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Sample records for vo2 heart rate

  1. The heart rate VO2 relationship of aerobic dance: a comparison of target heart rate methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharff-Olson, M; Williford, H N; Smith, F H

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between heart rate (HR) and oxygen consumption (VO2) for aerobic dance exercise. Therefore, eleven females completed 20 minutes of aerobic dance with continuous monitoring of HR and VO2. These physiological responses were analyzed with correlation/regression techniques. The results showed that for aerobic dance to produce a response in excess of 50% of VO2 max, the target HR must be approximately 80% of the age-predicted HR max or greater. In contrast, previously reported data for treadmill running shows that 50% of VO2 max is achieved at approximately 65% of age-predicted HR max in females. The maximum heart rate reserve (Karvonen) method was also found to underestimate the actual VO2 of AD. With the Karvonen method, the target heart rate must approximate 65% of maximum HR reserve in order to elicit a VO2 response which is representative of 50% of VO2 max. These data support recent research which illustrates that target heart rate prescriptions derived from treadmill testing may fail to accurately place AD participants in the recommended training zone.

  2. VO2 Reserve vs. Heart Rate Reserve During Moderate Intensity Treadmill Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solheim, Tanner J; Keller, Brad G; Fountaine, Charles J

    VO2 and heart rate (HR) are widely used when determining appropriate training intensities for clinical, healthy, and athletic populations. It has been shown that if the % reserve (%R) is used, rather than % of max, HR and VO2 can be used interchangeably to accurately prescribe exercise intensities. Thus, heart rate reserve (HRR) can be prescribed if VO2 reserve (VO2R) is known. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare VO2 R and HRR during moderate intensity exercise (50%R). Physically active college students performed a maximal treadmill test to exhaustion. During which VO2 and HR were monitored to determine max values. Upon completion of the maximal test, calculations were made to determine the % grade expected to yield approximately 50% of the subjects VO2R. Subjects then returned to complete the submaximal test (50%R) at least two days later. The %VO2R and %HRR were calculated and compared to the predicted value as well as to each other. Statistical analysis revealed that VO2 at 50%R was significantly greater than the actual VO2 achieved, p VO2 could be more accurately predicted than HR during moderate intensity exercise. The weak correlation between VO2R and HRR indicates that caution should be used when relying on a HR to determine VO2.

  3. Removing the thermal component from heart rate provides an accurate VO2 estimation in forest work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Philippe-Antoine; Imbeau, Daniel; Dubeau, Denise; Lebel, Luc; Kolus, Ahmet

    2016-05-01

    Heart rate (HR) was monitored continuously in 41 forest workers performing brushcutting or tree planting work. 10-min seated rest periods were imposed during the workday to estimate the HR thermal component (ΔHRT) per Vogt et al. (1970, 1973). VO2 was measured using a portable gas analyzer during a morning submaximal step-test conducted at the work site, during a work bout over the course of the day (range: 9-74 min), and during an ensuing 10-min rest pause taken at the worksite. The VO2 estimated, from measured HR and from corrected HR (thermal component removed), were compared to VO2 measured during work and rest. Varied levels of HR thermal component (ΔHRTavg range: 0-38 bpm) originating from a wide range of ambient thermal conditions, thermal clothing insulation worn, and physical load exerted during work were observed. Using raw HR significantly overestimated measured work VO2 by 30% on average (range: 1%-64%). 74% of VO2 prediction error variance was explained by the HR thermal component. VO2 estimated from corrected HR, was not statistically different from measured VO2. Work VO2 can be estimated accurately in the presence of thermal stress using Vogt et al.'s method, which can be implemented easily by the practitioner with inexpensive instruments.

  4. Daily pattern of %VO2max and heart rates in normal and undernourished school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurr, G B; Reina, J C

    1990-10-01

    The pattern of usage of the VO2max, expressed as %VO2max during ordinary school days, with minute-by-minute heart rate recording, was studied in 106 boys and 83 girls, 6-16 yr of age divided into three age groups (6-8, 10-12, and 14-16 yr), living under economically deprived conditions in Colombia and classified as nutritionally normal or marginally malnourished. In a 12-h period, the 12 groups of children spent, on the average, 7-10 h at less than 30% VO2max, 1.5-4 h at 30-50% VO2max, and an accumulated time of 20-60 min above 50% VO2max. The latter occurred in short bursts rather than during sustained periods. There was a statistically significant but small decrease (approximately -3%) in the average 12 h %VO2max with age but no effects of sex or nutritional status. The overall average was about 25% VO2max in all groups. The data may suggest the existence of the regulation of physical activity to some level easily sustainable for long periods. Expressing the data as 30 min averages during 5 h of school and 5 h of free-time activity allows for the possibility of seeing group differences during shorter periods of time. This may prove useful in exercise training programs and studies of effort in the workplace.

  5. Earbud-Based Sensor for the Assessment of Energy Expenditure, Heart Rate, and VO2max

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBoeuf, Steven F.; Aumer, Michael E.; Kraus, William E.; Johnson, Johanna L.; Duscha, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction/Purpose The goal of this program was to determine the feasibility of a novel noninvasive, highly miniaturized optomechanical earbud sensor for accurately estimating total energy expenditure (TEE) and maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max). The optomechanical sensor module, small enough to fit inside commercial audio earbuds, was previously developed to provide a seamless way to measure blood flow information during daily life activities. The sensor module was configured to continuously measure physiological information via photoplethysmography (PPG) and physical activity information via accelerometry. This information was digitized and sent to a microprocessor where digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms extract physiological metrics in real-time. These metrics were streamed wirelessly from the earbud to a computer. Methods In this study, 23 subjects of multiple physical habitus were divided into a training group of 14 subjects and a validation group of 9 subjects. Each subject underwent the same exercise measurement protocol consisting of treadmill-based cardiopulmonary exercise (CPX) testing to reach VO2max. Benchmark sensors included a 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) sensor for measuring heart rate, a calibrated treadmill for measuring distance and speed, and a gas-exchange analysis instrument for measuring TEE and VO2max. The earbud sensor was the device under test (DUT). Benchmark and DUT data collected from the 14-person training dataset study were integrated into a preconceived statistical model for correlating benchmark data with earbud sensor data. Coefficients were optimized, and the optimized model was validated in the 9-person validation dataset. Results It was observed that the earbud sensor estimated TEE and VO2max with mean ± SD percent estimation errors of −0.7 ± 7.4% and −3.2 ± 7.3% respectively. Conclusion The earbud sensor can accurately estimate TEE and VO2max during CPX testing. PMID:24743110

  6. A longitudinal assessment of change in VO2max and maximal heart rate in master athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, S A; Marcell, T J; Victoria Jaque, S; Wiswell, R A

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the longitudinal change in VO2max and HRmax in male and female master endurance runners and to compare these changes based upon gender, age, and change in training volume. Eighty-six male (53.9 +/- 1.1 yr) and 49 female (49.1 +/- 1.2 yr) master endurance runners were tested an average of 8.5 yr apart. Subjects were grouped by age at first visit, change in VO2max, and change in training volume. Measurements included body composition by hydrostatic weighing, maximal exercise testing on a treadmill, and training history by questionnaire. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and multiple regression. VO2max and HRmax declined significantly regardless of gender or age group (P VO2max by age group ranged from -1% to -4.6% per year for men and -0.5% to 2.4% per year for women. Men with the greatest loss in VO2max had the greatest loss in LBM (-2.8 +/- 0.7 kg), whereas women with the greatest loss in VO2max demonstrated the greatest change in training volume (-24.1 +/- 3.0 km.wk-1). Additionally, women with the greatest loss in VO2max (-9.6 +/- 2.6 mL.kg-1.min-1) did not replace estrogen after menopause independent of age. HRmax change did not differ by VO2max change or training volume change in either gender. In conclusion, these data suggest that VO2max declines in male and female master athletes at a rate similar to or greater than that expected in sedentary older adults. Additionally, these data suggest that maintenance of LBM and VO2max were associated in men, whereas in women, estrogen replacement and maintenance of training volume were associated with maintained VO2max.

  7. Crossvalidation of two heart rate-based equations for predicting VO2max in white and black men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esco, Michael R; Olson, Michele S; Williford, Henry N; Mugu, Emmanuel M; Bloomquist, Barbara E; McHugh, Aindrea N

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to crossvalidate 2 equations that use the ratio of maximal heart rate (HRmax) to resting HR (HRrest) for predicting maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) in white and black men. One hundred and nine white (n = 51) and black (n = 58) men completed a maximal exercise test on a treadmill to determine VO2max. The HRrest and HRmax were used to predict VO2max via the HRindex and HRratio equations. Validity statistics were done to compare the criterion versus predicted VO2max values across the entire cohort and within each race separately. For the entire group, VO2max was significantly overestimated with the HRindex equation, but the HRratio equation yielded no significant difference compared with the criterion. In addition, there were no significant differences shown between VO2max and either HR-based prediction equation for the white subgroup. However, both equations significantly overestimated VO2max in the black group. Furthermore, large standard error of estimates (ranging from 6.92 to 7.90 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)), total errors (ranging from 8.30 to 8.62 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)), and limits of agreement (ranging from upper limits of 16.65 to lower limits of -18.25 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) were revealed when comparing the predicted to criterion VO2max for both the groups. Considering the results of this investigation, the HRratio and HRindex methods appear to crossvalidate and prove useful for estimating the mean VO2max in white men as a group but not for an age-matched group of black men. However, because of inflated values for error, caution should be exercised when using these methods to predict individual VO2max.

  8. Adjustment for gas exchange threshold enhances precision of heart rate-derived VO2 estimates during heavy exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettitt, Robert W; Symons, J David; Taylor, Julie E; Eisenman, Patricia A; White, Andrea T

    2008-02-01

    Overestimates of oxygen uptake (VO2) are derived from the heart rate reserve-VO2 reserve (HRR-VO2R) model. We tested the hypothesis that adjusting for differences above and below gas exchange threshold (HRR-GET model) would tighten the precision of HR-derived VO2 estimates during heavy exercise. Seven men and 7 women of various VO2 max levels, on 2 separate days, cycled for 6 min at intensities equal to power at GET, 15% the difference between GET and VO2 max (15% above), and at 30% above GET. A second bout at 15% above GET (15% above (bout 2)) after 3 min of recovery was performed to assess estimates during interval training. Actual VO2 was compared with estimates derived from the HRR-VO2R and the HRR-GET. VO2 values were summed over the 6 min duration of data collection (6 min LO2) and compared with Bland-Altman plots. HRR-VO2R yielded 6 min LO2 (+/-2 SD) overestimates of 2.0 (+/-2.5), 1.9 (+/-2.7), and 1.3 (+/-3.3) for GET, 15% over, and 30% over, respectively, whereas corresponding 6 min LO2 difference values for the HRR-GET model were -0.42 (+/-1.6), -0.23 (+/-1.1), and -0.55 (+/-1.8), respectively. For 15% above (bout 2), the 6 min LO2 difference for HRR-VO2R was 1.8 (+/-2.9), whereas the difference for HRR-GET was 0.17 (+/-1.4). The 6 min LO2 values relative to the subjects' VO2 max did not vary (r=0.05 to 0.36); therefore, fitness level did not affect estimates. Sex did not affect accuracy of either estimate model (sex X estimate model interaction, p>0.95). We observed accurate estimates from the HRR-GET model during heavy exercise.

  9. HIGHER PRECISION OF HEART RATE COMPARED WITH VO2 TO PREDICT EXERCISE INTENSITY IN ENDURANCE-TRAINED RUNNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. Reis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to assess the precision of oxygen uptake with heart rate regression during track running in highly-trained runners. Twelve national and international level male long-distance road runners (age 30.7 ± 5.5 yrs, height 1.71 ± 0.04 m and mass 61.2 ± 5.8 kg with a personal best on the half marathon of 62 min 37 s ± 1 min 22 s participated in the study. Each participant performed, in an all-weather synthetic track five, six min bouts at constant velocity with each bout at an increased running velocity. The starting velocity was 3.33 m·s-1 with a 0.56 m·s-1 increase on each subsequent bout. VO2 and heart rate were measured during the runs and blood lactate was assessed immediately after each run. Mean peak VO2 and mean peak heart rate were, respectively, 76.2 ± 9.7 mL·kg-1·min-1 and 181 ± 13 beats·min-1. The linearity of the regressions between heart rate, running velocity and VO2 were all very high (r > 0.99 with small standard errors of regression (i.e. Sy.x < 5% at the velocity associated with the 2 and 4 mmol·L-1 lactate thresholds. The strong relationships between heart rate, running velocity and VO2 found in this study show that, in highly trained runners, it is possible to have heart rate as an accurate indicator of energy demand and of the running speed. Therefore, in this subject cohort it may be unnecessary to use VO2 to track changes in the subjects' running economy during training periods.

  10. Estimation of VO2max from the ratio between HRmax and HRrest--the Heart Rate Ratio Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uth, Niels; Sørensen, Henrik; Overgaard, Kristian; Pedersen, Preben K

    2004-01-01

    The effects of training and/or ageing upon maximal oxygen uptake ( VO(2max)) and heart rate values at rest (HR(rest)) and maximal exercise (HR(max)), respectively, suggest a relationship between VO(2max) and the HR(max)-to-HR(rest) ratio which may be of use for indirect testing of VO(2max). Fick principle calculations supplemented by literature data on maximum-to-rest ratios for stroke volume and the arterio-venous O(2) difference suggest that the conversion factor between mass-specific VO(2max) (ml.min(-1).kg(-1)) and HR(max).HR(rest)(-1) is approximately 15. In the study we experimentally examined this relationship and evaluated its potential for prediction of VO(2max). VO(2max) was measured in 46 well-trained men (age 21-51 years) during a treadmill protocol. A subgroup ( n=10) demonstrated that the proportionality factor between HR(max).HR(rest)(-1) and mass-specific VO(2max) was 15.3 (0.7) ml.min(-1).kg(-1). Using this value, VO(2max) in the remaining 36 individuals could be estimated with an SEE of 0.21 l.min(-1) or 2.7 ml.min(-1).kg(-1) (approximately 4.5%). This compares favourably with other common indirect tests. When replacing measured HR(max) with an age-predicted one, SEE was 0.37 l.min(-1) and 4.7 ml.min(-1).kg(-1) (approximately 7.8%), which is still comparable with other indirect tests. We conclude that the HR(max)-to-HR(rest) ratio may provide a tool for estimation of VO(2max) in well-trained men. The applicability of the test principle in relation to other groups will have to await direct validation. VO(2max) can be estimated indirectly from the measured HR(max)-to-HR(rest) ratio with an accuracy that compares favourably with that of other common indirect tests. The results also suggest that the test may be of use for VO(2max) estimation based on resting measurements alone.

  11. Higher Precision of Heart Rate Compared with VO2 to Predict Exercise Intensity in Endurance-Trained Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Victor M; den Tillaar, Roland Van; Marques, Mario C

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the precision of oxygen uptake with heart rate regression during track running in highly-trained runners. Twelve national and international level male long-distance road runners (age 30.7 ± 5.5 yrs, height 1.71 ± 0.04 m and mass 61.2 ± 5.8 kg) with a personal best on the half marathon of 62 min 37 s ± 1 min 22 s participated in the study. Each participant performed, in an all-weather synthetic track five, six min bouts at constant velocity with each bout at an increased running velocity. The starting velocity was 3.33 m·s(-1) with a 0.56 m·s(-1) increase on each subsequent bout. VO2 and heart rate were measured during the runs and blood lactate was assessed immediately after each run. Mean peak VO2 and mean peak heart rate were, respectively, 76.2 ± 9.7 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1) and 181 ± 13 beats·min(-1). The linearity of the regressions between heart rate, running velocity and VO2 were all very high (r > 0.99) with small standard errors of regression (i.e. Sy.x heart rate, running velocity and VO2 found in this study show that, in highly trained runners, it is possible to have heart rate as an accurate indicator of energy demand and of the running speed. Therefore, in this subject cohort it may be unnecessary to use VO2 to track changes in the subjects' running economy during training periods. Key pointsHeart rate is used in the control of exercise intensity in endurance sports.However, few studies have quantified the precision of its relationship with oxygen uptake in highly trained runners.We evaluated twelve elite half-marathon runners during track running at various intensities and established three regressions: oxygen uptake / heart rate; heart rate / running velocity and oxygen uptake / running velocity.The three regressions presented, respectively, imprecision of 4,2%, 2,75% and 4,5% at the velocity associated with the 4 mmol·L(-1) threshold.The results of the present study show that, in highly trained runners

  12. Validity of a taekwondo specific test to measure vo2peak and the heart rate deflection point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant'Ana, Jader; Franchini, Emerson; Murias, Juan; Diefenthaeler, Fernando

    2017-07-19

    This study investigated whether the progressive specific taekwondo test (PSTT) is a valid test to measure peak oxygen consumption (VO2PEAK) and the heart rate deflection point (HRDP) in taekwondo athletes. Eighteen male black belt athletes (25.3 ± 4.8 years; 8.2 ± 4.7 years of practice; 171.8 ± 4.7 cm; 76.1 ± 8.2 kg, and 13.1 ± 2.9% body fat) involved in regional and national level competitions performed the PSTT and an incremental treadmill test (IT). The following variables were analyzed: VO2PEAK, respiratory quotient, oxygen consumption at the HRDP (VO2HRDP), peak heart rate (HRPEAK), HRDP, and peak post-test blood lactate concentration. During the PSTT the peak kick frequency (FKPEAK) and kick frequency at the HRDP (FKHRDP) was also obtained. During the IT, the peak speed and the speed at the HRDP were identified by the DMAX method (the first and last points of the curve were connected by a straight line and the most distant point of the curve to the line was considered as the heart rate deflection point). No differences were observed between VO2 responses during the PSTT and IT (p>0.05). VO2PEAK and VO2HRDP presented bias (1.3 ml·kg·min and -0.78 ml·kg·min, respectively) derived from the Bland & Altman plots, with the 95% limits of agreement indicating that the differences between the two measures can reach 11% for VO2PEAK and 17% for VO2HRDP. The PSTT is a valid tool to assess aerobic power and capacity in taekwondo athletes based on direct comparisons to a treadmill test. The test presents more specific variables for the assessment and training of taekwondo athletes, such as FKPEAK and FKHRDP, which can be used to determine and control the effects of training and help coaches in prescribing training programs.

  13. Comparing the effects of two in-flight aerobic exercise protocols on standing heart rates and VO(2peak) before and after space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siconolfi, S. F.; Charles, J. B.; Moore, A. D. Jr; Barrows, L. H.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of regular aerobic exercise on orthostatic tolerance have been the subject of a long-standing controversy that will influence the use of exercise during space flight. To examine these effects, astronauts performed continuous (CE) aerobic exercise (n = 8), interval (IE) aerobic exercise (n = 4), or no (NE) exercise (n = 5) during flights of 7 to 11 days. Heart rate (HR) responses to an orthostatic challenge (stand test) were measured 10 days before flight and on landing day. VO(2peak) (graded treadmill exercise) was measured 7 to 21 days before and 2 days after flight. No significant differences across the groups were observed in standing HRs before or after flight. However, the within-group mean HRs significantly increased in the NE (71-89 beats/min) and CE (60-85 beats/min) groups after space flight. The HRs for the IE group did not significantly increase (75-86 beats/min) after space flight. VO(2peak) decreased (P < .05) in the NE (-9.5%) group, but did not change in the CE (-2.4%) and IE (1%) groups. The relationship (r = 0.237) between the delta HR and delta VO(2peak) was not significant. These preliminary results indicate that: (1) continuous exercise does not affect the orthostatic HR response after space flight; (2) interval exercise may minimize an increase in the postflight orthostatic HR; and (3) both exercise protocols can maintain VO(2peak).

  14. Comparing the effects of two in-flight aerobic exercise protocols on standing heart rates and VO(2peak) before and after space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siconolfi, S. F.; Charles, J. B.; Moore, A. D. Jr; Barrows, L. H.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of regular aerobic exercise on orthostatic tolerance have been the subject of a long-standing controversy that will influence the use of exercise during space flight. To examine these effects, astronauts performed continuous (CE) aerobic exercise (n = 8), interval (IE) aerobic exercise (n = 4), or no (NE) exercise (n = 5) during flights of 7 to 11 days. Heart rate (HR) responses to an orthostatic challenge (stand test) were measured 10 days before flight and on landing day. VO(2peak) (graded treadmill exercise) was measured 7 to 21 days before and 2 days after flight. No significant differences across the groups were observed in standing HRs before or after flight. However, the within-group mean HRs significantly increased in the NE (71-89 beats/min) and CE (60-85 beats/min) groups after space flight. The HRs for the IE group did not significantly increase (75-86 beats/min) after space flight. VO(2peak) decreased (P exercise does not affect the orthostatic HR response after space flight; (2) interval exercise may minimize an increase in the postflight orthostatic HR; and (3) both exercise protocols can maintain VO(2peak).

  15. The effects of modified exponential tapering technique on perceived exertion, heart rate, time trial performance, VO2max and power output among highly trained junior cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Asmadi; Hashim, Hairul A; Krasilshchikov, Oleksandr

    2016-09-01

    The present study investigated the effects of a 2-week modified exponential taper on physiological adaptation and time trial performance among junior cyclists. Participants (N.=27) with the mean age of 16.95±0.8 years, height of 165.6±6.1 cm and weight of 54.19±8.1 kg were matched into either modified exponential taper (N.=7), normal exponential taper (N.=7), or control (N.=7) groups using their initial VO2max values. Both experimental groups followed a 12-week progressive endurance training program and subsequently, a 2-week tapering phase. A simulated 20-km time trial performance along with VO2max, power output, heart rate and rating of perceived exertion were measured at baseline, pre and post-taper. One way ANOVA was used to analyze the difference between groups before the start of the intervention while mixed factorial ANOVA was used to analyze the difference between groups across measurement sessions. When homogeneity assumption was violated, the Greenhouse-Geisser Value was used for the corrected values of the degrees of freedom for the within subject factor the analysis. Significant interactions between experimental groups and testing sessions were found in VO2max (F=6.67, df=4, P<0.05), power output (F=5.02, df=4, P<0.05), heart rate (F=10.87, df=2.51, P<0.05) rating of perceived exertion (F=13.04, df=4, P<0.05) and 20KM time trial (F=4.64, df=2.63, P<0.05). Post-hoc analysis revealed that both types of taper exhibited positive effects compared to the non-taper condition in the measured performance markers at post-taper while no different were found between the two taper groups. It was concluded that both taper protocols successfully inducing physiological adaptations among the junior cyclists by reducing the volume and maintaining the intensity of training.

  16. Higher Precision of Heart Rate Compared with VO2 to Predict Exercise Intensity in Endurance-Trained Runners

    OpenAIRE

    Victor M. Reis; Roland van den Tillaar; Marques, Mario C.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the precision of oxygen uptake with heart rate regression during track running in highly-trained runners. Twelve national and international level male long-distance road runners (age 30.7 ± 5.5 yrs, height 1.71 ± 0.04 m and mass 61.2 ± 5.8 kg) with a personal best on the half marathon of 62 min 37 s ± 1 min 22 s participated in the study. Each participant performed, in an all-weather synthetic track five, six min bouts at constant velocity with each ...

  17. The contribution of preintervention blood pressure, VO2max, BMI, autonomic function and gender to exercise-induced changes in heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Catharina C; Janse van Rensburg, Dina C

    2013-06-01

    The quantification of heart rate variability (HRV) is a tool to assess the interaction between exercise and autonomic control, as well as the pathophysiology of diseases affecting autonomic function. Little is known about the influence of genetically influenced physiology on exercise-induced changes in autonomic cardiac regulation. It was theorised that preintervention values for blood pressure, VO2max, body mass index (BMI), autonomic function and gender contribute significantly to the exercise-induced changes in HRV. A 12-week, medium-to-high intensity exercise intervention was completed by 183 volunteers (18-22 years). Data were sampled at baseline and after 12 weeks. Standard time domain, frequency domain and Poincaré HRV quantification techniques were implemented. Regression analysis was performed to determine the influences of the predictors (baseline values for low frequency  (LF), high frequency (HF), BMI, VO2max, gender, blood pressure) on the exercise-induced response of the dependent variables (changes in HRV-indicator values). Parameters found to be significant (pexercise-induced changes were LF, HF and systolic blood pressure in, respectively, 10, 5 and 2 of the 12 regressions performed. The results indicated that the independent variables contribute between 12.83% and 29.82%, depending on the specific HRV indicator, to the exercise-induced changes in the autonomic nervous system. Preintervention autonomic status, as represented specifically by LF, is the most important determinant of cardiac autonomic response to an exercise intervention in a healthy study population. Baseline autonomic function could thus be a significant confounder in the outcome of exercise study results.

  18. Study of the relationship between the aerobic capacity (VO2 max) and the rating of perceived exertion based on the measurement of heart beat in the metal industries Esfahan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Ehsanollah; Dehghan, Habibollah; Moghiseh, Mohammad; Hasanzadeh, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: To establish a balance between work (physical exercise) and human beings, the aerobic capacity (VO2 max) could be used as a measure. Additionally, the subjective and physiological assessment could be applied as one of the methods for assessing physical exercise. The most commonly used tools for the assessment of fatigue during physical exercise include the Borg scale Rating of perceived Exertion (RPE) in relation to subjective symptoms and heart rate (HR) in relation to physiological symptoms. The study is aimed to investigate the relationship between the aerobic capacity and the RPE based on the measurement of heat rate (HR) of workers from the Metal Industries of Isfahan. Materials and Methods: The subjects were 200 male workers from metal components manufacturers in Isfahan selected by using random sampling based on statistic method. The subjects were examined by using ergometer in accordance with A strand 6 minutes cycle test protocol. Furthermore, the subjects were asked to rate their status based on the Borg rating scale at the end of each minute. Additionally, their heat rates were monitored and recorded automatically at the end of each minutes. Results: Statistical analysis showed that there was a significant relationship between the RPE and the aerobic capacity (VO2 max) (r = –0.904, P VO2 max (r = 0.991, P VO2 max and HR. Conclusions: The results indicated that there was a strong relationship between the RPE and VO2 max, as well as a greater correlation between HR and VO2 max. Therefore, the HR could be used as a Prediction measure to estimate VO2 max. PMID:25077148

  19. VO2 max in an Indian population: a study to understand the role of factors determining VO2 max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitin, Y M; Sucharita, S; Madhura, M; Thomas, T; Sandhya, T A

    2013-01-01

    VO2 max is the maximum amount of oxygen a person can consume and the value does not change despite an increase in workload. There is lack of data evaluating the impact of factors, which could affect VO2 max measurement, particularly in Indian population. The objectives of the present study were (i) to estimate VO2 max in a young healthy Indian population and to compare it with available prediction equations for Indian population (ii) to correlate time to achieve VO2 max with the relative VO2 max (iii) to assess the factors affecting the time to achieve VO2 max measurement (body composition and physical activity level). Twenty healthy adult males (18-30 years) underwent detailed anthropometry, physical activity level and modified Bruce protocol for VO2 max assessment. Breath by breath VO2, VCO2, oxygen saturation, heart rate, blood pressure were measured continuously and following exercise protocol. There was an internal validity between the estimated VO2 max and the maximum heart rate (MHR) (r = 0.51, P VO2 max P VO2 max. Out of the 3 prediction equations computed to estimate VO2 max, 2 equations significantly overestimated VO2 max. In Conclusion, physical activity level emerged to be a strong predictor of time to VO2 max. Time to achieve VO2 max is an important factor to be considered when determining VO2 max. There was an overestimation in the VO2 max values derived from predicted equations.

  20. Is low VO2max/kg in obese heart failure patients indicative of cardiac dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hothi, S S; Tan, D K; Partridge, G; Tan, L B

    2015-04-01

    Low peak O2 consumption (VO2max/kg) has been widely used as an indirect indicator of poor cardiac fitness, and often guides management of patients with severe heart failure (HF). We hypothesized that it should be as good an indicator of cardiac dysfunction in obese and non-obese HF patients. We compared the cardiopulmonary exercise performance and non-invasive hemodynamics of 152 obese (BMI>34 kg.m(-2)) and 173 non-obese (BMI≤32) male HF patients in NYHA classes II and III, with reference to 101 healthy male controls. Their physical and cardiac functional reserves were measured during treadmill exercise testing with standard respiratory gas analyses and CO2 rebreathing to measure cardiac output non-invasively during peak exercise. Data are given as mean ± SD. Obese HF patients with BMI 40.9 ± 7.5 kg·m(-2) (age 56.1 ± 14.0 years, NYHA 2.5 ± 0.5) exercised to acceptable cardiopulmonary limits (peak RER=1.07 ± 0.12), and achieved a mean VO2max/kg of 18.6 ± 5.2 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1), significantly lower than in non-obese HF counterparts (19.9 ± 5.6 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1), P=0.02, age 55.8 ± 10.6 years, BMI 26.6 ± 3.1, NYHA 2.4 ± 0.5, peak RER=1.07 ± 0.09), with both lower than controls (38.5 ± 9.7 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1), PVO2max was higher in obese (2.31 ± 0.69 ml·min(-1)) than non-obese HF patients (1.61 ± 0.49 ml·min(-1), PVO2max/kg is not a generally reliable indicator of cardiac fitness in all patients. Instead, we found that despite having lower VO2max/kg, obese HF patients had stronger hearts capable of generating greater cardiac power than non-obese HF patients of equivalent clinical HF status. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. VO2max Measured with a Self-selected Work Rate Protocol on an Automated Treadmill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheadler, Cory M; Devor, Steven T

    2015-10-01

    The use of graded maximal exercise tests for measuring maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) is common practice in both cardiopulmonary rehabilitation settings and in sports medicine research. Recent alterations of common testing protocols to allow for self-selected work rates (SPV) have elicited V˙O2max values similar to or higher than more traditional style protocols (TP). Research is lacking in the delivery of the SPV protocol using a treadmill modality. The purpose of the study was to examine the validity of an SPV using an automated treadmill for measuring cardiorespiratory fitness. Thirteen experienced endurance runners completed three maximal exercise tests on a treadmill. Oxygen consumption was measured using a computerized system and averaged more than 30-s time periods. SPV was completed using an automated treadmill that consisted of a sonar range finder, microcontroller, and customized computer software. Subject deviations from the middle of the treadmill belt resulted in rapid, graded increases or decreases in speed. TP was completed on the same treadmill without the use of the automated software. A verification phase protocol (VP) was used to verify if VO2 was maximal. Peak work rate achieved during SPV was significantly greater than that achieved during TP by 1.2 METs; P VO2max than TP despite higher work rates.

  2. PREDICTION OF VO2PEAK USING OMNI RATINGS OF PERCEIVED EXERTION FROM A SUBMAXIMAL CYCLE EXERCISE TEST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Ryan J.; Goss, Fredric L.; Nagle-Stilley, Elizabeth F.; Gallagher, Michael; Schafer, Mark A.; Kim, Kevin H.; Robertson, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The primary aim of this study was to develop statistical models to predict peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) using OMNI Ratings of Perceived Exertion measured during submaximal cycle ergometry. Men (mean ± standard error: 20.90 ± 0.42 yrs) and women (21.59 ± 0.49 yrs) participants (n = 81) completed a load-incremented maximal cycle ergometer exercise test. Simultaneous multiple linear regression was used to develop separate VO2peak statistical models using submaximal ratings of perceived exertion for the overall body, legs, and chest/breathing as predictor variables. VO2peak (L·min−1) predicted for men and women from ratings of perceived exertion for the overall body (3.02 ± 0.06; 2.03 ± 0.04), legs (3.02 ± 0.06; 2.04 ± 0.04) and chest/breathing (3.02 ± 0.05; 2.03 ± 0.03) were similar with measured VO2peak (3.02 ± 0.10; 2.03 ± 0.06, ps > .05). Statistical models based on submaximal OMNI Ratings of Perceived Exertion provide an easily administered and accurate method to predict VO2peak. PMID:25068750

  3. Speeding of pulmonary VO2 on-kinetics by light-to-moderate-intensity aerobic exercise training in chronic heart failure: clinical and pathophysiological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzani, Alessandro; Grassi, Bruno; Jones, Andrew M; Giordano, Andrea; Corrà, Ugo; Porcelli, Simone; Della Bella, Silvia; Taddeo, Adriano; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary VO2 on-kinetics during light-to-moderate-intensity constant-work-rate exercise, an experimental model mirroring energetic transitions during daily activities, has been shown to speed up with aerobic exercise training (AET) in normal subjects, but scant data are available in chronic heart failure (CHF). Thirty CHF patients were randomized to 3 months of light-to-moderate-intensity AET (CHF-AET) or control (CHF-C). Baseline and end-protocol evaluations included i) one incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test with near infrared spectroscopy analysis of peak deoxygenated hemoglobin+myoglobin concentration changes (Δ[deoxy(Hb+Mb)]) in vastus lateralis muscle, ii) 8 light-to-moderate-intensity constant-work-rate exercise tests for VO2 on-kinetics phase I duration, phase II τ, and mean response time (MRT) assessment, and iii) circulating endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) measurement. Reference values were obtained in 7 age-matched normals (N). At end-protocol, phase I duration, phase II τ, and MRT were significantly reduced (-12%, -22%, and -19%, respectively) and peak VO2, peak Δ[deoxy(Hb+Mb)], and EPCs increased (9%, 20%, and 98%, respectively) in CHF-AET, but not in CHF-C. Peak Δ[deoxy(Hb+Mb)] and EPCs relative increase correlated significantly to that of peak VO2 (r=0.61 and 0.64, respectively, pexercise-related risk. The AET-induced simultaneous improvement of phase I and phase II, associated with an increase of peak peripheral oxygen extraction and EPCs, supports microcirculatory O2 delivery impairment as a key factor determining exercise intolerance in CHF. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Estimation of VO2 Max: A Comparative Analysis of Five Exercise Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwiren, Linda D.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty-eight healthy females measured maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) on the cycle ergometer and treadmill to compare five exercise tests (run, walk, step, and two tests using heart-rate response on the bicycle ergometer) in predicting VO2max. Results indicate that walk and run tests are satisfactory predictors of VO2max in 30- to 39-year-old…

  5. Role of right ventricle and dynamic pulmonary hypertension on determining ΔVO2/ΔWork Rate flattening: insights from cardiopulmonary exercise test combined with exercise echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandera, Francesco; Generati, Greta; Pellegrino, Marta; Donghi, Valeria; Alfonzetti, Eleonora; Gaeta, Maddalena; Villani, Simona; Guazzi, Marco

    2014-09-01

    Several cardiovascular diseases are characterized by an impaired O2 kinetic during exercise. The lack of a linear increase of Δoxygen consumption (VO2)/ΔWork Rate (WR) relationship, as assessed by expired gas analysis, is considered an indicator of abnormal cardiovascular efficiency. We aimed at describing the frequency of ΔVO2/ΔWR flattening in a symptomatic population of cardiac patients, characterizing its functional profile, and testing the hypothesis that dynamic pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular contractile reserve play a major role as cardiac determinants. We studied 136 patients, with different cardiovascular diseases, referred for exertional dyspnoea. Cardiopulmonary exercise test combined with simultaneous exercise echocardiography was performed using a symptom-limited protocol. ΔVO2/ΔWR flattening was observed in 36 patients (group A, 26.5% of population) and was associated with a globally worse functional profile (reduced peak VO2, anaerobic threshold, O2 pulse, impaired VE/VCO2). At univariate analysis, exercise ejection fraction, exercise mitral regurgitation, rest and exercise tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion, exercise systolic pulmonary artery pressure, and exercise cardiac output were all significantly (Pexercise systolic pulmonary artery pressure (odds ratio, 1.06; confidence interval, 1.01-1.11; P=0.01) and exercise tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (odds ratio, 0.88; confidence interval, 0.80-0.97; P=0.01) as main cardiac determinants of ΔVO2/ΔWR flattening; female sex was strongly associated (odds ratio, 6.10; confidence interval, 2.11-17.7; Pincrease and the reduced peak right ventricular longitudinal systolic function. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Validation of a new method for estimating VO2max based on VO2 reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, David P; Parrott, James A; Bennett, Anna R; Branch, J David; Dowling, Elizabeth A

    2004-08-01

    The American College of Sports Medicine's (ACSM) preferred method for estimating maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) has been shown to overestimate VO2max, possibly due to the short length of the cycle ergometry stages. This study validates a new method that uses a final 6-min stage and that estimates VO2max from the relationship between heart rate reserve (HRR) and VO2 reserve. A cycle ergometry protocol was designed to elicit 65-75% HRR in the fifth and sixth minutes of the final stage. Maximal workload was estimated by dividing the workload of the final stage by %HRR. VO2max was then estimated using the ACSM metabolic equation for cycling. After the 6-min stage was completed, an incremental test to maximal effort was used to measure actual VO2max. Forty-nine subjects completed a pilot study using one protocol to reach the 6-min stage, and 50 additional subjects completed a modified protocol. The pilot study obtained a valid estimate of VO2max (r = 0.91, SEE = 3.4 mL x min(-1) x kg-1) with no over- or underestimation (mean estimated VO2max = 35.3 mL x min(-1) x kg(-1), mean measured VO2max = 36.1 mL x min(-1) x kg(-1)), but the average %HRR achieved in the 6-min stage was 78%, with several subjects attaining heart rates considered too high for submaximal fitness testing. The second study also obtained a valid estimate of VO2max (r = 0.89, SEE = 4.0 mL x min(-1) x kg(-1)) with no over- or underestimation (mean estimated VO2max = 36.7 mL x min(-1) x kg(-1), mean measured VO2max = 36.9 mL x min(-1) x kg(-1), and the average %HRR achieved in the 6-min stage was 64%. A new method for estimating VO2max from submaximal cycling based on VO2 reserve has been found to be valid and more accurate than previous methods.

  7. Association of VO2 and VCO2 rate variability with serum glucose, insulin, and glucose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satué-Rodríguez, Julián; Méndez, José D

    2012-08-01

    Changes in the cellular metabolism assessed by the variability of oxygen consumption (VO(2) ) and carbon dioxide production (VCO(2) ) as well as the association of serum glucose and insulin to energy spectral density (ESD) of VO(2) and VCO(2) were evaluated. Ten nonglucose intolerant and 10 glucose intolerant subjects, aged 21-70 years, were included. Glucose and insulin concentrations and VO(2) and VCO(2) records were collected every 10 min during 3 h. ESD of VO(2) and VCO(2) was estimated and associated with glucose and insulin concentrations. Statistical significance in glucose levels, insulin, and ESD of VO(2) and VCO(2) among nonglucose intolerant subjects and glucose and insulin among glucose intolerance subjects at postload glucose (PLG) state compared with basal state was found. Moreover, glucose was significantly higher in glucose intolerance subjects than nonglucose intolerant subjects for basal and PLG states. These results show an increment in ESD of VO(2) and VCO(2) at PLG state among nonglucose intolerant subjects and suggest that their measurement may be a key indicator of the variability of cellular metabolic activity and contribute to confirm disturbances in glucose metabolism.

  8. Oxygen Kinetics and Heart Rate Response during Early Recovery from Exercise in Patients with Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalampos D. Kriatselis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of this study was to assess the post-exercise O2 uptake and heart rate response in patients with heart failure (HF in comparison to healthy individuals. Methods and Results. Exercise testing of all subjects was conducted according to the RITE-protocol. The study subjects were classified according to their peak oxygen uptake (peak VO2 in four groups: healthy individuals with a peak VO2 >22 mL/kg/min (group 1, : 50, and patients with HF and a peak VO2 of 18–22 mL/kg/min, (group 2, : 48, 14–18 mL/kg/min (group 3, : 57, and <14 mL/kg/min (group 4, : 31. Both peak VO2 and HR declined more slowly in the patients with HF than in the normal subjects. Recovery of VO2 and HR followed monoexponential kinetics in the early post-recovery phase. This enabled the determination of a time constant for both HR and VO2 (TC VO2 and TC HR. From group 1 to 4 there was a prolongation of the time constant for VO2 and HR: TC VO2 (group 1: 110±34, group 2: 197±43, group 3: 238±80, and group 4: 278±50 sec, and TC HR (group 1: 148±82, group 2: 290±65, group 3: 320±58, and group 4: 376±55 sec. Conclusion. The rate of decline of VO2 and HR in the early post-exercise phase is inversely related to the peak VO2. The time constant for oxygen uptake (TC VO2 and heart rate (TC HR might prove a useful parameter for more precise monitoring and grading of HF.

  9. A comparison between heart rate and heart rate variability as indicators of cardiac health and fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catharina Cornelia Grant

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of cardiac autonomic activity and control via heart rate (HR and heart rate variability (HRV is known to provide prognostic information in clinical populations. Issues with regard to standardisation and interpretation of HRV data make the use of the more easily accessible HR on its own as an indicator of autonomic cardiac control very appealing. The aim of this study was to investigate the strength of associations between an important cardio vascular health metric such as VO2max and the following: HR, HRV indicators and heart rate normalised HRV indicators. A cross sectional descriptive study was done including 145 healthy volunteers aged between 18 and 22 years. HRV was quantified by time domain, frequency domain and Poincaré plot analysis. Indirect VO2max was determined using the Multistage Coopers test. The Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated to quantify the strength of the associations. Both simple linear and multiple stepwise regressions were performed to be able to discriminate between the role of the individual indicators as well as their combined association with VO2max. Only HR, RR interval and pNN50 showed significant (p<0.01, p<0.01 and p=0.03 correlations with VO2max. Stepwise multiple regression indicated that, when combining all HRV indicators the most important predictor of cardio vascular fitness as represented by VO2max, is HR. HR explains 17% of the variation, while the inclusion of HF (high frequency HRV indicator added only an additional 3.1% to the coefficient of determination. Results also showed when testing the normalised indicators, HR explained of the largest percentage of the changes in VO2max (16.5%. Thus HR on its own is the most important predictor of changes in an important cardiac health metric such as VO2max. These results may indicate that during investigation of exercise ability (VO2max phenomena, quantification of HRV may not add significant value.

  10. Elevated resting heart rate, physical fitness and all-cause mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Magnus Thorsten; Suadicani, Poul; Hein, Hans Ole

    2013-01-01

    To examine whether elevated resting heart rate (RHR) is an independent risk factor for mortality or a mere marker of physical fitness (VO2Max).......To examine whether elevated resting heart rate (RHR) is an independent risk factor for mortality or a mere marker of physical fitness (VO2Max)....

  11. Assessment of anaerobic power to verify VO2max attainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astorino, Todd A; White, Ailish C

    2010-07-01

    Across various populations, verification testing is used to confirm VO(2)max attainment and has repeatedly shown similar VO(2)max values to those obtained from incremental exercise. Yet, many individuals show meaningful differences in VO(2)max between protocols, and an explanation for this is unknown. The aim of the study was to elucidate this phenomenon in 30 men and women of similar age, fitness, and physical activity using assessment of anaerobic power. On day 1, they completed the Wingate test, and returned at least 48 h later to complete incremental cycle ergometry followed by a verification protocol. During exercise, ventilation, pulmonary gas exchange data, and heart rate (HR) were continuously measured. Mean VO(2)max was similar (P > 0.05) between protocols (42.05 +/- 5.88 ml kg(-1) per min versus 42.03 +/- 5.75 ml kg(-1) per min, respectively), although seven subjects (23%) revealed a VO(2)max that was not 'verified' by the supramaximal protocol. Indices of power output and gas exchange data were similar (P > 0.05) between subjects who revealed a 'true' VO(2)max compared to those who did not, although peak and mean power was consistently higher in persons whose VO(2)max was not 'verified.' A previously established HRmax criterion for verification testing was not met in 17% of subjects. Additional study is merited to identify alternate determinants of VO(2)max, such as muscle activation via assessment of motor unit recruitment, and to investigate utility of verification testing to confirm VO(2)max attainment in elite athletes and the elderly.

  12. A comparison between heart rate and heart rate variability as indicators of cardiac health and fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Catharina C; Murray, Carien; Janse van Rensburg, Dina C; Fletcher, Lizelle

    2013-01-01

    Quantification of cardiac autonomic activity and control via heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) is known to provide prognostic information in clinical populations. Issues with regard to standardization and interpretation of HRV data make the use of the more easily accessible HR on its own as an indicator of autonomic cardiac control very appealing. The aim of this study was to investigate the strength of associations between an important cardio vascular health metric such as VO2max and the following: HR, HRV indicators, and HR normalized HRV indicators. A cross sectional descriptive study was done including 145 healthy volunteers aged between 18 and 22 years. HRV was quantified by time domain, frequency domain and Poincaré plot analysis. Indirect VO2max was determined using the Multistage Coopers test. The Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated to quantify the strength of the associations. Both simple linear and multiple stepwise regressions were performed to be able to discriminate between the role of the individual indicators as well as their combined association with VO2max. Only HR, RR interval, and pNN50 showed significant (p VO2max. Stepwise multiple regression indicated that, when combining all HRV indicators the most important predictor of cardio vascular fitness as represented by VO2max, is HR. HR explains 17% of the variation, while the inclusion of HF (high frequency HRV indicator) added only an additional 3.1% to the coefficient of determination. Results also showed when testing the normalized indicators, HR explained of the largest percentage of the changes in VO2max (16.5%). Thus, HR on its own is the most important predictor of changes in an important cardiac health metric such as VO2max. These results may indicate that during investigation of exercise ability (VO2max) phenomena, quantification of HRV may not add significant value.

  13. Time limit and time at VO2max' during a continuous and an intermittent run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarie, S; Koralsztein, J P; Billat, V

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify, by track field tests, whether sub-elite runners (n=15) could (i) reach their VO2max while running at v50%delta, i.e. midway between the speed associated with lactate threshold (vLAT) and that associated with maximal aerobic power (vVO2max), and (ii) if an intermittent exercise provokes a maximal and/or supra maximal oxygen consumption longer than a continuous one. Within three days, subjects underwent a multistage incremental test during which their vVO2max and vLAT were determined; they then performed two additional testing sessions, where continuous and intermittent running exercises at v50%delta were performed up to exhaustion. Subject's gas exchange and heart rate were continuously recorded by means of a telemetric apparatus. Blood samples were taken from fingertip and analysed for blood lactate concentration. In the continuous and the intermittent tests peak VO2 exceeded VO2max values, as determined during the incremental test. However in the intermittent exercise, peak VO2, time to exhaustion and time at VO2max reached significantly higher values, while blood lactate accumulation showed significantly lower values than in the continuous one. The v50%delta is sufficient to stimulate VO2max in both intermittent and continuous running. The intermittent exercise results better than the continuous one in increasing maximal aerobic power, allowing longer time at VO2max and obtaining higher peak VO2 with lower lactate accumulation.

  14. [VO2 max, a true exercise test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunier, Carole

    2013-01-01

    VO2 max is nowadays an essential examination performed in the monitoring of heart failure. The nurse has a role to play during the test and in supporting the patient, although this test remains highly technical and complex.

  15. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure: Prognostic Comparison from Peak VO2 and VE/VCO2 Slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarullo, Filippo Maria; Fazio, Giovanni; Brusca, Ignazio; Fasullo, Sergio; Paterna, Salvatore; Licata, Pamela; Novo, Giuseppina; Novo, Salvatore; Di Pasquale, Pietro

    2010-05-26

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing with ventilatory expired gas analysis (CPET) has proven to be a valuable tool for assessing patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). The maximal oxygen uptake (peak V02) is used in risk stratification of patients with CHF. The minute ventilation-carbon dioxide production relationship (VE/VCO2 slope) has recently demonstrated prognostic significance in patients with CHF. Between January 2006 and December 2007 we performed CPET in 184 pts (146 M, 38 F, mean age 59.8 +/- 12.9 years), with stable CHF (96 coronary artery disease, 88 dilated cardiomyopathy), in NYHA functional class II (n.107) - III (n.77), with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) /= 35.6 and 25% in those with VE/VCO2 slope 12.2 ml/kg/min (log rank chi2: 50.98, p /= 32.5 and 23% in those with VE/VCO2 slope 12.3 ml/kg/min (log rank chi2: 72.86, p < 0.0001). The VE/VCO2 slope was demonstrated with receiver operating characteristic curve analysis to be equivalent to peak VO2 in predicting cardiac-related mortality (0.89 vs. 0.89). Although area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the VE/VCO2 slope was greater than peak VO2 in predicting cardiac-related hospitalization (0.88 vs 0.82), the difference was no statistically significant (p = 0.13). These results add to the present body of knowledge supporting the use of CPET in CHF patients. The VE/VCO2 slope, as an index of ventilatory response to exercise, is an excellent prognostic parameter and improves the risk stratification of CHF patients. It is easier to obtain than parameters of maximal exercise capacity and is of equivalent prognostic importance than peak VO2.

  16. Submaximal treadmill test predicts VO2max in overweight children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Blaise A; Carrel, Aaron L; Eickhoff, Jens; Clark, R Randall; Peterson, Susan E; Allen, David B

    2009-05-01

    To demonstrate the ability of a submaximal test to predict VO(2max) in overweight children. A total of 130 children, 11 to 14 years old, with body mass index >85 percentile for age and sex performed a submaximal walking test. VO(2max) was measured by using open circuit spirometry during a graded exercise test to volitional fatigue. An equation to predict VO(2max) was modeled by using the variables of sex, weight (kg), height (cm), heart rate (HR) after 4 minutes during the submaximal test (4minHR), HR difference (4minHR - resting HR), and submaximal treadmill speed (miles per hour [mph]) in 75% of the subjects. Validation was performed by using the remaining 25% of subjects. A total of 113 subjects achieved a maximal effort and was used in the statistical analysis. Development and validation groups were similar in all aspects. On validation, the mean square error was 241.06 with the predicted VO(2max) within 10% of the observed value in 67% of subjects. VO(2max) was accurately predicted in this cohort of overweight children by using a submaximal, treadmill-based testing protocol.

  17. Reliability of treadmill measures and criteria to determine VO2max in prepubertal girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Colon, R; Hunter, G R; Mayo, M S; Aldridge, R A; Goran, M I; Weinsier, R L

    2000-04-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine the reliability of measuring treadmill exercise economy (VO2submax) and the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) in prepubertal girls tested twice, 6 wk apart. We also wanted to examine the percentage of young girls who were able to reach the criteria for achieving VO2max and to describe methods that would allow a high proportion of young children to achieve criteria for reaching a true VO2max. We studied 61 normal-weight, prepubertal girls with a mean (+/- SD) age 7.3+/-1.3 yr (range 4.8 to 10.3 yr). VO2submax was determined while walking for 4 min at 2.5 mph with 0% grade. VO2max was measured during a progressive, all-out, continuous treadmill test using standardized procedures and criteria. Heart rate (HR) was measured using a Polar monitor. Respiratory rate (RR), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), ventilation (V), and VO2 were measured using a Sensormedics metabolic monitor. There were no significant differences between visits I and 2 in mean HR, RR, RER, V, VO2submax (421 vs 422 mL x min(-1), respectively), and VO2max (1036 vs 1049 mL x min(-1), respectively). Intra-individual coefficients of variation (CV) between visits 1 and 2 for submaximal tests were: HR = 5.1%, RR = 12.4%, RER = 7.2%, V = 12.5%, and VO2 = 12.4%. Intra-individual CVs for the maximum tests were: HRmax = 2.1%, RRmax = 10.8%, RERmax = 5.3%, Vmax = 11.7%, and VO2max = 7.5%. A high proportion of the girls reached criteria for VO2max [RER> 1.00, HR>85% of age predicted maximum, and plateauing of VO2max] in both visits: 99% reached one of three criteria, 92% reached two of three criteria, and 70% reached all three criteria. Twenty girls [mean age 7.2+/-1.2 yr] reached at least two criteria in both visits, whereas 32 girls [mean (+/- SD) age 8.6+/-1.0 yr] reached three criteria in both visits. Exercise measurements using treadmill testing were reliable in healthy, normal-weight, prepubertal girls. Older girls when compared to the younger girls were able

  18. Predictors of VO2Peak in children age 6- to 7-years-old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Magnus; Hermansen, Bianca; Bugge, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the predictors of aerobic fitness (VO2PEAK) in young children on a population-base. Participants were 436 children (229 boys and 207 girls) aged 6.7 ± 0.4 yrs. VO2PEAK was measured during a maximal treadmill exercise test. Physical activity was assessed by accelerometers....... Total body fat and total fat free mass were estimated from skinfold measurements. Regression analyses indicated that significant predictors for VO2PEAK per kilogram body mass were total body fat, maximal heart rate, sex, and age. Physical activity explained an additional 4-7%. Further analyses showed...... the main contributing factors for absolute values of VO2PEAK were fat free mass, maximal heart rate, sex, and age. Physical activity explained an additional 3-6%....

  19. Validity of heart rate based nomogram fors estimation of maximum oxygen uptake in Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S Krishna; Khare, P; Jaryal, A K; Talwar, A

    2012-01-01

    Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) during a graded maximal exercise test is the objective method to assess cardiorespiratory fitness. Maximal oxygen uptake testing is limited to only a few laboratories as it requires trained personnel and strenuous effort by the subject. At the population level, submaximal tests have been developed to derive VO2max indirectly based on heart rate based nomograms or it can be calculated using anthropometric measures. These heart rate based predicted standards have been developed for western population and are used routinely to predict VO2max in Indian population. In the present study VO2max was directly measured by maximal exercise test using a bicycle ergometer and was compared with VO2max derived by recovery heart rate in Queen's College step test (QCST) (PVO2max I) and with VO2max derived from Wasserman equation based on anthropometric parameters and age (PVO2max II) in a well defined age group of healthy male adults from New Delhi. The values of directly measured VO2max showed no significant correlation either with the estimated VO2max with QCST or with VO2max predicted by Wasserman equation. Bland and Altman method of approach for limit of agreement between VO2max and PVO2max I or PVO2max II revealed that the limits of agreement between directly measured VO2max and PVO2max I or PVO2max II was large indicating inapplicability of prediction equations of western population in the population under study. Thus it is evident that there is an urgent need to develop nomogram for Indian population, may be even for different ethnic sub-population in the country.

  20. VO2 pico e inclinação VE/VCO2 na era dos betabloqueadores na insuficiência cardíaca: uma experiência brasileira Peak VO2 and VE/VCO2 slope in betablockers era in patients with heart failure: a brazilian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Veiga Guimarães

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: Estudos têm demonstrado que o consumo de oxigênio de pico (VO2 pico e a inclinação VE/VCO2 são preditores de sobrevida em pacientes com insuficiência cardíaca (IC. Entretanto, com a adição do betabloqueador no tratamento da IC, os valores de prognóstico do VO2 pico e da Inclinação VE/VCO2 não estão totalmente estabelecidos. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o efeito dos betabloqueadores no valor de prognóstico do VO2 pico e da inclinação VE/VCO2 em pacientes com IC. MÉTODOS: Estudamos 391 pacientes com insuficiência cardíaca, com idade de 49 ± 14 anos e fração de ejeção do ventrículo esquerdo de 38 ± 10%. Total de pacientes que usavam (grupo I - GI e não usavam (grupo II - GII betabloqueadores: 229 e 162, respectivamente. Todos os pacientes foram submetidos a teste de esforço cardiopulmonar, em esteira, usando o protocolo de Naughton. RESULTADOS: O VO2 pico 16 ml.kg-1.min-1 categorizaram pacientes com melhor prognóstico em médio prazo. A faixa do VO2 pico entre > 10 e BACKGROUND: Studies have demonstrated that peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2 and the VE/VCO2 slope are predictors of survival in patients with heart failure (HF. However, with the advent of betablockers in the treatment of HF, the prognostic values of peak VO2 and VE/VCO2 slope have not been fully established. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of betablocker use on the prognostic value of peak VO2 and VE/VCO2 slope in patients with HF. METHODS: We studied 391 patients with heart failure, aged 49 ± 14 years and presenting a left ventricular ejection fraction of 38 ± 10%. The total number of patients that used (Group I - GI or did not use (Group II - GII betablockers was 229 and 162, respectively. All patients were submitted to a cardiopulmonary stress test on a treadmill, using the Naughton protocol. RESULTS: A peak VO2 16 ml.kg-1.min-1 categorizes patients with a better mid-term prognosis. Peak VO2 values between > 10 and < 16 ml.kg-1.min-1 indicated

  1. The relationship among HRpeak, RERpeak, and VO2peak during treadmill testing in girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyer, Karissa; Pivarnik, James M; Coe, Dawn Podulka

    2011-12-01

    Clear criteria for maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) determination in youth are not available, and no studies have examined this issue in girls. Our purpose was to determine whether different peak heart rate (HRpeak) and peak respiratory exchange ratio (RERpeak) cut points affect girls' (N = 453; M age = 13.3 years, SD = .1) VO2max during a maximal treadmill test. A multivariate analysis of variance revealed VO2max (ml kg(-1) min(-1) differed significantly among HRpeak, 180-189 b min(-1) = 34 (SD = .8), 190-194 bmin(-1) = 35 (SD = .9), 195-199 b min(-1) = 38 (SD = .8), 200-204 b min(-1) = 40 ml kg1 x min(-1) (SD = .8), and > or = 205 bmin(-1) = 42 ml kg1 x min(-1) (SD = .7) but not RERpeak. In studies where evidence of a VO2 plateau was examined, peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) did not differ between plateau and no-plateau groups. Although our results suggest the association between lower VO2peak and lower peak heart rate is a true cardiovascular limit to aerobic energy production, we cannot rule out participant effort.

  2. .VO2max is not altered by self-pacing during incremental exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidnok, Weerapong; Dimenna, Fred J; Bailey, Stephen J; Burnley, Mark; Wilkerson, Daryl P; Vanhatalo, Anni; Jones, Andrew M

    2013-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that incremental cycling to exhaustion that is paced using clamps of the rating of perceived exertion (RPE) elicits higher .VO2max values compared to a conventional ramp incremental protocol when test duration is matched. Seven males completed three incremental tests to exhaustion to measure .VO2max. The incremental protocols were of similar duration and included: a ramp test at 30 W min(-1) with constant cadence (RAMP1); a ramp test at 30 W min(-1) with cadence free to fluctuate according to subject preference (RAMP2); and a self-paced incremental test in which the power output was selected by the subject according to prescribed increments in RPE (SPT). The subjects also completed a .VO2max 'verification' test at a fixed high-intensity power output and a 3-min all-out test. No difference was found for .VO2max between the incremental protocols (RAMP1 = 4.33 ± 0.60 L min(-1); RAMP2 = 4.31 ± 0.62 L min(-1); SPT = 4.36 ± 0.59 L min(-1); P > 0.05) nor between the incremental protocols and the peak.VO2max measured during the 3-min all-out test (4.33 ± 0.68 L min(-1)) or the .VO2max measured in the verification test (4.32 ± 0.69 L min(-1)). The integrated electromyogram, blood lactate concentration, heart rate and minute ventilation at exhaustion were not different (P > 0.05) between the incremental protocols. In conclusion, when test duration is matched, SPT does not elicit a higher .VO2max compared to conventional incremental protocols. The striking similarity of .VO2max measured across an array of exercise protocols indicates that there are physiological limits to the attainment of .VO2max that cannot be exceeded by self-pacing.

  3. Effect of energy drink dose on exercise capacity, heart rate recovery and heart rate variability after high-intensity exercise

    OpenAIRE

    An, Sang Min; Park, Jong Suk; Kim, Sang Ho

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of exercise capacity, heart rate recovery and heart rate variability after high-intensity exercise on caffeine concentration of energy drink. [Methods] The volunteers for this study were 15 male university student. 15 subjects were taken basic physical examinations such as height, weight and BMI before the experiment. Primary tests were examined of VO2max per weight of each subjects by graded exercise test using Bruce proto...

  4. Patterns of Senescence in Human Cardiovascular Fitness: VO2max in Subsistence and Industrialized Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisor, Anne C.; Gurven, Michael; Blackwell, Aaron D.; Kaplan, Hillard; Yetish, Gandhi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study explores whether cardiovascular fitness levels and senescent decline are similar in the Tsimane of Bolivia and Canadians, as well as other subsistence and industrialized populations. Among Tsimane, we examine whether morbidity predicts lower levels and faster decline of cardiovascular fitness, or whether their lifestyle (e.g., high physical activity) promotes high levels and slow decline. Alternatively, high activity levels and morbidity might counterbalance such that Tsimane fitness levels and decline are similar to those in industrialized populations. Methods Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) was estimated using a step test heart rate method for 701 participants. We compared these estimates to the Canadian Health Measures Survey and previous studies in industrialized and subsistence populations. We evaluated whether health indicators and proxies for market integration were associated with VO2max levels and rate of decline for the Tsimane. Results The Tsimane have significantly higher levels of VO2max and slower rates of decline than Canadians; initial evidence suggests differences in VO2max levels between other subsistence and industrialized populations. Low hemoglobin predicts low VO2max for Tsimane women while helminth infection predicts high VO2max for Tsimane men, though results might be specific to the VO2max scaling parameter used. No variables tested interact with age to moderate decline. Conclusions The Tsimane demonstrate higher levels of cardiovascular fitness than industrialized populations, but levels similar to other subsistence populations. The high VO2max of Tsimane is consistent with their high physical activity and few indicators of cardiovascular disease, measured in previous studies. PMID:24022886

  5. Emperor penguin oxygen consumption, heart rate and plasma lactate levels during graded swimming exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooyman, G L; Ponganis, P J

    1994-10-01

    Oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rate and blood chemistry were measured in four emperor penguins, Aptenodytes forsteri (Gray), during graded swimming exercise. The maximum VO2 obtained, 52 ml O2 kg-1 min-1, was 7.8 times the measured resting VO2 of 6.7 ml O2 kg-1 min-1 and 9.1 times the predicted resting VO2. As the swimming effort rose, a linear increase in surface and submerged heart rates (fH) occurred. The highest average maximum surface and submersion heart rates of any bird were 213 and 210 beats min-1, respectively. No increase in plasma lactate concentrations occurred until VO2 was greater than 25 ml O2 kg-1 min-1. At the highest VO2 values measured, plasma lactate concentration reached 9.4 mmol l-1. In comparison with other animals of approximately the same mass, the aerobic capacity of the emperor penguin is less than those of the emu and dog but about the same as those of the seal, sea lion and domestic goat. For aquatic animals, a low aerobic capacity seems to be consistent with the needs of parsimonious oxygen utilization while breath-holding.

  6. Predictors of VO2Peak in children age 6- to 7-years-old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Magnus; Hermansen, Bianca; Bugge, Anna

    2011-01-01

    . Total body fat and total fat free mass were estimated from skinfold measurements. Regression analyses indicated that significant predictors for VO2PEAK per kilogram body mass were total body fat, maximal heart rate, sex, and age. Physical activity explained an additional 4-7%. Further analyses showed...

  7. Heart rate index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, C; Pedersen, F H; Svendsen, J H

    1992-01-01

    The present study compares the variables assessed by standard exercise test with the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) measured by multigated radionuclide angiocardiography (MUGA) in 77 patients early after myocardial infarction. The exercise test and MUGA were performed within two weeks...... after the myocardial infarction. A significant correlation (Spearman's correlation coefficient rs, p less than 0.05) was found between LVEF at rest and the following variables assessed at exercise test: 1) the heart rate at rest, 2) rise in heart rate, 3) ratio between maximal heart rate and heart rate...... at rest, 4) rise in systolic blood pressure, 5) rate pressure product at rest, 6) rise in rate pressure product, 7) ratio (rHR) between maximal rate pressure product and rate pressure product at rest, 8) total exercise time. The heart rate was corrected for effects caused by age (heart index (HR...

  8. Cross-country skiing and postexercise heart-rate recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourot, Laurent; Fabre, Nicolas; Andersson, Erik; Willis, Sarah; Buchheit, Martin; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2015-01-01

    Postexercise heart-rate (HR) recovery (HRR) indices have been associated with running and cycling endurance-exercise performance. The current study was designed (1) to test whether such a relationship also exists in the case of cross-country skiing (XCS) and (2) to determine whether the magnitude of any such relationship is related to the intensity of exercise before obtaining HRR indices. Ten elite male cross-country skiers (mean ± SD; 28.2 ± 5.4 y, 181 ± 8 cm, 77.9 ± 9.4 kg, 69.5 ± 4.3 mL · min-1 · kg-1 maximal oxygen uptake [VO2max]) performed 2 sessions of roller-skiing on a treadmill: a 2 × 3-km time trial and the same 6-km at an imposed submaximal speed followed by a final 800-m time trial. VO2 and HR were monitored continuously, while HRR and blood lactate (BLa) were assessed during 2 min immediately after each 6-km and the 800-m time trial. The 6-km time-trial time was largely negatively correlated with VO2max and BLa. On the contrary, there was no clear correlation between the 800-m time-trial time and VO2, HR, or BLa. In addition, in no case was any clear correlation between any of the HRR indices and performance time or VO2max observed. These findings confirm that XCS performance is largely correlated with VO2max and the ability to tolerate high levels of BLa; however, postexercise HRR showed no clear association with performance. The homogeneity of the group of athletes involved and the contribution of the arms and upper body to the exercise preceding determination of HRR may explain this absence of a relationship.

  9. The oxygen uptake-heart rate relationship in trained female wheelchair athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria Louise; Tolfrey, Keith

    2004-05-01

    We examined the relationship between the percentage of peak heart rate (HR) and the percentage of peak oxygen uptake VO2 during steady-rate incremental wheelchair propulsion in 10 trained female wheelchair athletes (WAs) to determine the appropriateness of using American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) target HRs for training prescription. Oxygen uptake was calculated during each submaximal exercise stage, and HR was monitored continuously. Peak VO2 was determined with the use of a separate protocol. Linear regression equations of percentage of peak HR versus percentage of peak VO2 were measured for each participant. Subsequently, we calculated the percentage of peak HR values corresponding with 40%, 60%, 80%, and 85% peak VO2. The linear regression formula (derived as the group mean of the slope and intercept terms determined from each individual participant) was % peak HR = 0.652 x % peak VO2 + 35.2 (standard error of the estimate [SEE] 3.41). The group mean of the individual correlation coefficients for the VO2-HR relationship was r = 0.973. The percentage peaks of HRs for the WAs were slightly, though not significantly, greater than those suggested by the ACSM across the exercise intensity continuum. These findings suggest that training programs prescribed on the basis of ACSM target HR guidelines need not be altered for trained female WAs with lesions of T6 and below. Notably, the discrepancy between the WA values and the population norm (ACSM) decreased from 6% at 40% peak VO2 (i.e., 61% vs. 55%) to <1% at 85% peak VO2 (i.e., 90.6% vs. 90.0%). This discrepancy indicates a tendency for the use of percentage of HR peak at the lower exercise intensities to slightly underestimate the relative exercise intensity (i.e., percentage of peak VO2) in the WA population.

  10. A prospective population study of resting heart rate and peak oxygen uptake (the HUNT Study, Norway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javaid Nauman

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We assessed the prospective association of resting heart rate (RHR at baseline with peak oxygen uptake (VO(2peak 23 years later, and evaluated whether physical activity (PA could modify this association. BACKGROUND: Both RHR and VO(2peak are strong and independent predictors of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the association of RHR with VO(2peak and modifying effect of PA have not been prospectively assessed in population studies. METHODS: In 807 men and 810 women free from cardiovascular disease both at baseline (1984-86 and follow-up 23 years later, RHR was recorded at both occasions, and VO(2peak was measured by ergospirometry at follow-up. We used Generalized Linear Models to assess the association of baseline RHR with VO(2peak, and to study combined effects of RHR and self-reported PA on later VO(2peak. RESULTS: There was an inverse association of RHR at baseline with VO(2peak (p<0.01. Men and women with baseline RHR greater than 80 bpm had 4.6 mL.kg(-1.min(-1 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8 to 6.3 and 1.4 mL.kg(-1.min(-1 (95% CI, -0.4 to 3.1 lower VO(2peak at follow-up compared with men and women with RHR below 60 bpm at baseline. We found a linear association of change in RHR with VO(2peak (p=0.03, suggesting that a decrease in RHR over time is likely to be beneficial for cardiovascular fitness. Participants with low RHR and high PA at baseline had higher VO(2peak than inactive people with relatively high RHR. However, among participants with relatively high RHR and high PA at baseline, VO(2peak was similar to inactive people with relatively low RHR. CONCLUSION: RHR is an important predictor of VO(2peak, and serial assessments of RHR may provide useful and inexpensive information on cardiovascular fitness. The results suggest that high levels of PA may compensate for the lower VO(2peak associated with a high RHR.

  11. Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SA) node --- the heart's natural pacemaker - sends out electrical signals faster than usual. The heart rate is fast, but the heart beats properly. Causes of sinus tachycardia A rapid heartbeat may be your body's response to common conditions such as: Fever Anxiety ...

  12. Development of a branching submaximal treadmill test for predicting VO2max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, A M; Serapiglia, L; Funk, D; Adams, K J; Durham, M; Berning, J M

    2001-08-01

    This study determined the reliability and validity of a branching treadmill protocol in predicting VO2max. Thirty-seven, apparently healthy individuals (19 women and 18 men); volunteered to participate. On 2 separate testing days, each subject underwent maximal exercise testing using the protocol developed. Stepwise regression analysis indicated that the percentage of age-predicted maximum heart rate (APMHR) achieved at stage 3, speed and grade at stage 3, and APMHR accounted for 89% of the variance in VO2max. The 4 predictor variables were statistically significant (p VO2max for their clients outside the laboratory environment. Furthermore, our results indicate that using the proposed regression model is reliable and has received preliminary construct validity support.

  13. Skinfold thickness is related to cardiovascular autonomic control as assessed by heart rate variability and heart rate recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esco, Michael R; Williford, Henry N; Olson, Michele S

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if heart rate recovery (HRR) and heart rate variability (HRV) are related to maximal aerobic fitness and selected body composition measurements. Fifty men (age = 21.9 ± 3.0 years, height = 180.8 ± 7.2 cm, weight = 80.4 ± 9.1 kg, volunteered to participate in this study. For each subject, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and the sum of skinfolds across the chest, abdomen, and thigh regions (SUMSF) were recorded. Heart rate variability (HRV) was assessed during a 5-minute period while the subjects rested in a supine position. The following frequency domain parameters of HRV were recorded: normalized high-frequency power (HFnu), and low-frequency to high-frequency power ratio (LF:HF). To determine maximal aerobic fitness (i.e., VO2max), each subject performed a maximal graded exercise test on a treadmill. Heart rate recovery was recorded 1 (HRR1) and 2 (HRR2) minutes during a cool-down period. Mean VO2max and BMI for all the subjects were 49.5 ± 7.5 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) and 24.7 ± 2.2 kg·m(-2), respectively. Although VO2max, WC, and SUMSF was each significantly correlated to HRR and HRV, only SUMSF had a significant independent correlation to HRR1, HRR2, HFnu, LF:HF (p < 0.01). The results of the regression procedure showed that SUMSF accounted for the greatest variance in HRR1, HRR2, HFnu, and LF:HF (p < 0.01). The results of this study suggest that cardiovascular autonomic modulation is significantly related to maximal aerobic fitness and body composition. However, SUMSF appears to have the strongest independent relationship with HRR and HRV, compared to other body composition parameters and VO2max.

  14. Effect of energy drink dose on exercise capacity, heart rate recovery and heart rate variability after high-intensity exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Sang Min; Park, Jong Suk; Kim, Sang Ho

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of exercise capacity, heart rate recovery and heart rate variability after high-intensity exercise on caffeine concentration of energy drink. The volunteers for this study were 15 male university student. 15 subjects were taken basic physical examinations such as height, weight and BMI before the experiment. Primary tests were examined of VO2max per weight of each subjects by graded exercise test using Bruce protocol. Each of five subject was divided 3 groups (CON, ECGⅠ, ECGⅡ) by matched method based on weight and VO2max per weight what gained of primary test for minimize the differences of exercise capacity and ingestion of each groups. For the secondary tests, the groups of subjects were taken their materials before and after exercise as a blind test. After the ingestion, subjects were experimented on exercise test of VO2max 80% by treadmill until the all-out. Heart rate was measured by 1minute interval, and respiratory variables were analyzed VO2, VE, VT, RR and so on by automatic respiratory analyzer. And exercise exhaustion time was determined by stopwatch. Moreover, HRV was measured after exercise and recovery 3 min. Among the intake groups, ECGⅡ was showed the longest of exercise exhaustion time more than CON group (p = .05). Result of heart rate during exercise according to intake groups, there was significant differences of each time (p .05). Result of RPE during exercise according to intake groups, there was significant differences of each time (p .05). In conclusion, EDGⅡ showed the significant increase of exercise exhaustion time more than CON group (p=.05) and not significant differences in HR, RPE, RER, HRV, HRR, blood pressure (p > .05). Therefore, 2.5 mg/kg(-1) ingestion of energy drink might be positive effect to increase exercise performance capacity without side-effect in cardiovascular disease.

  15. Fish oil reduces heart rate and oxygen consumption during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peoples, Gregory E; McLennan, Peter L; Howe, Peter R C; Groeller, Herbert

    2008-12-01

    Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are readily incorporated into heart and skeletal muscle membranes where, in the heart, animal studies show they reduce O2 consumption. To test the hypothesis that omega-3 PUFAs alter O2 efficiency in humans, the effects of fish oil (FO) supplementation on O2 consumption during exercise were evaluated. Sixteen well-trained men (cyclists), randomly assigned to receive 8 x 1 g capsules per day of olive oil (control) or FO for 8 weeks in a double-blind, parallel design, completed the study (control: n = 7, age 27.1 +/- 2.7 years; FO: n = 9, age 23.2 +/- 1.2 years). Subjects used an electronically braked cycle ergometer to complete peak O2 consumption tests (VO 2peak) and sustained submaximal exercise tests at 55% of peak workload (from the VO 2peak test) before and after supplementation. Whole-body O2 consumption and indirect measurements of myocardial O2 consumption [heart rate and rate pressure product (RPP)] were assessed. FO supplementation increased omega-3 PUFA content of erythrocyte cell membranes. There were no differences in VO 2peak (mL kg(-1) min(-1)) (control: pre 66.8 +/- 2.4, post 67.2 +/- 2.3; FO: pre 68.3 +/- 1.4, post 67.2 +/- 1.2) or peak workload after supplementation. The FO supplementation lowered heart rate (including peak heart rate) during incremental workloads to exhaustion (P exercise heart rate, whole-body O2 consumption, and RPP (P heart and skeletal muscle to reduce both whole-body and myocardial O2 demand during exercise, without a decrement in performance.

  16. Development of a rowing-specific VO2max field test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntsman, Heather D; DiPietro, Loretta; Drury, Daniel G; Miller, Todd A

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an aerobic capacity test for rowers using minimal equipment that could be used in the field. Thirty rowers (15 men and 15 women) between the ages of 18 and 26 years were recruited on a volunteer basis from the District of Columbia metro area. The testing protocol consisted of a maximum of 7 2-minute stages on a rowing ergometer, separated by 30-second breaks where lactic acid concentrations were analyzed. Starting intensity for men was 200 W, although women started at 150 W, and each stage increased by 50 W. Expired gasses were collected during the test, and athletes were asked to row until maximal volition so that the directly measured VO2max could be compared to predicted values. Peak heart rates from each completed stage were plotted, and regression equations were calculated to predict VO2max. Separate regression equations were calculated for men and women. The predicted VO2max values were approximately 23 and 25% lower than what was actually achieved for men and women, respectively. Heart rate was a stronger correlate of VO2max in men compared with in women. Among men, we observed a moderate and statistically significant correlation (r = 0.55; p = 0.05), whereas among women, no such agreement was observed (r = -0.05; p > 0.85). The principle finding of this study was that the test was adequate in predicting VO2max in men but was inadequate in its prediction in women. With slight modifications to the testing protocol, stronger correlations and a more accurate prediction of VO2max is expected in men.

  17. Aerobic Fitness Levels and Validation of a Non-Exercise VO2max Prediction Equation for HIV-Infected Patients on HAART

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Katherine; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Chow, Dominic; Cornelius, Elizabeth; Romine, Rebecca K.; Lindsey, Rachel A.; Stickley, Christopher D.; Kimura, Iris F.; Hetzler, Ronald K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-exercise (N-EX) questionnaires have been developed to determine maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) in healthy populations. There are limited reliable and validated N-EX questionnaires for the HIV+ population that provide estimates of habitual physical activity and not VO2max. Objectives To determine how well regression equations developed previously on healthy populations, including N-EX prediction equations for VO2max and age-predicted maximal heart rates (APMHR), worked on an HIV+ population; and to develop a specific N-EX prediction equation for VO2max and APMHR for HIV+ individuals. Methods Sixty-six HIV+ participants on stable HAART completed 4 N-EX questionnaires and performed a maximal graded exercise test. Results Sixty males and 6 females were included; mean (SD) age was 49.2 (8.2) years; CD4 count was 516.0 ± 253.0 cells·mn−3; and 92% had undetectable HIV PCR. Mean VO2max was 29.2 ± 7.6 (range, 14.4–49.4) mL·kg−1·min−1. Despite positive correlations with VO2max, previously published N-EX VO2max equations produced results significantly different than actual VO2 scores (P VO2max values, R = 0.71, when compared to achieved VO2max (P = .53). Conclusion HIV+ individuals tend to be sedentary and unfit, putting them at increased risk for the development of chronic diseases associated with a sedentary lifestyle. Based on the level of error associated with utilizing APMHR and N-EX VO2max equations with HIV+ individuals, neither should be used in this population for exercise prescription. PMID:24710921

  18. Heart rate recovery and aerobic endurance capacity in cancer survivors: interdependence and exercise-induced improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederer, Daniel; Vogt, Lutz; Gonzalez-Rivera, Javier; Schmidt, Katharina; Banzer, Winfried

    2015-12-01

    Whilst evidence supports beneficial effects of exercise on heart rate variability in cancer patients, its impact on heart rate recovery (HRR) and possible associations of exercise capacity and HRR have not yet been investigated. We aimed to evaluate the effects of an exercise intervention on HRR in relation to the baseline aerobic capacity. Cancer patients (n = 309, 178 females) performed a cardiopulmonary exercise test at baseline and at a 4-month interval follow-up with home-based and supervised exercise programs in-between. VO2 and heart rate were assessed during and HRR at 60 and 120 s after test termination. Based on a median split of the VO2 peak baseline values, participants were dichotomized into two groups: below median (47 female; 57.5 ± 10 years) and above median (48 female; 54.3 ± 12 years). In the baseline sample (n = 309), VO2 peak correlated significantly with HRR60 (r = .327, p  .05). These findings point toward a positive linear relationship between aerobic capacity and vagal reactivation in cancer patients. Patients with initial VO2 peak values below median showed improved VO2 peak, HRR60 and HRR120 following the moderate aerobic exercise intervention and differences to patients above median in all outcomes compared.

  19. Heart Rate Monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Under a NASA grant, Dr. Robert M. Davis and Dr. William M. Portnoy came up with a new type of electrocardiographic electrode that would enable long term use on astronauts. Their invention was an insulated capacitive electrode constructed of a thin dielectric film. NASA subsequently licensed the electrode technology to Richard Charnitski, inventor of the VersaClimber, who founded Heart Rate, Inc., to further develop and manufacture personal heart monitors and to produce exercise machines using the technology for the physical fitness, medical and home markets. Same technology is on both the Home and Institutional Model VersaClimbers. On the Home Model an infrared heart beat transmitter is worn under exercise clothing. Transmitted heart rate is used to control the work intensity on the VersaClimber using the heart rate as the speedometer of the exercise. This offers advantages to a full range of users from the cardiac rehab patient to the high level physical conditioning of elite athletes. The company manufactures and markets five models of the 1*2*3 HEART RATE monitors that are used wherever people exercise to accurately monitor their heart rate. Company is developing a talking heart rate monitor that works with portable headset radios. A version of the heart beat transmitter will be available to the manufacturers of other aerobic exercise machines.

  20. New Methods for Processing and Quantifying VO2 Kinetics to Steady State: VO2 Onset Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig R. McNulty

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Current methods of oxygen uptake (VO2 kinetics data handling may be too simplistic for the complex physiology involved in the underlying physiological processes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify the VO2 kinetics to steady state across the full range of sub-ventilatory threshold work rates, with a particular focus on the VO2 onset kinetics. Ten healthy, moderately trained males participated in five bouts of cycling. Each bout involved 10 min at a percentage of the subject's ventilation threshold (30, 45, 60, 75, 90% from unloaded cycling. The VO2 kinetics was quantified using the conventional mono-exponential time constant (tau, τ, as well as the new methods for VO2 onset kinetics. Compared to linear modeling, non-linear modeling caused a deterioration of goodness of fit (main effect, p < 0.001 across all exercise intensities. Remainder kinetics were also improved using a modified application of the mono-exponential model (main effect, p < 0.001. Interestingly, the slope from the linear regression of the onset kinetics data is similar across all subjects and absolute exercise intensities, and thereby independent of subject fitness and τ. This could indicate that there are no functional limitations between subjects during this onset phase, with limitations occurring for the latter transition to steady state. Finally, the continuing use of mono-exponential modeling could mask important underlying physiology of more instantaneous VO2 responses to steady state. Consequently, further research should be conducted on this new approach to VO2 onset kinetics.

  1. Effects of high-intensity interval versus continuous exercise training on post-exercise heart rate recovery in coronary heart-disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villelabeitia-Jaureguizar, Koldobika; Vicente-Campos, Davinia; Senen, Alejandro Berenguel; Jiménez, Verónica Hernández; Garrido-Lestache, María Elvira Barrios; Chicharro, Jose López

    2017-10-01

    Heart rate recovery (HRR) has been considered a prognostic and mortality indicator in both healthy and coronary patients. Physical exercise prescription has shown improvements in VO2peak and HRR, but most of the studies have been carried out applying continuous training at a moderate intensity, being very limited the use of protocols of high intensity interval training in coronary patients. We aimed to compare the effects of a moderate continuous training (MCT) versus a high intensity interval training (HIIT) programme on VO2peak and HRR. Seventy three coronary patients were assigned to either HIIT or MCT groups for 8weeks. Incremental exercise tests in a cycloergometer were performed to obtain VO2peak data and heart rate was monitored during and after the exercise test to obtain heart rate recovery data. Both exercise programmes significantly increase VO2peak with a higher increase in the HIIT group (HIIT: 4.5±4.46ml/kg/min vs MCT: 2.46±3.57ml/kg/min; p=0.039). High intensity interval training resulted in a significantly increase in HRR at the first and second minute of the recovery phase (15,44±7,04 vs 21,22±6,62, pheart disease of low risk resulted in an improvement in VO2peak, and also improvements in post-exercise heart-rate recovery, compared with continuous training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Oxygen Uptake and Heart Rate Kinetics after Different Types of Resistance Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna, Jeferson M.; Werneck, Francisco Z.; Coelho, Emerson F.; Damasceno, Vinicius O.; Reis, Victor M.

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen uptake (VO2) and heart rate (HR) kinetics after exercise are important indicators of fitness and cardiovascular health. However, these variables have been little investigated in resistance exercise (RE). The current study compared post-exercise kinetics of VO2 and the HR among different types of REs. The study included 14 males (age: 26.5±5.4 years, body mass: 80.1±11.4 kg, body height: 1.77±0.07 m, fat content: 11.3±4.6%) with RE experience. Dynamic muscle strength was measured using one repetition maximum (1RM) with regard to the half-squat, bench press, pull-down, and triceps pushdown exercises. The participants performed a maximum number of repetitions at 80% of 1RM for each exercise, separated by a recovery period of 60 minutes. VO2 was measured using ergospirometry. VO2 and HR kinetics were assessed using the time constant of the recovery curves, and excess oxygen consumption (EPOC) was calculated afterward. Significant differences were not observed across the exercises with regard to VO2 kinetics. However, the half-squat exercise elicited a greater EPOC than the bench press and triceps pushdown exercises (pEPOC, but not VO2 kinetics. PMID:25414756

  3. Oxygen uptake and heart rate kinetics after different types of resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna, Jeferson M; Werneck, Francisco Z; Coelho, Emerson F; Damasceno, Vinicius O; Reis, Victor M

    2014-09-29

    Oxygen uptake (VO2) and heart rate (HR) kinetics after exercise are important indicators of fitness and cardiovascular health. However, these variables have been little investigated in resistance exercise (RE). The current study compared post-exercise kinetics of VO2 and the HR among different types of REs. The study included 14 males (age: 26.5±5.4 years, body mass: 80.1±11.4 kg, body height: 1.77±0.07 m, fat content: 11.3±4.6%) with RE experience. Dynamic muscle strength was measured using one repetition maximum (1RM) with regard to the half-squat, bench press, pull-down, and triceps pushdown exercises. The participants performed a maximum number of repetitions at 80% of 1RM for each exercise, separated by a recovery period of 60 minutes. VO2 was measured using ergospirometry. VO2 and HR kinetics were assessed using the time constant of the recovery curves, and excess oxygen consumption (EPOC) was calculated afterward. Significant differences were not observed across the exercises with regard to VO2 kinetics. However, the half-squat exercise elicited a greater EPOC than the bench press and triceps pushdown exercises (pEPOC, but not VO2 kinetics.

  4. Oxygen consumption and heart rate responses during and after constant load and alternating intensity exercise at 105% of lactate threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanoudaki, S; Karatzanos, E; Baltopoulos, P; Maridaki, M

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was a secondary-analysis of previously published data, in order to compare the acute VO2 responses, the time spent at high percentage of VO2max and total VO2 consumed (TVO2) between constant and alternating intensity exercise of the same intensity and duration. This study also aimed to examine VO2 and heart rate (HR) responses one hour after both exercises. Ten recreationally trained men (24.7±4.7 years) completed the following two exercise tests lasting an hour each and having the same mean intensity at 105% of lactate threshold (70% VO2max): 1) constant load cycling (CON), and 2) alternating intensity exercise (ALT), during which 40 seconds of light exercise (47% VO2max) were alternated with 20 seconds of supramaximal intensity at 120% of VO2max. TVO2 (69.89±7.02 vs. 58.22±9.13 mL/kg/min, P=0.03) and HR (142±16, 128±12, P=0.04) was higher in CON exercise compared to ALT. All participants reached 70% and 80% of VO2max irrespective of the exercise protocol. In ALT exercise the time spent at 90% was higher compared to CON exercise (70.81±21.37 vs. 36.88±11.88 seconds). Also, TVO2 recovery values after ALT exercise was higher compared to CON (11.1 ±2.93 vs. 9.94±3.54 mL/kg/min). ALT exercise allowed participants to spend longer time at 90% of VO2max, even if TVO2 in CON exercise was higher, suggesting that in ALT exercise greater aerobic stress (as based on exercise intensity) is imposed on the athletes. While VO2 recovery values were higher in ALT compared to CON, indicating different substrate utilization during and after exercise.

  5. Heart rate turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate turbulence (HRT) is a baroreflex-mediated biphasic reaction of heart rate in response to premature ventricular beats. Heart rate turbulence is quantified by: turbulence onset (TO) reflecting the initial acceleration of heart rate following premature beat and turbulence slope (TS) describing subsequent deceleration of heart rate. Abnormal HRT identifies patients with autonomic dysfunction or impaired baroreflex sensitivity due to variety of disorders, but also may reflect changes in autonomic nervous system induced by different therapeutic modalities such as drugs, revascularization, or cardiac resynchronization therapy. More importantly, impaired HRT has been shown to identify patients at high risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death, particularly in postinfarction and congestive heart failure patients. It should be emphasized that abnormal HRT has a well-established role in stratification of postinfarction and heart failure patients with relatively preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The ongoing clinical trials will document whether HRT can be used to guide implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators in this subset of patients, not covered yet by ICD guidelines. This review focuses on the current state-of-the-art knowledge regarding clinical significance of HRT in detection of autonomic dysfunction and regarding the prognostic significance of this parameter in predicting all-cause mortality and sudden death. © 2013.

  6. Target Heart Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... morning after you’ve had a good night’s sleep and before you get out of bed. According to the National Institute of Health, the average resting heart rate: for children 10 years and older, and adults ( ...

  7. Prediction of heart rate and oxygen uptake during incremental and maximal exercise in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbarn, M S; Blackie, S P; McElvaney, N G; Wiggs, B R; Paré, P D; Pardy, R L

    1994-05-01

    Measurement of heart rate and oxygen uptake during incremental exercise and at maximal exercise is useful in evaluating mechanisms responsible for exercise limitation in patients with cardiopulmonary disease. Presently used prediction equations are based on relatively small groups of subjects in whom there was an uneven distribution of subjects with regard to age and sex or based on equations that were from extrapolated data. Our prediction equations are based on data from 231 men and women equally divided within decades between 20 and 80 years. Patients exercised to a symptom-limited maximum on a cycle ergometer while measurements of heart rate and oxygen uptake were recorded. The relationship between heart rate and oxygen uptake throughout exercise (HR:VO2) was determined using a statistical technique that included each data point from each subject. The HR:VO2 throughout incremental exercise was best described by separate equations for women younger than 50 years and older than 50 years and for men younger than 70 years and older than 70 years. Prediction equations for maximal heart rate (HRmax) and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) were developed by linear regression and were selected from all possible combinations of parameters. The HRmax was most accurately predicted by age alone for both sexes. Unlike the HR:VO2 relationship, the slope of the line relating heart rate to age was not different for the older women compared with the younger women so that a single equation was derived to predict HRmax. A single equation for the men was also sufficient since the slope of heart rate to age was the same for all ages. To most accurately predict VO2max, a separate equation was required for both the women and men that included age, height, and weight.

  8. VO2max estimation from a submaximal 1-mile track jog for fit college-age individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, J D; Vehrs, P R; Allsen, P E; Fellingham, G W; Fisher, A G

    1993-03-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to develop a submaximal field test for the estimation of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) using a 1-mile track jog. A second purpose was to determine the accuracy of the 1.5-mile run in estimating VO2max for both male and female subjects. VO2max was measured in 149 relatively fit college students (males = 88, females = 61) 18-29 yr using a treadmill protocol (mean +/- SD; VO2max = 47.7 +/- 6.3 ml.kg-1 x min-1). Multiple regression analysis (N = 54) to estimate VO2max from the submaximal, steady-state 1-mile track jog yielded the following validation (V) model (r(adi) = 0.87, SEE = 3.0 ml.kg-1 x min-1): VO2max = 100.5 + 8.344* GENDER (0 = female; 1 = male) - 0.1636* BODY MASS (kg) - 1.438* JOG TIME (min.mile-1) - 0.1928* HEART RATE (bpm). To help ensure that a submaximal level of exertion was realized for the 1-mile track jog, elapsed jog time was restricted to > or = 8.0 min for males and > or = 9.0 min for females and exercise HR to < or = 180 bpm. Cross-validation (CV) of the 1-mile track jog comparing observed and estimated VO2max (N = 52) resulted in radj = 0.84, SEE = 3.1 ml.kg-1 x min-1. Multiple regression analysis (N = 50) to estimate VO2max from the 1.5-mile run (V:N = 49, radj = 0.90, SEE = 2.8 ml.kg-1 x min-1; CV: N = 47, radj = 0.82, SEE = 3.9 ml.kg-1 x min-1), used elapsed run time, body mass, and gender as independent variables.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Rates of oxygen uptake increase independently of changes in heart rate in late stages of development and at hatching in the green iguana, Iguana iguana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Marina R; Abe, Augusto S; Crossley, Dane A; Taylor, Edwin W

    2017-03-01

    Oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rate (fH), heart mass (Mh) and body mass (Mb) were measured during embryonic incubation and in hatchlings of green iguana (Iguana iguana). Mean fH and VO2 were unvarying in early stage embryos. VO2 increased exponentially during the later stages of embryonic development, doubling by the end of incubation, while fH was constant, resulting in a 2.7-fold increase in oxygen pulse. Compared to late stage embryos, the mean inactive level of VO2 in hatchlings was 1.7 fold higher, while fH was reduced by half resulting in a further 3.6 fold increase in oxygen pulse. There was an overall negative correlation between mean fH and VO2 when data from hatchlings was included. Thus, predicting metabolic rate as VO2 from measurements of fH is not possible in embryonic reptiles. Convective transport of oxygen to supply metabolism during embryonic incubation was more reliably indicated as an index of cardiac output (COi) derived from the product of fH and Mh. However, a thorough analysis of factors determining rates of oxygen supply during development and eclosion in reptiles will require cannulation of blood vessels that proved impossible in the present study, to determine oxygen carrying capacity by the blood and arteriovenous oxygen content difference (A-V diff), plus patterns of blood flow. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Relationship between reduced lower abdominal blood flows and heart rate in recovery following cycling exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, T; Iwane, H; Katsumura, T; Murase, N; Higuchi, H; Sakamoto, A; Hamaoka, T; Shimomitsu, T

    2012-03-01

    To examine the blood flow (BF) response in the lower abdomen (LAB) in recovery following upright cycling exercise at three levels of relative maximum pulmonary oxygen consumption (VO(2max)) and the relationship of BF(LAB) to heart rate (HR) and target intensity. For 11 healthy subjects, BF (Doppler ultrasound) in the upper abdominal aorta (Ao) above the coeliac trunk and in the right femoral artery (RFA) was measured repeatedly for 720 s after the end of cycling exercises at target intensities of 30%, 50% and 85% VO(2max), respectively. Blood flow in the lower abdomen (BF(LAB)) can be measured by subtracting bilateral BF(FAs) (≈twofolds of BF(RFA)) from BF(Ao). Change in BF(LAB) (or BF(LAB) volume) at any point was evaluated by difference between change in BF(Ao) and in BF(FAs). Heart rate and blood pressure were also measured. At 85% VO(2max), significant reduction in BF(LAB) by approx. 89% was shown at 90 s and remained until 360 s. At 50% VO(2max), reduction in BF(LAB) by approx. 33% was found at 90 s although it returned to pre-exercise value at 120 s. On the contrary at 30% VO(2max), BF(LAB) showed a light increase (exercise intensities. © 2011 The Authors. Acta Physiologica © 2011 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  11. Effect of high-intensity interval training on cardiovascular function, VO2max, and muscular force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astorino, Todd A; Allen, Ryan P; Roberson, Daniel W; Jurancich, Matt

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of short-term high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on cardiovascular function, cardiorespiratory fitness, and muscular force. Active, young (age and body fat = 25.3 ± 4.5 years and 14.3 ± 6.4%) men and women (N = 20) of a similar age, physical activity, and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) completed 6 sessions of HIIT consisting of repeated Wingate tests over a 2- to 3-week period. Subjects completed 4 Wingate tests on days 1 and 2, 5 on days 3 and 4, and 6 on days 5 and 6. A control group of 9 men and women (age and body fat = 22.8 ± 2.8 years and 15.2 ± 6.9%) completed all testing but did not perform HIIT. Changes in resting blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR), VO2max, body composition, oxygen (O2) pulse, peak, mean, and minimum power output, fatigue index, and voluntary force production of the knee flexors and extensors were examined pretraining and posttraining. Results showed significant (p VO2max, O2 pulse, and Wingate-derived power output with HIIT. The magnitude of improvement in VO2max was related to baseline VO2max (r = -0.44, p = 0.05) and fatigue index (r = 0.50, p 0.05) in resting BP, HR, or force production was revealed. Data show that HIIT significantly enhanced VO2max and O2 pulse and power output in active men and women.

  12. Factors determining the time course of VO2(max) decay during bedrest: implications for VO2(max) limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, C; Antonutto, G; Kenfack, M Azabji; Cautero, M; Lador, F; Moia, C; Tam, E; Ferretti, G

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the time course of maximal oxygen consumption VO2(max) changes during bedrests longer than 30 days, on the hypothesis that the decrease in VO2(max) tends to asymptote. On a total of 26 subjects who participated in one of three bedrest campaigns without countermeasures, lasting 14, 42 and 90 days, respectively, VO2(max) maximal cardiac output (Qmax) and maximal systemic O2 delivery (QaO2max) were measured. After all periods of HDT, VO2max, Qmax, and QaO2max were significantly lower than before. The VO2max decreased less than qmax after the two shortest bedrests, but its per cent decay was about 10% larger than that of Qmax after 90-day bedrest. The VO2max decrease after 90-day bedrest was larger than after 42- and 14-day bedrests, where it was similar. The Qmax and QaO2max declines after 90-day bedrest was equal to those after 14- and 42-day bedrest. The average daily rates of the VO2max, Qmax, and QaO2max decay during bedrest were less if the bedrest duration were longer, with the exception of that of VO2max in the longest bedrest. The asymptotic VO2max decay demonstrates the possibility that humans could keep working effectively even after an extremely long time in microgravity. Two components in the VO2max decrease were identified, which we postulate were related to cardiovascular deconditioning and to impairment of peripheral gas exchanges due to a possible muscle function deterioration.

  13. Frequency of the VO2max plateau phenomenon in world-class cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucía, A; Rabadán, M; Hoyos, J; Hernández-Capilla, M; Pérez, M; San Juan, A F; Earnest, C P; Chicharro, J L

    2006-12-01

    We aimed to determine the frequency of the VO2max plateau phenomenon in top-level male professional road cyclists (n = 38; VO2max [mean +/- SD]: 73.5 +/- 5.5 ml.kg(-1).min(-1)) and in healthy, sedentary male controls (n = 37; VO2max: 42.7 +/- 5.6 ml.kg(-1).min(-1)). All subjects performed a continuous incremental cycle-ergometer test of 1-min workloads until exhaustion. Power output was increased from a starting value of 25 W (cyclists) or 20 W (controls) at the rate of 25 W.min(-1) (cyclists) or 20 W.min(-1) (controls) until volitional exhaustion. We measured gas-exchange and heart rate (HR) throughout the test. Blood concentrations of lactate (BLa) were measured at end-exercise in both groups. We defined maximal exercise exertion as the attainment of a respiratory exchange rate (RER) >or= 1.1; HR > 95 % age-predicted maximum; and BLa > 8 mmo.l(-1). The VO2max plateau phenomenon was defined as an increase in two or more consecutive 1-min mean VO2 values of less than 1.5 ml.kg(-1).min(-1). Most cyclists met our criteria for maximal exercise effort (RER > 1.1, 100 %; 95 % predicted maximal HR [HRmax], 82 %; BLa > 8 mmol.l(-1), 84 %). However, the proportion of cyclists attaining a V.O (2max) plateau was considerably lower, i.e., 47 %. The majority of controls met the criteria for maximal exercise effort (RER > 1.1, 100 %; predicted HRmax, 68 %; BLa > 8 mmol. l(-1), 73 %), but the proportion of these subjects with a VO2max plateau was only 24 % (significantly lower proportion than in cyclists [p < 0.05]). Scientists should consider 1) if typical criteria of attainment of maximal effort are sufficiently stringent, especially in elite endurance athletes; and 2) whether those humans exhibiting the VO2max plateau phenomenon are those who perform an absolute maximum effort or there are additional distinctive features associated with this phenomenon.

  14. The relationship between heart rate and rate of oxygen consumption in Galapagos marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) at two different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Patrick J; Frappell, Peter B; Wang, Tobias; Wikelski, Martin

    2002-07-01

    To enable the use of heart rate (fH) for estimating field metabolic rate (FMR) in free-ranging Galapagos marine iguanas Amblyrhynchus cristatus, we determined the relationships between fH and mass-specific rate of oxygen consumption (sVO2) in seven iguanas before and during exercise on a treadmill and during the post-exercise period. The experiments were conducted at 27 and 35 degrees C, which are the temperatures that represent the lowest and highest average body temperatures of these animals in the field during summer. There were linear and significant relationships between fH and sVO2 at both temperatures (r(2)=0.86 and 0.91 at 27 degrees C and 36 degrees C, respectively). The slopes of the two regression lines did not differ, but there were significant differences in their intercepts. Thus, while heart rate can be used to predict FMR, the effects of temperature on the intercept of the regression must be taken into account when converting fH to sVO2. On the basis of our data, this can be achieved by applying the following formula: sVO2=0.0113fH-0.2983Q(10)((T(b)-27)/10). The increase in sVO2 with elevated body temperature results from an increase in fH, with no significant change in mass-specific oxygen pulse (sO(2) pulse; cardiac stroke volume times the difference in oxygen content between arterial and mixed venous blood). However, during exercise at both temperatures, increases in fH are insufficient to provide all of the additional O(2) required and there are also significant increases in the sO(2) pulses. This creates the situation whereby the same fH at the two temperatures can represent different values of sVO2.

  15. Early ventilation-heart rate breakpoint during incremental cycling exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravier, G; Delliaux, S; Ba, A; Delpierre, S; Guieu, R; Jammes, Y

    2014-03-01

    Previous observations having reported a transient hypoxia at the onset of incremental exercise, we investigated the existence of concomitant ventilatory and heart rate (HR) breakpoints.33 subjects executed a maximal cycling exercise with averaging for successive 5-s periods of HR, ventilation, tidal volume (VT), mean inspiratory flow rate (VT/Ti), and end-tidal partial pressures of O2 (PETO2) and CO2. In 10 subjects, the transcutaneous partial pressure of O2 (PtcO2) was recorded and the venous blood lactic acid (LA) concentration measured.At the beginning of exercise, PETO2 decreased, reaching a nadir, then progressively increased until the exercise ended. PtcO2 varied in parallel. Whether or not a 0-W cycling period preceded the incremental exercise, the rate of changes in VE, VT, VT/Ti and HR significantly increased when the nadir PO2 was reached. The ventilatory/ HR breakpoint was measured at 33±4% of VO2max, whereas the ventilatory threshold (VTh) was detected at 67±4% of VO2max and LA began to increase at 45 to 50% of VO2max.During incremental cycling exercise, we identified the existence of HR and ventilatory breakpoints in advance of both lactate and ventilatory thresholds which coincided with modest hypoxia and hypercapnia. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. All about Heart Rate (Pulse)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... get a picture of your health. Learn more: Blood Pressure Vs. Heart Rate Target Heart Rate Arrhythmias (abnormal heart rhythms) This ... Healthy 6 What are the Symptoms of High Blood Pressure? 7 All About Heart Rate (Pulse) 8 Warning Signs of a Heart Attack ...

  17. Supramaximal testing to confirm attainment of VO2max in sedentary men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astorino, T A; White, A C; Dalleck, L C

    2009-04-01

    Supramaximal testing is widely used to verify VO2max attainment, yet its efficacy in sedentary subjects is unknown. The aim of the study was to test this hypothesis in men and women completing maximal cycle ergometry. Fifteen sedentary subjects (age=22.4+/-3.9 year) completed incremental exercise, and returned at least 24 h later to complete constant load exercise at 105% peak work rate (Wmax). Another group of nine sedentary men and women (age=21.8+/-5 year) completed supramaximal exercise at 115% Wmax 1-1.5 h after incremental exercise. During exercise, gas exchange data and heart rate (HR) were continuously obtained. VO2max was similar (p>0.05) between incremental and supramaximal exercise in subjects in the first (32.32+/-4.81 mL/kg/min vs. 31.80+/-5.35 mL/kg/min) and second subset (40.63+/-3.61 mL/kg/min vs. 41.66+/-5.55 mL/kg/min). Maximal HR was lower (pTest-retest reliability (r=0.81-0.89, pVO2max was high during repeated bouts of supramaximal testing. Findings support use of this protocol to confirm VO2max attainment in healthy, sedentary men and women completing incremental cycle ergometry.

  18. Modelling heart rate kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakynthinaki, Maria S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to formulate a simple and at the same time effective mathematical model of heart rate kinetics in response to movement (exercise). Based on an existing model, a system of two coupled differential equations which give the rate of change of heart rate and the rate of change of exercise intensity is used. The modifications introduced to the existing model are justified and discussed in detail, while models of blood lactate accumulation in respect to time and exercise intensity are also presented. The main modification is that the proposed model has now only one parameter which reflects the overall cardiovascular condition of the individual. The time elapsed after the beginning of the exercise, the intensity of the exercise, as well as blood lactate are also taken into account. Application of the model provides information regarding the individual's cardiovascular condition and is able to detect possible changes in it, across the data recording periods. To demonstrate examples of successful numerical fit of the model, constant intensity experimental heart rate data sets of two individuals have been selected and numerical optimization was implemented. In addition, numerical simulations provided predictions for various exercise intensities and various cardiovascular condition levels. The proposed model can serve as a powerful tool for a complete means of heart rate analysis, not only in exercise physiology (for efficiently designing training sessions for healthy subjects) but also in the areas of cardiovascular health and rehabilitation (including application in population groups for which direct heart rate recordings at intense exercises are not possible or not allowed, such as elderly or pregnant women).

  19. Modelling heart rate kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria S Zakynthinaki

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to formulate a simple and at the same time effective mathematical model of heart rate kinetics in response to movement (exercise. Based on an existing model, a system of two coupled differential equations which give the rate of change of heart rate and the rate of change of exercise intensity is used. The modifications introduced to the existing model are justified and discussed in detail, while models of blood lactate accumulation in respect to time and exercise intensity are also presented. The main modification is that the proposed model has now only one parameter which reflects the overall cardiovascular condition of the individual. The time elapsed after the beginning of the exercise, the intensity of the exercise, as well as blood lactate are also taken into account. Application of the model provides information regarding the individual's cardiovascular condition and is able to detect possible changes in it, across the data recording periods. To demonstrate examples of successful numerical fit of the model, constant intensity experimental heart rate data sets of two individuals have been selected and numerical optimization was implemented. In addition, numerical simulations provided predictions for various exercise intensities and various cardiovascular condition levels. The proposed model can serve as a powerful tool for a complete means of heart rate analysis, not only in exercise physiology (for efficiently designing training sessions for healthy subjects but also in the areas of cardiovascular health and rehabilitation (including application in population groups for which direct heart rate recordings at intense exercises are not possible or not allowed, such as elderly or pregnant women.

  20. Modelling Heart Rate Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakynthinaki, Maria S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to formulate a simple and at the same time effective mathematical model of heart rate kinetics in response to movement (exercise). Based on an existing model, a system of two coupled differential equations which give the rate of change of heart rate and the rate of change of exercise intensity is used. The modifications introduced to the existing model are justified and discussed in detail, while models of blood lactate accumulation in respect to time and exercise intensity are also presented. The main modification is that the proposed model has now only one parameter which reflects the overall cardiovascular condition of the individual. The time elapsed after the beginning of the exercise, the intensity of the exercise, as well as blood lactate are also taken into account. Application of the model provides information regarding the individual’s cardiovascular condition and is able to detect possible changes in it, across the data recording periods. To demonstrate examples of successful numerical fit of the model, constant intensity experimental heart rate data sets of two individuals have been selected and numerical optimization was implemented. In addition, numerical simulations provided predictions for various exercise intensities and various cardiovascular condition levels. The proposed model can serve as a powerful tool for a complete means of heart rate analysis, not only in exercise physiology (for efficiently designing training sessions for healthy subjects) but also in the areas of cardiovascular health and rehabilitation (including application in population groups for which direct heart rate recordings at intense exercises are not possible or not allowed, such as elderly or pregnant women). PMID:25876164

  1. Prediction VO2max during cycle ergometry based on submaximal ventilatory indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Rodolfo Alkmim Moreira; Vale, Rodrigo Gomes de Souza; Simão, Roberto; de Salles, Belmiro Freitas; Reis, Victor Machado; Novaes, Jefferson da Silva; Miranda, Humberto; Rhea, Matthew R; Medeiros, Aldo da Cunha

    2009-09-01

    There are several equations to predict maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max) from ergometric test variables on different ergometers. However, a similar equation using ventilatory thresholds of ergospirometry in a submaximal test on a cycle ergometer is unavailable. The aim of the present study was to assess the accuracy of VO2max prediction models based on indicators of submaximal effort. Accordingly, 4,640 healthy, nonathlete women ages 20 years and older volunteered to be tested on a cycle ergometer using a maximum incremental protocol. The subjects were randomly assigned to 2 groups: group A (estimation) and group B (validation). From the independent variables of weight in kilograms, the second workload threshold (WT2), and heart rate of the second threshold (HRT2), it was possible to build a multiple linear regression model to predict maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max = 40.302 - 0.497 [Weight] - 0.001 [HRT2] + 0.239 [WT2] in mL O2/kg/min(-1); r = 0.995 and standard error of the estimate [SEE] = 0.68 mL O2/kg/min(-1)). The cross-validation method was used in group B with group A serving as the basis for building the model and the validation dataset. The results showed that, in healthy nonathlete women, it is possible to predict VO2max with a minimum of error (SEE = 1.00%) from submaximal indicators obtained in an incremental test.

  2. Influence of exercise modality on agreement between gas exchange and heart rate variability thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, F A; Montenegro, R A; Midgley, A W; Vasconcellos, F; Soares, P P; Farinatti, P

    2014-08-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the level of agreement between the gas exchange threshold (GET) and heart rate variability threshold (HRVT) during maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) using three different exercise modalities. A further aim was to establish whether there was a 1:1 relationship between the percentage heart rate reserve (%HRR) and percentage oxygen uptake reserve (%VO2 R) at intensities corresponding to GET and HRVT. Sixteen apparently healthy men 17 to 28 years of age performed three maximal CPETs (cycling, walking, and running). Mean heart rate and VO2 at GET and HRVT were 16 bpm (P0.05). There was a strong relationship between GET and HRVT, with R2 ranging from 0.69 to 0.90. A 1:1 relationship between %HRR and % VO2 R was not observed at GET and HRVT. The %HRR was higher during cycling (GET mean difference=7%; HRVT mean difference=11%; both P<0.001), walking (GET mean difference=13%; HRVT mean difference=13%; both P<0.001), or running (GET mean difference=11%; HRVT mean difference=10%; both P<0.001). Therefore, using HRVT to prescribe aerobic exercise intensity appears to be valid. However, to assume a 1:1 relationship between %HRR and % VO2 R at HRVT would probably result in overestimation of the energy expenditure during the bout of exercise.

  3. A new submaximal cycle ergometer test for prediction of VO2max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekblom-Bak, E; Björkman, F; Hellenius, M-L; Ekblom, B

    2014-04-01

    Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) is an important, independent predictor of cardiovascular health and mortality. Despite this, it is rarely measured in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to create and evaluate a submaximal cycle ergometry test based on change in heart rate (HR) between a lower standard work rate and an individually chosen higher work rate. In a mixed population (n = 143) with regard to sex (55% women), age (21-65 years), and activity status (inactive to highly active), a model included change in HR per unit change in power, sex, and age for the best estimate of VO2max. The association between estimated and observed VO2max for the mixed sample was r = 0.91, standard error of estimate = 0.302 L/min, and mean measured VO2max = 3.23 L/min. The corresponding coefficient of variation was 9.3%, a significantly improved precision compared with one of the most commonly used submaximal exercise tests, the Åstrand test, which in the present study was estimated to be 18.1%. Test-retest reliability analysis over 1 week revealed no mean difference in the estimated VO2max (-0.02 L/min, 95% confidence interval: -0.07-0.03). The new test is low-risk, easily administered, and valid for a wide capacity range, and is therefore suitable in situations as health evaluations in the general population. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Comparison of heart rate deflection and ventilatory threshold during a field cross-country roller-skiing test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Nicolas; Passelergue, Philippe; Bouvard, Marc; Perrey, Stéphane

    2008-11-01

    This study was to assess whether the point of deflection from linearity of heart rate (HRd) could be an accurate predictor of ventilatory threshold (VT2) during a specific cross-country roller-skiing (RS) test. Ten well-trained cross-country skiers performed a maximal and incremental RS test in the field and a standardized maximal and incremental treadmill running (TR) test in the laboratory. Values of oxygen uptake (VO2) and heart rate (HR) were continuously recorded during all exercises by a portable breath-by-breath gas exchange measurement system and a wireless Polar monitoring system, respectively. The VT2 and HRd points were individually determined by visual analysis during RS. Maximal VO2 (VO2 max) and HR were higher (p cross-country coaches and skiers to evaluate and control specific aerobic training loads.

  5. Contributions of Astronauts Aerobic Exercise Intensity and Time on Change in VO2peak during Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Meghan E.; Buxton, Roxanne; Moore, Alan; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable variability among astronauts with respect to changes in maximal aerobic capacity (VO2peak) during International Space Station (ISS) missions, ranging from a 5% increase to 30% decline. Individual differences may be due to in-flight aerobic exercise time and intensity. PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of in-flight aerobic exercise time and intensity on change in VO2peak during ISS missions. METHODS: Astronauts (N=11) performed peak cycle tests approx 60 days before flight (L-60), on flight day (FD) approx 14, and every approx 30 days thereafter. Metabolic gas analysis and heart rate (HR) were measured continuously during the test using the portable pulmonary function system. HR and duration of each in-flight cycle ergometer and treadmill (TM) session were recorded and averaged in time segments corresponding to each peak test. Mixed effects linear regression with exercise mode (TM or cycle) as a categorical variable was used to assess the contributions of exercise intensity (%time >70% peak HR or %time >90% peak HR) and time (min/wk), adjusted for body weight, on %change in VO2peak during the mission, and incorporating the repeated-measures experimental design. RESULTS: 110 observations were included in the model (4-6 peak cycle tests per astronaut, 2 exercise devices). VO2peak was reduced from preflight throughout the mission (FD14: 13+/-13% and FD 105: 8+/-10%). Exercise intensity (%peak HR: FD14=66+/-14; FD105=75+/-8) and time (min/wk: FD14=82+/-46; FD105=158+/-40) increased during flight. The models showed main effects for exercise time and intensity with no interactions between time, intensity, and device (70% peak HR: time [z-score=2.39; P=0.017], intensity [z-score=3.51; P=0.000]; 90% peak HR: time [zscore= 3.31; P=0.001], intensity [z-score=2.24; P=0.025]). CONCLUSION: Exercise time and intensity independently contribute to %change in VO2peak during ISS missions, indicating that there are minimal values for exercise time and intensity

  6. STUDY OF VO 2 MAX DURING PHASES OF MENSTRUATION IN YOUNG FEMALE ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunitha

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Context: The menstrual cycle is a natural monthly event in y oung women, coordinated by the hypothalamic-pituitary ovarian axis and may influence physiological and pathological changes that occur throughout the life time of the woman. There is a cyclical change in sex hormones during the course of menstrual cycle that have the potential effects on exercise capacity and performance through numerous mechanisms, such a s substrate metabolism, cardiorespiratory function, thermoregulation, psychological factors a nd injuries. Consequently hormone level changes may theoretically lead to either improved or decrea sed performance at various times throughout the menstrual cycle. Physiological indices such as heart rate, tension, VO 2 max and aerobic power are of the main indicators of exercise performance, a potential change in these indices over the menstrual cycle will have large practical implicati ons for female athletes. VO 2 max is highly predictive of endurance performance, hence the pres ent study was done to evaluate whether there is any changes in the VO 2 max during phases of menstruation in young female athletes. Aim: The present study was done to evaluate the VO 2 max during phases of menstruation in young female athletes. Settings and Design: The present study was a cross sectional study consi sting of 30 healthy female athletes of 17-20 years of age. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in the Department of Physiology, Adichunchanagiri inst itute of medical sciences after the institutional ethical clearance and written consent from each par ticipant. VO 2 max (maximum oxygen uptake was indirectly assessed by the Astrand nomogram met hod from submaximal exercise data obtained using Harvard step test during all the three phases of menstrual cycle. Results: The parameters were analyzed for statistical significance using St udents‘t’ test and p<0.05 was considered the level of significance. There were no significant

  7. Heart rate variability in isolated rabbit hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, B; Heger, G; Mayer, C; Kiegler, B; Stöhr, H; Steurer, G

    1996-11-01

    The presence of heart rate variability (HRV) in patients with cardiac denervation after heart transplantation raised our interest in HRV of isolated, denervated hearts. Hearts from seven adult white ELCO rabbits were transferred to a perfusion apparatus. All hearts were perfused in the working mode and in the Langendorff mode for 20 minutes each. HRV was analyzed in the frequency domain. A computer simulated test ECG at a constant rate of 2 Hz was used for error estimation of the system. In the isolated, denervated heart, HRV was of random, broadband fluctuations, different from the well-characterized oscillations at specific frequencies in intact animals. Mean NN was 423 +/- 51 ms in the Langendorff mode, 406 +/- 33 ms in the working heart mode, and 500 ms in the test ECG. Total power was 663 +/- 207 ms2, 817 +/- 318 ms2, and 3.7 ms2, respectively. There was no significant difference in any measure of HRV between Langendorff and working heart modes. The data provide evidence for the presence of HRV in isolated, denervated rabbit hearts. Left atrial and ventricular filling, i.e., the working heart mode, did not alter HRV, indicating that left atrial or ventricular stretch did not influence the sinus nodal discharge rate.

  8. Heart rate as an indicator for exercise prescription for normal, overweight, and obese adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamilla Bolonha Gomes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to investigate the relationship between heart rate (HR predicted and VO2max using a CPET (cardiopulmonary exercise testing among normal weight, overweight, and obese adolescents. The sample comprised 299 adolescents (142 boys, from Vitória (ES, Brazil, aged 10-14 years (12.6±1.4. Adolescents were classified into normal weight (n=236, overweight (n=34, and obese (n=29. Adolescents were subjected to a CPET ramp protocol on a treadmill. It was observed that the reserve heart rate (HRres was similar to the maximum recommended oxygen uptake (VO2 for the maintenance and improvement of cardiorespiratory fitness. It was also observed that HRres can be used to control the intensity of exercise sessions in physical education classes independent of weight status. In conclusion, the relationship between the HR and VO2 for adolescents is linear, allowing the level of intensity to be determined by the HRres proportion related with the correspondent %VO2max levels of intensity, according to BMI-for-age categories.

  9. Reduced Heart Rate Volatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Eric L.; Morris, John A.; Norris, Patrick R.; France, Daniel J.; Ozdas, Asli; Stiles, Renée A.; Harris, Paul A.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Speroff, Theodore

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine if using dense data capture to measure heart rate volatility (standard deviation) measured in 5-minute intervals predicts death. Background: Fundamental approaches to assessing vital signs in the critically ill have changed little since the early 1900s. Our prior work in this area has demonstrated the utility of densely sampled data and, in particular, heart rate volatility over the entire patient stay, for predicting death and prolonged ventilation. Methods: Approximately 120 million heart rate data points were prospectively collected and archived from 1316 trauma ICU patients over 30 months. Data were sampled every 1 to 4 seconds, stored in a relational database, linked to outcome data, and de-identified. HR standard deviation was continuously computed over 5-minute intervals (CVRD, cardiac volatility–related dysfunction). Logistic regression models incorporating age and injury severity score were developed on a test set of patients (N = 923), and prospectively analyzed in a distinct validation set (N = 393) for the first 24 hours of ICU data. Results: Distribution of CVRD varied by survival in the test set. Prospective evaluation of the model in the validation set gave an area in the receiver operating curve of 0.81 with a sensitivity and specificity of 70.1 and 80.0, respectively. CVRD predict death as early as 24 hours in the validation set. Conclusions: CVRD identifies a subgroup of patients with a high probability of dying. Death is predicted within first 24 hours of stay. We hypothesize CVRD is a surrogate for autonomic nervous system dysfunction. PMID:15319726

  10. Creative MuVo2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    zdwei

    2004-01-01

    苹果(Apple)与创新(Creative),这两大巨擘在MP3播放器上的造诣可谓各有千秋,前者推出的iPod系列在外形上独领风骚,而后者推出的NOMAND系列则在间效上无人能比。就在苹果最新型iPod3排山倒海般的宣传攻势下,创新也推出了一款以曼妙身材和相对低廉价格为主打的1.5GB硬盘式MP3播放器——NOMAND MuVo2

  11. Comparison of Methods for Determining Aerobic Exercise Intensity Using Heart Rate in Acute Leukemia Patients Prior to Induction Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Christina; Bryant, Ashley Leak; Phillips, Brett; Bailey, Charlotte; Shields, Edgar W; Battaglini, Claudio

    2016-07-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET), the gold standard of cardiopulmonary evaluation, is used to determine VO2 levels at different aerobic exercise training intensities; however, it may not be feasible to conduct CPET in all clinical settings. To compare the heart rate reserve (HRR) and percent of 220-age methods for prescribing cycle ergometry exercise intensity using heart rate (HR) against the HRs obtained during a CPET in adults undergoing treatment for acute leukemia (AL). In this exploratory study, part of a larger randomized controlled trial, 14 adults with AL completed CPET on a cycle ergometer with indirect calorimetry within 96 hr of admission to a cancer hospital to determine VO2peak and HR corresponding to low (40% VO2peak), moderate (60% VO2peak), and high (75% VO2peak) exercise intensities. Analyses of variance were used to compare estimated HR for each intensity level using the HRR and percent of 220-age methods with HR determined via VO2peak. HR corresponding to low-intensity exercise differed significantly across all three methods (p ≤ .05). No significant differences were observed between HR estimated via the percent of 220-age method and determined via VO2peak at moderate (100 ± 8 and 113 ± 24 bpm, p = .122) or high intensities (125 ± 10 and 123 ± 25 bpm, p = .994). In adults with AL, HR-based methods for defining aerobic exercise intensities should be used with caution. At low intensity, neither should be used, while at moderate and high intensities, the percent of 220-age equation might serve as an adequate substitute for CPET. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Impact of obesity and Down syndrome on peak heart rate and aerobic capacity in youth and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Sang Ouk; Pitetti, Kenneth H; Goulopoulou, Styliani; Collier, Scott R; Guerra, Myriam; Baynard, Tracy

    2014-10-24

    Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) exhibit reduced aerobic capacity with reduced peak heart rate (HRpeak). This condition is often coexistent with higher level of obesity compared to individuals without DS. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of obesity and Down syndrome (DS) on peak heart rate (HRpeak) and peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) in children and adults both with and without intellectual disabilities (ID)s. VO2peak and HRpeak from individualized treadmill tests on 654 individuals were analyzed. Body mass index was used to categorize individuals' weight status using standard cut-offs. DS groups had the lowest HRpeak (167bpm±14, pObesity did not affect HRpeak among adults and children with DS. VO2peak was lower among individuals with DS (25.2mL/kg/min±6.3, pObese adults with DS had lower VO2peak (24.3mL/kg/min±6.9, p=0.001) compared to the normal weight (26.7±7.1mL/kg/min) and overweight groups (27.0mL/kg/min±6.1) with DS. Conversely, in children, obesity level did not impact VO2peak in individuals with DS. Our results suggest that DS attenuates both VO2peak and HRpeak, regardless of obesity status and age group. However, obesity was associated with lower VO2peak in all adults, but not in children with DS.

  13. Bluetooth Heart Rate Monitors for Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, R. E.; West, M. R.; Kalogera, K. L.; Hanson, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate monitoring is required for crewmembers during exercise aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and will be for future exploration missions. The cardiovascular system must be sufficiently stressed throughout a mission to maintain the ability to perform nominal and contingency/emergency tasks. High quality heart rate data are required to accurately determine the intensity of exercise performed by the crewmembers and show maintenance of VO2max. The quality of the data collected on ISS is subject to multiple limitations and is insufficient to meet current requirements. PURPOSE: To evaluate the performance of commercially available Bluetooth heart rate monitors (BT HRM) and their ability to provide high quality heart rate data to monitor crew health aboard the ISS and during future exploration missions. METHODS: Nineteen subjects completed 30 data collection sessions of various intensities on the treadmill and/or cycle. Subjects wore several BT HRM technologies for each testing session. One electrode-based chest strap (CS) was worn, while one or more optical sensors (OS) were worn. Subjects were instrumented with a 12-lead ECG to compare the heart rate data from the Bluetooth sensors. Each BT HRM data set was time matched to the ECG data and a +/-5bpm threshold was applied to the difference between the 2 data sets. Percent error was calculated based on the number of data points outside the threshold and the total number of data points. RESULTS: The electrode-based chest straps performed better than the optical sensors. The best performing CS was CS1 (1.6% error), followed by CS4 (3.3% error), CS3 (6.4% error), and CS2 (9.2% error). The OS resulted in 10.4% error for OS1 and 14.9% error for OS2. CONCLUSIONS: The highest quality data came from CS1, but unfortunately it has been discontinued by the manufacturer. The optical sensors have not been ruled out for use, but more investigation is needed to determine how to obtain the best quality data. CS2 will be

  14. Bluetooth Heart Rate Monitors For Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, R. E.; West, M. R.; Kalogera, K. L.; Hanson, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate monitoring is required for crewmembers during exercise aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and will be for future exploration missions. The cardiovascular system must be sufficiently stressed throughout a mission to maintain the ability to perform nominal and contingency/emergency tasks. High quality heart rate data are required to accurately determine the intensity of exercise performed by the crewmembers and show maintenance of VO2max. The quality of the data collected on ISS is subject to multiple limitations and is insufficient to meet current requirements. PURPOSE: To evaluate the performance of commercially available Bluetooth heart rate monitors (BT_HRM) and their ability to provide high quality heart rate data to monitor crew health aboard the ISS and during future exploration missions. METHODS: Nineteen subjects completed 30 data collection sessions of various intensities on the treadmill and/or cycle. Subjects wore several BT_HRM technologies for each testing session. One electrode-based chest strap (CS) was worn, while one or more optical sensors (OS) were worn. Subjects were instrumented with a 12-lead ECG to compare the heart rate data from the Bluetooth sensors. Each BT_HRM data set was time matched to the ECG data and a +/-5bpm threshold was applied to the difference between the 2 data sets. Percent error was calculated based on the number of data points outside the threshold and the total number of data points. RESULTS: The electrode-based chest straps performed better than the optical sensors. The best performing CS was CS1 (1.6% error), followed by CS4 (3.3% error), CS3 (6.4% error), and CS2 (9.2% error). The OS resulted in 10.4% error for OS1 and 14.9% error for OS2. CONCLUSIONS: The highest quality data came from CS1, but unfortunately it has been discontinued by the manufacturer. The optical sensors have not been ruled out for use, but more investigation is needed to determine how to obtain the best quality data. CS2 will be

  15. Efeitos do estado e especificidade do treinamento aeróbio na relação %VO2max versus %FCmax durante o ciclismo Effects of the state and specificity of aerobic training on the %VO2max versus %HRmax ratio during cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Caputo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar os efeitos do estado e especificidade de treinamento aeróbio na relação entre o percentual do consumo máximo de oxigênio (%VO2max e o percentual da frequência cardíaca máxima (%FCmax durante o exercício incremental realizado no cicloergômetro. MÉTODOS: Sete corredores, 9 ciclistas, 11 triatletas e 12 sedentários, todos do sexo masculino e aparentemente saudáveis, foram submetidos a um teste incremental até a exaustão no cicloergômetro. Regressões lineares entre %VO2max e %FCmax foram determinadas para cada indivíduo. Com base nessas regressões, foram calculados %FCmax correspondentes a determinados %VO2max (50, 60, 70, 80 e 90% de cada participante. RESULTADOS: Não foram encontradas diferenças significantes entre todos os grupos nos %FCmax para cada um dos %VO2max avaliados. Analisando-se os voluntários como um único grupo, as médias dos %FCmax correspondentes a 50, 60, 70, 80 e 90% %VO2max foram 67, 73, 80, 87, e 93%, respectivamente. CONCLUSÃO: Nos grupos analisados, a relação entre o %VO2max e %FCmax durante o exercício incremental no ciclismo não é dependente do estado e especificidade do treinamento aeróbio.OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of the status and specificity of exercise training in the ratio between maximum oxygen consumption (%VO2max and the percentage of maximal heart rate (%HRmax during incremental exercise on a cycle ergometer. METHODS: Seven runners, 9 cyclists, 11 triathletes, and 12 sedentary individuals, all male and apparently healthy, underwent exhaustive incremental exercise on cycle ergometers. Linear regressions between %VO2max x %HRmax were determined for each individual. Based on these regressions, %HRmax was assessed corresponding to a determined %VO2max (50, 60, 70, 80, and 90% from each participant. RESULTS: Significant differences were not found between the groups in %HRmax for each of the %VO2max assessed. Analyzing the volunteers as a single group, the

  16. Individual versus Standardized Running Protocols in the Determination of VO2max

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula F. Sperlich, Hans-Christer Holmberg, Jennifer L. Reed, Christoph Zinner, Joachim Mester, Billy Sperlich

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether an individually designed incremental exercise protocol results in greater rates of oxygen uptake (VO2max than standardized testing. Fourteen well-trained, male runners performed five incremental protocols in randomized order to measure their VO2max: i an incremental test (INCS+I with pre-defined increases in speed (2 min at 8.64 km·h−1, then a rise of 1.44 km·h−1 every 30 s up to 14.4 km·h−1 and thereafter inclination (0.5° every 30 s; ii an incremental test (INCI at constant speed (14.4 km·h−1 and increasing inclination (2° every 2 min from the initial 0°; iii an incremental test (INCS at constant inclination (0° and increasing speed (0.5 km·h−1 every 30 s from the initial 12.0 km·h−1; iv a graded exercise protocol (GXP at a 1° incline with increasing speed (initially 8.64 km·h−1 + 1.44 km·h−1 every 5 min; v an individual exercise protocol (INDXP in which the runner chose the inclination and speed. VO2max was lowest (-4.2% during the GXP (p = 0.01; d = 0.06-0.61 compared to all other tests. The highest rating of perceived exertion, heart rate, ventilation and end-exercise blood lactate concentration were similar between the different protocols (p < 0.05. The time to exhaustion ranged from 7 min 18 sec (INCS to 25 min 30 sec (GXP (p = 0.01.The VO2max attained by employing an individual treadmill protocol does not differ from the values derived from various standardized incremental protocols.

  17. Intermittent exercise alters the heart rate-blood lactate relationship used for calculating the training impulse (TRIMP) in team sport players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akubat, Ibrahim; Abt, Grant

    2011-05-01

    The training impulse (TRIMP) quantifies training dose by weighting heart rate according to the relationship between fractional elevation in heart rate (ΔHR) and blood lactate concentration (BLa). This study compared the physiological responses to intermittent and continuous exercise and their influence on TRIMP weightings. Repeated measures crossover. Twelve team sport players undertook a vVO2max test and then a continuous trial (CT) and intermittent trial (IT) in a randomised order. Each trial consisted of 4×4 min stages corresponding to 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of vVO2max. Trials were matched for distance and mean speed. A repeated measures ANOVA revealed higher BLa for IT at 75% vVO2max (p=0.023) and 100% vVO2max (p=0.012); higher VO(2) for IT at 25% vVO(2max) (pexercise alters the ΔHR-BLa relationship and TRIMP weightings at high exercise intensities. Determination of the training impulse from the ΔHR-BLa relationship derived from a continuous exercise protocol may underestimate the exercise 'dose' of training and/or matches in team sport players. Copyright © 2010 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Rate of change in physical fitness and quality of life and depression following exercise training in patients with congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Neil A; Murison, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Exercise training appears to improve peak oxygen consumption (VO(2) ) and quality of life (QOL) in heart failure patients, although disease etiology, patient demographics and medication may alter the rate of adaptation. The authors sought to identify rate of change from baseline in fitness, QOL, and depression following exercise training in a cohort of patients with congestive heart failure. Thirty male systolic heart failure patients (aged 63.8±8.3 years, baseline peak VO(2) 12.2±4.8 mL/kg/min, left ventricular ejection fraction 28.2±9.4%, New York Heart Association class II/II 22/8) undertook 52 weeks of exercise training, 16 weeks as an outpatient and a further 36 weeks of home exercise. Peak VO(2) and QOL was measured using the Minnesota Living With Heart Failure (MLWHF) questionnaire and depression using the Hare-Davis scale. The authors analyzed the rate of change in peak VO(2) and MLWHF after grouping patients according to clinical, demographic, and pharmacologic characteristics. Peak VO(2) measurements varied over time, with no effect of disease pathology or β-blocker on peak VO(2) . The rate of change in physical MLWHF score was significantly greater (improved) during 0 to 16 weeks in patients with dilated pathology, but was not significantly affected by β-blocker use or age. The exercise training venue and supervision, or lack thereof, is the major determinant of adaptation to the intervention in heart failure patients, although age, β-adrenergic medication, and heart failure etiology also explain some of the variation in adaptive responses observed.

  19. Tunable VO2/Au hyperbolic metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prayakarao, S.; Mendoza, B.; Devine, A.; Kyaw, C.; van Dover, R. B.; Liberman, V.; Noginov, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is known to have a semiconductor-to-metal phase transition at ˜68 °C. Therefore, it can be used as a tunable component of an active metamaterial. The lamellar metamaterial studied in this work is composed of subwavelength VO2 and Au layers and is designed to undergo a temperature controlled transition from the optical hyperbolic phase to the metallic phase. VO2 films and VO2/Au lamellar metamaterial stacks have been fabricated and studied in electrical conductivity and optical (transmission and reflection) experiments. The observed temperature-dependent changes in the reflection and transmission spectra of the metamaterials and VO2 thin films are in a good qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions. The demonstrated optical hyperbolic-to-metallic phase transition is a unique physical phenomenon with the potential to enable advanced control of light-matter interactions.

  20. Estimating Heart Rate, Energy Expenditure, and Physical Performance With a Wrist Photoplethysmographic Device During Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parak, Jakub; Uuskoski, Maria; Machek, Jan; Korhonen, Ilkka

    2017-07-25

    Wearable sensors enable long-term monitoring of health and wellbeing indicators. An objective evaluation of sensors' accuracy is important, especially for their use in health care. The aim of this study was to use a wrist-worn optical heart rate (OHR) device to estimate heart rate (HR), energy expenditure (EE), and maximal oxygen intake capacity (VO2Max) during running and to evaluate the accuracy of the estimated parameters (HR, EE, and VO2Max) against golden reference methods. A total of 24 healthy volunteers, of whom 11 were female, with a mean age of 36.2 years (SD 8.2 years) participated in a submaximal self-paced outdoor running test and maximal voluntary exercise test in a sports laboratory. OHR was monitored with a PulseOn wrist-worn photoplethysmographic device and the running speed with a phone GPS sensor. A physiological model based on HR, running speed, and personal characteristics (age, gender, weight, and height) was used to estimate EE during the maximal voluntary exercise test and VO2Max during the submaximal outdoor running test. ECG-based HR and respiratory gas analysis based estimates were used as golden references. OHR was able to measure HR during running with a 1.9% mean absolute percentage error (MAPE). VO2Max estimated during the submaximal outdoor running test was closely similar to the sports laboratory estimate (MAPE 5.2%). The energy expenditure estimate (n=23) was quite accurate when HR was above the aerobic threshold (MAPE 6.7%), but MAPE increased to 16.5% during a lighter intensity of exercise. The results suggest that wrist-worn OHR may accurately estimate HR during running up to maximal HR. When combined with physiological modeling, wrist-worn OHR may be used for an estimation of EE, especially during higher intensity running, and VO2Max, even during submaximal self-paced outdoor recreational running.

  1. Estimating Heart Rate, Energy Expenditure, and Physical Performance With a Wrist Photoplethysmographic Device During Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uuskoski, Maria; Machek, Jan; Korhonen, Ilkka

    2017-01-01

    Background Wearable sensors enable long-term monitoring of health and wellbeing indicators. An objective evaluation of sensors’ accuracy is important, especially for their use in health care. Objective The aim of this study was to use a wrist-worn optical heart rate (OHR) device to estimate heart rate (HR), energy expenditure (EE), and maximal oxygen intake capacity (VO2Max) during running and to evaluate the accuracy of the estimated parameters (HR, EE, and VO2Max) against golden reference methods. Methods A total of 24 healthy volunteers, of whom 11 were female, with a mean age of 36.2 years (SD 8.2 years) participated in a submaximal self-paced outdoor running test and maximal voluntary exercise test in a sports laboratory. OHR was monitored with a PulseOn wrist-worn photoplethysmographic device and the running speed with a phone GPS sensor. A physiological model based on HR, running speed, and personal characteristics (age, gender, weight, and height) was used to estimate EE during the maximal voluntary exercise test and VO2Max during the submaximal outdoor running test. ECG-based HR and respiratory gas analysis based estimates were used as golden references. Results OHR was able to measure HR during running with a 1.9% mean absolute percentage error (MAPE). VO2Max estimated during the submaximal outdoor running test was closely similar to the sports laboratory estimate (MAPE 5.2%). The energy expenditure estimate (n=23) was quite accurate when HR was above the aerobic threshold (MAPE 6.7%), but MAPE increased to 16.5% during a lighter intensity of exercise. Conclusions The results suggest that wrist-worn OHR may accurately estimate HR during running up to maximal HR. When combined with physiological modeling, wrist-worn OHR may be used for an estimation of EE, especially during higher intensity running, and VO2Max, even during submaximal self-paced outdoor recreational running. PMID:28743682

  2. Evidence of O2 supply-dependent VO2 max in the exercise-trained human quadriceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R S; Grassi, B; Gavin, T P; Haseler, L J; Tagore, K; Roca, J; Wagner, P D

    1999-03-01

    Maximal O2 delivery and O2 uptake (VO2) per 100 g of active muscle mass are far greater during knee extensor (KE) than during cycle exercise: 73 and 60 ml. min-1. 100 g-1 (2.4 kg of muscle) (R. S. Richardson, D. R. Knight, D. C. Poole, S. S. Kurdak, M. C. Hogan, B. Grassi, and P. D. Wagner. Am. J. Physiol. 268 (Heart Circ. Physiol. 37): H1453-H1461, 1995) and 28 and 25 ml. min-1. 100 g-1 (7.5 kg of muscle) (D. R. Knight, W. Schaffartzik, H. J. Guy, R. Predilleto, M. C. Hogan, and P. D. Wagner. J. Appl. Physiol. 75: 2586-2593, 1993), respectively. Although this is evidence of muscle O2 supply dependence in itself, it raises the following question: With such high O2 delivery in KE, are the quadriceps still O2 supply dependent at maximal exercise? To answer this question, seven trained subjects performed maximum KE exercise in hypoxia [0.12 inspired O2 fraction (FIO2)], normoxia (0.21 FIO2), and hyperoxia (1.0 FIO2) in a balanced order. The protocol (after warm-up) was a square wave to a previously determined maximum work rate followed by incremental stages to ensure that a true maximum was achieved under each condition. Direct measures of arterial and venous blood O2 concentration in combination with a thermodilution blood flow technique allowed the determination of O2 delivery and muscle VO2. Maximal O2 delivery increased with inspired O2: 1.3 +/- 0.1, 1.6 +/- 0.2, and 1.9 +/- 0.2 l/min at 0.12, 0.21, and 1.0 FIO2, respectively (P VO2 (VO2 max): 1.04 +/- 0.13, 1. 24 +/- 0.16, and 1.45 +/- 0.19 l/min at 0.12, 0.21, and 1.0 FIO2, respectively (P VO2 max, supporting our previous finding that a decrease in O2 supply will proportionately decrease muscle VO2 max. As even in the isolated quadriceps (where normoxic O2 delivery is the highest recorded in humans) an increase in O2 supply by hyperoxia allows the achievement of a greater VO2 max, we conclude that, in normoxic conditions of isolated KE exercise, KE VO2 max in trained subjects is not limited by mitochondrial

  3. Effects of body mass on exercise efficiency and VO2 during steady-state cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, M J; Storsteen, J A; Woodard, C M

    1993-09-01

    Oxygen uptake (VO2) and exercise efficiency during cycle ergometer exercise are considered to be independent of body mass. To determine the validity of this assumption, 50 females ranging in body mass from 41.5-98.9 kg exercised on a cycle ergometer with no load at 60 rpm and at 25, 50, 75, and 100 W at 60 and 90 rpm. Gross VO2 and efficiency, net VO2 and efficiency, work VO2 and efficiency, and delta efficiency were computed. Gross and net VO2 were significantly and positively correlated with body mass at all work rates and pedal frequencies. Gross efficiency was significantly and negatively correlated with body mass at all work rates and pedal frequencies. Work VO2 and body mass were not significantly correlated. The correlations between work and delta efficiency and body mass were not significant. Since body mass was found to be significantly correlated with gross VO2, the following equation was developed using stepwise multiple regression to predict gross VO2: VO2 (ml.min-1) = 10.9 (work rate, W) + 8.2 (pedal rate, rpm) + 8.3 (body mass, kg) - 559.6. These data suggest that body mass should be considered when estimating the oxygen uptake during cycle ergometer exercise.

  4. Heart rates during competitive orienteering.

    OpenAIRE

    Bird, S R; Bailey, R.; Lewis, J.

    1993-01-01

    This study investigated the heart rate profiles of 16 experienced, competitive orienteers (aged 15-62 years) during three competitive events. Each competitor was assessed over three different types of course which were classified as: fast run (FR), slow run (SR) and highly physical (HP). The results showed that all subjects recorded heart rates that were between 140 and 180 beats min-1 for the majority of each event (irrespective of age or course type). The heart rate data indicated that the ...

  5. Longitudinal changes in heart rate-corrected measures of exercise performance in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintala, Kavitha; Epstein, Michael L; Singh, Tajinder P

    2008-01-01

    Interpretation of change in exercise performance over time in children with repaired congenital heart disease is often hampered by poor effort that limits the maximum heart rate; this is often difficult to distinguish from chronotropic impairment, a common finding in these children. In an attempt to address this limitation, we sought to examine measures of exercise performance that are corrected for heart rate in healthy children and to determine if these change with somatic growth. We studied two serial graded exercise tests in 24 healthy children at an interval of >3 years. Paired comparisons revealed that maximum oxygen pulse (O(2) pulse), O(2) pulse at ventilatory anaerobic threshold, O(2) pulse at a heart rate of 140 beats per minute, and slope of the VO(2)-heart rate relationship all increased with age. However, when indexed to somatic growth, there was no change in the mean values of these parameters over time. We conclude that O(2 )pulse and slope of the VO(2)-heart rate relationship during exercise increase in proportion to somatic growth in children so that optimal oxygen delivery to the exercising muscles is ensured. This study provides the "normative" response of exercise parameters to growth, against which responses of children with repaired congenital heart disease may be compared.

  6. Heart rate variability and heart rate recovery as prognostic factors

    OpenAIRE

    GRAD, COSMIN

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim Heart rate (HR) can appear static and regular at rest, during exercise or recovery after exercise. However, HR is constantly adjusted due to factors such as breathing, blood pressure control, thermoregulation and the renin-angiotensin system, leading to a more dynamic response that can be quantified using HRV (heart rate variability). HRV is defined as the deviation in time between successive normal heart beat and is a noninvasive method to measure the total variation in a ...

  7. COPD patients' oxygen uptake and heart rate on-kinetics at cycle-ergometer: correlation with their predictors of severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessoa, Bruna V; Beltrame, Thomas; Di Lorenzo, Valéria A Pires; Catai, Aparecida M; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Jamami, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    To assess whether there is a correlation between oxygen uptake (VO2) and heart rate (HR) on-kinetics in the constant-load cycle-ergometer test (CLT) and the BODE index and its isolated variables in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Fourteen male patients between 55 and 78 years of age with moderate to severe COPD were evaluated. Each patient underwent spirometry, the six-minute walk test (6MWT), the cycle-ergometer incremental test (IT) and CLT on alternate days. The exhaled gases were collected, and the VO2 and HR on-kinetics were analyzed. The BODE index was calculated. It was noted that the VO2 tau (τ) and mean response time (MRT) were significantly higher than HR τ and MRT. Moderate and strong correlations between τ and MRT of the VO2 and HR and the BODE index was noted (r=0.75 and r=0.78; r=0.62 and r=0.63, respectively), and there were correlations between the VO2 τ and MRT and the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) (r=-0.60; r=-0.53) and the distance traveled at 6MWT (DT-6MWT) (r=-0.61; r=-0.44) and DT-6MWT % predicted (r=-0.62; r=-0.46). The HR τ and MRT were correlated with DT-6MWT (r=-0.59; r=-0.58) and DT-6MWT % predicted (r=-0.62; r=-0.62). The slowing of cycle-ergometer VO2, and especially of HR on-kinetics, may be key markers of disease severity. Furthermore, airflow obstruction and reduced exercise capacity are associated with the slowing of patients' VO2 and HR on-kinetics.

  8. How does heart rate recovery after sub-maximal exercise correlate with maximal exercise testing in children with CF?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Sarah P; Orenstein, David M

    2014-12-01

    Disease progression in cystic fibrosis (CF) is marked by worsening exercise tolerance. Further, maximal exercise capacity (VO2 peak) correlates with survival in CF, but maximal tests are uncomfortable and resource-intensive. A three-minute step test (STEP) has been validated in CF. Heart rate (HR) recovery after exercise correlates with all-cause mortality in adult non-CF populations. We compared HR recovery after the three-minute step test with VO2 peak in children with CF. Twenty-four children with CF performed STEP and a maximal exercise test. Correlation between the tests was assessed. Maximum HR on STEP was lower than on the maximal test (140 vs. 190, p<0.01). Peak HR during STEP correlated inversely with VO2 peak. In subjects with mild lung disease, faster HR recovery after STEP correlated with higher VO2 peak. The three-minute step test is a feasible submaximal test in this patient population. HR during and after a three-minute step test may reflect VO2 peak in children with CF. Copyright © 2014 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Endurance training guided individually by daily heart rate variability measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviniemi, Antti M; Hautala, Arto J; Kinnunen, Hannu; Tulppo, Mikko P

    2007-12-01

    Purpose of this study was to test utility of heart rate variability (HRV) in daily endurance exercise prescriptions. Twenty-six healthy, moderately fit males were randomized into predefined training group (TRA, n = 8), HRV-guided training group (HRV, n = 9), and control group (n = 9). Four-week training period consisted of running sessions lasting 40 min each at either low- or high-intensity level. TRA group trained on 6 days a week, with two sessions at low and four at high intensity. Individual training program for HRV group was based on individual changes in high-frequency R-R interval oscillations measured every morning. Increase or no change in HRV resulted in high-intensity training on that day. If there was significant decrease in HRV (below reference value [10-day mean-SD] or decreasing trend for 2 days), low-intensity training or rest was prescribed. Peak oxygen consumption (VO(2peak)) and maximal running velocity (Load(max)) were measured in maximal treadmill test before and after the training. In TRA group, Load(max) increased from 15.1 +/- 1.3 to 15.7 +/- 1.2 km h(-1) (P = 0.004), whereas VO(2peak) did not change significantly (54 +/- 4 pre and 55 +/- 3 ml kg(-1) min(-1) post, P = 0.224). In HRV group, significant increases were observed in both Load(max) (from 15.5 +/- 1.0 to 16.4 +/- 1.0 km h(-1), P < 0.001) and VO(2peak) (from 56 +/- 4 to 60 +/- 5 ml kg(-1) min(-1), P = 0.002). The change in Load(max) was significantly greater in HRV group compared to TRA group (0.5 +/- 0.4 vs. 0.9 +/- 0.2 km h(-1), P = 0.048, adjusted for baseline values). No significant differences were observed in the changes of VO(2peak) between the groups. We concluded that cardiorespiratory fitness can be improved effectively by using HRV for daily training prescription.

  10. Heart rate response to breathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J; Pagh, K; Nielsen, J S

    1987-01-01

    Heart rate responses to stepwise and periodic changes in lung volume were studied in seven young healthy males. Stepwise inspiration and expiration both resulted in an increase in heart rate followed by a rapid decrease in heart rate. The fastest heart rate was reached in 1.6 +/- 0.5 s and in 3.......6 +/- 1.4 s in response to inspiration and expiration, respectively (P less than 0.01). The slowest heart rate was reached in 4.8 +/- 1.0 s and in 7.6 +/- 1.9 s in response to inspiration and expiration, respectively (P less than 0.01). Following this biphasic change the heart rate returned to a steady...... level. The difference between the fastest and the slowest heart rates was significantly larger in response to inspiration (21.7 +/- 7.3 beats per minute) than in response to expiration (12.0 +/- 7.3 beats per minute; P less than 0.01). Periodic changes in lung volume were performed with frequencies from...

  11. Circadian rhythm of heart rate and heart rate variability

    OpenAIRE

    Massin, M; Maeyns, K.; Withofs, N.; Ravet, F.; Gerard, P.; Healy, M.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Measurements of heart rate variability (HRV) are increasingly used as markers of cardiac autonomic activity.
AIM—To examine circadian variation in heart rate and HRV in children.
SUBJECTS—A total of 57 healthy infants and children, aged 2 months to 15 years, underwent ambulatory 24 hour Holter recording. Monitoring was also performed on five teenagers with diabetes mellitus and subclinical vagal neuropathy in order to identify the origin of the circadian variat...

  12. Kinetics of VO(2) in professional cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucía, Alejandro; Hoyos, Jesús; Santalla, Alfredo; Pérez, Margarita; Chicharro, José L

    2002-02-01

    To analyze the kinetics of oxygen uptake (VO(2)) in professional road cyclists during a ramp cycle ergometer test and to compare the results with those derived from well-trained amateur cyclists. Twelve professional cyclists (P group; 25 +/- 1 yr; maximal power output (W(max)), 508.3 +/- 9.3 watts) and 10 amateur cyclists (A group; 22 +/- 1 y; W(max), 429.9 +/- 8.6 watts) performed a ramp test until exhaustion (power output increases of 25 watts x min(-1)). The regression lines of the VO(2):power output (W) relationship were calculated for the following three phases: phase I (below the lactate threshold (LT)), phase II (between LT and the respiratory compensation point (RCP)), and phase III (above RCP). In group P, the mean slope (Delta VO(2):Delta W) of the VO(2):W relationship decreased significantly (P 0.05) were found between phases I and II (P > 0.05) in group A, whereas Delta VO(2):Delta W significantly increased in phase III (P < 0.01), compared with phase II (10.2 +/- 0.3, 9.2 +/- 0.4, and 10.1 +/- 1.1 mL O(2) x watts(-1) x min(-1) in phases I, II, and III, respectively). The mean value of Delta VO(2):Delta W for phase III was significantly lower in group P than in group A (P < 0.01). Contrary to the case in amateur riders, the rise in VO(2) in professional cyclists is attenuated at moderate to high workloads. This is possibly an adaptation to the higher demands of their training/competition schedule.

  13. Differences in exercise capacity in patients with chronic left heart failure and chronic right heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Hua; Luo, Qin; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Zhao, Qing; Xi, Qun-Ying; Zhao, Zhi-Hui

    2014-11-01

    Exercise impairment is common in chronic left heart failure and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Exercise impairment degree is a strong predictor of clinical outcome. Our purpose was to evaluate differences in exercise capacity using cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) in patients with chronic left and right heart failure, and determine which factors were related to exercise impairment. 102 patients with class II/III New York Heart Association were involved in the study (41 with chronic left heart failure, 61 with chronic right heart failure secondary to PAH). All patients underwent CPX to evaluate exercise capacity. Patients with right heart failure had significantly lower peak oxygen uptake (VO2), peak VO2/kg ratio, peak oxygen uptake/heart rate (VO2/HR) ratio and increases in oxygen uptake/increase in work rateVO2/ΔWR) slope, and had higher minute ventilation/CO2 production ratio and peak dead space volume/tidal volume during exercise. In patients with left heart failure, peak VO2/HR ratio was positively correlated with ΔVO2/ΔWR slope. However, VO2 and VO2/HR ratio were positively correlated with ΔVO2/ΔWR slope in patients with right heart failure. Compared with left heart failure, patients with right heart failure showed worse exercise capacity resulting from worse pulmonary and cardiovascular adaptation to exercise. Copyright © 2014 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The reliability and validity of the Astrand nomogram and linear extrapolation for deriving VO2max from submaximal exercise data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macsween, A

    2001-09-01

    While the accepted measure of aerobic power remains the VO2max this test is extremely demanding even for athletes. There are serious practical and ethical concerns in attempting such testing in non-athletic or patient populations. An alternative method of measuring aerobic power in such populations is required. A limited body of work exists evaluating the accuracy of the Astrand-Ryhming nomogram and linear extrapolation of the heart rate/oxygen uptake plot. Issues exist in terms of both equipment employed and sample numbers. Twenty-five normal subjects (mean age 28.6, range 22-50) completed 52 trials (Bruce treadmill protocol) meeting stringent criteria for VO2max performance. Respiratory gases were measured with a portable gas analyser on a five-sec sample period. The data was analysed to allow comparison of the reliability and validity of linear extrapolations to three estimates of heart rate maximum with the Astrand nomogram prediction. Extrapolation was preferable yielding intraclass correlation co-efficients (ICC) of 0.9433 comparable to that of the observed VO2max at 0.9443 and a bias of -1.1 ml x min(-1) x kg(-1) representing a 2.19 percent underestimate. This study provides empirical evidence that extrapolation of submaximal data can be employed with confidence for both clinical monitoring and research purposes. With the use of portable equipment and submaximal testing the scope for future research in numerous populations and non-laboratory environments is considerably increased.

  15. Blood Pressure vs. Heart Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Blood Pressure vs. Heart Rate (Pulse) Updated:Sep 15,2017 ... content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP Introduction What ...

  16. Heart rate regulation and extreme bradycardia in diving emperor penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Jessica U; Stockard, Torre K; Williams, Cassondra L; Ponganis, Katherine V; Ponganis, Paul J

    2008-04-01

    To investigate the diving heart rate (f(H)) response of the emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri), the consummate avian diver, birds diving at an isolated dive hole in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica were outfitted with digital electrocardiogram recorders, two-axis accelerometers and time depth recorders (TDRs). In contrast to any other freely diving bird, a true bradycardia (f(H) significantly emperor penguins. Maximum instantaneous surface interval f(H) in this study is the highest ever recorded for emperor penguins (256 beats min(-1)), equivalent to f(H) at V(O(2)) max., presumably facilitating oxygen loading and post-dive metabolism. The classic Scholander-Irving dive response in these emperor penguins contrasts with the absence of true bradycardia in diving ducks, cormorants, and other penguin species.

  17. Identifying the active site in nitrogen-doped graphene for the VO2+/VO2(+) redox reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jutao; Fu, Xiaogang; Liu, Qiao; Liu, Yanru; Wei, Zhiyang; Niu, Kexing; Zhang, Junyan

    2013-06-25

    Nitrogen-doped graphene sheets (NGS), synthesized by annealing graphite oxide (GO) with urea at 700-1050 °C, were studied as positive electrodes in a vanadium redox flow battery. The NGS, in particular annealed at 900 °C, exhibited excellent catalytic performance in terms of electron transfer (ET) resistance (4.74 ± 0.51 and 7.27 ± 0.42 Ω for the anodic process and cathodic process, respectively) and reversibility (ΔE = 100 mV, Ipa/Ipc = 1.38 at a scan rate of 50 mV s(-1)). Detailed research confirms that not the nitrogen doping level but the nitrogen type in the graphene sheets determines the catalytic activity. Among four types of nitrogen species doped into the graphene lattice including pyridinic-N, pyrrolic-N, quaternary nitrogen, and oxidic-N, quaternary nitrogen is verified as a catalytic active center for the [VO](2+)/[VO2](+) couple reaction. A mechanism is proposed to explain the electrocatalytic performance of NGS for the [VO](2+)/[VO2](+) couple reaction. The possible formation of a N-V transitional bonding state, which facilitates the ET between the outer electrode and reactant ions, is a key step for its high catalytic activity.

  18. Heart rates during competitive orienteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, S R; Bailey, R; Lewis, J

    1993-03-01

    This study investigated the heart rate profiles of 16 experienced, competitive orienteers (aged 15-62 years) during three competitive events. Each competitor was assessed over three different types of course which were classified as: fast run (FR), slow run (SR) and highly physical (HP). The results showed that all subjects recorded heart rates that were between 140 and 180 beats min-1 for the majority of each event (irrespective of age or course type). The heart rate data indicated that the activity was largely aerobic but varied in intensity, with phases of strenuous anaerobic work. The type of course was shown significantly (analysis of variance; P orienteer (FR = 160, HP = 158, SR = 150 beats min-1), with courses that required more technical skill and hence slower running producing lower mean heart rates; although the general physical demands were similar for all courses. The older orienteers (> 45 years) recorded heart rate profiles that were similar to those of the young orienteers with no correlation being found between age and mean heart rate while exercising.

  19. HEART RATE RECOVERY AFTER EXERCISE AND NEURAL REGULATION OF HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN 30-40 YEAR OLD FEMALE MARATHON RUNNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Matsuoka

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of endurance training on heart rate (HR recovery after exercise and cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS modulation in female marathon runners by comparing with untrained controls. Six female marathon runners (M group aged 32-40 years and eight age-matched untrained females (C group performed a maximum-effort treadmill running exercise. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max was measured during the exercise with a gas analyzer connected to subjects through a face mask. Heart rate, blood pressure and blood lactate were measured before and after the exercise. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE to the exercise was obtained immediately after the exercise. Holter ECG was recorded and analyzed with power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV to investigate the cardiac ANS modulation. The M group had significantly higher VO2max, faster HR recovery after exercise, higher Mean RR, SDRR, HF power and lower LF/HF ratio at rest compared with the C group. The M group also presented greater percent decrease of blood pressure after exercise, although their blood pressure after exercise was higher than the C group. It is suggested that endurance training induced significant alterations in cardiac ANS modulation at rest and significant acceleration of HR recovery after exercise in female marathon runners. Faster HR recovery after exercise in the female marathon runners should result from their higher levels of HRV, higher aerobic capacity and exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise compared with untrained controls.

  20. Maximal heart rate does not limit cardiovascular capacity in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, G D W; Svendsen, J H; Damsgaard, R

    2014-01-01

    In humans, maximal aerobic power (VO2 max ) is associated with a plateau in cardiac output (Q), but the mechanisms regulating the interplay between maximal heart rate (HRmax) and stroke volume (SV) are unclear. To evaluate the effect of tachycardia and elevations in HRmax on cardiovascular function...... and capacity during maximal exercise in healthy humans, 12 young male cyclists performed incremental cycling and one-legged knee-extensor exercise (KEE) to exhaustion with and without right atrial pacing to increase HR. During control cycling, Q and leg blood flow increased up to 85% of maximal workload (WLmax...... and RAP (P exercise, suggesting that HRmax and myocardial work capacity do not limit VO2 max in healthy...

  1. HCN Channels and Heart Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Dentamaro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization and Cyclic Nucleotide (HCN -gated channels represent the molecular correlates of the “funny” pacemaker current (If, a current activated by hyperpolarization and considered able to influence the sinus node function in generating cardiac impulses. HCN channels are a family of six transmembrane domain, single pore-loop, hyperpolarization activated, non-selective cation channels. This channel family comprises four members: HCN1-4, but there is a general agreement to consider HCN4 as the main isoform able to control heart rate. This review aims to summarize advanced insights into the structure, function and cellular regulation of HCN channels in order to better understand the role of such channels in regulating heart rate and heart function in normal and pathological conditions. Therefore, we evaluated the possible therapeutic application of the selective HCN channels blockers in heart rate control.

  2. Heart-rate deflection point and the second heart-rate variability threshold during running exercise in trained boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, Martin; Solano, Roberto; Millet, Grégoire Paul

    2007-05-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to compare the accuracy of the heart-rate (HR) deflection point (HRDP) and the second HR variability threshold (HRVTh2) to predict anaerobic threshold in boys. HRDP was determined from slope trends of successive linear regressions. HRVTh2 was determined from the high frequency's peak and power-density trends. The second ventilatory threshold (VTh2) corresponding to the first decrease in PETCO2, with an increase in VE /VCO2, was used as the reference measure of AnT. Results show that VO2 and HR were similar at HRDP, HRVTh2, and VTh2. HRVTh2 and HRDP were highly correlated. It appears that HRVTh2 is a good alternative to HRDP for assessing anaerobic threshold. HRVTh2 and HRDP might rely on similar mechanisms.

  3. Selective growth of single phase VO2(A, B, and M polymorph thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar Srivastava

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the growth of high quality single phase films of VO2(A, B, and M on SrTiO3 substrate by controlling the vanadium arrival rate (laser frequency and oxidation of the V atoms. A phase diagram has been developed (oxygen pressure versus laser frequency for various phases of VO2 and their electronic properties are investigated. VO2(A phase is insulating VO2(B phase is semi-metallic, and VO2(M phase exhibits a metal-insulator transition, corroborated by photo-electron spectroscopic studies. The ability to control the growth of various polymorphs opens up the possibility for novel (heterostructures promising new device functionalities.

  4. [Influence of physical workload patterns and breaks on heart rate recovery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoya, Manabu; Izumi, Hiroyuki; Kubota, Makoto; Yamashita, Tsuyoshi; Kumashiro, Masaharu

    2010-01-01

    It is necessary to try to achieve quick recovery from work strain by setting adequate breaks and shortening continuous working hours to prevent the accumulation of fatigue. However, there has been no research investigating the influence of the timing and lengths of breaks on individual aerobic capacities in recovery from work strain. In this study, we set three load patterns based on the length and timing of breaks: "no breaks", "one break" and "regular small breaks". We examined the differences of the heart rate variation in the recovery time after working considering the individual aerobic capacities (VO(2)max) of ten male subjects (mean age 22.3 +/- 1.7 yr) in the case of 50 W or 100 W workloads on a bicycle ergometer. When individual aerobic capacity was not considered, the "regular small breaks" condition led to the quickest recovery to the level of the resting heart rate at 50 W workload. Not all conditions showed heart rate recovery within 30 min at 100 W workload. On the other hand, when individual aerobic capacity was considered, the "regular small breaks" condition showed the quickest recovery to the level of the resting heart rate at 50 W workload in the low aerobic capacity group (VO(2)max mean 42.2 +/- 3.7 ml/kg/min). However, in the high aerobic capacity group (VO(2)max mean 54.5 +/- 4.1 ml/kg/min), the "regular small breaks" condition resulted in the quickest recovery of the level to the resting heart rate at 100W workload. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA was performed for the recovery time with respect to the rate of increase from resting heart rate to examine the influence on heart rate recovery of physical activity loads, workload patterns and individual fitness. Physical activity loads were strongly related to the increase from resting heart rate in recovery time, and workload patterns showed that the regular small breaks condition was related to the heart rate recovery in the high fitness subjects in the case of the exercise intensity of 100 W

  5. Time to Exhaustion at the VO2max Velocity in Swimming: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ricardo J; Vilas-Boas, J Paulo

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to present a review on the time to exhaustion at the minimum swimming velocity corresponding to maximal oxygen consumption (TLim-vVO2max). This parameter is critical both for the aerobic power and the lactate tolerance bioenergetical training intensity zones, being fundamental to characterize it, and to point out its main determinants. The few number of studies conducted in this topic observed that swimmers were able to maintain an exercise intensity corresponding to maximal aerobic power during 215 to 260 s (elite swimmers), 230 to 260 s (high level swimmers) and 310 to 325 s (low level swimmers), and no differences between genders were reported. TLim-vVO2max main bioenergetic and functional determinants were swimming economy and VO2 slow component (direct relationship), and vVO2max, velocity at anaerobic threshold and blood lactate production (inverse relationship); when more homogeneous groups of swimmers were analysed, the inverse correlation value between TLim-vVO2max and vVO2max was not so evident. In general, TLim-vVO2max was not related to VO2max. TLim-vVO2max seems also to be influenced by stroking parameters, with a direct relationship to stroke length and stroke index, and an inverse correlation with stroke rate. Assessing TLim-vVO2max, together with the anaerobic threshold and the biomechanical general parameters, will allow a larger spectrum of testing protocols application, helping to build more objective and efficient training programs.

  6. Dimensional analysis of heart rate variability in heart transplant recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zbilut, J.P.; Mayer-Kress, G.; Geist, K.

    1987-01-01

    We discuss periodicities in the heart rate in normal and transplanted hearts. We then consider the possibility of dimensional analysis of these periodicities in transplanted hearts and problems associated with the record.

  7. Is time limit at the minimum swimming velocity of VO2 max influenced by stroking parameters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ricardo J; Marinho, Daniel A; Barbosa, Tiago M; Vilas-Boas, J Paulo

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the relationship between time limit at the minimum velocity that elicits maximal oxygen consumption (TLim-v VO2 max) and stroke rate, stroke length, and stroke index. 13 men and 10 women, highly trained swimmers, performed an intermittent incremental test for v VO2 max assessment and an all-out swim to estimate TLim-v VO2 max. The mean +/- SD TLim-v VO2 max, v VO2 max, stroke rate, stroke length, and stroke index values were 233.36 +/- 53.92 sec., 1.40 +/- .06 meter/sec., 35.58 +/- 2.89 cycles/min., 2.39 +/- .22 meter/cycle, and 3.36 +/- .41 meter2/(cycle x sec.), respectively. The correlation between TLim-v VO2 max and stroke rate was -.51 (p VO2 max with stroke length (r = .52, p < .01) and stroke index (r = .45, p < .05). These results seem to suggest that technical skill is a key factor in typical efforts requiring prolonged aerobic power.

  8. Heart dimensions may influence the occurrence of the heart rate deflection point in highly trained cyclists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, A.; Carvajal, A.; Boraita, A.; Serratosa, L.; Hoyos, J.; Chicharro, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether the heart rate (HR) response to exercise in 21 highly trained cyclists (mean (SD) age 25 (3) years) was related to their heart dimensions. METHODS: Before performing an incremental exercise test involving a ramp protocol with workload increases of 25 W/min, each subject underwent echocardiographic evaluation of the following variables: left ventricular end diastolic internal diameter (LVIDd), left ventricular posterior wall thickness at end diastole (LVPWTd), interventricular septal wall thickness at end diastole (IVSTd), left ventricular mass index (LVMI), left atrial dimension (LAD), longitudinal left atrial (LLAD) and right atrial (LRAD) dimensions, and the ratio of early to late (E/A) diastolic flow velocity. RESULTS: The HR response showed a deflection point (HRd) at about 85% VO2MAX in 66.7% of subjects (D group; n = 14) and was linear in 33.3% (NoD group; n = 7). Several echocardiographic variables (LVMI, LAD, LLAD, LRAD) indicative of heart dimensions were similar in each group. However, mean LPWTd (p<0.01) and IVSTd (p<0.05) values were significantly higher in the D group. Finally, no significant difference between groups was found with respect to the E/A. CONCLUSIONS: The HR response is curvilinear during incremental exercise in a considerable number of highly trained endurance athletes-that is, top level cyclists. The departure of HR increase from linearity may predominantly occur in athletes with thicker heart walls. 


 PMID:10597846

  9. Individual versus Standardized Running Protocols in the Determination of VO2max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperlich, Paula F; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Reed, Jennifer L; Zinner, Christoph; Mester, Joachim; Sperlich, Billy

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether an individually designed incremental exercise protocol results in greater rates of oxygen uptake (VO2max) than standardized testing. Fourteen well-trained, male runners performed five incremental protocols in randomized order to measure their VO2max: i) an incremental test (INCS+I) with pre-defined increases in speed (2 min at 8.64 km·h(-1), then a rise of 1.44 km·h(-1) every 30 s up to 14.4 km·h(-1)) and thereafter inclination (0.5° every 30 s); ii) an incremental test (INCI) at constant speed (14.4 km·h(-1)) and increasing inclination (2° every 2 min from the initial 0°); iii) an incremental test (INCS) at constant inclination (0°) and increasing speed (0.5 km·h(-1) every 30 s from the initial 12.0 km·h(-1)); iv) a graded exercise protocol (GXP) at a 1° incline with increasing speed (initially 8.64 km·h(-1) + 1.44 km·h(-1) every 5 min); v) an individual exercise protocol (INDXP) in which the runner chose the inclination and speed. VO2max was lowest (-4.2%) during the GXP (p = 0.01; d = 0.06-0.61) compared to all other tests. The highest rating of perceived exertion, heart rate, ventilation and end-exercise blood lactate concentration were similar between the different protocols (p VO2max attained by employing an individual treadmill protocol does not differ from the values derived from various standardized incremental protocols. Key pointsThe mean maximum oxygen uptake during the GXP was lower than for all other tests.Differences in the maximum rate of oxygen uptake between the various protocols exhibited considerable inter-individual variation.From the current findings, it can be concluded that well trained athletes are able to perform an individually designed treadmill running protocol.

  10. Effect of hindlimb suspension on VO2 max and regional blood flow responses to exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, J M; Woodman, C R; Tipton, C M

    1989-02-01

    Male rodents were studied before and after undergoing one of three treatment conditions for 9 days: 1) cage control (n = 15, CON), 2) horizontal suspension (n = 15, HOZ), and 3) head-down suspension (n = 18, HDT). Testing included measurements of maximal O2 uptake (VO2 max) and select cardiovascular responses to graded treadmill exercise. VO2 max expressed on an absolute basis (ml/min) was significantly decreased after HOZ (-14.1 +/- 2.5%) and HDT (-14.3 +/- 2.0%), while being essentially unchanged in CON (-1.0 +/- 3.3%). Significant reductions in body weight were observed after both HOZ (-10.1 +/- 4.2 g) and HDT (-22.5 +/- 3.3 g), whereas CON animals exhibited a significant increase in weight (10.4 +/- 3.8 g). As a result, when VO2 max was normalized for body weight, all groups exhibited similar significant reductions of 6-7%. Although no differences in heart rate and blood pressure response to graded exercise were observed, the HDT group exhibited greater increases in mesenteric resistance at the same absolute exercise intensity. Furthermore, both suspended groups had higher iliac resistance values during exercise at similar relative exercise conditions, suggesting that muscle blood flow during treadmill running may have been reduced after suspension. In general, the decrements associated with the HOZ and HDT conditions were similar. It was concluded that reduction in exercise capacity and altered cardiovascular responses to exercise observed after 6-9 days of suspension were attributable to a combination of hypokinesia, lack of hindlimb weight bearing, or restraint, rather than to hydrostatic influences associated with HDT.

  11. Applicability of an Indirect VO2max Test: Its Association with the 400 Meters Freestyle Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalberto Veronese da Costa

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the VO2max using a previously validated indirect test for non-expert adult swimmers and to verify its connection with the 400 meters freestyle test. A total of 17 non-expert male swimmers (21.5 ± 3.12 years were evaluated. Body composition measurements included body weight (74 ± 9.41 kg, height (172.9 ± 5.21 cm and body fat percentage (15.2 ± 4.15 %. Two tests were conducted on different days; the 400 meters freestyle (400 MF and the Progressive Swim Test (PSwT, respectively. The participant's heart rate frequency before and after the test (BHR and AHR was analyzed, as well as the subjective perception of effort (RPE, the number of laps covered (NLP, and the time of test execution measured in minutes. Significant differences were identified in all variables (p - 0.60 was found between AHR and execution time (r > - 0.70, as well as between the VO2max estimated by the PSwT and the 400 MF performance test (r > - 0.70. The Bland-Altman Plot showed that the values discovered were within the established concordance limits of 95% (±1.96 SD. A negative correlation between a swimming test and a test that estimates the VO2max occurred, and the PSwT showed results of greater approximation of the aerobic power of non-expert swimmers. In conclusion, the PSwT is applicable for non-expert adult swimmers.

  12. Potassium supplementation and heart rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, L.; Molenberg, Famke; Bakker, S.J.L.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Increasing the intake of potassium has been shown to lower blood pressure, but whether it also affects heart rate (HR) is largely unknown. We therefore assessed the effect of potassium supplementation on HR in a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Methods and resul

  13. Min-By-Min Respiratory Exchange and Oxygen Uptake Kinetics During Steady-State Exercise in Subjects of High and Low Max VO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltman, Arthur; Katch, Victor

    1976-01-01

    No statistically meaningful differences in steady-state vo2 uptake for high and low max vo2 groups was indicated in this study, but a clear tendency was observed for the high max vo2 group to reach the steady-state at a faster rate. (MB)

  14. Heart rate variability and heart rate recovery as prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grad, Cosmin

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) can appear static and regular at rest, during exercise or recovery after exercise. However, HR is constantly adjusted due to factors such as breathing, blood pressure control, thermoregulation and the renin-angiotensin system, leading to a more dynamic response that can be quantified using HRV (heart rate variability). HRV is defined as the deviation in time between successive normal heart beat and is a noninvasive method to measure the total variation in a number of HR interval. HRV can serve as measure of autonomic activity of sino-atrial node. The aim of the study was to determine the influence of certain clinical and paraclinical parameters on heart rate recovery after exercise in patients with ischemic heart disease and the relation with HRV using 24 h Holter monitoring. The study included 46 patients who were submitted to cardiovascular exercise stress test and also to 24 h Holter EKG monitoring. Subjects had a mean age of 56.2±11.2 years, with a minimum of 25 and a maximum of 79 years. The study included 22 (47.8%) men and 24 (52.2%) women. Statistical analysis was performed using MedCalc software version 14.8.1. Multivariate analysis consisted of the construction of several multiple linear regression models. A p value of 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The HRV values (time domain) were all lower in the IHD compared with the group without coronary heart disease, even if the difference is not statistically significant. Also rest and maximal HR values were similar but during the test varies in the sense that those with IHD had higher values of rest and maximal HR and lower HRR, but not statistically significant. HRV is a very easy and safe method if there is an available device and it is used for evaluation of the autonomic nervous system in many cardiovascular diseases, but also in other pathologies. In uncomplicated ischemic heart disease HRV is depressed, but not significant. HRR, which is also considered an indicator of the

  15. Comparison of VO2 Max Prediction Value, Physiological Response, and Borg Scale between 12-Minute and 3200-Meter Run Fitness Tests among Indonesian Army Soldiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maulidi Abdillah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the VO2 max and physiological responses between 12-minute and 3200-meter run fitness tests. Methods: The subjects were 40 soldiers aged 18–21 years old of the Infantry Battalion 303/SSM of Cikajang, Garut, West Java, Indonesia. The 12-minute and 3200-meter run fitness tests were conducted with one week resting period. The measurement of the VO2 max prediction was based on each of the formulations and the measurement of physiological response included blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, Borg scale and oxygen saturation before and after the tests. This study used a cross-sectional method while the data were analyzed statistically using t-test (p=0.05. Results: The results showed that the VO2 max prediction in 12-minute run fitness test was 52.046±2.980 mL/KgBB/min and the 3200-meter run test was 55.323±3.238 mL/KgBB/min. The value was statistically significant (p=0.008. There was no significant difference in the physiological response in both tests, except the SpO2 parameter after the tests (p=0.021. Conclusions: There is a significant difference in VO2 max prediction between 12 minutes and 3200 meter run test. No significant difference was found in the physiological response in both tests, except the SpO2 parameter.

  16. Blunted heart rate recovery is improved following exercise training in overweight adults with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Christopher E; Crowley, E Patrick; Ewing, Gary B; Burch, James B; Blair, Steven N; Durstine, J Larry; Davis, J Mark; Youngstedt, Shawn D

    2013-08-20

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) predisposes individuals to cardiovascular morbidity, and cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) markers prognostic for cardiovascular disease have been found to be abnormal in adults with OSA. Due to the persistence of OSA and its cardiovascular consequences, whether the cardiovascular adaptations normally conferred by exercise are blunted in adults not utilizing established OSA treatment is unknown. The aims of this study were to document whether OSA participants have abnormal CPET responses and determine whether exercise modifies these CPET markers in individuals with OSA. The CPET responses of 43 sedentary, overweight adults (body mass index [BMI]>25) with untreated OSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI]≥ 15) were compared against matched non-OSA controls (n=9). OSA participants were then randomized to a 12-week exercise training (n=27) or stretching control treatment (n=16), followed by a post-intervention CPET. Measures of resting, exercise, and post-exercise recovery heart rate (HRR), blood pressure, and ventilation, as well as peak oxygen consumption (VO(2peak)), were obtained. OSA participants had blunted HRR compared to non-OSA controls at 1 (P=.03), 3 (P=.02), and 5-min post-exercise (P=.03). For OSA participants, exercise training improved VO2 peak (P=.04) and HRR at 1 (P=.03), 3 (Pexercise (Pexercise (r=-.30, Pexercise training, by increasing HRR and VO2 peak, may attenuate autonomic imbalance and improve functional capacity independent of OSA severity reduction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Relationship between post-exercise heart rate variability and skinfold thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esco, Michael R; Williford, Henry N

    2013-01-01

    This investigation aimed to determine if groupings based upon sum of skinfold thickness (SF) would reflect the differences in heart rate variability (HRV) measured for up to 30-minutes following maximal exercise, and to determine the extent in variation in post-exercise HRV that could be accounted for between the following independent variables: SF, body mass index (BMI) and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max). SF and BMI measurements were performed on fifty-four men who completed maximal exercise testing to determine VO2max. HRV was evaluated for five-minutes before (Pre), at 0-5 minutes post- (Post1) and 25-30 minutes post-exercise (Post2), and analyzed by frequency domain [high frequency (HF) power, and HF to low frequency power ratio (LF:HF)). Two groups were formed based on being above or below the sample mean value of SF. HF and LF:HF were significantly higher and lower, respectively, at Pre and Post 2 in Group 1 compared to Group 2 (p  0.05). In addition, SF was the only variable to significantly relate to the post-exercise HRV parameters (p < 0.05). The findings of this investigation suggest greater SF is related to a delayed return of HRV toward baseline from maximal exercise. The association between SF and HRV is independent of VO2max and BMI.

  18. Enhanced electrochemical performance of orientated VO2(B) raft-like nanobelt arrays through direct lithiation for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liang; Liu, Qiang; Zhao, Wen; Li, Guochun; Wang, Limei; Shi, Weidong; Chen, Long

    2017-02-01

    Lithiation modification of VO2(B) has been carried out by a facile hydrothermal process, and the compact and locally ordered VO2(B) raft-like nanobelt arrays have been prepared. The synthesis route provides a new approach to elaborate a VO2(B) nanostructure under a mild environment condition. It is found that the growth mechanism of VO2(B) raft-like nanobelt arrays is different from the traditional nucleation-growth process. A novel chemical lithiating-exfoliating-splitting model is proposed. Compared with the bulk counterpart, the lithiated VO2(B) raft-like nanobelt arrays as cathodes exhibit a higher discharge capacity and an enhanced high-rate performance owing to their increased structural anisotropy and decreased polarization. This work indicates that VO2(B) raft-like nanobelt arrays have great potential applications as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries.

  19. All about Heart Rate (Pulse)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  20. Effects of muscle electrical stimulation on peak VO2 in cardiac transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, A F; Chicharro, J L; Gil, L; Ruiz, M P; Sánchez, V; Lucía, A; Urrea, S; Gómez, M A

    1998-07-01

    Peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2) has become a critical component in the evaluation of heart transplant recipients (HTR). In these patients, peak VO2 remains low after cardiac transplantation mainly because of persisting peripheral limitations in the working muscles. Muscular electrical stimulation, on the other hand, has been shown to enhance the oxidative capacity of healthy muscle. It was the purpose of our investigation to study the effects of ES on the peak VO2 of HTR. Fourteen (11 males and 3 females) HTR (age: 57+/-7yr, mean +/- SD; height: 163+/-7 cm, weight: 70.5+/-8.6 kg) were selected as subjects and each of them was randomly assigned to one of two groups: (a) group EXP (n = 7), receiving electrical stimulation on both quadriceps muscles during a period of 8 weeks, and (b) group CONT (n = 7), not receiving electrical stimulation. Before (PRE) and after (POST) the aforementioned 8-week period, respectively, all the subjects performed a cardiopulmonary exercise test (ramp protocol) on a cycle ergometer for peak VO2 determination. PRE values of peak VO2 were similar in both groups (17.1+/-2.0 vs 16.9+/-3.8ml x kg(-1) x min(-1) in EXP and CONT, respectively). However, peak values of VO2 significantly increased in EXP (p < 0.05) after the period of electrical stimulation (POST peak VO2: 18.7+/-2.0ml x kg(-1)), whereas no change was observed in CONT (POST peak VO2: 16.2+/-3.2 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)). In conclusion, electrical stimulation could therefore be used to improve the functional capacity of HTR, and might be included in the rehabilitation programs of this population group.

  1. Resting heart rate, heart rate variability and functional decline in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ogliari, Giulia; Mahinrad, Simin; Stott, David J;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart rate and heart rate variability, markers of cardiac autonomic function, have been linked with cardiovascular disease. We investigated whether heart rate and heart rate variability are associated with functional status in older adults, independent of cardiovascular disease. METHODS......: We obtained data from the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER). A total of 5042 participants were included in the present study, and mean followup was 3.2 years. Heart rate and heart rate variability were derived from baseline 10-second electrocardiograms. Heart rate...... heart rate and lower heart rate variability were associated with worse functional status and with higher risk of future functional decline in older adults...

  2. High performance of solvothermally prepared VO2(B as anode for aqueous rechargeable lithium batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Sanja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The VO2 (B was synthesized via a simple solvothermal route at 160oC in ethanol. The initial discharge capacity of VO2 (B anode, in saturated aqueous solution of LiNO3, was 177 mAh g-1 at a current rate of 50 mA g-1. After 50 cycles capacity fade was 4%, but from 20th-50th cycle no capacity drop was observed. The VO2 (B has shown very good cyclability at current rate of even 1000 mA g-1 with initial discharge capacity of 92 mAh g-1. The excellent electrochemical performance of VO2 (B was attributed to the stability of micro-nano structures to repeated intercalation /deintercalation process, very good electronic conductivity as well as the very low charge transfer resistance in the aqueous electrolyte. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III45014

  3. Specificity of VO2MAX and the ventilatory threshold in free swimming and cycle ergometry: comparison between triathletes and swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roels, B; Schmitt, L; Libicz, S; Bentley, D; Richalet, J-P; Millet, G

    2005-12-01

    To compare maximal heart rate (HRmax), maximal oxygen consumption (VO2MAX), and the ventilatory threshold (VT; %VO2MAX) during cycle ergometry and free swimming between swimmers and triathletes. Nine swimmers and ten triathletes completed an incremental swimming and cycling test to exhaustion. Whole body metabolic responses were determined in each test. The swimmers exhibited a significantly higher VO2MAX in swimming than in cycling (58.4 (5.6) v 51.3 (5.1) ml/kg/min), whereas the opposite was found in the triathletes (53.0 (6.7) v 68.2 (6.8) ml/kg/min). HRmax was significantly different in the maximal cycling and swimming tests for the triathletes (188.6 (7.5) v 174.8 (9.0) beats/min). In the maximal swimming test, HRmax was significantly higher in the swimmers than in the triathletes (174.8 (9.0) v 184.6 (9.7) beats/min). No significant differences were found for VT measured in swimming and cycling in the triathletes and swimmers. This study confirms that the exercise testing mode affects the VO2MAX value, and that swimmers have very specific training adaptations even compared with triathletes. This may be a function of acute physiological responses combined with the specialist training status of the different athletes influencing maximal cardiac output or oxygen extraction. In contrast, the different training regimens do not seem to influence the VT, as this variable did not differ between the two testing modes in either group.

  4. Resting autonomic modulations and the heart rate response to exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David; Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Donovan, Gay; Singleton, Lynette D; Sandercock, Gavin R H; Brodie, David A

    2010-08-01

    Identify the underlying role of resting heart rate variability (HRV) in the hearts response to graded exercise testing (GXT). Resting 5-min HRV and heart rate (HR) measurements were made in 33 volunteers (19 males, median age 34, range 25-63 years and 14 females median age 48, range 21-63 years). Measures of VO2 peak and HR obtained during a maximal GXT and heart rate recovery (HRR) post-GXT were assessed for associations with resting HRV. Differences and effect size (d) for measures of HRV were assessed between groups based on established risk cut-points for resting, exercise and recovery HR responses. Small associations were observed for the majority of resting HRV and GXT HR responses (best r value = -0.27, P > 0.05). Measures of HRV demonstrated moderate associations with HRR (best r value = 0.46, P < 0.05) and were able to predict a negative risk HRR. In contrast to other dependent variables, measures of HRV were consistently able to demonstrate significant and moderate to large (d = 0.9-2.0) differences between groups based on literature defined prognostic HR cut-points. Small associations with HR responses to exercise prevent their accurate prediction from resting HRV. Data support the use of vagally mediated resting HRV in predicting better HRR. Lower resting autonomic modulations underlined high risk resting and exercise HR responses. Resting short-term HRV measurements should be considered when assessing cardiac autonomic health from the HR response before, during and/or after exercise.

  5. Improved VO2max and time trial performance with more high aerobic intensity interval training and reduced training volume: a case study on an elite national cyclist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Støren, Øyvind; Bratland-Sanda, Solfrid; Haave, Marius; Helgerud, Jan

    2012-10-01

    The present study investigated to what extent more high aerobic intensity interval training (HAIT) and reduced training volume would influence maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and time trial (TT) performance in an elite national cyclist in the preseason period. The cyclist was tested for VO2max, cycling economy (C(c)), and TT performance on an ergometer cycle during 1 year. Training was continuously logged using heart rate monitor during the entire period. Total monthly training volume was reduced in the 2011 preseason compared with the 2010 preseason, and 2 HAIT blocks (14 sessions in 9 days and 15 sessions in 10 days) were performed as running. Between the HAIT blocks, 3 HAIT sessions per week were performed as cycling. From November 2010 to February 2011, the cyclist reduced total average monthly training volume by 18% and cycling training volume by 60%. The amount of training at 90-95% HRpeak increased by 41%. VO2max increased by 10.3% on ergometer cycle. TT performance improved by 14.9%. C(c) did not change. In conclusion, preseason reduced total training volume but increased amount of HAIT improved VO2max and TT performance without any changes in C(c). These improvements on cycling appeared despite that the HAIT blocks were performed as running. Reduced training time, and training transfer from running into improved cycling form, may be beneficial for cyclists living in cold climate areas.

  6. Prior Knowledge of Trial Number Influences the Incidence of Plateau at VO2max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Dan; Caddy, Oliver; Merzbach, Viviane; Gernigon, Marie; Baker, James; Scruton, Adrian; Keiller, Don; Barnes, Richard

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the VO2max plateau response at VO2max during a series of pre-determined trials. Ten male well-trained athletes (age, 23.0 ± 3.2; height, 183.3 ± 5.5 cm; mass 77.5 ± 11.1 Kg; VO2max 66.5 ± 5.0 ml(.)kg(-1,)min(-1)), but who were VO2max testing naïve and with prior-knowledge of trial number completed four incremental tests to volitional exhaustion, separated by ~72-h for the determination of VO2max and gas exchange threshold. Throughout all trials VO2max was recorded on a breath-by-breath basis using a pre-calibrated metabolic cart, using a plateau criterion of Δ VO2 ≤1.5 ml(.)kg(-1.)min(-1) over the final 2 consecutive 30 s sampling periods. A significant difference was observed between trial-1 and trial-4 for plateau incidence (p = 0.0285) rising from 20% in trial-1 to a 70% response rate in trial-4. Furthermore a significant difference was observed for VO2dif (difference between criterion value and Δ VO2) in trial-1, 1.02 ± 1.69 ml(.)kg(-1.)min(-1) (p = 0.038), with non-significant differences observed for all other trials, despite a non-significant difference for VO2max across all trials (p > 0.05). Finally, a significant difference was observed for effort perception (RPE) at volitional exhaustion between trial-1 (17.7 ± 1.3) and trial-4 (19.0 ± 1.4) (p = 0.0052). These data indicate that prior-knowledge of trial number can influence the manifestation of the VO2 plateau in a group of well-trained male athletes, thereby suggesting that a form of effort control is established in order to preserve the finite anaerobic capacity. Key pointsIn well-trained athletes the incidence of plateau at VO2max increases in conjunction with an increase in trial number and the associated sensations of pain and fatigue.By informing the participant of the number of trials to be completed a closed-loop condition is developed whereby effort in all trials is compared to a perceptually developed template.Closed-loop condition leads to a

  7. Effect of nonstoichiometry on Raman scattering of VO2 films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Hong-Tao; Feng Ke-Cheng; Wang Xue-Jin; Li Chao; He Chen-Juan; Nie Yu-Xin

    2004-01-01

    @@ We report on Raman scattering of VO2 films prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering under different conditions. Our investigations revealed that the dominated Raman peaks shift towards high frequency for both V-rich and O-rich VO2 films, compared with the stoichiometry VO2 films. The experimental evidence is presented and the cause for nonstoichiometry dependence of Raman spectra of VO2 films is discussed.

  8. Relationship between laboratory-measured variables and heart rate during an ultra-endurance triathlon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Paul B; Knez, Wade L; Shing, Cecilia M; Langill, Robert H; Rhodes, Edward C; Jenkins, David G

    2005-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between the performance heart rate during an ultra-endurance triathlon and the heart rate corresponding to several demarcation points measured during laboratory-based progressive cycle ergometry and treadmill running. Less than one month before an ultra-endurance triathlon, 21 well-trained ultra-endurance triathletes (mean +/- s: age 35 +/- 6 years, height 1.77 +/- 0.05 m, mass 74.0 +/- 6.9 kg, = 4.75 +/- 0.42 l x min(-1)) performed progressive exercise tests of cycle ergometry and treadmill running for the determination of peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), heart rate corresponding to the first and second ventilatory thresholds, as well as the heart rate deflection point. Portable telemetry units recorded heart rate at 60 s increments throughout the ultra-endurance triathlon. Heart rate during the cycle and run phases of the ultra-endurance triathlon (148 +/- 9 and 143 +/- 13 beats x min(-1) respectively) were significantly (P triathlon were significantly related to (r = 0.76 and 0.66; P triathlon and heart rate at the first ventilatory threshold was related to marathon run time (r = 0.61; P triathlon time (r = 0.45; P triathlon at an exercise intensity near their first ventilatory threshold.

  9. Resistance modulation in VO2 nanowires induced by an electric field via air-gap gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanki, Teruo; Chikanari, Masashi; Wei, Tingting; Tanaka, Hidekazu; The Institute of Scientific; Industrial Research Team

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) shows huge resistance change with metal-insulator transition (MIT) at around room temperature. Controlling of the MIT by applying an electric field is a topical ongoing research toward the realization of Mott transistor. In this study, we have successfully switched channel resistance of VO2 nano-wire channels by a pure electrostatic field effect using a side-gate-type field-effect transistor (SG-FET) viaair gap and found that single crystalline VO2 nanowires and the channels with narrower width enhance transport modulation rate. The rate of change in resistance ((R0-R)/R, where R0 and R is the resistance of VO2 channel with off state and on state gate voltage (VG) , respectively) was 0.42 % at VG = 30 V in in-plane poly-crystalline VO2 channels on Al2O3(0001) substrates, while the rate in single crystalline channels on TiO2 (001) substrates was 3.84 %, which was 9 times higher than that using the poly-crystalline channels. With reducing wire width from 3000 nm to 400 nm of VO2 on TiO2 (001) substrate, furthermore, resistance modulation ratio enhanced from 0.67 % to 3.84 %. This change can not be explained by a simple free-electron model. In this presentation, we will compare the electronic properties between in-plane polycrystalline VO2 on Al2O3 (0001) and single crystalline VO2 on TiO2 (001) substrates, and show experimental data in detail..

  10. Multifractality and heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Roberto; Signorini, Maria Gabriella; Cerutti, Sergio

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we participate to the discussion set forth by the editor of Chaos for the controversy, "Is the normal heart rate chaotic?" Our objective was to debate the question, "Is there some more appropriate term to characterize the heart rate variability (HRV) fluctuations?" We focused on the ≈24 h RR series prepared for this topic and tried to verify with two different techniques, generalized structure functions and wavelet transform modulus maxima, if they might be described as being multifractal. For normal and congestive heart failure subjects, the hq exponents showed to be decreasing for increasing q with both methods, as it should be for multifractal signals. We then built 40 surrogate series to further verify such hypothesis. For most of the series (≈75%-80% of cases) multifractality stood the test of the surrogate data employed. On the other hand, series coming from patients in atrial fibrillation showed a small, if any, degree of multifractality. The population analyzed is too small for definite conclusions, but the study supports the use of multifractal series to model HRV. Also it suggests that the regulatory action of autonomous nervous system might play a role in the observed multifractality.

  11. Research on the Correlation between the .VO2 max and Resting Function of Heart and Lung-Taking Female College Students in Non-Sports Professional as an Example%最大耗氧量与安静时心输出量和肺呼吸功能相关性研究--以非运动专业的青年女大学生为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程宙明; 卢健; 牛俊茹; 张涛; 陈贝贝; 邱林利; 陈彩珍; 季浏

    2015-01-01

    Objective :This paper explores the correlation between .VO2 max and function of rest‐ing heart and lung ,and compare the difference in participants of different .VO2 max level be‐tween .VO2 max and function of heart and lung .Method :Testing 66 female college students’ (age :20 ± 6 ,BMI :20 .88 ± 1 .32 ) .VO2 max ,Cardiac output ,and lung function .Dividing the participants into two groups (normal or less than normal) based on the testing results .Con‐ducting Independent‐Samples T Test on each groups .Results :1) There is a significant correla‐tion between .VO2max(ml/kg/min) with VE (P 0 .05);3)The ventila‐tion volume of the“below‐average” group is significantly lower than the“normal” group while the respiration quotient of the former group is larger than the latter one’ s ( P 0 .05);5)The MET ,QLD and EVP of the participants in the“below‐average” group ,to some extent ,fluctuate with small range and lack amplitude .Conclusions :1) .VO2 max is greatly influenced by the ventilation volume and is posi‐tively correlated with the lungs breathing vibration intensity .However ,it is uncorrelated with the cardiac output in a static situation ;2) The depth of respiration of the “normal” group (in sports) is significantly higher than the“below‐average” group ,which is possibly due to a bet‐ter oxygen utilization in metabolism and energy supply ;3) Participants with different .VO2 max levels show no significant difference of heart function in a static situation ,suggesting that par‐ticipants of the“below‐average” group didn't lose on the "starting line" ;4) Participants of the“below‐average” group lacks advantage in terms of the overall Aerobic capacity ,which + also seems to affect their cardiopulmonary function when doing sports .%目的:探讨最大耗氧量(.VO2 max )与安静时心脏、肺功能的相关性,以及不同.VO2 max水平受试者的心脏和肺功能差异。方法:对66

  12. Heart rate reduction in coronary artery disease and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Roberto; Fox, Kim

    2016-08-01

    Elevated heart rate is known to induce myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and heart rate reduction is a recognized strategy to prevent ischaemic episodes. In addition, clinical evidence shows that slowing the heart rate reduces the symptoms of angina by improving microcirculation and coronary flow. Elevated heart rate is an established risk factor for cardiovascular events in patients with CAD and in those with chronic heart failure (HF). Accordingly, reducing heart rate improves prognosis in patients with HF, as demonstrated in SHIFT. By contrast, data from SIGNIFY indicate that heart rate is not a modifiable risk factor in patients with CAD who do not also have HF. Heart rate is also an important determinant of cardiac arrhythmias; low heart rate can be associated with atrial fibrillation, and high heart rate after exercise can be associated with sudden cardiac death. In this Review, we critically assess these clinical findings, and propose hypotheses for the variable effect of heart rate reduction in cardiovascular disease.

  13. Occupational stress and heart rate variability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martin Rauber; Marjan Bilban; Radovan Starc

    2015-01-01

    Brief description of the article: This article considers heart rate variability as a measurable parameter of stress reaction and present recent studies that examined the impact of occupational stress on heart rate variability...

  14. Wearable sensor for heart rate detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Cong; Liu, Xiaohua; Kong, Lingqin; Wu, Jizhe; Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Hui, Mei; Zhao, Yuejin

    2015-08-01

    In recent years heart and blood vessel diseases kill more people than everything else combined. The daily test of heart rate for the prevention and treatment of the heart head blood-vessel disease has the vital significance. In order to adapt the transformation of medical model and solve the low accuracy problem of the traditional method of heart rate measuring, we present a new method to monitor heart rate in this paper. The heart rate detection is designed for daily heart rate detection .The heart rate signal is collected by the heart rate sensor. The signal through signal processing circuits converts into sine wave and square wave in turn. And then the signal is transmitted to the computer by data collection card. Finally, we use LABVIEW and MATLAB to show the heart rate wave and calculate the heart rate. By doing contrast experiment with medical heart rate product, experimental results show that the system can realize rapidly and accurately measure the heart rate value. A measurement can be completed within 10 seconds and the error is less than 3beat/min. And the result shows that the method in this paper has a strong anti-interference ability. It can effectively suppress the movement interference. Beyond that the result is insensitive to light.

  15. Maximal heart rate does not limit cardiovascular capacity in healthy humans: insight from right atrial pacing during maximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munch, G D W; Svendsen, J H; Damsgaard, R; Secher, N H; González-Alonso, J; Mortensen, S P

    2014-01-15

    In humans, maximal aerobic power (VO2 max ) is associated with a plateau in cardiac output (Q), but the mechanisms regulating the interplay between maximal heart rate (HRmax) and stroke volume (SV) are unclear. To evaluate the effect of tachycardia and elevations in HRmax on cardiovascular function and capacity during maximal exercise in healthy humans, 12 young male cyclists performed incremental cycling and one-legged knee-extensor exercise (KEE) to exhaustion with and without right atrial pacing to increase HR. During control cycling, Q and leg blood flow increased up to 85% of maximal workload (WLmax) and remained unchanged until exhaustion. SV initially increased, plateaued and then decreased before exhaustion (P rate pressure product and RAP (P heart can be paced to a higher HR than observed during maximal exercise, suggesting that HRmax and myocardial work capacity do not limit VO2 max in healthy individuals. A limited left ventricular filling and possibly altered contractility reduce SV during atrial pacing, whereas a plateau in LVFP appears to restrict Q close to VO2 max .

  16. MYOCARDIAL BLOOD-FLOW AND VO2 IN LAMBS WITH AN AORTOPULMONARY SHUNT DURING STRENUOUS EXERCISE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GRATAMA, JWC; MEUZELAAR, JJ; DALINGHAUS, M; KOERS, JH; GERDING, AM; MONCHEN, MTM; TENIJENHUIS, FCAM; ZIJLSTRA, WG; KUIPERS, JRG

    To determine how much myocardial O2 consumption (VO2) would increase during an additional load on the heart in shunt as compared with control lambs, we studied 12 7-wk-old lambs with an aortopulmonary left-to-right shunt (59 +/- 3% of left ventricular output, means +/-SE) and 11 control lambs during

  17. [Resting heart rate and cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito Díaz, Buenaventura; Alemán Sánchez, José Juan; Cabrera de León, Antonio

    2014-07-07

    Heart rate reflects autonomic nervous system activity. Numerous studies have demonstrated that an increased heart rate at rest is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as an independent risk factor. It has been shown a link between cardiac autonomic balance and inflammation. Thus, an elevated heart rate produces a micro-inflammatory response and is involved in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction. In turn, decrease in heart rate produces benefits in congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. Alteration of other heart rate-related parameters, such as their variability and recovery after exercise, is associated with risk of cardiovascular events. Drugs reducing the heart rate (beta-blockers, calcium antagonists and inhibitors of If channels) have the potential to reduce cardiovascular events. Although not recommended in healthy subjects, interventions for reducing heart rate constitute a reasonable therapeutic goal in certain pathologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Rhesus monkey heart rate during exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorge, J.; Thach, J. S., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Various schedules of reinforcement and their relation to heart rates of rhesus monkeys during exercise are described. All the reinforcement schedules produced 100 per cent or higher increments in the heart rates of the monkeys during exercise. Resting heart rates were generally much lower than those previously reported, which was attributed to the lack of physical restraint of the monkeys during recording.

  19. Prior Knowledge of Trial Number Influences the Incidence of Plateau at VO2max

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the VO2max plateau response at VO2max during a series of pre-determined trials. METHODS: Ten male well-trained athletes (age, 23.0 ± 3.2; height, 183.3 ± 5.5 cm; mass 77.5 ± 11.1 Kg; VO2max 66.5 ± 5.0 ml.kg-1,min-1, but who were VO2max testing naïve and with prior-knowledge of trial number completed four incremental tests to volitional exhaustion, separated by ~72-h for the determination of VO2max and gas exchange threshold. Throughout all trials VO2max was recorded on a breath-by-breath basis using a pre-calibrated metabolic cart, using a plateau criterion of Δ VO2 ≤1.5 ml.kg-1.min-1 over the final 2 consecutive 30 s sampling periods. A significant difference was observed between trial-1 and trial-4 for plateau incidence (p = 0.0285 rising from 20% in trial-1 to a 70% response rate in trial-4. Furthermore a significant difference was observed for VO2dif (difference between criterion value and Δ VO2 in trial-1, 1.02 ± 1.69 ml.kg-1.min-1 (p = 0.038, with non-significant differences observed for all other trials, despite a non-significant difference for VO2max across all trials (p > 0.05. Finally, a significant difference was observed for effort perception (RPE at volitional exhaustion between trial-1 (17.7 ± 1.3 and trial-4 (19.0 ± 1.4 (p = 0.0052. These data indicate that prior-knowledge of trial number can influence the manifestation of the VO2 plateau in a group of well-trained male athletes, thereby suggesting that a form of effort control is established in order to preserve the finite anaerobic capacity.

  20. Effects of Heart Rate vs. Speed-Based High Intensity Interval Training on Aerobic and Anaerobic Capacity of Female Soccer Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Arazi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two types of high-intensity interval training (HIIT programs on aerobic and anaerobic capacity of female soccer players. Regional-level female athletes were randomly divided into heart rate-based HIIT (n = 8; age 23.4 ± 1.1 year and speed-based HIIT groups (n = 8; age 23.4 ± 1.3 year. Athletes trained three days per week for six weeks. Before and after training, each athlete’s performance was assessed directly through the Hoff test, 30-15 Intermittent Fitness Test (VIFT, and repeated-sprint ability test (RAST; maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max, power and fatigue were estimated indirectly. Both experimental groups improved power, fatigue index and VO2max after training (p < 0.05. It was noteworthy that the speed-based group had greater gains in minimal power (effect size (ES: 3.99 vs. 0.75, average power (ES: 2.23 vs. 0.33, and fatigue index (ES: 2.53 vs. 0.17 compared to heart rate-based group (p < 0.05. In conclusion, both heart rate-based and speed-based HIIT induced meaningful improvements in power, VO2max, and fatigue index in female soccer players, although the speed-based HIIT group achieved greater gains in power and fatigue index compared to the heart rate-based group.

  1. High-intensity interval training every second week maintains VO2max in soccer players during off-season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slettaløkken, Gunnar; Rønnestad, Bent R

    2014-07-01

    Reduced endurance training among semiprofessional soccer players during off-season may have negative effect on game performance during the competition season. This negative effect can be prevented by adding high-intensity interval training (HIT) to normal activity. In this study, we want to compare 2 different frequencies of HIT (5 bouts of 4 minutes on 87-97% peak heart rate) session on maintenance of aerobic fitness among semiprofessional soccer players during a 6-week off-season period. Seventeen male players at second and third highest soccer division in Norway participated. The subjects were randomized into 1 HIT session every second week (HIT 0.5) or 1 HIT session per week (HIT 1). All participants performed a 20-m shuttle run test and a maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) test on treadmill before and after the training intervention. VO2max (HIT 0.5, 63.4 ± 5.9 ml·kg-1·min-1; HIT 1, 65.6 ± 2.1 ml·kg-1·min-1) and 20-m shuttle run performance (HIT 0.5, 2335 ± 390 m, HIT 1, 2531 ± 106 m) were not different between the groups before the training intervention. VO2max was maintained after the training intervention in both HIT 0.5 and HIT 1 (64.0 ± 5.9 ml·kg-1·min-1 and 64.3 ± 1.3 ml·kg-1·min-1, respectively). There was a reduction in distance covered during the 20-m shuttle run test in HIT 1 and when groups were pooled (-7.9 ± 5.7% and -6.4 ± 7.9%, respectively, p ≤ 0.05). In conclusion, HIT 1 did not maintain VO2max better than HIT 0.5 when added to normal off-season activity. However, performance in 20-m shuttle run, which is a more soccer-specific fitness test than VO2max test, was slightly reduced when both groups was pooled.

  2. Bluetooth(Registered Trademark) Heart Rate Monitors for Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Roxanne E.; West, Michael R.; Kalogera, Kent L.; Hanson, Andrea M.

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate monitoring is required during exercise for crewmembers aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and will be for future exploration missions. The cardiovascular system must be sufficiently stressed throughout a mission to maintain the ability to perform nominal and contingency/emergency tasks. High quality heart rate data is required to accurately determine the intensity of exercise performed by the crewmembers and show maintenance of VO2max. The quality of the data collected on ISS is subject to multiple limitations and is insufficient to meet current requirements. PURPOSE: To evaluate the performance of commercially available Bluetooth® heart rate monitors (BT_HRM) and their ability to provide high quality heart rate data to monitor crew health on board ISS and during future exploration missions. METHODS: Nineteen subjects completed 30 data collection sessions of various intensities on the treadmill and/or cycle. Subjects wore several BT_HRM technologies for each testing session. One electrode-based chest strap (CS) was worn, while one or more optical sensors (OS) was worn. Subjects were instrumented with a 12-lead ECG to compare the heart rate data from the Bluetooth sensors. Each BT_RHM data set was time matched to the ECG data and a +/-5bpm threshold was applied to the difference between the two data sets. Percent error was calculated based on the number of data points outside the threshold and the total number of data points. REULTS: The electrode-based chest straps performed better than the optical sensors. The best performing CS was CS1 (1.6%error), followed by CS4 (3.3%error), CS3 (6.4%error), and CS2 (9.2%error). The OS resulted in 10.4% error for OS1 and 14.9% error for OS2. CONCLUSIONS: The highest quality data came from CS1, unfortunately it has been discontinued by the manufacturer. The optical sensors have not been ruled out for use, but more investigation is needed to determine how to get the best quality data. CS2 will be used in an

  3. Reduced Dietary Sodium Intake Increases Heart Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, Niels A; Hubeck-Graudal, Thorbjørn; Jürgens, Gesche

    2016-01-01

    Reduced dietary sodium intake (sodium reduction) increases heart rate in some studies of animals and humans. As heart rate is independently associated with the development of heart failure and increased risk of premature death a potential increase in heart rate could be a harmful side......-effect of sodium reduction. The purpose of the present meta-analysis was to investigate the effect of sodium reduction on heart rate. Relevant studies were retrieved from an updated pool of 176 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in the period 1973-2014. Sixty-three of the RCTs including 72 study...... populations reported data on heart rate. In a meta-analysis of these data sodium reduction increased heart rate with 1.65 beats per minute [95% CI: 1.19, 2.11], p sodium reduction...

  4. Periodic heart rate decelerations in premature infants

    OpenAIRE

    Flower, Abigail A.; Moorman, J. Randall; Lake, Douglas E.; Delos, John B.

    2010-01-01

    The pacemaking system of the heart is complex; a healthy heart constantly integrates and responds to extracardiac signals, resulting in highly complex heart rate patterns with a great deal of variability. In the laboratory and in some pathological or age-related states, however, dynamics can show reduced complexity that is more readily described and modeled. Reduced heart rate complexity has both clinical and dynamical significance – it may provide warning of impending illness or clues about ...

  5. Heart rate profile during exercise in patients with early repolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cay, Serkan; Cagirci, Goksel; Atak, Ramazan; Balbay, Yucel; Demir, Ahmet Duran; Aydogdu, Sinan

    2010-09-01

    Both early repolarization and altered heart rate profile are associated with sudden death. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate an association between early repolarization and heart rate profile during exercise. A total of 84 subjects were included in the study. Comparable 44 subjects with early repolarization and 40 subjects with normal electrocardiogram underwent exercise stress testing. Resting heart rate, maximum heart rate, heart rate increment and decrement were analyzed. Both groups were comparable for baseline characteristics including resting heart rate. Maximum heart rate, heart rate increment and heart rate decrement of the subjects in early repolarization group had significantly decreased maximum heart rate, heart rate increment and heart rate decrement compared to control group (all P heart rate increment (heart rate decrement (heart rate increment and heart rate decrement compared to higher levels, respectively. Subjects with early repolarization have altered heart rate profile during exercise compared to control subjects. This can be related to sudden death.

  6. Scale Invariant Properties in Heart Rate Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowiec, D.; Dudkowska, A.; Zwierz, M.; Galaska, R.; Rynkiewicz, A.

    2006-05-01

    The rate of heart beat is controlled by autonomic nervous system: accelerated by the sympathetic system and slowed by the parasympathetic system. Scaling properties in heart rate are usually related to the intrinsic dynamics of this physiological regulatory system. The two packages calculating local exponent spectra: Wavelet Transform Modulus Maxima and Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (accessible from Physionet home page http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/101/23/e215) are tested, and then used to investigate the spectrum of singularity exponents in series of heart rates obtained from patients suffering from reduced left ventricle systolic function. It occurs that this state of a heart could be connected to some perturbation in the regulatory system, because the heart rate appears to be less controlled than in a healthy human heart. The multifractality in the heart rate signal is weakened: the spectrum is narrower and moved to higher values what indicate the higher activity of the sympatethic nervous system.

  7. Fitness self-perception and Vo2max in firefighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peate, W F; Lundergan, Linda; Johnson, Jerry J

    2002-06-01

    Firefighters work at maximal levels of exertion. Fitness for such duty requires adequate aerobic capacity (maximum oxygen consumption [Vo2max]). Aerobic fitness can both improve a worker's ability to perform and offer resistance to cardiopulmonary conditions. Inactive firefighters have a 90% greater risk of myocardial infarction than those who are aerobically fit. Participants (101 firefighters) completed a questionnaire that asked them to rank their fitness level from 0 to 7; e.g., Level 0 was low fitness: "I avoid walking or exertion, e.g., always use elevator, drive whenever possible." The level of activity rating increased to Level 7: "I run over 10 miles per week or spend 3 hours per week in comparable physical activity." Each participant then completed two measures of Vo2max: a 5-minute step test and a submaximal treadmill test. There was no association between the firefighters' self-perception of their level of fitness and their aerobic capacity as measured by either step test or submaximal treadmill. Because of the critical job demands of firefighting and the negative consequences of inadequate fitness and aerobic capacity, periodic aerobic capacity testing with individualized exercise prescriptions and work--community support may be advisable for all active-duty firefighters.

  8. The relationship between body temperature, heart rate, breathing rate, and rate of oxygen consumption, in the tegu lizard (Tupinambis merianae) at various levels of activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piercy, Joanna; Rogers, Kip; Reichert, Michelle; Andrade, Denis V; Abe, Augusto S; Tattersall, Glenn J; Milsom, William K

    2015-12-01

    The present study determined whether EEG and/or EMG recordings could be used to reliably define activity states in the Brazilian black and white tegu lizard (Tupinambis merianae) and then examined the interactive effects of temperature and activity states on strategies for matching O2 supply and demand. In a first series of experiments, the rate of oxygen consumption (VO2), breathing frequency (fR), heart rate (fH), and EEG and EMG (neck muscle) activity were measured in different sleep/wake states (sleeping, awake but quiet, alert, or moving). In general, metabolic and cardio-respiratory changes were better indictors of the transition from sleep to wake than were changes in the EEG and EMG. In a second series of experiments, the interactive effects of temperature (17, 27 and 37 °C) and activity states on fR, tidal volume (VT), the fraction of oxygen extracted from the lung per breath (FIO2-FEO2), fH, and the cardiac O2 pulse were quantified to determine the relative roles of each of these variables in accommodating changes in VO2. The increases in oxygen supply to meet temperature- and activity-induced increases in oxygen demand were produced almost exclusively by increases in fH and fR. Regression analysis showed that the effects of temperature and activity state on the relationships between fH, fR and VO2 was to extend a common relationship along a single curve, rather than separate relationships for each metabolic state. For these lizards, the predictive powers of fR and fH were maximized when the effects of changes in temperature, digestive state and activity were pooled. However, the best r(2) values obtained were 0.63 and 0.74 using fR and fH as predictors of metabolic rate, respectively.

  9. Influence of glycemic control on pulmonary function and heart rate in response to exercise in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard, Patrice; Ferland, Annie; Bogaty, Peter; Desmeules, Marc; Jobin, Jean; Poirier, Paul

    2006-11-01

    Conflicting results exist regarding the impact of glycemic control on peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The influence of glycemic control on submaximal oxygen uptake (VO2) in these subjects is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of fasting blood glucose (FBG) (short-term glycemic control) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) (long-term glycemic control) on submaximal VO2 and VO2peak during exercise in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus without cardiovascular disease. FBG and HbA1c levels and exercise tolerance in 30 sedentary men with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with oral hypoglycemic agents and/or diet were evaluated. VO2, carbon dioxide production (VCO2), heart rate, pulmonary ventilation (VE), and the respiratory exchange ratio (RER) were measured throughout the exercise protocol. Subjects were separated into 2 groups of the same age, weight, and body mass index according to median FBG and HbA1c levels (6.5 mmol/L and 6.1%, respectively). Per protocol design, there was a significant difference in FBG and HbA1c levels (P exercise parameters between the 2 groups according to median FBG or median HbA1c levels. However, the subjects with elevated HbA1c level had lower submaximal V e throughout the exercise protocol (P heart rate pattern during submaximal exercise (P type 2 diabetes mellitus without cardiovascular disease, they may influence pulmonary function and the chronotropic response during submaximal exercise in these subjects.

  10. Heart rate and blood pressure response to ramp exercise and exercise capacity in relation to age, gender, and mode of exercise in a healthy population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Haruki; Ajisaka, Ryuichi; Koike, Akira; Makita, Shigeru; Omiya, Kazuto; Kato, Yuko; Adachi, Hitoshi; Nagayama, Masatoshi; Maeda, Tomoko; Tajima, Akihiko; Harada, Naomi; Taniguchi, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    The responses of heart rate (HR) and blood pressure to the ramp exercise test are not known and the current understanding of peak oxygen uptake and anaerobic threshold (AT) values in the normal Japanese population is insufficient. A total of 749 healthy Japanese subjects aged 20-78 years underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test using a cycle ergometer or treadmill ergometer with ramp protocols. HR, systolic blood pressure (SBP), and oxygen uptake VO2 at rest, at AT, and at peak exercise were determined. HR and SBP at peak exercise in a cycle ergometer and treadmill ergometer test decreased with age. Work rate at peak exercise in a cycle ergometer increased with body weight and decreased with age. VO2 at AT and at peak exercise were higher in treadmill ergometer testing than in cycle ergometer testing, and were not affected by exercise protocol. Both of these decreased with age. The normal responses of HR and SBP to ramp exercise testing are reported for the first time. AT, peak VO2, and VO2 at each stage are shown for a healthy population. Some of these parameters were influenced by weight, gender, and age, as well as mode of exercise and the protocol used. These results provide useful reference values for interpreting the results of cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Copyright © 2012 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of Sodium Phosphate Supplementation on Cycling Time Trial Performance and VO2 1 and 8 Days Post Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron P. Brewer, Brian Dawson, Karen E. Wallman, Kym J. Guelfi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of 6 days of sodium phosphate (SP (50 mg·kg·FFM-1·day-1 or placebo (PL supplementation in trained cyclists on either 100 kJ (23.9 Kcal (~3-4 min or 250 kJ (59.7 Kcal (~10-12 min time trials performances both 1 and 8 days post-supplementation. Trials were performed in a counterbalanced crossover design, with a 28-day washout period between supplementation phases. No significant differences, moderate-large ES (d or likely (or greater smallest worthwhile change (SWC values were recorded for time to completion and mean power output on days 1 and 8 post-supplementation, both within and between SP and PL for either the 100 or 250 kJ (23.9 or 59.7 Kcal trials. In the 100 kJ (23.9 Kcal trial (only first minute VO2 tended to be higher in SP8 than both PL8 (d = 0.60; 88/10/2 SWC and SP1 (d = 0.47: 82/15/3 SWC, as was mean VO2 (PL8: d = 0.77; 93/6/1 SWC and SP1: d = 0.84; 90/8/3 SWC. No significant differences were found for heart rate, ratings of perceived exertion and blood lactate post-exercise within or between any trials, while serum phosphate values were not different before or after supplementation with SP or PL. In conclusion, this study showed a tendency for increased VO2 in a short duration (100 kJ/ 23.9 Kcal: ~3-4 min cycling test on day 8 after SP supplementation, but no differences in 100 or 250 kJ (23.9 or 59.7 Kcal time trials performances were observed.

  12. Atomic layer deposition of VO2 films with Tetrakis-dimethyl-amino vanadium (IV) as vanadium precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xinrui; Cao, Yunzhen; Yan, Lu; Li, Ying; Song, Lixin

    2017-02-01

    VO2 thin films have been grown on Si(100) (VO2/Si) and fused silica substrates (VO2/SiO2) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using tetrakis-dimethyl-amino vanadium (IV) (TDMAV) as a novel vanadium precursor and water as reactant gas. The quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurement was performed to study the ALD process of VO2 thin film deposition, and a constant growth rate of about 0.95 Å/cycle was obtained at the temperature range of 150-200 °C. XRD measurement was performed to study the influence of deposition temperature and post-annealing condition on the crystallization of VO2 films, which indicated that the films deposited between 150 and 200 °C showed well crystallinity after annealing at 475 °C for 100 min in Ar atmosphere. XPS measurement verified that the vanadium oxidation state was 4+ for both as-deposited film and post-annealed VO2/Si film. AFM was applied to study the surface morphology of VO2/Si films, which showed a dense polycrystalline film with roughness of about 1 nm. The resistance of VO2/Si films deposited between 150 °C and 200 °C as a function of temperature showed similar semiconductor-to-metal transition (SMT) characters with the transition temperature for heating branch (Tc,h) of about 72 °C, a hysteresis width of about 10 °C and the resistance change of two orders of magnitude. The increase of Tc,h compared with the bulk VO2 (68 °C) may be attributed to the tensile stress along the c-axis in the film. Transmittance measurement of VO2/SiO2 films showed typical thermochromic property with a NIR switching efficiency of above 50% at 2 μm across the transition.

  13. Slow VO2 off-kinetics in skeletal muscle is associated with fast PCr off-kinetics--and inversely.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewski, Bernard; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2013-09-01

    The computer model of the bioenergetic system in skeletal muscle, developed previously, was used to study the effect of the characteristic decay time of the parallel activation of oxidative phosphorylation [τ(OFF)] during muscle recovery on the muscle oxygen consumption rate (Vo2) and phosphocreatine (PCr) work-to-rest transition (off)-kinetics and on the relationship between the Vo2 and PCr rest-to-work transition (on)- and off-kinetics in moderate and heavy exercise. An increase in τ(OFF) slows down the initial phase of the muscle Vo2 off-kinetics and accelerates the PCr off-kinetics. As a result, the relationship between the initial phase of the Vo2 off-kinetics (lasting approximately 3-60 s in computer simulations) and the PCr off-kinetics is inverse: the slower the former, the faster the latter. A faster initial phase of the Vo2 off-kinetics is associated with a slower late phase of the Vo2 off-kinetics, and as a result, the integral of Vo2 above baseline during recovery, representing the oxygen debt, is identical in all cases [values of τ(OFF)] for a given PCr decrease. Depending on τ(OFF), the muscle Vo2 on-kinetics was either equally fast or slower than the Vo2 off-kinetics in moderate exercise and always slower in heavy exercise. PCr on-kinetics was always faster than PCr off-kinetics. This study clearly demonstrates that τ(OFF) has a pronounced impact on the mutual relations between the muscle Vo2 and PCr on- and off-kinetics.

  14. Markers of inflammation are inversely associated with VO2 max in asymptomatic men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullo, Iftikhar J; Khaleghi, Mahyar; Hensrud, Donald D

    2007-04-01

    We investigated whether markers of inflammation, including a cytokine (IL-6), acute-phase reactants [C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen], and white blood cell (WBC) count are associated with maximal O(2) consumption (Vo(2 max)) in men without coronary heart disease (CHD). In asymptomatic men (n = 172, 51 +/- 9.3 yr old), Vo(2 max) was measured during a symptom-limited graded treadmill exercise test. Physical activity level was assessed by a standardized questionnaire. IL-6 and CRP were measured by immunoassays, fibrinogen by the Clauss method, and WBC count with a Coulter counter. IL-6 and CRP were logarithmically transformed to reduce skewness. Multivariable regression was used to assess whether markers of inflammation were associated with Vo(2 max) after adjustment for age, body mass index, CHD risk factors, and lifestyle variables (physical activity level, percent body fat, and alcohol intake). Vo(2 max) was 34.5 ml.kg(-1).min(-1) (SD 6.1). Log IL-6 (r = -0.38, P max). In separate multivariable linear regression models that adjusted for age, body mass index, CHD risk factors, and lifestyle variables, log IL-6 [beta-coeff = -1.66 +/- 0.63 (SE), P = 0.010], log CRP [beta-coeff = -0.99 +/- 0.33 (SE), P = 0.003], fibrinogen [beta-coeff = -1.51 +/- 0.44 (SE), P = 0.001], and WBC count [beta-coeff = -0.52 +/- 0.30 (SE), P = 0.088] were each inversely associated with Vo(2 max). In conclusion, higher circulating levels of IL-6, CRP, and fibrinogen are independently associated with lower Vo(2 max) in asymptomatic men.

  15. Maternal heart rate changes during labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söhnchen, N; Melzer, K; Tejada, B Martinez de; Jastrow-Meyer, N; Othenin-Girard, V; Irion, O; Boulvain, M; Kayser, B

    2011-10-01

    Labour and delivery represent a considerable effort for pregnant women. Lack of aerobic fitness may limit pushing efforts during childbirth and represents increased cardiovascular strain and risk. Increasing prevalence of sedentary behaviour and lack of aerobic fitness may reduce heart rate reserve during labour. We quantified maternal heart rate reserve (maximum heart rate minus resting heart rate) of 30 healthy pregnant women during labour and delivery and related it to habitual daily physical activity levels quantified during the third pregnancy trimester by the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire. Heart rates during labour reached values similar to those observed during moderate to heavy physical exercise. During active pushing one out of five women reached heart rates more than 90% of their heart rate reserve (188 ± 7 beats per min). Half of the women reached more than 70% of heart rate reserve (172 ± 14 beats per min). Physically inactive women used more of their heart rate reserve as physically more active women (87 ± 20% vs. 65 ± 12%, upper and lower tertile respectively, plabour is increased in physically inactive women and may potentially limit the intensity and duration of pushing efforts. Such higher cardiovascular strain in physically less active women may represent increased cardiovascular risk during labour. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Heart rate reduction and longevity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gent, Sabine; Kleinbongard, Petra; Dammann, Philip; Neuhäuser, Markus; Heusch, Gerd

    2015-03-01

    Heart rate correlates inversely with life span across all species, including humans. In patients with cardiovascular disease, higher heart rate is associated with increased mortality, and such patients benefit from pharmacological heart rate reduction. However, cause-and-effect relationships between heart rate and longevity, notably in healthy individuals, are not established. We therefore prospectively studied the effects of a life-long pharmacological heart rate reduction on longevity in mice. We hypothesized, that the total number of cardiac cycles is constant, and that a 15% heart rate reduction might translate into a 15% increase in life span. C57BL6/J mice received either placebo or ivabradine at a dose of 50 mg/kg/day in drinking water from 12 weeks to death. Heart rate and body weight were monitored. Autopsy was performed on all non-autolytic cadavers, and parenchymal organs were evaluated macroscopically. Ivabradine reduced heart rate by 14% (median, interquartile range 12-15%) throughout life, and median life span was increased by 6.2% (p = 0.01). Body weight and macroscopic findings were not different between placebo and ivabradine. Life span was not increased to the same extent as heart rate was reduced, but nevertheless significantly prolonged by 6.2%.

  17. Heart rate dependency of JT interval sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatkova, Katerina; Johannesen, Lars; Vicente, Jose; Malik, Marek

    2017-08-09

    Little experience exists with the heart rate correction of J-Tpeak and Tpeak-Tend intervals. In a population of 176 female and 176 male healthy subjects aged 32.3±9.8 and 33.1±8.4years, respectively, curve-linear and linear relationship to heart rate was investigated for different sections of the JT interval defined by the proportions of the area under the vector magnitude of the reconstructed 3D vectorcardiographic loop. The duration of the JT sub-section between approximately just before the T peak and almost the T end was found heart rate independent. Most of the JT heart rate dependency relates to the beginning of the interval. The duration of the terminal T wave tail is only weakly heart rate dependent. The Tpeak-Tend is only minimally heart rate dependent and in studies not showing substantial heart rate changes does not need to be heart rate corrected. For any correction formula that has linear additive properties, heart rate correction of JT and JTpeak intervals is practically the same as of the QT interval. However, this does not apply to the formulas in the form of Int/RR(a) since they do not have linear additive properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Study of Thermal properties of VO2 and multilayer VO2 thin films for application in Thermal Switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Gaohua

    Ultrafast nature of the phase transition near room temperature in VO2 makes it attractive material for applications in electronics and optical devices however utilization of corresponding drastic change in thermo-physical properties are rarely reported. In this study we investigate thermal and electronic properties of VO2 thin films on various substrates across the transition temperature to seek possibility of utilizing VO2 based thermal switches for applications in thermal devices. In addition, the interfacial heat transfer in VO2/metal multilayer thin film is mediated by phonons at low temperature, and when temperature is elevated beyond phase transition temperature, the interface thermal conductance is mediated mainly by both phons and electrons. VO2-multilayers approach is studied to utilize the switching interface thermal conductance in order to obtain higher thermal conductivity switch ratio than what can be achieved in intrinsic VO2. Thermal conductivities and interface thermal conductance of VO2 and VO2 multilayer thin films are measured using the time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) method. We will discuss interplay of phononic and electronic component to thermal conductivity in the light of Wiedemann-Franz law across the metal to insulator state of VO2 films.

  19. Exercise training bradycardia is largely explained by reduced intrinsic heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrainy, Samira; Levy, Wayne C; Busey, Janet M; Caldwell, James H; Stratton, John R

    2016-11-01

    Resting heart rate (RHR) declines with exercise training. Possible mechanisms include: 1) increased parasympathetic tone, 2) decreased responsiveness to beta-adrenergic stimulation, 3) decreased intrinsic heart rate or 4) combination of these factors. To determine whether an increase in resting parasympathetic tone or decrease in response to beta-adrenergic stimulation contributes to the decrease in RHR with training. 51 screened healthy subjects aged 18-32 (n=20, mean age 26, 11 female) or 65-80 (n=31, mean age 69, 16 female) were tested before and after 6months of supervised exercise training. Heart rate response to parasympathetic withdrawal was assessed using atropine and beta-adrenergic responsiveness during parasympathetic withdrawal using isoproterenol. Training increased VO2 max by 17% (28.7±7.7 to 33.6±9.20ml/kg/min, Pincrease in heart rate in response to parasympathetic withdrawal was unchanged after training (+37.3±12.8 pre vs. +36.4±12.2 beats per min post, P=0.41). There was no change in the heart rate response to isoproterenol after parasympathetic blockade with training (+31.9±10.9 pre vs. +31.0±12.0 post beats per min, P=0.56). The findings were similar in all four subgroups. We did not find evidence that an increase in parasympathetic tone or a decrease in responsiveness to beta-adrenergic activity accounts for the reduction in resting heart rate with exercise training. We suggest that a decline in heart rate with training is most likely due to decrease in the intrinsic heart rate. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  20. Oxygen consumption and heart rate responses to isolated ballet exercise sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Krause, Josianne; Dos Santos Cunha, Giovani; Alberton, Cristine Lima; Follmer, Bruno; Krause, Mauricio; Reischak-Oliveira, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Ballet stage performances are associated with higher cardiorespiratory demand than rehearsals and classes. Hence, new interest is emerging to create periodized training that enhances dancers' fitness while minimizing delayed exercise-induced fatigue and possible injuries. Finding out in what zones of intensity dancers work during different ballet movements may support the use of supplemental training adjusted to the needs of the individual dancer. Therefore, the main purpose of this study was to describe dancers' oxygen consumption (VO2) and heart rate (HR) responses during the performance of nine isolated ballet exercise sets, as correlated with their first and second ventilatory thresholds (VT1 and VT2). Twelve female ballet dancers volunteered for the study. Their maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max), VT1, and VT2 were determined by use of an incremental treadmill test. Nine sets of ballet movements were assessed: pliés, tendus, jetés, rond de jambes, fondus, grand adage (adage), grand battements, temps levés, and sautés. The sets were randomly executed and separated by 5 minute rest periods. ANOVA for repeated measurements followed by the Bonferroni Post-hoc test were applied (p ballet sets. This stratification followed closely, but not exactly, the variation in HR. For example, rond de jambes (156.8 ± 19 b·min(-1)) did not show any significant difference from all the other ballet sets, nor VT1 or VT2. It is concluded that the workloads of isolated ballet sets, based on VO2 responses, vary between low and moderate aerobic intensity in relation to dancers' VT1 and VT2. However, ballet set workloads may be higher when based on HR responses, due to the intermittent and isometric components of dance.

  1. Heart Rate Extraction from Vowel Speech Signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdelwadood Mesleh; Dmitriy Skopin; Sergey Baglikov; Anas Quteishat

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel non-contact heart rate extraction method from vowel speech signals.The proposed method is based on modeling the relationship between speech production of vowel speech signals and heart activities for humans where it is observed that the moment of heart beat causes a short increment (evolution) of vowel speech formants.The short-time Fourier transform (STFT) is used to detect the formant maximum peaks so as to accurately estimate the heart rate.Compared with traditional contact pulse oximeter,the average accuracy of the proposed non-contact heart rate extraction method exceeds 95%.The proposed non-contact heart rate extraction method is expected to play an important role in modern medical applications.

  2. Losartan improves heart rate variability and heart rate turbulence in heart failure due to ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Murat; Arslan, Uğur; Türkoğlu, Sedat; Balcioğlu, Serhat; Cengel, Atiye

    2007-12-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate turbulence are known to be disturbed and associated with excess mortality in heart failure. The aim of this study was to investigate whether losartan, when added on top of beta-blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) therapy, could improve these indices in patients with systolic heart failure. Seventy-seven patients (mean age 60.4 +/- 8.0, 80.5% male) with ischemic cardiomyopathy (mean ejection fraction 34.5 +/- 4.4%) and New York Heart Association Class II-III heart failure symptoms, already receiving a beta-blocker and an ACEI, were randomly assigned to either open-label losartan (losartan group) or no additional drug (control group) in a 2:1 ratio and the patients were followed for 12 weeks. The HRV and heart rate turbulence indices were calculated from 24-hour Holter recordings both at the beginning and at the end of follow-up. The baseline clinical characteristics, HRV, and heart rate turbulence indices were similar in the 2 groups. At 12 weeks of follow-up, all HRV parameters except pNN50 increased (SDNN: 113.2 +/- 34.2 versus 127.8 +/- 24.1, P = .001; SDANN: 101.5 +/- 31.7 versus 115.2 +/- 22.0, P = .001; triangular index: 29.9 +/- 11.1 versus 34.2 +/- 7.9, P = .008; RMSSD: 29.1 +/- 20.2 versus 34.3 +/- 23.0, P = .009; NN50: 5015.3 +/- 5554.9 versus 6446.7 +/- 6101.1, P = .024; NN50: 5.65 +/- 6.41 versus 7.24 +/- 6.99, P = .089; SDNNi: 45.1 +/- 13.3 versus 50.3 +/- 14.5, P = .004), turbulence onset decreased (-0. 61 +/- 1.70 versus -1.24 +/- 1.31, P = .003) and turbulence slope increased (4.107 +/- 3.881 versus 5.940 +/- 4.281, P = .004) significantly in the losartan group as compared with controls. A 12-week-long losartan therapy significantly improved HRV and heart rate turbulence in patients with Class II-III heart failure and ischemic cardiomyopathy already on beta-blockers and ACEI.

  3. The efficacy of ergometry determined heart rates for flatwater kayak training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Someren, K A; Oliver, J E

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of incremental ergometry determined heart rate training intensities for the control of kayak ergometer and open water kayak training. Eight well-trained male kayakers completed a maximal incremental exercise test on an air-braked kayak ergometer for the determination of LT(1) (the power output at which blood lactate concentration increased by > or = 1 mmol x L(-1)), the associated heart rate (HR-LT(1)), VO(2)peak, maximal heart rate and maximal aerobic power. Subjects then performed 20 min trials of kayak ergometry (E), open water kayaking in a single kayak (K1) and open water kayaking in a four-seat kayak (K4) at HR-LT(1). During the three trials, heart rate was continuously measured, and blood lactate concentration, rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and stroke rate were determined every 5 min. In all trials, exercise at HR-LT(1) resulted in stable blood lactate concentrations and a stable RPE. Comparison of the three trials demonstrated that the only difference was for RPE, which was lower in (K4) than in (E), (p kayak ergometer and open water kayak training in both single and team boats.

  4. Heart rate variability and swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Julian; Jarczok, Marc N; Wasner, Mieke; Hillecke, Thomas K; Thayer, Julian F

    2014-10-01

    Professionals in the domain of swimming have a strong interest in implementing research methods in evaluating and improving training methods to maximize athletic performance and competitive outcome. Heart rate variability (HRV) has gained attention in research on sport and exercise to assess autonomic nervous system activity underlying physical activity and sports performance. Studies on swimming and HRV are rare. This review aims to summarize the current evidence on the application of HRV in swimming research and draws implications for future research. A systematic search of databases (PubMed via MEDLINE, PSYNDEX and Embase) according to the PRISMA statement was employed. Studies were screened for eligibility on inclusion criteria: (a) empirical investigation (HRV) in humans (non-clinical); (b) related to swimming; (c) peer-reviewed journal; and (d) English language. The search revealed 194 studies (duplicates removed), of which the abstract was screened for eligibility. Fourteen studies meeting the inclusion criteria were included in the review. Included studies broadly fell into three classes: (1) control group designs to investigate between-subject differences (i.e. swimmers vs. non-swimmers, swimmers vs. other athletes); (2) repeated measures designs on within-subject differences of interventional studies measuring HRV to address different modalities of training or recovery; and (3) other studies, on the agreement of HRV with other measures. The feasibility and possibilities of HRV within this particular field of application are well documented within the existing literature. Future studies, focusing on translational approaches that transfer current evidence in general practice (i.e. training of athletes) are needed.

  5. Mental load, heart rate and heart rate variability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blitz, P.S.; Hoogstraten, J.; Mulder, G.

    1970-01-01

    "Several investigators have shown that diminished sinus arrhythmia can be seen as an indication of increased mental load. The present experiment deals with the influence of different levels of mental load, operationalized as the number of binary choices per minute, on the regularity of the heart

  6. Fabrication and Characterization of Nanocrystalline VO2 Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hong-Chen; YI Xin-Jian; LAI Jian-Jun; LI Yi

    2005-01-01

    @@ Nanocrystalline VO2 films with phase transition temperature 34℃ have been fabricated on Si3N4-film-coated silicon and quartz substrates by argon-annealing films of metastable VO2(B). The original VO2(B) films are obtained by ion beam sputtering in an argon-oxygen atmosphere at 200 ℃. The nanocrystalline VO2 films exhibit strong changes in electrical and optical properties when a phase transition is completed. The phase transition temperature in the as-fabricated samples is about 34 ℃, which is smaller in comparison with 68 ℃ in the singlecrystalline VO2 material. A lower phase transition temperature is favorable for device applications such as smart window coating and low power consumption optical switching.

  7. Periodic heart rate decelerations in premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, Abigail A; Moorman, J Randall; Lake, Douglas E; Delos, John B

    2010-04-01

    The pacemaking system of the heart is complex; a healthy heart constantly integrates and responds to extracardiac signals, resulting in highly complex heart rate patterns with a great deal of variability. In the laboratory and in some pathological or age-related states, however, dynamics can show reduced complexity that is more readily described and modeled. Reduced heart rate complexity has both clinical and dynamical significance - it may provide warning of impending illness or clues about the dynamics of the heart's pacemaking system. In this paper, we describe simple and interesting heart rate dynamics that we have observed in premature human infants - reversible transitions to large-amplitude periodic oscillations - and we show that the appearance and disappearance of these periodic oscillations can be described by a simple mathematical model, a Hopf bifurcation.

  8. AEROBIC FITNESS LEVEL TYPICAL OF ELITE ATHLETES IS NOT ASSOCIATED WITH EVEN FASTER VO2 KINETICS DURING CYCLING EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago R. Figueira

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to address the question if the VO2 kinetics is further improved as the aerobic training status increases from trained to elite level athletes. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max, work-rate associated to VO2max (IVO2max and VO2 kinetics of moderate (Mod and maximal exercise (Max were determined in fifty- five subjects. Then, they were assigned into three groups: low (LF, intermediate (IF and high (HF aerobic fitness level. In average, the VO2max of LF, IF and HF groups were, respectively, 36.0 ± 3.1, 51.1 ± 4.5 and 68.1 ± 3.9 ml·kg·min-1 (p < 0.05 among each other. VO2 kinetics mean response time of both exercise intensities were significantly faster (p < 0.05 in HF (Mod, 27.5 ± 5.5 s; Max, 32.6 ± 8.3 s and IF (Mod, 25.0 ± 3.1 s; Max, 42.6 ± 10.4 s when compared to LF (Mod, 35.7 ± 7.9 s; Max: 57.8 ± 17.8 s. We can conclude that VO2 kinetics is improved as the fitness level is increased from low to intermediate but not further improved as the aerobic fitness level increases from intermediate to high.

  9. Improving the electrocatalytic performance of carbon nanotubes for VO2+/VO2+ redox reaction by KOH activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lei; Jiang, Yingqiao; Meng, Wei; Zhou, Huizhu; Wang, Ling; He, Zhangxing

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was activated by KOH treatment at high temperature and investigated as catalyst for VO2+/VO2+ redox reaction for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results suggest that the oxygen-containing groups can be introduced on CNTs by KOH activation. The mass transfer of vanadium ions can be accelerated by chemical etching by KOH activation and improved wettability due to the introduction of hydrophilic groups. The electrochemical properties of VO2+/VO2+ redox reaction can be enhanced by introduced oxygen-containing groups as active sites. The sample treated at 900 °C with KOH/CNTs mass ratio of 3:1 (CNTs-3) exhibits the highest electrocatalytic activity for VO2+/VO2+ redox reaction. The cell using CNTs-3 as positive catalyst demonstrates the smallest electrochemical polarization, the highest capacity and efficiency among the samples. Using KOH-activated CNTs-3 can increase the average energy efficiency of the cell by 4.4%. This work suggests that KOH-activated CNTs is a low-cost, efficient and promising catalyst for VO2+/VO2+ redox reaction for VRFB system.

  10. The Effect of Habitual Smoking on VO2max

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wier, Larry T.; Suminski, Richard R.; Poston, Walker S.; Randles, Anthony M.; Arenare, Brian; Jackson, Andrew S.

    2008-01-01

    VO2max is associated with many factors, including age, gender, physical activity, and body composition. It is popularly believed that habitual smoking lowers aerobic fitness. PURPOSE: to determine the effect of habitual smoking on VO2max after controlling for age, gender, activity and BMI. METHODS: 2374 men and 375 women employed at the NASA/Johnson Space Center were measured for VO2max by indirect calorimetry (RER>=1.1), activity by the 11 point (0-10) NASA Physical Activity Status Scale (PASS), BMI and smoking pack-yrs (packs day*y of smoking). Age was recorded in years and gender was coded as M=1, W=0. Pack.y was made a categorical variable consisting of four levels as follows: Never Smoked (0), Light (1-10), Regular (11-20), Heavy (>20). Group differences were verified by ANOVA. A General Linear Models (GLM) was used to develop two models to examine the relationship of smoking behavior on VO2max. GLM #1(without smoking) determined the combined effects of age, gender, PASS and BMI on VO2max. GLM #2 (with smoking) determined the added effects of smoking (pack.y groupings) on VO2max after controlling for age, gender, PASS and BMI. Constant errors (CE) were calculated to compare the accuracy of the two models for estimating the VO2max of the smoking subgroups. RESULTS: ANOVA affirmed the mean VO2max of each pack.y grouping decreased significantly (psmoking exposure increased. GLM #1 showed that age, gender, PASS and BMI were independently related with VO2max (R2 = 0.642, SEE = 4.90, pSmoked, the effects on VO2max from Light and Regular smoking habits were -0.83 and -0.85 ml.kg- 1.min-1 respectively (peffect of Heavy smoking on VO2max was -2.56 ml.kg- 1.min-1 (psmoking group in GLM #2 was smaller than the CE s of the smoking group counterparts in GLM #1. CONCLUSIONS: After accounting for the effects of gender, age, PASS and BMI the effect of habitual smoking on reducing VO2max is minimal, about 0.85 ml/kg/min, until the habit exceeds 20 pack.y at which point an

  11. Heart rate and oxygen demand of powered exoskeleton–assisted walking in persons with paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Asselin, MS

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Historically, persons with paralysis have limited options for overground ambulation. Recently, powered exoskeletons, which are systems that translate the user’s body movements to activate motors that move the lower limbs through a predetermined gait pattern, have become available. As part of an ongoing clinical study (NCT01454570, eight nonambulatory persons with paraplegia were trained to ambulate with a powered exoskeleton. Measurements of oxygen uptake (VO2 and heart rate (HR were recorded for 6 min each during each maneuver while sitting, standing, and walking. The average value of VO2 during walking (11.2 +/– 1.7 mL/kg/min was significantly higher than for sitting and standing (3.5 +/– 0.4 and 4.3 +/– 0.9 mL/kg/min, respectively; p < 0.001. The HR response during walking was significantly greater than that of either sitting or standing (118 +/– 21 vs 70 +/– 10 and 81 +/– 12 beats per minute, respectively; p < 0.001. Persons with paraplegia were able to ambulate efficiently using the powered exoskeleton for overground ambulation, providing the potential for functional gain and improved fitness.

  12. Aerobic and anaerobic profiles, heart rate and match analysis in older soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessitore, Antonio; Meeusen, Romain; Tiberi, Monica; Cortis, Cristina; Pagano, Rita; Capranica, Laura

    The aim of the present study was to provide aerobic (maximal oxygen consumption--VO2max) and anaerobic [jump tests: counter-movement jump (CMJ) and bounce jump (BJ); and running tests: 10 m sprint and 10 m dribbling the ball (10 mDB)] profiles of older soccer players (n = 12), and heart rate (HR), blood lactate accumulation (La) and match analysis (individual motor activity and team behaviour) aspects of a soccer match. The maximal aerobic test values were: HRmax, 154 +/- 14 beat min(-1); maximal power, 160 +/- 24 W; VO2peak, 36.3 +/- 11.3 ml kg(-1) min(-1); peak La, 8.2 +/- 1.8 mM. Jump test values were: CMJ, 21.2 +/- 4.5 cm; BJ, 17.3 +/- 4.8 cm. Running performances were: 10 m sprint, 2.06 +/- 0.36 s; 10 mDB, 2.17 +/- 0.21 s. Running showed similar values in the two halves (first half, 82%; second half, 88%), while walking lasted longer during the second half. Regarding the technical aspects of the match, 42% of the consecutive passes made in possession of the ball exceeded three passes, indicating that their play was structured in a cooperative manner. Older soccer players succeeded in maintaining good aerobic and anaerobic physical capability.

  13. How reliable are the equations for predicting maximal heart rate values in military personnel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporis, Goran; Vucetic, Vlatko; Jukic, Igor; Omrcen, Darija; Bok, Daniel; Custonja, Zrinko

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of equations for predicting maximal values of heart rate (HR) in military personnel. Five hundred and nine members of the Croatian Armed Forces (age 29.1 +/- 5.5 years; height 180.1 +/- 6.6 cm; body mass 83.4 +/- 11.3 kg; maximal oxygen uptake [VO2(max)] 49.7 +/- 6.9 mL O2/kg/min) were tested. The graded exercise test with gas exchange measurements was used to determine VO2(max) and maximum HR (HR(max)). The analysis of variance was used to determine the differences between the equations to calculate HR(max). The analysis of variance yielded statistically significant differences between seven HR equations (p max) = 205 - [age/2]) and Fox and Haskell's (HR(max) = 220 - age) equations had the highest correlation with the HRmax obtained by the graded exercise test. The authors recommend using the HR(max) values from the Stevens Creek and the Fox and Haskell equations for the purpose of training, testing, and daily exercise routine in military personnel.

  14. The use of heart rates and graded maximal test values to determine rugby union game intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Martinique; Coetzee, Ben

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the intensities of university rugby union games using heart rates and graded maximal test values. Twenty-one rugby players performed a standard incremental maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) test to the point of exhaustion in the weeks between 3 rugby matches. The heart rates that corresponded to the first and second ventilatory thresholds were used to classify the heart rates into low-, moderate-, and high-intensity zones. The heart rates recorded through heart rate telemetry during the matches were then categorized into the different zones. The average heart rates for the different intensity zones as well the percentages of the maximum heart rate (HRmax) were as follows: low, 141-152 b·min(-1) (76.2-82.0% HRmax); moderate, 153-169 b·min(-1) (82.7-91.4% HRmax); and high, 170-182 b·min(-1) (91.9-100% HRmax). The percentages of time players spent in the different intensity zones were as follows: 22.8% for the low-intensity, 33.6% for the moderate-intensity, and 43.6% for the high-intensity zones. The dependant t-test revealed significant differences (p rugby union games. It also revealed that university rugby games are categorized by significantly more high-intensity activities than was previously reported by other rugby match analyzing-related studies. Thus, sport scientists and conditioning coaches should concentrate more on high-intensity activities for longer periods during training sessions.

  15. Resting heart rate estimation using PIR sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapu, Hemanth; Saraswat, Kavisha; Ozturk, Yusuf; Cetin, A. Enis

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we describe a non-invasive and non-contact system of estimating resting heart rate (RHR) using a pyroelectric infrared (PIR) sensor. This infrared system monitors and records the chest motion of a subject using the analog output signal of the PIR sensor. The analog output signal represents the composite motion due to inhale-exhale process with magnitude much larger than the minute vibrations of heartbeat. Since the acceleration of the heart activity is much faster than breathing the second derivative of the PIR sensor signal monitoring the chest of the subject is used to estimate the resting heart rate. Experimental results indicate that this ambient sensor can measure resting heart rate with a chi-square significance level of α = 0.05 compared to an industry standard PPG sensor. This new system provides a low cost and an effective way to estimate the resting heart rate, which is an important biological marker.

  16. Familial aggregation of exercise heart rate and blood pressure in response to 20 weeks of endurance training: the HERITAGE family study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, P; Pérusse, L; Rankinen, T; Borecki, I B; Gagnon, J; Leon, A S; Skinner, J S; Wilmore, J H; Bouchard, C; Rao, D C

    2003-01-01

    Changes of heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) relative to baseline levels in response to an extended period of endurance training are indices of cardiovascular adaptability. Familial influences were investigated for HR and BP at work rates of 50 W and 60 % of the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) in response to 20 weeks of endurance training. A total of 481 participants from 99 sedentary White nuclear families in the HERITAGE Family Study (HERITAGE) were analyzed using a familial correlation model. Each of these training response phenotypes was adjusted for the effects of age, BMI, cigarette smoking, baseline VO2max, and its baseline values in fathers, mothers, sons and daughters, respectively. We found that maximal heritabilities reached 34 % and 29 % for HR training responses at 50 W and 60 % of VO2 max, respectively. The heritability was 22 % for systolic BP (SBP) training response at 50 W, but negligible at 60 % of VO2max. No significant heritabilities were found for diastolic BP (DBP) training responses at either 50 W or 60 % of VO2max. Familial influences for exercise HR and BP training responses were also assessed in a total of 257 participants from 113 Black family units in HERITAGE. However, there was no significant familial resemblance, which may be attributable to the small sample size. In conclusion, HR and SBP training responses during submaximal exercise in Whites were influenced by a modest, but significant, familial component. These observations are therefore in contrast to substantial familial effects (heritability estimates of about 50 %) previously reported for these variables measured at baseline.

  17. Heart rate and respiratory rate influence on heart rate variability repeatability: effects of the correction for the prevailing heart rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Sławomir Gąsior

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since heart rate variability (HRV is associated with average heart rate (HR and respiratory rate (RespRate, alterations in these parameters may impose changes in HRV. Hence the repeatability of HRV measurements may be affected by differences in HR and RespRate. The study aimed to evaluate HRV repeatability and its association with changes in HR and RespRate.Methods: Forty healthy volunteers underwent two ECG examinations seven days apart. Standard HRV indices were calculated from 5-min ECG recordings. The ECG-derived respiration signal was estimated to assess RespRate. To investigate HR impact on HRV, HRV parameters were corrected for prevailing HR. Results: Differences in HRV parameters between the measurements were associated with the changes in HR and RespRate. However, in multiple regression analysis only HR alteration proved to be independent determinant of the HRV differences – every change in HR by 1 bpm changed HRV values by 16.5% on average. After overall removal of HR impact on HRV, coefficients of variation of the HRV parameters significantly dropped on average by 26.8% (p < 0.001, i.e. by the same extent HRV reproducibility improved. Additionally, the HRV correction for HR decreased association between RespRate and HRV. Conclusions: In stable conditions, HR but not RespRate is the most powerful factor determining HRV reproducibility and even a minimal change of HR may considerably alter HRV. However, the removal of HR impact may significantly improve HRV repeatability. The association between HRV and RespRate seems to be, at least in part, HR dependent.

  18. Heart Rate and Respiratory Rate Influence on Heart Rate Variability Repeatability: Effects of the Correction for the Prevailing Heart Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gąsior, Jakub S.; Sacha, Jerzy; Jeleń, Piotr J.; Zieliński, Jakub; Przybylski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Background: Since heart rate variability (HRV) is associated with average heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RespRate), alterations in these parameters may impose changes in HRV. Hence the repeatability of HRV measurements may be affected by differences in HR and RespRate. The study aimed to evaluate HRV repeatability and its association with changes in HR and RespRate. Methods: Forty healthy volunteers underwent two ECG examinations 7 days apart. Standard HRV indices were calculated from 5-min ECG recordings. The ECG-derived respiration signal was estimated to assess RespRate. To investigate HR impact on HRV, HRV parameters were corrected for prevailing HR. Results: Differences in HRV parameters between the measurements were associated with the changes in HR and RespRate. However, in multiple regression analysis only HR alteration proved to be independent determinant of the HRV differences—every change in HR by 1 bpm changed HRV values by 16.5% on average. After overall removal of HR impact on HRV, coefficients of variation of the HRV parameters significantly dropped on average by 26.8% (p < 0.001), i.e., by the same extent HRV reproducibility improved. Additionally, the HRV correction for HR decreased association between RespRate and HRV. Conclusions: In stable conditions, HR but not RespRate is the most powerful factor determining HRV reproducibility and even a minimal change of HR may considerably alter HRV. However, the removal of HR impact may significantly improve HRV repeatability. The association between HRV and RespRate seems to be, at least in part, HR dependent. PMID:27588006

  19. COPD patients' oxygen uptake and heart rate on-kinetics at cycle-ergometer: correlation with their predictors of severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna V. Pessoa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To assess whether there is a correlation between oxygen uptake (VO2 and heart rate (HR on-kinetics in the constant-load cycle-ergometer test (CLT and the BODE index and its isolated variables in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. METHOD: Fourteen male patients between 55 and 78 years of age with moderate to severe COPD were evaluated. Each patient underwent spirometry, the six-minute walk test (6MWT, the cycle-ergometer incremental test (IT and CLT on alternate days. The exhaled gases were collected, and the VO2 and HR on-kinetics were analyzed. The BODE index was calculated. RESULTS: It was noted that the VO2 tau (τ and mean response time (MRT were significantly higher than HR τ and MRT. Moderate and strong correlations between τ and MRT of the VO2 and HR and the BODE index was noted (r=0.75 and r=0.78; r=0.62 and r=0.63, respectively, and there were correlations between the VO2 τ and MRT and the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 (r=-0.60; r=-0.53 and the distance traveled at 6MWT (DT-6MWT (r=-0.61; r=-0.44 and DT-6MWT % predicted (r=-0.62; r=-0.46. The HR τ and MRT were correlated with DT-6MWT (r=-0.59; r=-0.58 and DT-6MWT % predicted (r=-0.62; r=-0.62. CONCLUSION: The slowing of cycle-ergometer VO2, and especially of HR on-kinetics, may be key markers of disease severity. Furthermore, airflow obstruction and reduced exercise capacity are associated with the slowing of patients' VO2 and HR on-kinetics. OBJETIVOS: Verificar se há correlação entre a cinética-on do consumo de oxigênio (VO2 e da frequência cardíaca (FC no teste de carga constante em cicloergômetro (TCC com o índice BODE e suas variáveis isoladas em pacientes com doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica (DPOC. MÉTODO: Foram avaliados 14 homens com DPOC de obstrução moderada a muito grave, entre 55 e 78 anos, submetidos em dias alternados à espirometria, teste de caminhada de seis minutos (TC6, teste incremental em

  20. Leg strength and the VO2 max of older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, D; Cuneo, R; Delphinus, E; Gass, G

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if leg strength limits VO2 max and the ability to reach a plateau during VO2 max test in older men during cycle ergometry. Men aged 70-80 years were randomly selected into a strength training (ST, n=12) 3 times weekly for 16 weeks, followed by 4 weeks detraining or a non-training control group (C, n=12). Leg strength and VO2 max were assessed every 4 weeks for 20 weeks; body composition and cardiac function were assessed before and after 16 weeks training and after 4 weeks detraining. Leg strength, upper leg muscle mass (ULMM), arterial-venous O2 difference (a-v O2 difference) and VO2 max increased in the ST group (95±0.6%, 7±0.7%. 6.2±0.5% and 8±0.8%, respectively; PVO2 max and a-v O2 difference returned to pre-training levels. There was no change in the ability of the participants to reach a plateau during VO2 max testing over the 20-week study. These findings indicate that leg strength may not limit either VO2 max or the ability to plateau during VO2 max tests in older men during cycle ergometry. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Epitaxial Ni/VO2 heterostructures on Si (001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singamaneni, Srinivasa Rao; Foley, Gabrielle; Prater, John; Narayan, Jay

    VO2 is a strongly correlated oxide, undergoes a first order metal-insulator (MIT) well above the room temperature 340K. Previous works have shown that the stress associated with structural changes across MIT, VO2 can produce significant changes in magnetic properties of over layer ferromagnetic films such as Ni. This control of the magnetic properties could be very important to many technological applications. However, the current use of r-sapphire as substrate can be restrictive in the microelectronics industry. The previous works focused their studies on polycrystalline Ni and VO2 films, which do not allow the precise controlling of the associated properties due to poor reproducibility of polycrystalline films. We have investigated the magnetic and electronic properties of Ni/VO2 films when epitaxially integrated on Si (001) by pulsed laser deposition using domain matching epitaxy paradigm. Ni was grown both in nanoscale islands and layered form. The XRD results showed that the Ni, VO2and YSZ layers were grown epitaxially in single out of plane orientations. We found that the hysteresis in resistance vs. temperature curves in VO2 thin films was retained even when it is in close proximity with the Ni layer which helped confirm that VO2 layer preserves its characteristic features, revealed the fingerprint magnetic features of Ni layer. We will present and discuss our comprehensive experimental findings.

  2. Peak heart rates at extreme altitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, C; Van Hall, Gerrit

    2001-01-01

    We have measured maximal heart rate during a graded maximal bicycle exercise test to exhaustion in five healthy climbers before and during an expedition to Mt. Everest. Maximal heart rates at sea level were 186 (177-204) beats/min(-1) at sea level and 170 (169-182) beats/min(-1) with acute hypoxia....... After 1, 4 and 6 weeks of acclimatization to 5400 m, maximal heart rates were 155 (135-182), 158 (144-182), and 155 (140-183) beats/min(-1), respectively. Heart rates of two of the climbers were measured during their attempt to reach the summit of Mt. Everest without the use of supplemental oxygen....... The peak heart rates at 8,750 m for the two climbers were 142 and 144 beats/min(-1), which were similar to their maximal heart rates during exhaustive bicycle exercise at 5,400 m, the values being 144 and 148 beats/min(-1), respectively. The peak heart rates at 8,750 m are in agreement with other field...

  3. Peak treadmill running velocity during the VO2 max test predicts running performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noakes, T D; Myburgh, K H; Schall, R

    1990-01-01

    Twenty specialist marathon runners and 23 specialist ultra-marathon runners underwent maximal exercise testing to determine the relative value of maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max), peak treadmill running velocity, running velocity at the lactate turnpoint, VO2 at 16 km h-1, % VO2max at 16 km h-1, and running time in other races, for predicting performance in races of 10-90 km. Race time at 10 or 21.1 km was the best predictor of performance at 42.2 km in specialist marathon runners and at 42.2 and 90 km in specialist ultra-marathon runners (r = 0.91-0.97). Peak treadmill running velocity was the best laboratory-measured predictor of performance (r = -0.88(-)-0.94) at all distances in ultra-marathon specialists and at all distances except 42.2 km in marathon specialists. Other predictive variables were running velocity at the lactate turnpoint (r = -0.80(-)-0.92); % VO2max at 16 km h-1 (r = 0.76-0.90) and VO2max (r = 0.55(-)-0.86). Peak blood lactate concentrations (r = 0.68-0.71) and VO2 at 16 km h-1 (r = 0.10-0.61) were less good predictors. These data indicate: (i) that in groups of trained long distance runners, the physiological factors that determine success in races of 10-90 km are the same; thus there may not be variables that predict success uniquely in either 10 km, marathon or ultra-marathon runners, and (ii) that peak treadmill running velocity is at least as good a predictor of running performance as is the lactate turnpoint. Factors that determine the peak treadmill running velocity are not known but are not likely to be related to maximum rates of muscle oxygen utilization.

  4. Induction of cyto-protective autophagy by paramontroseite VO2 nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Miao, Yanyan; Zhang, Yunjiao; Liu, Liang; Lin, Jun; Yang, James Y.; Xie, Yi; Wen, Longping

    2013-04-01

    A variety of inorganic nanomaterials have been shown to induce autophagy, a cellular degradation process critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. The overwhelming majority of autophagic responses elicited by nanomaterials were detrimental to cell fate and contributed to increased cell death. A widely held view is that the inorganic nanoparticles, when encapsulated and trapped by autophagosomes, may compromise the normal autophagic process due to the inability of the cells to degrade these materials and thus they manifest a detrimental effect on the well-being of a cell. Here we show that, contrary to this notion, nano-sized paramontroseite VO2 nanocrystals (P-VO2) induced cyto-protective, rather than death-promoting, autophagy in cultured HeLa cells. P-VO2 also caused up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a cellular protein with a demonstrated role in protecting cells against death under stress situations. The autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine significantly inhibited HO-1 up-regulation and increased the rate of cell death in cells treated with P-VO2, while the HO-1 inhibitor protoporphyrin IX zinc (II) (ZnPP) enhanced the occurrence of cell death in the P-VO2-treated cells while having no effect on the autophagic response induced by P-VO2. On the other hand, Y2O3 nanocrystals, a control nanomaterial, induced death-promoting autophagy without affecting the level of expression of HO-1, and the pro-death effect of the autophagy induced by Y2O3. Our results represent the first report on a novel nanomaterial-induced cyto-protective autophagy, probably through up-regulation of HO-1, and may point to new possibilities for exploiting nanomaterial-induced autophagy for therapeutic applications.

  5. DISCREPANCY BETWEEN TRAINING, COMPETITION AND LABORATORY MEASURES OF MAXIMUM HEART RATE IN NCAA DIVISION 2 DISTANCE RUNNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvah C. Stahlnecker IV

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A percentage of either measured or predicted maximum heart rate is commonly used to prescribe and measure exercise intensity. However, maximum heart rate in athletes may be greater during competition or training than during laboratory exercise testing. Thus, the aim of the present investigation was to determine if endurance-trained runners train and compete at or above laboratory measures of 'maximum' heart rate. Maximum heart rates were measured utilising a treadmill graded exercise test (GXT in a laboratory setting using 10 female and 10 male National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA division 2 cross-country and distance event track athletes. Maximum training and competition heart rates were measured during a high-intensity interval training day (TR HR and during competition (COMP HR at an NCAA meet. TR HR (207 ± 5.0 b·min-1; means ± SEM and COMP HR (206 ± 4 b·min-1 were significantly (p < 0.05 higher than maximum heart rates obtained during the GXT (194 ± 2 b·min-1. The heart rate at the ventilatory threshold measured in the laboratory occurred at 83.3 ± 2.5% of the heart rate at VO2 max with no differences between the men and women. However, the heart rate at the ventilatory threshold measured in the laboratory was only 77% of the maximal COMP HR or TR HR. In order to optimize training-induced adaptation, training intensity for NCAA division 2 distance event runners should not be based on laboratory assessment of maximum heart rate, but instead on maximum heart rate obtained either during training or during competition

  6. How to Take Your Heart Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 140 135 Some medications may keep your heart rate from going too high. If you are taking medicine for your heart or blood pressure, check with your health care team about how hard you should exercise. www. move. va. gov Physical Activity Handouts • P09 ...

  7. Metaiodobenzylguanidine and heart rate variability in heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurata, Chinori; Shouda, Sakae; Mikami, Tadashi; Uehara, Akihiko; Ishikawa, Keiko [Hamamatsu Univ., Shizuoka (Japan). School of Medicine; Tawarahara, Kei; Nakano, Tomoyasu; Matoh, Fumitaka; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko

    1998-10-01

    It is assumed that the low-frequency power (LF) of heart rate variability (HRV) increases with progress of congestive heart failure (CHF), therefore positively correlating with cardiac {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) washout. It is demonstrated here that HRV, including normalized LF, correlated inversely with MIBG washout and positively with the ratio of heart-to-mediastinum MIBG activity in controls and CHF patients, whereas these correlations were not observed within CHF patients. Thus MIBG washout may increase and HRV including normalized LF may decrease with CHF, although the HRV and MIBG measures may not similarly change in proportion to the severity of the cardiac autonomic dysfunction in CHF. (author)

  8. FPGA Implementation of Heart Rate Monitoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahy, D; Rakshit, M; Sahu, P K

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a field programmable gate array (FPGA) implementation of a system that calculates the heart rate from Electrocardiogram (ECG) signal. After heart rate calculation, tachycardia, bradycardia or normal heart rate can easily be detected. ECG is a diagnosis tool routinely used to access the electrical activities and muscular function of the heart. Heart rate is calculated by detecting the R peaks from the ECG signal. To provide a portable and the continuous heart rate monitoring system for patients using ECG, needs a dedicated hardware. FPGA provides easy testability, allows faster implementation and verification option for implementing a new design. We have proposed a five-stage based methodology by using basic VHDL blocks like addition, multiplication and data conversion (real to the fixed point and vice-versa). Our proposed heart rate calculation (R-peak detection) method has been validated, using 48 first channel ECG records of the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. It shows an accuracy of 99.84%, the sensitivity of 99.94% and the positive predictive value of 99.89%. Our proposed method outperforms other well-known methods in case of pathological ECG signals and successfully implemented in FPGA.

  9. Cardiorespiratory fitness and heart rate recovery in obese premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, S; Marshall, P; Ingle, L; Borkoles, E

    2012-12-01

    Post-exercise heart rate recovery (HRR) has been proposed as a measure of cardiac autonomic dysfunction in apparently healthy adults. We aimed to determine the effects of a lifestyle intervention on HRR among clinically obese premenopausal women. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to investigate the effects of a 3-month non-dieting lifestyle intervention program on cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and HRR among healthy clinically obese premenopausal women. Thirty-one were randomly assigned to 3-month intensive lifestyle intervention and 31 served as controls. Sixty-one participants performed a maximal treadmill walking test with metabolic gas exchange. Baseline anthropometric measures were closely related to HRR at 1 min, which may indicate reduced parasympathetic reactivation. Post-exercise HRR at 60 s (HRR60) increased from 21.3 ± 6.2 to 27.8 ± 10.2 bpm in the intervention group compared with a smaller reduction (26.8 ± 12.3 to 24.5 ± 9.9 bpm) in controls (test for interaction P = 0.0001). HRR120 showed a significant effect of time (P = 0.0002) with no significant interaction with lifestyle intervention. A significant increase in VO2 peak was evident in the lifestyle group (21.6 to 23.6 mL/kg/min) compared with a modest reduction in the controls (22.6 to 21.6 mL/kg/min; test for interaction, P = 0.001). Clinically obese healthy premenopausal women achieved significant improvements in HRR60 and VO peak following a 3-month intensive lifestyle intervention. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Somatic, Endurance Performance and Heart Rate Variability Profiles of Professional Soccer Players Grouped According to Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botek Michal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study compared somatic, endurance performance determinants and heart rate variability (HRV profiles of professional soccer players divided into different age groups: GI (17–19.9 years; n = 23, GII (20–24.9 years; n = 45, GIII (25–29.9 years; n = 30, and GIV (30–39 years; n = 26. Players underwent somatic and HRV assessment and maximal exercise testing. HRV was analyzed by spectral analysis of HRV, and high (HF and low (LF frequency power was transformed by a natural logarithm (Ln. Players in GIV (83 ± 7 kg were heavier (p 25 years showed negligible differences in Pmax unlike the age group differences demonstrated in VO2max. A shift towards relative sympathetic dominance, particularly due to reduced vagal activity, was apparent after approximately 8 years of competing at the professional level.

  11. Photoinduced insulator-to-metal transition and surface statistics of VO2 monitored by elastic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysenko, Sergiy; Fernández, Felix; Rúa, Armando; Sepúlveda, Nelson; Aparicio, Joaquin

    2015-03-10

    Measurements of ultrafast light scattering within a hemisphere are performed for statistical analysis of nonequilibrium processes in VO2 epitaxial film. A Gerchberg-Saxton error reduction algorithm is applied for accurate calculation of a surface autocorrelation function from light scattering data and for partial reconstruction of a power spectral density function. Upon ultrafast photoinduced phase transition of VO2, the elastic light scattering reveals anisotropic grain-size-dependent dynamics. It was found that the transition rate depends on the optical absorption and orientation of VO2 grains with respect to polarization of the pump pulse. An observed stepwise evolution of surface autocorrelation length and transient anisotropy of the scattering field presumably originates from complex multistage transformation of VO2 lattice on a subpicosecond time scale.

  12. Heart rate recovery after exercise: relations to heart rate variability and complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Javorka M; Zila I.; Balhárek T.; Javorka K

    2002-01-01

    Physical exercise is associated with parasympathetic withdrawal and increased sympathetic activity resulting in heart rate increase. The rate of post-exercise cardiodeceleration is used as an index of cardiac vagal reactivation. Analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) and complexity can provide useful information about autonomic control of the cardiovascular system. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the association between heart rate decrease after exercise and HRV parameters. He...

  13. Heart rate recovery after exercise: relations to heart rate variability and complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Javorka M.; Zila I.; Balhárek T.; Javorka K

    2002-01-01

    Physical exercise is associated with parasympathetic withdrawal and increased sympathetic activity resulting in heart rate increase. The rate of post-exercise cardiodeceleration is used as an index of cardiac vagal reactivation. Analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) and complexity can provide useful information about autonomic control of the cardiovascular system. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the association between heart rate decrease after exercise and HRV parameters. He...

  14. Aerobic Fitness Level Typical of Elite Athletes is not Associated With Even Faster VO2 Kinetics During Cycling Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Tiago R; Caputo, Fabrizio; Machado, Carlos E P; Denadai, Benedito S

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to address the question if the VO2 kinetics is further improved as the aerobic training status increases from trained to elite level athletes. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), work-rate associated to VO2max (IVO2max) and VO2 kinetics of moderate (Mod) and maximal exercise (Max) were determined in fifty- five subjects. Then, they were assigned into three groups: low (LF), intermediate (IF) and high (HF) aerobic fitness level. In average, the VO2max of LF, IF and HF groups were, respectively, 36.0 ± 3.1, 51.1 ± 4.5 and 68.1 ± 3.9 ml·kg·min(-1) (p ≤ 0.05 among each other). VO2 kinetics mean response time of both exercise intensities were significantly faster (p ≤ 0.05) in HF (Mod, 27.5 ± 5.5 s; Max, 32.6 ± 8.3 s) and IF (Mod, 25.0 ± 3.1 s; Max, 42.6 ± 10.4 s) when compared to LF (Mod, 35.7 ± 7.9 s; Max: 57.8 ± 17.8 s). We can conclude that VO2 kinetics is improved as the fitness level is increased from low to intermediate but not further improved as the aerobic fitness level increases from intermediate to high. Key pointsCurrently, it is reasonable to believe that the rate-limiting step of VO2 kinetics depends on exercise intensity.The well known physiological adaptations induced by endurance training are likely the most extreme means to overcome rate-limiting steps determining VO2 kinetics across exercise intensities.However, exercise adaptation leading individuals to the high-end of aerobic fitness level range (VO2max > 65 ml.kg.min-1) is not able to further improve VO2 kinetics during both, moderate and maximal intensity exercise.

  15. Cardiac resynchronization therapy modulation of exercise left ventricular function and pulmonary O₂ uptake in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczak, Corey R; Paterson, Ian; Haykowsky, Mark J; Lawrance, Richard; Martellotto, Andres; Pantano, Alfredo; Gulamhusein, Sajad; Haennel, Robert G

    2012-06-15

    To better understand the mechanisms contributing to improved exercise capacity with cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), we studied the effects of 6 mo of CRT on pulmonary O(2) uptake (Vo(2)) kinetics, exercise left ventricular (LV) function, and peak Vo(2) in 12 subjects (age: 56 ± 15 yr, peak Vo(2): 12.9 ± 3.2 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1), ejection fraction: 18 ± 3%) with heart failure. We hypothesized that CRT would speed Vo(2) kinetics due to an increase in stroke volume secondary to a reduction in LV end-systolic volume (ESV) and that the increase in peak Vo(2) would be related to an increase in cardiac output reserve. We found that Vo(2) kinetics were faster during the transition to moderate-intensity exercise after CRT (pre-CRT: 69 ± 21 s vs. post-CRT: 54 ± 17 s, P exercise, LV ESV reserve (exercise - resting) increased 9 ± 7 ml (vs. a 3 ± 9-ml decrease pre-CRT, P increased (pre-CRT: 42 ± 8 ml vs. post-CRT: 61 ± 12 ml, P exercise post-CRT (P > 0.05). CRT improved heart rate, measured as a lower resting and steady-state exercise heart rate and as faster heart rate kinetics after CRT (pre-CRT: 89 ± 12 s vs. post-CRT: 69 ± 21 s, P exercise, cardiac output reserve increased significantly post-CRT and was 22% higher at peak exercise post-CRT (both P increase in cardiac output was due to both a significant increase in peak and reserve stroke volume and to a nonsignificant increase in heart rate reserve. Similar patterns in LV volumes as moderate-intensity exercise were observed at peak exercise. Cardiac output reserve was related to peak Vo(2) (r = 0.48, P increase in peak Vo(2) in clinically stable heart failure patients.

  16. Elevated heart rate and nondipping heart rate as potential targets for melatonin: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simko, Fedor; Baka, Tomas; Paulis, Ludovit; Reiter, Russel J

    2016-09-01

    Elevated heart rate is a risk factor for cardiovascular and all-cause mortalities in the general population and various cardiovascular pathologies. Insufficient heart rate decline during the night, that is, nondipping heart rate, also increases cardiovascular risk. Abnormal heart rate reflects an autonomic nervous system imbalance in terms of relative dominance of sympathetic tone. There are only a few prospective studies concerning the effect of heart rate reduction in coronary heart disease and heart failure. In hypertensive patients, retrospective analyses show no additional benefit of slowing down the heart rate by beta-blockade to blood pressure reduction. Melatonin, a secretory product of the pineal gland, has several attributes, which predict melatonin to be a promising candidate in the struggle against elevated heart rate and its consequences in the hypertensive population. First, melatonin production depends on the sympathetic stimulation of the pineal gland. On the other hand, melatonin inhibits the sympathetic system in several ways representing potentially the counter-regulatory mechanism to normalize excessive sympathetic drive. Second, administration of melatonin reduces heart rate in animals and humans. Third, the chronobiological action of melatonin may normalize the insufficient nocturnal decline of heart rate. Moreover, melatonin reduces the development of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis, which are considered a crucial pathophysiological disorder of increased heart rate and pulsatile blood flow. The antihypertensive and antiremodeling action of melatonin along with its beneficial effects on lipid profile and insulin resistance may be of additional benefit. A clinical trial investigating melatonin actions in hypertensive patients with increased heart rate is warranted.

  17. Heart Rate Sensor for Freshwater Mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, C. L.; Vial, D. P.; Kruger, A.; Niemeier, J. J.; Lee, H. W.; Schroer, H. W.

    2014-12-01

    Researchers have long been interested the cardiac activity of mollusks. First, it is important as a basic measure of the animal's metabolism. Further, activities such as feeding and burrowing affect heart rate, as do environmental factors such as water salinity, water temperature, exposure, and predation. We have developed a small, noninvasive sensor for measuring freshwater mussel heart rate. Its working principle is as follows. An infrared (IR) light-emitting diode is placed in contact with the mussel shell. Some of the IR penetrates through the shell, reflects off internal organs, and traverses back. A photodetector detects this IR, and electronics condition the signal. The heartbeat of the animal modulates the IR, allowing one to measure the heart rate. The technique is widely-used in finger heart-rate monitors in humans. The sensors do not have to be positioned above the heart and several locations on the mussel shell work well. The sensor is small (8 mm × 10 mm) and consumes less than 1 mA, and has a simple one-wire interface that allows for easy integration into data acquisition hardware. We present heart rate measurements for the common pocketbook (lampsilis cardium) freshwater mussel.

  18. VO2 kinetics and metabolic contributions whilst swimming at 95, 100, and 105% of the velocity at VO2max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ana C; Vilas-Boas, João P; Fernandes, Ricardo J

    2014-01-01

    A bioenergetical analysis of swimming at intensities near competitive distances is inexistent. It was aimed to compare the transient VO2 kinetics responses and metabolic contributions whilst swimming at different velocities around VO2max. 12 trained male swimmers performed (i) an incremental protocol to determine the velocity at VO2max (vVO2max) and (ii) three square wave exercises from rest to 95, 100, and 105% of vVO2max. VO2 was directly measured using a telemetric portable gas analyser and its kinetics analysed through a double-exponential model. Metabolic contributions were assessed through the sum of three energy components. No differences were observed in the fast component response (τ1--15, 18, and 16 s, A1--36, 34, and 37 mL · kg(-1) · min (-1), and Gain--32, 29, and 30 mL · min (-1) at 95, 100, and 105% of the vVO2max, resp.) but A2 was higher in 95 and 100% compared to 105% intensity (480.76 ± 247.01, 452.18 ± 217.04, and 147.04 ± 60.40 mL · min (-1), resp.). The aerobic energy contribution increased with the time sustained (83 ± 5, 74 ± 6, and 59 ± 7% for 95, 100, and 105%, resp.). The adjustment of the cardiovascular and/or pulmonary systems that determine O2 delivery and diffusion to the exercising muscles did not change with changing intensity, with the exception of VO2 slow component kinetics metabolic profiles.

  19. A novel inorganic precipitation-peptization method for VO2 sol and VO2 nanoparticles preparation: Synthesis, characterization and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yao; Jiang, Peng; Xiang, Wei; Ran, Fanyong; Cao, Wenbin

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, a simple, safe and cost-saving precipitation-peptization method was proposed to prepare VO2 sol by using inorganic VOSO4-NH3⋅H2O-H2O2 reactants system in air under room temperature. In this process, VOSO4 was firstly precipitated to form VO(OH)2, then monometallic species of VO(O2)(OH)(-) were formed through the coordination between VO(OH)2 and H2O2. The rearrangement of VO(O2)(OH)(-) in a nonplanar pattern and intermolecular condensation reactions result in multinuclear species. Finally, VO2 sol is prepared through the condensation reactions between the multinuclear species. After drying the obtained sol at 40°C, VO2 xerogel exhibiting monoclinic crystal structure with the space group of C2/m was prepared. The crystal structure of VO2 nanoparticles was transferred to monoclinic crystal structure with the space group of P21/c (VO2(M)) by annealing the xerogel at 550°C. Both XRD and TEM analysis indicated that the nanoparticles possess good crystallinity with crystallite size of 34.5nm as estimated by Scherrer's method. These results suggest that the VO2 sol has been prepared successfully through the proposed simple method.

  20. Modality determines VO2max achieved in self-paced exercise tests: validation with the Bruce protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Nicholas J; Scheadler, Cory M; Lee, Taylor L; Neuenfeldt, Noah C; Michael, Timothy J; Miller, Michael G

    2016-07-01

    The Bruce protocol is traditionally used to assess maximal cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max), but may have limitations, such as an unknown duration and large work rate increases. The use of self-paced VO2max tests (SPVs) may be beneficial if they are able to elicit similar maximal values in a set period of time. In addition, differences in modality between SPVs have not been explored. The purpose of this study was to compare SPVs, utilizing two different modes, with the Bruce (treadmill) protocol. Thirteen healthy, recreationally active individuals (eight men, five women) volunteered and participated in three different laboratory visits with each utilizing a different VO2max testing protocol. The first visit consisted of the Bruce protocol test, and the remaining visits entailed a maximal SPV on a treadmill (TM SPV) and a cycle ergometer (CE SPV). There were no differences in VO2max values between the TM SPV and the Bruce protocol tests (55.6 ± 4.9 vs. 56.2 ± 6.8, respectively; p = .510). As expected, the CE SPV (48.3 ± 7.6) was significantly lower than the other two tests (p VO2max as the Bruce protocol and did so with less incline and in less time suggesting that there are no changes in the limits of VO2max even when the test is self-paced and perceptually regulated.

  1. Difference in Physiological Components of VO2 Max During Incremental and Constant Exercise Protocols for the Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Junshiro; Harada, Tetsuya; Okada, Akinori; Maemura, Yuko; Yamamoto, Misaki; Tabira, Kazuyuki

    2014-08-01

    [Purpose] VO2 is expressed as the product of cardiac output and O2 extraction by the Fick equation. During the incremental exercise test and constant high-intensity exercise test, VO2 results in the attainment of maximal O2 uptake at exhaustion. However, the differences in the physiological components, cardiac output and muscle O2 extraction, have not been fully elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that constant exercise would result in higher O2 extraction than incremental exercise at exhaustion. [Subjects] Twenty-five subjects performed incremental exercise and constant exercise at 80% of their peak work rate. [Methods] Ventilatory, cardiovascular, and muscle oxygenation responses were measured using a gas analyzer, Finapres, and near-infrared spectroscopy, respectively. [Results] VO2 was not significantly different between the incremental exercise and constant exercise. However, cardiac output and muscle O2 saturation were significantly lower for the constant exercise than the incremental exercise at the end of exercise. [Conclusion] These findings indicate that if both tests produce a similar VO2 value, the VO2 in incremental exercise would have a higher ratio of cardiac output than constant exercise, and VO2 in constant exercise would have a higher ratio of O2 extraction than incremental exercise at the end of exercise.

  2. A novel mechanism for the oxidation reaction of VO2+ on a graphite electrode in acidic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjun; Fan, Xinzhuang; Liu, Jianguo; Yan, Chuanwei; Zeng, Chaoliu

    2014-09-01

    With the consideration of optimizing the performance of the all-vanadium redox flow battery (VRB), the oxidation reaction mechanism of VO2+ on a rotating graphite disk electrode has been investigated by potentiodynamic polarization in sulfuric acid solutions with various pH and vanadium concentrations. Furthermore, the reaction orders of VO2+ and H+ for the oxidation reaction of VO2+ have been calculated from the polarization results and compared with the theoretical results according to the possible reaction mechanisms available in the literature. However, a new oxidation reaction mechanism has been proposed to describe the oxidation of VO2+ at last, and the theoretic reaction orders of VO2+ and H+ based on the new mechanism are consistent with the experimental results when the electrochemical reaction is the rate-limited process. Moreover, a corresponding kinetic equation has been established for the oxidation reaction of VO2+ on a spectroscopically pure graphite electrode, and can be well used to predict the polarization behavior in V (IV) acidic solutions.

  3. Sound and vibration: effects on infants' heart rate and heart rate variability during neonatal transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Björn-Markus; Lindkvist, Marie; Lindkvist, Markus; Karlsson, Marcus; Lundström, Ronnie; Håkansson, Stellan; Wiklund, Urban; van den Berg, Johannes

    2012-02-01

    To measure the effect of sound and whole-body vibration on infants' heart rate and heart rate variability during ground and air ambulance transport. Sixteen infants were transported by air ambulance with ground ambulance transport to and from the airports. Whole-body vibration and sound levels were recorded and heart parameters were obtained by ECG signal. Sound and whole-body vibration levels exceeded the recommended limits. Mean whole-body vibration and sound levels were 0.19 m/s(2) and 73 dBA, respectively. Higher whole-body vibration was associated with a lower heart rate (p < 0.05), and higher sound level was linked to a higher heart rate (p = 0.05). The heart rate variability was significantly higher at the end of the transport than at the beginning (p < 0.01). Poorer physiological status was associated with lower heart rate variability (p < 0.001) and a lower heart rate (p < 0.01). Infants wearing earmuffs had a lower heart rate (p < 0.05). Sound and whole-body vibration during neonatal transport exceed recommended levels for adults, and sound seem to have a more stressful effect on the infant than vibrations. Infants should wear earmuffs during neonatal transport because of the stress-reducing effect. © 2011 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2011 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  4. The heart rate variability when conducting anesthesia

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    Khmel'nitskiy I.V.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The study was performed on the base of 10 years of using different methods of analysis of heart rate variability as an indicator of direct and reverse connection of the sympatho-adrenal system in the preoperative diagnosis and anesthetic monitoring. The possibility of predicting the depth of anaesthesia was analyzed, for depending on significant amounts of external and internal conditions, the level of anesthesia changes significantly. In this regard the influence of drugs and technological means of influencing the condition of all life-supporting systems, and the autonomic nervous system in particular, before, during and after anesthesia is of great practical interest. The balance of the pharmacological protection of the vegetative balance in the surgical aggression is studied, as well as the use of heart rate variability as a non-specific method in relation to nosological forms of pathology, both under internal and external influences. A review of a number of sources confirms that heart rate is virtually the only high-speed method to present the sympatho-vagal regulation, the most accessible somatic parameter for estimation of the cardiovascular system functioning in anesthesiology. The heart rate variability serves as an indicator of functional condition of autonomous (vegetative nervous system. It is proposed to perform the continuous monitoring of the autonomic indices of the heart rhythm, which allows to register sympaho-vagal imbalance. Dynamic monitoring, timely interpretation of heart rate variability are constantly in the spotlight, but the approach and methodology of the domestic and foreign authors distinctly differ on the following points: heart rythmography as a visual method of assessing information about the dynamics of slow-wave processes, spectral analysis of the heart sinus rhythm as the best method of analysis of large and small wave activity, tests of functional diagnostics for subsequent measurement of the autonomic nervous

  5. Accuracy of VO2(max) prediction equations in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Matthew J; Pieper, Carl F; Morey, Miram C

    2003-01-01

    We explored the accuracy and bias of prediction equations (ACSM and Foster) in older, deconditioned men and women. We also examined the predictors of VO2(max) to further understand which variables affect respiratory fitness in the elderly. One hundred seventy-one community dwelling, men (72.6 +/- 4.8 yr) and women (71.0 +/- 5.1 yr) screened in a clinical trial were retrospectively examined. VO2(max) was measured using a standardized protocol with gas exchange measured. Measured VO2 (max) values were compared with prediction equations via mean difference analyses, and bias was explored using Bland-Altman analyses. Regression analysis determined significant predictors of measured VO2 (max). Alpha was PVO2 (max), 21.7 +/- 4.8 and 17.3 +/- 4.0, respectively. ACSM overestimated VO2 (max) in men and women, 26.3 +/- 8.2 and 20.9 +/- 7.3, respectively. By using Bland-Altman plots, ACSM showed significant overestimation bias in more fit women (r = 0.29), whereas Foster showed no estimation bias in either gender. Significant predictors of VO2 (max) were gender, BMI, age, treadmill grade, and speed, with an equation R(2) of 0.70. A measure of current activity levels did not make it into the final model ( P= 0.0505) but is worthy of future consideration using more sensitive measures than ours. ACSM is not appropriate for use when treadmill testing older adults. We believe the Foster equation's VO2 (max) prediction accuracy is acceptable, showing no bias along a continuum of aerobic capacity.

  6. Effects of acute inhalation of albuterol on submaximal and maximal VO2 and blood lactate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, S J; Lucia, A; Storms, W W; Wallach, J M; Vint, P F; Zimmerman, S D

    1993-07-01

    The acute effects of inhaled albuterol, a selective beta-2 adrenergic agonist, on measures of endurance cycling performance and pulmonary function were assessed in 21 competitive road cyclists. A 5 step methacholine challenge revealed all cyclists to be non-asthmatic. Albuterol (A) total dose 360 micrograms or a saline placebo (P) was administered by inhaler, in 4 metered doses of 90 micrograms each, 15 minutes before cycle ergometry exercise. Heart rate, whole blood lactate, perceived exertion and VO2 were determined at the submaximal workloads of 150, 200, 225, 250, 275, 300 watts and at max. Pulmonary function tests determining forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume during the first second of expiration, forced mid-expiratory flow and maximal voluntary ventilation were performed prior to and 10 minutes after inhalation; and 5, 10 and 15 minutes after termination of the exercise protocol. Heart rate was significantly greater during the A compared to the P treatment at 200 (150.8 +/- 2.5 vs 146.7 +/- 2.8 beats per minute), 225 (159.7 +/- 2.4 vs 154.6 +/- 2.7 beats per minute) and 250 watts (166.9 +/- 2.4 vs 164.4 +/- 2.6 beats per minute). Whole blood lactate was significantly greater during the A compared to the P treatment at 275 watts (4.7 +/- 0.3 vs 4.2 +/- 0.4 mmol.l-1). No other significant differences were found between the 2 treatments at any time point. These data indicate that the acute effect of albuterol inhalation at twice the recommended dosage has no positive effect on endurance performance measures or pulmonary function in athletes who are not asthmatic.

  7. Can common exercise indices determine peak exercise oxygen consumption and anaerobic threshold during stress testing in patients with chronic congestive heart failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrashekhar, Y; Anand, I S

    1993-01-01

    Maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) is one of the most important predictors of prognosis in chronic heart failure and is now used to define degree of heart failure. While most centres can routinely do treadmill exercise testing (TMT), VO2 max measurements are not widely available. We, therefore, analysed the ability to predict VO2 max from common TMT variables: Peak exercise heart rate, exercise time, and METS achieved in 26 patients with chronic congestive heart failure (NYHA II-III, ejection fraction 43 +/- 2%) in whom exercise VO2 studies were simultaneously done by breath to breath expiratory gas analysis using a metabolic cart. METS achieved during exercise and exercise time correlated reasonably well although not perfectly (r = 0.78 & 0.73 respectively, tail critical value +/-0.41). Resting ejection fraction did not correlate at all (r = 0.0004). The regression equation (2.7) (METS) + 5.8 defined VO2 max with SE of 0.47. Although in unvariate analysis, exercise time, METS achieved & peak heart rate predicted VO2 max, only METS achieved was predictive in step wise regression. None of the parameters predicted the anaerobic threshold accurately although there was a modest relation between AT and peak exercise VO2. We conclude that most exercise variables do not accurately predict VO2 max in patients with chronic congestive heart failure. METS achieved is the best predictor and the VO2 max can be predicted using a regression equation. Anaerobic threshold cannot be predicted without tests involving expiratory gas analysis.

  8. [Effect of 4 weeks of training on the limit time at VO2 max].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heubert, Richard; Bocquet, Valéry; Koralsztein, Jean Pierre; Billat, Véronique

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of 4 weeks training in running on the time spent at VO2max (tlim VO2max). Eight athletes carried out, before and after an aerobic training, an incremental and five exhaustive tests at 90, 95, 100, 115% vVO2max and at the critical power at VO2max (CV'; slope of the linear relation between the tlim VO2max and the distance limit at VO2max). This training did not significantly improve VO2max (p = 0.17) or tlim VO2max (p = 0.72). However, the "tlim VO2max-intensity" curve was shifted toward the right, meaning that the athlete had to run at a higher intensity after training to obtain the same tlim VO2max. Tlim VO2max at CV' before training was significantly higher than tlim VO2max at 90, 95, 100, and 115% vVO2max (p max; p = 0.9). In conclusion, in spite of the shift of the "tlim VO2max-intensity" curve, tlim VO2max was not significantly increased by this training. Furthermore, CV' allowed subjects to spend the longest time of exercise at VO2max during a continuous exercise with constant speed, but CV', expressed in % vVO2max, did not improve with this training.

  9. Monitoring nocturnal heart rate with bed sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, M; Kortelainen, J M; Pärkkä, J; Tenhunen, M; Himanen, S L; Bianchi, A M

    2014-01-01

    This article is part of the Focus Theme of Methods of Information in Medicine on "Biosignal Interpretation: Advanced Methods for Studying Cardiovascular and Respiratory Systems". The aim of this study is to assess the reliability of the estimated Nocturnal Heart Rate (HR), recorded through a bed sensor, compared with the one obtained from standard electrocardiography (ECG). Twenty-eight sleep deprived patients were recorded for one night each through matrix of piezoelectric sensors, integrated into the mattress, through polysomnography (PSG) simultaneously. The two recording methods have been compared in terms of signal quality and differences in heart beat detection. On average, coverage of 92.7% of the total sleep time was obtained for the bed sensor, testifying the good quality of the recordings. The average beat-to-beat error of the inter-beat intervals was 1.06%. These results suggest a good overall signal quality, however, considering fast heart rates (HR > 100 bpm), performances were worse: in fact, the sensitivity in the heart beat detection was 28.4% while the false positive rate was 3.8% which means that a large amount of fast beats were not detected. The accuracy of the measurements made using the bed sensor has less than 10% of failure rate especially in periods with HR lower than 70 bpm. For fast heart beats the uncertainty increases. This can be explained by the change in morphology of the bed sensor signal in correspondence of a higher HR.

  10. Heart Rate Variability Analysis in General Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Gang

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic nervous system plays an integral role in homeostasis. Autonomic modulation can frequently be altered in patients with cardiac disorders as well as in patients with other critical illnesses or injuries. Assessment of heart rate variability is based on analysis of consecutive normal R-R intervals and may provide quantitative information on the modulation of cardiac vagal and sympathetic nerve input. The hypothesis that depressed heart rate variability may occur over a broad range of illness and injury, and may inversely correlated with disease severity and outcome has been tested in various clinical settings over the last decade. This article reviews recent literature concerning the potential clinical implications and limitations of heart rate variability assessment in general medicine.

  11. Resting Heart Rate and Auditory Evoked Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Fiuza Regaçone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between rest heart rate (HR and the components of the auditory evoked-related potentials (ERPs at rest in women. We investigated 21 healthy female university students between 18 and 24 years old. We performed complete audiological evaluation and measurement of heart rate for 10 minutes at rest (heart rate monitor Polar RS800CX and performed ERPs analysis (discrepancy in frequency and duration. There was a moderate negative correlation of the N1 and P3a with rest HR and a strong positive correlation of the P2 and N2 components with rest HR. Larger components of the ERP are associated with higher rest HR.

  12. Biology of VO2 max: looking under the physiology lamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundby, C; Montero, D; Joyner, M

    2017-06-01

    In this review, we argue that several key features of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) should underpin discussions about the biological and reductionist determinants of its interindividual variability: (i) training-induced increases in VO2 max are largely facilitated by expansion of red blood cell volume and an associated improvement in stroke volume, which also adapts independent of changes in red blood cell volume. These general concepts are also informed by cross-sectional studies in athletes that have very high values for VO2 max. Therefore, (ii) variations in VO2 max improvements with exercise training are also likely related to variations in these physiological determinants. (iii) All previously untrained individuals will respond to endurance exercise training in terms of improvements in VO2 max provided the stimulus exceeds a certain volume and/or intensity. Thus, genetic analysis and/or reductionist studies performed to understand or predict such variations might focus specifically on DNA variants or other molecular phenomena of relevance to these physiological pathways. © 2016 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Electronic structure and insulating gap in epitaxial VO2 polymorphs

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    Shinbuhm Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Determining the origin of the insulating gap in the monoclinic V O2(M1 is a long-standing issue. The difficulty of this study arises from the simultaneous occurrence of structural and electronic transitions upon thermal cycling. Here, we compare the electronic structure of the M1 phase with that of single crystalline insulating V O2(A and V O2(B thin films to better understand the insulating phase of VO2. As these A and B phases do not undergo a structural transition upon thermal cycling, we comparatively study the origin of the gap opening in the insulating VO2 phases. By x-ray absorption and optical spectroscopy, we find that the shift of unoccupied t2g orbitals away from the Fermi level is a common feature, which plays an important role for the insulating behavior in VO2 polymorphs. The distinct splitting of the half-filled t2g orbital is observed only in the M1 phase, widening the bandgap up to ∼0.6 eV. Our approach of comparing all three insulating VO2 phases provides insight into a better understanding of the electronic structure and the origin of the insulating gap in VO2.

  14. Effects of social stress on heart rate and heart rate variability in growing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, IC; Sgoifo, A; Lambooij, E; Korte, SM; Blokhuis, HJ; Koolhaas, JM

    2000-01-01

    The effects of social stress on heart rate, heart rate variability and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias were studied in 12 growing pigs. Social stress was induced during a good competition test with a pen mate, and subsequently during a resident-intruder test with an unacquainted pig in which t

  15. Effects of social stress on heart rate and heart rate variability in growing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, IC; Sgoifo, A; Lambooij, E; Korte, SM; Blokhuis, HJ; Koolhaas, JM

    2000-01-01

    The effects of social stress on heart rate, heart rate variability and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias were studied in 12 growing pigs. Social stress was induced during a good competition test with a pen mate, and subsequently during a resident-intruder test with an unacquainted pig in which t

  16. Effects of social stress on heart rate and heart rate variability in growing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, IC; Sgoifo, A; Lambooij, E; Korte, SM; Blokhuis, HJ; Koolhaas, JM

    The effects of social stress on heart rate, heart rate variability and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias were studied in 12 growing pigs. Social stress was induced during a good competition test with a pen mate, and subsequently during a resident-intruder test with an unacquainted pig in which

  17. Heart rate profile during exercise in patients with early repolarization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Serkan Cay; Goksel Cagirci; Ramazan Atak; Yucel Balbay; Ahmet Duran Demir; Sinan Aydogdu

    2010-01-01

    Background Both early repolarization and altered heart rate profile are associated with sudden death. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate an association between early repolarization and heart rate profile during exercise.Methods A total of 84 subjects were included in the study. Comparable 44 subjects with early repolarization and 40 subjects with normal electrocardiogram underwent exercise stress testing. Resting heart rate, maximum heart rate, heart rate increment and decrement were analyzed.Results Both groups were comparable for baseline characteristics including resting heart rate. Maximum heart rate, heart rate increment and heart rate decrment of the subjects in early repolarization group had significantly decreased maximum heart rate, heart rate increment and heart rate decrement compared to control group (all P<0.05). The lower heart rate increment (<106 beats/min) and heart rate decrement (<95 beats/min) were significantly associated with the presence of early repolarization. After adjustment for age and sex, the multiple-adjusted OR of the risk of presence of early repolarization was 2.98 (95% CI 1.21-7.34) (P=0.018) and 7.73 (95% CI 2.84-21.03) (P <0.001) for the lower heart rate increment and heart rate decrement compared to higher levels, respectively.Conclusions Subjects with early repolarization have altered heart rate profile during exercise compared to control subjects. This can be related to sudden death.

  18. Heart rate response during a simulated Olympic boxing match is predominantly above ventilatory threshold 2: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Lira CA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Claudio Andre Barbosa de Lira,1 Luiz Fernando Peixinho-Pena,2 Rodrigo Luiz Vancini1,2 Rafael Júlio de Freitas Guina Fachina,3,4 Alexandre Aparecido de Almeida,2 Marília dos Santos Andrade,2 Antonio Carlos da Silva2 1Setor de Fisiologia Humana e do Exercício, Universidade Federal de Goiás (UFG, Câmpus Jataí, Jataí, GO, Brazil; 2Departamento de Fisiologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP, São Paulo, SP, Brazil; 3Departamento de Ciência do Esporte, Faculdade de Educação Física (FEF, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP, Campinas, Brazil; 4Confederação Brasileira de Basketball (CBB, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Abstract: The present study aimed to describe heart rate (HR responses during a simulated Olympic boxing match and examine physiological parameters of boxing athletes. Ten highly trained Olympic boxing athletes (six men and four women performed a maximal graded exercise test on a motorized treadmill to determine maximal oxygen uptake (52.2 mL · kg-1 · min-1 ± 7.2 mL · kg-1 · min-1 and ventilatory thresholds 1 and 2. Ventilatory thresholds 1 and 2 were used to classify the intensity of exercise based on respective HR during a boxing match. In addition, oxygen uptake (VO2 was estimated during the match based on the HR response and the HR-VO2 relationship obtained from a maximal graded exercise test for each participant. On a separate day, participants performed a boxing match lasting three rounds, 2 minutes each, with a 1-minute recovery period between each round, during which HR was measured. In this context, HR and VO2 were above ventilatory threshold 2 during 219.8 seconds ± 67.4 seconds. There was an increase in HR and VO2 as a function of round (round 3 < round 2 < round 1, P < 0.0001.These findings may direct individual training programs for boxing practitioners and other athletes. Keywords: heart rate, physiological profile, intermittent exercise, combat sports, boxing

  19. Excess VO2 during ramp exercise is positively correlated to intercostal muscles deoxyhemoglobin levels above the gas exchange threshold in young trained cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oueslati, Ferid; Girard, Olivier; Tabka, Zouhair; Ahmaidi, Said

    2016-07-01

    We assessed respiratory muscles oxygenation responses during a ramp exercise to exhaustion and further explored their relationship with the non-linear increase of VO2 (VO2 excess) observed above the gas-exchange threshold. Ten male cyclists completed a ramp exercise to exhaustion on an electromagnetically braked cycle-ergometer with a rate of increment of 30Wmin(-1) with continuous monitoring of expired gases (breath-by-breath) and oxygenation status of intercostal muscles. Maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressure measurements were taken at rest and at exhaustion. The VO2 excess represents the difference between VO2max observed and VO2max expected using linear equation between the VO2 and the intensity before gas-exchange threshold. The deoxyhemoglobin remained unchanged until 60% of maximal aerobic power (MAP) and thereafter increased significantly by 37±18% and 40±22% at 80% and 100% of MAP, respectively. Additionally, the amplitude of deoxyhemoglobin increase between 60 and 100% of MAP positively correlated with the VO2 excess (r=0.69, p<0.05). Compared to exercise start, the oxygen tissue saturation index decreased from 80% of MAP (-4.8±3.2%, p<0.05) onwards. At exhaustion, maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures declined by 7.8±16% and 12.6±10% (both p<0.05), respectively. In summary, our results suggest a significant contribution of respiratory muscles to the VO2 excess phenomenon.

  20. Thermochromic VO2 on Zinnwaldite Mica by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathevula, L.; Ngom, B. D.; Kotsedi, L.; Sechogela, P.; Doyle, T. B.; Ghouti, M.; Maaza, M.

    2014-09-01

    VO2 thin films have been deposited by pulsed laser deposition on Zinnwaldite Mica substrates. The crystal structure, chemical composition, morphology were determined and the semiconductor/metal transition (SMT) properties of the deposited films were investigated. Without any post annealing, the films exhibit a textured nature with a VO2 (0 1 1) preferred crystallographic orientation and an elevated thermal variation of the electric resistance ratio RS/RM through the SMT at T ≈ 68 °C of the order of 104 and a narrow ∼7 °C hysteresis. In addition, the growth of the VO2 crystallites seem to be governed likely by a Volmer-Weber or Stranski-Krastanov mechanisms and certainly not a Frank-van Der Merwe process.

  1. Association between maximal oxygen uptake and the heart rate corrected-QT interval in postmenopausal overweight women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michishita, Ryoma; Shono, Naoko; Kasahara, Takaki; Tsuruta, Toshiyuki

    2009-08-01

    Increased aerobic capacity can reduce the incidence of cardiovascular disease and the mortality rate. On the other hand, a prolonged heart rate corrected-QT (QTc) interval is associated with an increased risk of arrhythmias, cardiac sudden death and coronary artery disease. The association of the aerobic capacity and coronary risk factors with QTc interval was investigated in postmenopausal overweight women. The subjects included 84 postmenopausal overweight women [age: 58.7+/-6.4 years, body mass index (BMI): 27.9+/-3.3] with coronary risk factors. Electrocardiogram (ECG) was recorded with a standard resting 12-lead ECG after more than 5 minutes of rest. The QTc interval was automatically calculated according to Bazett's formula. A multistage graded submaximal exercise test was performed on an electric bicycle ergometer to determine the estimated maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2)max). Single correlation analysis showed the QTc interval to be positively associated with hemoglobin A(1)c (HbA(1)c), fasting glucose, fasting insulin, BMI, waist circumference, serum potassium and the number of coronary risk factors, while negatively correlated with VO(2)max. Stepwise multiple regression analysis demonstrated the strong association of the QTc interval with HbA(1)c and VO(2)max (r(2)=0.244, p<0.0001). In both patients with and without metabolic syndrome (n=15, n=69, respectively), the QTc interval was independently associated with the HbA(1)c (r(2)=0.318, p<0.05, r(2)= 0.115, p<0.05, respectively). These results suggest that decreased aerobic capacity and glucose intolerance may be independent risk factors for a prolonged QTc interval, while demonstrating no relationship with metabolic syndrome.

  2. Effects of aerobic exercise on the resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness of female patients with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seol-Jung; Kim, Eon-Ho; Ko, Kwang-Jun

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aerobic exercise on the resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness or female patients with metabolic syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were randomly assigned to an exercise group (n=12) or a control group (n=11). Subjects in the exercise group performed aerobic exercise at 60-80% of maximum heart rate for 40 min 5 times a week for 12 weeks. The changes in metabolic syndrome risk factors, resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness were measured and analyzed before and after initiation of the exercise program to determine the effect of exercise. Arterial stiffness was assessed based on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV). [Results] Compared to the control group; The metabolic syndrome risk factors (weight, % body fat, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and HDL-Cholesterol) were significantly improved in the exercise: resting heart rate was significantly decreased; VO2max, muscle strength and muscle endurance were significantly increased; and ba-PWV was significantly decreased. [Conclusion] Aerobic exercise had beneficial effects on the resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness of patients with metabolic syndrome.

  3. EFFECTS OF HIGH INTENSITY TRAINING BY HEART RATE OR POWER IN RECREATIONAL CYCLISTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Robinson

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances in interval training for cyclists have led to the development of both heart rate (HR monitors and powermeters (PM. Despite the growing popularity of PM use, the superiority of PM-based training has not been established. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relative effectiveness of HR-based versus PM-based interval training on 20 km time trial (20km TT, lactate threshold (LT power, and peak aerobic capacity (VO2max in recreational cyclists. Participants (n =20; M age=33.9, SD =13 completed a baseline 20km TT to establish their VO2max and LT and were then randomly assigned to either HR-determined or PM-determined training sessions. Over a period of up to 5 weeks participants completed 7.2 (± 1.1 interval training sessions at their specific LT for their respective interval training method. Repeated measures analyses of variances (ANOVAs showed that both HR-based and PM-based training groups significantly improved their LT power (F(1,16 = 28., p < 0.01, eta2 = 0.63 and 20km TT time (F(1,16 = 4.92, p = 0.04, eta2 = 0.24 at posttest, showing a 17 watt increase (9.8% and a near 3-and-a-half minute improvement (7.8% in 20km TT completion time. There were no significant group (HR vs. PM x time (baseline vs. posttest interactions for 20km TT completion time, LT power, or VO2max ratings. Our results coincide with the literature supporting the effectiveness of interval training for endurance athletes. Furthermore, our findings indicate that there is no empirical evidence for the superiority of any single type of device in the implementation of interval training. This study indicates that there are no noticeable advantages to using PM to increase performance in the average recreational cyclist, suggesting that low cost HR monitor are equally capable as training devices

  4. Effect of Sodium Phosphate Supplementation on Cycling Time Trial Performance and VO2 1 and 8 Days Post Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Cameron P; Dawson, Brian; Wallman, Karen E; Guelfi, Kym J

    2014-09-01

    This study examined the effect of 6 days of sodium phosphate (SP) (50 mg·kg·FFM(-1)·day(-1)) or placebo (PL) supplementation in trained cyclists on either 100 kJ (23.9 Kcal) (~3-4 min) or 250 kJ (59.7 Kcal) (~10-12 min) time trials performances both 1 and 8 days post-supplementation. Trials were performed in a counterbalanced crossover design, with a 28-day washout period between supplementation phases. No significant differences, moderate-large ES (d) or likely (or greater) smallest worthwhile change (SWC) values were recorded for time to completion and mean power output on days 1 and 8 post-supplementation, both within and between SP and PL for either the 100 or 250 kJ (23.9 or 59.7 Kcal) trials. In the 100 kJ (23.9 Kcal) trial (only) first minute VO2 tended to be higher in SP8 than both PL8 (d = 0.60; 88/10/2 SWC) and SP1 (d = 0.47: 82/15/3 SWC), as was mean VO2 (PL8: d = 0.77; 93/6/1 SWC and SP1: d = 0.84; 90/8/3 SWC). No significant differences were found for heart rate, ratings of perceived exertion and blood lactate post-exercise within or between any trials, while serum phosphate values were not different before or after supplementation with SP or PL. In conclusion, this study showed a tendency for increased VO2 in a short duration (100 kJ/ 23.9 Kcal: ~3-4 min) cycling test on day 8 after SP supplementation, but no differences in 100 or 250 kJ (23.9 or 59.7 Kcal) time trials performances were observed. Key PointsStudies investigating the effects of sodium phosphate loading on shorter duration (ergogenic effect may last.Loading did not improve cycling time trial (~3-4 min and 10-12 min) performance either 1 or 8 days after supplementation.Future studies should investigate the effect of sodium phosphate loading on repeated sprints and simulated cycling road race performance over extended durations (>30 min), where it may be likely to have a more beneficial effect.

  5. Heart rate and heart rate variability in dogs with different degrees of myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Caroline Elisabeth; Falk, Bo Torkel; Zois, Nora Elisabeth;

    2011-01-01

    HEART RATE AND HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN DOGS WITH DIFFERENT DEGREES OF MYXOMATOUS MITRAL VALVE DISEASE. CE Rasmussen1, T Falk1, NE Zois1, SG Moesgaard1, HD Pedersen2, J Häggström3 and LH Olsen1. 1. Department of Basic Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University...... of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark. 2. Novo Nordic A/S, Maaloev, Denmark. 3. Department of Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Uppsala, Sweden. Heart rate variability (HRV) is an indirect measurement of the autonomic modulation of heart rate (HR). Reduced HRV measured from short......-time electrocardiography is seen in dogs with heart failure (HF) secondary to myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD). However, HRV is suggested to increase with disease severity at early stages of MMVD. The aims of this study were 1) to associate HR and HRV with severity of MMVD in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCS...

  6. Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring during Labor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the process of checking the condition of your baby during labor and delivery by monitoring his or her heart rate with ... health care provider may decide to deliver the baby right away. In this case, the delivery of the baby is more likely to be ...

  7. Heart rate control via vagus nerve stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buschman, Hendrik P.; Storm, Corstiaan J.; Duncker, Dirk J.; Verdouw, Pieter D.; Aa, van der Hans E.; Kemp, van der Peter

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: There is ample and well-established evidence that direct electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve can change heart rate in animals and humans. Since tachyarrhythmias cannot always be controlled through medication, we sought, in this pilot study, to elucidate whether a clinical implantab

  8. Influence of basic heart rate and sex on heart rate turbulence in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Jörg O; Eichner, Gerrit; Veit, Gudrun; Schmitt, Heiko; Lewalter, Thorsten; Lüderitz, Berndt

    2004-12-01

    Acceleration and deceleration of the heart rate after the occurrence of a ventricular premature complex is characterized as heart rate turbulence (HRT). Two parameters quantify heart rate turbulence: onset and slope. The physiological properties have not been clarified in a large cohort of persons yet. This study evaluated properties of HRT, and focused on the influence of basic heart rate and sex on HRT. Using a special protocol, 95 persons were studied prospectively. HRT and its physiological properties were determined in 95 persons using Holter ECGs. The authors found 24% with a turbulence onset 0% and 5% with a turbulence slope women and men (745 vs 817 ms, P linear, weighted regression model revealed that an increased heart rate before a ventricular premature complex is associated with a decreased turbulence onset (P men (P = 0.0022). On the contrary, the study detected no influence of the basic heart rate on turbulence slope in women (P = 0.0015 for the comparison between women and men). Basic heart rate and sex show an influence on HRT and should be considered when using HRT for noninvasive risk stratification.

  9. Optimal Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Pacing Rate in Non-Ischemic Heart Failure Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghotbi, Adam Ali; Sander, Mikael; Køber, Lars

    2015-01-01

    by microneurography (MSNA), peak oxygen consumption (pVO2), N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (p-NT-proBNP), echocardiography and QoL. RESULTS: DDD-80 pacing for 3 months increased the mean heart rate from 77.3 to 86.1 (p = 0.001) and reduced sympathetic activity compared to DDD-60 (51±14 bursts/100 cardiac......BACKGROUND: The optimal pacing rate during cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the impact of changing basal pacing frequencies on autonomic nerve function, cardiopulmonary exercise capacity and self-perceived quality of life (QoL). METHODS: Twelve CRT...... patients with non-ischemic heart failure (NYHA class II-III) were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, crossover trial, in which the basal pacing rate was set at DDD-60 and DDD-80 for 3 months (DDD-R for 2 patients). At baseline, 3 months and 6 months, we assessed sympathetic nerve activity...

  10. Gaussian mixture model of heart rate variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Costa

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV is an important measure of sympathetic and parasympathetic functions of the autonomic nervous system and a key indicator of cardiovascular condition. This paper proposes a novel method to investigate HRV, namely by modelling it as a linear combination of Gaussians. Results show that three Gaussians are enough to describe the stationary statistics of heart variability and to provide a straightforward interpretation of the HRV power spectrum. Comparisons have been made also with synthetic data generated from different physiologically based models showing the plausibility of the Gaussian mixture parameters.

  11. The effects of physical fitness and body composition on oxygen consumption and heart rate recovery after high-intensity exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, E Z; Bastos, F N; Papoti, M; Freitas Junior, I F; Gobatto, C A; Balikian Junior, P

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential relationship between excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC), heart rate recovery (HRR) and their respective time constants (tvo2 and t HR) and body composition and aerobic fitness (VO2max) variables after an anaerobic effort. 14 professional cyclists (age=28.4±4.8 years, height=176.0±6.7 cm, body mass=74.4±8.1 kg, VO2max=66.8±7.6 mL·kg - 1·min - 1) were recruited. Each athlete made 3 visits to the laboratory with 24 h between each visit. During the first visit, a total and segmental body composition assessment was carried out. During the second, the athletes undertook an incremental test to determine VO2max. In the final visit, EPOC (15-min) and HRR were measured after an all-out 30 s Wingate test. The results showed that EPOC is positively associated with % body fat (r=0.64), total body fat (r=0.73), fat-free mass (r=0.61) and lower limb fat-free mass (r=0.55) and negatively associated with HRR (r= - 0.53, pEPOC after high-intensity exercise. Even in short-term exercise, the major metabolic disturbance due to higher muscle mass and total muscle mass may increase EPOC. However, body fat impedes HRR and delays recovery of oxygen consumption after effort in highly trained athletes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Music determines heart rate variability of singers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn eVickhoff

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Choir singing is known to promote wellbeing. One reason for this may be that singing demands a slower than normal respiration which may in turn affect heart activity. Coupling of heart rate variability (HRV to respiration is called Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA. This coupling has a subjective as well as a biologically soothing effect, and it is beneficial for cardiovascular function. RSA is seen to be more marked during slow-paced breathing and at lower respiration rates (0.1 Hz and below. In this study, we investigate how singing, which is a form of guided breathing, affects HRV and RSA. The study comprises a group of healthy 18 year olds of mixed gender. The subjects are asked to; (1 hum a single tone and breathe whenever they need to; (2 sing a hymn with free, unguided breathing; and (3 sing a slow mantra and breathe solely between phrases. Heart rate (HR is measured continuously during the study. The study design makes it possible to compare above three levels of song structure. In a separate case study, we examine five individuals performing singing tasks (1-(3. We collect data with more advanced equipment, simultaneously recording HR, respiration, skin conductance and finger temperature. We show how song structure, respiration and heart rate are connected. Unison singing of regular song structures makes the hearts of the singers accelerate and decelerate simultaneously. Implications concerning the effect on wellbeing and health are discussed as well as the question how this inner entrainment may affect perception and behavior.

  13. Matching of Male and Female Subjects Using VO2 Max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cureton, Kirk J.

    1981-01-01

    The increasing use of various VO2 max expressions as test measures is a problem because the magnitude of sex difference varies considerably with each expression. A valid match of male and female test subjects would consider physical activity history and the amount of endurance exercise done in the previous year. (Author/FG)

  14. VO2 prediction and cardiorespiratory responses during underwater treadmill exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Nicholas P; Greene, Elizabeth S; Carbuhn, Aaron F; Green, John S; Crouse, Stephen F

    2011-06-01

    We compared cardiorespiratory responses to exercise on an underwater treadmill (UTM) and land treadmill (LTM) and derived an equation to estimate oxygen consumption (VO2) during UTM exercise. Fifty-five men and women completed one LTM and five UTM exercise sessions on separate days. The UTM sessions consisted of chest-deep immersion, with 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100% water-jet resistance. All session treadmill velocities increased every 3 min from 53.6 to 187.8 m x min(-1). Cardiorespiratory responses were similar between LTM and UTM when jet resistance for UTM was 50%. Using multiple regression analysis, weight-relative VO2 could be estimated as: VO2 (mLO2 c kg(-1) x min(-1)) = 0.19248 x height (cm) + 0.17422 x jet resistance (% max) + 0.14092 x velocity (m x min(-1)) -0.12794 x weight (kg)-27.82849, R2 = .82. Our data indicate that similar LTM and UTM cardiorespiratory responses are achievable, and we provide a reasonable estimate of UTM VO2.

  15. Validity of 3 protocols for verifying VO2 max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkeberg, J M; Dalleck, L C; Kamphoff, C S; Pettitt, R W

    2011-04-01

    The verification bout has emerged as a technique for confirming 'true' VO2 max; however, validity during a single visit is unknown. We evaluated 3 different GXT durations with severe intensity verification bouts. On 3 separate days, in counterbalanced order, 12 recreational-trained men completed short (9±1 min), middle (11±1 min), and long (13±2 min) duration GXTs followed by exhaustive, sine wave verification bouts during the same visit. Intensities for verification were set at speeds equivalent to 2-stages minus end-GXT speed. No differences (pVO2 max (mL/kg/min) were observed between short (49.1), middle (48.2), and long (48.8) protocols. In addition, no differences in verification bout duration occurred between protocols (3±1 min). Validity of VO2 max was strongest for the middle duration protocol (ICC α=0.97; typical error=1 mL/kg/min; CV=2%). A small, but significantly higher HR (max) (∼1-2 bpm) was observed for the long protocol. Maximum respiratory exchange ratios were inconsistent (ICC α ranged 0.58-0.68). Our findings indicate GXT-verification bout testing during a single visit is a valid means of measuring 'true' VO2 max. The 10 min target for GXT duration was the optimum. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Lessons from the Heart: Individualizing Physical Education with Heart Rate Monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Beth; Birnbaum, Burton H.

    Learning about the relationship between heart rate and physical activity is an important aspect of fitness education. Use of a heart rate monitor (HRM) helps a student to understand how stretching and large muscle movements gradually increase the heart rate and blood flow, and enables students to measure their exercise heart rates and set goals…

  17. Steady State Condition in the Measurement of VO2and VCO2by Indirect Calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, M; Sacristan, E; Infante, O; Escalante, B; Rodriguez, F

    2005-01-01

    Resting Metabolic Rate (RMR) is computed using VO2and VCO2short time 15-minute window measurement with Indirect Calorimetry (IC) instruments designed with mixing chamber. Steady state condition using a 10% variation coefficient criteria is the main objective to achieve metabolic long time prediction reliability. This study address how susceptible is the steady state VO2, VCO2measurement condition to the clino-orthostatic physiological maneuver. 30 young healthy subjects were analyzed. Only 18 passed the 10% variation coefficient inclusive criteria. They were exposed to 10 minutes clino-stage and 10 minutes orthostage. The hypothesis tests show not statistical significance (p< 0.1) in the average and variance analysis. It is concluded that the steady state is not influenced by the patient position IC test, probably because IC mixing chamber instruments are insensitive to detect a mayor physiological dynamics changes that can modify the steady state definition.

  18. High prevalence of false-positive plateau phenomena during VO2max testing in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrami, Fernando G; Wong, Del P; Noakes, Timothy D

    2014-09-01

    It is believed that a plateau in oxygen consumption (VO2) at the end of an incremental exercise test identifies the upper limits of cardiovascular capacity. We investigated how different criteria influence the frequency with which the "plateau phenomenon" is detected and the prevalence at which "false" plateau phenomena occurs during sub-maximal exercise. Cross-sectional. Six different criteria with 3 different sampling intervals each were used to identify the "plateau phenomenon" from a single data set comprising 63 incremental exercise tests along with secondary criteria based on target heart rate (HR) and respiratory exchange ratio (RER). A single criterion from the original 18 (HALF) was also used to detect the incidence of any plateau phenomena during each test. The plateau phenomenon was detected in 16-82% of the tests depending on the criteria used, mostly as a result of the different sampling intervals. HALF identified 103 "plateau phenomena" but 73 (70.9%) of these occurred during sub-maximal exercise and so were "false". "False" plateaus were verified by at least one secondary criterion in 27% of cases. Participants reached the HR and RER targets after 83.6 ± 11.7% and 81.9 ± 18.1% of total test duration, respectively. The wide range in the percentage of plateau phenomena detected by different criteria plus the high rate (71%) of "false" plateau during sub-maximal exercise could indicate that this phenomenon is a calculation artifact rather than an indicator of true physiological events. Secondary criteria can be reached early in exercise and often identify "false" plateau phenomena as "true". Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Heart rate variability. Applications in psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servant, D; Logier, R; Mouster, Y; Goudemand, M

    2009-10-01

    The autonomic nervous system sends messages through the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system. The sympathetic nervous system innervates the cardioaccelerating center of the heart, the lungs (increased ventilatory rhythm and dilatation of the bronchi) and the non-striated muscles (artery contraction). It releases adrenaline and noradrenaline. As opposed to the sympathetic nervous system, it innervates the cardiomoderator center of the heart, the lungs (slower ventilatory rhythm and contraction of the bronchi) and the non-striated muscles (artery dilatation). It uses acetylcholine (ACh) as its neurotransmitter. Sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions function antagonistically to preserve a dynamic modulation of vital functions. These systems act on the heart respectively through the stellar ganglion and the vagus nerve. The interaction of these messages towards the sinoauricular node is responsible for normal cardiac variability, which can be measured by monitoring heart rate variability (HRV). Heart rate is primarily controlled by vagal activity. Sensorial data coming from the heart are fed back to the central nervous system. HRV is an indicator of both how the central nervous system regulates the autonomic nervous system, and of how peripheral neurons feed information back to the central level. HRV measures are derived by estimating the variation among a set of temporally ordered interbeat intervals. The state of perfect symmetry, which, in medical parlance, is called respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), can be described as a state of cardiac coherence. Obtaining a series of interbeat intervals requires a continuous measure of heart rate, typically electrocardiography (ECG). Commercially available software is then used to define the interbeat intervals within an ECG recording. The autonomic nervous system is highly adaptable and allows the organism to maintain its balance when experiencing strain or stress. Conversely, a lack of flexibility and a rigid

  20. Determinants of VO2 max decline with aging: an integrated perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betik, Andrew C; Hepple, Russell T

    2008-02-01

    Aging is associated with a progressive decline in the capacity for physical activity. Central to this decline is a reduction in the maximal rate of oxygen utilization, or VO2 max. This critical perspective examines the roles played by the factors that determine the rate of muscle oxygen delivery versus those that determine the utilization of oxygen by muscle as a means of probing the reasons for VO2 max decline with aging. Reductions in muscle oxygen delivery, principally due to reduced cardiac output and perhaps also a maldistribution of cardiac output, appear to play the dominant role up until late middle age. On the other hand, there is a decline in skeletal muscle oxidative capacity with aging, due in part to mitochondrial dysfunction, which appears to play a particularly important role in extreme old age (senescence) where skeletal muscle VO2 max is observed to decline by approximately 50% even under conditions of similar oxygen delivery as young adult muscle. It is noteworthy that at least the structural aspects of the capillary bed do not appear to be reduced in a manner that would compromise the capacity for muscle oxygen diffusion even in senescence.

  1. In-season changes in heart rate recovery are inversely related to time to exhaustion but not aerobic capacity in rowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraldsdottir, K; Brickson, S; Sanfilippo, J; Dunn, W; Watson, A

    2017-06-26

    To determine if in-season changes in heart rate recovery (HRR) are related to aerobic fitness and performance in collegiate rowers. Twenty-two female collegiate rowers completed testing before and after their competitive season. Body fat percentage (BF%) was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max ) and time to exhaustion (Tmax ) were determined during maximal rowing ergometer testing followed by 1 minute of recovery. HRR was expressed absolutely and as a percentage of maximal HR (HRR%1 min ). Variables were compared using paired Wilcoxon tests. Multivariable regression models were used to predict in-season changes in HRR using changes in VO2max and Tmax , while accounting for changes in BF%. From preseason to post-season, VO2max and BF% decreased (3.98±0.42 vs 3.78±0.35 L/min, P=.002 and 23.8±3.4 vs 21.3±3.9%, PVO2max were not associated with HRR%1 min (P>.05). In-season changes in Tmax were related to changes in HRR%1 min (β=-1.67, P=.006). In-season changes in BF% were not related to changes in HRR (P>.05 for all). HRR1 min and HRR%1 min were faster preseason to post-season, although the changes were unrelated to VO2max . Faster HRR%1 min post-season was inversely related to changes in Tmax . This suggests that HRR should not be used as a measure of aerobic capacity in collegiate rowers, but is a promising measure of training status in this population. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Slower heart rate and oxygen consumption kinetic responses in the on- and off-transient during a discontinuous incremental exercise: effects of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Rodrigo P; Bonjorno, José C; Beltrame, Thomas; Catai, Aparecida M; Arena, Ross; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of the kinetic responses of heart rate (HR) and oxygen consumption (VO(2)) are an important tool for the evaluation of exercise performance and health status. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aging on the HR and VO(2) kinetics during the rest-exercise transition (on-transient) and the exercise-recovery transition (off-transient), in addition to investigating the influence of exercise intensity (mild and moderate) on these variables. A total of 14 young (23±3 years) and 14 elderly (70±4 years) healthy men performed an incremental exercise testing (ramp protocol) on a cycle-ergometer to determine the maximal power (MP). Discontinuous exercise testing was initiated at 10% of the MP with subsequent increases of 10% until exhaustion. The measurement of HR, ventilatory and metabolic variables and blood lactate were obtained at rest and during the discontinuous exercise. The lactate threshold was determined in each subject and was similar between the groups (30±7% of MP in the young group and 29±5% of MP in the elderly group, p>0.05). The HR and VO(2) kinetics (on- and off-transient) were slower in the elderly group compared to the young group (pexercise intensity. We concluded that the elderly group presented with slower HR and VO(2) kinetics in relation to the young group for both on- and off-transients of the dynamic exercise. Moreover, in the young group, the kinetic responses were slower in the moderate intensity in relation to the mild intensity.

  3. Heart rate recovery and heart rate complexity following resistance exercise training and detraining in young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Kevin S; Fahs, Christopher A; Shinsako, Kevin K; Jae, Sae Young; Fernhall, Bo

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine heart rate recovery (HRR) and linear/nonlinear heart rate variability (HRV) before and after resistance training. Fourteen young men (25.0 +/- 1.1 yr of age) completed a crossover design consisting of a 4-wk time-control period, 6 wk of resistance training (3 days/wk), and 4 wk of detraining. Linear HRV was spectrally decomposed using an autoregressive approach. Nonlinear dynamics of heart rate complexity included sample entropy (SampEn) and Lempel-Ziv entropy (LZEn). HRR was calculated from a graded maximal exercise test as maximal heart rate attained during the test minus heart rate at 1 min after exercise (HRR). There was no change in SampEn, LZEn, or HRR after the time-control portion of the study (P > 0.05). SampEn (P change in spectral measures of HRV at any time point (P > 0.05). These findings suggest that resistance exercise training increases heart rate complexity and HRR after exercise but has no effect on spectral measures of HRV in young healthy men. These autonomic changes regress shortly after cessation of training.

  4. Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability in Parents at Risk for Child Physical Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, Julie L; Hiraoka, Regina; McCanne, Thomas R; Reo, Gim; Wagner, Michael F; Krauss, Alison; Milner, Joel S; Skowronski, John J

    2015-12-10

    The present study examined heart rate and heart rate variability (i.e., respiratory sinus arrhythmia [RSA]) in a sample of 48 general population parents (41.7% fathers), who were either at high risk (n = 24) or low risk (n = 24) for child physical abuse. During baseline assessments of heart rate and RSA, parents sat quietly for 3 min. Afterward, parents were presented with a series of anagrams (either easy or difficult) and were instructed to solve as many anagrams as possible in 3 min. As expected, high-risk (compared with low-risk) parents evinced significantly higher resting heart rate and significantly lower resting RSA. During the anagram task, high-risk parents did not evince significant changes in heart rate or RSA relative to baseline levels. In contrast, low-risk parents evinced significant increases in heart rate and significant decreases in RSA during the anagram task. Contrary to expectations, the anagram task difficulty did not moderate the study findings. Collectively, this pattern of results is consistent with the notion that high-risk parents have chronically higher levels of physiological arousal relative to low-risk parents and exhibit less physiological flexibility in response to environmental demands. High-risk parents may benefit from interventions that include components that reduce physiological arousal and increase the capacity to regulate arousal effectively. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Heart rate response to hypoxic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, C; Møller, P; Kanstrup, I L

    2001-01-01

    This study examined the effects of dopamine D(2)-receptor blockade on the early decrease in maximal heart rate at high altitude (4559 m). We also attempted to clarify the time-dependent component of this reduction and the extent to which it is reversed by oxygen breathing. Twelve subjects performed...... two consecutive maximal exercise tests, without and with oxygen supplementation respectively, at sea level and after 1, 3 and 5 days at altitude. On each study day, domperidone (30 mg; n=6) or no medication (n=6) was given 1 h before the first exercise session. Compared with sea level, hypoxia...... breathing completely reversed the decrease in maximal heart rate to values not different from those at sea level. In conclusion, dopamine D(2)-receptor blockade with domperidone demonstrates that hypoxic exercise in humans activates D(2)-receptors, resulting in a decrease in circulating levels...

  6. Heart rate recovery after exercise: relations to heart rate variability and complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javorka, M; Zila, I; Balhárek, T; Javorka, K

    2002-08-01

    Physical exercise is associated with parasympathetic withdrawal and increased sympathetic activity resulting in heart rate increase. The rate of post-exercise cardiodeceleration is used as an index of cardiac vagal reactivation. Analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) and complexity can provide useful information about autonomic control of the cardiovascular system. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the association between heart rate decrease after exercise and HRV parameters. Heart rate was monitored in 17 healthy male subjects (mean age: 20 years) during the pre-exercise phase (25 min supine, 5 min standing), during exercise (8 min of the step test with an ascending frequency corresponding to 70% of individual maximal power output) and during the recovery phase (30 min supine). HRV analysis in the time and frequency domains and evaluation of a newly developed complexity measure - sample entropy - were performed on selected segments of heart rate time series. During recovery, heart rate decreased gradually but did not attain pre-exercise values within 30 min after exercise. On the other hand, HRV gradually increased, but did not regain rest values during the study period. Heart rate complexity was slightly reduced after exercise and attained rest values after 30-min recovery. The rate of cardiodeceleration did not correlate with pre-exercise HRV parameters, but positively correlated with HRV measures and sample entropy obtained from the early phases of recovery. In conclusion, the cardiodeceleration rate is independent of HRV measures during the rest period but it is related to early post-exercise recovery HRV measures, confirming a parasympathetic contribution to this phase.

  7. Heart rate recovery after exercise: relations to heart rate variability and complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Javorka

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Physical exercise is associated with parasympathetic withdrawal and increased sympathetic activity resulting in heart rate increase. The rate of post-exercise cardiodeceleration is used as an index of cardiac vagal reactivation. Analysis of heart rate variability (HRV and complexity can provide useful information about autonomic control of the cardiovascular system. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the association between heart rate decrease after exercise and HRV parameters. Heart rate was monitored in 17 healthy male subjects (mean age: 20 years during the pre-exercise phase (25 min supine, 5 min standing, during exercise (8 min of the step test with an ascending frequency corresponding to 70% of individual maximal power output and during the recovery phase (30 min supine. HRV analysis in the time and frequency domains and evaluation of a newly developed complexity measure - sample entropy - were performed on selected segments of heart rate time series. During recovery, heart rate decreased gradually but did not attain pre-exercise values within 30 min after exercise. On the other hand, HRV gradually increased, but did not regain rest values during the study period. Heart rate complexity was slightly reduced after exercise and attained rest values after 30-min recovery. The rate of cardiodeceleration did not correlate with pre-exercise HRV parameters, but positively correlated with HRV measures and sample entropy obtained from the early phases of recovery. In conclusion, the cardiodeceleration rate is independent of HRV measures during the rest period but it is related to early post-exercise recovery HRV measures, confirming a parasympathetic contribution to this phase.

  8. Virtual spiders raise real heart rates

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Virtual realities (VR) give rise to feelings of presence in virtual environments and have been proven a useful medium when treating specific phobias. For validation of the usability of VR for exposure therapy it is critical to investigate the techs capacity of activating the user physiologically. An experiment was designed with the purpose of investigating if virtual spiders in a virtual environment could cause a heightening of heart rate in the participants (N = 24). The hypothesis was that ...

  9. Low doses of caffeine reduce heart rate during submaximal cycle ergometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wetter Thomas J

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to examine the cardiovascular effects of two low-levels of caffeine ingestion in non habitual caffeine users at various submaximal and maximal exercise intensities. Methods Nine male subjects (19–25 yr; 83.3 ± 3.1 kg; 184 ± 2 cm, underwent three testing sessions administered in a randomized and double-blind fashion. During each session, subjects were provided 4 oz of water and a gelatin capsule containing a placebo, 1.5 mg/kg caffeine, or 3.0 mg/kg caffeine. After thirty minutes of rest, a warm-up (30 Watts for 2 min the pedal rate of 60 rpm was maintained at a steady-state output of 60 watts for five minutes; increased to 120 watts for five minutes and to 180 watts for five minutes. After a 2 min rest the workload was 180 watts for one minute and increased by 30 watts every minute until exhaustion. Heart rate (HR was measured during the last 15-seconds of each minute of submaximal exercise. Systolic blood pressure (BP was measured at rest and during each of the three sub-maximal steady state power outputs. Minute ventilation (VE, Tidal volume (VT, Breathing frequency (Bf, Rating of perceived exertion (RPE, Respiratory exchange ratio (RER, and Oxygen consumption (VO2 were measured at rest and during each minute of exercise. Results Caffeine at 1.5 and 3.0 mg/kg body weight significantly lowered (p E, VT, VO2, RPE, maximal power output or time to exhaustion. Conclusion In non habitual caffeine users it appears that consuming a caffeine pill (1.5 & 3.0 mg/kg at a dose comparable to 1–3 cups of coffee lowers heart rate during submaximal exercise but not at near maximal and maximal exercise. In addition, this caffeine dose also only appears to affect systolic blood pressure at rest but not during cycling exercise.

  10. Escala de VO2pico em adolescentes obesos e não-Obesos por diferentes métodos Escala de VO2pico en adolescentes obesos y no obesos por diferentes métodos Scale of VO2peak in obese and non-obese adolescents by different methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerusa Eisfeld Milano

    2009-12-01

    estrategia atractiva para comparar individuos con grandes diferencias en la masa corporal. OBJETIVO: Investigar el VO2pico en individuos obesos y no obesos usando el método de corrección de masa corporal (convencional y la escala alométrica (método alométrico y cómo esos métodos se aplican cuando individuos de ambos sexos se ejercitan en una cinta ergométrica. MÉTODOS: El VO2pico relativo al peso corporal y por el método alométrico fue comparado en 54 adolescentes obesos y 33 no obesos (10-16 años. Para evaluar el VO2pico durante un test máximo se utilizó calorimetría indirecta. El exponente alométrico fue calculado considerando la masa corporal individual. Así, el VO2pico fue corregido mediante el exponente alométrico. Las comparaciones se realizaron utilizando two-way ANOVA para medidas repetidas (p0,05. Sin embargo, el VO2pico calculado por el método convencional fue mayor (p0.05 entre los grupos. CONCLUSIÓN: Los individuos obesos presentaron VO2pico más bajo que los no obesos, al ser evaluados mediante el método convencional. Sin embargo, las diferencias desaparecieron cuando se aplicó el método de la escala alométrica.BACKGROUND: Peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak can be defined as the highest oxygen rate consumed during exhaustive or maximal exercise. The evaluation of the aerobic fitness can be expressed as relative to body mass, but this procedure may not fully remove differences when heavy subjects are assessed. Thus, the allometric scaling procedure is an attractive strategy to compare individuals with large differences in body mass. OBJECTIVE: Investigate VO2peak in obese and non-obese individuals using body mass correction (conventional and allometric scaling (allometric methods and how these methods apply when subjects of different genders exercise on a treadmill. METHODS: VO2peak relative to body weight and measured by the allometric method were compared in 54 obese and 33 non-obese adolescents (10 a 16 years. Indirect calorimetry was used to

  11. Does treadmill running performance, heart rate and breathing rate response during maximal graded exercise improve after volitional respiratory muscle training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, K; Sharma, V K; Subramanian, S K

    2017-05-10

    Maximal physical exertion in sports usually causes fatigue in the exercising muscles, but not in the respiratory muscles due to triggering of the Respiratory muscle metabo-reflex, a sympathetic vasoconstrictor response leading to preferential increment in blood flow to respiratory muscles.(1) We planned to investigate whether a six week yogic pranayama based Volitional Respiratory Muscle Training (VRMT) can improve maximal Graded Exercise Treadmill Test (GXTT) performance in healthy adult recreational sportspersons. Consecutive, consenting healthy adult recreational sportspersons aged 20.56±2.49 years (n=30), volunteered to 'baseline recording' of resting heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), respiratory rate (RR), and Bruce ramp protocol maximal GXTT until volitional exhaustion providing total test time (TTT), derived VO2max, Metabolic Equivalent of Task (METs), HR and BP response during maximal GXTT and drop in recovery HR data. After six weeks of observation, they underwent 'pre-intervention recording' followed by supervised VRMT intervention for 6 weeks (30 minutes a day; 5 days a week) and then 'post-intervention recording'. Repeated measures ANOVA with pairwise t statistical comparison was used to analyse the data. After supervised VRMT, we observed significant decrease in their resting supine RR (pincrease in TTT (pincrease in cardiac stroke volume and autonomic resetting towards parasympatho-dominance. Yogic Pranayama based VRMT can be used in sports conditioning programme of athletes to further improve their maximal exercise performance, and as part of rehabilitation training during return from injury.

  12. Peak Exercise Oxygen Uptake Predicts Recurrent Admissions in Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palau, Patricia; Domínguez, Eloy; Núñez, Eduardo; Ramón, José María; López, Laura; Melero, Joana; Sanchis, Juan; Bellver, Alejandro; Santas, Enrique; Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Chorro, Francisco J; Núñez, Julio

    2017-06-27

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is a highly prevalent syndrome with an elevated risk of morbidity and mortality. To date, there is scarce evidence on the role of peak exercise oxygen uptake (peak VO2) for predicting the morbidity burden in HFpEF. We sought to evaluate the association between peak VO2 and the risk of recurrent hospitalizations in patients with HFpEF. A total of 74 stable symptomatic patients with HFpEF underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test between June 2012 and May 2016. A negative binomial regression method was used to determine the association between the percentage of predicted peak VO2 (pp-peak VO2) and recurrent hospitalizations. Risk estimates are reported as incidence rate ratios. The mean age was 72.5 ± 9.1 years, 53% were women, and all patients were in New York Heart Association functional class II to III. Mean peak VO2 and median pp-peak VO2 were 10 ± 2.8mL/min/kg and 60% (range, 47-67), respectively. During a median follow-up of 276 days [interquartile range, 153-1231], 84 all-cause hospitalizations in 31 patients (41.9%) were registered. A total of 15 (20.3%) deaths were also recorded. On multivariate analysis, accounting for mortality as a terminal event, pp-peak VO2 was independently and linearly associated with the risk of recurrent admission. Thus, and modeled as continuous, a 10% decrease of pp-peak VO2 increased the risk of recurrent hospitalizations by 32% (IRR, 1.32; 95%CI, 1.03-1.68; P = .028). In symptomatic elderly patients with HFpEF, pp-peak VO2 predicts all-cause recurrent admission. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Aerobic Fitness, Heart Rate Recovery and Heart Rate Recovery Time in Indian School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Rajesh Jeniton; Ravichandran, K; Vaz, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Data on aerobic fitness and heart rate recovery in children are limited. This study was done to evaluate the relation between them in Indian school going children. Three hundred children of 7 to 10.5 years were recruited and their aerobic fitness was predicted using modified Harvard's step test (VO₂max) and 20 meter shuttle test (VO₂peak). The heart rate was monitored for 12 minutes post modified Harvard's step test. The difference between the maximum and the 1st minute HR was noted as HRR1 and the time taken to reach the resting heart rate was also recorded. VO₂max was inversely correlated with HRR1 (r = -0.64, precovery rate per unit time was 3% greater with increasing VO₂max (HR = 1.03, 95% CI:1.01 to 1.05, p = 0.013). The heart rate parameters did not show any associat with VO₂peak This study demonstrates that there is no relation between VO₂max and HRR1 after 3 minutes of modified Harvard's step test in Indian children of 7 to 10.5 years. However, aerobic fitness is a positive predictor of heart rate recovery time in this group.

  14. CAN WE CONFIDENTLY STUDY VO2 KINETICS IN YOUNG PEOPLE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha G. Fawkner

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of VO2 kinetics offers the potential to non-invasively examine the cardiorespiratory and metabolic response to dynamic exercise and limitations to every day physical activity. Its non-invasive nature makes it hugely attractive for use with young people, both healthy and those with disease, and yet the literature, whilst growing with respect to adults, remains confined to a cluster of studies with these special populations. It is most likely that this is partly due to the methodological difficulties involved in studying VO2 kinetics in young people which are not present, or present to a lesser degree, with adults. This article reviews these methodological issues, and explains the main procedures that might be used to overcome them

  15. The mitochondrial uniporter controls fight or flight heart rate increases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuejin; Rasmussen, Tyler P; Koval, Olha M; Joiner, Mei-Ling A; Hall, Duane D; Chen, Biyi; Luczak, Elizabeth D; Wang, Qiongling; Rokita, Adam G; Wehrens, Xander H T; Song, Long-Sheng; Anderson, Mark E

    2015-01-20

    Heart rate increases are a fundamental adaptation to physiological stress, while inappropriate heart rate increases are resistant to current therapies. However, the metabolic mechanisms driving heart rate acceleration in cardiac pacemaker cells remain incompletely understood. The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) facilitates calcium entry into the mitochondrial matrix to stimulate metabolism. We developed mice with myocardial MCU inhibition by transgenic expression of a dominant-negative (DN) MCU. Here, we show that DN-MCU mice had normal resting heart rates but were incapable of physiological fight or flight heart rate acceleration. We found that MCU function was essential for rapidly increasing mitochondrial calcium in pacemaker cells and that MCU-enhanced oxidative phoshorylation was required to accelerate reloading of an intracellular calcium compartment before each heartbeat. Our findings show that MCU is necessary for complete physiological heart rate acceleration and suggest that MCU inhibition could reduce inappropriate heart rate increases without affecting resting heart rate.

  16. BIOPHYSICAL CHARACTERISATION OF THE UNDER-APPRECIATED AND IMPORTANT RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HEART RATE VARIABILITY AND HEART RATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfredi, Oliver; Lyashkov, Alexey E; Johnsen, Anne-Berit; Inada, Shin; Schneider, Heiko; Wang, Ruoxi; Nirmalan, Mahesh; Wisloff, Ulrik; Maltsev, Victor A; Lakatta, Edward G; Zhang, Henggui; Boyett, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (beat-to-beat changes in the RR interval) has attracted considerable attention over the last 30+ years (PubMed currently lists >17,000 publications). Clinically, a decrease in heart rate variability is correlated to higher morbidity and mortality in diverse conditions, from heart disease to foetal distress. It is usually attributed to fluctuation in cardiac autonomic nerve activity. We calculated heart rate variability parameters from a variety of cardiac preparations (including humans, living animals, Langendorff-perfused heart and single sinoatrial nodal cell) in diverse species, combining this with data from previously published papers. We show that regardless of conditions, there is a universal exponential decay-like relationship between heart rate variability and heart rate. Using two biophysical models, we develop a theory for this, and confirm that heart rate variability is primarily dependent on heart rate and cannot be used in any simple way to assess autonomic nerve activity to the heart. We suggest that the correlation between a change in heart rate variability and altered morbidity and mortality is substantially attributable to the concurrent change in heart rate. This calls for re-evaluation of the findings from many papers that have not adjusted properly or at all for heart rate differences when comparing heart rate variability in multiple circumstances. PMID:25225208

  17. Frequency Structure of Heart Rate Variability

    OpenAIRE

    MUKHIN, V.

    2008-01-01

    Factor structure of heart rate periodogram has been detected with factor analysis. The results showed that there are at least four periodical phenomena of HRV. Two of them have not been discovered and physiologically explained yet. Their frequency ranges are 0.21 to 0.31 1/beat with the peak at 0.26 1/beat and 0.25 to 0.5 1/beat with the peak 0.35 1/beat. Despite of differences of the peak frequencies the frequency rages of the factors are overlapped. Therefore, power of spectral density with...

  18. The computation of evoked heart rate and blood pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koers, G.; Mulder, L.J.M.; van der Veen, F.M.

    1999-01-01

    For many years psychophysiologists have been interested in stimulus related changes in heart rate and blood pressure. To represent these evoked heart rate and blood pressure patterns, heart rate and blood pressure data have to be transformed into equidistant time series. This paper presents an

  19. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1CPDA-2VO2X [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1CPDA-2VO2X 1CPD 2VO2 A X LVHVASVEKGRSYEDFQK---VYNAIALKLREDDEYDNY...IGYGPVLVRLAWHISGTWDKHDNTGGSYGGTYRFKKEFNDPSNAGLQNGFKFLEPIHKEFPWISSGDLFSLGGVTAVQEMQGPKIPWRCGRVDTPEDTTPDNGRLPDA...GFIAEKR-------CAPLMLRLAAHSAGTFDKGTKTGGPF-GTIKHPAELAHSANNGLDIAVRLLEPLKAEFPILSYADFYQLAGVVAVEVTGGPEVPFHPGREDKP--EPPPEGRLPDA...ID> 0 1CPD A 1CPDA 1 1CPD A 1CPDA

  20. Effect of blood haemoglobin concentration on V(O2,max) and cardiovascular function in lowlanders acclimatised to 5260 m

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, J A L; Rådegran, G; Boushel, Robert Christopher

    2002-01-01

    +/- 5 to 185 +/- 5 g l(-1) (P delivery was reduced...... and maximal V(O(2)) was thus maintained by higher O(2) extraction. While CO increased linearly with work rate irrespective of [Hb] or inspired oxygen fraction (F(I,O(2))), both LBF and leg vascular conductance were systematically higher when [Hb] was low. Close and significant relationships were seen between...

  1. Sympathetic excitation during exercise as a cause of attenuated heart rate recovery in patients with myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushijima, Akiko; Fukuma, Nagaharu; Kato, Yuko; Aisu, Noriko; Mizuno, Kyoichi

    2009-04-01

    Heart rate recovery (HRR) after exercise is known as a predictor of cardiac death in patients with heart disease. The mechanism is not fully understood, although a parasympathetic mechanism has been reported. To elucidate the factors that influence HRR, we evaluated the relationship of HRR with exercise performance and plasma norepinephrine (NE), lactic acid and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) responses to exercise testing. The study population consisted of 52 male patients (age 58 +/- 9.6 years) who had experienced myocardial infarction without residual ischemia, uncompensated heart failure or atrial fibrillation. All subjects underwent a symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise test without a cool-down period and echocardiography. NE, lactic acid and BNP were measured at rest and at peak exercise. HRR did not correlate with the left ventricular ejection fraction, peak VO(2), lactic acid and BNP. HRR significantly correlated with the increment in heart rate (HR) from rest to peak exercise (DeltaHR) (r=0.30, pexercise (r=-0.286, pexercise suppresses parasympathetic reactivation and results in attenuation of HRR.

  2. Graphene-Nanowall-Decorated Carbon Felt with Excellent Electrochemical Activity Toward VO2(+)/VO(2+) Couple for All Vanadium Redox Flow Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyue; Zhang, Zhenyu; Tang, Yongbing; Bian, Haidong; Ng, Tsz-Wai; Zhang, Wenjun; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2016-04-01

    3D graphene-nanowall-decorated carbon felts (CF) are synthesized via an in situ microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method and used as positive electrode for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB). The carbon fibers in CF are successfully wrapped by vertically grown graphene nanowalls, which not only increase the electrode specific area, but also expose a high density of sharp graphene edges with good catalytic activities to the vanadium ions. As a result, the VRFB with this novel electrode shows three times higher reaction rate toward VO2(+)/VO(2+) redox couple and 11% increased energy efficiency over VRFB with an unmodified CF electrode. Moreover, this designed architecture shows excellent stability in the battery operation. After 100 charging-discharging cycles, the electrode not only shows no observable morphology change, it can also be reused in another battery and practical with the same performance. It is believed that this novel structure including the synthesis procedure will provide a new developing direction for the VRFB electrode.

  3. Porous carbon derived from disposable shaddock peel as an excellent catalyst toward VO2+/VO2+ couple for vanadium redox battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Wang, Z. A.; Wu, X. W.; Yuan, X. H.; Hu, J. P.; Zhou, Q. M.; Liu, Z. H.; Wu, Y. P.

    2015-12-01

    Functional porous carbon (PC) derived from bio-friendly shaddock peel has been firstly explored as catalyst for vanadium redox flow battery (VRB). The prepared PC is micro-mesoporous with high BET surface area of 882.7 m2 g-1, has some surface oxygen-containing functional groups, and is doped with N and P heteroatoms. These three factors greatly favor the electrochemical reactions of VO2+/VO2+ on the PC modified glass carbon (PC-GC). Compared with the naked GC and graphite modified GC, the PC-GC presents a lower peak separation (66 mV), higher anodic current density (17.1 mA cm-2) and cathodic current density (15.0 mA cm-2). The VRB using PC modified graphite felt (GF) as positive electrode demonstrates an enhanced voltage efficiency of 82.7% at the current density of 60 mA cm-2, and a better rate performance than that from the virginal GF.

  4. Heart-Rate Variability—More than Heart Beats?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gernot Ernst

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Heart-rate variability (HRV is frequently introduced as mirroring imbalances within the autonomous nerve system. Many investigations are based on the paradigm that increased sympathetic tone is associated with decreased parasympathetic tone and vice versa. But HRV is probably more than an indicator for probable disturbances in the autonomous system. Some perturbations trigger not reciprocal, but parallel changes of vagal and sympathetic nerve activity. HRV has also been considered as a surrogate parameter of the complex interaction between brain and cardiovascular system. Systems biology is an inter-disciplinary field of study focusing on complex interactions within biological systems like the cardiovascular system, with the help of computational models and time series analysis, beyond others. Time series are considered surrogates of the particular system, reflecting robustness or fragility. Increased variability is usually seen as associated with a good health condition, whereas lowered variability might signify pathological changes. This might explain why lower HRV parameters were related to decreased life expectancy in several studies. Newer integrating theories have been proposed. According to them, HRV reflects as much the state of the heart as the state of the brain. The polyvagal theory suggests that the physiological state dictates the range of behavior and psychological experience. Stressful events perpetuate the rhythms of autonomic states, and subsequently, behaviors. Reduced variability will according to this theory not only be a surrogate but represent a fundamental homeostasis mechanism in a pathological state. The neurovisceral integration model proposes that cardiac vagal tone, described in HRV beyond others as HF-index, can mirror the functional balance of the neural networks implicated in emotion–cognition interactions. Both recent models represent a more holistic approach to understanding the significance of HRV.

  5. Comparison of Blood Cholesterol Profiles Before and After The Measurements of Maximum Aerobic Capacity (VO2max

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ar Rasyid Shadiqin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed to compare the blood cholesterol profile, before and after the measurement of maximum aerobic capacity (VO2max in the students of Jurusan Pendidikan Olahraga dan Kesehatan (JPOK pada Fakultas Keguruan dan Ilmu Pendidikan (FKIP Universitas Lambung Mangkurat Banjarmasin.Variables in this study consist of lipid profiles, including total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL, low density lipoprotein (LDL, triglyceride (TG and Maximum Aerobic Capacity (VO2max. The concept of VO2max according to Kent(1994:268: “maximum oxygen volume consumed per minute to show total work capacity, or volume per minute relative to body weight (ml/kg.min”. Operationally, VO2max referred in this study is the maximum volume of oxygen that can be consumed per minute, as measured at progressive run (Bleep Test.The method used in this study is pre-experimental with one group pretest-posttest design. This design implies that a group of subjects are treated for a specific period and the measurements are taken both pre and post.The results: There are changes in blood cholesterol profile after the measurement of maximum oxygen capacity (VO2max, shown by significant decrease of total cholesterol variable, increased HDL, and decreased LDL. Changes in triglyceride variable showed no significant decrease despite the statistic differences. Specific HDL sub-class increasing after exercise is a constructive lipoprotein sub-class whereas LDL is destructive lipoproteins sub-class that might damage the body. Therefore, an increase in HDL and decrease in LDL found in this study appears to be advantageous and consequently might alter the risk of coronary heart disease.

  6. Heart rate variability, sleep and sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Phyllis K; Pu, Yachuan

    2012-02-01

    Heart rate (HR) is modulated by the combined effects of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. Therefore, measurement of changes in HR over time (heart rate variability or HRV) provides information about autonomic functioning. HRV has been used to identify high risk people, understand the autonomic components of different disorders and to evaluate the effect of different interventions, etc. Since the signal required to measure HRV is already being collected on the electrocardiogram (ECG) channel of the polysomnogram (PSG), collecting data for research on HRV and sleep is straightforward, but applications have been limited. As reviewed here, HRV has been applied to understand autonomic changes during different sleep stages. It has also been applied to understand the effect of sleep-disordered breathing, periodic limb movements and insomnia both during sleep and during the daytime. HRV has been successfully used to screen people for possible referral to a Sleep Lab. It has also been used to monitor the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). A novel HRV measure, cardiopulmonary coupling (CPC) has been proposed for sleep quality. Evidence also suggests that HRV collected during a PSG can be used in risk stratification models, at least for older adults. Caveats for accurate interpretation of HRV are also presented.

  7. Determinants of VO(2) kinetics at high power outputs during a ramp exercise protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucía, Alejandro; Rivero, José-Luis L; Pérez, Margarita; Serrano, Antonio L; Calbet, José A L; Santalla, Alfredo; Chicharro, José L

    2002-02-01

    To determine the relationship between the additional, nonlinear increase in oxygen uptake (Delta VO(2)) that occurs at high power outputs during a ramp cycle ergometer test, on one hand; and possible explanatory mechanisms of the phenomenon, such as cardiorespiratory work, blood lactate, fitness level, or muscle fiber distribution, on the other. Ten healthy, sedentary young adults (age (mean +/- SEM), 22 +/- 1 yr) were chosen as subjects. A muscle biopsy specimen was taken from the vastus lateralis of the right leg to determine fiber type distribution by immunohistochemical identification of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. During the ramp tests (power output increases of 5 W every 15-s interval), the ventilatory threshold (VT) and lactate threshold (LT) were measured. We defined Delta VO(2) as the difference between "true" VO(2) values observed at the maximal power output (VO(2)obs) and those expected (VO(2)exp) from the previous linear VO2:power output relationship below the VT. A nonlinear increase was observed in VO2 (Delta VO(2) = 239 +/- 79 mL x min(-1), P < 0.05 for VO(2)obs vs VO(2)exp), which was significantly correlated with the percentage of type IIX fibers (r = 0.80, P < 0.05). No other correlations were found between Delta VO(2) and possible explanatory mechanisms. A greater percentage of type IIX fibers is associated with a higher excess VO(2) at high power outputs (above VT).

  8. HEART-RATE-VARIABILITY SPECTRA BASED ON NONEQUIDISTANT SAMPLING - THE SPECTRUM OF COUNTS AND THE INSTANTANEOUS HEART-RATE SPECTRUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANSTEENIS, HG; TULEN, JHM; MULDER, LJM

    1994-01-01

    This paper compares two methods to estimate heart rate variability spectra i.e., the spectrum of counts and the instantaneous heart rate spectrum. Contrary to Fourier techniques based on equidistant sampling of the interbeat intervals, the spectrum of counts of the instantaneous heart rate spectrum

  9. HEART-RATE-VARIABILITY SPECTRA BASED ON NONEQUIDISTANT SAMPLING - THE SPECTRUM OF COUNTS AND THE INSTANTANEOUS HEART-RATE SPECTRUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANSTEENIS, HG; TULEN, JHM; MULDER, LJM

    This paper compares two methods to estimate heart rate variability spectra i.e., the spectrum of counts and the instantaneous heart rate spectrum. Contrary to Fourier techniques based on equidistant sampling of the interbeat intervals, the spectrum of counts of the instantaneous heart rate spectrum

  10. Heart rate awareness in patients with chronic stable heart failure. A multi-center observational study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, D

    2014-08-23

    We assessed adherence to European Society of Cardiology heart rate guidelines (i.e. heart rates less than 70bpm) in patients with chronic stable heart failure. We also investigated the percent of patients on target doses of rate controlling drugs.

  11. Heart rate and heart rate variability responses to Tai Chi and jogging in Beijing and Graz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litscher, Gerhard; Zhang, Weibo; Huang, Tao; Wang, Lu

    2011-02-01

    Tai Chi is a famous training method in China, and jogging is a popular kind of exercise both in Austria and China. Nevertheless, there is little information concerning online monitoring of biosignals during both training activities in parallel. Within the last years innovative scientific monitoring tools for evaluating features of neurocardial fitness have been developed. The goal of this study was to demonstrate heart rate and heart rate variability analysis for the first time during Tai Chi and jogging. Continuous electrocardiographic monitoring over a period of 75 minutes was performed simultaneously in two healthy volunteers using the same type of equipment (medilog AR12 systems). Two healthy persons (both male, 49 years and 52 years, respectively), both hobby sportsmen, were monitored continuously during two resting periods before and after active sport and also during Tai Chi and jogging, respectively. Data acquisition was performed without any technical problems in both subjects. Poincaré plots of sequential R-R intervals (beat to beat variability) show two ellipses of different shape and magnitude. During resting periods blood pressure effects can be clearly seen in one subject (jogging). The same effects, however reduced, are obvious in the other volunteer during Tai Chi. The present investigations during Tai Chi and jogging highlight the potential value of heart rate and heart rate variability monitoring even under difficult conditions. The innovative kind of analysis helps to show how well the human body reacts to sport, stress and recovery.

  12. Equestrian expertise affecting physical fitness, body compositions, lactate, heart rate and calorie consumption of elite horse riding players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Bong-Ju; Jeon, Sang-Yong; Lim, Sung-Ro; Lee, Kyu-Eon; Jee, Hyunseok

    2015-01-01

    Horse riding (HR) is a sport harmonized with rider and horse. HR is renowned as an effective sport for young and old women and men. There is rare study regarding comparison between elite horse riders and amateurs. We aimed to investigate comprehensive ranges of parameters such as change of lactate, heart rate, calorie, VO2max, skeletal muscle mass, body water, body fat, etc between amateurs and professionals to emphasize HR not only as a sport training but also as a therapeutic aspect. We performed 3 experiments for comparing physical fitness, body compositions, lactate value, heart rate and calorie consumption change before and after riding between amateurs and elites. Around 3 yr riding experienced elites are preeminent at balance capability compared to 1 yr riding experienced amateurs. During 18 min horse riding, skeletal muscle mass and body fat were interestingly increased and decreased, respectively. Lactate response was more sensitive in elites rather than amateurs and its recovery was reversely reacted. Exercise intensity estimated from heart rate was significantly higher in elites (PHorse riding possibly induces various physiological (muscle strength, balance, oxidative capability, flexibility, and metabolic control) changes within body and is thus highly recommended as combined exercise for women, children, and aged as therapeutic and leisure sport activity. PMID:26171385

  13. Robust heart rate from fitness videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjin; den Brinker, Albertus C; Stuijk, Sander; de Haan, Gerard

    2017-06-01

    Remote photoplethysmography (rPPG) enables contactless heart-rate monitoring using a regular video camera. This paper aims to improve the rPPG technology targeting continuous heart-rate measurement during fitness exercises. The fundamental limitation of the existing (multi-wavelength) rPPG methods is that they can suppress at most n  -  1 independent distortions by linearly combining n wavelength color channels. Their performance are highly restricted when more than n  -  1 independent distortions appear in a measurement, as typically occurs in fitness applications with vigorous body motions. To mitigate this limitation, we propose an effective yet very simple method that algorithmically extends the number of possibly suppressed distortions without using more wavelengths. Our core idea is to increase the degrees-of-freedom of noise reduction by decomposing the n wavelength camera-signals into multiple orthogonal frequency bands and extracting the pulse-signal per band-basis. This processing, namely Sub-band rPPG (SB), can suppress different distortion-frequencies using independent combinations of color channels. A challenging fitness benchmark dataset is created, including 25 videos recorded from 7 healthy adult subjects (ages from 25 to 40 yrs; six male and one female) running on a treadmill in an indoor environment. Various practical challenges are simulated in the recordings, such as different skin-tones, light sources, illumination intensities, and exercising modes. The basic form of SB is benchmarked against a state-of-the-art method (POS) on the fitness dataset. Using non-biased parameter settings, the average signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) for POS varies in [-4.18, -2.07] dB, for SB varies in [-1.08, 4.77] dB. The ANOVA test shows that the improvement of SB over POS is statistically significant for almost all settings (p-value  increases the robustness of heart-rate measurement in challenging fitness applications, and outperforms the state

  14. Fighter pilots' heart rate, heart rate variation and performance during an instrument flight rules proficiency test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansikka, Heikki; Virtanen, Kai; Harris, Don; Simola, Petteri

    2016-09-01

    Increased task demand will increase the pilot mental workload (PMWL). When PMWL is increased, mental overload may occur resulting in degraded performance. During pilots' instrument flight rules (IFR) proficiency test, PMWL is typically not measured. Therefore, little is known about workload during the proficiency test and pilots' potential to cope with higher task demands than those experienced during the test. In this study, fighter pilots' performance and PMWL was measured during a real IFR proficiency test in an F/A-18 simulator. PMWL was measured using heart rate (HR) and heart rate variation (HRV). Performance was rated using Finnish Air Force's official rating scales. Results indicated that HR and HRV differentiate varying task demands in situations where variations in performance are insignificant. It was concluded that during a proficiency test, PMWL should be measured together with the task performance measurement.

  15. [Population characteristics and impact on heart rate variability, heart rate and blood pressure of passive smoking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; He, Fei; Hu, Da-yi; Ding, Rong-jing; Yu, Xiao-jun; Wang, Long; Zhang, Ping; Li, Xue-bin; Guo, Ji-hong; Liu, Wen-ling; Li, Cui-lan; Li, Lei; Gao, Chuan-yu; Zhao, Luo-sha; Chu, Ying-jie; Huang, Zhen-wen; Wei, Jing-han; Hua, Shao-hua; Liu, Rui-yun; Zhuang, Xiao-feng

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the basic characteristics of passive smoking population, and the impact of passive smoking on heart rate variability, heart rate and blood pressure. Eighty-six passive smokers [mean age: (52.4 ± 7.6) years] were recruited from patients and their relatives who visited cardiovascular outpatient department and excluded structural heart disease between June 2010 and June 2012, 80 normal subjects who were not exposed to smoking served as controls. Questionnaire survey, 24 hours ambulatory electrocardiogram examination and blood pressure measurement were performed in all recruited subjects. (1) Non-marriage rate [18.60% (16/86) vs. 3.75% (3/80), P professional technology industry employers [20.93% (18/86) vs. 36.25% (29/80), P restaurants (48.84%, 42/86). (2) Standard of the normal sinus RR intervals (SDNN), the normal consecutive sinus RR interval difference between the root-mean-square (rMSSD) and adjacent the difference between the RR interval>50 ms the number of share the percentage (PNN50) were significantly lower in passive smoking group than in the control group (all P 0.05). Ultra-low-frequency power (VLF), low frequency power (LF), high frequency power (HF) and LF/HF were significantly lower in passive smoking group than in the control group (all P 0.05). Marriage status, education level, profession and daily working time are independent determinants for passive smoking. Passive smoking mainly occurred in the workplace, entertainment venues and restaurants. Passive smoking is linked with reduced heart rate variability, increased 24 h average heart rate and diastolic blood pressure.

  16. Ultrafast dynamics during the photoinduced phase transition in VO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegkamp, Daniel; Stähler, Julia

    2015-12-01

    The phase transition of VO2 from a monoclinic insulator to a rutile metal, which occurs thermally at TC = 340 K, can also be driven by strong photoexcitation. The ultrafast dynamics during this photoinduced phase transition (PIPT) have attracted great scientific attention for decades, as this approach promises to answer the question of whether the insulator-to-metal (IMT) transition is caused by electronic or crystallographic processes through disentanglement of the different contributions in the time domain. We review our recent results achieved by femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron, optical, and coherent phonon spectroscopy and discuss them within the framework of a selection of latest, complementary studies of the ultrafast PIPT in VO2. We show that the population change of electrons and holes caused by photoexcitation launches a highly non-equilibrium plasma phase characterized by enhanced screening due to quasi-free carriers and followed by two branches of non-equilibrium dynamics: (i) an instantaneous (within the time resolution) collapse of the insulating gap that precedes charge carrier relaxation and significant ionic motion and (ii) an instantaneous lattice potential symmetry change that represents the onset of the crystallographic phase transition through ionic motion on longer timescales. We discuss the interconnection between these two non-thermal pathways with particular focus on the meaning of the critical fluence of the PIPT in different types of experiments. Based on this, we conclude that the PIPT threshold identified in optical experiments is most probably determined by the excitation density required to drive the lattice potential change rather than the IMT. These considerations suggest that the IMT can be driven by weaker excitation, predicting a transiently metallic, monoclinic state of VO2 that is not stabilized by the non-thermal structural transition and, thus, decays on ultrafast timescales.

  17. U.S. Heart Failure Rates on the Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163266.html U.S. Heart Failure Rates on the Rise And heart ... Medicine, the National Institutes of Health, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. More Health ...

  18. Comprehensive picture of VO2 from band theory

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Zhiyong

    2012-08-28

    The structural, electronic, and magnetic features of the metal-insulator transition from the tetragonal rutile (R) to the monoclinic (M1) phase of VO2 are well reproduced by band theory using the modified Becke-Johnson exchange potential. Based on this description, we identify a tendency for monoclinic charge ordering in the R phase due to electronic correlations as the origin of the phase transition. Whereas, the structural changes are crucial for the gap opening in the M1 phase, spin degeneracy in both phases is stabilized by correlation-induced delocalization of the V3d electrons.

  19. Creative MuVo2 FM 5GB

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    可存储多达2500首歌曲Creative MuVo2 FM 5GB设计轻巧简洁;尺寸只有67×665×20mm.内置了完备的FM收音/录音和语音录音功能.并设计了全新的摇杆按键,也是即插即用的大容量U盘,更具有高达98dB的信噪比,可更换式充电锂电池,

  20. High readmission rate after heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibilitz, K L; Berg, S K; Thygesen, Lau Caspar;

    2015-01-01

    of anxiety and depression were present in 13.6% and 13.8%, respectively (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale score ≥ 8). Twelve months following discharge, 483 persons (56%) were readmitted. Readmission was associated with lower self-reported health (SF-36 PCS: 46.5 vs. 43.9, and MCS 52.2 vs. 50.7). Higher...... after surgery (3.2 (1.2-8.9)) predicted mortality. CONCLUSIONS: 6-12 months after heart valve surgery the readmission rate is high and the self-reported health status is low. Readmission is associated with low self-reported health. Therefore, targeted follow-up strategies post-surgery are needed....

  1. Heart rate recovery: Short review of methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurić Biljana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Determination of the heart rate recovery (HRR after the session of a physical activity, represents the valuable parameter for the investigation of autonomic balance and its dynamic in the general population, but also in the population of elite athletes. However, the methodology for its determination and analysis is still not entirely specified. It is necessary to define an adequate protocol of cardiopulmonary exercise test, by choosing an adequate ergometer (treadmill, ergo-bicycle or step bench. Organization of recovery period (active or passive, after the session of exercise is also very important, because its protocol interfered significantly with the value of HRR. Interpretation of obtained HRR values varies a lot, and researcher has freedom to choose the most adequate way, in accordance with the objectives of his study. Following paper represents a short review of determination, interpretation and analysis of HRR, followed by the latest recommendations.

  2. Effect of Yoga Therapy on Heart Rate, Blood Pressure and Cardiac Autonomic Function in Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna, Bandi Hari; Pal, Pravati; G.K., Pal; J, Balachander; E., Jayasettiaseelon; Y, Sreekanth; M.G., Sridhar; G.S., Gaur

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: It is well known that a hall mark of heart failure is adverse changes in autonomic function. Elevated blood pressure is a powerful predictor of congestive heart failure and other Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) outcomes. In this study, we planned to examine the effects of a 12 week yoga therapy on blood pressure, heart rate, heart rate variability, and rate pressure product (RPP).

  3. After-exercise heart rate variability is attenuated in postmenopausal women and unaffected by estrogen therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Paula J; O'Donnell, Emma; Picton, Peter; Morris, Beverley L; Notarius, Catherine F; Floras, John S

    2016-04-01

    Delayed heart rate (HR) recovery in the immediate postexercise period has been linked to adverse cardiovascular prognosis. The after effects of an acute bout of exercise on HR modulation in postmenopausal women (PMW) and the influence of estrogen therapy are unknown. In 13 sedentary PMW (54 ± 2 y, mean ± SEM), we assessed HR variability (HRV)--an index of HR modulation--and the influence of estrogen therapy on HRV. HRV in the frequency domain was quantified during supine rest and again 60 minutes after treadmill exercise for 45 minutes, at 60% VO2peak. PMW were studied before and after 4 weeks of oral estradiol. To obtain reference values for the after effects of exercise on HRV in healthy young women, 14 premenopausal women (PreM) completed the identical exercise protocol. Compared with PreM, PMW demonstrated lower high frequency (vagal modulation) and total HRV (P exercise. In contrast, in PMW after exercise, despite having identical HR to PreM, high frequency and total HRV were all lower (all P ≤ 0.01) compared with pre-exercise HRV values. Estrogen therapy had no effect on pre or postexercise values for HRV. When compared with PreM, PMW have identical HR, but lower vagal HR modulation at rest and delayed HRV recovery after exercise. Estrogen does not restore baseline HRV or accelerate HRV recovery postexercise, suggesting aging rather than estrogen deficiency per se may lower HRV in PMW.

  4. Ordinal pattern statistics for the assessment of heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, G.; Graff, B.; Kaczkowska, A.; Makowiec, D.; Amigó, J. M.; Piskorski, J.; Narkiewicz, K.; Guzik, P.

    2013-06-01

    The recognition of all main features of a healthy heart rhythm (the so-called sinus rhythm) is still one of the biggest challenges in contemporary cardiology. Recently the interesting physiological phenomenon of heart rate asymmetry has been observed. This phenomenon is related to unbalanced contributions of heart rate decelerations and accelerations to heart rate variability. In this paper we apply methods based on the concept of ordinal pattern to the analysis of electrocardiograms (inter-peak intervals) of healthy subjects in the supine position. This way we observe new regularities of the heart rhythm related to the distribution of ordinal patterns of lengths 3 and 4.

  5. Inverse Correlation between Heart Rate Variability and Heart Rate Demonstrated by Linear and Nonlinear Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Zaki Hassan Kazmi

    Full Text Available The dynamical fluctuations in the rhythms of biological systems provide valuable information about the underlying functioning of these systems. During the past few decades analysis of cardiac function based on the heart rate variability (HRV; variation in R wave to R wave intervals has attracted great attention, resulting in more than 17000-publications (PubMed list. However, it is still controversial about the underling mechanisms of HRV. In this study, we performed both linear (time domain and frequency domain and nonlinear analysis of HRV data acquired from humans and animals to identify the relationship between HRV and heart rate (HR. The HRV data consists of the following groups: (a human normal sinus rhythm (n = 72; (b human congestive heart failure (n = 44; (c rabbit sinoatrial node cells (SANC; n = 67; (d conscious rat (n = 11. In both human and animal data at variant pathological conditions, both linear and nonlinear analysis techniques showed an inverse correlation between HRV and HR, supporting the concept that HRV is dependent on HR, and therefore, HRV cannot be used in an ordinary manner to analyse autonomic nerve activity of a heart.

  6. HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN ASSESSMENT OF CLINICAL STATUS, FUNCTIONAL CONDITIONS AND PROGNOSIS IN HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. Vasyuk

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Data about heart rate variability analysis in healthy people and patients with chronic heart failure are reviewed. Prognostic value of time-domain and spectral measures is mentioned. Influence of standard therapy on heart rate variability is described.

  7. Application of Six-minute Walk Test in Heart Transplantation Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guolin Zhang; Wenhui Huang; Lan Guo; Zhi Liu; Guilan Wu

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To analyze the six-minute walk test (6MWT) and gas exchange of 5 heart transplantation patients and to approach the variation tendency of exercise tolerance,oxygen uptake (VO2) and heart rate chronotropic response.Methods 5 cases of heart transplantation patients (age 25~52 years) were undertaken 6MWT 6~30 months after operation,synchronizing gas exchanging parameters were measured by wireless portable remote sensing K4B2 gas analyzer,51 normal controls were compared.Results The six-minute walk distance (6MWD) of 5 patients were (592.61±26.7)m (558~625)m,the ascending tendency during exercise was slower,the maximum heart rates were 80%±6% of age-predicting maximal heart rate,lower than normal control (86%);the end point VO2/kg were (21.8±1.4)mL/min·kg(19.94~23.60)mL/min·kg.Conclusions The 6WMD and VO2 of 5 patients reached normal range,but the heart rate chronotropic response and VO2 ascending tendency were slower than those of normal controls.

  8. [Expired gas analysis--focused on VO2 max and anaerobic threshold].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omiya, K

    1996-07-01

    Recently, expired gas analysis(EGA) during exercise testing is broadly performed. It has been recognized that anaerobic threshold(AT) and maximal oxygen uptake(VO2 max) may be useful in identifying one's exercise tolerance. AT especially has a good correlation with endurance capacity. In the field of sports medicine, the purposes of EGA are: 1) evaluation of endurance exercise capacity. 2) decision of intensity and frequency for exercise training, and 3) prevention of overtraining syndrome. In the clinical fields, EGA is frequently performed with cardiovascular patients, for example, myocardial infarction(MI), and congestive heart failure(CHF). The purposes are: 1) decision of intensity for exercise therapy with the patients of old MI. 2) evaluation of exercise capacity with the patients' of CHF. 3) index of exercise therapy for hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes, and 4) evaluation of drug effects including vasodilators and cardiotonics.

  9. Limitations to vasodilatory capacity and .VO2 max in trained human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barden, Jeremy; Lawrenson, Lesley; Poole, Jennifer G; Kim, Jeannie; Wray, D Walter; Bailey, Damian M; Richardson, Russell S

    2007-05-01

    To further explore the limitations to maximal O(2) consumption (.VO(2 max)) in exercise-trained skeletal muscle, six cyclists performed graded knee-extensor exercise to maximum work rate (WR(max)) in hypoxia (12% O(2)), hyperoxia (100% O(2)), and hyperoxia + femoral arterial infusion of adenosine (ADO) at 80% WR(max). Arterial and venous blood sampling and thermodilution blood flow measurements allowed the determination of muscle O(2) delivery and O(2) consumption. At WR(max), O(2) delivery rose progressively from hypoxia (1.0 +/- 0.04 l/min) to hyperoxia (1.20 +/- 0.09 l/min) and hyperoxia + ADO (1.33 +/- 0.05 l/min). Leg .VO(2 max) varied with O(2) availability (0.81 +/- 0.05 and 0.97 +/- 0.07 l/min in hypoxia and hyperoxia, respectively) but did not improve with ADO-mediated vasodilation (0.80 +/- 0.09 l/min in hyperoxia + ADO). Although a vasodilatory reserve in the maximally working quadriceps muscle group may have been evidenced by increased leg vascular conductance after ADO infusion beyond that observed in hyperoxia (increased blood flow but no change in blood pressure), we recognize the possibility that the ADO infusion may have provoked vasodilation in nonexercising tissue of this limb. Together, these findings imply that maximally exercising skeletal muscle may maintain some vasodilatory capacity, but the lack of improvement in leg .VO(2 max) with significantly increased O(2) delivery (hyperoxia + ADO), with a degree of uncertainty as to the site of this dilation, suggests an ADO-induced mismatch between O(2) consumption and blood flow in the exercising limb.

  10. Effect of exercise intensity on post-exercise oxygen consumption and heart rate recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Theresa N; Webster, Christopher; Lamberts, Robert P; Lambert, Michael I

    2014-09-01

    There is some evidence that measures of acute post-exercise recovery are sensitive to the homeostatic stress of the preceding exercise and these measurements warrant further investigation as possible markers of training load. The current study investigated which of four different measures of metabolic and autonomic recovery was most sensitive to changes in exercise intensity. Thirty-eight moderately trained runners completed 20-min bouts of treadmill exercise at 60, 70 and 80% of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and four different recovery measurements were determined: the magnitude of excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOCMAG), the time constant of the oxygen consumption recovery curve (EPOCτ), heart rate recovery within 1 min (HRR60s) and the time constant of the heart rate recovery curve (HRRτ) . Despite significant differences in exercise parameters at each exercise intensity, only EPOCMAG showed significantly slower recovery with each increase in exercise intensity at the group level and in the majority of individuals. EPOCτ was significantly slower at 70 and 80% of VO₂max vs. 60% VO₂max and HRRτ was only significantly slower when comparing the 80 vs. 60% VO₂max exercise bouts. In contrast, HRR60s reflected faster recovery at 70 and 80% of VO₂max than at 60% VO₂max. Of the four recovery measurements investigated, EPOCMAG was the most sensitive to changes in exercise intensity and shows potential to reflect changes in the homeostatic stress of exercise at the group and individual level. Determining EPOCMAG may help to interpret the homeostatic stress of laboratory-based research trials or training sessions.

  11. Influence of heavy cigarette smoking on heart rate variability and heart rate turbulence parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cagirci, Goksel; Cay, Serkan; Karakurt, Ozlem

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking increases the risk of cardiovascular events related with several mechanisms. The most suggested mechanism is increased activity of sympathetic nervous system. Heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate turbulence (HRT) has been shown to be independent and powerful...... predictors of mortality in a specific group of cardiac patients. The goal of this study was to assess the effect of heavy cigarette smoking on cardiac autonomic function using HRV and HRT analyses. METHODS: Heavy cigarette smoking was defined as more than 20 cigarettes smoked per day. Heavy cigarette smokers......, 69 subjects and nonsmokers 74 subjects (control group) were enrolled in this study. HRV and HRT analyses [turbulence onset (TO) and turbulence slope (TS)] were assessed from 24-hour Holter recordings. RESULTS: The values of TO were significantly higher in heavy cigarette smokers than control group...

  12. Genome-wide association studies and resting heart rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskari Kilpeläinen, Tuomas

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revolutionized the search for genetic variants regulating resting heart rate. In the last 10 years, GWASs have led to the identification of at least 21 novel heart rate loci. These discoveries have provided valuable insights into the mechanisms...... and pathways that regulate heart rate and link heart rate to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. GWASs capture majority of genetic variation in a population sample by utilizing high-throughput genotyping chips measuring genotypes for up to several millions of SNPs across the genome in thousands...... of individuals. This allows the identification of the strongest heart rate associated signals at genome-wide level. While GWASs provide robust statistical evidence of the association of a given genetic locus with heart rate, they are only the starting point for detailed follow-up studies to locate the causal...

  13. Heart rate variability and blood pressure during dynamic and static exercise at similar heart rate levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weippert, Matthias; Behrens, Kristin; Rieger, Annika; Stoll, Regina; Kreuzfeld, Steffi

    2013-01-01

    Aim was to elucidate autonomic responses to dynamic and static (isometric) exercise of the lower limbs eliciting the same moderate heart rate (HR) response. 23 males performed two kinds of voluntary exercise in a supine position at similar heart rates: static exercise (SE) of the lower limbs (static leg press) and dynamic exercise (DE) of the lower limbs (cycling). Subjective effort, systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), rate pressure product (RPP) and the time between consecutive heart beats (RR-intervals) were measured. Time-domain (SDNN, RMSSD), frequency-domain (power in the low and high frequency band (LFP, HFP)) and geometric measures (SD1, SD2) as well as non-linear measures of regularity (approximate entropy (ApEn), sample entropy (SampEn) and correlation dimension D2) were calculated. Although HR was similar during both exercise conditions (88±10 bpm), subjective effort, SBP, DBP, MAP and RPP were significantly enhanced during SE. HRV indicators representing overall variability (SDNN, SD 2) and vagal modulated variability (RMSSD, HFP, SD 1) were increased. LFP, thought to be modulated by both autonomic branches, tended to be higher during SE. ApEn and SampEn were decreased whereas D2 was enhanced during SE. It can be concluded that autonomic control processes during SE and DE were qualitatively different despite similar heart rate levels. The differences were reflected by blood pressure and HRV indices. HRV-measures indicated a stronger vagal cardiac activity during SE, while blood pressure response indicated a stronger sympathetic efferent activity to the vessels. The elevated vagal cardiac activity during SE might be a response mechanism, compensating a possible co-activation of sympathetic cardiac efferents, as HR and LF/HF was similar and LFP tended to be higher. However, this conclusion must be drawn cautiously as there is no HRV-marker reflecting "pure" sympathetic cardiac activity.

  14. Prediction of VO2max in Children and Adolescents Using Exercise Testing and Physical Activity Questionnaire Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Nate E; Vehrs, Pat R; Fellingham, Gilbert W; George, James D; Hager, Ron

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of a treadmill walk-jog-run exercise test previously validated in adults and physical activity questionnaire data to estimate maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max) in boys (n = 62) and girls (n = 66) aged 12 to 17 years old. Data were collected from Physical Activity Rating (PA-R) and Perceived Functional Ability (PFA) questionnaires, a walk-jog-run submaximal treadmill exercise test, and a maximal graded exercise test. Regression analysis resulted in the development of 2 models to predict VO2max. Submaximal exercise test data were used to build the following model (R2 = .73; SEE = 4.59 mL + kg(- 1) + min(- 1)): VO2max (mL + kg(- 1) + min(- 1)) = 26.890+(5.877 × Gender; 0 = female; 1 = male) - (0.782 × Body Mass Index [BMI])+(0.438 × PFA Score) +(2.712 × Treadmill Speed; mph) +(0.746 × Age) +(0.449 × PA-R Score). Maximal exercise test data were used to build the following model (R2 = .83; SEE = 3.63 mL + kg(- 1) + min(- 1)): VO2max (mL + kg(- 1) + min(- 1)) = 10.716+(1.334 × Maximal Treadmill Grade) +(5.203 × Treadmill Speed; mph) +(3.494 × Gender; 0 = female; 1 = male) - (0.413 × BMI) +(0.249 × PFA). The results of this study demonstrate, for the first time, that regression equations that use both exercise data and physical activity questionnaire data can accurately predict VO2max in youth. The submaximal and maximal exercise tests that use self-selected treadmill speeds can be used to assess cardiorespiratory fitness of youth with a wide range of fitness levels.

  15. The relationship between resting heart rate variability and heart rate recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esco, Michael R; Olson, Michele S; Williford, Henry N; Blessing, Daniel L; Shannon, David; Grandjean, Peter

    2010-02-01

    There is limited research available regarding a possible relationship between resting heart rate variability (HRV) and post-exercise heart rate recovery (HRR). The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between resting HRV and HRR after maximal exercise. Sixty-six college age men participated in this study. HRV was measured in a supine position before and for 30 min after a maximal exercise test on a treadmill. HRV was assessed in the time (i.e., SDNN) and frequency (i.e., normalized HF power [HFnu] and normalized LF:HF ratio [LFnu:HFnu]) domains. Heart rate was recorded at maximal exercise (MHR), and at 1- (HR1) and 2- (HR2) min of the cool-down recovery period. HRR was determined from the difference between MHR and HR1 (HRR1) and the difference between MHR and HR2 (HRR2). No significant relationship was found between resting HRV and HRR1 or HRR2. However, SDNN was significantly inversely correlated to MHR (P MHR (P MHR accounted for the greatest variation in both SDNN and HFnu (P MHR, HR1 and HR2 post-maximal exercise.

  16. Heart Rate Variability Interventions for Concussion and Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Lake Conder; Conder, Alanna A.

    2014-01-01

    The study of Heart Rate Variability (HRV) has emerged as an essential component of cardiovascular health, as well as a physiological mechanism by which one can increase the interactive communication between the cardiac and the neurocognitive systems (i.e., the body and the brain). It is well-established that lack of heart rate variability implies cardiopathology, morbidity, reduced quality-of-life, and precipitous mortality. On the positive, optimal heart rate variability has been associated ...

  17. Heart rate modulation by sympathetic nerves in dogs with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uechi, Masami; Shimizu, Akira; Mizuno, Masashi

    2002-11-01

    To clarify heart rate modulation by the sympathetic nervous system, dogs with naturally acquired and experimentally induced heart failure were examined. Heart rate and plasma catecholamine concentrations were measured in clinically healthy dogs (control dogs) and dogs with mitral regurgitation (MR) during a resting period, a standing period, a period of standing in a medical examination room (to which the dogs were unaccustomed), a running period, and a period of recovery after running. The heart rate and plasma catecholamine concentration increased in control dogs during the standing period and the medical examination room period, relative to the resting period. However, dogs with MR did not exhibit any clear increase in heart rate or catecholamine concentration under these light stress conditions. Running stress increased plasma catecholamine levels in control dogs; however, dogs with MR did not exhibit any significant changes. Thirty-two dogs with naturally acquired heart disease were classified as grades I to III on the ISACHC scale. The degree of increase in heart rate and plasma catecholamine levels in dogs with naturally acquired heart failure depended on their degree of heart failure. In conclusion, an increased heart rate and an activated sympathetic nervous system were observed, even in mild heart failure. This chronically activated sympathetic activity is expected to increase myocardial oxygen consumption, myocardial hypertrophy, and fibrosis, and to portend a poorer prognosis in heart failure.

  18. Biophysical characterization of the underappreciated and important relationship between heart rate variability and heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfredi, Oliver; Lyashkov, Alexey E; Johnsen, Anne-Berit; Inada, Shin; Schneider, Heiko; Wang, Ruoxi; Nirmalan, Mahesh; Wisloff, Ulrik; Maltsev, Victor A; Lakatta, Edward G; Zhang, Henggui; Boyett, Mark R

    2014-12-01

    Heart rate (HR) variability (HRV; beat-to-beat changes in the R-wave to R-wave interval) has attracted considerable attention during the past 30+ years (PubMed currently lists >17 000 publications). Clinically, a decrease in HRV is correlated to higher morbidity and mortality in diverse conditions, from heart disease to fetal distress. It is usually attributed to fluctuation in cardiac autonomic nerve activity. We calculated HRV parameters from a variety of cardiac preparations (including humans, living animals, Langendorff-perfused heart, and single sinoatrial nodal cell) in diverse species, combining this with data from previously published articles. We show that regardless of conditions, there is a universal exponential decay-like relationship between HRV and HR. Using 2 biophysical models, we develop a theory for this and confirm that HRV is primarily dependent on HR and cannot be used in any simple way to assess autonomic nerve activity to the heart. We suggest that the correlation between a change in HRV and altered morbidity and mortality is substantially attributable to the concurrent change in HR. This calls for re-evaluation of the findings from many articles that have not adjusted properly or at all for HR differences when comparing HRV in multiple circumstances.

  19. Effect of W addition on the electrical switching of VO2 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeswaran, Bharathi; Umarji, Arun M.

    2016-03-01

    Vanadium Oxide has been a frontrunner in the field of oxide electronics because of its metal-insulator transition (MIT). The interplay of different structures of VO2 has played a crucial role in deciding the magnitude of the first order MIT. Substitution doping has been found to introduce different polymorphs of VO2. Hence the role of substitution doping in stabilizing the competing phases of VO2 in the thin film form remains underexplored. Consequently there have been reports both discounting and approving such a stabilization of competing phases in VO2. It is reported in the literature that the bandwidth of the hysteresis and transition temperature of VO2 can be tuned by substitutional doping of VO2 with W. In this work, we have adopted a novel technique called, Ultrasonic Nebulized Spray Pyrolysis of Aqueous Combustion Mixture (UNSPACM) to deposit VO2 and W- doped VO2 as thin films. XRD and Raman spectroscopy were used to investigate the role of tungsten on the structure of VO2 thin films. Morphology of the thin films was found to be consisting of globular and porous nanoparticles of size ˜ 20nm. Transition temperature decreased with the addition of W. We found that for 2.0 at % W doping in VO2, the transition temperature has reduced from 68 o C to 25 o C. It is noted that W-doping in the process of reducing the transition temperature, alters the local structure and also increases room temperature carrier concentration.

  20. VO2@RER1.0: a novel submaximal cardiopulmonary exercise index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Clifford; Kazmucha, Jeffrey; Kim, Nancy; Suryani, Reny; Olson, Inger

    2010-01-01

    Maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) is the "gold standard" by which to assess functional capacity; however, it is effort dependent. VO2@RER1.0 is defined when VO2 = VCO2. Between December 22, 1997 and November 9, 2004, 305 pediatric subjects underwent cycle ergometer cardiopulmonary exercise testing, exercised to exhaustion, and reached a peak respiratory exchange ratio > or = 1.10. Group 1 subjects achieved a peak VO2 > or = 80% of predicted VO2max; group 2 subjects achieved a peak VO2 equation was created. VO2@RER1.0 data from groups 2 and 3 were plotted onto the normative graph. Contingency table and relative-risk analysis showed that an abnormal VO2@RER1.0 predicted an abnormal peak VO2(positive-predictive value 83%, negative-predictive value 85%, sensitivity 84%, and specificity 84%). VO2@RER1.0 is a highly sensitive, specific, and predictive submaximal index of functional capacity. This submaximal index is easy to identify without subjectivity. This index may aid in the evaluation of subjects who cannot exercise to maximal parameters.

  1. Heart Rate, Life Expectancy and the Cardiovascular System: Therapeutic Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudoulas, Konstantinos Dean; Borer, Jeffrey S; Boudoulas, Harisios

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that life span is inversely related to resting heart rate in most organisms. This association between heart rate and survival has been attributed to the metabolic rate, which is greater in smaller animals and is directly associated with heart rate. Studies have shown that heart rate is related to survival in apparently healthy individuals and in patients with different underlying cardiovascular diseases. A decrease in heart rate due to therapeutic interventions may result in an increase in survival. However, there are many factors regulating heart rate, and it is quite plausible that these may independently affect life expectancy. Nonetheless, a fast heart rate itself affects the cardiovascular system in multiple ways (it increases ventricular work, myocardial oxygen consumption, endothelial stress, aortic/arterial stiffness, decreases myocardial oxygen supply, other) which, in turn, may affect survival. In this brief review, the effects of heart rate on the heart, arterial system and survival will be discussed. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Indirect estimation of VO2max in athletes by ACSM’s equation: valid or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutlianos, N; Dimitros, E; Metaxas, T; Cansiz, M; Deligiannis, AS; Kouidi, E

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to assess the indirect calculation of VO2max using ACSM’s equation for Bruce protocol in athletes of different sports and to compare with the directly measured; secondly to develop regression models predicting VO2 max in athletes. Methods: Fifty five male athletes of national and international level (mean age 28.3 ± 5.6 yrs) performed graded exercise test with direct measurement of VO2 through ergospirometric device. Moreover, 3 equations were used for the indirect calculation of VO2max: a) VO2max= (0.2 · Speed) + (0.9 · Speed · Grade) + 3.5 (ACSM running equation), b) regression analysis model using enter method and c) stepwise method based on the measured data of VO2. Age, BMI, speed, grade and exercise time were used as independent variables. Results: Regression analysis using enter method yielded the equation (R=.64, standard error of estimation [SEE] = 6.11): VO2max (ml·kg-1·min-1) = 58.443 - (0.215 · age) - (0.632 · BMI) - (68.639 · grade) + (1.579 · time) while stepwise method (R = .61, SEE = 6.18) led to: VO2max (ml·kg-1·min-1) = 33.971 - (0.291 · age) + (1.481 · time). The calculated values of VO2max from these regression models did not differ significantly from the measured VO2max (p>.05). On the contrary, VO2max calculated from the ACSM’s running equation was significantly higher from the actually measured value by 14.6% (p VO2max in athletes aged 18-37 years using Bruce protocol. Only the regression models were correlated moderately with the actually measured values of VO2max. PMID:24376318

  3. Indirect estimation of VO2max in athletes by ACSM's equation: valid or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutlianos, N; Dimitros, E; Metaxas, T; Cansiz, M; Deligiannis, As; Kouidi, E

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the indirect calculation of VO2max using ACSM's equation for Bruce protocol in athletes of different sports and to compare with the directly measured; secondly to develop regression models predicting VO2 max in athletes. Fifty five male athletes of national and international level (mean age 28.3 ± 5.6 yrs) performed graded exercise test with direct measurement of VO2 through ergospirometric device. Moreover, 3 equations were used for the indirect calculation of VO2max: a) VO2max= (0.2 · Speed) + (0.9 · Speed · Grade) + 3.5 (ACSM running equation), b) regression analysis model using enter method and c) stepwise method based on the measured data of VO2. Age, BMI, speed, grade and exercise time were used as independent variables. Regression analysis using enter method yielded the equation (R=.64, standard error of estimation [SEE] = 6.11): VO2max (ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) = 58.443 - (0.215 · age) - (0.632 · BMI) - (68.639 · grade) + (1.579 · time) while stepwise method (R = .61, SEE = 6.18) led to: VO2max (ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) = 33.971 - (0.291 · age) + (1.481 · time). The calculated values of VO2max from these regression models did not differ significantly from the measured VO2max (p>.05). On the contrary, VO2max calculated from the ACSM's running equation was significantly higher from the actually measured value by 14.6% (p VO2max in athletes aged 18-37 years using Bruce protocol. Only the regression models were correlated moderately with the actually measured values of VO2max.

  4. Accuracy of smartphone apps for heart rate measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppetti, Thomas; Brauchlin, Andreas; Müggler, Simon; Attinger-Toller, Adrian; Templin, Christian; Schönrath, Felix; Hellermann, Jens; Lüscher, Thomas F; Biaggi, Patric; Wyss, Christophe A

    2017-08-01

    Background Smartphone manufacturers offer mobile health monitoring technology to their customers, including apps using the built-in camera for heart rate assessment. This study aimed to test the diagnostic accuracy of such heart rate measuring apps in clinical practice. Methods The feasibility and accuracy of measuring heart rate was tested on four commercially available apps using both iPhone 4 and iPhone 5. 'Instant Heart Rate' (IHR) and 'Heart Fitness' (HF) work with contact photoplethysmography (contact of fingertip to built-in camera), while 'Whats My Heart Rate' (WMH) and 'Cardiio Version' (CAR) work with non-contact photoplethysmography. The measurements were compared to electrocardiogram and pulse oximetry-derived heart rate. Results Heart rate measurement using app-based photoplethysmography was performed on 108 randomly selected patients. The electrocardiogram-derived heart rate correlated well with pulse oximetry ( r = 0.92), IHR ( r = 0.83) and HF ( r = 0.96), but somewhat less with WMH ( r = 0.62) and CAR ( r = 0.60). The accuracy of app-measured heart rate as compared to electrocardiogram, reported as mean absolute error (in bpm ± standard error) was 2 ± 0.35 (pulse oximetry), 4.5 ± 1.1 (IHR), 2 ± 0.5 (HF), 7.1 ± 1.4 (WMH) and 8.1 ± 1.4 (CAR). Conclusions We found substantial performance differences between the four studied heart rate measuring apps. The two contact photoplethysmography-based apps had higher feasibility and better accuracy for heart rate measurement than the two non-contact photoplethysmography-based apps.

  5. Ivabradine: Cardioprotection By and Beyond Heart Rate Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusch, Gerd; Kleinbongard, Petra

    2016-05-01

    Ivabradine inhibits hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in the sinus node, thereby reducing heart rate, and heart rate reduction improves regional myocardial blood flow and contractile function in ischemic myocardium. Accordingly, ivabradine reduces anginal symptoms in patients with stable coronary artery disease but does not improve their clinical outcome. Heart rate reduction with ivabradine in patients with symptomatic heart failure reduces symptoms, attenuates remodeling, and improves clinical outcome. In pigs and mice, ivabradine reduces infarct size from myocardial ischemia/reperfusion, even when heart rate reduction is abrogated by atrial pacing. Improved viability is also observed in isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes subjected to simulated ischemia/reperfusion. These beneficial effects are attributed to reduced reactive oxygen species formation from the mitochondria. There is also evidence for a heart rate-independent benefit from ivabradine in the vasculature of mice and humans, and in left ventricular contractile function of pigs. Finally, in mice, ivabradine also has anti-aging potential.

  6. Heart rate patterns in trisomic fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariniemi, V; Aula, P

    1982-01-01

    A survey of the clinical records of fifteen fetuses with trisomy 21, six fetuses with trisomy 18, and two fetuses with trisomy 13 was made in order to find out typical patterns of fetal heart rate (FHR) possibly associated with these conditions. Antepartal FHR patterns of 55 normal pregnancies and intrapartal FHR patterns of 14 normal labors were used as a control material. Trisomic fetuses showed significantly fewer FHR accelerations than did the controls. Fetuses with trisomy 18 and 13 had more antepartal decelerations than fetuses with trisomy 21. Trisomic fetuses also showed more intrapartal late decelerations and epochs of silent FHR pattern than did the controls. The abnormal FHR patterns of the trisomic fetuses thus were similar to those in placental insufficiency. Cesarean section was performed for both fetuses with trisomy 13, for five of the six fetuses with trisomy 18 and for nine of fifteen fetuses with trisomy 21. In eleven of sixteen cesarean sections the main indication was abnormal cardiotocogram. Fetal karyotyping from an amniotic fluid sample should perhaps be considered when decelerations and silent patterns of FHR in a growth-retarded, late second or early third trimester fetus are seen. In most cases, however, the decision for optimal management o labor must be based on FHR patterns solely.

  7. Investigation of determinism in heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, M. E. D.; Souza, A. V. P.; Guimarães, H. N.; Aguirre, L. A.

    2000-06-01

    The article searches for the possible presence of determinism in heart rate variability (HRV) signals by using a new approach based on NARMA (nonlinear autoregressive moving average) modeling and free-run prediction. Thirty-three 256-point HRV time series obtained from Wistar rats submitted to different autonomic blockade protocols are considered, and a collection of surrogate data sets are generated from each one of them. These surrogate sequences are assumed to be nondeterministic and therefore they may not be predictable. The original HRV time series and related surrogates are submitted to NARMA modeling and prediction. Special attention has been paid to the problem of stationarity. The results consistently show that the surrogate data sets cannot be predicted better than the trivial predictor—the mean—while most of the HRV control sequences are predictable to a certain degree. This suggests that the normal HRV signals have a deterministic signature. The HRV time series derived from the autonomic blockade segments of the experimental protocols do not show the same predictability performance, albeit the physiological interpretation is not obvious. These results have important implications to the methodology of HRV analysis, indicating that techniques from nonlinear dynamics and deterministic chaos may be applied to elicit more information about the autonomic modulation of the cardiovascular activity.

  8. Depression and heart rate variability in firefighters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Mei Liao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depression has been found to increase the risk of mortality in patients with coronary artery disease through a mechanism of changing cardiac autonomic tone which is reflected by alteration of heart rate variability indices. This study investigated whether such mechanism existed in firefighters who were at high risk of depression and sudden cardiac death. Methods and results: In total, 107 firefighters were recruited. All completed Beck Depression Inventory and underwent 24-h ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring. The root-mean-square of successive differences, standard deviation of all normal-to-normal intervals index, and the percentage of differences between adjacent normal-to-normal intervals >50 ms were significantly lower in depressed than in non-depressed firefighters after controlling for hypertension, age, and body mass index (40.1 ± 18.8 vs 62.5 ± 77.4, p < 0.01; 63.0 ± 19.2 vs 72.1 ± 34.8, p < 0.01; 8.4 ± 7.2 vs 12.7 ± 10.9, p < 0.01, respectively. Conclusion: Decreased vagal tone is a possible mechanism linking depression and sudden cardiac death in firefighters.

  9. Heart rate variability reproducibility during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNarry, Melitta A; Lewis, Michael J

    2012-07-01

    The use of heart rate variability (HRV) parameters during exercise is not supported by appropriate reliability studies. In 80 healthy adults, ECG was recorded during three 6 min bouts of exercise, separated by 6 min of unloaded cycling. Two bouts were at a moderate intensity while the final bout was at a heavy exercise intensity. This protocol was repeated under the same conditions on three occasions, with a controlled start time (pre-determined at the first visit). Standard time and frequency domain indices of HRV were derived. Reliability was assessed by Bland–Altman plots, 95% limits of agreement and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). The sample size required to detect a mean difference ≥30% of the between-subject standard deviation was also estimated. There was no systematic change between days. All HRV parameters demonstrated a high degree of reproducibility during baseline (ICC range: 0.58–0.75), moderate (ICC: 0.58–0.85) and heavy intensity exercise (ICC range: 0.40–0.76). The reproducibility was slightly diminished during heavy intensity exercise relative to both unloaded baseline cycling and moderate exercise. This study indicates that HRV parameters can be reliably determined during exercise, and it underlines the importance of standardizing exercise intensity with regard to fitness levels if HRV is to be reliably determined.

  10. Heart rate variability and suicidal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Scott T; Chesin, Megan; Fertuck, Eric; Keilp, John; Brodsky, Beth; Mann, J John; Sönmez, Cemile Ceren; Benjamin-Phillips, Christopher; Stanley, Barbara

    2016-06-30

    Identification of biological indicators of suicide risk is important given advantages of biomarker-based models. Decreased high frequency heart rate variability (HF HRV) may be a biomarker of suicide risk. The aim of this research was to determine whether HF HRV differs between suicide attempters and non-attempters. Using the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), we compared HF HRV between females with and without a history of suicide attempt, all with a lifetime diagnosis of a mood disorder. To investigate a potential mechanism explaining association between HF HRV and suicide, we examined the association between self-reported anger and HF HRV. Results of an Area under the Curve (AUC) analysis showed attempters had a lower cumulative HF HRV during the TSST than non-attempters. In addition, while there was no difference in self-reported anger at baseline, the increase in anger was greater in attempters, and negatively associated with HF HRV. Results suggest that suicide attempters have a reduced capacity to regulate their response to stress, and that reduced capacity to regulate anger may be a mechanism through which decreased HF HRV can lead to an increase in suicide risk. Our results have implications for the prevention of suicidal behavior in at-risk populations.

  11. Drowsiness detection using heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, José; Laguna, Pablo; Bartra, Ariadna; Bailón, Raquel

    2016-06-01

    It is estimated that 10-30 % of road fatalities are related to drowsy driving. Driver's drowsiness detection based on biological and vehicle signals is being studied in preventive car safety. Autonomous nervous system activity, which can be measured noninvasively from the heart rate variability (HRV) signal obtained from surface electrocardiogram, presents alterations during stress, extreme fatigue and drowsiness episodes. We hypothesized that these alterations manifest on HRV and thus could be used to detect driver's drowsiness. We analyzed three driving databases in which drivers presented different sleep-deprivation levels, and in which each driving minute was annotated as drowsy or awake. We developed two different drowsiness detectors based on HRV. While the drowsiness episodes detector assessed each minute of driving as "awake" or "drowsy" with seven HRV derived features (positive predictive value 0.96, sensitivity 0.59, specificity 0.98 on 3475 min of driving), the sleep-deprivation detector discerned if a driver was suitable for driving or not, at driving onset, as function of his sleep-deprivation state. Sleep-deprivation state was estimated from the first three minutes of driving using only one HRV feature (positive predictive value 0.80, sensitivity 0.62, specificity 0.88 on 30 drivers). Incorporating drowsiness assessment based on HRV signal may add significant improvements to existing car safety systems.

  12. Controlling the emotional heart: heart rate biofeedback improves cardiac control during emotional reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peira, Nathalie; Fredrikson, Mats; Pourtois, Gilles

    2014-03-01

    When regulating negative emotional reactions, one goal is to reduce physiological reactions. However, not all regulation strategies succeed in doing that. We tested whether heart rate biofeedback helped participants reduce physiological reactions in response to negative and neutral pictures. When viewing neutral pictures, participants could regulate their heart rate whether the heart rate feedback was real or not. In contrast, when viewing negative pictures, participants could regulate heart rate only when feedback was real. Ratings of task success paralleled heart rate. Participants' general level of anxiety, emotion awareness, or cognitive emotion regulation strategies did not influence the results. Our findings show that accurate online heart rate biofeedback provides an efficient way to down-regulate autonomic physiological reactions when encountering negative stimuli.

  13. Sleep problems and heart rate variability over the working day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackowska, Marta; Dockray, Samantha; Endrighi, Romano; Hendrickx, Hilde; Steptoe, Andrew

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to discover whether greater sleep problems are associated with reduced heart rate variability during working hours and at night, and to determine whether this association is in part mediated by experienced affective states. This study involved 199 working women with a mean age of 33.8years. Sleep problems were assessed with the Jenkins Sleep Problems Scale, and the Day Reconstruction Method was used to measure positive affect and stress on the evening before and during the working day. Heart rate variability was indexed by the mean square root of the successive standard difference in heart period. Disturbed sleep was inversely related to heart rate variability during the working day (P=0.022), independently of demographic and behavioural confounders. Additional adjustment for positive affect and stress did not lead to further reductions in the association between sleep problems and reduced heart rate variability over the work day. Sleep problems were not predictive of reduced night-time heart rate variability. This report extends the findings from experimental studies and clinical samples, and suggests that disturbed sleep might impair heart rate variability in real life settings, in particular during working hours. Reduced heart rate variability might be a potential pathway linking sleep problems with cardiovascular disease. Based on the current data there was little evidence that the inverse associations between sleep problems and heart rate variability were mediated by experienced affective states.

  14. Aerobic exercise during pregnancy influences fetal cardiac autonomic control of heart rate and heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Linda E; Glaros, Alan; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Clapp, James F; Gustafson, Kathleen M

    2010-04-01

    Previous studies using ultrasound technology showed that fetal heart rate (HR) may be responsive to maternal aerobic exercise. Although it is recognized that cardiac autonomic control may be influenced by the intrauterine environment, little is known about how maternal exercise affects fetal heart development. This study tested the hypothesis that regular maternal exercise throughout gestation influences fetal cardiac autonomic control of HR and heart rate variability (HRV) when compared to fetuses of non-exercising women. Magnetocardiograms (MCGs) were recorded using a dedicated fetal biomagnetometer at 28, 32 and 36 weeks gestational age (GA) from 26 regularly exercising (>30 min of aerobic exercise, 3x per week) and 35 healthy, non-exercising pregnant women. Fetal MCG was isolated and normal R-peaks were marked to derive fetal HR and HRV in the time and frequency domains. We applied a mixed-effects model to investigate the effects of exercise, GA and fetal activity state. At 36 weeks GA, during the active fetal state, fetal HR was significantly lower in the exercise group (p=exercise group during the active fetal state at 36 weeks GA for both time and frequency domain measures. These results indicate that regular maternal exercise throughout gestation results in significantly lower fetal HR and increased HRV. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ratings of perceived exertion in adults with chronically physical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satonaka, A; Suzuki, N; Kawamura, M

    2012-10-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate: the relationship between ratings perceived exertion (RPE) and percentage of maximal oxygen uptake (%VO2max) during submaximal exercise; the influence of daily physical activities on RPE; and the influence of aerobic fitness on RPE. The participants were thirty-eight adults with chronically physical challenges. Submaximal exercise testing was conducted to estimate VO2max. The participants themselves declared their perceived exertion just before the end of the exercise testing by indicating the Borg's 6-20 RPE scale. Measurement of continuous heart rates was employed for measurement of the intensity of daily physical activities. The relationship between %VO2max and RPE was analyzed. There was a significant correlation between %VO2max and RPE only in the active men who did daily aerobic physical activities with intensity of 30%HRR and more (N.=9, r=0.74, P=0.02). In the good fitness groups of both women and men, the actual %VO2max in 11 out of 12 participants was lower than the reference value of %VO2max of the RPE while the opposite trend was found in poor aerobic fitness group. Our results recommend that RPE should be used together with objective physiological variables such as HR for assessment of exercise intensity in people with chronically physical challenges, especially who are low in aerobic fitness or who are inactive.

  16. VO2: a novel view from band theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyert, V

    2011-07-01

    New calculations for vanadium dioxide, one of the most controversially discussed materials for decades, reveal that band theory as based on density functional theory is well capable of correctly describing the electronic and magnetic properties of the metallic as well as both the insulating M(1) and M(2) phases. Considerable progress in the understanding of the physics of VO(2) is achieved by the use of the recently developed hybrid functionals, which include part of the electron-electron interaction exactly and thereby improve on the weaknesses of semilocal exchange functionals as provided by the local density and generalized gradient approximations. Much better agreement with photoemission data as compared to previous calculations is found and a consistent description of the rutile-type early transition-metal dioxides is achieved.

  17. n-VO2/p-GaN based nitride-oxide heterostructure with various thickness of VO2 layer grown by MBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minhuan; Bian, Jiming; Sun, Hongjun; Liu, Weifeng; Zhang, Yuzhi; Luo, Yingmin

    2016-12-01

    High quality VO2 films with precisely controlled thickness were grown on p-GaN/sapphire substrates by oxide molecular beam epitaxy (O-MBE). Results indicated that a distinct reversible semiconductor-to-metal (SMT) phase transition was observed for all the samples in the temperature dependent electrical resistance measurement, and the influence of VO2 layer thickness on the SMT properties of the as-grown n-VO2/p-GaN based nitride-oxide heterostructure was investigated. Meanwhile, the clear rectifying transport characteristics originated from the n-VO2/p-GaN interface were demonstrated before and after SMT of the VO2 over layer, which were attributed to the p-n junction behavior and Schottky contact character, respectively. Moreover, the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses confirmed the valence state of vanadium (V) in VO2 films was principally composed of V4+ with trace amount of V5+. The design and modulation of the n-VO2/p-GaN based heterostructure devices will benefit significantly from these achievements.

  18. Reduced intrinsic heart rate is associated with reduced arrhythmic susceptibility in guinea-pig heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchii, Oleg E

    2014-12-01

    In the clinical setting, patients with slower resting heart rate are less prone to cardiovascular death compared with those with elevated heart rate. However, electrophysiological adaptations associated with reduced cardiac rhythm have not been thoroughly explored. In this study, relationships between intrinsic heart rate and arrhythmic susceptibility were examined by assessments of action potential duration (APD) rate adaptation and inducibility of repolarization alternans in sinoatrial node (SAN)-driven and atrioventricular (AV)-blocked guinea-pig hearts perfused with Langendorff apparatus. Electrocardiograms, epicardial monophasic action potentials, and effective refractory periods (ERP) were assessed in normokalemic and hypokalemic conditions. Slower basal heart rate in AV-blocked hearts was associated with prolonged ventricular repolarization during spontaneous beating, and with attenuated APD shortening at increased cardiac activation rates during dynamic pacing, when compared with SAN-driven hearts. During hypokalemic perfusion, the inducibility of repolarization alternans and tachyarrhythmia by rapid pacing was found to be lower in AV-blocked hearts. This difference was ascribed to prolonged ERP in the setting of reduced basal heart rate, which prevented ventricular capture at critically short pacing intervals required to induce arrhythmia. Reduced basal heart rate is associated with electrophysiological changes that prevent electrical instability upon an abrupt cardiac acceleration.

  19. The prognostic value of estimated glomerular filtration rate, amino-terminal portion of the pro-hormone B-type natriuretic peptide and parameters of cardiopulmonary exercise testing in patients with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.Aernout Somsen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of renal function in relation to amino-terminal portion of the pro-hormone B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP and parameters of cardiopulmonary exercise testing in predicting mortality and morbidity in patients with moderate chronic heart failure (CHF. Sixty-one CHF patients were included in the study. Patients’ characteristics were: age 64.3±11.6 years; New York Heart Association class I/II/III: 14/37/10; left ventricular ejection fraction: 0.30±0.13 (%; NT-proBNP: 252.2±348.0 (ng/L; estimated creatinine clearance (e-CC: 73.6±31.4 (mL/min; estimated glomerular filtration rate (e-GFR: 66.1±24.6 (mL/min/1.73 m2; the highest O2 uptake during exercise (VO2-peak: 1.24±0.12 mL/kg/min; VO2/workload: 8.52±1.81 (mL/min/W]. During follow up (59.5±4.0 months there were 15 cardiac deaths and 16 patients were hospitalized due to progression of heart failure. NT-proBNP and VO2/workload were independently associated with cardiac death (P=0.007 and P=0.006, respectively. Hospitalization for progressive CHF was only associated with NT-proBNP (P=0.002. The combined cardiac events (cardiac death and hospitalization were associated with NT-proBNP and VO2/workload (P=0.007 and P=0.005, respectively. The addition of estimates of renal function (neither serum creatinine nor e-GFR did not improve the prognostic value for any of the models. In conclusion, in patients with moderate CHF, increased NT-proBNP and reduced VO2/workload identify those with increased mortality and morbidity, irrespective of estimates of renal function.

  20. The prognostic value of estimated glomerular filtration rate, amino-terminal portion of the pro-hormone B-type natriuretic peptide and parameters of cardiopulmonary exercise testing in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verberne, Hein J; van der Spank, Aukje; Bresser, Paul; Somsen, G Aernout

    2012-06-05

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of renal function in relation to amino-terminal portion of the pro-hormone B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and parameters of cardiopulmonary exercise testing in predicting mortality and morbidity in patients with moderate chronic heart failure (CHF). Sixty-one CHF patients were included in the study. Patients' characteristics were: age 64.3±11.6 years; New York Heart Association class I/II/III: 14/37/10; left ventricular ejection fraction: 0.30±0.13 (%); NT-proBNP: 252.2±348.0 (ng/L); estimated creatinine clearance (e-CC): 73.6±31.4 (mL/min); estimated glomerular filtration rate (e-GFR): 66.1±24.6 (mL/min/1.73 m(2)); the highest O2 uptake during exercise (VO(2-peak)): 1.24±0.12 mL/kg/min; VO(2)/workload: 8.52±1.81 (mL/min/W)]. During follow up (59.5±4.0 months) there were 15 cardiac deaths and 16 patients were hospitalized due to progression of heart failure. NT-proBNP and VO(2)/workload were independently associated with cardiac death (P=0.007 and P=0.006, respectively). Hospitalization for progressive CHF was only associated with NT-proBNP (P=0.002). The combined cardiac events (cardiac death and hospitalization) were associated with NT-proBNP and VO(2)/ workload (P=0.007 and P=0.005, respectively). The addition of estimates of renal function (neither serum creatinine nor e-GFR) did not improve the prognostic value for any of the models.In conclusion, in patients with moderate CHF, increased NT-proBNP and reduced VO(2)/ work-load identify those with increased mortality and morbidity, irrespective of estimates of renal function.

  1. HEART RATE DURING SLEEP: IMPLICATIONS FOR MONITORING TRAINING STATUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam R. Waldeck

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Resting heart rate has sometimes been used as a marker of training status. It is reasonable to assume that the relationship between heart rate and training status should be more evident during sleep when extraneous factors that may influence heart rate are reduced. Therefore the aim of the study was to assess the repeatability of monitoring heart rate during sleep when training status remained unchanged, to determine if this measurement had sufficient precision to be used as a marker of training status. The heart rate of ten female subjects was monitored for 24 hours on three occasions over three weeks whilst training status remained unchanged. Average, minimum and maximum heart rate during sleep was calculated. The average heart rate of the group during sleep was similar on each of the three tests (65 ± 9, 63 ± 6 and 67 ± 7 beats·min-1 respectively. The range in minimum heart rate variation during sleep for all subjects over the three testing sessions was from 0 to 10 beats·min-1 (mean = 5 ± 3 beats·min-1 and for maximum heart rate variation was 2 to 31 beats·min-1 (mean = 13 ± 9 beats·min-1. In summary it was found that on an individual basis the minimum heart rate during sleep varied by about 8 beats·min-1. This amount of intrinsic day-to-day variation needs to be considered when changes in heart rate that may occur with changes in training status are interpreted

  2. Heart Rate and Cardiovascular Disease: An Alternative to Beta Blockers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Liang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ivabradine, an If inhibitor, acts primarily on the sinoatrial node and is used to reduce the heart rate with minimal effect on myocardial contractility, blood pressure, and intracardiac conduction. Heart rate reduction is an important aspect of care in patients with chronic stable angina and heart failure. Many patients with coronary artery disease have coexisting asthma or chronic obstructive airway disease, and most of them are unable to tolerate beta blockers. Ivabradine may thus be a useful medicine in therapeutic heart rate management especially in patients who are intolerant of beta-blockers.

  3. In situ Raman spectroscopy study of metal-enhanced hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of VO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Fu, Qiang; Bao, Xinhe

    2016-11-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) has a phase transition from insulator to metal at 340 K, and this transition can be strongly modified by hydrogenation. In this work, two dimensional (2D) VO2 sheets have been grown on Si(1 1 1) surfaces through chemical vapor deposition, and metal (Au, Pt) thin films were deposited on VO2 surfaces by sputtering. The hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of VO2 and metal-decorated VO2 structures in H2 and in air were in situ studied by Raman. We found that hydrogenation and dehydrogenation temperatures have been significantly decreased with the VO2 surface decorated by Au and Pt. The enhanced hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reactions can be attributed to catalytic dissociation of H2 and O2 molecules on metal surfaces and subsequent spillover of dissociated H and O atoms to the oxide surfaces.

  4. Heart rate variability in elite triathletes, is variation in variability the key to effective training? A case comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plews, Daniel J; Laursen, Paul B; Kilding, Andrew E; Buchheit, Martin

    2012-11-01

    Measures of an athlete's heart rate variability (HRV) have shown potential to be of use in the prescription of training. However, little data exists on elite athletes who are regularly exposed to high training loads. This case study monitored daily HRV in two elite triathletes (one male: 22 year, VO2max 72.5 ml kg min(-1); one female: 20 year, VO2max 68.2 ml kg min(-1)) training 23 ± 2 h per week, over a 77-day period. During this period, one athlete performed poorly in a key triathlon event, was diagnosed as non-functionally over-reached (NFOR) and subsequently reactivated the dormant virus herpes zoster (shingles). The 7-day rolling average of the log-transformed square root of the mean sum of the squared differences between R-R intervals (Ln rMSSD), declined towards the day of triathlon event (slope = -0.17 ms/week; r2 = -0.88) in the NFOR athlete, remaining stable in the control (slope = 0.01 ms/week; r2 = 0.12). Furthermore, in the NFOR athlete, coefficient of variation of HRV (CV of Ln rMSSD 7-day rolling average) revealed large linear reductions towards NFOR (i.e., linear regression of HRV variables versus day number towards NFOR: -0.65%/week and r2 = -0.48), while these variables remained stable for the control athlete (slope = 0.04%/week). These data suggest that trends in both absolute HRV values and day-to-day variations may be useful measurements indicative of the progression towards mal-adaptation or non-functional over-reaching.

  5. Monitoring changes in VO2max via the Polar FT40 in female collegiate soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esco, Michael R; Snarr, Ronald L; Williford, Hank N

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine if the Polar FT40 could accurately track changes in maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) in a group of female soccer players. Predicted VO2max (pVO2max) via the Polar FT40 and observed VO2max (aVO2max) from a maximal exercise test on a treadmill were determined for members of a collegiate soccer team (n = 20) before and following an 8-week endurance training protocol. Predicted (VO2max and aVO2max measures were compared at baseline and within 1 week post-training. Change values (i.e., the difference between pre to post) for each variable were also determined and compared. There was a significant difference in aVO2max (pre = 43.6 ± 2.4 ml · kg · min(-1), post = 46.2 ± 2.4 ml · kg · min(-1), P < 0.001) and pVO2max (pre = 47.3 ± 5.3 ml · kg · min(-1), post = 49.7 ± 6.2 ml · kg · min(-1), P = 0.009) following training. However, predicted values were significantly greater at each time point compared to observed values (P < 0.001 at pre and P = 0.008 at post). Furthermore, there was a weak correlation between the change in aVO2max and the change in pVO2max (r = 0.18, P = 0.45). The Polar FT40 does not appear to be a valid method for predicting changes in individual VO2max following 8 weeks of endurance training in female collegiate soccer players.

  6. Using photoplethysmography in heart rate monitoring of patients with epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Andel, Judith; Ungureanu, Constantin; Aarts, Ronald; Leijten, Frans; Arends, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate is a useful neurophysiological sign when monitoring seizures in patients with epilepsy. In an ambulatory setting, heart rate is measured with ECG involving electrodes on the skin. This method is uncomfortable which is burdensome for patients and is sensitive to motion artifacts, which dec

  7. Using photoplethysmography in heart rate monitoring of patients with epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Andel, Judith; Ungureanu, Constantin; Aarts, Ronald; Leijten, Frans; Arends, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate is a useful neurophysiological sign when monitoring seizures in patients with epilepsy. In an ambulatory setting, heart rate is measured with ECG involving electrodes on the skin. This method is uncomfortable which is burdensome for patients and is sensitive to motion artifacts, which

  8. Fetal Behavior and Heart Rate in Twin Pregnancy : A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tendais, Iva; Visser, Gerard H. A.; Figueiredo, Barbara; Montenegro, Nuno; Mulder, Eduard J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Fetal movements and fetal heart rate (FHR) are well-established markers of fetal well-being and maturation of the fetal central nervous system. The purpose of this paper is to review and discuss the available knowledge on fetal movements and heart rate patterns in twin pregnancies. There is some evi

  9. Effect of Age and Other Factors on Maximal Heart Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londeree, Ben R.; Moeschberger, Melvin L.

    1982-01-01

    To reduce confusion regarding reported effects of age on maximal exercise heart rate, a comprehensive review of the relevant English literature was conducted. Data on maximal heart rate after exercising with a bicycle, a treadmill, and after swimming were analyzed with regard to physical fitness and to age, sex, and racial differences. (Authors/PP)

  10. Prognostic value of time-related changes of cardiopulmonary exercise testing indices in stable chronic heart failure: a pragmatic and operative scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrà, Ugo; Mezzani, Alessandro; Bosimini, Enzo; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo

    2006-04-01

    Although peak oxygen consumption (VO2) is an objective measurement of functional capacity linked to survival, most clinicians use clinical history to monitor changes over time of functional disability. The aim was to verify the prognostic value of time-related changes (Delta) of symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) indices in stable chronic heart failure (CHF). We studied 231 stable CHF patients (200 men) with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of 24 +/- 8% and peak VO2 of 14.3 +/- 8 ml/kg per min, who performed two symptom-limited CPX over time. The two incremental CPX were separated by a mean interval of 258 +/- 42 days; 59 (26%) suffered cardiovascular death or underwent urgent heart transplantation during the follow-up (1167 +/- 562 days). Peak VO2, LVEF (measured at second evaluation), Deltapeak VO2 and DeltaNYHA (New York Heart Association classification) were selected as independent predictors in the total population, and LVEF, Deltapeak VO2, and NYHA in patients with peak VO2 of 14 ml/kg per min or less (106 patients); no Delta parameter was selected in patients with preserved exercise tolerance. Survival analysis was performed taking into consideration the inter-test variability of peak VO2 (6%): true fall: more than 6% decrease, decline within the measurement variability; less than 6% decrease, improvement within the measurement variability; less than 6% increase and true rise; more than 6% increase: total mortality rate was 51, 23, 19 and 14% (P < 0.0001), respectively. Deltapeak VO2 is a useful outcome index; a combination of static (single) and time-related functional variables can enhance the prognostication process in stable CHF patients.

  11. Heart rate recovery normality data recorded in response to a maximal exercise test in physically active men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Campos, Davinia; Martín López, Aurora; Nuñez, María Jesús; López Chicharro, Jose

    2014-06-01

    Despite a growing clinical interest in determining the heart rate recovery (HRR) response to exercise, the limits of a normal HRR have not yet been well established. This study was designed to examine HRR following a controlled maximal exercise test in healthy, physically active adult men. The subjects recruited (n = 789) performed a maximal stress test on a treadmill. HRR indices were calculated by subtracting the first and third minute heart rates (HRs) during recovery from the maximal HR obtained during stress testing and designated these as HRR-1 and HRR-3, respectively. The relative change in HRR was determined as the decrease in HR produced at the time points 1 and 3 min after exercise as a percentage of the peak HR (%HRR-1/HR(peak) and %HRR-3/HR(peak), respectively). Percentile values of HRR-1 and HRR-3 were generated for the study population. Mean HHR-1 and HHR-3 were 15.24 ± 8.36 and 64.58 ± 12.17 bpm, respectively, and %HRR-1/HR(peak) and %HRR-3/HR(peak) were 8.60 ± 4.70 and 36.35 ± 6.79%, respectively. Significant correlation was detected between Peak VO2 and HRR-3 (r = 0.36; p < 0.001) or %HRR-3/HR(peak) (r = 0.23; p < 0.001). Our study provides normality data for HRR following a maximal Ergometry test obtained in a large population of physically active men.

  12. Effects of Tai Chi exercise on heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Aimee R; Wijarnpreecha, Karn; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2016-05-01

    Tai Chi is a callisthenic exercise form that incorporates aerobic exercise with diaphragmatic breathing. These two aspects alone have been shown to enhance the heart rate variability, warranting research into the effects of Tai Chi on autonomic nervous system modulation and heart rate variability. A low heart rate variability has been shown to be indicative of compromised health. Any methods to enhance the heart rate variability, in particular, non-pharmacological methods, are therefore seen as beneficial to health and are sought after. The aim of this review was to comprehensively summarize the currently published studies regarding the effects of Tai Chi on heart rate variability. Both consistent and inconsistent findings are presented and discussed, and an overall conclusion attained which could benefit future clinical studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessing Heart Rate in Physical Education. Assessment Series: K-12 Physical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Marilyn M.

    This guide discusses the assessment of heart rate and, in particular, the assessment of heart rate using a heart monitor. Part 1, "Foundation for the Use of Heart Rate," reviews literature about heart rate assessment and heart rate monitors, offering an overview of national guidelines for physical activity. It focuses on the importance…

  14. The clinical significance of detection to heart rate deceleration capacity and heart rate variability in patients with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-rong Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the change of heart rate deceleration capacity ( DC and heart rate variability in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF and its relationship with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF. Methods: DC, LVEF, time and frequency domain parameters of HRV were measured in 66 patients with CHF and 34 healthy adults (control group by using 24h Holter recordings and Echocardiography. The standard deviation of normal R-R intervals( SDNN, squares of differences between adjacent NN intervals ( RMSSD,low frequency power( LFn and high frequency power( HFn and the changes of LVEF were compared between  the two groups,the relationship between DC,LVEF and HRV were studied in patients with CHF. Results: The median value of DC in the patients with CHF was significantly lower than that in control group( 3.1 ± 2.4 ms vs 7.2 ± 1.3 ms,P <0.01.Incidence of abnormal DC in the CHF group was 57.5%,which was significantly higher than that in the control group (P <0.01.The HRV index, including SDNN、RMSSD、LFn、HFn, in the CHF group was significantly lower than that in normal control group (P < 0.01. Significant positive correlation between HRV index and LVEF were confirmed (P < 0.01. Conclusions: DC and HRV index are lower in patients with CHF and have a good correlation with the left ventricular ejection fraction.

  15. Long‐term Cardiovascular Risks Associated With an Elevated Heart Rate: The Framingham Heart Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jennifer E.; Larson, Martin G.; Ghorbani, Anahita; Cheng, Susan; Coglianese, Erin E.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Wang, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Higher heart rate has been associated with an adverse prognosis, but most prior studies focused on individuals with known cardiovascular disease or examined a limited number of outcomes. We sought to examine the association of baseline heart rate with both fatal and nonfatal outcomes during 2 decades of follow‐up. Methods and Results Our study included 4058 Framingham Heart Study participants (mean age 55 years, 56% women). Cox models were performed with multivariable adjustment for clinical risk factors and physical activity. A total of 708 participants developed incident cardiovascular disease (303 heart failure, 343 coronary heart disease, and 216 stroke events), 48 received a permanent pacemaker, and 1186 died. Baseline heart rate was associated with incident cardiovascular disease (hazard ratio [HR] 1.15 per 1 SD [11 bpm] increase in heart rate, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.24, P=0.0002), particularly heart failure (HR 1.32, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.48, Pheart rate was also associated with higher all‐cause (HR 1.17, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.24, Pheart rate abated or increased. In contrast, individuals with a higher heart rate had a lower risk of requiring permanent pacemaker placement (HR 0.55, 95% CI 0.38 to 0.79, P=0.001). Conclusions Individuals with a higher heart rate are at elevated long‐term risk for cardiovascular events, in particular, heart failure, and all‐cause death. On the other hand, a higher heart rate is associated with a lower risk of future permanent pacemaker implantation. PMID:24811610

  16. [Heart rate measurement algorithm based on artificial intelligence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chengxian, Cai; Wei, Wang

    2010-01-01

    Based on the heart rate measurement method using time-lapse image of human cheek, this paper proposes a novel measurement algorithm based on Artificial Intelligence. The algorithm combining with fuzzy logic theory acquires the heart beat point by using the defined fuzzy membership function of each sampled point. As a result, it calculates the heart rate by counting the heart beat points in a certain time period. Experiment shows said algorithm satisfies in operability, accuracy and robustness, which leads to constant practical value.

  17. Effects of Exercise During Pregnancy on Maternal Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Linda E; Knowlton, Jennifer; Hanson, Jessica; Suminski, Richard; Paynter, Christopher; Fang, Xiangming; Gustafson, Kathleen M

    2016-07-01

    Pregnancy is associated with an increased sympathetic state, which can be exacerbated by gestational conditions. Research has shown that exercise during pregnancy lowers heart rate (HR) and can attenuate the symptoms of gestational conditions associated with increased sympathetic control. However, changes in maternal heart autonomic function in response to exercise have not been reported across multiple time points during pregnancy. This analysis is designed to address this gap. To determine if exercise throughout gestation improves maternal cardiac autonomic nervous system functioning, as evidenced by decreased HR and increased heart rate variability (HRV) indices. Case control study. Academic medical institution. A total of 56 women with healthy, singleton, low-risk pregnancies. Participants were asked to complete 3 resting 18-minute HRV recordings at 28, 32, and 36 weeks' gestation, along with a physical activity questionnaire. HRV indices were calculated for time (R peak to R peak interval standard deviation and root mean squared of successive differences) and frequency (very low, low, and high frequency) domain measures. The differences between groups were compared for HRV indices at 28, 32, and 36 weeks. Resting HR was significantly lower in the exercise group at 28 weeks (P exercise group had significantly (P exercise group relative to the control group. No differences occurred in sympathovagal balance (low frequency/high frequency ratio) between groups. Exercise throughout pregnancy can significantly improve cardiac autonomic control. More research is needed to determine if this adaptation to exercise may reduce the risk of adverse outcomes associated with gestational conditions with poor autonomic control, such as diabetes, hypertension, pre-eclampsia, and excessive weight gain. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Population characteristics and impact on heart rate variability,heart rate and blood pressure of passive smoking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵菁

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the basic characteristics of passive smoking population,and the impact of passive smoking on heart rate variability,heart rate and blood pressure.Methods Eighty-six passive smokers[mean age: (52.4±7.6) years]were recruited from patients

  19. Job strain in relation to ambulatory blood pressure, heart rate, and heart rate variability among female nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riese, H.; Doornen, L.J.P. van; Houtman, I.L.D.; Geus, E.J.C. de

    2004-01-01

    Objective. This study examined the effects of exposure to job strain on independent predictors of cardiovascular disease (ambulatory blood pressure, heart rate, and heart rate variability). Methods. The participants comprised a homogeneous group of 159 healthy female nurses [mean age 35.9 (SD 8.5)

  20. A point-process model of human heartbeat intervals: new definitions of heart rate and heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Riccardo; Matten, Eric C; Alabi, Abdulrasheed A; Brown, Emery N

    2005-01-01

    Heart rate is a vital sign, whereas heart rate variability is an important quantitative measure of cardiovascular regulation by the autonomic nervous system. Although the design of algorithms to compute heart rate and assess heart rate variability is an active area of research, none of the approaches considers the natural point-process structure of human heartbeats, and none gives instantaneous estimates of heart rate variability. We model the stochastic structure of heartbeat intervals as a history-dependent inverse Gaussian process and derive from it an explicit probability density that gives new definitions of heart rate and heart rate variability: instantaneous R-R interval and heart rate standard deviations. We estimate the time-varying parameters of the inverse Gaussian model by local maximum likelihood and assess model goodness-of-fit by Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests based on the time-rescaling theorem. We illustrate our new definitions in an analysis of human heartbeat intervals from 10 healthy subjects undergoing a tilt-table experiment. Although several studies have identified deterministic, nonlinear dynamical features in human heartbeat intervals, our analysis shows that a highly accurate description of these series at rest and in extreme physiological conditions may be given by an elementary, physiologically based, stochastic model.

  1. Job strain in relation to ambulatory blood pressure, heart rate, and heart rate variability among female nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riese, H.; Doornen, L.J.P. van; Houtman, I.L.D.; Geus, E.J.C. de

    2004-01-01

    Objective. This study examined the effects of exposure to job strain on independent predictors of cardiovascular disease (ambulatory blood pressure, heart rate, and heart rate variability). Methods. The participants comprised a homogeneous group of 159 healthy female nurses [mean age 35.9 (SD 8.5) y

  2. Heart Rate Responses to Synthesized Affective Spoken Words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirja Ilves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effects of brief synthesized spoken words with emotional content on the ratings of emotions and heart rate responses. Twenty participants' heart rate functioning was measured while they listened to a set of emotionally negative, neutral, and positive words produced by speech synthesizers. At the end of the experiment, ratings of emotional experiences were also collected. The results showed that the ratings of the words were in accordance with their valence. Heart rate deceleration was significantly the strongest and most prolonged to the negative stimuli. The findings are the first suggesting that brief spoken emotionally toned words evoke a similar heart rate response pattern found earlier for more sustained emotional stimuli.

  3. THE IMPACT OF SHORT TERM SUPERVISED AND HOME-BASED WALKING PROGRAMMES ON HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH PERIPHERAL ARTERIAL DISEASET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin R.H. Sandercock

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the study were to determine whether heart rate variability (HRV measured at rest and during exercise could be altered by an exercise training programme designed to increase walking performance in patients with peripheral arterial disease. Forty-four volunteers were randomised into 12 weeks of either: supervised walking training twice weekly for 30 min at 75% VO2peak (SU, home-based walking training sessions: twice weekly, 30 min per week (HB or no exercise (CT. HRV measures were calculated from a 5-min resting ECG. Each patient then underwent maximal, graded exercise treadmill testing. All measures were repeated after 12 weeks. The SU group showed significantly (p < 0.001 increased maximal walking time (MWT but no change in VO2peak. There were no statistically significant changes in any of the measures of HRV in any group. Effect sizes for change in HRV measures were all very small and in some cases negative. Improved walking performance was not accompanied by central cardiorespiratory or neuroregulatory adaptations in the present study. The lack of any change in HRV was possibly due to either the low intensity or discontinuous nature of exercise undertaken

  4. Resting heart rate variability and heart rate recovery after submaximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danieli, Aljoša; Lusa, Lara; Potočnik, Nejka; Meglič, Bernard; Grad, Anton; Bajrović, Fajko F

    2014-04-01

    Aerobic training accelerates Heart Rate Recovery after exercise in healthy subjects and in patients with coronary disease. As shown by pharmacological autonomic blockade, HRR early after exercise is dependent primarily on parasympathetic reactivation. Thus, accelerated HRR early after exercise in endurance-trained athletes may be attributed to augmented parasympathetic reactivation. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the HRR early after submaximal exercise is related to the pre-exercise parasympathetic modulation. Thirty endurance-trained athletes (20 males, 50 ± 7 years) and thirty control subjects (20 males, 52 ± 6 years) performed a submaximal exercise on a cyclo-ergometer. Pre-exercise resting short-term heart rate variability (HRV) parameters in time and frequency-domains were correlated with HRR during the first 30 s, 1 and 2 min after cessation of exercise. We found that HRR was statistically significantly faster in athletes than in controls at all examination time points (p exercise is related to resting parasympathetic modulation in the middle-aged subjects. In addition, they suggested an optimal range of HRV for maximal HRR after exercise.

  5. The effect of relaxing massage on heart rate and heart rate variability in purebred Arabian racehorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalik, Sylwester; Janczarek, Iwona; Kędzierski, Witold; Stachurska, Anna; Wilk, Izabela

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of relaxing massage on the heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) in young racehorses during their first racing season. In the study, 72 Purebred Arabian racehorses were included. The study was implemented during the full race season. The horses from control and experimental groups were included in regular race training 6 days a week. The horses from the experimental group were additionally subject to the relaxing massage 3 days a week during the whole study. HR and HRV were assumed as indicators of the emotional state of the horses. The measurements were taken six times, every 4-5 weeks. The HRV parameters were measured at rest, during grooming and saddling the horse and during warm-up walking under a rider. The changes of the parameters throughout the season suggest that the relaxing massage may be effectively used to make the racehorses more relaxed and calm. Moreover, the horses from the experimental group had better race performance records. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  6. Heart rate and heart rate variability modification in chronic insomnia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Benedetto; Dittoni, Serena; Colicchio, Salvatore; Testani, Elisa; Losurdo, Anna; Gnoni, Valentina; Di Blasi, Chiara; Brunetti, Riccardo; Contardi, Anna; Mazza, Salvatore; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Chronic insomnia is highly prevalent in the general population, provoking personal distress and increased risk for psychiatric and medical disorders. Autonomic hyper-arousal could be a pathogenic mechanism of chronic primary insomnia. The aim of this study was to investigate autonomic activity in patients with chronic primary insomnia by means of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. Eighty-five consecutive patients affected by chronic primary insomnia were enrolled (38 men and 47 women; mean age: 53.2 ± 13.6). Patients were compared with a control group composed of 55 healthy participants matched for age and gender (23 men and 32 women; mean age: 54.2 ± 13.9). Patients underwent an insomnia study protocol that included subjective sleep evaluation, psychometric measures, and home-based polysomnography with evaluation of HRV in wake before sleep, in all sleep stages, and in wake after final awakening. Patients showed modifications of heart rate and HRV parameters, consistent with increased sympathetic activity, while awake before sleep and during Stage-2 non-REM sleep. No significant differences between insomniacs and controls could be detected during slow-wave sleep, REM sleep, and post-sleep wake. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that autonomic hyper-arousal is a major pathogenic mechanism in primary insomnia, and confirm that this condition is associated with an increased cardiovascular risk.

  7. Fighter pilots' heart rate, heart rate variation and performance during instrument approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansikka, Heikki; Simola, Petteri; Virtanen, Kai; Harris, Don; Oksama, Lauri

    2016-10-01

    Fighter pilots' heart rate (HR), heart rate variation (HRV) and performance during instrument approaches were examined. The subjects were required to fly instrument approaches in a high-fidelity simulator under various levels of task demand. The task demand was manipulated by increasing the load on the subjects by reducing the range at which they commenced the approach. HR and the time domain components of HRV were used as measures of pilot mental workload (PMWL). The findings of this study indicate that HR and HRV are sensitive to varying task demands. HR and HRV were able to distinguish the level of PMWL after which the subjects were no longer able to cope with the increasing task demands and their instrument landing system performance fell to a sub-standard level. The major finding was the HR/HRV's ability to differentiate the sub-standard performance approaches from the high-performance approaches. Practitioner Summary: This paper examined if HR and HRV were sensitive to varying task demands in a fighter aviation environment and if these measures were related to variations in pilot's performance.

  8. Improvements in fetal heart rate analysis by the removal of maternal-fetal heart rate ambiguities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Paula; Costa-Santos, Cristina; Gonçalves, Hernâni; Ayres-De-Campos, Diogo; Bernardes, João

    2015-11-19

    Misinterpretation of the maternal heart rate (MHR) as fetal may lead to significant errors in fetal heart rate (FHR) interpretation. In this study we hypothesized that the removal of these MHR-FHR ambiguities would improve FHR analysis during the final hour of labor. Sixty-one MHR and FHR recordings were simultaneously acquired in the final hour of labor. Removal of MHR-FHR ambiguities was performed by subtracting MHR signals from their FHR counterparts when the absolute difference between the two was less or equal to 5 beats per minute. Major MHR-FHR ambiguities were defined when they exceeded 1% of the tracing. Maternal, fetal and neonatal characteristics were evaluated in cases where major MHR-FHR ambiguities occurred and computer analysis of FHR recordings was compared, before and after removal of the ambiguities. Seventy-two percent of tracings (44/61) exhibited episodes of major MHR-FHR ambiguities, which were not significantly associated with any maternal, fetal or neonatal characteristics, but were associated with MHR accelerations, FHR signal loss and decelerations. Removal of MHR-FHR ambiguities resulted in a significant decrease in FHR decelerations, and improvement in FHR tracing classification. FHR interpretation during the final hour of labor can be significantly improved by the removal of MHR-FHR ambiguities.

  9. VO2 Kinetics and Metabolic Contributions Whilst Swimming at 95, 100, and 105% of the Velocity at VO2 max

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C. Sousa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A bioenergetical analysis of swimming at intensities near competitive distances is inexistent. It was aimed to compare the transient VO2 kinetics responses and metabolic contributions whilst swimming at different velocities around VO2max⁡. 12 trained male swimmers performed (i an incremental protocol to determine the velocity at VO2max⁡ (vVO2max⁡ and (ii three square wave exercises from rest to 95, 100, and 105% of vVO2max⁡. VO2 was directly measured using a telemetric portable gas analyser and its kinetics analysed through a double-exponential model. Metabolic contributions were assessed through the sum of three energy components. No differences were observed in the fast component response (τ1—15, 18, and 16 s, A1—36, 34, and 37 mL·kg-1·min⁡-1, and Gain—32, 29, and 30 mL·min⁡-1 at 95, 100, and 105% of the vVO2max⁡, resp. but A2 was higher in 95 and 100% compared to 105% intensity (480.76 ± 247.01, 452.18 ± 217.04, and 147.04 ± 60.40 mL·min⁡-1, resp.. The aerobic energy contribution increased with the time sustained (83 ± 5, 74 ± 6, and 59 ± 7% for 95, 100, and 105%, resp.. The adjustment of the cardiovascular and/or pulmonary systems that determine O2 delivery and diffusion to the exercising muscles did not change with changing intensity, with the exception of VO2 slow component kinetics metabolic profiles.

  10. Validation of a single-stage fixed-rate step test for the prediction of maximal oxygen uptake in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Dominique; Jacobs, Nele; Thijs, Herbert; Dendale, Paul; Claes, Neree

    2016-09-01

    Healthcare professionals with limited access to ergospirometry remain in need of valid and simple submaximal exercise tests to predict maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max ). Despite previous validation studies concerning fixed-rate step tests, accurate equations for the estimation of VO2max remain to be formulated from a large sample of healthy adults between age 18-75 years (n > 100). The aim of this study was to develop a valid equation to estimate VO2max from a fixed-rate step test in a larger sample of healthy adults. A maximal ergospirometry test, with assessment of cardiopulmonary parameters and VO2max , and a 5-min fixed-rate single-stage step test were executed in 112 healthy adults (age 18-75 years). During the step test and subsequent recovery, heart rate was monitored continuously. By linear regression analysis, an equation to predict VO2max from the step test was formulated. This equation was assessed for level of agreement by displaying Bland-Altman plots and calculation of intraclass correlations with measured VO2max . Validity further was assessed by employing a Jackknife procedure. The linear regression analysis generated the following equation to predict VO2max (l min(-1) ) from the step test: 0·054(BMI)+0·612(gender)+3·359(body height in m)+0·019(fitness index)-0·012(HRmax)-0·011(age)-3·475. This equation explained 78% of the variance in measured VO2max (F = 66·15, Pstep test equation has been developed to estimate VO2max in healthy adults. This tool could be employed by healthcare professionals with limited access to ergospirometry.

  11. Effect of yoga therapy on heart rate, blood pressure and cardiac autonomic function in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Bandi Hari; Pal, Pravati; G K, Pal; J, Balachander; E, Jayasettiaseelon; Y, Sreekanth; M G, Sridhar; G S, Gaur

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that a hall mark of heart failure is adverse changes in autonomic function. Elevated blood pressure is a powerful predictor of congestive heart failure and other Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) outcomes. In this study, we planned to examine the effects of a 12 week yoga therapy on blood pressure, heart rate, heart rate variability, and rate pressure product (RPP). Out of 130 heart failure patients recruited for the study, 65 patients were randomly selected to receive 12 week yoga therapy along with standard medical therapy (yoga group). Other patients (n=65) received only standard medical therapy (control group). Heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac autonomic function (by short-term heart-rate variability analysis) and myocardial oxygen consumption (by RPP) were assessed before and after 12 weeks. In the yoga group, 44 patients and in the control group, 48 patients completed the study. There was a significant decrease in heart rate, blood pressure and RPP in yoga group compared to control group. Also, LFnu and LF-HF ratio decreased significantly and HFnu increased significantly in yoga group compared to control group. Twelve-week yoga therapy significantly improved the parasympathetic activity and decreased the sympathetic activity in heart failure patients (NYHA I&II).

  12. Heart rate dynamics during a treadmill cardiopulmonary exercise test in optimized beta-blocked heart failure patients

    OpenAIRE

    Vitor Oliveira Carvalho; Guilherme Veiga Guimarães; Emmanuel Gomes Ciolac; Edimar Alcides Bocchi

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calculating the maximum heart rate for age is one method to characterize the maximum effort of an individual. Although this method is commonly used, little is known about heart rate dynamics in optimized beta-blocked heart failure patients. AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate heart rate dynamics (basal, peak and % heart rate increase) in optimized beta-blocked heart failure patients compared to sedentary, normal individuals (controls) during a treadmill cardiopulmonary exer...

  13. The Effect of Aging on Relationships between Lean Body Mass and VO2max in Rowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chul-Ho; Wheatley, Courtney M; Behnia, Mehrdad; Johnson, Bruce D

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with a fall in maximal aerobic capacity as well as with a decline in lean body mass. The purpose of the study was to investigate the influence of aging on the relationship between aerobic capacity and lean body mass in subjects that chronically train both their upper and lower bodies. Eleven older rowers (58±5 yrs) and 11 younger rowers (27±4 yrs) participated in the study. Prior to the VO2max testing, subjects underwent a dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scan to estimate total lean body mass. Subsequently, VO2max was quantified during a maximal exercise test on a rowing ergometer as well as a semi-recumbent cycle ergometer. The test protocol included a pre-exercise stage followed by incremental exercise until VO2max was reached. The order of exercise modes was randomized and there was a wash-out period between the two tests. Oxygen uptake was obtained via a breath-by-breath metabolic cart (Vmax™ Encore, San Diego, CA). Rowing VO2max was higher than cycling VO2max in both groups (pVO2max from cycling to rowing (pVO2max for both groups (pVO2max between groups disappeared (p>0.05), however, older subjects still demonstrated a lower rowing VO2max relative to younger subjects (pVO2max obtained, however, it appears that VO2max in older subjects may be less influenced by muscle mass than in younger subjects.

  14. A Study of VO2 Max and Body Fat Percentage in Female Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bute, Smita S; Deshmukh, P.R

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Aerobic capacity of athletes is an important element of success in sports achievements. It is generally considered the best indicator of cardio respiratory endurance and athletic fitness. Body fat percentage affects VO2 max and thus the cardiovascular status of the athletes. The present study was undertaken to assess the VO2 max and body fat percentage in athletes. The secondary objective of the study was to study the relationship between VO2 max and body fat percentage. Materials and Methods: Twenty five female athletes of age group 17-22years were selected for the study. VO2 max was determined by Queen’s college step test and body fat percentage by skin fold calipers. The VO2 max and body fat percentage were determined in non athletes of same age group for comparison. The statistical analysis was done by Student’s t-test and Pearson correlation test. Observation and Results: The mean VO2 max in athletic group was 39.62 ± 2.80 ml/kg/min. In non-athletic group, VO2 max was 23.54 ± 3.26 ml/kg/min. The mean body fat percentage in athletes was 24.11 ± 1.83% and in non-athletes it was 29.31 ± 3.86%.The difference in VO2 max and body fat percentage was statistically significant in our study. The VO2 max and body fat percentage in both the groups showed negative correlation by Pearson test but, was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The present study showed a statistically significant higher VO2 max in female athletes. The study showed a negative correlation between VO2 max and body fat percentage but was not statistically significant. PMID:25653935

  15. Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring from Phonocardiograph Signal Using Repetition Frequency of Heart Sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As a passive, harmless, and low-cost diagnosis tool, fetal heart rate (FHR monitoring based on fetal phonocardiography (fPCG signal is alternative to ultrasonographic cardiotocography. Previous fPCG-based methods commonly relied on the time difference of detected heart sound bursts. However, the performance is unavoidable to degrade due to missed heart sounds in very low signal-to-noise ratio environments. This paper proposes a FHR monitoring method using repetition frequency of heart sounds. The proposed method can track time-varying heart rate without both heart sound burst identification and denoising. The average accuracy rate comparison to benchmark is 88.3% as the SNR ranges from −4.4 dB to −26.7 dB.

  16. Fractal and complexity measures of heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkiömäki, Juha S; Mäkikallio, Timo H; Huikuri, Heikki V

    2005-01-01

    Heart rate variability has been analyzed conventionally with time and frequency domain methods, which measure the overall magnitude of RR interval fluctuations around its mean value or the magnitude of fluctuations in some predetermined frequencies. Analysis of heart rate dynamics by methods based on chaos theory and nonlinear system theory has gained recent interest. This interest is based on observations suggesting that the mechanisms involved in cardiovascular regulation likely interact with each other in a nonlinear way. Furthermore, recent observational studies suggest that some indexes describing nonlinear heart rate dynamics, such as fractal scaling exponents, may provide more powerful prognostic information than the traditional heart rate variability indexes. In particular, the short-term fractal scaling exponent measured by the detrended fluctuation analysis method has predicted fatal cardiovascular events in various populations. Approximate entropy, a nonlinear index of heart rate dynamics, that describes the complexity of RR interval behavior, has provided information on the vulnerability to atrial fibrillation. Many other nonlinear indexes, e.g., Lyapunov exponent and correlation dimensions, also give information on the characteristics of heart rate dynamics, but their clinical utility is not well established. Although concepts of chaos theory, fractal mathematics, and complexity measures of heart rate behavior in relation to cardiovascular physiology or various cardiovascular events are still far away from clinical medicine, they are a fruitful area for future research to expand our knowledge concerning the behavior of cardiovascular oscillations in normal healthy conditions as well as in disease states.

  17. Heart Rate Variability Measures and Models

    CERN Document Server

    Teich, M C; Jost, B M; Vibe-Rheymer, K; Heneghan, C; Teich, Malvin C.; Lowen, Steven B.; Jost, Bradley M.; Vibe-Rheymer, Karin; Heneghan, Conor

    2001-01-01

    We focus on various measures of the fluctuations of the sequence of intervals between beats of the human heart, and how such fluctuations can be used to assess the presence or likelihood of cardiovascular disease. We examine sixteen such measures and their suitability for correctly classifying heartbeat records of various lengths as normal or revealing the presence of cardiac dysfunction, particularly congestive heart failure. Using receiver-operating-characteristic analysis we demonstrate that scale-dependent measures prove substantially superior to scale-independent ones. The wavelet-transform standard deviation at a scale near 32 heartbeat intervals, and its spectral counterpart near 1/32 cycles/interval, turn out to provide reliable results using heartbeat records just minutes long. We further establish for all subjects that the human heartbeat has an underlying stochastic origin rather than arising from a chaotic attractor. Finally, we develop a mathematical point process that emulates the human heartbea...

  18. Stochastic heart-rate model can reveal pathologic cardiac dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuusela, Tom

    2004-03-01

    A simple one-dimensional Langevin-type stochastic difference equation can simulate the heart-rate fluctuations in a time scale from minutes to hours. The model consists of a deterministic nonlinear part and a stochastic part typical of Gaussian noise, and both parts can be directly determined from measured heart-rate data. Data from healthy subjects typically exhibit the deterministic part with two or more stable fixed points. Studies of 15 congestive heart-failure subjects reveal that the deterministic part of pathologic heart dynamics has no clear stable fixed points. Direct simulations of the stochastic model for normal and pathologic cases can produce statistical parameters similar to those of real subjects. Results directly indicate that pathologic situations simplify the heart-rate control system.

  19. Assesment of Autonomic Function in Metabolic Syndrome using Combination Heart Rate Variability and Heart Rate Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülay Aydın

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Metabolic syndrome (MetS is described as a group of various abnormal metabolic risk factors such as obesity, dyslipidemia, increased blood pressure, increased plasma glucose levels, prothrombotic condition and proinflammatory state. These parameters are related to decreased parasympathetic and increased sympathetic activity. We aimed to evaluate autonomic function using a combination with heart rate variability (HRV and heart rate turbulence (HRT in metabolic syndrome to compare non-metabolic syndrome(non-MetS. METHODS: We selected consecutive 50 patients with MetS and 50 patients with healthy non-MetS individuals. All patients underwent 24 hours holter monitoring to evaluate HRT and HRV parameters. RESULTS: Age of patients was not different in two groups. Mean age of MetS patients was 57,50±12,13 and 54,6±10,25 in non- MetS individuals. Sex of patients was non different in MetS compared to non-MetS (37 female and 13 male vs. 22 female, 28 male p<0,05 respectively. SDNN and RMSSD was lower in MetS compared to those without MetS (131,96±49,12 vs 179,59±85,83 p=0,03 and 78,64±35,22 vs 112,73±81,24 p=0,08 respectively. SDANN, pNN50,Mean RR, mean heart rate, count of ventricular premature complex(VPC were not different between two groups. Turbulence Slope(TS was not different in two groups. Turbulence Onset(TO was higher in MetS compared to non-MetS (2,01±15,29 and -6,21±13,5 p=0,005. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: We showed that autonomic function in MetS was impaired using a combination with HRT and HRV. These patients should be followed closely for adverse cardiovascular outcome especially including cardiac arrhythmia.

  20. Scaling Behaviour and Memory in Heart Rate of Healthy Human

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Shi-Min; PENG Hu; YANG Hui-Jie; ZHOU Tao; ZHOU Pei-Ling; WANG Bing-Hong

    2007-01-01

    We investigate a set of complex heart rate time series from healthy human in different behaviour states with the detrended fluctuation analysis and diffusion entropy (DE) method. It is proposed that the scaling properties are influenced by behaviour states. The memory detected by DE exhibits an approximately same pattern after a detrending procedure. Both of them demonstrate the long-range strong correlations in heart rate. These findings may be helpful to understand the underlying dynamical evolution process in the heart rate control system, as well as to model the cardiac dynamic process.

  1. Epitaxial growth of higher transition-temperature VO2 films on AlN/Si

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Slusar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the epitaxial growth and the mechanism of a higher temperature insulator-to-metal-transition (IMT of vanadium dioxide (VO2 thin films synthesized on aluminum nitride (AlN/Si (111 substrates by a pulsed-laser-deposition method; the IMT temperature is TIMT ≈ 350 K. X-ray diffractometer and high resolution transmission electron microscope data show that the epitaxial relationship of VO2 and AlN is VO2 (010 ‖ AlN (0001 with VO2 [101] ‖   AlN   [ 2 1 ̄ 1 ̄ 0 ] zone axes, which results in a substrate-induced tensile strain along the in-plane a and c axes of the insulating monoclinic VO2. This strain stabilizes the insulating phase of VO2 and raises TIMT for 10 K higher than TIMT single crystal ≈ 340 K in a bulk VO2 single crystal. Near TIMT, a resistance change of about four orders is observed in a thick film of ∼130 nm. The VO2/AlN/Si heterostructures are promising for the development of integrated IMT-Si technology, including thermal switchers, transistors, and other applications.

  2. Waist circumference and VO2max are associated with metabolic and hemostatic risk in premenopausal nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elich, H; Riese, H; De Geus, EJC

    In 21 nurses (34.4+/-3.9 yr), VO2max, physical activity, body composition and lifestyle parameters were measured to determine which of these characteristics are related to metabolic and hemostatic risk for cardiovascular disease. Physical activity was assessed with the 7-day recall interview VO2max

  3. Effect of Toe Clips During Bicycle Ergometry on VO2 max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Roger S.; Sparling, Phillip B.

    1985-01-01

    Eight men participated in three randomized maximal oxygen uptake tests to investigate the hypothesis that the use of toe clips on bicycle ergometers produced a higher VO2 max. No significant difference in mean VO2 max or performance time was observed. (Author/MT)

  4. Infrared Thermochromic Properties of VO2 Thin Films Prepared through Aqueous Sol-gel Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Dongqing; CHENG Haifeng; ZHENG Wenwei; ZHANG Chaoyang

    2012-01-01

    The stoichiometric vanadium(Ⅳ) oxide thin films were obtained by controlling the temperature,time and pressure of annealing.The thermochromic phase transition and the IR thermochromic property of 400 nm and 900 nm VO2 thin films in the 7.5 μm-14 μm region were discussed.The derived VO2 thin film samples were characterized by Raman,XRD,XPS,AFM,SEM,and DSC.The resistance and infrared emissivity of VO2 thin films under different temperature were measured,and the thermal images of films were obtained using infrared imager.The results show that the VO2 thin film annealed at 550 ℃ for 10 hours through aqueous sol-gel process is pure and uniform.The 900 nm VO2 thin film exhibits better IR thermochromic property than the 400 nm VO2 thin film.The resistance of 900 nm VO2 film can change by 4orders of magnitude and the emissivity can change by 0.6 during the phase transition,suggesting the outstanding IR thermochromic property.The derived VO2 thin film can control its infrared radiation intensity and lower its apparent temperature actively when the real temperature increases,which may be applied in the field of energy saving,thermal control and camouflage.

  5. Metal-insulator phase transition in a VO2 thin film observed with terahertz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd; Fischer, Bernd M.; Thoman, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the dielectric properties of a thin VO2 film in the terahertz frequency range in the vicinity of the semiconductor-metal phase transition. Phase-sensitive broadband spectroscopy in the frequency region below the phonon bands of VO2 gives insight into the conductive properties...

  6. Relationship between Cardiometabolic Parameters and Elevated Resting and Effort Heart Rate in Schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cristiane Fernanda da; Burgos, Miria Suzana; Silva, Priscila Tatiana da; Burgos, Leandro Tibiriçá; Welser, Letícia; Sehn, Ana Paula; Horta, Jorge André; Mello, Elza Daniel de; Reuter, Cézane Priscila

    2017-07-20

    Little has been studied on heart rate and its relationship with metabolic disorders. To identify possible association between heart rate (HR) and metabolic disorders in children and adolescents. This cross-sectional study evaluated 2.098 subjects, aged between 7 and 17 years. The variables evaluated were: HR, systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), pulse pressure (PP), double-product (DP), myocardial oxygen consumption (mVO2), lipids, glucose and uric acid levels, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). The values of HR at rest and effort were divided into quartiles. The association between continuous values of HR and cardiometabolic indicators was tested by linear regression. LDL cholesterol presented a significantly higher mean (p = 0.003) in schoolchildren with resting HR greater or equal to 91 bpm, compared to students with less than 75 bpm. Compared with the quartiles of effort HR, SBP, DBP, glucose and uric acid presented high values when HR was greater or equal than 185 bpm. SBP, glucose and HDL cholesterol demonstrated a significant association with resting HR. Uric acid was observed as a predictor of increased effort HR. Schoolchildren with a higher resting HR have higher mean of LDL cholesterol. For effort HR, there was an increase in blood pressure, glucose and uric acid levels. Uric acid has been shown to be a predictor of elevated effort HR. Pouco se tem estudado sobre frequência cardíaca e suas relações com alterações metabólicas. Verificar se existe associação entre frequência cardíaca e disfunções metabólicas em crianças e adolescentes. Estudo transversal com 2.098 escolares, com idade entre 7 e 17 anos. As variáveis avaliadas foram: frequência cardíaca (FC), pressão arterial sistólica (PAS), diastólica (PAD) e de pulso (PP), duplo-produto (DP), consumo de oxigênio pelo miocárdio (mVO2), perfil lipídico e glicêmico, níveis de ácido úrico, índice de massa corporal (IMC) e circunferência da cintura

  7. Heart rate, heart rate variability, and arrhythmias in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Caroline Elisabeth; Falk, Bo Torkel; Zois, Nora Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Autonomic modulation of heart rhythm is thought to influence the pathophysiology of myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD).......Autonomic modulation of heart rhythm is thought to influence the pathophysiology of myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD)....

  8. A new non-exercise-based Vo2max prediction equation for aerobically trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, Moh H; Housh, Terry J; Berger, Dale E; Coburn, Jared W; Beck, Travis W

    2005-08-01

    The purposes of the present study were to (a) modify previously published Vo(2)max equations using the constant error (CE = mean difference between actual and predicted Vo(2)max) values from Malek et al. (28); (b) cross-validate the modified equations to determine their accuracy for estimating Vo(2)max in aerobically trained men; (c) derive a new non- exercise-based equation for estimating Vo(2)max in aerobically trained men if the modified equations are not found to be accurate; and (d) cross-validate the new Vo(2)max equation using the predicted residual sum of squares (PRESS) statistic and an independent sample of aerobically trained men. One hundred and fifty-two aerobically trained men (Vo(2)max mean +/- SD = 4,154 +/- 629 ml.min(-1)) performed a maximal incremental test on a cycle ergometer to determine actual Vo(2)max. An aerobically trained man was defined as someone who had participated in continuous aerobic exercise 3 or more sessions per week for a minimum of 1 hour per session for at least the past 18 months. Nine previously published Vo(2)max equations were modified for use with aerobically trained men. The predicted Vo(2)max values from the 9 modified equations were compared to actual Vo(2)max by examining the CE, standard error of estimate (SEE), validity coefficient (r), and total error (TE). Cross-validation of the modified non-exercise-based equations on a random subsample of 50 subjects resulted in a %TE > or = 13% of the mean of actual Vo(2)max. Therefore, the following non-exercise-based Vo(2)max equation was derived from a random subsample of 112 subjects: Vo(2)max (ml.min(-1)) = 27.387(weight in kg) + 26.634(height in cm) - 27.572(age in years) + 26.161(h.wk(-1) of training) + 114.904(intensity of training using the Borg 6-20 scale) + 506.752(natural log of years of training) - 4,609.791 (R = 0.82, R(2) adjusted = 0.65, and SEE = 378 ml.min(-1)). Cross-validation of this equation on the remaining sample of 40 subjects resulted in a %TE of 10

  9. Hydrothermal growth of VO2 nanoplate thermochromic films on glass with high visible transmittance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiasong; Li, Jingbo; Chen, Pengwan; Rehman, Fida; Jiang, Yijie; Cao, Maosheng; Zhao, Yongjie; Jin, Haibo

    2016-06-01

    The preparation of thermochromic vanadium dioxide (VO2) films in an economical way is of interest to realizing the application of smart windows. Here, we reported a successful preparation of self-assembly VO2 nanoplate films on TiO2-buffered glass by a facile hydrothermal process. The VO2 films composed of triangle-shaped plates standing on substrates exhibit a self-generated porous structure, which favors the transmission of solar light. The porosity of films is easily controlled by changing the concentration of precursor solutions. Excellent thermochromic properties are observed with visible light transmittance as high as 70.3% and solar modulating efficiency up to 9.3% in a VO2 film with porosity of ~35.9%. This work demonstrates a promising technique to promote the commercial utilization of VO2 in smart windows.

  10. Behaviour, heart rate, and heart rate variability in pigs exposed to novelty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manja Zupan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the present study, we investigated behavioural responses and determined parameters of heart rate variability (HRV to elucidate a relative activation of autonomic nervous system (ANS during baseline (10 min and in response to potentially stressful situations (10 min in two pig breeds and sexes. Gilts (n = 21 and barrows (n = 9 of the Landrace × Yorkshire (LY; n = 15 and Landrace/Yorkshire × Landrace/Duroc (LYLD; n = 15 breeds were subjected to a novel object test (NOT and a novel arena test (NAT. Basal ANS state differed in pigs across breeds but not sexes. Landrace × Yorkshire pigs had a significantly lower basal heart rate (HR and low-frequency band (LF with a higher root mean square of successive interbeat intervals (RMSSD and high-frequency band (HF than LYLD pigs. In the NOT, despite having similar cardiac responses, gilts had a longer duration of contact with a novel object, higher lying and standing duration, and a lower duration of walking compared with barrows. In the NAT, we found similar behaviour across sexes but a different degree of ANS state, with barrows having a significantly higher increase in LF/HF (power of the low frequency component divided by the power of the high-frequency band compared with gilts. Landrace/Yorkshire × Landrace/Duroc pigs showed longer duration of contact with a novel object in the NOT accompanied by less lying and standing than LY pigs in both tests. No difference in ANS activation between breeds was found in the NOT. In the NAT, HR increased more from baseline to testing in LY pigs than in LYLD pigs. There is a complex and often contradictory nature of relationships between behaviour and cardiac responses to novelty in pigs of different breeds and sexes.

  11. Heart rate response at the onset of exercise in an apparently healthy cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagoda, Allison; Myers, Jonathan N; Kaminsky, Leonard A; Whaley, Mitchell H

    2014-01-01

    The exercise test is a powerful non-invasive tool for risk stratifying patients with or suspected of having cardiovascular disease (CVD). Heart rate (HR) response during and following exercise has been extensively studied. However, the clinical utility of HR response at the onset of exercise is less understood. Furthermore, conflicting reports exist regarding whether a faster vs. slower HR acceleration represents a CVD risk marker. The primary study purpose was to describe HR acceleration early in exercise in apparently healthy individuals. Retrospective analyses were performed in a sample (N = 947) representing a range of age and fitness (11-78 years; VO2peak 17-49 mL kg(-1) min(-1)). HR response was defined over the initial 7 min of the protocol. Associations between HR acceleration and CVD risk factors were also assessed. Mean increases in HR were 18 ± 9 and 23 ± 11 beats at minute one, for men and women, respectively (p exercise HR, only modest associations were observed between the change in HR at minute one and body mass index, resting blood pressure, cigarette smoking, physical activity, HR reserve, and cardiorespiratory fitness. There was wide variability in HR acceleration at the onset of exercise in this apparently healthy cohort. A lower increase in HR during the first minute of exercise was associated with a better CVD risk profile, including higher cardiorespiratory fitness, in apparently healthy individuals. These data suggest a greater parasympathetic influence at the onset of exercise may be protective in an asymptomatic population.

  12. Heart rate and lactate responses to taekwondo fight in elite women performers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Cardinale

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine heart rate (HR and blood lactate (LA concentration before, during and after a competitive Tae kwon do (TKD fight performed by elite women performers. Specifically, we were interested to see weather HR and LA responses to competitive fight were greater than to TKD or karate exercises published in scientific literature. Seven international-standard women TKD fighters participated in the study. HR was recorded continuously throughout the fight using Polar Vantage telemetric HR monitors. LA samples were taken before and 3 min after the fight and analysed using an Accusport portable lactate analyzer. At the beginning of the fight, HR significantly increased (p<0.01 from pre-fight values of 91.6±9.9 beats min-1 to 144.1±13.6 beats min-1. During the whole fight the HRmean was 186.6±2.5 beats min-1 and remained significantly elevated (p<0.01 at 3 min into recovery. HR values expressed as a percentage of HRmax averaged during the whole fight at 91.7±2.6% respectively. LA concentration significantly increased (p<0.01 3 min after the fight and averaged 82% of LApeak values measured after the VO2max test. Results of the present study indicate that physiological demands of competitive TKD fight in women, measured by HR and LA responses, are considerably higher than the physiological demands of TKD or karate training exercises. The observed HR and LA responses suggest to us that conditioning for TKD should generally emphasise high-intensity anaerobic exercise.

  13. Energy Expenditure in Playground Games in Primary School Children Measured by Accelerometer and Heart Rate Monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Prieto, Jorge Cañete; Martinez-Vizcaino, Vicente; García-Hermoso, Antonio; Sánchez-López, Mairena; Arias-Palencia, Natalia; Fonseca, Juan Fernando Ortega; Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo

    2017-04-07

    The aim of this study was to examine the energy expenditure (EE) measured using indirect calorimetry (IC) during playground games and to assess the validity of heart rate (HR) and accelerometry counts as indirect indicators of EE in children´s physical activity games. 32 primary school children (9.9 ± 0.6 years old, 19.8 ± 4.9 kg · m(-2) BMI and 37.6 ± 7.2 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1) VO2max). Indirect calorimetry (IC), accelerometry and HR data were simultaneously collected for each child during a 90 min session of 30 playground games. Thirty-eight sessions were recorded in 32 different children. Each game was recorded at least in three occasions in other three children. The inter-subject coefficient of variation within a game was 27% for IC, 37% for accelerometry and 13% for HR. The overall mean EE in the games was 4.2 ± 1.4 kcals · min(-1) per game, totaling to 375 ± 122 kcals/per 90 min/session. The correlation coefficient between indirect calorimetry and accelerometer counts was 0.48 (p=0.026) for endurance games and 0.21 (p=0.574) for strength games. The correlation coefficient between indirect calorimetry and HR was 0.71 (p=0.032) for endurance games and 0.48 (p=0.026) for strength games. Our data indicate that both accelerometer and HR monitors are useful devices for estimating EE during endurance games, but only HR monitors estimates are accurate for endurance games.

  14. Heart Rate Unreliability during Interval Training Recovery in Middle Distance Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocco, Filippo; Sanna, Irene; Mulliri, Gabriele; Magnani, Sara; Todde, Francesco; Mura, Roberto; Ghiani, Giovanna; Concu, Alberto; Melis, Franco; Crisafulli, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Heart rate (HR) was tested as a reliable index for recovery management during interval training (IT), considering its relationship with the several factors involved in respiratory, metabolic and cardiovascular homeostasis. Thirteen runners underwent two different IT sessions: at 80% and 120% of the second ventilatory threshold (VT2). Throughout both sessions HR, oxygen uptake (VO2), carbon dioxide production (VCO2) and pulmonary ventilation (VE), were measured by means of a portable gas analyzer. Carbon dioxide production excess (CO2excess), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), oxygen pulse (OP) and oxygen debt (O2debt) were also estimated. A significant increase in HR values (144 versus 150 beats·min(-1) between the first recovery and the last, p recovery to the last (p recovery at 80% at the VT2 speed (18.3 versus 16.4 mL·beats(-1), p recovery in tests performed at 120% of the VT2 speed (17.8 versus 16.3 mL·beats(-1), p recovery is inaccurate and unfit for training. The phenomenon of cardiac drift to set the restart timing after the repetitions, i.e. by progressively increasing HR values, should be taken into account by coaches. Key pointsDuring an IT session, if recovery time after repetitions is fixed, HR supplies a different indication compared to all the respiratory parameters: HR indicates an incomplete recovery while the other parameters do not.The use of fixed HR values as a reliable index of the established recovery during IT is inaccurate and it may be the cause of under-training.To set the restart timing after repetitions the phenomenon of cardiac drift should be taken into account by coaches.HR drift during recoveries did not appear linked to the CO2excess.

  15. How to Be 80 Year Old and Have a VO2max of a 35 Year Old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trine Karlsen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To discuss the cardiovascular and pulmonary physiology and common risk factors of an 80-year-old man with a world record maximal oxygen uptake of 50 mL·kg−1·min−1. Methods. Case report. Results. His maximal oxygen uptake of 3.31 L·min−1, maximal heart rate of 175 beats·min−1, and maximal oxygen pulse of 19 mL·beats−1 are high. He is lean (66.6 kg and muscular (49% skeletal muscle mass. His echo parameters of mitral flow (left ventricular filling, E = 82 cm·s−1 and E/A = 1.2 were normal for 40- to 60-year-old men. Systolic and diastolic function increased adequately during exercise, with no increase in left ventricular filling pressure. He has excellent pulmonary function (FVC = 4.31 L, FEV1 = 3.41, FEV1/FVC = 0.79, and DLCO = 12.0 Si1 and normal FMD and blood volumes (5.8 L. He has a high level of daily activity (10,900 steps·day−1 and 2:51 hours·day−1 of physical activity and a lifelong history of physical activity. Conclusion. The man is in excellent cardiopulmonary fitness and is highly physically active. His cardiac and pulmonary functions are above expectations for his age, and his VO2max is comparable to that of an inactive 25-year-old and of a normal, active 35-year-old Norwegian man.

  16. Validation of a Ramp Running Protocol for Determination of the True VO2max in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayachi, Mohamed; Niel, Romain; Momken, Iman; Billat, Véronique L.; Mille-Hamard, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    In the field of comparative physiology, it remains to be established whether the concept of VO2max is valid in the mouse and, if so, how this value can be accurately determined. In humans, VO2max is generally considered to correspond to the plateau observed when VO2 no longer rises with an increase in workload. In contrast, the concept of VO2peak tends to be used in murine studies. The objectives of the present study were to determine whether (i) a continuous ramp protocol yielded a higher VO2peak than a stepwise, incremental protocol, and (ii) the VO2peak measured in the ramp protocol corresponded to VO2max. The three protocols (based on intensity-controlled treadmill running until exhaustion with eight female FVB/N mice) were performed in random order: (a) an incremental protocol that begins at 10 m.min−1 speed and increases by 3 m.min−1 every 3 min. (b) a ramp protocol with slow acceleration (3 m.min−2), and (c) a ramp protocol with fast acceleration (12 m.min−2). Each protocol was performed with two slopes (0 and 25°). Hence, each mouse performed six exercise tests. We found that the value of VO2peak was protocol-dependent (p VO2max plateau was associated with the fulfillment of two secondary criteria (a blood lactate concentration >8 mmol.l−1 and a respiratory exchange ratio >1). The total duration of the 3 m.min−2 0° ramp protocol was shorter than that of the incremental protocol. Taken as a whole, our results suggest that VO2max in the mouse is best determined by applying a ramp exercise protocol with slow acceleration and no treadmill slope. PMID:27621709

  17. Effects of ATP-induced leg vasodilation on VO2 peak and leg O2 extraction during maximal exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, J A L; Lundby, C; Sander, M

    2006-01-01

    During maximal whole body exercise VO2 peak is limited by O2 delivery. In turn, it is though that blood flow at near-maximal exercise must be restrained by the sympathetic nervous system to maintain mean arterial pressure. To determine whether enhancing vasodilation across the leg results in higher...... O2 delivery and leg VO2 during near-maximal and maximal exercise in humans, seven men performed two maximal incremental exercise tests on the cycle ergometer. In random order, one test was performed with and one without (control exercise) infusion of ATP (8 mg in 1 ml of isotonic saline solution......) into the right femoral artery at a rate of 80 microg.kg body mass-1.min-1. During near-maximal exercise (92% of VO2 peak), the infusion of ATP increased leg vascular conductance (+43%, P...

  18. Heart rate responses induced by acoustic tempo and its interaction with basal heart rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ken; Ooishi, Yuuki; Kashino, Makio

    2017-01-01

    Many studies have revealed the influences of music on the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Since previous studies focused on the effects of acoustic tempo on the ANS, and humans have their own physiological oscillations such as the heart rate (HR), the effects of acoustic tempo might depend on the HR. Here we show the relationship between HR elevation induced by acoustic tempo and individual basal HR. Since high tempo-induced HR elevation requires fast respiration, which is based on sympatho-respiratory coupling, we controlled the participants’ respiration at a faster rate (20 CPM) than usual (15 CPM). We found that sound stimuli with a faster tempo than the individual basal HR increased the HR. However, the HR increased following a gradual increase in the acoustic tempo only when the extent of the gradual increase in tempo was within a specific range (around + 2%/min). The HR did not follow the increase in acoustic tempo when the rate of the increase in the acoustic tempo exceeded 3% per minute. These results suggest that the effect of the sympatho-respiratory coupling underlying the HR elevation caused by a high acoustic tempo depends on the basal HR, and the strength and the temporal dynamics of the tempo. PMID:28266647

  19. Effects of low calorie diet-induced weight loss on post-exercise heart rate recovery in obese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Maeng Kyu

    2014-06-01

    Heart Rate Recovery (HRR) after maximum exercise is a reactivation function of vagus nerve and an independent risk factor that predicts cardiovascular disease and mortality. Weight loss obtained through dietary programs has been employed as a therapy to reduce risks of cardiovascular disease and obesity. Eighteen subjects of middle aged obese men (age 44.8 ± 1.6 yrs, BMI 29.7 ± 0.5 kg/m(2)) were selected for this study. As a weight loss direction, the nutritional direction of low-calorie diet mainly consisted of carbohydrate, protein, and fat has been conducted for 3 months. Blood pressure was measured after overnight fasting, and blood samples were collected from the antecubital vein before and after weight loss program. All the pre- and post-exercise 'HRR decay constant's were assessed by using values of HRR (heart recovery rate; 2 minutes) and HR measured after reached to the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) exploited the bicycle ergometer. After the completion of weight loss program, body weight and BMI were significantly decreased, but the Heart Rate (HR) after maximum exercise and in steady state were not changed significantly (p > 0.05). The post-exercise HRR after the weight loss did not show significant changes in perspectives of 30 seconds (-16.6 ± 2.3 to -20.2 ± 2.1 beats/min, p > 0.05) and 60 seconds (-33.5 ± 3.4 to -34.6 ± 2.8 beats/min, p > 0.05) respectively but in perspectives of 90 seconds (-40.9 ± 2.6 to -48.1 ± 3.1 beats/min, p exercise, and this improvement in cardiovascular autonomic nerve system was estimated to be involved with improvements in blood glucose and maximal oxygen consumption.

  20. [Typical spontaneous changes in heart rate in pheochromocytoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramann, H U; Zidek, W; Vetter, H; Grosse-Heitmeyer, W

    1985-01-01

    Investigations in 13 hospitalized patients with pheochromocytomata showed peculiar characteristics of heart rate variation at rest, when compared with normals. All patients were given alpha- and beta-sympatholytic drugs. In one case alpha-methyl-Tyrosine caused I-II degree AV blocks and a stable high frequency sinus rate without physiological variations. Resting heart rate in pheochromocytoma varied interindividually from 55-105/min, in the absence of clinical attacks of the underlying disease. The frequency profile was characterized in 12 patients by sudden and inadequate rises of heart rate (200%) of short duration, which were often recorded within 20 seconds of the onset of muscular activity. A similar but less pronounced heart rate modulation was found 1-2 weeks after operation in 3 cases. Our observations indicate that the heart rate profile described may be a sensitive parameter of dysfunction of the autonomous nervous system in pheochromocytoma. Whether the heart rate characteristics are of diagnostic value has to be assessed by further studies.

  1. Acute stress affects heart rate variability during sleep

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hall, Martica; Vasko, Raymond; Buysse, Daniel; Ombao, Hernando; Chen, Qingxia; Cashmere, J David; Kupfer, David; Thayer, Julian F

    2004-01-01

    .... In this study, we used autoregressive spectral analysis of the electrocardiogram (EKG) interbeat interval sequence to characterize stress-related changes in heart rate variability during sleep in 59 healthy men and women. Participants (N = 59...

  2. Arduino-based noise robust online heart-rate detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sangita; Pal, Saurabh; Mitra, Madhuchhanda

    2017-04-01

    This paper introduces a noise robust real time heart rate detection system from electrocardiogram (ECG) data. An online data acquisition system is developed to collect ECG signals from human subjects. Heart rate is detected using window-based autocorrelation peak localisation technique. A low-cost Arduino UNO board is used to implement the complete automated process. The performance of the system is compared with PC-based heart rate detection technique. Accuracy of the system is validated through simulated noisy ECG data with various levels of signal to noise ratio (SNR). The mean percentage error of detected heart rate is found to be 0.72% for the noisy database with five different noise levels.

  3. Method of Discriminant Gravity Tolerance using Heart Rate Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Kiyoko; Takada, Hiroki; Iwase, Satoshi

    When returning on the earth by the space flight, the space deconditioning may be developed. As this countermeasure, the artificial gravity load device using the centrifuge is proposed in the space station. But the gravity load might cause the faint, and safe gravity load is uncertainty. We proposed that discriminate strength of gravity tolerance using heart rate variability time series. Step function was inputted to AR model estimated from heart rate variability time series during rest or under light gravity load, and strength of the gravity tolerance was discriminated by the step response function. On the result, discriminant accuracy was 87.5% by using heart rate variability time series when gravity load of 1.0 G was added to the human lying on the supine. Therefore, possibility of discriminant of gravity tolerance was obtained by using heart rate variability time series when sympathetic hyperactivity. Discriminant of the gravity tolerance is expected before countermeasure of space deconditioning is executed.

  4. Effects of Interval Training Programme on Resting Heart Rate in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of Interval Training Programme on Resting Heart Rate in Subjects ... Results: Findings of the study revealed significant effect of exercise training program on HR. Also, changes in V02max negatively correlated with changes in HR (r= ...

  5. Effects of Interval Training Programme on Resting Heart Rate in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DATONYE ALASIA

    significant effect of exercise training program on HR. Also ... diseases, with a major impact on morbidity and. [1] mortality . ... Type of Article: Original. Page 26 ... Resting Heart Rate in Subjects with Hypertension — Lamina S. et al investigate ...

  6. Continuous measurement of heart rate variability following carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-07-16

    Jul 16, 2010 ... Studies using HRV analysis during positive-pressure ... Keywords: heart rate variability; positive pressure pneumoperitoneum; continuous monitoring. Abstract .... entropy predicts arterial blood pressure fluctuation during the.

  7. Increased heart rate variability but normal resting metabolic rate in hypocretin/orexin-deficient human narcolepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fronczek, R.; Overeem, S.; Reijntjes, R.; Lammers, G.J.; Dijk, J.G.M.; Pijl, H.

    2008-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: We investigated autonomic balance and resting metabolic rate to explore their possible involvement in obesity in hypocretin/orexin-deficient narcoleptic subjects. METHODS: Resting metabolic rate (using indirect calorimetry) and variability in heart rate and blood pressure were

  8. Heart Rate at Hospital Discharge in Patients With Heart Failure Is Associated With Mortality and Rehospitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskey, Warren K.; Alomari, Ihab; Cox, Margueritte; Schulte, Phillip J.; Zhao, Xin; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Heidenreich, Paul A.; Eapen, Zubin J.; Yancy, Clyde; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Fonarow, Gregg C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether heart rate upon discharge following hospitalization for heart failure is associated with long‐term adverse outcomes and whether this association differs between patients with sinus rhythm (SR) and atrial fibrillation (AF) have not been well studied. Methods and Results We conducted a retrospective cohort study from clinical registry data linked to Medicare claims for 46 217 patients participating in Get With The Guidelines®–Heart Failure. Cox proportional‐hazards models were used to estimate the association between discharge heart rate and all‐cause mortality, all‐cause readmission, and the composite outcome of mortality/readmission through 1 year. For SR and AF patients with heart rate ≥75, the association between heart rate and mortality (expressed as hazard ratio [HR] per 10 beats‐per‐minute increment) was significant at 0 to 30 days (SR: HR 1.30, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.39; AF: HR 1.23, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.29) and 31 to 365 days (SR: HR 1.15, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.20; AF: HR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.08). Similar associations between heart rate and all‐cause readmission and the composite outcome were obtained for SR and AF patients from 0 to 30 days but only in the composite outcome for SR patients over the longer term. The HR from 0 to 30 days exceeded that from 31 to 365 days for both SR and AF patients. At heart rates heart failure, higher discharge heart rate was associated with increased risks of death and rehospitalization, with higher risk in the first 30 days and for SR compared with AF. PMID:25904590

  9. Evaluation of Maximal Oxygen Uptake (V02max) and Submaximal Estimates of VO2max Before, During and After Long Duration ISS Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Alan; Evetts, Simon; Feiveson, Alan; Lee, Stuart; McCleary, Frank; Platts, Steven

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Human Research Program Integrated Research Plan (HRP-47065) serves as a road-map identifying critically needed information for future space flight operations (Lunar, Martian). VO2max (often termed aerobic capacity) reflects the maximum rate at which oxygen can be taken up and utilized by the body during exercise. Lack of in-flight and immediate postflight VO2max measurements was one area identified as a concern. The risk associated with not knowing this information is: Unnecessary Operational Limitations due to Inaccurate Assessment of Cardiovascular Performance (HRP-47065).

  10. Age related reference ranges for respiration rate and heart rate from 4 to 16 years

    OpenAIRE

    Wallis, L; Healy, M.; Undy, M; Maconochie, I

    2005-01-01

    Background: Clinical vital signs in children (temperature, heart rate, respiration rate, and blood pressure) are an integral part of clinical assessment of degree of illness or normality. Despite this, only blood pressure and temperature have a reliable evidence base. The accepted ranges of heart and respiration rate vary widely.

  11. Heart rate and activity profile for young female soccer players

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The physical and physiological demands of high-level male soccer have been studied extensively, while few studies have investigated the demands placed on females during match-play, however, there is no information available about the heart rate and activity profile of young female soccer players during match play. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine cardiovascular (heart-rates HR) and physical demands of young female soccer players during a match. Players were observed during a fr...

  12. Accuracy of Heart Rate Watches: Implications for Weight Management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P Wallen

    Full Text Available Wrist-worn monitors claim to provide accurate measures of heart rate and energy expenditure. People wishing to lose weight use these devices to monitor energy balance, however the accuracy of these devices to measure such parameters has not been established.To determine the accuracy of four wrist-worn devices (Apple Watch, Fitbit Charge HR, Samsung Gear S and Mio Alpha to measure heart rate and energy expenditure at rest and during exercise.Twenty-two healthy volunteers (50% female; aged 24 ± 5.6 years completed ~1-hr protocols involving supine and seated rest, walking and running on a treadmill and cycling on an ergometer. Data from the devices collected during the protocol were compared with reference methods: electrocardiography (heart rate and indirect calorimetry (energy expenditure.None of the devices performed significantly better overall, however heart rate was consistently more accurate than energy expenditure across all four devices. Correlations between the devices and reference methods were moderate to strong for heart rate (0.67-0.95 [0.35 to 0.98] and weak to strong for energy expenditure (0.16-0.86 [-0.25 to 0.95]. All devices underestimated both outcomes compared to reference methods. The percentage error for heart rate was small across the devices (range: 1-9% but greater for energy expenditure (9-43%. Similarly, limits of agreement were considerably narrower for heart rate (ranging from -27.3 to 13.1 bpm than energy expenditure (ranging from -266.7 to 65.7 kcals across devices.These devices accurately measure heart rate. However, estimates of energy expenditure are poor and would have implications for people using these devices for weight loss.

  13. Heart rate variability in natural time and 1/f "noise"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlis, N. V.; Skordas, E. S.; Varotsos, P. A.

    2009-07-01

    Several studies have shown that heart rate fluctuations exhibit the ubiquitous 1/f behavior which is altered in desease. Furthermore, the analysis of electrocardiograms in natural time reveals that important malfunctions in the complex system of the human heart can be identified. Here, we present a simple evolution model in natural time that exhibits the 1/fa behavior with a close to unity. The results of this model are consistent with a progressive modification of heart rate variability in healthy children and adolescents. The model results in complexity measures that separate healthy dynamics from patients as well as from sudden cardiac death individuals.

  14. Probability of detection of clinical seizures using heart rate changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Ivan; Manly, B F J

    2015-08-01

    Heart rate-based seizure detection is a viable complement or alternative to ECoG/EEG. This study investigates the role of various biological factors on the probability of clinical seizure detection using heart rate. Regression models were applied to 266 clinical seizures recorded from 72 subjects to investigate if factors such as age, gender, years with epilepsy, etiology, seizure site origin, seizure class, and data collection centers, among others, shape the probability of EKG-based seizure detection. Clinical seizure detection probability based on heart rate changes, is significantly (pprobability of detecting clinical seizures (>0.8 in the majority of subjects) using heart rate is highest for complex partial seizures, increases with a patient's years with epilepsy, is lower for females than for males and is unrelated to the side of hemisphere origin. Clinical seizure detection probability using heart rate is multi-factorially dependent and sufficiently high (>0.8) in most cases to be clinically useful. Knowledge of the role that these factors play in shaping said probability will enhance its applicability and usefulness. Heart rate is a reliable and practical signal for extra-cerebral detection of clinical seizures originating from or spreading to central autonomic network structures. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Inadequate control of heart rate in patients with stable angina: results from the European heart survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daly, C.A.; Clemens, F.; Sendon, J.L.; Tavazzi, L.; Boersma, E.; Danchin, N.; Delahaye, F.; Gitt, A.; Julian, D.; Mulcahy, D.; Ruzyllo, W.; Thygesen, K.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Fox, K.M.

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: To examine resting heart rate (HR) in a population presenting with stable angina in relation to prior and subsequent pharmacological treatment, comorbid conditions and clinical outcome. METHODS AND RESULTS: The European Heart Survey was a prospective, observational, cohort study of 3779 patien

  16. HEART RATE-LOWERING THERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Shalaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspects of heart rate-lowering therapy in patients with chronic heart failure using If-channel blocker ivabradine are discussed. The evidence-based data on ivabradine use reveal its advantages, disadvantages and place in the treatment of cardiac patients.

  17. HEART RATE-LOWERING THERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Shalaev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aspects of heart rate-lowering therapy in patients with chronic heart failure using If-channel blocker ivabradine are discussed. The evidence-based data on ivabradine use reveal its advantages, disadvantages and place in the treatment of cardiac patients.

  18. Hydration status after exercise affect resting metabolic rate and heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Sepulveda, Mauricio; Cerda-Kohler, Hugo; Pérez-Luco, Cristian; Monsalves, Matías; Andrade, David Cristobal; Zbinden-Foncea, Herman; Báez-San Martín, Eduardo; Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo

    2014-12-17

    Heart rate variability and resting metabolic rate are commonly to assess athlete's physiological status and energy requirements. Exercise-induced dehydration can reach up to 5% of body mass per hour. Consequently, dehydration may have a profound physiological effect on human's homeostasis. To compare the effects of dehydration and rehydration after exercise on heart rate variability and resting metabolic rate in college athletes. 14 college athletes were divided into a dehydration group (n=7) and a rehydration group (n=7), both submitted to basal (T1) heart rate variability and resting metabolic rate measurements. After basal measurements both groups were actively dehydrated (-3.4 ± 0.4% of body mass for both groups). Afterwards, dehydration group rested, while rehydration group receive a fluid intake (during a 3 h period) equivalent to 150% of body mass loss achieved during active dehydration. Four hours after active dehydration heart rate variability and resting metabolic rate were re-assessed (T2). At T2 both rehydration group (+13%) and dehydration group (+30%) achieve a significant (prate, however, only dehydration group ..showed a significant reduction in heart rate variability. More so, the change in resting metabolic rate was significantly higher in dehydration group compared to rehydration group. Hydric homeostasis after exercise affects resting metabolic rate and heart rate variability, highlighting the necessity to control hydration state before resting metabolic rate and heart rate variability assessment. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  19. Interrelation between donor and recipient heart rates during exercise after heterotopic cardiac transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Yusuf, S; Mitchell, A; Yacoub, M H

    1985-01-01

    The interrelation between the rates of the innervated recipient heart and the denervated donor heart at rest, on standing, and during the different phases of maximal exercise was studied in nine patients 1-6 months after heterotopic cardiac transplantation. The resting heart rate was significantly higher in the donor heart compared with the recipient heart. Eight of the nine recipient hearts and none of the donor hearts showed an increase in heart rate on standing up. All patients were exerci...

  20. Heart rate, heart rate variability and behaviour of horses during air transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsters, C C B M; de Gooijer, J-W; van den Broek, J; van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, M M Sloet

    2013-01-05

    Heart rate (HR), HR variability (HRV) and behaviour score (BS) of nine horses were evaluated during an eight-hour air transport between The Netherlands and New York. HR and HRV parameters were calculated every five minutes during the air transport. Compared with transit (40±3), mean HRs were higher during loading into the jet stall (67±21, Phorses showed differences in mean HR (P=0.005) and peak HR (Phorses. BS was highest during turbulence (3.2±0.4). However, behaviour did not always correspond with HR measurements: the least responsive horse had the highest HR. Loading into the jet stall caused the highest increase in HR and was considered the most stressful event. During transit, HR was generally comparable with resting rates. Previous studies have shown that loading and transporting by road caused more elevation in HR than during loading and transporting by air. HRV data were not found to be useful, and caution is needed when interpreting HRV data. Not every horse exhibited stress through visible (evasive) behaviour, and HR measurements may provide an additional tool to assess stress in horses.

  1. Curvilinear VO(2):power output relationship in a ramp test in professional cyclists: possible association with blood hemoglobin concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucía, Alejandro; Hoyos, Jesús; Santalla, Alfredo; Pérez, Margarita; Chicharro, José L

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine (1) if there exists an additional, nonlinear increase (DeltaVO(2)) in the oxygen uptake observed (VO2 (obs)) at the maximal power output reached during a ramp cycle ergometer test and that expected (VO2 (exp)) from the linear relationship between VO(2) and power output below the lactate threshold (LT) in professional riders, and (2) the relationship between DeltaVO(2) and possible explanatory mechanisms. Each of 12 professional cyclists (25 +/- 1 years; VO(2 max): 71.3 +/- 1.2 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) performed a ramp test until exhaustion (power output increases of 25 W x min(-1)) during which several gas-exchange and blood variables were measured (including lactate, HCO(3)(-) and K(+)). VO(2) was linearly related to power output until the LT in all subjects. Afterward, a nonlinear deflection was observed in the VO(2):power output relationship (DeltaVO(2) = 2492 +/- 55 ml x min(-1) and p < 0.05 for VO2 (obs) vs. VO2 (exp)). A significant negative correlation was encountered between DeltaVO(2) and resting hemoglobin levels before the tests (r = 20.61; p < 0.05). In conclusion, professional cyclists exhibit an attenuation of the VO(2) rise above the LT.

  2. 1/f scaling in heart rate requires antagonistic autonomic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Hayano, Junichiro; Sakata, Seiichiro; Kwak, Shin; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2004-11-01

    We present systematic evidence for the origins of 1/f -type temporal scaling in human heart rate. The heart rate is regulated by the activity of two branches of the autonomic nervous system: the parasympathetic (PNS) and the sympathetic (SNS) nervous systems. We examine alterations in the scaling property when the balance between PNS and SNS activity is modified, and find that the relative PNS suppression by congestive heart failure results in a substantial increase in the Hurst exponent H towards random-walk scaling 1/f2 and a similar breakdown is observed with relative SNS suppression by primary autonomic failure. These results suggest that 1/f scaling in heart rate requires the intricate balance between the antagonistic activity of PNS and SNS.

  3. A theoretical analysis of factors determining VO2 MAX at sea level and altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, P D

    1996-12-01

    When maximal VO2 (VO2 MAX) is limited by O2 supply, it is generally thought that cardiac output (QT) is mostly responsible, but other O2 transport conductances [ventilation (VA); [Hb]; pulmonary (DLO2) and muscle (DMO2) diffusion capacities] may also influence VO2 MAX. A numerical analysis interactively linking the lungs, circulation and muscles was designed to compare the influences of each conductance component on VO2 MAX at three altitudes: PB = 760, 464 and 253 Torr. For any given set of conductances the analysis simultaneously solved six equations for alveolar, arterial, and venous PO2 and PcO2. The equations represent pulmonary mass balance, pulmonary diffusion, and muscle diffusion for both gases. At PB = 760, [Hb], DLO2 and DMO2 were as influential as QT in limiting VO2 MAX. With increasing altitude, the influence of QT and [Hb] fell while that of VA, DLO2 and DMO2 progressively increased until at PB = 253, VO2 MAX was independent of QT and [Hb]. Neither the fall in maximal QT nor rise in [Hb] with chronic hypoxia therefore appear to affect VO2 MAX. However, high values of ventilation, DLO2 and DMO2 appear to be advantageous for exercise at altitude.

  4. VO2 max is associated with ACE genotype in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagberg, J M; Ferrell, R E; McCole, S D; Wilund, K R; Moore, G E

    1998-11-01

    Relationships have frequently been found between angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) genotype and various pathological and physiological cardiovascular outcomes and functions. Thus we sought to determine whether ACE genotype affected maximal O2 consumption (VO2 max) and maximal exercise hemodynamics in postmenopausal women with different habitual physical activity levels. Age, body composition, and habitual physical activity levels did not differ among ACE genotype groups. However, ACE insertion/insertion (II) genotype carriers had a 6.3 ml . kg-1 . min-1 higher VO2 max (P VO2 max (P VO2 max than the DD genotype group, but the difference was not significant. ACE genotype accounted for 12% of the variation in VO2 max among women after accounting for the effect of habitual physical activity levels. The entire difference in VO2 max among ACE genotype groups was the result of differences in maximal arteriovenous O2 difference (a-vDO2). ACE genotype accounted for 17% of the variation in maximal a-vDO2 in these women. Maximal cardiac output index did not differ whatsoever among ACE genotype groups. Thus it appears that ACE genotype accounts for a significant portion of the interindividual differences in VO2 max among these women. However, this difference is the result of genotype-dependent differences in maximal a-vDO2 and not of maximal stroke volume and maximal cardiac output.

  5. The influence of VO2(B nanobelts on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yifu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of vanadium dioxide VO2(B on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP has not been reported before. In this contribution, the effect of VO2(B nanobelts on the thermal decomposition of AP was investigated by the Thermo- Gravimetric Analysis and Differential Thermal Analysis (TG/DTA. VO2(B nanobelts were hydrothermally prepared using peroxovanadium (V complexes, ethanol and water as starting materials. The thermal decomposition temperatures of AP in the presence of I wt.%, 3 wt.% and 6 wt.% of as-obtained VO2VO2(B nanobelts had a great influence on the thermal decomposition temperature of AP Furthermore, the influence of the corresponding V2Os, which was obtained by thermal treatment of VO2(B nanobelts, on the thermal decomposition of AP was also investigated. The resufs showed that VO2(B nanobelts had a greater influence on the thermal decomposition temperature of AP than that of V2Os.

  6. Are the oxygen uptake and heart rate off-kinetics influenced by the intensity of prior exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento Salvador, Paulo Cesar; de Aguiar, Rafael Alves; Teixeira, Anderson Santiago; Souza, Kristopher Mendes de; de Lucas, Ricardo Dantas; Denadai, Benedito Sérgio; Guglielmo, Luiz Guilherme Antonacci

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of prior exercise on the heart rate (HR) and oxygen uptake (VO2) off-kinetics after a subsequent high-intensity running exercise. Thirteen male futsal players (age 22.8±6.1years) performed a series of high-intensity bouts without prior exercise (control), preceded by a prior same intensity continuous exercise (CE+CE) and a prior sprint exercise (SE+CE). The magnitude of excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOCm-4.25±0.19 vs. 3.69±0.20Lmin(-1) in CE+CE and 3.62±0.18Lmin(-1) in control; pheart rate time-course (HRτ-86±5s) were significantly longer after the SE+CE condition than control transition (48±2s and 69±5s, respectively; pincrease the total energy expenditure following an exercise session. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. DETECTING CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE USING HEART RATE SEQUENTIAL TREND ANALYSIS PLOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SRINIVAS KUNTAMALLA,

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability analysis is gaining acceptance as a potential non-invasive means of autonomic nervous system assessment in research as well as clinical domains. In this study, a nonlinear analysis method is developed to detect congestive heart failure. The data obtained from an online and widely used public database (i.e., MIT/BIH physionet database, is used for testing the performance of the method. The method developed is based on the sequential trend analysis plot of heart rate variability and correlates well with the characteristic autonomic nervous system regulations in congestive heart failure. The proposed method can be used for screening as well as diagnosing the heart failure patients. The algorithm is computationally simple and can be implemented in a real time processing hardware. This method classifies 31 out of 32 subjects and has the highest discrimination power in terms of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy.

  8. VO(2) based waveguide-mode plasmonic nano-gratings for optical switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Yashna; Tiruveedhula, Veeranjaneya A; Muth, John F; Dhawan, Anuj

    2015-03-09

    In this paper, we present one dimensional plasmonic narrow groove nano-gratings, covered with a thin film of VO(2) (Vanadium Dioxide), as novel optical switches. These narrow groove gratings couple the incident optical radiation to plasmonic waveguide modes leading to high electromagnetic fields in the gaps between the nano-gratings. Since VO(2) changes from its semiconductor to its metallic phase on heating, on exposure to infra-red light, or on application of voltage, the optical properties of the underlying plasmonic grating also get altered during this phase transition, thereby resulting in significant switchability of the reflectance spectra. Moreover, as the phase transition in VO(2) can occur at femto-second time-scales, the VO(2)-coated plasmonic optical switch described in this paper can potentially be employed for ultrafast optical switching. We aim at maximizing this switchability, i.e., maximizing the differential reflectance (DR) between the two states (metallic and semiconductor) of this VO(2) coated nano-grating. Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) reveals that the switching wavelengths - i.e., the wavelengths at which the values of the differential reflectance between VO(2) (S) and VO(2) (M) phases are maximum - can be tuned over a large spectral regime by varying the nano-grating parameters such as groove width, depth of the narrow groove, grating width, and thickness of the VO(2) layer. A comparison of the proposed ideal nano-gratings with various types of non-ideal nano-gratings - i.e., nano-gratings with non-parallel sidewalls - has also been carried out. It is found that significant switchability is also present for these non-ideal gratings that are easy to fabricate. Thus, we propose highly switchable and wide-spectra VO(2) based narrow groove nano-gratings that do not have a complex structure and can be easily fabricated.

  9. Effects of high-intensity interval training on the VO2 response during severe exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Rob; Edge, Johann; Bishop, David

    2006-06-01

    This study examined the effect of high-intensity interval training on the VO2 response during severe, constant-load exercise. Prior to, and following training, 10 females (V O2 peak 37.4+/-6.0 mL kg-1 min-1) performed a graded exercise test to determine VO2 peak and lactate threshold (LT) and a 6 min cycle test (CT) at the pre-training VO2 peak intensity. Training involved high-intensity intervals (2 min work, 1 min rest) performed 3x week for 8 weeks. Breath-by-breath data from 0 to 6 min during the CT were smoothed using 5s averages and fit to a bi-exponential model starting from 20s. Training resulted in significant improvements in VO2 max (2.34+/-0.37-2.78+/-0.30 L min-1), power at VO2 max (170+/-26-204+/-25 W) and power at LT (113+/-17-136+/-20 W) (pVO2 response showed a significant increase in the amplitude of the primary phase (A1) (1396+/-103-1695+/-100 mL min-1; pVO2 (VO2 EE), with no difference (p>0.05) in the time constants of either phase or the amplitude of the slow component (318+/-67-380+/-48 mL; p=0.15). In conjunction, accumulated oxygen deficit (AOD) (43.7+/-9.8-17.2+/-2.8 mL O2 eq kg-1) and anaerobic contribution to the CT (19.4+/-4.4-7.2+/-1.2%) were significantly reduced. In contrast to previous moderate-intensity research, a high-intensity interval training program increased A1 and VO2 EE for the same absolute exercise intensity, decreasing the AOD during a severe-intensity CT.

  10. Expression of VO2peak in Children and Youth, with Special Reference to Allometric Scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftin, Mark; Sothern, Melinda; Abe, Takashi; Bonis, Marc

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this review was to highlight research that has focused on examining expressions of peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) in children and youth, with special reference to allometric scaling. VO2peak is considered the highest VO2 during an increasing workload treadmill or bicycle ergometer test until volitional termination. We have reviewed scholarly works identified from PubMed, One Search, EBSCOhost and Google Scholar that examined VO2peak in absolute units (L·min(-1)), relative units [body mass, fat-free mass (FFM)], and allometric expressions [mass, height, lean body mass (LBM) or LBM of the legs raised to a power function] through July 2015. Often, the objective of measuring VO2peak is to evaluate cardiorespiratory function and fitness level. Since body size (body mass and height) frequently vary greatly in children and youth, expressing VO2peak in dimensionless units is often inappropriate for comparative or explanatory purposes. Consequently, expressing VO2peak in allometric units has gained increased research attention over the past 2 decades. In our review, scaling mass was the most frequent variable employed, with coefficients ranging from approximately 0.30 to over 1.0. The wide variance is probably due to several factors, including mass, height, LBM, sex, age, physical training, and small sample size. In summary, we recommend that since skeletal muscle is paramount for human locomotion, an allometric expression of VO2peak relative to LBM is the best expression of VO2peak in children and youth.

  11. Theoretical investigation of the optical and EPR parameters for VO 2+ion in some complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfaoğlu, Emel; Karabulut, Bünyamin

    2012-04-01

    The molecular orbital coefficients and the EPR parameters of trisodium citrate dihydrate, sodium hydrogen oxalate monohydrate, potassium d-gluconate monohydrate and L-Alanine vanadyl complexes are calculated theoretically. Two d-d transition spectra and EPR parameters for the VO2+ complex are calculated theoretically by using crystal-field theory. The calculated g and A paramaters have indicated that paramagnetic center is axially symmetric. Having the relations of g∥A⊥ for VO2+ ions, it can be concluded that VO2+ ions are located in distorted octahedral sites (C4v) elongated along the z-axis and the ground state of the paramagnetic electron is dxy.

  12. Inhomogeneous electronic state near the insulator-to-metal transition in the correlated oxide VO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, A.; Qazilbash, M. M.; Brehm, M.; Chae, Byung-Gyu; Kim, Bong-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Tak; Balatsky, A. V.; Keilmann, F.; Basov, D. N.

    2009-09-01

    We investigate the percolative insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) in films of the correlated material vanadium dioxide (VO2) . Scattering-type scanning near-field infrared microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to explore the relationship between the nucleation of metallic regions and the topography in insulating VO2 . We demonstrate that the IMT begins within 10 nm from grain boundaries and crevices by using mean curvature and statistical analysis. We also observe coexistence of insulating and metallic domains in a single crystalline grain that points to intrinsic inhomogeneity in VO2 due to competing electronic phases in the IMT regime.

  13. VV and VO2 defects in silicon studied with hybrid density functional theory

    KAUST Repository

    Christopoulos, Stavros Richard G

    2014-12-07

    The formation of VO (A-center), VV and VO2 defects in irradiated Czochralski-grown silicon (Si) is of technological importance. Recent theoretical studies have examined the formation and charge states of the A-center in detail. Here we use density functional theory employing hybrid functionals to analyze the formation of VV and VO2 defects. The formation energy as a function of the Fermi energy is calculated for all possible charge states. For the VV and VO2 defects double negatively charged and neutral states dominate, respectively.

  14. Influence of prior exercise on VO2 kinetics subsequent exhaustive rowing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ana; Ribeiro, João; Sousa, Marisa; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo; Fernandes, Ricardo J

    2014-01-01

    Prior exercise has the potential to enhance subsequent performance by accelerating the oxygen uptake (VO2) kinetics. The present study investigated the effects of two different intensities of prior exercise on pulmonary VO2 kinetics and exercise time during subsequent exhaustive rowing exercise. It was hypothesized that in prior heavy, but not prior moderate exercise condition, overall VO2 kinetics would be faster and the VO2 primary amplitude would be higher, leading to longer exercise time at VO2max. Six subjects (mean ± SD; age: 22.9±4.5 yr; height: 181.2±7.1 cm and body mass: 75.5±3.4 kg) completed square-wave transitions to 100% of VO2max from three different conditions: without prior exercise, with prior moderate and heavy exercise. VO2 was measured using a telemetric portable gas analyser (K4b(2), Cosmed, Rome, Italy) and the data were modelled using either mono or double exponential fittings. The use of prior moderate exercise resulted in a faster VO2 pulmonary kinetics response (τ1 = 13.41±3.96 s), an improved performance in the time to exhaustion (238.8±50.2 s) and similar blood lactate concentrations ([La(-)]) values (11.8±1.7 mmol.L(-1)) compared to the condition without prior exercise (16.0±5.56 s, 215.3±60.1 s and 10.7±1.2 mmol.L(-1), for τ1, time sustained at VO2max and [La(-)], respectively). Performance of prior heavy exercise, although useful in accelerating the VO2 pulmonary kinetics response during a subsequent time to exhaustion exercise (τ1 = 9.18±1.60 s), resulted in a shorter time sustained at VO2max (155.5±46.0 s), while [La(-)] was similar (13.5±1.7 mmol.L(-1)) compared to the other two conditions. Although both prior moderate and heavy exercise resulted in a faster pulmonary VO2 kinetics response, only prior moderate exercise lead to improved rowing performance.

  15. Sport-specific fitness testing differentiates professional from amateur soccer players where VO2max and VO2 kinetics do not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, C M; Edwards, A M; Winter, E M; Fysh, M L; Drust, B

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify if sport-specific and cardiopulmonary exercise testing differentiated professional from amateur soccer players. Thirty six men comprising 18 professional (mean±s: age 23.2±2.4 years) and 18 amateur (mean±SD: age 21.1±1.6 years) soccer players participated and performed four tests on separate occasions: 1) a graded exercise test to determine VO2max; 2) four exercise transients from walking to 80%Δ for the determination of VO2 kinetics; 3) the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test level 2 (Yo-Yo IR2) and 4) a repeated sprint test (RST). The players did not differ in VO2max (professional 56.5±2.9 mL.kg-1.min-1; amateur 55.7±3.5 mL.kg-1.min-1: P=0.484) or VO2 kinetic fundamental measures (τ1 onset, professional 24.5±3.2 s; amateur 24.0±1.8 s: τ1 cessation, professional 28.7±2.8 s; amateur 29.3±3.5 s: P=0.923). However, the amateurs were outperformed in the Yo-Yo IR2 (Professional 966±153 m; Amateur 840±156 m) (P=0.034) and RST (best time, professional 6.46±0.27 s; amateur 6.84±0.24 s, P=0.012). Performance indices derived from field-based sport-specific performance tests identified significant differences between professional and amateur players (Ptests of VO2 kinetics nor VO2max differentiated between groups, suggesting laboratory tests of cardiorespiratory parameters are probably less consequential to soccer than sport-specific field-based observations.

  16. Heart rate variability and heart rate turbulence in mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Ugur; Ozdemir, Murat; Kocaman, Sinan Altan; Balcioglu, Serhat; Cemri, Mustafa; Cengel, Atiye

    2008-12-01

    To study heart rate (HR) variability and HR turbulence parameters in mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis (AS) and to disclose whether any relationship exists between these parameters and echocardiographic findings. Forty-three asymptomatic patients with mild-to-moderate AS (AS group) were studied. Echocardiographic parameters and HR variability and HR turbulence indices obtained over 24 Holter ECG recordings were compared with those of an age and sex matched control population free of cardiovascular disease. Correlation between echocardiographic findings and HR variability and HR turbulence indices was also studied in the AS group. All HR variability parameters except mean RR interval, RMSSD, and pNN50 and one HR turbulence parameter, turbulence onset, were significantly disturbed in the AS group. Echocardiographic findings of diastolic dysfunction had significant correlations with HR variability and HR turbulence parameters in AS patients. Symphatovagal imbalance as shown by disturbed HR variability and HR turbulence parameters was demonstrated for the first time in patients with mild-to-moderate AS. This imbalance, which was shown to be correlated with echocardiographic findings of diastolic dysfunction, may lead to arrhythmic complications in this seemingly low-risk patient population.

  17. Impact of age and basic heart rate on heart rate turbulence in healthy persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Jörg Otto; Eichner, Gerrit; Shlevkov, Nikolay; Schrickel, Jan; Yang, Alexander; Balta, Osman; Lewalter, Thorsten; Lüderitz, Berndt

    2005-01-01

    Postextrasystolic acceleration of heart rate (HR), known as HR turbulence (HRT) is attenuated in patients with coronary artery disease at increased risk of adverse events. The influence of age and basic HR on HRT have not been evaluated in a large cohort of persons. In 95 healthy individuals, HRT onset (TO) and slope (TS) were calculated from 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiograms, as well as the turbulence timing (TT). Gender specific differences in TO and TS were compared in simple, linear, weighted regression model. The influence of age and the basic HR preceding ventricular premature contractions on HRT were examined. We found that, in men and women, TO decreases as basic HR increases (P men, TS decreased as basic HR increases, whereas in women, basic HR influenced TS only slightly (P linear regression model revealed a decrease in HRT with increasing age in men. In conclusion, physiological acceleration of the HR within the first 11 beats after premature ventricular complex (VPC) was observed in >75% of healthy individuals. An accelerating HR preceding the VPC influenced HRT in men. An increasing age was associated with a decrease in HRT in men and a decrease in TO in women. These results illustrate the importance of physiological modulations of HRT when used for risk stratification, especially in older populations.

  18. HEART-RATE-VARIABILITY IN LEFT-VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION AND HEART-FAILURE - EFFECTS AND IMPLICATIONS OF DRUG-TREATMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TUININGA, YS; VANVELDHUISEN, DJ; BROUWER, J; HAAKSMA, J; CRIJNS, HJGM; MANINTVELD, AJ; LIE, KI

    1994-01-01

    Objective-To review the importance of heart rate variability analysis in left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure and to assess the effects of drug treatment. In patients with left: ventricular dysfunction or heart failure, a low heart rate variability is a strong predictor of a low probabilit

  19. Comparison of Estimations Versus Measured Oxygen Consumption at Rest in Patients With Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction Who Underwent Right-Sided Heart Catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Paul J; Davis, Paul G; Wideman, Laurie; Starnes, Joseph W; Schulz, Mark R; Bensimhon, Daniel R

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac output during right-sided heart catheterization is an important variable for patient selection of advanced therapies (cardiac transplantation and left ventricular assist device implantation). The Fick method to determine cardiac output is commonly used and typically uses estimated oxygen consumption (VO2) from 1 of 3 published empirical formulas. However, these estimation equations have not been validated in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The objectives of the present study were to determine the accuracy of 3 equations for estimating VO2 compared with direct measurement of VO2 and determine the extent clinically significant error occurred in calculating cardiac output of patients with HFrEF. Breath-by-breath measurements of VO2 from 44 patients who underwent cardiac catheterization (66% men; age, 65 ± 11 years, left ventricular ejection fraction, 22 ± 6%) were compared with the derived estimations of LaFarge and Miettinen, Dehmer et al, and Bergstra et al. Single-sample t tests found only the mean difference between the estimation of LaFarge and Miettinen and the measured VO2 to be nonsignificant (-10.3 ml/min ± 6.2 SE, p = 0.053). Bland-Altman plots demonstrated unacceptably large limits of agreement for all equations. The rate of ≥25% error in the equations by LaFarge and Miettinen, Dehmer et al, and Bergstra et al occurred in 11%, 23%, and 45% of patients, respectively. Misclassification of cardiac index derived from each equation for 2 clinically important classifications: cardiogenic shock-21%, 23%, and 32% and hypoperfusion-16%, 16%, and 25%; respectively. In conclusion, these findings do not support the use of these empiric formulas to estimate the VO2 at rest in patients with HFrEF who underwent right-sided heart catheterization.

  20. Heart Rate Variability in Male Sexual Arousal and Erectile Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-22

    Ali Weinstein has provided much assistance with statistics and conceptual ideas. Current and past members of the Sbrocco lab (Laurel Cofell, Andrew ...1995; Stein, Bosner, Kleiger, & Conger , 1994; Task Force, 1996). Time Domain Analyses of HRV There are two methods of time domain analysis (Cohen...Bosner, M. S., Kleiger, R. E., & Conger , B. M. (1994). Heart rate variability: A measure of cardiac autonomic tone. Am Heart J, 127(5), 1376-1381

  1. Quantification of fetal heart rate regularity using symbolic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, P.; Cysarz, D.; Lange, S.; Geue, D.; Groenemeyer, D.

    2007-03-01

    Fetal heart rate complexity was examined on the basis of RR interval time series obtained in the second and third trimester of pregnancy. In each fetal RR interval time series, short term beat-to-beat heart rate changes were coded in 8bit binary sequences. Redundancies of the 28 different binary patterns were reduced by two different procedures. The complexity of these sequences was quantified using the approximate entropy (ApEn), resulting in discrete ApEn values which were used for classifying the sequences into 17 pattern sets. Also, the sequences were grouped into 20 pattern classes with respect to identity after rotation or inversion of the binary value. There was a specific, nonuniform distribution of the sequences in the pattern sets and this differed from the distribution found in surrogate data. In the course of gestation, the number of sequences increased in seven pattern sets, decreased in four and remained unchanged in six. Sequences that occurred less often over time, both regular and irregular, were characterized by patterns reflecting frequent beat-to-beat reversals in heart rate. They were also predominant in the surrogate data, suggesting that these patterns are associated with stochastic heart beat trains. Sequences that occurred more frequently over time were relatively rare in the surrogate data. Some of these sequences had a high degree of regularity and corresponded to prolonged heart rate accelerations or decelerations which may be associated with directed fetal activity or movement or baroreflex activity. Application of the pattern classes revealed that those sequences with a high degree of irregularity correspond to heart rate patterns resulting from complex physiological activity such as fetal breathing movements. The results suggest that the development of the autonomic nervous system and the emergence of fetal behavioral states lead to increases in not only irregular but also regular heart rate patterns. Using symbolic dynamics to

  2. Short duration of music modify the heart rate variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namrata Upadhayay

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are contradictory findings regarding the effect of music on heart rate variability. Reports mention that the music increases the parasympathetic markers of heart rate variability. While some report no change in it. Method: We set out to study the acute effect of music on heart rate variability in 15 healthy male medical students of age 20-36 years. Their resting heart rate variability in eyes closed state for five minutes was recorded thrice: once without listening music, secondly during listening instrumental music for five minutes and thirdly after listening it. Their subjective feeling regarding music and its influence on the brain were documented. Data was compared using the Friedman test followed by Wilcoxon-signed rank test, considering P significant at ≤ 0.05. Results: The mean respiratory rate was significantly higher during music as compared to before listening it. There was a significantly higher HF power after listening to music than during listening it [703.5 (247.25-1195 > 529 (213-699, p=0.026]. As well as, the total power of heart rate variability was significantly higher after music listening as compared to before listening it [2472.5 (1351-4178.75 > 2147.5 (1072.5-3208.25, p=0.035]. All participants felt that they were relaxed during and after the short music session. Conclusions: The instrumental-soft relaxing music for short duration (five minutes can increase the parasympathetic activity of the heart. The effect of music on vagus supply to the heart remains in higher level even after over of music. It makes people feel relaxed and helps to minimize their stress instantly in their working place.

  3. Why is VO2 max after altitude acclimatization still reduced despite normalization of arterial O2 content?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, J A L; Boushel, Robert Christopher; Radegran, G

    2003-01-01

    Acute hypoxia (AH) reduces maximal O2 consumption (VO2 max), but after acclimatization, and despite increases in both hemoglobin concentration and arterial O2 saturation that can normalize arterial O2 concentration ([O2]), VO2 max remains low. To determine why, seven lowlanders were studied at VO2...

  4. Arterial blood pressure and heart rate regulation in shock state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaVolpe, Jeffrey D; Moore, Jason E; Pinsky, Michael R

    2015-10-01

    Circulatory shock is a complicated problem that carries a high risk of complications and mortality for critically ill patients. The heart rate and blood pressure targets to which a patient in shock should be resuscitated remain a challenge to intensivists. While the ideal blood pressure and heart rate in circulatory shock are still not definitive, recent studies have begun to refine these targets. A recent trial comparing a mean arterial pressure target of 80-85 mmHg with a target of 65-70 mmHg showed no difference in mortality, with a decreased need for renal replacement therapy in patients with pre-existing hypertension based on subgroup analysis. Regulation of heart rate was defined by a trial demonstrating that heart rate control in patients with severe sepsis on high-dose norepinephrine with esmolol titration did not result in additional adverse events. The ideal target blood pressure in the resuscitation of circulatory shock is variable and likely depends on prior blood pressure. Heart rate regulation with β-blockade appears to be safe in selected patients when accompanied by adequate resuscitation and monitoring.

  5. Concurrent validity of the Armour39 heart rate monitor strap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Shawn D; Comstock, Brett A; Dupont, William H; Sterczala, Adam R; Looney, Dave P; Dombrowski, Dylan H; McDermott, Danielle M; Bryce, Alexander; Maladouangdock, Jesse; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Luk, Hui-Ying; Szivak, Tunde K; Hooper, David R; Kraemer, William J

    2014-03-01

    New technology offers potential advantages in physically demanding environments where convenience and comfort are important and accurate and reliable data collection is challenging. Nevertheless, it is important to validate the accuracy and reliability of such biological monitoring systems (BMS) before they are adopted. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the concurrent validity of a new heart rate monitor across a range of exercise intensities and with a large and diverse group of male subjects in a large cohort with diverse physical fitness characteristics. Seventy-five men (age, 23 ± 4 years; height, 181 ± 8 cm; body mass, 83 ± 12 kg; estimated V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak, 3.16 ± 0.63 [L·min]) volunteered and completed a graded cycle ergometer exercise protocol while heart rate was continuously monitored before, during, and after exercise with the new device (Armour39) and the gold standard (electrocardiogram). The 2-minute stages included sitting, standing, and cycling with 35 W increments until volitional fatigue. The coefficient of determination between mean heart rate values at each stage was R = 0.99, whereas Pearson correlations (r) at each stage were ≥ 0.99. Heart rates during exercise were typically within 1 beat of each other. The Armour39 BMS, therefore, is an acceptable means for the valid and reliable determination of heart rate under various bodily positions and levels of exertion, including maximal exercise intensity.

  6. AUTONOMIC CONTROL OF HEART RATE AFTER EXERCISE IN TRAINED WRESTLERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez, San Martín E.; Von Oetinger, A.; Cañas, Jamett R.; Ramírez, Campillo R.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish differences in vagal reactivation, through heart rate recovery and heart rate variability post exercise, in Brazilian jiu-jitsu wrestlers (BJJW). A total of 18 male athletes were evaluated, ten highly trained (HT) and eight moderately trained (MT), who performed a maximum incremental test. At the end of the exercise, the R-R intervals were recorded during the first minute of recovery. We calculated heart rate recovery (HRR60s), and performed linear and non-linear (standard deviation of instantaneous beat-to-beat R-R interval variability – SD1) analysis of heart rate variability (HRV), using the tachogram of the first minute of recovery divided into four segments of 15 s each (0-15 s, 15-30 s, 30-45 s, 45-60 s). Between HT and MT individuals, there were statistically significant differences in HRR60s (p <0.05) and in the non linear analysis of HRV from SD130-45s (p <0.05) and SD145-60s (p <0.05). The results of this research suggest that heart rate kinetics during the first minute after exercise are related to training level and can be used as an index for autonomic cardiovascular control in BJJW. PMID:24744476

  7. Effect of Selective Heart Rate Slowing in Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Nikhil; Sivaswamy, Nadiya; Mahmod, Masliza; Yavari, Arash; Rudd, Amelia; Singh, Satnam; Dawson, Dana K; Francis, Jane M; Dwight, Jeremy S; Watkins, Hugh; Neubauer, Stefan; Frenneaux, Michael; Ashrafian, Houman

    2015-11-03

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality but is currently refractory to therapy. Despite limited evidence, heart rate reduction has been advocated, on the basis of physiological considerations, as a therapeutic strategy in HFpEF. We tested the hypothesis that heart rate reduction improves exercise capacity in HFpEF. We conducted a randomized, crossover study comparing selective heart rate reduction with the If blocker ivabradine at 7.5 mg twice daily versus placebo for 2 weeks each in 22 symptomatic patients with HFpEF who had objective evidence of exercise limitation (peak oxygen consumption at maximal exercise [o2 peak] change in o2 peak. Secondary outcomes included tissue Doppler-derived E/e' at echocardiography, plasma brain natriuretic peptide, and quality-of-life scores. Ivabradine significantly reduced peak heart rate compared with placebo in the HFpEF (107 versus 129 bpm; Pchange in o2 peak in the HFpEF cohort (-2.1 versus 0.9 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1); P=0.003) and significantly reduced submaximal exercise capacity, as determined by the oxygen uptake efficiency slope. No significant effects on the secondary end points were discernable. Our observations bring into question the value of heart rate reduction with ivabradine for improving symptoms in a HFpEF population characterized by exercise limitation. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02354573. © 2015 The Authors.

  8. Modeling baroreflex regulation of heart rate during orthostatic stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olufsen, Mette; Tran, Hien T.; Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2006-01-01

    . The model uses blood pressure measured in the finger as an input to model heart rate dynamics in response to changes in baroreceptor nerve firing rate, sympathetic and parasympathetic responses, vestibulo-sympathetic reflex, and concentrations of norepinephrine and acetylcholine. We formulate an inverse...

  9. The Use of Heart Rate Monitors in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Randall; Davis, Kathryn L.; McCord, Tim; Schmidt, Dave; Slezak, Alex M.

    2009-01-01

    The ever-rising rate of obesity and the need for increased physical activity for young children is well documented. Data suggests that today's youth are not participating in enough quality health-enhancing physical activity either in or outside of school. Heart rate monitors have been used by adult exercisers for many years to monitor and assess…

  10. Heart rate-based lactate minimum test: a reproducible method.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strupler, M.; Muller, G.; Perret, C.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To find the individual intensity for aerobic endurance training, the lactate minimum test (LMT) seems to be a promising method. LMTs described in the literature consist of speed or work rate-based protocols, but for training prescription in daily practice mostly heart rate is used. The

  11. Heart rate-based lactate minimum test: a reproducible method.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strupler, M.; Muller, G.; Perret, C.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To find the individual intensity for aerobic endurance training, the lactate minimum test (LMT) seems to be a promising method. LMTs described in the literature consist of speed or work rate-based protocols, but for training prescription in daily practice mostly heart rate is used. The ai

  12. Optimization of pharmacotherapy in chronic heart failure: is heart rate adequately addressed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Jennifer; Wolter, Jan Sebastian; Meme, Lillian; Keppler, Jeannette; Tschierschke, Ramon; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the use of beta-blockers in chronic heart failure (CHF) and the extent of heart rate reduction achieved in clinical practice and to determine differences in outcome of patients who fulfilled select inclusion criteria of the SHIFT study according to resting heart rate modulated by beta-blocker therapy. We evaluated an all-comer population of our dedicated CHF outpatient clinic between 2006 and 2010. For inclusion, individually optimized doses of guideline-recommended pharmacotherapy including beta-blockers had to be maintained for at least 3 months and routine follow-up performed at our outpatient CHF-clinic thereafter. Treatment dosages of beta-blockers, and demographic and clinical profiles including resting heart rate were assessed. The outcome of patients who fulfilled select inclusion criteria of the SHIFT study (left-ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤35 %, sinus rhythm, NYHA II-IV) and were followed-up for at least 1 year was stratified according to resting heart rates: ≥75 versus <75 bpm and ≥70 versus <70 bpm. The composite primary endpoint was defined as all-cause death or hospital admission for worsening heart failure during 12-month follow-up. In total, 3,181 patients were assessed in regard to treatment dosages of beta-blockers, and demographic and clinical profiles including resting heart rate. Of the overall studied population, 443 patients fulfilled all inclusion criteria and entered outcome analysis. Median observation time of survivors was 27.5 months with 1,039.7 observation-years in total. Up-titration to at least half the evidence-based target dose of beta-blockers was achieved in 69 % and full up-titration in 29 % of these patients. Patients with increased heart rates were younger, more often male, exhibited a higher NYHA functional class and lower LVEF. The primary endpoint occurred in 21 % of patients in the ≥70 bpm group versus 9 % of patients in the group with heart rates <70

  13. Heart rate and heart rate variability in pregnant dairy cows and their fetuses determined by fetomaternal electrocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenk, Lisa; Kuhl, Juliane; Aurich, Jörg; Aurich, Christine; Nagel, Christina

    2015-11-01

    In this study, fetomaternal electrocardiograms were recorded once weekly in cattle during the last 14 weeks of gestation. From the recorded beat-to-beat (RR) intervals, heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV) variables standard deviation of the RR interval (SDRR) and root mean square of successive RR differences (RMSSD) were calculated. To differentiate between effects of lactation and gestation, pregnant lactating (PL) cows (n = 7) and pregnant nonlactating (PNL) heifers (n = 8) were included. We hypothesized that lactation is associated with stress detectable by HRV analysis. We also followed the hypothesis that heart rate and HRV are influenced by growth and maturation of the fetus toward term. Maternal heart rate changed over time in both groups, and in PL cows, it decreased with drying-off. During the last 5 weeks of gestation, maternal heart rate increased in both groups but was lower in PL cows than in PNL heifers. Maternal HRV did not change over time, but SDRR was significantly higher in PL cows than in PNL heifers, and significant interactions of group × time existed. On the basis of HRV, undisturbed pregnancies are thus no stressor for the dam in cattle. Fetal heart rate decreased from week 14 to week 1 before birth with no difference between groups. Gestational age thus determines heart rate in the bovine fetus. The HRV variables SDRR and RMSSD increased toward the end of gestation in fetuses carried by cows but not in those carried by heifers. The increase in HRV indicates maturation of fetal cardiac regulation which may be overrun by high sympathoadrenal activity in fetuses carried by heifers as suggested by their low HRV.

  14. Heart Rate Responses to Unaided Orion Side Hatch Egress in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Kirk L.; Hwang Emma Y.; Ryder, Jeffrey W.; Kelly, Cody; Walker, Thomas; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is developing the Orion capsule as a vehicle for transporting crewmembers to and from the International Space Station (ISS) and for future human space exploration missions. Orion and other commercial vehicles are designed to splash down in the ocean where nominally support personnel will assist crewmembers in egressing the vehicle. However, off-nominal scenarios will require crewmembers to egress the vehicle unaided, deploy survival equipment, and ingress a life raft. PURPOSE: To determine the heart rate (HR) responses to unaided Orion side hatch egress and raft ingress as a part of the NASA Crew Survival Engineering Team's evaluation of the PORT Orion mockup in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL). METHODS: Nineteen test subjects, including four astronauts (N=19, 14 males/5 females, 38.6+/-8.4 y, 174.4+/-9.6 cm, 75.7+/-13.1 kg), completed a graded maximal test on a cycle ergometer to determine VO2peak and HRpeak and were divided into five crews of four members each; one subject served on two crews. Each crew was required to deploy a life raft, egress the Orion vehicle from the side hatch, and ingress the life raft with two 8 kg emergency packs per crew. Each crew performed this activity one to three times; a total of ten full egresses were completed. Subjects wore a suit that was similar in form, mass, and function to the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES) including helmet, gloves, boots, supplemental O2 bottles, and a CO2-inflated life preserver (approx.18 kg); subjects began each trial seated supine in the PORT Orion mockup with seat belts and mockup O2 and communication connections and ended each trial with all four crewmembers inside the life raft. RESULTS: VO2peak was 40.8+/-6.8 mL/kg/min (3.1+/-0.7 L/min); HRpeak was 181+/-10 bpm. Total egress time across trials was 5.0+/-1.6 min (range: 2.8-8.0 min); all subjects were able to successfully complete all trials. Average maximum HR at activity start, at the hatch opening, in the water, and in the

  15. EVALUATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE VO2 OF ATHLETES THAT ATTEND A SOCCER SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Bittencourt Oliveira

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to identify the effects from technical and physical activities on the VO2, of male athletes aged 14 to 15, participants of a soccer school, in the municipality of Rio Pardo - RS. The semi-experimental research involved 10 male adolescents. For the VO2 evaluation the 12 minute Cooper test was used. Interval-training work was applied, at which the athletes exercised 75% of their maximum speed, in 60-meter runs. After training for two months (at least two sessions a week the Cooper post-test was applied to check the improvement of the VO2. As results of this study, we can draw the conclusion that all adolescents involved in this training showed considerable improvement in their maximum VO2, especially the 15-year-old teens, who managed to obtain a much higher percentage level.