has carefully developed the objectives and built the presentation around attainment of the objectives. The best presentations are rehearsed, not so that the speaker memorizes exactly what he or she will say, but to facilitate the speaker's ability to interact with the audience and portray a relaxed, professional, and confident demeanor. Rehearsal also helps alleviate stage fright. The most useful method of controlling nervousness is to visualize success. When showing images, it is important to orient the audience with an adequate description, point out the relevant findings, and allow enough time for the audience to assimilate the information before moving on. This can be facilitated with appropriate use of a laser pointer, cursor, or use of builds and transitioning. A presentation should be designed to include as much audience participation as possible, no matter the size of the audience. Techniques to encourage audience participation include questioning, brainstorming, small-group activities, role-playing, case-based examples, and directed listening. It is first necessary to motivate and gain attention of the learner for learning to take place. This can be accomplished through appropriate use of humor, anecdotes, and quotations. Attention should be given to posture, body movement, eye contact, and voice when speaking, as how one appears to the audience will have an impact on their reaction to what is presented. Copyright RSNA, 2004

  6. Learning from Multimedia Presentations: The Effects of Graphical Realism and Voice Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodicio, Hector Garcia

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Most of the research on the design of multimedia instructional materials has addressed how to combine words and pictures to produce effective presentations whereas the development of single representations has received less attention. In this study we explored different ways of presenting single representations. Method: In Experiment…

  7. Learning from Multimedia Presentations: The Effects of Graphical Realism and Voice Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodicio, Hector Garcia

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Most of the research on the design of multimedia instructional materials has addressed how to combine words and pictures to produce effective presentations whereas the development of single representations has received less attention. In this study we explored different ways of presenting single representations. Method: In Experiment…

  8. Educating to Tolerance: Effects of Communicating Social Psychology Research Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Barbera, Francesco

    2015-08-01

    The effect of communicating social psychology research findings on ingroup bias in a classroom setting has been investigated. Two hundred and twenty one high school students either read or did not read a brief report about three classical social psychological studies, then completed evaluation scales for the ingroup and the outgroup. Participants' motivation was manipulated, and the messages were different as regards the congruency between the content and participants' actual intergroup experience. Results showed that communication exerted a significant effect in reducing ingroup bias for participants in the high motivation/high congruency condition, that is, the communication effect was moderated by the individual's level of motivation and the content of the arguments proposed in the report. Practical implications of results for education work and stereotype change, limitations of the study, as well as possible directions for future research are discussed.

  9. Educating to Tolerance: Effects of Communicating Social Psychology Research Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco La Barbera

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of communicating social psychology research findings on ingroup bias in a classroom setting has been investigated. Two hundred and twenty one high school students either read or did not read a brief report about three classical social psychological studies, then completed evaluation scales for the ingroup and the outgroup. Participants’ motivation was manipulated, and the messages were different as regards the congruency between the content and participants’ actual intergroup experience. Results showed that communication exerted a significant effect in reducing ingroup bias for participants in the high motivation/high congruency condition, that is, the communication effect was moderated by the individual’s level of motivation and the content of the arguments proposed in the report. Practical implications of results for education work and stereotype change, limitations of the study, as well as possible directions for future research are discussed.

  10. Association between birth control pills and voice quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Ofer; Kishon-Rabin, Liat

    2004-06-01

    The objective was to extend our knowledge of the effect of birth control pills on voice quality in women based on various acoustic measures. A longitudinal comparative study of 14 healthy young women over a 36- to 45-day period. Voices of seven women who used birth control pills and seven women who did not were recorded repeatedly approximately 20 times. Voice samples were analyzed acoustically, using an extended set of frequency perturbation parameters (jitter, relative average perturbation, pitch period perturbation quotient), amplitude perturbation parameters (shimmer, amplitude average perturbation quotient), and noise indices (noise-to-harmonics ratio, voice turbulence index). Voice quality and stability were found to be better among the women who used birth control pills. Lower values were found for all acoustic measures with the exception of voice turbulence index. Results also provided preliminary indication for vocal changes associated with the days preceding ovulation. In contrast to the traditional view of oral contraceptives as a risk factor for voice quality, and in keeping with the authors' previous work, the data in the present study showed that not only did oral contraceptives have no adverse effect on voice quality but, in effect, most acoustic measures showed improved voice quality among women who used the birth control pill. The differences in the noise indices between groups may also shed light on the nature of the effect of sex hormones on vocal fold activity. It was suggested that hormonal fluctuations may have more of an effect on vocal fold regulation of vibration than on glottal adduction.

  11. Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailenson, Jeremy; Buzzanell, Patrice; Deetz, Stanley; Tewksbury, David; Thompson, Robert J.; Turow, Joseph; Bichelmeyer, Barbara; Bishop, M. J.; Gayeski, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of communications were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Jeremy Bailenson, Patrice Buzzanell, Stanley Deetz, David Tewksbury, Robert J. Thompson, and…

  12. Using Voice Boards: pedagogical design, technological implementation, evaluation and reflections

    OpenAIRE

    Yaneske, Elisabeth; Oates, Briony

    2010-01-01

    We present a case study to evaluate the use of a Wimba Voice Board to support asynchronous audio discussion. We discuss the learning strategy and pedagogic rationale when a Voice Board was implemented within an MA module for language learners, enabling students to create learning objects and facilitating peer-to-peer learning. Previously students studying the module had communicated using text-based synchronous and asynchronous discussion only. A common criticism of text-based media is the la...

  13. Teamwork and communication: an effective approach to patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujumdar, Sandhya; Santos, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Teamwork and communication failures are leading causes of patient safety incidents in health care. Though health care providers must work in teams, they are not well-trained in teamwork and communication skills. Health care faces the problems of differences in communication styles, communication failures and poor teamwork. There is enough evidence in the literature to show that communication failure is detrimental to patient safety. It is estimated that 80% of serious medical errors worldwide take place because of miscommunication between medical providers. NUH recognizes that effective communication and teamwork are essential in the delivery of high quality safe patient care, especially in a complex organization. NUH is a good example, where there is a rich mix of nationalities and races, in staff and in patients, and there is a rapidly expanding care environment. NUH had to overcome these challenges by adopting a multi-pronged approach. The trials and tribulations of NUH in this journey were worthwhile as the patient safety climate survey scores improved over the years.

  14. Dominant Voice in Hamlet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丹

    2015-01-01

    <正>The Tragedy of Hamlet dramatizes the revenge Prince Hamlet exacts on his uncle Claudius for murdering King Hamlet,Claudius’s brother and Prince Hamlet’s father,and then succeeding to the throne and taking as his wife Gertrude,the old king’s widow and Prince Hamlet’s mother.This paper will discuss something about dominant voice in the play.Dominant voice is the major voice in the country,the society,or the whole world.Those people who have the power or

  15. Determining the effectiveness of illustrated communication material for communication with intubated patients at an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otuzoğlu, Münevver; Karahan, Azize

    2014-10-01

    Communication with non-speaking patients in intensive care unit is stress for both nurse and patients. Semi-experimental study that took place at a University Hospital was to develop illustrated material for patient communication and determine its effectiveness. The study sample consisted of 90 intubated patients at the Adult Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit who had undergone open heart surgery. The patients were divided into the intervention and control groups. Data analysis was with descriptive statistics and the χ(2) test. The illustrated communication material was stated to be helpful by 77.8% and partially helpful by 22.2% of the intervention group patients regarding the communication between the health-care staff and the patients. Control group patients had more difficulties communicating with the health-care staff. Illustrated communication material was an effective method in communicating with intubated patients. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. The Show with the Voice: An [Au]/-[o]-tophonographic Parody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David D.J. Sander Scheidt

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available According to my claim that voice as a phenomenon cannot be materialised or located, neither in the (voice organ of the self nor in the (ear of the other, I coined the term [au]/[o]-tophonography for my examination of the possibilities of performing subjectivity in writing and in sound productions. Drawing on the theory of performativity in its deconstructive senses (see BUTLER, 1993, 1997, 1999/1990; DERRIDA, 1988/1972, 1997/1967, 2002/1981; SMITH, 1995 my performative epistemology reaches beyond the theoretical, including the practical and the aesthetical, aiming at questioning notions of "self", "audience", "voice", "writing" and "communication". "The show with the voice" (http://www.qualitative-research.net/fqs-texte/2-08/08-2-27_audio.mp3 is an example of this practice. It parodies the medico-scientific approach to the human voice by presenting some of its possible appearances (the "normal", the "disordered", the "homosexual" and the "transsexual" voice in an audio collage that takes the shape of a mock tutorial. Through re-contextualising and re-compiling voice samples from different sources that are usually kept apart (e.g. the lecturer's voice, the researcher's voice, the artist's voice, the autobiographer's voice I open a space for a multidisciplinary and creative perspective to the examination of voice. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0802279

  17. Improving outpatient safety through effective electronic communication: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espadas Donna

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health information technology and electronic medical records (EMRs are potentially powerful systems-based interventions to facilitate diagnosis and treatment because they ensure the delivery of key new findings and other health related information to the practitioner. However, effective communication involves more than just information transfer; despite a state of the art EMR system, communication breakdowns can still occur. 123 In this project, we will adapt a model developed by the Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety (SEIPS to understand and improve the relationship between work systems and processes of care involved with electronic communication in EMRs. We plan to study three communication activities in the Veterans Health Administration's (VA EMR: electronic communication of abnormal imaging and laboratory test results via automated notifications (i.e., alerts; electronic referral requests; and provider-to-pharmacy communication via computerized provider order entry (CPOE. Aim Our specific aim is to propose a protocol to evaluate the systems and processes affecting outcomes of electronic communication in the computerized patient record system (related to diagnostic test results, electronic referral requests, and CPOE prescriptions using a human factors engineering approach, and hence guide the development of interventions for work system redesign. Design This research will consist of multiple qualitative methods of task analysis to identify potential sources of error related to diagnostic test result alerts, electronic referral requests, and CPOE; this will be followed by a series of focus groups to identify barriers, facilitators, and suggestions for improving the electronic communication system. Transcripts from all task analyses and focus groups will be analyzed using methods adapted from grounded theory and content analysis.

  18. 76 FR 23812 - Reliability and Continuity of Communications Networks, Including Broadband Technologies; Effects...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-28

    ... COMMISSION Reliability and Continuity of Communications Networks, Including Broadband Technologies; Effects on Broadband Communications Networks of Damage or Failure of Network Equipment or Severe Overload; Independent Panel Reviewing the Impact of Hurricane Katrina on Communications Networks AGENCY:...

  19. Radio Gaga? Intra-team communication of Australian Rules Football umpires - effect of radio communication on content, structure and frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Timothy J; Salmon, Paul M; Read, Gemma J M

    2017-07-31

    Intra-team communication plays an important role in team effectiveness in various domains including sport. As such, it is a key consideration when introducing new tools within systems that utilise teams. The difference in intra-team communication of Australian Rules Football (AFL) umpiring teams was studied when umpiring with or without radio communications technology. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted to analyse the verbal communication of seven umpiring teams (20 participants) grouped according to their experience with radio communication. The results identified that radio communication technology increased the frequency and altered the structure of intra-team communication. Examination of the content of the intra-team communication identified impacts on the 'Big Five' teamwork behaviours and associated coordinating mechanisms. Analysis revealed that the communications utilised did not align with the closed-loop form of communication described in the Big Five model. Implications for teamwork models, coaching and training of AFL umpires are discussed. Practitioner Summary: Assessing the impact of technology on performance is of interest to ergonomics practitioners. The impact of radio communications on teamwork is explored in the highly dynamic domain of AFL umpiring. When given radio technology, intra-team communication increased which supported teamwork behaviours, such as backup behaviour and mutual performance monitoring.

  20. Intercultural communication between patients and health care providers: an exploration of intercultural communication effectiveness, cultural sensitivity, stress, and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrey, K L; Amason, P

    2001-01-01

    Cultural diversity is becoming increasingly more important in the workplace. This is particularly true in health care organizations facing demographic shifts in the patients served and their families. This study serves to aid the development of intercultural communication training programs for health care providers by examining how cultural sensitivity and effective intercultural communication, besides helping patients, personally benefit health care providers by reducing their stress. Effective intercultural communication and cultural sensitivity were found to be related. Health care providers' levels of intercultural anxiety also were found to correlate with effective intercultural communication.