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Sample records for vnis vitamin nutrition

  1. Vitamin C nutrition in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, T

    2012-05-01

    Domestic animals, including ruminants, can synthesize vitamin C (VC) in their liver; as such, the dietary requirement for VC has not been confirmed in these animals. The adequacy of VC has been evaluated by quantifying VC levels in plasma, but the reported values in bovine plasma have been widely variable. Plasma VC concentration is decreased by heat stress, hepatic lesions, fattening, and infectious diseases such as mastitis in cattle. Therefore, VC supplementation is potentially beneficial for cattle with low plasma VC concentration. This review discusses the methods for determination of plasma VC concentration in cattle, VC nutrition, and the efficacy of VC supplementation in calves, dairy cattle, and beef cattle. Additionally I propose a reference range for plasma VC concentration in Japanese Black cattle.

  2. Vitamin D nutrition in pregnancy: current opinion

    OpenAIRE

    Dawodu A; Akinbi H

    2013-01-01

    Adekunle Dawodu,1 Henry Akinbi21Global Health Center, 2Neonatology and Pulmonary Biology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USAAbstract: There is increasing interest in vitamin D nutrition during pregnancy because of widespread reports of a high prevalence of low vitamin D status in pregnant women. While vitamin D is important for calcium and phosphorus homeostasis and for bone health, it also plays important roles in many other physiologic functions in th...

  3. Vitamin C Nutrition in Cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Matsui, T.

    2012-01-01

    Domestic animals, including ruminants, can synthesize vitamin C (VC) in their liver; as such, the dietary requirement for VC has not been confirmed in these animals. The adequacy of VC has been evaluated by quantifying VC levels in plasma, but the reported values in bovine plasma have been widely variable. Plasma VC concentration is decreased by heat stress, hepatic lesions, fattening, and infectious diseases such as mastitis in cattle. Therefore, VC supplementation is potentially beneficial ...

  4. Vitamin B nutrition in the Nigerian tropical ataxic neuropathy.

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Assessment of nutritional status of vitamin B components by plasma or blood levels indicated riboflavin deficiency and possibly thiamine deficiency in Nigerian patients who suffered from tropical ataxic neuropathy and neurologically normal Nigerians who subsisted on predominant cassava diet. Serum levels of folate, niacin, pyridoxine and panthothenic acid were normal. Vitamin deficiencies probably are minor factors, if any, in the pathogenesis of tropical ataxic neuropathy in Nigerians.

  5. Urinary water-soluble vitamins and their metabolite contents as nutritional markers for evaluating vitamin intakes in young Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Shibata, Katsumi

    2008-06-01

    Little information is available to estimate water-soluble vitamin intakes from urinary vitamins and their metabolite contents as possible nutritional markers. Determination of the relationships between the oral dose and urinary excretion of water-soluble vitamins in human subjects contributes to finding valid nutrition markers of water-soluble vitamin intakes. Six female Japanese college students were given a standard Japanese diet in the first week, the same diet with a synthesized water-soluble vitamin mixture as a diet with approximately onefold vitamin mixture based on Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) for Japanese in the second week, with a threefold vitamin mixture in the third week, and a sixfold mixture in the fourth week. Water-soluble vitamins and their metabolites were measured in the 24-h urine collected each week. All urinary vitamins and their metabolite levels except vitamin B(12) increased linearly in a dose-dependent manner, and highly correlated with vitamin intake (r=0.959 for vitamin B(1), r=0.927 for vitamin B(2), r=0.965 for vitamin B(6), r=0.957 for niacin, r=0.934 for pantothenic acid, r=0.907 for folic acid, r=0.962 for biotin, and r=0.952 for vitamin C). These results suggest that measuring urinary water-soluble vitamins and their metabolite levels can be used as good nutritional markers for assessing vitamin intakes.

  6. Vitamin nutritional status of women using oral contraceptive pills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, N K; Vijaya, S

    1980-03-01

    A comparative study was conducted to assess the biochemical effects of a low-estrogen combined OC (oral contraceptive). The focus of the study was on possible biochemical effects indicative of altered nutritional status. Both low and high income women on pills were compared with others not on pills. The groups were further divided according to the duration of OC usage. Blood hemoglobin, serum Vitamin A, plasma ascorbic acid, folic acid, riboflavin, and aspartate transaminase levels were measured. Higher income women had better measures on all the indices than the low income women, indicating a better initial nutritional status. Deficiencies increased with duration of use. Results of the study show that OCs reduce the vitamin nutritional level in women. For poor women on OCs, special nutrition intervention programs should be instituted.

  7. TOTAL PARENTERAL NUTRITION (TPN: ROLE OF RIBOFLAVIN (VITAMIN B2 AND CYANOCOBALAMIN (VITAMIN B12

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    Samina Shiekh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Total parenteral nutrition (TPN replaces and maintains essential nutrients in patients in whom oral or tube feedings are contraindicated or inadequate. A nutritional assessment must be carried out before initiating TPN in order to determine nutritional needs and any metabolic changes due to the patient’s underlying condition, medications or concurrent therapies. In addition to carbohydrates, proteins and fats, certain amounts of micronutirents are also added to TPN solutions. These micronutrients include electrolytes, vitamins, and trace minerals. This review highlights some basic concepts regarding the use and formulation of TPNs along with their advantages and disadvantages and the importance of water soluble vitamins B2 and B12 in human nutrition.

  8. [Food based approaches to improve vitamin and mineral nutrition adequacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzún, M T; Uauy, R; Olivares, S

    2001-03-01

    This paper, using the nutrient density concept and the development of Food-Based Dietary Guidelines (FBDG), explores the nutritional adequacy of food patterns based on the main staples around the world--maize, wheat, rice and potato. The nutritional adequacy of the vitamins A, C, folates and the minerals iron, zinc and calcium in diets composed by these staples is analyzed. Projected diets modified by the addition of foods high in vitamins and minerals, based on food table composition information, are analyzed for changes in nutritional adequacy, in order to cover the nutritional requirements of all family members. This theoretical exercise shows that diets diversified by the addition of relatively small quantities (27-70 g) of foods like fruits, vegetables, legumes and meat improve substantially the nutritional adequacy of the vitamins A, C, folates, iron and zinc. In the case of calcium, the addition of a dairy source becomes essential. From the practical point of view, the implementation of the food based approach requires a national effort in order to support the production of nutrient rich foods and to promote consciousness of nutrient bioavailability, so that people may obtain all nutrient potential from foods. Simultaneously, the need of fortification programs at the national level is recognized. This is the case for critical nutrients, where requirements might be above the potential in available foods. A similar situation occurs in the case of vulnerable groups like pregnant women and infants, who need supplementation to ensure nutritional adequacy of their diets. In conclusion, the use of FBDG is a good alternative for improving the nutritional adequacy of diets based predominantly on staple foods. However, food fortification and supplementation programs directed to vulnerable groups are necessary and complementary practices to the FBDG implementation.

  9. NUTRITIONAL CYTOPENIA (VITAMIN M DEFICIENCY) IN THE MONKEY.

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    Langston, W C; Darby, W J; Shukers, C F; Day, P L

    1938-10-31

    Young rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were given a diet containing casein, polished rice, whole wheat, salt mixture, sodium chloride, cod liver oil, and ascorbic acid. They developed a syndrome characterized by anemia, leukopenia, and loss of weight. Ulceration of the gums and diarrhea were common, and death occurred between the 26th and 100th day. 4 monkeys were given the deficient diet supplemented with 1 mg. of riboflavin daily, and these developed the characteristic signs and died. in periods of time similar to the survival of monkeys receiving the deficient diet alone. Nicotinic acid, either alone or in combination with riboflavin and thiamin chloride, failed to alter appreciably the course of the deficiency manifestations. Thus, it is evident that this nutritional cytopenia is not the result of a deficiency of vitamin B, riboflavin, or nicotinic acid. The deficient diet supplemented with either 10 gm. of dried brewers' yeast or 2 gm. of liver extract (Cohn fraction G) daily supported good growth, permitted normal body development, and maintained a normal blood picture over long periods. It is obvious that yeast and liver extract contain a substance essential to the nutrition of the monkey which is not identical with any of those factors of the vitamin B complex that have been chemically identified. We have proposed the term vitamin M for this factor which prevents nutritional cytopenia in the monkey.

  10. NUTRITIONAL STATUS, VITAMIN D AND NASAL COLONIZATION IN SPINAL SURGERY

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    Diego Benone dos Santos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Evaluate the nutritional status, vitamin D, the serum albumin, and the nasal colonization by bacteria in a Brazilian population sample that included specifically patients undergoing spine surgery Methods: The serum albumin and vitamin D tests were performed on blood samples; nasal microbiological research was performed by swab and demographic information was collected. We studied the correlation between the tests and gender and age groups of patients. Results: Seventy-five patients were included. Of this total, 74 patients underwent testing of albumin levels, 64 of vitamin D and 41 underwent nasal swab. The mean of serum albumin was 3.76 g/dl (SD = 0.53 g/dl; 70.3% of subjects were considered normal and 29.7% showed hypoalbuminemia. Regarding vitamin D, the mean was 16.64 ng/ml (SD: 7.43 ng/ml; 64.1% of patients were considered deficient, 32.8% insufficient, and 3.1% were considered normal. There was significant difference between albumin and age (p=0.007, being that the greater the age, the lower the albumin. Hypoalbuminemia was significantly more frequent over 60 years (p<0.001. There was no correlation between vitamin D or nasal swab and age (p=0.603 and 0.725, respectively. The correlation between the tests and gender showed no significant difference in any of the parameters. Conclusion: The serum albumin and vitamin D levels and results of nasal swab were presented for a Brazilian sample of patients undergoing spine surgery. It was found correlation between hypoalbuminemia (inferring malnutrition and age group of patients. Almost all the patients had some degree of vitamin D deficiency, with no correlation with age.

  11. Con: Nutritional vitamin D replacement in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

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    Agarwal, Rajiv; Georgianos, Panagiotis I

    2016-05-01

    Insufficiency of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is highly prevalent among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and is a critical component in the pathogenesis of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Accordingly, current National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative and Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend the correction of hypovitaminosis D through nutritional vitamin D replacement as a first-step therapeutic approach targeting secondary hyperparathyroidism. In this Polar Views debate, we summarize the existing evidence, aiming to defend the position that nutritional vitamin D replacement is not evidence-based and should not be applied to patients with CKD. This position is supported by the following: (i) our meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials shows that whereas nutritional vitamin D significantly increases serum 25(OH)D levels relative to placebo, there is no evidence either in predialysis CKD or in ESRD that parathyroid hormone (PTH) is lowered; (ii) on the other hand, in randomized head-to-head comparisons, nutritional vitamin D is shown to be inferior to activated vitamin D analogs in reducing PTH levels; (iii) nutritional vitamin D is reported to exert minimal to no beneficial actions in a series of surrogate risk factors, including aortic stiffness, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), epoetin utilization and immune function among others; and (iv) there is no evidence to support a benefit of nutritional vitamin D on survival and other 'hard' clinical outcomes. Whereas nutritional vitamin D replacement may restore 25(OH)D concentration to near normal, the real target of treating vitamin D insufficiency is to treat secondary hyperparathyroidism, which is untouched by nutritional vitamin D. Furthermore, the pleotropic benefits of nutritional vitamin D remain to be proven. Thus, there is little, if any, benefit of nutritional vitamin D replacement in CKD.

  12. Abnormal vitamin levels in patients receiving home total parenteral nutrition.

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    Mikalunas, V; Fitzgerald, K; Rubin, H; McCarthy, R; Craig, R M

    2001-01-01

    The administration of multivitamins to patients receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN) was decreased from once daily to three times weekly during the parenteral multivitamin shortage in 1997. Blood vitamin levels were measured to examine whether the decrement in the infused vitamins affected the levels. Six patients with normal renal and liver function, receiving HPN for 6 months to 10 years, were studied 6 months after the institution of 10 mL of multivitamins thrice weekly. Two patients with renal insufficiency who required hemodialysis and HPN were also studied. Multivitamin administration was eliminated in one patient and was reduced to once weekly when elevated pyridoxine levels were found in association with possible neurotoxicity. Five of the six patients with normal renal function had low serum ascorbic acid levels. Serum riboflavin levels were found to be low in one patient, serum pyridoxine was low in one, serum retinoids were low in three, and serum niacin was low in one. There were no clinically obvious untoward effects caused by the vitamin deficiencies. Each of the dialysis patients had elevated serum pyridoxine levels and had some neurologic disturbance (peripheral neuropathy, involuntary movements). The serum pyridoxine levels fell to normal in each after the cessation or decrease of the multivitamin preparation. Ascorbic acid levels were low in one patient and fell into abnormally low levels in the other when the parenteral multivitamins were reduced, but they corrected with the separate administration of intravenous vitamin C. In conclusion, the reduced administration of multivitamins in 1997 resulted in diminished ascorbic acid levels in seven of eight patients receiving total parenteral nutrition. Less often, low levels of retinoids, niacin, pyridoxine, and riboflavin were seen. Patients with chronic renal failure receiving HPN with multivitamins may develop elevated pyridoxine levels, which might result in neurologic sequelae.

  13. Investigation of the vitamin D nutritional status in women with gestational diabetes mellitus in Beijing.

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    Liu, Yanping; Jin, Qiaer; Bao, Yuanyuan; Li, Shanshan; Wang, Jing; Qiu, Ling

    2017-01-28

    Vitamin D deficiency is a common issue, which has relation with GDM, during the pregnant period. To study the Vitamin D nutritional status of pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the middle and late pregnancy and analyze the different sources of Vitamin D intake. A total of ninety-eight pregnant women with GDM were enrolled voluntarily in this study. The patients were divided into two groups, Vitamin D supplement intake and control group. The level of 25-hydroxy Vitamin D (25-OH Vit D) and the sources of Vitamin D intake and the frequency of food consumption rich in Vitamin D were investigated. The incidence rate of Vitamin D deficiency (nutritional balance of Vitamin D.

  14. Dietary vitamin D₂--a potentially underestimated contributor to vitamin D nutritional status of adults?

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    Cashman, Kevin D; Kinsella, Michael; McNulty, Breige A; Walton, Janette; Gibney, Michael J; Flynn, Albert; Kiely, Mairead

    2014-07-28

    It has been suggested that vitamin D₂ is not very prevalent in the human food chain. However, data from a number of recent intervention studies suggest that the majority of subjects had measurable serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D₂ (25(OH)D₂) concentrations. Serum 25(OH)D₂, unlike 25(OH)D₃, is not directly influenced by exposure of skin to sun and thus has dietary origins; however, quantifying dietary vitamin D₂ is difficult due to the limitations of food composition data. Therefore, the present study aimed to characterise serum 25(OH)D₂ concentrations in the participants of the National Adult Nutrition Survey (NANS) in Ireland, and to use these serum concentrations to estimate the intake of vitamin D₂ using a mathematical modelling approach. Serum 25(OH)D₂ concentration was measured by a liquid chromatography-tandem MS method, and information on diet as well as subject characteristics was obtained from the NANS. Of these participants, 78.7 % (n 884) had serum 25(OH)D₂ concentrations above the limit of quantification, and the mean, maximum, 10th, 50th (median) and 90th percentile values of serum 25(OH)D₂ concentrations were 3.69, 27.6, 1.71, 2.96 and 6.36 nmol/l, respectively. To approximate the intake of vitamin D₂ from these serum 25(OH)D₂ concentrations, we used recently published data on the relationship between vitamin D intake and the responses of serum 25(OH)D concentrations. The projected 5th to 95th percentile intakes of vitamin D₂ for adults were in the range of 0.9-1.2 and 5-6 μg/d, respectively, and the median intake ranged from 1.7 to 2.3 μg/d. In conclusion, the present data demonstrate that 25(OH)D₂ concentrations are present in the sera of adults from this nationally representative sample. Vitamin D₂ may have an impact on nutritional adequacy at a population level and thus warrants further investigation.

  15. Dangerous nutrition? Calcium, vitamin D, and shark cartilage nutritional supplements and cancer-related hypercalcemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagman, Ruth; Walsh, Declan

    2003-04-01

    The use of nutritional supplements in the general population and in cancer patients has become very popular. These supplements are not perceived as medications and are presumed to be safe by cancer patients, who may however be at risk for hypercalcemia. We note that many of our patients who have developed symptomatic hypercalcemia were taking vitamin D, calcium, or shark cartilage supplements. We report eight cases of hypercalcemia in cancer patients seen at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation in whom these nutritional supplements may have contributed to the prevalence or severity of hypercalcemia.

  16. The role of vitamin A in nutritional anaemia: a study in pregnant women in West Java, Indonesia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suharno, D.

    1994-01-01

    Nutritional anaemia affects 50-70% of pregnant women in the developing world where vitamin A deficiency is also a problem. Since previous studies have indicated that vitamin A deficiency can be involved in the aetiology of nutritional anaemia, the role of vitamin A deficiency in nutritional anaemia

  17. Vitamin supplementation and related nutritional status in Thai children, aged 1-5 years.

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    Ratanachu-ek, Suntaree

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of vitamin supplementation in Thai children aged 1-5 years at Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health (QSNICH), parental knowledge of vitamins, practices, and related factors such as nutritional status in vitamin supplementation. A cross-sectional study was performed at the Well Child Clinic, QSNICH, from 1-31 May 2005. Five hundred parents of young children, aged 1-5 years were interviewed by using the questionnaire to obtain information regarding knowledge and practices of vitamin supplementation. Weight and length/height were measured and nutritional status was assessed using the Thai growth reference. The relationships among vitamin supplement, nutritional status, and other related factors were analyzed using Chi-square test. The p-value vitamin supplementation was 76%, including vitamin C 62%, multi-vitamin (MTV) 35%, and cod-liver oil 20%. Regarding parental knowledge of vitamins, 57% of them knew the health benefits but 74% did not know the toxic effects of vitamins. The reasons for vitamin supplementation were poor feeding 63%, under-weight 23% and unhealthy status 14%. Vitamins were obtained from over-the-counter 59%, health services 40%, and friends 1%. Vitamin supplementation was significantly higher in children over 2 years of age, whose parents knew the benefits of vitamins, and in those children with malnutrition. The prevalence of vitamin supplementation was high in malnourished children, over 2 years of age whose parents had knowledge about benefits of vitamins. Parents should be warned about the dangers of high dose of vitamin consumption.

  18. Low serum levels of vitamin B12 in older adults with normal nutritional status by mini nutritional assessment.

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    Araújo, D A; Noronha, M B; Cunha, N A; Abrunhosa, S F; Rocha, A N; Amaral, T F

    2016-07-01

    Undernutrition as well as low levels of vitamin B12 and folic acid are common problems among older adults. However, recommended routine nutritional status assessment tools may result in inadequate vitamin serum levels to go unnoticed. Therefore, the aim of this study is to evaluate the inadequacy of serum levels of vitamin B12 and folic acid within Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) classification categories among older adults. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 97 older adults residing in care homes in Portugal. Undernutrition was identified through the MNA, and serum levels of vitamin B12 and folic acid were measured using chemiluminescence. Cognitive function, depressive symptoms and functional characteristics were also assessed using the Abbreviated Mental Test Score, the Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the Barthel Index, respectively. The mean age of older adults was 82.2 (6.3) years; 3.1% were undernourished and 26.8% were at undernutrition risk. In the MNA normal nutritional status group, 11.8% presented vitamin B12 deficiency (older adults with low serum levels of vitamin B12 presenting normal nutritional status by MNA was identified. This finding emphasizes the need to evaluate serum vitamin B12 levels, independently of the MNA results.

  19. Rural nutrition interventions with indigenous plant foods - a case study of vitamin A deficiency in Malawi

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    Babu S.C.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification, propagation, and introduction of a nutritionally rich, indigenous plant species in the existing cropping system are presented in this paper as a method of rural nutrition intervention. A case study of Moringa (Moringa oleifera Lam., Moringaceae, which is a common tree in Malawi and one of the richest sources of vitamin A and vitamin C compared to the commonly consumed vegetables is presented to address the problem of vitamin A deficiency. After a brief review of the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency and the efforts to reduce its incidence in Malawi, Moringa is suggested as a potential solution to the problem. A framework for designing nutrition intervention with Moringa is described for actual implementation. It is argued that attempts to identify, document, and encourage the utilization of nutrient-rich indigenous plants could be cost-effective, and a sustainable method of improving the nutritional status of local populations.

  20. Nutrition of Indonesian women during pregnancy and lactation: a focus on vitamin A and iron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muslimatun, S.

    2001-01-01

    Nutrition during pregnancy is important for women's health, outcome of pregnancy and child survival. A community-based study was conducted in a rural area of West Java, Indonesia to investigate 1) the effect of weekly vitamin A and iron supplementation during pregnancy on iron and vitamin A status o

  1. Vitamin K nutritional status and undercarboxylated osteocalcin in postmenopausal osteoporotic women treated with bisphosphonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Jun; Takada, Tetsuya; Sato, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Serum undercarboxylated osteocalcin (ucOC) is an index of vitamin K nutritional status in treatment-naive postmenopausal osteoporotic women. The purpose of the present study was to reveal the association between vitamin K nutritional status and serum ucOC concentrations in postmenopausal osteoporotic women taking bisphosphonates. Eighty-six postmenopausal women with osteoporosis (age range: 47-90 years) initiated bisphosphonate treatment. Vitamin K nutritional status was evaluated using a simple vitamin K-intake questionnaire and serum ucOC concentrations were measured after 6 months of treatment. The patients were divided into two groups according to the simple vitamin K-intake questionnaire score: a low vitamin K-intake (score =40) group (n=19). There were no significant differences between the groups in baseline parameters including age, height, body weight, body mass index, serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), urinary cross-linked N-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (NTX), and changes in serum ALP and urinary NTX concentrations during the 6-month treatment period. However, the mean serum ucOC concentration after 6 months of treatment was significantly higher in the low vitamin K-intake group (2.79 ng/mL) than in the normal vitamin K-intake group (2.20 ng/mL). These results suggest that 78% of postmenopausal osteoporotic women treated with bisphosphonates may have vitamin K deficiency as indicated by low vitamin K-intake and high serum ucOC concentrations, despite having a similar reduction in bone turnover to women who have normal vitamin K-intake.

  2. [Bone and Nutrition. Vitamin D independent calcium absorption].

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    Masuyama, Ritsuko

    2015-07-01

    Vitamin D endocrine system is required for normal calcium and bone homeostasis. Trans-epithelial calcium absorption is initiated with calcium entry into the intestinal epithelial cells from luminal fluid through calcium permeable channels, and those expressions are strongly supported by vitamin D action. On the other hands, dietary treatment, mineral supplementation or restriction, successfully improves intestinal calcium absorption in global vitamin D receptor knock-out (VDR KO) mice, though vitamin D dependent active transport pathway is lacking. Dietary rescue of intestinal calcium absorption provided a positive calcium balance in this mouse model, and suggested that the major role of vitamin D function on calcium homeostasis was considered to be intestinal active absorption. To elucidate the entire process of intestinal calcium absorption, vitamin D independent calcium transport system was characterized into either trans-cellular or para-cellular process.

  3. Effects of Nutritional Intervention on Vitamins and Minerals Intake at Overweight and Obese Patients

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    Mihaela Posea

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims- To evaluate the impact of nutritional intervention on vitamins and minerals from intake food and anthropometric parameters at overweight and obese patients. Material and methods- To a sample of 40 overweight and obese patients we evaluated the nutritional content of food intake (kilocalories, macro and micronutrients. We also measured anthropometric parameters like weight, body mass index, body fat, percent of body fat, abdominal circumference and arterial tension. Results- After the nutritional intervention, overweight and obese patients had significantly lower level of intake carbohydrates (P=.018, lipids (P=.002, B1 vitamin (P<.001, B3 vitamin (P=.02 and E vitamin (P=.016. There is a significantly increased level of proteins (P<.001. Regarding the minerals, we found that the intake levels of following‘s decreased: sodium (P<.001, magnesium (P=.006, zinc (P=.035, copper (P=.002, manganese (P<.001. Phosphorus is the only mineral of which the intake level increased significantly (P<.001. All the anthropometric parameters decreased significantly: weight (P<.001, body mass index (P<.001, body fat (P<.001, percent of body fat (P<.001, abdominal circumference (P<0.001, systolic arterial tension (P<.001, diastolic arterial tension (P=.002. Conclusions- All the patients had imbalanced intake of vitamins and minerals both before and after intervention. There is a significant improved on anthropometric measures after nutritional intervention. We need to promote healthy lifestyle changes to prevent the risks associated with obesity.

  4. Correlation of vitamin A nutritional status on alpha-tocopherol in the colostrum of lactating women.

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    de Lira, Larissa Queiroz; Lima, Mayara Santa Rosa; de Medeiros, Jovilma Maria Soares; da Silva, Isabelle Ferreira; Dimenstein, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The adequate supply of vitamins A and E to newborns is essential. However, factors such as maternal nutritional status and nutrient interaction may limit its bioavailability. The aim of this study was to establish nutritional status for vitamins A and E and evaluate the correlation of retinol on colostrum alpha-tocopherol in lactating women. A total of 103 lactating women were recruited at a Brazilian public maternity hospital. Fasting serum and colostrum samples were collected in the immediate post-partum. Retinol and alpha-tocopherol levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and nutritional status for these vitamins was defined from specific cut-off points for serum and colostrum. Mean serum and colostrum retinol (1.49 µmol L(-1) , 2.18 µmol L(-1) ) and alpha-tocopherol (26.4 µmol L(-1) , 26.1 µmol L(-1) ) indicated satisfactory biochemical status. However, we found a prevalence of subclinical deficiency of vitamin A and vitamin E in serum (15.5% and 16%) and colostrum (50% and 60%). Lactating women with serum retinol ≥ 1.05 µmol L(-1) showed an inverse correlation between serum retinol and alpha-tocopherol concentration in the colostrum (P = 0.008, r = -0.28). This association was not observed in serum level nutritional status of lactating women for vitamins A and E was adequate, although there is a risk of subclinical deficiency. The negative correlation of serum retinol on alpha-tocopherol concentration in the colostrum must be carefully evaluated in situations of vitamin A supplementation, because alpha-tocopherol bioavailability in maternal milk may be compromised.

  5. Dietary intakes of retinol, beta-carotene, vitamin D and vitamin E in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenab, M.; Salvini, S.; van Gils, C. H.; Brustad, M.; Shakya-Shrestha, S.; Buijsse, B.; Verhagen, H.; Touvier, M.; Biessy, C.; Wallstrom, P.; Bouckaert, K.; Lund, E.; Waaseth, M.; Roswall, N.; Joensen, A. M.; Linseisen, J.; Boeing, H.; Vasilopoulou, E.; Dilis, V.; Sieri, S.; Sacerdote, C.; Ferrari, P.; Manjer, J.; Nilsson, S.; Welch, A. A.; Travis, R.; Boutron-Ruault, M. C.; Niravong, M.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.; van der Schouw, Y. T.; Tormo, M. J.; Barricarte, A.; Riboli, E.; Bingham, S.; Slimani, N.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the intake of the fat-soluble nutrients retinol, beta-carotene, vitamin E and vitamin D and their food sources among 27 redefined centres in 10 countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Methods: Between 1995 and

  6. Current Understanding of Vitamin D Metabolism, Nutritional Status, and Role in Disease Prevention

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    INTRODUCTION: Vitamin D is a nutrient that, until recently, was neglected by the nutrition community. Although it was recognized in the early twentieth century as an essential nutrient, recommendations for intake were often qualified as being needed only in absence of sunlight. In theory (and in anc...

  7. Recent nutritional trends of calcium and vitamin D in East Asia

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    Hiroaki Ohta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Calcium intake may play an important role on bone health. The recent national nutritional survey in Japan revealed the gradual decrease in calcium intake to around 480 mg/day. In addition, the patients with low level of vitamin D become too large in proportion. The present perspective proposes to increase calcium intake in Asian population.

  8. The impact of food processing on the nutritional quality of vitamins and minerals.

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    Reddy, M B; Love, M

    1999-01-01

    Processing (including preparation) makes food healthier, safer, tastier and more shelf-stable. While the benefits are numerous, processing can also be detrimental, affecting the nutritional quality of foods. Blanching, for example, results in leaching losses of vitamins and minerals. Also, milling and extrusion can cause the physical removal of minerals during processing. The nutritional quality of minerals in food depends on their quantity as well as their bioavailability. The bioavailability of key minerals such as iron, zinc and calcium is known to be significantly affected by the fiber, phytic acid, and tannin content of foods. Concentrations of these constituents are altered by various processing methods including milling, fermentation, germination (sprouting), extrusion, and thermal processing. Vitamins, especially ascorbic acid, thiamin and folic acid, are highly sensitive to the same processing methods. The time and temperature of processing, product composition and storage are all factors that substantially impact the vitamin status of our foods.

  9. Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development – Vitamin A Review

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    The Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development (BOND) project is designed to provide evidence-informed advice to anyone with an interest in the role of nutrition in health. Specifically, the BOND program provides state-of-the-art information and service with regard to selection, use, and interpretation...

  10. Nutritional vitamin-B12 deficiency. Possible contributory role of subtle vitamin-B12 malabsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmel, R

    1978-05-01

    Dietary deficiency of vitamin B-12 has been reported, yet most people ingesting vitamin-B12-deficient diets even for many years appear to achieve a balance that does not lead to overt signs and symptoms of deficiency. I present the case of a vegan of 25 years' duration who developed severe neurologic abnormalities due to vitamin-B12 deficiency. His diet provided 1.2 microgram of vitamin B12 daily at most. Despite normal Schilling test findings, he absorbed subnormal amounts of vitamin B12 given with ovalbumin. This poor absorption appeared to be related to his gastritis, achlorhydria, and subnormal intrinsic-factor secretion. Probably, vitamin-B12 deficiency in this patient resulted from both dietary restriction and the subtle malabsorption, neither of which would have sufficed alone to produce the clinical problem. Possibly such malabsorption may also be present in many of those vegans developing overt vitamin-B12 deficiency in whom Schilling test findings have been normal.

  11. Vitamina K: metabolismo e nutrição Vitamin K: metabolism and nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Maria Custódio das DÔRES

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desta revisão foi discutir aspectos que envolvem a compreensão do metabolismo da vitamina K e os recentes avanços quanto ao papel da vitamina na nutrição humana. São abordadas questões sobre as fontes da vitamina, sua absorção, distribuição e metabolismo, recomendações dietéticas, avaliação do estado nutricional relacionado à vitamina K e ainda fatores que afetam sua concentração plasmática. Diante das novas evidências sobre a participação da vitamina K no metabolismo ósseo, pesquisas adicionais são necessárias a fim de identificar as possíveis conseqüências à saúde, a longo prazo, de deficiência subclínica desta vitamina. Pesquisadores e comitês futuros encontram um desafio no que se refere a investigar novos requerimentos nutricionais da vitamina.The aim of this study was to discuss the aspects that involve the understanding of vitamin K metabolism and recent advances of its role in human nutrition. The paper presents dietary sources, absorption, distribution in the body and metabolism of vitamin K, nutritional recommendations, evaluation of nutritional status related to the vitamin and factors influencing its plasmatic concentration. In the light of evidences about vitamin K role in bone metabolism, further studies are needed to identify the possible long-term consequences to health of subclinical vitamin K deficiency. A great challenge for researchers and further scientific committees will be certainly concerned with investigation of new nutritional requirements of the vitamin.

  12. Fat Soluble Vitamins in Cystic Fibrosis and Pancreatic Insufficiency: Efficacy of a Nutrition Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolaso, Chiara; Groleau, Veronique; Schall, Joan I.; Maqbool, Asim; Mascarenhas, Maria; Latham, Norma; Dougherty, Kelly A.; Stallings, Virginia A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the impact of LYM-X-SORB™ (LXS), an organized lipid matrix that has previously been shown to be absorbable without pancreatic enzyme therapy on fat soluble vitamin status in children with CF and PI. Methods Children with CF and PI were randomized to daily LXS or an iso-caloric placebo comparison supplement for 12 months. Serum vitamins A (retinol), D (25-hydroxyvitamin D[25D]), E (α-tocopherol, α-tocopherol:cholesterol ratio) and K (%undercarboxylated osteocalcin [%ucOC] and plasma proteins induced by vitamin K absence factor II [PIVKA II]) were assessed at baseline and 12 months. Dietary intake was determined using 3-day weighed food records, and supplemental vitamin intake by a comprehensive questionnaire. Results 58 subjects (32 males, age 10.3±2.9 yrs [mean±SD]) with complete serum vitamin, dietary and supplemental vitamin data were analyzed. After adjusting for dietary and supplemental vitamin intake, serum retinol increased 3.0±1.4 μg/dL (coefficient±SE) (Adj R2=0.02, p=0.03) and vitamin K status improved as demonstrated by a decreased %ucOC of −6.0±1.6% by 12 months (Adj R2=0.15, p<0.001). These changes occurred in both the LXS and placebo comparison groups. No changes in serum 25D or α-tocopherol were detected. Both nutrition interventions increased caloric intake a mean of 83±666 kcal/d by 12 months. Conclusions Vitamin A and K status improved, while vitamin D and E status was unchanged over 12 month of LXS and iso-caloric placebo comparison supplement in children with CF and PI. PMID:24345827

  13. Vitamin-mineral supplement use and nutritional status of athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzarre, T L; Scarpino, A; Sigmon, R; Marquart, L F; Wu, S M; Izurieta, M

    1993-04-01

    Dietary, anthropometric, and chronic disease risk factors (CDRF) including blood lipids and blood pressure (BP), were measured in 91 vitamin-mineral supplement users (SU) and nonusers (NU) representing a wide range of athletic interests. Supplements were used by 46 (51%) subjects; 100% of female athletes and 51% of male athletes used supplements while none of a group of 15 control female subjects currently used supplements. Both dietary intake and energy expenditure were measured using 7-day records. Adiposity was determined from body weight, body mass index, and skinfolds. Total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, serum ferritin, hemoglobin, hematocrit, zinc, copper, and vitamin C were based on 12-hour fasting blood samples. Dietary intake (excluding supplements) for SU tended to be greater than NU for vitamin C, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, B6, B12, folate, calcium, iron and magnesium. Plasma vitamin C levels were significantly higher among SU than NU of both gender groups (p < 0.05). Although SU may exhibit additional healthy lifestyle practices, lipid profiles for many of these athletes were unfavorable with regard to CDRF.

  14. Neurology of Nutritional Vitamin B12 Deficiency in Infants: Case Series From India and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goraya, Jatinder Singh; Kaur, Sukhjot; Mehra, Bharat

    2015-11-01

    We studied 27 infants aged 6 to 27 months with vitamin B12 deficiency also known as "infantile tremor syndrome" in India. All were exclusively breast-fed by vegetarian mothers. Developmental delay or regression, pallor, skin hyperpigmentation, and sparse brown hair were present in all. Majority were hypotonic and involuntary movements were encountered in 18. Anemia and macrocytosis was found in 83% and 71% infants, respectively. Low serum vitamin B12 was present in 12 of 21 infants. Seven of the 9 infants with normal serum vitamin B12 had received vitamin B12 before referral. Twelve mothers had low serum vitamin B12. Cerebral atrophy was present in all the 9 infants who underwent neuroimaging. Treatment with vitamin B12 resulted in dramatic improvement in general activity and appetite within 48 to 72 hours followed by return of lost milestones. Tremors resolved in all by 3 to 4 weeks. Nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency is a treatable cause of neurologic dysfunction in infants. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Roles of Vitamins D and K, Nutrition, and Lifestyle in Low-Energy Bone Fractures in Children and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpiński, Michał; Popko, Janusz; Maresz, Katarzyna; Badmaev, Vladimir; Stohs, Sidney J

    2017-07-01

    The research on skeletal system health in children and young adults, while recognizing the important role of calcium and vitamin D, goes beyond these nutritional standards. This review focuses on the role of vitamin K in combination with vitamin D and other factors in bone health. The current understanding is that maintaining bone health and prevention of low-energy fractures in any pediatric population includes nutritional factors combined with an active lifestyle. Calcium, vitamin D, and vitamin K supplementation contribute independently and collectively to bone health. The beneficial role of vitamin K, particularly vitamin K2 as menaquinone-7 (MK-7), in bone and cardiovascular health is reasonably well supported scientifically, with several preclinical, epidemiological, and clinical studies published over the last decade. Osteocalcin and matrix-Gla (glutamate-containing) protein (MGP) exemplify vitamin K-dependent proteins involved in building bone matrix and keeping calcium from accumulating in the arterial walls, respectively. An important part of the mechanism of vitamin K involves carboxylation and posttranslational activation of the family of vitamin K-dependent proteins, which prevent expression of pro-inflammatory factors and support improvement in bone mineral concentration, bone mineral density, and the quality of bone matrix. Understanding the combined approach to a healthy skeletal system in children and young adults, including the roles of vitamins D and K, calcium, healthy diet, and exercise, is particularly important in view of reports of subclinical insufficiency of vitamins D and K in otherwise healthy pediatric populations with low-energy bone fractures.

  16. Elevated Plasma Vitamin B12 Concentrations Are Independent Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality in Adult Patients at Nutritional Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, Silvia; Cereda, Emanuele; Rondanelli, Mariangela; Klersy, Catherine; Cameletti, Barbara; Albertini, Riccardo; Magno, Daniela; Caraccia, Marilisa; Turri, Annalisa; Caccialanza, Riccardo

    2016-12-23

    Background: Elevated plasma vitamin B12 concentrations were identified as predictors of mortality in patients with oncologic, hepatic and renal diseases, and in elderly and critically ill medical patients. The association between vitamin B12 concentrations and in-hospital mortality in adult patients at nutritional risk has not been assessed. Methods: In this five-year prospective study, we investigated whether high vitamin B12 concentrations (>1000 pg/mL) are associated with in-hospital mortality in 1373 not-bed-ridden adult patients at nutritional risk (Nutrition Risk Index B12 > 1000 pg/mL. Two hundred and four patients died in the hospital (14.9%). The adjusted odds ratio of in-hospital mortality in patients with high vitamin B12 was 2.20 (95% CI, 1.56-3.08; p B12 also had a longer length of stay (LOS) than those with normal concentrations (median 25 days, (IQR 15-41) versus 23 days (IQR 14-36); p = 0.014), and elevated vitamin B12 was an independent predictor of LOS (p = 0.027). Conclusions: An independent association between elevated vitamin B12 concentrations, mortality and LOS was found in our sample of hospitalized adult patients at nutritional risk. Although the underlying mechanisms are still unknown and any cause-effect relation cannot be inferred, clinicians should be aware of the potential negative impact of high vitamin B12 concentrations in hospitalized patients at nutritional risk and avoid inappropriate vitamin supplementation.

  17. Lifestyle modification, nutritional and vitamins supplements for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Helena P Y; Liu, David T L; Lam, Dennis S C

    2013-02-01

    To provide a systematic review of the published studies pertaining to the lifestyle modification, dietary, nutritional and vitamins supplements for preventing occurrence or halting deterioration of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The literature searches from 1990 to December 2010 with following keywords, 'age related macular degeneration', 'nutrition', 'antioxidant', 'diet' and 'vitamins supplements' using search engines Pubmed, Google Scholar, Medline and the Cochrane Library. Meta-analyses, population-based cohort studies and case-controlled trials were reviewed, whereas small cases series, case reports, commentaries, abstracts in proceedings or personal observations were excluded. Smoking and obesity are identified risk factors for AMD. High dietary intakes of omega-3 fatty acids, and macular xanthophylls lutein and zeaxanthin have been associated with a lower risk of prevalence and incidence in AMD. Vitamin B and extracts from wolfberry, Gingko biloba and berry anthocyanins were also subjects of intense research interests, but there has been no concluding scientific evidence yet. The Age-Related Eye Disease study (AREDS) is the only large-scale randomized controlled clinical trial to show beneficial effect of AREDS formulation of vitamins C, E, beta-carotene and zinc with copper in reducing the risk progression to advanced AMD in patients with intermediate AMD or with advanced AMD in one eye. Quit smoking is an important advice to patients to prevent or slow the progress of AMD. There is no recommendation for routine nutritional or vitamins supplementation for primary prevention. However, patients with documented intermediate risk of AMD or advanced AMD in one eye are recommended to take AREDS-type vitamin supplements. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2012 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  18. From Roche Vitamins to DSM Nutritional Products%从罗氏维生素到帝斯曼营养产品

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    In October 2003, the Dutch group DSM has acquired the Vitamins and Fine Chemicals business from Roche to create DSM Nutritional Products-one of the world's leading suppliers of vitamins and carotenoids for Animal Nutrition industry, the Food and Pharmaceutical industries as well as the Cosmetics industry by offering a wide range of products to help improve nutrition and prevent disease. In China market, B vitamins are provided by DSM Nutritional Products for food fortification.

  19. Calcium and vitamin D nutrition and bone disease of the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennari, C

    2001-04-01

    Osteoporosis, a systemic skeletal disease characterized by a low bone mass, is a major public health problem in EC member states because of the high incidence of fragility fractures, especially hip and vertebral fracture. In EC member states the high incidence of osteoporotic fractures leads to considerable mortality, morbidity, reduced mobility and decreased quality of life. In 1995 the number of hip fractures in 15 countries of EC has been 382,000 and the estimated total care cost of about 9 billion of ECUs. Given the magnitude of the problem public health measures are important for preventive intervention. Skeletal bone mass is determined by a combination of endogenous (genetic, hormonal) and exogenous (nutritional, physical activity) factors. Nutrition plays an important role in bone health. The two nutrients essential for bone health are calcium and vitamin D. Reduced supplies of calcium are associated with a reduced bone mass and osteoporosis, whereas a chronic and severe vitamin D deficiency leads to osteomalacia, a metabolic bone disease characterized by a decreased mineralization of bone. Vitamin D insufficiency, the preclinical phase of vitamin D deficiency, is most commonly found in the elderly. The major causes of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency are decreased renal hydroxylation of vitamin D, poor nutrition, scarce exposition to sunlight and a decline in the synthesis of vitamin D in the skin. The daily average calcium intake in Europe has been evaluated in the SENECA study concerning the diet of elderly people from 19 towns of 10 European countries. In about one third of subjects the dietary calcium intake results were very low, between 300 and 600 mg/day in women, and 350 and 700 mg/day in men. Calcium supplements reduce the rate of bone loss in osteoporotic patients. Some recent studies have reported a significant positive effect of calcium treatment not only on bone mass but also on fracture incidence. The SENECA study, has also shown that

  20. [Enteral nutrition in neurological patients: is there enough vitamin D content in commonly used formulas?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella Romero, F; Alfaro Martínez, J J; Luna López, V; Galicia Martín, I

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency produces inadequate bone mineralization, proximal muscle weakness, abnormal gait and increased risk of falls and fractures. Moreover, in epidemiological studies, has been associated with increased risk of cancer, autoimmune diseases, type 1 and 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, infectious diseases, cardiovascular diseases and depression. When synthesis through the skin by sun exposure is not possible and the patient can not eat by mouth, as in the advanced stages of various neurological diseases, the supply of vitamin D has to be done by enteral nutrition. The aim of this study is to review the role of vitamin D in a common group of neurological conditions that often require artificial nutrition and analyze whether the vitamin D of different enteral nutrition formulas is adequate to meet the needs of this group of patients. Numerous studies have shown the association between vitamin D deficiency and increased incidence of dementia, stroke and other neurodegenerative diseases. Interventions aimed to increase levels of vit. D and its effects on functional (falls, pain, quality of life) and cardiovascular goals (cardiovascular death, stroke, myocardial infarction, cardiovascular risk factors) have obtained as highlight data a clear reduction of falls and fractures, while the evidence for the other parameters studied is still limited and inconsistent. The content of calcium and vitamin D of enteral formulas is legislated in our country. The total amount of vitamin D for a daily intake of 1,500-2,000 kcal ranges between 300 and 1,600 IU/d (mean ± SD: 32.9 ± 8.5 mg/100 kcal) in the complete formulas for enteral nutrition most commonly used. 50% of the diets studied, for an intake of 2,000 kcal/d, and 90% for an intake of 1,500 kcal/d, provide less than 600 IU/d of vitamin D. Some revised recently guidelines published recommendations of daily intake of vitamin D. The document published by the U.S. Institute of Medicine

  1. Vitamin D status in infants: relation to nutrition and season

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergard, M.; Arnberg, K.; Michaelsen, K. F.;

    2011-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study, the primary objective was to assess the plasma concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH) D) in healthy 9-month-old infants (n = 255). The secondary objective was to evaluate nutritional variables and season in relation to 25(OH) D. The concentration of 25(OH) D was 77...

  2. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the Tolerable Upper Intake Level of vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to re-evaluate the safety in use of vitamin D and to provide, if necessary, revised Tolerable Upper Intake Levels (ULs) of vitamin D for all relevant population groups. The ULs...

  3. The nutritional status of iron, folate, and vitamin B-12 of Buddhist vegetarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yujin; Krawinkel, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Nutritional status of iron, folate, and vitamin B-12 in vegetarians were assessed and compared with those of non- vegetarians in Korea. The vegetarian subjects were 54 Buddhist nuns who ate no animal source food except for dairy products. The non-vegetarians were divided into two groups: 31 Catholic nuns and 31 female college students. Three-day dietary records were completed, and the blood samples were collected for analyzing a complete blood count, and serum levels of ferritin, folate, and vitamin B-12. There was no difference in hemoglobin among the diet groups. The serum ferritin and hematocrit levels of vegetarians did not differ from that of non- vegetarian students with a high intake of animal source food but low intake of vitamin C, and the levels were lower than that of non-vegetarian Catholic nuns with a modest consumption of animal source food and a high intake of vitamin C. The serum vitamin B-12 levels of all subjects except one vegetarian and the serum folate levels of all subjects except one non-vegetarian student fell within a normal range. In vegetarians, there was a positive correlation between the vitamin C intake and serum ferritin levels as well as between the laver intake and serum vitamin B-12 levels. In order to achieve an optimal iron status, both an adequate amount of iron intake and its bioavailability should be considered. Sufficient intake of vegetables and fruits was reflected in adequate serum folate status. Korean laver can be a good source of vitamin B-12 for vegetarians.

  4. Vitamin D status of Irish adults: findings from the National Adult Nutrition Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Kevin D; Muldowney, Siobhan; McNulty, Breige; Nugent, Anne; FitzGerald, Anthony P; Kiely, Mairead; Walton, Janette; Gibney, Michael J; Flynn, Albert

    2013-04-14

    Previous national nutrition surveys in Irish adults did not include blood samples; thus, representative serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) data are lacking. In the present study, we characterised serum 25(OH)D concentrations in Irish adults from the recent National Adult Nutrition Survey, and determined the impact of vitamin D supplement use and season on serum 25(OH)D concentrations. Of the total representative sample (n 1500, aged 18+ years), blood samples were available for 1132 adults. Serum 25(OH)D was measured via immunoassay. Vitamin D-containing supplement use was assessed by questionnaire and food diary. Concentrations of serum 25(OH)D were compared by season and in supplement users and non-users. Year-round prevalence rates for serum 25(OH)D concentration 125 nmol/l. These first nationally representative serum 25(OH)D data for Irish adults show that while only 6.7 % had serum 25(OH)D Institute of Medicine as being inadequate for bone health. These prevalence estimates were much higher during winter time. While vitamin D supplement use has benefits in terms of vitamin D status, at present rates of usage (17.5 % of Irish adults), it will have only very limited impact at a population level. Food-based strategies, including fortified foods, need to be explored.

  5. Elevated Plasma Vitamin B12 Concentrations Are Independent Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality in Adult Patients at Nutritional Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Cappello

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elevated plasma vitamin B12 concentrations were identified as predictors of mortality in patients with oncologic, hepatic and renal diseases, and in elderly and critically ill medical patients. The association between vitamin B12 concentrations and in-hospital mortality in adult patients at nutritional risk has not been assessed. Methods: In this five-year prospective study, we investigated whether high vitamin B12 concentrations (>1000 pg/mL are associated with in-hospital mortality in 1373 not-bed-ridden adult patients at nutritional risk (Nutrition Risk Index <97.5, admitted to medical and surgical departments. Results: Three hundred and ninety-six (28.8% patients presented vitamin B12 > 1000 pg/mL. Two hundred and four patients died in the hospital (14.9%. The adjusted odds ratio of in-hospital mortality in patients with high vitamin B12 was 2.20 (95% CI, 1.56–3.08; p < 0.001; it was independent of age, gender, body mass index, six-month previous unintentional weight loss, admission ward, presence of malignancy, renal function, C-reactive protein and prealbumin. Patients with high vitamin B12 also had a longer length of stay (LOS than those with normal concentrations (median 25 days, (IQR 15–41 versus 23 days (IQR 14–36; p = 0.014, and elevated vitamin B12 was an independent predictor of LOS (p = 0.027. Conclusions: An independent association between elevated vitamin B12 concentrations, mortality and LOS was found in our sample of hospitalized adult patients at nutritional risk. Although the underlying mechanisms are still unknown and any cause-effect relation cannot be inferred, clinicians should be aware of the potential negative impact of high vitamin B12 concentrations in hospitalized patients at nutritional risk and avoid inappropriate vitamin supplementation.

  6. Vitamins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Movies & More Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading ... What's in this article? Vitamins Hang Out in Water and Fat Vitamins Feed Your Needs Vitamin A ...

  7. Vitamin A Intake, Serum Vitamin D and Bone Mineral Density: Analysis of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES, 2008–2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Nam-Seok; Yang, Sung-Won; Song, Byeng Chun; Yeum, Kyung-Jin

    2015-01-01

    The association of high vitamin A intake and low bone mineral density (BMD) is still controversial. To determine the association of dietary vitamin A intake and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration with BMD, a total of 6481 subjects (2907 men and 3574 women) aged ≥50 years from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2008–2011) were divided into groups according to dietary vitamin A intake (tertiles) and serum 25(OH)D (75 nmol/L), and evaluated for BMD after adjusting for relevant variables. Mean dietary vitamin A intakes were 737 and 600 μg RE (Retinol Equivalents) in men and women, respectively. Total hip and femoral neck BMD in men and lumbar spine BMD in women were both positively correlated with dietary vitamin A intake in subjects with serum 25(OH)D >75 nmol/L. Among men with serum 25(OH)D vitamin A intake had lower BMD than the middle group (mean 577 μg RE). In this population, BMD was the highest among men and women with serum 25(OH)D = 50–75 nmol/L and that there were no differences in BMD by vitamin A intake in these vitamin D adequate groups. This cross-sectional study indicates that vitamin A intake does not affect bone mineral density as long as the serum 25(OH)D concentration is maintained in the moderate level of 50–75 nmol/L. PMID:25763530

  8. Vitamin A intake, serum vitamin D and bone mineral density: analysis of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES, 2008-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Nam-Seok; Yang, Sung-Won; Song, Byeng Chun; Yeum, Kyung-Jin

    2015-03-10

    The association of high vitamin A intake and low bone mineral density (BMD) is still controversial. To determine the association of dietary vitamin A intake and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration with BMD, a total of 6481 subjects (2907 men and 3574 women) aged ≥50 years from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2008-2011) were divided into groups according to dietary vitamin A intake (tertiles) and serum 25(OH)D (75 nmol/L), and evaluated for BMD after adjusting for relevant variables. Mean dietary vitamin A intakes were 737 and 600 μg RE (Retinol Equivalents) in men and women, respectively. Total hip and femoral neck BMD in men and lumbar spine BMD in women were both positively correlated with dietary vitamin A intake in subjects with serum 25(OH)D >75 nmol/L. Among men with serum 25(OH)D vitamin A intake had lower BMD than the middle group (mean 577 μg RE). In this population, BMD was the highest among men and women with serum 25(OH)D = 50-75 nmol/L and that there were no differences in BMD by vitamin A intake in these vitamin D adequate groups. This cross-sectional study indicates that vitamin A intake does not affect bone mineral density as long as the serum 25(OH)D concentration is maintained in the moderate level of 50-75 nmol/L.

  9. The Vitamin Nicotinamide: Translating Nutrition into Clinical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Zhong Chong

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide, the amide form of vitamin B3 (niacin, is changed to its mononucleotide compound with the enzyme nicotinic acide/nicotinamide adenylyltransferase, and participates in the cellular energy metabolism that directly impacts normal physiology. However, nicotinamide also influences oxidative stress and modulates multiple pathways tied to both cellular survival and death. During disorders that include immune system dysfunction, diabetes, and aging-related diseases, nicotinamide is a robust cytoprotectant that blocks cellular inflammatory cell activation, early apoptotic phosphatidylserine exposure, and late nuclear DNA degradation. Nicotinamide relies upon unique cellular pathways that involve forkhead transcription factors, sirtuins, protein kinase B (Akt, Bad, caspases, and poly (ADP-ribose polymerase that may offer a fine line with determining cellular longevity, cell survival, and unwanted cancer progression. If one is cognizant of the these considerations, it becomes evident that nicotinamide holds great potential for multiple disease entities, but the development of new therapeutic strategies rests heavily upon the elucidation of the novel cellular pathways that nicotinamide closely governs.

  10. The vitamin nicotinamide: translating nutrition into clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiese, Kenneth; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Hou, Jinling; Shang, Yan Chen

    2009-09-09

    Nicotinamide, the amide form of vitamin B(3) (niacin), is changed to its mononucleotide compound with the enzyme nicotinic acide/nicotinamide adenylyltransferase, and participates in the cellular energy metabolism that directly impacts normal physiology. However, nicotinamide also influences oxidative stress and modulates multiple pathways tied to both cellular survival and death. During disorders that include immune system dysfunction, diabetes, and aging-related diseases, nicotinamide is a robust cytoprotectant that blocks cellular inflammatory cell activation, early apoptotic phosphatidylserine exposure, and late nuclear DNA degradation. Nicotinamide relies upon unique cellular pathways that involve forkhead transcription factors, sirtuins, protein kinase B (Akt), Bad, caspases, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase that may offer a fine line with determining cellular longevity, cell survival, and unwanted cancer progression. If one is cognizant of the these considerations, it becomes evident that nicotinamide holds great potential for multiple disease entities, but the development of new therapeutic strategies rests heavily upon the elucidation of the novel cellular pathways that nicotinamide closely governs.

  11. Elevated Plasma Vitamin B12 Concentrations Are Independent Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality in Adult Patients at Nutritional Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, Silvia; Cereda, Emanuele; Rondanelli, Mariangela; Klersy, Catherine; Cameletti, Barbara; Albertini, Riccardo; Magno, Daniela; Caraccia, Marilisa; Turri, Annalisa; Caccialanza, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Elevated plasma vitamin B12 concentrations were identified as predictors of mortality in patients with oncologic, hepatic and renal diseases, and in elderly and critically ill medical patients. The association between vitamin B12 concentrations and in-hospital mortality in adult patients at nutritional risk has not been assessed. Methods: In this five-year prospective study, we investigated whether high vitamin B12 concentrations (>1000 pg/mL) are associated with in-hospital mortality in 1373 not-bed-ridden adult patients at nutritional risk (Nutrition Risk Index 1000 pg/mL. Two hundred and four patients died in the hospital (14.9%). The adjusted odds ratio of in-hospital mortality in patients with high vitamin B12 was 2.20 (95% CI, 1.56–3.08; p < 0.001); it was independent of age, gender, body mass index, six-month previous unintentional weight loss, admission ward, presence of malignancy, renal function, C-reactive protein and prealbumin. Patients with high vitamin B12 also had a longer length of stay (LOS) than those with normal concentrations (median 25 days, (IQR 15–41) versus 23 days (IQR 14–36); p = 0.014), and elevated vitamin B12 was an independent predictor of LOS (p = 0.027). Conclusions: An independent association between elevated vitamin B12 concentrations, mortality and LOS was found in our sample of hospitalized adult patients at nutritional risk. Although the underlying mechanisms are still unknown and any cause-effect relation cannot be inferred, clinicians should be aware of the potential negative impact of high vitamin B12 concentrations in hospitalized patients at nutritional risk and avoid inappropriate vitamin supplementation. PMID:28025528

  12. New Methods for the Analysis of Fat-Soluble Vitamins in Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Don

    2016-01-01

    The AOAC Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals (SPIFAN) defined fat-soluble vitamins (FSVs) to include vitamins A, D, E, and K. The levels of FSVs have been closely scrutinized because of a number of factors, including nutrition value especially in foods used to provide sole-source nutrition and the potential for health risks associated with content both below and above recommended levels. Stricter scrutiny and emphasis on nutrient-level compliance with regulatory requirements placed an increased demand on analytical methods that were fit-for-purpose, provided accurate and precise results. Over time, compendial methods have been developed and published by organizations such as AOAC INTERNATIONAL, the European Committee for Standardization, the International Dairy Federation, and the International Organization for Standardization, among others. In general, these methods have shown adequate precision for regulatory compliance based on example food matrixes for which they were designed. However, method evaluation for infant formulas and adult nutritional products was limited to very few matrixes within these categories. As such, method applicability gaps were noted and correlated with more complicated or diverse product matrixes. AOAC undertook the task of modernizing test methods for the determination of nutrients in infant formulas and in adult nutritional products formulated specifically for both healthy adults and those requiring specific nutritional intake. Composition of products in this category continued to evolve, which in turn presented increasing and new challenges to analytical methodology. A summary of a new generation of candidate compendial methods for determination of FSVs in these matrixes, identified by SPIFAN, is presented here.

  13. Australasian Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (AuSPEN) adult vitamin guidelines for parenteral nutrition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Osland, Emma J; Ali, Azmat; Nguyen, Truc; Davis, Melvyn; Gillanders, Lyn

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: This work represents the second part of a progressive review of AuSPEN's 1999 Guidelines for Provision of Micronutrient Supplementation in adult patients receiving parenteral nutrition...

  14. Contatos imediatos: investigando personalidade, transtornos mentais e atribuição de causalidade em experiências subjetivas com óvnis e alienígenas

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Breno Martins

    2012-01-01

    Esta pesquisa compara pessoas que alegam experiências anômalas e que não as alegam quanto aos cinco grandes fatores da personalidade, indicadores de transtornos mentais e atribuições de causalidade. O recorte incide sobre experiências caracteristicamente contemporâneas, que mencionam objetos voadores não-identificados (óvnis) e eventos correlatos, como alegadas visões de alienígenas. As variáveis foram escolhidas para o estudo devido ao seu papel teórico na edificação das experiências e aos a...

  15. Vitamin D nutritional status in preterm infants and response to supplementation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Roberta A

    2013-07-14

    Little is known about vitamin D status in preterm infants and their response to supplementation. To investigate this, we assessed serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels using RIA in a consecutive sample of stable preterm very low birth weight (VLBW) infants (born ≤ 32 weeks gestation or birth weight ≤ 1·5 kg), and we explored associated factors. Serum 25OHD level was first assessed once infants were tolerating feeds (n 274). If this first 25OHD level was below 50 nmol\\/l (20 ng\\/ml), which is the level associated with covering requirements in terms of skeletal health in the majority, then we recommended prolonged augmented vitamin D intake ( ≥ 10 μg (400 IU) daily) from a combination of fortified feeds and vitamin supplements and follow-up re-assessment at approximately 6 weeks corrected age (n 148). The first assessment, conducted at a median for chronological age of 18 (interquartile range (IQR) 11-28) d, found that 78 % had serum 25OHD levels below 50 nmol\\/l. Multivariable analysis demonstrated that the determinants of serum 25OHD levels were duration of vitamin D supplementation and gestational age at birth (r 2 0·215; P< 0·001). At follow-up, after a median of 104 (IQR 78-127) d, 87 % achieved levels ≥ 50 nmol\\/l and 8 % had levels >125 nmol\\/l, a level associated with potential risk of harm. We conclude that low 25OHD levels are an issue for preterm VLBW infants, warranting early nutritional intervention. In infants with serum 25OHD levels < 50 nmol\\/l, a vitamin D intake of ≥ 10 μg (400 IU) daily achieves target levels in the majority; however, further work is needed to determine the exact dose to safely meet target levels without overcorrection.

  16. ANIMAL NUTRITION. PROGRAMMED INSTRUCTION UNITS, ANIMAL NUTRITION, FEED CHARACTERISTICS, VITAMINS, MINERALS. FINAL REPORT NUMBER 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LONG, GILBERT A.

    PRINCIPLES AND FACTS NECESSARY FOR EFFECTIVE ANIMAL NUTRITION PRACTICES WERE IDENTIFIED BY EXAMINATION OF RECENT SCIENTIFIC REPORTS. UTILIZING THIS INFORMATION, THE AUTHOR INVOLVED 16 VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE TEACHERS IN THE DEVELOPMENT AND EXPERIMENTAL USE OF A UNIT OF PROGRAMED LEARNING MATERIALS. INSTRUCTIONAL RESULTS WERE NOT AVAILABLE AT THE…

  17. Effect of different cooking methods on minerals, vitamins and nutritional quality indices of kutum roach (Rutilus frisii kutum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Hedayat; Mahmoudzadeh, Maryam; Rezaei, Masoud; Mahmoudzadeh, Leila; Khaksar, Ramin; Khosroshahi, Nader Karimian; Babakhani, Aria

    2014-04-01

    In this study, the influence of four cooking methods (baking, boiling, microwaving and frying) was evaluated on the nutritional value of kutum roach. Proximate, fatty acid composition, vitamin and mineral contents and also nutritional quality indices (NQI) of kutum roach were investigated before and after cooking treatment. All treated samples showed increase in protein, ash and lipid contents and decrease in the content of total omega-3 fatty acids (n-3) in comparison to raw fish fillets (control group). Cooking methods had no significant effect on omega-6 fatty acids (n-6) except for frying that increased it. Nonetheless, all of the cooking methods reduced vitamin B1, A and D contents. Boiling significantly decreased mineral contents including Na, K, P and Zn. Considering the overall nutritional quality indices, vitamin and mineral contents, baking is the best cooking method among other applied methods.

  18. Vitamins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health problems, including heart disease, cancer, and poor bone health ( osteoporosis ). Vitamin A helps form and maintain healthy teeth, bones, soft tissue, mucus membranes, and skin. Vitamin B6 ...

  19. Self-reported use of vitamins and other nutritional supplements in adult patients with cystic fibrosis. Is daily practice in concordance with recommendations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, F.M.; Roos, de N.M.; Dopheide, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: In cystic fibrosis (CF), prophylactic supplementation of the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K is recommended. Limited data is available describing vitamin prescription adherence by adult patients. The aim of this study was to assess the use of prescribed vitamins and other nutritional

  20. Nutritional status of iron in children from 6 to 59 months of age and its relation to vitamin A deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Cristina Sales

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the iron nutritional status of children from 6 to 59 months of age and its relation to vitamin A deficiency. Method: Cross-sectional study involving 100 children, living in nine cities in the state of Paraiba, which were selected for convenience to form two study groups: children with vitamin A deficiency (serum retinol 0.70 μmol/L; n = 50. The iron nutritional status was evaluated by biochemical, hematological and hematimetric indices. The cases of subclinical infection (C-Reactive Protein > 6 mg/L were excluded. Results: Children with vitamin A deficiency had serum iron values statistically lower than the corresponding values in children without deficiency. The other iron nutritional status indices showed no statistical difference according to presence/absence of vitamin A deficiency. Conclusion: The interaction between iron and vitamin A deficiencies was evidenced in the case of circulating iron deficiency (serum iron, suggesting failure in the transport mechanisms of the mineral in children with vitamin A deficiency.

  1. Discovery of novel sources of vitamin b(12) in traditional korean foods from nutritional surveys of centenarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Chung Shil; Lee, Mee Sook; Oh, Se In; Park, Sang Chul

    2010-01-01

    Human longevity can be explained by a variety of factors, among them, nutritional factor would play an important role. In our study of Korean centenarians for their longevity, the apparent nutritional imbalance in the traditional semi-vegetarian diet raised a special attention, especially on vitamin B(12) status, supplied by animal foods. Interestingly, we found that the prevalence of vitamin B(12) deficient Korean centenarians was not higher compared with those from Western nations with animal-oriented traditional foods. We assumed that there might be some unveiled sources for vitamin B(12) in the Korean traditional foods. Screening of vitamin B(12) contents has revealed that some traditional soybean-fermented foods, such as Doenjang and Chunggukjang, and seaweeds contain considerable amounts of vitamin B(12). Taken together, it can be summarized that the traditional foods, especially of fermentation, might be evaluated for compensation of the nutritional imbalance in the vegetable-oriented dietary pattern by supplying vitamin B(12), resulting in maintenance of health status.

  2. Vitamin A Intake, Serum Vitamin D and Bone Mineral Density: Analysis of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES, 2008–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam-Seok Joo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The association of high vitamin A intake and low bone mineral density (BMD is still controversial. To determine the association of dietary vitamin A intake and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD concentration with BMD, a total of 6481 subjects (2907 men and 3574 women aged ≥50 years from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2008–2011 were divided into groups according to dietary vitamin A intake (tertiles and serum 25(OHD (<50, 50–75, >75 nmol/L, and evaluated for BMD after adjusting for relevant variables. Mean dietary vitamin A intakes were 737 and 600 μg RE (Retinol Equivalents in men and women, respectively. Total hip and femoral neck BMD in men and lumbar spine BMD in women were both positively correlated with dietary vitamin A intake in subjects with serum 25(OHD >75 nmol/L. Among men with serum 25(OHD <50 nmol/L, both the top (mean 1353 μg RE and bottom (mean 218 μg RE tertiles of dietary vitamin A intake had lower BMD than the middle group (mean 577 μg RE. In this population, BMD was the highest among men and women with serum 25(OHD = 50–75 nmol/L and that there were no differences in BMD by vitamin A intake in these vitamin D adequate groups. This cross-sectional study indicates that vitamin A intake does not affect bone mineral density as long as the serum 25(OHD concentration is maintained in the moderate level of 50–75 nmol/L.

  3. Vitamin E in new-generation lipid emulsions protects against parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease in parenteral nutrition-fed preterm pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) in preterm infants leads to PN-associated liver disease (PNALD). PNALD has been linked to serum accumulation of phytosterols that are abundant in plant oil but absent in fish oil emulsions. Whether modifying the phytosterol and vitamin E composition of soy and fish oil lipi...

  4. Vitamin E in new Generation Lipid Emulsions Protects Against Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Liver disease in Parenteral Nutrition-Fed Preterm Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenneth, Ng; Stoll, Barbara; Chacko, Shaji

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Parenteral nutrition (PN) in preterm infants leads to PN-associated liver disease (PNALD). PNALD has been linked to serum accumulation of phytosterols that are abundant in plant oil but absent in fish oil emulsions. Hypothesis: Whether modifying the phytosterol and vitamin E...

  5. Determination of vitamin A (retinol) in infant formula and adult nutritionals by liquid chromatography: First Action 2011.15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, Jonathan W; Silvera, Karlene R; McSherry, Elliot; Dowell, Dawn

    2012-01-01

    During the "Standards Development and International Harmonization: AOAC INTERNATIONAL Mid-Year Meeting," held on June 29, 2011, an Expert Review Panel (ERP) reviewed the method for the "Determination of Vitamins A (Retinol) and E (alpha-Tocopherol) in Foods by Liquid Chromatography: Collaborative Study," published by Jonathan W. DeVries and Karlene R. Silvera in J. AOAC Int. in 2002. After evaluation of the original validation data, an ERP agreed in June 2011 that the method meets standard method performance requirements (SMPRs) for vitamin A, as articulated by the Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals. The ERP granted the method First Action status, applicable to determining vitamin A in ready-to-eat infant and adult nutritional formula. In an effort to achieve Final Action status, it was recommended that additional information be generated for different types of infant and adult nutritional formula matrixes at varied concentration levels as indicated in the vitamin A (retinol) SMPR. Existing AOAC LC methods are suited for specific vitamin A analytical applications. The original method differs from existing methods in that it can be used to assay samples in all nine sectors of the food matrix. One sector of the food matrix was powdered infant formula and gave support for the First Action approval for vitamin A in infant and adult nutritional formula. In this method, standards and test samples are saponified in basic ethanol-water solution, neutralized, and diluted, converting fats to fatty acids and retinol esters to retinol. Retinol is quantitated by an LC method, using UV detection at 313 or 328 nm for retinol. Vitamin concentration is calculated by comparison of the peak heights or peak areas of retinol in test samples with those of standards.

  6. [The vitamin D nutritional status in Chinese urban women of child-bearing age from 2010 to 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J X; Liu, X B; Chen, J; Hu, Y C; Yun, C F; Li, W D; Wang, R; Yang, Y H; Mao, D Q; Piao, J H; Yang, X G; Yang, L C

    2017-02-06

    Objective: To evaluate the vitamin D nutritional status in Chinese women of child-bearing age by analyzing serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level in 2010-2012. Methods: Data were obtained from the China Nutrition and Health Survey in 2010-2012. Using cluster sampling and proportional stratified random sampling, 1 514 women of child-bearing age (18-44 years old) from 34 metropolis and 41 small and medium-sized cities were included in this study. Demographic information was collected by questionnaire and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration was determined by radioimmunoassay, in accordance with the 2010 Institute of Medicine of the National Academies standards. We compared differences in vitamin D levels, specifically serious deficiency, lack of deficiency, insufficiency, and excess. Results: The overall serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of Chinese urban women of child-bearing age (P(50) (P(25)-P(75))) was 20.1 (15.1-26.3) ng/ml; minorities had a significantly higher serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of 22.0 (15.9-27.5) ng/ml compared with women of Han nationality (19.8 (14.9-26.2) ng/ml) (χ(2)=7.02, P=0.008). The proportions of women with serious deficiency, lack of deficiency, insufficiency, and excess vitamin D were 11.6% (n=175), 37.9% (n=574), 35.1% (n=531), and 0.3% (n=5), respectively. Only 15.1% (n=229) of women of child-bearing age had normal vitamin D nutritional status. No significant differences in vitamin D nutritional status were observed according to age, body mass index, city, nationality, educational level, marital status, or household income per capita (P>0.05). Conclusion: Most Chinese urban women of child-bearing age have poor vitamin D levels and require vitamin D supplementation.

  7. Vitamins B1, B2, B3 and B9 - Occurrence, Biosynthesis Pathways and Functions in Human Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolak, Natalia; Zawrotniak, Marcin; Gogol, Mariusz; Kozik, Andrzej; Rapala-Kozik, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Vitamins are chemical compounds whose derivatives are involved in vital metabolic pathways of all living organisms. The complete endogenous biosynthesis of vitamins can be performed by many bacteria, yeast and plants, but humans need to acquire most of these essential nutrients with food. In recent years, new types of action of the well-recognized vitamins or their more sophisticated relationships have been reported. In this review we present the current knowledge of factors that can influence the yield and regulation of vitamin B1, B2, B3 and B9 biosynthesis in plants which can be important for human nutrition. A summary of modern methods applied for vitamin analysis in biological materials is also provided. Contributions of selected vitamins to the homeostasis of the human organism, as well as their relations to the progress or prevention of some important diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and Alzheimer's disease are discussed in the light of recent investigations. Better understanding of the mechanisms of vitamin uptake by human tissues and possible metabolic or genetic backgrounds of vitamin deficiencies can open new perspectives on the medical strategies and biotechnological processes of food fortification. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Assessment of vitamin and trace element supplementation in severely burned patients undergoing long-term parenteral and enteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perro, G; Bourdarias, B; Cutillas, M; Higueret, D; Sanchez, R; Iron, A

    1995-10-01

    The efficacy of an oral supplement of vitamins and trace elements during a longterm artificial parenteral and enteral nutrition was investigated for 3 months in patients with extensive burns. Thirty severely burned patients (22 male, 8 female, age 41 +/- 18 years, range 23-59 years, 33 +/- 12% total body surface area burn, 22% +/- 8 full thickness burn surface area) were included. Every 10 days, from day 10 until day 90, we determined serum levels of: *vitamins B1, B12, A, E, *folic acid, *copper, zinc, iron, *transferrin, albumin, prealbumin, total proteins, *fibronectin, retinol binding protein (RBP), *calcium, *phosphorus, *triglycerides, *total cholesterol, *C reactive protein (CRP), *erythrocyte folic acid. The mean daily nutritional support was 60 Kcals and 0.4 g N per kg of body weight, 70% enterally and 30% parenterally administered, with enteral vitamin and trace element supplementation. On day 10, there was a decrease of the serum level of 19/20 parameters. For 8 parameters (vitamin A, total cholesterol, iron, transferrin, fibronectin, phosphorus, RBP, total proteins), the level was lower than usual. Between day 10 and day 20, a significant normalization of 6 of them was noted, the average levels of transferrin and iron remaining below normal values until day 50. There was a significant decrease in C-reactive protein levels, however above normal limits. No deficiency in vitamins or trace elements was found. Cyclic variations of serum levels occurred which may be more related to volemic, hydroelectrolytic, endocrine and inflammatory disorders than to nutritional problems.

  9. Vitamins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz-Roso, Baltasar

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available A thermal treatment is an intrinsic part of most food processing procedures and may be employed to inactive enzimes and toxic '• factors, to change texture and flavour or to preserve. The vitamin degree of transformation or destruction in cooking methods depends on the temperature and on the time of exposure to this temperature. Oxigen, light and transition metals frequently play an active role in accelerating or promoting vitamin losses. Both chemical change and difussion proceed more rapidly as the temperature is raised. An advantage of deep frying consists of the fact that the temperature within the food does not exceed the temperature of the steam under the crust, and that frying times are in general very short compared to other cooking procedures. Another advantages may be the low content of dissolved oxygen in frying fats, and also in its high tocopherol content. There is no leaching of water-soluble vitamins in deep-frying. Speaking of vitamin stability we have to keep in mind that the concept of vitamins is a more physiological concept than a chemical one. The stability itself is not a property of the various vitamins but rather of the various chemical compounds sometimes called vitamers, of which a certain vitamin group consists. For practical purposes, vitamin losses should be considered only in foods wich substantially contribute to the vitamin supply of single people or population groups. There is little data in the literature about vitamin changes in deep-frying of food. However published experimental data on vitamin loses show that deep-frying is one of the most protective cooking procedures. For example, in ours results the vitamin C losses of stewed vegetable foods were twice higher than that of fried ones, (raw potatoes containing 19 mg/100g fresh weight, 13 mg/100 fried in olive oil, and 5 mg/100g stewed in the same oil.

  10. Differences in vitamin D nutritional status between newly diagnosed cancer patients from rural or urban settings in Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, K L; Wiggins, A T; Van Meter, E M; Means, R T; Hayslip, J W; Roach, J P

    2013-01-01

    Although poor nutritional status and weight loss in cancer patients is known to affect outcomes, little is known about malnutrition differences based on geographic location. We investigated nutritional and inflammatory status of 220 newly diagnosed adults with solid tumors at the University of Kentucky's Markey Cancer Center during December 2008 through October 2011. Chi-square tests were used to determine any associations between suboptimal nutritional levels and rural-urban areas of residence. Out of the 13 lab values collected, the only significant difference between rural and urban participants was found for vitamin D resulting in more rural subjects (67.4%) having a suboptimal vitamin D status as compared to those residing in urban areas (53.3%, P = 0.04). Controlling for baseline demographics including age, race, sex, body mass index, nutritional status, and type of cancer, logistic regression analyses concluded those in rural areas had nearly a twofold increase in the odds of having a suboptimal vitamin D level compared to those in urban areas (odd's ratio = 1.97; 95% confidence interval = 1.04, 3.74). Further investigation into the rural-urban differences in vitamin D needs to be investigated in order to improve outcomes during cancer treatment.

  11. The role of maternal nutrition in growth and health of Indonesian infants: a focus on vitamin A and iron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, M.K.

    2001-01-01

    Nutrition during pregnancy is important for women's health, pregnancy outcome, and infant growth and health. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether weekly supplementation with iron and vitamin A of pregnant women improves growth and health, as indicated by reduced morbidity and

  12. The role of maternal nutrition in growth and health of Indonesian infants: a focus on vitamin A and iron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, M.K.

    2001-01-01

    Nutrition during pregnancy is important for women's health, pregnancy outcome, and infant growth and health. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether weekly supplementation with iron and vitamin A of pregnant women improves growth and health, as indicated by reduced morbidity and impr

  13. Determination of vitamin A in infant formula and adult nutritionals by UPLC-UV: First Action 2011.07.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trisconi, Marie-José; Campos-Gimenez, Esther; Jaudzems, Greg; Dowell, Dawn

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin A, a fat-soluble vitamin, is essential for health and plays an important part in vision, bone growth, reproduction, regulating the immune system, cell function, and skin health. Due to the advances in technology and the expansion of its uses, LC technologies are being studied for effectiveness in detecting and quantifying vitamin A in an effort to help determine the amount of vitamin A in various types of samples. For this reason, an Expert Review Panel agreed on June 29, 2011, at the "Standards Development and International Harmonization: AOAC INTERNATIONAL Mid-Year Meeting," to approve "Determination of Vitamin A in Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals by UPLC-UV" as AOAC Official Method 2011.07. To move from First to Final Action status, it was recommended that additional information be generated for all types of infant formulas and adult nutritional formula matrixes at varied concentration levels, as indicated in the standard method performance requirements. International units or retinol equivalents typically represent the concentration of vitamin A in food and supplements. However, for the purpose of this method, the concentration represented is presented in microg/100 g.

  14. [Nutritional status of participants in the Giessen Senior Long-Term Study with respect to antioxidant vitamins and selenium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritschneder, K; Herbert, B; Lührmann, P; Neuhäuser-Berthold, M

    1998-12-01

    Within the longitudinal study on nutrition and health status in an aging population of Giessen, Germany, baseline measurements with regard to antioxidant status were obtained in 85 free living elderly persons. The subjects were at least 60 years old, non-smoking, feeding themselves, and not supplementing any vitamins or minerals. Dietary intake of nutrients was assessed by means of a 3-day estimated food record, which was especially developed and validated for this study. Antioxidant status was evaluated by fasting plasma concentrations of vitamin C, E, beta-carotene, and selenium. The results show that in this study group self-determined nutrition provides enough nutrients to yield a good antioxidant status in the advanced age. Although no differences could be detected in dietary intake of vitamin C, E, and beta-carotene between males and females, significantly higher plasma concentrations of all substances investigated were found in females when compared to males.

  15. STOSS THERAPY AND WEEKLY VITAMIN D THERAPY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF NUTRITIONAL RICKETS IN CHILDREN- A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhava Vijayakumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The Aim of the study is to study the risk factors of nutritional rickets in children of age 1-5 years and to compare the effectiveness of classical single mega dose vitamin D administration (stoss therapy and weekly cholecalciferol administration. METHODS 50 children of age group 1-5 year with clinical, biochemical and radiological features of nutritional rickets and an equal number of age and gender matched control were included in the study. Their risk factors were compared. Those children with rickets were divided randomly into two groups of equal numbers. For one group, single oral dose of 6,00,000 IU of vitamin D and for the other group, weekly oral dose of 60,000 IU of vitamin D was administered for 8 weeks. All children were given calcium supplementation. Regular follow up was done at 1, 2, 6, 9 and 12 months and the improvement was assessed clinically, radiologically and as per the laboratory results. RESULTS Major risk factors for the development of nutritional rickets were prematurity, low birth weight, high birth order, consumption of complementary feeds poor in calcium, lack of adequate sunlight exposure and prolonged exclusive breast feeding. Response to treatment was comparable both clinically and as per the investigation results among those who received single massive dose and those on weekly vitamin D therapy. CONCLUSION Increased birth order, prematurity and low birth weight were important risk factors for rickets. Inadequate dietary calcium and inadequate sunlight exposure increased chance of getting rickets. Supplementation of vitamin D and calcium were protective. Inadequate maternal sunlight exposure, lack of antenatal and post-natal calcium and vitamin D supplementation showed a significant association with rickets. The most common clinical feature of rickets was bow legs. Both massive single dose therapy and weekly vitamin D administration were equally effective and revealed no significant difference in clinical

  16. Estabilidad de vitaminas en nutrición parenteral Vitamins stability in parenteral nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Such Díaz

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Hace algunas décadas se publicaron varios estudios describiendo la degradación de vitaminas en nutrición parenteral (NP y su catalización por oligoelementos tales como el cobre. Por ello se instauró la práctica de administrar oligoelementos y vitaminas a días alternos y aditivarlos el mismo día de la administración. Todavía muchos hospitales españoles siguen estas recomendaciones aunque actualmente se utilizan productos, tipo de material del envase y formas de administración distintas de las de entonces. El objetivo de esta revisión es determinar si en las condiciones actuales de preparación y administración de NP sería recomendable la administración conjunta de vitaminas y oligoelementos y cuantos días serían estables en refrigeración antes de su administración. Ámbito: Se han revisado los artículos sobre estabilidad de vitaminas en NP publicados posteriormente a 1990. Resultados: Con la vitamina A hay resultados contradictorios pero la administración "todo en uno" y la fotoprotección disminuyen considerablemente su degradación y parece que no existen diferencias entre añadir la vitamina antes de su administración o hacerlo con anterioridad. La vitamina E se muestra estable con fotoprotección durante 3-7 días en refrigeración más un día a temperatura ambiente. La vitamina C es estable junto a oligoelementos en bolsas multicapa por 2-7 días en refrigeración más un día a temperatura ambiente. La tiamina es estable si se utilizan soluciones de aminoácidos que no contengan bisulfitos. Conclusiones: Se concluye que se pueden administrar conjuntamente vitaminas y oligoelementos y preparar la NP con anterioridad a su administración cuando se utiliza NP "todo en uno", bolsas multicapa, soluciones de aminoácidos sin bisulfitos y fotoprotección.Objective: Some decades ago, several studies were published describing vitamins degradation in parenteral nutrition (PN and their catalysis by oligoelements such

  17. Routine supplementation does not warrant the nutritional status of vitamin D adequate after gastric bypass Roux-en-Y

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Leticia da Rosa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery can lead to nutritional deficiencies, including those related to bone loss. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum concentrations of calcium, vitamin D and PTH in obese adults before and six months after gastric bypass surgery in Roux-en-Y (RYGB and evaluate the doses of calcium and vitamin D supplementation after surgery. Methods: Retrospective longitudinal study of adult patients of both sexes undergoing RYGB. We obtained data on weight, height, BMI and serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, ionized calcium and PTH. Following surgery, patients received dietary supplementation daily 500 mg calcium carbonate and 400 IU vitamin D. Results: We studied 56 women and 27 men. Preoperative serum concentrations of vitamin D were inadequate in 45% of women and 37% of men, while in the postoperative period 91% of women and 85% of men had deficiency of this vitamin. No change in serum calcium was found before and after surgery. Serum PTH preoperatively remained adequate in 89% of individuals of both sexes. After surgery serum concentrations remained adequate and 89% women and 83% men evaluated. Conclusion: Obesity appears to be a risk factor for the development of vitamin D. The results show that supplementation routine postoperative was unable to treat and prevent vitamin D deficiency in obese adults undergoing RYGB.

  18. The Effect of Fishmeal on the Levels of Zinc,Vitamin A Serum, Nutritional Intake and Shortness Status of Children Aged 2-4 Years after Administration of Vitamin A in Makassar, South Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Fanny

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available One kind of individual nutrition services offered is supplementation of zinc (Zn which is recommended to overcome the problem of growth among children. Animal foods which are source of zinc, such as fish, have a high quality of protein, with digestibility as of 96%. High digestibility of protein is necessary for growth and intelligence. This study aim to the effect of fishmeal on the levels of zinc, vitamin A serum, nutritional intake and shortness status of children aged 2-4 years after administration of vitamin A. This study used experimental study design using Pre-Test and Post-Test Control Group Design. Sample size was 30 individuals, randomly selected among children aged 2-4 years with shortness status after receiving vitamin A supplementation, which was then divided into two groups of treatments: the group of vitamin A, and the group of vitamin A plus fishmeal. Nutritional status was known through anthropometric measurements using the seca and microtoise for weight and height respectively. The tools used were in state of good for use and was already been calibrated. Nutritional intake was obtained using a 24-hour recall with consumer multi-pass method. Enumerator were nutritionists, the supervisor was a professor of nutrition at Health Polytechnic Makassar. The study used an internal ethics committee approval at the department of nutrition. Statistical analysis was done using paired t-test with 95% significance. Nutritional intake in group I (Vitamin A, all increased after the intervention except for energy intake. Significance values for energy, protein, fat, carbohydrate, Vitamin A and Zn were (0.278 (0.000 (0.000 (0.010 (0.000 and (0.002 respectively. Nutritional intake in group II (Vitamins A, plus fishmeal, all increased after intervention except energy intake. Significance values for energy, protein, fat, carbohydrate, Vitamin A and Zn were (0.100 (0.000 (0.000 (0.000 (0.000 and (0.001 respectively. Zn levels after intervention in

  19. Folate, vitamin B12, and vitamin B6 status of a group of high socioeconomic status women in the Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayyaz, Faiqa; Wang, Flora; Jacobs, René L; O'Connor, Deborah L; Bell, Rhonda C; Field, Catherine J

    2014-12-01

    Folic acid supplementation and food fortification policies have improved folate status in North American women of child bearing age. Recent studies have reported the possible inadequacy of vitamin B12 and B6 in the etiology of neural tube defects in folate-fortified populations. The aims of this study were to describe folate status and its relationship to supplementation and to assess vitamin B12 and B6 status in a cohort of pregnant women. Supplement intake data were collected in each trimester from the first cohort (n = 599) of the Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) study. Red blood cell folate (RBCF) and plasma folate, holotranscobalamin, and pyridoxal 5-phosphate were measured. Overt folate deficiency was rare (3%) but 24% of women in their first trimester had suboptimal RBCF concentration (1360 nmol·L(-1)) was observed in approximately half of the women during each pregnancy trimester. Vitamin B12 and B6 deficiencies were rare (pregnancy and over half the women had abnormally high RBCF, suggesting that supplementation during pregnancy is not appropriate in a cohort of women considered to be healthy and a low risk for nutritional deficiencies.

  20. Nutritional megaloblastic anemia in young Turkish children is associated with vitamin B-12 deficiency and psychomotor retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katar, Selahattin; Nuri Ozbek, Mehmet; Yaramiş, Ahmet; Ecer, Sultan

    2006-09-01

    We aimed to investigate the presence of psychomotor retardation, physical and laboratory examination in infants with megaloblastic anemia. Inclusion criteria for the study were; age 9 to 36 months, refusal of food except for breast and cow milk, loss of appetite, developmental delay, significant pallor, and hypersegmentation neutrophils in the peripheral blood smear. A total of 33 children fulfilling the inclusion criteria were enrolled among 3368 patients attending Pediatric Outpatient Clinics of şirnak-Cizre State Hospital between January 25, 2004 and May 5, 2004. Mean age was 16.4 months. Thirty-two patients had Vitamin B12 deficiency, 1 patient had folate deficiency, and 10 patients had combined vitamin B12 and folate deficiency. Statistically, a positive significant relationship was detected between serum vitamin B12 levels and mean corpuscular volume (P = 0.001, r = 0.56), and between vitamin B12 levels and hemoglobin (P = 0.004, r = 0.49). We believe that preventative measures such as fortification of flour with vitamin B12, nutritional support with vitamin B12 for the mother during pregnancy and nursing, provision of adequate primary preventive health services, and starting complementary food after 6 months of age are important determinants for preventing megaloblastic anemia.

  1. Effects on anthropometry and appetite of vitamins and minerals given in lipid nutritional supplements for malnourished HIV-infected adults referred for antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehman, Andrea M; Woodd, Susannah; PrayGod, George;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: The evidence base for effects of nutritional interventions for malnourished HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) is limited and inconclusive. OBJECTIVE:: We hypothesised that both vitamin and mineral deficiencies and poor appetite limit weight gain in malnouris...

  2. [Nutrition and bone health. The bone and the foods containing many water-soluble vitamins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Hiromi

    2009-08-01

    On the Dietary Reference Intakes in Japan, nine kinds of water-soluble vitamins are taken up. Those vitamins are supplied from various food. Food from animal sources and vegetable sources are those vitamins source of supply. Vitamin C participates in generation of collagen. Vitamin C is supplied from vegetables or fruits. Since vitamin C is lost by cooking processing, the content of a raw state is not expectable after cooking. Moreover, the vitamin B group of food origin has combined with protein etc., and free types, such as supplement, differ in the bioavailability.

  3. Socioeconomic factors are associated with folate and vitamin B12 intakes and related biomarkers concentrations in European adolescents: the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iglesia, I.; Mouratidou, Th.; González, M.; Novakovic, R.N.; Breidenassel, C.; Jiménez-Pavón, D.; Huybrechts, I.; Geelen, A.; Veer, van 't P.; Cavelaars, A.J.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    Because socioeconomic factors (SEFs) may influence dietary quality and vitamin intakes, this study aimed to examine associations between socioeconomic factors and folate and vitamin B12 intakes as well as their related biomarkers in the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence study.

  4. Dietary beta-carotene, vitamin C and E intake and breast cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagel, G.; Linseisen, J.; Gils, C.H. van; Peeters, P.H.M.; Boutron-Ruault, M.C.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Romieu, I.; Tjonneland, A.; Olsen, A.; Roswall, N.; Witt, P.M.; Overvad, K.; Rohrmann, S.; Kaaks, R.; Drogan, D.; Boeing, H.; Trichopoulou, A.; Stratigakou, V.; Zylis, D.; Engeset, D.; Lund, E.; Skeie, G.; Berrino, F.; Grioni, S.; Mattiello, A.; Masala, G.; Tumino, R.; Zanetti, R.; Ros, M.M.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.; Ardanaz, E.; Sanchez, M.J.; Huerta, J.M.; Amiano, P.; Rodriguez, L.; Manjer, J.; Wirfalt, E.; Lenner, P.; Hallmans, G.; Spencer, E.A.; Key, T.J.; Bingham, S.; Khaw, K.T.; Rinaldi, S.; Slimani, N.; Boffetta, P.; Gallo, V.; Norat, T.; Riboli, E.

    2010-01-01

    So far, studies on dietary antioxidant intake, including beta-carotene, vitamin C and vitamin E, and breast cancer risk are inconclusive. Thus, we addressed this question in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. During a median follow-up time of 8.8 years, 7,502 primary i

  5. Two newborns with nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency: challenges in newborn screening for vitamin B12 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, C D; Ganesh, J; Ficicioglu, C

    2005-12-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency causes decreased Methionine Synthase and L-Methylmalonyl-CoA Mutase activity and results in accumulation of Homocysteine, Methylmalonic acid and Propionylcarnitine. Propionylcarnitine is included in tandem mass spectrometry-based newborn screening programs for detection of certain inborn errors of metabolism. We report two asymptomatic newborns with Vitamin B12 deficiency due to maternal deficiencies. One was detected incidentally at 3 weeks of age; the second on supplemental newborn screening based on elevated Propionylcarnitine at 2 days of age. This illustrates the potential for false negative results for Vitamin B12 deficiency screening by acylcarnitine profiling in newborn screening. Homocysteine and Methylmalonic acid may be better markers of Vitamin B12 deficiency. In conclusion, we suggest measuring Methylmalonic acid, Propionylcarnitine and Homocysteine levels in blood spots in expanded newborn screening in order to detect asymptomatic newborns with Vitamin B12 deficiency. Further studies are needed to establish the sensitivity of these three markers in screening for Vitamin B12 deficiency.

  6. Nutritional status of vitamin A in morbid obesity before and after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Gabriela Villaça; Pereira, Silvia Elaine; Saboya, Carlos José; Ramalho, Andréa

    2007-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify the factors which contribute to the appearance and/or aggravation of Vitamin A Deficiency (VAD) in individuals with morbid obesity in the pre- and postoperative stages of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP). Bibliography searches were done in the data-bases of Medline and Lilacs, published in the last 35 years, priorizing the studies which assessed VAD through serum levels of retinol. The principal factors identified as contributors to VAD were oxidative stress, deficiency of other nutrients, lipid malabsorption in the postoperative stage, insufficient intake of lipids and food sources of Vitamin A, and presence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The investigation of the nutritional status of Vitamin A in those individuals may foment intervention strategies easily incorporated in already established routine procedures, aiming to reduce VAD rates, which will reflect upon those individuals' quality of life.

  7. [Study on vitamin A nutritional status of Chinese urban elderly residents in 2010-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Hu, Y C; Yang, C; Yun, C F; Wang, R; Mao, D Q; Li, W D; Yang, Y H; Yang, X G; Yang, L C

    2017-02-06

    Objective: To assess the vitamin A nutritional status of the Chinese urban elderly population by analyzing serum retinol level in 2010-2012. Methods: Data were collected from the Chinese National Nutrition and Health Survey in 2010-2012. Using the multi-stage stratified cluster sampling method, serum samples from elderly residents aged ≥60 years old were obtained from 34 metropolis and 41 middle-sized and small cities. Demographic data were collected using a questionnaire survey. The serum retinol concentration was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) was determined using the World Health Organization guidelines. A total of 3 200 elderly residents were included in the study. The serum retinol levels and prevalence of VAD and marginal VAD were also compared. Results: The serum retinol concentration (P(50)(P(25)-P(75))) of Chinese urban elderly residents was 1.83 (1.37-2.39) μmoL/L. Compared with middle-sized and small cities (1.91 (1.47-2.48) μmol/L), the retinol level of senior citizens in metropolis (1.70 (1.25-2.25) μmol/L) was significantly lower (Pelderly male (1.89 (1.37-2.47) μmoL/L) was significantly higher than that of female (1.80 (1.36-2.28) μmoL/L) (P=0.001). The serum retinol concentration was 1.87 (1.42-2.43), 1.78 (1.32-2.33), and 1.71 (1.24-2.24) μmol/L for 60-69, 70-79, and ≥80 years olds, respectively. The retinol level in elderly people ≥70 years olds was significantly lower than that of 60-69 years olds (Pelderly residents was 4.22% (135/3 200); 6.00% (81/1 350) for metropolis residents and 2.92% (54/1 850) for middle-sized and small city residents. The overall marginal VAD rate of Chinese urban elderly residents was 8.19% (262/3 200); 10.51% (142/1 350) for metropolis residents and 6.49% (120/1 850) for medium-sized and small city residents. The prevalence of VAD and marginal VAD for males was 3.87% (61/1 577) and 8.24% (130/1 577), respectively (Pelderly residents showed various levels of

  8. 25-hydroxy-vitamin D demography and the risk of vitamin D insufficiency in the South East Asian Nutrition Surveys (SEANUTS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Bee Koon; Rojroongwasinkul, Nipa; Nguyen, Bao Khanh Le; Sandjaja; Ruzita, Abd Talib; Yamborisut, Uruwan; Hong, Truong Nguyen; Ernawati, Fitrah; Deurenberg, Paul; Parikh, Panam

    2016-01-01

    The South East Asian Nutrition Surveys (SEANUTS) were conducted in 2010/2011 in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam in country representative samples totalling 16,744 children aged 0.5 to 12 years. Information on socio-demographic and behavioural variables was collected using questionnaires and anthropometric variables were measured. In a sub-sample of 2016 children, serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25(OH)D) was determined. Data were analysed using SPSS complex sample with weight factors to report population representative data. Children were categorized as deficient (=75 nmol/L). In Malaysia and Thailand, urban children had lower 25(OH)D than rural children. In all countries, except Vietnam, boys had higher 25(OH)D levels and older children had lower 25(OH)D. Regional differences after correcting for age, sex and area of residence were seen in all countries. In Thailand and Malaysia, 25(OH)D status was associated with religion. The percentage of children with adequate 25(OH)D (>=75 nmol/L) ranged from as low as 5% (Indonesia) to 20% (Vietnam). Vitamin D insufficiency (countries. Logistic regression showed that girls, urban area, region within the country and religion significantly increased the odds for being vitamin D insufficient. The high prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency in the (sub) tropical SEANUTS countries suggests a need for tailored approach to successfully combat this problem. Promoting active outdoor livestyle with safe sunlight exposure along with food-based strategies to improve vitamin D intake can be feasible options.

  9. Analysis of Vitamin D2 and Vitamin D3 in Fortified Milk Powders and Infant and Nutritional Formulas by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Single-Laboratory Validation, First Action 2016.05.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Brendon D; Abernethy, Grant A; Green, Rebecca J; Indyk, Harvey E

    2016-09-01

    A method for the determination of vitamin D2 and vitamin D3 in fortified milk powders and infant and adult nutritional formulas is described. Samples are saponified at high temperature and lipid-soluble components are extracted into isooctane. A portion of the isooctane layer is transferred and washed, and an aliquot of 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione is added to derivatize the vitamin D to form a high-molecular-mass, easily ionizable adduct. The vitamin D adduct is then re-extracted into a small volume of acetonitrile and analyzed by RPLC. Detection is by tandem MS, using multiple reaction monitoring. Stable isotope-labeled vitamin D2 and vitamin D3 internal standards are used for quantitation to correct for losses in extraction and any variation in derivatization and ionization efficiencies. A single-laboratory validation of the method using AOAC Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals (SPIFAN) kit samples was performed and compared with parameters defined according to the vitamin D Standard Method Performance Requirements (SMPR(®)). Linearity was demonstrated over the range specified in the SMPR, with the LOD being estimated at below that required. Method spike recovery (vitamin D2, 97.0-99.2%; and vitamin D3, 96.0-101.0%) and RSDr (vitamin D3, 1.5-5.2%) were evaluated and compared favorably with limits in the vitamin D SMPR. Acceptable bias for vitamin D3 was demonstrated against both the certified value for National Institute of Standards and Technology 1849a Standard Reference material (P(α = 0.05) = 0.25) and AOAC INTERNATIONAL reference method 2002.05 (P(α = 0.05) = 0.09). The method was demonstrated to meet the requirements of the vitamin D SMPR as defined by SPIFAN, and was recently approved for Official First Action status by the AOAC Expert Review Panel on SPIFAN Nutrient Methods.

  10. Challenges of long-term nutrition intervention studies on cognition: discordance between observational and intervention studies of vitamin B12 and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Cherie

    2010-11-01

    Conducting long-term nutrition intervention studies on cognition can be challenging. The gaps in current methodology are addressed via a case study of the relationship between vitamin B(12) and cognition in people aged 60 and older. There is robust evidence from many observational studies, both cross-sectional and longitudinal, showing that a deficit of the vitamin is associated with poor or declining cognition in this age group, but supplementation of the vitamin in trials does not bring about improved cognition. The evidence from observational studies as well as clinical trials is reviewed here, and the potential difficulties in conducting long-term nutritional intervention studies in this area are highlighted.

  11. Effects of dietary vitamin C and soybean lecithin in the nutrition of brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus L. fingerlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Aničić

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of different forms of vitamin C and soybean lecithin on growth performance, feed utilization and body composition of brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus, Lesuer 1819 were evaluated during a 9-week growth trial. A special interest was to investigate a possible combine effect of these nutritional components. The diets used contained three forms of vitamin C (crystallized ascorbic acid, encapsulated L-ascorbic acid and Ca-L-threonate (100 mg/kg with and without the combination of soybean lecithin. Besides control diet (K, one more diet was supplemented with soybean lecithin (L only. One-hundred-ninety-two brown bullhead of about 45 g initial body weight was randomly divided in 24 tanks (115 L each. Testing conditions included 8 fish per tank, with triplicate tanks for treatment. All diets with supplemented components had higher final weight. Specific growth rate, feed conversion rate and condition factor were significantly higher with encapsulated vitamin C diets (CC, CCL, followed by the results of enriched ascorbic acid diets. Vitamin C and lecithin supplementation showed positive influence on significantly higher number of erythrocytes, haematocrit, triglycerides and total protein. Vitamin C content of muscle and liver tissue was not uniform and was significantly higher in AAL, CCL, CC and AA feeding groups. The fatty acids profile of muscle and liver tissue showed that phospholipids from soybean lecithin and vitamin C diets enhanced the quality of usable part of the fish body. Combine supplementation of vitamin C and soy lecithin indicated positive production effects, but did not cause a statistically significant difference.

  12. Role of intestinal transporters in neonatal nutrition: carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, minerals, and vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudry, Gaëlle; David, Elmer S; Douard, Véronique; Monteiro, Iona M; Le Huërou-Luron, Isabelle; Ferraris, Ronaldo P

    2010-10-01

    To support rapid growth and a high metabolic rate, infants require enormous amounts of nutrients. The small intestine must have the complete array of transporters that absorb the nutrients released from digested food. Failure of intestinal transporters to function properly often presents symptoms as "failure to thrive" because nutrients are not absorbed and as diarrhea because unabsorbed nutrients upset luminal osmolality or become substrates of intestinal bacteria. We enumerate the nutrients that constitute human milk and various infant milk formulas, explain their importance in neonatal nutrition, then describe for each nutrient the transporter(s) that absorbs it from the intestinal lumen into the enterocyte cytosol and from the cytosol to the portal blood. More than 100 membrane and cytosolic transporters are now thought to facilitate absorption of minerals and vitamins as well as products of digestion of the macronutrients carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids. We highlight research areas that should yield information needed to better understand the important role of these transporters during normal development.

  13. Problems of trace elements and vitamins during long-term total parenteral nutrition: a case report of idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadowaki, H; Ouchi, M; Kaga, M; Motegi, T; Yanagawa, Y; Hayakawa, H; Hashimoto, G; Furuya, K

    1987-01-01

    An 8-year-old girl with chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIIP), who is the first case of CIIP in Japan, has been receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) for more than 6 years. During this time, she experienced deficiencies of copper, zinc, vitamin A, vitamin B12, folic acid, and biotin, and an excess of vitamin A; she exhibited a series of signs and symptoms due to these deficiencies and vitamin A overdosage. Nevertheless, careful monitoring of serum levels of trace elements and vitamins and appropriate therapy have almost solved these problems. She has achieved normal physical and mental development and goes to school, while receiving home parenteral nutrition with an ambulatory infusion system.

  14. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for vitamin C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) derived Dietary Reference Values (DRVs) for vitamin C. The Panel concludes that an Average Requirement (AR) can be derived from indicators of vitamin C status, as well as a Population...... metabolic vitamin C losses and allows the maintenance of an adequate body pool characterised by fasting plasma ascorbate concentrations at around 50 µmol/L. In men, an AR of 90 mg/day of vitamin C and a PRI of 110 mg/day are proposed. As no value for metabolic losses is available in women, the AR for women...

  15. Vitamin B-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in vitamin B12 if I’m vegetarian or vegan?ResourcesNational Institutes of Health: MedlinePlus, Vitamin B12 Last Updated: March 2017 This article was contributed by: familydoctor.org editorial staff Tags: B12, B12 deficiency, diet, nutrition, vitamin B12, vitamins Food and Nutrition, Nutrients ...

  16. Hydrosoluble vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Jasvinder; Kvarnberg, David

    2014-01-01

    The hydrosoluble vitamins are a group of organic substances that are required by humans in small amounts to prevent disorders of metabolism. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the biochemical, physiologic and nutritional aspects of the water-soluble vitamins. Deficiency of these particular vitamins, most commonly due to inadequate nutrition, can result in disorders of the nervous system. Many of these disorders have been successfully prevented in developed countries; however, they are still common in developing countries. Of the hydrosoluble vitamins, the nervous system depends the most on vitamins B and C (ascorbic acid) for proper functioning. The B group vitamins include thiamin (vitamin B1), riboflavin (vitamin B2), niacin or niacinamide (vitamin B3), pantothenic acid (vitamin B5), pyridoxine or pyridoxal (vitamin B6) and cobalamin (vitamin B12). Clinical findings depend upon the deficiency of the underlying vitamin; generally, deficiency symptoms are seen from a combination rather than an isolated vitamin deficiency. True hereditary metabolic disorders and serious deficiency-associated diseases are rare and in general limited to particular geographic regions and high-risk groups. Their recognition is truly important as that determines the appropriate therapeutic management. The general availability of vitamins to practically everyone and several national health programs have saved many lives and prevented complications. However, there has been some apprehension for several decades about how harmless generous dosages of these vitamins are. Overt overdosages can cause vitamin toxicity affecting various body systems including the nervous system. Systemically, vitamin toxicity is associated with nonspecific symptoms, such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and skin rash which are common with any acute or chronic vitamin overdose. At a national level, recommended daily allowances for vitamins become policy statements. Nutrition policy has far

  17. Dietary vitamin C intake protects against COPD: the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park HJ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hye Jung Park,1 Min Kwang Byun,1 Hyung Jung Kim,1 Jae Yeol Kim,2 Yu-Il Kim,3 Kwang-Ha Yoo,4 Eun Mi Chun,5 Ji Ye Jung,6 Sang Haak Lee,7 Chul Min Ahn1 On behalf of the Korean Smoking Cessation Study Group 1Department of Internal Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju, 4Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, 5Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, 6Division of Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, Institute of Chest Disease, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 7Division of Pulmonology, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea Background: Vitamin C, as an antioxidant, has recently been suggested to provide protection against COPD; however, only few national cohort studies have investigated these effects. We aimed to confirm the protective effects of vitamin C against COPD in Korean patients. Patients and methods: We analyzed the data of 3,283 adults aged ≥40 years (representing 23,541,704 subjects who underwent pulmonary function tests and responded to questionnaires on smoking history and vitamin C intake, with stratification variables and sampling weight designated by the Korea 2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results: Among all the subjects, 512 (representing 3,459,679 subjects; 15.6% were diagnosed as having COPD based on pulmonary function test results. Male gender, old age, residence in suburban/rural regions, low household income, low educational level, an occupation in agriculture or fisheries, and heavy smoking were significantly associated with COPD. Low intake of nutrients, including potassium, vitamin A, carotene, retinol

  18. Stability-Indicating HPLC-UV Method for Vitamin D3 Determination in Solutions, Nutritional Supplements and Pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temova, Žane; Roškar, Robert

    2016-08-01

    A simple and fast high-performance liquid chromatography method with UV detection for determination of vitamin D3 in stability studies as well as in solutions, nutritional supplements and pharmaceuticals was developed. Successful separation of vitamin D3 from its degradation products was achieved on a Gemini C18 100 × 3.0 mm column using a mixture of acetonitrile and water (99:1, v/v) as а mobile phase. The method was successfully validated according to the ICH guidelines. The described reversed-phase HPLC method is favorable compared with other published HPLC-UV methods because of its stability-indicating nature, short run time (3.3 min) and wide analytical range with outstanding linearity, accuracy and precision. The method was further applied for quantification of vitamin D3 in selected liquid and solid nutritional supplements and prescription medicines, confirming its suitability for routine analysis. Degradation products, formed under stress conditions (hydrolysis, oxidation, photolysis and thermal degradation), were additionally elucidated by suitable equipment (LC-DAD-MS) to confirm the stability-indicating nature of the developed method.

  19. Iron limitation of a springtime bacterial and phytoplankton community in the Ross Sea: implications for vitamin B12 nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M. Bertrand

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The Ross Sea is home to some of the largest phytoplankton blooms in the Southern Ocean. Primary production in this system has previously been shown to be iron limited in the summer and periodically iron and vitamin B12 colimited. In this study, we examined trace metal limitation of biological activity in the Ross Sea in the austral spring and considered possible implications for vitamin B12 nutrition. Bottle incubation experiments demonstrated that iron limited phytoplankton growth in the austral spring while B12, cobalt, and zinc did not. This is the first demonstration of iron limitation in a Phaeocystis antarctica-dominated, early season Ross Sea phytoplankton community. The lack of B12 limitation in this location is consistent with previous Ross Sea studies in the austral summer, wherein vitamin additions did not stimulate P. antarctica growth and B12 was limiting only when bacterial abundance was low. Bottle incubation experiments and a bacterial regrowth experiment also revealed that iron addition directly enhanced bacterial growth. B12 uptake measurements in natural water samples and in an iron fertilized bottle incubation demonstrated that bacteria serve not only as a source for vitamin B12, but also as a significant sink, and that iron additions enhanced B12 uptake rates in phytoplankton but not bacteria. Additionally, vitamin uptake rates did not become saturated upon the addition of up to 95 pM B12. A rapid B12 uptake rate was observed after 13 min, which then decreased to a slower constant uptake rate over the next 52 hours. Results from this study highlight the importance of iron availability in limiting early season Ross Sea phytoplankton growth and suggest that rates of vitamin B12 production and consumption may be impacted by iron availability.

  20. Increasing Vitamin C Content in Plant Foods to Improve Their Nutritional Value—Successes and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Gallie

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin C serves as a cofactor in the synthesis of collagen needed to support cardiovascular function, maintenance of cartilage, bones, and teeth, as well as being required in wound healing. Although vitamin C is essential, humans are one of the few mammalian species unable to synthesize the vitamin and must obtain it through dietary sources. Only low levels of the vitamin are required to prevent scurvy but subclinical vitamin C deficiency can cause less obvious symptoms such as cardiovascular impairment. Up to a third of the adult population in the U.S. obtains less than the recommended amount of vitamin C from dietary sources of which plant-based foods constitute the major source. Consequently, strategies to increase vitamin C content in plants have been developed over the last decade and include increasing its synthesis as well as its recycling, i.e., the reduction of the oxidized form of ascorbic acid that is produced in reactions back into its reduced form. Increasing vitamin C levels in plants, however, is not without consequences. This review provides an overview of the approaches used to increase vitamin C content in plants and the successes achieved. Also discussed are some of the potential limitations of increasing vitamin C and how these may be overcome.

  1. The relationship between nutritional status, vitamin A and zinc levels and oxidative stress in patients with ataxia-telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, R; dos Santos-Valente, E C; Burim Scomparini, F; Saccardo Sarni, R O; Costa-Carvalho, B T

    2014-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare and degenerative disease that leads to varying degrees of immunodeficiency, oxidative stress, and malnutrition. Vitamin A and zinc are essential for immune function and antioxidant defence. To compare levels of retinol, beta carotene, and zinc in patients with ataxia-telangiectasia and healthy controls. We performed a cross-sectional study with 14 AT patients and 14 healthy controls matched for age and gender. All participants underwent a nutritional and laboratory evaluation comprising concentrations of retinol, beta carotene, serum and erythrocyte zinc, malondialdehyde (MDA), T lymphocyte numbers (CD4(+) and CD8(+)) and immunoglobulin (IgA). The AT patients showed high rates of malnutrition with reduced lean body mass when compared to the control group. However, the concentrations of MDA, retinol, beta carotene, and serum and erythrocyte zinc in AT patients were similar to those of the control group. The retinol levels presented a negative correlation with MDA and positive correlation with IgA serum level. The AT patients assessed showed no change in nutritional status for vitamin A and zinc; however, they presented severe impairment in overall nutritional status observed and correlation between retinol with MDA and IgA. Copyright © 2012 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of metabolism of vitamins D2 and D3 in children with nutritional rickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacher, Tom D; Fischer, Philip R; Obadofin, Michael O; Levine, Michael A; Singh, Ravinder J; Pettifor, John M

    2010-09-01

    Children with calcium-deficiency rickets may have increased vitamin D requirements and respond differently to vitamin D(2) and vitamin D(3). Our objective was to compare the metabolism of vitamins D(2) and D(3) in rachitic and control children. We administered an oral single dose of vitamin D(2) or D(3) of 1.25 mg to 49 Nigerian children--28 with active rickets and 21 healthy controls. The primary outcome measure was the incremental change in vitamin D metabolites. Baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations ranged from 7 to 24 and 15 to 34 ng/mL in rachitic and control children, respectively (p vitamins D(2) and D(3) in children with rickets (29 ± 17 and 25 ± 11 ng/mL, respectively) and in control children (33 ± 13 and 31 ± 16 ng/mL, respectively). 1,25(OH)(2)D rose significantly (p vitamin D(2) and D(3) administration, respectively, in children with rickets. By contrast, control children had no significant increase in 1,25(OH)(2)D (19 ± 28 and 16 ± 38 pg/mL after vitamin D(2) and D(3) administration, respectively). We conclude that in the short term, vitamins D(2) and D(3) similarly increase serum 25(OH)D concentrations in rachitic and healthy children. A marked increase in 1,25(OH)(2)D in response to vitamin D distinguishes children with putative dietary calcium-deficiency rickets from healthy children, consistent with increased vitamin D requirements in children with calcium-deficiency rickets. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  3. [Simultaneous determination of vitamins A, D3 and E in infant formula and adult nutritions by online two-dimensional liquid chromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanhai; Qibule, Hasi; Jin, Yan; Wang, Jia; Ma, Wenli

    2015-03-01

    A rapid method for the simultaneous determination of vitamins A, D3 and E in infant formula and adult nutritions has been developed using online two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC). First of all, C8 and polar embedded C18 columns were chosen as the first and second dimensional column respectively according to hydrophobic-subtraction model, which constituted excellent orthogonal separation system. The detection wavelengths were set at 263 nm for vitamin D3, 296 nm for vitamin E and 325 nm for vitamin A. The purification of vitamin D3 and quantifications of vitamins A and E were completed simultaneously in the first dimensional separation using the left pump of Dual Gradient LC (DGLC) with methanol, acetonitrile and water as mobile phases. The heart-cutting time window of vitamin D3 was confirmed according to the retention time of vitamin D3 in the first dimensional separation. The elute from the first dimensional column (1-D column) which contained vitamin D3 was collected by a 500 µL sample loop and then taken into the second dimensional column (2-D column) by the right pump of DGLC with methanol, acetonitrile and water as mobile phases. The quantification of vitamin D3 was performed in the second dimensional separation with vitamin D2 as internal standard. At last, this method was applied for the analysis of the three vitamins in milk powder, cheese and yogurt. The injected sample solution with no further purification was pre-treated by hot-saponification using 1. 25 kg/L KOH solution and extracted by petroleum ether solvent. The recoveries of vitamin D3 spiked in all samples were 75.50%-85.00%. There was no statistically significant difference for the results between this method and standard method through t-test. The results indicate that vitamins A, D3 and E in infant formula and adult fortified dairy can be determined rapidly and accurately with this method.

  4. Dietary intake of vitamin K in relation to bone mineral density in Korea adults: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2010-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Sung; Kim, Eun-Soo; Sohn, Cheong-Min

    2015-11-01

    Low vitamin K nutritional status has been associated with increased risk of fracture, however inconsistent results exist to support the role of vitamin K on bone mineral density depending on ethnic difference and gender. Our objective was to determine vitamin K intake in Korean adults, examine correlation between vitamin K intake and bone mineral density. This study analyzed raw data from the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for adults (2,785 men, 4,307 women) aged over 19 years. Cross-sectional analyses showed only positive association between vitamin K intake and femur bone mineral density in men after adjusting bone-related factors. However, women in high tertiles of vitamin K intake had a significantly higher bone mineral density both in femur and lumber as compared to women in lowest tertiles (pvitamin K intake increased in women, but this effect was not persisted after adjusting factors. The findings of this study indicate that low dietary vitamin K intake was associated with low bone mineral density in subjects. From these results we may suggest an increase in dietary vitamin K intakes for maintaining bone mineral density. (2010-02CON-21-C, 2011-02CON-06-C).

  5. Vitamin D – a systematic literature review for the 5th edition of the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations

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    Christel Lamberg-Allardt

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present literature review is part of the NNR5 project with the aim of reviewing and updating the scientific basis of the 4th edition of the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR issued in 2004. Objectives: The overall aim was to review recent scientific data on the requirements and health effects of vitamin D and to report it to the NNR5 Working Group, who is responsible for updating the current dietary reference values valid in the Nordic countries. Methods: The electronic databases MEDLINE and Swemed were searched. We formulated eight questions which were used for the search. The search terms related to vitamin D status and intake and different health outcomes as well as to the effect of different vitamin D sources on vitamin D status. The search was done in two batches, the first covering January 2000–March 2010 and the second March 2009–February 2011. In the first search, we focused only on systematic literature reviews (SLRs and in the second on SLRs and randomized control trials (RCTs published after March 2009. Furthermore, we used snowballing for SLRs and IRCTs published between February 2011 and May 2012. The abstracts as well as the selected full-text papers were evaluated in pairs. Results: We found 1,706 studies in the two searches of which 28 studies were included in our review. We found 7 more by snowballing, thus 35 papers were included in total. Of these studies, 31 were SLRs and 4 were RCTs. The SLRs were generally of good or fair quality, whereas that of the included studies varied from good to poor. The heterogeneity of the studies included in the SLRs was large which made it difficult to interpret the results and provide single summary statements. One factor increasing the heterogeneity is the large variation in the assays used for assessing 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration [25(OHD], the marker of vitamin D status. The SLRs we have reviewed conclude that the evidence for a protective effect of vitamin D

  6. Dietary ?-carotene, vitamin C and E intake and breast cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)

    OpenAIRE

    Nagel, G.; Linseisen, J.; Gils, C. H.; Peeters, P.H.; Boutron-Ruault, M C; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Romieu, I; Tjønneland, A; Olsen, A.; Roswall, N.; Witt, P. M.; Overvad, K; Rohrmann, S; Kaaks, R; Drogan, D.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract So far, studies on dietary antioxidant intake, including ?-carotene, vitamin C and vitamin E, and breast cancer risk are inconclusive. Thus, we addressed this question in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. During a median follow-up time of 8.8 years, 7,502 primary invasive breast cancer cases were identified. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). All analyses were run strati...

  7. TIDBIT: portable diagnostics of multiplexed nutrition deficiencies: iron, vitamin A and inflammation status (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhengda; Erickson, David

    2017-03-01

    Vitamin A and iron deficiency are common malnutrition affecting billions of people worldwide. However, in infrastructure limited settings, access to blood vitamin A and iron status test is limited because of the complexity and cost of traditional diagnostic methods. Direct measurements of vitamin A and iron level is not easy to perform, and it is necessary to measure approximate marker for obtaining vitamin A and iron deficiency status. Measurement of inflammatory marker is also necessary because the vitamin A and iron level are altered by inflammation status. Here we introduced a multiplex rapid point-of-care (POC) diagnostic devices that simultaneously characterize three markers relevant to vitamin A, iron and inflammation status: retinol binding protein 4, ferritin and C-reactive protein with lateral flow immunoassay test strips. Level of retinol binding protein 4, ferritin and C-reactive protein are indicated by excitation intensity of fluorescence tags with three different colors. The test can be done within 15 minutes and a complete sample-answer quantitative results of vitamin A, iron and inflammation status level can be obtained with assists of a smartphone and an external device. We also demonstrated the device is able to perform colorimetric analysis on single test area. which gives the device potential to perform more tests simultaneously at the same time.

  8. Early-life nutritional exposures and lifelong health: immediate and long-lasting impacts of probiotics, vitamin D, and breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Cristiana; Agostoni, Carlo; Davanzo, Riccardo; Hyppönen, Elina; Isolauri, Erika; Meltzer, Helle M; Steegers-Theunissen, Régine P M; Cetin, Irene

    2017-02-01

    Pregnancy and infancy comprise the most critical stages for conditioning an individual's health, with a number of implications for subsequent risks of morbidity, mortality, and reproductive health. Nutrition may influence both the overall pregnancy outcome and the growth trajectory and immune system of the fetus and infant, with short- and long-term effects on the health of the offspring. Within this context, leading experts at Expo Milano 2015 in Milan, Italy, discussed up-to-date knowledge while providing suggestions and challenges before, during, and after pregnancy. This narrative review summarizes the key issues raised by the experts concerning the interplay between the nutritional environment from conception to early infancy and the offspring's immediate and lifelong health, with a particular focus on epigenetic mechanisms, probiotics, vitamin D, and breastfeeding. Taken together, the findings strengthen the awareness that nutritional exposures occurring from preconception to the postnatal period may be strong determinants of the offspring's health and may provide supportive evidence for current nutritional recommendations and guidelines for pregnant women and infants. Critical topics to be addressed in future research and translated into recommendations of public health relevance are also highlighted. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Nutrition knowledge and practices, and consumption of vitamin A--rich plants by rural Nepali participants and nonparticipants in a kitchen-garden program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Katharine M; Specio, Sheila E; Shrestha, Parvati; Brown, Kenneth H; Allen, Lindsay H

    2005-06-01

    Food-based nutrition interventions, including kitchen gardens and nutrition education, offer a potentially sustainable approach to reducing multiple nutritional deficiencies, but they have been poorly evaluated in developing countries. In a poor region of the terai (the flat, subtropical agricultural region that borders on India) in rural Nepal, we developed and evaluated the impact of a nutrition program added to the Market Access for Rural Development (MARD) Project. The primary objective of the MARD Project was to augment household income by increasing the production of high-economic-value crops. The objective of the nutrition program was to increase vitamin A and iron intakes by promoting kitchen gardens (training, technical assistance, and seed distribution) and nutrition education. One-third of the kitchen-garden program participants also attended nutrition education or agricultural training sessions that were part of the MARD Project. The program was evaluated after 36 months by a cross-sectional nutrition survey in 430 MARD households with kitchen gardens and 389 non-MARD control households. The lack of knowledge about nutrition, including the causes, prevention, and treatment of night-blindness and anemia, was remarkable. However, compared with control households, the kitchen-gardens group had significantly more nutrition knowledge (38% vs. 13% knew one of the causes of night-blindness, and 17% vs. 3% knew one of the causes of anemia), were more likely to feed special complementary foods to infants and to preserve food, and consumed more of 16 types of home-produced micronutrient-rich vegetables and fruits. Although the cross-sectional nature of the study limits our ability to attribute these differences to the program, we observed a striking lack of nutrition knowledge in these communities, and a clear opportunity to increase the intake of vitamin A through home production of vitamin A-rich plants.

  10. Nutritional Health of Indonesian Adolescent Girls: the role of riboflavin and vitamin A on iron status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillon, D.

    2005-01-01

    In developing countries, adolescent girls often have anemia and micronutrient deficiencies. The objective of this thesis was to investigate the role of riboflavin or vitamin A as determinant of anemia and iron deficiency in Indonesian adolescent girls.

  11. Planning and Budgeting for Nutrition Programs in Tanzania: Lessons Learned From the National Vitamin A Supplementation Program

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    Margaret Benjamin Lyatuu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Micronutrient deficiency in Tanzania is a significant public health problem, with vitamin A deficiency (VAD affecting 34% of children aged 6 to 59 months. Since 2007, development partners have worked closely to advocate for the inclusion of twice-yearly vitamin A supplementation and deworming (VASD activities with budgets at the subnational level, where funding and implementation occur. As part of the advocacy work, a VASD planning and budgeting tool (PBT was developed and is used by district officials to justify allocation of funds. Helen Keller International (HKI and the Tanzania Food and Nutrition Centre (TFNC conduct reviews of VASD funds and health budgets annually in all districts to monitor the impact of advocacy efforts. This paper presents the findings of the fiscal year (FY 2010 district budget annual review. The review was intended to answer the following questions regarding district-level funding: (1 how many funds were allocated to nutrition-specific activities in FY 2010? (2 how many funds were allocated specifically to twice-yearly VASD activities in FY 2010? and (3 how have VASD funding allocations changed over time? Methods: Budgets from all 133 districts in Tanzania were accessed, reviewed and documented to identify line item funds allocated for VASD and other nutrition activities in FY 2010. Retrospective data from prior annual reviews for VASD were used to track trends in funding. The data were collected using specific data forms and then transcribed into an excel spreadsheet for analysis. Results: The total funds allocated in Tanzania’s districts in FY 2010 amounted to US$1.4 million of which 92% were for VASD. Allocations for VASD increased from US$0.387 million to US$1.3 million between FY 2005 and FY 2010. Twelve different nutrition activities were identified in budgets across the 133 districts. Despite the increased trend, the percentage of districts allocating sufficient funds to implement VAS (as defined

  12. Nutritional supplementation of hop rho iso-alpha acids, berberine, vitamin D₃, and vitamin K₁ produces a favorable bone biomarker profile supporting healthy bone metabolism in postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Joseph J; Holick, Michael F; Lerman, Robert H; Konda, Veera R; Minich, Deanna M; Desai, Anuradha; Chen, Tai C; Austin, Melissa; Kornberg, Jacob; Chang, Jyh-Lurn; Hsi, Alex; Bland, Jeffrey S; Tripp, Matthew L

    2011-05-01

    Metabolic syndrome poses additional risk for postmenopausal women who are already at risk for osteoporosis. We hypothesized that a nutritional supplement containing anti-inflammatory phytochemicals and essential bone nutrients would produce a favorable bone biomarker profile in postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome. In this 14-week, randomized trial, 51 women were instructed to consume a modified Mediterranean-style, low-glycemic-load diet and to engage in aerobic exercise. Those in the intervention arm (n = 25) additionally received 200 mg hop rho iso-alpha acids, 100 mg berberine sulfate trihydrate, 500 IU vitamin D₃, and 500 μg vitamin K₁ twice daily. Forty-five women completed the study. Baseline nutrient intake did not differ between arms. Compared with baseline, the intervention arm exhibited an approximate 25% mean decrease (P vitamin D₃, and vitamin K₁ produced a more favorable bone biomarker profile indicative of healthy bone metabolism in postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome.

  13. Changes on metabolic parameters induced by acute cannabinoid administration (CBD, THC in a rat experimental model of nutritional vitamin A deficiency

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    Loubna El Amrani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vitamin A deficiency can result from malnutrition, malabsorption of vitamin A, impaired vitamin metabolism associated with liver disease, or chronic debilitating diseases like HIV infection or cancer. Background & aims: Cannabis administration has been described as a palliative symptom management therapy in such pathological stages. Therefore, this research aimed to study the effects of acute administration of cannabidiol (CBD or thetrahydrocannabinol (THC on the levels of retinol in plasma and in the liver, and biochemical parameters related to lipid and glucose metabolism (cholesterolaemia, triglyceridemia and glycemia in a rat experimental model of vitamin A deficiency. Methods: The experimental animal model of Vitamin A deficiency was developed during a 50-day experimental period in which rats consumed a vitamin A-free diet. Cannabidiol (10 mg/kg body weight or thetrahydrocannabinol (5 mg/kg body weight were administered intraperitoneally 2 hours prior to sacrifice of the animals. Results: The nutritional deficiency caused a significant decrease in plasmatic and liver contents of retinol and biochemical parameters of glycemic, lipidic, and mineral metabolism. Acute intraperitoneal administration of Cannabidiol and thetrahydrocannabinol did not improve the indices of vitamin A status in either control or vitamin A-deficient rats. However, it had a significant effect on specific biochemical parameters such as glucose, triglycerides, and cholesterol. Conclusion: Under our experimental conditions, the reported effects of cannabinoid administration on certain signs of nutritional vitamin A deficiency appeared to be mediated through mechanisms other than changes in retinol metabolism or its mobilization after the acute administration of such compounds.

  14. Vitamin A and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... supported by your browser. Home Bone Basics Nutrition Vitamin A and Bone Health Publication available in: PDF ( ... Find More Information? For Your Information What Is Vitamin A? Vitamin A is a family of compounds ...

  15. Determination of Vitamin E and Vitamin A in Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals by Normal-Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography: Collaborative Study, Final Action 2012.10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Adrienne

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the AOAC Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals (SPIFAN) project is to establish international consensus methods for infant formula and adult nutritionals, which will benefit intermarket supply and dispute resolution. A collaborative study was conducted on AOAC First Action Method 2012.10 Simultaneous Determination of 13-cis and All-trans Vitamin A Palmitate (Retinyl Palmitate), Vitamin A Acetate (Retinyl Acetate), and Total Vitamin E (α-Tocopherol and D-α-tocopherol acetate) in Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals by Normal-Phase HPLC. Fifteen laboratories from 11 countries participated in an interlaboratory study to determine 13-cis and all-trans vitamin A palmitate (retinyl palmitate), vitamin A acetate (retinyl acetate), and total vitamin E (α-tocopherol and D-α-tocopherol acetate) in infant formula and adult nutritionals by normal-phase HPLC and all laboratories returned valid data. Eighteen test portions of nine blind duplicates of a variety of infant formula and adult nutritional products were used in the study. The matrixes included milk-based and soy-based hydrolyzed protein as well as a low fat product. Each of the samples was prepared fresh and analyzed in singlicate. As the number of samples exceeded the recommended number to be prepared in a single day, analysis took place over 2 days running 12 samples on day one and 10 samples on day two. The reference standard stock was prepared once and the six-point curve diluted freshly on each day. Results obtained from all 15 laboratories are reported. The RSDR for total vitamin A (palmitate or acetate) ranged from 6.51 to 22.61% and HorRat values ranged from 0.33 to 1.25. The RSDR for total vitamin E (as tocopherol equivalents) ranged from 3.84 to 10.78% and HorRat values ranged from 0.27 to 1.04. Except for an adult low fat matrix which generated reproducibility RSD >40% for some isomers, most SPIFAN matrixes gave results within the acceptance criteria of <16

  16. Effects of vitamin B-6 nutrition on benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptor binding in the developing rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borek, J.P.; Guilarte, T.R. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1990-02-26

    A dietary deficiency of vitamin B-6 promotes seizure activity in neonatal animals and human infants. Previous studied have shown that neonatal vitamin B-6 deprivation results in reduced levels of brain gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and increased binding at the GABA site of the GABA/BDZ receptor complex. Since the GABA and BDZ receptors are allosterically linked, this study was undertaken to determine if vitamin B-6 deprivation had an effect on BDZ receptor binding. Benzodiazepine receptor binding isotherms using {sup 3}H-flunitrazepam as ligand were performed in the presence and absence of 10 {mu}M GABA. The results indicate a significant increase in the binding affinity (Kd) in the presence of GABA in cerebellar membranes from deficient rat pups at 14 days of age with no effect on receptor number (Bmax). By 28 days of age, the increase in Kd was no longer present. No change in Kd or Bmax was observed in cortical tissue from deficient animals at 14 or 28 days of age. Preliminary studies of GABA-enhancement of {sup 3}H-flunitrazepam binding indicate that vitamin B-6 deficiency also induces alterations in the ability of GABA to enhance BZD receptor binding. In summary, these results indicate that the effects of vitamin B-6 deprivation on BDZ receptor binding are region specific and age related.

  17. Determination of vitamin A (retinol) in infant and medical nutritional formulas with AOAC method 992.06 using a modified extraction procedure: single-laboratory validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Linda B; Schimpf, Karen J; Stiner, Lisa A; Schmitz, Daniel J

    2010-01-01

    The applicability of AOAC Official Method 992.06, vitamin A (retinol) in milk-based infant formula can be extended to specialty infant formulas, and medical and adult nutritional products with a few minor modifications to the sample preparation procedure. Currently, AOAC Official Method 992.06 is only applicable to milk-based infant formulas containing >500 IU vitamin A per reconstituted quart. When this method is used as written to test specialty infant formulas, vitamin A recoveries are low compared to results generated with alternate validated vitamin A methods. AOAC Method 992.06 vitamin A recoveries can be improved significantly in specialty infant formulas if the amount of potassium hydroxide used during the saponification step is doubled. With this one minor modification to the sample preparation procedure, AOAC Method 992.06 demonstrates acceptable precision and accuracy for the quantitation of vitamin A (retinol) in specialty infant formulas, milk- and soy-based infant formulas, and adult and medical nutritionals. Because increasing the amount of potassium hydroxide can cause emulsions to form, 2-4 mL aliquots of reagent alcohol may need to be added to some samples to separate the organic and aqueous layers during the extraction step. A single-laboratory validation of these modifications was completed. During validation, 15 different product matrixes were analyzed. The intermediate precision averaged 2.70% RSD, and spike recovery data averaged 96.3%.

  18. Efficacy of Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C) and/N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) Supplementation on Nutritional and Antioxidant Status of Male Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirabbasi, Elham; Shahar, Suzana; Manaf, Zahara Abdul; Rajab, Nor Fadilah; Manap, Roslina Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidant therapy has a potential to be introduced as therapeutic modality for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. This study aimed to determine the effect of antioxidant supplementation [ascorbic acid and N-Acetylcysteine (NAC)] on nutritional and antioxidant status in male COPD patients. A parallel and single blind randomised controlled clinical trial (RCT) was conducted at two medical centers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Seventy-nine subjects were recruited and randomly divided into four trial arms (i.e., NAC, vitamin C, NAC+vitamin C and control groups) for six mo. The primary outcome was changes in body mass index by estimating power of 90% and significance level of psupplementation of NAC or vitamin C improved nutritional and antioxidant status of subjects.

  19. Improving the nutritional value of Golden Rice through increased pro-vitamin A content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paine, Jacqueline A; Shipton, Catherine A; Chaggar, Sunandha; Howells, Rhian M; Kennedy, Mike J; Vernon, Gareth; Wright, Susan Y; Hinchliffe, Edward; Adams, Jessica L; Silverstone, Aron L; Drake, Rachel

    2005-04-01

    "Golden Rice" is a variety of rice engineered to produce beta-carotene (pro-vitamin A) to help combat vitamin A deficiency, and it has been predicted that its contribution to alleviating vitamin A deficiency would be substantially improved through even higher beta-carotene content. We hypothesized that the daffodil gene encoding phytoene synthase (psy), one of the two genes used to develop Golden Rice, was the limiting step in beta-carotene accumulation. Through systematic testing of other plant psys, we identified a psy from maize that substantially increased carotenoid accumulation in a model plant system. We went on to develop "Golden Rice 2" introducing this psy in combination with the Erwinia uredovora carotene desaturase (crtI) used to generate the original Golden Rice. We observed an increase in total carotenoids of up to 23-fold (maximum 37 microg/g) compared to the original Golden Rice and a preferential accumulation of beta-carotene.

  20. Golden rice: Development, Nutritional Assessment, and Potential for Alleviating Vitamin A Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden Rice (GR) is a transgenic product engineered to produce beta-carotene in the rice endosperm. It has been developed as a means to combat vitamin A malnutrition, which exists throughout much of the developing world (especially in rice eating populations) and can lead to blindness, increased sus...

  1. Simultaneous determination of vitamins D2 and D3 by electrospray ionization LC/MS/MS in infant formula and adult nutritionals: First Action 2012.11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Donald L; Black, Charles K; Denison, James E; Seipelt, Charles T; Baugh, Steve

    2013-01-01

    A method was developed for the analysis of vitamins D2 and D3 in a variety of nutritional products. To extract vitamins D2 and D3 from products containing substantial amounts of fat, a saponification with alcoholic potassium hydroxide is required to release the vitamin D. Trideuterium-labeled vitamin D is added to the sample prior to saponification, and quantitation is achieved using linear regression of the ratio of peak response for 2H3-D and vitamin D. Acceptable linearity was achieved between 0.6 and 27 microg/100 g with a correlation requirement of >0.999. The method detection limit of 0.02 microg/100 g was verified by spiking placebo products carried through the saponification and extraction steps of the method. At the quantitation limit (0.12 microg/100 g), the signal was easily distinguished from the background. Vitamin D3 spike recoveries ranged from 107 to 119% at the low level and 104 to 116% at the high-level spike. Vitamin D2 recoveries were 105 to 116% and 91 to 110% for the low- and high-level spikes, respectively. SRM 1849a has a certified concentration of 11.1 +/- 1.7 microg/100 g; using this standard reference material, the range of 9.4 to 12.8 microg/100 g was met on each of the 6 days. Method repeatability, determined in 12 vitamin D3 product matrixes over 6 days, ranged from 3.9 to 48%. The adult nutrition-milk protein sample was the most notable; it failed within-day, as well as day-to-day, precision requirements. There was no attempt to optimize the sample preparation to accommodate any problem matrix.

  2. Long-term outcome in children with nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melike Sezgin Evim

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Vitamin B12 deficiency is frequently observed in developing countries. Herein we report the long-term clinical and laboratory outcomes in 45 children presented with various symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency.Materials and Methods: Symptoms and physical findings, and percentiles for weight, height, and head circumference at presentation were recorded. The educational level of the patients’ mothers, vitamin B12 deficiency-related diseases and family income data were collected. Complete blood count, serum vitamin B12, folate, iron, iron binding capacity and ferritin, and plasma homocysteine levels were recorded measured at presentation. The patients were treated with vitamin B12, as follows: 1 mg/d IM for 1 week, followed by 1 mg IM QWK for 2 weeks, and then monthly 1mg injections. Patients were neurologically and hematologically re-evaluated after treatment. The visual evoked potential (VEP test was used to examine the integrity and function of the visual pathway. Brainstem evoked potential (BAEP responses were used to analyze auditory function. Neuromotor development was assessed using Denver II Development Screening Test. Results: The mean age of 20 male and 25 female patients was 5.6±5.9 years (range: 1.4 months-17 years. The most common symptoms at presentation were weakness, failure to thrive, and hematologic manifestations (pallor, petechiae, ecchymosis. Abnormal neurologic findings at presentation were observed in 20% of the patients, and were more commonly observed in those <2 years. VEP, BAEP, and Denver II Development tests were performed in 66% of the patients one year after vitamin B12 replacement was started. VEP and BAEP interval prolongation was observed in 37% and 17% of the cases, respectively. Denver II Development Test results showed developmental delay in 20% of the patients tested.Conclusion: All the patients achieved full hematologic recovery within 1 month of treatment onset. Neurological symptoms resolved

  3. Nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, and nicotinamide riboside: a molecular evaluation of NAD+ precursor vitamins in human nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogan, Katrina L; Brenner, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Although baseline requirements for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) synthesis can be met either with dietary tryptophan or with less than 20 mg of daily niacin, which consists of nicotinic acid and/or nicotinamide, there is growing evidence that substantially greater rates of NAD+ synthesis may be beneficial to protect against neurological degeneration, Candida glabrata infection, and possibly to enhance reverse cholesterol transport. The distinct and tissue-specific biosynthetic and/or ligand activities of tryptophan, nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, and the newly identified NAD+ precursor, nicotinamide riboside, reviewed herein, are responsible for vitamin-specific effects and side effects. Because current data suggest that nicotinamide riboside may be the only vitamin precursor that supports neuronal NAD+ synthesis, we present prospects for human nicotinamide riboside supplementation and propose areas for future research.

  4. [Metabolic and nutritional neuropathies: update in diabetes, vitamin B12 and copper deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franques, J; Gazzola, S

    2013-12-01

    Metabolic and deficiency neuropathies retain a growing interest because of their important prevalence. The dismemberment of diabetic neuropathies is proceeded, letting distinct pathophysiological mechanisms appear. So, even if glycaemic control remains determining for preventing the neuropathy associated with type 1 diabetes, it seems to have a restricted role with type 2 diabetes in which other metabolic factors are involved. The diagnosis of neuropathy due to B12 vitamin deficiency remains a real challenge for the clinician. Indeed, positive and negative predictive values of serum B12 and metabolites assay are weak, only a good therapeutic response allows a reliable diagnostic. It is so recommended to know the clinical and contextual particularities of this etiology in order to not delay the vitamin substitution, determining for the functional outcome. Finally, copper deficiency remains an unknown cause of neuropathy which is suitable to raise in case of malabsorption but also and especially in case of abuse of dental adhesive rich in zinc.

  5. Determination of vitamin B12 in infant formula and adult nutritionals by surface plasmon resonance: First Action 2011.16 (test kit method).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Pathik; O'Kane, Anthony A; Dowell, Dawn

    2012-01-01

    At the "Standards Development and International Harmonization: AOAC INTERNATIONAL Mid-Year Meeting" on June 29, 2011, an Expert Review Panel (ERP) agreed to further examine AOAC Official Method 2011.01, "Determination of Vitamin B12 by Surface Plasmon Resonance," for use with infant formula and adult nutritionals. The original collaborative study was conducted using the Biacore Q biosensor instrument and the Biacore Q Qflex Kit Vitamin B12 PI. Samples included in the study were infant formula, cereals, premixes, vitamin tablets, dietary supplements, and baby food. Eleven laboratories participated in the collaborative study. The results demonstrated a repeatability RSD (RSDr) of 1.59-27.8 and HorRat values for reproducibility of 0.34-1.89 in samples with levels ranging from ppm to ppb. The assay studied is a label-free protein binding-based assay that uses the principle of surface plasmon resonance to measure the interaction between vitamin B12 and a specific binding protein by passing a portion of the prepared sample extract combined with binding protein solution across a functionalized sensor chip. The response from the functionalized sensor chip is given as free-binding protein, as the mixture binds to the prepared surface of the chip. The ready-to-use Qflex Kit Vitamin B12 PI provides the reagents and accessories necessary to perform this assay. AOAC Method 2011.01 was approved by the AOAC Method Committee on Food Nutrition for Official First Action status, applicable to a wide range of food products, dietary supplements, and multivitamin premixes. After evaluation of the validation data available, an ERP agreed in June 2011 that the method meets standard method performance requirements, as articulated by the Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals. The ERP granted the method First Action status, applicable to infant formula and adult/pediatric nutritional formula.

  6. Water, electrolytes, vitamins and trace elements – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Working group for developing the guidelines for parenteral nutrition of The German Association for Nutritional Medicine

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A close cooperation between medical teams is necessary when calculating the fluid intake of parenterally fed patients. Fluids supplied parenterally, orally and enterally, other infusions, and additional fluid losses (e.g. diarrhea must be considered. Targeted diagnostic monitoring (volume status is required in patients with disturbed water or electrolyte balance. Fluid requirements of adults with normal hydration status is approximately 30–40 ml/kg body weight/d, but fluid needs usually increase during fever. Serum electrolyte concentrations should be determined prior to PN, and patients with normal fluid and electrolyte balance should receive intakes follwing standard recommendations with PN. Additional requirements should usually be administered via separate infusion pumps. Concentrated potassium (1 mval/ml or 20% NaCl solutions should be infused via a central venous catheter. Electrolyte intake should be adjusted according to the results of regular laboratory analyses. Individual determination of electrolyte intake is required when electrolyte balance is initially altered (e.g. due to chronic diarrhea, recurring vomiting, renal insufficiency etc.. Vitamins and trace elements should be generally substituted in PN, unless there are contraindications. The supplementation of vitamins and trace elements is obligatory after a PN of >1 week. A standard dosage of vitamins and trace elements based on current dietary reference intakes for oral feeding is generally recommended unless certain clinical situations require other intakes.

  7. Socioeconomic factors are associated with folate and vitamin B12 intakes and related biomarkers concentrations in European adolescents: the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesia, Iris; Mouratidou, Theodora; González-Gross, Marcela; Novakovic, Romana; Breidenassel, Christina; Jiménez-Pavón, David; Huybrechts, Inge; De Henauw, Stefaan; Geelen, Anouk; Gottrand, Frédéric; Kafatos, Anthony; Mistura, Lorenza; de Heredia, Fátima Pérez; Widhalm, Kurt; Manios, Yanis; Molnar, Denes; Stehle, Peter; Gurinovic, Mirjana; Cavelaars, Adrienne E J M; Van't Veer, Pieter; Moreno, Luis A

    2014-03-01

    Because socioeconomic factors (SEFs) may influence dietary quality and vitamin intakes, this study aimed to examine associations between socioeconomic factors and folate and vitamin B12 intakes as well as their related biomarkers in the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence study. Vitamin intakes were obtained from two 24-hour recalls in 2253 participants (47% males). Vitamin B biomarkers were assessed in a subsample of 977 participants (46% males). Socioeconomic factors were assessed by questionnaire, and 1-way analysis of covariance and linear regression analysis were applied. For males and females, mean intakes of folate were 211.19 and 177.18 μg/d, and for vitamin B12, 5.98 and 4.54 μg/d, respectively. Levels of plasma folate, red blood cell folate, serum B12, and holotranscobalamin were 18.74, 807.19, 330.64, and 63.04 nmol/L in males, respectively, and 19.13, 770.16, 377.9, and 65.63 nmol/L in females, respectively. Lower folate intakes were associated with several SEFs, including maternal and paternal education in both sexes. Regarding folate biomarkers, lower plasma folate intakes were associated with single/shared care in males and with lower paternal occupation in females. Lower vitamin B12 intakes were associated with almost all the studied SEFs, except paternal occupation in both sexes. In females, when considering vitamin B12 biomarkers, lower plasma vitamin B12 was associated with lower maternal education and occupation, and lower holotranscobalamin was associated with lower maternal education and lower paternal occupation. In conclusion, from the set of socioeconomic determinants studied in a sample of European adolescents, maternal education and paternal occupation were more consistently associated with folate and vitamin B12 intakes and biomarkers concentrations.

  8. Dietary vitamin D intake and risk of type 2 diabetes in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition – the EPIC-InterAct study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Sascha; Linseisen, Jakob; Rohrmann, Sabine; Beulens, Joline WJ; Buijsse, Brian; Amiano, Pilar; Ardanaz, Eva; Balkau, Beverley; Boeing, Heiner; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Fagherazzi, Guy; Franks, Paul W; Gavrila, Diana; Grioni, Sara; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy J; Khaw, Kay Tee; Masters, Tilman Kühn; Mattiello, Amalia; Molina-Montes, Esther; Nilsson, Peter M; Overvad, Kim; Quirós, J. Ramón; Rolandsson, Olov; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Saieva, Calogero; Slimani, Nadia; Sluijs, Ivonne; Spijkerman, Annemieke MW; Tjonneland, Anne; Tumino, Rosario; van der A, Daphne L; Zamora-Ros, Raul; Sharp, Stephen J; Langenberg, Claudia; Forouhi, Nita G; Riboli, Elio; Wareham, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Background Prospective cohort studies have indicated that serum vitamin D levels are inversely related to risk of type 2 diabetes. However, such studies cannot determine the source of vitamin D. Therefore, we examined the association of dietary vitamin D intake with incident type 2 diabetes within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-InterAct study in a heterogeneous European population including 8 countries with large geographical variation. Methods Using a case-cohort design, 11,245 incident cases of type 2 diabetes and a representative subcohort (N=15,798) were included in the analyses. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for type 2 diabetes were calculated using a Prentice-weighted Cox regression adjusted for potential confounders. 24-h diet recall data from a subsample (N=2347) were used to calibrate habitual intake data derived from dietary questionnaires. Results Median follow-up time was 10.8 years. Dietary vitamin D intake was not significantly associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes. HR and 95 % CIs for the highest compared to the lowest quintile of uncalibrated vitamin D intake was 1.09 (0.97-1.22), (ptrend=0.17). No associations were observed in a sex-specific analysis. The overall pooled effect [HR (95% CI)] using the continuous calibrated variable was 1.00 (0.97-1.03) per increase of 1 μg/day dietary vitamin D. Conclusion This observational study does not support an association between higher dietary vitamin D intake and type-2 diabetes incidence. This result has to be interpreted in light of the limited contribution of dietary vitamin D on the overall vitamin D status of a person. PMID:24253760

  9. Nutritional knowledge as a determinant of vitamin and mineral supplementation during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Alina D; Niţă, Otilia; Graur Arhire, Lidia I; Popescu, Raluca M; Botnariu, Gina E; Mihalache, Laura; Graur, Mariana

    2013-12-01

    Pregnancy is a critical period for both woman and baby from a nutritional perspective. Nutritional education is considered an important tool for promoting a healthy lifestyle, but has not been studied as a determinant for maternal use of supplements during pregnancy, especially in Romania, where evidence about pregnancy and nutrition is scarce. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between nutritional knowledge and the use of folic acid, iron and multivitamin supplements during pregnancy and to assess the influence of socio-demographic factors and prenatal care. We conducted a cross-sectional study on a sample of 400 pregnant women admitted to the Cuza-Vodă Obstetrics and Gynaecology Clinical Hospital in Iaşi, Romania, during August-September 2010. We collected self-reported data regarding socio-demographic characteristics, number of prenatal check-ups and the use of folic acid, iron and multivitamin supplements during pregnancy. We assessed nutritional knowledge using a standardized questionnaire divided into three sections: general nutritional recommendations for pregnant women; the roles of nutrients; and sources of nutrients. We used logistic regression to analyse the associations between these factors. The prevalence of the use of supplements during pregnancy was 48% for folic acid, 45.3% for iron and 68% for multivitamins. Above-average nutritional knowledge was independently associated with the use of folic acid (aOR, 4.7; 95% CI, 1.6-13.8), iron (aOR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.2-5.7) and multivitamins (aOR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.2-6.8). The use of folic acid was independently associated with a higher level of formal education (aOR, 5.2; 95% CI, 2.1-12.8) and an early start in prenatal care (aOR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.0-11.1). Women with a higher education (aOR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.1-4.9), more than 10 prenatal visits (aOR, 7.2; 95% CI, 3.4-15.0) and those who received advice on breastfeeding (aOR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1-3.5) were more likely to use iron during pregnancy. Similar

  10. Vitamin D: still a topical matter in children and adolescents. A position paper by the Committee on Nutrition of the French Society of Paediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidailhet, M; Mallet, E; Bocquet, A; Bresson, J-L; Briend, A; Chouraqui, J-P; Darmaun, D; Dupont, C; Frelut, M-L; Ghisolfi, J; Girardet, J-P; Goulet, O; Hankard, R; Rieu, D; Simeoni, U; Turck, D

    2012-03-01

    The aims of the present position paper by the Committee on Nutrition of the French Society of Paediatrics were to summarize the recently published data on vitamin D in infants, children and adolescents, i.e., on metabolism, physiological effects, and requirements and to make recommendations on supplementation after careful review of the evidence. Scientific evidence indicates that calcium and vitamin D play key roles in bone health. The current evidence, limited to observational studies, however, does not support other benefits for vitamin D. More targeted research should continue, especially interventional studies. In the absence of any underlying risk of vitamin D deficiency, the recommendations are as follows: pregnant women: a single dose of 80,000 to 100,000 IU at the beginning of the 7th month of pregnancy; breastfed infants: 1000 to 1200 IU/day; children less than 18 months of age, receiving milk supplemented with vitamin D: an additional daily dose of 600 to 800 IU; children less than 18 months of age receiving milk not supplemented with vitamin D: daily dose of 1000 to 1200 IU; children from 18 months to 5 years of age: 2 doses of 80,000 to 100,000 IU every winter (November and February). In the presence of an underlying risk of vitamin D deficiency (dark skin; lack of exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B [UVB] radiation from sunshine in summer; skin disease responsible for decreased exposure of the skin to UVB radiation from sunshine in summer; wearing skin-covering clothes in summer; intestinal malabsorption or maldigestion; cholestasis; renal insufficiency; nephrotic syndrome; drugs [rifampicin; antiepileptic treatment: phenobarbital, phenytoin]; obesity; vegan diet), it may be justified to start vitamin D supplementation in winter in children 5 to 10 years of age as well as to maintain supplementation of vitamin D every 3 months all year long in children 1 to 10 years of age and in adolescents. In some pathological conditions, doses of vitamin D can

  11. Octopus lipid and vitamin E composition: interspecies, interorigin, and nutritional variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrinha, Alvaro; Cruz, Rebeca; Gomes, Filipa; Mendes, Eulália; Casal, Susana; Morais, Simone

    2014-08-20

    Octopus vulgaris, Octopus maya, and Eledone cirrhosa from distinct marine environments [Northeast Atlantic (NEA), Northwest Atlantic (NWA), Eastern Central Atlantic, Western Central Atlantic (WCA), Pacific Ocean, and Mediterranean Sea] were characterized regarding their lipid and vitamin E composition. These species are those commercially more relevant worldwide. Significant interspecies and interorigin differences were observed. Unsaturated fatty acids account for more than 65% of total fatty acids, mostly ω-3 PUFA due to docosahexaenoic (18.4-29.3%) and eicosapentanoic acid (11.4-23.9%) contributions. The highest ω-3 PUFA amounts and ω-3/ω-6 ratios were quantified in the heaviest specimens, O. vulgaris from NWA, with high market price, and simultaneously in the lowest graded samples, E. cirrhosa from NEA, of reduced dimensions. Although having the highest cholesterol contents, E. cirrhosa from NEA and O. maya from WCA have also higher protective fatty acid indexes. Chemometric discrimination allowed clustering the selected species and several origins based on lipid and vitamin E profiles.

  12. Vitamin D status and community-acquired pneumonia: results from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeq A Quraishi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] level and history of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We identified 16,975 individuals (≥17 years from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III with documented 25(OHD levels. To investigate the association of 25(OHD with history of CAP in these participants, we developed a multivariable logistic regression model, adjusting for demographic factors (age, sex, race, poverty-to-income ratio, and geographic location, clinical data (body mass index, smoking status, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, diabetes mellitus, stroke, chronic kidney disease, neutropenia, and alcohol consumption, and season. Locally weighted scatterplot smoothing (LOWESS was used to depict the relationship between increasing 25(OHD levels and the cumulative frequency of CAP in the study cohort. RESULTS: The median [interquartile range (IQR] serum 25(OHD level was 24 (IQR 18-32 ng/mL. 2.1% [95% confidence interval (CI: 1.9-2.3] of participants reported experiencing a CAP within one year of their participation in the national survey. After adjusting for demographic factors, clinical data, and season, 25(OHD levels <30 ng/mL were associated with 56% higher odds of CAP [odds ratio 1.56; 95% confidence interval: 1.17-2.07] compared to levels ≥30 ng/mL. LOWESS analysis revealed a near linear relationship between vitamin D status and the cumulative frequency of CAP up to 25(OHD levels around 30 ng/mL. CONCLUSION: Among 16,975 participants in NHANES III, 25(OHD levels were inversely associated with history of CAP. Randomized controlled trials are warranted to determine the effect of optimizing vitamin D status on the risk of CAP.

  13. Vitamin D status and its associations with rheumatoid arthritis in Korean women: the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taeck-Hyun; Jin, Woo Sung; Park, Juwon; Choi, Hyun-Hee; Bae, Eun Jin

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, vitamin D status and its associations with rheumatoid arthritis in Korean women were investigated. Total 2,162 women’s data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey during 2008–2014 ware analyzed by complex sampling design logistic regression analysis and complex sampling design general linear model. Women who over 19 years old were included, and who has osteoporosis or abnormal parathyroid hormone or renal failure or liver cirrhosis or abnormal creatinine were excluded. Age and body mass index were used as covariate. In the present study, we have shown that vitamin D status were not associated with development of rheumatoid arthritis in Korean women as well were not associated with pain and quality of life in Korean women with rheumatoid arthritis. Based on the present study and considering the effects of vitamin D on fracture and osteoporosis, it can be suggested that additional cohort study and cost-effectiveness analysis are needed. PMID:28119885

  14. Nutritional status of iron, vitamin B12, folate, retinol and anemia in children 1 to 11 years old: Results of the Ensanut 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalpando, Salvador; Cruz, Vanessa de la; Shamah-Levy, Teresa; Rebollar, Rosario; Contreras-Manzano, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    To describe the frequency of anemia, iron, vitamin B12, folate, retinol and predictors of anemia among Mexican children from Ensanut 2012. Hemoglobin, ferritin, CRP, vitamin B12, retinol and folate concentrations were measured in 2 678 children aged 1-4 y and 4 275 children aged 5-11 y. Adjusted logistic regression models were constructed to assess the risk for anemia and micronutrient deficiencies. In preschoolers and scholars, the overall prevalence of anemia was 20.4 and 9.7%, iron deficiency 14 and 9.3%, low vitamin B12 (LB12S) 1.9 and 2.6%; Folate 0.30 and 0%, and retinol depletion (VADp) 15.7 and 2.3%, respectively. ID and VADp were negatively associated with Hb (coefficient: -0.38 and -0.45, pIron deficiency, anemia and VADp are some of the main nutritional problems among Mexican infants.

  15. Effect of nutrition on vitamin D status: studies on healthy and poorly nourished Brazilian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhares, E R; Jones, D A; Round, J M; Edwards, R H

    1984-04-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out of 412 healthy and 226 chronically malnourished children in Recife, Brazil. Anthropometric measurements, x-rays of hands and wrists, and biochemical data related to skeletal growth were obtained. Levels of plasma 25 hydroxyvitamin D were measured in both groups of children and both showed higher concentrations than those reported for normal European children. The high levels of 25 hydroxyvitamin D found in these two groups of Brazilian children are probably the result of the intense solar radiation in this part of Brazil and argue against the diet being an important source of vitamin D in poorly nourished children. Some bone abnormalities were seen in the underprivileged group of children but in view of our findings these were more likely to be a result of protein-energy malnutrition than rickets.

  16. Chemistry, nutritional sources, tissue distribution and metabolism of vitamin K with special reference to bone health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, M J; Bach, A; Kohlmeier, M

    1996-04-01

    Vitamin K occurs in nature as a series of compounds with a common 2-methyl- 1,4 naphthoquinone nucleus and differing isoprenoid side chains at the 3 position. They comprise a single major plant form, phylloquinone with a phytyl side chain and a family of bacterially synthesized menaquinones (MKs) with multiprenyl side chains. The major dietary source to humans is phylloquinone for which the chief food contributors are green, leafy vegetables followed by certain vegetable oils (soybean, rapeseed and olive oils). Recent analyses by high pressure liquid chromatography are now providing a wide-ranging database of phylloquinone in foods. Menaquinones are found in moderate concentrations in only a few foods such as cheeses (MK-8 and MK-9). A wider spectrum of MKs is synthesized by the gut microflora, and their intestinal absorption probably accounts for most of the hepatic stores, particularly those with very long side chains (MKs-10--13) synthesized by members of the genus Bacteroides. The site of absorption of floral MKs is not known, but reasonable concentrations are found in the terminal ileum where bile salt-mediated absorption is possible. Both phylloquinone and menaquinones are bioactive in hepatic gamma-carboxylation but long-chain MKs are less well absorbed. Liver stores of vitamin K are relatively small and predominantly MKs-7--13. The hepatic reserves of phylloquinone (approximately 10% of the total) are labile and turn over at a faster rate than menaquinones. Trabecular and cortical bone appear to contain substantial concentrations of both phylloquinone and menaquinones. A majority (approximately 60-70%) of the daily dietary intake of phylloquinone is lost to the body by excretion, which emphasizes the need for a continuous dietary supply to maintain tissue reserves.

  17. Simultaneous determination of vitamins D2 and D3 by LC-MS/MS in infant formula and adult nutritionals: First Action 2011.13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Donald L; Black, Charles K; Denison, James E; Seipelt, Charles T

    2012-01-01

    During the "Standards Development and International Harmonization: AOAC INTERNATIONAL Mid-Year Meeting" held on June 29, 2011, an Expert Review Panel (ERP) on behalf of AOAC INTERNATIONAL adopted the method "Simultaneous Determination of Vitamins D2 and D3 by LC-MS/MS in Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals" as an AOAC Official First Action method. Vitamins D2 and D3 are extracted from the sample using pentane-ether; the extract is collected and dried under nitrogen. Vitamin D is separated from interfering compounds using UPLC, and quantitated using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Preliminary data showed the intermediate precision ranged from 3.34-8.05% and an accuracy range of 98.5-111% over the samples tested for vitamin D3. For vitamin D2, the intermediate precision ranged from 2.37-5.45% and accuracy ranged from 96.4-104% over the four matrixes evaluated. The analytical range for the method is bounded by the concentrations of the working standards, 21-270 ng/mL, and is equivalent to 0.168-2.16 mcg/100 g in ready-to-feed product. The practical method quantitation limit is 0.168 mcg/100 g product with method detection limit of 60 ng/100 g product. The ERP reviewed the data and determined that the performance characteristics of the method met the standard method performance requirements, and therefore the method was granted First Action status.

  18. Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for staff development or offered staff development on nutrition and dietary behavior to those who teach health education increased ... for staff development or offered staff development on nutrition and dietary behavior to those who teach health education increased ...

  19. Vitamin D deficiency as a risk factor for cystic fibrosis-related diabetes in the Scandinavian Cystic Fibrosis Nutritional Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pincikova, T; Nilsson, Kristine Kahr; Moen, I E;

    2011-01-01

    Many cystic fibrosis patients are vitamin D-insufficient. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes is a major complication of cystic fibrosis. The literature suggests that vitamin D might possess certain glucose-lowering properties. We aimed to assess the relationship between vitamin D and cystic fibrosis...

  20. Relationship between the Nutritional Status of Vitamin A per Trimester of Pregnancy with Maternal Anthropometry and Anemia after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Sabrina; Matos, Andréa; da Cruz, Suelem Pereira; Pereira, Silvia; Saboya, Carlos; Ramalho, Andréa

    2017-09-08

    The aim of this study was to compare the nutritional status of vitamin A per trimester of pregnancy, as well as to assess its influence on pre-pregnancy BMI, total gestational weight gain (TGWG) and presence of anemia in women who had previously undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). An analytical, longitudinal and retrospective study comprising 30 pregnant women who had previously undergone RYGB was undertaken. In all trimesters of pregnancy, the serum concentrations of retinol, β-carotene, stages of vitamin A deficiency (VAD), night blindness (NB), anemia and anthropometric variables were assessed. VAD in pregnancy affected 90% of women, 86.7% developed NB and 82.8% had mild VAD. TGWG above/below the recommended range was related to the low serum concentrations of β-carotene (p = 0.045) in the second trimester and women with TGWG above the recommended range showed 100% of inadequacy of this nutrient in the third trimester. Among the pregnant women with anemia, 90.9% had VAD and 86.4% had NB. This study highlights the importance of monitoring the nutritional status of vitamin A in prenatal care, due to its relationship with TGWG and the high percentage of VAD and NB found since the beginning of pregnancy. It also reaffirms the use of the cut-off <1.05 μmol/L for determining VAD.

  1. Normal Vitamin Levels and Nutritional Indices in Alzheimer’s Disease Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment or Dementia with Normal Body Mass Indexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulstein, Ingun; Bøhmer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Evidence supports an association between vitamin deficiencies and cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). If vitamin deficiencies are causative for AD development, they should be detectable during very early stages of AD. Here we investigated nutritional factors among home-living patients diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or mild dementia due to AD, compared to healthy controls. Our study included 73 patients with AD (25 with MCI, 48 with dementia) and 63 cognitively intact age-matched controls. All participants underwent cognitive testing, somatic examination, and measurements of vitamins A, B1, B6, folate, B12, C, D, and E, and F2-α-isoprostane. Results are given as mean (SD). MMSE scores were 29.1 (1.0) for healthy controls, 27.4 (1.8) for patients with MCI, and 24.3 (3.2) for patients with dementia. Vitamin concentrations for the these groups, respectively, were as follows: B1 (nmol/l), 157 (29), 161 (35), and 161 (32); B6 (nmol/l), 57 (63), 71 (104), and 58 (44); folate (mmol/l), 23 (9), 26 (10), and 23 (11); B12 (pmol/l), 407 (159), 427 (116), and 397 (204); C (μmol/l), 63 (18), 61 (16), and 63 (29); A (μmol/l), 2.3 (0.6), 2.2 (0.5), and 2.3 (0.5); E (μmol/l), 36 (6.3), 36 (6.9), and 36 (8.2); 25-OH vitamin D (nmol/l), 65 (18), 61 (19), and 65 (20); and 8-iso-PGFα (pg/ml), 64 (27); 60 (19), and 66 (51). These concentrations did not significantly differ (p≤0.05) between the three groups. Our results do not support the hypothesis that vitamin deficiencies play a causative role in the development of early cognitive impairment. PMID:27716664

  2. Implications of the nutrition transition for vitamin D intake and status in Aboriginal groups in the Canadian Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hayek Fares, Jessy; Weiler, Hope A

    2016-09-01

    Aboriginal Canadians have low intakes of vitamin D and are shifting away from consumption of traditional foods. Higher body mass index, skin pigmentation, and geographic latitude of residence further predispose Canadian Aboriginal populations to low vitamin D status. Low vitamin D status could compromise bone health and other health outcomes. Studies assessing vitamin D status of different Aboriginal groups are limited. The aim of this review is to examine the literature on vitamin D status and intakes of Canadian Aboriginal populations living in the Arctic. PubMed was searched for relevant articles published from 1983 to 2013. The prevalence of 25-hydroxy vitamin D deficiency ranged from 13.9% to 76.0% among children and adults in the summer. Furthermore, mean vitamin D intakes among all age groups were below the estimated average requirement. As vitamin D deficiency has been recently associated with chronic diseases, and Aboriginal populations living in the Arctic are at high risk for low vitamin D status, their vitamin D status should be assessed regularly across seasons.

  3. Vitamin A Deficiency Among School Children of Bareilly: Crucial Role of Nutrition Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Swati

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To find out the prevalence of VAD among urban school children of District Bareilly, to identify the associated biosocial factors and to suggest the suitable measures to prevent xerophthalmia among them. Methods: Six month cross sectional study was conducted among school going children in 2 purposively selected schools in an urban area of Bareilly District. A structured proforma was used to collect the information. Chi- square test was used to analyze data. Results: Of the 800 children examined, the overall prevalence of VAD was found to be 6.37%. The prevalence of VAD was highest in 11-12 years of age group children and lowest in the 3-5 years age group (P-value >.05. The prevalence of VAD was slightly higher among boys as compared to girls (P-value >.05. The prevalence of VAD was significantly higher among the children belonging to lower socioeconomic class as compared to those belonging to upper and middle socioeconomic class (P-value >.05. Nearly 48.5% of children were found to be underweight while 12.25% were overweight. Nearly a quarter of children were found to be anemic. Conclusion: Nutrition education regarding regular intake of plant foods rich in carotene such as green leafy vegetables, yellow fruits, carrots and animal foods containing retinol like fish liver oil, fish, liver, egg, meat, milk, butter, cheese, and use of fortified food like vanaspati, margarine, dried skimmed milk should be strengthened. [National J of Med Res 2012; 2(2.000: 188-190

  4. Evaluation of Flow-Injection Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Rapid and High-Throughput Quantitative Determination of B-Vitamins in Nutritional Supplements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhandari, Deepak [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The use of flow-injection electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry for rapid and high-throughput mass spectral analysis of selected B-vitamins, viz. B1, B2, B3, B5, and B6, in nutritional formulations was demonstrated. A simple and rapid (~5 min) in-tube sample preparation was performed by adding extraction solvent to a powdered sample aliquot followed by agitation, centrifugation, and filtration to recover an extract for analysis. Automated flow injection introduced 1 L of the extracts directly into the mass spectrometer ion source without chromatographic separation. Sample-to-sample analysis time was 60 s representing significant improvement over conventional liquid chromatography approaches which typically require 25-45 min, and often require more significant sample preparation procedures. Quantitative capabilities of the flow-injection analysis were tested using the method of standard additions and NIST standard reference material (SRM 3280) multivitamin/multielement tablets. The quantity determined for each B-vitamin in SRM 3280 was within the statistical range provided for the respective certified values. The same sample preparation and analysis approach was also applied to two different commercial vitamin supplement tablets and proved to be successful in the quantification of the selected B-vitamins as evidenced by an agreement with the labels values and the results obtained using isotope dilution liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  5. Clinical presentation and metabolic consequences in 40 breastfed infants with nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency--what have we learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honzik, Tomas; Adamovicova, Miriam; Smolka, Vratislav; Magner, Martin; Hruba, Eva; Zeman, Jiri

    2010-11-01

    Maternal vitamin B(12) (Cbl) deficiency causes nutritional Cbl deficiency in breastfed infants. To analyse clinical presentation and metabolic consequences in 40 breastfed infants with Cbl deficiency. Cbl levels in serum and breast milk were determined by an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay, methylmalonic acid level by GC/MS, plasma homocysteine by HPLC and propionylcarnitine by MS/MS. Profound Cbl deficiency was found in 17 children (69 ± 17 ng/l, controls 200-900), and milder Cbl deficiency in 23 children (167 ± 40 ng/l). Maternal Cbl deficiency was mostly caused by insufficient Cbl absorption. Only six mothers were vegetarian. The average age at diagnosis was 4.4 ± 2.5 months. Clinical symptoms included failure to thrive (48% of children), hypotonia (40%), developmental delay (38%) and microcephaly (23%). 63% of children had anaemia (megaloblastic in 28% of all children). All but one patient had methylmalonic aciduria, 80% of patients had hyperhomocysteinemia and 87% had increased aminotransferases. Propionylcarnitine was elevated in two out of 25 infants. Comparing groups with severe and mild Cbl deficiency, a marked difference was found in severity of clinical and laboratory changes. Maternal Cbl status and diagnostic delay are the major factors influencing severity and progression of Cbl deficiency in breastfed infants. In our cohort, propionylcarnitine was not sufficiently sensitive marker of Cbl deficiency. Although symptoms are reversible on Cbl substitution, permanent neurological damage can result. Selective screening for Cbl deficiency is indicated in all breastfed infants with failure to thrive, hypotonia, developmental delay, microcephaly or megaloblastic anaemia. The best prevention in future could be the screening of all pregnant women. Copyright © 2009 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for vitamin E as α-tocopherol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2015-01-01

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) derived Dietary Reference Values (DRVs) for vitamin E. In this Opinion, the Panel considers vitamin E as α-tocopherol only. The Panel considers that Average Requirements (ARs...... of average intakes of α-tocopherol and of α-tocopherol equivalents estimated by EFSA from dietary surveys in children and adults in nine countries. The Panel notes the uncertainties in the available food composition and consumption data, the fact that most EU food composition databases contain values......-tocopherol is set at 6 mg/day for both sexes. For children aged 3 to sexes. For children aged 10 to

  7. Determination of vitamin B12 in infant formula and adult nutritionals by liquid chromatography/UV detection with immunoaffinity extraction: First Action 2011.08.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Giménez, Esther; Fontannaz, Patric; Trisconi, Marie-José; Kilinc, Tamara; Gimenez, Catherine; Andrieux, Pierre; Nelson, Maria

    2012-01-01

    At the "Standards Development and International Harmonization: AOAC INTERNATIONAL Mid-Year Meeting," on June 29, 2011, an Expert Review Panel agreed that the method "Determination of Vitamin B12 in Infant Formulas and Adult Nutritionals by Liquid Chromatography/UV Detection with Immunoaffinity Extraction" be adopted AOAC Official First Action status. The method is applicable for the determination of vitamin B12, which includes added cyanocobalamin and natural forms, making it applicable to both fortified and nonfortified products. Vitamin B12 is extracted from the sample in sodium acetate buffer in the presence of sodium cyanide (100 degrees C, 30 min). After purification and concentration with an immunoaffinity column, vitamin B12 is determined by LC with UV detection (361 nm). A single-laboratory validation study was conducted on a range of products, including milk- and soy-based infant formulas, cereals, cocoa beverages, health care products, and polyvitamin premixes. The method demonstrated linear response over a large range of concentrations, recovery rates of 100.8 +/- 7.5% (average +/- SD), repeatability RSD (RSDr) of 2.1%, and intermediate reproducibility (RSD(iR)) of 4.3%. LOD and LOQ values were 0.10 and 0.30 microg/100 g, respectively, and correlation with the reference microbiological assay was good (R2 = 0.9442). The results of the study were published in J. AOAC Int. 91, 786-793 (2008). The performance characteristics of the method met the standard method performance requirements set forth by the Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals; thus, the method was determined to be appropriate for First Action status.

  8. Determination of vitamin B12 in infant formula and adult nutritionals using HPLC after purification on an immunoaffinity column: first action 2011.09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Ursula; Degenhardt, Katharina; Raffler, Guenther; Nelson, Maria

    2012-01-01

    During the "Standards Development and International Harmonization: AOAC INTERNATIONAL Mid-Year Meeting," on June 29, 2011, the method "Determination of vitamin B12 in infant formula and adult nutritionals using HPLC after purification on an immunoaffinity column" was recommended by an Expert Review Panel and adopted as AOAC Official First Action status. The method is applicable for the determination of vitamin B12 in milk-based infant formula. Vitamin B12 is extracted from the sample in sodium acetate buffer in the presence of potassium cyanide. After purification and concentration with an immunoaffinity column (IAC), vitamin B12 is determined by LC with UV detection (361 nm). Data supplied by CLF demonstrated linear response over a wide range of concentrations (1.4-39 microg/100 mL). The analytical range is 0.2-10 microg/100 g, depending on the capacity of the IACs (0.01-0.5 microg), the input weight, and dilutions. Recovery rates were assessed using National Institute of Standards and Technology SRM 1849, and determined to be 95.1%, with SD of 0.34 and CV of 9.0. Measurement uncertainty (UE) was 0.8 microg/100 g, which was calculated from the validation data. It is an expanded measurement uncertainty and was obtained through multiplication with a coverage factor k. LOQ values were reported as 0.10 microg/100 g. The performance characteristics of the method met the standard method performance requirements set forth by the AOAC Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals; thus, the method was determined to be appropriate for First Action status.

  9. Application of dried blood spots to determine vitamin D status in a large nutritional study with unsupervised sampling: the Food4Me project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeller, Ulrich; Baur, Manuela; Roos, Franz F; Brennan, Lorraine; Daniel, Hannelore; Fallaize, Rosalind; Forster, Hannah; Gibney, Eileen R; Gibney, Mike; Godlewska, Magdalena; Hartwig, Kai; Kolossa, Silvia; Lambrinou, Christina P; Livingstone, Katherine M; Lovegrove, Julie A; Macready, Anna L; Manios, Yannis; Marsaux, Cyril F M; Martinez, J Alfredo; Celis-Morales, Carlos; Moschonis, George; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; O'Donovan, Clare B; San-Cristobal, Rodrigo; Saris, Wim H M; Surwiłło, Agnieszka; Traczyk, Iwona; Tsirigoti, Lydia; Walsh, Marianne C; Woolhead, Clara; Mathers, John C; Weber, Peter

    2016-01-28

    An efficient and robust method to measure vitamin D (25-hydroxy vitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) and 25-hydroxy vitamin D2 in dried blood spots (DBS) has been developed and applied in the pan-European multi-centre, internet-based, personalised nutrition intervention study Food4Me. The method includes calibration with blood containing endogenous 25(OH)D3, spotted as DBS and corrected for haematocrit content. The methodology was validated following international standards. The performance characteristics did not reach those of the current gold standard liquid chromatography-MS/MS in plasma for all parameters, but were found to be very suitable for status-level determination under field conditions. DBS sample quality was very high, and 3778 measurements of 25(OH)D3 were obtained from 1465 participants. The study centre and the season within the study centre were very good predictors of 25(OH)D3 levels (P<0·001 for each case). Seasonal effects were modelled by fitting a sine function with a minimum 25(OH)D3 level on 20 January and a maximum on 21 July. The seasonal amplitude varied from centre to centre. The largest difference between winter and summer levels was found in Germany and the smallest in Poland. The model was cross-validated to determine the consistency of the predictions and the performance of the DBS method. The Pearson's correlation between the measured values and the predicted values was r 0·65, and the sd of their differences was 21·2 nmol/l. This includes the analytical variation and the biological variation within subjects. Overall, DBS obtained by unsupervised sampling of the participants at home was a viable methodology for obtaining vitamin D status information in a large nutritional study.

  10. Correlations between Fruit, Vegetables, Fish, Vitamins, and Fatty Acids Estimated by Web-Based Nonconsecutive Dietary Records and Respective Biomarkers of Nutritional Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassale, Camille; Castetbon, Katia; Laporte, François; Deschamps, Valérie; Vernay, Michel; Camilleri, Géraldine M; Faure, Patrice; Hercberg, Serge; Galan, Pilar; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle

    2016-03-01

    It is of major importance to measure the validity of self-reported dietary intake using web-based instruments before applying them in large-scale studies. This study aimed to validate self-reported intake of fish, fruit and vegetables, and selected micronutrient intakes assessed by a web-based self-administered dietary record tool used in the NutriNet-Santé prospective cohort study, against the following concentration biomarkers: plasma beta carotene, vitamin C, and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. One hundred ninety-eight adult volunteers (103 men and 95 women, mean age=50.5 years) were included in the protocol: they completed 3 nonconsecutive-day dietary records and two blood samples were drawn 3 weeks apart. The study was conducted in the area of Paris, France, between October 2012 and May 2013. Reported fish, fruit and vegetables, and selected micronutrient intakes and plasma beta carotene, vitamin C, and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels were compared. Simple and adjusted Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were estimated after de-attenuation for intra-individual variation. Regarding food groups in men, adjusted correlations ranged from 0.20 for vegetables and plasma vitamin C to 0.49 for fruits and plasma vitamin C, and from 0.40 for fish and plasma c20:5 n-3 (eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA]) to 0.55 for fish and plasma c22:6 n-3 (docosahexaenoic acid). In women, correlations ranged from 0.13 (nonsignificant) for vegetables and plasma vitamin C to 0.41 for fruits and vegetables and plasma beta carotene, and from 0.27 for fatty fish and EPA to 0.54 for fish and EPA+docosahexaenoic acid. Regarding micronutrients, adjusted correlations ranged from 0.36 (EPA) to 0.58 (vitamin C) in men and from 0.32 (vitamin C) to 0.38 (EPA) in women. The findings suggest that three nonconsecutive web-based dietary records provide reasonable estimates of true intake of fruits, vegetables, fish, beta carotene, vitamin C, and n-3 fatty acids. Along with other validation

  11. Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durnin, J V

    1976-07-01

    Nutrition appeared somewhat late on the scene in the I.B.P. projects in the U.K., but eventually it occupied an integral part of many of the H.A. (human adaptability) investigations. The nutritional data obtained in the studies of isolated and nearisolated communities in Tristan da Cunha and in New Guinea provided information of wide nutritional significance. There were also detailed and extensive studies in Israel which, similarly to those in New Guinea, attempted to relate nutritional factors to enviroment, working conditions, and physical fitness. Some extraordinarily low energy intakes found in Ethiopians have induced much speculation on the extent which man can adequately adapt to restricted food supplies. Interesting nutritional observations, of general importance, have also arisen from results obtained on such disparate groups as Glasgow adolescents, Tanzanian and Sudanese students, children in Malawi and vegans in the U.K.

  12. Prevention of Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding in Newborn Infants: A Position Paper by the ESPGHAN Committee on Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihatsch, Walter A; Braegger, Christian; Bronsky, Jiri; Campoy, Cristina; Domellöf, Magnus; Fewtrell, Mary; Mis, Nataša F; Hojsak, Iva; Hulst, Jessie; Indrio, Flavia; Lapillonne, Alexandre; Mlgaard, Christian; Embleton, Nicholas; van Goudoever, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB) due to physiologically low vitamin K plasma concentrations is a serious risk for newborn and young infants and can be largely prevented by adequate vitamin K supplementation. The aim of this position paper is to define the condition, describe the prevalence, discuss current prophylaxis practices and outcomes, and to provide recommendations for the prevention of VKDB in healthy term newborns and infants. All newborn infants should receive vitamin K prophylaxis and the date, dose, and mode of administration should be documented. Parental refusal of vitamin K prophylaxis after adequate information is provided should be recorded especially because of the risk of late VKDB. Healthy newborn infants should either receive 1 mg of vitamin K1 by intramuscular injection at birth; or 3 × 2 mg vitamin K1 orally at birth, at 4 to 6 days and at 4 to 6 weeks; or 2 mg vitamin K1 orally at birth, and a weekly dose of 1 mg orally for 3 months. Intramuscular application is the preferred route for efficiency and reliability of administration. The success of an oral policy depends on compliance with the protocol and this may vary between populations and healthcare settings. If the infant vomits or regurgitates the formulation within 1 hour of administration, repeating the oral dose may be appropriate. The oral route is not appropriate for preterm infants and for newborns who have cholestasis or impaired intestinal absorption or are too unwell to take oral vitamin K1, or those whose mothers have taken medications that interfere with vitamin K metabolism. Parents who receive prenatal education about the importance of vitamin K prophylaxis may be more likely to comply with local procedures.

  13. Nutritional anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oski, F A

    1979-10-01

    The role of the metals, iron and copper, and the vitamins E, folic acid, and B12 in the genesis of nutritional anemias in infancy have been reviewed. All are preventable. The precise requirements for each of these trace elements and vitamins in the small premature infant remain to be defined. The nonhematologic consequences of these nutritional deficiencies require further study. Anemia may prove to be the least important manifestation of the deficiency states.

  14. Circulating uncarboxylated matrix gla protein is associated with vitamin K nutritional status, but not coronary artery calcium, in older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrix Gla protein (MGP) is a calcification inhibitor in vascular tissue. To function, MGP must be carboxylated by vitamin K. Evidence suggests that circulating uncarboxylated MGP (ucMGP) is elevated in diseased individuals with vascular calcification. The extent to which this reflects vitamin K’s r...

  15. Dietary intake of vitamin d and calcium and breast cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbas, S.; Linseisen, J.; Rohrmann, S.; Chang-Claude, J.; Peeters, P.H.; Engel, P.; Brustad, M.; Lund, E.; Skeie, G.; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.

    2013-01-01

    Studies assessing the effects of vitamin D or calcium intake on breast cancer risk have been inconclusive. Furthermore, few studies have evaluated them jointly. This study is the largest so far examining the association of dietary vitamin D and calcium intake with breast cancer risk in the European

  16. Chemical stability study of vitamins thiamine, riboflavin, pyridoxine and ascorbic acid in parenteral nutrition for neonatal use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabral Lúcio M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this work was to study the vitamins B1, B2, B6 and C stability in a pediatric formulation containing high amounts of calcium in the presence of organic phosphate, amino acids, glucose, sodium chloride, magnesium sulfate, pediatric vitamins and trace elements under different conditions using developed and validated analytical methods. Methods The study was carried out during 72 h with formulations packaged in recommended storage temperature (4°C and 25°C, with and without photoprotection. Results The results showed that the methodologies used for assessing the chemical stability of vitamins B1, B2, B6 and C in the formulation were selective, linear, precise and accurate. The vitamins could be considered stable in the formulation during the three days of study if stored at 4°C. When stored at 25°C vitamin C presented instability after 48 h. Conclusion The pediatric formulation containing high amount of calcium in the presence of organic phosphate, amino acids, glucose, sodium chloride, magnesium sulphate, pediatric vitamins and trace elements packaged in bag-type trilaminate presented a shelf life of the 72 h, when maintained under refrigeration, between 2°C and 8°C. This shelf life was measured considering the vitamins studied. Further studies are needed including all the vitamins present in this formulation.

  17. Dietary intake of vitamin d and calcium and breast cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbas, S.; Linseisen, J.; Rohrmann, S.; Chang-Claude, J.; Peeters, P.H.; Engel, P.; Brustad, M.; Lund, E.; Skeie, G.; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.

    2013-01-01

    Studies assessing the effects of vitamin D or calcium intake on breast cancer risk have been inconclusive. Furthermore, few studies have evaluated them jointly. This study is the largest so far examining the association of dietary vitamin D and calcium intake with breast cancer risk in the European

  18. Plasma and dietary carotenoids and vitamins A, C and E and risk of colon and rectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenders, Max; Leufkens, Anke M; Siersema, Peter D; van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B; Vrieling, Alina; Hulshof, Paul J M; van Gils, Carla H; Overvad, Kim; Roswall, Nina; Kyrø, Cecilie; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Fagerhazzi, Guy; Cadeau, Claire; Kühn, Tilman; Johnson, Theron; Boeing, Heiner; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Klinaki, Eleni; Androulidaki, Anna; Palli, Domenico; Grioni, Sara; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Tumino, Rosario; Panico, Salvatore; Bakker, Marije F; Skeie, Guri; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Jakszyn, Paula; Barricarte, Aurelio; María Huerta, José; Molina-Montes, Esther; Argüelles, Marcial; Johansson, Ingegerd; Ljuslinder, Ingrid; Key, Timothy J; Bradbury, Kathryn E; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Ferrari, Pietro; Duarte-Salles, Talita; Jenab, Mazda; Gunter, Marc J; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Wark, Petra A; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B

    2014-12-15

    Carotenoids and vitamins A, C and E are possibly associated with a reduced colorectal cancer (CRC) risk through antioxidative properties. The association of prediagnostic plasma concentrations and dietary consumption of carotenoids and vitamins A, C and E with the risk of colon and rectal cancer was examined in this case-control study, nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Plasma concentrations of carotenoids (α- and β-carotene, canthaxanthin, β-cryptoxanthin, lutein, lycopene, zeaxanthin) and vitamins A (retinol), C and E (α-, β- and γ- and δ-tocopherol) and dietary consumption of β-carotene and vitamins A, C and E were determined in 898 colon cancer cases, 501 rectal cancer cases and 1,399 matched controls. Multivariable conditional logistic regression models were performed to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). An association was observed between higher prediagnostic plasma retinol concentration and a lower risk of colon cancer (IRR for highest quartile = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.46, 0.87, p for trend = 0.01), most notably proximal colon cancer (IRR for highest quartile = 0.46, 95% CI: 0.27, 0.77, p for trend = 0.01). Additionally, inverse associations for dietary β-carotene and dietary vitamins C and E with (distal) colon cancer were observed. Although other associations were suggested, there seems little evidence for a role of these selected compounds in preventing CRC through their antioxidative properties.

  19. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Schneeman, Ph.D., Director of FDA's Office of Nutritional Products, and highlights reasons to consider taking vitamin supplements along with ... Professionals Science & Research Industry ...

  20. [Study on vitamin A nutritional status of 6- to 17-year-old urban children and adolescents between 2010 and 2012 in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Liu, X B; Yang, L C; Chen, J; Wang, R; Yang, X G; Piao, J H; Mao, D Q

    2017-02-06

    Objective: To investigate the vitamin A nutritional status of 6- to 17-year-old urban children and adolescents by analyzing serum retinol level, between 2010 and 2012 in China. Methods: Data were obtained from the China Nutrition and Health Survey in 2010-2012. Using multi-stage stratified sampling and the population proportional stratified random sampling method, 6 617 children aged 6-17 years from 32 metropolis and 41 middle-sized and small cities of China were selected. The questionnaire survey was used to collect demographic information. Blood samples were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography to determine serum retinol concentration, and the World Health Organization guidelines were used to evaluate the nutritional status of vitamin A. Vitamin A levels, vitamin A deficiency, and marginal vitamin A deficiency in children with different characteristics were compared. Results: A total of 3 785 cases with valid samples were obtained. The overall mean serum retinol concentration level was (1.49±0.71) μmol/L; the mean serum retinol concentration was (1.55±0.69) μmol/L for metropolis and (1.49±0.75) μmol/L for middle-sized and small cities (P>0.05). The mean serum retinol concentration was (1.52±0.78) μmol/L for boys and (1.47±0.68) μmol/L for girls (P>0.05). The mean serum retinol concentration level was (1.46±0.70) μmol/L for 6- to 11-year-old children and (1.54±0.65) μmol/L for 12- to 17-year-old children (Pyear-old children and 7.18% (120/1 670) for 12- to 17-year-old children. No significant differences were observed for region, sex, or age (P>0.05). The marginal vitamin A deficiency rate was 19.11% (86/450) for metropolis and 18.50% (617/3 335) for middle-sized and small cities; 18.19% (347/1 908) for boys and 18.97% (356/1 877) for girls, with no significant differences observed (P>0.05). The marginal vitamin A deficiency rate was 16.54% (350/2 115) for 6- to 11-year-old children and 21.13% (353/1 670) for 12- to 17-year

  1. Folate and vitamin B12 concentrations are associated with plasma DHA and EPA fatty acids in European adolescents: the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence (HELENA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesia, I; Huybrechts, I; González-Gross, M; Mouratidou, T; Santabárbara, J; Chajès, V; González-Gil, E M; Park, J Y; Bel-Serrat, S; Cuenca-García, M; Castillo, M; Kersting, M; Widhalm, K; De Henauw, S; Sjöström, M; Gottrand, F; Molnár, D; Manios, Y; Kafatos, A; Ferrari, M; Stehle, P; Marcos, A; Sánchez-Muniz, F J; Moreno, L A

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the association between vitamin B6, folate and vitamin B12 biomarkers and plasma fatty acids in European adolescents. A subsample from the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence study with valid data on B-vitamins and fatty acid blood parameters, and all the other covariates used in the analyses such as BMI, Diet Quality Index, education of the mother and physical activity assessed by a questionnaire, was selected resulting in 674 cases (43 % males). B-vitamin biomarkers were measured by chromatography and immunoassay and fatty acids by enzymatic analyses. Linear mixed models elucidated the association between B-vitamins and fatty acid blood parameters (changes in fatty acid profiles according to change in 10 units of vitamin B biomarkers). DHA, EPA) and n-3 fatty acids showed positive associations with B-vitamin biomarkers, mainly with those corresponding to folate and vitamin B12. Contrarily, negative associations were found with n-6:n-3 ratio, trans-fatty acids and oleic:stearic ratio. With total homocysteine (tHcy), all the associations found with these parameters were opposite (for instance, an increase of 10 nmol/l in red blood cell folate or holotranscobalamin in females produces an increase of 15·85 µmol/l of EPA (P value fatty acids might suggest underlying mechanisms between B-vitamins and CVD and it is worth the attention of public health policies.

  2. Determination of vitamins D2 and D3 in infant formula and adult nutritionals by ultra-pressure liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry detection (UPLC-MS/MS): First Action 2011.12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jack; Dowell, Dawn

    2012-01-01

    The method for the "Determination of Vitamins D2 and D3 in Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals by Ultra-Pressure Liquid Chromatography with Tandem Mass Spectrometry Detection (UPLC-MS/MS)" was adopted as AOAC Official First Action during the "Standards Development and International Harmonization: AOAC INTERNATIONAL Mid-Year Meeting" held June 29, 2011. During the meeting, an Expert Review Panel (ERP) evaluated the available validation information against standard method performance requirements (SMPRs) articulated by stakeholders. The method, approved by the ERP, is applicable for the determination of vitamin D (total vitamins D2 and D3). A range of products had been tested during a single-laboratory validation study. The products included butter, National Institute of Standards and Technology SRM 1849, eggs, cheese, yogurt, ready-to-eat cereal, bread, mushrooms, and tuna. The testing of the method established linearity in the range of 0.005-50 microg/mL. The recovery range was 93.4-100.9% for vitamin D2 and 102.4-106.2% for vitamin D3. The LOD and LOQ for vitamin D2 were reported as 0.20 and 0.61 microgl100 g, respectively; for vitamin D3, the reported values were 0.47 and 1.44 microg/100 g, respectively. The method met the SMPRs set by the Stakeholder Panel on Infant Formula and Adult Nutritionals (SPIFAN). It was, therefore, decided that the method was appropriate for Official First Action Method status.

  3. Pregnant Women Vitamin Supply Strategy and Nutrition Guide%孕妇维生素补给策略与营养指导

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李辉

    2014-01-01

    Objective To guide pregnant women scientific supply vitamins. Methods Through theoretical guidance and empirical analysis of itamins and trace elements. Results Lead pregnant women to absorb nutritious food. Conclusion Scientific nutrition can avoid some of fetal birth defects caused by insufficient vitamin intake,and prevent excessive cause pregnant women to nutrition conditions such as obesity,diabetes, and have a great son.%目的:指导孕妇科学补给维生素。方法通过理论指导与经验分析了解维生素族与微量元素。结果引导孕妇合理摄取富含营养的食物。结论科学营养可以避免因维生素摄取不足导致的某些胎儿先天缺陷,并预防营养过度引起孕妇肥胖、糖尿病、及产生巨大儿等病症。

  4. Development of the Nutrition Supplements with Selenium and vitamin E%硒VE营养素补充剂的开发

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐京

    2015-01-01

    The Nutrition Supplement with Selenium and vitamin E was developed. Through related introduction of the Nutrition Supplement with Selenium and vitamin E and by the stability test of the product with capsule dosage form for three months, the results of stability, hygiene and iconic composition test have all reached the quality standard.The data proved the stability of the quality. The results also showed the formula and technology were reasonable and suitable for industrial production and had very important developingValue .%硒VE营养素补充剂的开发。通过对硒VE营养素补充剂的相关介绍,并对胶囊剂型的产品进行三个月的稳定性、卫生学、标志性成分的试验,结果显示各项指标均达到了质量标准,因此确认了硒VE营养素补充剂产品质量的稳定性,说明该配方及工艺合理,适合工业化大生产,具有开发价值。

  5. Effects of nutritional supplementation with antioxidant vitamins and minerals and fish oil on antioxidant status and psychosocial stress in smokers: an open trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, H; Kinoyama, M; Watanabe, A; Shirao, K; Kihara, H; Arai, M

    2007-12-01

    Nutritional supplement foods containing antioxidant vitamins and minerals and fish oil (mainly docosahexaenoic acid, DHA, C22:6n-3), referred to as capsules, were administered to seven smokers every day for 34 days. Concentrations of antioxidant vitamins and minerals in serum, activity of superoxide dismutase in plasma and the concentration of 8-isoprostane (8-epi-prostaglandin F(2) alpha) in the urine showed an increase or a tendency to increase after the end of administration. The frequency of subjects showing poor state of psychological health evidenced by a total score of 8 points or more on the General Health Questionnaire (30-item edition) scale was 42.9%, although there was a significant decrease to 14.3% upon completion of administration of the capsules. These biochemical and psychological changes were mostly returned to the basal level one month after the end of administration of the capsules. The results suggest that administration of antioxidant vitamins and minerals and fish oil to smokers resulted in an increase in antioxidant capacity. Effectiveness in alleviating psychosocial stress likely to be attributable to DHA was also observed.

  6. Rediscovering vitamin D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasr Anaizi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 2 years there has been a radical change in standard clinical practice with respect to vitamin D. As a result of a growing body of knowledgeable physicians are assessing the vitamin D nutritional status of their patients and prescribing aggressive repletion regimens of a vitamin D supplement. The present paper summarizes some basic information about this essential nutrient and reviews some of the more recent data implicating vitamin D deficiency in disease etiology with an emphasis on cardiovascular disease and cancer. Finally a rational approach to the dosing of vitamin D in different patient populations is provided.

  7. The nutritional composition of South African eggs | van Niekerk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proximate analyses and vitamin, mineral, fatty acid and amino acid ... with values listed in the Research Institute for Nutritional Diseases food tables, a number of ... and folic acids, vitamin B12 , biotin, vitamin D1, vitamin E and phosphorus.

  8. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pizza, cheese, frozen 1 serving 115 mg Pudding, chocolate, prepared with 2% milk 4 oz 160 mg ... Treatment Medication and Treatment Adherence Calcium/Vitamin D Nutrition Overall Health Fractures/Fall Prevention Exercise/Safe Movement ...

  9. Vitamins and Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... minerals your body needs. But if you're skipping meals, dieting, or if you're concerned that ... Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Healthy Breakfast Planner Nutrition & Fitness Center Vitamin D Figuring Out ...

  10. Dietary intake of the water-soluble vitamins B1, B2, B6, B12 and C in 10 countries in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olsen, A.; Halkjaer, J.; van Gils, C. H.; Buijsse, B.; Verhagen, H.; Jenab, M.; Boutron-Ruault, M. C.; Ericson, U.; Ocke, M. C.; Peeters, P. H. M.; Touvier, M.; Niravong, M.; Waaseth, M.; Skeie, G.; Khaw, K. T.; Travis, R.; Ferrari, P.; Sanchez, M. J.; Agudo, A.; Overvad, K.; Linseisen, J.; Weikert, C.; Sacerdote, C.; Evangelista, A.; Zylis, D.; Tsiotas, K.; Manjer, J.; van Guelpen, B.; Riboli, E.; Slimani, N.; Bingham, S.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the intake of vitamins thiamine (B1), riboflavin (B2), B6 (pyridoxine), B12 (cobalamine) and C (ascorbic acid) and their food sources among 27 centres in 10 countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Methods: Betw

  11. Effects of pre-competitional rapid weight loss on nutrition, vitamin status and oxidative stress in elite boxers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reljic, Dejan; Jost, Joachim; Dickau, Kirsten; Kinscherf, Ralf; Bonaterra, Gabriel; Friedmann-Bette, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    Dietary intake, vitamin status and oxidative stress were evaluated in 17 elite male boxers. Ten of them frequently reduced body weight rapidly before competitions (Weight Loss Group) and 7 did not practice rapid weight loss (Control Group). Food record checklists, blood samples for determination of vitamin status and plasma glutathione levels were obtained during a week of weight maintenance, a pre-competition week and a post-competition week. The average dietary intakes in both groups were 33 ± 8 kcal·kg(-1), 3.7 ± 1.1 g·kg(-1) carbohydrates, 1.5 ± 0.4 g·kg(-1) protein, 1.2 ± 0.4 g·kg(-1) fat and 2.2 ± 1.0 L water per day (excluding pre-competition week in Weight Loss Group). Energy (18 ± 7 kcal·kg(-1)), carbohydrate (2.2 ± 0.8 g·kg(-1)), protein (0.8 ± 0.4 g·kg(-1)), fat (0.6 ± 0.3 g·kg(-1)) and water (1.6 ± 0.6 L) consumption (P-values <0.001) and intakes of most vitamins (P-values < 0.05) were significantly reduced during the pre-competition week in the Weight Loss Group. In both groups, the intakes of vitamins A, E and folate were below recommended values throughout the three periods; however, blood vitamin and plasma glutathione levels did not change significantly. Our findings indicate a low-caloric and low-carbohydrate diet in elite boxers, regardless of participating in rapid weight loss or not. Apparently, the pre-competitional malnutitrition in the Weight Loss Group did not induce alterations in the vitamin and glutathione status.

  12. [The alteration of vitamin status of adult population of the Russisn Federation in 1987-2009 (to the 40th anniversary of the Laboratory of Vitamins and Minerals of Institute of Nutrition at Russian Academy of Medical Sciences)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring of vitamin status of various groups of adult population (by vitamin serum blood level evaluation) during the period since 1987 on 2009 has shown that an authentic improvement of sufficiency with vitamin C takes place. At the present time the deficiency of B group vitamins has been determined much more often than the deficit of vitamins C, A and E. The revealed deficiencies don't depend on a place of residing and a professional accessory and, as a rule, affect not any one vitamin, but have a character of combined insufficiency of B group vitamins and some other vitamins.

  13. Determination of trans vitamin K1 in infant and medical nutritional products using AOAC Method 999.15 with modified preparation and extraction procedures and C30 bonded phase chromatography: single-laboratory validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimpf, Karen J; Thompson, Linda B; Schmitz, Daniel J

    2010-01-01

    Modifications were made to AOAC Official Method 999.15 to extend its applicability to specialty infant formulas containing hydrolyzed proteins and free amino acids, and to medical and adult nutritional products. Minor changes to the sample preparation procedure and chromatographic separation improved vitamin K1 recoveries and reduced chromatographic interferences in these types of matrixes. Currently AOAC Method 999.15 is applicable only to the determination of total vitamin K1 (phylloquione) in infant formula and milk (fluid, ready-to-feed, and powdered) containing > 1 microg vitamin K1/100 g solids. AOAC Method 999.15 recoveries of vitamin K1 were improved by altering sample sizes, extraction solvents and amounts, and the reagent addition order and amount of water or aqueous solutions added. The chromatographic separation of vitamin K1 in medical nutritional products containing canola and marine oils was improved, and trans vitamin K1 was separated from the biologically inactive cis isomer in all products with a C30 3 microm column and a 100% methanol mobile phase. With these modifications to the extraction procedure and chromatographic separation, AOAC Method 999.15 demonstrated acceptable precision and accuracy for the quantitation of trans vitamin K1 in specialty infant formulas containing hydrolyzed proteins and free amino acids, and medical and adult nutritional products. A single-laboratory validation of these minor modifications was completed. Fourteen different product matrixes were analyzed during validation. The intermediate precision averaged 4.15% RSD (range 2.52-5.81% RSD), and recovery data averaged 100.1% (range 92.2-109%).

  14. Inverse relation between vitamin D and serum total immunoglobulin G in the Scandinavian Cystic Fibrosis Nutritional Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pincikova, T; Nilsson, K; Moen, I E;

    2011-01-01

    The hallmark of cystic fibrosis (CF) is chronic lung inflammation. The severity of lung disease is closely correlated with immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels. Beyond its contribution to the bone health, the importance of vitamin D has not been fully recognized owing to the lack of human studies provid...

  15. Vitamin and mineral supplements have a nutritionally significant impact on micronutrient intakes of older adults attending senior centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeden, Allisha; Remig, Valentina; Holcomb, Carol Ann; Herald, Thomas J; Baybutt, Richard C

    2010-04-01

    Older adults frequently report use of vitamin and mineral (VM) supplements, although the impact of supplements on dietary adequacy remains largely unknown. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate micronutrient intakes of older adults with emphasis on identifying nutrients most improved by VM supplements, nutrients most likely to remain inadequate, and nutrients most likely consumed in excess. Community-based volunteers were recruited from senior centers and completed a questionnaire querying demographic data, current health status, and VM supplement use. Participants (n = 263) were then contacted by telephone to complete two 24-hour diet recalls and confirm VM supplement use. Dietary adequacy was determined by comparing the ratio of mean dietary intake to the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI). Dietary consumption was lowest for vitamins D and E, calcium, and magnesium. VM supplementation most improved intakes of vitamins E, D, B(6), folic acid, and calcium. Participants were most likely to exceed the Tolerable Upper Limit with supplementation of niacin, folic acid, and vitamin A.

  16. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2015. Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for cobalamin (vitamin B12)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2015-01-01

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) derived Dietary Reference Values (DRVs) for cobalamin (vitamin B12). The Panel considers that the approach based on a combination of biomarkers of cobalamin status, i.e. serum...... (AR) cannot be determined from the limited data available. There is consistent evidence in adults that a cobalamin intake of 4 μg/day and greater is associated with serum concentrations of holoTC and cobalamin within the reference ranges derived from healthy subjects, together with MMA and t....... For pregnancy and lactation, additional cobalamin intakes related to the accumulation of cobalamin in fetal tissues and transfer of cobalamin into breast milk are considered and AIs of 4.5 and 5 μg/day, respectively, are proposed....

  17. Impact of Frequency of Multi-Vitamin/Multi-Mineral Supplement Intake on Nutritional Adequacy and Nutrient Deficiencies in U.S. Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey B. Blumberg

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although >50% of U.S. adults use dietary supplements, little information is available on the impact of supplement use frequency on nutrient intakes and deficiencies. Based on nationally representative data in 10,698 adults from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES 2009 to 2012, assessments were made of intakes from food alone versus food plus multi-vitamin/multi-mineral supplements (MVMS of 17 nutrients with an Estimated Average Requirement (EAR and a Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL, and of the status of five nutrients with recognized biomarkers of deficiency. Compared to food alone, MVMS use at any frequency was associated with a lower prevalence of inadequacy (p < 0.01 for 15/17 nutrients examined and an increased prevalence of intakes >UL for 7 nutrients, but the latter was ≤4% for any nutrient. Except for calcium, magnesium, and vitamin D, most frequent MVMS use (≥21 days/30 days virtually eliminated inadequacies of the nutrients examined, and was associated with significantly lower odds ratios of deficiency for the examined nutrient biomarkers except for iron. In conclusion, among U.S. adults, MVMS use is associated with decreased micronutrient inadequacies, intakes slightly exceeding the UL for a few nutrients, and a lower risk of nutrient deficiencies.

  18. Processing, physico-chemical, sensory and nutritional evaluation of protein, mineral and vitamin enriched peanut chikki - an Indian traditional sweet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallavi, Byrappa Vasu; Chetana, Ramakrishna; Reddy, Sunkireddy Yella

    2014-01-01

    Chikki, a popular Indian traditional sweet snack prepared from peanut was enriched with protein, minerals and vitamins by incorporating soy protein isolate, calcium carbonate, ferrous fumerate, vitamin A and folic acid to meet the growing demand for health foods. The enriched nutra chikki was evaluated for physico-chemical characteristics such as moisture, texture, peroxide value (PV), fatty acid composition in comparison with control peanut chikki. Nutra chikki, which had initial moisture content of 2-3%, did not alter much up to 60 days of storage at 27 °C and 37 °C. PV increased gradually at 27 °C, whereas at 37 °C, it was higher. Hardness of nutra chikki did not change significantly when stored at 27 °C up to 105 days, but at 37 °C a gradual increase in hardness was observed after 45 days. These results of nutra chikki were similar and comparable with those of control chikki. Nutra chikki had 18% protein, 20% fat, 6.42% Ca, 1.7% Fe, 4000 μg vitamin A and 2660 μg folic acid. Protein digestibility corrected amino acid score of nutra chikki was 0.78 whereas that of control chikki was 0.73. The fatty acid composition of control and nutra chikki was same as both contain peanuts as oil source. The formulation and process parameters for preparation of protein, mineral and vitamin enriched peanut chikki, were standardized. The storage stability and quality parameters of enriched chikki were comparable with those of control chikki.

  19. Nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in a breast-fed infant of a vegan-diet mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklar, R

    1986-04-01

    A 7-month-old male presented with lethargy and failure to thrive. The child was exclusively breast-fed from birth by a mother who was a strict vegetarian. Laboratory data revealed macrocytic anemia and methylmalonic acid in the urine, consistent with vitamin B12 deficient anemia. The patient responded well to supplementation with B12 alone and was developmentally normal by 11 months of age. This study emphasizes the need for assuring maternal dietary adequacy during pregnancy and after birth.

  20. Nutritional Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the effects that space flight has on humans nutritional biochemistry. Particular attention is devoted to the study of protein breakdown, inflammation, hypercatabolism, omega 3 fatty acids, vitamin D, calcium, urine, folate and nutrient stability of certain vitamins, the fluid shift and renal stone risk, acidosis, iron/hematology, and the effects on bone of dietary protein, potassium. inflammation, and omega-3 fatty acids

  1. Effect of vitamin E nutritional supplementation on the pathological changes induced in the ileum of rabbits by experimental infection with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsalie, E; Kouzi, K; Poutahidis, T; Abas, Z; Sarris, K; Iliadis, N; Kaldrymidou, E

    2006-05-01

    A well-established rabbit model of enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) disease was used to examine whether vitamin E (VE) nutritional supplementation had an effect on the pathological changes induced in the bowel by EPEC. Quantitative methods were used to evaluate the influence of VE on bacterial colonization, intestinal mucosal architecture and inflammation, and intestinal epithelial proliferation and apoptosis. VE did not affect EPEC colonization and did not give significant protection against EPEC-induced changes and diarrhoea. Although VE had no effect on the EPEC-related increase of enterocyte apoptosis, it clearly contributed to an acceleration of epithelial cell proliferation in the ileal crypts. This finding may explain why ileal morphometry undertaken in this study showed that VE ameliorated somewhat the effects of EPEC on intestinal mucosal architecture. Quantitative studies on inflammatory cells in the intestinal mucosa revealed that VE nutritional supplementation resulted in an increased neutrophilic and mononuclear inflammatory cell response to EPEC infection, which did not contribute, however, to the clearance of infection.

  2. Nutrition and Inflammation in Older Individuals: Focus on Vitamin D, n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Whey Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticinesi, Andrea; Meschi, Tiziana; Lauretani, Fulvio; Felis, Giovanna; Franchi, Fabrizio; Pedrolli, Carlo; Barichella, Michela; Benati, Giuseppe; Di Nuzzo, Sergio; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Maggio, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Chronic activation of the inflammatory response, defined as inflammaging, is the key physio-pathological substrate for anabolic resistance, sarcopenia and frailty in older individuals. Nutrients can theoretically modulate this phenomenon. The underlying molecular mechanisms reducing the synthesis of pro-inflammatory mediators have been elucidated, particularly for vitamin D, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and whey proteins. In this paper, we review the current evidence emerging from observational and intervention studies, performed in older individuals, either community-dwelling or hospitalized with acute disease, and evaluating the effects of intake of vitamin D, n-3 PUFA and whey proteins on inflammatory markers, such as C-Reactive Protein (CRP), interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). After the analysis, we conclude that there is sufficient evidence for an anti-inflammatory effect in aging only for n-3 PUFA intake, while the few existing intervention studies do not support a similar activity for vitamin D and whey supplements. There is need in the future of large, high-quality studies testing the effects of combined dietary interventions including the above mentioned nutrients on inflammation and health-related outcomes. PMID:27043616

  3. Nutrition and Inflammation in Older Individuals: Focus on Vitamin D, n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Whey Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ticinesi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic activation of the inflammatory response, defined as inflammaging, is the key physio-pathological substrate for anabolic resistance, sarcopenia and frailty in older individuals. Nutrients can theoretically modulate this phenomenon. The underlying molecular mechanisms reducing the synthesis of pro-inflammatory mediators have been elucidated, particularly for vitamin D, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA and whey proteins. In this paper, we review the current evidence emerging from observational and intervention studies, performed in older individuals, either community-dwelling or hospitalized with acute disease, and evaluating the effects of intake of vitamin D, n-3 PUFA and whey proteins on inflammatory markers, such as C-Reactive Protein (CRP, interleukin-1 (IL-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α. After the analysis, we conclude that there is sufficient evidence for an anti-inflammatory effect in aging only for n-3 PUFA intake, while the few existing intervention studies do not support a similar activity for vitamin D and whey supplements. There is need in the future of large, high-quality studies testing the effects of combined dietary interventions including the above mentioned nutrients on inflammation and health-related outcomes.

  4. Association of Diabetes Mellitus with a Combination of Vitamin D Deficiency and Arsenic Exposure in the Korean General Population: Analysis of 2008–2009 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We present data from the Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (KNHANES) 2008–2009 on the combination of vitamin D deficiency and arsenic exposure on diabetes mellitus (DM) in a representative sample of the adult Korean population. Methods This study was based on data obtained from the KNHANES 2008–2009, which was conducted for 3 years (2007–2009) using a rolling sampling design that involved a complex, stratified, multistage, probability-cluster survey of a representative sample of the non-institutionalized civilian population in South Korea. Results Data analysis revealed that subjects who showed both vitamin D levels in the 1st quartile (Q) and urinary arsenic levels in the 4th Q, had a 302% increased risk of having DM, as compared with those whose vitamin D and urinary arsenic levels were in the 4th Q and 1st Q, respectively. Conclusion The present study reconfirmed an association of DM with low vitamin D levels and arsenic exposure, and further showed a combination of vitamin D deficiency and arsenic exposure on DM in the general Korean population. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing a combination of vitamin D deficiency and arsenic exposure on DM. The present findings have important public health implications. PMID:24472185

  5. The relationship between nutrition and frailty: Effects of protein intake, nutritional supplementation, vitamin D and exercise on muscle metabolism in the elderly. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artaza-Artabe, Iñaki; Sáez-López, Pilar; Sánchez-Hernández, Natalia; Fernández-Gutierrez, Naiara; Malafarina, Vincenzo

    2016-11-01

    Frailty is a geriatric syndrome that predicts the onset of disability, morbidity and mortality in elderly people; it is a state of pre-disability and is reversible. The aim of this review is to assess how nutrition influences both the risk of developing frailty and its treatment. We searched two databases, PubMed and Web of Science. We included epidemiologic studies and clinical trials carried out on people aged over 65 years. We included 32 studies with a total of over 50,000 participants. The prevalence of frailty is ranges from 15% among elderly people living in the community to 54% among those hospitalized. Furthermore, the prevalence of frailty is disproportionately high among elderly people who are malnourished. Malnutrition, which is very prevalent in geriatric populations, is one of the main risk factors for the onset of frailty. A good nutritional status and, wherever necessary, supplementation with macronutrients and micronutrients reduce the risk of developing frailty. Physical exercise has been shown to improve functional status, helps to prevent frailty and is an effective treatment to reverse it. Despite the relatively large number of studies included, this review has some limitations. Firstly, variability in the design of the studies and their different aims reduce their comparability. Secondly, several of the studies did not adequately define frailty. Poor nutritional status is associated with the onset of frailty. Screening and early diagnosis of malnutrition and frailty in elderly people will help to prevent the onset of disability. Effective treatment is based on correction of the macro- and micronutrient deficit and physical exercise. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Adiposity in the Relationship between Serum Vitamin D Level and Insulin Resistance in Middle-Aged and Elderly Korean Adults: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hyun Kang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe role of adiposity in the relationship between serum vitamin D levels and insulin resistance has not yet been fully studied. This aim of this study is to clarify the role of adiposity in the relationship between serum vitamin D level and insulin resistance among middle-aged and elderly Korean adults.MethodsWe used data from 2,710 individuals aged ≥50 years based on national data from a representative sample of the fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV-2 in 2008.ResultsAfter adjustment for potential confounders, body mass index (BMI was significantly associated with 25(OH vitamin D (P=0.008. However, waist circumference was not significantly associated with 25(OH vitamin D. In the stratified analyses, 25(OH vitamin D was found to be negatively associated with fasting insulin and homeostasis model assessment estimate of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR in participants with BMIs ≥25 kg/m2 (P=0.003 for both insulin and HOMR-IR but was not found to be associated in those with BMIs <23 kg/m2. However, we observed a significant inverse in the association of 25(OH vitamin D with fasting insulin and HOMA-IR in both the normal (P=0.001 and P<0.001 and the abdominally obese group (P=0.010 and P=0.009 in the stratified analyses according to abdominal obesity.ConclusionOur results support that the idea that endogenously-produced vitamin D might be stored in subcutaneous fat deposits. In addition, the association of vitamin D with insulin resistance in middle-aged and elderly Korean adults was stronger when it was stratified by BMI than when abdominal obesity status.

  7. Vitamin D and diabetes in Koreans: analyses based on the Fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), 2008–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, S Y; Hwang, Y-C; Chung, H Y; Woo, J-T

    2012-01-01

    Aims A causal relationship between vitamin D deficiency and the incidence of diabetes mellitus has been suggested, but little research has been conducted on the Korean population. Methods We analysed the glucose tolerance status and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in 12 263 subjects > 19 years old who were registered for the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2008–2009. Results Various demographic variables such as gender, age, season, resident area, physical activity, smoking, alcohol, marital status, education and occupation were associated with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations. After adjusting for these variables as confounders, 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in subjects with diabetes were significantly lower than those in subjects with normal glucose tolerance and those with impaired fasting glucose (P = 0.005). Compared with the ≥ 75 nmol/l subgroup of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration, the odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for diabetes mellitus were 1.206 (95% CI 0.948–1.534) in the 50- to 74-nmol/l subgroup, 1.339 (1.051–1.707) in the 25- to 49-nmol/l subgroup and 1.759 (1.267–2.443) in the < 25-nmol/l subgroup. Compared with the serum ≥ 75-nmol/l 25-hydroxyvitamin D subgroup, serum insulin and homeostasis model assessment 2%B, a marker of insulin secretory capacity, were significantly higher, and homeostasis model assessment 2%S, a marker of insulin sensitivity, was significantly lower in the < 25- and 25- to 49-nmol/l serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D subgroups than those in the other subgroups (P < 0.001). Conclusions The findings suggest that vitamin D deficiency, possibly involving altered insulin sensitivity, is associated with an increased risk for diabetes mellitus in the Korean population. PMID:22247968

  8. 成都市成人维生素D营养状况%Nutritional status of vitamin D in adults in Chengdu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李世云; 李勤; 李强; 郑振; 熊萍; 苟晓琴; 钱少平

    2012-01-01

    目的 了解成都市区成人的维生素D营养状况.方法 对2010年11月到2011年10月成都市某三甲医院Lis中患者第一次测定的25(OH)维生素D结果进行收集和分析.结果 共733名患者的25(OH)维生素D结果纳入分析,血25(OH)维生素D 水平全年不同月份波动大,11月为全年最低(14.70±5.94 ng/ml),仅8月(32.94±15.87 ng/ml)和9月(60.56±23.54 ng/ml)两个月高于30 ng/ml.全年维生素D充足者仅24.83%,不足者占23.47%,缺乏者占46.69%.血25(OH)维生素D水平与日照关系密切,男女之间无差异(P>0.05).结论 成都居民维生素D缺乏或不足的比例高,需要加强干预.%Objective To investigate the nutritional status of vitamin D in adults in Chengdu. Methods The data of serum 25 - hydroxy vitamin D ( 25 ( OH ) D ) of patients tested for the first time in a Third Grade A hospital, Lis, from November 2010 to October 2011 in Chengdu was collected and analyzed. Results The data of 733 patients was analyzed. Serum concentrations of 25 ( OH ) D differed greatly throughout the year. The lowest concentration showed in November ( 14. 70 ±5. 94 ng/ml ), and only the concentrations in August ( 32. 94 ± 15. 87ng/ml ) and September ( 60. 56 ± 23. 54 ng/ml ) were above 30 ng/ml. The sufficiency rate of vitamin D throughout the year was just 24. 83% , the insufficiency rate was 23. 47% , and the deficiency rate was 46. 69% . The concentration of serum 25 ( OH ) D had close relation with sunshine. There was no difference between males and females ( P > 0. 05 ). Conclusion The insufficiency or deficiency proportion of 25 ( OH ) D is high in Chengdu citizens, and the intervention should be strengthened.

  9. [Vitamin deficiencies and hypervitaminosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mino, M

    1999-10-01

    There have recently been very few deficiencies with respect to fat soluble and water soluble vitamins in Japan All-trans-retinoic acid as induction or maintenance treatment improves disease free and overall survival against acute promyelocytic leukemia. In the isolated vitamin E deficiencies gene mutation has been cleared for alpha-tocopherol transferprotein. Recently, a relation of nutritional vitamin K intake and senile osteoporosis in women was epidemiologically demonstrated on a prospective study. Thiamin was yet noticed as development of deficiency in alcoholism, while the importance of supplemental folic acid during pregnancy has become especially clear in light of studies showing that folic acid supplements reduce the risk of neural tube defects in the fetus. With respect to hypervitaminosis, the Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN), USA, has established safe intakes by identifying the NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level) and LOAEL (Lowest Observed Adverse Effect Level). Summaries of NOAEL and LOAEL for individual vitamins were shown.

  10. Nigerian Journal of Nutritional Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Nutritional Sciences (ISSN 0189-0913), official Journal ... health professionals, home economists, policy makers, students of nutrition and ... Vitamin A Status of Patients with Breast Cancer Attending University College ...

  11. Metabolic vitamin B12 status on a mostly raw vegan diet with follow-up using tablets, nutritional yeast, or probiotic supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, M S

    2000-01-01

    Pure vegetarian diets might cause cobalamin deficiency due to lack of dietary intake. It was hypothesized that a population following a vegan diet consuming mostly raw fruits and vegetables, carrot juice, and dehydrated barley grass juice would be able to avoid vitamin B12 deficiency naturally. Subjects were recruited at a health ministers' reunion based on adherence to the Hallelujah diet for at least 2 years. Serum cobalamin and urinary methylmalonic acid (MMA) assays were performed. Follow-up with sublingual tablets, nutritional yeast, or probiotic supplements was carried out on subjects with abnormal MMA results. 49 subjects were tested. Most subjects (10th to 90th percentile) had followed this diet 23-49 months. 6 subjects had serum B12 concentrations B12 concentrations 0.20). The urinary MMA assay is effective for identifying early metabolic cobalamin deficiency. People following the Hallelujah diet and other raw-food vegetarian diets should regularly monitor their urinary MMA levels, consume a sublingual cobalamin supplement, or consume cobalamin in their food.

  12. Determination of Vitamin C in Enteral Nutrition Emulsion by HPLC%HPLC法测定肠内营养乳剂中维生素C的含量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱虬; 朱卫红

    2012-01-01

    An HPLC method was established for the determination of vitamin C (VC) in enteral nutrition emulsion.The mobile phase consisted of 0.02 mol o L-1' potassium dihydrogen phosphate-acetonitrile (27:73, pH 5.3).The determination was performed on a Merck LiChrospher 100 NH2 column (250 mm× 4.0 mm, 5μm).The UV detection wavelength was set at 254 nm.The proposed method gained a linear range at 2.2868~7.5466 μg·-mL-1' (r=0.9999, n=5) with good accuracy and recovery.%建立肠内营养乳剂中维生素C的高效液相色谱测定法.用Merck LiChrospher100 NH2柱(250 mm ×4.0 mm,5μm),0.02 mol· L-1磷酸二氢钾溶液-乙腈(27∶73)为流动相(pH为5.3),进行分离,检测波长为254 nm.该法线性范围为2.2868~7.5466μg· mL-1,精密度和平均回收率良好.

  13. HYDROSOLUBLE VITAMINS AND SPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladmila Bojanić

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamins are organic substances needed for normal cell functioning in the human body, and therefore human health. People who train sports require an optimal psychophysical performance in order to achieve the best sports results. Athletes’ needs for vitamins may be higher than in general population, also they are taking vitamin supplements more often than other people. Thus, it is very important for them to be familiar with the vitamins’ roles and recommended intake levels.Hydrosoluble vitamins are easily absorbed into the blood and excreted in urine, and so very little stored in the body. They are less likely to cause toxic effects compared to the liposoluble vitamins, but their deficiency may occur much faster. The B group of vitamins takes part in many biochemical processes, and is especially important for athletes, as these vitamins help conversion of energy from food into the muscle energy. Vitamin C is known as an antioxidant that protects against oxygen free radicals. It has a number of other roles in metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, proteins and minerals.Athletes are likely to intake sufficient quantities of vitamins through the nutrition. Vitamins’ supplements are usually unnecessary and without additional benefits on sports performance. However, if vitamins’ supplements are taken, attention must be paid for their tolerable upper intake levels.

  14. Too Much Vitamin C: Harmful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nausea Vomiting Heartburn Abdominal bloating and cramps Headache Insomnia Kidney stones Remember, for most people, a healthy ... Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-answers/vitamin-c/faq- ...

  15. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Fortify Your Knowledge About Vitamins Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... Schneeman, Ph.D., Director of FDA's Office of Nutritional Products, Labeling, and Dietary Supplements, says, "The Guidelines ...

  16. Simultaneous determination of water-soluble vitamins in SRM 1849 Infant/Adult Nutritional Formula powder by liquid chromatography–isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assessing dietary intake of vitamins from all sources, including foods, dietary supplements, and fortified foods, would be aided considerably by having analytical methodologies that are capable of simultaneous determination of several vitamins. Vitamins naturally present in foods may occur in diffe...

  17. Quality of life and self-rated health in relation to changes in fruit and vegetable intake and in plasma vitamins C and E in a randomised trial of behavioural and nutritional education counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steptoe, Andrew; Perkins-Porras, Linda; Hilton, Sean; Rink, Elizabeth; Cappuccio, Francesco P

    2004-07-01

    We have carried out a randomised trial comparing brief behavioural counselling with nutritional education counselling to increase fruit and vegetable consumption and associated biomarkers in adults from a low-income neighbourhood. The objective of the present analysis was to assess the impact of interventions on quality of life and health status, and associations between changes in fruit and vegetable consumption, plasma vitamins C and E, and quality of life. Behavioural counselling and nutritional education counselling were carried out in 271 adults in two 15 min sessions in a primary-care setting. Physical and mental health status (medical outcome study short form 36) and self-rated health were assessed at baseline, 8 weeks and 12 months, and analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Both groups reported increased fruit and vegetable consumption; plasma vitamin E and beta-carotene also increased, with significantly greater changes in consumption and plasma beta-carotene in the behavioural counselling condition. Physical and mental health status, and the proportion of participants in good self-rated health, increased in both groups to a similar extent. Individual differences in improvements in physical health status and self-rated health were correlated with increases in fruit and vegetable intake and in plasma vitamins C and E, independently of age, gender, ethnicity, financial status, smoking, BMI and use of vitamin supplements. We conclude that participation in the present study was associated with improved health-related quality of life. Increases in fruit and vegetable intake and plasma vitamin levels may stimulate beneficial changes in physical health status in socio-economically deprived adults.

  18. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Schneeman, Ph.D., Director of FDA's Office of Nutritional Products, and highlights reasons to consider taking vitamin supplements along with tips for doing so safely. For More Information Fortify Your Knowledge About Vitamins FoodSafety.gov: Your Gateway to Federal ...

  19. Nutritional and genetic determinants of vitamin B and homocysteine metabolisms in neural tube defects: a multicenter case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candito, Mirande; Rivet, Romain; Herbeth, Bernard; Boisson, Catherine; Rudigoz, René-Charles; Luton, Dominique; Journel, Hubert; Oury, Jean-François; Roux, François; Saura, Robert; Vernhet, Isabelle; Gaucherand, Pascal; Muller, Françoise; Guidicelli, Béatrice; Heckenroth, Hélène; Poulain, Patrice; Blayau, Martine; Francannet, Christine; Roszyk, Laurence; Brustié, Cécile; Staccini, Pascal; Gérard, Philippe; Fillion-Emery, Nathalie; Guéant-Rodriguez, Rosa-Maria; Van Obberghen, Emmanuel; Guéant, Jean-Louis

    2008-05-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are severe congenital malformations due to failure of neural tube formation in early pregnancy. The proof that folic acid prevents NTDs raises the question of whether other parts of homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism may affect rates of NTDs. This French case-control study covered: 77 women aged 17-42 years sampled prior to elective abortion for a severe NTDs (cases) and 61 women aged 20-43 years with a normal pregnancy. Plasma and erythrocyte folate, plasma B6, B12 and Hcy were tested as five polymorphisms MTHFR 677 C --> T, MTHFR 1298 A --> C, MTR 2756 A --> G, MTTR 66 A --> G and TCN2 776 C --> G. Cases had significantly lower erythrocyte folate, plasma folate, B12 and B6 concentrations than the controls, and higher Hcy concentration. The odds ratio was 2.15 (95% CI: 1.00-4.59) for women with the MTRR 66 A --> G allele and it was decreased for mothers carrying the MTHFR 1298 A --> C allele. In multivariate analysis, only the erythrocyte folate concentration (P = 0.005) and plasma B6 concentration (P = 0.020) were predictors. Red cell folate is the main determinant of NTDs in France. Folic acid supplement or flour fortification would prevent most cases. Increased consumption of vitamins B12 and B6 could contribute to the prevention of NTDs. Genetic polymorphisms played only a small role. Until folic acid fortification becomes mandatory, all women of reproductive age should consume folic acid in a multivitamin that also contains B12 and B6.

  20. Rickets-vitamin D deficiency and dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Sahay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rickets is an important problem even in countries with adequate sun exposure. The causes of rickets/osteomalacia are varied and include nutritional deficiency, especially poor dietary intake of vitamin D and calcium. Non-nutritional causes include hypophosphatemic rickets primarily due to renal phosphate losses and rickets due to renal tubular acidosis. In addition, some varieties are due to inherited defects in vitamin D metabolism and are called vitamin D dependent rickets. This chapter highlights rickets/osteomalacia related to vitamin D deficiency or to inherited defects in vitamin D metabolism. Hypophosphatemic rickets and rickets due to renal tubular acidosis are discussed in other sections of the journal.

  1. [Evaluation of sufficiency with vitamins C, B1 and B2 of newborn infants feeding different types of nutrition, by means of urinary excretion determination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrzhesinskaya, O A; Kodentsova, V M; Pereverzeva, O G; Gmoshinskaya, M V; Pustograev, N N

    2015-01-01

    With the help of non-invasive methods the sufficiency with vitamins C, B1 and B2 in 58 newborns (38-40 weeks of gestation) on breastfeeding as well as on mixed or artificial feeding has been evaluated. Urinary excretion and breast content of ascorbic acid (measured by visual titration), thiamin (by thiochrome fluorimetric method) andriboflavin (fluorimetrically by titration with riboflavin-binding protein) was determined on the 3-10th day after birth. 35 infants were exclusively breastfed. 40% of their mothers regularly took multivitamin supplements during pregnancy and 42.9%--both during pregnancy and after childbirth, 17.1% did not use vitamin complexes either duringpregnancy or after childbearing. The content of vitamins C, B1 and B2 in the breast milk of women who did not additionally intake vitamins during pregnancy and lactation, was reduced compared with that of mothers who took multivitamin supplements, and provided only a half of the needs of their child in these vitamins. All these babies have urinary excretion of vitamins below the lower limit of norm. Among infants whose mothers took multivitamin supplements during pregnancy, but stop taking them immediately after their birth, only 28.6% of newborns were provided with vitamin C, while all the children identified a lack of vitamins By and B2. The insufficiency with vitamins C and B1 was detected in one third of children breastfed by mothers who took vitamins during pregnancy and continued intaking them after birth, adequate supplied with vitamin B2 was 35.7% of the surveyed. Determination of vitamin urinary excretion (perg creatinine) is useful for vitamin status evaluation. The content of vitamins in breast milk can be used for assessment of vitamin status both a nursing woman and her child. Taking into consideration that the diet of a breastfeeding woman is not always the best, there is no doubt about the need to continue multivitamin intake during breastfeeding. The question on the doses of vitamins

  2. Vitamin therapy after heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jignesh

    2015-10-01

    The need for routine nutritional supplementation with vitamins in most healthy individuals remains a matter of debate and current guidelines recommend that the need for these essential nutrients be met primarily through consuming an adequate diet. However, after heart transplantation, multiple factors, including the effects of prolonged debilitation prior to surgery and immunosuppression, may lead to physiological stress, which may justify consideration for vitamin supplementation. In general, clinical trials have not focused on vitamin supplementation after heart transplantation. There appears to be some limited clinical data to support the use of certain vitamins after heart transplantation. In particular, the putative antioxidant properties of vitamins C and E after heart transplantation may be beneficial as prophylaxis against cardiac allograft vasculopathy, and vitamin D, in conjunction with calcium, may help prevent post-transplant bone loss. Current guidelines only address the use of vitamin D after heart transplantation.

  3. Larval fish nutrition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holt, J

    2011-01-01

    ... introduction to fish micronutrient history 4.2 Micronutrients in larval feeds 4.3 Requirements versus recommendations 4.4 Vitamins 4.5 Minerals 34.6 Future challenges Section 2: Nutritional Physi...

  4. Vitamin D nutritional status and the influencing factors in elderly inpatients%老年住院患者维生素D营养状况分析及相关研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢冬喜; 尹福在; 张建东; 岳媛媛; 于常英; 朱海英; 姜源; 刘永升

    2013-01-01

    Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-OHD) level was examined to investigate the nutritional status of vitamin D in elderly inpatients.The influencing factors for vitamin D deficiency were also analyzed.The average serum 25-OHD concentration in elderly inpatients was (34.6 ± 16.2) nmol/L.Severe,moderate,and mild deficiency respectively accounted for 17.5%,73.0%,7.5%,and only 2.0% was normal.Vitamin D deficiency existed seriouslly in elderly inpatients.The reasons were complicated.Bedridden time,advanced age,and length of stay were closely related.%分析住院老年人群维生素D的营养状况以及缺乏原因.老年住院患者血清25-羟维生素D平均浓度为(34.6±16.2) nmol/L,其中重度缺乏者占17.5%,轻度缺乏者占73.0%,不足者占7.5%,充足者仅占2.0%.老年住院患者维生素D普遍缺乏且较严重,可能与高龄、卧床、住院时间长等有关.

  5. Characterisation of vitamin and mineral supplement users differentiated according to their motives for using supplements: results of the German National Nutrition Monitoring (NEMONIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Anne; Hoffmann, Ingrid; Heuer, Thorsten

    2017-08-01

    To characterise German vitamin and mineral supplement users differentiated by their motives for supplement use. Data were obtained from the German National Nutrition Monitoring (2010/11) via two 24 h dietary recalls and a telephone interview. Motive-based subgroups of supplement users were identified by factor and cluster analysis. Sociodemographic, lifestyle, health and dietary characteristics and supplement use were examined. Differences were analysed using χ 2 tests, logistic and linear regression models. Germany, nationwide. Individuals (n 1589) aged 18-80 years. Three motive-based subgroups were identified: a 'Prevention' subgroup (n 324), characterised by the motive to prevent nutrient deficiencies; a 'Prevention and additional benefits' subgroup (n 166), characterised by motives to prevent health problems and improve well-being and performance; and a 'Treatment' subgroup (n 136), characterised by motives to treat nutrient deficiencies or diseases. Members of the two prevention subgroups had a higher Healthy Eating Index score and tended to be more physically active than non-users. Those in the 'Prevention and additional benefits' subgroup supplemented with a greater number of micronutrients. Members of the 'Treatment' subgroup tended to be older and have a lower self-reported health status than non-users, and supplemented with a smaller number of micronutrients. The majority of supplement users take supplements for preventive purposes and they are more health conscious than non-users of supplements due to their concerns about developing health problems. Those supplementing for treatment purposes may have underlying health indications and may be more likely to benefit from supplementation than those supplementing for preventive purposes.

  6. 21 CFR 172.379 - Vitamin D2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Vitamin D2. 172.379 Section 172.379 Food and Drugs... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.379 Vitamin D2. Vitamin D2 may be used safely in foods as a... prescribed conditions: (a) Vitamin D2, also known as ergocalciferol, is the chemical...

  7. 21 CFR 172.380 - Vitamin D3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Vitamin D3. 172.380 Section 172.380 Food and Drugs... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.380 Vitamin D3. Vitamin D3 may be used safely in foods as a... prescribed conditions: (a) Vitamin D3, also known as cholecalciferol, is the chemical...

  8. Vitamin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamins are substances that your body needs to grow and develop normally. Vitamin A plays a role in your Vision Bone growth Reproduction Cell functions Immune system Vitamin A is an antioxidant. It can come from ...

  9. Vitamin E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamins are substances that your body needs to grow and develop normally. Vitamin E is an antioxidant. It plays a role ... immune system and metabolic processes. Good sources of vitamin E include Vegetable oils Margarine Nuts and seeds ...

  10. Vitamin K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamins are substances that your body needs to grow and develop normally. Vitamin K helps your body by making proteins for ... blood clotting. If you don't have enough vitamin K, you may bleed too much. Newborns have ...

  11. Vitamin D Toxicity: What If You Get Too Much?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Nutrition and healthy eating What is vitamin D toxicity, and should I worry about it ... Answers from Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L.D. Vitamin D toxicity, also called hypervitaminosis D, is a ...

  12. Vitamin food fortification today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Samaniego-Vaesken

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Historically, food fortification has served as a tool to address population-wide nutrient deficiencies such as rickets by vitamin D fortified milk. This article discusses the different policy strategies to be used today. Mandatory or voluntary fortification and fortified foods, which the consumer needs, also have to comply with nutritional, regulatory, food safety and technical issues. The ‘worldwide map of vitamin fortification’ is analysed, including differences between develop and developing countries. The vitamins, folate and vitamin D, are taken as practical examples in the review of the beneficial effect of different strategies on public health. The importance of the risk–benefit aspect, as well as how to identify the risk groups, and the food vehicles for fortification is discussed.

  13. Plasma and dietary carotenoids and vitamines A,C and E and the risk of colon and rectal cancer in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, M.; Leufkens, A.M.; Siersema, P.D.; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.; Vrieling, A.; Hulshof, P.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoids and vitamins A, C and E are possibly associated with a reduced colorectal cancer (CRC) risk through antioxidative properties. The association of prediagnostic plasma concentrations and dietary consumption of carotenoids and vitamins A, C and E with the risk of colon and rectal cancer was

  14. Plasma and dietary carotenoids and vitamins A, C and e and risk of colon and rectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, Max; Leufkens, Anke M.; Siersema, Peter D.; Van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B; Vrieling, Alina; Hulshof, Paul J M; Van Gils, Carla H.; Overvad, Kim; Roswall, Nina; Kyrø, Cecilie; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Fagerhazzi, Guy; Cadeau, Claire; Kühn, Tilman; Johnson, Theron; Boeing, Heiner; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Klinaki, Eleni; Androulidaki, Anna; Palli, Domenico; Grioni, Sara; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Tumino, Rosario; Panico, Salvatore; Bakker, Marije F.; Skeie, Guri; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Jakszyn, Paula; Barricarte, Aurelio; Huerta, José María; Molina-Montes, Esther; Argüelles, Marcial; Johansson, Ingegerd; Ljuslinder, Ingrid; Key, Timothy J.; Bradbury, Kathryn E.; Khaw, Kay Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Ferrari, Pietro; Duarte-Salles, Talita; Jenab, Mazda; Gunter, Marc J.; Vergnaud, Anne Claire; Wark, Petra A.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoids and vitamins A, C and E are possibly associated with a reduced colorectal cancer (CRC) risk through antioxidative properties. The association of prediagnostic plasma concentrations and dietary consumption of carotenoids and vitamins A, C and E with the risk of colon and rectal cancer was

  15. Plasma and dietary vitamin C levels and risk of gastric cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-EURGAST).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenab, M.; Riboli, E.; Ferrari, P.; Sabate, J.; Slimani, N.; Norat, T.; Friesen, M.; Tjonneland, A.; Olsen, A.; Overvad, K.; Boutron-Ruault, M.C.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Touvier, M.; Boeing, H.; Schulz, M.; Linseisen, J.; Nagel, G.; Trichopoulou, A.; Naska, A.; Oikonomou, E.; Krogh, V.; Panico, S.; Masala, G.; Sacerdote, C.; Tumino, R.; Peeters, P.H.; Numans, M.E.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.; Buchner, F.L.; Lund, E.; Pera, G.; Sanchez, C.N.; Sanchez, M.J.; Arriola, L.; Barricarte, A.; Quiros, J.R.; Hallmans, G.; Stenling, R.; Berglund, G.; Bingham, S.; Khaw, K.T.; Key, T.J.; Allen, N.; Carneiro, F.; Mahlke, U.; Giudice, G. Del; Palli, D.; Kaaks, R.; Gonzalez, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    Vitamin C is an antioxidant and inhibitor of carcinogenic N-nitroso compound production in the stomach. Higher dietary vitamin C consumption is associated with decreased risk of gastric cancer (GC) in numerous case-control studies, but data from prospective studies are limited, particularly so for b

  16. Plasma and dietary carotenoids and vitamins A, C and E and risk of colon and rectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, M.; Leufkens, A.M.; Siersema, P.D.; Duijnhoven, F.J.B. van; Vrieling, A.; Hulshof, P.J.; Gils, C.H. van; Overvad, K.; Roswall, N.; Kyro, C.; Boutron-Ruault, M.C.; Fagerhazzi, G.; Cadeau, C.; Kuhn, T.; Johnson, T.; Boeing, H.; Aleksandrova, K.; Trichopoulou, A.; Klinaki, E.; Androulidaki, A.; Palli, D.; Grioni, S.; Sacerdote, C.; Tumino, R.; Panico, S.; Bakker, M.F.; Skeie, G.; Weiderpass, E.; Jakszyn, P.; Barricarte, A.; Huerta, J. Maria; Molina-Montes, E.; Arguelles, M.; Johansson, I.; Ljuslinder, I.; Key, T.J.; Bradbury, K.E.; Khaw, K.T.; Wareham, N.J.; Ferrari, P.; Duarte-Salles, T.; Jenab, M.; Gunter, M.J.; Vergnaud, A.C.; Wark, P.A.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoids and vitamins A, C and E are possibly associated with a reduced colorectal cancer (CRC) risk through antioxidative properties. The association of prediagnostic plasma concentrations and dietary consumption of carotenoids and vitamins A, C and E with the risk of colon and rectal cancer was

  17. Circulating concentrations of folate and vitamin B12 in relation to prostate cancer risk: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johansson, M.; Appleby, P.N.; Allen, N.E.; Travis, R.C.; Roddam, A.W.; Egevad, L.; Jenab, M.; Rinaldi, S.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.; Vollset, S.E.; Ueland, P.M.; Sanchez, M.J.; Quiros, J.R.; Gonzalez, C.A.; Larranaga, N.; Chirlaque, M.D.; Ardanaz, E.; Sieri, S.; Palli, D.; Vineis, P.; Tumino, R.; Linseisen, J.; Kaaks, R.; Boeing, H.; Pischon, T.; Psaltopoulou, T.; Trichopoulou, A.; Trichopoulos, D.; Khaw, K.T.; Bingham, S.; Hallmans, G.; Riboli, E.; Stattin, P.; Key, T.J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Determinants of one-carbon metabolism, such as folate and vitamin B(12), have been implicated in cancer development. Previous studies have not provided conclusive evidence for the importance of circulating concentrations of folate and vitamin B(12) in prostate cancer etiology. The aim of

  18. Vitamin D and the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, Mona; Kerr, Philip E; Slade, Karren; Grant-Kels, Jane E

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D is a fat-soluble nutrient that humans obtain through the diet and by synthesis in the skin upon exposure to ultraviolet B. Vitamin D is then converted by the liver to 25-hydroxyvitamin D, its major circulating form. This form is the best indicator of vitamin D nutritional status and is easily measured. Under the influence of parathyroid hormone, the kidney then converts 25-hydroxyvitamin D to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, the biologically active, hormonal form of the nutrient that is important in the metabolism of calcium and phosphorus and is critical in building and maintaining healthy bones. Many cell types outside of the skeletal system, including various cells in the skin, also express the vitamin D receptor. In addition, many cell types convert circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D for local use. This metabolite has been shown to exert potent effects on cellular differentiation, cellular proliferation, and immune regulation. It is theorized that by these mechanisms vitamin D and its analogues are effective treatment options for psoriasis and other skin diseases. Insufficient vitamin D nutritional status has been associated with a host of other diseases, most notably cancer. There is evidence that supplementation with vitamin D reduces the overall incidence of cancer, although current evidence is insufficient to prove a causative effect. Sunscreen use blocks the ability of the skin to photosynthesize vitamin D, although the effect this has on the vitamin D status of the general population is unclear.

  19. INVESTIGATION ON THE VITAMIN A NUTRITION STATUS OF STUDENTS IN A MEDICALCOLLEGE%某医学院大学生维生素A营养状况评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晶; 詹杰; 李景辉; 李延龙; 苏丹

    2012-01-01

    [目的]了解目前大学生维生索A管养状况.[方法]采用暗适应仪测定270名大学生暗适应时间,同时进行膳食及饮食习惯调查.[结果]暗适应结果表明受检大学生中维生素A营养状况正常者占40.7%,维生素A不足者占58.9%,维生素A缺乏者占0.4%;男、女生膳食维生素A日平均摄入量为(367.6±380.7)和(332.2±335.5)μg视黄酵当量,分别占RNI的46.0%和47.5%.摄入量最低仅为RNI的10.4%;99%的学生饮食习惯处于中下等水平,39.5%的学生不考虑食品构成,动物性食品食用频率普遍较低.[结论]大学生维生素A摄入水平很低.已有59.3%学生出现维生素A不足和缺乏的早期症状.大学生是维生素A缺乏的一个重要群体,应引起高度重视.%[Objective] To know the vitamin A nutrition status of medical students. [Methods] The dark adaptation time of 270 students was measured by the dark adaptation appliance, while their dietary and eating habits were investigated. [Results] Dark adaptation results showed that the students with normal vitamin A nutritional status accounting for 40.7%, Vitamin A deficiencies accounting for 58.9%, vitamin A lack accounting for 0.4%; Male and female average daily dietary intakes of vitamin A were 367.6 ± 380.7 and 332.2 ± 335.5 μg retinol equivalent, accounting for 46.0% and 47.5% of RNI, respectively. The minimum intake of vitamin A was only 10.4% of RNI; 99% of students eating habits were irrational, 39.5% of students regardless to food composition and animal foods consumption frequency were quite low. [ Conclusion ] The level of vitamin A intake of the students was quite low. The early symptoms of vitamin A deficiencies were appear in 59.3% of the students. It is important to strengthen nutrition education and develop good eating habits to students.

  20. Children aged 12–59 months missed through the National Vitamin A Capsule Distribution Program in Bangladesh: findings of the Nutritional Surveillance Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Akhter

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available From January 1990 to December 2006, Helen Keller International implemented the Nutritional Surveillance Project (NSP in Bangladesh, which has been used to conduct regular surveillance and special surveys to provide information on health and nutritional status of children and mothers, and report on the coverage and impact of nutrition and health programs in Bangladesh. The Government of Bangladesh (GOB distributes vitamin A Capsule (VAC among children aged 12–59 months biannually. The NSP data was analyzed to assess VAC coverage and to explore which children were less likely to receive a VAC in order to help GOB identify necessary modifications aimed at higher coverage of VAC among all eligible children. Results showed that coverage among girls and boys was not different (P=0.970. However, coverage was consistently lower among children aged 12-23 months compared to older children (24–59 months (P≤0.001 in each of the distribution rounds. Coverage among children from poorer households was lower than among children from wealthiest households (P<0.001, with the extent of this difference varying by round. Coverage was significantly higher if households had had contact with a government health assistant in the last month (P<0.001; and among households who owned a radio or a TV compared to those who did not. The VAC distribution campaign needs to be strengthened to cover the children who are currently not reached; especially younger children, children living in underserved regions, children from poorer households and from households with less contact with health service providers or mass media.De janvier 1990 à décembre 2006, l’ONG Helen Keller International a mis en oeuvre le projet Nutritional Surveillance Project (NSP au Bangladesh. Ce projet a permis de réaliser une surveillance régulière et des études ciblées afin de recueillir des informations sur l’état de santé et l’état nutritionnel des mères et des enfants, et de

  1. Nutrition for Women Athletes. Commonly Asked Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, N. Peggy

    1987-01-01

    Information on the nutritional needs of female athletes is presented. Among the topics discussed are proper eating habits, carbohydrate loading, amenorrhea, osteoporosis, anemia, vitamins, and minerals. (MT)

  2. Nutritional Hormesis and Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, Daniel P.

    2009-01-01

    Nutritional hormesis has the potential to serve as a pro-healthy aging intervention by reducing the susceptibility of the elderly to various chronic degenerative diseases and thereby extending human healthspan. Supportive evidence for nutritional hormesis arising from essential nutrients (vitamins and minerals), dietary pesticides (natural and synthetic), dioxin and other herbicides, and acrylamide will be reviewed and discussed.

  3. Nutritional hormesis and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Daniel P

    2009-11-16

    Nutritional hormesis has the potential to serve as a pro-healthy aging intervention by reducing the susceptibility of the elderly to various chronic degenerative diseases and thereby extending human healthspan. Supportive evidence for nutritional hormesis arising from essential nutrients (vitamins and minerals), dietary pesticides (natural and synthetic), dioxin and other herbicides, and acrylamide will be reviewed and discussed.

  4. Vitamin B12 status in women of childbearing age in the UK and its relationship with national nutrient intake guidelines: results from two National Diet and Nutrition Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaikalakoteswari, Antonysunil; Venkataraman, Hema; Maheswaran, Hendramoorthy; Saravanan, Ponnusamy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess serum B12, folate and the associated homocysteine (Hcy) levels among women of childbearing age in the UK and examine their association with dietary intake in relation to the UK Recommended Nutrient Intakes (RNIs) for B12 and folate. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Data from two publicly available National Diet and Nutrition Surveys (NDNS 2000/2001 and 2008/2012) were used. These were population-based surveys of randomly selected samples of adults which were carried out in their households. Participants Women of childbearing age (aged 19–39 years), representative of the UK population. Those who were pregnant or breastfeeding were excluded. Outcome measures The associations between micronutrient intakes and blood levels of B12, folate and Hcy were assessed by correlation and stepwise linear regression. B12 intake was divided into quintiles and plotted against blood B12 and Hcy concentrations to determine the threshold of any associations. Results 299 women from the first NDNS cohort had complete intake and biomarker data. The prevalence of serum vitamin B12 (≤150 pmol/L) and serum folate (≤10 nmol/L) deficiency and hyperhomocysteinemia (≥12 µmol/L) was 12.4%, 6.4% and 21.2%, respectively, despite seemingly adequate B12 intakes (median 3.8 μg/day, 96% consumed more than the UK RNI of 1.5 μg/day). B12 concentrations increased across all quintiles of intake with serum levels in quintiles 4 and 5 (median intake 4.9 and 7.1 μg/day, respectively) significantly higher than quintile 1. However, Hcy concentrations levelled off between quintiles 4 and 5. Comparison of micronutrient intake between the two surveys found that folate intake has reduced in the more recent cohort. Conclusions The UK RNI for B12 intake should be increased for women of childbearing age with intakes of around 5–7 μg/day likely to be associated with stable biomarker levels. B12 levels should also be measured in women preconceptionally or in early

  5. Nutritional Supplementation with Chlorella pyrenoidosa Lowers Serum Methylmalonic Acid in Vegans and Vegetarians with a Suspected Vitamin B₁₂ Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Randall Edward; Phillips, Todd W; Udani, Jay

    2015-12-01

    Since vitamin B12 occurs in substantial amounts only in foods derived from animals, vegetarians and particularly vegans are at risk of developing deficiencies of this essential vitamin. The chlorella used for this study is a commercially available whole-food supplement, which is believed to contain the physiologically active form of the vitamin. This exploratory open-label study was performed to determine if adding 9 g of Chlorella pyrenoidosa daily could help mitigate a vitamin B12 deficiency in vegetarians and vegans. Seventeen vegan or vegetarian adults (26-57 years of age) with a known vitamin B12 deficiency, as evidenced by a baseline serum methylmalonic acid (MMA) level above 270 nmol/L at screening, but who otherwise appeared healthy were enrolled in the study. Each participant added 9 g of C. pyrenoidosa to their daily diet for 60 ± 5 days and their serum MMA, vitamin B12, homocysteine (Hcy) levels as well as mean corpuscular volume (MCV), hemoglobin (Hgb), and hematocrit (Hct) were measured at 30 and 60 days from baseline. After 30 and 60 days, the serum MMA level fell significantly (P vegetarians and vegans to get the vitamin B12 they need.

  6. Nutrition in the adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, R

    1999-02-01

    This article reviews the nutritional requirements of puberty and the clinical assessment of nutritional status, and discusses the nutritional risks imposed by vegetarian diets, pregnancy, and athletic involvement. Energy (calories) and protein are essential in pubertal development. Adolescent females require approximately 2200 calories/day, whereas male adolescents require 2500-3000 calories/day. Additional intake requirements include fat, calcium, iron, zinc, vitamins, and fiber. The clinical assessment of nutritional status begins with obtaining a good diet history of the patient and this could be offered by the body mass index. Nutritional deficiencies and poor eating habits established during adolescence can have long-term consequences, including delayed sexual maturation, loss of final adult height, osteoporosis, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. As for vegetarian adolescents, nutritional risks include lack of iodine, vitamin B12, vitamin D, and some essential fatty acids. In addition, substances in some grains reduce gut absorption, thus increasing mineral deficiencies. Pregnancy may also be a risk factor for poor nutrition during adolescence. A pregnant adolescent has different nutritional needs because she is still growing. Among adolescent athletes many are turning to nutritional supplements in an attempt to improve athletic performance. A balanced, varied diet provides adequate calories and nutrition to meet the needs of most adolescents. They also have greater water needs than do adult athletes. Details on adolescent health concerns are further discussed in this article.

  7. Vitamin D in youth with Type 1 diabetes: prevalence of insufficiency and association with insulin resistance in the SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The, N. S.; Crandell, J. L.; Lawrence, J. M.; King, I. B.; Dabelea, D.; Marcovina, S. M.; D’Agostino, R. B.; Norris, J. M.; Pihoker, C.; Mayer-Davis, E. J.

    2013-01-01

    Aims To determine the prevalence of plasma vitamin D insufficiency in individuals with Type 1 diabetes and to determine the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of plasma vitamin D with insulin resistance. Methods Participants from the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study [n = 1426; mean age 11.2 years (sd 3.9)] had physician-diagnosed Type 1 diabetes [diabetes duration mean 10.2 months (sd 6.5)] with data available at baseline and follow-up (approximately 12 and 24 months after baseline). Insulin resistance was estimated using a validated equation. Cross-sectional and longitudinal multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine the association of plasma vitamin D with insulin resistance, adjusting for potential confounders. Results Forty-nine per cent of individuals had plasma vitamin D < 50 nmol/l and 26% were insulin resistant. In cross-sectional multivariate analyses, participants who had higher plasma vitamin D (65 nmol/l) had lower odds of prevalent insulin resistance than participants with lower plasma vitamin D (25 nmol/l) (odds ratio 0.70, 95% CI 0.57–0.85). This association was attenuated after additional adjustment for BMI z-score, which could be a confounder or a mediator (odds ratio 0.81, 95% CI 0.64–1.03). In longitudinal multivariate analyses, individuals with higher plasma vitamin D at baseline had lower odds of incident insulin resistance, but this was not significant (odds ratio 0.85, 95% CI 0.63–1.14). Conclusions Vitamin D insufficiency is common in individuals with Type 1 diabetes and may increase risk for insulin resistance. Additional prospective studies are needed to determine the association between plasma vitamin D and insulin resistance, and to further examine the role of adiposity on this association. PMID:23909945

  8. Total parenteral nutrition - Problems in compatibility and stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroder, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Adding calcium, trace elements and vitamins could turn parenteral nutrition into a dangerous product, which could harm the patient. This article focuses on the major pharmaceutical problems of parenteral. nutrition when adding nutritional compounds Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  9. Prenatal Vitamins: OK for Women Who Aren't Pregnant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/dietary-supplements/questions-ask-taking-vitamin-and-mineral-supplements. Accessed March 20, 2017. Nutrition during pregnancy. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. http:// ...

  10. Vitamin Chart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Vitamin Chart KidsHealth > For Teens > Vitamin Chart Print A A A en español Tabla de las vitaminas Type Benefits Sources Quantity Vitamin A Vitamin A prevents eye problems, promotes a ...

  11. Vitamin Chart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Vitamin Chart KidsHealth > For Teens > Vitamin Chart A A A en español Tabla de las vitaminas Type Benefits Sources Quantity Vitamin A Vitamin A prevents eye problems, promotes a ...

  12. Encapsulated specialty oils commercialized in São Paulo state, Brazil: evaluation of identity (fatty acid profile and compliance of fatty acids and Vitamin E contents with nutrition labeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Hirashima

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Encapsulated specialty oils commercialized in São Paulo state, Brazil, were evaluated for their identity (fatty acids profile and compliance with nutrition labeling (fatty acids and Vitamin E (alpha tocopherol contents. Twenty one samples [flaxseed oil (6, evening primrose (5, safflower (8, borage (1, and black currant (1] purchased from local markets or collected by the health surveillance agency were analyzed. The fatty acids and vitamin E contents were analyzed by gas chromatography with flame ionization detector and liquid chromatography with UV detector, respectively. Nine samples were adulterated (5 samples of safflower oil, 3 of flaxseed oil, and one of evening primrose. Among them, 3 flaxseed and 2 safflower oil samples were probably adulterated by the addition of soybean oil. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA was found in two safflower oils samples although the sale of oils with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA is not permitted by the National Health Surveillance Agency in Brazil (ANVISA. Only two samples presented all values in compliance with nutrition labeling (one safflower oil sample and one borage oil sample. The results show that a continuous monitoring of encapsulated specialty oils commercialized in Brazil is necessary including a greater number of samples and sanitary surveillance.

  13. Vitamins and bone health: beyond calcium and vitamin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadieh, Hala; Arabi, Asma

    2011-10-01

    Osteoporosis is a major health disorder associated with an increased risk of fracture. Nutrition is among the modifiable factors that influence the risk of osteoporosis and fracture. Calcium and vitamin D play important roles in improving bone mineral density and reducing the risk of fracture. Other vitamins appear to play a role in bone health as well. In this review, the findings of studies that related the intake and/or the status of vitamins other than vitamin D to bone health in animals and humans are summarized. Studies of vitamin A showed inconsistent results. Excessive, as well as insufficient, levels of retinol intake may be associated with compromised bone health. Deficiencies in vitamin B, along with the consequent elevated homocysteine level, are associated with bone loss, decreased bone strength, and increased risk of fracture. Deficiencies in vitamins C, E, and K are also associated with compromised bone health; this effect may be modified by smoking, estrogen use or hormonal therapy after menopause, calcium intake, and vitamin D. These findings highlight the importance of adequate nutrition in preserving bone mass and reducing the risk of osteoporosis and fractures.

  14. [Nutrition and liver failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plauth, M

    2013-06-01

    In the critically ill liver patient, nutrition support is not very different from that given for other illnesses. In hyperacute liver failure, nutrition support is of less importance than in the other subtypes of acute liver failure that take a more protracted course. Nasoenteral tube feeding using a polymeric standard formula should be the first-line approach, while parenteral nutrition giving glucose, fat, amino acids, vitamins, and trace elements is initiated when enteral nutrition is insufficient or impracticable. In chronic liver disease, notably cirrhosis, there is frequently protein malnutrition indicating a poor prognosis and requiring immediate initiation of nutrition support. Enteral nutrition ensuring an adequate provision of energy and protein should be preferred. Particular care should be taken to avoid refeeding syndrome and to treat vitamin and trace element deficiency.

  15. 社区2型糖尿病患者膳食及维生素C营养状况调查%Survey on diet and vitamin C nutrition status in patients with type 2 diabetes in community

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张培红; 姚保栋; 唐玉英

    2013-01-01

    目的 了解2型糖尿病患者膳食及维生素C的营养状况,为糖尿病防治中抗氧化营养素的补充提供参考.方法 对上海市瑞金街道社区的2型糖尿病患者(2型糖尿病组,n =68)和健康人群(对照组,n=136)进行膳食营养调查和4h尿中维生素C负荷试验.结果 4h尿中维生素C负荷试验结果显示:2型糖尿病组中10.3%的患者维生素C营养状况处于缺乏状态,显著高于对照组的0.7%,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).膳食调查结果显示:两组人群每日维生素E平均摄入量均高于推荐标准(14 mg),但组间比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);两组人群的维生素C摄入量比较,差异也无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 2型糖尿病患者的维生素C营养水平较低,在治疗过程中应重视维生素C等抗氧化营养素的补充.%Objective To investigate the diet and vitamin C nutrition status in patients with type 2 diabetes, and provide reference for the supplement of antioxidant nutrients in the treatment of diabetes. Methods Sixty-eight patients with type 2 diabetes (type 2 diabetes group) and 136 healthy people (control group) from Shanghai Ruijin Community were selected, diet nutrition was investigated, and 4-h vitamin C urinary load test was conducted. Results The results of 4-h vitamin C urinary load test suggested that 10. 3% of patients in type 2 diabetes group were in insufficient status of vitamin C, which was significantly higher than that in control group (0. 7% ) (P 0. 05). Besides, there was no significant difference in vitamin C intake between two groups (P >0. 05). Conclusion Patients with type 2 diabetes may be in poor nutrition status of vitamin C, and supplement of antioxidant nutrients including vitamin C should be attached great importance in the treatment of diabetes.

  16. Nutritional status, dietary intake and serum levels of vitamin C upon diagnosis of cancer in children and adolescents El estado nutricional, la ingesta alimentaria y los niveles séricos de vitamina C en el momento del diagnóstico de cáncer en niños y adolescentes

    OpenAIRE

    L. Lima de Araújo; J. Maciel Barbosa; A. P. Gomes Ribeiro; A. C. Oliveira dos Santos; Pedrosa, F.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The prevalence of malnutrition upon diagnosis, together with reduced food intake secondary to disease and treatment, make the periodic assessment of nutritional status (including the intake of antioxidant nutrients) of considerable importance to the follow up of patients with cancer. Objectives: Assess the nutritional status and frequency of inadequate vitamin C levels among children and adolescents with cancer at the beginning of treatment and determine associated factors. Meth...

  17. Cardiovascular Diseases and Fat Soluble Vitamins: Vitamin D and Vitamin K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsugawa, Naoko

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the associations between insufficiency of fat soluble vitamins and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) have been reported. Vitamin D affects the cardiovascular system via several pathways, such as suppression of parathyroid hormone, the renin- angiotensin-aldosterone system and vascular endothelial growth and the immune system. Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have shown the association between the concentration of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), which is a vitamin D metabolite indicating nutritional vitamin D status, and hypertension, myocardial infarction, heart failure and CVD mortality. On the other hand, the association between vitamin K status and CVDs, especially vascular calcification, has been also reported. Cross-sectional and cohort studies show that high vitamin K status is associated with reduced coronary artery calcification, CVDs and mortality risk. Epidemiological and basic studies indicate that vitamin K possesses a benefit in the prevention of the progression of coronary artery calcification via activation of matrix-gla protein (MGP). While these data in epidemiological and basic studies suggest the protective role of vitamin D and K in CVDs, the benefits of supplementation of both vitamins have not been validated in randomized controlled trials. Further basic and interventional studies are needed to confirm the benefit of both vitamins in protection against CVDs.

  18. Use of calcium, folate, and vitamin D₃-fortified milk for 6 months improves nutritional status but not bone mass or turnover, in a group of Australian aged care residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieger, Jessica A; Nowson, Caryl A

    2009-07-01

    In residential care, inadequate calcium and folate intakes and low serum vitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations are common. We assessed whether daily provision of calcium, folate, and vitamin D₃-fortified milk for 6 months improved nutritional status (serum micronutrients), bone quality (heel ultrasound), bone turnover markers (parathyroid hormone, C-terminal collagen I telopeptide, terminal propeptide of type I procollagen), and/or muscle strength and mobility in a group of Australian aged care residents. One hundred and seven residents completed the study (mean (SD) age: 79.9 (10.1) years; body weight: 68.4 (15.4) kg). The median (inter-quartile range) volume of fortified milk consumed was 160 (149) ml/day. At the end of the study, the median daily vitamin D intake increased to 10.4 (8.7) μg (P < .001), which is 70% of the adequate intake (15 μg); and calcium density (mg/MJ) was higher over the study period compared with baseline (161 ± 5 mg/MJ vs. 142 ± 4 mg/MJ, P < .001). Serum 25(OH)D concentrations increased by 23 ± 2 nmol/L (83 (107)%, P < .001), yet remained in the insufficient range (mean 45 ± 2 nmol/L). Consumption of greater than the median intake of milk (160 ml/day) (n = 54, 50%) increased serum 25(OH)D levels into the adequate range (53 ± 2 nmol/L) and reduced serum parathyroid hormone by 24% (P = .045). There was no effect on bone quality, bone turnover markers, muscle strength, or mobility. Consumption of fortified milk increased dietary vitamin D intake and raised serum 25(OH)D concentrations, but not to the level thought to reduce fracture risk. If calcium-fortified milk also was used in cooking and milk drinks, this approach could allow residents to achieve a dietary calcium intake close to recommended levels. A vitamin D supplement would be recommended to ensure adequate vitamin D status for all residents.

  19. Space Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2009-01-01

    Optimal nutrition will be critical for crew members who embark on space exploration missions. Nutritional assessment provides an opportunity to ensure that crewmembers begin their missions in optimal nutritional status, to document changes during a mission and, if necessary, to provide intervention to maintain that status throughout the mission, and to assesses changes after landing in order to facilitate the return to their normal status as soon as possible after landing. We report here the findings from our nutritional assessment of astronauts who participated in the International Space Station (ISS) missions, along with flight and ground-based research findings. We also present ongoing and planned nutrition research activities. These studies provide evidence that bone loss, compromised vitamin status, and oxidative damage are the critical nutritional concerns for space travelers. Other nutrient issues exist, including concerns about the stability of nutrients in the food system, which are exposed to longterm storage and radiation during flight. Defining nutrient requirements, and being able to provide and maintain those nutrients on exploration missions, will be critical for maintaining crew member health.

  20. KOMPOSISI ZAT GIZI TEMPE YANG DIFORTIFIKASI ZAT BESI DAN VITAMIN A PADA TEMPE MENTAH DAN MATANG (Nutritional Composition of Soyben Tempeh Fortified with Iron and Vitamin A on Uncook and Cook Soyben Tempeh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahayu Astuti

    2014-07-01

    pada tempe mentah maupun masak. Pada tempe mentah, meningkatnya kadar zat besi perlakuan meningkatkan kadar zat besi tempe fortifikasi meskipun tidak signifikan. Kadar protein dan lemak menurun secara bermakna setelah diolah (dibacem (p0,05. Kata kunci: Tempe terfortifikasi, zat besi, vitamin A, komposisi zat gizi

  1. 赖氨酸及部分维生素强化面粉的营养评价%Nutrition evaluation of wheat flour fortified with lysine and some kinds of the vitamins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王惠梅; 李庆天; 张志新; 唐建梅

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the nutrition value of w heat flour fortified with lysine,vitamin B1,vitamin B2,vitamin A. Methods White rat cut off milk were allocated into four gro ups ( Ⅰ、Ⅱ、Ⅲ、Ⅳ)at random. Control group (Ⅰ) was raised with ordinary wheat flou r non-fortified and experiment group (Ⅱ、Ⅲ、Ⅳ) were raised with nutriment wh eat flour with different prescription. The observer watched each group of animal periodically in weight, nitrogen balance, food raised efficiency , thermal energy efficiency, protein efficiency ratio, and swimming persisting ti me under burdon, and so on. Results After raised for 28 days amo ng each group, the targets mentioned above in experiment group was found significently higher than that of control. Conclusions  The wheat flour possessed higher nutrition evaluation of protein which benefit s the development of white rat when fortified with lysine and some kinds of th e vitamins.%目的 探讨经赖氨酸、维生素B1、维生素B2 、维生素A等强化后食用面粉的营养价值。方法 将断乳大白鼠随机分为对 照组(Ⅰ组)和实验组(Ⅱ、Ⅲ、Ⅳ组),对照组饲以未经强化的普通面粉,实验组分 别饲以不同配方的营养素面粉,定期观察各组实验动物的体重、氮平衡、食饲效率、热能效 率、蛋白质功效比值及负重游泳持续时间等。结果 经过28天的分组饲养 后,实验组动物的上述指标均显著高于对照组。结论 食用面粉经赖氨酸 及部分维生素强化后蛋白质的营养价值得到显著提高,更有利于实验大白鼠的生长发育。

  2. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2014 . Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to vitamin D and contribution to normal bone and tooth development pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following an application from Specialised Nutrition Europe (formerly IDACE), submitted pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of France, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific...... for infants and young children. A claim on vitamin D and maintenance of normal bones and teeth in the general population has already been assessed with a favourable outcome. The Panel considers that the role of vitamin D in bone and tooth mineralisation and homeostasis applies to all ages, including infants...... and young children (from birth to three years). The Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has been established between the dietary intake of vitamin D and contribution to normal development of bones and teeth....

  3. [Therapy of hyperhomocysteinemia with vitamin B12].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajcovicová-Kudlácková, M; Blazícek, P; Sebeková, K; Valachovicová, M

    2002-11-01

    Prevalence of mild hyperhomocysteinemia in vegetarians and vegans is a consequence of vitamin B12 deficiency. Clinical study of homocysteine reduction by vitamin B12 consisted of subjective healthy adults on alternative nutrition (n = 9) with vitamin B12 deficiency and with mild hyperhomocysteinemia. Vitamin B12 treatment was implemented by 5 intramuscular cyanocobalamin injections of a total content of 2200 micrograms during two weeks. Homocysteine level was significantly reduced (from 22 mumol/l to 11.7 mumol/l; individual reduction 29-55%). Vitamin B12 concentration in blood was significantly increased (from 152 pmol/l to 277 pmol/l; individual % of increase 63-150). The results show a high effect of vitamin B12 treatment in homocysteine value reduction of subjects on alternative nutrition.

  4. Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body needs to grow and develop normally. Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium. Calcium is one ... building blocks of bone. A lack of vitamin D can lead to bone diseases such as osteoporosis ...

  5. Vitamin K

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dietary Reference Intakes: Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron Manganese, Molybdenium, Nickel, Silicon, ... provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  6. Vitamin C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body needs to grow and develop normally. Vitamin C is an antioxidant. It is important for your ... healing and helps the body absorb iron. Vitamin C comes from fruits and vegetables. Good sources include ...

  7. Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thin, and brittle bones, a condition known as rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. Vitamin D ... the body. In children, vitamin D deficiency causes rickets, where the bones become soft and bend. It's ...

  8. Vitamin E

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vitamin E combined with other antioxidants, zinc, and copper showed promise for slowing down the rate of ... several years had an increased risk of prostate cancer. Are there any interactions with vitamin E that ...

  9. Plasma 25(OH)vitamin D and the risk of breast cancer in the european prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC): A nested case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kühn, T.; Kaaks, R.; Becker, S.; Eomois, P.P.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Kvaskoff, M.; Dossus, L.; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.

    2013-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that vitamin D might play a role in the development of breast cancer. Although the results of case–control studies indicate that circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is inversely associated with the risk of breast cancer, the results of prospective studies are

  10. Nutritional status and influence of vitamin D among Chinese lactating women in 2013%2013年中国乳母维生素D营养状况及其影响因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞学红; 杨振宇; 王杰; 段一凡; 赵丽云; 荫士安; 赖建强

    2016-01-01

    目的:通过分析2013年中国乳母血清维生素D水平,评价乳母维生素D的营养状况及其影响因素。方法数据来源于2013年中国居民营养与健康状况监测。采用多阶段分层整群抽样,调查对象为中国内地除西藏自治区以外的30个省(直辖市、自治区)的55个县(市/区)产后0~24个月的乳母。问卷调查收集乳母基本情况、血样采集季节等信息,通过食物频率调查收集受试者近1个月的膳食信息;采用质谱法测定了1981名乳母血清维生素D水平。应用多因素logistic回归模型分析乳母维生素D缺乏的影响因素。结果乳母血清维生素D含量为(16.6±6.5)ng/ml,维生素D缺乏率(<12 ng/ml)为25.2%(499名),不足率(12 ng/ml≤血清维生素D<20 ng/ml)为45.4%(900名)。相对于汉族乳母,回族及维吾尔族乳母维生素D缺乏OR值为13.37;相对于初中及以下乳母,高中以上乳母维生素D缺乏OR值为1.40;相对于家务/待业乳母,专业技术乳母维生素D缺乏OR值为1.62;相对于普通农村乳母,大城市、中小城市、贫困农村乳母维生素D缺乏OR值分别为1.99、1.46、2.66;相对于秋季调查的乳母,冬春季调查的乳母维生素D缺乏OR值为2.19;乳母维生素D缺乏率随纬度增加而增加(OR=1.12),随每日摄入的畜肉量增加而降低(OR=0.73),P值均<0.05。结论中国乳母维生素D缺乏和不足的状况较普遍;回族/维吾尔族、文化水平较高、从事专业技术类工作、高纬度地区和冬春季的乳母是维生素D缺乏的高风险人群。%Objective To analyze serum vitamin D levels in Chinese lactating women, in 2013, and to evaluate their vitamin D nutritional status and influencing factors. Methods Data were from the Chinese National Nutrition and Health Surveillance in 2013. Using the multistage stratified cluster sampling method, serum samples from lactating women, at 0

  11. Effectiveness of fortification of drinking water with iron and vitamin C in the reduction of anemia and improvement of nutritional status in children attending day-care centers in Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Daniela da Silva; Capanema, Flávio Diniz; Netto, Michele Pereira; de Almeida, Carlos Alberto Nogueira; Franceschini, Sylvia do Carmo Castro; Lamounier, Joel Alves

    2011-12-01

    Because of the high prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia in Brazil, individual control measures tend to be ineffective, and fortification of foods with iron is considered the most effective method to fight anemia. To evaluate the effectiveness of fortification of drinking water with iron and vitamin C in the reduction of anemia in children in day-care centers in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. This before-and-after study evaluated 318 children aged 6 to 74 months. Identification data and data on socioeconomic variables were collected; anthropometric and biochemical measurements were performed before and after 5 months of fortification of water with 5 mg of elemental iron and 50 mg of ascorbic acid per liter. The fortified water was used for drinking and cooking at the day-care center. Wilcoxon's nonparametric test was used to evaluate the differences in continuous variables, and McNemar's test was used to compare the prevalence rates of anemia. The prevalence of anemia decreased significantly from 29.3% before fortification to 7.9% at the end of the study, with a significant increase in hemoglobin levels. Reductions in the prevalence rates of stunting and underweight were observed. Fortification of water with iron and vitamin C significantly reduced the prevalence of anemia and improved nutritional status among children attending day-care centers.

  12. Child and youth care workers: Profile, nutrition knowledge and food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-08-06

    Aug 6, 2014 ... The World Health Report of 2002 confirmed that iodine, iron, vitamin A and zinc ... most serious health risk factors worldwide (WHO 2002). Manary and ... indicators of poor nutrition and, combined with deficiencies in vitamin A ...

  13. Priorities in Dealing with Nutrition Problems in Indonesia. Cornell International Nutrition Monograph Series, Number 1 (1974).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soekirman

    A study of the literature dealing with past and present food and nutrition problems in Indonesia reveals that the problems remain serious. The major nutrition problems are: (1) Protein-Calorie Malnutrition; (2) Vitamin A Deficiency; (3) Nutritional Anemia; and (4) Goitre. These nutrition problems afflict people of all ages, males and females.…

  14. Vitamin D Status in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Seok Choi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The majority of the vitamin D in our body is produced by cutaneous synthesis in response to sunlight. As more and more people live in cities and spend the bulk of their time indoors, it can be difficult to get sufficient sun exposure for adequate cutaneous production of vitamin D. Therefore, vitamin D insufficiency has become a very common health problem worldwide. The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV 2008 showed that the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency, defined as a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] level below 50 nmol/L, was 47.3% in males and 64.5% in females. Only 13.2% of males and 6.7% of females had a serum 25(OHD level of greater than 75 nmol/L. In Korea, vitamin D insufficiency was more prevalent in young adults than in elderly people, likely due to the indoor lifestyle of younger people. Compared with the United States and Canada, Korea has a lower mean 25(OHD level and a higher prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency. To improve the vitamin D status of the Korean population, more aggressive policies on food fortification and vitamin D supplementation are needed.

  15. Impacto nutricio del consumo de una leche entera adicionada con vitaminas y minerales en niños Nutritional impact of a full strenght milk with added vitamins and minerals in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Maulen-Radovan

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar el impacto nutricio del consumo de leche entera fortificada con vitaminas y minerales en niños. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se hizo un estudio prospectivo, longitudinal, en 227 niños de entre 8 a 60 meses de edad. Se ofreció a los menores 500 ml diarios de leche entera fortificada por 90 días. Se registró ingestión, aceptación, peso, talla, hemoglobina (Hb, hierro (Fe, vitamina B12 y folatos séricos. El análisis estadístico se realizó con medidas de tendencia central y dispersión en variables dimensionales utilizando prueba t de Student para comparación de promedios y ji² para variables nominales. RESULTADOS: Al inicio de la suplementación 45 niños estaban desnutridos, y 36, anémicos. Al final de la misma estas cifras disminuyeron: 35 desnutridos (pOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the nutritional impact of the ingestion of a fortified whole milk in children. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Prospective, longitudinal assay in 227 children aged 8-60 months. Intervention: Daily consumption of 500 ml of fortified milk during 90 days. We registered milk acceptance and assessed weight, height; hemoglobin, serum iron, vitamin B12, and folic acid, at the beginning and the end of the study. Statistical evaluation were done with central and dispersion indices in the dimensional variables, using Student's t test and chi² test for compare nominal variables at initial and the end of the study. RESULTS: At admission, 45 children were malnourished and 36 were anemic. At the end of the supplementation period there was a reduction to 35 malnourished (p< 0.21 and 18 anemic (p< 0.01. Anthropometric weight/height score in Z at the beginning and end of the study (x±S.D were -0.35±0.88 vs -0.14±9 (p< 0.01; Hb g/dl: 11±1.3 vs 11.9±1.9 (p< 0.001, Iron mg/dl: 108±44 vs 115±31 (p= 0.06 and vitamin B12 pg/ml: 649±494 to 1053±854 (p< 0.001. The milk was well tolerated and widely accepted. CONCLUSIONS: The consumption of a fortified whole milk during 90

  16. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of vitamin C (ascorbic acid, sodium ascorbate, calcium ascorbate, ascorbyl palmitate, sodium calcium ascorbyl phosphate and sodium ascorbyl phosphate as a feed additive for all animal species based on a dossier submitted by DSM Nutritional Products Ltd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin C is essential for primates, guinea pigs and fish. Vitamin C, in the form of ascorbic acid and its calcium and sodium salts, ascorbyl palmitate, sodium calcium ascorbyl phosphate and sodium ascorbyl phosphate, is safe for all animal species. Setting a maximum content in feed and water for drinking is not considered necessary. Data on the vitamin C consumption of consumers are based on the levels of vitamin C in foodstuffs, including food of animal origin, produced in accordance with current EU legislation on the supplementation of feed with vitamin C. The exposure is far below the guidance level. Any potential contribution of the use of vitamin C in feed is therefore already considered in the above data. Consequently, the use of vitamin C in animal nutrition is not of concern for consumer safety. In the absence of inhalation toxicity studies it would be prudent to assume that inhalation of dust from the additives presents a health hazard to workers. Sodium calcium ascorbyl phosphate is not an irritant to skin and eyes and is unlikely to be a skin sensitiser. This conclusion is extrapolated to sodium ascorbyl phosphate. In the absence of data, ascorbic acid, sodium ascorbate, calcium ascorbate and ascorbyl palmitate should be considered as irritant to skin and eyes and as dermal sensitisers. The supplementation of feed with vitamin C does not pose a risk to the environment. Ascorbic acid, sodium calcium ascorbyl phosphate and sodium ascorbyl phosphate are regarded as effective sources of vitamin C when added to feed or water for drinking. Since ascorbic acid, sodium ascorbate, calcium ascorbate and ascorbyl palmitate are authorised for use as antioxidants in food and their function in feed is essentially the same as that in food, no further demonstration of efficacy is considered necessary.

  17. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health regimen. This Consumer Update video includes an interview with Barbara Schneeman, Ph.D., Director of FDA's Office of Nutritional Products, and highlights reasons to consider taking vitamin supplements along with tips for doing so safely. For More Information Fortify ...

  18. Night Blindness and Vitamin A Deficiency following Jejunoilieal Bypass Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Paul C; Canny, Christopher L.

    1989-01-01

    A 42-year-old man who developed severe night blindness 15 years following jejunoileal bypass surgery for morbid obesity is described. Ophthamological testing, including dark adaptation, electroretinography and serum vitamin A levels, confirmed a diagnosis of vitamin A deficiency. Oral vitamin A 25,000 iu/day for two months resulted in a full recovery of visual deficits. Nutritional vitamin A deficiency is discussed in the context of intestinal bypass surgery.

  19. Vitamins and cancer prevention: issues and dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, V R; Newberne, P M

    1981-03-01

    Vitamins are a class of organic compounds that are components of an adequate diet. They or their derivatives function as coenzymes, cellular antioxidants, and/or regulators of gene expression. Fourteen vitamins are recognized in human nutrition (Vitamins A, D, E, K, B1, B2, B6, B12, C, niacin, folacin, pantothenic acid, biotin, choline), with deficiencies or excesses in intake leading to changes in protein, nucleic acid, carbohydrates, fat and/or mineral metabolism. Thus, the integrity of physiological systems, including those associated with detoxification, cellular repair, immune processes, and neural and endocrine function, depends upon the nutritional and vitamin status of the host. For these reasons, it may be anticipated that the adequacy of the vitamin supply to cells and tissues would affect the development, progress, and outcome of cancers. In this review, the definition and functions of and requirements and recommended allowance for vitamins are discussed briefly before exploring the evidence, largely from studies in experimental animals, that indicates the nature of the link between vitamins and cancer. Although evidence based on studies in animal systems reveals that vitamin intake and status can modulate the outcome of experimental carcinogenesis, the findings are often conflicting and difficult to interpret. Furthermore, it is not yet possible to develop a suitable prediction of the role of the individual vitamins in tumor development. The significance of these observations for human nutrition and cancer prevention, particularly in reference to ascorbic acid (vitamin C), vitamin E, and B-complex vitamins is considered. Vitamin A and retinoid compounds are discussed elsewhere in the symposium. The many popular misconceptions and unsound advice concerning vitamins and health, including "fake" vitamins-pangamic acid ("vitamin B15") and laetrile ("vitamin B17")-are also discussed. On the basis of current evidence, it would be inappropriate to recommend

  20. B vitamins, homocysteine and bone health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratoni, Valentina; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2015-03-30

    Nutrition is one of the most important modifiable factors involved in the development and maintenance of good bone health. Calcium and Vitamin D have confirmed and established roles in the maintenance of proper bone health. However, other nutritional factors could also be implicated. This review will explore the emerging evidence of the supporting role of certain B Vitamins as modifiable factors associated with bone health. Individuals with high levels of homocysteine (hcy) exhibit reduced bone mineral density (BMD), alteration in microarchitecture and increased bone fragility. The pathophysiology caused by high serum homocysteine is not completely clear regarding fractures, but it may involve factors, such as bone mineral density, bone turnover, bone blood flow and collagen cross-linking. It is uncertain whether supplementation with B Vitamins, such as folate, Vitamin B1, and Vitamin B6, could decrease hip fracture incidence, but the results of further clinical trials should be awaited before a conclusion is drawn.

  1. Effect of dietary vitamin E on the performance of broilers and quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    Table 2 The formulation of the basal diet ..... of the APC differed significantly with vitamin E inclusion levels at specific storage periods, no trends were observed that ...... Handbook of vitamins: Nutritional, Biochemical and Clinical Aspects.

  2. Nutritive Value of Persian Hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) Orchards

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fatemeh Amini-Noori; Parisa Ziarati; Afshin Jafarpour

    2016-01-01

    .... Varieties, location, composition of soils, usage of fertilizer and irrigation affect the fatty acid, mineral and vitamin composition of hazelnuts, and consequently influence the nutritional value...

  3. 25-hydroxyvitamin D circulates in different fractions of calf plasma if the parent compound is vitamin D₂ or vitamin D₃, respectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymøller, Lone; Jensen, Søren K

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin D has become one of the most discussed nutrients in human nutrition, which has led to an increased interest in milk as a vitamin D source. Problems related to fortifying milk with synthetic vitamin D can be avoided by securing a high content of natural vitamin D in the milk by supplying dairy cows with sufficient vitamin D. However, choosing the most efficient route and form of supplementation requires insight into how different vitamin D metabolites are transported in the body of cattle. There are two forms of vitamin D: vitamin D2 (D2) and vitamin D3 (D3). Vitamin D2 originates from fungi on roughage. Vitamin D3 originates either from endogenous synthesis in the skin or from feed supplements. Vitamin D2 is chemically different from, and less physiologically active than, D3. Endogenous and dietary D3 is chemically similar but dietary D3 is toxic, whereas endogenous D3 appears well regulated in the body.

  4. 25-hydroxyvitamin D circulates in different fractions of calf plasma if the parent compound is vitamin D2 or vitamin D3 respectively

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hymøller, Lone; Jensen, Søren Krogh

    2016-01-01

    dairy cows with sufficient vitamin D. However, choosing the most efficient route and form of supplementation requires insight into how different vitamin D metabolites are transported in the body of cattle. There are two forms of vitamin D: vitamin D2 (D2) and vitamin D3 (D3). Vitamin D2 originates from...... fungi on roughage. Vitamin D3 originates either from endogenous synthesis in the skin or from feed supplements. Vitamin D2 is chemically different from, and less physiologically active than, D3. Endogenous and dietary D3 is chemically similar but dietary D3 is toxic, whereas endogenous D3 appears well......Vitamin D has become one of the most discussed nutrients in human nutrition, which has led to an increased interest in milk as a vitamin D source. Problems related to fortifying milk with synthetic vitamin D can be avoided by securing a high content of natural vitamin D in the milk by supplying...

  5. Vitamin E and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Food Service Resources Additional Resources About FAQ Contact Vitamin E and Health Table of Contents Introduction: Vitamin ... Vitamin E and Other Chronic Diseases References Introduction: Vitamin E and Disease Prevention Vitamin E’s main function ...

  6. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2014 . Scientific Opinion on the safety of vitamin D - enriched UV - treated baker‘s yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge; Poulsen, Morten

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver a scientific opinion on the safety of “UV-treated baker’s yeast” (Lallemand SAS) as a novel food ingredient in the context of Regulation (EC) No 258/97, taking...

  7. Does the nutrition profile of vitamins, fatty acids and microelements counteract the negative impact from organohalogen pollutants on bone mineral density in Greenland sledge dogs (Canis familiaris)?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Christian; Riget, Frank F.; Jensen, Jens-Erik Beck

    2008-01-01

    ) by DXA scanning (g/cm(-2)) in 15 age and weight normalized sledge dog (Canis familiaris) bitches and their 26 pups divided into a control group (n = 26) given 50-200 g/day clean pork (Suis scrofa) fat and a treated group (n = 15) given 50-200 g/day OHC polluted minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata...... using the present time frame and OHC concentrations (threshold levels not reached), or the difference in food composition (mainly vitamins and n3 fatty acids) conceal the potential OHC impact on BMD. Such information is important when evaluating the positive and negative health consequences from eating...

  8. Does the nutrition profile of vitamins, fatty acids and microelements counteract the negative impact from organohalogen pollutants on bone mineral density in Greenland sledge dogs (Canis familiaris)?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Christian; Rigét, Frank F; Beck Jensen, Jens-Erik

    2008-01-01

    ) by DXA scanning (g/cm(-2)) in 15 age and weight normalized sledge dog (Canis familiaris) bitches and their 26 pups divided into a control group (n=26) given 50-200 g/day clean pork (Suis scrofa) fat and a treated group (n=15) given 50-200 g/day OHC polluted minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata...... an impact on BMD using the present time frame and OHC concentrations (threshold levels not reached), or the difference in food composition (mainly vitamins and n3 fatty acids) conceal the potential OHC impact on BMD. Such information is important when evaluating the positive and negative health consequences...

  9. Vitamin D and vitamin B12 deficiencies are common in patients with midgut carcinoid (SI-NET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, A; Wängberg, B; Ellegård, L

    2016-09-01

    Patients with small intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (SI-NET) often have diarrhoea from hormonal overproduction, surgery and medical treatment, leading to malabsorption of bile salts, fats, vitamin B12 and fat-souble vitamins. This could lead to malnutrition. We assessed nutritional status in 50 consecutive out patients with disseminated SI-NET, 25 patients in each cohort. The first cohort was descriptive and the second cohort supplemented with vitamin D, B12 and calcium. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as vitamin D deficient. In patients without prior substitution, 32% had subnormal vitamin B12 levels. Seventy-six percent had low bone density. In the second cohort with vitamin and mineral supplementation, none had severe vitamin D deficiency, but 28% had moderate deficiency. No patient had subnormal vitamin B12 levels. Sixty percent had low bone density. The serum levels of vitamin D and B12 were higher and parathyroid hormone (PTH) lower in the second cohort compared with the first cohort (P⩽0,022). Vitamin D and PTH were negatively correlated, r=-30, P=⩽0.036. Low serum levels of vitamin D and vitamin B12, and low bone density are common in patients with disseminated SI-NET. Supplementation of vitamin D, B12 and calcium resulted in higher serum levels of vitamins, lower PTH levels and diminished severe vitamin D deficiency and is thus recommended as standard care.

  10. B Vitamins

    Science.gov (United States)

    The B vitamins are B1 (thiamine) B2 (riboflavin) B3 (niacin) B5 (pantothenic acid) B6 B7 (biotin) B12 Folic acid ... help form red blood cells. You can get B vitamins from proteins such as fish, poultry, meat, ...

  11. CORRECTION OF VITAMIN-DEFICIENT CONDITIONS IN CHILDREN WITH ATOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Vishneva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The most important biochemical processes in human organism are carried out with vitamins and microelements involved. Acting as biological catalysts, vitamins have an impact on metabolism and provide protection against unfavourable environmental factors. The key source of vitamins and microelements for a person is food. The content of vitamins in a diet varies and depends on a range of various reasons. However, now the diet may not fully meet vitamin and microelement requirements. The result of this is widespread prevalence of sub-clinical deficiency of vitamins and microelements. Patients from one of the risk groups, children with atopy, are especially susceptible to this condition. Hypoallergenic diet prescribed as part of the therapeutic measures, is often the cause of imbalanced and irrational nutrition. Modern vitamin complexes may solve the issue of subnormal supply of vitamins and apparent hypovitaminosis in children with allergic diseases.Key words: polyvitamin complexes, atopy, allergic diseases, subnormal supply of vitamins, children.

  12. Effect of a vitamin D{sub 3}-based nutritional supplement ('Videchol') on carbohydrate metabolism of rats following chronic low dose-rate irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starikovich, L.S.; Vernikovska, Ya.I.; Vigovska, T.V.; Veliky, M.M. [Lviv Ivan Franko National University, Department of Biochemistry, Lviv (Ukraine); Becerril Aragon, G.A. [Lviv Ivan Franko National University, Department of Biochemistry, Lviv (Ukraine)]. E-mail: gabriel_aragon@mail.ru

    2001-09-01

    In this study we evaluated the effects of the administration of a vitamin D{sub 3} preparation 'Videchol' to chronically irradiated rats (1 cGy day{sup -1}) by the assessment of the activities of several glycolytic enzymes: lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) (EC 1.1.1.28), pyruvate kinase (PK) (EC 2.7.1.40) and hexokinase (HK) (EC 2.7.1.1), in populations of erythroid and myeloid bone marrow cells. Videchol treatment of irradiated rats led to the normalisation of HK and LDH activity at cumulative doses of around 30 cGy in granulocyte-monocyte cells and to normalisation of LDH and PK activities in erythroid cells starting at 20 cGy in comparison with irradiated rats who did not receive Videchol. The reaction kinetic parameters of LDH in erythrocytes changed according to the redistribution pattern of the isozymes throughout the different stages of the experiment. The administration of Videchol to irradiated rats led to a rearrangement of the LDH isozymes ratio characterised by kinetic properties more comparable to those of the controls. Thus, vitamin D{sub 3} appears to induce a normalisation of carbohydrate metabolism in rats chronically irradiated with low dose-rate ionising radiation. (author)

  13. Comparative Evaluation of Nutritional Composition of African Locust ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nutritional requirement for human diet is through the investigation of their nutritional values. ... balance diet for normal growth (FAO 2004). ... west Nigeria, edible fruits from wild plants are often ... supplement important minerals and vitamins in.

  14. Psoriasis and Nutrition Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla Tevfikoğlu Alceylan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic complex inflammatory disease affected by both genetic and environmental factors. Nutrition and diet has been suggested to play a role in the etiology and pathogenesis of psoriasis. Diets poor in energy and saturated fatty acids and rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids have positive effects on the treatment of psoriasis. Vitamin A and D modulate immune system and their receptors shows an anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting the proliferation of keratinocytes. Patients with psoriasis are often Vitamin D deficient, they should be therefore evaluated considering their vitamin D levels. If they take a vitamin D supplementation, they should be monitored for side effects. Consumption levels of minerals such as copper, zinc and iron, and antioxidant compounds, including carotenoids and flavonoids involve in antioxidant reactions should be followed-up. A diet including a variety of vegetables and fruit can help reduce the risk of oxidative stress. Selenium levels are lower in patients, and selenium is effective in the prognosis of the disease when combined with antioxidant treatment. Alcohol consumption has a negative impact on the nutrition of the patients and the prognosis of the disease and should be avoided. The follow-up of the disease at an early stage, adequate and balanced nutrition are important in the treatment of psoriasis. Weight controls should be provided and diets with individual specific nutrition variety should be set.

  15. Diet and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eating broiled or steamed fish (e.g. herring, salmon, halibut, flounder, swordfish or pollack), using canola and olive oils, small & frequent meals, nutritional supplements if there is weight loss and if your doctor approves vitamins and mineral supplements. Avoid: Caffeine in coffee, tea ...

  16. Consistency of vitamin and/or mineral supplement use and demographic, lifestyle and health-status predictors: findings from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Heidelberg cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kuanrong; Kaaks, Rudolf; Linseisen, Jakob; Rohrmann, Sabine

    2010-10-01

    Cross-sectional studies suggest that dietary supplement use is associated with favourable demographic and lifestyle factors and certain health conditions. However, factors that affect the consistency of supplement use have not been investigated in prospective cohort studies. The aim of the present study was to seek baseline demographic, lifestyle and health-status predictors of subsequent consistent vitamin and/or mineral supplement use. A total of 8968 men and 10,672 women of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Heidelberg cohort, who answered the supplement-use questions in the baseline survey and two follow-up surveys, were categorised into three groups: consistent, inconsistent and never users. At baseline, 28.5 % of men and 38.6 % of women reported vitamin and/or mineral supplement use. After a median follow-up of 8.5 years, 14.6 % of men and 22.9 % of women were consistent users. During follow-up, 36.0 % of male and 26.6 % of female initial users stopped supplement use, whereas 27.8 % of male and 39.4 % of female initial non-users started supplement use. Women were more likely to be consistent users than men. Older age (≥ 50 years), lower BMI (educational level for men, and being more physically active and higher lifetime alcohol consumption for women. Consistent users had the highest intake of dairy products, fish, fruits and vegetables, and wine but the lowest intake of total meat. We concluded that supplement use is a fairly unstable behaviour in free-living individuals. Individuals with a favourable lifestyle and healthier diet are more likely to show consistent supplementation.

  17. Plasma carotenoids, vitamin C, retinol and tocopherols levels and pancreatic cancer risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition: a nested case-control study: plasma micronutrients and pancreatic cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeurnink, Suzanne M; Ros, Martine M; Leenders, Max; van Duijnhoven, Franzel J B; Siersema, Peter D; Jansen, Eugene H J M; van Gils, Carla H; Bakker, Marije F; Overvad, Kim; Roswall, Nina; Tjønneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Racine, Antoine; Cadeau, Claire; Grote, Verena; Kaaks, Rudolf; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Benetou, Vasiliki; Valanou, Elisavet; Palli, Domenico; Krogh, Vittorio; Vineis, Paolo; Tumino, Rosario; Mattiello, Amalia; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Skeie, Guri; Castaño, José María Huerta; Duell, Eric J; Barricarte, Aurelio; Molina-Montes, Esther; Argüelles, Marcial; Dorronsoro, Mire; Johansen, Dorthe; Lindkvist, Björn; Sund, Malin; Crowe, Francesca L; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Jenab, Mazda; Fedirko, Veronika; Riboli, E; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B

    2015-03-15

    Evidence of a protective effect of several antioxidants and other nutrients on pancreatic cancer risk is inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate the association for prediagnostic plasma levels of carotenoids, vitamin C, retinol and tocopherols with risk of pancreatic cancer in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). 446 incident exocrine pancreatic cancer cases were matched to 446 controls by age at blood collection, study center, sex, date and time of blood collection, fasting status and hormone use. Plasma carotenoids (α- and β-carotene, lycopene, β-cryptoxanthin, canthaxanthin, zeaxanthin and lutein), α- and γ-tocopherol and retinol were measured by reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography and plasma vitamin C by a colorimetric assay. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) for pancreatic cancer risk were estimated using a conditional logistic regression analysis, adjusted for smoking status, smoking duration and intensity, waist circumference, cotinine levels and diabetes status. Inverse associations with pancreatic cancer risk were found for plasma β-carotene (IRR highest vs. lowest quartile 0.52, 95%CI 0.31-0.88, p for trend = 0.02), zeaxanthin (IRR highest vs. lowest quartile 0.53, 95%CI 0.30-0.94, p for trend = 0.06) and α-tocopherol (IRR highest vs. lowest quartile 0.62, 95%CI 0.39-0.99, p for trend = 0.08. For α- and β-carotene, lutein, sum of carotenoids and γ-tocopherol, heterogeneity between geographical regions was observed. In conclusion, our results show that higher plasma concentrations of β-carotene, zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol may be inversely associated with risk of pancreatic cancer, but further studies are warranted.

  18. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies ), 2015. Scientific opinion on vitamin D and contribution to the normal function of the immune system: evaluation of a health claim pursuant to Article14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following an application from Specialised Nutrition Europe (formerly IDACE), submitted for authorisation of a health claim pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of France, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked...... in the functioning of the immune system applies to all ages, including infants and young children (from birth to three years of age). The Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has been established between the dietary intake of vitamin D and contribution to the normal function of the immune system....... The following wording reflects the scientific evidence: ‘Vitamin D contributes to the normal function of the immune system.’ The target population is infants and young children up to three years of age....

  19. Nutrition know-how.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, E

    1998-01-01

    The changes in nutritional needs of the body as HIV progresses are discussed. Nutrition, food preparation, and supplements are areas where one can meet those changing needs. For instance, as HIV progresses, the body needs more calories and subsequently needs more protein to build lean body mass. Supplements of the amino acid L-glutamine can help with this. Resistance exercise and anabolic steroids also help to reverse wasting. One side effect of protease inhibitors is a surplus of fat in the blood. A list of vitamin supplements that lessen the cardiovascular risk from this excess fat is provided. Tips are provided for combating low energy and lack of appetite. Ideas for managing lactose intolerance are given and vegetarians are reminded to get enough vitamin B-12. Recommendations for maintaining food safety and water safety are provided. The importance of vitamin and mineral supplements is discussed and a chart provides recommended doses.

  20. Nutrition and melanoma prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, J Daniel; Wing, Gregory J; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2010-01-01

    Melanoma has continued to rise in incidence despite public efforts to promote sun protection behaviors. Because sunscreen use does not completely prevent skin cancer induced by ultraviolet radiation, additional chemopreventive methods for protecting against and reversing the effects of ultraviolet photodamage need evaluation. Recent years have brought increased interest in dietary factors, such as natural botanicals and vitamins, for the prevention of melanoma. This contribution provides a narrative review of the relevant, nutrition-related literature found by searching the keywords "melanoma chemoprevention," "nutrition and melanoma," "dietary botanicals and melanoma prevention," "green tea and melanoma," "vitamin D and melanoma," and "vitamin E and melanoma" in the PubMed database. Although randomized controlled trials of humans are lacking, basic science and epidemiologic studies show promising benefits of many natural products in chemoprevention for melanoma. Future studies, hopefully, will yield concrete answers and clarify the role of commonly available dietary nutrients in melanoma chemoprevention.

  1. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to fat-free yogurts and fermented milks complying with the specifications “fat free”, “low in sugars”, “high protein”, “source of calcium” and “source of vitamin D” for nutrition claims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    substantiation of a health claim related to fat-free yogurts and fermented milks complying with the specifications “fat free”, “low in sugars”, “high protein”, “source of calcium” and “source of vitamin D” for nutrition claims and reduction of body and visceral fat while maintaining lean body mass in the context...... and fermented milks complying with the specifications “fat free”, “low in sugars”, “high protein”, “source of calcium” and “source of vitamin D” for nutrition claims are sufficiently characterised. The Panel considers that reduction of body and visceral fat mass while maintaining lean body mass in the context......-free yogurts and fermented milks complying with the specifications “fat free”, “low in sugars”, “high protein”, “source of calcium” and “source of vitamin D” for nutrition claims and reduction of body and visceral fat mass while maintaining lean body mass in the context of an energy-restricted diet....

  2. Vitamine D2 ou vitamine D3?

    OpenAIRE

    MISTRETTA, Virginie; Delanaye, Pierre; Chapelle, Jean-Paul; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Cavalier, Etienne

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: Nearly one billion people around the world are deficient in vitamin D and need to be supplemented. Vitamin D is available in medicines and fortified foods. It is available in two forms: vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol) and vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol). KEY POINTS: The pharmacopeiae consider these steroid hormones as equivalent and interchangeable. However, several studies have showed that serum level of 25(OH)D is increased more effectively with vitamin D3 than vitamin D2. Vitamin D2 has ...

  3. Generalised hyperpigmentation in vitamin B12 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Gouranga; Paul, Rudrajit; Ghosh, Sumit Kr; Chakraborty, Debojyoti; Das, Shubhabrata; Pradhan, Sourav; Das, Abhishek

    2014-08-01

    In developing countries like India, nutritional deficiencies are prevalent and hyperpigmentation due to protein energy malnutrition, zinc deficiency and pellagra are common. Indian women, especially vegetarian are prone to vitamin B12 deficiency. Vitamin B12 deficiency can present as anaemia, neurological defect, gastrointestinal symptoms or dementia. Hyperpigmentation as the first presentation of Vitamin B12 deficiency is rare. Our patient, a 45 year-old Hindu vegetarian female presented to us with generalized hyperpigmentation. Examination revealed associated anaemia and peripheral neuropathy. Laboratory investigation confirmed vitamin B12 deficiency. Clinical features along with hyperpigmentation improved with vitamin B12 supplementation. We report this case to highlight this rare manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency. A high index of clinical suspicion is warranted to diagnose the case. Since India is a country with a large number of potential vitamin B12 deficiency cases, the physicians need to be aware of all the varied manifestations of this vitamin deficiency. In case of hyperpigmentation, nutritional aspect must be ruled out as it is reversible. Early replacement therapy may also help to prevent morbidities like dementia and neuropathy.

  4. Nutritional consequences and nutrition therapy in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébuterne, X; Filippi, J; Al-Jaouni, R; Schneider, S

    2009-06-01

    75% of hospital patients with Crohn's disease (CD) suffer from malnutrition and one third of CD patients have a body mass index below 20. Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) patients have many vitamin and nutrient deficiencies which can lead to important consequences such as hyperhomocysteinemia which is associated with a higher risk of thromboembolic disease. Nutritional deficiencies in IBD patients are the result of insufficient intake, malabsorption and protein-losing enteropathy as well as the metabolic distubances directly induced by the chronic disease and its treatments, in particular corticosteroids. Screening for nutritional deficiencies in chronic disease patients is warranted. Managing the deficiencies involves simple nutritional guidelines, vitamin supplements, and nutritional support in the worst cases, in particular in children in order to limit the impact of IBD on growth. In active CD, enteral nutrition is the first line therapy in children and should be used as sole therapy in adults mainly when treatment with corticosteroids is not feasible.

  5. The effect of different dietary vitamin and mineral levels on certain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tesselaar, Ger-Mari

    2014-08-24

    Aug 24, 2014 ... have four functions in the body, namely structural, physiological, catalytic and .... Cobalt mg. 100. 100. 200. Iodine gram. 1. 1. 2. Selenium mg. 300. 300 ..... Vitamins in Animal Nutrition: Comparative Aspects to Human Nutrition.

  6. [Modular enteral nutrition in pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo Sanchís, S; Prenafeta Ferré, M T; Sempere Luque, M D

    1991-01-01

    Modular Enteral Nutrition may be a substitute for Parenteral Nutrition in children with different pathologies. Study of 4 children with different pathologies selected from a group of 40 admitted to the Maternal-Childrens Hospital "Valle de Hebrón" in Barcelona, who received modular enteral nutrition. They were monitored on a daily basis by the Dietician Service. Modular enteral nutrition consists of modules of proteins, peptides, lipids, glucids and mineral salts-vitamins. 1.--Craneo-encephalic traumatisms with loss of consciousness, Feeding with a combination of parenteral nutrition and modular enteral nutrition for 7 days. In view of the tolerance and good results of the modular enteral nutrition, the parenteral nutrition was suspended and modular enteral nutrition alone used up to a total of 43 days. 2.--55% burns with 36 days of hyperproteic modular enteral nutrition together with normal feeding. A more rapid recovery was achieved with an increase in total proteins and albumin. 3.--Persistent diarrhoea with 31 days of modular enteral nutrition, 5 days on parenteral nutrition alone and 8 days on combined parenteral nutrition and modular enteral nutrition. In view of the tolerance and good results of the modular enteral nutrition, the parenteral nutrition was suspended. 4.--Mucoviscidosis with a total of 19 days on modular enteral nutrition, 12 of which were exclusively on modular enteral nutrition and 7 as a night supplement to normal feeding. We administered proteic intakes of up to 20% of the total calorific intake and in concentrations of up to 1.2 calories/ml of the final preparation, always with a good tolerance. Modular enteral nutrition can and should be used as a substitute for parenteral nutrition in children with different pathologies, thus preventing the complications inherent in parenteral nutrition.

  7. Vitamin C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cataracts AMD and cataracts are two of the leading causes of vision loss in older people. Researchers do not believe that vitamin C and other antioxidants affect the risk of getting AMD. However, research ...

  8. Vitamin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... carotenoid is beta-carotene. Beta-carotene is an antioxidant. Antioxidants protect cells from damage caused by substances called ... A can lead to hyperkeratosis or dry, scaly skin. If you get too much vitamin A, you ...

  9. Iatrogenic nutritional deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R C; Blass, J P

    1982-01-01

    This article catalogs the nutritional deficiencies inadvertently introduced by certain treatment regimens. Specifically, the iatrogenic effects on nutrition of surgery, hemodialysis, irradiation, and drugs are reviewed. Nutritional problems are particularly frequent consequences of surgery on the gastrointestinal tract. Gastric surgery can lead to deficiencies of vitamin B12, folate, iron, and thiamine, as well as to metabolic bone disease. The benefits of small bowel bypass are limited by the potentially severe nutritional consequences of this procedure. Following bypass surgery, patients should be monitored for signs of possible nutritional probems such as weight loss, neuropathy, cardiac arrhythmias, loss of stamina, or changes in mental status. Minimal laboratory tests should include hematologic evaluation, B12, folate, iron, albumin, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, transaminases, sodium, potassium, chloride, and carbon dioxide levels. Roentgenologic examination of the bone should also be obtained. Loss of bone substance is a major consequence of many forms of treatment, and dietary supplementation with calcium is warranted. Patients undergoing hemodialysis have shown carnitine and choline deficiencies, potassium depletion, and hypovitaminosis, as well as osteomalacia. Chronic drug use may alter intake, synthesis, absorption, transport, storage, metabolism, or excretion of nutrients. Patients vary markedly in the metabolic effects of drugs, and recommendations for nutrition must be related to age, sex, reproductive status, and genetic endowment. Moreover, the illness being treated can itself alter nutritional requirements and the effect of the treatment on nutrient status. The changes in nutritional levels induced by use of estrogen-containing oral contraceptives (OCs) are obscure; however, the effects on folate matabolism appear to be of less clinical import than previously suggested. Reduction in pyridoxine and serum vitamin B12 levels has been

  10. Ácidos grasos, vitamina e y rotulado nutricional de margarinas y esparcibles comercializados en Bogotá, Colombia Fatty acids, vitamin E and nutritional labeling of margarines and spreads commercialized in Bogota, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena A Bolívar C

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN: en Colombia es escasa la información sobre el contenido de ácidos grasos y vitaminas en margarinas y esparcibles comercializados en el ámbito local. OBJETIVO: analizar el perfil de ácidos grasos y de vitamina E de las margarinas y esparcibles más comercializados en Bogotá, Colombia, y su situación actual de rotulado nutricional según la Resolución 0288 de 2008. MATERIALES Y MÉTODOS: en 2008 se realizó un conteo de caras de las margarinas y esparcibles más comercializados en supermercados de cadena de cinco localidades de Bogotá que incluyeron diferentes estratos socioeconómicos, y se escogieron las primeras diecisiete marcas comerciales y tres marcas propias para el estudio. De cada producto se tomaron y analizaron cinco repeticiones, una por localidad, entre agosto y noviembre de 2008. RESULTADOS: los ácidos grasos mayoritarios son palmítico, oleico y linoleico, y cuatro productos son fuente de ácidos grasos trans (4,4 g y 6,9 g/100 g. El contenido de vitamina E varía de 2,3 mg a 39,9 mg/100 g de producto. De 74,3% a 96,2% de los nutrientes de declaración obligatoria son efectivamente declarados en la etiqueta de los productos analizados. RESULTADOS: 91% de las margarinas y esparcibles más comercializados en cinco localidades de Bogotá en agosto de 2008 es libre de ácidos grasos trans (INTRODUCTION: information on the content of fatty acids and vitamins in margarines and spreads locally commercialized in Colombia is scarse. OBJECTIVE: analyze the fatty acids and vitamin E profile in margarines and spreads most commercialized in Bogotá, Colombia and its current nutritional labeling under Resolution 0288 of 2008. MATERIALS AND METHODS: a counting of labels of margarines and spreads most commercialized in chain supermarkets of five localities in Bogotá that included different socio-economical strata, was made. The first seventeen trademarks and three study brand marks were chosen for the study. Five samples

  11. Green Brand Development in Sports Nutrition Food

    OpenAIRE

    Zhe Ren

    2015-01-01

    This study is to research the current situation and the effect which is brought by the nutrition food of the green band development in sports nutrition food. Sports nutrition is the study and practice of nutrition and diet as it relates to athletic performance. It is concerned with the type and quantity of fluid and food taken by an athlete and deals with nutrients such as vitamins, minerals, supplements and organic substances such as carbohydrates, proteins and fats. Although an important pa...

  12. Vitamin supplementation in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Ensuring that a woman is well-nourished, both before and during pregnancy, is crucial for the health of the woman and that of the unborn child.(1) Maternal deficiency in key nutrients has been linked to pre-eclampsia, restricted fetal growth, neural tube defects, skeletal deformity and low birth weight.(1,2) Many nutritional supplements containing vitamins, minerals and other micronutrients are heavily marketed to women for all stages of pregnancy. However, much of the evidence for vitamin supplementation in pregnancy comes from studies carried out in low-income countries,(3) where women are more likely to be undernourished or malnourished than within the UK population. The challenges lie in knowing which supplements are beneficial and in improving uptake among those at most need. Here we summarise current UK guidance for vitamin supplementation in pregnancy and review the evidence behind it. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Nutrition and bone growth and development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prentice, Ann; Schoenmakers, Inez; Laskey, M Ann; de Bono, Stephanie; Ginty, Fiona; Goldberg, Gail R

    2006-01-01

    ... (e.g. Cu, Zn, vitamin C). In recent years there has been interest in the role nutrition may play in bone growth at intakes above those required to prevent classical deficiencies, particularly in relation to optimising peak...

  14. THE ROLE OF MEAT IN BALANCED NUTRITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Salobir

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Meat is a rich source of nutrients which human nutrition often lacks. It is a rich and important source of essential amino acids, vitamins, minerals and also long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Moderate intake of lean meat enables easier composition of balanced diet. On the other hand, excessive meat intake supersedes from the diet foodstuffs which supply dietary fibers, vitamins, and also non-vitamin antioxidant active substances and minerals. Not meat itself but imbalanced nutrition with too much fat and saturated fatty acids and deficient intake of ω-3 fatty acids, antioxidant vitamins and phytochemicals, minerals and dietary fiber present a risk for the development of cardiovascular disease and cancer. Because of its distinct and high nutritional value meat preserves its role in a rational human nutrition

  15. Unsuccessful vitamin D treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmedes, Anne; Hey, Henrik; Larsson, Iben

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D3 (25-OHD3) analyses have increased exponentially and vitamin D deficiency (vitamin D2). Lack of effect of treatment can be due to: 1......) too low dose, 2) incorrect analytical methods when injection treatment (vitamin D2) is used, 3) obesity, 4) seasonal variations, and 5) poor compliance. Treatment is mandatory in order to prevent osteopenia and osteoporosis. Vitamin D3 is more potent than vitamin D2. Injections with vitamin D2 should...... be replaced by vitamin D3....

  16. Vitamin D deficiency in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cashman, Kevin D.; Dowling, Kirsten G; Škrabáková, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vitamin D deficiency has been described as being pandemic, but serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] distribution data for the European Union are of very variable quality. The NIH-led international Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) has developed protocols for standardizing existing...... 25(OH)D values from national health/nutrition surveys. OBJECTIVE: This study applied VDSP protocols to serum 25(OH)D data from representative childhood/teenage and adult/older adult European populations, representing a sizable geographical footprint, to better quantify the prevalence of vitamin D...... deficiency in Europe. DESIGN: The VDSP protocols were applied in 14 population studies [reanalysis of subsets of serum 25(OH)D in 11 studies and complete analysis of all samples from 3 studies that had not previously measured it] by using certified liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry on biobanked...

  17. Vitamin d therapy and cardiovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Suzanne E; Tangpricha, Vin

    2011-06-01

    Vitamin D belongs to the family of nuclear steroid hormones, which has pleiotropic effects on several organ systems. Different vitamin D compounds have been studied as potential cardioprotective agents over the past 20 years. The results of these clinical studies vary based on the form and dosage of vitamin D administered during the trial. In the past 5 years, many have described an association of vitamin D compounds and cardiovascular health through reduction in blood pressure, reduction in inflammatory biomarkers, improved insulin sensitivity, and reduction in cardiovascular disease complications and death. Because there are several vitamin D compounds, it is important to consider the full breadth of the literature when examining vitamin D and cardiovascular health, to assist in hypothesis generation and understanding of the current state of the science. Although a growing body of evidence suggests that nutritional vitamin D supplementation and potentially even treatment with synthetic analogues of vitamin D may be cardioprotective, relatively few studies have examined either of these compounds in a randomized, controlled fashion. Studies examining the benefit of vitamin D supplementation are now beginning, but future studies considering calcitriol and analogue therapy also seem warranted.

  18. Childhood cancer and vitamins: prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, Virginia A

    2008-02-01

    Discussions of pediatric nutrition and cancer usually focus on important issues of ensuring an adequate nutrient intake (enteral and parenteral) during and after the early treatment phase of care. However, information is available that suggests that vitamin status may have additional roles in the care of children with cancer. Over the last decade, investigators have reported findings that suggest that maternal preconception and perinatal vitamin intake and status influence the cancer risk of the infant and child. Others have shown a relationship between vitamin and antioxidant status and the prevalence and severity of adverse side effects for children undergoing chemotherapy. Vitamin D has potential anti-cancer activity and vitamin D status is suboptimal in many children in North America. Each of these issues is briefly presented from a perspective of prevention and treatment of childhood cancer.

  19. Effects of vitamins B12, folic asid, A, D, E and C on maternal and fetal health

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Adequate and balanced nutrition together with appropriate weight gain during pregnancy is important for being protected from short and long term complications. During pregnancy energy and nutrition requirements increase. Sufficient intake of nutrients has important effects on both the mother's and the developing fetus's health. Deficient or excessive intakes of important vitamins can increase the risk of maternal and fetal health problems. Folic acid, vitamin B12, vitamin A, vitamin D, or ant...

  20. Family medicine obstetrics: pregnancy and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnisch, Jean M; Harnisch, Patricia H; Harnisch, David R

    2012-03-01

    This article discusses pregnancy and nutrition in 3 main timeframes, the prepregnancy nutritional health evaluation, nutrition during pregnancy, and nutrition during the puerperium, and also includes comments on nutrition and lactation. This article begins with a brief review of the risks of obesity (increased body mass index [BMI]) and anorexia (decreased BMI), with special attention to these undesired conditions during pregnancy, followed by a section on nutrients other than calories. Information on body weight, minerals, and vitamins during pregnancy is reviewed. This article ends with information on nutrition in the postpartum period.

  1. Meat-based enteral nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derevitskay, O. K.; Dydykin, A. S.

    2017-09-01

    Enteral nutrition is widely used in hospitals as a means of nutritional support and therapy for different diseases. Enteral nutrition must fulfil the energy needs of the body, be balanced by the nutrient composition and meet patient’s nutritional needs. Meat is a source of full-value animal protein, vitamins and minerals. On the basis of this research, recipes and technology for a meat-based enteral nutrition product were developed. The product is a ready-to-eat sterilised mixture in the form of a liquid homogeneous mass, which is of full value in terms of composition and enriched with vitamins and minerals, consists of particles with a size of not more than 0.3 mm and has the modified fat composition and rheological characteristics that are necessary for passage through enteral feeding tubes. The study presents experimental data on the content of the main macro- and micro-nutrients in the developed product. The new product is characterised by a balanced fatty acid composition, which plays an important role in correction of lipid metabolism disorders and protein-energy deficiency, and it is capable of satisfying patients’ daily requirements for vitamins and the main macro- and microelements when consuming 1500-2000 ml. Meat-based enteral nutrition can be used in diets as a standard mixture for effective correction of the energy and anabolic requirements of the body and support of the nutritional status of patients, including those with operated stomach syndrome.

  2. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to vitamin D and risk of falling pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    substantiation of a health claim related to vitamin D and risk of falling. Vitamin D (D2 and D3) is sufficiently characterised. A reduction in the risk of falling among men and women 60 years of age and older is beneficial to human health by reducing the risk of bone fractures. Daily vitamin D supplementation...... as the primary outcome. Statistical pooling of the data from these randomised controlled trials consistently shows a significant reduction in the risk of falling. The available data do not provide information about the lowest effective dose of vitamin D needed to obtain the claimed effect. On the basis...... of the data presented, the Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has been established between the intake of vitamin D and a reduction in the risk of falling. In order to obtain the claimed effect, 800 I.U. (20 g) of vitamin D from all sources should be consumed daily. The target population...

  3. ASUPAN VITAMIN A, STATUS VITAMIN A, DAN STATUS GIZI ANAK SEKOLAH DASAR DI KECAMATAN LEUWILIANG, KABUPATEN BOGOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Anna Marliyati

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe objective of this research was to study the intake of vitamin A, vitamin A status, nutritional status and health status of primary school children in Leuwiliang Sub—District, Bogor Regency. There were 31 children grade 2 and 3 in SD Angsana I and II Cibeber Village selected by purposive sampling technique. The results showed that more than half of the children had medium sufficient levels of vitamin A (54.8%. Generally, they had normal nutritional status (93.5%. More than half of children had low vitamin A status. The result also found that relationship between the level of adequacy of energy and protein with nutritional status of the children were not significant (p>0.05. The relationship between intake of vitamin A to vitamin A status also showed no significant relationship (p>0.05. It was presumably due to the presence of other factors (food consumption, reserves of vitamin A in the liver, and socio-economic. There was no significant relationship between nutritional status and vitamin A status (p>0.05.Keywords: energy and protein consumption, school-age children, vitamin A consumptionABSTRAKPenelitian ini bertujuan untuk mempelajari asupan vitamin A, status vitamin A, status gizi dan status kesehatan subjek di Kecamatan Leuwiliang, Kabupaten Bogor. Sebanyak 31 anak kelas 2 dan 3 SD Angsana I dan II Desa Cibeber dipilih dengan teknik purposive sampling. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa lebih dari separuh anak memiliki tingkat kecukupan vitamin A kategori sedang (54.8%. Pada umumnya status gizi mereka normal (93.5%. Lebih dari separuh anak memiliki status vitamin A dengan kategori rendah (58.1%. Hasil uji hubungan antara tingkat kecukupan energi dan protein dengan status gizi tidak menunjukkan hubungan yang signifikan (p>0.05. Hasil uji hubungan antara tingkat kecukupan vitamin A dengan vitamin A juga tidak menunjukkan hubungan yang signifikan (p>0.05. Hal ini diduga karena adanya faktor lain (konsumsi makanan, cadangan vitamin

  4. Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Because exposure to sunlight is a risk for skin cancer, you should use sunscreen after a few minutes in the sun. People who do not live in sunny places may not make enough vitamin D. Skin that is exposed to sunshine indoors through a ...

  5. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to a combination of lycopene, vitamin E, lutein and selenium and “ helps to prepare and activate tannin g ” pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following an application from Nutrilinks Sarl, submitted pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of Cyprus, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health claim...... related to a combination of lycopene, vitamin E, lutein and selenium and “helps to prepare and activate tanning”. The Panel considers that the combination of lycopene, vitamin E, lutein and selenium is sufficiently characterised. The claimed effect proposed by the applicant is “helps to prepare...... and activate tanning”. Tanning (i.e. increasing the pigmentation of the skin) may contribute to the protection of the skin against UV-induced damage. The Panel considers that protection of the skin from UV-induced (including photo-oxidative) damage is a beneficial physiological effect. A claim on a combination...

  6. Nobel laureates in the history of the vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souganidis, Ellie

    2012-01-01

    Research on vitamins has advanced considerably over the past 100 years with numerous advancements in the fields of biochemistry, medicine, and nutrition. The purpose of this article is to present the history of vitamins using Nobel Prizes as a framework for each vitamin-related discovery. The Nobel Prize Presentation Speech and Nobel Lecture were reviewed for each Nobel Laureate who received an award for vitamin-related research. The original scientific work of a number of awardees was also utilized as a primary source of the history. Nobel Prizes were awarded primarily for the identification, isolation, and synthesis of vitamins. Additional awards recognized the role of specific vitamins in disease processes. The awarding of over 10 Nobel Prizes in Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine in the last century has recognized the seminal work of numerous scientists and physicians and showcased multiple important advancements in vitamins research.

  7. Vitamin D supplementation in adults - guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinowska-Suchowierska, Ewa; Walicka, Magdalena; Tałałaj, Marek; Horst-Sikorska, Wanda; Ignaszak-Szczepaniak, Magdalena; Sewerynek, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D is necessary in maintaining appropriate calcium and phosphate homeostasis in the body (classical function) and ensuring appropriate functioning of many tissues, organs and cells, unrelated to mineral economy (non-classical function). Vitamin D deficiency in adults may cause osteomalacia, increase fracture risk in osteoporosis, induce cardiovascular diseases, diabetes type 1 and 2, multiple sclerosis, Lesniowski-Crohn disease, and cancer, including colon, breast, and prostate cancer. Possible causes of vitamin D deficiency in a healthy population include decreased cutaneous synthesis and an inadequate intake of vitamin D, both in food and in supplements. Vitamin D deficiency level (25(OH) D. 〈 20 ng/mL), is fairly widespread, being found in a substantial percentage of healthy subjects around the world, regardless of race, gender and age. Daily vitamin D dose, as determined by the Food and Nutrition Board in 1997, is now rather insufficient, the biggest problem being associated with maximal vitamin D levels (50 μg/day) in actually available food supplements. Nowadays, it is recommended that adults need a minimum of 800-1,000 U/day when their exposure to the sun is inadequate (in Poland from October to April). This dosage should be provided to all subjects who avoid sunlight, as well as to those aged over 65 because of their slower skin synthesis of vitamin D and for its proven anti-fracture and anti-fall effects.

  8. [Micronutrients in parenteral nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García de Lorenzo, A; Alvarez, J; Bermejo, T; Gomis, P; Piñeiro, G

    2009-01-01

    At a multidisciplinary debate, and after reviewing the evidence available as well as experts' opinion, the IV Baxter-SENPE Working Panel established the indications and managemente guidelines for micronutrients (water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins, and oligoelements or trace elements) in parenteral nutrition. It was concluded about the convenience of daily intake of micronutrients with diferent options regarding deficiente or excessive dosages, administration systems, interactions, monitoring, and cots-effectiveness.

  9. Nutritional disturbances in Crohn's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Harries, A D; Heatley, R V

    1983-01-01

    A wide range of nutritional disturbances may be found in patients with Crohn's disease. As more sophisticated tests become available to measure vitamin and trace element deficiencies, so these are being recognized as complications of Crohn's disease. It is important to recognize nutritional deficiencies at an early stage and initiate appropriate treatment. Otherwise many patients, experiencing what can be a chronic and debilitating illness, may suffer unnecessarily from the consequences of de...

  10. Update in Maternal and Infant Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Elizabeth M.

    1989-01-01

    This review emphasizes research that confirms or questions established practices regarding maternal and infant nutrition. Controversial issues include weight gain and use of vitamins and mineral supplements during pregnancy and the effects of second-hand smoke. Infant nutrition topics include use of unmodified cow's milk, level of fat, and…

  11. Vitamins B2 and B6 and Genetic Polymorphisms Related to One-Carbon Metabolism as Risk Factors for Gastric Adenocarcinoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eussen, Simone J. P. M.; Vollset, Stein Emil; Hustad, Steinar; Midttun, Oivind; Meyer, Klaus; Fredriksen, Ase; Ueland, Per Magne; Jenab, Mazda; Slimani, Nadia; Ferrari, Pietro; Agudo, Antonio; Sala, Nuria; Capella, Gabriel; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Palli, Domenico; Boeing, Heiner; Weikert, Cornelia; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Buechner, Frederike L.; Carneiro, Fatima; Berrino, Franco; Vineis, Paolo; Tumino, Rosario; Panico, Salvatore; Berglund, Goran; Manjer, Jonas; Stenling, Roger; Hallmans, Goeran; Martinez, Carmen; Arrizola, Larraitz; Barricarte, Aurelio; Navarro, Carmen; Rodriguez, Laudina; Bingham, Sheila; Linseisen, Jakob; Kaaks, Rudolf; Overvad, Kim; Tjonneland, Anne; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Numans, Mattijs E.; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Morois, Sophie; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lund, Eiliv; Plebani, Mario; Riboli, Elio; Gonzalez, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    B vitamins and polymorphisms in genes coding for enzymes involved in one-carbon metabolism may affect DNA synthesis and methylation and thereby be implicated in carcinogenesis. Previous data on vitamins B2 and B6 and genetic polymorphisms other than those involving MTHFR as risk factors for gastric

  12. Vitamins B2 and B6 and genetic polymorphisms related to one-carbon metabolism as risk factors for gastric adenocarcinoma in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eussen, S.J.; Vollset, S.E.; Hustad, S.; Midttun, O.; Meyer, K.; Fredriksen, A.; Ueland, P.M.; Jenab, M.; Slimani, N.; Ferrari, P.; Agudo, A.; Sala, N.; Capella, G.; Giudice, G. Del; Palli, D.; Boeing, H.; Weikert, C.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.; Buchner, F.L.; Carneiro, F.; Berrino, F.; Vineis, P.; Tumino, R.; Panico, S.; Berglund, G.; Manjer, J.; Stenling, R.; Hallmans, G.; Martinez, C.; Arrizola, L.; Barricarte, A.; Navarro, C.; Rodriguez, L.; Bingham, S.; Linseisen, J.; Kaaks, R.; Overvad, K.; Tjonneland, A.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Numans, M.E.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Boutron-Ruault, M.C.; Morois, S.; Trichopoulou, A.; Lund, E.; Plebani, M.; Riboli, E.; Gonzalez, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    B vitamins and polymorphisms in genes coding for enzymes involved in one-carbon metabolism may affect DNA synthesis and methylation and thereby be implicated in carcinogenesis. Previous data on vitamins B2 and B6 and genetic polymorphisms other than those involving MTHFR as risk factors for gastric

  13. Folate, vitamin B12 and human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    During the past decade the role of folate and vitamin B12 in human nutrition have been under constant re-examination. Basic knowledge on the metabolism and interactions between these essential nutrients has expanded and multiple complexities have been unraveled. These micronutrients have shared func...

  14. Controversies of antioxidant vitamins supplementation in exercise: ergogenic or ergolytic effects in humans?

    OpenAIRE

    Draeger, Cainara Lins; Naves, Andréia; Marques, Natália; Baptistella, Ana Beatriz; Carnauba, Renata Alves; Paschoal, Valéria; Nicastro, Humberto

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this commentary was to discuss the last studies regarding the effect of antioxidant vitamins supplementation on oxidative stress in exercise in humans. The inclusion criteria encompassed published studies done in adult males and females between 2006 and 2013. The keywords used in the search engine were: endurance athlete, diet, oxidative stress, physical activity, diet, nutrition, antioxidant, antioxidant status, vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin E, β-carotene and combinations. Twelve ...

  15. Nutrition and nutritional issues for dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Mónica; Carvalho, Pedro; Moreira, Pedro; Teixeira, Vítor H

    2013-09-01

    Proper nutrition, not simply adequate energetic intake, is needed to achieve optimal dance performance. However, little scientific research exists concerning nutrition in dance, and so, to propose nutritional guidelines for this field, recommendations need to be based mainly on studies done in other physically active groups. To diminish the risk of energy imbalance and associated disorders, dancers must consume at least 30 kcal/kg fat-free mass/day, plus the training energy expenditure. For macronutrients, a daily intake of 3 to 5 g carbohydrates/kg, 1.2 to 1.7 g protein/kg, and 20 to 35% of energy intake from fat can be recommended. Dancers may be at increased risk of poor micronutrient status due to their restricted energy intake; micronutrients that deserve concern are iron, calcium, and vitamin D. During training, dancers should give special attention to fluid and carbohydrate intake in order to maintain optimal cognition, motivation, and motor skill performance. For competition/stage performance preparation, it is also important to ensure that an adequate dietary intake is being achieved. Nutritional supplements that may help in achieving specific nutritional goals when dietary intake is inadequate include multivitamins and mineral, iron, calcium, and vitamin D supplements, sports drinks, sports bars, and liquid meal supplements. Caffeine can also be used as an ergogenic aid. It is important that dancers seek dietary advice from qualified specialists, since the pressure to maintain a low body weight and low body fat levels is high, especially in styles as ballet, and this can lead to an unbalanced diet and health problems if not correctly supervised.

  16. Nutritional management of the breastfeeding dyad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Christina J; Wagner, Carol L

    2013-02-01

    Milk is successfully produced by mothers regardless of their nutritional status. Nevertheless, the concentrations of some nutrients, specifically vitamins A, D, B1, B2, B3, B6, and B12, fatty acids, and iodine, in human milk depend on or are influenced by maternal diet. A healthy and varied diet during lactation ensures adequate maternal nutrition and optimal concentration of some nutrients in human milk. Exclusive breastfeeding meets the nutritional needs of infants for 6 months of life with the exception of vitamins D and K, which should be given to breastfed infants as supplements.

  17. Relationship between vitamin D during perinatal development and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaludjerovic, Jovana; Vieth, Reinhold

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is a highly prevalent condition that is present in 40% to 80% of pregnant women. There is emerging evidence that vitamin D deficiency may be a risk modifying factor for many chronic diseases, including osteomalacia, rickets, multiple sclerosis, schizophrenia, heart disease, type 1 diabetes, and cancer. Heightened susceptibility to these diseases may originate in early life during the development of tissue structure and function. It is suspected that biologic mechanisms can "memorize" the metabolic effects of early nutritional environment through fetal and neonatal imprinting. Inadequate vitamin D nutrition during perinatal life may establish a poor foundation that may produce long-term threats to human health. This review summarizes the risks of vitamin D deficiency for human health and provides the current vitamin D recommendations for mothers and their newborns. Copyright © 2010 American College of Nurse-Midwives. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Vitamin D Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Vitamin D Tests Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Ergocalciferol (Vitamin D 2 ); Cholecalciferol (Vitamin D 3 ); Calcidiol (25-hydroxyvitamin ...

  19. Vitamin A Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Vitamin A Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... Related tests: Complete Blood Count , Comprehensive Metabolic Panel , Vitamin B12 and Folate , Vitamin D Tests , Iron Tests , ...

  20. Vitamin A blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003570.htm Vitamin A blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The vitamin A test measures the level of vitamin A ...

  1. Vitamin D and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Service Resources Additional Resources About FAQ Contact Vitamin D and Health Table of Contents Vitamin D Deficiency: ... and Colds Risk of Premature Death References Vitamin D Deficiency: A Global Concern If you live north ...

  2. Vegetarianism. New Horizons in Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Justine; Grogan, Jane, Ed.

    This instructional handbook is one of a series of ten packets designed to form a comprehensive course in nutrition for secondary students. This unit examines the vegetarian diet as a viable alternative, and at the same time, it introduces the topics of protein and vitamin B12. It contains a page of teaching suggestions, a pre-test for the…

  3. Vegetarianism. New Horizons in Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Justine; Grogan, Jane, Ed.

    This instructional handbook is one of a series of ten packets designed to form a comprehensive course in nutrition for secondary students. This unit examines the vegetarian diet as a viable alternative, and at the same time, it introduces the topics of protein and vitamin B12. It contains a page of teaching suggestions, a pre-test for the…

  4. Effect of Low-Dose Vitamin D Supplementation on Serum 25(OH)D in School Children and White-Collar Workers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ronghua Zhang; Xiamusiye Muyiduli; Danting Su; Biao Zhou; Yueqiang Fang; Shuying Jiang; Shuojia Wang; Lichun Huang; Minjia Mo; Minchao Li; Bule Shao; Yunxian Yu

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Our study aimed to investigate the nutritional vitamin D status of school children aged 9-15 years and white-collar workers in Zhejiang province, and evaluate the efficacy of low-dose-oral vitamin D...

  5. Nutritional therapies in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evatt, Marian L

    2007-05-01

    Advise patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) to consume a balanced diet, with special attention to adequate intake of dietary fiber, fluids, and macro- and micronutrients. Regularly reassess patients' nutritional history and anthropomorphic measures (height and weight), particularly in patients with advanced disease. PD-related psychosocial as well as physical and cognitive limitations increase susceptibility to subacute and chronic malnutrition. Nutritional requirements may change with PD progression or after surgical therapy for PD. Patients and caregivers may benefit from counseling by a dietician who is knowledgeable about the nutritional risks and needs of PD. Regularly inquire about dysphagia symptoms, and consider speech therapy consultation for clinical and modified barium-swallowing evaluations and management recommendations. Although non-oral delivery options of dopaminergic therapy are increasing, severe dysphagia may warrant percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement for nutritional support and more reliable PD medication dosing. Analyze vitamin B(12) and D concentrations at regular intervals. Both vitamins are frequently deficient in elderly persons but may not be routinely checked by primary care physicians. Record over-the-counter and nutritional supplement medications at each visit, and assist patients in periodically re-evaluating their potential benefits, side effects, drug interactions, and costs. To date, clinical trials of antioxidant vitamins and nutritional supplements have provided insufficient evidence to support routine use for PD in the clinic. Data from several clinical trials of antioxidant vitamins/nutritional supplements are expected in the near future. Consider altering medication dosing in relation to meals to help with mild to moderate motor fluctuations. Patients with severe motor fluctuations may benefit from adapting the 5:1 carbohydrate-to-protein ratio in their daily meals and snacks. Following a "protein

  6. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vitamins that the body absolutely needs: vitamins A, C, D, E, K, and the B vitamins (thiamine, ... excessive amounts of water-soluble vitamins, like vitamins C and B, are not used by the body ...

  7. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vitamins that the body absolutely needs: vitamins A, C, D, E, K, and the B vitamins (thiamine, ... excessive amounts of water-soluble vitamins, like vitamins C and B, are not used by the body ...

  8. Nutritional optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicka-Pierko, Anna; Obuchowska, Iwona; Mariak, Zofia

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional optic neuropathy (aka deficiency optic neuropathy) is a dysfunction of the optic nerve resulting from improper dietary content of certain nutrients essential for normal functioning of the nerve fibers. Most commonly, it results from folic acid and vitamin B complex deficiency associated with malnutrition or poor dietary habits, incorrectly applied vegetarian diet, or chronic alcohol abuse. Obese patients after bariatric surgery constitute another risk group of optic neuropathy. Nutritional optic neuropathy is characterized by painless, gradually progressing, bilateral and symmetrical decrease in visual acuity, which can be accompanied by the color vision dysfunction. Progression of the neuropathy is associated with optic nerve atrophy, manifesting as complete disc pallor. Treatment of nutritional neuropathy includes dietary supplementation, aimed at compensating for the deficient nutrients. The treatment is mostly based on folic acid, vitamin B complex, and protein replacement, as well as eliminating risk factors of neuropathy. Early treatment commencement, prior to irreversible optic nerve atrophy, is a prerequisite of effective treatment. We would like to highlight this problem by presenting the case of a young woman in whom chronic use "water-based" diet resulted in anemia and bilateral nutritional optic neuropathy.

  9. Application of ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry for the measurement of vitamin D in infant formula and adult/pediatric nutritional formula: First Action 2011.11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Min; Winters, Doug; Sullivan, Darryl; Dowell, Dawn

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to measure vitamin D, ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) was applied to samples. The use of UHPLC-MS/MS decreased the run time by 50%. The UHPLC-MS/MS achieved equal or better separation efficiency with complex food matrixes compared to HPLC-MS/MS. It was also observed that under the optimized conditions of UHPLC, all previtamins of vitamin D3, D2, and isotope-labeled vitamin D3 were baseline-separated from their corresponding vitamins. The sterol isomers found in complex food matrixes that interfere in the analysis were well separated from the analytes. The accuracy of the method was evaluated by analyzing National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 1849 infant reference material. The average vitamin D3 concentration was 0.251 +/- 0.012 microg/g. This showed excellent agreement with the certified value of 0.251 +/- 0.027 microg/g. The spike recovery study of a commercial infant formula matrix showed a range of recovery from 100 to 108%. The LOQ values determined were 0.0022 and 0.0028 microg/g for vitamins D3 and D2, respectively; LOD values were 0.00065 and 0.00083 microg/g for vitamins D3 and D2, respectively.

  10. [Vitamin D supplementation in adults--guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinowska-Suchowierska, Ewa; Walicka, Magdalena; Tałałaj, Marek; Horst-Sikorska, Wanda; Ignaszak-Szczepaniak, Magdalena; Sewerynek, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D is necessary in maintaining appropriate calcium and phosphate homeostasis in the body (classical function) and ensuring appropriate functioning of many tissues, organs and cells, unrelated to mineral economy (non-classical function). Vitamin D deficiency in adults may cause osteomalacia, increase fracture risk in osteoporosis, induce cardiovascular diseases, diabetes type 1 and 2, multiple sclerosis, Lesniowski-Crohn disease, and cancer, including colon, breast, and prostate cancer. Possible causes of vitamin D deficiency in a healthy population include decreased cutaneous synthesis and an inadequate intake of vitamin D, both in food and in supplements. Vitamin D deficiency level (25(OH) D. Nutrition Board in 1997, is now rather insufficient, the biggest problem being associated with maximal vitamin D levels (50 μg/day) in actually available food supplements. Nowadays, it is recommended that adults need a minimum of 800-1,000 U/day when their exposure to the sun is inadequate (in Poland from October to April). This dosage should be provided to all subjects who avoid sunlight, as well as to those aged over 65 because of their slower skin synthesis of vitamin D and for its proven anti-fracture and anti-fall effects.

  11. Vitamin D supplements in the Indian Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Lhamo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is now known that vitamin D deficiency is a worldwide health problem. In our country, as food fortification is lacking, supplementation with pharmaceutical preparations is the only means of treatment of vitamin D deficiency. We aimed to study the composition and availability of various vitamin D preparations in the Indian market, data about which was collected from annual drug compendium. The preparations were assessed for total number, different formulations, constituents and amount of each constituent present in the formulation. Vitamin D3 is available in the form of cholecalciferol, alfacalcidiol and calcitriol as single ingredient products and in combination with calcium and other micronutrients. Most of the supplements contain calcitriol (46.5% or alfacalcidiol (43% as tablets (51.1% and capsules (35.2%. Cholecalciferol, the preferred form for prophylaxis and treatment of vitamin D deficient states, constitutes only 10% of the available market preparations. High market sales of calcium supplements containing calcitriol indicate increasing intake of calcitriol rather than cholecalciferol; which could predispose to toxicity. There is a need for marketing and rational prescribing of the appropriate vitamin D supplement in ostensibly healthy Indian population. Implementation of population-based education and intervention programmes with enforcement of strict regulations could generate awareness and curb unsupervised intake of vitamin D containing dietary supplements. This health challenge mandates effective nutritional policies, fortification and supplementation programmes and partnership between government, healthcare and industry to safeguard the health of Indian population at large.

  12. Vitamin deficiencies in rice-eating populations. Effects of B-vitamin supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamji, M S

    1983-01-01

    Rice is the staple food in many countries of Asia. Recent nutrition surveys in eight states, conducted by the National Nutrition Monitoring Bureau of India, show that though the average energy intake is adequate, more than 50% of the households surveyed consumed less than the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) of energy. These households generally had per capita incomes of less than Rupees 2/- (US+ 0.25) per day. The average intake of vitamin A was only 42% of the RDA and that of riboflavin, 70% of the RDA. The average intake of other nutrients such as thiamin, niacin, ascorbic acid, iron and calcium was adequate, although thiamin deficiency was present in populations where rice was the main cereal, but not in populations where rice was the main cereal, but not in populations that consumed mixed cereal or cereal-millet diets. The magnitude of the riboflavin deficiency (after correction or energy) was also more marked in the former. Vitamin A intake was not related to the type of cereal, but had some relationship to the quantity of vegetables consumed. Nutrition surveys from Japan also reveal deficiencies in intake of energy, vitamin A, thiamin and riboflavin. The Japanese diet tends to be deficient by 20% in vitamin A and riboflavin, but not thiamin. Thus, vitamin A, riboflavin and energy (in that order) are the major nutritional constraints in rice-eating populations. Clear-cut correlations between the magnitude of dietary deficiency and the prevalence of signs and symptoms of vitamin deficiency were not apparent in the comparisons between populations, suggesting that as well as dietary deficiency other environmental factors play a role in the development of clinical deficiency. Attempts to correlate clinical deficiency with the magnitude of biochemical deficiency have also failed. Recent studies aimed at examining the effects of food supplements (rural Gambian women) or vitamin supplements (rural Indian boys) on vitamin status suggest that in some communities

  13. Vitamin D deficiency and childhood obesity: interactions, implications, and recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson CA

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Catherine A Peterson Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO, USA Abstract: Vitamin D deficiency and childhood obesity have been classified as epidemics throughout the world, and both share some common risk factors including poor diet and inactivity. Observational and clinical studies show that vitamin D status and fat mass are inversely correlated. It is not clear whether vitamin D deficiency contributes to, or is a consequence of obesity, or whether there are regulatory interactions between excess adiposity and vitamin D activity. The effects of this deficiency in childhood obesity appear to have negative influences on overall health, including insulin resistance, inflammation, and impeded bone mineralization, as well as increased future risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and osteoporosis. The rather ubiquitous distribution of the vitamin D receptor and the 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1a-hydroxylase throughout the body, including evidence for a role of vitamin D in adipogenesis and adipocyte metabolism, may in part explain these widespread effects. Most of the findings to date suggest that the vitamin D needs of obese children are greater than the nonobese. Although ultraviolet B-induced skin synthesis is a main source of vitamin D, its use is neither feasible nor prudent due to limited sun availability for many and concerns for skin cancer. Likewise, obtaining adequate vitamin D from natural food sources alone is generally not achievable, and even in countries that allow fortification, vitamin D intakes are low. Therefore, in obese children, vitamin D supplementation is warranted. Weight loss interventions using energy restriction and physical activity may also improve the poor vitamin D status associated with obesity. More research is needed to define optimal vitamin D status in this vulnerable population, including investigations to determine the efficacy of vitamin D

  14. Celss nutrition system utilizing snails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midorikawa, Y.; Fujii, T.; Ohira, A.; Nitta, K.

    At the 40th IAF Congress in Malaga, a nutrition system for a lunar base CELSS was presented. A lunar base with a total of eight crew members was envisaged. In this paper, four species of plants—rice, soybean, lettuce and strawberry—were introduced to the system. These plants were sufficient to satisfy fundamental nutritional needs of the crew members. The supply of nutrition from plants and the human nutritional requirements could almost be balanced. Our study revealed that the necessary plant cultivation area per crew member would be nearly 40 m 3 in the lunar base. The sources of nutrition considered in the study were energy, sugar, fat, amino acids, inorganic salt and vitamins; however, calcium, vitamin B 2, vitamin A and sodium were found to be lacking. Therefore, a subsystem to supply these elements is of considerable value. In this paper, we report on a study for breeding snails and utilizing meat as food. Nutrients supplied from snails are shown to compensate for the abovementioned lacking elements. We evaluate the snail breeder and the associated food supply system as a subsystem of closed ecological life support system.

  15. Base de datos de carotenoides para valoración de la ingesta dietética de carotenos, xantofilas y de vitamina A: utilización en un estudio comparativo del estado nutricional en vitamina A de adultos jóvenes Carotenoid data base to assess dietary intake of carotenes, xanthophyls and vitamin A: its use in a comparative study of vitamin A nutritional status in young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Beltrán

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: 1 Elaborar una base de datos de carotenoides (BD-carotenoides de alimentos consumidos en España. 2 Valorar el estado nutricional en vitamina A (expresada en equivalentes de retinol (ER y en equivalentes de actividad de retinol (EAR en adultos jóvenes. Métodos: La BD-carotenoides incluye datos de carotenos (β-caroteno, α-caroteno y licopeno y xantofilas (β-critpoxantina, luteína y zeaxantina generados mediante HPLC. La ingesta de vitamina A se valoró a partir de tres recuerdos de 24 horas, en 54 adultos, 20-35 años, no obesos y con retinol sérico (> 30 µg/dl, utilizando la BD-carotenoides y unas Tablas de Composición de Alimentos de amplio uso en España. Resultados: La BD-carotenoides incluye datos para 89 alimentos (9 en crudo y cocido y 14 son alimentos procesados. La ingesta de carotenoides provitamínicos-A es de 2,5 mg/p/d, la de ER 682 µg/p/d y la de EAR 499 µg/p/d. La vitamina A expresada en EAR es un 27% inferior que como ER. El 76% de las ingestas se adecuan a las ingestas recomendadas y el 63% a la ingesta diaria recomendada. Conclusiones: Los datos individualizados de carotenoides permiten mayor precisión en los estudios entre dieta y salud, y facilitan la valoración de la ingesta de vitamina A, expresada en ER, EAR o en otras formas de expresión futuras. La ingesta de vitamina A expresada como EAR implica una reducción importante en la contribución de los carotenoides a la ingesta de vitamina A, lo que conlleva un aumento en la detección de inadecuaciones en la ingesta de esta vitamina.Objectives: 1 Develop a database of carotenoids (BD-carotenoids in foods widely consumed in Spain. 2 To assess the vitamin A nutritional status (expressed as retinol equivalents [RE] and retinol activity equivalents [RAE] in young adults. Methods: The BD-carotenoids includes data on carotenes (β-carotene, α-carotene and lycopene and xanthophylls (β-cryptoxanthin, lutein and zeaxanthin generated by HPLC. Vitamin A

  16. Parental vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy is associated with increased blood pressure in offspring via Panx1 hypermethylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meems, Laura M. G.; Mahmud, Hasan; Buikema, Hendrik; Tost, Jorg; Michel, Sven; Takens, Janny; Verkaik-Schakel, Rikst N; Vreeswijk-Baudoin, Inge; Mateo-Leach, Irene V.; van der Harst, Pim; Plosch, Torsten; de Boer, Rudolf A.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is one of the most common nutritional deficiencies worldwide. Maternal vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased susceptibility to hypertension in offspring, but the reasons for this remain unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if parental vitamin D deficiency

  17. Parental vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy is associated with increased blood pressure in offspring via Panx1 hypermethylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meems, Laura M. G.; Mahmud, Hasan; Buikema, Hendrik; Tost, Jorg; Michel, Sven; Takens, Janny; Verkaik-Schakel, Rikst N; Vreeswijk-Baudoin, Inge; Mateo-Leach, Irene V.; van der Harst, Pim; Plosch, Torsten; de Boer, Rudolf A.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is one of the most common nutritional deficiencies worldwide. Maternal vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased susceptibility to hypertension in offspring, but the reasons for this remain unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if parental vitamin D deficiency

  18. Nutrition for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2005-01-01

    Nutrition has proven to be critical throughout the history of human exploration, on both land and water. The importance of nutrition during long-duration space exploration is no different. Maintaining optimal nutritional status is critical for all bodily systems, especially in light of the fact that that many are also affected by space flight itself. Major systems of concern are bone, muscle, the cardiovascular system, the immune system, protection against radiation damage, and others. The task ahead includes defining the nutritional requirements for space travelers, ensuring adequacy of the food system, and assessing crew nutritional status before, during, and after flight. Accomplishing these tasks will provide significant contributions to ensuring crew health on long-duration missions. In addition, development and testing of nutritional countermeasures to effects of space flight is required, and assessment of the impact of other countermeasures (such as exercise and pharmaceuticals) on nutrition is also critical for maintaining overall crew health. Vitamin D stores of crew members are routinely low after long-duration space flight. This occurs even when crew members take vitamin D supplements, suggesting that vitamin D metabolism may be altered during space flight. Vitamin D is essential for efficient absorption of calcium, and has numerous other benefits for other tissues with vitamin D receptors. Protein is a macronutrient that requires additional study to define the optimal intake for space travelers. Administration of protein to bed rest subjects can effectively mitigate muscle loss associated with disuse, but too much or too little protein can also have negative effects on bone. In another bed rest study, we found that the ratio of protein to potassium was correlated with the level of bone resorption: the higher the ratio, the more bone resorption. These relationships warrant further study to optimize the beneficial effect of protein on both bone and muscle

  19. Nutritional status, dietary intake and serum levels of vitamin C upon diagnosis of cancer in children and adolescents El estado nutricional, la ingesta alimentaria y los niveles séricos de vitamina C en el momento del diagnóstico de cáncer en niños y adolescentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Lima de Araújo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prevalence of malnutrition upon diagnosis, together with reduced food intake secondary to disease and treatment, make the periodic assessment of nutritional status (including the intake of antioxidant nutrients of considerable importance to the follow up of patients with cancer. Objectives: Assess the nutritional status and frequency of inadequate vitamin C levels among children and adolescents with cancer at the beginning of treatment and determine associated factors. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out with 30 patients under 18 years. Nutritional status was assessed using laboratory methods and anthropometric measurements. Vitamin C adequacy was assessed through its serum concentration and dietary intake. Results: In the sample, 10% were short for their age and 13.3% were underweight. The triceps skinfold measurement revealed fat depletion in 68% and the arm muscle circumference measurement revealed muscle depletion in 32.0%. Seventy percent of the patients had vitamin C deficiency and had greater weight loss, lower Z scores for all anthropometric indicators analyzed, lower serum albumin and higher C-reactive protein than those without vitamin C deficiency, but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Children with cancer may have nutritional deficits upon diagnosis. Further studies are needed on the association between serum levels of antioxidant and nutritional status in order to offer safe, effective nutritional support.Introducción: La prevalencia de desnutrición al momento del diagnóstico junto a la reducción de la ingesta de alimentos secundaria a la enfermedad y el tratamiento, condicionan que la evaluación periódica del estado nutricional, incluso la evaluación de los nutrientes antioxidantes, sea de gran importancia en el seguimiento del paciente con cáncer. Objetivo: Evaluar el estado nutricional y la frecuencia de los niveles inadecuados de vitamina C en niños y

  20. Facts about Vitamin K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facts about Vitamin K 1 R. Elaine Turner and Wendy J. Dahl 2 FCS8666 Figure 1. Vitamin K is mostly found in vegetables, especially green ... ColognePhotos/iStock/Thinkstock, © ColognePhotos Why do we need vitamin K? Vitamin K is one of the fat- ...

  1. Vitamin B6

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Datos en español Health Professional Other Resources Vitamin B6 Fact Sheet for Consumers Have a question? ... out more about vitamin B6? Disclaimer What is vitamin B6 and what does it do? Vitamin B6 ...

  2. Vitamin B12

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Datos en español Health Professional Other Resources Vitamin B12 Fact Sheet for Consumers Have a question? ... out more about vitamin B12? Disclaimer What is vitamin B12 and what does it do? Vitamin B12 ...

  3. Facts about Vitamin C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facts About Vitamin C 1 Linda B. Bobroff and Isabel Valentín-Oquendo 2 FCS8702 Why do we need vitamin C? Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, has a ... maintain healthy body tissues and the immune system. Vitamin C also helps the body absorb iron from ...

  4. FATSOLUBLE VITAMINS AND SPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novica Bojanić

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamins are the cell biocatalysts, indispensable factors in performing the basic body functions. Fat-soluble vitamins are not involved in processes related to musscle contractions and energy expenditure, but they can affect physical performance indirectly because they are important for immune function (vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin E, antioxidant function (vitamin A, vitamin E or bone methabolism (vitamin D, vitamin K. Currently there are no clear recommendations for increase of fat-solubile vitamins intake in athletes, as well as evidence that athletic performance may be improved due to fat-solubile vitamins supplementation. In a small number of studies, it was shown that an antioxidant effect of beta carotene and vitamin E can prevent muscle damage and facilitate recovery after exercise. Also, athletes who perform the exercises in the halls should be informed about the necessity of sun exposure, as vitamin D is synthesised in the skin. Most athletes are not familiar with their needs for vitamins and trace elements, and take these compounds as supplements without consulting a nutritionist. It is important to emphasize that liposulubile vitamins are deposited in the body and can cause hypervitaminosis and toxic effects if taken in excess. It is indisputable that the lack of any fat-soluble vitamin cause problems in normal physiological processes, but supplementation is generally not required in athlets who have a well-balanced diet.

  5. Diet & Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nutrition Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Diet & Nutrition Eating healthy to take charge of your health. Shelly Diagnosed in 2006 Diet & Nutrition Take Control of Your Weight Portion Control Low ...

  6. Vitamin D alteration associated with obesity and bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lespessailles, Eric; Toumi, Hechmi

    2017-05-01

    Obesity and severe obesity constitute growing serious health problems reaching epidemic proportion in most countries. Interactions and relationships between obesity and bone tissue and its metabolism are complex but are more and more studied and recognized. Obesity is associated with an altered hormonal profile including particularly bone-regulating hormones like vitamin D. Bariatric surgery procedures, thanks to their effectiveness to achieve therapeutic endpoints for comorbidities associated with obesity, have had an increasing success. However, these surgeries by producing mechanical restriction and or malabsorption syndrome lead to nutritional deficiencies including vitamin D. In this review, we aim to (1) discuss the nutritional deficiency of vitamin D in the obese, (2) to summarize the different surgical options in bariatric surgery and to present the evidence concerning these procedures and their associated profile in vitamin D post-operative insufficiency, (3) to present the different recommendations in clinical practice to prevent or treat vitamin D deficiencies or insufficiencies in patients treated by bariatric surgery and finally to introduce emerging assumptions on the relationship between vitamin D, microbiota composition and circulating bile acids. Impact statement Obesity and severe obesity constitute growing serious health problems reaching epidemic proportion in most countries with a prevalence increasing from 6.4 in 1975 to 14.9% in 2014. This present review summarizes currently available data on vitamin D deficiencies in the obese population before and after bariatric surgery. The important evidence emerging from our evaluation confirms that obese patients are at risk of multiple nutritional deficiencies, especially vitamin D deficiency, before bariatric surgery. Our survey confirms that the precise role of the gut microbiome and its associated changes on the vitamin D metabolism after the different bariatric surgery procedures has not yet been

  7. Assessing the vitamin D status of the US population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetley, Elizabeth A

    2008-08-01

    This article describes the information currently available in the National Nutrition Monitoring System that is relevant to assessing the vitamin D status of US population groups, the strengths and limitations of this information, and selected results of vitamin D nutritional status assessments. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) provides information on vitamin D intakes only from 1988 to 1994. NHANES collected information on supplement use and circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations from 1988 through current surveys. The National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference started providing limited data on the vitamin D content of foods in 2002 and continues to update these values. The Food Label and Package Survey provides 2006-2007 label information on vitamin D fortification of marketed foods. Despite limitations in the available data and controversies about appropriate criteria for evaluating vitamin D status among population groups, we can make some useful comparisons of vitamin D status among life-stage groups. In general, males have higher vitamin D intakes and 25(OH)D concentrations than do females. Children tend to have higher vitamin D status than adults. The increasing use of multivitamin-mineral dietary supplements in younger to older adults is not associated with a corresponding increase in serum 25(OH)D concentrations. In general, leaner individuals have higher circulating concentrations of 25(OH)D and supplement use than do heavier individuals. Finally, non-Hispanic whites tend to have higher vitamin D status than do non-Hispanic blacks and Mexican Americans.

  8. Vitamin D Deficiency in India: Prevalence, Causalities and Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu G

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency prevails in epidemic proportions all over the Indian subcontinent, with a prevalence of 70%–100% in the general population. In India, widely consumed food items such as dairy products are rarely fortified with vitamin D. Indian socioreligious and cultural practices do not facilitate adequate sun exposure, thereby negating potential benefits of plentiful sunshine. Consequently, subclinical vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in both urban and rural settings, and across all socioeconomic and geographic strata. Vitamin D deficiency is likely to play an important role in the very high prevalence of rickets, osteoporosis, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer and infections such as tuberculosis in India. Fortification of staple foods with vitamin D is the most viable population based strategy to achieve vitamin D sufficiency. Unfortunately, even in advanced countries like USA and Canada, food fortification strategies with vitamin D have been only partially effective and have largely failed to attain vitamin D sufficiency. This article reviews the status of vitamin D nutrition in the Indian subcontinent and also the underlying causes for this epidemic. Implementation of population based educational and interventional strategies to combat this scourge require recognition of vitamin D deficiency as a public health problem by the governing bodies so that healthcare funds can be allocated appropriately.

  9. Vitamin D recommendations, fortification in France, and communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaussy Amélie

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The vitamin D has recently been the subject of many researches, demonstrating new effects, reinforcing the interest for this molecule. The interest to develop products fortified with vitamin D is thus very important. Regarding references values, it is necessary to distinguish the RDAs (Recommended Daily Allowances, single value set up at 5 μg/d for vitamin D at the European level, in order to be a reference and a labeling value, from the nutritional recommendations. These recommendations are defined by groups of population. The values vary according to the countries and the dates on which they were set, the most recent being usually higher. The vitamin D fortification is less constrained in France today than before 2006. To fortify a food with vitamin D, it is necessary to follow the rules set by the Regulation 1925/2006/EC, and use the formulations authorized, demonstrate the nutritional benefit of the fortification, and ensure that the fortification does not lead to a risk for the health of the consumers. In some countries, the vitamin D fortification has been made mandatory for some foods. In France, several products are fortified with vitamin D, especially dairy products, but also some breakfast cereals and vegetable oils. Finally, the communication that can be made on vitamin D in food or advertising is strictly regulated by the Regulation 1924/2006/EC.

  10. Impact of nutrition on immune function and the inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    The review utilizes data on three micronutrients (vitamin A, zinc and iron), anthropometrically defined undernutrition (stunting, wasting and underweight) and obesity to evaluate the effect on immune function, recovery of immune function in response to nutritional interventions, related health outco...

  11. Effect of substrate on the growth, nutritional and bioactive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rosemary

    waste, cocoa bean shell, and saw dust such as Gliricidia mixture were ... help to improve health and nutrition. When used as food, mushrooms promote good human health, being rich ... and vitamins which can be of direct benefit to the human.

  12. Nutrition in pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udipi, S A; Ghugre, P; Antony, U

    2000-09-01

    Nutrition at optimal levels is fundamental in the maintenance of positive health. Matemal nutrition is very important for the course and outcome of pregnancy. Lactation represents a stage wherein health and nutritional status of the infant are dependent on the mother. Successful pregnancy and lactation require adjustments in maternal body composition, metabolism and function of various physioogical systems. A diet that meets matemal nutritional needs is required for these adjustments, so that maternal well-being is safeguarded with birth of an healthy infant. Adequate nutrition supports the growth of both matemal and foetal tissues. Chronic undernutrition throughout pregnancy affects birth weights of newborns. Poor nutrition causes intra-uterine growth retardation. Specific nutrients like zinc, iodine and folate are also required for development of the foetus. Foetal iron deficiency exists in maternal iron deficiency anaemia. Maternal nutritional status, breast milk composition and volume are elaborated in the article. Proteins, fats, minerals and vitamins and their requirements are narrated in detail. Additional nutritional requirements during lactation have been tabulated in this article. Thus improving the nutrition and health of girls and younger women and of mothers during pregnancy and lactation will derive benefits in terms of improved health of their children throughout their lives.

  13. Seaweed vitamins as nutraceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrovánková, Soňa

    2011-01-01

    Seaweeds are a good source of some water- (B(1), B(2), B(12), C) and fat-soluble (β-carotene with vitamin A activity, vitamin E) vitamins. To ensure that the adequate intake of all vitamins is received in the diet, people (especially people on special diet, strict vegetarians, and vegans) can consume foods enriched with vitamins, for example, in the form of functional foods with vitamins as nutraceuticals, extracted from natural sources such as seaweeds. Seaweed vitamins are important not only due to their biochemical functions and antioxidant activity but also due to other health benefits such as decreasing of blood pressure (vitamin C), prevention of cardiovascular diseases (β-carotene), or reducing the risk of cancer (vitamins E and C, carotenoids). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. What's the Scoop on Autism Spectrum Disorders and Nutrition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Lee Shelly

    2009-01-01

    There is much discussion among families about the relationship between nutrition and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). There are claims of diets that will "cure" ASD: gluten-free, casein-free, specific carbohydrate diet (SCD). There are claims of benefits by adding nutrients to the diet, such as vitamin B-6 and magnesium, vitamin B-12, or essential…

  15. Vitamin D and allergies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gafvelin Guro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing amount of evidence has established that the biologically active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3, possesses immunoregulatory properties. Vitamin D exerts its effects through binding to the nuclear vitamin D receptor (VDR, which is expressed by cells of the immune system. Most of the immunological effects mediated by vitamin D-VDR are regulatory, inhibiting adaptive immune responses. It has become apparent that the incidence of vitamin D insufficiency is surprisingly high in the general population. A link between low vitamin D serum levels and the increased prevalence of allergic diseases has been proposed. This possible connection has been investigated in numerous studies on associations between vitamin D serum concentrations and different allergic conditions, as well as studies on the effect of vitamin D supplementation. Although there is some evidence for a protective role of vitamin D in asthma, no consensus on the role of vitamin D in allergic disease has yet been reached. Still, treatment strategies involving vitamin D supplementation to risk groups, combinatorial corticosteroid and vitamin D treatment in asthma and vitamin D as an immunomodulator in allergen specific immunotherapy show promise for the future.

  16. PARENTERAL NUTRITION IN PEDIATRICS AND PEDIATRIC SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Tepaev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition plays a key role in the growth and development of children. A present day balanced parenteral nutrition can adequately ensure the child’s organism with amino acids, carbohydrates, fats, and energy needed to maintain a basic energy level, physical activity, height, pre-correction of nutritional deficiency. The child’s body needs sufficient amounts of electrolytes, minerals, microelements and vitamins. Protein and energy homeostasis is the basis of the organism life, which determines the inflammatory response, the adequacy of the immune status, duration and severity of the disease. The paper presents recent data concerning the conduct of parenteral nutrition in children of different age groups. 

  17. Effects of an individualised nutritional education and support programme on dietary habits, nutritional knowledge, and nutritional status of older adults living alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jeong-Ah; Park, JeeWon; Kim, Chun-Ja

    2017-09-07

    The effects of an individualised nutritional education and support programme on dietary habits, nutritional knowledge, and nutritional status of 71 older adults living alone were examined. Although a regular dietary meal plan is recommended for improving nutritional status of older adults living alone, little research is done in this field in Korea. A pre- and post-test controlled quasi-experimental design was used at public health centres. The intervention group participated in an intensive nutritional education and support programme once a week for 8 weeks with dietary menus provided by home visiting nurses/dieticians; control group received usual care. Dietary habits and nutritional knowledge were assessed using structured questionnaires; nutritional intake status was analysed using Computer Aided Nutritional Analysis Program 5.0. The mean age of participants was 77.6 years, and 81.7% of the participants were women. At 8 weeks, there were significant interactions of group by time for dietary habits, nutritional knowledge, and selected nutritional status of protein, iron, and vitamins of B2 and C. Changes over time in the mean score of dietary habits and nutritional knowledge were significantly improved in the intervention group compared to the control group. The percentages of normal nutrition intake of protein, iron, and vitamins A and C in the intervention group were significantly higher than the control group at 8 weeks. Nutritional education and support programme positively impacted dietary habits, nutritional knowledge, and selected nutritional status in older adults living alone, and we highlight the need for community-based nutritional education and counselling programmes. Older adults living alone in a community have relatively poor nutritional status and thus require tailored nutritional intervention according to objective nutritional analysis. It is necessary to link visiting nurses with dieticians in the community to manage effective nutritional

  18. Nutrición enteral en el paciente neurológico: ¿es suficiente el contenido en vitamina D en las fórmulas de uso habitual? Enteral nutrition in neurological patients: is there enough vitamin D content in commonly used formulas?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Botella Romero

    2012-04-01

    órmulas completas de nutrición enteral de uso más común. El 50% de las dietas estudiadas, para una ingesta de 2.000 kcal/d, y el 90%, para una ingesta de 1.500 kcal/d, aportan menos de 600 UI/d de vitamina D. Discusión: Algunas guías publicadas recientemente han revisado las recomendaciones de ingesta diaria de vitamina D. El documento publicado por el Instituto de Medicina de EE.UU recomienda para los adultos, entre 19 y 70 años, 600 UI/d y, por encima de los 70 a, se proponen 800 UI/d de vitamina D. Estas cantidades son consideradas insuficientes por otras sociedades científicas que establecen que para conseguir unos niveles sanguíneos de 25(OHD iguales o superiores a 30 ng/ml puede requerirse un aporte diario de 1.500-2.000 UI y una cantidad dos o tres veces mayor si existe deficiencia previa. Conclusiones: Se necesitan más estudios controlados para averiguar cual es la dosis adecuada de vitamina D en fases avanzadas de la enfermedad neurológica, donde es difícil e improbable la exposición solar. Sugerimos que el contenido en vitamina D probablemente debería ser reconsiderado en las fórmulas de nutrición enteral, que, a la luz de las publicaciones recientes, aparecen como claramente insuficientes para aportes energéticos estándar (1.500-2.000 kcal.Introduction: Vitamin D deficiency produces inadequate bone mineralization, proximal muscle weakness, abnormal gait and increased risk of falls and fractures. Moreover, in epidemiological studies, has been associated with increased risk of cancer, autoimmune diseases, type 1 and 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, infectious diseases, cardiovascular diseases and depression. When synthesis through the skin by sun exposure is not possible and the patient can not eat by mouth, as in the advanced stages of various neurological diseases, the supply of vitamin D has to be done by enteral nutrition. Objectives: The aim of this study is to review the role of vitamin D in a common group of neurological

  19. 在线二维液相色谱法同时测定婴幼儿和成人配方营养品中的维生素A、D3和E%Simultaneous determination of vitamins A,D3 and E in infant formula and adult nutritions by online two-dimensional liquid chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艳海; 其布勒哈斯; 金燕; 王佳; 马文丽

    2015-01-01

    建立了在线二维液相色谱同时快速测定婴幼儿配方乳品和成人强化乳品中维生素 A、D3和 E 含量的方法。首先,依据疏水减法模型,选择 C8柱和极性嵌合的反相 C18柱分别作为一维和二维分离柱,构成正交分离体系,并均以甲醇、乙腈和水作为流动相,检测波长设为263 nm(维生素D3)、296 nm(维生素E)和325 nm(维生素A)。采用双三元液相色谱的左泵作为一维分析泵,完成维生素 A、E的定量和维生素 D3的净化;根据维生素 D3在一维色谱柱上的保留时间,确定切割时间窗口,并以500μL定量环收集含有维生素 D3的馏分,由双三元液相色谱的右泵将馏分带到二维色谱柱中,以维生素 D2作为内标物,采用内标法完成维生素 D3的定量分析,整个过程在密闭系统中自动化完成。在上述优化条件下测定了婴幼儿和成人奶粉、奶酪及酸奶等强化乳品中3种维生素的含量。经过1.25 kg/L KOH溶液的热皂化和石油醚的萃取,样品萃取液直接进样分析,得到维生素D3的加标回收率为75.50%~85.00%,并通过配对 t检验法与标准方法测定结果进行比较分析,结果差异无统计学意义,表明本方法可同时快速、准确测定婴幼儿及其他配方营养品中维生素 A、D3、E的含量,提高了样品分析效率。%A rapid method for the simultaneous determination of vitamins A,D3 and E in infant formula and adult nutritions has been developed using online two-dimensional liquid chromatog-raphy(2D-LC). First of all,C8 and polar embedded C18 columns were chosen as the first and second dimensional column respectively according to hydrophobic-subtraction model,which constituted excellent orthogonal separation system. The detection wavelengths were set at 263 nm for vitamin D3,296 nm for vitamin E and 325 nm for vitamin A. The purification of vitamin D3 and quantifications of vitamins A and E

  20. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to fat-free yogurts and fermented milks with live yogurt cultures complying with the specifications ?fat free?, ?low in sugars?, ?high protein?, ?source of calcium? and ?source of vitamin D? for nutrition claims and maintenance of lean body mass in the context of an energy-restricted diet pursuant to Article 13.5 of Regulation (EC No 1924/2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Following an application from Federación Nacional de Industrias Lácteas (FeNIL, submitted pursuant to Article 13.5 of Regulation (EC No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of Spain, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health claim related to fat-free yogurts and fermented milks with live yogurt cultures complying with the specifications “fat free”, “low in sugars”, “high protein”, “source of calcium” and “source of vitamin D” for nutrition claims and maintenance of lean body mass in the context of an energy-restricted diet. The Panel considers that the food that is the subject of the claim, fat-free yogurts and fermented milks complying with the specifications “fat free”, “low in sugars”, “high protein”, “source of calcium” and “source of vitamin D” for nutrition claims, is sufficiently characterised. The Panel considers that maintenance of lean body mass in the context of an energy-restricted diet is a beneficial physiological effect. No human intervention studies from which conclusions could be drawn for the scientific substantiation of the claim were provided. The Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has not been established between the consumption of fat-free yogurts and fermented milks with live yogurt cultures complying with the specifications “fat free”, “low in sugars”, “high protein”, “source of calcium” and “source of vitamin D” for nutrition claims and maintenance of lean body mass in the context of an energy-restricted diet.

  1. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... E, K, and the B vitamins (thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, biotin, vitamin B-6, vitamin B- ... back to top Water-soluble Vitamins B-3 (niacin): flushing, redness of the skin, upset stomach. B- ...

  2. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mail Consumer Updates RSS Feed Download PDF (422 K) On this page: Why Buy Vitamins? Vitamin Facts ... body absolutely needs: vitamins A, C, D, E, K, and the B vitamins (thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic ...

  3. La creación de un nuevo mercado alimentario en España: las vitaminas en la prensa periódica (1917-1950 The creation of a new nutritional market in Spain: vitamins in the press (1917-1950

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Perdiguero-Gil

    2012-11-01

    ", published in Barcelona, and the weekly publication "Blanco y Negro". The starting date was selected as the year in which the first news of vitamins appeared. The year 1950 marked the end of the harshest stage of autarky imposed by Franco's regime. The news that appeared was classified in the following categories: scientific news, nutritional advice, advertising, economy, politics, anecdotes and metaphors. Results: The advertisements that used vitamins as part of their marketing strategy are the most important section with over 50% of total references to the vitamin concept in almost all the newspapers. Scientific news on vitamins ranks second in importance. References to vitamins in the remaining categories were below 5%. Conclusions: Judging by the references which appear in the most important newspapers of the time vitamins represent a fundamental element in the creation of a new food product market in Spain in the first half of the twentieth century.

  4. Impact of calcium and vitamin D insufficiencies on serum parathyroid hormone and bone mineral density: analysis of the 4th & 5th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    The relative contributions of calcium and vitamin D to calcium metabolism and bone mineral density (BMD) have been examined previously, but not in a population with very low calcium intake. To determine the relative importance of dietary calcium intake and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concent...

  5. Plasma carotenoids, vitamin C, retinol and tocopherols levels and pancreatic cancer risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition: a nested case-control study: plasma micronutrients and pancreatic cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurnink, S.M.; Ros, M.M.; Leenders, M.; Duijnhoven, F.J. van; Siersema, P.D.; Jansen, E.H.; Gils, C.H. van; Bakker, M.F.; Overvad, K.; Roswall, N.; Tjonneland, A.; Boutron-Ruault, M.C.; Racine, A.; Cadeau, C.; Grote, V.; Kaaks, R.; Aleksandrova, K.; Boeing, H.; Trichopoulou, A.; Benetou, V.; Valanou, E.; Palli, D.; Krogh, V.; Vineis, P.; Tumino, R.; Mattiello, A.; Weiderpass, E.; Skeie, G.; Castano, J.M.; Duell, E.J.; Barricarte, A.; Molina-Montes, E.; Arguelles, M.; Dorronsoro, M.; Johansen, D.; Lindkvist, B.; Sund, M.; Crowe, F.L.; Khaw, K.T.; Jenab, M.; Fedirko, V.; Riboli, E.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of a protective effect of several antioxidants and other nutrients on pancreatic cancer risk is inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate the association for prediagnostic plasma levels of carotenoids, vitamin C, retinol and tocopherols with risk of pancreatic cancer in a case-

  6. Plasma carotenoids, vitamin C, retinol and tocopherols levels and pancreatic cancer risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition: A nested case-control study : Plasma micronutrients and pancreatic cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurnink, S.M.; Ros, M.M.; Leenders, M.; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of a protective effect of several antioxidants and other nutrients on pancreatic cancer risk is inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate the association for prediagnostic plasma levels of carotenoids, vitamin C, retinol and tocopherols with risk of pancreatic cancer in a case–

  7. North-south gradients in plasma concentrations of B-vitamins and other components of one-carbon metabolism in Western Europe : results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eussen, Simone J. P. M.; Nilsen, Roy M.; Midttun, Oivind; Hustad, Steinar; IJssennagger, Noortje; Meyer, Klaus; Fredriksen, Ase; Ulvik, Arve; Ueland, Per M.; Brennan, Paul; Johansson, Mattias; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Vineis, Paolo; Chuang, Shu-Chun; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Dossus, Laure; Perquier, Florence; Overvad, Kim; Teucher, Birgit; Grote, Verena A.; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Adarakis, George; Plada, Maria; Sieri, Sabina; Tumino, Rosario; Santucci de Magistris, Maria; Ros, Martine M.; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Luisa Redondo, Maria; Zamora-Ros, Raul; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Sonestedt, Emily; Ericson, Ulrika; Schneede, Joern; van Guelpen, Bethany; Wark, Petra A.; Gallo, Valentina; Norat, Teresa; Riboli, Elio; Vollset, Stein Emil

    2013-01-01

    Different lifestyle patterns across Europe may influence plasma concentrations of B-vitamins and one-carbon metabolites and their relation to chronic disease. Comparison of published data on one-carbon metabolites in Western European regions is difficult due to differences in sampling procedures and

  8. Vitamin B12: advances and insights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obeid, Rima

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) constitutes an amazing area of research with many hidden facets. Key milestones in this area have been developed over 10 decades. This long process of trials and errors, and search and discoveries has radically changed our understanding for the role of this nutrient...... in health and diseases. The impact of vitamin B12 on human health has been shifted from ‘treatment’ of a deadly condition to ‘prevention’ of diseases. The importance of B12 has now taken global dimensions on a population level given the high prevalence of subclinical B12 deficiency that affects many...... individuals in critical life phases. This book has been written by experts who documented latest developments in the field. It is written for individuals looking for in depth knowledge of the nutritional, chemistry, biochemistry, health and medical relevance of the vitamin. The book provides insights...

  9. Vitamin and Mineral Support in Children from Kharkiv Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Frolova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The mineral imbalance and hypovitaminosis significantly affect the level of a child’s health. The objective of the study: the analysis of vitamin and mineral supplementation of schoolchildren. 230 children aged 7 to 17 years underwent comprehensive examination with involvement of different specialty experts. Determination of vitamin content in the blood serum was conducted taking into account the analysis of actual nutrition by high performance liquid chromatography on Varian apparatus. The levels of macro- and microelements in the hair of children were evaluated by characteristic X-ray method on X-ray spectrometer X-Lab 2000. Analysis of the findings showed that nutrition of schoolchildren has 30–40 % energy deficit, which is associated with protein deficiency and excessive intake of carbohydrates (over 20 % due to simple sugars. The nutrition of all examined pupils had a significant deficiency of vitamins A, B, E, D, and vitamin C. The study of the content of vitamins in the blood serum showed that all children had a deficiency of at least one of the major vitamins, and 73.8 % of children had multivitamins deficiency. It was found that 78.8 % of children had mineral disturbances and imbalance in the ratio of major essential elements. It is established that 66.7 % of children with hypovitaminosis and mineral imbalance in the past medical history had a long period of recovery after acute diseases, and 23.1 % of children had various complications of these diseases.

  10. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to fats and “function of the cell membrane” (ID 622, 2900, 2911) and normal absorption of fat-soluble vitamins (ID 670, 2902) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to provide a scientific opinion on a list of health claims pursuant to Article 13 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006. This opinion addresses the scientific substantiation of health...... claims in relation to fats and “function of the cell membrane” and normal absorption of fat-soluble vitamins. The scientific substantiation is based on the information provided by the Member States in the consolidated list of Article 13 health claims and references that EFSA has received from Member...... States or directly from stakeholders. The food constituent that is the subject of the health claims is fats. The Panel considers that fats are sufficiently characterised in relation to the claimed effects....

  11. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to flaxseed oil and vitamin E and maintenance of the skin permeability barrier function pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following an application from Nutrilinks Sarl, submitted pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of Belgium, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health claim....... The applicant identified two published human intervention studies as being pertinent to the health claim. Owing to the very limited information provided regarding key methodological aspects, and to the important limitations of the statistical analysis performed, the Panel considers that no conclusions can...... be drawn from these studies for the scientific substantiation of the claim. The Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has not been established between the consumption of a combination of flaxseed oil and vitamin E and maintenance of the skin permeability barrier function...

  12. 北京市亚北地区0~6岁儿童维生素D营养状况调查分析%Investigation and analysis on nutritional status of vitamin D in children aged 0 ~ 6years old in northern Asia area in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王学梅; 郭素梅; 杨薇; 王秋月; 蔡菊英; 张秋生

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To understand the nutritional status of vitamin D in children aged 0 ~ 6 years old in northern Asia area in Beijing, provide a basis for the prevention and treatment of rickets.Methods: 210 children aged 0 ~ 6 years old with suspected medical history of vitamin D deficiency and any non - specific neuropsychiatric symptoms in northern Asia area in Beijing were surveyed by a questionnaire about rickets related factors, and all of the children received physical examination, electrochemical luminescence analyzer (competition method) was used to detect the serum level of 25 -(OH) D3, then the results were analyzed statistically.Results: The average serum level of 25 - (OH) D3 in the children aged 0 ~ 6 years old in northern Asia area in Beijing was (25.463 ± 7.772) ng · ml- 1.There was significant difference in serum level of 25 - (OH) D3 among different age groups ( P < 0.01 ), but there was no significant difference between boys and girls ( P > 0.05 ).The incidence of vitamin D deficiency was 24.8%.The incidences of vitamin D deficiency in neonates, early infants and preschool children were high.Conclusion: The nutritional status of vitamin D in children aged 0 ~ 6 years old in northern Asia area in Beijing is inferior to that in South Asia area, the supplement of vitamin D in pregnant women, early infants and preschool children should be strengthened.%目的:了解北京市亚北地区0~6岁儿童维生素D营养状况,为佝偻病防治提供依据.方法:对北京市亚北地区0~6岁210例有可疑VitD摄入不足病史和佝偻病的任何一个非特异性神经精神症状的儿童进行佝偻病相关因素问卷调查、体格检查,采用电化学发光分析仪(竞争法)检测血清25-(0H)D3水平,对结果进行统计学分析.结果:北京市亚北地区0~6岁儿童血清25-(OH)D3平均水平(25.463±7.772)ag/ml,不同年龄段血清25-(OH)D3值差异有统计学意义(P<0.01),性别之间无统计学意义(P>0.05).

  13. Compendium of dietary sources of vitamin A in the Thar desert

    OpenAIRE

    Desai Sanjiv; Desai Rajiv; Desai Navin

    1992-01-01

    The undisputed long term solution to prevent nutritional blindness lies in changing the dietary habits of a given population through nutritional education, nutritional supplementation, and nutritional rehabilitation. Before such strategies can be successfully implemented, it becomes necessary to study the existing dietary pattern of the population and to identify locally grown foods rich in vitamin A. Seventy eight rural women were interviewed to determine the common dietary items in western ...

  14. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, biotin, vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12 and folate). AAFP cites two categories of vitamins. ... magnesium, and vitamin E (for children and adolescents) vitamin B-12, iron, folic acid, and vitamins E and D ( ...

  15. Vitamin D levels in children with familial Mediterranean fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onur, Hatice; Aral, Hale; Arica, Vefik; Bercem, Gamze Atalay; Kasapcopur, Ozgur

    2016-04-27

    This study aimed to determine whether vitamin D deficiency is more common in children with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) than in healthy individuals. The study group consisted of 100 patients diagnosed with FMF and 50 healthy children. Serum baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and other related parameters were evaluated. The mean (standard deviation [SD]) vitamin D levels in patients with FMF and healthy controls were 24.78 (8.35) and 28.70 (11.70) ng/mL, respectively. Patients with FMF had significantly decreased vitamin D levels compared with those in healthy controls (P = 0.039). Vitamin D levels were similar in patients with FMF with different MEFV mutations (P = 0.633). Age was significantly correlated with vitamin D levels (r = -0.235, P = 0.019). In addition, a negative correlation between parathyroid hormone and vitamin D levels was detected (rs = -0.382, P < 0.0001). This study demonstrated that vitamin D levels are lower in children with FMF than in healthy controls. We speculate that vitamin D levels should be carefully examined, and nutritional supplementation may be required in patients with FMF. Further studies with larger patient populations are needed to confirm the frequency of vitamin D deficiency in patients with FMF.

  16. Molecular Basis for Vitamin A Uptake and Storage in Vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelstowska, Sylwia; Widjaja-Adhi, Made Airanthi K; Silvaroli, Josie A; Golczak, Marcin

    2016-10-26

    The ability to store and distribute vitamin A inside the body is the main evolutionary adaptation that allows vertebrates to maintain retinoid functions during nutritional deficiencies and to acquire new metabolic pathways enabling light-independent production of 11-cis retinoids. These processes greatly depend on enzymes that esterify vitamin A as well as associated retinoid binding proteins. Although the significance of retinyl esters for vitamin A homeostasis is well established, until recently, the molecular basis for the retinol esterification enzymatic activity was unknown. In this review, we will look at retinoid absorption through the prism of current biochemical and structural studies on vitamin A esterifying enzymes. We describe molecular adaptations that enable retinoid storage and delineate mechanisms in which mutations found in selective proteins might influence vitamin A homeostasis in affected patients.

  17. Molecular Basis for Vitamin A Uptake and Storage in Vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelstowska, Sylwia; Widjaja-Adhi, Made Airanthi K.; Silvaroli, Josie A.; Golczak, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The ability to store and distribute vitamin A inside the body is the main evolutionary adaptation that allows vertebrates to maintain retinoid functions during nutritional deficiencies and to acquire new metabolic pathways enabling light-independent production of 11-cis retinoids. These processes greatly depend on enzymes that esterify vitamin A as well as associated retinoid binding proteins. Although the significance of retinyl esters for vitamin A homeostasis is well established, until recently, the molecular basis for the retinol esterification enzymatic activity was unknown. In this review, we will look at retinoid absorption through the prism of current biochemical and structural studies on vitamin A esterifying enzymes. We describe molecular adaptations that enable retinoid storage and delineate mechanisms in which mutations found in selective proteins might influence vitamin A homeostasis in affected patients. PMID:27792183

  18. Vitamin D Signaling in Myogenesis: Potential for Treatment of Sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Wagatsuma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle mass and strength progressively decrease with age, which results in a condition known as sarcopenia. Sarcopenia would lead to physical disability, poor quality of life, and death. Therefore, much is expected of an effective intervention for sarcopenia. Epidemiologic, clinical, and laboratory evidence suggest an effect of vitamin D on muscle function. However, the precise molecular and cellular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Recent studies suggest that vitamin D receptor (VDR might be expressed in muscle fibers and vitamin D signaling via VDR plays a role in the regulation of myoblast proliferation and differentiation. Understanding how vitamin D signaling contributes to myogenesis will provide a valuable insight into an effective nutritional strategy to moderate sarcopenia. Here we will summarize the current knowledge about the effect of vitamin D on skeletal muscle and myogenic cells and discuss the potential for treatment of sarcopenia.

  19. Ionizing radiation effects on food vitamins: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionisio, Ana Paula, E-mail: annadionisio@yahoo.com.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia de Alimentos. Dept. de Ciencia de Alimentos; Gomes, Renata Takassugui; Oetterer, Marilia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz. Dept. de Agroindustria, Alimentos e Nutricao

    2009-09-15

    Ionizing radiation has been widely used in industrial processes, especially in the sterilization of medicines, pharmaceuticals, cosmetic products, and in food processing. Similar to other techniques of food processing, irradiation can induce certain alterations that can modify both the chemical composition and the nutritional value of foods. These changes depend on the food composition, the irradiation dose and factors such as temperature and presence or absence of oxygen in the irradiating environment. The sensitivity of vitamins to radiation is unpredictable and food vitamin losses during the irradiation are often substantial. The aim of this study was to discuss retention or loss of vitamins in several food products submitted to an irradiation process. (author)

  20. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to fat-free yogurts and fermented milks complying with the specifications ?fat free?, ?low in sugars?, ?high protein?, ?source of calcium? and ?source of vitamin D? for nutrition claims and reduction of body and visceral fat while maintaining lean body mass in the context of an energy-restricted diet pursuant to Article 13.5 of Regulation (EC No 1924/2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Following an application from Federación Nacional de Industrias Lácteas (FeNIL, submitted pursuant to Article 13.5 of Regulation (EC No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of Spain, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health claim related to fat-free yogurts and fermented milks complying with the specifications “fat free”, “low in sugars”, “high protein”, “source of calcium” and “source of vitamin D” for nutrition claims and reduction of body and visceral fat while maintaining lean body mass in the context of an energy-restricted diet. The food that is the subject of the claim is fat-free yogurts and fermented milks complying with the specifications “fat free”, “low in sugars”, “high protein”, “source of calcium” and “source of vitamin D” for nutrition claims. The Panel considers that fat-free yogurts and fermented milks complying with the specifications “fat free”, “low in sugars”, “high protein”, “source of calcium” and “source of vitamin D” for nutrition claims are sufficiently characterised. The Panel considers that reduction of body and visceral fat mass while maintaining lean body mass in the context of an energy-restricted diet is a beneficial physiological effect. No human intervention studies from which conclusions could be drawn for the scientific substantiation of the claim were provided. The Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has not been established between the consumption of fat-free yogurts and fermented milks complying with the specifications “fat free”, “low in sugars”, “high protein”, “source of calcium” and “source of vitamin D” for nutrition claims and reduction of body and visceral fat mass while maintaining lean body mass in the context of an energy-restricted diet.

  1. Breastfeeding: Vitamin D Supplementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Vitamin D Supplementation Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... not provide infants with an adequate intake of vitamin D. Most breastfed infants are able to synthesize ...

  2. Vitamin D Pooling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers brought together investigators from 10 cohorts to conduct a large prospective epidemiologic study of the association between vitamin D status and seven rarer cancers.

  3. Vitamin B1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prize Alfred Nobel's Life and Work Teachers' Questionnaire Vitamin B1 - About The Chicken Farm educational game and ... the game window. Reading: "Christian Eijkman, Beriberi and Vitamin B1" - Who was Eijkman and why did he ...

  4. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are unique to specific vitamin deficiencies. Folate-deficiency anemia risk factors include: Undergoing hemodialysis for kidney failure. ... the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most ...

  5. Vitamin B1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prize Alfred Nobel's Life and Work Teachers' Questionnaire Vitamin B1 - About The Chicken Farm educational game and ... the game window. Reading: "Christian Eijkman, Beriberi and Vitamin B1" - Who was Eijkman and why did he ...

  6. Vitamin and Mineral Deficiencies Are Highly Prevalent in Newly Diagnosed Celiac Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ad A. van Bodegraven

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Malabsorption, weight loss and vitamin/mineral-deficiencies characterize classical celiac disease (CD. This study aimed to assess the nutritional and vitamin/mineral status of current “early diagnosed” untreated adult CD-patients in the Netherlands. Newly diagnosed adult CD-patients were included (n = 80, 42.8 ± 15.1 years and a comparable sample of 24 healthy Dutch subjects was added to compare vitamin concentrations. Nutritional status and serum concentrations of folic acid, vitamin A, B6, B12, and (25-hydroxy D, zinc, haemoglobin (Hb and ferritin were determined (before prescribing gluten free diet. Almost all CD-patients (87% had at least one value below the lower limit of reference. Specifically, for vitamin A, 7.5% of patients showed deficient levels, for vitamin B6 14.5%, folic acid 20%, and vitamin B12 19%. Likewise, zinc deficiency was observed in 67% of the CD-patients, 46% had decreased iron storage, and 32% had anaemia. Overall, 17% were malnourished (>10% undesired weight loss, 22% of the women were underweight (Body Mass Index (BMI 25. Vitamin deficiencies were barely seen in healthy controls, with the exception of vitamin B12. Vitamin/mineral deficiencies were counter-intuitively not associated with a (higher grade of histological intestinal damage or (impaired nutritional status. In conclusion, vitamin/mineral deficiencies are still common in newly “early diagnosed” CD-patients, even though the prevalence of obesity at initial diagnosis is rising. Extensive nutritional assessments seem warranted to guide nutritional advices and follow-up in CD treatment.

  7. Priority nutrition messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The Philippine Food and Nutrition Program deliver priority short, simple, clear, and action filled nutrition messages in different languages and dialects to different audiences. Its 1st priority task is to promote breast feeding. It informs mothers that breast milk is the most nutritious food for infants and that it protects them from infectious diseases. The program also encourages breast feeding as long as possible. If mothers cannot breast feed, they should talk to an infant nutrition expert to help them choose the best formula and learn about proper preparation. A 4-6 month infant needs to begin eating small amounts of semisolid nutritious foods. Moreover these foods must include body building foods, such as meat and eggs, and energy providing foods, such as corn and rice. Mothers must 1st attend to food needs of infants and preschoolers since they are more likely to suffer malnutrition than older children and adults. This is especially important when they suffer from an infection. Specifically, the very young need a variety of foods each day including the vitamin and mineral rich vegetables and fruits. In fact, families should grow their own fruits and vegetables to ensure an adequate supply. Hands must be cleaned with soap and water after defecation and before preparing foods. Mothers should add fats and oils when preparing foods because they provide concentrated energy, fatty acids, and fat soluble vitamins. Pregnant mothers must consume increased amounts of fish, beans, and other body building foods as well as regulating foods (vegetables and fruits). Mothers must also space births. They should weigh children each month to monitor nutritional levels. Moreover they must pay attention to signs indicating inadequate and insufficient food intake e.g., underweight and night blindness.

  8. Nutritional supplementation for Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Thomas B; Remington, Ruth

    2015-03-01

    Evidence for the benefit of nutrition in Alzheimer's disease continues to accumulate. Many studies with individual vitamins or supplements show marginal, if any, benefit. However, new findings with combinatorial formulations demonstrate improvement in cognitive performance and behavioral difficulties that accompany Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we review some of the most recent clinical advances and summarize supportive preclinical studies. We present novel positive effects on Alzheimer's disease derived from diet, trace elements, vitamins and supplements. We discuss the inherent difficulty in conducting nutritional studies because of the variance in participants' nutritional history, versus pharmacological interventions in which participants are naive to the intervention. We examine the evidence that epigenetics play a role in Alzheimer's disease and how nutritional intervention can modify the key epigenetic events to maintain or improve cognitive performance. Overall consideration of the most recent collective evidence suggests that the optimal approach for Alzheimer's disease would seem to combine early, multicomponent nutritional approaches (a Mediterranean-style diet, multivitamins and key combinatorial supplements), along with lifestyle modifications such as social activity and mental and physical exercise, with ultimate addition of pharmacological agents when warranted.

  9. The nutritional status in adolescent Spanish cyclists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Julián-Almárcegui

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adolescence is an important period of nutritional vulnerability due to the increased dietary requirements. Objective: To describe the nutritional status of adolescent cyclist and a group of normoactive controls. Methods: The HELENA Dietary Assessment Tool was used to evaluate the nutritional intake of 20 adolescent cyclists and 17 controls. Total energy intake, resting energy expenditure (REE, total energy expenditure (TEE, macronutrients and several micronutrients were registered and compared with dietary guidelines. Results: REE was lower and TEE higher in cyclists than in controls (both P < 0.01. Significant differences were observed in phosphorus and vitamin B1 being higher in cyclists (P < 0.05. Most participants, both cyclist and controls, did not reach the diet requirements for macronutrients, vitamins and minerals. Conclusion: Nutritional status of adolescent cyclists and controls seems not to fulfil the requirements in quantity and quality. Possible implications for actual and future health especially in athlete adolescents need further research.

  10. Effect of Homocysteine ,Vitamin B12 , Folic acid during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita Patel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin B12, folic acid and homocysteine are metabolically closely related. At the same time homocysteine is found to be offending factor for vascular pathology causing preeclampsia. On the other hand periconceptional nutritional status influences the vitamin B12 & folic acid level. Which further affect the homocysteine level thus may affect pregnancy outcome. Various contributory factors lead these vitamin deficiencies, maternal nutrition is one of them. Ahmedabad being a predominantly vegetarian city, its population is at higher risk of vitamin B12 deficiency. But no systematic study has been done in Ahmedabad to know whether B12, folic acid and homocysteine levels influence pregnancy. To know this answer this study was planned to know total homocysteine level and its correlation in preeclampsia and normotensive pregnant women.Vitamin B12, folic acid and homocysteine were measured in all the subjects using fluorescence polarized immunoassay in AxSym Immunochemistry analyzer on 60 non vitamin supplemented vegetarian women. Vitamin levels were within lower normal limit. Homocysteine level was higher among preeclampsia patient. From the findings of the present study it can be concluded that measurement of these biochemical parameter in ante natal care are useful for further management and prevention of complication of pregnancy like preeclampsia

  11. Vitamins, Are They Safe?

    OpenAIRE

    Hadi Hamishehkar; Farhad Ranjdoost; Parina Asgharian; Ata Mahmoodpoor; Sarvin Sanaie

    2016-01-01

    The consumption of a daily multivitamin among people all over the world is dramatically increasing in recent years. Most of the people believe that if vitamins are not effective, at least they are safe. However, the long term health consequences of vitamins consumption are unknown. This study aimed to assess the side effects and possible harmful and detrimental properties of vitamins and to discuss whether vitamins can be used as safe health products or dietary supplements. We performed a MED...

  12. Nutritional rickets: pathogenesis and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettifor, John M

    2013-06-01

    Nutritional rickets remains a public health concern in many areas of the world despite cheap and effective means of preventing the disease. The roles of vitamin D deficiency, low dietary calcium intakes and the interrelationships between the two in the pathogenesis of the disease are discussed. It is now recognized that vitamin D deficiency in the pregnant and lactating mother predisposes to the development of rickets in the breastfed infant, and that cultural and social factors are important in the pathogenesis of the disease during the adolescent growth spurt. Prevention of rickets is dependent on the awareness of the medical profession and the general public of the need to ensure adequate intakes of vitamin D in at-risk populations, and of the importance of increasing dietary intakes of calcium using locally available and inexpensive foods in communities in which dietary calcium deficiency rickets is prevalent.

  13. Role of calcium and vitamin D in the treatment of muscle pain

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Raymond CR

    1985-01-01

    Calcium and vitamin D deficiencies are associated with abnormal muscular functions including non-specific pain and weakness. A diet survey of a patient complaining of back pain showed a low calcium intake. Clinically patients may have low utilization of dietary calcium. In addition to the normal chiropractic treatments, the patient was given calcium and vitamin D supplements. These supplements greatly improved the recovery of the patient. The nutritional status of calcium and vitamin D in the...

  14. Plausible ergogenic effects of vitamin D on athletic performance and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlquist, Dylan T; Dieter, Brad P; Koehle, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine vitamin D in the context of sport nutrition and its potential role in optimizing athletic performance. Vitamin D receptors (VDR) and vitamin D response elements (VDREs) are located in almost every tissue within the human body including skeletal muscle. The hormonally-active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, has been shown to play critical roles in the human body and regulates over 900 gene variants. Based on the literature presented, it is plausible that vitamin D levels above the normal reference range (up to 100 nmol/L) might increase skeletal muscle function, decrease recovery time from training, increase both force and power production, and increase testosterone production, each of which could potentiate athletic performance. Therefore, maintaining higher levels of vitamin D could prove beneficial for athletic performance. Despite this situation, large portions of athletic populations are vitamin D deficient. Currently, the research is inconclusive with regards to the optimal intake of vitamin D, the specific forms of vitamin D one should ingest, and the distinct nutrient-nutrient interactions of vitamin D with vitamin K that affect arterial calcification and hypervitaminosis. Furthermore, it is possible that dosages exceeding the recommendations for vitamin D (i.e. dosages up to 4000-5000 IU/day), in combination with 50 to 1000 mcg/day of vitamin K1 and K2 could aid athletic performance. This review will investigate these topics, and specifically their relevance to athletic performance.

  15. Facts about Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gorse/iStock/Thinkstock.com Food Eggs, sardines, and salmon contain vitamin D. Most fluid milk and some brands of ... 2. Typical Vitamin D Content in Food Food Vitamin D in IU (mcg) Salmon, cooked, 3 oz. 320 (8) Sardines, canned in ...

  16. Vitamin D and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolden-Kirk, Heidi; Overbergh, Lut; Christesen, Henrik Thybo

    2011-01-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that vitamin D may play a role in the defense against type 1 diabetes (T1D) as well as type 2 diabetes (T2D). Epidemiological data have established a link between vitamin D deficiency and an increased incidence of both T1D and T2D, whereas early and long-term vitamin...

  17. The effect of dietary intake of vitamin B6 on sleep quality and insomnia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, L.; Fernstrand, A.M.; Garssen, J.; Verster, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: There is increased notion that daily diet has an important impact on health and disease. In this context, the relationship between nutrition and sleep is gaining increased research interest, particularly focusing on tryptophan, niacin and Vitamin B6. Vitamin B6 has an important role in the

  18. Vitamin D Status and Optimal Supplementation in Institutionalized Adults with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpinen-Loisa, P.; Arvio, M.; Ilvesmaki, V.; Makitie, O.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Adults with intellectual disability (ID) have several risk factors for osteoporosis. Feeding problems with consequent nutritive deficiencies, and lack of sunshine exposure may lead to vitamin D deficiency. The purpose of this study was to evaluate vitamin D status in adults with ID living in nursing homes and to compare two different…

  19. Concepts and controversies in estimating vitamin K status in population based studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    A better understanding of vitamin K's role in health and disease requires the assessment of vitamin K nutritional status in population and clinical studies. This is primarily accomplished using dietary questionnaires and/or biomarkers. Because food composition databases in the U.S. are most complete...

  20. Biomarkers of folate and vitamin B12 and breast cancer risk : Report from the EPIC cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matejcic, M.; de Batlle, J.; Ricci, C.; Biessy, C.; Perrier, F.; Huybrechts, I.; Weiderpass, E.; Boutron-Ruault, M. C.; Cadeau, C.; His, M.; Cox, D. G.; Boeing, H.; Fortner, R. T.; Kaaks, R.; Lagiou, P.; Trichopoulou, A.; Benetou, V.; Tumino, R.; Panico, S.; Sieri, S.; Palli, D.; Ricceri, F.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Skeie, G.; Amiano, P.; Sánchez, M. J.; Chirlaque, M. D.; Barricarte, A.; Quirós, J. R.; Buckland, G.; van Gils, C. H.; Peeters, P. H.; Key, T. J.; Riboli, E.; Gylling, B.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A.; Gunter, M. J.; Romieu, I.; Chajès, V.

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported inconsistent findings for the association between B vitamins and breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated the relationship between biomarkers of folate and vitamin B12 and the risk of BC in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)

  1. Vitamin D Status and Optimal Supplementation in Institutionalized Adults with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpinen-Loisa, P.; Arvio, M.; Ilvesmaki, V.; Makitie, O.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Adults with intellectual disability (ID) have several risk factors for osteoporosis. Feeding problems with consequent nutritive deficiencies, and lack of sunshine exposure may lead to vitamin D deficiency. The purpose of this study was to evaluate vitamin D status in adults with ID living in nursing homes and to compare two different…

  2. Concentrações de vitamina A no leite humano e características socioeconômicas e nutricionais maternas: resultados de estudos brasileiros Vitamin A in human milk and socioeconomic and maternal nutritional factors: some results of Brazilian studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julicristie Machado de Oliveira

    2009-03-01

    study outcomes described average vitamin A concentrations in human milk ranging from 0.62 to 4.50 µmol/L. CONCLUSIONS: there was no consensus as to the relationship between the vitamin A content of human milk and a diet with a suitable vitamin A content, maternal nutritional status, maternal obstetric and demographical characteristics and duration of pregnancy. The review indicates that future studies should use casual samples of mature milk, and use high performance liquid chromatography - HPLC - as the laboratory technique in order to quantify vitamin A.

  3. Probiotic Meat Products and Nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Sena Özbay Doğu; Cemalettin Sarıçoban

    2015-01-01

    Meat and meat products are the basic building blocks of nutrition and are recognized as good sources of high biological value proteins, group B vitamins, minerals as well as some other bioactive compounds. The trend today is the development of novel food for special health use, called functional food, to promote human health and well-being of consumers. The trends are based on either reducing the content of unhealthy substances (like salt) or improving the content of substances with healthy b...

  4. Nutritional rickets around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Ann

    2013-07-01

    Nutritional rickets is a major public health problem in many countries of the world. The disease is characterized by deformities of the long bones, enlargement of the wrists and costochondral junctions, hypotonia and, in infants, craniotabes and delayed fontanelle closure. Predominantly caused by severe vitamin D deficiency, rickets can also be associated with hypocalcemic seizures and cardiac failure. First presentation is typically at 6-24 months of age, although hypocalcemia may be evident in younger infants. In many affluent industrialized countries, the prevalence of rickets in the general population diminished after the introduction of clean-air legislation and dietary supplementation. However, in such countries, vitamin-D deficiency rickets has re-emerged in recent years, particularly among groups with limited exposure to UVB-containing sunshine. Infants at risk of rickets tend to be those whose mothers had poor vitamin D status during pregnancy and those exclusively breast-fed for a prolonged period with little skin exposure to UVB. In other countries of the world, the prevalence of rickets can be high, even in regions with abundant year-round UVB-containing sunshine. In general, this is also due to vitamin D deficiency related to limited sun exposure. However, reports from Africa and Asia suggest that there may be other etiological factors involved. Studies in South Africa, Nigeria, The Gambia and Bangladesh have identified rickets in children, typically 3-5 years old at first presentation, in whom plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations are higher than those characteristic of primary vitamin D deficiency. Calcium deficiency has been implicated, and in some, but not all, disturbances of phosphate metabolism, renal compromise and iron deficiency may also be involved. Continuing studies of the etiology of nutritional rickets will provide evidence to underpin guidelines for the prevention and treatment of rickets world-wide. This article is part of a

  5. Nutrition and Allergic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.J.J. van Neerven

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of IgE-mediated allergic diseases is influenced by many factors, including genetic and environmental factors such as pollution and farming, but also by nutrition. In the last decade, substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the impact that nutrition can have on allergic diseases. Many studies have addressed the effect of breastfeeding, pre-, pro- and synbiotics, vitamins and minerals, fiber, fruit and vegetables, cow’s milk, and n-3 fatty acids, on the development of allergies. In addition, nutrition can also have indirect effects on allergic sensitization. This includes the diet of pregnant and breastfeeding women, which influences intrauterine development, as well as breastmilk composition. These include the diet of pregnant and breastfeeding women that influences intrauterine development as well as breastmilk composition, effects of food processing that may enhance allergenicity of foods, and effects via modulation of the intestinal microbiota and their metabolites. This editorial review provides a brief overview of recent developments related to nutrition and the development and management of allergic diseases.

  6. Nutritional status and physical fitness of elderly sportsmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatard, J C; Boutet, C; Tourny, C; Garcia, S; Berthouze, S; Guézennec, C Y

    1998-01-01

    The nutritional status of elderly sportsmen has not been reported on, neither has the nutritional balance nor the precise relationship between nutritional status and physical fitness been detailed for this population. Thus, group of 18 sportsmen [age 63 (SD 4.5) years] was monitored by weighing their food during a 6-day period. Macro nutrient, mineral and vitamin content was derived from tables. Daily energy expenditure (DEE) and sport activity (DSA) were quantified over a 7-day period using a questionnaire. Physical fitness was assessed by maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) measurements. The DEE was 11429 (SD 1890) kJ x day(-1). The DSA corresponded to 38% of DEE and VO2max to 35.9 (SD 6.1) ml x min(-1) x kg(-1). When compared with French recommended dietary allowances (RDA) intakes were higher for energy (+ 24%), macro nutrients, and most minerals and vitamins. Despite high energy intakes, some subjects had mineral and vitamin deficits. Energy intakes were significantly related to intakes of magnesium, phosphorus, iron, vitamins B2, B6, C and to VO2max, but not to age. Stepwise regressions indicated that vitamin C intake was the only determinant to have a relationship with VO2max. Thus, most elderly sportsmen had higher nutritional status than RDA, although some had mineral and vitamin deficits. It is therefore suggested that elderly sportsmen should be encouraged to consume food with higher mineral and vitamin contents.

  7. Effects of vitamin A supplementation on nutritional status of iron in healthy adults%补充维生素A对健康成人铁营养状况的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李祖文; 范萍; 邓广博; 杜珍; 邵泽伟; 汪之顼

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of vitamin A (VA) supplementation on the nutritional status of iron in healthy adults. Methods One hundred and Fifteen healthy adults were recruited and divided randomly into four groups, with 28 or 29 adults in each group. VA supplements with different doses of retinyl acetate in capsules were given for 4-month. The equivalent doses of supplemented retinyl acetate were 600(μg/d, 400μg/d, 200μg/d and 0μg/d (control) of retinol, respectively. The capsules were administered orally by double blind method. During the experiment, the subjects kept their usual dietary pattern but avoided high VA or pre-VA carotenoids foods from their diets. A 24-h dietary recall was carried out monthly on every subject. Before and after the intervention, the fast blood samples were collected from each subject, and were determined for hemoglobin concentration, levels of serum retinol, iron, ferrtin and tratisferrtin receptor. Results Total 108 subjects finished the experiment, with 27, 28, 27 and 26 persons left in group A, B, C and D, respectively. The subjects from each group had similar dietary intakes of energy nutrients, VA and iron ( both were P > 0. 05 ) during the experimental period. The serum retinol concentration of subjects from group A increased from 1. 63 ±0. 55μmol/L of baseline to 1. 93 ±0. 52 μmol/L at the end of the experiment ( P 0. 05 ). There was no significant difference on Hb concentration before and after the experiment as well as between groups ( all were P > 0. 05). In subjects of group A, serum iron concentration increased (P < 0. 05 ) and serum ferrtin and transferrtin receptor concentration decreased significantly ( both were P <0. 05) after VA supplement intervention. No such changes were observed in group B and C ( P < 0. 05 ) . Conclusion It seems that the intervention of VA supplement with relative high dose of retinol at dietary level could enhance the iron status further in no-anemic healthy adults even without

  8. Radiolysis of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B 12)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanchi, X.; Albarran, G.; Negron-Mendoza, A.

    2000-03-01

    Research on the radiolysis of vitamins is of considerable interest since these compounds are important nutritional constituents in foods and in dietetic supplements. In spite of these considerations there are few data and very often difficult to compare for the radiolytic behavior of vitamins. In this work we focused our attention on to the study of the radiolysis of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B 12) in solid state and in aqueous solutions. The procedure was followed by HPLC and UV-spectroscopy. The results obtained in aqueous solutions showed a dependence of the decomposition as a linear function of the dose. The G of decomposition for a 1×10 -5 M solution was 3.3. In the solid state the vitamin was very stable towards the irradiation in the conditions used in this study with a G=2.1×10 -3. A study made with Serratia marcescens as a microbiological contaminant showed that at the sterilization dose there is a destruction of the vitamin in aqueous solution. In the solid state the degree of decomposition was 7%.

  9. Nutrition and osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, E M; Woo, J

    1998-07-01

    Nutritional factors have a significant influence on the cause of osteoporosis. Calcium supplementation may be particularly effective in populations with a low calcium diet. Supplementations of 500 mg/d may produce about 4% gain in skeletal calcium in adolescents. Supplementations of 800 mg/d may prevent bone loss in postmenopausal women. The results of clinical trials also suggested that such supplementation may prevent hip and vertebral fractures in the elderly. The largest effect of calcium supplementation occurs in the first year of treatment, whereas sustained effects are not proven. Vitamin D supplementation may be particularly useful in vitamin D-deficient elderly. In this group, hip fractures may be prevented by vitamin D administration. Urinary sodium excretion is correlated with urinary calcium excretion in humans, and a direct effect of high sodium intake on loss at the hip has been demonstrated. Observational epidemiologic studies suggested a negative effect of a high protein intake on bone density, although there are no results from clinical trials to support this view. Dietary fiber, phytate, oxalate, and caffeine intake may have a small negative effect on calcium absorption.

  10. Epidemiology of nutritional rickets in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Atawi M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In most developing countries, nutritional rickets is a major health problem. The aim of this study was to explore the magnitude of nutritional rickets among Saudi infants, and the various clinical presentations, as well as to address the possible operating risk factors behind the disease. We carried out a retrospective study at King Abdulaziz Medical City-King Fahad National Guard Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The records of Saudi infants under the age of 14 months over a 10-year period (between January 1990 and January 2000 were reviewed. Infor-mation collected included age, sex, clinical presentations, biochemical, radiological findings, infant nutrition, presence of other nutritional deficiencies and exposure to sunlight. There were 283 infants diagnosed with nutritional rickets due to Vitamin D deficiency (67% males who were between 6 and 14 months of age. Among the total, 70% were exclusively breast-fed, and 23% were breast-fed until the age of 1 year. The most frequent clinical presentation was hypo-calcemic convulsions (34% followed by chest infections (33% and gastroenteritis (25%. In conclusion, nutritional rickets is still prevalent in Saudi Arabia with the primary etiology being vitamin D deficiency. Therefore we recommend that every infant, who is exclusively on breast-feeding, has routine supplement of vitamin D in the range of 200 IU/day (alone or as apart of multivitamin, started soon after birth until the time of weaning.

  11. 维生素D和钙剂治疗营养性佝偻病疗效的Meta分析%Meta-analysis of the efficacy of combined therapy vitamin D with calcium in nutritional rickets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于静; 李卫国; 李宇宁; 姜莉; 陶仲宾; 李湘津; 赵福林; 谢婧

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of combined vitamin D with calcium and vitamin D or cal-cium alone in rickets of vitamin D deficiency by meta-analysis method. Methods Searches were made in Cochrance Library , Pubmed, Web of science, Scirus, CNKI, Chinese Biological Medical Literature Database, (CBM),Wangfang from the establishment of the data base till March 2013. All randomized controlled trials about combined with vitamin D and calcium in rickets of vitamin D deficiency were eligible. Serum 25-( OH) ritamin D,phosphate ,ALP,calcium,PTH,phosphate,albumin ,radiographic score were chosen as evaluation in-dex to evaluate the weighted mean diffreence ( WMD) and 95% confidence interval ( CI) for continuous data. RevMan 5. 0. 2 software was used to make meta-analysis. Results 437 literatures were reviewed. Three eligible trials were used for meta-analysis. Meta-analysis showed that:(1)the increase of Serum 25-(OH)vitamin D:Combined therapy group and vitamin D group (MD= -7. 88,95%CI:-12. 24~ -3. 52);Combined therapy group and calcium group (MD= -18. 32,95%CI:-22. 61~ -14. 04). (2)the increase of serum phosphate:Combined therapy group and vitamin D group ( MD= -0. 64 ( 95%CI:-0. 86 ~ -0. 42 );Combined therapy group and calcium group MD= -0. 16 ( 95%CI:-0. 84 ~0. 51 ) . ( 3 ) the decrease of Serum ALP:Combined therapy group and vitamin D group (MD= 109. 99,95%CI:20. 40 ~199. 58);Combined therapy group and calcium group (MD=59. 89,95%CI:10. 09~109. 59 ). (4)the increase of serum calcium :Combined therapy group and vitamin D group (MD= -0. 71,95%CI:-0. 91,-0. 52);the decrease of Radiographic score:Com-bined therapy group and vitamin D group( MD=0. 68,95%CI:0. 42~ 0. 95). Except that the increase of serum phosphate between combined therapy group and calcium group had no significant difference,the rest had signifi-cant difference. Conclusion The long term efficacy in combined therapy group is much effective than vitamin D group or calcium group.%目的:采用Meta分析对

  12. Vitamin C and Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harri Hemilä

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the early literature, vitamin C deficiency was associated with pneumonia. After its identification, a number of studies investigated the effects of vitamin C on diverse infections. A total of 148 animal studies indicated that vitamin C may alleviate or prevent infections caused by bacteria, viruses, and protozoa. The most extensively studied human infection is the common cold. Vitamin C administration does not decrease the average incidence of colds in the general population, yet it halved the number of colds in physically active people. Regularly administered vitamin C has shortened the duration of colds, indicating a biological effect. However, the role of vitamin C in common cold treatment is unclear. Two controlled trials found a statistically significant dose–response, for the duration of common cold symptoms, with up to 6–8 g/day of vitamin C. Thus, the negative findings of some therapeutic common cold studies might be explained by the low doses of 3–4 g/day of vitamin C. Three controlled trials found that vitamin C prevented pneumonia. Two controlled trials found a treatment benefit of vitamin C for pneumonia patients. One controlled trial reported treatment benefits for tetanus patients. The effects of vitamin C against infections should be investigated further.

  13. Vitamin K and thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merli, Geno J; Fink, James

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin K was discovered in the 1930s during cholesterol metabolism experiments in chickens. It is a fat-soluble vitamin which occurs naturally in plants as phylloquinone (vitamin K1) and is produced by gram-negative bacteria in the human gastrointestinal tract as menaquinone (vitamin K2). This vitamin was found to be essential for normal functioning of hemostasis. In addition, a number of clinical conditions in which vitamin K deficiency was found to be the underlying pathophysiologic problem were discovered. These conditions include hemorrhagic disease of the newborn, obstructive jaundice, and malabsorption syndromes. The importance of this vitamin has become more apparent with the discovery of the anticoagulant warfarin which is a vitamin K antagonist. There are millions of patients on this therapy for a variety of thrombogenic conditions such as atrial fibrillation, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and prosthetic cardiac valves. The wide use of this narrow therapeutic index drug has resulted in significant risk for major bleeding. Vitamin K serves as one of the major reversing agent for patients over-anticoagulated with warfarin. In the past few years, research has focused on new areas of vitamin K metabolism, which include bone and endovascular metabolism; cell growth, regulation, migration, and proliferation; cell survival, apoptosis, phagocytosis, and adhesion. These new areas of research highlight the significance of vitamin K but raise new clinical questions for patients who must be maintained on long-term warfarin therapy.

  14. Nonclassical Vitamin D Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Zittermann

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly clear that vitamin D has a broad range of actions in the human body. Besides its well-known effects on calcium/phosphate homeostasis, vitamin D influences muscle function, cardiovascular homeostasis, nervous function, and the immune response. Vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency has been associated with muscle weakness and a high incidence of various chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 and 2 diabetes. Most importantly, low vitamin D status has been found to be an independent predictor of all-cause mortality. Several recent randomized controlled trials support the assumption that vitamin D can improve muscle strength, glucose homeostasis, and cardiovascular risk markers. In addition, vitamin D may reduce cancer incidence and elevated blood pressure. Since the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency is high throughout the world, there is a need to improve vitamin D status in the general adult population. However, the currently recommended daily vitamin D intake of 5–15 µg is too low to achieve an adequate vitamin D status in individuals with only modest skin synthesis. Thus, there is a need to recommend a vitamin D intake that is effective for achieving adequate circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations (>75 nmol/L.

  15. Recent Advances in Ruminant Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Rüştü Kutlu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most industrialized animal production branches of ruminant production successfully requires a blending of theoretical knowledge of nutritional principles with practical stockmanship, maintaining health and dealing with numbers. It is well known that high yielding, dairy cows, require balanced diet with adequate nutrients for yielding. This is not provided with only a few feedstuffs. Milk production in dairy cows is related to the improvements in genetic merit of farm animals and also developments in feed science, feed technology and animal nutrition. In particular, feeds and feed technology studies associated with sustainability, economical perspectives and product quality in the last decade have been in advance. In the present work, recent advances in feed sources and feed technology, minerals (macro and trace minerals , vitamins and amino acids, feed additives (antibiotics alternative growth stimulants, rumen modulator, organic acids, antioxidants, enzymes, plant extracts, nutrition-products (meat-milk-progeny quality and functional food production (milk, meat nutrition-reproduction, nutrition-animal health, nutrition-environmental temperature, nutrition-global warming were evaluated.

  16. [VITAMIN D AND PREGNANCY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitrova-Nikolova, St; Nikolov, A

    2015-01-01

    This arcicle reviews the role of vitimin D during pregnancy. Adequate intake of vitamin D during pregnancy is very important for the health of mother and infant. A number of epidemiological data worldwide show widespread suboptimal levels of vitamin D in pregnant women. Vitamin D deficiency may be associated with an increased risk of infection, bacterial vaginosis, pre-eclampsia, low serum vitamin D levels in the newborn and others. There are not universal recommendations for dosage and intake of vitamin D for pregnant women in the world. It is recommended that serum level of vitamin D in all pregnant women and its adequate supplementation. Normal maternal vitamin D levels would provide sufficient its accumulation in the fetus.

  17. The vitamin K controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huysman, M W; Sauer, P J

    1994-04-01

    Discussion about the efficacy and safety of vitamin K prophylaxis has recently restarted. In this review, new developments in diagnosis of vitamin K deficiency (including vitamin K plasma levels and protein induced by vitamin K absence [PIVKA]-II detection) and therapy of early, classic, and late hemorrhagic disease of the newborn are highlighted. Special attention is brought to the efficacy of preventing early and late hemorrhagic disease. The recently described association between intramuscular vitamin K administration and cancer is debated. The very high plasma levels, the intramuscular injection itself, or the adjuvants in the solution might all be responsible. These factors are all absent in oral administration. Therefore, we recommend repeated oral administration for preventing classic and late hemorrhagic disease of the newborn. Additionally, we recommend maternal supplementation of vitamin K for preventing early hemorrhagic disease of the newborn, especially when the mother is using medications that interfere with vitamin K metabolism.

  18. Nutritional Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutritional support is therapy for people who cannot get enough nourishment by eating or drinking. You may ... absorb nutrients through your digestive system You receive nutritional support through a needle or catheter placed in ...

  19. Nutritional supplements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Gry Bjerg; Andersen, Jens Rikardt

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies have indicated that cancer patients have significantly altered taste sensitivity without specifying the preferences. One of the related problems is low compliance to nutritional therapy with oral nutritional supplements (ONS) in patients suffering severe weight loss...

  20. Esmond E. Snell--the pathfinder of B vitamins and cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hideyuki; Tanase, Sumio; Yagi, Toshiharu

    2010-04-01

    Esmond E. Snell (1914-2003) was a giant of B-vitamin and enzyme research. His early research in bacterial nutrition had lead to the discovery of vitamins such as lipoic acid and folic acid, and an anti-vitamin avidin. He developed microbiological assay methods for riboflavin and other vitamins and amino acids, which are still used today. He also investigated the metabolism of vitamins, discovered pyridoxal and pyridoxamine as the active forms of vitamin B(6) and revealed the mechanism of transamination and other reactions catalysed by vitamin B(6) enzymes. His research in later years on pyruvoyl-dependent histidine decarboxylase unveiled the biogenesis mechanism of this first built-in cofactor. Throughout his career, he was a great mentor of many people, all of whom are inspired by his philosophy of science.

  1. New insights about vitamin d and cardiovascular disease: a narrative review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGreevy, Cora

    2012-02-01

    The worsening worldwide trend toward nutritional insufficiency and the emerging knowledge of the nonhormonal actions of vitamin D and its metabolites have increased interest in the synthesis, metabolism, and action of vitamin D. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked with hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke, as well as other cardiovascular-related diseases, such as diabetes, congestive heart failure, peripheral vascular disease, atherosclerosis, and endothelial dysfunction. This review discusses the physiology and definition of vitamin D deficiency, evaluates the worldwide prevalence of vitamin D deficiency, and discusses recent evidence for the association between hypovitaminosis D and cardiovascular disease. Few randomized, controlled trials have evaluated the effect of vitamin D replacement on cardiovascular outcomes, and the results have been inconclusive or contradictory. Carefully designed randomized, controlled trials are essential to evaluate the role of vitamin D supplementation in reducing cardiovascular disease.

  2. NUTRITIONAL AND ANTI NUTRITIONAL CONSTITUENTS OF MANIHOT ESCULENTUS AND PLECUTRANTHUS ROTUNDIFOLIUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Anbuselvi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional and anti nutritional characterization of two tubers namely Manihot esculenta and Plecutranthus rotundifolius were analyzed. A comparative analysis of nutrients of cassava and Chinese potato were carried out using standard analytical techniques. Results obtained showed high amount of protein, vitamins and low amount of phosphorus were found in leaves of chinese potato. Cassava pulp revealed 65 mg of calcium and 28.6 mg of vitamin A. 29 mg of reducing sugar and 1.8 mg of phosphorus were found in cassava leaves. Anti nutrients were accumulated more in cassava than chinese potato.

  3. Advantages of enteral nutrition over parenteral nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Seres, David S.; Valcarcel, Monika; Guillaume, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    It is a strong and commonly held belief among nutrition clinicians that enteral nutrition is preferable to parenteral nutrition. We provide a narrative review of more recent studies and technical reviews comparing enteral nutrition with parenteral nutrition. Despite significant weaknesses in the existing data, current literature continues to support the use of enteral nutrition in patients requiring nutrition support, over parenteral nutrition.

  4. Vitamin D Deficiency in Pregnant Women and Their Neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasian, Maryam; Chaman, Reza; Amiri, Mohammad; Ajami, Mohammad Esmaeil; Jafari-Koshki, Tohid; Rohani, Hossein; Taghavi-Shahri, Seyed Mahmood; Sadeghi, Erfan; Raei, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy is a worldwide problem. Studies have reported prevalence ranged 18-84% in pregnant women. Receiving adequate calcium and vitamin D during pregnancy period is necessary for calcium homeostasis, fetal growth and bone mineralization. This study was aimed to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women and their neonates in Shahroud city in the northeast Iran. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 284 pregnant women and their neonates referred to Fatemiyeh Hospital of Shahroud were included. Blood samples of mothers and umbilical cords were collected during the delivery and were sent to laboratory in order to measure calcium and 25-hydroxy vitamin D. Findings: Amounts of Vitamin D insufficiency (20-30 ng/mL) and deficiency (vitamin D (r=0.12, p=0.053). Conclusion: More than half of the mothers and their neonates had some degrees of vitamin D deficiency. It is recommended to evaluate the nutritional status of vitamin D in pregnant women along with public health interventions to be carried out. PMID:27157170

  5. Vitamin deficiencies in humans: can plant science help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Teresa B; Basset, Gilles J C; Borel, Patrick; Carrari, Fernando; DellaPenna, Dean; Fraser, Paul D; Hellmann, Hanjo; Osorio, Sonia; Rothan, Christophe; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2012-02-01

    The term vitamin describes a small group of organic compounds that are absolutely required in the human diet. Although for the most part, dependency criteria are met in developed countries through balanced diets, this is not the case for the five billion people in developing countries who depend predominantly on a single staple crop for survival. Thus, providing a more balanced vitamin intake from high-quality food remains one of the grandest challenges for global human nutrition in the coming decade(s). Here, we describe the known importance of vitamins in human health and current knowledge on their metabolism in plants. Deficits in developing countries are a combined consequence of a paucity of specific vitamins in major food staple crops, losses during crop processing, and/or overreliance on a single species as a primary food source. We discuss the role that plant science can play in addressing this problem and review successful engineering of vitamin pathways. We conclude that while considerable advances have been made in understanding vitamin metabolic pathways in plants, more cross-disciplinary approaches must be adopted to provide adequate levels of all vitamins in the major staple crops to eradicate vitamin deficiencies from the global population.

  6. Vitamin Deficiencies in Humans: Can Plant Science Help?[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Teresa B.; Basset, Gilles J.C.; Borel, Patrick; Carrari, Fernando; DellaPenna, Dean; Fraser, Paul D.; Hellmann, Hanjo; Osorio, Sonia; Rothan, Christophe; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2012-01-01

    The term vitamin describes a small group of organic compounds that are absolutely required in the human diet. Although for the most part, dependency criteria are met in developed countries through balanced diets, this is not the case for the five billion people in developing countries who depend predominantly on a single staple crop for survival. Thus, providing a more balanced vitamin intake from high-quality food remains one of the grandest challenges for global human nutrition in the coming decade(s). Here, we describe the known importance of vitamins in human health and current knowledge on their metabolism in plants. Deficits in developing countries are a combined consequence of a paucity of specific vitamins in major food staple crops, losses during crop processing, and/or overreliance on a single species as a primary food source. We discuss the role that plant science can play in addressing this problem and review successful engineering of vitamin pathways. We conclude that while considerable advances have been made in understanding vitamin metabolic pathways in plants, more cross-disciplinary approaches must be adopted to provide adequate levels of all vitamins in the major staple crops to eradicate vitamin deficiencies from the global population. PMID:22374394

  7. West syndrome due to vitamin B12 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serin, Hepsen Mine; Kara, Aslıhan Oruçoğlu; Oğuz, Baran

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin B12 is one of the essential vitamins affecting various systems of the body. Vitamin B12 deficiency in infants often produces haematological and neurological deficits including macrocyticanaemia, neurodevelopmental delay or regression, irritability, weakness, hypotonia, ataxia, apathy, tremor andseizures. In this article, we report the case of a six-month-old male patient diagnosed with West syndrome associated with vitamin B12 deficiency. Although the patient had no evidence of macrocytic anemia in complete blood count, we measured the level of vitamin B12 because the patient had hypotonicity and found it to be low. No other problem was found in the other investigations directed to the etiology of West syndrome. He was being exclusively breast-fed and vitamin B12 deficiency was related with nutritional inadequacy of his mother. Vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with different neurological findings. In addition, vitamin B12 deficiency should be considered as a rare cause in West syndrome which has a heterogeneous etiology.

  8. [Vitamin D supplementation: not too much, not too little!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamo, S; Freychet, C; Bertholet-Thomas, A; Poulat, A-L; Cochat, P; Vuillerot, C; Bacchetta, J

    2015-08-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common in the general population and even more frequent in patients with chronic diseases. The prevention of rickets with native vitamin D supplementation is one of the oldest and most effective prophylactic measures ever reported in medicine, leading to an almost complete eradication of vitamin D-deficient rickets in developed countries. We report on two children with vitamin D abnormalities: the first, 10-year-old child developed rickets without any vitamin D supplementation despite different risk factors (autism, ethnicity, nutritional problems, chronic antiepileptic therapies). In contrast, the second, 8-month-old child received double doses of native vitamin D from birth for several months and was referred for acute and symptomatic hypercalcemia. As such, vitamin D supplementation must follow specific rules: neither too much nor too little! We also discuss the emergence of "new" genetic diseases such as mutations in the 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1) gene inducing neonatal hypercalcemia and nephrocalcinosis: we believe that before prescribing conventional vitamin D supplementation as recommended by the national guidelines, pediatricians should quickly rule out a potential genetic abnormality in phosphate/calcium metabolism (namely a history of lithiasis or hypercalcemia) that would lead to further biological investigations.

  9. Let's Talk About Food. Answers to your Questions About Foods and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Philip L., Ed.; Selvey, Nancy, Ed.

    This book on the subject of nutrition is written in the form of often-asked questions and detailed, informative answers. In ten chapters the following range of nutrition topics is covered: (1) meaning of RDA, nutrition labeling, calorie tables, nutrient density; (2) adequate diet, pregnancy, physical fitness, vitamins, diet for athletes, baby…

  10. Let's Talk About Food. Answers to your Questions About Foods and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Philip L., Ed.; Selvey, Nancy, Ed.

    This book on the subject of nutrition is written in the form of often-asked questions and detailed, informative answers. In ten chapters the following range of nutrition topics is covered: (1) meaning of RDA, nutrition labeling, calorie tables, nutrient density; (2) adequate diet, pregnancy, physical fitness, vitamins, diet for athletes, baby…

  11. Using Nutrition Against Aging and Degenerative Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokosz, Francis M.

    A review of historical and research literature presents various perspectives on the growing controversy surrounding the use of vitamin and mineral supplements to maintain good health and for preventive health care. Several points are made in opposition to many health professionals' opinions that most nutritional supplements are unnecessary.…

  12. Plant Oils as Potential Sources of Vitamin D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele I Stangl

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To combat vitamin D insufficiency in a population, reliable diet sources of vitamin D are required. The recommendations to consume more oily fish and the use of UVB treated yeast are already applied strategies to address vitamin D insufficiency. This study aimed to elucidate the suitability of plant oils as an alternative vitamin D source. Therefore, plant oils that are commonly used in human nutrition were firstly analyzed for their content of vitamin D precursors and metabolites. Secondly, selected oils were exposed to a short-term UVB irradiation to stimulate the synthesis of vitamin D. Finally, to elucidate the efficacy of plant-derived vitamin D to improve the vitamin D status, we fed UVB-exposed wheat germ oil for 4 weeks to mice and compared them with mice that received non-exposed or vitamin D3 supplemented wheat germ oil. Sterol analysis revealed that the selected plant oils contained high amounts of ergosterol, but also 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC, with the highest concentrations found in wheat germ oil. Exposure to UVB irradiation resulted in a partial conversion of ergosterol and 7-DHC to vitamin D2 and D3 in these oils. Mice fed the UVB-exposed wheat germ oil were able to improve their vitamin D status as shown by the rise in the plasma concentration of 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD and the liver content of vitamin D compared to mice fed the non-exposed oil. However, the plasma concentration of 25(OHD of mice fed the UVB-treated oil did not reach the values observed in the group fed the D3 supplemented oil. It was striking that the intake of the UVB-exposed oil resulted in distinct accumulation of vitamin D2 in the livers of these mice. In conclusion, plant oils, in particular wheat germ oil, contain considerable amounts of vitamin D precursors which can be converted to vitamin D via UVB exposure. However, the UVB-exposed wheat germ oil was less effective to improve the 25(OHD plasma concentration than a supplementation with vitamin D

  13. Vitamin D in pregnancy: current perspectives and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiely, Mairead; Hemmingway, Andrea; O'Callaghan, Karen M

    2017-06-01

    As neonatal vitamin D status is determined by circulating maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations, prevention of maternal vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy is essential for the avoidance of neonatal deficiency. However, a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency has been extensively reported among gravidae and neonates from ethnic minorities and white populations resident at high latitude. Currently, regulatory authorities recommend vitamin D intakes for pregnant women that are similar to non-pregnant adults of the same age, at 10-15 µg/day (400-600 IU), to meet 25(OH)D thresholds of 25-50 nmol/liter. The lack of pregnancy-specific dietary recommendations is due to inadequate data indicating whether nutritional requirements for vitamin D during pregnancy differ from the non-pregnant state. In addition, there are few dose-response studies to determine the maternal 25(OH)D response to vitamin D intake throughout pregnancy at high latitude. These data are also required to determine vitamin D requirements during pregnancy for prevention of neonatal deficiency, an outcome which is likely to require a higher maternal 25(OH)D concentration than prevention of maternal deficiency only. With regard to the impact of vitamin D on perinatal health outcomes, which could guide pregnancy-specific 25(OH)D thresholds, dietary intervention studies to date have been inconsistent and recent systematic reviews have highlighted issues of low quality and a high risk of bias as drawbacks in the trial evidence to date. Many observational studies have been hampered by a reliance on retrospective data, unclear reporting, suboptimal clinical phenotyping and incomplete subject characterization. Current investigations of vitamin D metabolism during pregnancy have potentially exciting implications for clinical research. This paper provides an update of current dietary recommendations for vitamin D in pregnant women and a synopsis of the evidence relating vitamin D status with

  14. The association between the risk of premenstrual syndrome and vitamin D, calcium, and magnesium status among university students: a case control study [Health Promotion Perspectives, 2015, 5(3, 225-230

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Saeedian Kia

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: Vitamin D, Ca and Mg nutritional status are compromised in PMS subjects. Because PMS is a prevalent health problem among young women, it merits more attention regarding improvement of their health and nutritional status

  15. Complex Effects of Vitamin E and Vitamin C Supplementation on in Vitro Neonatal Mononuclear Cell Responses to Allergens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert N. Barker

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Low maternal dietary vitamin E (but not vitamin C intake during pregnancy has been associated with increased in vitro cord blood mononuclear cell (CBMC proliferative responses, childhood wheezing and asthma. We investigated whether these associations reflect direct effects of vitamin E by investigating the effects of supplementing CBMC cultures with physiological concentrations of vitamin E. CBMC from seventy neonates were cultured supplemented with either nothing, α-tocopherol or ascorbic acid. Proliferative, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β responses were measured. In general, vitamin E supplementation was associated with a trend for reduced proliferative responses after stimulation with antigens and house dust mite, and with increased proliferation after stimulation with timothy grass allergen. There was a trend for CBMC cultures to exhibit decreased secretion of IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-4. Supplementation with vitamin C had no effect on CBMC proliferation, but increased IFN-γ and IL-4 production, and decreased IL-10 production. In conclusion, in vitro vitamin E and C supplementation of CBMC modifies neonatal immune function, but not in a manner predicted by observational epidemiological studies. The observed associations between vitamin E and childhood respiratory disease are complex, and the nature and form of nutritional intervention need to be carefully considered before inclusion in trials.

  16. Nutritional management of the patient with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theologides, A

    1977-02-01

    Protein-calorie malnutrition, vitamin and other deficiencies, and weight loss frequently develop in cancer patients. Although there is no evidence that aggressive nutritional management prolongs survival, it may improve the quality of life. Efforts should be made to maintain adequate daily caloric intake with appropriate food selection and with control of complications interfering with nutrition. In selected patients, intravenous hyperalimentation can provide adequate nutrition during potentially effective chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Elemental diets also may be a source of complete or supplemental nutrition. Further experience with both approaches will help to clarify their role in the nutritional management of the patient with advanced cancer.

  17. Changes in serum phosphate and potassium and their effects on mortality in malnourished African HIV-infected adults starting antiretroviral therapy and given vitamins and minerals in lipid-based nutritional supplements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehman, Andrea Mary; Woodd, Susannah Louise; Heimburger, Douglas Corbett

    2017-01-01

    Malnourished HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) are at high risk of early mortality, some of which may be attributed to altered electrolyte metabolism. We used data from a randomised controlled trial of electrolyte-enriched lipid-based nutritional supplements to assess th...

  18. Nutrition Labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G

    2013-01-01

    because consumers will avoid products that the label shows to be nutritionally deficient, but also because food producers will try to avoid marketing products that appear, according to the label, as nutritionally problematic, for example, because of a high content of saturated fat or salt. Nutrition......Nutrition labeling refers to the provision of information on a food product’s nutritional content on the package label. It can serve both public health and commercial purposes. From a public health perspective, the aim of nutrition labeling is to provide information that can enable consumers...... to make healthier choices when choosing food products. Nutrition labeling is thus closely linked to the notion of the informed consumer, that chooses products according to their aims, on the basis of the information at their disposal. Because many consumers are assumed to be interested in making healthy...

  19. Nutrition Labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G

    2013-01-01

    because consumers will avoid products that the label shows to be nutritionally deficient, but also because food producers will try to avoid marketing products that appear, according to the label, as nutritionally problematic, for example, because of a high content of saturated fat or salt. Nutrition......Nutrition labeling refers to the provision of information on a food product’s nutritional content on the package label. It can serve both public health and commercial purposes. From a public health perspective, the aim of nutrition labeling is to provide information that can enable consumers...... to make healthier choices when choosing food products. Nutrition labeling is thus closely linked to the notion of the informed consumer, that chooses products according to their aims, on the basis of the information at their disposal. Because many consumers are assumed to be interested in making healthy...

  20. Effects of different dietary vitamin combinations on the egg quality and vitamin deposition in the whole egg of laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Zang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of different dietary vitamin combinations on the egg quality and vitamin concentrations in the eggs of commercial laying hens. A total of 1,800 25-week-old Lohman pink-shell hens were randomly assigned to four dietary vitamin treatments as follows: NRC(1994 level, NRC (1994 level with Hy.D® (25-hydroxy-cholecalciferol, Local level (current average industry level in China and OVN® level (optimum vitamin nutrition level, with 10 replicates per treatment and 45 layers per replicate. Hens were housed in commercial laying cages with three birds per cage and given ad libitum access to feed. Results showed the hens that received the fortified vitamin levels in the OVN® treatment had a significantly (p<0.05 lower number of cracked (.47% and dirty eggs (.27%, and increased egg deposition of vitamin B12, folic acid, vitamin A, vitamin D, 25-OH-D3, vitamin E, vitamin B1, biotin and pantothenate (p<0.05. Treatments had no significant effect on egg-shape index, egg specific gravity, Haugh units and eggshell thickness. Hens fed the NRC-Hy.D® combination also experienced a significant decrease in cracked and dirty eggs (.70% and .44%, respectively and an increased deposition of 25-OH-D3 in comparison with the NRC treatment. Results of the present study suggest that that the Local treatment was able to improve egg quality parameters of laying hens, but resulted in more cracked and dirty eggs. OVN® reduced the number of cracked eggs and dirty eggs, and improved the deposition of several vitamins in eggs. With the addition of Hy.D®, eggshell strength and 25-OH-D3 deposition in eggs were also improved, and cracked and dirty egg rates declined.

  1. Vitamin B-12 and Depression: Are They Related?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 143. Lang UE, et al. Nutritional aspects of depression. Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry. 2015;37:1029. Vitamin B12. Natural Medicines. https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com. Accessed Oct. 18, 2016. Mikkelsen K, ... in depression. Current Medicinal Chemistry. 2016;23:1. Nov. 23, ...

  2. Diet & Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Giving d Employer Matching Gifts d Gifts of Stock or Securities d Giving Circles Golden Circle Circle ... vitamin D might enhance the effect of interferon beta on MS disease activity. The National MS Society ...

  3. Brain damage in infancy and dietary vitamin B12 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wighton, M C; Manson, J I; Speed, I; Robertson, E; Chapman, E

    1979-07-14

    A case of the exclusively breast-fed infant of a vegetarian mother is reported. Neurological deterioration commenced between three and six months of age, and progressed to a comatose premoribund state by the age of nine months. Investigations revealed a mild nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in the mother, and a very severe nutritional B12 deficiency in the infant, with severe megaloblastic anaemia. Treatment of the infant with vitamin B12 resulted in a rapid clinical and haematological improvement, but neurological recovery was incomplete. Evidence is presented that dietary B12 deficiency was the sole cause of the infant's deterioration, and the literature relating to the condition is reviewed. It is recommended that all strict vegetarians (vegans), especially women in the child-bearing age group, take vitamin B12 supplements.

  4. Micronutrients in women's reproductive health: I. Vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontic-Vucinic, Olivera; Sulovic, Nenad; Radunovic, Nebojsa

    2006-01-01

    Proper nutritional status of women before, during, and after pregnancy is an important element of reproductive health. It maintains maternal health and reduces the risk of adverse pregnancy outcome, birth defects and chronic disease in children later in postnatal life. Pregnancy creates a special metabolic demand for high-quality nutrients. With careful food selection, it is possible to obtain most of the recommended levels of nutrients. Apart from the dietary intake, nutrition is highly dependant on economic status, social and cultural environment, and personal habits of the mother. Nutritional imbalance could cause detrimental effects to the pregnant woman, influence pregnancy outcome, and impair breast milk composition. Despite the extensive research, we still do not have a complete understanding how nutritional status of the mother influences her health as well as fetal growth and development. It is well known that fetal growth and development is strongly linked with maternal supply of essential nutrients, e.g. vitamins. The exact role of the variety of micronutrients in fetal growth and development has yet to be explored in detail. It is estimated that up to 30% of pregnant women suffer from a vitamin deficiency. Without supplementation, about 75% would show a deficit of at least one vitamin. Moreover, multivitamin deficit combinations often co-exist, and subclinical depletations are probably common; consequences could be severe. Studies carried on in developing countries have shown that improving micronutrient intake in deficient women can reduce maternal morbidity and mortality. Also, proper maternal intake of important micronutrients directly enhances the quality of breast milk. To meet the increasing demands during pregnancy and the breastfeeding period women should not be dependent only upon the dietary intake: adequate reserve is essential for the successful pregnancy outcome.

  5. B vitamins and n-3 fatty acids for brain development and function: review of human studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rest, van de O.; Hooijdonk, L.W.A.; Doets, E.L.; Schiepers, O.J.G.; Eilander, J.H.C.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Nutrition is one of many factors that affect brain development and functioning, and in recent years the role of certain nutrients has been investigated. B vitamins and n–3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are two of the most promising and widely studied nutritional factors. Methods: In

  6. Vitamin K: an old vitamin in a new perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Gröber, U; Reichrath, J.; Holick, MF; Kisters, K

    2015-01-01

    The topic of “Vitamin K” is currently booming on the health products market. Vitamin K is known to be important for blood coagulation. Current research increasingly indicates that the antihaemorrhagic vitamin has a considerable benefit in the prevention and treatment of bone and vascular disease. Vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) is more abundant in foods but less bioactive than the vitamin K2 menaquinones (especially MK-7, menaquinone-7). Vitamin K compounds undergo oxidation-reduction cycling with...

  7. Vitamine K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal dit Sollier Claire

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Subclasses of vitamin K, their origins, their differential characteristics of absorption and metabolism, their relative effects on gammacarboxylation of various proteins implicated in hemostasis andcoagulation, in bone calcification are not well known even by experts in these fields. These misunderstandings explain errors in recommendations for public and for patients. This review will not expose again the fundamentals on vitamins K as presented in the paper by Marc Guillaumont published in 2000 in this same journal. This 2011 review will try to update our actual knowledge and most of all will insist on their practical implications especially on the management of oral anticoagulant treatments since until recently vitamin K antagonist was the only available type of such a treatment. Several examples illustrate the need for a better understanding of this subject. The fear that diet vitamin K could deregulate the equilibrium of oral vitamin K antagonist treatment leads to recommend a quite total suppression of vitamin K containing components in the diet of anticoagulated patients. This leads to an opposite effect: a high sensitivity to vitamin K and to disequilibrium of the anticoagulant treatment while a comprehensivemoderate and regular diet intake of vitamin K first facilitates the food choice of the patients but also helps to stabilise the treatment of chronically anticoagulated patients. Vitamin K plays a role in bone calcification and in osteoporosis prevention. Until recently the food supplementation with vitamin K in view of preventing osteoporosis in general population was strongly limited due to fear to affect the treatment equilibrium in anticoagulated patients. While an understanding that the effects of moderate supplementation in vitamin K has no or limited effect on anticoagulation and on the long run could at the opposite help to stabilize the daily level of anticoagulation in patients chronically treated with vitamin K.

  8. ASUPAN KALSIUM DAN VITAMIN D PADA ANAK INDONESIA USIA 2 – 12 TAHUN [Calcium and Vitamin D Intake of Indonesian Children 2-12 Years Old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Valentina*

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Food consumption is playing an important role for nutritional status of children 2-12 years old. During growth and development phase, body needs macro and micro nutrients even more than later phase. The process can not be catched up at later stage therefore it is very important to pay attention to food consumption during this phase. This study used secondary data of South East Asian Nutrition Surveys (SEANUTS 2011-2012 which was covered recapitulation profile data of 300 children age 2-12 years old representative of 48 districts in Indonesia. The study showed that Indonesian children consuming less calcium and vitamin D-rich foods than the recommended daily allowance (RDA. It does not reflects on the result of anthropometry data, vitamin D on the blood and bone mass density since the dietary recall 24 hours shows only food consumption in that specific day while nutritional status shows a result of longer process. However, vitamin D in blood has a significant correlation with bone mass density of tibia bone (p<0.05. Deficiency of calcium and mainly vitamin D is a new finding at this time. Therefore, the study showed that fortification of calcium and vitamin min D in food become important to improve nutritional status of Indonesian children. 20% of RDA per serving size twice a day is recommended as well for fortification level of Calcium and Vitamin D.

  9. Vitamin D and Disease Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a hormone. The skin makes vitamin D after exposure to sunlight. We also absorb vitamin D from certain foods, ... people do not make enough vitamin D by exposure to sunlight* or get enough through their diets. They may ...

  10. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fiber, magnesium, and vitamin E (for children and adolescents) vitamin B-12, iron, folic acid, and vitamins ... manufacturers evaluate their products through testing identity, purity, strength, and composition. back to ... Federal, State & Local Officials ...

  11. Fortify Your Knowledge about Vitamins

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and the B vitamins (thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, biotin, vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12 and ... into the body with the use of bile acids, which are fluids used to absorb fat. The ...

  12. Vitamin E in dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Mohammad Abid; Hassan, Iffat

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin E is an important fat-soluble antioxidant and has been in use for more than 50 years in dermatology. It is an important ingredient in many cosmetic products. It protects the skin from various deleterious effects due to solar radiation by acting as a free-radical scavenger. Experimental studies suggest that vitamin E has antitumorigenic and photoprotective properties. There is a paucity of controlled clinical studies providing a rationale for well-defined dosages and clinical indications of vitamin E usage in dermatological practice. The aim of this article is to review the cosmetic as well as clinical implications of vitamin E in dermatology. PMID:27559512

  13. Vitamin D-mangel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hey, Henrik; Schmedes, Anne; Horn, Peer

    2009-01-01

    The importance of vitamin D for osteoporosis and fractures has been known for more than 40 years. Vitamin D deficiency is diagnosed by measuring 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD), which should be > 50 nmol/l year round. Recent research suggests that a number of severe diseases could be prevented...... by increasing 25-OHD to 80 nmol/l. Despite a strong focus on such increase, recommendations for intake of Vitamin D have not been changed and the present recommendations are too low even to ensure > 50 nmol/l. To achieve optimal concentrations > 80 nmol/l, we estimate that 50-70 microgram of vitamin D per day...

  14. Topical retinoids in skin ageing: a focused update with reference to sun-induced epidermal vitamin A deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorg, Olivier; Saurat, Jean-Hilaire

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin A is an important constituent of the epidermis, where it plays a crucial role in epidermal turnover. A deficiency of epidermal vitamin A may be the consequence of nutritional vitamin A deficiency, exposure to sunlight or any UV source, oxidative stress or chronological ageing. As a consequence, any treatment aiming at increasing epidermal vitamin A would exert a protective effect against these deleterious conditions. Retinoids may counteract some deleterious actions of UV radiation by physical and biological mechanisms. Topical natural retinoic acid precursors such as retinaldehyde or retinol are less irritant than acidic retinoids and may prevent epidermal vitamin A deficiency due to nutritional deficiency, exposure to sunlight or any condition leading to free radical production. Retinoids may be combined with other compounds with complementary actions against ageing, nutritional deficiency and cancer, such as antioxidants, to potentiate their beneficial effects in the skin.

  15. Implications of US Nutrition Facts Label Changes on Micronutrient Density of Fortified Foods and Supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBurney, Michael I; Hartunian-Sowa, Sonia; Matusheski, Nathan V

    2017-06-01

    The US FDA published new nutrition-labeling regulations in May 2016. For the first time since the implementation of the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990, the Daily Value (DV) for most vitamins will change, as will the units of measurement used in nutrition labeling for some vitamins. For some food categories, the Reference Amounts Customarily Consumed (RACCs) will increase to reflect portions commonly consumed on a single occasion. These regulatory changes are now effective, and product label changes will be mandatory beginning 26 July 2018. This commentary considers the potential impact of these regulatory changes on the vitamin and mineral contents of foods and dietary supplements. Case studies examined potential effects on food fortification and nutrient density. The updated DVs may lead to a reduction in the nutrient density of foods and dietary supplements with respect to 8 vitamins (vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12, biotin, and pantothenic acid) and 6 minerals (zinc, selenium, copper, chromium, molybdenum, and chloride), and have mixed effects on 2 vitamins where the amount required per serving is affected by chemical structure (i.e., form) (natural vitamin E compared with synthetic vitamin E and folic acid compared with folate). Despite an increased DV for vitamin D, regulations limit food fortification. The adoption of Dietary Folate Equivalents for folate labeling may lead to reductions in the quantity of folic acid voluntarily added per RACC. Finally, because of increased RACCs in some food categories to reflect portions that people typically eat at one time, the vitamin and mineral density of these foods may be affected adversely. In totality, the United States is entering an era in which the need to monitor dietary intake patterns and nutritional status is unprecedented. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  16. Vitamin and mineral supplementation of term infants: are they necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubetzky, Ronit; Mandel, Dror; Mimouni, Francis B

    2013-01-01

    This chapter examines the evidence behind the need or not to routinely administer multivitamin and/or mineral preparations to term infants. We reviewed the recommended dietary allowances (RDAs) of vitamins and minerals during the first year of life and examined whether standard nutritional options, i.e. human milk or infant formulae consistent with major international guidelines, satisfy these requirements. We found that RDA cannot adequately be met by either human milk or standard formulas for most vitamins and minerals. We suggest that RDAs are widely overestimated. A particular emphasis is placed on vitamin D and iron, where supplements are needed, and on iodine and vitamin B12, where supplements may be needed depending upon the circumstances.

  17. Vitamin D – a new look in medicine and rheumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogna Grygiel-Górniak

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The research of the last decade pointed to the importance of vitamin D not only in bone metabolic processes, but also in immunologic and anticarcinogenic processes. Thus, its common insufficiency is related to serious health consequences – e.g. increased mortality and morbidity caused by autoimmune and cancer diseases. The modification of the range of values of vitamin D serum concentration and revision of its nutritional and pharmacological recommendations are suggested nowadays. Moreover, the discovery of the vitamin D receptor (VDR enables us to understand its influence on other organs. To date the new properties of vitamin D are elucidated in the literature showing its preventive effect and possible application in supportive treatment of many diseases.

  18. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to a combination of lycopene, proanthocyanidins, vitamin C, vitamin E, selenium and beta-carotene and contribution to normal collagen formation (ID 1669) and protection, of the skin from UV-induced damage (ID 1669) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    claims in relation to a combination of lycopene, proanthocyanidins, vitamin C, vitamin E, selenium and beta-carotene and contribution to normal collagen formation and protection of the skin from UV-induced damage. The scientific substantiation is based on the information provided by the Member States...... in the consolidated list of Article 13 health claims and references that EFSA has received from Member States or directly from stakeholders. The food constituent that is the subject of the health claim is a combination of lycopene, proanthocyanidins, vitamin C, vitamin E, selenium, and beta-carotene. The Panel...... considers that the combination of lycopene, proanthocyanidins, vitamin C, vitamin E, selenium, and beta-carotene is sufficiently characterised....

  19. Quinoa: Nutritional, functional, and antinutritional aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Antonio Manoel Maradini; Pirozi, Mônica Ribeiro; Borges, João Tomaz Da Silva; Pinheiro Sant'Ana, Helena Maria; Chaves, José Benício Paes; Coimbra, Jane Sélia Dos Reis

    2017-05-24

    We have prepared a review of the physical-chemical composition and the functional and anti-nutritional properties of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.). It is a plant of the Chenopodiaceae family, originally from the Andean regions, adaptable to different types of soils and climatic conditions. Its composition has attracted the attention of scientific community for its high nutritional value, being rich in proteins, lipids, fibers, vitamins, and minerals, with an extraordinary balance of essential amino acids. It is also gluten-free, a characteristic that enables its use by celiac patients. In spite of all these attributes, quinoa is not widely used by consumers due to the high cost of imported grain and little knowledge of its benefits. More studies are required to increase knowledge about this "pseudo-cereal" to demonstrate its functional and nutritional benefits and to study its anti-nutritional effects, since it presents high commercial value and excellent nutritional quality.

  20. Vitamin composition of ethnic foods commonly consumed in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Ireland

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin analyses are particularly important for estimating dietary intakes, determining nutritional status and regulating food labelling. Due to the increased popularity of ethnic foods, the vitamin composition of these foods is required to ensure that national food databases are up-to-date.Objectives: The key objective of this study was to generate new and reliable data on the contents of fat-soluble vitamins, including vitamins A (all trans-retinol, D3 & E (α-tocopherol and those that are water-soluble (vitamins B6, B12, C, biotin, folate, niacin, pantothenic acid, riboflavin, and thiamin in ethnic foods commonly consumed in Europe.Design: Thirty commonly-consumed ethnic foods in Europe (from Belgium, France, Israel, Italy, The Netherlands, and the UK were analysed using harmonised methodologies for identification of representative foods, sampling, data scrutiny and documentation to generate reliable data. Analyses were carried out using International standard methods. Results: Certain vitamins were present in appreciable amounts: β-carotene in tayer leaves (7919µg/100g, thiamin in frik dry (0.24mg/100g, riboflavin in mbinzo worms (0.79mg/100g, and niacin in commercial soy patty (17.5mg/100g. However, retinol, pantothenic acid, vitamins D and B12 were below detectable levels in the majority of the foods analysed.Conclusions: The majority of the foods contained most of the water-soluble vitamins but lacked fat-soluble vitamins. However, these preliminary data represent only a small number of foods per country and so no conclusions about vitamin imbalances can be drawn. Additional data are required on a much wider range of commonly-consumed ethnic foods to make firm conclusions about adequacy of diets.

  1. Vitamin D/dietary calcium deficiency rickets and pseudo-vitamin D deficiency rickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorieux, Francis H; Pettifor, John M

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the pathogenesis, clinical presentation and biochemical perturbations found in privational (nutritional) rickets and pseudo-vitamin D deficiency rickets (PDDR), an autosomal recessive condition with loss of function mutations in CYP27B1. It may seem strange to combine a discussion on privational rickets and PDDR as a single topic, but privational rickets and PDDR present with similar clinical signs and symptoms and with similar perturbations in bone and mineral metabolism. Of interest is the characteristic lack of features of rickets at birth in infants with PDDR, a finding which has also been reported in infants born to vitamin D-deficient mothers. This highlights the independence of the fetus and neonate from the need for vitamin D to maintain calcium homeostasis during this period. The variable roles of vitamin D deficiency and dietary calcium deficiency in the pathogenesis of privational rickets are discussed and the associated alterations in vitamin D metabolism highlighted. Although PDDR is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, results of long-term follow-up are now available on the effect of treatment with calcitriol, and these are discussed. Areas of uncertainty, such as should affected mothers breastfeed their infants, are emphasized.

  2. Sunlight and Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Matthias; Holick, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D is the sunshine vitamin that has been produced on this earth for more than 500 million years. During exposure to sunlight 7-dehydrocholesterol in the skin absorbs UV B radiation and is converted to previtamin D3 which in turn isomerizes into vitamin D3. Previtamin D3 and vitamin D3 also absorb UV B radiation and are converted into a variety of photoproducts some of which have unique biologic properties. Sun induced vitamin D synthesis is greatly influenced by season, time of day, latitude, altitude, air pollution, skin pigmentation, sunscreen use, passing through glass and plastic, and aging. Vitamin D is metabolized sequentially in the liver and kidneys into 25-hydroxyvitamin D which is a major circulating form and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D which is the biologically active form respectively. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D plays an important role in regulating calcium and phosphate metabolism for maintenance of metabolic functions and for skeletal health. Most cells and organs in the body have a vitamin D receptor and many cells and organs are able to produce 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. As a result 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D influences a large number of biologic pathways which may help explain association studies relating vitamin D deficiency and living at higher latitudes with increased risk for many chronic diseases including autoimmune diseases, some cancers, cardiovascular disease, infectious disease, schizophrenia and type 2 diabetes. A three-part strategy of increasing food fortification programs with vitamin D, sensible sun exposure recommendations and encouraging ingestion of a vitamin D supplement when needed should be implemented to prevent global vitamin D deficiency and its negative health consequences. PMID:24494042

  3. Vitamin E Nicotinate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Kimbell R.; Suzuki, Yuichiro J.

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin E refers to a family of compounds that function as lipid-soluble antioxidants capable of preventing lipid peroxidation. Naturally occurring forms of vitamin E include tocopherols and tocotrienols. Vitamin E in dietary supplements and fortified foods is often an esterified form of α-tocopherol, the most common esters being acetate and succinate. The vitamin E esters are hydrolyzed and converted into free α-tocopherol prior to absorption in the intestinal tract. Because its functions are relevant to many chronic diseases, vitamin E has been extensively studied in respect to a variety of diseases as well as cosmetic applications. The forms of vitamin E most studied are natural α-tocopherol and the esters α-tocopheryl acetate and α-tocopheryl succinate. A small number of studies include or focus on another ester form, α-tocopheryl nicotinate, an ester of vitamin E and niacin. Some of these studies raise the possibility of differences in metabolism and in efficacy between vitamin E nicotinate and other forms of vitamin E. Recently, through metabolomics studies, we identified that α-tocopheryl nicotinate occurs endogenously in the heart and that its level is dramatically decreased in heart failure, indicating the possible biological importance of this vitamin E ester. Since knowledge about vitamin E nicotinate is not readily available in the literature, the purpose of this review is to summarize and evaluate published reports, specifically with respect to α-tocopheryl nicotinate with an emphasis on the differences from natural α-tocopherol or α-tocopheryl acetate. PMID:28335380

  4. Vitamin E Nicotinate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimbell R. Duncan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin E refers to a family of compounds that function as lipid-soluble antioxidants capable of preventing lipid peroxidation. Naturally occurring forms of vitamin E include tocopherols and tocotrienols. Vitamin E in dietary supplements and fortified foods is often an esterified form of α-tocopherol, the most common esters being acetate and succinate. The vitamin E esters are hydrolyzed and converted into free α-tocopherol prior to absorption in the intestinal tract. Because its functions are relevant to many chronic diseases, vitamin E has been extensively studied in respect to a variety of diseases as well as cosmetic applications. The forms of vitamin E most studied are natural α-tocopherol and the esters α-tocopheryl acetate and α-tocopheryl succinate. A small number of studies include or focus on another ester form, α-tocopheryl nicotinate, an ester of vitamin E and niacin. Some of these studies raise the possibility of differences in metabolism and in efficacy between vitamin E nicotinate and other forms of vitamin E. Recently, through metabolomics studies, we identified that α-tocopheryl nicotinate occurs endogenously in the heart and that its level is dramatically decreased in heart failure, indicating the possible biological importance of this vitamin E ester. Since knowledge about vitamin E nicotinate is not readily available in the literature, the purpose of this review is to summarize and evaluate published reports, specifically with respect to α-tocopheryl nicotinate with an emphasis on the differences from natural α-tocopherol or α-tocopheryl acetate.

  5. Vitamin E Nicotinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Kimbell R; Suzuki, Yuichiro J

    2017-03-13

    Vitamin E refers to a family of compounds that function as lipid-soluble antioxidants capable of preventing lipid peroxidation. Naturally occurring forms of vitamin E include tocopherols and tocotrienols. Vitamin E in dietary supplements and fortified foods is often an esterified form of α-tocopherol, the most common esters being acetate and succinate. The vitamin E esters are hydrolyzed and converted into free α-tocopherol prior to absorption in the intestinal tract. Because its functions are relevant to many chronic diseases, vitamin E has been extensively studied in respect to a variety of diseases as well as cosmetic applications. The forms of vitamin E most studied are natural α-tocopherol and the esters α-tocopheryl acetate and α-tocopheryl succinate. A small number of studies include or focus on another ester form, α-tocopheryl nicotinate, an ester of vitamin E and niacin. Some of these studies raise the possibility of differences in metabolism and in efficacy between vitamin E nicotinate and other forms of vitamin E. Recently, through metabolomics studies, we identified that α-tocopheryl nicotinate occurs endogenously in the heart and that its level is dramatically decreased in heart failure, indicating the possible biological importance of this vitamin E ester. Since knowledge about vitamin E nicotinate is not readily available in the literature, the purpose of this review is to summarize and evaluate published reports, specifically with respect to α-tocopheryl nicotinate with an emphasis on the differences from natural α-tocopherol or α-tocopheryl acetate.

  6. Correlation between Nutrition and Symptoms: Nutritional Survey of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Chongqing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Liu, Juan; Xiong, Xueqin; Yang, Ting; Hou, Nali; Liang, Xiaohua; Chen, Jie; Cheng, Qian; Li, Tingyu

    2016-05-14

    Restricted diets and inadequate nutrient intake of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have been reported. This study examined the nutritional statuses of children with ASD and the relationships between their behaviors and nutritional intake. A total of 154 children with ASD (age = 5.21 ± 1.83 years) and 73 typically-developing (TD) children (age = 4.83 ± 0.84 years) from Chongqing, China, were enrolled. The severity of ASD was evaluated using the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS). The serum ferritin, folate, vitamin B12, 25(OH) vitamin D, and vitamin A concentrations in the children with ASD were determined. All participants underwent anthropometric examinations, dietary assessments, and questionnaire assessments about their feeding behaviors, and gastrointestinal symptoms. The ZHA, ZWA, and ZBMIA were found to be significantly lower in the children with ASD compared with those without ASD. In addition, the percentages of children exhibiting severe picky eating and severe resistance to new foods, as well as those with a reported general impression of severe eating problems and constipation, were higher among the children with ASD. These children consumed significantly fewer macronutrients compared with the children without ASD. In addition, the children with ASD had the highest rate of vitamin A deficiency, followed by iron deficiency. After adjusting for sex, the vitamin A concentration was found to be negatively correlated with the CARS score (rs = -0.222, p = 0.021). No correlation between the ferritin, folate, vitamin D, or vitamin B12 concentration and the CARS score was found. These results suggest that reduced macronutrient intakes, severe feeding behavior issues, constipation, and vitamin A deficiency are quite common among children with ASD. Further, a low serum vitamin A level may be a risk factor for symptoms of ASD. However, the underlying mechanism should be further studied.

  7. Correlation between Nutrition and Symptoms: Nutritional Survey of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Chongqing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Restricted diets and inadequate nutrient intake of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD have been reported. This study examined the nutritional statuses of children with ASD and the relationships between their behaviors and nutritional intake. A total of 154 children with ASD (age = 5.21 ± 1.83 years and 73 typically-developing (TD children (age = 4.83 ± 0.84 years from Chongqing, China, were enrolled. The severity of ASD was evaluated using the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS. The serum ferritin, folate, vitamin B12, 25(OH vitamin D, and vitamin A concentrations in the children with ASD were determined. All participants underwent anthropometric examinations, dietary assessments, and questionnaire assessments about their feeding behaviors, and gastrointestinal symptoms. The ZHA, ZWA, and ZBMIA were found to be significantly lower in the children with ASD compared with those without ASD. In addition, the percentages of children exhibiting severe picky eating and severe resistance to new foods, as well as those with a reported general impression of severe eating problems and constipation, were higher among the children with ASD. These children consumed significantly fewer macronutrients compared with the children without ASD. In addition, the children with ASD had the highest rate of vitamin A deficiency, followed by iron deficiency. After adjusting for sex, the vitamin A concentration was found to be negatively correlated with the CARS score (rs = −0.222, p = 0.021. No correlation between the ferritin, folate, vitamin D, or vitamin B12 concentration and the CARS score was found. These results suggest that reduced macronutrient intakes, severe feeding behavior issues, constipation, and vitamin A deficiency are quite common among children with ASD. Further, a low serum vitamin A level may be a risk factor for symptoms of ASD. However, the underlying mechanism should be further studied.

  8. Vitamin D Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body forms vitamin D naturally after exposure to sunlight. But too much sun exposure can lead to skin aging and skin cancer, ... a malabsorption problem) You don't get enough exposure to sunlight. Your liver or kidneys cannot convert vitamin D ...

  9. Riboflavin : A multifunctional vitamin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Souza, ACS; Ferreira, CV; Juca, MB; Aoyama, H; Cavagis, ADM; Peppelenbosch, MP

    2005-01-01

    Riboflavin, a component of the B-2 vitaminic complex, plays important roles in biochemistry, especially in redox reactions, due to the ability to participate in both one- and two-electron transfers as well as acting as a photosensitizer. Accordingly, low intakes of this vitamin have been associated

  10. Vitamin D Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and the foods you eat. Foods with natural vitamin D include: • Certain fish: salmon, sardines, mackerel, tuna • Cod liver oil • Shiitake mushrooms • Egg yolks Foods that often have added vitamin D include: • Dairy products • Orange juice • Infant formula • ...

  11. Vitamins and Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you don't eat meat, you can find vitamin B12 in eggs, milk and other dairy foods, and fortified breakfast cereals. Vegans (vegetarians who eat no animal products at all, including dairy products) may need to take vitamin supplements. If you're thinking about becoming a ...

  12. Vitamin D and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuolo, Laura; Di Somma, Carolina; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Colao, Annamaria

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D system is a complex pathway that includes precursors, active metabolites, enzymes, and receptors. This complex system actives several molecular pathways and mediates a multitude of functions. In addition to the classical role in calcium and bone homeostasis, vitamin D plays “non-calcemic” effects in host defense, inflammation, immunity, and cancer processes as recognized in vitro and in vivo studies. The aim of this review is to highlight the relationship between vitamin D and cancer, summarizing several mechanisms proposed to explain the potential protective effect of vitamin D against the development and progression of cancer. Vitamin D acts like a transcription factor that influences central mechanisms of tumorigenesis: growth, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. In addition to cellular and molecular studies, epidemiological surveys have shown that sunlight exposure and consequent increased circulating levels of vitamin D are associated with reduced reduced occurrence and a reduced mortality in different histological types of cancer. Another recent field of interest concerns polymorphisms of vitamin D receptor (VDR); in this context, preliminary data suggest that VDR polymorphisms more frequently associated with tumorigenesis are Fok1, Bsm1, Taq1, Apa1, EcoRV, Cdx2; although further studies are needed to clarify their role in the cancer. In this review, the relationship between vitamin D and cancer is discussed. PMID:22649423

  13. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin B12 (B12; also known as cobalamin) is a B vitamin that has an important role in cellular metabolism, especially in DNA synthesis, methylation and mitochondrial metabolism. Clinical B12 deficiency with classic haematological and neurological manifestations is relatively uncommon. However, sub...

  14. Riboflavin : A multifunctional vitamin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Souza, ACS; Ferreira, CV; Juca, MB; Aoyama, H; Cavagis, ADM; Peppelenbosch, MP

    2005-01-01

    Riboflavin, a component of the B-2 vitaminic complex, plays important roles in biochemistry, especially in redox reactions, due to the ability to participate in both one- and two-electron transfers as well as acting as a photosensitizer. Accordingly, low intakes of this vitamin have been associated

  15. [Community Nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranceta, Javier

    2004-06-01

    In the last 20 years, Public Health Nutrition focused mainly on the qualitative aspects which may influence the onset of chronic diseases, quality of life, physical and mental performance and life expectancy. This applied knowledge organised as part of preventive and health promotion programs led to the development of Community Nutrition. The aim of Community Nutrition actions is to adequate lifestyles related to food consumption patterns in order to improve the quality of life and contribute to health promotion of the population in the community where programs and services are delivered. Key functions to develop in a Community Nutrition Unit consist in the identification and assessment of nutrition problems in the community as well as the design, implementation and evaluation of intervention programs by means of appropriate strategies. These should aim at different populations groups and settings, such as work places, schools, high risk groups or the general public. Nowadays, Community Nutrition work efforts should focus on three main aspects: nutrition education in schools and in the community; food safety and food security and the development and reinforcement of food preparation skills across all age groups. Social catering services, either in schools, the work place or at the community level, need to ensure adequate nutritional supply, provide foods contributing to healthy eating practices as well as to enhance culinary traditions and social learning. Food safety and food security have become a top priority in Public Health. The concepts referes to the availability of food safe and adequate as well as in sufficient amount in order to satisfy nutrition requirements of all individuals in the community. Social changes along new scientific developments will introduce new demands in Community Nutrition work and individual dietary counselling will become a key strategy. In order to face new challenges, community nutrition pactitioners require a high quality

  16. Effects of dietary vitamin E on muscle vitamin E and fatty acid content in Aohan fine-wool sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Increasing the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) content and decreasing the saturated fatty acid (SFA) content of mutton can help to improve its nutritional value for consumers. Several laboratories have evaluated the effects of vitamin E on the fatty acid (FA) composition of muscle in sheep. However, little information is available on wool sheep, even though wool sheep breeds are an important source of mutton, especially in northern China where sheep are extensively farmed. The present study was designed to address the effects of vitamin E on muscle FA composition in male Aohan fine-wool sheep. Methods Forty-two male Aohan fine-wool lambs (5 mo old) with similar initial body weight were randomly divided into seven groups and fed diets supplemented with 0 (control group), 20, 100, 200, 1,000, 2,000, or 2,400 IU/sheep/d vitamin E for 12 mo. Three lambs from each group were slaughtered to measure vitamin E and FA content in the longissimus lumborum (LL) and gluteus medius (GM) muscles. Results Vitamin E concentrations in the LL and GM increased significantly after 12 mo of vitamin E supplementation (P < 0.05). However, this increase did not occur in a dose-dependent manner because the muscle vitamin E concentration was highest in the 200 IU/sheep/d group. Dietary vitamin E supplementation also caused a significant reduction in SFA content and an increase in monounsaturated FA (MUFA) content in the LL and GM (P < 0.05). All six doses of vitamin E significantly increased cis9 trans11-conjugated linoleic acid (c9t11-CLA) content in the LL compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusions Dietary supplementation with vitamin E increased muscle vitamin E content and improved the nutritional value of mutton by decreasing SFA content and increasing MUFA and c9t11-CLA contents in Aohan fine-wool sheep. These effects were greatest in sheep fed a diet containing 200 IU/sheep/d vitamin E. PMID:23777843

  17. Vitamin and mineral status in chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia syndrome : A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joustra, Monica L.; Minovic, Isidor; Janssens, Karin A. M.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Rosmalen, Judith G. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Many chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) patients (35-68%) use nutritional supplements, while it is unclear whether deficiencies in vitamins and minerals contribute to symptoms in these patients. Objectives were (1) to determine vitamin and mineral status in CFS

  18. Vitamin A, E, and D Deficiencies in Tunisian Very Low Birth Weight Neonates: Prevalence and Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Fares

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Vitamin A, E, and D deficiencies are very common in Tunisian VLBW neonates and are associated with pre-eclampsia. Improved nutritional and health support for pregnant women and high dose vitamins A, E, and D supplementation in VLBW neonates are strongly required in Tunisia.

  19. Nutritional status of vegetarian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, J T; Dietz, W H; Andrews, E M; Suskind, R M

    1982-02-01

    Thirty-nine preschool children consuming different types of vegetarian diets were studied. Type and amount of carbohydrate, fat, protein, and amount of sodium and cholesterol provided by their diets were more like intakes suggested in the proposed Dietary Goals for the United States than to levels in usual diets of nonvegetarian children. Macrobiotic vegetarian children consumed less animal food than did other vegetarian children. The mean intake of vitamin D of macrobiotics was an eighth of the Recommended Dietary Allowance and mean serum alkaline phosphatase values were elevated. The mean intake of vitamin B12 levels were normal. Vegan macrobiotic children had the lowest intakes of vitamins B12 and D. Other vegetarians' mean intakes of these vitamins met the Recommended Dietary Allowance. Mean iron intakes of the vegetarians approximated the Recommended Dietary Allowance. Hematological indices were suggestive of mild iron deficiency anemia in a quarter of subjects. Serum cholesterol values were low for the group. Physical measurements were within normal limits and macrobiotic vegetarians were not smaller or leaner than other vegetarian children. The nutritional difficulties discovered could be corrected by careful planning of vegetarian children's diets while preserving the beneficial qualities of the diet in other respects.

  20. Oral contraceptives and changes in nutritional requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmery, M; Saraceno, A; Vaiarelli, A; Carlomagno, G

    2013-07-01

    Oral contraceptives (OCs) are a major class of prescription drug, used by a large proportion of women starting from early adolescence. Much research has been conducted to investigate the physiological changes that occur in women who take OCs. These include changes in general health as well as in nutritional needs. In terms of nutrition, several studies investigated whether women on OCs need different amounts of some vitamins and minerals. In particular, a report from the World Health Organization (WHO) points out that the influence of OCs on nutrient requirements is a topic of high clinical relevance and should, therefore, receive great attention. It has been shown that the key nutrient depletions concern folic acid, vitamins B2, B6, B12, vitamin C and E and the minerals magnesium, selenium and zinc. Most research has focused on the levels of these vitamins and minerals in the blood of women who take OCs compared to women who do not. Since women who take OCs not always have adequate diet, may have unhealthy life style or may suffer from pathologies of malabsorption, the possibility to prevent vitamin and mineral deficiencies by taking appropriate dietary supplements should be considered a first-line approach by clinicians.

  1. Vitamin K prophylaxis for premature infants: 1 mg versus 0.5 mg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costakos, Dennis T; Greer, Frank R; Love, Laureen A; Dahlen, Lynn R; Suttie, John W

    2003-11-01

    We studied babies (22 to 32 weeks gestational age) of mothers wishing to breast-feed. Group 1 received 1 mg of vitamin K and Group 2 received 0.5 mg of vitamin K. The Day 2 plasma levels of vitamin K were 1900 to 2600 times higher on average, and the Day 10 vitamin K levels 550 to 600 times higher on average, relative to normal adult plasma values, whether an initial prophylaxis dose of 0.5 mg or 1 mg was used. We conclude that 0.5 mg as the initial dose of vitamin K intramuscularly or intravenously would likely be more than adequate to prevent hemorrhagic disease of the newborn, and that 0.3 mg/per kg may be used for babies with birth weights below 1000 g. To decrease vitamin K intakes in this population, new preparations of total parenteral nutrition multivitamins are needed.

  2. Sports Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri State Dept. of Health, Jefferson City.

    This guide deals with various aspects of sports and nutrition. Twelve chapters are included: (1) "Sports and Nutrition"; (2) "Eat to Compete"; (3) "Fit Folks Need Fit Food"; (4) "The Food Guide Pyramid"; (5) "Fat Finder's Guide"; (6) "Pre- and Post-Event Meals"; (7) "Tips for the…

  3. Nutritional epigenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter is intended to provide a timely overview of the current state of research at the intersection of nutrition and epigenetics. I begin by describing epigenetics and molecular mechanisms of eigenetic regulation, then highlight four classes of nutritional exposures currently being investiga...

  4. Interaction Between Dietary Vitamin K Intake and Anticoagulation by Vitamin K Antagonists: Is It Really True?: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violi, Francesco; Lip, Gregory Yh; Pignatelli, Pasquale; Pastori, Daniele

    2016-03-01

    Educational advice is often given to patients starting treatment with vitamin K Antagonists (VKAs). A great emphasis is made on nutritional information. Common belief is that dietary vitamin K intake could counteract the anticoagulant effect by VKAs and for many years, patients have been discouraged to consume vitamin-K-rich foods, such as green leafy vegetables.The objective of this study is to summarize the current evidence supporting the putative interaction between dietary vitamin K intake and changes in INR with the VKAs.Data sources are MEDLINE via PubMed and Cochrane database.All clinical studies investigating the relationship between dietary vitamin K and measures of anticoagulation were included. We excluded all studies of supplementation of vitamin K alone.We performed a systematic review of the literature up to October 2015, searching for a combination of "food," "diet," "vitamin K," "phylloquinone," "warfarin," "INR," "coagulation," and "anticoagulant."Two dietary interventional trials and 9 observational studies were included. We found conflicting evidence on the effect of dietary intake of vitamin K on coagulation response. Some studies found a negative correlation between vitamin K intake and INR changes, while others suggested that a minimum amount of vitamin K is required to maintain an adequate anticoagulation. Median dietary intake of vitamin K1 ranged from 76 to 217 μg/day among studies, and an effect on coagulation may be detected only for high amount of vitamin intake (>150 μg/day).Most studies included patients with various indications for VKAs therapy, such as atrial fibrillation, prosthetic heart valves, and venous thromboembolism. Thus, INR target was dishomogeneous and no subanalyses for specific populations or different anticoagulants were conducted. Measures used to evaluate anticoagulation stability were variable.The available evidence does not support current advice to modify dietary habits when starting therapy with VKAs

  5. EFFECTS OF NUTRITIONAL ELEMENTS LEVEL ON NUTRITIONAL CHARACTERS AND PHYTOCHEMISTRY OF STRAWBERRY IN HYDROCULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robabeh Asghari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the impacts of nutrient elements on phytochemistry characters and qualities of strawberry in soilless culture system. The experiment was carried out in a factorial experiment based on randomized complete design with three replications. Treatments consisted of 6 groups of strawberry growing on soilless medium made of perlite and coco peat that were treated with different ratio of nutrient solutions. According to the results modified nutrient improved fruit nutritional characters but it was not unique. TSSS, TA, vitamin C and pH often were increased by increasing nutritional elements but anthocyanin was decreased by increasing some nutritional elements.

  6. Nutrition management of patients with epidermolysis bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birge, K

    1995-05-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB), a heterogeneous group of rare, inherited disorders, is manifested by recurrent blistering of the skin induced by the slightest trauma. Little information exists regarding the nutrition management of patients with EB. This study presents information on growth, identifies potential nutrition problems, and provides guidelines for nutrition management of persons with EB. Eighty patients attending a dermatology clinic for EB patients are described. Severity of disease ranged from mild blistering of the knees, elbows, and feet to extensive blistering and scarring of the skin and entire gastrointestinal tract. Of the 18 children with EB simplex, which is a mild form of the disease, 4 (22%) were at nutritional risk. None of the 13 adults with EB simplex were underweight and 8 (62%) were overweight. Of the patients with the more severe forms of EB, 27 of the 35 (77%) children with dystrophic EB and 4 of the 7 (57%) children with junctional EB were at risk for malnutrition. Of the 7 adults with dystrophic EB, 6 (86%) were underweight. Common nutrition problems included protein-energy malnutrition, chewing and swallowing problems, constipation, anemia, and vitamin/mineral deficiencies. When nutrition care protocols address these problems, growth, development, and nutritional status can improve. For those with severe nutrition problems, gastrostomy feeding or similar nutrition therapies should be considered.

  7. Estimated intake and food sources of vitamin A, folate, vitamin C, vitamin E, calcium, iron, and zinc for Guamanian children aged 9 to 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pobocik, Rebecca S; Richer, Jennifer J

    2002-09-01

    This study describes the nutrient intake and food sources of select vitamins and minerals for children on Guam. Food records (n = 954) from public school students aged nine to twelve of all regions on Guam were analyzed for nutrient content and compared to Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA). Individual foods were condensed into 194 food aggregates and food lists representing 84% to 91% of the major vitamins and minerals in the diet of the children were developed by frequency analysis. Median intake of calcium, vitamin E, folate were less than 50% of the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) and mean intake of these nutrients was 60% RDA or less. Mean and median vitamin A intake was 107% and 76% RDA, respectively. Both mean and median intake of Vitamin C, iron and zinc were present at levels above 100% RDA. Rice, meat, fruit drink from powder, milk, and fortified cereals are foods that provide substantial contributions to the vitamin and mineral content of the diets. Traditional, nutrient dense foods, such as fish, yams, papaya, and mango had minor contributions because of low frequently of consumption. Information from this study can be used to develop specific diet assessment instruments and culturally appropriate nutrition education.

  8. Sports nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomanić Milena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to higher energy consumption, physically active people have higher nutritional requirements. In addition to other important factors for sports, such as good health and physical predisposition, adequate nutrition is a fundamental component. Sports nutrition must be well planned and individually adapted based on physical characteristics, tendencies towards gaining or losing weight, frequency, duration and intensity of training sessions. Studies have shown that a well-balanced ratio of macro and micronutrients, with the support of supplements and adequate hydration, can significantly improve athletic performance and plays a key role in achieving better results. An optimally designed nutritional program, with realistic and achievable goals, which complements a well-planned training program, is the basis for success in sports. Only when nutritional requirements are met, deficits can be prevented and performance in sport pushed to the limit.

  9. Diet, nutrition, and cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, S.

    1985-01-01

    Evidence pertaining to the role of dietary factors in carcinogenesis comes from both epidemiological studies and laboratory experiments. In 1982, the Committee on Diet, Nutrition, and Cancer of the National Research Council conducted a comprehensive evaluation of this evidence. That assessment as well as recent epidemiological and laboratory investigations suggest that a high fat diet is associated with increased susceptibility to cancer of different sites, particularly the breast and colon, and to a lesser extent, the prostate. Current data permit no definitive conclusions about other dietary macroconstituents including cholesterol, total caloric intake, protein, carbohydrates and total dietary fiber. Specific components of fiber, however, may have a protective effect against colon cancer. In epidemiological studies, frequent consumption of certain fruits and vegetables, especially citrus fruits and carotene-rich and cruciferous vegetables, is associated with a lower incidence of cancers at various sites. The specific components responsible for these effects are not clearly identified, although the epidemiological evidence appears to be most consistent for a protective effect of carotene on lung cancer and less so for vitamins A and C and various cancer sites. The laboratory evidence is most consistent for vitamin A deficiency and enhanced tumorigenesis, and for the ability of various nonnutritive components in cruciferous vegetables to block in-vivo carcinogenesis. The data for minerals and carcinogenesis are extremely limited, although preliminary evidence from both epidemiological and laboratory studies suggests that selenium may protect against overall cancer risk. 402 references.

  10. Nutritional support in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Santamaria, Vera; Puig, Celia; Soldevillla, Cristina; Barata, Anna; Cuquet, Jordi; Recasens, Asunción

    2014-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic multisystem autoimmune disease which involves the gastrointestinal tract in about 90% of cases. It may contribute to nutritional deterioration. To assess whether the application of a nutritional support protocol to these patients could improve their nutritional status and quality of life. Single center prospective study, performed on an outpatient basis, in a county hospital. The Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) was used to screen risk for malnutrition. Health questionnaire SF-36 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were used to assess quality of life and psychopathology respectively. Weight, height, energy and protein requirements, macronutrient intake and nutritional biochemical parameters were evaluated. Nutritional intervention was performed in patients at risk for malnutrition. Of the 72 patients, 12.5% were at risk for malnutrition. Iron deficiency anemia (18.35%) and vitamin D deficiency (54%) were the most frequently observed nutritional deficits. The questionnaires on psychopathology and quality of life showed a high prevalence of anxiety and depression, and lower level poor quality of life in the physical and mental component. No significant improvements were observed in the weight, food intake, nutritional biochemical parameters, psychopathology and quality of life follow-up. Dietary intervention was able to maintain body weight and food intake. Iron deficiency anemia and vitamin D deficiency improved with iron and vitamine D supplements. No deterioration was observed in psychological assessment or quality of life. Studies with larger numbers of patients are needed to assess the efficacy of this intervention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Pantothenic acid (Vitamin B5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid), vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin), and folic acid. However, some products do ... Pantothenas, Calcium D-Pantothenate, Calcium Pantothenate, Complexe de Vitamines B, D-Calcium Pantothenate, D-Panthenol, D-Panthénol, ...

  12. Nutrition and sports performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherhood, J R

    1984-01-01

    energy expenditure are incurred during extended periods of hard training and competition. Salt, potassium, and magnesium are lost in nutritionally significant amounts in the sweat, but vitamins and trace elements are not. Adaptive mechanisms protect athletes against electrolyte depletion. Iron loss in sweat may contribute to the iron deficiency seen in some endurance runners. Protein is degraded and amino acids are oxidised during physical exercise. Protein is also retained during muscle building training. Recent investigations indicate that the minimal protein requirements of athletes may be substantially higher than those for sedentary persons.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  13. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of vitamin C (ascorbic acid, sodium ascorbate, calcium ascorbate, ascorbyl palmitate, sodium calcium ascorbyl phosphate and sodium ascorbyl phosphate) as a feed additive for all animal species based on a dossier submitted by DSM Nutritional Products Ltd

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin C is essential for primates, guinea pigs and fish. Vitamin C, in the form of ascorbic acid and its calcium and sodium salts, ascorbyl palmitate, sodium calcium ascorbyl phosphate and sodium ascorbyl phosphate, is safe for all animal species. Setting a maximum content in feed and water for drinking is not considered necessary. Data on the vitamin C consumption of consumers are based on the levels of vitamin C in foodstuffs, including food of animal origin, produced in accordance with c...

  14. Aging, Nutritional Status and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Wilma; Hankey, Catherine

    2015-07-30

    The older population is increasing worldwide and in many countries older people will outnumber younger people in the near future. This projected growth in the older population has the potential to place significant burdens on healthcare and support services. Meeting the diet and nutrition needs of older people is therefore crucial for the maintenance of health, functional independence and quality of life. While many older adults remain healthy and eat well those in poorer health may experience difficulties in meeting their nutritional needs. Malnutrition, encompassing both under and over nutrition increases health risks in the older population. More recently the increase in obesity, and in turn the incidence of chronic disease in older adults, now justifies weight management interventions in obese older adults. This growing population group is becoming increasingly diverse in their nutritional requirements. Micro-nutrient status may fluctuate and shortfalls in vitamin D, iron and a number of other nutrients are relatively common and can impact on well-being and quality of life. Aging presents a number of challenges for the maintenance of good nutritional health in older adults.

  15. Aging, Nutritional Status and Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilma Leslie

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The older population is increasing worldwide and in many countries older people will outnumber younger people in the near future. This projected growth in the older population has the potential to place significant burdens on healthcare and support services. Meeting the diet and nutrition needs of older people is therefore crucial for the maintenance of health, functional independence and quality of life. While many older adults remain healthy and eat well those in poorer health may experience difficulties in meeting their nutritional needs. Malnutrition, encompassing both under and over nutrition increases health risks in the older population. More recently the increase in obesity, and in turn the incidence of chronic disease in older adults, now justifies weight management interventions in obese older adults. This growing population group is becoming increasingly diverse in their nutritional requirements. Micro-nutrient status may fluctuate and shortfalls in vitamin D, iron and a number of other nutrients are relatively common and can impact on well-being and quality of life. Aging presents a number of challenges for the maintenance of good nutritional health in older adults.

  16. The composition and nutritional value of kiwifruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Lynley

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the nutrient composition of kiwifruit is central to discussions of the nutritional value and potential health benefits of kiwifruit. Until recently, there were only limited validated data providing extensive compositional information available as reference values for common commercial cultivars. As a genus, Actinidia is diverse in both form and composition; however, there are several notable compounds that, within the context of fruit, are the signature of Actinidia: vitamin C, actinidin, fiber, vitamin E, and for selected cultivars, the persistence of chlorophyll in the mature fruit. Kiwifruit is also known as a nutritionally dense fruit, based on the level of nutrients present. The high amount of vitamin C in kiwifruit is the primary driver of such nutritional scores. Recently, a new approach to estimating the true energy value of kiwifruit has shown that kiwifruit delivers less available energy relative to other foods than is assumed based on traditional measures of food energy content. This, together with the key nutritional elements of kiwifruit, supports its position as a highly nutritious, low-calorie fruit with the potential to deliver a range of health benefits.

  17. Nutrition and Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thai HbH:Vietnamese Relevant links Living with Thalassemia NUTRITIONNutrition and Diet ▶ Diet for the Non-transfused ... Nutrition with Connie Schroepfer, MS, RD: Dec 2016 Nutrition and Diet Nutritional deficiencies are common in thalassemia, ...

  18. Vitamin B12 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Robert; Brown, David L

    2003-03-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency is a common cause of macrocytic anemia and has been implicated in a spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders. The role of B12 deficiency in hyperhomocysteinemia and the promotion of atherosclerosis is only now being explored. Diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency is typically based on measurement of serum vitamin B12 levels; however, about 50 percent of patients with subclinical disease have normal B12 levels. A more sensitive method of screening for vitamin B12 deficiency is measurement of serum methylmalonic acid and homocysteine levels, which are increased early in vitamin B12 deficiency. Use of the Schilling test for detection of pernicious anemia has been supplanted for the most part by serologic testing for parietal cell and intrinsic factor antibodies. Contrary to prevailing medical practice, studies show that supplementation with oral vitamin B12 is a safe and effective treatment for the B12 deficiency state. Even when intrinsic factor is not present to aid in the absorption of vitamin B12 (pernicious anemia) or in other diseases that affect the usual absorption sites in the terminal ileum, oral therapy remains effective.

  19. Vitamin D – The Vitamin Hormone

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vitamin D are rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. These are far from the ... been gained over the past 15 years, and with the growing issue ... epidemiologic studies have observed relationships between low ... Open Access article distributed under the terms of the ... 65 year olds and over. ... mentioned in Table 1.7.

  20. Vitamin D Deficiency in HIV-Infected Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Ayesha; Wells, Saran; Gayton, Tabitha; Smotherman, Carmen; Rathore, Azeem; Kraemer, Dale; Rathore, Mobeen

    2016-11-01

    Improvement in life expectancy with the use of combination antiretroviral therapy has come with the recognition of the complications associated with chronic human immunodeficiency virus infection. Vitamin D has been of particular interest because of its effect on bone health and immune functions. The purpose of this study was to assess vitamin D status in children in relation to the duration and severity of their human immunodeficiency virus infection and nutritional status, as well as to determine whether there was any effect of seasonality. The study design was cross-sectional and all children 0 to 21 years of age were eligible to participate. A total of 59 participants provided informed consent, with 54 subjects completing all study activities. Thirteen (24.1%) had sufficient vitamin D levels, 13 (24.1%) had insufficient levels, and 28 (51.9%) had deficient levels per the guidelines of the Endocrine Society. In our univariate analysis, younger age was associated with higher vitamin D levels (P = 0.030). Higher CD4 counts were associated with higher vitamin D levels (P = 0.018). A significant association between the vitamin D intake per day and vitamin D level was seen (P = 0.013). In the multivariate analysis, the best ordinal logistic regression model had the CD4 count as predictor (P < 0.005), higher CD4 counts were associated with decreased odds of vitamin D deficiency (odds ratio 0.47, 95% confidence interval 0.28-0.80). Vitamin D deficiency was common among the patients included in this study.