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Sample records for vmd2 promoter fragment

  1. Analysis of the VMD2 promoter and implication of E-box binding factors in its regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esumi, Noriko; Oshima, Yuji; Li, Yuanyuan; Campochiaro, Peter A; Zack, Donald J

    2004-04-30

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is crucial for the normal development and function of retinal photo-receptors, and mutations in several genes that are preferentially expressed in the RPE have been shown to cause retinal degeneration. We analyzed the 5'-up-stream region of human VMD2, a gene that is preferentially expressed in the RPE and, when mutated, causes Best macular dystrophy. Transgenic mouse studies with VMD2 promoter/lacZ constructs demonstrated that a-253 to +38 bp fragment is sufficient to direct RPE-specific expression in the eye. Transient transfection assays using the D407 human RPE cell line with VMD2 promoter/luciferase reporter constructs identified two positive regulatory regions, -585 to -541 bp for high level expression and -56 to -42 bp for low level expression. Mutation of a canonical E-box located in the -56 to -42 bp region greatly diminished luciferase expression in D407 cells and abolished the bands shifted with bovine RPE nuclear extract in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Independently a candidate approach was used to select microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) for testing because it is expressed in the RPE and associated with RPE abnormalities when mutated. MITF-M significantly increased luciferase expression in D407 cells in an E-box-dependent manner. These studies define the VMD2 promoter region sufficient to drive RPE-specific expression in the eye, identify positive regulatory regions in vitro, and suggest that MITF as well as other E-box binding factors may act as positive regulators of VMD2 expression.

  2. [Cloning and expression of a promoter function fragment from Thiobacillus thiooxidans in Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, W

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports a recombinant plasmid pSDR12 which is constructed through the substitution of the EcoRI-HindIII fragment of pBR322 by a specific fragment of chromosomal DNA of T. thiooxidans. After it was transformed into C600, the transformants revealed higher levels of Tc resistance. This result shows that a promoter function fragment from autotrophic bacteria is able to express in Escherichia coil.

  3. Promoter engineering to optimize recombinant periplasmic Fab' fragment production in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Desmond M; Templar, Alex; Newton, Joseph; Nesbeth, Darren N

    2016-07-01

    Fab' fragments have become an established class of biotherapeutic over the last two decades. Likewise, developments in synthetic biology are providing ever more powerful techniques for designing bacterial genes, gene networks and entire genomes that can be used to improve industrial performance of cells used for production of biotherapeutics. We have previously observed significant leakage of an exogenous therapeutic Fab' fragment into the growth medium during high cell density cultivation of an Escherichia coli production strain. In this study we sought to apply a promoter engineering strategy to address the issue of Fab' fragment leakage and its consequent bioprocess challenges. We used site directed mutagenesis to convert the Ptac promoter, present in the plasmid, pTTOD-A33 Fab', to a Ptic promoter which has been shown by others to direct expression at a 35% reduced rate compared to Ptac . We characterized the resultant production trains in which either Ptic or Ptac promoters direct Fab' fragment expression. The Ptic promoter strain showed a 25-30% reduction in Fab' expression relative to the original Ptac strain. Reduced Fab' leakage and increased viability over the course of a fed-batch fermentation were also observed for the Ptic promoter strain. We conclude that cell design steps such as the Ptac to Ptic promoter conversion reported here, can yield significant process benefit and understanding with respect to periplasmic Fab' fragment production. It remains an open question as to whether the influence of transgene expression on periplasmic retention is mediated by global metabolic burden effects or periplasm overcapacity. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:840-847, 2016.

  4. Msh2-Msh3 Interferes with Okazaki Fragment Processing to Promote Trinucleotide Repeat Expansions

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    Athena Kantartzis

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Trinucleotide repeat (TNR expansions are the underlying cause of more than 40 neurodegenerative and neuromuscular diseases, including myotonic dystrophy and Huntington’s disease. Although genetic evidence points to errors in DNA replication and/or repair as the cause of these diseases, clear molecular mechanisms have not been described. Here, we focused on the role of the mismatch repair complex Msh2-Msh3 in promoting TNR expansions. We demonstrate that Msh2-Msh3 promotes CTG and CAG repeat expansions in vivo in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Furthermore, we provide biochemical evidence that Msh2-Msh3 directly interferes with normal Okazaki fragment processing by flap endonuclease1 (Rad27 and DNA ligase I (Cdc9 in the presence of TNR sequences, thereby producing small, incremental expansion events. We believe that this is the first mechanistic evidence showing the interplay of replication and repair proteins in the expansion of sequences during lagging-strand DNA replication.

  5. Isolation of Promoters and Fragments of Genes Controlling Endosperm Development Without Fertilization in Arabidopsis and Engineering of the Antisense Constructions

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    Grigory A. Gerashchenkov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Apomixis is asexual seed reproduction without both meiosis and fertilization based on the complex developmental processes such as apomeiosis, parthenogenesis and specific endosperm development. This investigation is aimed at engineering of apomixis in Arabidopsis thaliana with sexual seed reproduction. The fragments of known genes of endosperm formation MEA, FIE, FIS2 and gene of apomeiosis DYAD (as control were isolated using Q5 high fidelity DNA polymerase. These gene fragments of interest at the antisense orientation were fused with isolated constitutive and meiosis specific promoters of Arabidopsis at NcoI sites. The fused promoter-gene fragment modules were cloned in pCambia1301 at SalI cites. The engineered constructions will be used for the floral dip transformation of Arabidopsis and down regulation of these genes at engineering of apomixis.

  6. Synthesis of Functionalized Enynes by Zinc Promoted Tandem Fragmentation-Propargylation of 5-Iodofuranosides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Carina Storm; Madsen, Robert

    1999-01-01

    In the presence of zinc and propargyl bromide methyl 5-iodofuranosides undergo a tandem fragmentation propargylation to produce functionalized enynes......In the presence of zinc and propargyl bromide methyl 5-iodofuranosides undergo a tandem fragmentation propargylation to produce functionalized enynes...

  7. Characterization of the highly active fragment of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene promoter for recombinant protein expression in Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chaomin; Zheng, Liesheng; Zhu, Jihong; Chen, Liguo; Ma, Aimin

    2015-03-01

    Developing efficient native promoters is important for improving recombinant protein expression by fungal genetic engineering. The promoter region of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene in Pleurotus ostreatus (Pogpd) was isolated and optimized by upstream truncation. The activities of these promoters with different lengths were further confirmed by fluorescence, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. A truncated Pogpd-P2 fragment (795 bp) drove enhanced green fluorescence protein (egfp) gene expression in P. ostreatus much more efficiently than full-length Pogpd-P1. Further truncating Pogpd-P2 to 603, 403 and 231 bp reduced the eGFP expression significantly. However, the 403-bp fragment between -356 bp and the start codon was the minimal but sufficient promoter element for eGFP expression. Compact native promoters for genetic engineering of P. ostreatus were successfully developed and validated in this study. This will broaden the preexisting repertoire of fungal promoters for biotechnology application. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. In vitro incubation of human spermatozoa promotes reactive oxygen species generation and DNA fragmentation.

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    Cicaré, J; Caille, A; Zumoffen, C; Ghersevich, S; Bahamondes, L; Munuce, M J

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the oxidative process associated with sperm capacitation and its impact on DNA fragmentation and sperm function. Redox activity and lipid peroxidation were analysed in human spermatozoa after 3, 6 and 22 h of incubation in Ham's F10 medium plus bovine albumin at 37° and 5% CO2 for capacitation. DNA status, tyrosine phosphorylation pattern and induced acrosome reaction were evaluated after capacitating conditions. At 22 h of incubation, there was a significant (P DNA fragmentation. These results indicate that when spermatozoa are incubated for several hours (22 h), a common practice in assisted reproductive techniques, an increase in oxidative sperm metabolism and in the proportion of fragmented DNA should be expected. However, there was no effect on any of the other functional parameters associated with sperm fertilising capacity. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Cloning of open reading frames and promoters from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome: construction of genomic libraries of random small fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, G M; Tornow, J; Moldave, K

    1986-01-01

    We have developed a novel efficient method, carrier-facilitated insertion, to insert small (150-600 bp) DNA fragments into plasmid vectors. This method employs a carrier segment of vector DNA to circumvent the difficulties in ligating two fragments together to generate a recombinant circle efficiently. We have used carrier-facilitated insertion to construct three genomic libraries of random (DNase I-generated) fragments from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. One of these was an expression library, and the other two were promoter-cloning libraries. 87-90% of the Escherichia coli colonies in each library contained recombinant plasmids, and less than 3% of the recombinants contained more than one insert. Detection of open reading frames among the inserts in the expression library was accomplished by testing for beta-galactosidase activity. This methodology, unencumbered by the intrinsic disproportionality of cDNA libraries, can be used to identify and clone DNA that codes for a specific antigenic determinant. When used in combination with a method to detect and isolate random constitutive, repressible and inducible yeast promoters, these libraries should permit a comprehensive analysis of the yeast genome and its expression.

  10. Identification of a 49-bp fragment of the HvLTP2 promoter directing aleurone cell specific expression.

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    Opsahl-Sorteberg, Hilde-Gunn; Divon, Hege Hvattum; Nielsen, Peter Stein; Kalla, Roger; Hammond-Kosack, Michael; Shimamoto, Ko; Kohli, Ajay

    2004-10-27

    Identification of regulatory elements directing definite and specific spatiotemporal expression patterns is a prerequisite to the next generation of transgenic plants with commercial and ethical feasibility for producing plantibodies or other pharmaceutically important compounds. Here we describe the functional dissection of the barley nonspecific lipid transfer protein gene promoter, HvLTP2. The gene is specifically expressed in aleurone cells of cereals and used as an aleurone marker in maize and rice. The transcript is uniformly localised in the barley aleurone cells from around 10 DAP. Patchy expression in aleurone cells of transgenic rice has been reported and explained by silencing of transgenes. We have performed deletion analyses of the 801-bp HvLTP2 promoter to gain insight into the molecular basis of its regulation and the presence of putative regulatory elements. From the deletion studies, a 49-bp promoter region directing aleurone-specific expression was identified. Simultaneously, in vivo footprinting was carried out to identify promoter elements bound by putative regulatory proteins. Within the 49-bp fragment, the most promising candidate for a minimal cis-acting regulatory region directing aleurone specificity is the ds-sequence. Based on our results, we hypothesise that the ds-sequence directs aleurone specificity, possibly through a concerted action with elements directing general expression in the seed. Moreover, we present an overview of LTP2 elements putatively involved in directing seed, endosperm, and aleurone expression. Additionally, we report HvLTP2 expression in the embryo, not previously detected. The regulatory element(s) directing expression in embryo is located downstream of the 49-bp fragment directing aleurone specificity, thus demonstrating independent control of aleurone and embryo-localised expression. Finally, we discuss the existence of several endosperm-specific boxes and whether alternative promoter elements and combinations

  11. TURBULENT DISKS ARE NEVER STABLE: FRAGMENTATION AND TURBULENCE-PROMOTED PLANET FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, Philip F. [TAPIR, Mailcode 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Christiansen, Jessie L., E-mail: phopkins@caltech.edu [SETI Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, M/S 244-30, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2013-10-10

    A fundamental assumption in our understanding of disks is that when the Toomre Q >> 1, the disk is stable against fragmentation into self-gravitating objects (and so cannot form planets via direct collapse). But if disks are turbulent, this neglects a spectrum of stochastic density fluctuations that can produce rare, high-density mass concentrations. Here, we use a recently developed analytic framework to predict the statistics of these fluctuations, i.e., the rate of fragmentation and mass spectrum of fragments formed in a turbulent Keplerian disk. Turbulent disks are never completely stable: we calculate the (always finite) probability of forming self-gravitating structures via stochastic turbulent density fluctuations in such disks. Modest sub-sonic turbulence above Mach number M∼0.1 can produce a few stochastic fragmentation or 'direct collapse' events over ∼Myr timescales, even if Q >> 1 and cooling is slow (t{sub cool} >> t{sub orbit}). In transsonic turbulence this extends to Q ∼ 100. We derive the true Q-criterion needed to suppress such events, which scales exponentially with Mach number. We specify to turbulence driven by magneto-rotational instability, convection, or spiral waves and derive equivalent criteria in terms of Q and the cooling time. Cooling times ∼> 50 t{sub dyn} may be required to completely suppress fragmentation. These gravo-turbulent events produce mass spectra peaked near ∼(Q M{sub disk}/M{sub *}){sup 2} M{sub disk} (rocky-to-giant planet masses, increasing with distance from the star). We apply this to protoplanetary disk models and show that even minimum-mass solar nebulae could experience stochastic collapse events, provided a source of turbulence.

  12. Interactions between amyloid-β and Tau fragments promote aberrant aggregates: implications for amyloid toxicity.

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    Do, Thanh D; Economou, Nicholas J; Chamas, Ali; Buratto, Steven K; Shea, Joan-Emma; Bowers, Michael T

    2014-09-25

    We have investigated at the oligomeric level interactions between Aβ(25-35) and Tau(273-284), two important fragments of the amyloid-β and Tau proteins, implicated in Alzheimer's disease. We are able to directly observe the coaggregation of these two peptides by probing the conformations of early heteroligomers and the macroscopic morphologies of the aggregates. Ion-mobility experiment and theoretical modeling indicate that the interactions of the two fragments affect the self-assembly processes of both peptides. Tau(273-284) shows a high affinity to form heteroligomers with existing Aβ(25-35) monomer and oligomers in solution. The configurations and characteristics of the heteroligomers are determined by whether the population of Aβ(25-35) or Tau(273-284) is dominant. As a result, two types of aggregates are observed in the mixture with distinct morphologies and dimensions from those of pure Aβ(25-35) fibrils. The incorporation of some Tau into β-rich Aβ(25-35) oligomers reduces the aggregation propensity of Aβ(25-35) but does not fully abolish fibril formation. On the other hand, by forming complexes with Aβ(25-35), Tau monomers and dimers can advance to larger oligomers and form granular aggregates. These heteroligomers may contribute to toxicity through loss of normal function of Tau or inherent toxicity of the aggregates themselves.

  13. Electronic cigarette aerosols and copper nanoparticles induce mitochondrial stress and promote DNA fragmentation in lung fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerner, Chad A.; Rutagarama, Pierrot; Ahmad, Tanveer; Sundar, Isaac K.; Elder, Alison; Rahman, Irfan, E-mail: irfan_rahman@urmc.rochester.edu

    2016-09-02

    Oxidants or nanoparticles have recently been identified as constituents of aerosols released from various styles of electronic cigarettes (E-cigs). Cells in the lung may be directly exposed to these constituents and harbor reactive properties capable of incurring acute cell injury. Our results show mitochondria are sensitive to both E-cig aerosols and aerosol containing copper nanoparticles when exposed to human lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) using an Air-Liquid Interface culture system, evident by elevated levels of mitochondrial ROS (mtROS). Increased mtROS after aerosol exposure is associated with reduced stability of OxPhos electron transport chain (ETC) complex IV subunit and nuclear DNA fragmentation. Increased levels of IL-8 and IL-6 in HFL-1 conditioned media were also observed. These findings reveal both mitochondrial, genotoxic, and inflammatory stresses are features of direct cell exposure to E-cig aerosols which are ensued by inflammatory duress, raising a concern on deleterious effect of vaping. - Graphical abstract: Oxidants and possibly reactive properties of metal particles in E-cig aerosols impart mitochondrial oxidative stress and DNA damage. These biological effects accompany inflammatory response which may raise concern regarding long term E-cig use. Mitochondria may be particularly sensitive to reactive properties of E-cig aerosols in addition to the potential for them to induce genotoxic stress by generating increased ROS. - Highlights: • Mitochondria are sensitive to both E-cig aerosols and metal nanoparticles. • Increased mtROS by E-cig aerosol is associated with disrupted mitochondrial energy. • E-cig causes nuclear DNA fragmentation. • E-cig aerosols induce pro-inflammatory response in human fibroblasts.

  14. Dual therapeutic functions of F-5 fragment in burn wounds: preventing wound progression and promoting wound healing in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Ayesha; O'Brien, Kathryn; Chen, Mei; Wong, Alex; Garner, Warren; Woodley, David T; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Burn injuries are a leading cause of morbidity including prolonged hospitalization, disfigurement, and disability. Currently there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved burn therapeutics. A clinical distinction of burn injuries from other acute wounds is the event of the so-called secondary burn wound progression within the first week of the injury, in which a burn expands horizontally and vertically from its initial boundary to a larger area. Therefore, an effective therapeutics for burns should show dual abilities to prevent the burn wound progression and thereafter promote burn wound healing. Herein we report that topically applied F-5 fragment of heat shock protein-90α is a dual functional agent to promote burn wound healing in pigs. First, F-5 prevents burn wound progression by protecting the surrounding cells from undergoing heat-induced caspase 3 activation and apoptosis with increased Akt activation. Accordingly, F-5-treated burn and excision wounds show a marked decline in inflammation. Thereafter, F-5 accelerates burn wound healing by stimulating the keratinocyte migration-led reepithelialization, leading to wound closure. This study addresses a topical agent that is capable of preventing burn wound progression and accelerating burn wound healing.

  15. Biased signaling favoring gi over β-arrestin promoted by an apelin fragment lacking the C-terminal phenylalanine.

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    Ceraudo, Emilie; Galanth, Cécile; Carpentier, Eric; Banegas-Font, Inmaculada; Schonegge, Anne-Marie; Alvear-Perez, Rodrigo; Iturrioz, Xavier; Bouvier, Michel; Llorens-Cortes, Catherine

    2014-08-29

    Apelin plays a prominent role in body fluid and cardiovascular homeostasis. We previously showed that the C-terminal Phe of apelin 17 (K17F) is crucial for triggering apelin receptor internalization and decreasing blood pressure (BP) but is not required for apelin binding or Gi protein coupling. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that the important role of the C-terminal Phe in BP decrease may be as a Gi-independent but β-arrestin-dependent signaling pathway that could involve MAPKs. For this purpose, we have used apelin fragments K17F and K16P (K17F with the C-terminal Phe deleted), which exhibit opposite profiles on apelin receptor internalization and BP. Using BRET-based biosensors, we showed that whereas K17F activates Gi and promotes β-arrestin recruitment to the receptor, K16P had a much reduced ability to promote β-arrestin recruitment while maintaining its Gi activating property, revealing the biased agonist character of K16P. We further show that both β-arrestin recruitment and apelin receptor internalization contribute to the K17F-stimulated ERK1/2 activity, whereas the K16P-promoted ERK1/2 activity is entirely Gi-dependent. In addition to providing new insights on the structural basis underlying the functional selectivity of apelin peptides, our study indicates that the β-arrestin-dependent ERK1/2 activation and not the Gi-dependent signaling may participate in K17F-induced BP decrease. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. The One-Kilobase DNA Fragment Upstream of the ardC Actin Gene of Physarum polycephalum Is Both a Replicator and a Promoter

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    Pierron, Gérard; Pallotta, Dominick; Bénard, Marianne

    1999-01-01

    The 1-kb DNA fragment upstream of the ardC actin gene of Physarum polycephalum promotes the transcription of a reporter gene either in a transient-plasmid assay or as an integrated copy in an ectopic position, defining this region as the transcriptional promoter of the ardC gene (PardC). Since we mapped an origin of replication activated at the onset of S phase within this same fragment, we examined the pattern of replication of a cassette containing the PardC promoter and the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene, hph, integrated into two different chromosomal sites. In both cases, we show by two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis that an efficient, early activated origin coincides with the ectopic PardC fragment. One of the integration sites was a normally late-replicating region. The presence of the ectopic origin converted this late-replicating domain into an early-replicating domain in which replication forks propagate with kinetics indistinguishable from those of the native PardC replicon. This is the first demonstration that initiation sites for DNA replication in Physarum correspond to cis-acting replicator sequences. This work also confirms the close proximity of a replication origin and a promoter, with both functions being located within the 1-kb proximal region of the ardC actin gene. A more precise location of the replication origin with respect to the transcriptional promoter must await the development of a functional autonomously replicating sequence assay in Physarum. PMID:10207074

  17. The ability of apolipoprotein E fragments to promote intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid beta peptide 42 is both isoform and size-specific

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    Dafnis, Ioannis; Argyri, Letta; Sagnou, Marina; Tzinia, Athina; Tsilibary, Effie C.; Stratikos, Efstratios; Chroni, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    The apolipoprotein (apo) E4 isoform is the strongest risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). ApoE4 is more susceptible to proteolysis than apoE2 and apoE3 isoforms and carboxyl-terminal truncated apoE4 forms have been found in AD patients’ brain. We have previously shown that a specific apoE4 fragment, apoE4-165, promotes amyloid-peptide beta 42 (Aβ42) accumulation in human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells and increased intracellular reactive oxygen species formation, two events considered to occur early in AD pathogenesis. Here, we show that these effects are allele-dependent and absolutely require the apoE4 background. Furthermore, the exact length of the fragment is critical since longer or shorter length carboxyl-terminal truncated apoE4 forms do not elicit the same effects. Structural and thermodynamic analyses showed that apoE4-165 has a compact structure, in contrast to other carboxyl-terminal truncated apoE4 forms that are instead destabilized. Compared however to other allelic backgrounds, apoE4-165 is structurally distinct and less thermodynamically stable suggesting that the combination of a well-folded structure with structural plasticity is a unique characteristic of this fragment. Overall, our findings suggest that the ability of apoE fragments to promote Aβ42 intraneuronal accumulation is specific for both the apoE4 isoform and the particular structural and thermodynamic properties of the fragment. PMID:27476701

  18. Differential Roles of Cell Death-inducing DNA Fragmentation Factor-α-like Effector (CIDE) Proteins in Promoting Lipid Droplet Fusion and Growth in Subpopulations of Hepatocytes.

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    Xu, Wenyi; Wu, Lizhen; Yu, Miao; Chen, Feng-Jung; Arshad, Muhammad; Xia, Xiayu; Ren, Hao; Yu, Jinhai; Xu, Li; Xu, Dijin; Li, John Zhong; Li, Peng; Zhou, Linkang

    2016-02-26

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are dynamic subcellular organelles whose growth is closely linked to obesity and hepatic steatosis. Cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-α-like effector (CIDE) proteins, including Cidea, Cideb, and Cidec (also called Fsp27), play important roles in lipid metabolism. Cidea and Cidec are LD-associated proteins that promote atypical LD fusion in adipocytes. Here, we find that CIDE proteins are all localized to LD-LD contact sites (LDCSs) and promote lipid transfer, LD fusion, and growth in hepatocytes. We have identified two types of hepatocytes, one with small LDs (small LD-containing hepatocytes, SLHs) and one with large LDs (large LD-containing hepatocytes, LLHs) in the liver. Cideb is localized to LDCSs and promotes lipid exchange and LD fusion in both SLHs and LLHs, whereas Cidea and Cidec are specifically localized to the LDCSs and promote lipid exchange and LD fusion in LLHs. Cideb-deficient SLHs have reduced LD sizes and lower lipid exchange activities. Fasting dramatically induces the expression of Cidea/Cidec and increases the percentage of LLHs in the liver. The majority of the hepatocytes from the liver of obese mice are Cidea/Cidec-positive LLHs. Knocking down Cidea or Cidec significantly reduced lipid storage in the livers of obese animals. Our data reveal that CIDE proteins play differential roles in promoting LD fusion and lipid storage; Cideb promotes lipid storage under normal diet conditions, whereas Cidea and Cidec are responsible for liver steatosis under fasting and obese conditions.

  19. MET receptor variant R970C favors calpain-dependent generation of a fragment promoting epithelial cell scattering.

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    Montagne, Rémi; Baranzelli, Anne; Muharram, Ghaffar; Catherine, Leroy; Lesaffre, Marie; Vinchent, Audrey; Kherrouche, Zoulika; Werkmeister, Elisabeth; Cortot, Alexis B; Tulasne, David

    2017-01-04

    The receptor tyrosine kinase MET and its ligand, the hepatocyte growth factor, are essential to embryonic development, whereas deregulation of MET signaling is associated with tumorigenesis leading to various cancers, including lung carcinoma. Mutations in the MET kinase domain lead to constitutive kinase activity and are associated with tumorigenesis. In lung cancer, however, some mutations are found in the juxtamembrane domain, and their functional consequences are unknown. Because the juxtamembrane domain of MET is targeted by several proteolytic cleavages, involved in its degradation during cell death or under steady-state conditions, we evaluated the influence of these mutations on the MET proteolytic cleavages. In stably transfected epithelial cells expressing MET, the juxtamembrane mutations R970C, P991S, and T992I were found not to modify the known caspase or presenilin-dependent regulated intramembrane proteolysis. Yet when overexpressed, the R970C variant caused generation of an as yet undescribed 45-kDa fragment (p45 MET). This fragment was found in the confluent lung cancer cell line NCI-H1437 carrying the R970C mutation and at a lesser extent in cell lines expressing WT MET, suggesting that R970C mutation favors this cleavage. Generation of p45 MET required the activity of the calpain proteases, confirming the involvement of proteolysis. Ectopic expression of reconstituted p45 MET in epithelial cell lines favored cell scattering and invasion indicating active role of this fragment in HGF/SF induced responses. Hence, although the juxtamembrane mutations of MET do not affect its known proteolytic cleavages, the R970C MET variant favors calpain dependent proteolytic cleavage in lung cancer cells.

  20. [Will health promotion remain a utopia in a fragmented political system? The case of the Wallonia-Brussels Federation].

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    Bantuelle, Martine

    2013-01-01

    In the French Community of Belgium (the Wallonia-Brussels Federation), the changing political landscape and the various laws relating to the roles of the federal state, communities and regions introduced since 1980 have had a significant impact on health policy. Since then, there have been significant developments in health education services and activities. In 1997, a government decree was issued to promote the concept of health promotion, to reform the existing system and to define policy priorities as part of a new five-year plan (1998-2003). Significant progress was made during this period as a result of the development of a global approach extending beyond the mere analysis of risk factors. The second five-year plan (2004-2008), aimed at combining preventive medicine and health promotion, resulted in the involvement of a wider range of actors and greater cross-sector collaboration. However, the sheer number of decision-making levels has been a major obstacle to popular participation and consultation. If the question of social and cultural accessibility is not seriously addressed, the focus on preventive medicine programs may prove to be detrimental to the development of an effective health promotion framework. The disconnect between the political vision and the reality of practice has had an adverse impact on health promotion. Health promotion professionals have repeatedly called for a third five-year plan involving all ministers and aimed at developing a cross-sector approach, at addressing the determinants of health, at promoting the active participation of local communities and at reducing social health inequalities. The concerns of health promotion practitioners were further exacerbated by the introduction of an external assessment process initiated by the Ministry of Health in 2010. The current concerns over the future of the Belgian state, the economic crisis and the impact of spending cuts have increased the sense of uncertainty. The upcoming elections

  1. Single chain fragment variable antibodies developed by using as target the 3rd fibronectin type III homologous repeat fragment of human neural cell adhesion molecule L1 promote cell migration and neuritogenesis.

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    Tang, Dan-Yang; Yu, Yang; Zhao, Xuan-Jun; Schachner, Melitta; Zhao, Wei-Jiang

    2015-01-15

    L1CAM plays important roles during ontogeny, including promotion of neuronal cell migration and neuritogenesis, and stimulation of axonal outgrowth, fasciculation and myelination. These functions are at least partially exerted through a 16-mer amino acid sequence in the third fibronectin type III-like repeat of L1, which associates with several interaction partners, including integrins, other adhesion molecules and growth factor receptors. Here, using the Tomlinson I library for phage display, we obtained two single-chain variable fragment antibodies (scFvs) against this peptide sequence of human L1, hereafter called H3 peptide. Both scFvs recognize the H3 peptide and the extracellular domain of L1, as tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining of L1 expresssing cells. Furthermore, both scFvs reduce U-87 MG cell adhesion to fibronectin, while stimulating cell migration. Application of scFvs to human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells promote process outgrowth. Similar to triggering of endogenous L1 functions at the cell surface, both scFvs activate the signal transducers Erk and Src in these cells. Our results indicate that scFvs against a functionally pivotal domain in L1 trigger its regeneration-beneficial functions in vitro, encouraging thoughts on therapy of neurodegenerative diseases in the hope to ameliorate human nervous system diseases.

  2. Single chain variable fragment against aβ expressed in baculovirus inhibits abeta fibril elongation and promotes its disaggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhang

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common form of age-related dementia, and the most urgent problem is that it is currently incurable. Amyloid-β (Aβ peptide is believed to play a major role in the pathogenesis of AD. We previously reported that an Aβ N-terminal amino acid targeting monoclonal antibody (MAb, A8, inhibits Aβ fibril formation and has potential as an immunotherapy for AD based on a mouse model. To further study the underlying mechanisms, we tested our hypothesis that the single chain fragment variable (scFv without the Fc fragment is capable of regulating either Aβ aggregation or disaggregation in vitro. Here, a model of cell-free Aβ "on-pathway" aggregation was established and identified using PCR, Western blot, ELISA, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and thioflavin T (ThT binding analyses. His-tagged A8 scFvs was cloned and solubly expressed in baculovirus. Our data demonstrated that the Ni-NTA agarose affinity-purified A8 scFv inhibited the forward reaction of "on-pathway" aggregation and Aβ fibril maturation. The effect of A8 scFv on Aβ fibrillogenesis was markedly more significant when administered at the start of the Aβ folding reaction. Furthermore, the results also showed that pre-formed Aβ fibrils could be disaggregated via incubation with purified A8 scFv, which suggested that A8 scFv is involved in the reverse reaction of Aβ aggregation. Therefore, A8 scFv was capable of both inhibiting fibrillogenesis and disaggregating matured fibrils. Our present study provides valuable insight into the regulators of ultrastructural dynamics of cell-free "on-pathway" Aβ aggregation and will assist in the development of therapeutic strategies for AD.

  3. Calcium binding promotes prion protein fragment 90-231 conformational change toward a membrane destabilizing and cytotoxic structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacha Sorrentino

    Full Text Available The pathological form of prion protein (PrP(Sc, as other amyloidogenic proteins, causes a marked increase of membrane permeability. PrP(Sc extracted from infected Syrian hamster brains induces a considerable change in membrane ionic conductance, although the contribution of this interaction to the molecular mechanism of neurodegeneration process is still controversial. We previously showed that the human PrP fragment 90-231 (hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁ increases ionic conductance across artificial lipid bilayer, in a calcium-dependent manner, producing an alteration similar to that observed for PrP(Sc. In the present study we demonstrate that hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁, pre-incubated with 10 mM Ca⁺⁺ and then re-suspended in physiological external solution increases not only membrane conductance but neurotoxicity as well. Furthermore we show the existence of a direct link between these two effects as demonstrated by a highly statistically significant correlation in several experimental conditions. A similar correlation between increased membrane conductance and cell degeneration has been observed assaying hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁ bearing pathogenic mutations (D202N and E200K. We also report that Ca⁺⁺ binding to hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁ induces a conformational change based on an alteration of secondary structure characterized by loss of alpha-helix content causing hydrophobic amino acid exposure and proteinase K resistance. These features, either acquired after controlled thermal denaturation or induced by D202N and E200K mutations were previously identified as responsible for hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁ cytotoxicity. Finally, by in silico structural analysis, we propose that Ca⁺⁺ binding to hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁ modifies amino acid orientation, in the same way induced by E200K mutation, thus suggesting a pathway for the structural alterations responsible of PrP neurotoxicity.

  4. Calcium binding promotes prion protein fragment 90-231 conformational change toward a membrane destabilizing and cytotoxic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Sacha; Bucciarelli, Tonino; Corsaro, Alessandro; Tosatto, Alessio; Thellung, Stefano; Villa, Valentina; Schininà, M Eugenia; Maras, Bruno; Galeno, Roberta; Scotti, Luca; Creati, Francesco; Marrone, Alessandro; Re, Nazzareno; Aceto, Antonio; Florio, Tullio; Mazzanti, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The pathological form of prion protein (PrP(Sc)), as other amyloidogenic proteins, causes a marked increase of membrane permeability. PrP(Sc) extracted from infected Syrian hamster brains induces a considerable change in membrane ionic conductance, although the contribution of this interaction to the molecular mechanism of neurodegeneration process is still controversial. We previously showed that the human PrP fragment 90-231 (hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁) increases ionic conductance across artificial lipid bilayer, in a calcium-dependent manner, producing an alteration similar to that observed for PrP(Sc). In the present study we demonstrate that hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁, pre-incubated with 10 mM Ca⁺⁺ and then re-suspended in physiological external solution increases not only membrane conductance but neurotoxicity as well. Furthermore we show the existence of a direct link between these two effects as demonstrated by a highly statistically significant correlation in several experimental conditions. A similar correlation between increased membrane conductance and cell degeneration has been observed assaying hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁ bearing pathogenic mutations (D202N and E200K). We also report that Ca⁺⁺ binding to hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁ induces a conformational change based on an alteration of secondary structure characterized by loss of alpha-helix content causing hydrophobic amino acid exposure and proteinase K resistance. These features, either acquired after controlled thermal denaturation or induced by D202N and E200K mutations were previously identified as responsible for hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁ cytotoxicity. Finally, by in silico structural analysis, we propose that Ca⁺⁺ binding to hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁ modifies amino acid orientation, in the same way induced by E200K mutation, thus suggesting a pathway for the structural alterations responsible of PrP neurotoxicity.

  5. S/MAR-containing DNA nanoparticles promote persistent RPE gene expression and improvement in RPE65-associated LCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koirala, Adarsha; Makkia, Rasha S; Conley, Shannon M; Cooper, Mark J; Naash, Muna I

    2013-04-15

    Mutations in genes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cause or contribute to debilitating ocular diseases, including Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA). Genetic therapies, particularly adeno-associated viruses (AAVs), are a popular choice for monogenic diseases; however, the limited payload capacity of AAVs combined with the large number of retinal disease genes exceeding that capacity make the development of alternative delivery methods critical. Here, we test the ability of compacted DNA nanoparticles (NPs) containing a plasmid with a scaffold matrix attachment region (S/MAR) and vitelliform macular dystrophy 2 (VMD2) promoter to target the RPE, drive long-term, tissue-specific gene expression and mediate proof-of-principle rescue in the rpe65(-/-) model of LCA. We show that the S/MAR-containing plasmid exhibited reporter gene expression levels several fold higher than plasmid or NPs without S/MARs. Importantly, this expression was highly persistent, lasting up to 2 years (last timepoint studied). We therefore selected this plasmid for testing in the rpe65(-/-) mouse model and observe that NP or plasmid VMD2-hRPE65-S/MAR led to structural and functional improvements in the LCA disease phenotype. These results indicate that the non-viral delivery of hRPE65 vectors can result in persistent, therapeutically efficacious gene expression in the RPE.

  6. C-terminal fragment of amebin promotes actin filament bundling, inhibits acto-myosin ATPase activity and is essential for amoeba migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóźwiak, Jolanta; Rzhepetskyy, Yuriy; Sobczak, Magdalena; Kocik, Elżbieta; Skórzewski, Radosław; Kłopocka, Wanda; Rędowicz, Maria Jolanta

    2011-02-01

    Amebin [formerly termed as ApABP-FI; Sobczak et al. (2007) Biochem. Cell Biol. 85] is encoded in Amoeba proteus by two transcripts, 2672-nt and 1125-nt. A product of the shorter transcript (termed as C-amebin), comprising C-terminal 375 amino-acid-residue fragment of amebin, has been expressed and purified as the recombinant GST-fusion protein. GST-C-amebin bound both to monomeric and filamentous actin. The binding was Ca(2+)-independent and promoted filament bundling, as revealed with the transmission electron microscopy. GST-C-amebin significantly decreased MgATPase activity of rabbit skeletal muscle acto-S1. Removal with endoproteinase ArgC of a positively charged C-terminal region of GST-amebin containing KLASMWEQ sequence abolished actin-binding and bundling as well as the ATPase-inhibitory effect of C-amebin, indicating that this protein region was involved in the interaction with actin. Microinjection of amoebae with antibody against C-terminus of amebin significantly affected amoebae morphology, disturbed cell polarization and transport of cytoplasmic granules as well as blocked migration. These data indicate that amebin may be one of key regulators of the actin-cytoskeleton dynamics and actin-dependent motility in A. proteus.

  7. Dscam1 Forms a Complex with Robo1 and the N-Terminal Fragment of Slit to Promote the Growth of Longitudinal Axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Maryam; Song, Minmin; Gillis, Taylor; Bousum, Adam; Miller, Amanda; Kidd, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Slit protein is a major midline repellent for central nervous system (CNS) axons. In vivo, Slit is proteolytically cleaved into N- and C-terminal fragments, but the biological significance of this is unknown. Analysis in the Drosophila ventral nerve cord of a slit allele (slit-UC) that cannot be cleaved revealed that midline repulsion is still present but longitudinal axon guidance is disrupted, particularly across segment boundaries. Double mutants for the Slit receptors Dscam1 and robo1 strongly resemble the slit-UC phenotype, suggesting they cooperate in longitudinal axon guidance, and through biochemical approaches, we found that Dscam1 and Robo1 form a complex dependent on Slit-N. In contrast, Robo1 binding alone shows a preference for full-length Slit, whereas Dscam1 only binds Slit-N. Using a variety of transgenes, we demonstrated that Dscam1 appears to modify the output of Robo/Slit complexes so that signaling is no longer repulsive. Our data suggest that the complex is promoting longitudinal axon growth across the segment boundary. The ability of Dscam1 to modify the output of other receptors in a ligand-dependent fashion may be a general principle for Dscam proteins. PMID:27654876

  8. Quantum fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Peschanski, R

    1993-01-01

    Phenomenological and theoretical aspects of fragmentation for elementary particles (resp. nuclei) are discussed. It is shown that some concepts of classical fragmentation remain relevant in a microscopic framework, exhibiting non-trivial properties of quantum relativistic field theory (resp. lattice percolation). Email contact: pesch@amoco.saclay.cea.fr

  9. Fragmented Authoritarianism or Integrated Fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brødsgaard, Kjeld Erik

    of these business leaders prompts the question of whether we are seeing the development of distinct interest groups that could challenge Party and state authority and create a fragmented polity. However, through the nomenklatura system the Party has an important instrument of control to wield over business groups...... and the Party-state, I suggest the notion of integrated fragmentation....

  10. Magma Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnermann, Helge M.

    2015-05-01

    Magma fragmentation is the breakup of a continuous volume of molten rock into discrete pieces, called pyroclasts. Because magma contains bubbles of compressible magmatic volatiles, decompression of low-viscosity magma leads to rapid expansion. The magma is torn into fragments, as it is stretched into hydrodynamically unstable sheets and filaments. If the magma is highly viscous, resistance to bubble growth will instead lead to excess gas pressure and the magma will deform viscoelastically by fracturing like a glassy solid, resulting in the formation of a violently expanding gas-pyroclast mixture. In either case, fragmentation represents the conversion of potential energy into the surface energy of the newly created fragments and the kinetic energy of the expanding gas-pyroclast mixture. If magma comes into contact with external water, the conversion of thermal energy will vaporize water and quench magma at the melt-water interface, thus creating dynamic stresses that cause fragmentation and the release of kinetic energy. Lastly, shear deformation of highly viscous magma may cause brittle fractures and release seismic energy.

  11. Framing Fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    , contain distinctive architectural traits, not only based on rational repetition, but also supporting composition and montage as dynamic concepts. Prefab architecture is an architecture of fragmentation, individualization and changeability, and this sets up new challenges for the architect. This paper...... into separate parts or systems: skeleton, skin, services, internal cladding, etc. Each building part/system is being conceived, produced, delivered and maintained by different construction companies. Basically the building is being fragmented into separate parts living their separate lives. The architect has...... to create architectural meaning and give character to an architecture of fragmentation. Layers are both seen as conceptual as well as material frames which define certain strong properties or meanings in the architectural work. Defining layers is a way of separating and organizing; it both defines...

  12. Bespoke Fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse Aagaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    The Ph.D. -project Bespoke Fragments seeks to explore and utilise the space emerging between the potentials of digital drawing and fabrication and the field of materials and their properties and capacities. Within this span, the project is situated in a shuttling between the virtual and the actual......, the emergence of virtual space is no longer limited to the computer's digital world, but extends into the materials' world. Creation and uncertainty are allowed as virtual parameters in both the digital and reality. Based on this notion the project suggests utilising that exact potential to develop...

  13. CpG-island fragments from the HNRPA2B1/CBX3 genomic locus reduce silencing and enhance transgene expression from the hCMV promoter/enhancer in mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irvine Alistair

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hCMV promoter is very commonly used for high level expression of transgenes in mammalian cells, but its utility is hindered by transcriptional silencing. Large genomic fragments incorporating the CpG island region of the HNRPA2B1 locus are resistant to transcriptional silencing. Results In this report we describe studies on the use of a novel series of vectors combining the HNRPA2B1 CpG island with the hCMV promoter for expression of transgenes in CHO-K1 cells. We show that the CpG island gives at least twenty-fold increases in the levels of EGFP and EPO observed in pools of transfectants, and that transgene expression levels remain high in such pools for more than 100 generations. These novel vectors also allow facile isolation of clonal CHO-K1 cell lines showing stable, high-level transgene expression. Conclusion Vectors incorporating the hnRPA2B1 CpG island give major benefits in transgene expression from the hCMV promoter, including substantial improvements in the level and stability of expression. The utility of these vectors for the improved production of recombinant proteins in CHO cells has been demonstrated.

  14. Anti-CD20 single chain variable antibody fragment-apolipoprotein A-I chimera containing nanodisks promote targeted bioactive agent delivery to CD20-positive lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Natasha M; Ghosh, Mistuni; Su, Betty; Beckstead, Jennifer A; Kamei, Ayako; Simonsen, Jens B; Luo, Bing; Gordon, Leo I; Forte, Trudy M; Ryan, Robert O

    2015-08-01

    A fusion protein comprising an α-CD20 single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody, a spacer peptide, and human apolipoprotein (apo) A-I was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. The lipid interaction properties intrinsic to apoA-I as well as the antigen recognition properties of the scFv were retained by the chimera. scFv•apoA-I was formulated into nanoscale reconstituted high-density lipoprotein particles (termed nanodisks; ND) and incubated with cultured cells. α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND bound to CD20-positive non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) cells (Ramos and Granta) but not to CD20-negative T lymphocytes (i.e., Jurkat). Binding to NHL cells was partially inhibited by pre-incubation with rituximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against CD20. Confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis of Granta cells following incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND formulated with the intrinsically fluorescent hydrophobic polyphenol, curcumin, revealed α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I localizes to the cell surface, while curcumin off-loads and gains entry to the cell. Compared to control incubations, viability of cultured NHL cells was decreased upon incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND harboring curcumin. Thus, formulation of curcumin ND with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I as the scaffold component confers cell targeting and enhanced bioactive agent delivery, providing a strategy to minimize toxicity associated with chemotherapeutic agents.

  15. Fragmentation and Hadronization

    OpenAIRE

    Webber, B. R.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental data, theoretical ideas and models concerning jet fragmentation and the hadronization process are reviewed, concentrating on the following topics: factorization and small-x resummation of fragmentation functions, hadronization models, single-particle yields and spectra in Z decay, comparisons between quark and gluon jets, current and target fragmentation in deep inelastic scattering, heavy quark fragmentation, Bose-Einstein correlations and WW fragmentation.

  16. The C-terminal fragment of parathyroid hormone-related peptide promotes bone formation in diabetic mice with low-turnover osteopaenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, D; Fernández-de-Castro, L; Portal-Núñez, S; López-Herradón, A; Dapía, S; Gómez-Barrena, E; Esbrit, P

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Current data suggest that parathyroid hormone (PTH)-related peptide (PTHrP) domains other than the N-terminal PTH-like domain contribute to its role as an endogenous bone anabolic factor. PTHrP-107-139 inhibits bone resorption, a fact which has precluded an unequivocal demonstration of its possible anabolic action in vivo. We thus sought to characterize the osteogenic effects of this peptide using a mouse model of diabetic low-turnover osteopaenia. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH PTHrP-107-139 was administered to streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, with or without bone marrow ablation, for 13 days. Osteopaenia was confirmed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and microcomputed tomography analysis. Histological analysis was performed on paraffin-embedded bone tissue sections by haematoxylin/eosin and Masson's staining, and tartrate-resistent acid phosphatase immunohistochemistry. Mouse bone marrow stromal cells and osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured in normal and/or high glucose (HG) medium. Osteogenic and adipogenic markers were assessed by real-time PCR, and PTHrP and the PTH1 receptor protein expression by Western blot analysis. KEY RESULTS PTHrP-107-139 reversed the alterations in bone structure and osteoblast function, and also promoted bone healing after marrow ablation without affecting the number of osteoclast-like cells in diabetic mice. This peptide also reversed the high-glucose-induced changes in osteogenic differentiation in both bone marrow stromal cells and the more differentiated MC3T3-E1 cells. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These findings demonstrate that PTHrP-107-139 promotes bone formation in diabetic mice. This mouse model and in vitro cell cultures allowed us to identify various anabolic effects of this peptide in this scenario. PMID:21175568

  17. Pathogenic prion protein fragment (PrP106–126) promotes human immunodeficiency virus type-1 infection in peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacot, Silvia M.; Feldman, Gerald M.; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2017-01-01

    Transfusion of blood and blood products contaminated with the pathogenic form of prion protein Prpsc, thought to be the causative agent of variant a Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (vCJD), may result in serious consequences in recipients with a compromised immune system, for example, as seen in HIV-1 infection. In the present study, we demonstrate that treatment of peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) with PrP106–126, a synthetic domain of PrPsc that has intrinsic functional activities related to the full-length protein, markedly increased their susceptibility to HIV-1 infection, induced cytokine secretion, and enhanced their migratory behavior in response to N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (fMLP). Live-cell imaging of MDM cultured in the presence of PrP106–126 showed large cell clusters indicative of cellular activation. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor STI-571, protein kinase C inhibitor K252B, and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor olomoucine attenuated PrP106–126-induced altered MDM functions. These findings delineate a previously undefined functional role of PrP106–126-mediated host cell response in promoting HIV-1 pathogenesis. PMID:25589240

  18. Differences in the Ovine HSP90AA1 Gene Expression Rates Caused by Two Linked Polymorphisms at Its Promoter Affect Rams Sperm DNA Fragmentation under Environmental Heat Stress Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Carmen; Pérez-Guzmán, M. Dolores; Garde, J. Julián; García-Álvarez, Olga; Maroto-Morales, Alejandro; Calvo, Jorge H.; Serrano, M. Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock (HS) is one of the best-studied exogenous cellular stresses. Almost all tissues, cell types, metabolic pathways and biochemical reactions are affected in greater or lesser extent by HS. However, there are some especially thermo sensible cellular types such as the mammalian male germ cells. The present study examined the role of three INDELs in conjunction with the -660G/C polymorphism located at the HSP90AA1 promoter region over the gene expression rate under HS. Specially, the -668insC INDEL, which is very close to the -660G/C transversion, is a good candidate to be implied in the transcriptional regulation of the gene by itself or in a cooperative way with this SNP. Animals carrying the genotype II-668 showed higher transcription rates than those with ID-668 (FC = 3.07) and DD-668 (FC = 3.40) genotypes for samples collected under HS. A linkage between gene expression and sperm DNA fragmentation was also found. When HS conditions were present along or in some stages of the spermatogenesis, alternative genotypes of the -668insC and -660G/C mutations are involved in the effect of HS over sperm DNA fragmentation. Thus, unfavorable genotypes in terms of gene expression induction (ID-668GC-660 and DD-668GG-660) do not produce enough mRNA (stored as messenger ribonucleoprotein particles) and Hsp90α protein to cope with future thermal stress which might occur in posterior stages when transcriptional activity is reduced and cell types and molecular processes are more sensible to heat (spermatocytes in pachytene and spermatids protamination). This would result in the impairment of DNA packaging and the consequent commitment of the events occurring shortly after fertilization and during embryonic development. In the short-term, the assessment of the relationship between sperm DNA fragmentation sensitivity and ram’s fertility will be of interest to a better understanding of the mechanisms of response to HS and its consequences on animal production and

  19. Differences in the ovine HSP90AA1 gene expression rates caused by two linked polymorphisms at its promoter affect rams sperm DNA fragmentation under environmental heat stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salces-Ortiz, Judit; Ramón, Manuel; González, Carmen; Pérez-Guzmán, M Dolores; Garde, J Julián; García-Álvarez, Olga; Maroto-Morales, Alejandro; Calvo, Jorge H; Serrano, M Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock (HS) is one of the best-studied exogenous cellular stresses. Almost all tissues, cell types, metabolic pathways and biochemical reactions are affected in greater or lesser extent by HS. However, there are some especially thermo sensible cellular types such as the mammalian male germ cells. The present study examined the role of three INDELs in conjunction with the -660G/C polymorphism located at the HSP90AA1 promoter region over the gene expression rate under HS. Specially, the -668insC INDEL, which is very close to the -660G/C transversion, is a good candidate to be implied in the transcriptional regulation of the gene by itself or in a cooperative way with this SNP. Animals carrying the genotype II-668 showed higher transcription rates than those with ID-668 (FC = 3.07) and DD-668 (FC = 3.40) genotypes for samples collected under HS. A linkage between gene expression and sperm DNA fragmentation was also found. When HS conditions were present along or in some stages of the spermatogenesis, alternative genotypes of the -668insC and -660G/C mutations are involved in the effect of HS over sperm DNA fragmentation. Thus, unfavorable genotypes in terms of gene expression induction (ID-668GC-660 and DD-668GG-660) do not produce enough mRNA (stored as messenger ribonucleoprotein particles) and Hsp90α protein to cope with future thermal stress which might occur in posterior stages when transcriptional activity is reduced and cell types and molecular processes are more sensible to heat (spermatocytes in pachytene and spermatids protamination). This would result in the impairment of DNA packaging and the consequent commitment of the events occurring shortly after fertilization and during embryonic development. In the short-term, the assessment of the relationship between sperm DNA fragmentation sensitivity and ram's fertility will be of interest to a better understanding of the mechanisms of response to HS and its consequences on animal production and

  20. Cell-Specific Promoters Enable Lipid-Based Nanoparticles to Deliver Genes to Specific Cells of the Retina In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhong; Rajala, Ammaji; Cao, Binrui; Ranjo-Bishop, Michelle; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Mao, Chuanbin; Rajala, Raju V S

    2016-01-01

    Non-viral vectors, such as lipid-based nanoparticles (liposome-protamine-DNA complex [LPD]), could be used to deliver a functional gene to the retina to correct visual function and treat blindness. However, one of the limitations of LPD is the lack of cell specificity, as the retina is composed of seven types of cells. If the same gene is expressed in multiple cell types or is absent from one desired cell type, LPD-mediated gene delivery to every cell may have off-target effects. To circumvent this problem, we have tested LPD-mediated gene delivery using various generalized, modified, and retinal cell-specific promoters. We achieved retinal pigment epithelium cell specificity with vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2), rod cell specificity with mouse rhodopsin, cone cell specificity with red/green opsin, and ganglion cell specificity with thymocyte antigen promoters. Here we show for the first time that cell-specific promoters enable lipid-based nanoparticles to deliver genes to specific cells of the retina in vivo. This work will inspire investigators in the field of lipid nanotechnology to couple cell-specific promoters to drive expression in a cell- and tissue-specific manner.

  1. The role of complement receptors type 1 (CR1, CD35) and 2 (CR2, CD21) in promoting C3 fragment deposition and membrane attack complex formation on normal peripheral human B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Pedersen, Morten Løbner; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke

    2002-01-01

    Normal human B lymphocytes are known to activate the alternative pathway (AP) of complement, leading to C3-fragment deposition and membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. The process is mediated via complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21), with complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35) playing...... a subsidiary role. In this study, we examine the relative contributions of CR1 and CR2 to the deposition of C3 fragments and MAC on B lymphocytes under circumstances where all complement pathways are operational. C3-fragment deposition and MAC formation were assessed on human peripheral B lymphocytes......) bearing CR1, however, markedly reduced both C3-fragment deposition and MAC formation. Our data suggest that C3-fragment deposition and MAC formation on B lymphocytes in vivo may involve both AP and classical pathway activation, with CR1 contributing significantly to the latter. On the other hand...

  2. Mechanisms in Impact Fragmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Wittel, Falk K.; Carmona, Humberto A.; Kun, Ferenc; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2015-01-01

    The brittle fragmentation of spheres is studied numerically by a 3D Discrete Element Model. Large scale computer simulations are performed with models that consist of agglomerates of many spherical particles, interconnected by beam-truss elements. We focus on a detailed description of the fragmentation process and study several fragmentation mechanisms involved. The evolution of meridional cracks is studied in detail. These cracks are found to initiate in the inside of the specimen with quasi...

  3. DNA fragmentation in apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Cleavage of chromosomal DNA into oligonucleosomal size fragments is an integral part of apoptosis. Elegant biochemical work identified the DNA fragmentation factor (DFF) as a major apoptotic endonuclease for DNA fragmentation in vitro. Genetic studies in mice support the importance of DFF in DNA fragmentation and possibly in apoptosis in vivo. Recent work also suggests the existence of additional endonucleases for DNA degradation. Understanding the roles of individual endonucleases in apoptosis, and how they might coordinate to degrade DNA in different tissues during normal development and homeostasis, as well as in various diseased states, will be a major research focus in the near future.

  4. String fragmentation; La fragmentation des cordes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drescher, H.J.; Werner, K. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et des Technologies Associees - SUBATECH, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 44 - Nantes (France)

    1997-10-01

    The classical string model is used in VENUS as a fragmentation model. For the soft domain simple 2-parton strings were sufficient, whereas for higher energies up to LHC, the perturbative regime of the QCD gives additional soft gluons, which are mapped on the string as so called kinks, energy singularities between the leading partons. The kinky string model is chosen to handle fragmentation of these strings by application of the Lorentz invariant area law. The `kinky strings` model, corresponding to the perturbative gluons coming from pQCD, takes into consideration this effect by treating the partons and gluons on the same footing. The decay law is always the Artru-Menessier area law which is the most realistic since it is invariant to the Lorentz and gauge transformations. For low mass strings a manipulation of the rupture point is necessary if the string corresponds already to an elementary particle determined by the mass and the flavor content. By means of the fragmentation model it will be possible to simulate the data from future experiments at LHC and RHIC 3 refs.

  5. Fragmentation trees reloaded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böcker, Sebastian; Dührkop, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Untargeted metabolomics commonly uses liquid chromatography mass spectrometry to measure abundances of metabolites; subsequent tandem mass spectrometry is used to derive information about individual compounds. One of the bottlenecks in this experimental setup is the interpretation of fragmentation spectra to accurately and efficiently identify compounds. Fragmentation trees have become a powerful tool for the interpretation of tandem mass spectrometry data of small molecules. These trees are determined from the data using combinatorial optimization, and aim at explaining the experimental data via fragmentation cascades. Fragmentation tree computation does not require spectral or structural databases. To obtain biochemically meaningful trees, one needs an elaborate optimization function (scoring). We present a new scoring for computing fragmentation trees, transforming the combinatorial optimization into a Maximum A Posteriori estimator. We demonstrate the superiority of the new scoring for two tasks: both for the de novo identification of molecular formulas of unknown compounds, and for searching a database for structurally similar compounds, our method SIRIUS 3, performs significantly better than the previous version of our method, as well as other methods for this task. SIRIUS 3 can be a part of an untargeted metabolomics workflow, allowing researchers to investigate unknowns using automated computational methods.Graphical abstractWe present a new scoring for computing fragmentation trees from tandem mass spectrometry data based on Bayesian statistics. The best scoring fragmentation tree most likely explains the molecular formula of the measured parent ion.

  6. Fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasak, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Fragmentation is a degradation pathway ubiquitously observed in proteins despite the remarkable stability of peptide bond; proteins differ only by how much and where cleavage occurs. The goal of this review is to summarize reports regarding the non-enzymatic fragmentation of the peptide backbone of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The sites in the polypeptide chain susceptible to fragmentation are determined by a multitude of factors. Insights are provided on the intimate chemical mechanisms that can make some bonds prone to cleavage due to the presence of specific side-chains. In addition to primary structure, the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures have a significant impact in modulating the distribution of cleavage sites by altering local flexibility, accessibility to solvent or bringing in close proximity side chains that are remote in sequence. This review focuses on cleavage sites observed in the constant regions of mAbs, with special emphasis on hinge fragmentation. The mechanisms responsible for backbone cleavage are strongly dependent on pH and can be catalyzed by metals or radicals. The distribution of cleavage sites are different under acidic compared to basic conditions, with fragmentation rates exhibiting a minimum in the pH range 5–6; therefore, the overall fragmentation pattern observed for a mAb is a complex result of structural and solvent conditions. A critical review of the techniques used to monitor fragmentation is also presented; usually a compromise has to be made between a highly sensitive method with good fragment separation and the capability to identify the cleavage site. The effect of fragmentation on the function of a mAb must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis depending on whether cleavage sites are observed in the variable or constant regions, and on the mechanism of action of the molecule. PMID:21487244

  7. Embedded Fragments Registry (EFR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — In 2009, the Department of Defense estimated that approximately 40,000 service members who served in OEF/OIF may have embedded fragment wounds as the result of small...

  8. Fragmentation in Biaxial Tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, G H; Archbold, G C; Hurricane, O A; Miller, P L

    2006-06-13

    We have carried out an experiment that places a ductile stainless steel in a state of biaxial tension at a high rate of strain. The loading of the ductile metal spherical cap is performed by the detonation of a high explosive layer with a conforming geometry to expand the metal radially outwards. Simulations of the loading and expansion of the metal predict strain rates that compare well with experimental observations. A high percentage of the HE loaded material was recovered through a soft capture process and characterization of the recovered fragments provided high quality data, including uniform strain prior to failure and fragment size. These data were used with a modified fragmentation model to determine a fragmentation energy.

  9. DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rex, A S; Aagaard, J.; Fedder, J

    2017-01-01

    Sperm DNA Fragmentation has been extensively studied for more than a decade. In the 1940s the uniqueness of the spermatozoa protein complex which stabilizes the DNA was discovered. In the fifties and sixties, the association between unstable chromatin structure and subfertility was investigated....... In the seventies, the impact of induced DNA damage was investigated. In the 1980s the concept of sperm DNA fragmentation as related to infertility was introduced as well as the first DNA fragmentation test: the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA). The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labelling...... (TUNEL) test followed by others was introduced in the nineties. The association between DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa and pregnancy loss has been extensively investigated spurring the need for a therapeutic tool for these patients. This gave rise to an increased interest in the aetiology of DNA damage...

  10. Fragmentation Main Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The fragmentation model combines patch size and patch continuity with diversity of vegetation types per patch and rarity of vegetation types per patch. A patch was...

  11. Thermodynamics of fragment binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenczy, György G; Keserű, György M

    2012-04-23

    The ligand binding pockets of proteins have preponderance of hydrophobic amino acids and are typically within the apolar interior of the protein; nevertheless, they are able to bind low complexity, polar, water-soluble fragments. In order to understand this phenomenon, we analyzed high resolution X-ray data of protein-ligand complexes from the Protein Data Bank and found that fragments bind to proteins with two near optimal geometry H-bonds on average. The linear extent of the fragment binding site was found not to be larger than 10 Å, and the H-bonding region was found to be restricted to about 5 Å on average. The number of conserved H-bonds in proteins cocrystallized with multiple different fragments is also near to 2. These fragment binding sites that are able to form limited number of strong H-bonds in a hydrophobic environment are identified as hot spots. An estimate of the free-energy gain of H-bond formation versus apolar desolvation supports that fragment sized compounds need H-bonds to achieve detectable binding. This suggests that fragment binding is mostly enthalpic that is in line with their observed binding thermodynamics documented in Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) data sets and gives a thermodynamic rationale for fragment based approaches. The binding of larger compounds tends to more rely on apolar desolvation with a corresponding increase of the entropy content of their binding free-energy. These findings explain the reported size-dependence of maximal available affinity and ligand efficiency both behaving differently in the small molecule region featured by strong H-bond formation and in the larger molecule region featured by apolar desolvation.

  12. Fluctuations of fragment observables

    CERN Document Server

    Gulminelli, F

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents a review of our present theoretical as well as experimental knowledge of different fluctuation observables relevant to nuclear multifragmentation. The possible connection between the presence of a fluctuation peak and the occurrence of a phase transition or a critical phenomenon is critically analyzed. Many different phenomena can lead both to the creation and to the suppression of a fluctuation peak. In particular, the role of constraints due to conservation laws and to data sorting is shown to be essential. From the experimental point of view, a comparison of the available fragmentation data reveals that there is a good agreement between different data sets of basic fluctuation observables, if the fragmenting source is of comparable size. This compatibility suggests that the fragmentation process is largely independent of the reaction mechanism (central versus peripheral collisions, symmetric versus asymmetric systems, light ions versus heavy ion induced reactions). Configurationa...

  13. Fragments of Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Steen Ledet

    Time travel films necessarily fragment linear narratives, as scenes are revisited with differences from the first time we saw it. Popular films such as Back to the Future mine comedy from these visitations, but there are many different approaches. One extreme is Chris Marker's La Jetée - a film...... made almost completely of still images, recounting the end of the world. These stills can be viewed as fragments that have survived the end of the world and now provide the only access to the events that occured. Shane Carruth's Primer has a different approach to time travel, the narrative diegesis...

  14. The Serendipity of Fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leixnering, Stephan; Meyer, Renate E.

    , it was the central government’s task to coordinate, steer and control the newly emerged decentralized organizations. This raises questions about the overall design of the public sector at present. Our paper engages with the prevalent public governance phenomenon of fragmentation from a design perspective in order...... form of organizing between networks and formal organization: lacking a single center and featuring multiplex and multifaceted relations within the politico-administrative apparatus and between government and PSOs, high fragmentation, local and robust action, but latent structures of significant formal...

  15. IMPACT fragmentation model developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorge, Marlon E.; Mains, Deanna L.

    2016-09-01

    The IMPACT fragmentation model has been used by The Aerospace Corporation for more than 25 years to analyze orbital altitude explosions and hypervelocity collisions. The model is semi-empirical, combining mass, energy and momentum conservation laws with empirically derived relationships for fragment characteristics such as number, mass, area-to-mass ratio, and spreading velocity as well as event energy distribution. Model results are used for several types of analysis including assessment of short-term risks to satellites from orbital altitude fragmentations, prediction of the long-term evolution of the orbital debris environment and forensic assessments of breakup events. A new version of IMPACT, version 6, has been completed and incorporates a number of advancements enabled by a multi-year long effort to characterize more than 11,000 debris fragments from more than three dozen historical on-orbit breakup events. These events involved a wide range of causes, energies, and fragmenting objects. Special focus was placed on the explosion model, as the majority of events examined were explosions. Revisions were made to the mass distribution used for explosion events, increasing the number of smaller fragments generated. The algorithm for modeling upper stage large fragment generation was updated. A momentum conserving asymmetric spreading velocity distribution algorithm was implemented to better represent sub-catastrophic events. An approach was developed for modeling sub-catastrophic explosions, those where the majority of the parent object remains intact, based on estimated event energy. Finally, significant modifications were made to the area-to-mass ratio distribution to incorporate the tendencies of different materials to fragment into different shapes. This ability enabled better matches between the observed area-to-mass ratios and those generated by the model. It also opened up additional possibilities for post-event analysis of breakups. The paper will discuss

  16. Fragmented Work Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humle, Didde Maria; Reff Pedersen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    by exploring how different types of fragmentation create meanings. This is done by studying the work stories of job and personnel consultants and by drawing on the results of a narrative, ethnographic study of a consultancy. The analysis demonstrates how work stories are social practices negotiated, retold...

  17. Picking Up (On) Fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellis, Phil

    2015-01-01

    abstractThis article discusses the implications for archival and media archaeological research and reenactment artwork relating to a recent arts practice project: reenacttv: 30 lines / 60 seconds. It proposes that archival material is unstable but has traces and fragments that are full of creative p

  18. Fragments of the Past

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Szende

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With travel being made more accessible throughout the decades, the hospitality industry constantly evolved their practices as society and technology progressed. Hotels looked for news ways up service their customers, which led to the invention of the Servidor in 1918. Once revolutionary innovations have gone extinct, merely becoming fragments of the past.

  19. Cryobiology of coral fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Mary; Farrell, Ann; Carter, Virginia L

    2013-02-01

    Around the world, coral reefs are dying due to human influences, and saving habitat alone may not stop this destruction. This investigation focused on the biological processes that will provide the first steps in understanding the cryobiology of whole coral fragments. Coral fragments are a partnership of coral tissue and endosymbiotic algae, Symbiodinium sp., commonly called zooxanthellae. These data reflected their separate sensitivities to chilling and a cryoprotectant (dimethyl sulfoxide) for the coral Pocillopora damicornis, as measured by tissue loss and Pulse Amplitude Modulated fluorometry 3weeks post-treatment. Five cryoprotectant treatments maintained the viability of the coral tissue and zooxanthellae at control values (1M dimethyl sulfoxide at 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0h exposures, and 1.5M dimethyl sulfoxide at 1.0 and 1.5h exposures, P>0.05, ANOVA), whereas 2M concentrations did not (Pcoral tissue, but not in the zooxanthellae. During the winter when the fragments were chilled, the coral tissue remained relatively intact (∼25% loss) post-treatment, but the zooxanthellae numbers in the tissue declined after 5min of chilling (Pcoral tissue (∼75% loss) and zooxanthellae numbers declined in response to chilling alone (Pcoral against tissue loss after 45min of cryoprotectant exposure (P>0.05, ANOVA), but it did not protect against the loss of zooxanthellae (Pcoral fragment complex and future cryopreservation protocols must be guided by their greater sensitivity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Picking Up (On) Fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellis, Phil

    2015-01-01

    abstractThis article discusses the implications for archival and media archaeological research and reenactment artwork relating to a recent arts practice project: reenacttv: 30 lines / 60 seconds. It proposes that archival material is unstable but has traces and fragments that are full of creative p

  1. Wildlife habitat fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John. Lehmkuhl

    2005-01-01

    A primary issue in forest wildlife management is habitat fragmentation and its effects on viability, which is the "bottom line" for plant and animal species of conservation concern. Population viability is the likelihood that a population will be able to maintain itself (remain viable) over a long period of time-usually 100 years or more. Though it is true...

  2. Electroeluting DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzosa-Alvarez, Ana L; Sandoval-Cabrera, Antonio; Torres-Huerta, Ana L; Bermudez-Cruz, Rosa M

    2010-09-05

    Purified DNA fragments are used for different purposes in Molecular Biology and they can be prepared by several procedures. Most of them require a previous electrophoresis of the DNA fragments in order to separate the band of interest. Then, this band is excised out from an agarose or acrylamide gel and purified by using either: binding and elution from glass or silica particles, DEAE-cellulose membranes, "crush and soak method", electroelution or very often expensive commercial purification kits. Thus, selecting a method will depend mostly of what is available in the laboratory. The electroelution procedure allows one to purify very clean DNA to be used in a large number of applications (sequencing, radiolabeling, enzymatic restriction, enzymatic modification, cloning etc). This procedure consists in placing DNA band-containing agarose or acrylamide slices into sample wells of the electroeluter, then applying current will make the DNA fragment to leave the agarose and thus be trapped in a cushion salt to be recovered later by ethanol precipitation.

  3. Heavy meson fragmentation at LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Gomshi Nobary

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available   Large Hadron Collider (LHC at CERN will provide excellent opportunity to study the production and decay of heavy mesons and baryons with high statistics. We aim at the heavy mesons in this work and calculate their fragmentation functions consistent with this machine and present their total fragmentation probabilities and average fragmentation parameters.

  4. SCALING AND 4-QUARK FRAGMENTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHOLTEN, O; BOSVELD, GD

    1991-01-01

    The conditions for a scaling behaviour from the fragmentation process leading to slow protons are discussed- The scaling referred to implies that the fragmentation functions depend on the light-cone momentum fraction only. It is shown that differences in the fragmentation functions for valence- and

  5. Picking Up (On Fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Ellis

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the implications for archival and media archaeological research and reenactment artwork relating to a recent arts practice project: reenacttv: 30 lines / 60 seconds. It proposes that archival material is unstable but has traces and fragments that are full of creative potential to re-think and re-examine past media historical events through a media archaeological approach to reenactment. The article contains images and links to videos from the final reenactment artworks as well as from rehearsals in Vienna and Bradford.

  6. An Archeology of Fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald L. Bruns

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a short (fragmentary history of fragmentary writing from the German Romantics (F. W. Schlegel, Friedrich Hölderlin to modern and contemporary concrete or visual poetry. Such writing is (often deliberately a critique of the logic of subsumption that tries to assimilate whatever is singular and irreducible into totalities of various categorical or systematic sorts. Arguably, the fragment (parataxis is the distinctive feature of literary Modernism, which is a rejection, not of what precedes it, but of what Max Weber called “the rationalization of the world” (or Modernity whose aim is to keep everything, including all that is written, under surveillance and control.

  7. Generic behaviours in impact fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sator, N.; Mechkov, S.; Sausset, F. [Paris-6 Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, Lab. de Physique Theorique de la Matiere Condensee, UMR CNRS 7600, 75 - Paris (France); Mechkov, S. [Ecole Normale Superieure, Lab. de Physique Statistique, 75 - Paris (France)

    2008-02-15

    From atomic nuclei to supernovae, including plates and rocks, every cohesive system can be broken into fragments, provided that the deposited energy is sufficiently large compared to its cohesive energy. We present a simple numerical model for investigating the general properties of fragmentation. By use of molecular dynamics simulations, we study the impact fragmentation of a solid disk of interacting particles with a wall. Regardless of the particular form of the interaction potential, the fragment size distribution exhibits a power law behaviour with an exponent that increases logarithmically with the energy deposited in the system, in agreement with experiments. We expect this behaviour to be generic in fragmentation phenomena. (authors)

  8. Stone fragmentation by ultrasound

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Shrivastava; Kailash

    2004-08-01

    The presence of kidney stone in the kidney causes discomfort to patients. Hence, removal of such stones is important which is commonly done these days, non-destructively, with lithotripters without surgery. Commercially, lithotripters like extra-corporeal shock wave lithotripters (ESWL) made by Siemens etc are in routine use. These methods are very cumbersome and expensive. Treatment of the patients also takes comparatively more time because of more number of sittings. Some delicate nerves and fibres in the surrounding areas of the stones present in the kidney are also damaged by high ultrasonic intensity used in such systems. In the present work, enhancement of the kidney stone fragmentation by using ultrasound is studied. The cavitation bubbles are found to implode faster, with more disintegration efficiency of the lithotripters, which give better treatment to the patients.

  9. CONTROL OF FRAGMENTATION BY BLASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Božić

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The degree of fragmentation influences the economy of the excavation operations. Characteristics of blasted rock such as fragment size, volume and mass are fundamental variables effecting the economics of a mining operation and are in effect the basis for evaluating the quality of a blast. The properties of fragmentation, such as size and shape, are very important information for the optimization of production. Three factors control the fragment size distribution: the rock structure, the quantity of explosive and its distribution within the rock mass. Over the last decade there have been considerable advances in our ability to measure and analyze blasting performance. These can now be combined with the continuing growth in computing power to develop a more effective description of rock fragmentation for use by future blasting practitioners. The paper describes a view of the fragmentation problem by blasting and the need for a new generation of engineering tools to guide the design and implementation of blasting operations.

  10. Thermodynamical string fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Nadine; Sjöstrand, Torbjörn

    2017-01-01

    The observation of heavy-ion-like behaviour in pp collisions at the LHC suggests that more physics mechanisms are at play than traditionally assumed. The introduction e.g. of quark-gluon plasma or colour rope formation can describe several of the observations, but as of yet there is no established paradigm. In this article we study a few possible modifications to the Pythia event generator, which describes a wealth of data but fails for a number of recent observations. Firstly, we present a new model for generating the transverse momentum of hadrons during the string fragmentation process, inspired by thermodynamics, where heavier hadrons naturally are suppressed in rate but obtain a higher average transverse momentum. Secondly, close-packing of strings is taken into account by making the temperature or string tension environment-dependent. Thirdly, a simple model for hadron rescattering is added. The effect of these modifications is studied, individually and taken together, and compared with data mainly from the LHC. While some improvements can be noted, it turns out to be nontrivial to obtain effects as big as required, and further work is called for.

  11. Thermodynamical String Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    The observation of heavy-ion-like behaviour in pp collisions at the LHC suggests that more physics mechanisms are at play than traditionally assumed. The introduction e.g. of quark-gluon plasma or colour rope formation can describe several of the observations, but as of yet there is no established paradigm. In this article we study a few possible modifications to the Pythia event generator, which describes a wealth of data but fails for a number of recent observations. Firstly, we present a new model for generating the transverse momentum of hadrons during the string fragmentation process, inspired by thermodynamics, where heavier hadrons naturally are suppressed in rate but obtain a higher average transverse momentum. Secondly, close-packing of strings is taken into account by making the temperature or string tension environment-dependent. Thirdly, a simple model for hadron rescattering is added. The effect of these modifications is studied, individually and taken together, and compared with data mainly from...

  12. Fragmentation Considered Poisonous

    CERN Document Server

    Herzberg, Amir

    2012-01-01

    We present practical poisoning and name-server block- ing attacks on standard DNS resolvers, by off-path, spoofing adversaries. Our attacks exploit large DNS responses that cause IP fragmentation; such long re- sponses are increasingly common, mainly due to the use of DNSSEC. In common scenarios, where DNSSEC is partially or incorrectly deployed, our poisoning attacks allow 'com- plete' domain hijacking. When DNSSEC is fully de- ployed, attacker can force use of fake name server; we show exploits of this allowing off-path traffic analy- sis and covert channel. When using NSEC3 opt-out, attacker can also create fake subdomains, circumvent- ing same origin restrictions. Our attacks circumvent resolver-side defenses, e.g., port randomisation, IP ran- domisation and query randomisation. The (new) name server (NS) blocking attacks force re- solver to use specific name server. This attack allows Degradation of Service, traffic-analysis and covert chan- nel, and also facilitates DNS poisoning. We validated the attac...

  13. An Algebra for Program Fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bent Bruun; Madsen, Ole Lehrmann; Møller-Pedersen, Birger

    1985-01-01

    Program fragments are described either by strings in the concrete syntax or by constructor applications in the abstract syntax. By defining conversions between these forms, both may be intermixed. Program fragments are constructed by terminal and nonterminal symbols from the grammar and by variab...

  14. Complete axiomatizations for XPath fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Cate, B.; Litak, T.; Marx, M.

    2010-01-01

    We provide complete axiomatizations for several fragments of Core XPath, the navigational core of XPath 1.0 introduced by Gottlob, Koch and Pichler. A complete axiomatization for a given fragment is a set of equivalences from which every other valid equivalence is derivable; equivalences can be thou

  15. Epididymis-specific lipocalin promoters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kichiya Suzuki; Xiuping Yu; Pierre Chaurand; Yoshihiko Araki; Jean-Jacques Lareyre; Richard M. Caprioli; Marie-Claire Orgebin-Crist; Robert J. Matusik

    2007-01-01

    Our goal is to decipher which DNA sequences are required for tissue-specific expression of epididymal genes. At least 6 epididymis-specific lipocalin genes are known. These are differently regulated and regionalized in the epididymis.Lipocalin 5 (Lcn5 or mE-RABP) and Lipocalin 8 (Lcn8 or mEP17) are homologous genes belonging to the epididymis-specific lipocalin gene cluster. Both the 5 kb promoter fragment of the Lcn5 gene and the 5.3 kb promoter fragment of the Lcn8 gene can direct transgene expression in the epididymis (Lcn5 to the distal caput and Lcn8 to the initial segment), indicating that these promoter fragments contain important cis-regulatory element(s) for epididymisspecific gene expression. To define further the fragments regulating gene expression, the Lcn5 promoter was examined in transgenic mice and immortalized epididymal cell lines. After serial deletion, the 1.8 kb promoter fragment of the Lcn5 gene was sufficient for tissue-specific and region-specific gene expression in transgenic mice. Transient transfection analysis revealed that a transcription factor forkhead box A2 (Foxa2) interacts with androgen receptor and binds to the 100 bp fragment of the Lcn5 promoter between 1.2 kb and 1.3 kb and that Foxa2 expression inhibitsandrogen-dependent induction of the Lcn5 promoter activity. Immunohistochemistry indicated a restricted expression of Foxa2 in the epididymis where endogenous Lcn5 gene expression is suppressed and that the Foxa2 inhibition of the Lcn5 promoter is consistent with the lack of expression of Lcn5 in the corpus and cauda. Our approach provides a basic strategy for further analysis of the epididymal lipocalin gene regulation and flexible control of epididymal function.

  16. Forest Fragmentation and Driving Forces in Yingkou, Northeastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Forest fragmentation, the process of changing original large and intact forest patches into smaller and isolated areas, significantly influences the balance of surface physical environment, biodiversity, and species richness. Sufficient knowledge of forest fragmentation is necessary to maintain ecological balance and promote sustainable resource utilization. This study combines remote sensing, geographical information systems, and landscape metrics to assess forest fragmentation at landscape and pixel levels during different time periods (2000–2005, 2005–2010, and 2010–2015 in the Yingkou region. Spatial statistical analysis is also used to analyze the relationship between forest landscape fragmentation and its determinants (e.g., natural factors, socioeconomic factors, and proximity factors. Results show that forest patches became smaller, subdivided, and isolated during 2010–2015 at the total landscape level. Local changes occurred in the southwest of the study region or around the development area. Our data also indicate that shrinkage and subdivision were the main forest fragmentation processes during three times, and attrition became the main forest fragmentation process from 2010 to 2015. These changes were significantly influenced by natural factors (e.g., elevation and slope, proximity factors (e.g., distance to city and distance to province roads, and socioeconomic factors (e.g., gross domestic product. Results presented in this study provide valuable insights into the pattern and processes of forest fragmentation and present direct implications for the protection and reasonable utilization of forest resources.

  17. Driven fragmentation of granular gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Hidalgo, Raúl; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2008-06-01

    The dynamics of homogeneously heated granular gases which fragment due to particle collisions is analyzed. We introduce a kinetic model which accounts for correlations induced at the grain collisions and analyze both the kinetics and relevant distribution functions these systems develop. The work combines analytical and numerical studies based on direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations. A broad family of fragmentation probabilities is considered, and its implications for the system kinetics are discussed. We show that generically these driven materials evolve asymptotically into a dynamical scaling regime. If the fragmentation probability tends to a constant, the grain number diverges at a finite time, leading to a shattering singularity. If the fragmentation probability vanishes, then the number of grains grows monotonously as a power law. We consider different homogeneous thermostats and show that the kinetics of these systems depends weakly on both the grain inelasticity and driving. We observe that fragmentation plays a relevant role in the shape of the velocity distribution of the particles. When the fragmentation is driven by local stochastic events, the long velocity tail is essentially exponential independently of the heating frequency and the breaking rule. However, for a Lowe-Andersen thermostat, numerical evidence strongly supports the conjecture that the scaled velocity distribution follows a generalized exponential behavior f(c) approximately exp(-cn) , with n approximately 1.2 , regarding less the fragmentation mechanisms.

  18. The spectroscopy of fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, W.R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    High-resolution measurements on {gamma} rays from fission fragments have provided a rich source of information, unobtainable at the moment in any other way, on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei. In recent years important data have been obtained on the yrast- and near yrast-structure of neutron-rich fission fragments. We discuss the scope of measurements which can be made on prompt gamma rays from secondary fission fragments, the techniques used in the experiments and some results recently obtained. (author) 24 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Solution structure of a short dna fragment studied by neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lederer, H.; May, R. P.; Kjems, Jørgen

    1986-01-01

    The solution structure of a DNA fragment of 130 base pairs and known sequence has been investigated by neutron small-angle scattering. In 0.1 M NaCl, the overall structure of the DNA fragment which contains the strong promoter A1 of the Escherichia coli phage T7 agrees with that expected for B...

  20. Identification of Genes Affecting Vacuole Membrane Fragmentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaillat, Lydie; Mayer, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The equilibrium of membrane fusion and fission influences the volume and copy number of organelles. Fusion of yeast vacuoles has been well characterized but their fission and the mechanisms determining vacuole size and abundance remain poorly understood. We therefore attempted to systematically characterize factors necessary for vacuole fission. Here, we present results of an in vivo screening for deficiencies in vacuolar fragmentation activity of an ordered collection deletion mutants, representing 4881 non-essential genes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The screen identified 133 mutants with strong defects in vacuole fragmentation. These comprise numerous known fragmentation factors, such as the Fab1p complex, Tor1p, Sit4p and the V-ATPase, thus validating the approach. The screen identified many novel factors promoting vacuole fragmentation. Among those are 22 open reading frames of unknown function and three conspicuous clusters of proteins with known function. The clusters concern the ESCRT machinery, adaptins, and lipases, which influence the production of diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. A common feature of these factors of known function is their capacity to change membrane curvature, suggesting that they might promote vacuole fragmentation via this property. PMID:23383298

  1. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Cheng; Tsang, M B; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear energy released by splitting Uranium and Thorium isotopes into two, three, four, up to eight fragments with nearly equal size are studied. We found that the energy released come from equally splitting the $^{235,238}$U and $^{230,232}$Th nuclei into to three fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model is employed to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for the excited nuclei. Weighing the the probability distributions of fragments multiplicity at different excitation energies for the $^{238}$U nucleus, we found that an excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u is optimal for the $^{235}$U, $^{238}$U, $^{230}$Th and $^{232}$Th nuclei to release nuclear energy of about 0.7-0.75 MeV/u.

  2. Hands as markers of fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Barnard

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Margaret Atwood is an internationally read, translated, and critiqued writer whose novels have established her as one of the most esteemed authors in English (McCombs & Palmer, 1991:1. Critical studies of her work deal mainly with notions of identity from psychoanalytical perspectives. This study has identified a gap in current critical studies on Atwood’s works, namely the challenging of textual unity which is paralleled in the challenging of the traditional (single narrative voice. The challenging of textual unity and the single narrative voice brings about the fragmentation of both. This article will focus on the role that hands play as markers of fragmentation in “The Blind Assassin” (2000. In the novel, the writing hand destabilises the narrative voice, since it is not connected to the voice of a single author. If the author of the text – the final signified – is eliminated, the text becomes fragmentary and open, inviting the reader to contribute to the creation of meaning. Hands play a signficant role in foregrounding the narrator’s fragmented identity, and consequently, the fragmentation of the text. We will investigate this concept in the light of Roland Barthes’ notion of the scriptor, whose hand is metaphorically severed from his or her “voice”. Instead of the text being a unified entity, it becomes unstable and it displays the absence of hierarchical textual levels. Based mainly on Barthes’ writings, this article concludes that hands foreground the narrator’s fragmented identity, which is paralleled in the fragmented text.

  3. Phenomenology of Dihadron Fragmentation Function

    CERN Document Server

    Courtoy, A

    2016-01-01

    We report on the phenomenological results obtained through Dihadron Fragmentation Functions related processes. In 2015, an update on the fitting techniques for the Dihadron Fragmentation Functions has led to an improved extraction of the transversity PDF and, as a consequence, the nucleon tensor charge. We discuss the impact of the determination of the latter on search for physics Beyond the Standard Model, focusing on the error treatment. We also comment on the future of the extraction of the subleading-twist PDF $e(x)$ from JLab soon-to-be-released Beam Spin Asymmetry data.

  4. Transversity and dihadron fragmentation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Bacchetta, A; Bacchetta, Alessandro; Radici, Marco

    2005-01-01

    The observation of the quark transversity distribution requires another soft object sensitive to the quark's transverse spin. Dihadron fragmentation functions represent a convenient tool to analyze partonic spin, which can influence the angular distribution of the two hadrons. In particular, the so-called interference fragmentation functions can be used to probe transversity both in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering as well as proton-proton collisions. We discuss two single-spin asymmetries sensitive to transversity in the these two processes, at leading twist and leading order in alpha_S.

  5. RIA Fragmentation Line Beam Dumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, W

    2003-08-08

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator project involves generating heavy-element ion beams for use in a fragmentation target line to produce beams for physics research. The main beam, after passing through the fragmentation target, may be dumped into a beam dump located in the vacuum cavity of the first dipole magnet. For a dump beam power of 100 kW, cooling is required to avoid excessive high temperatures. The proposed dump design involves rotating cylinders to spread out the energy deposition and turbulent subcooled water flow through internal water cooling passages to obtain high, nonboiling, cooling rates.

  6. A thermodynamic theory of dynamic fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yew, Ching H. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States); Taylor, P.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-08-01

    We present a theory of dynamic fragmentation of brittle materials based on thermodynamic arguments. We recover the expressions for average fragment size and number as originally derived by Grady. We extend the previous work by obtaining descriptions of fragment size distribution and compressibility change due to the fragmentation process. The size distribution is assumed to be proportional to the spectral power of the strain history and a sample distribution is presented for a fragmentation process corresponding to a constant rate strain history. The description of compressibility change should be useful in computational studies of fragmentation. These results should provide insight into the process of fragmentation of brittle materials from hypervelocity impact.

  7. Population pressure and farm fragmentation:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    small but farms are further fragmented into diminutive size fields due to ... terms of household characteristics; land use and performance indicators; technology adoption .... 'best' unit of measurement of farm size, and size of enterprises within farms will ..... less common, accounting for 18 percent (3 percent) and 10 percent (7.

  8. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Cheng [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Souza, S.R. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro Cidade Universitária, Caixa Postal 68528, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tsang, M.B. [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Zhang, Feng-Shou, E-mail: fszhang@bnu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-08-15

    It is well known that binary fission occurs with positive energy gain. In this article we examine the energetics of splitting uranium and thorium isotopes into various numbers of fragments (from two to eight) with nearly equal size. We find that the energy released by splitting {sup 230,232}Th and {sup 235,238}U into three equal size fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) is applied to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for excited nuclei. By weighing the probability distributions of fragment multiplicity at different excitation energies, we find the peaks of energy release for {sup 230,232}Th and {sup 235,238}U are around 0.7–0.75 MeV/u at excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u in the primary breakup process. Taking into account the secondary de-excitation processes of primary fragments with the GEMINI code, these energy peaks fall to about 0.45 MeV/u.

  9. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Souza, S. R.; Tsang, M. B.; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that binary fission occurs with positive energy gain. In this article we examine the energetics of splitting uranium and thorium isotopes into various numbers of fragments (from two to eight) with nearly equal size. We find that the energy released by splitting 230,232Th and 235,238U into three equal size fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) is applied to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for excited nuclei. By weighing the probability distributions of fragment multiplicity at different excitation energies, we find the peaks of energy release for 230,232Th and 235,238U are around 0.7-0.75 MeV/u at excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u in the primary breakup process. Taking into account the secondary de-excitation processes of primary fragments with the GEMINI code, these energy peaks fall to about 0.45 MeV/u.

  10. The Fragmentation of Literary Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Syllabi from some 20 colleges and universities were reviewed with prominent English and literature departments and a discussion was held with a number of professors who teach literary theory. It is suggested that devolution and fragmentation of theory might be a survival strategy, an adaptation to the new realties of academic institutions.

  11. Fragmented nature : consequences for biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olff, Han; Ritchie, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss how fragmentation of resources and habitat operate differently on species diversity across spatial scales, ranging from positive effects on local species coexistence to negative effect on intermediate spatial scales, to again positive effects on large spatial and temporal scales. Species

  12. Fragmented nature: consequences for biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olff, H.; Ritchie, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss how fragmentation of resources and habitat operate differently on species diversity across spatial scales, ranging from positive effects on local species coexistence to negative effect on intermediate spatial scales, to again positive effects on large spatial and temporal scales. Species

  13. Fragmented nature : consequences for biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olff, Han; Ritchie, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss how fragmentation of resources and habitat operate differently on species diversity across spatial scales, ranging from positive effects on local species coexistence to negative effect on intermediate spatial scales, to again positive effects on large spatial and temporal scales. Species

  14. Fragmented nature: consequences for biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olff, H.; Ritchie, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss how fragmentation of resources and habitat operate differently on species diversity across spatial scales, ranging from positive effects on local species coexistence to negative effect on intermediate spatial scales, to again positive effects on large spatial and temporal scales. Species

  15. The VERDI fission fragment spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frégeau, M. O.; Bryś, T.; Gamboni, Th.; Geerts, W.; Oberstedt, S.; Oberstedt, A.; Borcea, R.

    2013-12-01

    The VERDI time-of-flight spectrometer is dedicated to measurements of fission product yields and of prompt neutron emission data. Pre-neutron fission-fragment masses will be determined by the double time-of-flight (TOF) technique. For this purpose an excellent time resolution is required. The time of flight of the fragments will be measured by electrostatic mirrors located near the target and the time signal coming from silicon detectors located at 50 cm on both sides of the target. This configuration, where the stop detector will provide us simultaneously with the kinetic energy of the fragment and timing information, significantly limits energy straggling in comparison to legacy experimental setup where a thin foil was usually used as a stop detector. In order to improve timing resolution, neutron transmutation doped silicon will be used. The high resistivity homogeneity of this material should significantly improve resolution in comparison to standard silicon detectors. Post-neutron fission fragment masses are obtained form the time-of-flight and the energy signal in the silicon detector. As an intermediary step a diamond detector will also be used as start detector located very close to the target. Previous tests have shown that poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD) diamonds provides a coincidence time resolution of 150 ps not allowing complete separation between very low-energy fission fragments, alpha particles and noise. New results from using artificial single-crystal diamonds (sCVD) show similar time resolution as from pCVD diamonds but also sufficiently good energy resolution.

  16. The VERDI fission fragment spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frégeau M.O.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The VERDI time-of-flight spectrometer is dedicated to measurements of fission product yields and of prompt neutron emission data. Pre-neutron fission-fragment masses will be determined by the double time-of-flight (TOF technique. For this purpose an excellent time resolution is required. The time of flight of the fragments will be measured by electrostatic mirrors located near the target and the time signal coming from silicon detectors located at 50 cm on both sides of the target. This configuration, where the stop detector will provide us simultaneously with the kinetic energy of the fragment and timing information, significantly limits energy straggling in comparison to legacy experimental setup where a thin foil was usually used as a stop detector. In order to improve timing resolution, neutron transmutation doped silicon will be used. The high resistivity homogeneity of this material should significantly improve resolution in comparison to standard silicon detectors. Post-neutron fission fragment masses are obtained form the time-of-flight and the energy signal in the silicon detector. As an intermediary step a diamond detector will also be used as start detector located very close to the target. Previous tests have shown that poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD diamonds provides a coincidence time resolution of 150 ps not allowing complete separation between very low-energy fission fragments, alpha particles and noise. New results from using artificial single-crystal diamonds (sCVD show similar time resolution as from pCVD diamonds but also sufficiently good energy resolution.

  17. Mechanical heterogeneity favors fragmentation of strained actin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Cruz, Enrique M; Martiel, Jean-Louis; Blanchoin, Laurent

    2015-05-05

    We present a general model of actin filament deformation and fragmentation in response to compressive forces. The elastic free energy density along filaments is determined by their shape and mechanical properties, which were modeled in terms of bending, twisting, and twist-bend coupling elasticities. The elastic energy stored in filament deformation (i.e., strain) tilts the fragmentation-annealing reaction free-energy profile to favor fragmentation. The energy gradient introduces a local shear force that accelerates filament intersubunit bond rupture. The severing protein, cofilin, renders filaments more compliant in bending and twisting. As a result, filaments that are partially decorated with cofilin are mechanically heterogeneous (i.e., nonuniform) and display asymmetric shape deformations and energy profiles distinct from mechanically homogenous (i.e., uniform), bare actin, or saturated cofilactin filaments. The local buckling strain depends on the relative size of the compliant segment as well as the bending and twisting rigidities of flanking regions. Filaments with a single bare/cofilin-decorated boundary localize energy and force adjacent to the boundary, within the compliant cofilactin segment. Filaments with small cofilin clusters were predicted to fragment within the compliant cofilactin rather than at boundaries. Neglecting contributions from twist-bend coupling elasticity underestimates the energy density and gradients along filaments, and thus the net effects of filament strain to fragmentation. Spatial confinement causes compliant cofilactin segments and filaments to adopt higher deformation modes and store more elastic energy, thereby promoting fragmentation. The theory and simulations presented here establish a quantitative relationship between actin filament fragmentation thermodynamics and elasticity, and reveal how local discontinuities in filament mechanical properties introduced by regulatory proteins can modulate both the severing efficiency

  18. Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.H. Riitters

    2009-01-01

    Effective resource management takes into account the administrative and biophysical settings within which natural resources occur. A setting may be described in many ways; for example, by forest land ownership, by reserved and roadless designation, or by the distribution of human populations in relation to forest (chapter 3). The physical arrangement of forest in a...

  19. The effects of amino acid composition of glutamine-rich domains on amyloid formation and fragmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander I Alexandrov

    Full Text Available Fragmentation of amyloid polymers by the chaperone Hsp104 allows them to propagate as prions in yeast. The factors which determine the frequency of fragmentation are unclear, though it is often presumed to depend on the physical strength of prion polymers. Proteins with long polyglutamine stretches represent a tractable model for revealing sequence elements required for polymer fragmentation in yeast, since they form poorly fragmented amyloids. Here we show that interspersion of polyglutamine stretches with various amino acid residues differentially affects the in vivo formation and fragmentation of the respective amyloids. Aromatic residues tyrosine, tryptophan and phenylalanine strongly stimulated polymer fragmentation, leading to the appearance of oligomers as small as dimers. Alanine, methionine, cysteine, serine, threonine and histidine also enhanced fragmentation, while charged residues, proline, glycine and leucine inhibited polymerization. Our data indicate that fragmentation frequency primarily depends on the recognition of fragmentation-promoting residues by Hsp104 and/or its co-chaperones, rather than on the physical stability of polymers. This suggests that differential exposure of such residues to chaperones defines prion variant-specific differences in polymer fragmentation efficiency.

  20. Efficient and accurate fragmentation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Spencer R; Bertoni, Colleen; Brorsen, Kurt R; Gordon, Mark S

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus Three novel fragmentation methods that are available in the electronic structure program GAMESS (general atomic and molecular electronic structure system) are discussed in this Account. The fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method can be combined with any electronic structure method to perform accurate calculations on large molecular species with no reliance on capping atoms or empirical parameters. The FMO method is highly scalable and can take advantage of massively parallel computer systems. For example, the method has been shown to scale nearly linearly on up to 131 000 processor cores for calculations on large water clusters. There have been many applications of the FMO method to large molecular clusters, to biomolecules (e.g., proteins), and to materials that are used as heterogeneous catalysts. The effective fragment potential (EFP) method is a model potential approach that is fully derived from first principles and has no empirically fitted parameters. Consequently, an EFP can be generated for any molecule by a simple preparatory GAMESS calculation. The EFP method provides accurate descriptions of all types of intermolecular interactions, including Coulombic interactions, polarization/induction, exchange repulsion, dispersion, and charge transfer. The EFP method has been applied successfully to the study of liquid water, π-stacking in substituted benzenes and in DNA base pairs, solvent effects on positive and negative ions, electronic spectra and dynamics, non-adiabatic phenomena in electronic excited states, and nonlinear excited state properties. The effective fragment molecular orbital (EFMO) method is a merger of the FMO and EFP methods, in which interfragment interactions are described by the EFP potential, rather than the less accurate electrostatic potential. The use of EFP in this manner facilitates the use of a smaller value for the distance cut-off (Rcut). Rcut determines the distance at which EFP interactions replace fully quantum

  1. Fragmentation in the biopharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Andrew D; Varela, Francisco E

    2017-02-01

    The large number of biopharmaceutical mergers and acquisitions (M&A) that occurred over the past decade has generated questions about whether the industry is consolidating around too-few players, negatively impacting both the number of medicines developed and overall innovation. However, closer examination of the level of biopharmaceutical consolidation by prescription sales shows that the industry was more fragmented in 2015 than in 2003. The trend towards increasing fragmentation is also observed across noncommercial and independent metrics over the same time period. The number and size of M&A deals has masked an active and competitive marketplace in which market growth and the number of companies entering the market exceeded the apparent reduction in the number of players caused by acquisitions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Fragment separator momentum compression schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandura, Laura, E-mail: bandura@anl.gov [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab, Michigan State University, 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Erdelyi, Bela [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115 (United States); Hausmann, Marc [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Kubo, Toshiyuki [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako (Japan); Nolen, Jerry [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Portillo, Mauricio [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Sherrill, Bradley M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab, Michigan State University, 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States)

    2011-07-21

    We present a scheme to use a fragment separator and profiled energy degraders to transfer longitudinal phase space into transverse phase space while maintaining achromatic beam transport. The first order beam optics theory of the method is presented and the consequent enlargement of the transverse phase space is discussed. An interesting consequence of the technique is that the first order mass resolving power of the system is determined by the first dispersive section up to the energy degrader, independent of whether or not momentum compression is used. The fragment separator at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams is a specific application of this technique and is described along with simulations by the code COSY INFINITY.

  3. Fragment separator momentum compression schemes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandura, L.; Erdelyi, B.; Hausmann, M.; Kubo, T.; Nolen, J.; Portillo, M.; Sherrill, B.M. (Physics); (MSU); (Northern Illinois Univ.); (RIKEN)

    2011-07-21

    We present a scheme to use a fragment separator and profiled energy degraders to transfer longitudinal phase space into transverse phase space while maintaining achromatic beam transport. The first order beam optics theory of the method is presented and the consequent enlargement of the transverse phase space is discussed. An interesting consequence of the technique is that the first order mass resolving power of the system is determined by the first dispersive section up to the energy degrader, independent of whether or not momentum compression is used. The fragment separator at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams is a specific application of this technique and is described along with simulations by the code COSY INFINITY.

  4. Fragment correlations from NAUTILUS multidetector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizard, G. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire

    1995-12-31

    It is shown on a few examples how heavy fragment correlations, induced either by conservation laws or by Coulomb interaction can bring physical information on nuclear reactions. All the experimental data discussed have been obtained at GANIL using the NAUTILUS gaseous multi detectors DELF and XYZT, which - due to their good spatial and time resolution and their large solid angle coverage - have proved to be efficient tools for multifragment correlation studies. Different reactions of Ar, Kr, Xe, and Pb beams on Au targets are discussed. It is shown that velocity and angular correlations between fragments provide a powerful clock to scrutinize the details of the hot nuclei decay history. (K.A.). 18 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Fragmentation in filamentary molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Contreras, Yanett; Rathborne, Jill M; Sanhueza, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Recent surveys of dust continuum emission at sub-mm wavelengths have shown that filamentary molecular clouds are ubiquitous along the Galactic plane. These structures are inhomogeneous, with over-densities that are sometimes associated with infrared emission and active of star formation. To investigate the connection between filaments and star formation, requires an understanding of the processes that lead to the fragmentation of filaments and a determination of the physical properties of the over-densities (clumps). In this paper, we present a multi-wavelength study of five filamentary molecular clouds, containing several clumps in different evolutionary stages of star formation. We analyse the fragmentation of the filaments and derive the physical properties of their clumps. We find that the clumps in all filaments have a characteristic spacing consistent with the prediction of the `sausage' instability theory, regardless of the complex morphology of the filaments or their evolutionary stage. We also find t...

  6. Fragmentering og korridorer i landskabet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammershøj, M.; Madsen, A. B.

    , at fragmentering af habitater resulterer i en reduktion og isolering af mange plante- og dyrepopulationer. Det er desuden vist, at korridorer har en funktion som habitater, hvilket er medvirkende til, at et område med korridorer kan huse flere arter og individer end et tilsvarende område uden korridorer. Der......Rapporten indeholder en litteraturudredning, der er baseret på en bearbejdning af den tilgængelige nationale og internationale litteratur omhandlende fragmentering og korridorer på det botaniske og zoologiske område. I alt 1.063 titler ligger til grund for udredningen. Udredningen har vist...... mangler dog entydige beviser for, at korridorer kan være af afgørende betydning for rekolonisering af habitater, i hvilke en given art er forsvundet. Afslutningsvis gives en liste med forskningsbehov samt en række anbefalinger....

  7. Asymmetry effects in fragment production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Kaur, Varinderjit

    2016-05-01

    The production of different fragments has been studied by taking into account the mass asymmetry of the reaction and employing the momentum dependent interactions. Two different set of asymmetric reactions have been analyzed while keeping Atotal fixed using soft momentum dependent equation of state. Our results indicate that the impact of momentum dependent interactions is different in lighter projectile systems as compared to heavier ones. The comparative analysis of IQMD simulations with the experimental data in case of heavier projectile and lighter target system for the reaction of 197Au+27Al (η = 0.7) at E = 600 MeV/nucleon shows that with the inclusion of MDI we are able, upto some extent, to reproduce the experimental universality of rise and fall of intermediate mass fragments (IMFs).

  8. The fragmentation of Kosmos 2163

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    On 6 Dec. 1991 Kosmos 2163, a maneuverable Soviet spacecraft which had been in orbit for 58 days, experienced a major breakup at an altitude of approximately 210 km. Although numerous pieces of debris were created, the fragments decayed rapidly leaving no long-term impact on the near-Earth environment. The assessed cause of the event is the deliberate detonation of an explosive device. Details of this event are presented.

  9. Modeling of Fragmentation of Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Parul; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Carlozzi, Alexander; Hart, Kenneth; Bryson, Katie; Sears, Derek

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to understand fragmentation and fracture of a given asteroid and mechanisms of break-up. The focus of the present work is to develop modeling techniques for stony asteroids in 10m-100m range to answer two questions: 1) What is the role of material makeup of an asteroid in the stress distribution? 2)How is stress distribution altered in the presence of pre-existing defects?

  10. Fragmentation measurement using image processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhang Sereshki

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, first of all, the existing problems in fragmentation measurement are reviewed for the sake of its fast and reliable evaluation. Then, the available methods used for evaluation of blast results are mentioned. The produced errors especially in recognizing the rock fragments in computer-aided methods, and also, the importance of determination of their sizes in the image analysis methods are described. After reviewing the previous work done, an algorithm is proposed for the automated determination of rock particles’ boundary in the Matlab software. This method can determinate automatically the particles boundary in the minimum time. The results of proposed method are compared with those of Split Desktop and GoldSize software in two automated and manual states. Comparing the curves extracted from different methods reveals that the proposed approach is accurately applicable in measuring the size distribution of laboratory samples, while the manual determination of boundaries in the conventional software is very time-consuming, and the results of automated netting of fragments are very different with the real value due to the error in separation of the objects.

  11. Residual Fragments after Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaan Özdedeli

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Clinically insignificant residual fragments (CIRFs are described as asymptomatic, noninfectious and nonobstructive stone fragments (≤4 mm remaining in the urinary system after the last session of any intervention (ESWL, URS or PCNL for urinary stones. Their insignificance is questionable since CIRFs could eventually become significant, as their presence may result in recurrent stone growth and they may cause pain and infection due to urinary obstruction. They may become the source of persistent infections and a significant portion of the patients will have a stone-related event, requiring auxilliary interventions. CT seems to be the ultimate choice of assessment. Although there is no concensus about the timing, recent data suggests that it may be performed one month after the procedure. However, imaging can be done in the immediate postoperative period, if there are no tubes blurring the assessment. There is some evidence indicating that selective medical therapy may have an impact on decreasing stone formation rates. Retrograde intrarenal surgery, with its minimally invasive nature, seems to be the best way to deal with residual fragments.

  12. High-resolution meiotic and physical mapping of the Best`s vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2) locus to pericentromeric chromosome 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, B.H.F.; Vogt, G. [Institut fuer Humangenetik, Wuerzburg (Germany); Walker, D. [UBC, Vancouver (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Vitelliform macular dystrophy, also known as Best`s disease, is a juvenile-onset macular degeneration with autosomal dominant inheritance. It is characterized by well-demarcated accumulation of lipofuscin-like material within and beneath the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and classically results in an egg yolk-like appearance of the macula. Typically, carriers of the disease gene show a specific electrophysiological sign which can be detected by electrooculography (EOG). The EOG measures a standing potential between the cornea and the retina which is primarily generated by the RPE. The histopathological findings as well as the EOG abnormalities suggest that Best`s disease is a generalized disorder of the RPE. The basic biochemical defect is still unknown. As a first step in the positional cloning of the defective gene, the Best`s disease locus was mapped to chromosome 11 between markers at D11S871 and INT2. Subsequently, his region was refined to a 3.7 cM interval flanked by loci D11S903 and PYGM. To further narrow the D11S903-PYGM interval and to obtain an estimate of the physical size of the minimal candidate region, we used a combination of high-resolution PCR hybrid mapping and analysis of recombinant Best`s disease chromosomes. We identified six markers from within the D11S903-PYGM interval that show no recombination with the defective gene in three multigeneration Best`s disease pedigrees. Our hybrid panel localizes these markers on either side of the centromere on chromosome 11. The closest markers flanking the disease gene are at D11S986 in band p12-11.22 and at D11S480 in band q13.2-13.3. Our study demonstrates that the physical size of the Best`s disease region is exceedingly larger than was previously estimated from the genetic data due to the proximity of the defective gene to the centromere of chromosome 11.

  13. Augmenting Tractable Fragments of Abstract Argumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Ordyniak, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    We present a new and compelling approach to the efficient solution of important computational problems that arise in the context of abstract argumentation. Our approach makes known algorithms defined for restricted fragments generally applicable, at a computational cost that scales with the distance from the fragment. Thus, in a certain sense, we gradually augment tractable fragments. Surprisingly, it turns out that some tractable fragments admit such an augmentation and that others do not. More specifically, we show that the problems of credulous and skeptical acceptance are fixed-parameter tractable when parameterized by the distance from the fragment of acyclic argumentation frameworks. Other tractable fragments such as the fragments of symmetrical and bipartite frameworks seem to prohibit an augmentation: the acceptance problems are already intractable for frameworks at distance 1 from the fragments. For our study we use a broad setting and consider several different semantics. For the algorithmic results...

  14. Energy-loss distributions of fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demidovich, N.N.; Nakhutin, I.E.; Shatunov, V.G.

    1976-03-05

    The f-f coincidence method was used to investigate the change in the form of the energy-loss distributions of Cf/sup 252/ fission fragments in air, down to fragment energies approx.0.8 MeV. A theoretical model is considered for the estimate of the mean-squared deviations of the fragment energy-loss distributions. (AIP)

  15. Self-organized criticality in fragmenting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, L.; Dimon, P.; Bohr, J.

    1993-01-01

    The measured mass distributions of fragments from 26 fractured objects of gypsum, soap, stearic paraffin, and potato show evidence of obeying scaling laws; this suggests the possibility of self-organized criticality in fragmenting. The probability of finding a fragment scales inversely to a power...

  16. Low pressure microfluidic-based DNA fragmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shui, Lingling; Sparreboom, Wouter; Bomer, Johan G.; Jin, Mingliang; Carlen, Edwin; van den Berg, Albert

    2011-01-01

    We report a low-pressure microfluidic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragmentation device based on a combination of me-chanical hydrodynamic shearing and low temperature sample heating. Conventional DNA fragmentation based on hydrody-namic shearing is capable of achieving fragment lengths (FL) < 10k bp

  17. Scaling and four-quark fragmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, O.; Bosveld, G. D.

    1991-01-01

    The conditions for a scaling behaviour from the fragmentation process leading to slow protons are discussed. The scaling referred to implies that the fragmentation functions depend on the light-cone momentum fraction only. It is shown that differences in the fragmentation functions for valence- and

  18. Changes in tree reproductive traits reduce functional diversity in a fragmented Atlantic forest landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Coe Girão

    Full Text Available Functional diversity has been postulated to be critical for the maintenance of ecosystem functioning, but the way it can be disrupted by human-related disturbances remains poorly investigated. Here we test the hypothesis that habitat fragmentation changes the relative contribution of tree species within categories of reproductive traits (frequency of traits and reduces the functional diversity of tree assemblages. The study was carried out in an old and severely fragmented landscape of the Brazilian Atlantic forest. We used published information and field observations to obtain the frequency of tree species and individuals within 50 categories of reproductive traits (distributed in four major classes: pollination systems, floral biology, sexual systems, and reproductive systems in 10 fragments and 10 tracts of forest interior (control plots. As hypothesized, populations in fragments and control plots differed substantially in the representation of the four major classes of reproductive traits (more than 50% of the categories investigated. The most conspicuous differences were the lack of three pollination systems in fragments--pollination by birds, flies and non-flying mammals--and that fragments had a higher frequency of both species and individuals pollinated by generalist vectors. Hermaphroditic species predominate in both habitats, although their relative abundances were higher in fragments. On the contrary, self-incompatible species were underrepresented in fragments. Moreover, fragments showed lower functional diversity (H' scores for pollination systems (-30.3%, floral types (-23.6%, and floral sizes (-20.8% in comparison to control plots. In contrast to the overwhelming effect of fragmentation, patch and landscape metrics such as patch size and forest cover played a minor role on the frequency of traits. Our results suggest that habitat fragmentation promotes a marked shift in the relative abundance of tree reproductive traits and

  19. Isoscaling of projectile-like fragments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Chen; Chen Jin-Hui; Guo Wei; Ma Chun-Wang; Ma Guo-Liang; Su Qian-Min; Yan Ting-Zhi; Zuo Jia-Xu; Ma Yu-Gang; Fang De-Qing; Cai Xiang-Zhou; Chen Jin-Gen; Shen Wen-Qing; Tian Wen-Dong; Wang Kun; Wei Yi-Bin

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the isotopic and isotonic distributions of projectile fragmentation products have been simulated by a modified statistical abrasion-ablation model and the isoscaling behaviour of projectile-like fragments has been discussed. The isoscaling parameters α andβ have been extracted respectively, for hot fragments before evaporation and cold fragments after evaporation. It looks that the evaporation has stronger effect on α than β. For cold fragments,a monotonic increase of α and |β| with the increase of Z and N is observed. The relation between isoscaling parameter and the change of isospin content is discussed.

  20. Faunal Communities Are Invariant to Fragmentation in Experimental Seagrass Landscapes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Lefcheck

    Full Text Available Human-driven habitat fragmentation is cited as one of the most pressing threats facing many coastal ecosystems today. Many experiments have explored the consequences of fragmentation on fauna in one foundational habitat, seagrass beds, but have either surveyed along a gradient of existing patchiness, used artificial materials to mimic a natural bed, or sampled over short timescales. Here, we describe faunal responses to constructed fragmented landscapes varying from 4-400 m2 in two transplant garden experiments incorporating live eelgrass (Zostera marina L.. In experiments replicated within two subestuaries of the Chesapeake Bay, USA across multiple seasons and non-consecutive years, we comprehensively censused mesopredators and epifaunal communities using complementary quantitative methods. We found that community properties, including abundance, species richness, Simpson and functional diversity, and composition were generally unaffected by the number of patches and the size of the landscape, or the intensity of sampling. Additionally, an index of competition based on species co-occurrences revealed no trends with increasing patch size, contrary to theoretical predictions. We extend conclusions concerning the invariance of animal communities to habitat fragmentation from small-scale observational surveys and artificial experiments to experiments conducted with actual living plants and at more realistic scales. Our findings are likely a consequence of the rapid life histories and high mobility of the organisms common to eelgrass beds, and have implications for both conservation and restoration, suggesting that even small patches can rapidly promote abundant and diverse faunal communities.

  1. Metazoan promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenhard, Boris; Sandelin, Albin Gustav; Carninci, Piero

    2012-01-01

    Promoters are crucial for gene regulation. They vary greatly in terms of associated regulatory elements, sequence motifs, the choice of transcription start sites and other features. Several technologies that harness next-generation sequencing have enabled recent advances in identifying promoters...... and their features, helping researchers who are investigating functional categories of promoters and their modes of regulation. Additional features of promoters that are being characterized include types of histone modifications, nucleosome positioning, RNA polymerase pausing and novel small RNAs. In this Review, we...... discuss recent findings relating to metazoan promoters and how these findings are leading to a revised picture of what a gene promoter is and how it works....

  2. Triggered fragmentation in gravitationally unstable discs: forming fragments at small radii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meru Farzana

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We carry out three dimensional radiation hydrodynamical simulations of gravitationally unstable discs using to explore the movement of mass in a disc following its fragmentation. Compared to a more quiescent state before it fragments, the radial velocity of the gas increases by up to a factor of ≈ 2 – 3 after fragmentation. While the mass movement occurs both inwards and outwards, the inwards motion can cause the inner spirals to be suciently dense that they may become unstable and potentially fragment. Consequently, the dynamical behaviour of fragmented discs may cause subsequent fragmentation at smaller radii after an initial fragment has formed in the outer disc.

  3. Natural fragmentation in river networks as a driver of speciation for freshwater fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, Murilo S.; Cornu, Jean-François; Oberdorff, Thierry; Lasso, Carlos A.; Tedesco, Pablo A.

    2013-01-01

    Although habitat fragmentation fosters extinctions, it also increases the probability of speciation by promoting and maintaining divergence among isolated populations. Here we test for the effects of two isolation factors that may reduce population dispersal within river networks as potential drivers of freshwater fish speciation: 1) the position of subdrainages along the longitudinal river gradient, and 2) the level of fragmentation within subdrainages caused by natural waterfalls. The occur...

  4. Analysis of Transmissions Scheduling with Packet Fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nir Menakerman

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a scheduling problem in which packets, or datagrams, may be fragmented. While there are a few applications to scheduling with datagram fragmentation, our model of the problem is derived from a scheduling problem present in data over CATV networks. In the scheduling problem datagrams of variable lengths must be assigned (packed into fixed length time slots. One of the capabilities of the system is the ability to break a datagram into several fragments. When a datagram is fragmented, extra bits are added to the original datagram to enable the reassembly of all the fragments. We convert the scheduling problem into the problem of bin packing with item fragmentation, which we define in the following way: we are asked to pack a list of items into a minimum number of unit capacity bins. Each item may be fragmented in which case overhead units are added to the size of every fragment. The cost associated with fragmentation renders the problem NP-hard, therefore an approximation algorithm is needed. We define a version of the well-known Next-Fit algorithm, capable of fragmenting items, and investigate its performance. We present both worst case and average case results and compare them to the case where fragmentation is not allowed.

  5. Impact of numerical models on fragmentation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renouf, Mathieu; Gezahengn, Belien; Abbas, Micheline; Bourgeois, Florent

    2013-06-01

    Simulated fragmentation process in granular assemblies is a challenging problem which date back the beginning of the 90'. If first approaches have focus on the fragmentation on a single particle, with the development of robust, fast numerical method is is possible today to simulated such process in a large collection of particles. But the question of the fragmentation problem is still open: should the fragmentation be done dynamically (one particle becoming two fragments) and according which criterion or should the fragment paths be defined initially and which is the impact of the discretization and the model of fragments? The present contribution proposes to investigate the second aspect i.e. the impact of fragment modeling on the fragmentation processes. First to perform such an analysis, the geometry of fragments (disks/sphere or polygon/polyhedra), their behavior (rigid/deformable) and the law governing their interactions are investigated. Then such model will be used in a grinding application where the evolution of fragments and impact on the behavior of the whole packing are investigate.

  6. The formation of planets by disc fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamatellos Dimitris

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available I discuss the role that disc fragmentation plays in the formation of gas giant and terrestrial planets, and how this relates to the formation of brown dwarfs and low-mass stars, and ultimately to the process of star formation. Protostellar discs may fragment, if they are massive enough and can cool fast enough, but most of the objects that form by fragmentation are brown dwarfs. It may be possible that planets also form, if the mass growth of a proto-fragment is stopped (e.g. if this fragment is ejected from the disc, or suppressed and even reversed (e.g by tidal stripping. I will discuss if it is possible to distinguish whether a planet has formed by disc fragmentation or core accretion, and mention of a few examples of observed exoplanets that are suggestive of formation by disc fragmentation.

  7. Reframing landscape fragmentation's effects on ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Matthew G E; Suarez-Castro, Andrés F; Martinez-Harms, Maria; Maron, Martine; McAlpine, Clive; Gaston, Kevin J; Johansen, Kasper; Rhodes, Jonathan R

    2015-04-01

    Landscape structure and fragmentation have important effects on ecosystem services, with a common assumption being that fragmentation reduces service provision. This is based on fragmentation's expected effects on ecosystem service supply, but ignores how fragmentation influences the flow of services to people. Here we develop a new conceptual framework that explicitly considers the links between landscape fragmentation, the supply of services, and the flow of services to people. We argue that fragmentation's effects on ecosystem service flow can be positive or negative, and use our framework to construct testable hypotheses about the effects of fragmentation on final ecosystem service provision. Empirical efforts to apply and test this framework are critical to improving landscape management for multiple ecosystem services.

  8. Extraction of 16th Century Calender Fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Jakob Povl; Etheridge, Christian

    at the Cultural Heritage & Archaeometric Research Team, SDU. Upon finding medieval manuscript fragments in the university library’s special collections, scholars at the Centre for Medieval Literature are consulted. In most cases, digital pictures of the finds will circulate in the international community...... of medieval scholars. Thousands of 16th and 17th Century books are stored in the University Library of Southern Denmark. One out of five of these books is expected to contain medieval manuscript fragments or fragments of rare prints, e.g. incunabula....... fragments may require extensive use of Big Data and other forms of analysis in order to be identified. Usually, the university library prefers not to remove the fragments from their “fragment carriers”. In order to read fragments that are only partially visible or invisible, x-ray technology may be deployed...

  9. Dihadron Fragmentation Functions and Transversity

    CERN Document Server

    Radici, Marco; Bacchetta, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    We present preliminary results for an updated extraction of the transversity parton distribution based on the analysis of pion-pair production in deep-inelastic scattering off transversely polarized targets in collinear factorization. Data for proton and deuteron targets by HERMES and COMPASS allow for a flavor separation of the valence components of transversity, while di-hadron fragmentation functions are taken from the semi-inclusive production of two pion pairs in back-to-back jets in $e^+ e^-$ annihilation. The latter data from Belle have been reanalyzed using the replica method and a more realistic estimate of the uncertainties on the chiral-odd interference fragmentation function has been obtained. After encoding this piece of information into the deep-inelastic scattering cross section, the transversity has been re-extracted by using the most recent and more precise COMPASS data for proton target. This picture represents the current most realistic estimate of the uncertainties on our knowledge of tran...

  10. Dihadron Fragmentation Functions and Transversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radici Marco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present preliminary results for an updated extraction of the transversity parton distribution based on the analysis of pion-pair production in deep-inelastic scattering off transversely polarized targets in collinear factorization. Data for proton and deuteron targets by HERMES and COMPASS allow for a flavor separation of the valence components of transversity, while di-hadron fragmentation functions are taken from the semi-inclusive production of two pion pairs in back-to-back jets in e+e− annihilation. The latter data from Belle have been reanalyzed using the replica method and a more realistic estimate of the uncertainties on the chiral-odd interference fragmentation function has been obtained. After encoding this piece of information into the deep-inelastic scattering cross section, the transversity has been re-extracted by using the most recent and more precise COMPASS data for proton target. This picture represents the current most realistic estimate of the uncertainties on our knowledge of transversity. The preliminary results indicate that the valence up component seems smaller and with a narrower error band than in previous extraction.

  11. Measuring fragmentation of ambulatory care in a tripartite healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su; Yeung, Philip C

    2013-05-15

    care. Individuals' health beliefs-as a result of the persistent habitual tendency and latitude incentivized by the system-may be behind the fragmented care we saw. Efforts are needed to alter health beliefs, targeting subgroups of vulnerable population, and create environments that promote better coordinated primary care.

  12. Cloning and Identification of promoter of Pseudomonas Pseudoaligenes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jie(张杰); Zhao Jian; Sun Qun; Yin Hongxiang; Yang Zhirong

    2003-01-01

    Promoter-probe vector pSUPV4 is used to clone the promoter of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes directly in E. Coli, and the recombinant pPA7, which has the highest kanamycin resistance, is obtained. Sequencing the PA7 fragment discloses several motifs similar to the conservative domains of prokaryotic promoters, including -10 box, -35 box, parallel SD fragment essential to transcription initiation, and the translation initiation site ATG. Southern blotting of PA7 indicates that the PA7 fragment comes from P. Pseudoalcaligenes genome and has probably one copy. The PA7 fragment is subcloned by PCR, and the result shows that the 5'-flanking fragment from 889 to 1120 bp has promoter activity, which can be enhanced by the 0.7Kb fragment at 5' end. The fragments of pPA7 and pPA7-2 are transferred into pseudomonas pseudoaligenes by electroporation, and the significant higher kanamycin resistance of transformants than that of control indicates that the PA7 fragment has the promoter activity in P. Pseudoaligene.

  13. Single chain Fab (scFab fragment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenneis Mariam

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The connection of the variable part of the heavy chain (VH and and the variable part of the light chain (VL by a peptide linker to form a consecutive polypeptide chain (single chain antibody, scFv was a breakthrough for the functional production of antibody fragments in Escherichia coli. Being double the size of fragment variable (Fv fragments and requiring assembly of two independent polypeptide chains, functional Fab fragments are usually produced with significantly lower yields in E. coli. An antibody design combining stability and assay compatibility of the fragment antigen binding (Fab with high level bacterial expression of single chain Fv fragments would be desirable. The desired antibody fragment should be both suitable for expression as soluble antibody in E. coli and antibody phage display. Results Here, we demonstrate that the introduction of a polypeptide linker between the fragment difficult (Fd and the light chain (LC, resulting in the formation of a single chain Fab fragment (scFab, can lead to improved production of functional molecules. We tested the impact of various linker designs and modifications of the constant regions on both phage display efficiency and the yield of soluble antibody fragments. A scFab variant without cysteins (scFabΔC connecting the constant part 1 of the heavy chain (CH1 and the constant part of the light chain (CL were best suited for phage display and production of soluble antibody fragments. Beside the expression system E. coli, the new antibody format was also expressed in Pichia pastoris. Monovalent and divalent fragments (DiFabodies as well as multimers were characterised. Conclusion A new antibody design offers the generation of bivalent Fab derivates for antibody phage display and production of soluble antibody fragments. This antibody format is of particular value for high throughput proteome binder generation projects, due to the avidity effect and the possible use of

  14. Fluid fragmentation from hospital toilets

    CERN Document Server

    Traverso, G; Lu, C -C; Maa, R; Langer, R; Bourouiba, L

    2013-01-01

    Hospital-acquired infections represent significant health and financial burdens to society. Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a particularly challenging bacteria with the potential to cause severe diarrhea and death. One mode of transmission for C. difficile, as well as other pathogens, which has received little attention is the potential air contamination by pathogen-bearing droplets emanating from toilets. In the fluid dynamics video submitted to the APS DFD Gallery of Fluid Motion 2013, we present flow visualizations via high-speed recordings showing the capture of the product of the fluid fragmentation generated by hospital toilet high-pressure flushes. Important quantities of both large and small droplets are observed. We illustrate how high-pressure flushes and cleaning products currently used in hospital toilets result in aggravating, rather than alleviating, the suspension and recirculation of tenacious airborne pathogen-bearing droplets.

  15. Fragmentation in Carbon Therapy Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Charara, Y M

    2010-01-01

    The state of the art Monte Carlo code HETC-HEDS was used to simulate spallation products, secondary neutron, and secondary proton production in A-150 Tissue Equivalent Plastic phantoms to investigate fragmentation of carbon therapy beams. For a 356 MeV/Nucleon carbon ion beam, production of charged particles heavier than protons was 0.24 spallation products per incident carbon ion with atomic numbers ranging from 1 through 5 (hydrogen to boron). In addition, there were 4.73 neutrons and 2.95 protons produced per incident carbon ion. Furthermore, as the incident energy increases, the neutron production rate increases at a rate of 20% per 10 MeV/nucleon. Secondary protons were created at a rate between 2.62-2.87 per carbon ion, while spallation products were created at a rate between 0.20-0.24 per carbon ion.

  16. Nonlinear Inflaton Fragmentation after Preheating

    CERN Document Server

    Felder, G N; Felder, Gary N.; Kofman, Lev

    2007-01-01

    We consider the nonlinear dynamics of inflaton fragmentation during and after preheating in the simplest model of chaotic inflation. While the earlier regime of parametric resonant particle production and the later turbulent regime of interacting fields evolving towards equilibrium are well identified and understood, the short intermediate stage of violent nonlinear dynamics remains less explored. Lattice simulations of fully nonlinear preheating dynamics show specific features of this intermediate stage: occupation numbers of the scalar particles are peaked, scalar fields become significantly non-gaussian and the field dynamics become chaotic and irreversible. Visualization of the field dynamics in configuration space reveals that nonlinear interactions generate non-gaussian inflaton inhomogeneities with very fast growing amplitudes. The peaks of the inflaton inhomogeneities coincide with the peaks of the scalar field(s) produced by parametric resonance. When the inflaton peaks reach their maxima, they stop ...

  17. High yield DNA fragmentation using cyclical hydrodynamic shearing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shui, Lingling; Sparreboom, Wouter; Spang, Peter; Roeser, Tina; Nieto, Benjamin; Guasch, Francesc; Corbera, Antoni Homs; van den Berg, Albert; Carlen, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    We report a new DNA fragmentation technique that significantly simplifies conventional hydrodynamic shearing fragmentation by eliminating the need for sample recirculation while maintaining high fragmentation yield and low fragment length variation, and therefore, reduces instrument complexity and c

  18. High yield DNA fragmentation using cyclical hydrodynamic shearing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shui, Lingling; Sparreboom, Wouter; Spang, Peter; Roeser, Tina; Nieto, Benjamin; Guasch, Francesc; Corbera, Antoni Homs; van den Berg, Albert; Carlen, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    We report a new DNA fragmentation technique that significantly simplifies conventional hydrodynamic shearing fragmentation by eliminating the need for sample recirculation while maintaining high fragmentation yield and low fragment length variation, and therefore, reduces instrument complexity and

  19. Resilient Networks of Ant-Plant Mutualists in Amazonian Forest Fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passmore, Heather A.; Bruna, Emilio M.; Heredia, Sylvia M.; Vasconcelos, Heraldo L.

    2012-01-01

    Background The organization of networks of interacting species, such as plants and animals engaged in mutualisms, strongly influences the ecology and evolution of partner communities. Habitat fragmentation is a globally pervasive form of spatial heterogeneity that could profoundly impact the structure of mutualist networks. This is particularly true for biodiversity-rich tropical ecosystems, where the majority of plant species depend on mutualisms with animals and it is thought that changes in the structure of mutualist networks could lead to cascades of extinctions. Methodology/Principal Findings We evaluated effects of fragmentation on mutualistic networks by calculating metrics of network structure for ant-plant networks in continuous Amazonian forests with those in forest fragments. We hypothesized that networks in fragments would have fewer species and higher connectance, but equal nestedness and resilience compared to forest networks. Only one of the nine metrics we compared differed between continuous forest and forest fragments, indicating that networks were resistant to the biotic and abiotic changes that accompany fragmentation. This is partially the result of the loss of only specialist species with one connection that were lost in forest fragments. Conclusions/Significance We found that the networks of ant-plant mutualists in twenty-five year old fragments are similar to those in continuous forest, suggesting these interactions are resistant to the detrimental changes associated with habitat fragmentation, at least in landscapes that are a mosaic of fragments, regenerating forests, and pastures. However, ant-plant mutualistic networks may have several properties that may promote their persistence in fragmented landscapes. Proactive identification of key mutualist partners may be necessary to focus conservation efforts on the interactions that insure the integrity of network structure and the ecosystems services networks provide. PMID:22912666

  20. Generalized fragmentation functions for fractal jet observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Benjamin T.; Procura, Massimiliano; Thaler, Jesse; Waalewijn, Wouter J.; Zhou, Kevin

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a broad class of fractal jet observables that recursively probe the collective properties of hadrons produced in jet fragmentation. To describe these collinear-unsafe observables, we generalize the formalism of fragmentation functions, which are important objects in QCD for calculating cross sections involving identified final-state hadrons. Fragmentation functions are fundamentally nonperturbative, but have a calculable renormalization group evolution. Unlike ordinary fragmentation functions, generalized fragmentation functions exhibit nonlinear evolution, since fractal observables involve correlated subsets of hadrons within a jet. Some special cases of generalized fragmentation functions are reviewed, including jet charge and track functions. We then consider fractal jet observables that are based on hierarchical clustering trees, where the nonlinear evolution equations also exhibit tree-like structure at leading order. We develop a numeric code for performing this evolution and study its phenomenological implications. As an application, we present examples of fractal jet observables that are useful in discriminating quark jets from gluon jets.

  1. Coal char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, L.L.

    1995-07-01

    A series of investigations of coal and char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion is reported for a suite of coals ranging in rank from lignite to low-volatile (lv) bituminous coal under combustion conditions similar to those found in commercial-scale boilers. Experimental measurements are described that utilize identical particle sizing characteristics to determine initial and final size distributions. Mechanistic interpretation of the data suggest that coal fragmentation is an insignificant event and that char fragmentation is controlled by char structure. Chars forming cenospheres fragment more extensively than solid chars. Among the chars that fragment, large particles produce more fine material than small particles. In all cases, coal and char fragmentation are seen to be sufficiently minor as to be relatively insignificant factors influencing fly ash size distribution, particle loading, and char burnout.

  2. Fragmentation processes during explosion welding (review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinberg, B. A.; Ivanov, M. A.; Rybin, V. V.; Elkina, O. A.; Patselov, A. M.; Antonova, O. V.; Inozemtsev, A. V.; Tolmachev, T. P.

    2013-10-01

    The fragmentation during explosion welding is briefly reviewed. Fragmentation of partitioning type (FPT), which consists in partitioning into particles that either fly away or join each other, is detected. FPT is an analog of the fragmentation during an explosion that was studied by Mott. In both cases, the flight of particles (fragments) takes place, and the integrity of the material is retained in FPT. FPT is a powerful channel for the dissipation of supplied energy, since the surface of flying particles has a large total area.

  3. Molecular energies from an incremental fragmentation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitei, Oinam Romesh; Heßelmann, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    The systematic molecular fragmentation method by Collins and Deev [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 104104 (2006)] has been used to calculate total energies and relative conformational energies for a number of small and extended molecular systems. In contrast to the original approach by Collins, we have tested the accuracy of the fragmentation method by utilising an incremental scheme in which the energies at the lowest level of the fragmentation are calculated on an accurate quantum chemistry level while lower-cost methods are used to correct the low-level energies through a high-level fragmentation. In this work, the fragment energies at the lowest level of fragmentation were calculated using the random-phase approximation (RPA) and two recently developed extensions to the RPA while the incremental corrections at higher levels of the fragmentation were calculated using standard density functional theory (DFT) methods. The complete incremental fragmentation method has been shown to reproduce the supermolecule results with a very good accuracy, almost independent on the molecular type, size, or type of decomposition. The fragmentation method has also been used in conjunction with the DFT-SAPT (symmetry-adapted perturbation theory) method which enables a breakdown of the total nonbonding energy contributions into individual interaction energy terms. Finally, the potential problems of the method connected with the use of capping hydrogen atoms are analysed and two possible solutions are supplied.

  4. A Note on Convex Renorming and Fragmentability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Mirmostafaee

    2005-05-01

    Using the game approach to fragmentability, we give new and simpler proofs of the following known results: (a) If the Banach space admits an equivalent Kadec norm, then its weak topology is fragmented by a metric which is stronger than the norm topology. (b) If the Banach space admits an equivalent rotund norm, then its weak topology is fragmented by a metric. (c) If the Banach space is weakly locally uniformly rotund, then its weak topology is fragmented by a metric which is stronger than the norm topology.

  5. Cloning and Characterization of Gene Promoters from Bacillus pumilus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Jiao(潘皎); Zhang Yizheng

    2004-01-01

    DNA fragments obtained from Sau3AI partially digested total DNA of Bacillus pumilus UN31-C-42 are first inserted into BamHI site of pSUPV4, a promoter-probe vector. The recombinant DNA molecules are transformed into Escherichia coli cells and eight-three Kanr clones (named pSUBp1- pSUBp83) are obtained. The inserted fragments in pSUBp53, pSUBp57, pSUBp21, which showed high level of kanamycin - resistance, are sequenced and analyzed, respectively. These fragments contain some conserved sequences of prokaryotic gene promoters, such as TATAAT and TTGACA box. The promoter fragment Bp53 could efficiently promote the alkaline protease gene of B.pumilus expression not only in E.coli but also in B.subtilis cells.

  6. In vitro Recombination and Identification of Mutated Fragment Corresponding to Regulation Region of mtrR Gene of Neisseria Gonorrhoeae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Changzheng; LIN Nengxing; TU Yating; LIAN Xin; KANG Jian; ZHU Li

    2007-01-01

    A site-directed mutant DNA fragment was synthesized and transfected into clinical Neisseria Gonorrhoeae (NG) stains to construct the transformants that contained the corresponding mutagenesis of regulation region of mtrR gene. According to the technique of gene splicing by over-lap extension (SOEing), a DNA segment with specific mutagenesis was constructed by two-step po-lymerase chain reaction (PCR). The mutation fragments EF could be used for the next experiment in which the mutation NG strains were induced. By comparing the recombinant EF fragments to the corresponding DNA fragments of clinical NG strains, 2 of these were not compatible completely. The results of sequencing revealed that there was a 9 bp deletion between the 45 to 54 inverted repeat se-quence localized within the mtrR promoter. It can be confirmed that the fragments EF are the specifi-cally designed mutant fragments.

  7. Governmental Fragmentation in Metropolitan Detroit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis, Kristal D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available At its population peak in the 1950’s, Detroit, Michigan was inhabited by almost two million residents and served as the car capital of the country. Today, however, the population has dropped by more than fifty percent. With the loss of Detroit residents to surrounding cities and counties, the wedge between Detroit and the suburbs has grown wider. Detroit, once considered the crown jewel of the state of Michigan, is now treated as an immovable stain by its surrounding municipalities. What this means for the metro Detroit area is a high level of governmental fragmentation, preventing economic opportunities for both the city and its suburbs. This is especially unfortunate for the economy of the metro Detroit area because of the current economic crisis in the state of Michigan. With the state’s long tradition of home rule and pride in autonomous, municipal decision-making, municipalities in the metro Detroit area might better realize economic opportunities and the relief they can bring to their own local economies by not only collaborating with the city of Detroit, but with neighboring cities as well.

  8. [Novel bidirectional promoter from human genome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orekhova, A S; Sverdlova, P S; Spirin, P V; Leonova, O G; Popenko, V I; Prasolov, V S; Rubtsov, P M

    2011-01-01

    In human and other mammalian genomes a number of closely linked gene pairs transcribed in opposite directions are found. According to bioinformatic analysis up to 10% of human genes are arranged in this way. In present work the fragment of human genome was cloned that separates genes localized at 2p13.1 and oriented "head-to-head", coding for hypothetical proteins with unknown functions--CCDC (Coiled Coil Domain Containing) 142 and TTC (TetraTricopeptide repeat Containing) 31. Intergenic CCDC142-TTC31 region overlaps with CpG-island and contains a number of potential binding sites for transcription factors. This fragment functions as bidirectional promoter in the system ofluciferase reporter gene expression upon transfection of human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. The vectors containing genes of two fluorescent proteins--green (EGFP) and red (DsRed2) in opposite orientations separated by the fragment of CCDC142-TTC31 intergenic region were constructed. In HEK293 cells transfected with these vectors simultaneous expression of two fluorescent proteins is observed. Truncated versions of intergenic region were obtained and their promoter activity measured. Minimal promoter fragment contains elements Inr, BRE, DPE characteristic for TATA-less promoters. Thus, from the human genome the novel bidirectional promoter was cloned that can be used for simultaneous constitutive expression of two genes in human cells.

  9. On the fragmentation of biomolecules: fragmentation of alanine dipeptide along the polypeptide chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Yakubovich, Alexander; Solov'yov, Andrey

    2006-01-01

    . The fragmentation of dipeptide along the polypeptide chain, as well as the interaction between alanines, has been considered. The energy of the system has been analyzed as a function of the distance between fragments for all possible dipeptide fragmentation channels. Analysis of the energy barriers makes...... it possible to estimate the characteristic fragmentation times and to determine the degree of applicability of classical electrodynamics for describing the system energy....

  10. Modelling distribution functions and fragmentation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, J; Mulders, P J

    1995-01-01

    We present examples for the calculation of the distribution and fragmentation functions using the representation in terms of non-local matrix elements of quark field operators. As specific examples, we use a simple spectator model to estimate the leading twist quark distribution functions and the fragmentation functions for a quark into a nucleon or a pion.

  11. The Family Circle: A Study in Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfenbrenner, Urie

    1976-01-01

    Presents data describing the fragmentation of the family, suggests causes for the fragmentation, and offers suggestions for reversing the trend. The suggestions focus on day care, part-time employment practices, enhancing the position of women, and work and responsibility. (IRT)

  12. The Stellar IMF from turbulent fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padoan, P.; Nordlund, A.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper they conclude that turbulent fragmentation is unavoidable in super-sonically turbulent molecular clouds, and given the success of the present model to predict the observed shape of the Stellar IMF, they conclude that turbulent fragmentation is essential to the origin of the stellar IMF.

  13. Baculovirus display of functional antibody Fab fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Shinya; Ogawa, Takafumi; Matsui, Kazusa; Suzuki, Tasuku; Katsuda, Tomohisa; Yamaji, Hideki

    2015-08-01

    The generation of a recombinant baculovirus that displays antibody Fab fragments on the surface was investigated. A recombinant baculovirus was engineered so that the heavy chain (Hc; Fd fragment) of a mouse Fab fragment was expressed as a fusion to the N-terminus of baculovirus gp64, while the light chain of the Fab fragment was simultaneously expressed as a secretory protein. Following infection of Sf9 insect cells with the recombinant baculovirus, the culture supernatant was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using antigen-coated microplates and either an anti-mouse IgG or an anti-gp64 antibody. A relatively strong signal was obtained in each case, showing antigen-binding activity in the culture supernatant. In western blot analysis of the culture supernatant using the anti-gp64 antibody, specific protein bands were detected at an electrophoretic mobility that coincided with the molecular weight of the Hc-gp64 fusion protein as well as that of gp64. Flow cytometry using a fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated antibody specific to mouse IgG successfully detected the Fab fragments on the surface of the Sf9 cells. These results suggest that immunologically functional antibody Fab fragments can be displayed on the surface of baculovirus particles, and that a fluorescence-activated cell sorter with a fluorescence-labeled antigen can isolate baculoviruses displaying specific Fab fragments. This successful baculovirus display of antibody Fab fragments may offer a novel approach for the efficient selection of specific antibodies.

  14. Pollen and gene flow in fragmented habitats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwak, Manja M.; Velterop, Odilia; van Andel, Jelte

    1998-01-01

    . Habitat fragmentation affects both plants and pollinators. Habitat fragmentation leads to changes in species richness, population number and size, density, and shape, thus to changes in the spatial arrangement of flowers. These changes influence the amount of food for flower-visiting insects and t

  15. Pollen and gene flow in fragmented habitats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwak, Manja M.; Velterop, Odilia; van Andel, Jelte

    1998-01-01

    . Habitat fragmentation affects both plants and pollinators. Habitat fragmentation leads to changes in species richness, population number and size, density, and shape, thus to changes in the spatial arrangement of flowers. These changes influence the amount of food for flower-visiting insects and t

  16. INTERMITTENCY, A TEST FOR STRING FRAGMENTATION PROCESSES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHOLTEN, O

    The Artru-Mennessier and the string fragmentation procedure as implemented in the code VENUS have been compared. The two fragmentation prescriptions predict a similar rapidity spectrum including its energy dependence and event multiplicities, but give rise to very different intermittency results.

  17. Fragmentation of eastern United States forest types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt H. Riitters; John W. Coulston

    2013-01-01

    Fragmentation is a continuing threat to the sustainability of forests in the Eastern United States, where land use changes supporting a growing human population are the primary driver of forest fragmentation (Stein and others 2009). While once mostly forested, approximately 40 percent of the original forest area has been converted to other land uses, and most of the...

  18. Long-term effects of fragmentation and fragment properties on bird species richness in Hawaiian forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Flaspohler; Christian P. Giardina; Gregory P. Asner; Patrick Hart; Jonathan Price; Cassie Ka’apu Lyons; Xeronimo. Castaneda

    2010-01-01

    Forest fragmentation is a common disturbance affecting biological diversity, yet the impacts of fragmentation on many forest processes remain poorly understood. Forest restoration is likely to be more successful when it proceeds with an understanding of how native and exotic vertebrates utilize forest patches of different size. We used a system of forest fragments...

  19. Topological analysis of group fragmentation in multiagent systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLellis, Pietro; Porfiri, Maurizio; Bollt, Erik M.

    2013-02-01

    In social animals, the presence of conflicts of interest or multiple leaders can promote the emergence of two or more subgroups. Such subgroups are easily recognizable by human observers, yet a quantitative and objective measure of group fragmentation is currently lacking. In this paper, we explore the feasibility of detecting group fragmentation by embedding the raw data from the individuals' motions on a low-dimensional manifold and analyzing the topological features of this manifold. To perform the embedding, we employ the isomap algorithm, which is a data-driven machine learning tool extensively used in computer vision. We implement this procedure on a data set generated by a modified à la Vicsek model, where agents are partitioned into two or more subsets and an independent leader is assigned to each subset. The dimensionality of the embedding manifold is shown to be a measure of the number of emerging subgroups in the selected observation window and a cluster analysis is proposed to aid the interpretation of these findings. To explore the feasibility of using this approach to characterize group fragmentation in real time and thus reduce the computational cost in data processing and storage, we propose an interpolation method based on an inverse mapping from the embedding space to the original space. The effectiveness of the interpolation technique is illustrated on a test-bed example with potential impact on the regulation of collective behavior of animal groups using robotic stimuli.

  20. Immunogenic properties of Streptococcus agalactiae FbsA fragments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Papasergi

    Full Text Available Several species of Gram-positive bacteria can avidly bind soluble and surface-associated fibrinogen (Fng, a property that is considered important in the pathogenesis of human infections. To gain insights into the mechanism by which group B Streptococcus (GBS, a frequent neonatal pathogen, interacts with Fng, we have screened two phage displayed genomic GBS libraries. All of the Fng-binding phage clones contained inserts encoding fragments of FbsA, a protein displaying multiple repeats. Since the functional role of this protein is only partially understood, representative fragments were recombinantly expressed and analyzed for Fng binding affinity and ability to induce immune protection against GBS infection. Maternal immunization with 6pGST, a fragment containing five repeats, significantly protected mouse pups against lethal GBS challenge and these protective effects could be recapitulated by administration of anti-6pGST serum from adult animals. Notably, a monoclonal antibody that was capable of neutralizing Fng binding by 6pGST, but not a non-neutralizing antibody, could significantly protect pups against lethal GBS challenge. These data suggest that FbsA-Fng interaction promotes GBS pathogenesis and that blocking such interaction is a viable strategy to prevent or treat GBS infections.

  1. CLP-based protein fragment assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Palu', Alessandro Dal; Fogolari, Federico; Pontelli, Enrico; 10.1017/S1471068410000372

    2010-01-01

    The paper investigates a novel approach, based on Constraint Logic Programming (CLP), to predict the 3D conformation of a protein via fragments assembly. The fragments are extracted by a preprocessor-also developed for this work- from a database of known protein structures that clusters and classifies the fragments according to similarity and frequency. The problem of assembling fragments into a complete conformation is mapped to a constraint solving problem and solved using CLP. The constraint-based model uses a medium discretization degree Ca-side chain centroid protein model that offers efficiency and a good approximation for space filling. The approach adapts existing energy models to the protein representation used and applies a large neighboring search strategy. The results shows the feasibility and efficiency of the method. The declarative nature of the solution allows to include future extensions, e.g., different size fragments for better accuracy.

  2. The politics of municipal fragmentation in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulai Kuyini Mohammed

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The scholarly debate over the rival merits of local government consolidation and fragmentation is an old but enduring one. However, in this debate very little attention has been focused on the political dimension of council amalgamation and fragmentation – yet political considerations play a central role in both the formulation and outcomes of de-concentration policy. The purpose of this article is to fill a gap in the literature by examining local government fragmentation in Ghana from 1988 to 2014. The article does this by identifying the key players and analysing their interests and gains, as well as the tensions arising from the fragmentation exercise. The implications from the Ghanaian case for more general theories of fragmentation are drawn out.

  3. First principles approach to ionicity of fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilania, Ghanshyam; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Valone, Steven M.

    2015-02-01

    We develop a first principles approach towards the ionicity of fragments. In contrast to the bond ionicity, the fragment ionicity refers to an electronic property of the constituents of a larger system, which may vary from a single atom to a functional group or a unit cell to a crystal. The fragment ionicity is quantitatively defined in terms of the coefficients of contributing charge states in a superposition of valence configurations of the system. Utilizing the constrained density functional theory-based computations, a practical method to compute the fragment ionicity from valence electron charge densities, suitably decomposed according to the Fragment Hamiltonian (FH) model prescription for those electron densities, is presented for the first time. The adopted approach is illustrated using BeO, MgO and CaO diatomic molecules as simple examples. The results are compared and discussed with respect to the bond ionicity scales of Phillips and Pauling.

  4. Health Promotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povlsen, Lene; Borup, I.

    2015-01-01

    In 1953 when the Nordic School of Public Health was founded, the aim of public health programmes was disease prevention more than health promotion. This was not unusual, since at this time health usually was seen as the opposite of disease and illness. However, with the Ottawa Charter of 1986......, the World Health Organization made a crucial change to view health not as a goal in itself but as the means to a full life. In this way, health promotion became a first priority and fundamental action for the modern society. This insight eventually reached NHV and in 2002 - 50 years after the foundation...... - an associate professorship was established with a focus on health promotion. Nevertheless, the concept of health promotion had been integrated with or mentioned in courses run prior to the new post. Subsequently, a wide spectrum of courses in health promotion was introduced, such as Empowerment for Child...

  5. Understanding the impacts of forest fragmentation in the Southern Appalachian Mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, S.M.

    1993-06-01

    Southern Appalachian forests are rich in biological diversity. These forests contain many species adapted to conditions ranging from mesic coves to xeric ridges. The major plant communities include wetlands and balds as well as hardwood and coniferous forests. To understand the impacts of habitat fragmentation, the sensitivity of ecosystems, communities, and species to fragmentation must be determined. Recognizing the natural patterns of heterogeneity in these forest and the importance of this heterogeneity to ecological processes will promote our understanding of fragmentation. The impact of a specific forest use (economic development, forest harvesting, recreation) depends on the type of habitat modification.and the spatial extent and pattern of this use. Information on ecological processes, maps of natural communities, and projections about activities that modify forests are needed in order to implement management strategies that will minimize forest fragmentation.

  6. Identification of IGFBP-3 fragments generated by KLK2 and prevention of fragmentation by KLK2-inhibiting peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekim, Can; Riipi, Tero; Weisell, Janne; Närvänen, Ale; Koistinen, Riitta; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Koistinen, Hannu

    2010-04-01

    Kallikrein-related peptidase 2 (KLK2) degrades insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in vitro. IGFBP-3 forms complexes with IGFs, preventing them from binding to their receptors and stimulating cell proliferation and survival. IGF-independent actions have also been described for IGFBP-3. The degradation of IGFBP-3 by KLK2 or other proteases in the prostate may promote the growth of prostate cancer. We studied IGFBP-3 degradation by immunoblotting and two specific immunoassays, one recognizing only native non-fragmented IGFBP-3 and the other one recognizing both intact and proteolytically cleaved IGFBP-3. Peptides were used to inhibit the enzyme activity of KLK2 and cleavage sites in IGFBP-3 were identified by mass spectrometry. KLK2 proteolyzed IGFBP-3 into several small fragments, mostly after Arg residues, in keeping with the trypsin-like activity of KLK2. The fragmentation could be inhibited by KLK2-inhibiting peptides in a dose-dependent fashion. As degradation of IGFBP-3 could lead to a more aggressive cancer phenotype, inhibition of KLK2 activity might be useful for treatment of prostate cancer and other diseases associated with increased KLK2 activity.

  7. Exact Solutions of Fragmentation Equations with General Fragmentation Rates and Separable Particles Distribution Kernels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Oukouomi Noutchie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We make use of Laplace transform techniques and the method of characteristics to solve fragmentation equations explicitly. Our result is a breakthrough in the analysis of pure fragmentation equations as this is the first instance where an exact solution is provided for the fragmentation evolution equation with general fragmentation rates. This paper is the key for resolving most of the open problems in fragmentation theory including “shattering” and the sudden appearance of infinitely many particles in some systems with initial finite particles number.

  8. SmI(2)-mediated carbon-carbon bond fragmentation in alpha-aminomethyl malonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiongfeng; Cheng, Bin; Ye, Xinshan; Zhai, Hongbin

    2009-09-17

    A new and efficient samarium diiodide-promoted carbon-carbon bond fragmentation reaction of alpha-aminomethyl malonates, taking place normally at room temperature and generating the corresponding deaminomethylation products in 74-94% yields, is reported. The presence of the amino group is necessary for the success of the current transformation.

  9. Virtual fragment screening: an exploration of various docking and scoring protocols for fragments using Glide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawatkar, Sameer; Wang, Hongming; Czerminski, Ryszard; Joseph-McCarthy, Diane

    2009-08-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery approaches allow for a greater coverage of chemical space and generally produce high efficiency ligands. As such, virtual and experimental fragment screening are increasingly being coupled in an effort to identify new leads for specific therapeutic targets. Fragment docking is employed to create target-focussed subset of compounds for testing along side generic fragment libraries. The utility of the program Glide with various scoring schemes for fragment docking is discussed. Fragment docking results for two test cases, prostaglandin D2 synthase and DNA ligase, are presented and compared to experimental screening data. Self-docking, cross-docking, and enrichment studies are performed. For the enrichment runs, experimental data exists indicating that the docking decoys in fact do not inhibit the corresponding enzyme being examined. Results indicate that even for difficult test cases fragment docking can yield enrichments significantly better than random.

  10. Improved chemical shift based fragment selection for CS-Rosetta using Rosetta3 fragment picker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernon, Robert [Hospital for Sick Children, Program in Molecular Structure and Function (Canada); Shen, Yang [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Baker, David [University of Washington, Department of Biochemistry (United States); Lange, Oliver F., E-mail: oliver.lange@tum.de [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department Chemie, Biomolecular NMR and Munich Center for Integrated Protein Science (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    A new fragment picker has been developed for CS-Rosetta that combines beneficial features of the original fragment picker, MFR, used with CS-Rosetta, and the fragment picker, NNMake, that was used for purely sequence based fragment selection in the context of ROSETTA de-novo structure prediction. Additionally, the new fragment picker has reduced sensitivity to outliers and other difficult to match data points rendering the protocol more robust and less likely to introduce bias towards wrong conformations in cases where data is bad, missing or inconclusive. The fragment picker protocol gives significant improvements on 6 of 23 CS-Rosetta targets. An independent benchmark on 39 protein targets, whose NMR data sets were published only after protocol optimization had been finished, also show significantly improved performance for the new fragment picker (van der Schot et al. in J Biomol NMR, 2013)

  11. Decomposition and fragmentation principles in computational chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezey, Paul G.

    2015-12-01

    A common approach to the mathematical modeling of various objects and processes is the subdivision of the problem into smaller, (and, as hoped), more easily understandable entities. By modeling these smaller entities, which are often fragments of the whole, and eventually re-combining these smaller fragment models into a model of the whole, one may expect that a reasonably reliable modeling approach for the complete problem may be obtained. One crucial aspect of such an approach is the level of complexity of the interrelations between the fragments. If the interrelations are weak and relatively simple, than the fragmentation approach may succeed and provide satisfactory results. However, as often happens, the interrelations are complex and not well understood, and then the fragmentation approach may face difficulties and even fail. One field where the interrelations between potential fragments is strong, yet the fragment-based approach has proven to be successful, is the modelling of both small and large molecules, providing valuable lessons for some fields not directly linked to chemistry.

  12. On Disciplinary Fragmentation and Scientific Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balietti, Stefano; Mäs, Michael; Helbing, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Why are some scientific disciplines, such as sociology and psychology, more fragmented into conflicting schools of thought than other fields, such as physics and biology? Furthermore, why does high fragmentation tend to coincide with limited scientific progress? We analyzed a formal model where scientists seek to identify the correct answer to a research question. Each scientist is influenced by three forces: (i) signals received from the correct answer to the question; (ii) peer influence; and (iii) noise. We observed the emergence of different macroscopic patterns of collective exploration, and studied how the three forces affect the degree to which disciplines fall apart into divergent fragments, or so-called “schools of thought”. We conducted two simulation experiments where we tested (A) whether the three forces foster or hamper progress, and (B) whether disciplinary fragmentation causally affects scientific progress and vice versa. We found that fragmentation critically limits scientific progress. Strikingly, there is no effect in the opposite causal direction. What is more, our results shows that at the heart of the mechanisms driving scientific progress we find (i) social interactions, and (ii) peer disagreement. In fact, fragmentation is increased and progress limited if the simulated scientists are open to influence only by peers with very similar views, or when within-school diversity is lost. Finally, disciplines where the scientists received strong signals from the correct answer were less fragmented and experienced faster progress. We discuss model’s implications for the design of social institutions fostering interdisciplinarity and participation in science. PMID:25790025

  13. New information on photon fragmentation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Klasen, M

    2014-01-01

    Thermal photons radiated in heavy-ion collisions represent an important signal for a recently discovered new state of matter, the deconfined quark-gluon plasma. However, a clean identification of this signal requires precise knowledge of the prompt photons produced simultaneously in hard collisions of quarks and gluons, mostly through their fragmentation. In this Letter, we demonstrate that PHENIX data on photons produced in proton-proton collisions with low transverse momenta allow to extract new information on this fragmentation process. In particular, these data favor one parameterization (BFG II) over the two other frequently used photon fragmentation functions (BFG I and GRV NLO).

  14. HETC-3STEP included fragmentation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigyo, Nobuhiro; Iga, Kiminori; Ishibashi, Kenji [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-03-01

    High Energy Transport Code (HETC) based on the cascade-evaporation model is modified to calculate the fragmentation cross section. For the cascade process, nucleon-nucleon cross sections are used for collision computation; effective in-medium-corrected cross sections are adopted instead of the original free-nucleon collision. The exciton model is adopted for improvement of backward nucleon-emission cross section for low-energy nucleon-incident events. The fragmentation reaction is incorporated into the original HETC as a subroutine set by the use of the systematics of the reaction. The modified HETC (HETC-3STEP/FRG) reproduces experimental fragment yields to a reasonable degree. (author)

  15. Composite Overwrap Fragmentation Observations, Concerns, and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangham, Mike; Hovater, Mary

    2017-01-01

    A series of test activities has raised some concerns about the generation of orbital debris caused by failures of composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). These tests have indicated that a large number of composite fragments can be produced by either pressure burst failures or by high-speed impacts. A review of prior high-speed tests with COPV indicates that other tests have produced large numbers of composite fragments. As was the case with the test referenced here, the tests tended to produce a large number of small composite fragments with relatively low velocities induced by the impact and or gas expansion.

  16. Spatial scale and movement behaviour traits control the impacts of habitat fragmentation on individual fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattarino, Lorenzo; McAlpine, Clive A; Rhodes, Jonathan R

    2016-01-01

    searching mortality rates. Habitat selection strongly mitigated the impact of the scale at which fragmentation occurred on individual fitness. Our findings suggest that the land use to target with conservation actions to reduce fragmentation, such as financial schemes that promote re-vegetation or retention of standing vegetation, depends on the scale at which fragmentation occurs and the movement behaviour traits of the species of conservation concern. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2015 British Ecological Society.

  17. Generation of a synthetic mammalian promoter library by modification of sequences spacing transcription factor binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Jens; Kusk, P.; Johansen, T.E.;

    2002-01-01

    The development of a set of synthetic mammalian promoters with different specific activities is described. The library is based on a synthetic promoter, JeT, constructed as a 200 bp chimeric promoter built from fragments of the viral SV40 early promoter and the human beta-actin and ubiquitin C...

  18. Generation of a synthetic mammalian promoter library by modification of sequences spacing transcription factor binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Jens; Kusk, P.; Johansen, T.E.

    2002-01-01

    The development of a set of synthetic mammalian promoters with different specific activities is described. The library is based on a synthetic promoter, JeT, constructed as a 200 bp chimeric promoter built from fragments of the viral SV40 early promoter and the human beta-actin and ubiquitin C pr...

  19. Oscillating Filaments: I - Oscillation and Geometrical Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Gritschneder, Matthias; Burkert, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We study the stability of filaments in equilibrium between gravity and internal as well as external pressure using the grid based AMR-code RAMSES. A homogeneous, straight cylinder below a critical line mass is marginally stable. However, if the cylinder is bent, e.g. with a slight sinusoidal perturbation, an otherwise stable configuration starts to oscillate, is triggered into fragmentation and collapses. This previously unstudied behavior allows a filament to fragment at any given scale, as long as it has slight bends. We call this process `geometrical fragmentation'. In our realization the spacing between the cores matches the wavelength of the sinusoidal perturbation, whereas up to now, filaments were thought to be only fragmenting on the characteristical scale set by the mass-to-line ratio. Using first principles, we derive the oscillation period as well as the collapse timescale analytically. To enable a direct comparison with observations, we study the line-of-sight velocity for different inclinations. ...

  20. Gravitational fragmentation of the Carina Flare supershell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünsch, Richard

    2015-03-01

    We study the gravitational fragmentation of a thick shell comparing the analytical theory to 3D hydrodynamic simulations and to observations of the Carina Flare supershell. We use both grid-based (AMR) and particle-based (SPH) codes to follow the idealised model of the fragmenting shell and found an excellent agreement between the two codes. Growth rates of fragments at different wavelength are well described by the pressure assisted gravitational instability (PAGI) - a new theory of the thick shell fragmentation. Using the APEX telescope we observe a part of the surface of the Carina Flare supershell (GSH287+04-17) in the 13CO(2-1) line. We apply a new clump-finding algorithm DENDROFIND to identify 50 clumps. We determine the clump mass function and we construct the minimum spanning tree connecting clumps positions to estimate the typical distance among clumps. We conclude that the observed masses and distances correspond well to the prediction of PAGI.

  1. Habitat fragmentation causes rapid genetic differentiation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... differentiation and homogenization in natural plant populations – A ... The effects of habitat fragmentations on the forage grass Leymus thinness (Trin.) Tzvel, which ... selection etc, combined together with ecological factors.

  2. FOREST FRAGMENTATION AS AN ECONOMIC INDICATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite concern over the ecological consequences of conversion of land from natural cover to anthropogenic uses, there are few studies that show a quantitative relationship between fragmentation and economic factors. For the southside economic region of Virginia, we generated a ...

  3. Energy efficiency of consecutive fragmentation processes

    CERN Document Server

    Fontbona, Joaquin; Martinez, Servet

    2010-01-01

    We present a ?rst study on the energy required to reduce a unit mass fragment by consecutively using several devices, as it happens in the mining industry. Two devices are considered, which we represent as different stochastic fragmentation processes. Following the self-similar energy model introduced by Bertoin and Martinez, we compute the average energy required to attain a size x with this two-device procedure. We then asymptotically compare, as x goes to 0 or 1, its energy requirement with that of individual fragmentation processes. In particular, we show that for certain range of parameters of the fragmentation processes and of their energy cost-functions, the consecutive use of two devices can be asymptotically more efficient than using each of them separately, or conversely.

  4. The NJL Model for Quark Fragmentation Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Ito, W. Bentz, I. Cloet, A W Thomas, K. Yazaki

    2009-10-01

    A description of fragmentation functions which satisfy the momentum and isospin sum rules is presented in an effective quark theory. Concentrating on the pion fragmentation function, we first explain the reason why the elementary (lowest order) fragmentation process q → qπ is completely inadequate to describe the empirical data, although the “crossed” process π → qq describes the quark distribution functions in the pion reasonably well. Then, taking into account cascade-like processes in a modified jet-model approach, we show that the momentum and isospin sum rules can be satisfied naturally without introducing any ad-hoc parameters. We present numerical results for the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in the invariant mass regularization scheme, and compare the results with the empirical parametrizations. We argue that this NJL-jet model provides a very useful framework to calculate the fragmentation functions in an effective chiral quark theory.

  5. The NJL Model for Quark Fragmentation Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Ito, W. Bentz, I. Cloet, A W Thomas, K. Yazaki

    2009-10-01

    A description of fragmentation functions which satisfy the momentum and isospin sum rules is presented in an effective quark theory. Concentrating on the pion fragmentation function, we first explain the reason why the elementary (lowest order) fragmentation process q → qπ is completely inadequate to describe the empirical data, although the “crossed” process π → qq describes the quark distribution functions in the pion reasonably well. Then, taking into account cascade-like processes in a modified jet-model approach, we show that the momentum and isospin sum rules can be satisfied naturally without introducing any ad-hoc parameters. We present numerical results for the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in the invariant mass regularization scheme, and compare the results with the empirical parametrizations. We argue that this NJL-jet model provides a very useful framework to calculate the fragmentation functions in an effective chiral quark theory.

  6. An improved algorithm for MFR fragment assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontaxis, Georg, E-mail: georg.kontaxis@univie.ac.at [University of Vienna, Max F. Perutz Laboratories, Department of Structural and Computational Biology, Centre for Molecular Biology (Austria)

    2012-06-15

    A method for generating protein backbone models from backbone only NMR data is presented, which is based on molecular fragment replacement (MFR). In a first step, the PDB database is mined for homologous peptide fragments using experimental backbone-only data i.e. backbone chemical shifts (CS) and residual dipolar couplings (RDC). Second, this fragment library is refined against the experimental restraints. Finally, the fragments are assembled into a protein backbone fold using a rigid body docking algorithm using the RDCs as restraints. For improved performance, backbone nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) may be included at that stage. Compared to previous implementations of MFR-derived structure determination protocols this model-building algorithm offers improved stability and reliability. Furthermore, relative to CS-ROSETTA based methods, it provides faster performance and straightforward implementation with the option to easily include further types of restraints and additional energy terms.

  7. Successfully introduce maize DNA fragments into rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGKaizhi

    1994-01-01

    The maize DNA fragments was successfully incorporated into rice by Associate Prof WAN Wenju's research team at Hunan Agricultural College, Changsha, China. The new gene transferring rice is named Genetic Engineered Rice (GER) line.

  8. The Fragmentation of the College Mathematics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper examines to what extent and asking reason the fragmentation of college mathematics have attained the present development in the course of looking at the history of mathematics education. (Contains 1 table.)

  9. Anthropogenic Fragmentation in the western United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — We evaluated the fragmentation of the western United States by anthropogenic features. The addition of roads, railroads, and power lines to wildlands, and the...

  10. Emission of intermediate mass fragments during fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S. L.; de Souza, R. T.; Cornell, E.; Davin, B.; Hamilton, T. M.; Hulbert, D.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Lou, Y.; Viola, V. E.; Korteling, R. G.; Wile, J. L.

    1996-11-01

    Ternary fission in the reaction 4He + 232Th at Elab=200 MeV has been observed. Intermediate mass fragments (IMF: 3fission. The widths of the energy spectra are relatively constant for neck fragments with Z>=4, suggesting little variability in the scission configurations. A linear dependence of on Z is observed for the neck IMFs. The observed trend is compared with a Coulomb trajectory model.

  11. Fragment Length of Circulating Tumor DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter R Underhill

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Malignant tumors shed DNA into the circulation. The transient half-life of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA may afford the opportunity to diagnose, monitor recurrence, and evaluate response to therapy solely through a non-invasive blood draw. However, detecting ctDNA against the normally occurring background of cell-free DNA derived from healthy cells has proven challenging, particularly in non-metastatic solid tumors. In this study, distinct differences in fragment length size between ctDNAs and normal cell-free DNA are defined. Human ctDNA in rat plasma derived from human glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells in the rat brain and human hepatocellular carcinoma in the rat flank were found to have a shorter principal fragment length than the background rat cell-free DNA (134-144 bp vs. 167 bp, respectively. Subsequently, a similar shift in the fragment length of ctDNA in humans with melanoma and lung cancer was identified compared to healthy controls. Comparison of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA between a melanoma patient and healthy controls found that the BRAF V600E mutant allele occurred more commonly at a shorter fragment length than the fragment length of the wild-type allele (132-145 bp vs. 165 bp, respectively. Moreover, size-selecting for shorter cell-free DNA fragment lengths substantially increased the EGFR T790M mutant allele frequency in human lung cancer. These findings provide compelling evidence that experimental or bioinformatic isolation of a specific subset of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA may improve detection of ctDNA.

  12. Fragment Length of Circulating Tumor DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, Hunter R; Kitzman, Jacob O; Hellwig, Sabine; Welker, Noah C; Daza, Riza; Baker, Daniel N; Gligorich, Keith M; Rostomily, Robert C; Bronner, Mary P; Shendure, Jay

    2016-07-01

    Malignant tumors shed DNA into the circulation. The transient half-life of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) may afford the opportunity to diagnose, monitor recurrence, and evaluate response to therapy solely through a non-invasive blood draw. However, detecting ctDNA against the normally occurring background of cell-free DNA derived from healthy cells has proven challenging, particularly in non-metastatic solid tumors. In this study, distinct differences in fragment length size between ctDNAs and normal cell-free DNA are defined. Human ctDNA in rat plasma derived from human glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells in the rat brain and human hepatocellular carcinoma in the rat flank were found to have a shorter principal fragment length than the background rat cell-free DNA (134-144 bp vs. 167 bp, respectively). Subsequently, a similar shift in the fragment length of ctDNA in humans with melanoma and lung cancer was identified compared to healthy controls. Comparison of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA between a melanoma patient and healthy controls found that the BRAF V600E mutant allele occurred more commonly at a shorter fragment length than the fragment length of the wild-type allele (132-145 bp vs. 165 bp, respectively). Moreover, size-selecting for shorter cell-free DNA fragment lengths substantially increased the EGFR T790M mutant allele frequency in human lung cancer. These findings provide compelling evidence that experimental or bioinformatic isolation of a specific subset of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA may improve detection of ctDNA.

  13. Fragmentation of Care in Ectopic Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulberg, Debra B; Dahlquist, Irma; Jarosch, Christina; Lindau, Stacy T

    2016-05-01

    Ectopic pregnancy is an important cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Women who experience fragmented care may undergo unnecessary delays to diagnosis and treatment. Based on ectopic pregnancy cases observed in clinical practice that raised our concern about fragmentation of care, we designed an exploratory study to describe the number, characteristics, and outcomes of fragmented care among patients with ectopic pregnancy at one urban academic hospital. Chart review with descriptive statistics. Fragmented care was defined as a patient being evaluated at an outside facility for possible ectopic pregnancy and transferred, referred, or discharged before receiving care at the study institution. Of 191 women seen for possible or definite ectopic pregnancy during the study period, 42 (22 %) met the study definition of fragmented care. The study was under-powered to observe statistically significant differences across groups, but we found concerning, non-significant trends: patients with fragmented care were more likely to be Medicaid recipients (65.9 vs. 58.8 %) and to experience a complication (23.8 vs. 18.1 %) compared to those with non-fragmented care. Most patients (n = 37) received no identifiable treatment prior to transfer and arrived to the study hospital with no communication to the receiving hospital from the outside provider (n = 34). Nine patients (21 %) presented with ruptured ectopic pregnancies. The fragmentation we observed in our study may contribute to previously identified socio-economic disparities in ectopic pregnancy outcomes. If future research confirms these findings, health information exchanges and regional coordination of care may be important strategies for reducing maternal mortality.

  14. Modified Empirical Parametrization of Fragmentation Cross Sections

    CERN Document Server

    Sümmerer, K

    2000-01-01

    New experimental data obtained mainly at the GSI/FRS facility allow to modify the empirical parametrization of fragmentation cross sections, EPAX. It will be shown that minor modifications of the parameters lead to a much better reproduction of measured cross sections. The most significant changes refer to the description of fragmentation yields close to the projectile and of the memory effect of neutron-deficient projectiles.

  15. Fragment-based approaches to enzyme inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Ciulli, Alessio; Abell, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Fragment-based approaches have provided a new paradigm for small-molecule drug discovery. The methodology is complementary to high-throughput screening approaches, starting from fragments of low molecular complexity and high ligand efficiency, and building up to more potent inhibitors. The approach, which depends heavily on a number of biophysical techniques, is now being taken up by more groups in both industry and academia. This article describes key aspects of the process and highlights re...

  16. Observations of Titan IIIC Transtage Fragmentation Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowardin, Heather; Seitzer, P.; Abercromby, K.; Barker, E.; Buckalew, B.; Cardona, T.; Krisko, P.; Lederer, S.

    2013-01-01

    The fragmentation of a Titan IIIC Transtage (1968-081) on 21 February 1992 is one of only two known break-ups in or near geosynchronous orbit. The original rocket body and 24 pieces of debris are currently being tracked by the U. S. Space Surveillance Network (SSN). The rocket body (SSN# 3432) and several of the original fragments (SSN# 25000, 25001, 30000, and 33511) were observed in survey mode during 2004-2010 using the 0.6-m Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope (MODEST) in Chile using a broad R filter. This paper presents a size distribution for all calibrated magnitude data acquired on MODEST. Size distribution plots are also shown using historical models for small fragmentation debris (down to 10 cm) thought to be associated with the Titan Transtage break-up. In November 2010, visible broadband photometry (Johnson/Kron-Cousins BVRI) was acquired with the 0.9-m Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile on several Titan fragments (SSN 25001, 33509, and 33510) and the parent rocket body (SSN 3432). Color index data are used to determine the fragment brightness distribution and how the data compares to spacecraft materials measured in the laboratory using similar photometric measurement techniques. In order to better characterize the break-up fragments, spectral measurements were acquired on three Titan fragments (one fragment observed over two different time periods) using the 6.5-m Magellan telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. The telescopic spectra of SSN 25000 (May 2012 and January 2013), SSN 38690, and SSN 38699 are compared with laboratory acquired spectra of materials (e.g., aluminum and various paints) to determine the surface material.

  17. First principles approach to ionicity of fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilania, Ghanshyam, E-mail: gpilania@lanl.gov; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Valone, Steven M.

    2015-02-20

    Highlights: • A novel first principles approach towards the fragment ionicity. • Constrained DFT and valance charge density decomposition were employed. • Correct dissociation limit achieved for diatomics. • Ionicity is an input parameter for a new class of atomistic potentials. - Abstract: We develop a first principles approach towards the ionicity of fragments. In contrast to the bond ionicity, the fragment ionicity refers to an electronic property of the constituents of a larger system, which may vary from a single atom to a functional group or a unit cell to a crystal. The fragment ionicity is quantitatively defined in terms of the coefficients of contributing charge states in a superposition of valence configurations of the system. Utilizing the constrained density functional theory-based computations, a practical method to compute the fragment ionicity from valence electron charge densities, suitably decomposed according to the Fragment Hamiltonian (FH) model prescription for those electron densities, is presented for the first time. The adopted approach is illustrated using BeO, MgO and CaO diatomic molecules as simple examples. The results are compared and discussed with respect to the bond ionicity scales of Phillips and Pauling.

  18. Correlation measurements of fission-fragment properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberstedt, S.; Belgya, T.; Billnert, R.; Borcea, R.; Cano-Ott, D.; Göök, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Karlsson, J.; Kis, Z.; Martinez, T.; Oberstedt, A.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Takác, K.

    2010-10-01

    For the development of future nuclear fission applications and for a responsible handling of nuclear waste the a-priori assessment of the fission-fragments' heat production and toxicity is a fundamental necessity. The success of an indispensable modelling of the fission process strongly depends on a good understanding of the particular mechanism of scission, the mass fragmentation and partition of excitation energy. Experimental observables are fission-fragment properties like mass- and energy-distributions, and the prompt neutron as well as γ-ray multiplicities and emission spectra. The latter quantities should preferably be known as a function of fragment mass and excitation energy. Those data are highly demanded as published by the OECD-NEA in its high priority data request list. With the construction of the double (v, E) spectrometer VERDI we aim at measuring pre- and post-neutron masses directly and simultaneously to avoid prompt neutron corrections. From the simultaneous measurement of pre- and post-neutron fission-fragment data the prompt neutron multiplicity may then be inferred fully correlated with fragment mass yield and total kinetic energy. Using an ultra-fast fission event trigger spectral prompt fission γ-ray measurements may be performed. For that purpose recently developed lanthanum-halide detectors, with excellent timing characteristics, were coupled to the VERDI spectrometer allowing for a very good discrimination of fission γ-rays and prompt neutrons due to their different time-of-flight.

  19. DNA fragmentation status in patients with necrozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahem, Sonia; Jellad, Sonia; Ibala, Samira; Saad, Ali; Mehdi, Meriem

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if a relationship exists between the levels of sperm DNA fragmentation and necrospermia in infertile men. Semen samples obtained from 70 men consulting for infertility evaluation were analyzed according to World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. Patients were subdivided into three groups according to the percentage of necrotic spermatozoa: normozoospermia (80%; n = 20). DNA fragmentation was detected by the terminal desoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The sperm DNA fragmentation index (DFI) was 9.28 ± 2.98% in patients with a normal level of necrotic spermatozoa, 20.25 ± 3.21% in patients with moderate necrozoospermia, and 35.31 ± 5.25% in patients with severe necrozoospermia. There was a statistically significant increase of DNA fragmentation in the necrozoospermic group (P DNA fragmentation. We concluded that patients with necrozoospermia showed a high level of DNA fragmentation compared to normozoospermic men. Severe necrozoospermia (>80%) is a predictive factor for increased sperm DNA damage.

  20. Implications of promiscuous Pim-1 kinase fragment inhibitor hydrophobic interactions for fragment-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Andrew C; Liu, Jinyu; Hirth, Bradford; Asmussen, Gary; Xiang, Yibin; Biemann, Hans-Peter; Bishop, Kimberly A; Fremgen, Trisha; Fitzgerald, Maria; Gladysheva, Tatiana; Jain, Annuradha; Jancsics, Katherine; Metz, Markus; Papoulis, Andrew; Skerlj, Renato; Stepp, J David; Wei, Ronnie R

    2012-03-22

    We have studied the subtleties of fragment docking and binding using data generated in a Pim-1 kinase inhibitor program. Crystallographic and docking data analyses have been undertaken using inhibitor complexes derived from an in-house surface plasmon resonance (SPR) fragment screen, a virtual needle screen, and a de novo designed fragment inhibitor hybrid. These investigations highlight that fragments that do not fill their binding pocket can exhibit promiscuous hydrophobic interactions due to the lack of steric constraints imposed on them by the boundaries of said pocket. As a result, docking modes that disagree with an observed crystal structure but maintain key crystallographically observed hydrogen bonds still have potential value in ligand design and optimization. This observation runs counter to the lore in fragment-based drug design that all fragment elaboration must be based on the parent crystal structure alone.

  1. Fragment library design: using cheminformatics and expert chemists to fill gaps in existing fragment libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutchukian, Peter S; So, Sung-Sau; Fischer, Christian; Waller, Chris L

    2015-01-01

    Fragment based screening (FBS) has emerged as a mainstream lead discovery strategy in academia, biotechnology start-ups, and large pharma. As a prerequisite of FBS, a structurally diverse library of fragments is desirable in order to identify chemical matter that will interact with the range of diverse target classes that are prosecuted in contemporary screening campaigns. In addition, it is also desirable to offer synthetically amenable starting points to increase the probability of a successful fragment evolution through medicinal chemistry. Herein we describe a method to identify biologically relevant chemical substructures that are missing from an existing fragment library (chemical gaps), and organize these chemical gaps hierarchically so that medicinal chemists can efficiently navigate the prioritized chemical space and subsequently select purchasable fragments for inclusion in an enhanced fragment library.

  2. Promoting Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Zhao, Yongxin; Wu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Si

    There can be multitudinous models specifying aspects of the same system. Each model has a bias towards one aspect. These models often override in specific aspects though they have different expressions. A specification written in one model can be refined by introducing additional information from other models. The paper proposes a concept of promoting models which is a methodology to obtain refinements with support from cooperating models. It refines a primary model by integrating the information from a secondary model. The promotion principle is not merely an academic point, but also a reliable and robust engineering technique which can be used to develop software and hardware systems. It can also check the consistency between two specifications from different models. A case of modeling a simple online shopping system with the cooperation of the guarded design model and CSP model illustrates the practicability of the promotion principle.

  3. Role of the NH2 -terminal fragment of dentin sialophosphoprotein in dentinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Monica P; Liu, Qilin; Zhu, Qinglin; Lu, Yongbo; Jani, Priyam; Wang, Xiaofang; Liu, Ying; Paine, Michael L; Snead, Malcolm L; Feng, Jian Q; Qin, Chunlin

    2013-04-01

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) is a large precursor protein that is proteolytically processed into a NH2 -terminal fragment [composed of dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and a proteoglycan form (DSP-PG)] and a COOH-terminal fragment [dentin phosphoprotein (DPP)]. In vitro studies indicate that DPP is a strong initiator and regulator of hydroxyapatite crystal formation and growth, but the role(s) of the NH2 -terminal fragment of DSPP (i.e., DSP and DSP-PG) in dentinogenesis remain unclear. This study focuses on the function of the NH2 -terminal fragment of DSPP in dentinogenesis. Here, transgenic (Tg) mouse lines expressing the NH2 -terminal fragment of DSPP driven by a 3.6-kb type I collagen promoter (Col 1a1) were generated and cross-bred with Dspp null mice to obtain mice that express the transgene but lack the endogenous Dspp (Dspp KO/DSP Tg). We found that dentin from the Dspp KO/DSP Tg mice was much thinner, more poorly mineralized, and remarkably disorganized compared with dentin from the Dspp KO mice. The fact that Dspp KO/DSP Tg mice exhibited more severe dentin defects than did the Dspp null mice indicates that the NH2 -terminal fragment of DSPP may inhibit dentin mineralization or may serve as an antagonist against the accelerating action of DPP and serve to prevent predentin from being mineralized too rapidly during dentinogenesis.

  4. Okazaki fragment maturation: nucleases take centre stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zheng; Binghui Shen

    2011-01-01

    Completion of lagging strand DNA synthesis requires processing of up to 50 million Okazaki fragments per cell cycle in mammalian cells. Even in yeast, the Okazaki fragment maturation happens approximately a million times during a singte round of DNA replication. Therefore, efficient processing of Okazaki fragments is vital for DNA replication and cell proliferation. During this process,primase-synthesized RNA/DNA primers are removed, and Okazaki fragments are joined into an intact lagging strand DNA. The processing of RNA/DNA primers requires a group of structure-specific nucleases typified by flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1). Here, we summarize the distinct roles of these nucleases in different pathways for removal of RNA/DNA primers. Recent findings reveal that Okazaki fragment maturation is highly coordinated. The dynamic interactions of polymerase δ, FEN1 and DNA ligase I with proliferating cell nuclear antigen allow these enzymes to act sequentially during Okazaki fragment maturation. Such protein-protein interactions may be regulated by post-translational modifications. We also discuss studies using mutant mouse models that suggest two distinct cancer etiological mechanisms arising from defects in different steps of Okazaki fragment maturation.Mutations that affect the efficiency of RNA primer removal may result in accumulation of unligated nicks and DNA double-strand breaks. These DNA strand breaks can cause varying forms of chromosome aberrations, contributing to development of cancer that associates with aneuploidy and gross chromosomal rearrangement. On the other hand, mutations that impair editing out of polymerase o incorporation errors result in cancer displaying a strong mutator phenotype.

  5. Invariant Object Recognition Based on Extended Fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniy eBart

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Visual appearance of natural objects is profoundly affected by viewing conditions such as viewpoint and illumination. Human subjects can nevertheless compensate well for variations in these viewing conditions. The strategies that the visual system uses to accomplish this are largely unclear. Previous computational studies have suggested that in principle, certain types of object fragments (rather than whole objects can be used for invariant recognition. However, whether the human visual system is actually capable of using this strategy remains unknown. Here, we show that human observers can achieve illumination invariance by using object fragments that carry the relevant information. To determine this, we have used novel, but naturalistic, 3-D visual objects called ‘digital embryos’. Using novel instances of whole embryos, not fragments, we trained subjects to recognize individual embryos across illuminations. We then tested the illumination-invariant object recognition performance of subjects using fragments. We found that the performance was strongly correlated with the mutual information (MI of the fragments, provided that MI value took variations in illumination into consideration. This correlation was not attributable to any systematic differences in task difficulty between different fragments. These results reveal two important principles of invariant object recognition. First, the subjects can achieve invariance at least in part by compensating for the changes in the appearance of small local features, rather than of whole objects. Second, the subjects do not always rely on generic or pre-existing invariance of features (i.e., features whose appearance remains largely unchanged by variations in illumination, and are capable of using learning to compensate for appearance changes when necessary. These psychophysical results closely fit the predictions of earlier computational studies of fragment-based invariant object recognition.

  6. Invariant object recognition based on extended fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, Evgeniy; Hegdé, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Visual appearance of natural objects is profoundly affected by viewing conditions such as viewpoint and illumination. Human subjects can nevertheless compensate well for variations in these viewing conditions. The strategies that the visual system uses to accomplish this are largely unclear. Previous computational studies have suggested that in principle, certain types of object fragments (rather than whole objects) can be used for invariant recognition. However, whether the human visual system is actually capable of using this strategy remains unknown. Here, we show that human observers can achieve illumination invariance by using object fragments that carry the relevant information. To determine this, we have used novel, but naturalistic, 3-D visual objects called "digital embryos." Using novel instances of whole embryos, not fragments, we trained subjects to recognize individual embryos across illuminations. We then tested the illumination-invariant object recognition performance of subjects using fragments. We found that the performance was strongly correlated with the mutual information (MI) of the fragments, provided that MI value took variations in illumination into consideration. This correlation was not attributable to any systematic differences in task difficulty between different fragments. These results reveal two important principles of invariant object recognition. First, the subjects can achieve invariance at least in part by compensating for the changes in the appearance of small local features, rather than of whole objects. Second, the subjects do not always rely on generic or pre-existing invariance of features (i.e., features whose appearance remains largely unchanged by variations in illumination), and are capable of using learning to compensate for appearance changes when necessary. These psychophysical results closely fit the predictions of earlier computational studies of fragment-based invariant object recognition.

  7. DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa: a historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rex, A S; Aagaard, J; Fedder, J

    2017-07-01

    Sperm DNA Fragmentation has been extensively studied for more than a decade. In the 1940s the uniqueness of the spermatozoa protein complex which stabilizes the DNA was discovered. In the fifties and sixties, the association between unstable chromatin structure and subfertility was investigated. In the seventies, the impact of induced DNA damage was investigated. In the 1980s the concept of sperm DNA fragmentation as related to infertility was introduced as well as the first DNA fragmentation test: the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA). The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labelling (TUNEL) test followed by others was introduced in the nineties. The association between DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa and pregnancy loss has been extensively investigated spurring the need for a therapeutic tool for these patients. This gave rise to an increased interest in the aetiology of DNA damage. The present decade continues within this research area. Some of the more novel methods recently submerging are sorting of cells with increased DNA fragmentation and hyaluronic acid (HA) binding techniques. The clinical value of these tests remains to be elucidated. In spite of half a century of research within the area, this analysis is not routinely implemented into the fertility clinics. The underlying causes are multiple. The abundance of methods has impeded the need for a clinical significant threshold. One of the most promising methods was commercialized in 2005 and has been reserved for larger licensed laboratories. Myriads of reviews and meta-analyses on studies using different assays for analysis of DNA fragmentation, different clinical Artificial Reproductive Treatments (ART), different definitions of successful ART outcome and small patient cohorts have been published. Although the area of DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa is highly relevant in the fertility clinics, the need for further studies focusing on standardization of the methods and clinical

  8. Hydrogen rearrangement to and from radical z fragments in electron capture dissociation of peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savitski, Mikhail M; Kjeldsen, Frank; Nielsen, Michael L

    2007-01-01

    capture dissociation (ECD), including previously unreported double H. losses. Consistent with the radical character of H. abstraction, the residue determining the formation rate of z' = z. + H. species is found to be the N-terminal residue in z. species. The size of the complementary c(m)' fragment turned...... out to be another important factor, with z' species dominating over z. ions for m carbon groups of residues composing the c' species, with Gln and His in the c' fragment promoting H. donation and Asp and Ala...

  9. Rock fragmentation control in opencast blasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.K. Singh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The blasting operation plays a pivotal role in the overall economics of opencast mines. The blasting sub-system affects all the other associated sub-systems, i.e. loading, transport, crushing and milling operations. Fragmentation control through effective blast design and its effect on productivity are the challenging tasks for practicing blasting engineer due to inadequate knowledge of actual explosive energy released in the borehole, varying initiation practice in blast design and its effect on explosive energy release characteristic. This paper describes the result of a systematic study on the impact of blast design parameters on rock fragmentation at three mines in India. The mines use draglines and shovel–dumper combination for removal of overburden. Despite its pivotal role in controlling the overall economics of a mining operation, the expected blasting performance is often judged almost exclusively on the basis of poorly defined parameters such as powder factor and is often qualitative which results in very subjective assessment of blasting performance. Such an approach is very poor substitutes for accurate assessment of explosive and blasting performance. Ninety one blasts were conducted with varying blast designs and charging patterns, and their impacts on the rock fragmentation were documented. A high-speed camera was deployed to record the detonation sequences of the blasts. The efficiency of the loading machines was also correlated with the mean fragment size obtained from the fragmentation analyses.

  10. Short read DNA fragment anchoring algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wendi; Zhang, Peiheng; Liu, Xinchun

    2009-01-30

    The emerging next-generation sequencing method based on PCR technology boosts genome sequencing speed considerably, the expense is also get decreased. It has been utilized to address a broad range of bioinformatics problems. Limited by reliable output sequence length of next-generation sequencing technologies, we are confined to study gene fragments with 30 - 50 bps in general and it is relatively shorter than traditional gene fragment length. Anchoring gene fragments in long reference sequence is an essential and prerequisite step for further assembly and analysis works. Due to the sheer number of fragments produced by next-generation sequencing technologies and the huge size of reference sequences, anchoring would rapidly becoming a computational bottleneck. We compared algorithm efficiency on BLAT, SOAP and EMBF. The efficiency is defined as the count of total output results divided by time consumed to retrieve them. The data show that our algorithm EMBF have 3 - 4 times efficiency advantage over SOAP, and at least 150 times over BLAT. Moreover, when the reference sequence size is increased, the efficiency of SOAP will get degraded as far as 30%, while EMBF have preferable increasing tendency. In conclusion, we deem that EMBF is more suitable for short fragment anchoring problem where result completeness and accuracy is predominant and the reference sequences are relatively large.

  11. Formation of wide binaries by turbulent fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Seokho; Dunham, Michael M.; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Choi, Minho; Bergin, Edwin A.; Evans, Neal J.

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the formation of wide-binary systems of very low-mass stars (M ≤ 0.1 solar masses, M⊙) is challenging 1,2,3 . The most obvious route is through widely separated low-mass collapsing fragments produced by turbulent fragmentation of a molecular core4,5. However, close binaries or multiples from disk fragmentation can also evolve to wide binaries over a few initial crossing times of the stellar cluster through tidal evolution6. Finding an isolated low-mass wide-binary system in the earliest stage of formation, before tidal evolution could occur, would prove that turbulent fragmentation is a viable mechanism for (very) low-mass wide binaries. Here we report high-resolution ALMA observations of a known wide-separation protostellar binary, showing that each component has a circumstellar disk. The system is too young7 to have evolved from a close binary, and the disk axes are misaligned, providing strong support for the turbulent fragmentation model. Masses of both stars are derived from the Keplerian rotation of the disks; both are very low-mass stars.

  12. Supramolecular gel electrophoresis of large DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazawa, Shohei; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Oyoshi, Takanori; Yamanaka, Masamichi

    2017-07-06

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis is a frequent technique used to separate exceptionally large DNA fragments. In a typical continuous field electrophoresis, it is challenging to separate DNA fragments larger than 20 kbp because they migrate at a comparable rate. To overcome this challenge, it is necessary to develop a novel matrix for the electrophoresis. Here, we describe the electrophoresis of large DNA fragments up to 166 kbp using a supramolecular gel matrix and a typical continuous field electrophoresis system. C3 -symmetric tris-urea self-assembled into a supramolecular hydrogel in tris-boric acid-EDTA buffer, a typical buffer for DNA electrophoresis, and the supramolecular hydrogel was used as a matrix for electrophoresis to separate large DNA fragments. Three types of DNA marker, the λ-Hind III digest (2 to 23 kbp), Lambda DNA-Mono Cut Mix (10 to 49 kbp), and Marker 7 GT (10 to 165 kbp), were analyzed in this study. Large DNA fragments of greater than 100 kbp showed distinct mobility using a typical continuous field electrophoresis system. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Simvastatin inhibits CD44 fragmentation in chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terabe, Kenya; Takahashi, Nobunori; Takemoto, Toki; Knudson, Warren; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kojima, Toshihisa

    2016-08-15

    In human osteoarthritic chondrocytes, the hyaluronan receptor CD44 undergoes proteolytic cleavage at the cell surface. CD44 cleavage is thought to require transit of CD44 into cholesterol-rich lipid rafts. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether statins exert a protective effect on articular chondrocytes due to diminution of cholesterol. Three model systems of chondrocytes were examined including human HCS-2/8 chondrosarcoma cells, human osteoarthritic chondrocytes and normal bovine articular chondrocytes. Treatment with IL-1β + Oncostatin M resulted in a substantial increase in CD44 fragmentation in each of the three chondrocyte models. Pre-incubation with simvastatin prior to treatment with IL-1β + Oncostatin M decreased the level of CD44 fragmentation, decreased the proportion of CD44 that transits into the lipid raft fractions, decreased ADAM10 activity and diminished the interaction between CD44 and ADAM10. In HCS-2/8 cells and bovine articular chondrocytes, fragmentation of CD44 was blocked by the knockdown of ADAM10. Inhibition of CD44 fragmentation by simvastatin also resulted in improved retention of pericellular matrix. Addition of cholesterol and farnesyl-pyrophosphate reversed the protective effects of simvastatin. Thus, the addition of simvastatin exerts positive effects on chondrocytes including reduced CD44 fragmentation and enhanced the retention of pericellular matrix. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Global-Scale Patterns of Forest Fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Riitters

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available We report an analysis of forest fragmentation based on 1-km resolution land-cover maps for the globe. Measurements in analysis windows from 81 km 2 (9 x 9 pixels, "small" scale to 59,049 km 2 (243 x 243 pixels, "large" scale were used to characterize the fragmentation around each forested pixel. We identified six categories of fragmentation (interior, perforated, edge, transitional, patch, and undetermined from the amount of forest and its occurrence as adjacent forest pixels. Interior forest exists only at relatively small scales; at larger scales, forests are dominated by edge and patch conditions. At the smallest scale, there were significant differences in fragmentation among continents; within continents, there were significant differences among individual forest types. Tropical rain forest fragmentation was most severe in North America and least severe in Europe-Asia. Forest types with a high percentage of perforated conditions were mainly in North America (five types and Europe-Asia (four types, in both temperate and subtropical regions. Transitional and patch conditions were most common in 11 forest types, of which only a few would be considered as "naturally patchy" (e.g., dry woodland. The five forest types with the highest percentage of interior conditions were in North America; in decreasing order, they were cool rain forest, coniferous, conifer boreal, cool mixed, and cool broadleaf.

  15. Correlation measurements of fission-fragment properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oberstedt A.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available For the development of future nuclear fission applications and for a responsible handling of nuclear waste the a-priori assessment of the fission-fragments’ heat production and toxicity is a fundamental necessity. The success of an indispensable modelling of the fission process strongly depends on a good understanding of the particular mechanism of scission, the mass fragmentation and partition of excitation energy. Experimental observables are fission-fragment properties like mass- and energy-distributions, and the prompt neutron as well as γ-ray multiplicities and emission spectra. The latter quantities should preferably be known as a function of fragment mass and excitation energy. Those data are highly demanded as published by the OECD-NEA in its high priority data request list. With the construction of the double (v, E spectrometer VERDI we aim at measuring pre- and post-neutron masses directly and simultaneously to avoid prompt neutron corrections. From the simultaneous measurement of pre- and post-neutron fission-fragment data the prompt neutron multiplicity may then be inferred fully correlated with fragment mass yield and total kinetic energy. Using an ultra-fast fission event trigger spectral prompt fission γ-ray measurements may be performed. For that purpose recently developed lanthanum-halide detectors, with excellent timing characteristics, were coupled to the VERDI spectrometer allowing for a very good discrimination of fission γ-rays and prompt neutrons due to their different time-of-flight.

  16. Stream hydrological fragmentation drives bacterioplankton community composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Fazi

    Full Text Available In Mediterranean intermittent streams, the hydrological fragmentation in summer and the successive water flow re-convergence in autumn allow exploring how local processes shape the microbial community within the same habitat. The objectives of this study were to determine how bacterial community composition responded to hydrological fragmentation in summer, and to evaluate whether the seasonal shifts in community composition predominate over the effects of episodic habitat fragmentation. The bacterial community was assessed along the intermittent stream Fuirosos (Spain, at different levels of phylogenetic resolution by in situ hybridization, fingerprinting, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The hydrological fragmentation of the stream network strongly altered the biogeochemical conditions with the depletion of oxidized solutes and caused changes in dissolved organic carbon characteristics. In the isolated ponds, beta-Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria increased their abundance with a gradual reduction of the alpha-diversity as pond isolation time increased. Moreover, fingerprinting analysis clearly showed a shift in community composition between summer and autumn. In the context of a seasonal shift, the temporary stream fragmentation simultaneously reduced the microbial dispersion and affected local environmental conditions (shift in redox regime and quality of the dissolved organic matter tightly shaping the bacterioplankton community composition.

  17. Ternary fission fragmentation of 252Cf for all possible third fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimaran, K.; Balasubramaniam, M.

    2010-09-01

    The ternary fragmentation of 252Cf for all possible third fragments has been investigated using the recently proposed three-cluster model within a spherical approximation and satisfying the condition A 1 ≥ A 2 ≥ A 3 . The most probable ternary configurations in the fission of 252Cf accompanied with all possible third fragment mass numbers from A 3 = 1 to 84 are predicted and their independent and overall relative yields are calculated. The calculations of the properly charge minimized potential energy surface (PES) and yield reveal that even-mass third fragments are more favored than odd ones. In the most probable configuration having the minimum in the potential energy and the maximum in yield, among the three fragments, at least one (or two) of the fragment(s) associates itself with the neutron (or proton) closed shell and in some cases even with the doubly closed shell. The calculated relative yields imply that next to 14C (the heaviest third fragment observed in the spontaneous ternary fission of 252Cf , 34, 36, 38Si , 46, 48Ar , and 48, 50Ca are presenting themselves as the most favoured cases to be observed as the third particle in the spontaneous ternary fission of 252Cf.

  18. Fragmentation of methane molecules by antiproton impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehzadeh, Arash; Kirchner, Tom

    2016-09-01

    Extending previous work for proton impact, we have investigated the fragmentation of methane molecules due to collisions with antiprotons in the 25 keV to 5 MeV impact energy range. The multi-center nature of the problem is addressed by using a spectral representation of the molecular Hartree-Fock-level Hamiltonian and a single-center expansion of the initially populated molecular orbitals. The two-center basis generator method (TC-BGM) is used for orbital propagation. Electron-removal cross sections obtained from the TC-BGM solutions are complemented with a dynamical decay-route fragmentation model to calculate cross sections for the production of fragment ions. Good agreement with the available experimental data is observed for CH4+,CH3+,CH2+and CH+. Work supported by NSERC, Canada.

  19. New information on photon fragmentation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, Michael; König, Florian

    2014-08-01

    Thermal photons radiated in heavy-ion collisions represent an important signal for a recently discovered new state of matter, the deconfined quark-gluon plasma. However, a clean identification of this signal requires precise knowledge of the prompt photons produced simultaneously in hard collisions of quarks and gluons, mostly through their fragmentation. In this paper, we demonstrate that PHENIX data on photons produced in proton-proton collisions with low transverse momenta allow to extract new information on this fragmentation process. While existing data do not yet convincingly favor one parameterization (BFG II) over the two other frequently used photon fragmentation functions (BFG I and GRV NLO), the data sets recorded by PHENIX and STAR at BNL RHIC in 2013 with tenfold higher statistics should allow for such an analysis.

  20. New information on photon fragmentation functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasen, Michael; Koenig, Florian [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Muenster (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Thermal photons radiated in heavy-ion collisions represent an important signal for a recently discovered new state of matter, the deconfined quark-gluon plasma. However, a clean identification of this signal requires precise knowledge of the prompt photons produced simultaneously in hard collisions of quarks and gluons, mostly through their fragmentation. In this paper, we demonstrate that PHENIX data on photons produced in proton-proton collisions with low transverse momenta allow one to extract new information on this fragmentation process. While existing data do not yet convincingly favor one parameterization (BFG II) over the two other frequently used photon fragmentation functions (BFG I and GRV NLO), the data sets recorded by PHENIX and STAR at BNL RHIC in 2013 with tenfold higher statistics should allow for such an analysis. (orig.)

  1. Fragmentation of colliding planetesimals with water content

    CERN Document Server

    Maindl, Thomas I; Schäfer, Christoph; Speith, Roland

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the outcome of collisions of Ceres-sized planetesimals composed of a rocky core and a shell of water ice. These collisions are not only relevant for explaining the formation of planetary embryos in early planetary systems, but also provide insight into the formation of asteroid families and possible water transport via colliding small bodies. Earlier studies show characteristic collision velocities exceeding the bodies' mutual escape velocity which - along with the distribution of the impact angles - cover the collision outcome regimes 'partial accretion', 'erosion', and 'hit-and-run' leading to different expected fragmentation scenarios. Existing collision simulations use bodies composed of strengthless material; we study the distribution of fragments and their water contents considering the full elasto-plastic continuum mechanics equations also including brittle failure and fragmentation.

  2. Flow angle from intermediate mass fragment measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rami, F.; Crochet, P.; Dona, R.; De Schauenburg, B.; Wagner, P.; Alard, J.P.; Andronic, A.; Basrak, Z.; Bastid, N.; Belyaev, I.; Bendarag, A.; Berek, G.; Best, D.; Caplar, R.; Devismes, A.; Dupieux, P.; Dzelalija, M.; Eskef, M.; Fodor, Z.; Gobbi, A.; Grishkin, Y.; Herrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K.D.; Hong, B.; Kecskemeti, J.; Kirejczyk, M.; Korolija, M.; Kotte, R.; Lebedev, A.; Leifels, Y.; Merlitz, H.; Mohren, S.; Moisa, D.; Neubert, W.; Pelte, D.; Petrovici, M.; Pinkenburg, C.; Plettner, C.; Reisdorf, W.; Schuell, D.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Simion, V.; Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stockmeir, M.; Vasiliev, M.; Wisniewski, K.; Wohlfarth, D.; Yushmanov, I.; Zhilin, A

    1999-02-15

    Directed sideward flow of light charged particles and intermediate mass fragments was measured in different symmetric reactions at bombarding energies from 90 to 800 A MeV. The flow parameter is found to increase with the charge of the detected fragment up to Z = 3-4 and then turns into saturation for heavier fragments. Guided by simple simulations of an anisotropic expanding thermal source, we show that the value at saturation can provide a good estimate of the flow angle, {theta}{sub flow}, in the participant region. It is found that {theta}{sub flow} depends strongly on the impact parameter. The excitation function of {theta}{sub flow} reveals striking deviations from the ideal hydrodynamical scaling. The data exhibit a steep rise of {theta}{sub flow} to a maximum at around 250 - 400 A MeV, followed by a moderate decrease as the bombarding energy increases further.

  3. Fragmentation of Kozai–Lidov Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wen; Lubow, Stephen H.; Martin, Rebecca G.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the gravitational instability (GI) of a locally isothermal inclined disk around one component of a binary system. Such a disk can undergo global Kozai–Lidov (KL) cycles if the initial disk tilt is above the critical KL angle (of about 40◦). During these cycles, an initially circular disk exchanges its inclination for eccentricity, and vice versa. Self-gravity may suppress the cycles under some circumstances. However, with hydrodynamic simulations that include self-gravity, we show that for a sufficiently high initial disk tilts and for certain disk masses, disks can undergo KL oscillations and fragment due to GI, even when the Toomre Q value for an equivalent undisturbed disk is well within the stable regime (Q> 2). We suggest that KL triggered disk fragmentation provides a mechanism for the efficient formation of giant planets in binary systems and may enhance the fragmentation of disks in massive black hole binaries.

  4. Antiproton Induced Fission and Fragmentation of Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The annihilation of slow antiprotons with nuclei results in a large highly localized energy deposition primarily on the nuclear surface. \\\\ \\\\ The study of antiproton induced fission and fragmentation processes is expected to yield new information on special nuclear matter states, unexplored fission modes, multifragmentation of nuclei, and intranuclear cascades.\\\\ \\\\ In order to investigate the antiproton-nucleus interaction and the processes following the antiproton annihilation at the nucleus, we propose the following experiments: \\item A)~Measurement of several fragments from fission and from multifragmentation in coincidence with particle spectra, especially neutrons and kaons. \\item B)~Precise spectra of $\\pi$, K, n, p, d and t with time-of-flight techniques. \\item C)~Installation of the Berlin 4$\\pi$ neutron detector with a 4$\\pi$ Si detector placed inside for fragments and charged particles. This yields neutron multiplicity distributions and consequently distributions of thermal excitation energies and...

  5. Improved Empirical Parametrization of Fragmentation Cross Sections

    CERN Document Server

    Sümmerer, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    A new version is proposed for the universal empirical formula, EPAX, which describes fragmentation cross sections in high-energy heavy-ion reactions. The new version, EPAX 3, can be shown to yield cross sections that are in better agreement with experimental data for the most neutron-rich fragments than the previous version. At the same time, the very good agreement of EPAX 2 with data on the neutron-deficient side has been largely maintained. Comparison with measured cross sections show that the bulk of the data is reproduced within a factor of about 2, for cross sections down to the pico-barn range.

  6. Parton-to-Pion Fragmentation Reloaded

    CERN Document Server

    de Florian, D; Epele, M; Hernandez-Pinto, R J; Stratmann, M

    2014-01-01

    We present a new, comprehensive global analysis of parton-to-pion fragmentation functions at next-to-leading order accuracy in QCD. The obtained results are based on the latest experimental information on single-inclusive pion production in electron-positron annihilation, lepton-nucleon deep-inelastic scattering, and proton-proton collisions. An excellent description of all data sets is achieved, and the remaining uncertainties in parton-to-pion fragmentation functions are estimated based on the Hessian method. Extensive comparisons to the results from our previous global analysis are performed.

  7. Laser photoluminescence spectroscopy of photodissociation fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, W. M.; Cody, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Laser induced photoluminescence spectroscopy has been used to study the energy partitioning among CN fragments produced by the photodissociation of C2N2. The CN radicals are produced in both the A 2Pi and the X 2Sigma+ states. The A state is formed primarily in the nu-prime = 0 level, and the X state is formed in the lower vibrational levels. Since the photodissociation process does not produce the maximum amount of vibrational excitation in the CN fragments, it is suggested that the excess energy goes into either translational and/or rotational excitation of the CN.

  8. Limit theorems for fragmentation processes with immigration

    CERN Document Server

    Knobloch, Robert

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we extend two limit theorems which were recently obtained for fragmentation processes to such processes with immigration. More precisely, in the setting with immigration we consider a limit theorem for the process counted with a random characteristic as well as the asymptotic behaviour of an empirical measure associated with the stopping line corresponding to the first blocks, in their respective line of descent, that are smaller than a given size. In addition, we determine the asymptotic decay rate of the size of the largest block in a homogeneous fragmentation process with immigration. The techniques used to proves these results are based on submartingale arguments.

  9. Radio Frequency Fragment Separator at NSCL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazin, D. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States)], E-mail: bazin@nscl.msu.edu; Andreev, V. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Becerril, A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Doleans, M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Mantica, P.F. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Ottarson, J. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Schatz, H. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Stoker, J.B. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Vincent, J. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States)

    2009-07-21

    A new device has been designed and built at NSCL which provides additional filtering of radioactive beams produced via projectile fragmentation. The Radio Frequency Fragment Separator (RFFS) uses the time micro structure of the beams accelerated by the cyclotrons to deflect particles according to their time-of-flight, in effect producing a phase filtering. The transverse RF (Radio Frequency) electric field of the RFFS has superior filtering performance compared to other electrostatic devices, such as Wien filters. Such filtering is critical for radioactive beams produced on the neutron-deficient side of the valley of stability, where strong contamination occurs at intermediate energies from 50 to 200 MeV/u.

  10. Parton Propagation and Fragmentation in QCD Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberto Accardi, Francois Arleo, William Brooks, David D' Enterria, Valeria Muccifora

    2009-12-01

    We review recent progress in the study of parton propagation, interaction and fragmentation in both cold and hot strongly interacting matter. Experimental highlights on high-energy hadron production in deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering, proton-nucleus and heavy-ion collisions, as well as Drell-Yan processes in hadron-nucleus collisions are presented. The existing theoretical frameworks for describing the in-medium interaction of energetic partons and the space-time evolution of their fragmentation into hadrons are discussed and confronted to experimental data. We conclude with a list of theoretical and experimental open issues, and a brief description of future relevant experiments and facilities.

  11. Angular Momentum Population in Projectile Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolyák, Zs.; Gladnishki, K. A.; Gerl, J.; Hellström, M.; Kopatch, Y.; Mandal, S.; Górska, M.; Regan, P. H.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Gsi-Isomer Collaboration

    2004-02-01

    Isomeric states in neutron-deficient nuclei around A ≈190 have been identified following the projectile fragmentation of a relativistic energy 238U beam. The deduced isomeric ratios are compared with a model based on the abrasion-ablation description. The experimental isomeric ratios are lower by a factor of ≈2 than the calculated ones assuming the `sharp cutoff' approximation. The observation of the previously reported isomeric Iπ=43/2- state in 215Ra represents the current record for the highest discrete spin state observed following a projectile fragmentation reaction.

  12. Radio Frequency Fragment Separator at NSCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazin, D.; Andreev, V.; Becerril, A.; Doléans, M.; Mantica, P. F.; Ottarson, J.; Schatz, H.; Stoker, J. B.; Vincent, J.

    2009-07-01

    A new device has been designed and built at NSCL which provides additional filtering of radioactive beams produced via projectile fragmentation. The Radio Frequency Fragment Separator (RFFS) uses the time micro structure of the beams accelerated by the cyclotrons to deflect particles according to their time-of-flight, in effect producing a phase filtering. The transverse RF (Radio Frequency) electric field of the RFFS has superior filtering performance compared to other electrostatic devices, such as Wien filters. Such filtering is critical for radioactive beams produced on the neutron-deficient side of the valley of stability, where strong contamination occurs at intermediate energies from 50 to 200 MeV/u.

  13. Eigenmodes of decay and discrete fragmentation processes

    CERN Document Server

    Giraud, B G; Giraud, B G; Peschanski, R

    1994-01-01

    Linear rate equations are used to describe the cascading decay of an initial heavy cluster into fragments. This representation is based upon a triangular matrix of transition rates. We expand the state vector of mass multiplicities, which describes the process, into the biorthonormal basis of eigenmodes provided by the triangular matrix. When the transition rates have a scaling property in terms of mass ratios at binary fragmentation vertices, we obtain solvable models with explicit mathematical properties for the eigenmodes. A suitable continuous limit provides an interpolation between the solvable models. It gives a general relationship between the decay products and the elementary transition rates.

  14. Computer Model Of Fragmentation Of Atomic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Norbury, John W.; KHAN FERDOUS; Badavi, Francis F.

    1995-01-01

    High Charge and Energy Semiempirical Nuclear Fragmentation Model (HZEFRG1) computer program developed to be computationally efficient, user-friendly, physics-based program for generating data bases on fragmentation of atomic nuclei. Data bases generated used in calculations pertaining to such radiation-transport applications as shielding against radiation in outer space, radiation dosimetry in outer space, cancer therapy in laboratories with beams of heavy ions, and simulation studies for designing detectors for experiments in nuclear physics. Provides cross sections for production of individual elements and isotopes in breakups of high-energy heavy ions by combined nuclear and Coulomb fields of interacting nuclei. Written in ANSI FORTRAN 77.

  15. Dissipative fragmentation in a phase space approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adorno, A.; Di Toro, M.; Bonasera, A.; Gregoire, C.; Gulminelli, F.

    Semi-classical approaches have evidenced the role of one and two-body dissipation in nucleus-nucleus collisions. On the other hand, a substantial energy dissipation and some angular momentum transfer have been observed at moderate energy where a fragmentation process is the dominant reaction mechanism. In order to analyse main features of these reactions, we developed a phenomenological model taking into account phase space constraints. The transition between deep inelastic collisions and abrasion-like fragmentation is described and a general agreement with available data is found.

  16. CONSUMERSíATTITUDES TOWARD SALES PROMOTIONS ANDPERCEIVED BENEFITS

    OpenAIRE

    Mine Oyman

    2004-01-01

    While sales promotion has been around for a long time, its role and importance in marketing communications programs have increased in recent years. A number of factors have led to the increase in sales promotion. Among them are the growing power of retailers, declining brand loyalty, fragmentation of consumer market, short-term focus, competition and advertising clutter. Sales promotions may be targeted at any or all of consumers, distribution channel members and sales force. The target audie...

  17. The relationship between sperm viability and DNA fragmentation rates

    OpenAIRE

    Mary K. Samplaski; Dimitromanolakis, Apostolos; Lo, Kirk C; Grober, Ethan D.; Mullen, Brendan; Garbens, Alaina; Jarvi, Keith A

    2015-01-01

    Background In humans, sperm DNA fragmentation rates have been correlated with sperm viability rates. Reduced sperm viability is associated with high sperm DNA fragmentation, while conversely high sperm viability is associated with low rates of sperm DNA fragmentation. Both elevated DNA fragmentation rates and poor viability are correlated with impaired male fertility, with a DNA fragmentation rate of > 30% indicating subfertility. We postulated that in some men, the sperm viability assay coul...

  18. Inclusion: The Unifying Thread for Fragmented Metaphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Lynn H.

    2004-01-01

    The fabric of educational leadership is changing. Murphy (2001) has suggested three new metaphors for educational leaders: moral stewards, builders of communities, and educators for school improvement. However, shifting priorities and contradictions between these metaphors could result in fragmentation within the field. This article discusses…

  19. Modelling of the PELE fragmentation dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verreault, J.

    2014-01-01

    The Penetrator with Enhanced Lateral Effect (PELE) is a type of explosive-free projectile that undergoes radial fragmentation upon an impact with a target plate. This type of projectile is composed of a brittle cylindrical shell (the jacket) filled in its core with a material characterized with a la

  20. Metagenome Fragment Classification Using -Mer Frequency Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail Rosen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A vast amount of microbial sequencing data is being generated through large-scale projects in ecology, agriculture, and human health. Efficient high-throughput methods are needed to analyze the mass amounts of metagenomic data, all DNA present in an environmental sample. A major obstacle in metagenomics is the inability to obtain accuracy using technology that yields short reads. We construct the unique -mer frequency profiles of 635 microbial genomes publicly available as of February 2008. These profiles are used to train a naive Bayes classifier (NBC that can be used to identify the genome of any fragment. We show that our method is comparable to BLAST for small 25 bp fragments but does not have the ambiguity of BLAST's tied top scores. We demonstrate that this approach is scalable to identify any fragment from hundreds of genomes. It also performs quite well at the strain, species, and genera levels and achieves strain resolution despite classifying ubiquitous genomic fragments (gene and nongene regions. Cross-validation analysis demonstrates that species-accuracy achieves 90% for highly-represented species containing an average of 8 strains. We demonstrate that such a tool can be used on the Sargasso Sea dataset, and our analysis shows that NBC can be further enhanced.

  1. [Fragmented QRS. Relevance in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Alexander; Sinnecker, Daniel; Berkefeld, Anna; Müller, Alexander; Gebhardt, Josef; Dommasch, Michael; Huster, Katharina M; Barthel, Petra; Schmidt, Georg

    2015-09-01

    The QRS complex represents the electrical depolarization of ventricular myocardium. In the case of an undisturbed depolarization, the QRS complex has a normal configuration and duration, but abnormal electrical conduction leads to widening of the QRS complex. The block of one of the Tawara branches results in a typical bundle branch block pattern. A QRS complex that cannot be classified as bundle branch block due to an atypical configuration and contains notched R or S waves is called a fragmented QRS. The underlying pathophysiologies are manifold and include myocardial scars induced by ischemic heart disease, myocardial fibrosis due to other diseases, primary cardiac pathologies as well as systemic diseases with cardiac involvement. Pathologies on the cellular level, such as ion channel dysfunctions, also correlate with fragmented QRS. Besides the diagnostic relevance, fragmented QRS is known to have prognostic properties, for example in identifying high risk patients with coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathy, Brugada syndrome and acquired long QT syndrome; however, fragmented QRS may also be detected in ECGs of healthy individuals.

  2. Element Distribution and Multiplicity of Heavy Fragments

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment will measure the energy and angular distribution of heavy fragments produced in the reactions of |1|2C on several targets between |2|7Al and |2|3|8U at 86~MeV/u. The systematic investigation of a highly excited interaction region (fireball) by means of a clean N and Z identification of heavy tar fragments, may result in a better understanding of temperature concept and of the degree of equilibration of the local interaction region with respect to the total system. For this investigation a large-area position sensitive ionization chamber of 50~msr solid angle in conjunction with a time-of-flight telescope consisting of parallel-plate detectors will be used. \\\\ \\\\ In order to get information on the transverse momentum transfer and the inelasticity of the collision, the energy of the PROJECTILE-FRAGMENTS will be measured at forward angles with a plastic scintillator hodoscope. In addition to this inclusive measurement correlations between heavy fragments will be investigated by means of three pos...

  3. Distribution and Causes of Global Forest Fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bruce Jones

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Because human land uses tend to expand over time, forests that share a high proportion of their borders with anthropogenic uses are at higher risk of further degradation than forests that share a high proportion of their borders with non-forest, natural land cover (e.g., wetland. Using 1-km advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR satellite-based land cover, we present a method to separate forest fragmentation into natural and anthropogenic components, and report results for all inhabited continents summarized by World Wildlife Fund biomes. Globally, over half of the temperate broadleaf and mixed forest biome and nearly one quarter of the tropical rainforest biome have been fragmented or removed by humans, as opposed to only 4% of the boreal forest. Overall, Europe had the most human-caused fragmentation and South America the least. This method may allow for improved risk assessments and better targeting for protection and remediation by identifying areas with high amounts of human-caused fragmentation.

  4. DFT STUDIES OF DP-3 AMYLOSE FRAGMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study extends our work on mono- and disaccharides to structures with three glucose residues by two alpha-[1-4] bridges, denoted herein as DP-3's. DFT optimization studies of DP-3 fragments have been carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level of theory. Different hydroxymethyl conformations (gg...

  5. Conformational studies of cellulosic fragments by DFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study of cellulosic fragments by DFTr is a continuation of our efforts to produce quality structural data that will be valuable to those working in the field of cellulose structure and enzymatic degradation. Using a reduced basis set and density functional DFTr (B3LYP), optimization of cellulosi...

  6. Computations in Fragments of Intuitionistic Propositional Logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongh, Dick de; Hendriks, Lex; Renardel de Lavalette, Gerard R.

    1991-01-01

    This article is a report on research in progress into the structure of finite diagrams of intuitionistic propositional logic with the aid of automated reasoning systems for larger calculations. A fragment of a propositional logic is the set of formulae built up from a finite number of propositional

  7. Water cluster fragmentation probed by pickup experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chuanfu; Kresin, Vitaly V.; Pysanenko, Andriy; Fárník, Michal

    2016-09-01

    Electron ionization is a common tool for the mass spectrometry of atomic and molecular clusters. Any cluster can be ionized efficiently by sufficiently energetic electrons, but concomitant fragmentation can seriously obstruct the goal of size-resolved detection. We present a new general method to assess the original neutral population of the cluster beam. Clusters undergo a sticking collision with a molecule from a crossed beam, and the velocities of neat and doped cluster ion peaks are measured and compared. By making use of longitudinal momentum conservation, one can reconstruct the sizes of the neutral precursors. Here this method is applied to H2O and D2O clusters in the detected ion size range of 3-10. It is found that water clusters do fragment significantly upon electron impact: the deduced neutral precursor size is ˜3-5 times larger than the observed cluster ions. This conclusion agrees with beam size characterization by another experimental technique: photoionization after Na-doping. Abundant post-ionization fragmentation of water clusters must therefore be an important factor in the interpretation of experimental data; interestingly, there is at present no detailed microscopic understanding of the underlying fragmentation dynamics.

  8. Oscillating Filaments. I. Oscillation and Geometrical Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritschneder, Matthias; Heigl, Stefan; Burkert, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    We study the stability of filaments in equilibrium between gravity and internal as well as external pressure using the grid-based AMR code RAMSES. A homogeneous, straight cylinder below a critical line mass is marginally stable. However, if the cylinder is bent, such as with a slight sinusoidal perturbation, an otherwise stable configuration starts to oscillate, is triggered into fragmentation, and collapses. This previously unstudied behavior allows a filament to fragment at any given scale, as long as it has slight bends. We call this process “geometrical fragmentation.” In our realization, the spacing between the cores matches the wavelength of the sinusoidal perturbation, whereas up to now, filaments were thought to be only fragmenting on the characteristic scale set by the mass-to-line ratio. Using first principles, we derive the oscillation period as well as the collapse timescale analytically. To enable a direct comparison with observations, we study the line-of-sight velocity for different inclinations. We show that the overall oscillation pattern can hide the infall signature of cores.

  9. Intraday Price Discovery in Fragmented Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.R. Ozturk (Sait); M. van der Wel (Michel); D.J.C. van Dijk (Dick)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractFor many assets, trading is fragmented across multiple exchanges. Price discovery measures summarize the informativeness of trading on each venue for discovering the asset’s true underlying value. We explore intraday variation in price discovery using a structural model with

  10. Physical laws of cholesterol gallstone fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubrand, M; Greinwald, I; Lobentanzer, H; Paumgartner, G; Hermeking, H; Sauerbruch, T

    1997-03-01

    Efficient fragmentation is the most important prerequisite for successful treatment of gallstones by extracorporeally induced shock waves. No data are available on the amount of energy necessary for stone disintegration and on the threshold energy below which no further fragmentation occurs. We therefore performed an in vitro investigation on human cholesterol gallstones to elucidate physical laws governing shock-wave lithotripsy. First, the focal pressure of the lithotripter was measured to calculate the energy traversing a stone. Second, 96 gallstones from 16 gall bladders were analysed with respect to physicochemical composition, radiological features and ultrasound before fragmentation was performed. Energy for stone disintegration was constant within each stone family but varied between 4.6 mL-1 and 36.8J mL-1 in different families. This energy correlated linearly with stone volume. None of the radiological and physicochemical factors revealed a clear-cut correlation of the different energies necessary for similar stone disintegration. The threshold energy differed between 0.26 mJ and 1.04 mJ per pulse. In conclusion, stone volume was the best parameter predicting stone fragmentation. However, in cholesterol stones with a similar composition the required energy per volume varies considerably together with the threshold energy. Radiological and ultrasound parameters appear to be of minor importance in explaining these differences.

  11. Modelling of the PELE fragmentation dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verreault, J.

    2014-01-01

    The Penetrator with Enhanced Lateral Effect (PELE) is a type of explosive-free projectile that undergoes radial fragmentation upon an impact with a target plate. This type of projectile is composed of a brittle cylindrical shell (the jacket) filled in its core with a material characterized with a

  12. Modelling of the PELE fragmentation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verreault, J.

    2014-05-01

    The Penetrator with Enhanced Lateral Effect (PELE) is a type of explosive-free projectile that undergoes radial fragmentation upon an impact with a target plate. This type of projectile is composed of a brittle cylindrical shell (the jacket) filled in its core with a material characterized with a large Poisson's ratio. Upon an impact with a target, the axial compression causes the filling to expand in the radial direction. However, due to the brittleness of the jacket material, very little radial deformation can occur which creates a radial stress between the two materials and a hoop stress in the jacket. Fragmentation of the jacket occurs if the hoop stress exceeds the material's ultimate stress. The PELE fragmentation dynamics is explored via Finite-Element Method (FEM) simulations using the Autodyn explicit dynamics hydrocode. The numerical results are compared with an analytical model based on wave interactions, as well as with the experimental investigation of Paulus and Schirm (1996). The comparison is based on the mechanical stress in the filling and the qualitative fragmentation of the jacket.

  13. Searching Fragment Spaces with feature trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessel, Uta; Wellenzohn, Bernd; Lilienthal, Markus; Claussen, Holger

    2009-02-01

    Virtual combinatorial chemistry easily produces billions of compounds, for which conventional virtual screening cannot be performed even with the fastest methods available. An efficient solution for such a scenario is the generation of Fragment Spaces, which encode huge numbers of virtual compounds by their fragments/reagents and rules of how to combine them. Similarity-based searches can be performed in such spaces without ever fully enumerating all virtual products. Here we describe the generation of a huge Fragment Space encoding about 5 * 10(11) compounds based on established in-house synthesis protocols for combinatorial libraries, i.e., we encode practically evaluated combinatorial chemistry protocols in a machine readable form, rendering them accessible to in silico search methods. We show how such searches in this Fragment Space can be integrated as a first step in an overall workflow. It reduces the extremely huge number of virtual products by several orders of magnitude so that the resulting list of molecules becomes more manageable for further more elaborated and time-consuming analysis steps. Results of a case study are presented and discussed, which lead to some general conclusions for an efficient expansion of the chemical space to be screened in pharmaceutical companies.

  14. Fragmentation of a Jet with Small Radius

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, Lin; Leibovich, Adam K

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we consider the fragmentation of a parton into a jet with small jet radius $R$. Perturbatively, logarithms of $R$ can appear, which for narrow jets can lead to large corrections. Using soft-collinear effective theory (SCET), we introduce the jet fragmentation function (JFF), which describes the fragmentation of a parton into a jet. We discuss how these objects are related to the standard jet functions. Calculating the JFF to next-to-leading order, we show that these objects satisfy the standard DGLAP evolution equations, with a natural scale that depends upon $R$. By using standard renormalization group evolution, we can therefore resum logarithms of $R$. We further use SCET to prove a factorization theorem where the JFFs naturally appear, for the fragmentation of a hadron within a jet with small $R$. Finally, we also show how this formalism can be used to resum the ratio of jet radii for a subjet to be emitted from within a fat jet.

  15. Fragmentation of forest, grassland, and shrubland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt H. Riitters

    2013-01-01

    As humans introduce competing land uses into natural landscapes, the public concerns regarding landcover patterns are expressed through headline issues such as urban sprawl, forest fragmentation, water quality, and wilderness preservation. The spatial arrangement of an environment affects all human perceptions and ecological processes within that environment, but this...

  16. The paradox of forest fragmentation genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrea T. Kramer; Jennifer L. Ison; Mary V. Ashley; Henry F. Howe

    2008-01-01

    Theory predicts widespread loss of genetic diversity from drift and inbreeding in trees subjected to habitat fragmentation, yet empirical support of this theory is scarce. We argue that population genetics theory may be misapplied in light of ecological realities that, when recognized, require scrutiny of underlying evolutionary assumptions. One ecological reality is...

  17. Targeting incentives to reduce habitat fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Lewis; Andrew Plantinga; Junjie Wu

    2009-01-01

    This article develops a theoretical model to analyze the spatial targeting of incentives for the restoration of forested landscapes when wildlife habitat can be enhanced by reducing fragmentation. The key theoretical result is that the marginal net benefits of increasing forest can be convex, in which case corner solutions--converting either none or all of the...

  18. Brownian shape motion: Fission fragment mass distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sierk Arnold J.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available It was recently shown that remarkably accurate fission-fragment mass distributions can be obtained by treating the nuclear shape evolution as a Brownian walk on previously calculated five-dimensional potential-energy surfaces; the current status of this novel method is described here.

  19. Fragment size distribution statistics in dynamic fragmentation of laser shock-loaded tin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua He

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the geometric statistics method to characterize the size distribution of tin fragments produced in the laser shock-loaded dynamic fragmentation process. In the shock experiments, the ejection of the tin sample with etched V-shape groove in the free surface are collected by the soft recovery technique. Subsequently, the produced fragments are automatically detected with the fine post-shot analysis techniques including the X-ray micro-tomography and the improved watershed method. To characterize the size distributions of the fragments, a theoretical random geometric statistics model based on Poisson mixtures is derived for dynamic heterogeneous fragmentation problem, which reveals linear combinational exponential distribution. The experimental data related to fragment size distributions of the laser shock-loaded tin sample are examined with the proposed theoretical model, and its fitting performance is compared with that of other state-of-the-art fragment size distribution models. The comparison results prove that our proposed model can provide far more reasonable fitting result for the laser shock-loaded tin.

  20. Fragmentation characteristics analysis of sandstone fragments based on impact rockburst test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqiao Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Impact rockburst test on sandstone samples with a central hole is carried out under true triaxial static loads and vertical dynamic load conditions, and rock fragments after the test are collected. The fragments of sandstone generated from strain rockburst test and uniaxial compression test are also collected. The fragments are weighed and the length, width and thickness of each piece of fragments are measured respectively. The fragment quantities with coarse, medium, fine and micro grains in different size ranges, mass and particles distributions are also analyzed. Then, the fractal dimension of fragments is calculated by the methods of size-frequency, mass-frequency and length-to-thickness ratio-frequency. It is found that the crushing degree of impact rockburst fragments is higher, accompanied with blocky characteristics observably. The mass percentage of small grains, including fine and micro grains, in impact rockburst test is higher than those in strain rockburst test and uniaxial compression test. Energy dissipation from rockburst tests is more than that from uniaxial compression test, as the quantity of micro grains generated does.

  1. Fragmentation characteristics analysis of sandstone fragments based on impact rockburst test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongqiao Liu; Dejian Li; Fei Zhao; Chengchao Wang

    2014-01-01

    Impact rockburst test on sandstone samples with a central hole is carried out under true triaxial static loads and vertical dynamic load conditions, and rock fragments after the test are collected. The fragments of sandstone generated from strain rockburst test and uniaxial compression test are also collected. The fragments are weighed and the length, width and thickness of each piece of fragments are measured respectively. The fragment quantities with coarse, medium, fine and micro grains in different size ranges, mass and particles distributions are also analyzed. Then, the fractal dimension of fragments is calculated by the methods of size-frequency, mass-frequency and length-to-thickness ratio-frequency. It is found that the crushing degree of impact rockburst fragments is higher, accompanied with blocky character-istics observably. The mass percentage of small grains, including fine and micro grains, in impact rock-burst test is higher than those in strain rockburst test and uniaxial compression test. Energy dissipation from rockburst tests is more than that from uniaxial compression test, as the quantity of micro grains generated does.

  2. A decadal view of magma fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, K. V.; Rust, A.

    2010-12-01

    Although the past decade has seen fundamental advances in studies of explosive volcanism, the disruption to air traffic caused by the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland, highlights the need for improved understanding of magmatic fragmentation in general, and of fine ash generation in particular. To develop a theoretical basis for predicting the fine ash content of eruptive plumes, we need to understand not only fragmentation mechanisms but also the dependence of those mechanisms on conditions of magma ascent and degassing. Experimental and analytical approaches to this problem include experimental studies of vesiculation and permeability development in silicic melts, quantitative textural studies of pyroclasts to constrain conditions that reduce fragmentation efficiency (that is, allow vesicular clasts to be preserved), direct experiments on fragmentation in both natural and analog materials, and determination of total grain size distributions (TGSDs) of pyroclastic deposits. Experiments on silicic melts have demonstrated that very high supersaturations (overpressures ΔP) may be achieved in silicic melts prior to homogeneous bubble nucleation, and that the high bubble number densities of silicic pumice require not only homogeneous nucleation but also nucleation of a mixed H2O-CO2 gas phase. In most pumice and scoria clasts, resulting vesicle populations form power law size distributions; power law exponents >3 in silicic tephras indicate that small vesicles comprise most of the vesicle volume (consistent with rapid late-stage vesiculation at high ΔP), while exponents 60-70%) and show no dependence on either melt composition or mass eruption rate; this suggests that melt porosity is more important than either decompression rate or magma rheology for clast preservation. These pyroclasts also have uniformly high permeabilities, high pore connectivity, and simple porous pathways, all of which suggest that ease of gas escape also contributed to clast

  3. The Spectrum of Satellite Breakup and Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkleman, D.

    The objective of this paper is to expose the spectrum of satellite breakup physics and is implications for debris production and observables. Satellite response to the debris environment generally emphasizes small scale hypervelocity impact or the interaction of intense, coherent radiation with satellite surfaces or internals. There are empirical correlations of fragment size distributions based on arena tests and extremely rare observations of breakups in space. Klinkrad describes well research on material response to hypervelocity impact such as the ballistic limit for various materials and shielding walls. Smirnov, et. al., report well the phenomenology of breakups under the influence of nonuniform internal loading of monolithic bodies, such as pressurized tanks. They set forth the transformation of elastic energy into fragment kinetic energy. They establish a sound physical framework for bounding the number of fragments. We took advantage of these works in our previous papers. There is not much research into the response of nonuniform structures to hypervelocity collisions with similarly massive and complex objects. This work generally employs complex hydrodynamic and finite element computation that is not well suited to real time, operational assessment of the consequences of such encounters. We hope to diminish the void between the extremes of microscopic impact and complex hydrocodes. Our previous reports employed the framework established by Chobotov and Spencer, fundamentally equilibrium, Newtonian approach. We now explore the spectrum of interactions and debris evolutions possible with realistic combinations of these theories. The spectrum encompasses Newtonian, semi-elastic energy and momentum transfer through little or no momentum exchange and from virtually all of the mass of the colliders being involved through fractional mass involvement. We observe that the more Newtonian outcomes do not agree well with sparse observations of the few collisions that

  4. Analysis of Fragmentation and Resulting Shrapnel Penetration of Naturally Fragmenting Cylindrical Bombs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, S.E.

    2000-08-01

    Fragmentation of exploding cylinders and penetration mechanics of surrounding vessel walls were examined and a qualitative understanding was achieved. This understanding provided a basis for making simplifying approximations and assumptions that aided in creating a shrapnel penetration model. Several mathematical models were discussed, and results from 6 cylinder tests were analyzed in order to select a model that best represented the data. It was determined that the overall best mathematical model to predict shrapnel penetration uses the modified Gurney equation to calculate fragment velocity, the Mott equation to calculate largest fragment weight, and the Christman/Gehring equation to calculate penetration depth.

  5. Vasoinhibins, N-terminal mouse prolactin fragments, participate in mammary gland involution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Michiyo; Maehara, Midori; Watanabe, Tsukasa; Yanagisawa, Yu; Takata, Yukiko; Nakajima, Ryojun; Suzuki, Mika; Harigaya, Toshio

    2014-06-01

    Vasoinhibins are a family of peptides that act on endothelial cells to suppress angiogenesis and promote apoptosis-mediated vascular regression. Vasoinhibins include the N-terminal fragments from prolactin (PRL), GH, and placental lactogen. One of the vasoinhibins, the N-terminal PRL fragment of 16 kDa, is generated by the lysosomal representative protease cathepsin D (Cath D). Because the normal growth and involution of the mammary gland (MG) are profoundly affected by the expansion and regression of blood vessels and also because PRL stimulates the growth and differentiation of MG, we proposed that intact PRL produced during lactation contributes to MG angiogenesis and increased blood flow, whereas during involution, the N-terminal PRL fragment would have proapoptotic effects on mammary epithelial cells (MECs). Therefore, we investigated the production of the N-terminal PRL fragment and its direct effect on the MG. Mouse PRL (mPRL) was proteolytically cleaved by Cath D between amino acids 148 and 149. N-terminal PRL fragment and Cath D expression increased during MG involution. Furthermore, incubation of MG fragments and MCF7 with recombinant 16 kDa mPRL revealed a proapoptotic effect in MECs. Ectopic mPRL in MECs was cleaved to 16 kDa PRL by Cath D in the MG lysosomal fraction. The majority of PRL derived from pituitary gland was cleaved to 16 kDa PRL in culture medium. Therefore, N-terminal PRL fragment increases during the involution period, has a proapoptotic effect on MECs, and is mainly generated by secreted Cath D in the extracellular space of MG.

  6. Fragmentation of vertically stratified gaseous layers: monolithic or coalescence-driven collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnbier, František; Wünsch, Richard; Whitworth, Anthony P.; Palouš, Jan

    2016-12-01

    We investigate, using 3D hydrodynamic simulations, the fragmentation of pressure-confined, vertically stratified, self-gravitating gaseous layers. The confining pressure is either thermal pressure acting on both surfaces, or thermal pressure acting on one surface and ram-pressure on the other. In the linear regime of fragmentation, the dispersion relation we obtain agrees well with that derived by Elmegreen & Elmegreen (1978), and consequently deviates from the dispersion relations based on the thin shell approximation (Vishniac 1983) or pressure assisted gravitational instability (Wünsch et al. 2010). In the non-linear regime, the relative importance of the confining pressure to the self-gravity is a crucial parameter controlling the qualitative course of fragmentation. When confinement of the layer is dominated by external pressure, self-gravitating condensations are delivered by a two-stage process: first the layer fragments into gravitationally bound but stable clumps, and then these clumps coalesce until they assemble enough mass to collapse. In contrast, when external pressure makes a small contribution to confinement of the layer, the layer fragments monolithically into gravitationally unstable clumps and there is no coalescence. This dichotomy persists whether the external pressure is thermal or ram. We apply these results to fragments forming in a shell swept up by an expanding H II region, and find that, unless the swept up gas is quite hot or the surrounding medium has low density, the fragments have low-mass (⪉ 3 M_{_⊙}), and therefore they are unlikely to spawn stars that are sufficiently massive to promote sequential self-propagating star formation.

  7. Vasoinhibins: a family of N-terminal prolactin fragments that inhibit angiogenesis and vascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Carmen; González, Carmen; Macotela, Yazmín; Aranda, Jorge; Rivera, José C; García, Celina; Guzmán, Jessica; Zamorano, Miriam; Vega, Claudia; Martín, Cecilia; Jeziorski, Michael C; de la Escalera, Gonzalo Martínez

    2006-01-01

    Antiangiogenic molecules derived from prolactin (PRL) are not a single entity, but rather a family of peptides with different molecular masses, all containing the N-terminal region of PRL. Cleavage of PRL by cathepsin-D or by matrix metalloproteases generates N-terminal fragments that act on endothelial cells to suppress vasodilation and angiogenesis and promote vascular regression. N-terminal PRL fragments have been identified in cartilage and retina, where angiogenesis is highly restricted. In vivo experiments demonstrate that these PRL fragments exert a tonic and essential suppression of retinal blood vessel growth and dilation. Similar PRL fragments have been detected in the pituitary gland, a highly vascularized organ where the control of vascular growth may differ from that in tissues where angiogenesis is highly restricted. We have previously proposed the name vasoinhibins to describe the collection of N-terminal PRL fragments having blood vessel-blocking activity, and here we discuss their promise as factors to control vascular function in health and disease.

  8. Selective binding of anti-DNA antibodies to native dsDNA fragments of differing sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uccellini, Melissa B; Busto, Patricia; Debatis, Michelle; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann; Viglianti, Gregory A

    2012-03-30

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are characterized by the development of autoantibodies directed against a limited subset of nuclear antigens, including DNA. DNA-specific B cells take up mammalian DNA through their B cell receptor, and this DNA is subsequently transported to an endosomal compartment where it can potentially engage TLR9. We have previously shown that ssDNA-specific B cells preferentially bind to particular DNA sequences, and antibody specificity for short synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs). Since CpG-rich DNA, the ligand for TLR9 is found in low abundance in mammalian DNA, we sought to determine whether antibodies derived from DNA-reactive B cells showed binding preference for CpG-rich native dsDNA, and thereby select immunostimulatory DNA for delivery to TLR9. We examined a panel of anti-DNA antibodies for binding to CpG-rich and CpG-poor DNA fragments. We show that a number of anti-DNA antibodies do show preference for binding to certain native dsDNA fragments of differing sequence, but this does not correlate directly with the presence of CpG dinucleotides. An antibody with preference for binding to a fragment containing optimal CpG motifs was able to promote B cell proliferation to this fragment at 10-fold lower antibody concentrations than an antibody that did not selectively bind to this fragment, indicating that antibody binding preference can influence autoreactive B cell responses.

  9. 213 nm Ultraviolet Photodissociation on Peptide Anions: Radical-Directed Fragmentation Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Mohammad A.; Girod, Marion; MacAleese, Luke; Lemoine, Jérôme; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Characterization of acidic peptides and proteins is greatly hindered due to lack of suitable analytical techniques. Here we present the implementation of 213 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) in high-resolution quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer in negative polarity for peptide anions. Radical-driven backbone fragmentation provides 22 distinctive fragment ion types, achieving the complete sequence coverage for all reported peptides. Hydrogen-deficient radical anion not only promotes the cleavage of Cα-C bond but also stimulates the breaking of N-Cα and C-N bonds. Radical-directed loss of small molecules and specific side chain of amino acids are detected in these experiments. Radical containing side chain of amino acids (Tyr, Ser, Thr, and Asp) may possibly support the N-Cα backbone fragmentation. Proline comprising peptides exhibit the unusual fragment ions similar to reported earlier. Interestingly, basic amino acids such as Arg and Lys also stimulated the formation of abundant b and y ions of the related peptide anions. Loss of hydrogen atom from the charge-reduced radical anion and fragment ions are rationalized by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculation, locating the potential energy surface (PES) of ππ* and repulsive πσ* excited states of a model amide system.

  10. Ecologically scaled responses of forest-dwelling vertebrates to habitat fragmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Ascensão, Fernando Jorge Portela Martins, 1976-

    2013-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Biologia (Biologia da Conservação), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2013 Road habitat fragmentation has been identified as a major threat for biodiversity conservation. Roads induce a ‘barrier effect’ by representing a physical obstacle or promoting animal-vehicle collisions, disrupting daily and seasonal movements and consequently leading to the depletion and genetic subdivision of animal populations. However, road verges may also provide resources for...

  11. Assessment of missile hazards: identification of reference fragmentation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubinelli, Gianfilippo; Cozzani, Valerio

    2009-04-30

    Industrial accidents involving fragment projection were investigated. The analysis of fracture mechanics fundamentals allowed the exploration of the relations between the fracture characteristics and the final event leading to equipment collapse. Reference fragmentation patterns were defined on the basis of the geometrical characteristics of the categories of process vessels that are more frequently involved in fragmentation accidents. Primary scenarios leading to fragment projection were correlated to specific fragmentation patterns. A database reporting a detailed analysis of more than 140 vessel fragmentation events provided the data needed to support and validate the approach. The available data also allowed the calculation of the expected probability of fragment projection following vessel fragmentation, and the probability of the alternative fragmentation patterns with respect to the different accidental scenarios, based on the observed frequencies over the available data set.

  12. PREFIX-BASED LABELING ANNOTATION FOR EFFECTIVE XML FRAGMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Leong Koong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available XML is gradually employed as a standard of data exchange in web environment since its inception in the 90s until present. It serves as a data exchange between systems and other applications. Meanwhile the data volume has grown substantially in the web and thus effective methods of storing and retrieving these data is essential. One recommended way is physically or virtually fragments the large chunk of data and distributes the fragments into different nodes. Fragmentation design of XML document contains of two parts: fragmentation operation and fragmentation method. The three fragmentation operations are Horizontal, Vertical and Hybrid. It determines how the XML should be fragmented. This paper aims to give an overview on the fragmentation design consideration and subsequently, propose a fragmentation technique using number addressing.

  13. HIERARCHICAL FRAGMENTATION OF THE ORION MOLECULAR FILAMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Satoko; Ho, Paul T. P.; Su, Yu-Nung [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Teixeira, Paula S. [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Universitaet Wien, Tuerkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180, Wien (Austria); Zapata, Luis A., E-mail: satoko_t@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Morelia, Michoacan 58090 (Mexico)

    2013-01-20

    We present a high angular resolution map of the 850 {mu}m continuum emission of the Orion Molecular Cloud-3 (OMC 3) obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA); the map is a mosaic of 85 pointings covering an approximate area of 6.'5 Multiplication-Sign 2.'0 (0.88 Multiplication-Sign 0.27 pc). We detect 12 spatially resolved continuum sources, each with an H{sub 2} mass between 0.3-5.7 M {sub Sun} and a projected source size between 1400-8200 AU. All the detected sources are on the filamentary main ridge (n{sub H{sub 2}}{>=}10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}), and analysis based on the Jeans theorem suggests that they are most likely gravitationally unstable. Comparison of multi-wavelength data sets indicates that of the continuum sources, 6/12 (50%) are associated with molecular outflows, 8/12 (67%) are associated with infrared sources, and 3/12 (25%) are associated with ionized jets. The evolutionary status of these sources ranges from prestellar cores to protostar phase, confirming that OMC-3 is an active region with ongoing embedded star formation. We detect quasi-periodical separations between the OMC-3 sources of Almost-Equal-To 17''/0.035 pc. This spatial distribution is part of a large hierarchical structure that also includes fragmentation scales of giant molecular cloud ( Almost-Equal-To 35 pc), large-scale clumps ( Almost-Equal-To 1.3 pc), and small-scale clumps ( Almost-Equal-To 0.3 pc), suggesting that hierarchical fragmentation operates within the Orion A molecular cloud. The fragmentation spacings are roughly consistent with the thermal fragmentation length in large-scale clumps, while for small-scale cores it is smaller than the local fragmentation length. These smaller spacings observed with the SMA can be explained by either a helical magnetic field, cloud rotation, or/and global filament collapse. Finally, possible evidence for sequential fragmentation is suggested in the northern part of the OMC-3 filament.

  14. The Fission-fragment Spectrometer VERDI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frégeau, M. O.; Oberstedt, S.

    VERDI (VElocity foR Direct particle Identification) is a fission-fragment spectrometer presently under construction at the Joint Research Centre IRMM. It will allow measuring the kinetic energy and the velocity of both fission fragments simultaneously. The velocity information provide information about the pre-neutron mass of each fission fragment when isotropic prompt-neutron emission from the fragments is assumed. The kinetic energy, in complement of the velocity, will provide us with the post-neutron mass. From the difference between pre- and post-neutron masses the number of neutrons emitted by each fragment may be deter- mined. Knowledge of this quantity as a function of the total kinetic energy will contribute to the understanding of how the available excitation energy is shared between both fission fragments at scission. The contemplated pre-neutron mass resolving power, A/ΔA, of at least 126 requires a time-of-flight (TOF) resolution better than 200 ps (FWHM) and an energy resolution, ΔE/E of 0.3% for a post-neutron mass. The VERDI spectrometer provides the best compromise between geometrical efficiency and time of flight. It consists of an electron detector located very close to the fissionable target and a double array of silicon detectors located 50 cm away on both sides of the target. Each silicon detector has an area of 450 mm2 and is made from neutron transmutation-doped (NTD) silicon to reduce rise-time variation, to minimize pulse height defect and to reduce the plasma delay time. The intrinsic timing resolution of the electron detector was determined, using a 241Am alpha source (Eα = 5.49 MeV), against a previously characterized single-crystal diamond to σ = 140 ps. The timing resolution of the NTD silicon detectors was determined using the spontaneous fission of 252Cf in conjunction with Monte-Carlo simulations to σNTD = 150 ps. With the present timing resolution, σTOF VERDI is already close to the set goals. The excellent timing properties

  15. Isolation of a pollen-specific promoter in tritordeum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tu Zhiming; Zhang Jiangzhou; Chen Lin; Chuan Qin; Yang Guangxiao; He Guangyuan

    2011-01-01

    The promoter is a cis-acting element in regulating gene expression. A promoterless plasmid containing UidA gene was transformed into tritordeum by barmbadment. Histochemical analysis of various tissues in transgenic tritordeum was carried to examine tissue-specific expression of GUS(beta-glucuronidase) activity. The pollen-specific promoter was trapped and identified successfully in a transformant line. PCR(polymerase chain reaction) method was used to isolate this pollen-specific promoter. By sequencing and analyzing the amplified fragment from PCR, a part of UidA gene and a flanking sequence were obtained. Some essential elements of plant promoters were found in the sequence. To determine the function of it, the cloned fragment was fused with UidA gene, then cloned and transformed into Triticum durum. The transgenic plant transformed by this vector showed GUS expression only in pollen. Therefore a pollen-specific promoter was isolated successfully.

  16. Fragmentation of massive dense cores down to ≲ 1000 AU: Relation between fragmentation and density structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, Aina; Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciències de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB-Facultat de Ciències, Torre C5-parell 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain); Estalella, Robert [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia (IEEC-UB), Institut de Ciències del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fuente, Asunción [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, P.O. Box 112, E-28803 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Fontani, Francesco; Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, INAF, Lago E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Commerçon, Benoit; Hennebelle, Patrick [Laboratoire de Radioastronomie, UMR CNRS 8112, École Normale Supérieure et Observatoire de Paris, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Busquet, Gemma [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Area di Recerca di Tor Vergata, Via Fosso Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Bontemps, Sylvain [Université de Bordeaux, LAB, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France); Zapata, Luis A. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, P.O. Box 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Zhang, Qizhou [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Di Francesco, James, E-mail: palau@ieec.uab.es [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 355, STN CSC, Victoria, BC, V8W 3P6 (Canada)

    2014-04-10

    In order to shed light on the main physical processes controlling fragmentation of massive dense cores, we present a uniform study of the density structure of 19 massive dense cores, selected to be at similar evolutionary stages, for which their relative fragmentation level was assessed in a previous work. We inferred the density structure of the 19 cores through a simultaneous fit of the radial intensity profiles at 450 and 850 μm (or 1.2 mm in two cases) and the spectral energy distribution, assuming spherical symmetry and that the density and temperature of the cores decrease with radius following power-laws. Even though the estimated fragmentation level is strictly speaking a lower limit, its relative value is significant and several trends could be explored with our data. We find a weak (inverse) trend of fragmentation level and density power-law index, with steeper density profiles tending to show lower fragmentation, and vice versa. In addition, we find a trend of fragmentation increasing with density within a given radius, which arises from a combination of flat density profile and high central density and is consistent with Jeans fragmentation. We considered the effects of rotational-to-gravitational energy ratio, non-thermal velocity dispersion, and turbulence mode on the density structure of the cores, and found that compressive turbulence seems to yield higher central densities. Finally, a possible explanation for the origin of cores with concentrated density profiles, which are the cores showing no fragmentation, could be related with a strong magnetic field, consistent with the outcome of radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

  17. Assessment of Fragmentation Performance of Blast-enhanced Explosive Fragmentation Munitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    aluminized blast-enhanced PAX-Al composition. The experimental assessment of the fragmentation performance of tested charges was accomplished using...charges, rapid expansion of high pressure detonation products results in high-strain high-strain-rate dilation of the hardened steel shell, which...eventually ruptures generating a “spray” of high-velocity steel fragments. Defining the longitudinal axis of the munition as the polar axis z, the

  18. Fragmentation of massive dense cores down to ~1000 AU: Relation between fragmentation and density structure

    CERN Document Server

    Palau, Aina; Girart, J M; Fuente, A; Fontani, F; Commercon, B; Busquet, G; Bontemps, S; Sanchez-Monge, A; Zapata, L A; Zhang, Q; Hennebelle, P; Di Francesco, J

    2014-01-01

    In order to shed light on the main physical processes controlling fragmentation of massive dense cores, we present a uniform study of the density structure of 19 massive dense cores, selected to be at similar evolutionary stages, for which their relative fragmentation level was assessed in a previous work. We inferred the density structure of the 19 cores through a simultaneous fit of the radial intensity profiles at 450 and 850 micron (or 1.2 mm in two cases) and the Spectral Energy Distribution, assuming spherical symmetry and that the density and temperature of the cores decrease with radius following power-laws. We find a weak (inverse) trend of fragmentation level and density power-law index, with steeper density profiles tending to show lower fragmentation, and vice versa. In addition, we find a trend of fragmentation increasing with density within a given radius, which arises from a combination of flat density profile and high central density and is consistent with Jeans fragmentation. We considered th...

  19. The Coincident Fission Fragment Detector (CFFD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakhle, A.; Hammerton, K.; Kohley, Z.; Yurkon, J.; Stiefel, K.

    2017-08-01

    A Parallel Plate Avalanche Counter (PPAC) based fission detector system, called the Coincident Fission Fragment Detector (CFFD), has been developed for the ReA3 re-accelerator facility of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). Binary reaction kinematics are reconstructed based on position and time-of-flight measurements of fission fragments. Large area PPACs provide 1 ns level time resolution and mm level position resolution. The detectors allow measurements of fission product angular and mass distributions of heavy-ion induced fusion reactions. The 30 cm by 40 cm active area of each PPAC provides large solid angle coverage well suited for measurements of low intensity rare-isotope beams (RIBs).

  20. Detecting Cortex Fragments During Bacterial Spore Germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Michael B; Sorg, Joseph A

    2016-06-25

    The process of endospore germination in Clostridium difficile, and other Clostridia, increasingly is being found to differ from the model spore-forming bacterium, Bacillus subtilis. Germination is triggered by small molecule germinants and occurs without the need for macromolecular synthesis. Though differences exist between the mechanisms of spore germination in species of Bacillus and Clostridium, a common requirement is the hydrolysis of the peptidoglycan-like cortex which allows the spore core to swell and rehydrate. After rehydration, metabolism can begin and this, eventually, leads to outgrowth of a vegetative cell. The detection of hydrolyzed cortex fragments during spore germination can be difficult and the modifications to the previously described assays can be confusing or difficult to reproduce. Thus, based on our recent report using this assay, we detail a step-by-step protocol for the colorimetric detection of cortex fragments during bacterial spore germination.

  1. Fragment formation in biased random walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramola, Kabir

    2008-10-01

    We analyse a biased random walk on a 1D lattice with unequal step lengths. Such a walk was recently shown to undergo a phase transition from a state containing a single connected cluster of visited sites to one with several clusters of visited sites (fragments) separated by unvisited sites at a critical probability pc (Anteneodo and Morgado 2007 Phys. Rev. Lett. 99 180602). The behaviour of ρ(l), the probability of formation of fragments of length l, is analysed. An exact expression for the generating function of ρ(l) at the critical point is derived. We prove that the asymptotic behaviour is of the form \\rho (l) \\simeq 3/[l(\\log \\ l)^2] .

  2. HCH for Checking Containment of XPath Fragment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Hua Feng; Yu-Guo Liao; Yong Zhang

    2007-01-01

    XPath is ubiquitous in XML applications for navigating XML trees and selecting a set of element nodes. In XPath query processing, one of the most important issues is how to efficiently check containment relationship between two XPath expressions. To get out of the intricacy and complexity caused by numerous XPath features, we investigate this issue on a frequently used fragment of XPath expressions that consists of node tests, the child axis (/), the descendant axis (//), branches ([]) and label wildcards (*). Prior work has shown that homomorphism technology can be used for containment checking. However, homomorphism is the sufficient but not necessary condition for containment. For special classes of this fragment, the homomorphism algorithm returns false negatives. To address this problem, this paper proposes two containment techniques, conditioned homomorphism and hidden conditioned homomorphism, and then presents sound algorithms for checking containment. Experimental results confirm the practicability and efficiency of the proposed algorithms.

  3. Fission Fragment characterization with FALSTAFF at NFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pancin J.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Neutrons for Science (NFS facility will be one of the first installations of the SPIRAL2 facility. NFS will be composed of a time-of-flight baseline and irradiation stations and will allow studying neutron-induced reactions for energies going from some hundreds of keV up to 40 MeV. Continuous and quasi-monoenergetic energy neutron beams will be available. Taking advantage of this new installation, the development of an experimental setup for a full characterization of actinide fission fragments in this energy domain has been undertaken. To achieve this goal a new detection system called FALSTAFF (Four Arm cLover for the STudy of Actinide Fission Fragments in under development. In this paper, the characteristics of the NFS facility will be exposed and the motivations for the FALSTAFF experiment will be presented. The experimental setup will be described and the expected resolutions based on realistic GEANT4 simulations will be discussed.

  4. Development of an efficient bi-directional promoter with tripartite enhancer employing three viral promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patro, Sunita; Maiti, Indu B; Dey, Nrisingha

    2013-02-10

    We have developed a novel bi-directional promoter (FsFfCBD) by placing two heterogeneous core-promoters from the Figwort mosaic virus sub-genomic transcript promoter (FsCP, -69 to +31) and Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (CCP, -89 to +1) respectively on upstream (5') and downstream (3') ends of a tri-hybrid enhancer (FsEFfECE), in reverse orientation. The FsEFfECE domain encompasses three heterologous enhancer fragments from Figwort mosaic virus sub-genomic transcript promoter (FsE, 101 bp, -70 to -170), Figwort mosaic virus full-length transcript promoter (FfE, 196 bp, -249 to -54) and Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (CE, 254 bp, -343 to -90). The bi-directional nature of the FsFfCBD promoter (coupled to GFP and GUS) was established both in transient systems (onion epidermal cells and tobacco protoplasts) and transgenic plant (Nicotiana tabacum samsun NN) by monitoring the simultaneous expression of GFP and GUS employing fluorescence (for GFP) and biochemical (for GUS) based assays. In transgenic plants, the FsFfCBD promoter was found to be 6.8 and 2.5 times stronger than two parent promoters; Fs and FfC respectively. The bi-directional compound promoter FsFfCBD, composed of three heterologous enhancers with enhanced activity could become a valuable additional tool for efficient plant metabolic engineering and molecular pharming.

  5. Spin dependence of heavy quark fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornet, Fernando [Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos and Centro Anadaluz de Fisica de Particulas, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)], E-mail: cornet@ugr.es; Garcia Canal, Carlos A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 67, La Plata (1900) (Argentina)

    2008-05-01

    We propose that the non-perturbative part of the fragmentation function describing the transition from a heavy quark to a heavy meson is proportional to the square of the produced meson wave function at the origin, taking into account hyperfine interactions. We analyze the effects of this proposal on the number of pseudoscalar mesons compared to the number of vector mesons produced and find a good agreement with experimental data. Finally, we discuss further experimental checks for our hypothesis.

  6. Size Effects in Heavy Ions Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Barrañon, A; Dorso, C O

    2003-01-01

    Rise-Plateau Caloric curves for different Heavy Ion collisions have been obtained, in the range of experimental observations. Limit temperature decreases when the residual size is increased, in agreement with recent theoretical analysis of experimental results reported by other Collaborations. Besides, promptly emitted particles influence on temperature plateau is shown. LATINO binary interaction semiclassical model is used to reproduce the inter-nucleonic forces via Pandharipande Potential and fragments are detected with an Early Cluster Recognition Algorithm.

  7. A nuclear fragmentation energy deposition model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, D. M.; Wilson, J. W.; Fogarty, T. N.; Buck, W. W.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    A formalism for target fragment transport is presented with application to energy loss spectra in thin silicon devices. A nuclear data base is recommended that agrees well with the measurements of McNulty et al. using surface barrier detectors. High-energy events observed by McNulty et al., which are not predicted by intranuclear cascade models, are well represented by the present work.

  8. New results on jet fragmentation at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jindariani, Sergo; /Florida U.

    2006-12-01

    Presented are the latest results of jet fragmentation studies at the Tevatron using the CDF Run II detector. Studies include the distribution of transverse momenta (Kt) of particles jets, two-particle momentum correlations, and indirectly global event shapes in p{bar p} collisions. Results are discussed within the context of recent Next-to-Leading Log calculations as well as earlier experimental results from the Tevatron and e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders.

  9. Engineered single chain antibody fragments for radioimmunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huhalov, A.; Chester, K. A. [Cancer Research UK Imaging and Targeting Group Royal Free, London (United Kingdom). Department of Oncology; University College Medical School Royal Free Campus, London (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-01

    An ideal molecule to deliver radioimmunotherapy (RIT) would be target specific and have prolonged residence time at high concentrations in the tumour with rapid clearance from normal tissues. It would also be non-immunogenic. These features can be rationally introduced into recombinant antibody-based proteins using antibody engineering techniques. This reviews focuses on the use of antibody engineering in the design and development of RIT molecules which have single chain Fv (scFv) antibody fragments as building blocks.

  10. Dendrite fragmentation by catastrophic elastic remelting

    OpenAIRE

    Ananiev, S.; Nikrityuk, P.; Eckert, K.

    2008-01-01

    The paper proposes a new fragmentation mechanism of dendrite arms. The theoretical basis of this mechanism is a shift in the thermodynamical equilibrium at the solid-liquid interface due to the presence of elastic energy. This effect is modelled by the generalized Gibbs-Thomson condition [1], where each term is calculated analytically using a simple Bernoulli-Euler beam model. The resulting nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations is integrated in time using a fully implicit scheme...

  11. Time invariant scaling in discrete fragmentation models

    CERN Document Server

    Giraud, B G; Giraud, B G; Peschanski, R

    1994-01-01

    Linear rate equations are used to describe the cascading decay of an initial heavy cluster into fragments. We consider moments of arbitrary orders of the mass multiplicity spectrum and derive scaling properties pertaining to their time evolution. We suggest that the mass weighted multiplicity is a suitable observable for the discovery of scaling. Numerical tests validate such properties, even for moderate values of the initial mass (nuclei, percolation clusters, jets of particles etc.). Finite size effects can be simply parametrized.

  12. Inhomogeneous Fragmentation of the Rolling Tachyon

    OpenAIRE

    Felder, Gary N; Kofman, Lev

    2004-01-01

    Dirac-Born-Infeld type effective actions reproduce many aspects of string theory classical tachyon dynamics of unstable Dp-branes. The inhomogeneous tachyon field rolling from the top of its potential forms topological defects of lower codimensions. In between them, as we show, the tachyon energy density fragments into a p-dimensional web-like high density network evolving with time. We present an analytic asymptotic series solution of the non-linear equations for the inhomogeneous tachyon an...

  13. Fragmentation and the Nuclear Equation of State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Wolfgang [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-2320 (United States)]. E-mail: bauer@pa.msu.edu

    2007-05-01

    Progress on the determination of the order of the fragmentation phase transition, the location of its critical point in the nuclear matter phase diagram, the values of the critical exponents that determine the universality class of the transition, and finite size scaling effects is discussed. Evidence for the presence of Zipf-Mandelbrot-scaling in the relative size of the largest clusters is examined, and the connection to the value of the critical exponent {tau} is established.

  14. N/Z Dependence of Projectile Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Trautmann, W; Aumann, T; Bacri, C O; Barczyk, T; Bassini, R; Bianchin, S; Boiano, C; Botvina, A S; Boudard, A; Brzychczyk, J; Chbihi, A; Cibor, J; Czech, B; De Napoli, M; Ducret, J -E; Emling, H; Frankland, J D; Hellström, M; Henzlova, D; Imme, G; Iori, I; Johansson, H; Kezzar, K; Lafriakh, A; Le Fèvre, A; Gentil, E Le; Leifels, Y; Lühning, J; Lukasik, J; Lynch, W G; Lynen, U; Majka, Z; Mocko, M; Müller, W F J; Mykulyak, A; Orth, H; Otte, A N; Palit, R; Pawlowski, P; Pullia, A; Raciti, G; Rapisarda, E; Sann, H; Schwarz, C; Sfienti, C; Simon, H; Sümmerer, K; Tsang, M B; Verde, G; Volant, C; Wallace, M; Weick, H; Wiechula, J; Wieloch, A; Zwieglinski, B

    2007-01-01

    The N/Z dependence of projectile fragmentation at relativistic energies has been studied in a recent experiment at the GSI laboratory with the ALADiN forward spectrometer coupled to the LAND neutron detector. Besides a primary beam of 124Sn, also secondary beams of 124La and 107Sn delivered by the FRS fragment separator have been used in order to extend the range of isotopic compositions of the produced spectator sources. With the achieved mass resolution of \\Delta A/A \\approx 1.5%, lighter isotopes with atomic numbers Z \\le 10 are individually resolved. The presently ongoing analyses of the measured isotope yields focus on isoscaling and its relation to the properties of hot fragments at freeze-out and on the derivation of chemical freeze-out temperatures which are found to be independent of the isotopic composition of the studied systems. The latter result is at variance with the predictions for limiting temperatures as obtained with finite-temperature Hartree-Fock calculations.

  15. Cationized Carbohydrate Gas-Phase Fragmentation Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bythell, Benjamin J.; Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Wagoner, Ashley R.; Guan, Shanshan; Rabus, Jordan M.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the fragmentation chemistry of cationized carbohydrates using a combination of tandem mass spectrometry, regioselective labeling, and computational methods. Our model system is D-lactose. Barriers to the fundamental glyosidic bond cleavage reactions, neutral loss pathways, and structurally informative cross-ring cleavages are investigated. The most energetically favorable conformations of cationized D-lactose were found to be similar. In agreement with the literature, larger group I cations result in structures with increased cation coordination number which require greater collision energy to dissociate. In contrast with earlier proposals, the B n -Y m fragmentation pathways of both protonated and sodium-cationized analytes proceed via protonation of the glycosidic oxygen with concerted glycosidic bond cleavage. Additionally, for the sodiated congeners our calculations support sodiated 1,6-anhydrogalactose B n ion structures, unlike the preceding literature. This affects the subsequent propensity of formation and prediction of B n /Y m branching ratio. The nature of the anomeric center (α/β) affects the relative energies of these processes, but not the overall ranking. Low-energy cross-ring cleavages are observed for the metal-cationized analytes with a retro-aldol mechanism producing the 0,2 A 2 ion from the sodiated forms. Theory and experiment support the importance of consecutive fragmentation processes, particularly for the protonated congeners at higher collision energies.

  16. Cationized Carbohydrate Gas-Phase Fragmentation Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bythell, Benjamin J.; Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Wagoner, Ashley R.; Guan, Shanshan; Rabus, Jordan M.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the fragmentation chemistry of cationized carbohydrates using a combination of tandem mass spectrometry, regioselective labeling, and computational methods. Our model system is D-lactose. Barriers to the fundamental glyosidic bond cleavage reactions, neutral loss pathways, and structurally informative cross-ring cleavages are investigated. The most energetically favorable conformations of cationized D-lactose were found to be similar. In agreement with the literature, larger group I cations result in structures with increased cation coordination number which require greater collision energy to dissociate. In contrast with earlier proposals, the B n -Y m fragmentation pathways of both protonated and sodium-cationized analytes proceed via protonation of the glycosidic oxygen with concerted glycosidic bond cleavage. Additionally, for the sodiated congeners our calculations support sodiated 1,6-anhydrogalactose B n ion structures, unlike the preceding literature. This affects the subsequent propensity of formation and prediction of B n /Y m branching ratio. The nature of the anomeric center (α/β) affects the relative energies of these processes, but not the overall ranking. Low-energy cross-ring cleavages are observed for the metal-cationized analytes with a retro-aldol mechanism producing the 0,2 A 2 ion from the sodiated forms . Theory and experiment support the importance of consecutive fragmentation processes, particularly for the protonated congeners at higher collision energies.

  17. Electroproduction in the Target Fragmentation Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avagyan, Harut

    2014-09-01

    The Semi-Inclusive DIS process in the Target Fragmentation Region (TFR), when the hadron is produced in the fragmentation process of the target remnants, can be described through the so-called Fracture Functions (FFs). They represent the joint probability of producing the final hadron from the target remnants, when a parton of the target nucleon is struck by the virtual photon in a hard scattering process. Like the ordinary parton distribution functions, the FFs are universal objects, thus they can be measured in one experiment at a given hard scale and then used to make predictions for other experiments, at another hard scale. Measurements of the Lambda multiplicities and polarization asymmetries in TFR, in particular, will provide information on corresponding Fracture Functions. The study of its Q2 dependence at JLab and EIC also will test the perturbative framework implied by Fracture Functions, simultaneously encoding the information on the interacting parton and on the fragmentation of the spectator system. We will present ongoing studies of electroproduction in TFR at Jefferson Lab, and proposed future measurement at upgraded JLab and Electron Ion Collider.

  18. Antibody Fragments as Probe in Biosensor Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Muyldermans

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Today’s proteomic analyses are generating increasing numbers of biomarkers, making it essential to possess highly specific probes able to recognize those targets. Antibodies are considered to be the first choice as molecular recognition units due to their target specificity and affinity, which make them excellent probes in biosensor development. However several problems such as difficult directional immobilization, unstable behavior, loss of specificity and steric hindrance, may arise from using these large molecules. Luckily, protein engineering techniques offer designed antibody formats suitable for biomarker analysis. Minimization strategies of antibodies into Fab fragments, scFv or even single-domain antibody fragments like VH, VL or VHHs are reviewed. Not only the size of the probe but also other issues like choice of immobilization tag, type of solid support and probe stability are of critical importance in assay development for biosensing. In this respect, multiple approaches to specifically orient and couple antibody fragments in a generic one-step procedure directly on a biosensor substrate are discussed.

  19. Transcription activation by the bacteriophage Mu Mor protein: analysis of promoter mutations in Pm identifies a new region required for promoter function.

    OpenAIRE

    Artsimovitch, I; Howe, M M

    1996-01-01

    Middle transcription of bacteriophage Mu requires Escherichia coli RNA polymerase holoenzyme and a Mu-encoded protein, Mor. Consistent with these requirements, the middle promoter, Pm, has a recognizable -10 region but lacks a -35 region. Mutagenesis of this promoter (from -70 to +10) was performed using mutagenic oligonucleotide-directed PCR. The resulting fragments were cloned into a promoter-lacZfusion vector and analyzed for promoter activity by assaying beta-galactosidase production. Sin...

  20. Detection of fission fragments by secondary emission; Detection des fragments de fission par emission secondaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audias, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    This fission fragment detecting apparatus is based on the principle that fragments traversing a thin foil will cause emission of secondary electrons. These electrons are then accelerated (10 kV) and directly detected by means of a plastic scintillator and associated photomultiplier. Some of the advantages of such a detector are, its rapidity, its discriminating power between alpha particles and fission fragments, its small energy loss in detecting the fragments and the relatively great amount of fissionable material which it can contain. This paper is subdivided as follows: a) theoretical considerations b) constructional details of apparatus and some experimental details and c) a study of the secondary emission effect itself. (author) [French] Le detecteur de fragments de fission que nous avons realise est base sur le principe de l'emission secondaire produite par les fragments de fission traversant une feuille mince: les electrons secondaires emis sont acceleres a des tensions telles (de l'ordre de 10 kV), qu'ils soient directement detectables par un scintillateur plastique associe a un photomultiplicateur. L'interet d'un tel detecteur reside: dans sa rapidite, sa tres bonne discrimination alpha, fission, la possibilite de detecter les fragments de fission avec une perte d'energie pouvant rester relativement faible, et la possibilite d'introduire des quantites de matiere fissile plus importantes que dans les autres types de detecteurs. Ce travail comporte: -) un apercu bibliographique de la theorie du phenomene, -) realisation et mise au point du detecteur avec etude experimentale de quelques parametres intervenant dans l'emission secondaire, -) etude de l'emission secondaire (sur la face d'emergence des fragments de fission) en fonction de l'energie du fragment et en fonction de l'epaisseur de matiere traversee avant emission secondaire, et -) une etude comparative de l'emission secondaire sur la

  1. Fish responses to experimental fragmentation of seagrass habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macreadie, Peter I; Hindell, Jeremy S; Jenkins, Gregory P; Connolly, Rod M; Keough, Michael J

    2009-06-01

    Understanding the consequences of habitat fragmentation has come mostly from comparisons of patchy and continuous habitats. Because fragmentation is a process, it is most accurately studied by actively fragmenting large patches into multiple smaller patches. We fragmented artificial seagrass habitats and evaluated the impacts of fragmentation on fish abundance and species richness over time (1 day, 1 week, 1 month). Fish assemblages were compared among 4 treatments: control (single, continuous 9-m(2) patches); fragmented (single, continuous 9-m(2) patches fragmented to 4 discrete 1-m(2) patches); prefragmented/patchy (4 discrete 1-m(2) patches with the same arrangement as fragmented); and disturbance control (fragmented then immediately restored to continuous 9-m(2) patches). Patchy seagrass had lower species richness than actively fragmented seagrass (up to 39% fewer species after 1 week), but species richness in fragmented treatments was similar to controls. Total fish abundance did not vary among treatments and therefore was unaffected by fragmentation, patchiness, or disturbance caused during fragmentation. Patterns in species richness and abundance were consistent 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month after fragmentation. The expected decrease in fish abundance from reduced total seagrass area in fragmented and patchy seagrass appeared to be offset by greater fish density per unit area of seagrass. If fish prefer to live at edges, then the effects of seagrass habitat loss on fish abundance may have been offset by the increase (25%) in seagrass perimeter in fragmented and patchy treatments. Possibly there is some threshold of seagrass patch connectivity below which fish abundances cannot be maintained. The immediate responses of fish to experimental habitat fragmentation provided insights beyond those possible from comparisons of continuous and historically patchy habitat. ©2009 Society for Conservation Biology.

  2. Analysis of the Cotton E6 Promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Aimin; LIU Jinyuan

    2005-01-01

    An E6 gene from sea island cotton (Gossypium barbadense) was expressed specifically in cotton fiber cells to transfer functions to cultivated species for better transgenic engineering. The regulatory activity of the E6 promoter region was then studied by isolating a 614-bp fragment of the 5'-flanking region from upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum CRI-12) to produce a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter construct for analysis of tissue-specific expression in transgenic tobacco seedlings. Fluorescent analyses indicate that the relatively short E6 promoter is sufficient to direct green fluorescent protein expression specifically in the leaf trichomes (hair cells) of the transgenic tobacco plants. As cotton fibers are also unicellular trichomes that differentiate from epidermal cells of developing cotton ovules, the result suggests that the relatively short E6 promoter can serve as a fiber-specific expression promoter for genetic engineering to improve cotton fiber quality.

  3. Magnetic processes in a collapsing dense core. II. Fragmentation. Is there a fragmentation crisis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebelle, P.; Teyssier, R.

    2008-01-01

    Context: A large fraction of stars are found in binary systems. It is therefore important for our understanding of the star formation process, to investigate the fragmentation of dense molecular cores. Aims: We study the influence of the magnetic field, ideally coupled to the gas, on the fragmentation in multiple systems of collapsing cores. Methods: We present high resolution numerical simulations performed with the RAMSES MHD code starting with a uniform sphere in solid body rotation and a uniform magnetic field parallel to the rotation axis. We pay particular attention to the strength of the magnetic field and interpret the results using the analysis presented in a companion paper. Results: The results depend much on the amplitude, A, of the perturbations seeded initially. For a low amplitude, A=0.1, we find that for values of the mass-to-flux over critical mass-to-flux ratio, μ, as high as μ = 20, the centrifugally supported disk which fragments in the hydrodynamical case is stabilized and remains axisymmetric. Detailed investigations reveal that this is due to the rapid growth of the toroidal magnetic field induced by the differential motions within the disk. For values of μ smaller than ≃5, corresponding to higher magnetic intensities, there is no centrifugally supported disk because of magnetic braking. When the amplitude of the perturbation is equal to A=0.5, each initial peak develops independently and the core fragments for a large range of μ. Only for values of μ close to 1 is the magnetic field able to prevent the fragmentation. Conclusions: Since a large fraction of stars are binaries, the results of low magnetic intensities preventing the fragmentation in the case of weak perturbations is problematic. We discuss three possible mechanisms which could lead to the formation of binary systems, namely the presence of high amplitude fluctuations in the core initially, ambipolar diffusion and fragmentation during the second collapse.

  4. [The fragmentation of representational space in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plagnol, A; Oïta, M; Montreuil, M; Granger, B; Lubart, T

    2003-01-01

    Existent neurocognitive models of schizophrenia converge towards a core of impairments involving working memory, context processing, action planning, controlled and intentional processing. However, the emergence of this core remains itself difficult to explain and more specific hypotheses do not explain the heterogeneity of schizophrenia. To overcome these limits, we propose a new paradigm based on representational theory from cognitive science. Some recent developments of this theory enable us to describe a subjective universe as a representational space which is displayed from memory. We outline a conceptual framework to construct such a representational space from analogical -representations that can be activated in working memory and are connected to a network of symbolic structures. These connections are notably made through an analytic process of the analogical fragments, which involves the attentional focus. This framework allows us to define rigorously some defense processes in response to traumatic tensions that are expressed on the representational space. The fragmentation of representational space is a consequence of a defensive denial based on an impairment of the analytic process. The fragmentation forms some parasitic areas in memory which are excluded from the main part of the representational space and disturb information processing. The key clinical concepts of paranoid syndromes can be defined in this conceptual framework: mental automatism, delusional intuition, acute destructuration, psychotic dissociation, and autistic withdrawal. We show that these syndromes imply each other, which in return increases the fragmentation of the representational space. Some new concepts emerge naturally in this framework, such as the concept of "suture" which is defined as a link between a parasitic area and the main representational space. Schizophrenia appears as a borderline case of fragmentation of the representational space. This conceptual framework is

  5. Fragmentation Point Detection of JPEG Images at DHT Using Validator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Kamaruddin Malik; Deris, Mustafa Mat

    File carving is an important, practical technique for data recovery in digital forensics investigation and is particularly useful when filesystem metadata is unavailable or damaged. The research on reassembly of JPEG files with RST markers, fragmented within the scan area have been done before. However, fragmentation within Define Huffman Table (DHT) segment is yet to be resolved. This paper analyzes the fragmentation within the DHT area and list out all the fragmentation possibilities. Two main contributions are made in this paper. Firstly, three fragmentation points within DHT area are listed. Secondly, few novel validators are proposed to detect these fragmentations. The result obtained from tests done on manually fragmented JPEG files, showed that all three fragmentation points within DHT are successfully detected using validators.

  6. Colorado Plateau Rapid Ecoregion Assessment Indicators: Natural Vegetation Fragmentation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Land Management, Department of the Interior — This dataset presents measures of landscape fragmentation calculated by FRAGSTATS at 4KM and HUC5 reporting unit levels. Fragmentation integrates the influence of...

  7. Specification and development of choreography fragments for a choreography designer

    OpenAIRE

    Schilling, Joas

    2014-01-01

    This thesis specifies choreography fragments. Also the process of extracting them from an existing choreography as well as importing them into another choreography is defined. Then these choreography fragments are implemented for a choreography designer, that was written by Oliver Sonnauer. The implementation also connects the choreography designer with a repository for fragments called Fragmento, which can be used to version, share and reuse fragments easily.

  8. Cross sections and kinematics of proton induced fragmentation of carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streibel, T.; Roecher, H.; Huentrup, G.; Heinrich, W. [Siegen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Physics

    1997-09-01

    Charge changing fragmentation cross sections for C at a proton energy of about 70 MeV were measured. The discrepancies between measurement and model predictions indicate the necessity of further investigations. We have also measured distributions of fragment emission angles which can be described using a model with a momentum transfer to the fragmenting nucleus. The developed model leads to predictions for momentum distributions of proton induced target fragments of C at small energies. (orig.)

  9. Energetic Light Fragment Production Capability in MCNP6

    CERN Document Server

    Kerby, Leslie M; Gudima, Konstantin K; Sierk, Arnold J; Bull, Jeffrey S; James, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research is to enable MCNP6 to produce high-energy light fragments. These energetic light fragments may be emitted by our models through three processes: Fermi breakup, preequilibrium, and coalescence. We explore the emission of light fragments through each of these mechanisms and demonstrate an improved agreement with experimental data achieved by extending precompound models to include emission of fragments heavier than $^4$He.

  10. Fragmentation of relativistic oxygen nuclei in interactions with a proton

    CERN Document Server

    Glagolev, V V; Lipin, V D; Lutpullaev, S L; Olimov, K K; Yuldashev, A A; Yuldashev, B S; Olimov, Kh.K.

    2001-01-01

    The data on investigation of inelastic interactions of 16O nuclei with a proton at 3.25 A GeV/c momentum by the bubble chamber method are presented. The separate characteristics as fragments isotopic composition and as topo-logical cross sections of fragmentation channels are given. The processes of light fragments formation and breakup of 16O nucleus on multicharge fragments have been investigated. The comparison of experimental data with the calculations by statistical multifragmentation model was conducted.

  11. The relationship between sperm viability and DNA fragmentation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samplaski, Mary K; Dimitromanolakis, Apostolos; Lo, Kirk C; Grober, Ethan D; Mullen, Brendan; Garbens, Alaina; Jarvi, Keith A

    2015-05-14

    In humans, sperm DNA fragmentation rates have been correlated with sperm viability rates. Reduced sperm viability is associated with high sperm DNA fragmentation, while conversely high sperm viability is associated with low rates of sperm DNA fragmentation. Both elevated DNA fragmentation rates and poor viability are correlated with impaired male fertility, with a DNA fragmentation rate of >30% indicating subfertility. We postulated that in some men, the sperm viability assay could predict the sperm DNA fragmentation rates. This in turn could reduce the need for sperm DNA fragmentation assay testing, simplifying the infertility investigation and saving money for infertile couples. All men having semen analyses with both viability and DNA fragmentation testing were identified via a prospectively collected database. Viability was measured by eosin-nigrosin assay. DNA fragmentation was measured using the sperm chromosome structure assay. The relationship between DNA fragmentation and viability was assessed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. From 2008-2013, 3049 semen analyses had both viability and DNA fragmentation testing. A strong inverse relationship was seen between sperm viability and DNA fragmentation rates, with r=-0.83. If viability was ≤50% (n=301) then DNA fragmentation was ≥ 30% for 95% of the samples. If viability was ≥75% (n=1736), then the DNA fragmentation was ≤30% for 95% of the patients. Sperm viability correlates strongly with DNA fragmentation rates. In men with high levels of sperm viability≥75%, or low levels of sperm viability≤ 30%, DFI testing may be not be routinely necessary. Given that DNA fragmentation testing is substantially more expensive than vitality testing, this may represent a valuable cost-saving measure for couples undergoing a fertility evaluation.

  12. Global patterns of fragmentation and connectivity of mammalian carnivore habitat

    OpenAIRE

    Crooks, Kevin R.; Burdett, Christopher L.; David M. Theobald; Rondinini, Carlo; Boitani, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Although mammalian carnivores are vulnerable to habitat fragmentation and require landscape connectivity, their global patterns of fragmentation and connectivity have not been examined. We use recently developed high-resolution habitat suitability models to conduct comparative analyses and to identify global hotspots of fragmentation and connectivity for the world's terrestrial carnivores. Species with less fragmentation (i.e. more interior high-quality habitat) had larger geographical ranges...

  13. Active ADP-ribosylation Factor-1 (ARF1) Is Required for Mitotic Golgi Fragmentation*S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yi; Seemann, Joachim; Bisel, Blaine; Punthambaker, Sukanya; Wang, Yanzhuang

    2012-01-01

    In mammalian cells the Golgi apparatus undergoes an extensive disassembly process at the onset of mitosis that is believed to facilitate equal partitioning of this organelle into the two daughter cells. However, the underlying mechanisms for this fragmentation process are so far unclear. Here we have investigated the role of the ADP-ribosylation factor-1 (ARF1) in this process to determine whether Golgi fragmentation in mitosis is mediated by vesicle budding. ARF1 is a small GTPase that is required for COPI vesicle formation from the Golgi membranes. Treatment of Golgi membranes with mitotic cytosol or with purified coatomer together with wild type ARF1 or its constitutive active form, but not the inactive mutant, converted the Golgi membranes into COPI vesicles. ARF1-depleted mitotic cytosol failed to fragment Golgi membranes. ARF1 is associated with Golgi vesicles generated in vitro and with vesicles in mitotic cells. In addition, microinjection of constitutive active ARF1 did not affect mitotic Golgi fragmentation or cell progression through mitosis. Our results show that ARF1 is active during mitosis and that this activity is required for mitotic Golgi fragmentation. PMID:17562717

  14. Cue depreciation: when word fragment completion is undermined by prior exposure to lesser fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peynircioğlu, Z F; Watkins, M J

    1986-07-01

    The ability to think of a previously studied item has often been shown to be impaired when, in one way or another, the extraitem context is changed from study to test. In a series of five experiments, such impairment is induced in a somewhat different way. A fragment (e.g. r-i--rop) of a just-studied word (raindrop) is shown to be less readily completed if it is presented bit by bit (r------p, r----r-p, r-i--r-p, r-i--rop) rather than all at once (Experiments 1, 3, 4, and 5). No such effect is found if the word has not been studied beforehand (Experiments 2, 3, 4, and 5). This pattern of results occurs even when fragments of studied and nonstudied words occur in the same test and under conditions in which subjects cannot tell whether a given fragment is of a studied or nonstudied word (Experiments 4 and 5). In addition, for words that have been studied beforehand, the impairment is shown to increase systematically with the number of steps involved in the presentation of the word fragment (Experiment 3) and also to persist when the time allowed for completion of the final version of the fragment is increased from 4 s to a full minute (Experiment 5).

  15. Lack of Population Genetic Structuring in Ocelots (Leopardus pardalis in a Fragmented Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina G. Figueiredo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Habitat fragmentation can promote patches of small and isolated populations, gene flow disruption between those populations, and reduction of local and total genetic variation. As a consequence, these small populations may go extinct in the long-term. The ocelot (Leopardus pardalis, originally distributed from Texas to southern Brazil and northern Argentina, has been impacted by habitat fragmentation throughout much of its range. To test whether habitat fragmentation has already induced genetic differentiation in an area where this process has been documented for a larger felid (jaguars, we analyzed molecular variation in ocelots inhabiting two Atlantic Forest fragments, Morro do Diabo (MD and Iguaçu Region (IR. Analyses using nine microsatellites revealed mean observed and expected heterozygosity of 0.68 and 0.70, respectively. The MD sampled population showed evidence of a genetic bottleneck under two mutational models (TPM = 0.03711 and SMM = 0.04883. Estimates of genetic structure (FST = 0.027; best fit of k = 1 with STRUCTURE revealed no meaningful differentiation between these populations. Thus, our results indicate that the ocelot populations sampled in these fragments are still not significantly different genetically, a pattern that strongly contrasts with that previously observed in jaguars for the same comparisons. This observation is likely due to a combination of two factors: (i larger effective population size of ocelots (relative to jaguars in each fragment, implying a slower effect of drift-induced differentiation; and (ii potentially some remaining permeability of the anthropogenic matrix for ocelots, as opposed to the observed lack of permeability for jaguars. The persistence of ocelot gene flow between these areas must be prioritized in long-term conservation planning on behalf of these felids.

  16. Sum rules for the T-odd fragmentation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Schäfer, A

    2000-01-01

    The conservation of the intrinsic transverse momentum during parton fragmentation imposes non-trivial constraints on T-odd fragmentation functions. These significantly enhance the differences between the favoured and unfavoured fragmentation functions, which could be relevant to understand the azimuthal asymmetries of charged pion production observed recently by the HERMES collaboration.

  17. ION-IMPACT-INDUCED FRAGMENTATION OF WATER-MOLECULES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WERNER, U; BECKORD, K; BECKER, J; FOLKERTS, HO; LUTZ, HO

    1995-01-01

    The multiple ionization and fragmentation of H2O by fast H+, He+, O6+ and O7+ ions was studied utilizing a position- and time-sensitive multi-particle detector which allows the coincident measurement of the momenta of correlated fragments. Thereby, the fragmentation energy and angular correlations f

  18. Microfluidic DNA fragmentation for on-chip genomic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shui, Lingling; Bomer, Johan G.; Jin, Mingliang; Carlen, Edwin T.; Berg, van den Albert

    2011-01-01

    We report a high-throughput clog-free microfluidic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragmentation chip that is based on hydrodynamic shearing. Salmon sperm DNA has been reproducibly fragmented down to ∼5k bp fragment lengths by applying low hydraulic pressures (≤1 bar) across micromachined constrictions

  19. Scaling properties of crack branching and brittle fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uvarov S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study is focused on the correlation of scaling properties of crack branching and brittle fragmentation with damage accumulation and a change in the fracture mechanism. The experimental results obtained from the glass fragmentation tests indicate that the size distribution of fragments has a fractal character and is described by a power law.

  20. Fragment and particle size distribution of impacted ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Weerheijm, J.; Ditzhuijzen, C.; Tuinman, I.

    2014-01-01

    The fragmentation of ceramic tiles under ballistic impact has been studied. Fragments and aerosol (respirable) particles were collected and analyzed to determine the total surface area generated by fracturing (macro-cracking and comminution) of armor grade ceramics. The larger fragments were collect

  1. Microfluidic DNA fragmentation for on-chip genomic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shui, Lingling; Bomer, Johan G.; Jin, Mingliang; Carlen, Edwin; van den Berg, Albert

    2011-01-01

    We report a high-throughput clog-free microfluidic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragmentation chip that is based on hydrodynamic shearing. Salmon sperm DNA has been reproducibly fragmented down to ∼5k bp fragment lengths by applying low hydraulic pressures (≤1 bar) across micromachined constrictions

  2. High-throughput on-chip DNA fragmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shui, Lingling; Jin, Mingliang; Bomer, Johan G.; Carlen, Edwin; van den Berg, Albert; Abelmann, Leon; Abelmann, L.; Groenland, J.P.J.; van Honschoten, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    free microfluidic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragmentation chip that is based on hydrodynamic shearing. Genomic DNA has been reproducibly fragmented with 2-10 kbp fragment lengths by applying hydraulic pressure ΔP across micromachined constrictions in the microfluidic channels. The utilization of a

  3. Temporal change in fragmentation of continental US forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    James D. Wickham; Kurt H. Riitters; Timothy G. Wade; Collin Homer

    2008-01-01

    Changes in forest ecosystem function and condition arise from changes in forest fragmentation. Previous studies estimated forest fragmentation for the continental United States (US). In this study, new temporal land-cover data from the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) were used to estimate changes in forest fragmentation at multiple scales for the continental US....

  4. Habitat fragmentation in the temperate zone: a perspective for managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Faaborg; Margaret Brittingham; Therese Donovan; John Blake

    1993-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation occurs when a large, fairly continuous tract of vegetation is converted to other vegetation types such that only scattered fragments of the original type remain. Problems associated with habitat fragmentation include overall habitat loss, increase in edge habitat and edge effects (particularly higher parasitism and nest predation rates), and...

  5. Metastable fragmentation of silver bromide clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L' Hermite, J.M.; Rabilloud, F.; Marcou, L.; Labastie, P. [Lab. CAR/IRSAMC, Univ. Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France)

    2001-06-01

    The abundance spectra and the fragmentation channels of silver bromide clusters have been measured and analyzed. The most abundant species are Ag{sub n}Br{sub n} {sub -} {sub 1}{sup +} and Ag {sub n}Br {sub n} {sub +} {sub 1}{sup -} and Ag {sub 14}Br {sub 13}{sup +} is a magic number, revealing their ionic nature. However, some features depart from what is generally observed for alkali-halide ionic clusters. From a certain size, Ag {sub n}Br {sub n} {sub -} {sub 1}{sup +} is no more the main series, and Ag {sub n}Br {sub n} {sub -} {sub 2,} {sub 3}{sup +} series become almost as important. The fast fragmentation induced by a UV laser makes the cations lose more bromine than silver ions and lead to more silver-rich clusters. Negative ions mass spectra contain also species with more silver atoms than required by stoichiometry. We have investigated the metastable fragmentation of the cations using a new experimental method. The large majority of the cations release mainly a neutral Ag {sub 3}Br {sub 3} cluster. These decay channels are in full agreement with our recent ab initio DFT calculations, which show that Ag {sup +}-Ag {sup +} repulsion is reduced due to a globally attractive interaction of their d orbitals. This effect leads to a particularly stable trimer (AgBr) {sub 3} and to quasi-planar cyclic structures of (AgBr) {sub n} clusters up to n = 6. We have shown that these two features may be extended to other silver halides, to silver hydroxides (AgOH) {sub n}, and to cuprous halide compounds. (orig.)

  6. Negative Ion CID Fragmentation of O-linked Oligosaccharide Aldoses—Charge Induced and Charge Remote Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doohan, Roisin A.; Hayes, Catherine A.; Harhen, Brendan; Karlsson, Niclas Göran

    2011-06-01

    Collision induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation was compared between reducing and reduced sulfated, sialylated, and neutral O-linked oligosaccharides. It was found that fragmentation of the [M - H]- ions of aldoses with acidic residues gave unique Z-fragmentation of the reducing end GalNAc containing the acidic C-6 branch, where the entire C-3 branch was lost. This fragmentation pathway, which is not seen in the alditols, showed that the process involved charge remote fragmentation catalyzed by a reducing end acidic anomeric proton. With structures containing sialic acid on both the C-3 and C-6 branch, the [M - H]- ions were dominated by the loss of sialic acid. This fragmentation pathway was also pronounced in the [M - 2H]2- ions revealing both the C-6 Z-fragment plus its complementary C-3 C-fragment in addition to glycosidic and cross ring fragmentation. This generation of the Z/C-fragment pairs from GalNAc showed that the charges were not participating in their generation. Fragmentation of neutral aldoses showed pronounced Z-fragmentation believed to be generated by proton migration from the C-6 branch to the negatively charged GalNAc residue followed by charge remote fragmentation similar to the acidic oligosaccharides. In addition, A-type fragments generated by charge induced fragmentation of neutral oligosaccharides were observed when the charge migrated from C-1 of the GalNAc to the GlcNAc residue followed by rearrangement to accommodate the 0,2A-fragmentation. LC-MS also showed that O-linked aldoses existed as interchangeable α/β pyranose anomers, in addition to a third isomer (25% of the total free aldose) believed to be the furanose form.

  7. Cloning, sequencing and expression analysis of the NAR promoter activated during hyphal stage of Magnaporthe grisea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The promoter of N4R gene in Magnaporthe grisea was isolated and sequenced. The promoter sequences contained the "TATA" box, the "CAAT" box, and binding sites for fungal regulatory proteins. Programs that predict promoter sequences indicated that promoter sequence lies between locations 430 and 857 of the NAR promoter fragment. GFP expression under the NAR promoter and NAR transcript analysis revealed that this promoter is activated primarily at the mycelial stage in the rice blast fungus and could be used to express native or extrinsic genes in the mycelia of the rice blast fungus.

  8. Studies of Shell Fragment Mass Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    1946-01-05

    from fuze, auxiliary dotonýtor or adaptor, not identifiable as such. - l - Tabla VI (continuod) ’L.0 3 /C p’ . C om.,/1ui-liinum 0o. 58 No. 59 -o...Composition A alike. Table XII gives the average cumulative numbers of fragmer and their average deviations for each e 1 )losive, excluding the nose fragments...36 where 1.78 j 0.04 and 1.36 ý 0.05 are the respective values of Mo for TNT and for Composition A. The data from Table XII (small circles) together

  9. Deciding Security for a Fragment of ASLan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mödersheim, Sebastian Alexander

    ASLan is the input language of the verification tools of the AVANTSSAR platform, and an extension of the AVISPA Intermediate Format IF. One of ASLan's core features over IF is to integrate a transition system with Horn clauses that are evaluated at every state. This allows for modeling many common...... situations in security such as the interaction between the work ow of a system with its access control policies. While even the transition relation is undecidable for ASLan in general, we show the security problem is decidable for a large and useful fragment that we call TASLan, as long as we bound...

  10. Deciding Security for a Fragment of ASLan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mödersheim, Sebastian Alexander

    2012-01-01

    ASLan is the input language of the verification tools of the AVANTSSAR platform, and an extension of the AVISPA Intermediate Format IF. One of ASLan's core features over IF is to integrate a transition system with Horn clauses that are evaluated at every state. This allows for modeling many common...... situations in security such as the interaction between the workflow of a system with its access control policies. While even the transition relation is undecidable for ASLan in general, we show the security problem is decidable for a large and useful fragment that we call TASLan, as long as we bound...

  11. Fragmentation and clustering in star matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulminelli F.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The specificity of the crust-core phase transition in neutron star at zero and finite temperature will be discussed. It will be shown that, as a consequence of the presence of long range Coulomb interactions, the equivalence of statistical ensembles is violated and a clusterised phase is expected which is not accessible in the grancanonical ensemble. A specific analytical Nuclear Statistical Equilibrium model will be presented and some new quantitative results relevant for the supernova dynamics will be shown. Finally, the analogies and differences with the phenomenon of nuclear fragmentation will be highlighted.

  12. Pyridoxamine Protects Protein Backbone from Oxidative Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetyrkin, Sergei; Mathis, Missy; McDonald, W. Hayes; Shackelford, Xavier; Hudson, Billy; Voziyan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative damage to proteins is one of the major pathogenic mechanisms in many chronic diseases. Therefore, inhibition of this oxidative damage can be an important part of therapeutic strategies. Pyridoxamine (PM), a prospective drug for treatment of diabetic nephropathy, has been previously shown to inhibit several oxidative and glycoxidative pathways, thus protecting amino acid side chains of the proteins from oxidative damage. Here, we demonstrated that PM can also protect protein backbone from fragmentation induced via different oxidative mechanisms including autoxidation of glucose. This protection was due to hydroxyl radical scavenging by PM and may contribute to PM therapeutic effects shown in clinical trials. PMID:21763683

  13. [Intraosseous screw splinting of mandibular fragments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erle, A

    1978-12-01

    Fractures in the frontal region of the mandible may be treated by intra-ossal splinting without the risk of injuring nerves or vessels. Function-stable fixation of the reposited fragments was achieved in 15 patients by means of a transfragmental screw with metric thread. The advantages of this procedure consist in the easy removability of the material and the superfluidity of new developments of material or instruments. As the possibility of early functional treatment prevents the late impairment of the articular function, this procedure is particularly indicated in case of concurrent paramedian and articular fractures.

  14. Three-dimensional Statistical Jet Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Urmossy, Karoly

    2016-01-01

    We reproduce the distribution of the longitudinal and transverse components of momenta of charged hadrons stemming from jets created in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt s$ = 7 TeV by a statistical fragmentation model. Our hadronisation model is based on microcanonical statistics and negative binomial multiplicity fluctuations. We describe the scale dependence of the fit parameters of the model with formulas obtained by approximating the exact solution of the DGLAP equation in the $\\phi^3$ theory with leading order splitting function and 1-loop coupling.

  15. Efficient exploration of chemical space by fragment-based screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Richard J; Mortenson, Paul N; Murray, Christopher W

    2014-01-01

    Screening methods seek to sample a vast chemical space in order to identify starting points for further chemical optimisation. Fragment based drug discovery exploits the superior sampling of chemical space that can be achieved when the molecular weight is restricted. Here we show that commercially available fragment space is still relatively poorly sampled and argue for highly sensitive screening methods to allow the detection of smaller fragments. We analyse the properties of our fragment library versus the properties of X-ray hits derived from the library. We particularly consider properties related to the degree of planarity of the fragments.

  16. How predation and landscape fragmentation affect vole population dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalkvist, Trine; Sibly, Richard; Topping, Christopher John

    2011-01-01

    on vole population dynamics of making predators more specialised, of altering the breeding season, and increasing the level of habitat fragmentation. We found that fragmentation as well as the presence of specialist predators are necessary for the occurrence of population cycles. Habitat fragmentation...... to unravel in field experiments. We hope our results will help understand the reasons for cycle gradients observed in other areas. Our results clearly demonstrate the importance of landscape fragmentation for population cycling and we recommend that the degree of fragmentation be more fully considered...

  17. How Predation and Landscape Fragmentation Affect Vole Population Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalkvist, Trine; Sibly, Richard M.; Topping, Chris J.

    2011-01-01

    on vole population dynamics of making predators more specialised, of altering the breeding season, and increasing the level of habitat fragmentation. We found that fragmentation as well as the presence of specialist predators are necessary for the occurrence of population cycles. Habitat fragmentation...... to unravel in field experiments. We hope our results will help understand the reasons for cycle gradients observed in other areas. Our results clearly demonstrate the importance of landscape fragmentation for population cycling and we recommend that the degree of fragmentation be more fully considered...

  18. H3K27 demethylase, JMJD3, regulates fragmentation of spermatogonial cysts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Iwamori

    Full Text Available The spermatogonial stem cell (SSC compartment is maintained by self-renewal of stem cells as well as fragmentation of differentiating spermatogonia through abscission of intercellular bridges in a random and stochastic manner. The molecular mechanisms that regulate this reversible developmental lineage remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that histone H3K27 demethylase, JMJD3 (KDM6B, regulates the fragmentation of spermatogonial cysts. Down-regulation of Jmjd3 in SSCs promotes an increase in undifferentiated spermatogonia but does not affect their differentiation. Germ cell-specific Jmjd3 null male mice have larger testes and sire offspring for a longer period compared to controls, likely secondary to increased and prolonged maintenance of the spermatogonial compartment. Moreover, JMJD3 deficiency induces frequent fragmentation of spermatogonial cysts by abscission of intercellular bridges. These results suggest that JMJD3 controls the spermatogonial compartment through the regulation of fragmentation of spermatogonial cysts and this mechanism may be involved in maintenance of diverse stem cell niches.

  19. H3K27 Demethylase, JMJD3, Regulates Fragmentation of Spermatogonial Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamori, Naoki; Iwamori, Tokuko; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2013-01-01

    The spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) compartment is maintained by self-renewal of stem cells as well as fragmentation of differentiating spermatogonia through abscission of intercellular bridges in a random and stochastic manner. The molecular mechanisms that regulate this reversible developmental lineage remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that histone H3K27 demethylase, JMJD3 (KDM6B), regulates the fragmentation of spermatogonial cysts. Down-regulation of Jmjd3 in SSCs promotes an increase in undifferentiated spermatogonia but does not affect their differentiation. Germ cell-specific Jmjd3 null male mice have larger testes and sire offspring for a longer period compared to controls, likely secondary to increased and prolonged maintenance of the spermatogonial compartment. Moreover, JMJD3 deficiency induces frequent fragmentation of spermatogonial cysts by abscission of intercellular bridges. These results suggest that JMJD3 controls the spermatogonial compartment through the regulation of fragmentation of spermatogonial cysts and this mechanism may be involved in maintenance of diverse stem cell niches. PMID:23967333

  20. Antibody fragments for stabilization and crystallization of G protein-coupled receptors and their signaling complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Arun K; Gupta, Charu; Srivastava, Ashish; Jaiman, Deepika

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the key players in extracellular signal recognition and their subsequent communications with cellular signaling machinery. Crystallization and high-resolution structure determination of GPCRs has been one of the major advances in the area of GPCR biology over the last 7-8 years. There have primarily been three approaches to GPCR crystallization till date. These are fusion protein strategy, thermostabilization, and antibody fragment-mediated crystallization. Of these, antibody fragment-mediated crystallization has not only provided the first breakthrough in structure determination of a non-rhodopsin GPCR but it has also assisted in obtaining structures of fully active conformations of GPCRs. Antibody fragment approach has also been crucial in obtaining structural information on GPCR signaling complexes. Here, we highlight the specific examples of GPCR crystal structures that have utilized antibody fragments for promoting crystallogenesis and structure solution. We also discuss emerging powerful technologies such as the nanobody technology and the synthetic phage display libraries in the context of GPCR crystallization and underline how these tools are likely to propel key GPCR structural studies in future.

  1. Functional analysis of a novel human serotonin transporter gene promoter in immortalized raphe cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, O V; Thomassen, M; Larsen, M B

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the structural basis for genetic regulation of the human serotonin transporter gene, a 1.8 kb fragment upstream to the cap site was cloned and sequenced. The promoter possesses a polymorphic repeat region with 16 and 14 repeats, respectively. Both were cloned and characterized....... The promoter sequence revealed an internal 379 bp fragment not reported in previous publications. This novel fragment contains consensus sequences for several transcription factors including SpI and GATA. DNA from 48 unrelated individuals was PCR amplified, in this region, to test for allelic variations. All...

  2. Research on the photoelectric measuring method of warhead fragment velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ji; Yu, Lixia; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Xiaoyan

    2016-09-01

    The velocity of warhead fragment is the key criteria to determine its mutilation efficiency. But owing to the small size, larger quantity, irregular shape, high speed, arbitrary direction, large dispersion of warhead fragment and adverse environment, the test of fragment velocity parameter is very difficult. The paper designed an optoelectronic system to measure the average velocity of warhead fragments accurately. The apparatus included two parallel laser screens spaced apart at a known fixed distance for providing time measurement between start and stop signals. The large effective screen area was composed of laser source, retro-reflector and large area photo-diode. Whenever a moving fragment interrupted two optical screens, the system would generate a target signal. Due to partial obscuration of the incident energy and the poor test condition of the explosion, fragment target signal is easily disturbed. Therefore, fragments signal processing technology has become a key technology of the system. The noise of signal was reduced by employing wavelet decomposition and reconstruction. The time of fragment passing though the target was obtained by adopting peak detection algorithm. Based on the method of search peak in different width scale and waveform trend by using optima wavelet, the problem of rolling waveform was solved. Lots of fragments experiments of the different types of the warheads were conducted. Experimental results show that: warhead fragments capture rate of system is better than 98%, which can give velocity of each fragment in the density of less than 20 pieces per m2.

  3. A Secreted Slit2 Fragment Regulates Adipose Tissue Thermogenesis and Metabolic Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Katrin J; Long, Jonathan Z; Jedrychowski, Mark P; Cohen, Paul; Lo, James C; Serag, Sara; Kir, Serkan; Shinoda, Kosaku; Tartaglia, Julia A; Rao, Rajesh R; Chédotal, Alain; Kajimura, Shingo; Gygi, Steven P; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2016-03-01

    Activation of brown and beige fat can reduce obesity and improve glucose homeostasis through nonshivering thermogenesis. Whether brown or beige fat also secretes paracrine or endocrine factors to promote and amplify adaptive thermogenesis is not fully explored. Here we identify Slit2, a 180 kDa member of the Slit extracellular protein family, as a PRDM16-regulated secreted factor from beige fat cells. In isolated cells and in mice, full-length Slit2 is cleaved to generate several smaller fragments, and we identify an active thermogenic moiety as the C-terminal fragment. This Slit2-C fragment of 50 kDa promotes adipose thermogenesis, augments energy expenditure, and improves glucose homeostasis in vivo. Mechanistically, Slit2 induces a robust activation of PKA signaling, which is required for its prothermogenic activity. Our findings establish a previously unknown peripheral role for Slit2 as a beige fat secreted factor that has therapeutic potential for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders.

  4. On the evolution of ejecta fragments in compact supernova remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Cid-Fernandes, R; Rózyczka, M; Franco, J; Terlevich, R J; Tenorio-Tagle, G; Miller, W

    1996-01-01

    We examine the evolution of inhomogeneities (fragments) of supernova ejecta in compact supernova remnants by means of hydrodynamical modeling and simplified analytical calculations. Under the influence of intense post-shock cooling the fragments become strongly compressed as they traverse the hot shocked region between the reverse and outer shocks of the remnant. We find that the most likely outcome of the interaction of fragments with the reverse shock and the hot shocked region is their disruption resulting in generation of secondary fragments. Secondary fragments arriving at the thin and dense outer shell of the remnant give rise to brief X-ray flashes. Under suitable conditions the primary fragments may traverse the hot shocked region without being completely destroyed, to eventually reach the outer shell as dense, elongated structures. Collisions of such fragments with the shell are likely to give rise to powerful X-ray flares.

  5. The role of planetesimal fragmentation on giant planet formation

    CERN Document Server

    Guilera, O M; Brunini, A; Santamaría, P J

    2014-01-01

    In the standard scenario of planet formation, terrestrial planets and the cores of the giant planets are formed by accretion of planetesimals. As planetary embryos grow the planetesimal velocity dispersion increases due to gravitational excitations produced by embryos. The increase of planetesimal relative velocities causes the fragmentation of them due to mutual collisions. We study the role of planetesimal fragmentation on giant planet formation. We analyze how planetesimal fragmentation modifies the growth of giant planet's cores for a wide range of planetesimal sizes and disk masses. We incorporate a model of planetesimal fragmentation into our model of in situ giant planet formation. We calculate the evolution of the solid surface density (planetesimals plus fragments) due to the accretion by the planet, migration and fragmentation. The incorporation of planetesimal fragmentation significantly modifies the process of planetary formation. If most of the mass loss in planetesimal collisions is distributed ...

  6. Oxygen-containing fragments in natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titarenko, Zoya; Vasilevich, Natalya; Zernov, Vladimir; Kirpichenok, Michael; Genis, Dmitry

    2013-02-01

    An analysis of the chemical environment of the oxygen atoms in the DNP database compared to the CMC and SCD databases was performed. Some structural clusters were identified which are predominant among the natural products and can be considered as distinctive features of NPs. Fifty-three oxygen-containing structural fragments that are distinctive for the DNP (distinctive set of fragments DSF) in comparison with the SCD have been identified. A new descriptor Mc was introduced for describing the ratio of atoms involved in the DSF to the total number of heavy atoms. A significant difference in the Mc values among the reference databases allowed the use of a specific cluster of the DSF as a tool for performing similarity searches for oxygen-containing NP molecules, or for evaluation or comparison of databases according to their NP-likeness. An example illustrating that the suggested approach could allow not only estimating the NP-likeness, but also serve as a tool for designing new NP-like compounds is provided. The suggested approach for NP-likeness evaluation moves away from the traditional ideas of scaffolds, cycles, linkers and substituents.

  7. Fragment Screening of Human Aquaporin 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet To

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins (AQPs are membrane proteins that enable water transport across cellular plasma membranes in response to osmotic gradients. Phenotypic analyses have revealed important physiological roles for AQPs, and the potential for AQP water channel modulators in various disease states has been proposed. For example, AQP1 is overexpressed in tumor microvessels, and this correlates with higher metastatic potential and aggressiveness of the malignancy. Chemical modulators would help in identifying the precise contribution of water channel activity in these disease states. These inhibitors would also be important therapeutically, e.g., in anti-cancer treatment. This perceived importance contrasts with the lack of success of high-throughput screens (HTS to identify effective and specific inhibitors of aquaporins. In this paper, we have screened a library of 1500 “fragments”, i.e., smaller than molecules used in HTS, against human aquaporin (hAQP1 using a thermal shift assay and surface plasmon resonance. Although these fragments may not inhibit their protein target, they bound to and stabilized hAQP1 (sub mM binding affinities (KD, with an temperature of aggregation shift ΔTagg of +4 to +50 °C in a concentration-dependent fashion. Chemically expanded versions of these fragments should follow the determination of their binding site on the aquaporin surface.

  8. On the fragmentation of biomolecules: fragmentation of alanine dipeptide along the polypeptide chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Yakubovich, Alexander; Solov'yov, Andrey;

    2006-01-01

    The interaction potential between amino acids in alanine dipeptide has been studied for the first time taking into account exact molecular geometry. Ab initio calculation has been performed in the framework of density functional theory taking into account all electrons in the system. The fragment...

  9. Fragment Merger: An Online Tool to Merge Overlapping Long Sequence Fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kramvis

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available While PCR amplicons extend to a few thousand bases, the length of sequences from direct Sanger sequencing is limited to 500–800 nucleotides. Therefore, several fragments may be required to cover an amplicon, a gene or an entire genome. These fragments are typically sequenced in an overlapping fashion and assembled by manually sliding and aligning the sequences visually. This is time-consuming, repetitive and error-prone, and further complicated by circular genomes. An online tool merging two to twelve long overlapping sequence fragments was developed. Either chromatograms or FASTA files are submitted to the tool, which trims poor quality ends of chromatograms according to user-specified parameters. Fragments are assembled into a single sequence by repeatedly calling the EMBOSS merger tool in a consecutive manner. Output includes the number of trimmed nucleotides, details of each merge, and an optional alignment to a reference sequence. The final merge sequence is displayed and can be downloaded in FASTA format. All output files can be downloaded as a ZIP archive. This tool allows for easy and automated assembly of overlapping sequences and is aimed at researchers without specialist computer skills. The tool is genome- and organism-agnostic and has been developed using hepatitis B virus sequence data.

  10. Fragmented Romanian sociology: growth and structure of the collaboration network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hâncean, Marian-Gabriel; Perc, Matjaž; Vlăsceanu, Lazăr

    2014-01-01

    Structural patterns in collaboration networks are essential for understanding how new ideas, research practices, innovation or cooperation circulate and develop within academic communities and between and within university departments. In our research, we explore and investigate the structure of the collaboration network formed by the academics working full-time within all the 17 sociology departments across Romania. We show that the collaboration network is sparse and fragmented, and that it constitutes an environment that does not promote the circulation of new ideas and innovation within the field. Although recent years have witnessed an increase in the productivity of Romanian sociologists, there is still ample room for improvement in terms of the interaction infrastructure that ought to link individuals together so that they could maximize their potentials. We also fail to discern evidence in favor of the Matthew effect governing the growth of the network, which suggests scientific success and productivity are not rewarded. Instead, the structural properties of the collaboration network are partly those of a core-periphery network, where the spread of innovation and change can be explained by structural equivalence rather than by interpersonal influence models. We also provide support for the idea that, within the observed network, collaboration is the product of homophily rather than prestige effects. Further research on the subject based on data from other countries in the region is needed to place our results in a comparative framework, in particular to discern whether the behavior of the Romanian sociologist community is unique or rather common.

  11. Forest Fragments Surrounded by Sugar Cane Are More Inhospitable to Terrestrial Amphibian Abundance Than Fragments Surrounded by Pasture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Eveline Ribeiro D’Anunciação

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been increasing interest in matrix-type influence on forest fragments. Terrestrial amphibians are good bioindicators for this kind of research because of low vagility and high philopatry. This study compared richness, abundance, and species composition of terrestrial amphibians through pitfall traps in two sets of semideciduous seasonal forest fragments in southeastern Brazil, according to the predominant surrounding matrix (sugar cane and pasture. There were no differences in richness, but fragments surrounded by sugar cane had the lowest abundance of amphibians, whereas fragments surrounded by pastures had greater abundance. The most abundant species, Rhinella ornata, showed no biometric differences between fragment groups but like many other amphibians sampled showed very low numbers of individuals in fragments dominated by sugar cane fields. Our data indicate that the sugar cane matrix negatively influences the community of amphibians present in fragments surrounded by this type of land use.

  12. Modelling rock fragmentation of Extremely Energetic Rockfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Blasio, Fabio; Dattola, Giuseppe; Battista Crosta, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    Extremely energetic rockfalls (EER) are phenomena for which the combination of a large volume (at least some thousands of m ) and a free fall height of hundreds of metres, results in a large released energy. We fix a threshold value of around 1/50 of kilotons to define such a type of events. Documented examples include several events with dif-ferent size in the Alps (Dru, 2005, 2011, 265,000, 59,200 m3; val Fiscalina - Cima Una, 2007, 40,000 m3; Thurwieser 2004, ca 2 Mm3; Cengalo, 2011, 1.5*105 m3 in 2016, in Switzerland; Civetta, 2013, ca 50,000 m3;), in the Apennines (Gran Sasso, 2006, 30,000 m3), Rocky Mountains (Yosemite, Happy Isles, 38,000 m3), and Himalaya. EERs may become more frequent on steep and sharp mountain peaks as a consequence of permafrost thawing at higher altitudes. In contrast to low energy rockfalls where block disintegration is limited, in EERs the impact after free fall causes an immediate and efficient release of energy much like an explosion. The severe disintegration of the rock and the corresponding air blast are capable of snapping trees many hundreds of metres ahead of the fall area. Pulverized rock at high speed can abrade tree logs, and the resulting suspension flow may travel much further the impact zone, blanketing vast surrounding areas. Using both published accounts of some of these events and collecting direct data for some of them, we present some basic models to describe the involved processes based on analogies with explosions and explosive fragmentation. Of the initial energy, one part is used up in the rock disintegration, and the rest is shared between the shock wave and air blast. The fragmentation energy is calculated based on the fitting of the dust size spectrum by using different proba-bilistic distribution laws and the definition of a surface energy and by considering the involved strain rate. We find the fragmentation is around one third of the initial boulder energy. Finally, we evaluate the velocity of the

  13. Fractal Fragmentation triggered by meteor impact: The Ries Crater (Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes Marino, Joali; Perugini, Diego; Rossi, Stefano; Kueppers, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    FRACTAL FRAGMENTATION TRIGGERED BY METEOR IMPACT: THE RIES CRATER (GERMANY) Joali Paredes (1), Stefano Rossi (1), Diego Perugini (1), Ulrich Kueppers (2) 1. Department of Physics and Geology, University of Perugia, Italy 2. Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Munich, Germany The Nördlinger Ries is a large circular depression in western Bavaria, Germany. The depression was caused by a meteor impact, which occurred about 14.3 million-14.5 million years ago. The original crater rim had an estimated diameter of 24 kilometers. Computer modeling of the impact event indicates that the impact or probably had diameters of about 1.5 kilometers and impacted the target area at an angle around 30 to 50 degrees from the surface in a west- southwest to east-northeast direction. The impact velocity is thought to have been about 20 km/s. The meteor impact generated extensive fragmentation of preexisting rocks. In addition, melting of these rocks also occurred. The impact melt was ejected at high speed provoking its extensive fragmentation. Quenched melt fragments are ubiquitous in the outcrops. Here we study melt fragment size distributions with the aim of understanding the style of melt fragmentation during ejection and to constrain the rheological properties of such melts. Digital images of suevite (i.e. the rock generated after deposition and diagenesis of ash and fragments produced by the meteor impact) were obtained using a high-resolution optical scanner. Successively, melt fragments were traced by image analysis and the images segmented in order to obtain binary images on which impact melt fragments are in black color, embedded on a white background. Hence, the size of fragments was determined by image analysis. Fractal fragmentation theory has been applied to fragment size distributions of melt fragments in the Ries crater. Results indicate that melt fragments follow fractal distributions indicating that fragmentation of melt generated by the

  14. Care fragmentation, quality, and costs among chronically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Brigham R; Joynt, Karen E; Rebitzer, James B; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-05-01

    To assess the relationship between care fragmentation and both quality and costs of care for commercially insured, chronically ill patients. We used claims data from 2004 to 2008 for 506,376 chronically ill, privately insured enrollees of a large commercial insurance company to construct measures of fragmentation. We included patients in the sample if they had chronic conditions in any of the following categories: cardiovascular disease, diabetes, asthma, arthritis, or migraine. We assigned each patient a fragmentation index based on the patterns of care of their primary care provider (PCP), with care patterns spread across a higher number of providers considered to be more fragmented. We used regression analysis to examine the relationship between fragmentation and both quality and cost outcomes. Patients of PCPs in the highest quartile of fragmentation had a higher chance of having a departure from clinical best practice (32.8%, vs 25.9% among patients of PCPs in the lowest quartile of fragmentation; P fragmentation had higher rates of preventable hospitalizations (9.1% in highest quartile vs 7.1% in lowest quartile; P fragmentation was associated with $4542 higher healthcare spending ($10,396 in the highest quartile vs $5854 in the lowest quartile; P fragmented care more often experience lapses in care quality and incur greater healthcare costs.

  15. Artificial promoter libraries for selected organisms and promoters derived from such libraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    An artificial promoter library for a selected organism or group of organisms is constructed as a mixture of double stranded DNA fragments, the sense strands of which comprise at least two consensus sequences of efficient promoters from said organism or group of organisms, or parts thereof...... imparting a specific regulatory feature, such as activation by a change in the growth conditions, to the promoters of the library. Further, they may have a sequence comprising one or more recognition sites for restriction endonucleases added to one of or both their ends. The selected organism or group...... in eukaryotes said consensus sequences should comprise a TATA box and at least one upstream activation sequence (UAS). Such artificial promoter libraries can be used i.a. for optimizing the expression of specific genes in various selected organisms....

  16. Hadron Fragmentation Inside Jets in Hadronic Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufmann, Tom; Vogelsang, Werner

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytical next-to-leading order QCD calculation of the partonic cross sections for the process $pp\\rightarrow ({\\text{jet}} \\,h)X$, for which a specific hadron is observed inside a fully reconstructed jet. In order to obtain the analytical results, we assume the jet to be relatively narrow. We show that the results can be cast into a simple and systematic form based on suitable universal jet functions for the process. We confirm the validity of our calculation by comparing to previous results in the literature for which the next-to-leading order cross section was treated entirely numerically by Monte-Carlo integration techniques. We present phenomenological results for experiments at the LHC and at RHIC. These suggest that $pp\\rightarrow ({\\text{jet}} \\,h)X$ should enable very sensitive probes of fragmentation functions, especially of the one for gluons.

  17. Fragmentation of metastable molecular ions of acetylanisoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Osamu; Noguchi, Tsutomu; Ogino, Kazuo; Tajima, Susumu

    1994-04-01

    The spontaneous unimolecular dissociation reactions of the molecular ions of ortho-, meta- and para-acetylanisoles have been investigated by mass-analyzed ion kinetic energy spectrometry, high resolution mass spectrometry and deuterium labelling. Losses of CH3. from the molecular ions of all isomers occur exclusively from the acetyl group. The loss of CH3. for the o-isomer consists of two processes, i.e. one of them is a simple cleavage, and the other is a rearrangement. The latter is not observed for the m- and p-isomers. The loss of H2O from the molecular ion is also unique for the o-isomer, and the fragmentation mechanism is also explored.

  18. Isolator fragmentation and explosive initiation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, Peter [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rae, Philip John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Foley, Timothy J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Novak, Alan M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Armstrong, Christopher Lee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baca, Eva V. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gunderson, Jake Alfred [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-19

    Three tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of firing an isolator in proximity to a barrier or explosive charge. The tests with explosive were conducted without a barrier, on the basis that since any barrier will reduce the shock transmitted to the explosive, bare explosive represents the worst-case from an inadvertent initiation perspective. No reaction was observed. The shock caused by the impact of a representative plastic material on both bare and cased PBX 9501 is calculated in the worst-case, 1-D limit, and the known shock response of the HE is used to estimate minimum run-to-detonation lengths. The estimates demonstrate that even 1-D impacts would not be of concern and that, accordingly, the divergent shocks due to isolator fragment impact are of no concern as initiating stimuli.

  19. Inflaton Fragmentation After lambda phi^4 Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Felder, G N; Felder, Gary N; Navros, Olga

    2007-01-01

    We use lattice simulations to examine the detailed dynamics of inflaton fragmentation during and after preheating in $\\lambda \\phi^4$ chaotic inflation. The dynamics are qualitatively similar to preheating after $m^2 \\phi^2$ inflation, involving the exponential growth and subsequent expansion and collision of bubble-like inhomogeneities of the inflaton and other scalar fields. During this stage fluctuations of the fields become strongly non-Gaussian. In the quartic theory, the conformal nature of the theory allows us to extend our simulations to much greater times than is possible for the quadratic model. With these longer simulations we have been able to determine the time scale on which Gaussianity is restored, which occurs after a time on the order of a thousand inflaton oscillations.

  20. Inhomogeneous Fragmentation of the Rolling Tachyon

    CERN Document Server

    Felder, G N; Felder, Gary N.; Kofman, Lev

    2004-01-01

    Dirac-Born-Infeld type effective actions reproduce many aspects of string theory classical tachyon dynamics of unstable Dp-branes. The inhomogeneous tachyon field rolling from the top of its potential forms topological defects of lower codimensions. In between them, as we show, the tachyon energy density fragments into a p-dimensional web-like high density network evolving with time. We present an analytic asymptotic series solution of the non-linear equations for the inhomogeneous tachyon and its stress energy. The generic solution for a tachyon field with a runaway potential in arbitrary dimensions is described by the free streaming of noninteracting massive particles whose initial velocities are defined by the gradients of the initial tachyon profile. Thus, relativistic particle mechanics is a dual picture of the tachyon field effective action. Implications of this picture for inflationary models with a decaying tachyon field are discussed.

  1. Isolator fragmentation and explosive initiation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rae, Philip John [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Foley, Timothy J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Novak, Alan M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Armstrong, Christopher Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baca, Eva V. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gunderson, Jake Alfred [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Three tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of firing an isolator in proximity to a barrier or explosive charge. The tests with explosive were conducted without barrier, on the basis that since any barrier will reduce the shock transmitted to the explosive, bare explosive represents the worst-case from an inadvertent initiation perspective. No reaction was observed. The shock caused by the impact of a representative plastic material on both bare and cased PBX9501 is calculated in the worst-case, 1-D limit, and the known shock response of the HE is used to estimate minimum run-to-detonation lengths. The estimates demonstrate that even 1-D impacts would not be of concern and that, accordingly, the divergent shocks due to isolator fragment impact are of no concern as initiating stimuli.

  2. QCD at the Tevatron: Jets and fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Daniel Elvira

    2001-09-27

    At the Fermilab Tevatron energies, ({radical} s=1800 GeV and {radical} s = 630 GeV), jet production is the dominant process. During the period 1992-1996, the D0 and CDF experiments accumulated almost 100 pb{sup -1} of data and performed the most accurate jet production measurements up to this date. These measurements and the NLO-QCD theoretical predictions calculated during the last decade, have improved our understanding of QCD, our knowledge of the proton structure, and pushed the limit to the scale associated with quark compositeness to 2.4-2.7 TeV. In this paper, we present the most recent published and preliminary measurements on jet production and fragmentation by the D0 and CDF collaborations.

  3. Youth Subcultures: From Deviation to Fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Smolík

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This theoretical text introduces the issue of youth subcultures and tries to define particular basic concepts that are essential for the study of this issue in context of social pedagogy and sociology. These terms include culture, dominant culture, subculture, counterculture, scene, etc. The article also deals with the basic definition of youth subcultures; it discusses this category on the basis of current debates and then introduces various sociological schools which have dealt with this issue for a long time. These are the Chicago school of sociology, Center for the Study of Popular Culture and the post-subculture approaches. Finally, it is noted that in the last two decades there has occurred a fragmentation of particular styles, which led to the gradual replacement of sociological term subculture.

  4. Material point method simulations of fragmenting cylinders

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Biswajit

    2012-01-01

    Most research on the simulation of deformation and failure of metals has been and continues to be performed using the finite element method. However, the issues of mesh entanglement under large deformation, considerable complexity in handling contact, and difficulties encountered while solving large deformation fluid-structure interaction problems have led to the exploration of alternative approaches. The material point method uses Lagrangian solid particles embedded in an Eulerian grid. Particles interact via the grid with other particles in the same body, with other solid bodies, and with fluids. Thus, the three issues mentioned in the context of finite element analysis are circumvented. In this paper, we present simulations of cylinders which fragment due to explosively expanding gases generated by reactions in a high energy material contained inside. The material point method is the numerical method chosen for these simulations discussed in this paper. The plastic deformation of metals is simulated using ...

  5. Magnetic-Moment Fragmentation and Monopole Crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Brooks-Bartlett

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Coulomb phase, with its dipolar correlations and pinch-point–scattering patterns, is central to discussions of geometrically frustrated systems, from water ice to binary and mixed-valence alloys, as well as numerous examples of frustrated magnets. The emergent Coulomb phase of lattice-based systems has been associated with divergence-free fields and the absence of long-range order. Here, we go beyond this paradigm, demonstrating that a Coulomb phase can emerge naturally as a persistent fluctuating background in an otherwise ordered system. To explain this behavior, we introduce the concept of the fragmentation of the field of magnetic moments into two parts, one giving rise to a magnetic monopole crystal, the other a magnetic fluid with all the characteristics of an emergent Coulomb phase. Our theory is backed up by numerical simulations, and we discuss its importance with regard to the interpretation of a number of experimental results.

  6. Assortative mating and fragmentation within dog breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailer Frank

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are around 400 internationally recognized dog breeds in the world today, with a remarkable diversity in size, shape, color and behavior. Breeds are considered to be uniform groups with similar physical characteristics, shaped by selection rooted in human preferences. This has led to a large genetic difference between breeds and a large extent of linkage disequilibrium within breeds. These characteristics are important for association mapping of candidate genes for diseases and therefore make dogs ideal models for gene mapping of human disorders. However, genetic uniformity within breeds may not always be the case. We studied patterns of genetic diversity within 164 poodles and compared it to 133 dogs from eight other breeds. Results Our analyses revealed strong population structure within poodles, with differences among some poodle groups as pronounced as those among other well-recognized breeds. Pedigree analysis going three generations back in time confirmed that subgroups within poodles result from assortative mating imposed by breed standards as well as breeder preferences. Matings have not taken place at random or within traditionally identified size classes in poodles. Instead, a novel set of five poodle groups was identified, defined by combinations of size and color, which is not officially recognized by the kennel clubs. Patterns of genetic diversity in other breeds suggest that assortative mating leading to fragmentation may be a common feature within many dog breeds. Conclusion The genetic structure observed in poodles is the result of local mating patterns, implying that breed fragmentation may be different in different countries. Such pronounced structuring within dog breeds can increase the power of association mapping studies, but also represents a serious problem if ignored. In dog breeding, individuals are selected on the basis of morphology, behaviour, working or show purposes, as well as geographic

  7. Assortative mating and fragmentation within dog breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnerfeldt, Susanne; Hailer, Frank; Nord, Maria; Vilà, Carles

    2008-01-28

    There are around 400 internationally recognized dog breeds in the world today, with a remarkable diversity in size, shape, color and behavior. Breeds are considered to be uniform groups with similar physical characteristics, shaped by selection rooted in human preferences. This has led to a large genetic difference between breeds and a large extent of linkage disequilibrium within breeds. These characteristics are important for association mapping of candidate genes for diseases and therefore make dogs ideal models for gene mapping of human disorders. However, genetic uniformity within breeds may not always be the case. We studied patterns of genetic diversity within 164 poodles and compared it to 133 dogs from eight other breeds. Our analyses revealed strong population structure within poodles, with differences among some poodle groups as pronounced as those among other well-recognized breeds. Pedigree analysis going three generations back in time confirmed that subgroups within poodles result from assortative mating imposed by breed standards as well as breeder preferences. Matings have not taken place at random or within traditionally identified size classes in poodles. Instead, a novel set of five poodle groups was identified, defined by combinations of size and color, which is not officially recognized by the kennel clubs. Patterns of genetic diversity in other breeds suggest that assortative mating leading to fragmentation may be a common feature within many dog breeds. The genetic structure observed in poodles is the result of local mating patterns, implying that breed fragmentation may be different in different countries. Such pronounced structuring within dog breeds can increase the power of association mapping studies, but also represents a serious problem if ignored. In dog breeding, individuals are selected on the basis of morphology, behaviour, working or show purposes, as well as geographic population structure. The same processes which have

  8. Hexamine cobalt chloride promotes intermolecular ligation of blunt end DNA fragments by T4 DNA ligase.

    OpenAIRE

    Rusche, J R; Howard-Flanders, P

    1985-01-01

    Hexamine cobalt chloride (HCC) increases the efficiency of blunt end ligation by T4 DNA ligase about 50 fold. Maximum stimulation occurs when standard buffers for ligation are supplemented with 1 mM HCC. All the ligation events are intermolecular regardless of the initial DNA concentration. In the presence of monovalent cations (eg. 25 mM KCl) HCC still increases the extent of T4 catalyzed ligation but intramolecular ligation products are also formed. Therefore, intermolecular ligation can be...

  9. Microfluidic DNA fragmentation for on-chip genomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Lingling; Bomer, Johan G; Jin, Mingliang; Carlen, Edwin T; van den Berg, Albert

    2011-12-09

    We report a high-throughput clog-free microfluidic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragmentation chip that is based on hydrodynamic shearing. Salmon sperm DNA has been reproducibly fragmented down to ∼ 5k bp fragment lengths by applying low hydraulic pressures (≤1 bar) across micromachined constrictions positioned in larger microfluidic channels that create point-sink flow with large velocity gradients near the constriction entrance. Long constrictions (100 µm) produce shorter fragment lengths compared to shorter constrictions (10 µm), while increasing the hydrodynamic pressure requirement. Sample recirculation (10 ×) in short constrictions reduces the mean fragment length and fragment length variation, and improves yield compared to single-pass experiments without increasing the hydrodynamic pressure.

  10. Data Mining-based Fragmentation of XML Data Warehouses

    CERN Document Server

    Mahboubi, Hadj

    2008-01-01

    With the multiplication of XML data sources, many XML data warehouse models have been proposed to handle data heterogeneity and complexity in a way relational data warehouses fail to achieve. However, XML-native database systems currently suffer from limited performances, both in terms of manageable data volume and response time. Fragmentation helps address both these issues. Derived horizontal fragmentation is typically used in relational data warehouses and can definitely be adapted to the XML context. However, the number of fragments produced by classical algorithms is difficult to control. In this paper, we propose the use of a k-means-based fragmentation approach that allows to master the number of fragments through its $k$ parameter. We experimentally compare its efficiency to classical derived horizontal fragmentation algorithms adapted to XML data warehouses and show its superiority.

  11. Peptide fragmentation induced by radicals at atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilkov, Andrey N; Laiko, Victor V; Doroshenko, Vladimir M

    2009-04-01

    A novel ion dissociation technique, which is capable of providing an efficient fragmentation of peptides at essential atmospheric pressure conditions, is developed. The fragmentation patterns observed often contain c-type fragments that are specific to electron capture dissociation/electron transfer dissociation (ECD/ETD), along with the y-/b-type fragments that are specific to collision-activated dissociation (CAD). In the presented experimental setup, ion fragmentation takes place within a flow reactor located in the atmospheric pressure region between the ion source and the mass spectrometer. According to a proposed mechanism, the fragmentation results from the interaction of ESI-generated analyte ions with the gas-phase radical species produced by a corona discharge source.

  12. arXiv Generalized Fragmentation Functions for Fractal Jet Observables

    CERN Document Server

    Elder, Benjamin T.; Thaler, Jesse; Waalewijn, Wouter J.; Zhou, Kevin

    2017-06-15

    We introduce a broad class of fractal jet observables that recursively probe the collective properties of hadrons produced in jet fragmentation. To describe these collinear-unsafe observables, we generalize the formalism of fragmentation functions, which are important objects in QCD for calculating cross sections involving identified final-state hadrons. Fragmentation functions are fundamentally nonperturbative, but have a calculable renormalization group evolution. Unlike ordinary fragmentation functions, generalized fragmentation functions exhibit nonlinear evolution, since fractal observables involve correlated subsets of hadrons within a jet. Some special cases of generalized fragmentation functions are reviewed, including jet charge and track functions. We then consider fractal jet observables that are based on hierarchical clustering trees, where the nonlinear evolution equations also exhibit tree-like structure at leading order. We develop a numeric code for performing this evolution and study its phen...

  13. Geometric design constratins for controlled fragmentation of metallic cylindrical shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Allen William

    Geometric designs for the controlled fragmentation of cylindrical shells have been successfully modeled by means of CTH hydrocode simulation. Design parameters varied include the shell radius, thickness, and the depth and spacing of interior notches. A large number of shell designs were analyzed and their controlled fragmentation effectiveness categorized. The best overall controlled fragmentation designs exhibit full and complete fragment breakup as prescribed along the system of interior grooves or notches without any of the individual fragments naturally fragmenting throughout their thicknesses. For the combination of the Composition C-4 explosive and the 4340 steel, the best performing designs were shown to commonly possess the following characteristics: (1) they each have notch or groove depths greater than half of the shell thickness, (2) they each have notch or groove spacing within a range that is approximately the same as the shell thickness, and (3) they each have shell thicknesses many times smaller than the shell radius.

  14. Effective Fragmentation and Flyrock Control Strategies at Quarries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat Esen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effective fragmentation and flyrock control strategies that could be applied at quarries to improve the productivity and safety. Fragmentation measurement and modelling as well as a comprehensive drill and blast audit are essential for improving the fragmentation. Face profiling and bore tracking are good tools to manage the ―as-designed‖ and ―as-drilled‖ conditions to get reasonable fragmentation from face burden zone and minimise the flyrock risk. In general, a large scatter in fragmentation data was observed at sites and the causes should be analysed by a detailed root-cause analysis technique. Two case studies were presented in this paper showing some of the effective fragmentation strategies. Finally, a flyrock model was shown to determine the safe blast exclusion zone for the mining equipment and personnel. Some key guidelines were suggested to minimise the occurrence of the flyrock.

  15. Fragmentation Functions for Heavy Baryons in the Recombination Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭茹

    2011-01-01

    Using the shower parton distributions determined by the recombination model, we predict the fragmentation functions for heavy baryons. Then we obtain the completed fragmentation functions of heavy quarks (c and b) splitting into their hadrons (mesons and baryons containing one heavy valence quark). The calculated process shows that the fragmentation functions for mesons and baryons are not independent if the hadronization of the shower partons is taken into account.%Using the shower parton distributions determined by the recombination model,we predict the fragmentation functions for heavy baryons.Then we obtain the completed fragmentation functions of heavy quarks(c and b)splitting into their hadrons(mesons and baryons containing one heavy valence quark).The calculated process shows that the fragmentation functions for mesons and baryons are not independent if the hadronization of the shower partons is taken into account.

  16. Nuclear Fragmentation in Clinical Heavy Ion Beams, Should We Worry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Hansen, David Christoffer; Toftegaard, Jakob

    fragmentation of the primary ions. Even if patient treatment with heavy ions has been established, the influence of nuclear fragmentation is yet to be fully quantified. The fragmentation spectrum of ions is relevant for particle therapy in numerous ways: 1. Dose distribution: A distinct tail of secondary...... on the secondary particle spectrum from fragmentation. b. In addition hereto, fluence correction factors can be calculated which take this effect into account, which are directly a result of nuclear fragmentation in the medium. 3. Radiobiology: Physical dose is not sufficient to describe the outcome of a treatment...... the sensitivity on the three fields mentioned above, including: turning off nuclear fragmentation entirely, changing all ineleastic cross sections +/- 20%, changing key parameters in the Fermi-Breakup (FB) model. Results show nuclear effects have their largest impact on the dose distribution. Stopping power...

  17. Land reform and land fragmentation in Central and Eastern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Morten B.

    2014-01-01

    It has often been stated that land fragmentation and farm structures characterized by small agricultural holdings and farms divided in a large number of parcels have been the side-effect of land reform in Central and Eastern Europe. This article reports the findings of a study of land reform in 25...... countries in the region from 1989 and onwards and provides an overview of applied land reform approaches. With a basis in theory on land fragmentation, the linkage between land reform approaches and land fragmentation is explored. It is discussed in which situations land fragmentation is a barrier...... for the development of the agricultural and rural sector. The main finding is that land fragmentation is often hampering agricultural and rural development when both land ownership and land use is highly fragmented....

  18. Soft x-ray ionization induced fragmentation of glycine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itälä, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FIN-20014 Turku (Finland); Kooser, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FIN-20014 Turku (Finland); Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, 51014 Tartu (Estonia); Rachlew, E. [Department of Physics, KTH, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Huels, M. A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiobiology, Facility of Medicine, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, JIH 5N4 Quebec (Canada); Kukk, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FIN-20014 Turku (Finland); Turku University Centre for Materials and Surfaces (MatSurf), FIN-20014 Turku (Finland)

    2014-06-21

    X-ray absorption commonly involves dissociative core ionization producing not only momentum correlated charged fragments but also low- and high-energy electrons capable of inducing damage in living tissue. This gives a natural motivation for studying the core ionization induced fragmentation processes in biologically important molecules such as amino acids. Here the fragmentation of amino acid glycine following carbon 1s core ionization has been studied. Using photoelectron-photoion-photoion coincidence technique, a detailed analysis on fragmentation of the sample molecule into pairs of momentum correlated cations has been carried out. The main characteristics of core ionization induced fragmentation of glycine were found to be the rupture of the C–C{sub α} bond and the presence of the CNH{sub 2}{sup +} fragment.

  19. Soft x-ray ionization induced fragmentation of glycine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itälä, E.; Kooser, K.; Rachlew, E.; Huels, M. A.; Kukk, E.

    2014-06-01

    X-ray absorption commonly involves dissociative core ionization producing not only momentum correlated charged fragments but also low- and high-energy electrons capable of inducing damage in living tissue. This gives a natural motivation for studying the core ionization induced fragmentation processes in biologically important molecules such as amino acids. Here the fragmentation of amino acid glycine following carbon 1s core ionization has been studied. Using photoelectron-photoion-photoion coincidence technique, a detailed analysis on fragmentation of the sample molecule into pairs of momentum correlated cations has been carried out. The main characteristics of core ionization induced fragmentation of glycine were found to be the rupture of the C-Cα bond and the presence of the CNH_2^+ fragment.

  20. Fragment size does not matter when you are well connected: effects of fragmentation on fitness of coexisting gypsophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matesanz, S; Gómez-Fernández, A; Alcocer, I; Escudero, A

    2015-09-01

    Most habitat fragmentation studies have focused on the effects of population size on reproductive success of single species, but studies assessing the effects of both fragment size and connectivity, and their interaction, on several coexisting species are rare. In this study, we selected 20 fragments along two continuous gradients of size and degree of isolation in a gypsum landscape in central Spain. In each fragment, we selected 15 individuals of each of three dominant gypsophiles (Centaurea hyssopifolia, Lepidium subulatum and Helianthemum squamatum, 300 plants per species, 900 plants in total) and measured several reproductive traits: inflorescence number, fruit set, seed set and seed mass. We hypothesised that plant fitness would be lower on small and isolated fragments due to an interaction between fragment size and connectivity, and that response patterns would be species-specific. Overall, fragment size had very little effect on reproductive traits compared to that of connectivity. We observed a positive effect of fragment connectivity on C. hyssopifolia fitness, mediated by the increased seed predation in plants from isolated fragments, resulting in fewer viable seeds per capitulum and lower seed set. Furthermore, seed mass was lower in plants from isolated fragments for both C. hyssopifolia and L. subulatum. In contrast, few reproductive traits of H. squamatum were affected by habitat fragmentation. We discuss the implications of species-specific responses to habitat fragmentation for the dynamics and conservation of gypsum plant communities. Our results highlight the complex interplay among plants and their mutualistic and antagonistic visitors, and reinforce the often-neglected role of habitat connectivity as a key component of the fragmentation process.

  1. Fragmentation of mercury compounds under ultraviolet light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkonen, E.; Löytynoja, T.; Hautala, L.; Jänkälä, K.; Huttula, M.

    2015-08-01

    Ultraviolet light induced photofragmentation of mercury compounds is studied experimentally with electron energy resolved photoelectron-photoion coincidence techniques and theoretically with computational quantum chemical methods. A high resolution photoelectron spectrum using synchrotron radiation is presented. Fragmentation of the molecule is studied subsequent to ionization to the atomic-mercury-like d orbitals. State dependent fragmentation behaviour is presented and specific reactions for dissociation pathways are given. The fragmentation is found to differ distinctly in similar orbitals of different mercury compounds.

  2. Critical Features of Fragment Libraries for Protein Structure Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevizani, Raphael; Custódio, Fábio Lima; Dos Santos, Karina Baptista; Dardenne, Laurent Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    The use of fragment libraries is a popular approach among protein structure prediction methods and has proven to substantially improve the quality of predicted structures. However, some vital aspects of a fragment library that influence the accuracy of modeling a native structure remain to be determined. This study investigates some of these features. Particularly, we analyze the effect of using secondary structure prediction guiding fragments selection, different fragments sizes and the effect of structural clustering of fragments within libraries. To have a clearer view of how these factors affect protein structure prediction, we isolated the process of model building by fragment assembly from some common limitations associated with prediction methods, e.g., imprecise energy functions and optimization algorithms, by employing an exact structure-based objective function under a greedy algorithm. Our results indicate that shorter fragments reproduce the native structure more accurately than the longer. Libraries composed of multiple fragment lengths generate even better structures, where longer fragments show to be more useful at the beginning of the simulations. The use of many different fragment sizes shows little improvement when compared to predictions carried out with libraries that comprise only three different fragment sizes. Models obtained from libraries built using only sequence similarity are, on average, better than those built with a secondary structure prediction bias. However, we found that the use of secondary structure prediction allows greater reduction of the search space, which is invaluable for prediction methods. The results of this study can be critical guidelines for the use of fragment libraries in protein structure prediction.

  3. Critical Features of Fragment Libraries for Protein Structure Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Karina Baptista

    2017-01-01

    The use of fragment libraries is a popular approach among protein structure prediction methods and has proven to substantially improve the quality of predicted structures. However, some vital aspects of a fragment library that influence the accuracy of modeling a native structure remain to be determined. This study investigates some of these features. Particularly, we analyze the effect of using secondary structure prediction guiding fragments selection, different fragments sizes and the effect of structural clustering of fragments within libraries. To have a clearer view of how these factors affect protein structure prediction, we isolated the process of model building by fragment assembly from some common limitations associated with prediction methods, e.g., imprecise energy functions and optimization algorithms, by employing an exact structure-based objective function under a greedy algorithm. Our results indicate that shorter fragments reproduce the native structure more accurately than the longer. Libraries composed of multiple fragment lengths generate even better structures, where longer fragments show to be more useful at the beginning of the simulations. The use of many different fragment sizes shows little improvement when compared to predictions carried out with libraries that comprise only three different fragment sizes. Models obtained from libraries built using only sequence similarity are, on average, better than those built with a secondary structure prediction bias. However, we found that the use of secondary structure prediction allows greater reduction of the search space, which is invaluable for prediction methods. The results of this study can be critical guidelines for the use of fragment libraries in protein structure prediction. PMID:28085928

  4. Gravitational fragmentation - A comparison with W49A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keto, Eric R.; Lattanzio, John C.; Monaghan, Joe J.

    1991-01-01

    The process of gravitational fragmentation of molecular clouds is investigated through a comparison of numerical and observational results. The expected millimeter wave molecular line emission from a model fragmenting cloud generated by a numerical hydrodynamic simulation is calculated and compared with observations of HCO(+) from the star-forming region W49A. This investigation suggests that the rotating ring of H II regions, the necklace in W49A, may have formed in the gravitational fragmentation of a flattened rotating molecular cloud.

  5. Fragmentation of mercury compounds under ultraviolet light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokkonen, E.; Hautala, L.; Jänkälä, K.; Huttula, M. [Centre for Molecular Materials Research, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Löytynoja, T. [Centre for Molecular Materials Research, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Division of Theoretical Chemistry & Biology, School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-08-21

    Ultraviolet light induced photofragmentation of mercury compounds is studied experimentally with electron energy resolved photoelectron-photoion coincidence techniques and theoretically with computational quantum chemical methods. A high resolution photoelectron spectrum using synchrotron radiation is presented. Fragmentation of the molecule is studied subsequent to ionization to the atomic-mercury-like d orbitals. State dependent fragmentation behaviour is presented and specific reactions for dissociation pathways are given. The fragmentation is found to differ distinctly in similar orbitals of different mercury compounds.

  6. Microevolutionary Effects of Habitat Fragmentation on Plant-Animal Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Fontúrbel, Francisco E.; Maureen M. Murúa

    2014-01-01

    Plant-animal interactions are a key component for biodiversity maintenance, but they are currently threatened by human activities. Habitat fragmentation might alter ecological interactions due to demographic changes, spatial discontinuities, and edge effects. Also, there are less evident effects of habitat fragmentation that potentially alter selective forces and compromise the fitness of the interacting species. Changes in the mutualistic and antagonistic interactions in fragmented habitats ...

  7. Fragmentation of weak non-ablating objects during entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-04-01

    Fragmentation of objects during entry can be treated with developed models of breakup, fragment cascade, separation, and deceleration. The results reduce to those derived earlier for strong objects. Model predictions are in agreement with the key features of numerical simulations. Model equations can be inverted analytically to infer object size, entry speed, and strength from measurements of peak power and altitude and fragmentation altitude or time.

  8. Tropical Forest Landscape Fragmentation in Batang Toru Watershed, North Sumatra

    OpenAIRE

    Samsuri Samsuri; I Nengah Surati Jaya; Cecep Kusmana; Kukuh Murtilaksono

    2014-01-01

    Timber-based forest management is now shifting to as broader scope including ecosystem-based management. Timber-oriented forest management frequently affects the fragmentation of forest landscape. This paper defines the degree of forest landscape fragmentation in Batang Toru watershed, North Sumatra through indentification of correlation between forest landscape fragmentation and driving factors including biophysical and anthropogenic factors. Identification structure, pattern, and fragmentat...

  9. Public Values in Water Law: A Case of Substantive Fragmentation?

    OpenAIRE

    Monika Ambrus; Herman Kasper Gilissen; Jasper J.H. van Kempen

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal fragmentation, from a public-values perspective, is a quite well-documented phenomenon in international (water) law. However, the literature does not provide any insight into vertical or substantive fragmentation, i.e. differences in the protection of public values at the various institutional levels. This article assesses whether there is substantive fragmentation in water law at the international, the European, the sub-regional (Danube River Basin), and the Dutch domestic level. ...

  10. Synthesis of (Z)-trisubstituted olefins by decarboxylative grob-type fragmentations: epothilone D, discodermolide, and peloruside A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prantz, Kathrin; Mulzer, Johann

    2010-01-11

    Methyl-branched (Z)-trisubstituted olefins are found in many polyketides with interesting biological activity, such as epothilone D (1), discodermolide (3), and peloruside A (2). Despite the employment of numerous different strategies, this motif has often been the weak point in total synthesis. Thus, we present a novel hydroxide- induced Grob-type fragmentation as an easy access to trisubstituted olefins. In our case, beta-mesyloxy delta-lactones with three stereogenic centers were chosen whose fragmentation underlies a high stereoelectronic control. Major challenges in the syntheses were the installation of quaternary stereocenters, achieved by enzymatic desymmetrization of meso-diesters and by aluminium-promoted stereoselective rearrangement of chiral epoxides, respectively. Different aldol strategies were developed for the formation of the fragmentation precursors. Additionally a short survey about nucleophilic additions to aldehydes with quaternary alpha-centers is presented.

  11. AMPLIFICATION OF AZOSPIRILLUM SP. JG3 GLPD GENE FRAGMENT USING DEGENERATE PRIMERS GENERATED BY WEB-BASED TOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stalis Norma Ethica

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Primaclade and In Silico web-based tools were used as a strategy to obtain the correct-size PCR amplicon targeting a fragment of gene encoding glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (glpD of Azospirillum sp. JG3. The bacterial strains are soil, Gram-negative PGPR (Plant-Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria isolated from an agricultural land in Purwokerto, Central Java, Indonesia, which have ability to produce several commercial enzymes. The aim is to obtain a pair of reliable degenerate primers from a limited number of glpD sequences from other Azospirilla retrieved in GenBank using bioinformatics approach. We demonstrated degenerate primer design that led to successful PCR amplification corresponding to the targeted DNA fragment. Homology analysis showed that the obtained DNA fragment is 61% and 99% similar to sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase genes of Azospirillum brasilense and Stenotrophomonas maltophili respectively.

  12. The Effective Fragment Molecular Orbital Method for Fragments Connected by Covalent Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Casper; Fedorov, Dmitri G.; Jensen, Jan H.

    2012-01-01

    We extend the effective fragment molecular orbital method (EFMO) into treating fragments connected by covalent bonds. The accuracy of EFMO is compared to FMO and conventional ab initio electronic structure methods for polypeptides including proteins. Errors in energy for RHF and MP2 are within 2 kcal/mol for neutral polypeptides and 6 kcal/mol for charged polypeptides similar to FMO but obtained two to five times faster. For proteins, the errors are also within a few kcal/mol of the FMO results. We developed both the RHF and MP2 gradient for EFMO. Compared to ab initio, the EFMO optimized structures had an RMSD of 0.40 and 0.44 Å for RHF and MP2, respectively. PMID:22844433

  13. Relativistic correction to gluon fragmentation function into pseudoscalar quarkonium

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Xiangrui; Li, LiuJi; Xiong, Xiaonu

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the recent measurements of the $\\eta_c$ meson production at LHC, we investigate the relativistic correction effect for the fragmentation function of the gluon into $\\eta_c$, which constitutes the crucial nonperturbative elements to understand $\\eta_c$ production at high $p_T$. Employing three distinct methods, we calculate the leading relativistic correction to the $g\\to\\eta_c$ fragmentation function in the NRQCD factorization framework, as well as verify the existing NLO result for the $c\\to \\eta_c$ fragmentation function. We also study the evolution behavior of these fragmentation functions with the aid of DGLAP equation.

  14. Fragment-based learning of visual object categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegdé, Jay; Bart, Evgeniy; Kersten, Daniel

    2008-04-22

    When we perceive a visual object, we implicitly or explicitly associate it with a category we know. It is known that the visual system can use local, informative image fragments of a given object, rather than the whole object, to classify it into a familiar category. How we acquire informative fragments has remained unclear. Here, we show that human observers acquire informative fragments during the initial learning of categories. We created new, but naturalistic, classes of visual objects by using a novel "virtual phylogenesis" (VP) algorithm that simulates key aspects of how biological categories evolve. Subjects were trained to distinguish two of these classes by using whole exemplar objects, not fragments. We hypothesized that if the visual system learns informative object fragments during category learning, then subjects must be able to perform the newly learned categorization by using only the fragments as opposed to whole objects. We found that subjects were able to successfully perform the classification task by using each of the informative fragments by itself, but not by using any of the comparable, but uninformative, fragments. Our results not only reveal that novel categories can be learned by discovering informative fragments but also introduce and illustrate the use of VP as a versatile tool for category-learning research.

  15. Matricryptins and matrikines: biologically active fragments of the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Salza, Romain

    2014-07-01

    Numerous extracellular proteins and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) undergo limited enzymatic cleavage resulting in the release of fragments exerting biological activities, which are usually different from those of the full-length molecules. In this review, we define matrikines and matricryptins, which are bioactive fragments released from the extracellular matrix proteins, proteoglycans and GAGs and report their major biological activities. These fragments regulate a number of physiopathological processes including angiogenesis, cancer, fibrosis, inflammation, neurodegenerative diseases and wound healing. The challenges to translate these fragments from molecules biologically active in vitro and in experimental models to potential drugs are discussed in the last part of the review.

  16. Pathogenesis, developmental consequences, and clinical correlations of human embryo fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Victor Y; Browne, Richard W; Bloom, Michael S; Sakkas, Denny; Alikani, Mina

    2011-03-15

    This narrative review summarizes the current state of knowledge about human embryo fragmentation during IVF. The clinical relevance of fragmentation is discussed and evidence supporting a central role for the oocyte in the pathogenesis of fragmentation is presented. A mechanism of fragmentation as aberrant cell division involving the cytoskeleton is described along with the novel concept of membrane instability in relation to follicular high-density lipoprotein metabolism and cholesterol transport. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Biological and environmental conditionings for a sperm DNA fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojar, Iwona; Witczak, Mariusz; Wdowiak, Artur

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the presented study was determination of the effect of selected agents on sperm DNA fragmentation--superoxide dismutase in seminal plasma, the patients' age, and burdening with the tobacco smoking habit. An attempt was also undertaken to evaluate the effect of DNA fragmentation on the effectiveness of infertility treatment. The study covered 186 men who received treatment due to infertility. The database and statistical analyses were performed using computer software STATISTICA 7.1. A relationship was observed between sperm DNA fragmentation and superoxide dismutase activity, the higher the SOD activity, the lower the percentage of sperm fragmentation (rs=-0.324; P=0.000; r = -0.2110). A statistical relationship was found between sperm DNA fragmentation and the percentage of pregnancies obtained during the first year of treatment--patients with the lower DFI more frequently became fathers during the first year of trying, compared to the remainder (t=2.51; P=0.013). A statistically significant relationship was confirmed (rs=-0.370; P=0.000) consisting in an increase in the DFI with respondents' age. No significant differences were noted between the DFI and the tobacco smoking habit (Chi2=0.29; P=0.926). The percentage of sperm DNA fragmentation was inversely proportional to superoxide dismutase activity in seminal plasma. DNA fragmentation becomes intensified with patients' age. Cigarette smoking has no effect on sperm DNA fragmentation. DNA fragmentation exerts an effect on the effectiveness of infertility treatment.

  18. Habitat specialization predicts genetic response to fragmentation in tropical birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khimoun, Aurélie; Eraud, Cyril; Ollivier, Anthony; Arnoux, Emilie; Rocheteau, Vincent; Bely, Marine; Lefol, Emilie; Delpuech, Martin; Carpentier, Marie-Laure; Leblond, Gilles; Levesque, Anthony; Charbonnel, Anaïs; Faivre, Bruno; Garnier, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    Habitat fragmentation is one of the most severe threats to biodiversity as it may lead to changes in population genetic structure, with ultimate modifications of species evolutionary potential and local extinctions. Nonetheless, fragmentation does not equally affect all species and identifying which ecological traits are related to species sensitivity to habitat fragmentation could help prioritization of conservation efforts. Despite the theoretical link between species ecology and extinction proneness, comparative studies explicitly testing the hypothesis that particular ecological traits underlies species-specific population structure are rare. Here, we used a comparative approach on eight bird species, co-occurring across the same fragmented landscape. For each species, we quantified relative levels of forest specialization and genetic differentiation among populations. To test the link between forest specialization and susceptibility to forest fragmentation, we assessed species responses to fragmentation by comparing levels of genetic differentiation between continuous and fragmented forest landscapes. Our results revealed a significant and substantial population structure at a very small spatial scale for mobile organisms such as birds. More importantly, we found that specialist species are more affected by forest fragmentation than generalist ones. Finally, our results suggest that even a simple habitat specialization index can be a satisfying predictor of genetic and demographic consequences of habitat fragmentation, providing a reliable practical and quantitative tool for conservation biology. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Fluctuations and symmetry energy in nuclear fragmentation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonna, M

    2013-01-25

    Within a dynamical description of nuclear fragmentation, based on the liquid-gas phase transition scenario, we explore the relation between neutron-proton density fluctuations and nuclear symmetry energy. We show that, along the fragmentation path, isovector fluctuations follow the evolution of the local density and approach an equilibrium value connected to the local symmetry energy. Higher-density regions are characterized by smaller average asymmetry and narrower isotopic distributions. This dynamical analysis points out that fragment final state isospin fluctuations can probe the symmetry energy of the density domains from which fragments originate.

  20. Isolation and Structural Analysis of the Seed-Specific Promoter from Soybean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAIYIN Qing-ge-le; LI Ming-chun; CAI Yi; ZHAO Gui-lan; ZHAO Yue-ju; XING Lai-jun

    2005-01-01

    The promoter region (BCSP666) of β-conglycinin α-subunit gene from the genomic DNA of soybean Jilin 43 was isolated by PCR method. Sequencing analysis showed that the cloned fragment BCSP666 had the similar structure to the soybean seed-specific promoter β-conglycinin α'-subunit gene promoter and β-conglycinin β-subunit gene promoter, and it also contains many motifs that contribute to the seed-specific promoter activity. Based on this sequencing analysis, we deduced that promoter fragment BCSP666 had the seed-sepecific promoter activity. And then we constructed the seedspecific expression vector pBMI666 with the promoter fragment BCSP666 and △6-fatty acid desaturase gene from Mortierella isabellina. The △6-fatty acid desaturase is the rate-limiting enzyme of the desaturation of linoleic acid in the production of a human essential fatty acid, γ-linolenic acid(GLA). The production of γ-linolenic acid(GLA) was observed in soybean callus cells, which were transformed with this vector. This confirmed the activity of the activity fragment BCSP666.

  1. Functional analysis of a novel human serotonin transporter gene promoter in immortalized raphe cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, O V; Thomassen, M; Larsen, M B

    1999-01-01

    were found to possess the additional 379 bp fragment. The integrity of the promoter was furthermore confirmed by genomic Southern blotting. The promoter activity was analyzed by reporter gene assays in neuronal and non-neuronal serotonergic cell lines. In immortalized serotonergic raphe neurons, RN46A...

  2. Magnetic processes in a collapsing dense core. II Fragmentation. Is there a fragmentation crisis ?

    CERN Document Server

    Hennebelle, P

    2007-01-01

    Abridged. A large fraction of stars are found in binary systems. It is therefore important for our understanding of the star formation process, to investigate the fragmentation of dense molecular cores. We study the influence of the magnetic field, ideally coupled to the gas, on the fragmentation in multiple systems of collapsing cores. We present high resolution numerical simulations performed with the RAMSES MHD code starting with a uniform sphere in solid body rotation and a uniform magnetic field parallel to the rotation axis. We pay particular attention to the strength of the magnetic field and interpret the results using the analysis presented in a companion paper. The results depend much on the amplitude, $A$, of the perturbations seeded initially. For a low amplitude, $A=0.1$, we find that for values of the mass-to-flux over critical mass-to-flux ratio, $\\mu$, as high as $\\mu = 20$, the centrifugally supported disk which fragments in the hydrodynamical case, is stabilized and remains axisymmetric. Det...

  3. Fragmentation and Unpredictability of Early-Life Experience in Mental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baram, Tallie Z.; Solodkin, Ana; Davis, Elysia P.; Stern, Hal; Obenaus, Andre; Sandman, Curt A.; Small, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    Maternal sensory signals in early life play a crucial role in programming the structure and function of the developing brain, promoting vulnerability or resilience to emotional and cognitive disorders. In rodent models of early-life stress, fragmentation and unpredictability of maternally derived sensory signals provoke persistent cognitive and emotional dysfunction in offspring. Similar variability and inconsistency of maternal signals during both gestation and early postnatal human life may influence development of emotional and cognitive functions, including those that underlie later depression and anxiety. PMID:22885631

  4. Epidural catheter fragment entrapment: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi M

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1":*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Epidural catheters are seldom difficult to remove from patients. The breakage of the catheters is uncommon, troublesome and occasionally dangerous. "n"nCase presentation: A lumbar epidural catheter inserted in a 17 year-old man for applying anesthesia for internal fixation of femur fracture and subsequent postoperative epidural analgesia. In the third postoperative day, during unsuccessful attempt for removing the catheter, it was broken and was retained in his back. A CT- scan was performed and shows a fragment of catheter in the sub- laminar ligament between L3 and L4 without any connection with epidural space. As the patient had no complaint the fractured fragment was left in site and he was just followed up in the clinic."n"nConclusion: The knowledge of practical method in locating the retained epidural catheter, and the indication for surgical removal are very important. CT- scan is useful in showing the mechanism and locating the epidural catheter entrapment and facilitating surgical follow-up.

  5. RAY TRACING RENDER MENGGUNAKAN FRAGMENT ANTI ALIASING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Febriliyan Samopa

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Rendering is generating surface and three-dimensional effects on an object displayed on a monitor screen. Ray tracing as a rendering method that traces ray for each image pixel has a drawback, that is, aliasing (jaggies effect. There are some methods for executing anti aliasing. One of those methods is OGSS (Ordered Grid Super Sampling. OGSS is able to perform aliasing well. However, this method requires more computation time since sampling of all pixels in the image will be increased. Fragment Anti Aliasing (FAA is a new alternative method that can cope with the drawback. FAA will check the image when performing rendering to a scene. Jaggies effect is only happened at curve and gradient object. Therefore, only this part of object that will experience sampling magnification. After this sampling magnification and the pixel values are computed, then downsample is performed to retrieve the original pixel values. Experimental results show that the software can implement ray tracing well in order to form images, and it can implement FAA and OGSS technique to perform anti aliasing. In general, rendering using FAA is faster than using OGSS

  6. RICE SUCROSE SYNTHASE PROMOTER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    A promoter is described. The promoter comprises a nucleotide sequence corresponding to that shown as SEQ ID No. 1 or a variant, homologue or derivative thereof.......A promoter is described. The promoter comprises a nucleotide sequence corresponding to that shown as SEQ ID No. 1 or a variant, homologue or derivative thereof....

  7. Release and characteristics of fungal fragments in various conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mensah-Attipoe, Jacob [Department of Environmental Science, University of Eastern Finland, Yliopistonranta 1D, P. O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Saari, Sampo [Department of Physics, Tampere University of Technology, Korkeakoulunkatu 3, 33720 Tampere (Finland); Veijalainen, Anna-Maria; Pasanen, Pertti [Department of Environmental Science, University of Eastern Finland, Yliopistonranta 1D, P. O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Keskinen, Jorma [Department of Physics, Tampere University of Technology, Korkeakoulunkatu 3, 33720 Tampere (Finland); Leskinen, Jari T.T. [SIB Labs, University of Eastern Finland, Yliopistonranta 1E, P. O. Box 1627, FI-70211, Kuopio (Finland); Reponen, Tiina, E-mail: reponeta@ucmail.uc.edu [Department of Environmental Science, University of Eastern Finland, Yliopistonranta 1D, P. O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 670056, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0056 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Intact spores and submicrometer size fragments are released from moldy building materials during growth and sporulation. It is unclear whether all fragments originate from fungal growth or if small pieces of building materials are also aerosolized as a result of microbial decomposition. In addition, particles may be formed through nucleation from secondary metabolites of fungi, such as microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs). In this study, we used the elemental composition of particles to characterize the origin of submicrometer fragments released from materials contaminated by fungi. Particles from three fungal species (Aspergillus versicolor, Cladosporium cladosporioides and Penicillium brevicompactum), grown on agar, wood and gypsum board were aerosolized using the Fungal Spore Source Strength Tester (FSSST) at three air velocities (5, 16 and 27 m/s). Released spores (optical size, d{sub p} ≥ 0.8 μm) and fragments (d{sub p} ≤ 0.8 μm) were counted using direct-reading optical aerosol instruments. Particles were also collected on filters, and their morphology and elemental composition analyzed using scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) coupled with an Energy-Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Among the studied factors, air velocity resulted in the most consistent trends in the release of fungal particles. Total concentrations of both fragments and spores increased with an increase in air velocity for all species whereas fragment–spore (F/S) ratios decreased. EDX analysis showed common elements, such as C, O, Mg and Ca, for blank material samples and fungal growth. However, N and P were exclusive to the fungal growth, and therefore were used to differentiate biological fragments from non-biological ones. Our results indicated that majority of fragments contained N and P. Because we observed increased release of fragments with increased air velocities, nucleation of MVOCs was likely not a relevant process in the formation of fungal fragments. Based

  8. Aerodynamic characteristics and respiratory deposition of fungal fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seung-Hyun; Seo, Sung-Chul; Schmechel, Detlef; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Reponen, Tiina

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of fungal fragments and to estimate their respiratory deposition. Fragments and spores of three different fungal species ( Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium melinii, and Stachybotrys chartarum) were aerosolized by the fungal spore source strength tester (FSSST). An electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) measured the size distribution in real-time and collected the aerosolized fungal particles simultaneously onto 12 impactor stages in the size range of 0.3-10 μm utilizing water-soluble ZEF-X10 coating of the impaction stages to prevent spore bounce. For S. chartarum, the average concentration of released fungal fragments was 380 particles cm -3, which was about 514 times higher than that of spores. A. versicolor was found to release comparable amount of spores and fragments. Microscopic analysis confirmed that S. chartarum and A. versicolor did not show any significant spore bounce, whereas the size distribution of P. melinii fragments was masked by spore bounce. Respiratory deposition was calculated using a computer-based model, LUDEP 2.07, for an adult male and a 3-month-old infant utilizing the database on the concentration and size distribution of S. chartarum and A. versicolor aerosols measured by the ELPI. Total deposition fractions for fragments and spores were 27-46% and 84-95%, respectively, showing slightly higher values in an infant than in an adult. For S. chartarum, fragments demonstrated 230-250 fold higher respiratory deposition than spores, while the number of deposited fragments and spores of A. versicolor were comparable. It was revealed that the deposition ratio (the number of deposited fragments divided by that of deposited spores) in the lower airways for an infant was 4-5 times higher than that for an adult. As fungal fragments have been shown to contain mycotoxins and antigens, further exposure assessment should include the measurement of fungal fragments for

  9. Fragmentation pathways of nanofractal structures on surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick, Veronika V.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2011-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the post-growth processes occurring in nanofractals grown on a surface. For this study we have developed a method that accounts for the internal dynamics of particles in a fractal. We demonstrate that the detachment of particles from the fractal and their diff......We present a theoretical analysis of the post-growth processes occurring in nanofractals grown on a surface. For this study we have developed a method that accounts for the internal dynamics of particles in a fractal. We demonstrate that the detachment of particles from the fractal...... and their diffusion within the fractal and over the surface determines the shape of the islands remaining on a surface after the fractal fragmentation. We consider different scenarios of fractal post-growth relaxation and analyze the time evolution of the island's morphology. The results of our calculations...... are compared with available experimental observations, and experiments in which the post-growth relaxation of deposited nanostructures can be tested are suggested....

  10. Shear-induced fragmentation of laponite suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibaud, Thomas; Barentin, Catherine; Taberlet, Nicolas; Manneville, Sébastien

    Simultaneous rheological and velocity profile measurements are performed in a smooth Couette geometry on Laponite suspensions seeded with glass microspheres and undergoing the shear-induced solid-to-fluid (or yielding) transition. Under these slippery boundary conditions, a rich temporal behaviour is uncovered, in which shear localization is observed at short times, that rapidly gives way to a highly heterogeneous flow characterized by intermittent switching from plug-like flow to linear velocity profiles. Such a temporal behaviour is linked to the fragmentation of the initially solid sample into blocks separated by fluidized regions. These solid pieces get progressively eroded over time scales ranging from a few minutes to several hours depending on the applied shear rate $\\dot{\\gamma}$. The steady-state is characterized by a homogeneous flow with almost negligible wall slip. The characteristic time scale for erosion is shown to diverge below some critical shear rate $\\dot{\\gamma}^\\star$ and to scale as $(\\dot{\\gamma}-\\dot{\\gamma}^\\star)^{-n}$ with $n\\simeq 2$ above $\\dot{\\gamma}^\\star$. A tentative model for erosion is discussed together with open questions raised by the present results.

  11. Fragmentation modeling of a resin bonded sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilth, William; Ryckelynck, David

    2017-06-01

    Cemented sands exhibit a complex mechanical behavior that can lead to sophisticated models, with numerous parameters without real physical meaning. However, using a rather simple generalized critical state bonded soil model has proven to be a relevant compromise between an easy calibration and good results. The constitutive model formulation considers a non-associated elasto-plastic formulation within the critical state framework. The calibration procedure, using standard laboratory tests, is complemented by the study of an uniaxial compression test observed by tomography. Using finite elements simulations, this test is simulated considering a non-homogeneous 3D media. The tomography of compression sample gives access to 3D displacement fields by using image correlation techniques. Unfortunately these fields have missing experimental data because of the low resolution of correlations for low displacement magnitudes. We propose a recovery method that reconstructs 3D full displacement fields and 2D boundary displacement fields. These fields are mandatory for the calibration of the constitutive parameters by using 3D finite element simulations. The proposed recovery technique is based on a singular value decomposition of available experimental data. This calibration protocol enables an accurate prediction of the fragmentation of the specimen.

  12. The Nagoya Protocol: Fragmentation or Consolidation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Richerzhagen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In October, 2010, a protocol on access and benefit-sharing (ABS of genetic resources was adopted, the so-called Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources and the Fair and Equitable Sharing of Benefits Arising from their Utilization to the Convention on Biological Diversity. Before the adoption of the Nagoya Protocol, the governance architecture of ABS was already characterized by a multifaceted institutional environment. The use of genetic resources is confronted with many issues (conservation, research and development, intellectual property rights, food security, health issues, climate change that are governed by different institutions and agreements. The Nagoya Protocol contributes to increased fragmentation. However, the question arises whether this new regulatory framework can help to advance the implementation of the ABS provisions of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD. This paper attempts to find an answer to that question by following three analytical steps. First, it analyzes the causes of change against the background of theories of institutional change. Second, it aims to assess the typology of the architecture in order to find out if this new set of rules will contribute to a more synergistic, cooperative or conflictive architecture of ABS governance. Third, the paper looks at the problem of “fit” and identifies criteria that can be used to assess the new ABS governance architecture with regard to its effectiveness.

  13. [Production of recombinant fragments of the Clostridium tetani neurotoxin for the development of new immune-prophylaxis preparations against tetanus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varfolomeeva, N A; Makhotina, O A; Sergeeva, T I; Belyĭ, Iu F

    2003-01-01

    Tetanus belongs to dangerous infection diseases, whose effective prevention can be ensured by vaccines. The acting substance of tetanus vaccines, presently in use, is a partially purified and deprived-of-lethal-action Clostridium tetani neurotoxin. The construction of a subunit preparation on the basis of toxin fragments obtained through gene engineering could be a method aimed at promoting the quality of the used tetanus vaccines. With this goal in mind, we built, within the present case study, the expressing genetic constructions and obtained, in the pure form, an extensive tetanus-vaccine chain with its C-terminal (Hc) fragment, hydride peptides, containing the Hc-fragment and C-terminal fragment of toxin B C. difficile, as well as Hc-fragment and S3 collagen-binding domain of collagenase C. histolyticum. The thus obtained proteins can be used in testing their immunogenic and protective properties, while the conducted study could be a basis for further research of a new-generation vaccine against tetanus and other human infection diseases.

  14. Quantitative approaches for illustrating correlations among the mechanical fragmentation scales, crystallinity and enzymatic hydrolysis glucose yield of rice straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Guanya; Han, Lujia; Gao, Chongfeng; Xiao, Weihua; Zhang, Yang; Cao, Yaoyao

    2017-10-01

    Mechanical fragmentation is an important pretreatment in the biomass biotransformation process. Mechanical fragmentation at the tissue scale significantly reduced the particle size of rice straw but did not significantly change its crystalline properties; the increase in the glucose yield was limited from 28.75% (95.55mg/g substrate) to 35.29% (115.28mg/g substrate). Mechanical fragmentation at the cellular scale destroyed the cell wall structure and reduced its crystalline properties. Thus, the glucose yield also showed a significant increase from 35.29% (115.28mg/g substrate) to 81.71% (287.07mg/g of substrate). The quantitative equations among the particle size, crystalline properties and glucose yield (mg/g substrate) are as follows: CrI=44.14×[1-exp(-0.03658×D50)] and CP=(8.403×logD50-24.1836)/(1-4.225/D50^0.5); GY=-5.636CrI+343.7 and GY=-14.62CP+512.1; and GY=97.218+247.5×exp(-0.03824×D50). The quantitative correlations among the mechanical fragmentation scales and crystalline properties can determine the effect and mechanism of mechanical fragmentation on biomass and can further promote the construction of a cost-competitive biotransformation process for biomass. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Quantum fluctuation effects on nuclear fragment and atomic cluster formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Akira [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Randrup, J.

    1997-05-01

    We investigate the nuclear fragmentation and atomic cluster formation by means of the recently proposed quantal Langevin treatment. It is shown that the effect of the quantal fluctuation is in the opposite direction in nuclear fragment and atomic cluster size distribution. This tendency is understood through the effective classical temperature for the observables. (author)

  16. The Progressive Fragmentation of 332P/Ikeya-Murakami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleyna, J. T.; Ye, Q.-Z.; Hui, M.-T.; Meech, K. J.; Wainscoat, R.; Micheli, M.; Keane, J. V.; Weaver, H. A.; Weryk, R.

    2016-08-01

    We describe 2016 January-April observations of the fragments of 332P/Ikeya-Murakami, a comet earlier observed in a 2010 October outburst. We present photometry of the fragments and perform simulations to infer the time of breakup. We argue that the eastern-most rapidly brightening fragment (F4) best corresponds to the original nucleus, rather than the initial bright fragment F1. We compute radial and tangential nongravitational parameters, A 1 = (1.5 ± 0.4) × 10-8 au day-2 and (7.2 ± 1.9) × 10-9 au day-2 both are consistent with zero at the 4σ level. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the fragments were emitted on the outbound journey well after the 2010 outburst, with bright fragment F1 splitting in early 2014 and the fainter fragments within months of the 2016 January recovery. Western fragment F7 is the oldest, dating from 2011. We suggest that the delayed onset of the splitting is consistent with a self-propagating crystallization of water ice.

  17. Simulation of natural fragmentation of rings cut from warheads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Moxnes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural fragmentation of warheads that detonates causes the casing of the warhead to split into various sized fragments through shear or radial fractures depending on the toughness, density, and grain size of the material. The best known formula for the prediction of the size distribution is the Mott formulae, which is further examined by Grady and Kipp by investigating more carefully the statistical most random way of portioning a given area into a number of entities. We examine the fragmentation behavior of radially expanding steel rings cut from a 25 mm warhead by using an in house smooth particle hydrodynamic (SPH simulation code called REGULUS. Experimental results were compared with numerical results applying varying particle size and stochastic fracture strain. The numerically obtained number of fragments was consistent with experimental results. Increasing expansion velocity of the rings increases the number of fragments. Statistical variation of the material parameters influences the fragment characteristics, especially for low expansion velocities. A least square regression fit to the cumulative number of fragments by applying a generalized Mott distribution shows that the shape parameter is around 4 for the rings, which is in contrast to the Mott distribution with a shape parameter of ½. For initially polar distributed particles, we see signs of a bimodal cumulative fragment distribution. Adding statistical variation in material parameters of the fracture model causes the velocity numerical solutions to become less sensitive to changes in resolution for Cartesian distributed particles.

  18. Chromosomal fragments transmitted through three generations in Oncopeltus (Hemiptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaChance, L E; Degrugillier, M

    1969-10-10

    Chromosomal fragments and translocations induced by x-rays in the sperm of adult milkweed bugs, Oncopeltus fasciatus (Dallas), were detected in the meiotic cells of F(1), F(2), and F(3), males and caused high levels of sterility in lintreated progeny. The persistence of these fragments through numerous generations of cells confirmed the holokinetic nature of the milkweed bug chromosomes.

  19. Habitat connectivity and fragmented nuthatch populations in agricultural landscapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langevelde, van F.

    1999-01-01

    In agricultural landscapes, the habitat of many species is subject to fragmentation. When the habitat of a species is fragmented and the distances between patches of habitat are large relative to the movement distances of the species, it can be expected that the degree of habitat connectivity affect

  20. Comparison of calculated and experimental results of fragmenting cylinder experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WILSON,L.T.; REEDAL,D.R.; KIPP,MARLIN E.; MARTINEZ,REINA R.; GRADY,D.E.

    2000-06-02

    The Grady-Kipp fragmentation model provides a physically based method for determining the fracture and breakup of materials under high loading rates. Recently, this model has been implemented into the CTH Shock Physics Code and has been used to simulate several published experiments. Materials studied in this paper are AerMet 100 steel and a 90% tungsten alloy. The experimental geometry consists of a right circular cylinder filled with an explosive main charge that is initiated at its center. The sudden expansion of the resulting detonation products causes fracture of the cylinder. Strain rates seen in the cylinder are on the order of 10{sup 4} s{sup {minus}1}. The average fragment sizes calculated with the Grady-Kipp fragmentation model successfully replicate the mean fragment size obtained from the experimental fragment distribution. When Poisson statistics are applied to the calculated local average fragment sizes, good correlation is also observed with the shape of the experimental cumulative fragment distribution. The experimental fragmentation results, CTH numerical simulations, and correlation of these numerical results with the experimental data are described.

  1. [Fragmentation and/or decondensation of spermatic DNA: which consequences?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, E; Muratori, M; Marchiani, S; Tamburrino, L; Fallet, C

    2010-04-01

    Absence of DNA fragmentation and/or decondensation is a marker of sperm quality and is related to outcome of assisted reproductive techniques: new tests have been set up to determine fragmentation rate. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Physiognomy and Eschatology: Some More Fragments of 4Q561

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Søren; Høgenhaven, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    Text, translation and discussion of previously unpublished fragments of "4Q561 Physiognomy". The content of the newly published fragments is of a narrative, and possibly eschatological nature, in contradistinction to the physiognomic divination in the previously known ones, causing the authors to...

  3. Public Values in Water Law : A Case of Substantive Fragmentation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambrus, Monika; Gilissen, Herman Kasper; van Kempen, Jasper JH

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal fragmentation, from a public-values perspective, is a quite well-documented phenomenon in international (water) law. However, the literature does not provide any insight into vertical or substantive fragmentation, i.e. differences in the protection of public values at the various institut

  4. Public Values in Water Law: A Case of Substantive Fragmentation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambrus, M.; Gilissen, Herman Kasper|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314838732; van Kempen, Jasper|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314011900

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal fragmentation, from a public-values perspective, is a quite well-documented phenomenon in international (water) law. However, the literature does not provide any insight into vertical or substantive fragmentation, i.e. differences in the protection of public values at the various institut

  5. Between fragments and fullness: Worshipping in the in- between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-13

    Mar 13, 2013 ... understanding of fullness, as articulated for instance in the concept Ubunye [we are one]. ... linked to the question of identity, namely the experience of fragment and .... The fragments of the future, on the other hand, signify ..... could perhaps be described as a combination of 'two principles of representation,.

  6. Temperature dependent fission fragment distribution in the Langevin equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kun; MA Yu-Gang; ZHENG Qing-Shan; CAI Xiang-Zhou; FANG De-Qing; FU Yao; LU Guang-Cheng; TIAN Wen-Dong; WANG Hong-Wei

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependent width of the fission fragment distributions was simulated in the Langevin equation by taking two-parameter exponential form of the fission fragment mass variance at scission point for each fission event. The result can reproduce experimental data well, and it permits to make reliable estimate for unmeasured product yields near symmetry fission.

  7. Analysis of the fragmentation debris environment between 2005 and 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegel, Sven Kevin; Stabroth, Sebastian; Wiedemann, Carsten; Klinkrad, Heiner; Krag, Holger; Vörsmann, Peter

    Several fragmentation events have occurred in the years since the release of the ESA space debris model MASTER-2005 (Meteoroid and Space Debris Terrestrial Environment Reference). During this period some notable events took place which resulted in an unusually large increase in the spatial debris density. A compilation of the fragmentation events between 2005 and 2008 is presented based on data gathered from the literature. Event parameters such as object type and location are discussed. The spatial object density is then simulated using the MASTER- 2005 population generation tool POEM (Program for Orbital Debris Environment Modelling). The NASA Breakup Model implemented in POEM is used to determine the properties of the initial cloud of fragments for each event. Propagating the orbital elements of all fragments yields the time dependent evolution of the object clouds. Spatial densities are then calculated from the distribution of the fragments. The results are discussed for all events in the detailed time frame. The changes in the orbital fragment environment since 2005 as a consequence of the presented events are of further interest. To this end, the overall density which is obtained from the simulations with POEM is compared to the predicted growth of the total spatial density. The prediction for the fragmentation debris is generated with MASTER-2005 on the basis of a business-as-usual scenario for the year 2005. Deviations between the resulting spatial density distributions are discussed in terms of fragmentation rates, breakup locations and breakup cause.

  8. Modelling the negative effects of landscape fragmentation on habitat selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langevelde, van F.

    2015-01-01

    Landscape fragmentation constrains movement of animals between habitat patches. Fragmentation may, therefore, limit the possibilities to explore and select the best habitat patches, and some animals may have to cope with low-quality patches due to these movement constraints. If so, these individuals

  9. High-throughput fragment screening by affinity LC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong-Thi, Minh-Dao; Bergström, Maria; Fex, Tomas; Isaksson, Roland; Ohlson, Sten

    2013-02-01

    Fragment screening, an emerging approach for hit finding in drug discovery, has recently been proven effective by its first approved drug, vemurafenib, for cancer treatment. Techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, surface plasmon resonance, and isothemal titration calorimetry, with their own pros and cons, have been employed for screening fragment libraries. As an alternative approach, screening based on high-performance liquid chromatography separation has been developed. In this work, we present weak affinity LC/MS as a method to screen fragments under high-throughput conditions. Affinity-based capillary columns with immobilized thrombin were used to screen a collection of 590 compounds from a fragment library. The collection was divided into 11 mixtures (each containing 35 to 65 fragments) and screened by MS detection. The primary screening was performed in 3500 fragments per day). Thirty hits were defined, which subsequently entered a secondary screening using an active site-blocked thrombin column for confirmation of specificity. One hit showed selective binding to thrombin with an estimated dissociation constant (K (D)) in the 0.1 mM range. This study shows that affinity LC/MS is characterized by high throughput, ease of operation, and low consumption of target and fragments, and therefore it promises to be a valuable method for fragment screening.

  10. Land fragmentation and its driving forces in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, S.; Heerink, N.; Qu, F.

    2006-01-01

    Fragmentation of landholdings is commonly regarded as a major obstacle to agricultural production growth in China. This study analyses the factors contributing to land fragmentation, and uses household- and village-level data from 11 villages in Jiangxi Province to test these factors empirically.

  11. Adaptation to fragmentation: evolutionary dynamics driven by human influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheptou, Pierre-Olivier; Hargreaves, Anna L; Bonte, Dries; Jacquemyn, Hans

    2017-01-19

    Fragmentation-the process by which habitats are transformed into smaller patches isolated from each other-has been identified as a major threat for biodiversity. Fragmentation has well-established demographic and population genetic consequences, eroding genetic diversity and hindering gene flow among patches. However, fragmentation should also select on life history, both predictably through increased isolation, demographic stochasticity and edge effects, and more idiosyncratically via altered biotic interactions. While species have adapted to natural fragmentation, adaptation to anthropogenic fragmentation has received little attention. In this review, we address how and whether organisms might adapt to anthropogenic fragmentation. Drawing on selected case studies and evolutionary ecology models, we show that anthropogenic fragmentation can generate selection on traits at both the patch and landscape scale, and affect the adaptive potential of populations. We suggest that dispersal traits are likely to experience especially strong selection, as dispersal both enables migration among patches and increases the risk of landing in the inhospitable matrix surrounding them. We highlight that suites of associated traits are likely to evolve together. Importantly, we show that adaptation will not necessarily rescue populations from the negative effects of fragmentation, and may even exacerbate them, endangering the entire metapopulation.This article is part of the themed issue 'Human influences on evolution, and the ecological and societal consequences'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  12. Quantification of habitat fragmentation reveals extinction risk in terrestrial mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Kevin R; Burdett, Christopher L; Theobald, David M; King, Sarah R B; Di Marco, Moreno; Rondinini, Carlo; Boitani, Luigi

    2017-07-18

    Although habitat fragmentation is often assumed to be a primary driver of extinction, global patterns of fragmentation and its relationship to extinction risk have not been consistently quantified for any major animal taxon. We developed high-resolution habitat fragmentation models and used phylogenetic comparative methods to quantify the effects of habitat fragmentation on the world's terrestrial mammals, including 4,018 species across 26 taxonomic Orders. Results demonstrate that species with more fragmentation are at greater risk of extinction, even after accounting for the effects of key macroecological predictors, such as body size and geographic range size. Species with higher fragmentation had smaller ranges and a lower proportion of high-suitability habitat within their range, and most high-suitability habitat occurred outside of protected areas, further elevating extinction risk. Our models provide a quantitative evaluation of extinction risk assessments for species, allow for identification of emerging threats in species not classified as threatened, and provide maps of global hotspots of fragmentation for the world's terrestrial mammals. Quantification of habitat fragmentation will help guide threat assessment and strategic priorities for global mammal conservation.

  13. Habitat fragmentation and the Burrowing Owls (Speotyto cunicularia) in Saskatchewan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert G. Warnock; Paul C. James

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between landscape (125,664 ha circular plots) fragmentation patterns and the spatial distribution of Burrowing Owls (Speotyto cunicularia) was investigated in the heavily fragmented grasslands of Saskatchewan. Data were collected from 152 Burrowing Owl sites and 250 random sites located on 1990 LANDSAT-TM satellite images and 1:250,...

  14. Quantifying terrestrial habitat loss and fragmentation: A protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin McGarigal; Samuel Cushman; Claudia Regan

    2005-01-01

    Anthropogenic habitat loss and fragmentation have been implicated as among the key drivers of the burgeoning global biodiversity crisis. In response, there is a growing mandate among natural resource managers to evaluate the impacts of proposed management actions on the extent and fragmentation of habitats. Unfortunately, few guidelines exist to help managers...

  15. Modelling the negative effects of landscape fragmentation on habitat selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langevelde, van F.

    2015-01-01

    Landscape fragmentation constrains movement of animals between habitat patches. Fragmentation may, therefore, limit the possibilities to explore and select the best habitat patches, and some animals may have to cope with low-quality patches due to these movement constraints. If so, these individuals

  16. Public Values in Water Law : A Case of Substantive Fragmentation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambrus, Monika; Gilissen, Herman Kasper; van Kempen, Jasper JH

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal fragmentation, from a public-values perspective, is a quite well-documented phenomenon in international (water) law. However, the literature does not provide any insight into vertical or substantive fragmentation, i.e. differences in the protection of public values at the various

  17. Public Values in Water Law: A Case of Substantive Fragmentation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambrus, M.; Gilissen, Herman Kasper|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314838732; van Kempen, Jasper|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314011900

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal fragmentation, from a public-values perspective, is a quite well-documented phenomenon in international (water) law. However, the literature does not provide any insight into vertical or substantive fragmentation, i.e. differences in the protection of public values at the various

  18. Quantifying Urban Fragmentation under Economic Transition in Shanghai City, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyuan You

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Urban fragmentation affects sustainability through multiple impacts on economic, social, and environmental cost. Characterizing the dynamics of urban fragmentation in relation to economic transition should provide implications for sustainability. However, rather few efforts have been made in this issue. Using the case of Shanghai (China, this paper quantifies urban fragmentation in relation to economic transition. In particular, urban fragmentation is quantified by a time-series of remotely sensed images and a set of landscape metrics; and economic transition is described by a set of indicators from three aspects (globalization, decentralization, and marketization. Results show that urban fragmentation presents an increasing linear trend. Multivariate regression identifies positive linear correlation between urban fragmentation and economic transition. More specifically, the relative influence is different for the three components of economic transition. The relative influence of decentralization is stronger than that of globalization and marketization. The joint influences of decentralization and globalization are the strongest for urban fragmentation. The demonstrated methodology can be applicable to other places after making suitable adjustment of the economic transition indicators and fragmentation metrics.

  19. Identification of a bi-directional promoter from Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A bi-directional promoter of Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV) was obtained with the total DNA from TYLCCNV isolate Y10 infected tobacco leaves as a template. Plant expression vectors were constructed by fusing the amplified DNA fragment with the gus gene and nopaline terminator in different orientations. The vectors containing promoter fragments were transferred into leaf cells and plant stems of Nicotiana benthamiana by Agrobacterium-mediated method. Transient expression results showed that both the complementary and virion-sense promoters could drive the gus gene to express, and the GUS activity of the complementary-sense promoter was stronger than that of the virion-sense. Co-expression of the vector containing βC1 gene of TYLCCNV DNAβ with the vector containing a bi-directional promoter revealed that the βC1 protein has no impact on expression of either the virion- or the complementarysense promoter.

  20. Interaction of bombesin and its fragments with gold nanoparticles analyzed using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tąta, Agnieszka; Szkudlarek, Aleksandra; Kim, Younkyoo; Proniewicz, Edyta

    2017-02-01

    This work demonstrates the application of commercially available stable surface composed of gold nanograins with diameters ranging from 70 to 226 nm deposited onto silicon wafer for surface-enhanced Raman scattering investigations of biologically active compounds, such as bombesin (BN) and its fragments. BN is an important neurotransmitter involved in a complex signaling pathways and biological responses; for instance, hypertensive action, contractive on uterus, colon or ileum, locomotor activity, stimulation of gastric and insulin secretion as well as growth promotion of various tumor cell lines, including: lung, prostate, stomach, colon, and breast. It has also been shown that 8-14 BN C-terminal fragment partially retains the biological activity of BN. The SERS results for BN and its fragment demonstrated that (1) three amino acids from these peptides sequence; i.e., L-histidine, L-methionine, and L-tryptophan, are involved in the interaction with gold coated silicon wafer and (2) the strength of these interactions depends upon the aforementioned amino acids position in the peptide sequence.

  1. Nuclear fragmentation measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Napoli, M. [INFN - Sezione di Catania (Italy); Agodi, C.; Blancato, A. A.; Cavallaro, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Sardina, D.; Scuderi, V. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (Italy); Battistoni, G. [INFN - Sezione di Milano (Italy); Bondi, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; Nicolosi, D.; Raciti, G.; Tropea, S. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Italy and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Catania (Italy); Giacoppo, F. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo (Norway); Morone, M. C. [Dipartimento di Biopatologia e Diagnostica per Immagini, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); Pandola, L. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy); Rapisarda, E. [Nuclear and Radiation Physics Section, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Celestijnenlaan Heverlee (Belgium); Romano, F. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (Italy) and Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche E. Fermi Roma (Italy); and others

    2013-04-19

    Nuclear fragmentation measurements are necessary in hadrontherapy and space radiation protection, to predict the effects of the ion nuclear interactions within the human body. Nowadays, a very limited set of carbon fragmentation cross sections has been measured and in particular, to our knowledge, no double differential fragmentation cross sections at intermediate energies are available in literature. We have measured the double differential cross sections and the angular distributions of the secondary fragments produced in the {sup 12}C fragmentation at 62 AMeV on a thin carbon target. The experimental data have been also used to benchmark the prediction capability of the Geant4 Monte Carlo code at intermediate energies, where it was never tested before.

  2. Does reaction-diffusion support the duality of fragmentation effect?

    CERN Document Server

    Roques, Lionel

    2009-01-01

    There is a gap between single-species model predictions, and empirical studies, regarding the effect of habitat fragmentation per se, i.e., a process involving the breaking apart of habitat without loss of habitat. Empirical works indicate that fragmentation can have positive as well as negative effects, whereas, traditionally, single-species models predict a negative effect of fragmentation. Within the class of reaction-diffusion models, studies almost unanimously predict such a detrimental effect. In this paper, considering a single-species reaction-diffusion model with a removal -- or similarly harvesting -- term, in two dimensions, we find both positive and negative effects of fragmentation of the reserves, i.e. the protected regions where no removal occurs. Fragmented reserves lead to higher population sizes for time-constant removal terms. On the other hand, when the removal term is proportional to the population density, higher population sizes are obtained on aggregated reserves, but maximum yields ar...

  3. Limestone fragmentation and attrition during fluidized bed oxyfiring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrizio Scala; Piero Salatino [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione - CNR, Napoli (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    Attrition/fragmentation of limestone under simulated fluidized bed oxyfiring conditions was investigated by means of an experimental protocol that had been previously developed for characterization of attrition/fragmentation of sorbents in air-blown atmospheric fluidized bed combustors. The protocol was based on the use of different and mutually complementary techniques. The extent and pattern of attrition by surface wear in the dense phase of a fluidized bed were assessed in experiments carried out with a bench scale fluidized bed combustor under simulated oxyfiring conditions. Sorbent samples generated during simulated oxyfiring tests were further characterized from the standpoint of fragmentation upon high velocity impact by means of a purposely designed particle impactor. Results showed that under calcination-hindered conditions attrition and fragmentation patterns are much different from those occurring under air-blown atmospheric combustion conditions. Noteworthy, attrition/fragmentation enhanced particle sulfation by continuously regenerating the exposed particle surface. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Analytical Predictions of Fragment Penetration through Hollow Concrete Masonry Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bogosian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling steel casing fragment impacts on hollow CMU poses some problems, since the fragments will typically penetrate through the front face and may also penetrate the back face. Techniques are needed for predicting (a the size of the hole created by the penetration, (b the size of the annular region of damaged concrete around the hole, and (c the residual velocity of the fragment. A series of calculations using the AUTODYN code were performed to investigate the accuracy and reliability of the model. The model uses the smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH approach to represent the CMU. A variety of steel fragment sizes were projected at a layer of CMU, and the resulting hole size, damage, and fragment residual velocity were tabulated. Results were validated against existing empirical relationships to insure the model's applicability, while additional analyses demonstrated trends and parametric sensitivity.

  5. Fission fragments transport by gaseous flow with aerosols

    CERN Document Server

    Gangrskij, Y P; Zhemenik, V I; Myshinskij, G V; Penionzhkevich, Yu E; Selesh, O

    2002-01-01

    Paper describes a pilot facility for fission fragment transport by gaseous flow with aerosols. This facility designed for fragment transport consists of a reaction chamber with irradiated target, receipt chamber to collect fragments, aerosol generator, roughing pump to pump put gas and a capillary connecting these units of facility. Paper presents the results of facility testing with fragments of sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U photofission by microtron Bremsstrahlung. The obtained parameters of facility (up to 70% efficiency of transport, up to 0.1 s time of transport at 1 m distance) enable to use it efficiently in experiments dealing with heavy nuclei fission and with investigation in properties of fission fragments

  6. Quantification of projection angle in fragment generator warhead

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.D.DHOTE; K.P.S.MURTHY; K.M.RAJAN; M.M.SUCHEENDRAN

    2014-01-01

    Tactical Ballistic Missile (TBM) class target neutralization by the fragment spray of a Fragment Generator Warhead (FGW) calls for quantification of fragment projection angle scatter to finalize the end game engagement logic. For conventional axi-symmetric warhead, dispersion is assumed to be normal with a standard deviation of 30. However, such information is not available in case of FGW. Hence, a set of experiments are conducted to determine the dispersion of fragments. The experiments are conducted with a specific configuration of FGW in an identical arena to quantify the scatter and then verified its applicability to other configurations having a range of L/D and C/M ratios, and contoured fragmenting discs. From the experimental study, it is concluded that the scatter in projection angle follows normal distribution with a standard deviation of 0.75? at Chi-square significance level of 0.01(c20.99).

  7. Quantification of projection angle in fragment generator warhead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.D. Dhote

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Tactical Ballistic Missile (TBM class target neutralization by the fragment spray of a Fragment Generator Warhead (FGW calls for quantification of fragment projection angle scatter to finalize the end game engagement logic. For conventional axi-symmetric warhead, dispersion is assumed to be normal with a standard deviation of 30. However, such information is not available in case of FGW. Hence, a set of experiments are conducted to determine the dispersion of fragments. The experiments are conducted with a specific configuration of FGW in an identical arena to quantify the scatter and then verified its applicability to other configurations having a range of L/D and C/M ratios, and contoured fragmenting discs. From the experimental study, it is concluded that the scatter in projection angle follows normal distribution with a standard deviation of 0.75° at Chi-square significance level of 0.01(χ20.99.

  8. Fission fragment mass distributions via prompt -ray spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L S Danu; D C Biswas; B K Nayak; R K Choudhury

    2015-09-01

    The distribution of fragment masses formed in nuclear fission is one of the most striking features of the process. Such measurements are very important to understand the shape evolution of the nucleus from ground state to scission through intermediate saddle points. The fission fragment mass distributions, generally obtained via conventional methods (i.e., by measuring the energy and/or the velocity of the correlated fission fragments) are limited to a mass resolution of 4–5 units. On the other hand, by employing the -ray spectroscopy, it is possible to estimate the yield of individual fission fragments. In this work, determination of the fission fragment mass distribution by employing prompt -ray spectroscopy is described along with the recent results on 238U(18O, f) and 238U(32S, f) systems.

  9. Fragment-based activity space: smaller is better.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesterkamp, Thomas; Whittaker, Mark

    2008-06-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery has the potential to supersede traditional high throughput screening based drug discovery for molecular targets amenable to structure determination. This is because the chemical diversity coverage is better accomplished by a fragment collection of reasonable size than by larger HTS collections. Furthermore, fragments have the potential to be efficient target binders with higher probability than more elaborated drug-like compounds. The selection of the fragment screening technique is driven by sensitivity and throughput considerations, and we advocate in the present article the use of high concentration bioassays in conjunction with NMR-based hit confirmation. Subsequent ligand X-ray structure determination of the fragment ligand in complex with the target protein by co-crystallisation or crystal soaking can focus on confirmed binders.

  10. Nuclear fragmentation measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Napoli, M.; Agodi, C.; Battistoni, G.; Blancato, A. A.; Bondı, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Giacoppo, F.; Morone, M. C.; Nicolosi, D.; Pandola, L.; Raciti, G.; Rapisarda, E.; Romano, F.; Sardina, D.; Scuderi, V.; Sfienti, C.; Tropea, S.

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear fragmentation measurements are necessary in hadrontherapy and space radiation protection, to predict the effects of the ion nuclear interactions within the human body. Nowadays, a very limited set of carbon fragmentation cross sections has been measured and in particular, to our knowledge, no double differential fragmentation cross sections at intermediate energies are available in literature. We have measured the double differential cross sections and the angular distributions of the secondary fragments produced in the 12C fragmentation at 62 AMeV on a thin carbon target. The experimental data have been also used to benchmark the prediction capability of the Geant4 Monte Carlo code at intermediate energies, where it was never tested before.

  11. Fragmentation of a viscoelastic food by human mastication

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Naoki; Shiozawa, Kouichi

    2010-01-01

    Fragment-size distributions have been studied experimentally in masticated viscoelastic food (fish sausage).The mastication experiment in seven subjects was examined. We classified the obtained results into two groups, namely, a single lognormal distribution group and a lognormal distribution with exponential tail group. The facts suggest that the individual variability might affect the fragmentation pattern when the food sample has a much more complicated physical property. In particular, the latter result (lognormal distribution with exponential tail) indicates that the fragmentation pattern by human mastication for fish sausage is different from the fragmentation pattern for raw carrot shown in our previous study. The excellent data fitting by the lognormal distribution with exponential tail implies that the fragmentation process has a size-segregation-structure between large and small parts.In order to explain this structure, we propose a mastication model for fish sausage based on stochastic processes.

  12. Characterization of the scission point from fission-fragment velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Caamaño, M; Delaune, O; Schmidt, K -H; Schmitt, C; Audouin, L; Bacri, C -O; Benlliure, J; Casarejos, E; Derkx, X; Fernández-Domínguez, B; Gaudefroy, L; Golabek, C; Jurado, B; Lemasson, A; Ramos, D; Rodríguez-Tajes, C; Roger, T; Shrivastava, A

    2015-01-01

    The isotopic-yield distributions and kinematic properties of fragments produced in transfer-induced fission of 240Pu and fusion-induced fission of 250Cf, with 9 MeV and 45 MeV of excitation energy respectively, were measured in inverse kinematics with the spectrometer VAMOS. The kinematic properties of identified fission fragments allow to derive properties of the scission configuration such as the distance between fragments, the total kinetic energy, the neutron multiplicity, the total excitation energy, and, for the first time, the proton- and neutron-number sharing during the emergence of the fragments. These properties of the scission point are studied as functions of the fragment atomic number. The correlation between these observables, gathered in one single experiment and for two different fissioning systems at different excitation energies, give valuable information for the understanding and modeling of the fission process.

  13. Evolution of chirality-odd twist-3 fragmentation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J. P.; Zhang, G. P.

    2017-09-01

    We derive the complete set of evolutions of chirality-odd twist-3 fragmentation functions at one-loop level. There are totally nine real twist-3 fragmentation functions, among which seven are independent. The renormalization-scale dependence of the nine functions has an important implication for studies of single transverse-spin asymmetries. We find that the evolutions of the three complex fragmentation functions defined by quark-gluon-quark operator are mixed with themselves. There is no mixing with the fragmentation functions defined only with bilinear quark field operators. In the large-Nc limit the evolutions of the three complex fragmentation functions are simplified and reduced to six homogeneous equations.

  14. Habitat fragmentation, climate change, and inbreeding in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimu, Roosa; Vergeer, Philippine; Angeloni, Francesco; Ouborg, N Joop

    2010-05-01

    Habitat fragmentation and climate change are recognized as major threats to biodiversity. The major challenge for present day plant populations is how to adapt and cope with altered abiotic and biotic environments caused by climate change, when at the same time adaptive and evolutionary potential is decreased as habitat fragmentation reduces genetic variation and increases inbreeding. Although the ecological and evolutionary effects of fragmentation and climate change have been investigated separately, their combined effects remained largely unexplored. In this review, we will discuss the individual and joint effects of habitat fragmentation and climate change on plants and how the abilities and ways in which plants can respond and cope with climate change may be compromised due to habitat fragmentation.

  15. Retention of polyurethane foam fragments during VAC therapy: a complication to be considered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessy, Luca A; Serratore, Francesco; Corrias, Federico; Parisi, Paola; Mazzocchi, Marco; Carlesimo, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a closed-loop, non-invasive active system, characterised by a controlled and localised negative pressure applied on porous polyurethane absorbent foams. It promotes healing of acute and chronic wounds. Therapeutic effects of VAC therapy have been proved and demonstrated; however, this method can have some disadvantages. Even if it is a quite versatile device, only qualified medical/paramedical personnel should use it in order to avoid possible complications that can occur after an improper application. In this report, 11 cases of foam-fragment retention within the wound are presented. This rare complication did not promote healing, but further hindered it. On the basis of our experience, it is mandatory to define the indications, benefits and limitations of VAC therapy.

  16. Statistical study of auroral fragmentation into patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Ayumi; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Otsuka, Yuichi; Oyama, Shin-ichiro; Nozawa, Satonori; Hori, Tomoaki; Lester, Mark; Johnsen, Magnar Gullikstad

    2015-08-01

    The study of auroral dynamics is important when considering disturbances of the magnetosphere. Shiokawa et al. (2010, 2014) reported observations of finger-like auroral structures that cause auroral fragmentation. Those structures are probably produced by macroscopic instabilities in the magnetosphere, mainly of the Rayleigh-Taylor type. However, the statistical characteristics of these structures have not yet been investigated. Here based on observations by an all-sky imager at Tromsø (magnetic latitude = 67.1°N), Norway, over three winter seasons, we statistically analyzed the occurrence conditions of 14 large-scale finger-like structures that developed from large-scale auroral regions including arcs and 6 small-scale finger-like structures that developed in auroral patches. The large-scale structures were seen from midnight to dawn local time and usually appeared at the beginning of the substorm recovery phase, near the low-latitude boundary of the auroral region. The small-scale structures were primarily seen at dawn and mainly occurred in the late recovery phase of substorms. The sizes of these large- and small-scale structures mapped in the magnetospheric equatorial plane are usually larger than the gyroradius of 10 keV protons, indicating that the finger-like structures could be caused by magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. However, the scale of small structures is only twice the gyroradius of 10 keV protons, suggesting that finite Larmor radius effects may contribute to the formation of small-scale structures. The eastward propagation velocities of the structures are -40 to +200 m/s and are comparable with those of plasma drift velocities measured by the colocating Super Dual Auroral Radar Network radar.

  17. Primary and secondary fragmentation of crystal-bearing intermediate magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Thomas J.; McNamara, Keri; Eychenne, Julia; Rust, Alison C.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Scheu, Bettina; Edwards, Robyn

    2016-11-01

    Crystal-rich intermediate magmas are subjected to both primary and secondary fragmentation processes, each of which may produce texturally distinct tephra. Of particular interest for volcanic hazards is the extent to which each process contributes ash to volcanic plumes. One way to address this question is by fragmenting pyroclasts under controlled conditions. We fragmented pumice samples from Soufriere Hills Volcano (SHV), Montserrat, by three methods: rapid decompression in a shock tube-like apparatus, impact by a falling piston, and milling in a ball mill. Grain size distributions of the products reveal that all three mechanisms produce fractal breakage patterns, and that the fractal dimension increases from a minimum of 2.1 for decompression fragmentation (primary fragmentation) to a maximum of 2.7 by repeated impact (secondary fragmentation). To assess the details of the fragmentation process, we quantified the shape, texture and components of constituent ash particles. Ash shape analysis shows that the axial ratio increases during milling and that particle convexity increases with repeated impacts. We also quantify the extent to which the matrix is separated from the crystals, which shows that secondary processes efficiently remove adhering matrix from crystals, particularly during milling (abrasion). Furthermore, measurements of crystal size distributions before (using x-ray computed tomography) and after (by componentry of individual grain size classes) decompression-driven fragmentation show not only that crystals influence particular size fractions across the total grain size distribution, but also that free crystals are smaller in the fragmented material than in the original pumice clast. Taken together, our results confirm previous work showing both the control of initial texture on the primary fragmentation process and the contributions of secondary processes to ash formation. Critically, however, our extension of previous analyses to characterisation

  18. Observations of Titan 3C-4 Transtage Fragmentation Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowardin, Heather; Seitzer, P.; Abercromby, K.; Barker, E.; Cardona, T.; Krisko, P.; Lederer, S.

    2013-01-01

    The fragmentation of a Titan 3C-4 Transtage (1968-081) on 21 February 1992 is one of only two known break-ups in or near geosynchronous orbit. The original rocket body and 24 pieces of debris are currently being tracked by the US Space Surveillance Network (SSN). The rocket body (SSN# 3432) and several of the original fragments (SSN# 25000, 25001, 30000, and 33511) were observed in survey mode during 2004-2010 using the 0.6-m Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope (MODEST) in Chile using a broad R filter. This paper will present a size distribution for all calibrated magnitude data acquired on MODEST. Size distribution plots will also be shown using historical models for small fragmentation debris (down to 10 cm) believed to be associated with the Titan break-up. In November 2010, visible broadband photometry (Johnson/Kron-Cousins BVRI) was acquired with the 0.9-m Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile on several Titan fragments (SSN# 25001, 33509, 33510) and the parent rocket body. Color index data will be used to determine the fragment brightness distribution and how the data compares to spacecraft materials measured in the laboratory using similar photometric measurement techniques. In 2012, the SSN added 16 additional fragments to the catalogue. MODEST acquired magnitude data on ten Titan fragments in late 2012 and early 2013. The magnitude distribution of all the observed fragments are analyzed as a function of time. In order to better characterize the breakup fragments spectral measurements were acquired on the original rocket body and five Titan fragments using the 6.5-m Magellan telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. The telescopic spectra are compared with laboratory acquired spectra of materials (e.g., Aluminum and various paints) and categorized based on known absorption features for spacecraft materials.

  19. Beyond the fragmentation threshold hypothesis: regime shifts in biodiversity across fragmented landscapes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Pardini

    Full Text Available Ecological systems are vulnerable to irreversible change when key system properties are pushed over thresholds, resulting in the loss of resilience and the precipitation of a regime shift. Perhaps the most important of such properties in human-modified landscapes is the total amount of remnant native vegetation. In a seminal study Andrén proposed the existence of a fragmentation threshold in the total amount of remnant vegetation, below which landscape-scale connectivity is eroded and local species richness and abundance become dependent on patch size. Despite the fact that species patch-area effects have been a mainstay of conservation science there has yet to be a robust empirical evaluation of this hypothesis. Here we present and test a new conceptual model describing the mechanisms and consequences of biodiversity change in fragmented landscapes, identifying the fragmentation threshold as a first step in a positive feedback mechanism that has the capacity to impair ecological resilience, and drive a regime shift in biodiversity. The model considers that local extinction risk is defined by patch size, and immigration rates by landscape vegetation cover, and that the recovery from local species losses depends upon the landscape species pool. Using a unique dataset on the distribution of non-volant small mammals across replicate landscapes in the Atlantic forest of Brazil, we found strong evidence for our model predictions--that patch-area effects are evident only at intermediate levels of total forest cover, where landscape diversity is still high and opportunities for enhancing biodiversity through local management are greatest. Furthermore, high levels of forest loss can push native biota through an extinction filter, and result in the abrupt, landscape-wide loss of forest-specialist taxa, ecological resilience and management effectiveness. The proposed model links hitherto distinct theoretical approaches within a single framework

  20. Identification of seed-specific promoter nap300 and its comparison with 7S promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By fusing seed-specific promoter nap300 with β-glucuronidase gene, it was found that this about 300bp DNA fragment was sufficient to direct seed-specific gene expression. The substitution mutation in both distB and proxB elements had a little effect on the expression efficiency and almost no effect on the organ-specific expression pattern. In the experiment designed to compare nap300 with 7S promoter, the result showed that tissue specificity for nap300 was higher than that for 7S, and its expression level was lower than 7S's. There was no big difference in their expression pattern, and the maximal activity stage for the two promoters was identical, which indicated they could be used simultaneously for expressing different foreign genes in seeds.

  1. Characterisation of the Mucor circinelloides regulated promoter gpd1P

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, G.G.; Appel, K.F.; Wolff, A.M.;

    2004-01-01

    The promoter of the Mucor circinelloides gpd1 gene encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gpd1P) was recently cloned and used for the production of recombinant proteins, such as the Aspergillus niger glucose oxidase 1 (GOX). This represents the first example of the application...... of a strong and regulated promoter from this fungus for recombinant protein production. The original 741-bp gpd1P promoter fragment conferred hexose-dependent expression of GOX in M. circinelloides. To understand the regulatory mechanisms involved in gpd1P-driven expression and to develop improved promoter...... or a 361-bp derivative. Expression levels for the 361-bp derivative were high and comparable, regardless of the carbon source used. This promoter represents a useful derivative for constitutive heterologous gene expression in M. circinelloides....

  2. Gene Flow of a Forest-Dependent Bird across a Fragmented Landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael V Adams

    Full Text Available Habitat loss and fragmentation can affect the persistence of populations by reducing connectivity and restricting the ability of individuals to disperse across landscapes. Dispersal corridors promote population connectivity and therefore play important roles in maintaining gene flow in natural populations inhabiting fragmented landscapes. In the prairies, forests are restricted to riparian areas along river systems which act as important dispersal corridors for forest dependent species across large expanses of unsuitable grassland habitat. However, natural and anthropogenic barriers within riparian systems have fragmented these forested habitats. In this study, we used microsatellite markers to assess the fine-scale genetic structure of a forest-dependent species, the black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus, along 10 different river systems in Southern Alberta. Using a landscape genetic approach, landscape features (e.g., land cover were found to have a significant effect on patterns of genetic differentiation. Populations are genetically structured as a result of natural breaks in continuous habitat at small spatial scales, but the artificial barriers we tested do not appear to restrict gene flow. Dispersal between rivers is impeded by grasslands, evident from isolation of nearby populations (~ 50 km apart, but also within river systems by large treeless canyons (>100 km. Significant population genetic differentiation within some rivers corresponded with zones of different cottonwood (riparian poplar tree species and their hybrids. This study illustrates the importance of considering the impacts of habitat fragmentation at small spatial scales as well as other ecological processes to gain a better understanding of how organisms respond to their environmental connectivity. Here, even in a common and widespread songbird with high dispersal potential, small breaks in continuous habitats strongly influenced the spatial patterns of genetic

  3. Gene Flow of a Forest-Dependent Bird across a Fragmented Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Habitat loss and fragmentation can affect the persistence of populations by reducing connectivity and restricting the ability of individuals to disperse across landscapes. Dispersal corridors promote population connectivity and therefore play important roles in maintaining gene flow in natural populations inhabiting fragmented landscapes. In the prairies, forests are restricted to riparian areas along river systems which act as important dispersal corridors for forest dependent species across large expanses of unsuitable grassland habitat. However, natural and anthropogenic barriers within riparian systems have fragmented these forested habitats. In this study, we used microsatellite markers to assess the fine-scale genetic structure of a forest-dependent species, the black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus), along 10 different river systems in Southern Alberta. Using a landscape genetic approach, landscape features (e.g., land cover) were found to have a significant effect on patterns of genetic differentiation. Populations are genetically structured as a result of natural breaks in continuous habitat at small spatial scales, but the artificial barriers we tested do not appear to restrict gene flow. Dispersal between rivers is impeded by grasslands, evident from isolation of nearby populations (~ 50 km apart), but also within river systems by large treeless canyons (>100 km). Significant population genetic differentiation within some rivers corresponded with zones of different cottonwood (riparian poplar) tree species and their hybrids. This study illustrates the importance of considering the impacts of habitat fragmentation at small spatial scales as well as other ecological processes to gain a better understanding of how organisms respond to their environmental connectivity. Here, even in a common and widespread songbird with high dispersal potential, small breaks in continuous habitats strongly influenced the spatial patterns of genetic variation. PMID

  4. Multi-antigenic DNA immunization using herpes simplex virus type 2 genomic fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Ralph P; Dong, Lichun; Jerome, Sarah; Herber, Renee; Roberts, Lee K; Payne, Lendon G

    2008-01-01

    A novel DNA vaccine was generated using genomic fragments of a pathogen as the source of both the antigen coding and regulatory regions. The constructs, termed subgenomic vaccines (SGVs), incorporated genomic DNA sequences up to 45 kbp that encompass 15-20 different genes. The SGVs were developed to generate vaccines capable of expressing multiple genes from a single construct, which could be of great benefit for commercialization. The unique feature of the SGVs is that genes are expressed from their native promoters rather than heterologous promoters typical of DNA vaccines. SGVs composed of genomic fragments from the DS-DNA virus Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 (HSV-2) induced HSV-2 specific immune responses following particle-mediated epidermal delivery (PMED) in mice and these responses protected animals from lethal infectious challenge. A second generation SGV (SGV-H2), intended as an HSV-2 therapeutic vaccine, was generated that had five HSV-2 genes and was capable of generating multi-antigenic responses in naïve mice, and enhancing responses in infected animals. When compared with standard single plasmid vaccines, immunization with the SGV-H2 was found to be at least as effective as single plasmids or plasmid mixtures. The activity of the SGV-H2 could be greatly enhanced by co-delivering plasmids expressing E. coli heat labile toxin (LT) or cholera toxin CT as adjuvants as has been found previously for standard single-gene DNA vaccines.

  5. Nearest-neighbor interactions, habitat fragmentation, and the persistence of host-pathogen systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodarz, Dominik; Sun, Zhiying; Lau, John W; Komarova, Natalia L

    2013-09-01

    Spatial interactions are known to promote stability and persistence in enemy-victim interactions if instability and extinction occur in well-mixed settings. We investigate the effect of spatial interactions in the opposite case, where populations can persist in well-mixed systems. A stochastic agent-based model of host-pathogen dynamics is considered that describes nearest-neighbor interactions in an undivided habitat. Contrary to previous notions, we find that in this setting, spatial interactions in fact promote extinction. The reason is that, in contrast to the mass-action system, the outcome of the nearest-neighbor model is governed by dynamics in small "local neighborhoods." This is an abstraction that describes interactions in a minimal grid consisting of an individual plus its nearest neighbors. The small size of this characteristic scale accounts for the higher extinction probabilities. Hence, nearest-neighbor interactions in a continuous habitat lead to outcomes reminiscent of a fragmented habitat, which is underlined further with a metapopulation model that explicitly assumes habitat fragmentation. Beyond host-pathogen dynamics, axiomatic modeling shows that our results hold for generic enemy-victim interactions under specified assumptions. These results are used to interpret a set of published experiments that provide a first step toward model testing and are discussed in the context of the literature.

  6. Roles of mitochondrial fragmentation and reactive oxygen species in mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Tomoyuki [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Saotome, Masao, E-mail: msaotome@hama-med.ac.jp [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Nobuhara, Mamoru; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Funaki, Makoto [Clinical Research Center for Diabetes, Tokushima University Hospital, 2-50-1 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Hayashi, Hideharu [Internal Medicine III, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Evidence suggests an association between aberrant mitochondrial dynamics and cardiac diseases. Because myocardial metabolic deficiency caused by insulin resistance plays a crucial role in heart disease, we investigated the role of dynamin-related protein-1 (DRP1; a mitochondrial fission protein) in the pathogenesis of myocardial insulin resistance. Methods and Results: DRP1-expressing H9c2 myocytes, which had fragmented mitochondria with mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ{sub m}) depolarization, exhibited attenuated insulin signaling and 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) uptake, indicating insulin resistance. Treatment of the DRP1-expressing myocytes with Mn(III)tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin pentachloride (TMPyP) significantly improved insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. When myocytes were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), they increased DRP1 expression and mitochondrial fragmentation, resulting in ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and insulin resistance. When DRP1 was suppressed by siRNA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance were restored. Our results suggest that a mutual enhancement between DRP1 and reactive oxygen species could induce mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance. In palmitate-induced insulin-resistant myocytes, neither DRP1-suppression nor TMPyP restored the ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and impaired 2-DG uptake, however they improved insulin signaling. Conclusions: A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS could promote mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of insulin signal transduction. However, other mechanisms, including lipid metabolite-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, may be involved in palmitate-induced insulin resistance. - Highlights: • DRP1 promotes mitochondrial fragmentation and insulin-resistance. • A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS ipromotes insulin-resistance. • Palmitate increases DRP1 expression and induces insulin

  7. Statistical universalities in fragmentation under scaling symmetry with a constant frequency of fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorokhovski, M A [Laboratoire de Mecanique des Fluides et d' Acoustique, CNRS - Ecole Centrale de Lyon - INSA Lyon - Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 36 Avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully Cedex (France); Saveliev, V L [Institut of Ionosphere, Kamenskoe Plato, 050020 Almaty (Kazakhstan)], E-mail: mikhael.gorokhovski@ec-lyon.fr, E-mail: saveliev@topmail.kz

    2008-04-21

    This paper analyses statistical universalities that arise over time during constant frequency fragmentation under scaling symmetry. The explicit expression of particle-size distribution obtained from the evolution kinetic equation shows that, with increasing time, the initial distribution tends to the ultimate steady-state delta function through at least two intermediate universal asymptotics. The earlier asymptotic is the well-known log-normal distribution of Kolmogorov (1941 Dokl. Akad. Nauk. SSSR 31 99-101). This distribution is the first universality and has two parameters: the first and the second logarithmic moments of the fragmentation intensity spectrum. The later asymptotic is a power function (stronger universality) with a single parameter that is given by the ratio of the first two logarithmic moments. At large times, the first universality implies that the evolution equation can be reduced exactly to the Fokker-Planck equation instead of making the widely used but inconsistent assumption about the smallness of higher than second order moments. At even larger times, the second universality shows evolution towards a fractal state with dimension identified as a measure of the fracture resistance of the medium.

  8. DebriSat Fragment Characterization System and Processing Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, M.; Shiotani, B.; M. Carrasquilla; Fitz-Coy, N.; Liou, J. C.; Sorge, M.; Huynh, T.; Opiela, J.; Krisko, P.; Cowardin, H.

    2016-01-01

    The DebriSat project is a continuing effort sponsored by NASA and DoD to update existing break-up models using data obtained from hypervelocity impact tests performed to simulate on-orbit collisions. After the impact tests, a team at the University of Florida has been working to characterize the fragments in terms of their mass, size, shape, color and material content. The focus of the post-impact effort has been the collection of 2 mm and larger fragments resulting from the hypervelocity impact test. To date, in excess of 125K fragments have been recovered which is approximately 40K more than the 85K fragments predicted by the existing models. While the fragment collection activities continue, there has been a transition to the characterization of the recovered fragments. Since the start of the characterization effort, the focus has been on the use of automation to (i) expedite the fragment characterization process and (ii) minimize the effects of human subjectivity on the results; e.g., automated data entry processes were developed and implemented to minimize errors during transcription of the measurement data. At all steps of the process, however, there is human oversight to ensure the integrity of the data. Additionally, repeatability and reproducibility tests have been developed and implemented to ensure that the instrumentations used in the characterization process are accurate and properly calibrated.

  9. All possible ternary fragmentations of Cf252 in collinear configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimaran, K.; Balasubramaniam, M.

    2011-03-01

    All possible ternary fragmentations in fission of Cf252 are studied in collinear configuration within a spherical approximation using the recently proposed “three cluster model.” The potential energy surface of collinear configuration exhibits a strong valley around Ca48 and its neighboring nuclei Ca50, Ti54, and Cr60. Such strong minima are not seen in the potential energy surface of an equatorial configuration. As a consequence of strong minima in the potential, the overall relative yield is higher for the ternary fragmentation with Ca48, Ca50, Ti54, Cr60, and Ge82 as the third fragment. The results of potential energy and relative yield calculations reveal that collinear configuration increases the probability of emission of heavy fragments like Ca48 (doubly magic nucleus) and its neighboring nuclei as the third fragment. The obtained results indicate that the collinear configuration is the preferred configuration for intermediate nuclei (Ca48, Ca50, Ti54, and Cr60) as the third fragment in particle accompanied fission while the equatorial configuration may be a preferred configuration for light nuclei (He4, Be10) as the third fragment.

  10. Considerations in producing preferentially reduced half-antibody fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makaraviciute, Asta; Jackson, Carolyn D; Millner, Paul A; Ramanaviciene, Almira

    2016-02-01

    Half-antibody fragments are a promising reagent for biosensing, drug-delivery and labeling applications, since exposure of the free thiol group in the Fc hinge region allows oriented reaction. Despite the structural variations among the molecules of different IgG subclasses and those obtained from different hosts, only generalized preferential antibody reduction protocols are currently available. Preferential reduction of polyclonal sheep anti-digoxin, rabbit anti-Escherichia coli and anti-myoglobin class IgG antibodies to half-antibody fragments has been investigated. A mild reductant 2-mercaptoethylamine (2-MEA) and a slightly stronger reductant tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) were used and the fragments obtained were quantitatively determined by SDS-PAGE analysis. It has been shown that the yields of half-antibody fragments could be increased by lowering the pH of the reduction mixtures. However, antibody susceptibility to the reductants varied. At pH4.5 the highest yield of sheep anti-digoxin IgG half-antibody fragments was obtained with 1M 2-MEA. Conversely, rabbit IgG half-antibody fragments could only be obtained with the stronger reductant TCEP. Preferential reduction of rabbit anti-myoglobin IgG antibodies was optimized and the highest half-antibody yield was obtained with 35 mM TCEP. Finally, it has been demonstrated that produced anti-myoglobin half-IgG fragments retained their binding activity.

  11. Clustering document fragments using background color and texture information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, Sukalpa; Franke, Katrin; Pal, Umapada

    2012-01-01

    Forensic analysis of questioned documents sometimes can be extensively data intensive. A forensic expert might need to analyze a heap of document fragments and in such cases to ensure reliability he/she should focus only on relevant evidences hidden in those document fragments. Relevant document retrieval needs finding of similar document fragments. One notion of obtaining such similar documents could be by using document fragment's physical characteristics like color, texture, etc. In this article we propose an automatic scheme to retrieve similar document fragments based on visual appearance of document paper and texture. Multispectral color characteristics using biologically inspired color differentiation techniques are implemented here. This is done by projecting document color characteristics to Lab color space. Gabor filter-based texture analysis is used to identify document texture. It is desired that document fragments from same source will have similar color and texture. For clustering similar document fragments of our test dataset we use a Self Organizing Map (SOM) of dimension 5×5, where the document color and texture information are used as features. We obtained an encouraging accuracy of 97.17% from 1063 test images.

  12. The effect of radiative feedback on disc fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Anthony; Stamatellos, Dimitris

    2017-02-01

    Protostellar discs may become massive enough to fragment producing secondary low-mass objects: planets, brown dwarfs and low-mass stars. We study the effect of radiative feedback from such newly formed secondary objects using radiative hydrodynamic simulations. We compare the results of simulations without any radiative feedback from secondary objects with those where two types of radiative feedback are considered: (i) continuous and (ii) episodic. We find that (i) continuous radiative feedback stabilizes the disc and suppresses further fragmentation, reducing the number of secondary objects formed; (ii) episodic feedback from secondary objects heats and stabilizes the disc when the outburst occurs, but shortly after the outburst stops, the disc becomes unstable and fragments again. However, fewer secondary objects are formed compared to the case without radiative feedback. We also find that the mass growth of secondary objects is mildly suppressed due to the effect of their radiative feedback. However, their mass growth also depends on where they form in the disc and on their subsequent interactions, such that their final masses are not drastically different from the case without radiative feedback. We find that the masses of secondary objects formed by disc fragmentation are from a few MJ to a few 0.1 M⊙. Planets formed by fragmentation tend to be ejected from the disc. We conclude that planetary-mass objects on wide orbits (wide-orbit planets) are unlikely to form by disc fragmentation. Nevertheless, disc fragmentation may be a significant source of free-floating planets and brown dwarfs.

  13. Bootstrap embedding: An internally consistent fragment-based method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welborn, Matthew; Tsuchimochi, Takashi; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2016-08-01

    Strong correlation poses a difficult problem for electronic structure theory, with computational cost scaling quickly with system size. Fragment embedding is an attractive approach to this problem. By dividing a large complicated system into smaller manageable fragments "embedded" in an approximate description of the rest of the system, we can hope to ameliorate the steep cost of correlated calculations. While appealing, these methods often converge slowly with fragment size because of small errors at the boundary between fragment and bath. We describe a new electronic embedding method, dubbed "Bootstrap Embedding," a self-consistent wavefunction-in-wavefunction embedding theory that uses overlapping fragments to improve the description of fragment edges. We apply this method to the one dimensional Hubbard model and a translationally asymmetric variant, and find that it performs very well for energies and populations. We find Bootstrap Embedding converges rapidly with embedded fragment size, overcoming the surface-area-to-volume-ratio error typical of many embedding methods. We anticipate that this method may lead to a low-scaling, high accuracy treatment of electron correlation in large molecular systems.

  14. Using landscape history to predict biodiversity patterns in fragmented landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, Robert M; Didham, Raphael K; Pearse, William D; Lefebvre, Véronique; Rosa, Isabel M D; Carreiras, João M B; Lucas, Richard M; Reuman, Daniel C

    2013-10-01

    Landscape ecology plays a vital role in understanding the impacts of land-use change on biodiversity, but it is not a predictive discipline, lacking theoretical models that quantitatively predict biodiversity patterns from first principles. Here, we draw heavily on ideas from phylogenetics to fill this gap, basing our approach on the insight that habitat fragments have a shared history. We develop a landscape 'terrageny', which represents the historical spatial separation of habitat fragments in the same way that a phylogeny represents evolutionary divergence among species. Combining a random sampling model with a terrageny generates numerical predictions about the expected proportion of species shared between any two fragments, the locations of locally endemic species, and the number of species that have been driven locally extinct. The model predicts that community similarity declines with terragenetic distance, and that local endemics are more likely to be found in terragenetically distinctive fragments than in large fragments. We derive equations to quantify the variance around predictions, and show that ignoring the spatial structure of fragmented landscapes leads to over-estimates of local extinction rates at the landscape scale. We argue that ignoring the shared history of habitat fragments limits our ability to understand biodiversity changes in human-modified landscapes.

  15. DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa and its relationship with impaired spermatogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Rudneva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sperm cells DNA fragmentation is one of the factors of male sub-/infertility discovered recently. At present, pathophysiological mechanisms that cause DNA fragmentation have not been studied completely. It is suggested that they may be caused with defects of chromatin remodeling, apoptosis, and oxidative stress. Spermiological examination was performed in 461 infertile men. With 23 % of the patients examined, the frequency of sperm cells DNA fragmentation comprises over 15 %, with that, 18 % of the patients demonstrated its range from 15.1 to 30 %, and with 5 % of patients, it exceeded 30 %. We found that the amount of sperm cells with fragmented DNA with severe forms of pathozoospermia is higher that with less manifested disturbances of spermatogenesis. Negative dynamics was revealed regarding the change in sperm concentration in men that have increased frequency of DNA fragmentation. Obtained results confirm the suggestion of the correlation between some semen parameters (concentration, motility, and morphology and sperm DNA fragmentation. Thus, one can state that the DNA fragmentation parameter of sperm cells has a certain diagnostic and forecasting value for married couples with reproduction disorders.

  16. Modulation of Protein Fragmentation Through Carbamylation of Primary Amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Sylvester M.; Holden, Dustin D.; Fellers, Ryan; Kelleher, Neil L.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2017-08-01

    We evaluate the impact of carbamylation of the primary amines of the side-chains of Lys and the N-termini on the fragmentation of intact protein ions and the chromatographic properties of a mixture of E. coli ribosomal proteins. The fragmentation patterns of the six unmodified and carbamylated proteins obtained by higher energy collision dissociation (HCD) and ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) were compared. Carbamylation significantly reduced the total number of protons retained by the protein owing to the conversion of basic primary amines to non-basic carbamates. Carbamylation caused a significant negative impact on fragmentation of the protein by HCD (i.e., reduced sequence coverage and fewer diagnostic fragment ions) consistent with the mobile proton model, which correlates peptide fragmentation with charge distribution and the opportunity for charge-directed pathways. In addition, fragmentation was enhanced near the N- and C-termini upon HCD of carbamylated proteins. For LCMS/MS analysis of E. coli ribosomal proteins, the retention times increased by 16 min on average upon carbamylation, an outcome attributed to the increased hydrophobicity of the proteins after carbamylation. As noted for both the six model proteins and the ribosomal proteins, carbamylation had relatively little impact on the distribution or types of fragment ions product by UVPD, supporting the proposition that the mechanism of UVPD for intact proteins does not reflect the mobile proton model.

  17. Gluon fragmentation functions in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Dong-Jing

    2016-01-01

    We derive gluon fragmentation functions in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model by treating a gluon as a pair of color lines formed by fictitious quark and anti-quark ($q\\bar q$). Gluon elementary fragmentation functions are obtained from the quark and anti-quark elementary fragmentation functions for emitting specific mesons in the NJL model under the requirement that the $q\\bar q$ pair maintains in the flavor-singlet state after meson emissions. An integral equation, which iterates the gluon elementary fragmentation functions to all orders, is then solved to yield the gluon fragmentation functions at a model scale. It is observed that these solutions are stable with respect to variation of relevant model parameters, especially after QCD evolution to a higher scale is implemented. We show that the inclusion of the gluon fragmentation functions into the theoretical predictions from only the quark fragmentation functions greatly improves the agreement with the SLD data for the pion and kaon productions in $e^+e^...

  18. Microevolutionary Effects of Habitat Fragmentation on Plant-Animal Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco E. Fontúrbel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant-animal interactions are a key component for biodiversity maintenance, but they are currently threatened by human activities. Habitat fragmentation might alter ecological interactions due to demographic changes, spatial discontinuities, and edge effects. Also, there are less evident effects of habitat fragmentation that potentially alter selective forces and compromise the fitness of the interacting species. Changes in the mutualistic and antagonistic interactions in fragmented habitats could significantly influence the plant reproductive output and the fauna assemblage associated with. Fragmented habitats may trigger contemporary evolution processes and open new evolutionary opportunities. Interacting parties with a diffuse and asymmetric relationship are less susceptible to local extinction but more prone to evolve towards new interactions or autonomy. However, highly specialized mutualisms are likely to disappear. On the other hand, ecological interactions may mutually modulate their response in fragmented habitats, especially when antagonistic interactions disrupt mutualistic ones. Ecoevolutionary issues of habitat fragmentation have been little explored, but the empiric evidence available suggests that the complex modification of ecological interactions in fragmented habitats might lead to nonanalogous communities on the long term.

  19. Effects of fragmentation on plant adaptation to urban environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Jonathan; Cheptou, Pierre-Olivier

    2017-01-19

    Urban ecosystems are relatively recent and heavily human-altered terrestrial ecosystems with a surprisingly high diversity of animals, plants and other organisms. Urban habitats are also strongly fragmented and subject to higher temperatures, providing a compelling model for studying adaptation to global change. Crepis sancta (Asteraceae), an annual Mediterranean wasteland weed, occupies fragmented urban environments as well as certain unfragmented landscapes in southern France. We tested for shifts in dispersal, reproductive traits and size across a rural-urban gradient to learn whether and how selection may be driving changes in life history in urban and fragmented habitats. We specifically compared the structure of quantitative genetic variation and of neutral markers (microsatellites) between urban and rural and between fragmented and unfragmented habitats. We showed that fragmentation provides a better descriptor of trait variation than urbanization per se for dispersal traits. Fragmentation also affected reproductive traits and plant size though one rural population did conform to this scheme. Our study shows the role of fragmentation for dispersal traits shift in urban environments and a more complex pattern for other traits. We discuss the role of pollinator scarcity and an inhospitable matrix as drivers of adaptation.This article is part of the themed issue 'Human influences on evolution, and the ecological and societal consequences'.

  20. Fragment approaches in structure-based drug discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, Roderick E., E-mail: rod@ysbl.york.ac.uk [Vernalis R& D Ltd and University of York (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-01

    Fragment-based methods are successfully generating novel and selective drug-like inhibitors of protein targets, with a number of groups reporting compounds entering clinical trials. This paper summarizes the key features of the approach as one of the tools in structure-guided drug discovery. There has been considerable interest recently in what is known as 'fragment-based lead discovery'. The novel feature of the approach is to begin with small low-affinity compounds. The main advantage is that a larger potential chemical diversity can be sampled with fewer compounds, which is particularly important for new target classes. The approach relies on careful design of the fragment library, a method that can detect binding of the fragment to the protein target, determination of the structure of the fragment bound to the target, and the conventional use of structural information to guide compound optimization. In this article the methods are reviewed, and experiences in fragment-based discovery of lead series of compounds against kinases such as PDK1 and ATPases such as Hsp90 are discussed. The examples illustrate some of the key benefits and issues of the approach and also provide anecdotal examples of the patterns seen in selectivity and the binding mode of fragments across different protein targets.

  1. Genetic consequences of habitat fragmentation during a range expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, S; Ray, N; Arenas, M; Excoffier, L

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the effect of habitat fragmentation on the genetic diversity of a species experiencing a range expansion. These two evolutionary processes have not been studied yet, at the same time, owing to the difficulties of deriving analytic results for non-equilibrium models. Here we provide a description of their interaction by using extensive spatial and temporal coalescent simulations and we suggest guidelines for a proper genetic sampling to detect fragmentation. To model habitat fragmentation, we simulated a two-dimensional lattice of demes partitioned into groups (patches) by adding barriers to dispersal. After letting a population expand on this grid, we sampled lineages from the lattice at several scales and studied their coalescent history. We find that in order to detect fragmentation, one needs to extensively sample at a local level rather than at a landscape level. This is because the gene genealogy of a scattered sample is less sensitive to the presence of genetic barriers. Considering the effect of temporal changes of fragmentation intensities, we find that at least 10, but often >100, generations are needed to affect local genetic diversity and population structure. This result explains why recent habitat fragmentation does not always lead to detectable signatures in the genetic structure of populations. Finally, as expected, long-distance dispersal increases local genetic diversity and decreases levels of population differentiation, efficiently counteracting the effects of fragmentation. PMID:24149654

  2. Prolonged incubation of processed human spermatozoa will increase DNA fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, A; Khalili, M A; Halvaei, I; Roodbari, F

    2014-05-01

    One of the causes of failure in ART is sperm DNA fragmentation which may be associated with long period of spermatozoa incubation at 37 °C. The objective was to evaluate the rate of sperm DNA fragmentation using the sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD) test after swim-up at different time intervals prior to use. In this prospective study, 21 normozoospermic specimens were analysed. The samples were incubated at 37 °C after preparation by direct swim-up. DNA fragmentation was assessed at different time intervals (0, 1, 2 and 3 h) using SCD test. Spermatozoa with no DNA fragmentation showed large- or medium-sized halos, and sperm cells with DNA fragmentation showed either a small halo or no halo. The rates of normal morphology and progressive motility after sperm processing were 72.33 ± 2.53% and 90 ± 1.02%, respectively. The rate of sperm DNA fragmentation was significantly higher after 2 h (8.81 ± 0.93%, P = 0.004) and 3 h (10.76 ± 0.89%, P fragmentation. Therefore, sperm samples intended for ART procedures should be used within 2 h of incubation at 37 °C. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Causes and consequences of habitat fragmentation in river networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Matthew R; Doyle, Martin W; Strayer, David L

    2015-10-01

    Increases in river fragmentation globally threaten freshwater biodiversity. Rivers are fragmented by many agents, both natural and anthropogenic. We review the distribution and frequency of these major agents, along with their effects on connectivity and habitat quality. Most fragmentation research has focused on terrestrial habitats, but theories and generalizations developed in terrestrial habitats do not always apply well to river networks. For example, terrestrial habitats are usually conceptualized as two-dimensional, whereas rivers often are conceptualized as one-dimensional or dendritic. In addition, river flow often leads to highly asymmetric effects of barriers on habitat and permeability. New approaches tailored to river networks can be applied to describe the network-wide effects of multiple barriers on both connectivity and habitat quality. The net effects of anthropogenic fragmentation on freshwater biodiversity are likely underestimated, because of time lags in effects and the difficulty of generating a single, simple signal of fragmentation that applies to all aquatic species. We conclude by presenting a decision tree for managing freshwater fragmentation, as well as some research horizons for evaluating fragmented riverscapes. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  4. Global patterns of fragmentation and connectivity of mammalian carnivore habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Kevin R; Burdett, Christopher L; Theobald, David M; Rondinini, Carlo; Boitani, Luigi

    2011-09-27

    Although mammalian carnivores are vulnerable to habitat fragmentation and require landscape connectivity, their global patterns of fragmentation and connectivity have not been examined. We use recently developed high-resolution habitat suitability models to conduct comparative analyses and to identify global hotspots of fragmentation and connectivity for the world's terrestrial carnivores. Species with less fragmentation (i.e. more interior high-quality habitat) had larger geographical ranges, a greater proportion of habitat within their range, greater habitat connectivity and a lower risk of extinction. Species with higher connectivity (i.e. less habitat isolation) also had a greater proportion of high-quality habitat, but had smaller, not larger, ranges, probably reflecting shorter distances between habitat patches for species with restricted distributions; such species were also more threatened, as would be expected given the negative relationship between range size and extinction risk. Fragmentation and connectivity did not differ among Carnivora families, and body mass was associated with connectivity but not fragmentation. On average, only 54.3 per cent of a species' geographical range comprised high-quality habitat, and more troubling, only 5.2 per cent of the range comprised such habitat within protected areas. Identification of global hotspots of fragmentation and connectivity will help guide strategic priorities for carnivore conservation.

  5. Genetic consequences of habitat fragmentation during a range expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, S; Ray, N; Arenas, M; Excoffier, L

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the effect of habitat fragmentation on the genetic diversity of a species experiencing a range expansion. These two evolutionary processes have not been studied yet, at the same time, owing to the difficulties of deriving analytic results for non-equilibrium models. Here we provide a description of their interaction by using extensive spatial and temporal coalescent simulations and we suggest guidelines for a proper genetic sampling to detect fragmentation. To model habitat fragmentation, we simulated a two-dimensional lattice of demes partitioned into groups (patches) by adding barriers to dispersal. After letting a population expand on this grid, we sampled lineages from the lattice at several scales and studied their coalescent history. We find that in order to detect fragmentation, one needs to extensively sample at a local level rather than at a landscape level. This is because the gene genealogy of a scattered sample is less sensitive to the presence of genetic barriers. Considering the effect of temporal changes of fragmentation intensities, we find that at least 10, but often >100, generations are needed to affect local genetic diversity and population structure. This result explains why recent habitat fragmentation does not always lead to detectable signatures in the genetic structure of populations. Finally, as expected, long-distance dispersal increases local genetic diversity and decreases levels of population differentiation, efficiently counteracting the effects of fragmentation.

  6. Exome-based Variant Detection in Core Promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeong C; Cui, Jian; Luo, Jiangtao; Xiao, Fengxia; Downs, Bradley; Wang, San Ming

    2016-07-28

    Core promoter controls the initiation of transcription. Core promoter sequence change can disrupt transcriptional regulation, lead to impairment of gene expression and ultimately diseases. Therefore, comprehensive characterization of core promoters is essential to understand normal and abnormal gene expression in biomedical studies. Here we report the development of EVDC (Exome-based Variant Detection in Core promoters) method for genome-scale analysis of core-promoter sequence variation. This method is based on the fact that exome sequences contain the sequences not only from coding exons but also from non-coding region including core promoters generated by random fragmentation in exome sequencing process. Using exome data from three cell types of CD4+ T cells, CD19+ B cells and neutrophils of a single individual, we characterized the features of core promoter-mapped exome sequences, and analysed core-promoter variation in this individual genome. We also compared the core promoters between YRI (Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigeria) and the CEU (Utah residents of European decedent) populations using the exome data generated by the 1000 Genome project, and observed much higher variation in YRI population than in CEU population. Our study demonstrates that the EVDC method provides a simple but powerful means for genome-wile de novo characterization of core promoter sequence variation.

  7. Health promotion education in India: present landscape and future vistas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Sanghamitra; Sharma, Kavya; Zodpey, Sanjay; Chauhan, Kavita; Dobe, Madhumita

    2012-06-24

    'Health promotion is the process of enabling people to increase control over and to improve their health'. This stream of public health is emerging as a critical domain within the realm of disease prevention. Over the last two decades, the curative model of health care has begun a subtle shift towards a participatory model of health promotion emphasizing upon practice of healthy lifestyles and creating healthy communities. Health promotion encompasses five key strategies with health communication and education as its cornerstones. Present study is an attempt to explore the current situation of health promotion education in India with an aim to provide a background for capacity building in health promotion. A systematic predefined method was adopted to collect and compile information on existing academic programs pertaining to health promotion and health education/communication. Results of the study reveal that currently health promotion education in India is fragmented and not uniform across institutes. It is yet to be recognized as a critical domain of public health education. Mostly teaching of health promotion is limited to health education and communication. There is a need for designing programmes for short-term and long-term capacity building, with focus on innovative methods and approaches. Public health institutes and associations could play a proactive role in designing and imparting academic programs on health promotion. Enhancing alliances with various institutes involved in health promotion activities and networking among public health and medical institutes as well as health services delivery systems would be more productive.

  8. Promoting preschool reading

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The thesis titled Promoting preschool reading consists of a theoretiral and an empirical part. In the theoretical part I wrote about reading, the importance of reading, types of reading, about reading motivation, promoting reading motivation, internal and external motivation, influence of reading motivation on the child's reading activity, reading and familial literacy, the role of adults in promotion reading literacy, reading to a child and promoting reading in pre-school years, where I ...

  9. How Promotions Work

    OpenAIRE

    Robert C. Blattberg; Richard Briesch; Fox, Edward J.

    1995-01-01

    By synthesizing findings across the sales promotion literature, this article helps the reader understand how promotions work. We identify and explain empirical generalizations related to sales promotion; that is, effects that have been found consistently in multiple studies involving different researchers. We also identify issues which have generated conflicting findings in the research, as well as important sales promotion topics that have not yet been studied. This overview of the research ...

  10. Habitat Fragmentation and Native Bees: a Premature Verdict?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H. Cane

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Few studies directly address the consequences of habitat fragmentation for communities of pollinating insects, particularly for the key pollinator group, bees (Hymenoptera: Apiformes. Bees typically live in habitats where nesting substrates and bloom are patchily distributed and spatially dissociated. Bee studies have all defined habitat fragments as remnant patches of floral hosts or forests, overlooking the nesting needs of bees. Several authors conclude that habitat fragmentation is broadly deleterious, but their own data show that some native species proliferate in sampled fragments. Other studies report greater densities and comparable diversities of native bees at flowers in some fragment size classes relative to undisrupted habitats, but find dramatic shifts in species composition. Insightful studies of habitat fragmentation and bees will consider fragmentation, alteration, and loss of nesting habitats, not just patches of forage plants, as well as the permeability of the surrounding matrix to interpatch movement. Inasmuch as the floral associations and nesting habits of bees are often attributes of species or subgenera, ecological interpretations hinge on authoritative identifications. Study designs must accommodate statistical problems associated with bee community samples, especially non-normal data and frequent zero values. The spatial scale of fragmentation must be appreciated: bees of medium body size can regularly fly 1-2 km from nest site to forage patch. Overall, evidence for prolonged persistence of substantial diversity and abundances of native bee communities in habitat fragments of modest size promises practical solutions for maintaining bee populations. Provided that reserve selection, design, and management can address the foraging and nesting needs of bees, networks of even small reserves may hold hope for sustaining considerable pollinator diversity and the ecological services pollinators provide.

  11. Fragmentation Wave in Viscoelastic Medium Containing Bubbles and Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, M.; Nakamura, K.; Takayama, K.

    2007-12-01

    We conducted fragmentation experiment using viscoelastic silicone compound with various pressure, vesicularity, crystallinity and permeability to understand the magma fragmentation in an explosive volcanic eruption. We used a vertical shock tube to generate rapid decompression. The specimen was pressurized with nitrogen very slowly so that the pores are filled with the high-pressure gas. Then the membranes separating the high- pressure part from the atmospheric pressure part are artificially ruptured, and the specimen is rapidly decompressed. The fragmentation behavior of the specimen is photographed by a high-speed video camera. The fragmentation wave velocity is measured from the video images. After each experiment, the fragments are taken out of the chamber on top of the shock tube carefully and the structures are observed. We obtained the following results from the observation of the fragmentation speed. The fragmentation speed is in the range of 20-40 m/s. Its dependence on the void fraction is not clear in the present experimental conditions with void fraction ranging from 0.33 to 0.44. It tends to be decreased by existence of crystals and increase of permeability. The larger it is, the larger is the acceleration of the fragments. We have noticed significant cavitation in the viscoelastic compound after rapid decompression. The bubbles are generated homogeneously within the compound. The cavitation occurred regardless of the initial gas-saturation condition of the compound. It was not observed with slow decompression, though the decompression amplitude is the same. The bubble nucleation depending on the decompression rate might be significant also in the volcanic processes with rapid decompression and magma fragmentation.

  12. Statistical mechanics of fragmentation processes of ice and rock bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashkirov, A. G.; Vityazev, A. V.

    1996-09-01

    It is a well-known experimental fact that impact fragmentation, specifically of ice and rock bodies, causes a two-step ("knee"-shaped) power distribution of fragment masses with exponent values within the limits -4 and -1.5 (here and henceforth the differential distribution is borne in mind). A new theoretical approach is proposed to determine the exponent values, a minimal fracture mass, and properties of the knee. As a basis for construction of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of condensed matter fragmentation the maximum-entropy variational principle is used. In contrast to the usual approach founded on the Boltzmann entropy the more general Tsallis entropy allowing stationary solutions not only in the exponential Boltzmann-Gibbs form but in the form of the power (fractal) law distribution as well is invoked. Relying on the analysis of a lot of published experiments a parameter β is introduced to describe an inhomogeneous distribution of the impact energy over the target. It varies from 0 (for an utterly inhomogeneous distribution of the impact energy) to 1 (for a homogeneous distribution). The lower limit of fragment masses is defined as a characteristic fragment mass for which the energy of fragment formation is minimal. This mass value depends crucially on the value of β. It is shown that for β≪1 only small fragments can be formed, and the maximal permitted fragment (of mass m1) is the upper boundary of the first stage of the fracture process and the point where the knee takes place. The second stage may be realized after a homogeneous redistribution of the remainder of the impact energy over the remainder of the target (when β→1). Here, the formation of great fragments is permitted only and the smallest of them (of mass m2) determines a lower boundary of the second stage. Different forms of the knee can be observed depending on relations between m1 and m2.

  13. Sleep Fragmentation and Biomarkers in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Teresa M; Yuwen, Weichao; Voss, Joachim; Foell, Dirk; Gohar, Faekah; Ringold, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    (1) To compare sleep (nighttime sleep duration and sleep efficiency) and sleep fragmentation (movement and fragmentation index), as measured by actigraphy, and symptoms (pain and fatigue) in 8- to 14-year-old children with polyarticular and extended oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and (2) to examine the associations between sleep fragmentation (movement and fragmentation index) and the calcium-binding protein biomarkers S100A12 and myeloid-related protein (MRP8/14). Participants included 40 children with extended oligoarticular (n = 15) or polyarticular (n = 25) JIA and their parents. Serum protein samples were obtained during routine rheumatology clinic visits. Children completed the PedsQL Multidimensional Fatigue Scale and daily pain and sleep diaries and wore actigraphy monitors for 9 consecutive days. Parents completed the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ). Of the 40 children, 68% scored above the CSHQ clinical cutoff score for sleep disturbances. Mean nighttime sleep duration was 7.5 hr, and mean sleep efficiency was 85.3%. Group differences were not found for nighttime sleep duration, sleep efficiency, movement and fragmentation index, or S100A12 and MRP8/14 protein concentrations. In a stepwise regression, medications, joint count, and movement and fragmentation index explained 21% of the variance in MRP8/14 concentration. Decreased nighttime sleep duration, poor sleep efficiency, and fragmented sleep were observed in our sample, regardless of JIA category. Sleep fragmentation was a significant predictor of MRP8/14 protein concentration. Additional research is needed to understand the interrelations among sleep fragmentation, effects of medication, and S100A12 and MRP8/14 protein biomarkers in JIA. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Life history strategy influences parasite responses to habitat fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froeschke, Götz; van der Mescht, Luther; McGeoch, Melodie; Matthee, Sonja

    2013-12-01

    Anthropogenic habitat use is a major threat to biodiversity and is known to increase the abundance of generalist host species such as rodents, which are regarded as potential disease carriers. Parasites have an intimate relationship with their host and the surrounding environment and it is expected that habitat fragmentation will affect parasite infestation levels. We investigated the effect of habitat fragmentation on the ecto- and endoparasitic burdens of a broad niche small mammal, Rhabdomys pumilio, in the Western Cape Province, South Africa. Our aim was to look at the effects of fragmentation on different parasite species with diverse life history characteristics and to determine whether general patterns can be found. Sampling took place within pristine lowland (Fynbos/Renosterveld) areas and at fragmented sites surrounded and isolated by agricultural activities. All arthropod ectoparasites and available gastrointestinal endoparasites were identified. We used conditional autoregressive models to investigate the effects of habitat fragmentation on parasite species richness and abundance of all recovered parasites. Host density and body size were larger in the fragments. Combined ecto- as well as combined endoparasite taxa showed higher parasite species richness in fragmented sites. Parasite abundance was generally higher in the case of R. pumilio individuals in fragmented habitats but it appears that parasites that are more permanently associated with the host's body and those that are host-specific show the opposite trend. Parasite life history is an important factor that needs to be considered when predicting the effects of habitat fragmentation on parasite and pathogen transmission. Copyright © 2013 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Perceptions of health promoters about health promotion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-02-11

    Feb 11, 2013 ... formal written health promotion guidelines for families with adolescents orphaned ..... community: '…What worries me is the fact that they still become pregnant .... to learn about HIV risk factors, testing, treatment choices and.

  16. Developing a Promotional Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epley, Hannah K.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for Extension professionals to show clientele the benefits of their program. This article shares how promotional videos are one way of reaching audiences online. An example is given on how a promotional video has been used and developed using iMovie software. Tips are offered for how professionals can create a promotional video and…

  17. Procedure for assessing the performance of a rockfall fragmentation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matas, Gerard; Lantada, Nieves; Corominas, Jordi; Gili, Josep Antoni; Ruiz-Carulla, Roger; Prades, Albert

    2017-04-01

    A Rockfall is a mass instability process frequently observed in road cuts, open pit mines and quarries, steep slopes and cliffs. It is frequently observed that the detached rock mass becomes fragmented when it impacts with the slope surface. The consideration of the fragmentation of the rockfall mass is critical for the calculation of block's trajectories and their impact energies, to further assess their potential to cause damage and design adequate preventive structures. We present here the performance of the RockGIS model. It is a GIS-Based tool that simulates stochastically the fragmentation of the rockfalls, based on a lumped mass approach. In RockGIS, the fragmentation initiates by the disaggregation of the detached rock mass through the pre-existing discontinuities just before the impact with the ground. An energy threshold is defined in order to determine whether the impacting blocks break or not. The distribution of the initial mass between a set of newly generated rock fragments is carried out stochastically following a power law. The trajectories of the new rock fragments are distributed within a cone. The model requires the calibration of both the runout of the resultant blocks and the spatial distribution of the volumes of fragments generated by breakage during their propagation. As this is a coupled process which is controlled by several parameters, a set of performance criteria to be met by the simulation have been defined. The criteria includes: position of the centre of gravity of the whole block distribution, histogram of the runout of the blocks, extent and boundaries of the young debris cover over the slope surface, lateral dispersion of trajectories, total number of blocks generated after fragmentation, volume distribution of the generated fragments, the number of blocks and volume passages past a reference line and the maximum runout distance Since the number of parameters to fit increases significantly when considering fragmentation, the

  18. Gluon fragmentation into {sup 3} P{sub J} quarkonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J.P.

    1995-10-01

    The functions of the gluon fragmentation into {sup 3}P{sub j} quarkonium are calculated to order {alpha}{sup 2}{sub s}. With the recent progress in analysing quarkonium systems in QCD it is possible show how the so called divergence in the limit of the zero-binding energy, which is related to P-wave quarkonia, is treated correctly in the case of fragmentation functions. The obtained fragmentation functions satisfy explicitly at the order of {alpha} {sup 2}{sub s} the Altarelli-Parisi equation and when z {yields} 0 they behave as z{sup -1} as expected. 19 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Cloning, bacterial expression and crystallization of Fv antibody fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    E´, Jean-Luc; Boulot, Ginette; Chitarra, V´ronique; Riottot, Marie-Madeleine; Souchon, H´le`ne; Houdusse, Anne; Bentley, Graham A.; Narayana Bhat, T.; Spinelli, Silvia; Poljak, Roberto J.

    1992-08-01

    The variable Fv fragments of antibodies, cloned in recombinant plasmids, can be expressed in bacteria as functional proteins having immunochemical properties which are very similar or identical with those of the corresponding parts of the parent eukaryotic antibodies. They offer new possibilities for the study of antibody-antigen interactions since the crystals of Fv fragments and of their complexes with antigen reported here diffract X-rays to a higher resolution that those obtained with the cognate Fab fragments. The Fv approach should facilitate the structural study of the combining site of antibodies and the further characterization of antigen-antibody interactions by site-directed mutagenesis experiments.

  20. The Fission Fragment Time-Of Spectrometer Verdi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberstedt, S.; Borcea, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Zeynalov, Sh.; Oberstedt, A.; Göök, A.; Belgya, T.; Kis, Z.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Takács, K.; Martinez-Perez, T.

    2011-10-01

    For the investigation of correlated fission characteristics like fragment mass-and energy-distributions the double (v, E) spectrometer VERDI is being constructed. With this instrument we aim at the simultaneous measurement of pre- and post-neutron masses, avoiding prompt neutron corrections. From the simultaneous measurement of pre- and post-neutron fission-fragment data the prompt neutron multiplicity may be inferred as a function of fragment mass and total kinetic energy. In order to arrive at a mass resolving power ΔA VERDI spectrometer performed at the Budapest Research Reactor.