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Sample records for vivo regulatory role

  1. A Proteome-wide, Quantitative Survey of In Vivo Ubiquitylation Sites Reveals Widespread Regulatory Roles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Sebastian Alexander; Beli, Petra; Weinert, Brian Tate

    2011-01-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins by ubiquitin is a fundamentally important regulatory mechanism. However, proteome-wide analysis of endogenous ubiquitylation remains a challenging task, and almost always has relied on cells expressing affinity tagged ubiquitin. Here we combine single...

  2. In vivo FRET imaging revealed a regulatory role of RanGTP in kinetochore-microtubule attachments via Aurora B kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoke-Peng Lee

    Full Text Available Under the fluctuating circumstances provided by the innate dynamics of microtubules and opposing tensions resulted from microtubule-associated motors, it is vital to ensure stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments for accurate segregation. However, a comprehensive understanding of how this regulation is mechanistically achieved remains elusive. Using our newly designed live cell FRET time-lapse imaging, we found that post-metaphase RanGTP is crucial in the maintenance of stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments by regulating Aurora B kinase via the NES-bearing Mst1. More importantly, our study demonstrates that by ensuring stable alignment of metaphase chromosomes prior to segregation, RanGTP is indispensible in governing the genomic integrity and the fidelity of cell cycle progression. Our findings suggest an additional role of RanGTP beyond its known function in mitotic spindle assembly during the prometaphase-metaphase transition.

  3. In vivo SPECT reporter gene imaging of regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Sharif-Paghaleh

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs were identified several years ago and are key in controlling autoimmune diseases and limiting immune responses to foreign antigens, including alloantigens. In vivo imaging techniques including intravital microscopy as well as whole body imaging using bioluminescence probes have contributed to the understanding of in vivo Treg function, their mechanisms of action and target cells. Imaging of the human sodium/iodide symporter via Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT has been used to image various cell types in vivo. It has several advantages over the aforementioned imaging techniques including high sensitivity, it allows non-invasive whole body studies of viable cell migration and localisation of cells over time and lastly it may offer the possibility to be translated to the clinic. This study addresses whether SPECT/CT imaging can be used to visualise the migratory pattern of Tregs in vivo. Treg lines derived from CD4(+CD25(+FoxP3(+ cells were retrovirally transduced with a construct encoding for the human Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS and the fluorescent protein mCherry and stimulated with autologous DCs. NIS expressing self-specific Tregs were specifically radiolabelled in vitro with Technetium-99m pertechnetate ((99mTcO(4(- and exposure of these cells to radioactivity did not affect cell viability, phenotype or function. In addition adoptively transferred Treg-NIS cells were imaged in vivo in C57BL/6 (BL/6 mice by SPECT/CT using (99mTcO(4(-. After 24 hours NIS expressing Tregs were observed in the spleen and their localisation was further confirmed by organ biodistribution studies and flow cytometry analysis. The data presented here suggests that SPECT/CT imaging can be utilised in preclinical imaging studies of adoptively transferred Tregs without affecting Treg function and viability thereby allowing longitudinal studies within disease models.

  4. Structural imprints in vivo decode RNA regulatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitale, Robert C; Flynn, Ryan A; Zhang, Qiangfeng Cliff; Crisalli, Pete; Lee, Byron; Jung, Jong-Wha; Kuchelmeister, Hannes Y; Batista, Pedro J; Torre, Eduardo A; Kool, Eric T; Chang, Howard Y

    2015-03-26

    Visualizing the physical basis for molecular behaviour inside living cells is a great challenge for biology. RNAs are central to biological regulation, and the ability of RNA to adopt specific structures intimately controls every step of the gene expression program. However, our understanding of physiological RNA structures is limited; current in vivo RNA structure profiles include only two of the four nucleotides that make up RNA. Here we present a novel biochemical approach, in vivo click selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation and profiling experiment (icSHAPE), which enables the first global view, to our knowledge, of RNA secondary structures in living cells for all four bases. icSHAPE of the mouse embryonic stem cell transcriptome versus purified RNA folded in vitro shows that the structural dynamics of RNA in the cellular environment distinguish different classes of RNAs and regulatory elements. Structural signatures at translational start sites and ribosome pause sites are conserved from in vitro conditions, suggesting that these RNA elements are programmed by sequence. In contrast, focal structural rearrangements in vivo reveal precise interfaces of RNA with RNA-binding proteins or RNA-modification sites that are consistent with atomic-resolution structural data. Such dynamic structural footprints enable accurate prediction of RNA-protein interactions and N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) modification genome wide. These results open the door for structural genomics of RNA in living cells and reveal key physiological structures controlling gene expression.

  5. Role of regulatory body related to siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asmis, G.J.K.

    1981-11-01

    The role of a regulatory body, the Atomic Energy Control Board of Canada, in the siting process is discussed. A description of the Board's legal structure and safety criteria is followed by an example of the implementation of these criteria in relation to the siting of the Darlington nuclear power plant, with particular reference to external hazards such as tornadoes, earthquakes and explosions

  6. Homeostasis and function of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in vivo: lessons from TCR-transgenic Tregs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attridge, Kesley; Walker, Lucy S K

    2014-01-01

    The identification of CD25 and subsequently Forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) as markers for regulatory T cells (Tregs) has revolutionized our ability to explore this population experimentally. In a similar vein, our understanding of antigen-specific Treg responses in vivo owes much to the fortuitous generation of T-cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic Tregs. This has permitted tracking of Tregs with a defined specificity in vivo, facilitating analysis of how encounter with cognate antigen shapes Treg homeostasis and function. Here, we review the key lessons learned from a decade of analysis of TCR-transgenic Tregs and set this in the broader context of general progress in the field. Use of TCR-transgenic Tregs has led to an appreciation that Tregs are a highly dynamic proliferative population in vivo, rather than an anergic population as they were initially portrayed. It is now clear that Treg homeostasis is positively regulated by encounter with self-antigen expressed on peripheral tissues, which is likely to be relevant to the phenomenon of peripheral repertoire reshaping that has been described for Tregs and the observation that the Treg TCR specificities vary by anatomical location. Substantial evidence has also accumulated to support the role of CD28 costimulation and interleukin-2 in Treg homeostasis. The availability of TCR-transgenic Tregs has enabled analysis of Treg populations that are sufficient or deficient in particular genes, without the comparison being confounded by repertoire alterations. This approach has yielded insights into genes required for Treg function in vivo, with particular progress being made on the role of ctla-4 in this context. As the prospect of manipulating Treg populations in the clinic becomes reality, a full appreciation of the rules governing their homeostasis will prove increasingly important. PMID:24712457

  7. The Role of Regulatory and Customary Institutions to Access ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Remember me ... The findings of the study show a somewhat 'pessimistic' picture to shed light on the hitherto neglected role of informal institutions to support the ... Key words: Rural youth, Access to land, Customary/regulatory institutions,

  8. Pb exposure attenuates hypersensitivity in vivo by increasing regulatory T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Liang [Department of Immunology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Zhao, Fang; Shen, Xuefeng [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health and the Ministry of Education Key Lab of Hazard Assessment and Control in Special Operational Environment, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Ouyang, Weiming [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Division of Monoclonal Antibodies, Office of Biotechnology Products, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, United States Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Liu, Xinqin; Xu, Yan; Yu, Tao [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health and the Ministry of Education Key Lab of Hazard Assessment and Control in Special Operational Environment, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Jin, Boquan [Department of Immunology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Chen, Jingyuan, E-mail: jy_chen@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health and the Ministry of Education Key Lab of Hazard Assessment and Control in Special Operational Environment, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Luo, Wenjing, E-mail: luowenj@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health and the Ministry of Education Key Lab of Hazard Assessment and Control in Special Operational Environment, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China)

    2012-12-01

    Pb is a common environmental pollutant affecting various organs. Exposure of the immune system to Pb leads to immunosuppression or immunodysregulation. Although previous studies showed that Pb exposure can modulate the function of helper T cells, Pb immunotoxicity remains incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of Pb exposure on T cell development, and the underlying mechanism of Pb-induced suppression of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response in vivo. Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to 300 ppm Pb-acetate solution via the drinking water for six weeks, and we found that Pb exposure significantly increased Pb concentrations in the blood by 4.2-fold (p < 0.05) as compared to those in the control rats. In Pb-exposed rats, the amount of thymic CD4{sup +}CD8{sup −} and peripheral CD4{sup +} T cells was significantly reduced, whereas, CD8{sup +} population was not affected. In contrast to conventional CD4{sup +} T cells, Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs) were increased in both the thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs of Pb-exposed rats. In line with the increase of Tregs, the DTH response of Pb-exposed rats was markedly suppressed. Depletion of Tregs reversed the suppression of DTH response by Pb-exposed CD4{sup +} T cells in an adoptive transfer model, suggesting a critical role of the increased Tregs in suppressing the DTH response. Collectively, this study revealed that Pb-exposure may upregulate Tregs, thereby leading to immunosuppression. -- Highlights: ► Pb exposure impaired CD4{sup +} thymic T cell development. ► Peripheral T lymphocytes were reduced following Pb exposure. ► Pb exposure increases thymic and peripheral Treg cells in rats. ► Tregs played a critical role in Pb-exposure-induced immune suppression.

  9. Pb exposure attenuates hypersensitivity in vivo by increasing regulatory T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Liang; Zhao, Fang; Shen, Xuefeng; Ouyang, Weiming; Liu, Xinqin; Xu, Yan; Yu, Tao; Jin, Boquan; Chen, Jingyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2012-01-01

    Pb is a common environmental pollutant affecting various organs. Exposure of the immune system to Pb leads to immunosuppression or immunodysregulation. Although previous studies showed that Pb exposure can modulate the function of helper T cells, Pb immunotoxicity remains incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of Pb exposure on T cell development, and the underlying mechanism of Pb-induced suppression of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response in vivo. Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to 300 ppm Pb-acetate solution via the drinking water for six weeks, and we found that Pb exposure significantly increased Pb concentrations in the blood by 4.2-fold (p + CD8 − and peripheral CD4 + T cells was significantly reduced, whereas, CD8 + population was not affected. In contrast to conventional CD4 + T cells, Foxp3 + regulatory T cells (Tregs) were increased in both the thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs of Pb-exposed rats. In line with the increase of Tregs, the DTH response of Pb-exposed rats was markedly suppressed. Depletion of Tregs reversed the suppression of DTH response by Pb-exposed CD4 + T cells in an adoptive transfer model, suggesting a critical role of the increased Tregs in suppressing the DTH response. Collectively, this study revealed that Pb-exposure may upregulate Tregs, thereby leading to immunosuppression. -- Highlights: ► Pb exposure impaired CD4 + thymic T cell development. ► Peripheral T lymphocytes were reduced following Pb exposure. ► Pb exposure increases thymic and peripheral Treg cells in rats. ► Tregs played a critical role in Pb-exposure-induced immune suppression.

  10. Regulatory Role of Circular RNAs and Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Gabriele; Zhang, Longbin; Follesa, Paolo; Sun, Tao

    2017-09-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a class of long noncoding RNAs that are characterized by the presence of covalently linked ends and have been found in all life kingdoms. Exciting studies in regulatory roles of circRNAs are emerging. Here, we summarize classification, characteristics, biogenesis, and regulatory functions of circRNAs. CircRNAs are found to be preferentially expressed along neural genes and in neural tissues. We thus highlight the association of circRNA dysregulation with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Investigation of regulatory role of circRNAs will shed novel light in gene expression mechanisms during development and under disease conditions and may identify circRNAs as new biomarkers for aging and neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. An in vivo cis-regulatory screen at the type 2 diabetes associated TCF7L2 locus identifies multiple tissue-specific enhancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Savic

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have repeatedly shown an association between non-coding variants in the TCF7L2 locus and risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D, implicating a role for cis-regulatory variation within this locus in disease etiology. Supporting this hypothesis, we previously localized complex regulatory activity to the TCF7L2 T2D-associated interval using an in vivo bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC enhancer-trapping reporter strategy. To follow-up on this broad initial survey of the TCF7L2 regulatory landscape, we performed a fine-mapping enhancer scan using in vivo mouse transgenic reporter assays. We functionally interrogated approximately 50% of the sequences within the T2D-associated interval, utilizing sequence conservation within this 92-kb interval to determine the regulatory potential of all evolutionary conserved sequences that exhibited conservation to the non-eutherian mammal opossum. Included in this study was a detailed functional interrogation of sequences spanning both protective and risk alleles of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs7903146, which has exhibited allele-specific enhancer function in pancreatic beta cells. Using these assays, we identified nine segments regulating various aspects of the TCF7L2 expression profile and that constitute nearly 70% of the sequences tested. These results highlight the regulatory complexity of this interval and support the notion that a TCF7L2 cis-regulatory disruption leads to T2D predisposition.

  12. The regulatory roles of B cell subsets in transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Zhulang; Zou, Weilong; Xu, Yanan; Sun, Qiquan; Zhao, Yong

    2018-02-01

    B cells mediate allograft rejection through antigen presentation, and production of cytokines and antibodies. More and more immunosuppressive agents specifically targeting B cells and plasma cells have been applied in clinical transplantation. However, recent studies have indicated the regulatory roles of B cells. Therefore, it is vital to clarify the different effects of B cell subsets in organ transplantation so that we can completely understand the diverse functions of B cells in transplantation. Areas covered: This review focuses on the regulatory roles of B cells in transplantation. B cell subsets with immune modulation and factors mediating immunosuppressive functions of regulatory B (Breg) cells were analyzed. Therapies targeting B cells and the application of B cells for transplant tolerance induction were discussed. Expert commentary: Besides involving rejection, B cells could also play regulatory roles in transplantation. Breg cells and the related markers may be used to predict the immune tolerant state in transplant recipients. New therapeutic strategies targeting B cells should be explored to promote tolerance induction with less impact on the host's protective immunity in organ transplanted patients.

  13. Genome-Wide Mapping of Collier In Vivo Binding Sites Highlights Its Hierarchical Position in Different Transcription Regulatory Networks.

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    Mathilde de Taffin

    Full Text Available Collier, the single Drosophila COE (Collier/EBF/Olf-1 transcription factor, is required in several developmental processes, including head patterning and specification of muscle and neuron identity during embryogenesis. To identify direct Collier (Col targets in different cell types, we used ChIP-seq to map Col binding sites throughout the genome, at mid-embryogenesis. In vivo Col binding peaks were associated to 415 potential direct target genes. Gene Ontology analysis revealed a strong enrichment in proteins with DNA binding and/or transcription-regulatory properties. Characterization of a selection of candidates, using transgenic CRM-reporter assays, identified direct Col targets in dorso-lateral somatic muscles and specific neuron types in the central nervous system. These data brought new evidence that Col direct control of the expression of the transcription regulators apterous and eyes-absent (eya is critical to specifying neuronal identities. They also showed that cross-regulation between col and eya in muscle progenitor cells is required for specification of muscle identity, revealing a new parallel between the myogenic regulatory networks operating in Drosophila and vertebrates. Col regulation of eya, both in specific muscle and neuronal lineages, may illustrate one mechanism behind the evolutionary diversification of Col biological roles.

  14. Genome-Wide Mapping of Collier In Vivo Binding Sites Highlights Its Hierarchical Position in Different Transcription Regulatory Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Laurence; Bataillé, Laetitia; Painset, Anaïs; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Jost, Bernard; Crozatier, Michèle; Vincent, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Collier, the single Drosophila COE (Collier/EBF/Olf-1) transcription factor, is required in several developmental processes, including head patterning and specification of muscle and neuron identity during embryogenesis. To identify direct Collier (Col) targets in different cell types, we used ChIP-seq to map Col binding sites throughout the genome, at mid-embryogenesis. In vivo Col binding peaks were associated to 415 potential direct target genes. Gene Ontology analysis revealed a strong enrichment in proteins with DNA binding and/or transcription-regulatory properties. Characterization of a selection of candidates, using transgenic CRM-reporter assays, identified direct Col targets in dorso-lateral somatic muscles and specific neuron types in the central nervous system. These data brought new evidence that Col direct control of the expression of the transcription regulators apterous and eyes-absent (eya) is critical to specifying neuronal identities. They also showed that cross-regulation between col and eya in muscle progenitor cells is required for specification of muscle identity, revealing a new parallel between the myogenic regulatory networks operating in Drosophila and vertebrates. Col regulation of eya, both in specific muscle and neuronal lineages, may illustrate one mechanism behind the evolutionary diversification of Col biological roles. PMID:26204530

  15. Food-allergic infants have impaired regulatory T-cell responses following in vivo allergen exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Thanh D; Allen, Katrina J; J Martino, David; Koplin, Jennifer J; Licciardi, Paul V; Tang, Mimi L K

    2016-02-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are critical for development of oral tolerance, and studies suggest that dysfunction of Tregs may lead to food allergy. However, to date, no study has investigated Treg responses following in vivo exposure to peanut or egg allergens in humans. To examine changes in peripheral blood CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Treg populations (total, activated and naive) in food-allergic, food-sensitized but tolerant, and healthy (non-sensitized non-allergic) patients over time following in vivo allergen exposure. A subset of infants from the HealthNuts study with egg or peanut allergy (n = 37), egg or peanut sensitization (n = 35), or who were non-sensitized non-allergic (n = 15) were studied. All subjects underwent oral food challenge (OFC) to egg or peanut. PBMCs were obtained within 1 h of OFC (in vivo allergen exposure), and Treg populations enumerated ex vivo on day 0, and after 2 and 6 days rest in vitro. Non-allergic infants showed stable total Treg frequencies over time; food-sensitized infants had a transient fall in Treg percentage with recovery to baseline by day 6 (6.87% day 0, 5.27% day 2, 6.5% day 6); and food-allergic infants showed persistent reduction in Treg (6.85% day 0, 5.4% day 2, 6.2% day 6) following in vivo allergen exposure. Furthermore, food-allergic infants had a significantly lower ratio of activated Treg:activated T cells (10.5 ± 0.77) at day 0 compared to food-sensitized (14.6 ± 1.24) and non-allergic subjects (16.2 ± 1.23). Our data suggest that the state of allergen sensitization is associated with depletion of Treg following allergen exposure. Impaired capacity to regenerate the Treg pool following allergen exposure may be an important factor that determines clinical allergy vs. sensitization without allergic reaction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The Role of Advisory Committees on Regulatory functions: Argentine Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larcher, A. M.; Arias, C.; Kunst, J. J.; Perez, R. M.; Rudelli, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) has appointed a consultants body that advises its Board of Directors on aspects related to authorization's granting to individuals for the use of radioisotopes and ionizing radiation in medicine, research and industry. Such committee, whose existence goes back to the year 1958, is integrated by prominent professionals knowledgeable about ionizing radiation and radioisotopes applications in the medical, biomedical and industrial fields, representing important professional associations or institutions related to the practices in question. Originally, the committee was conceived as a consultation body to fulfil two important functions: To produce, in a regular way, authorized opinions at experts level to settle down questions relative to the regulation of practices, new at that time in the country, and To submit to a peer review applications for individual authorization for different uses of ionizing radiation previously it's granting by the Regulatory Authority. In this paper the role of the advisory council is analyzed from a historical perspective trying to emphasize an outstanding aspect not sufficiently analyzed linked to the capability that advisory bodies, with representative users' presence, can reach in the interpretation of regulatory standards based on a performance philosophy. Such approach outlines the permanent dilemma about the performance level of the licensee that should satisfy the Regulatory Authority. Once the broad objectives of radiation protection has been defined professional criteria is required for applying them to different practices. Balance between flexibility and avoidance of excessive uncertainty is desirable. In the authors' opinion the inclusion, inside the regulator's structure of consultants bodies giving direct participation to qualified stakeholders, far from harming the necessary independence that should characterize the regulator, on the contrary, allows to have an excellent social

  17. In vivo genome-wide profiling of RNA secondary structure reveals novel regulatory features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yiliang; Tang, Yin; Kwok, Chun Kit; Zhang, Yu; Bevilacqua, Philip C; Assmann, Sarah M

    2014-01-30

    RNA structure has critical roles in processes ranging from ligand sensing to the regulation of translation, polyadenylation and splicing. However, a lack of genome-wide in vivo RNA structural data has limited our understanding of how RNA structure regulates gene expression in living cells. Here we present a high-throughput, genome-wide in vivo RNA structure probing method, structure-seq, in which dimethyl sulphate methylation of unprotected adenines and cytosines is identified by next-generation sequencing. Application of this method to Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings yielded the first in vivo genome-wide RNA structure map at nucleotide resolution for any organism, with quantitative structural information across more than 10,000 transcripts. Our analysis reveals a three-nucleotide periodic repeat pattern in the structure of coding regions, as well as a less-structured region immediately upstream of the start codon, and shows that these features are strongly correlated with translation efficiency. We also find patterns of strong and weak secondary structure at sites of alternative polyadenylation, as well as strong secondary structure at 5' splice sites that correlates with unspliced events. Notably, in vivo structures of messenger RNAs annotated for stress responses are poorly predicted in silico, whereas mRNA structures of genes related to cell function maintenance are well predicted. Global comparison of several structural features between these two categories shows that the mRNAs associated with stress responses tend to have more single-strandedness, longer maximal loop length and higher free energy per nucleotide, features that may allow these RNAs to undergo conformational changes in response to environmental conditions. Structure-seq allows the RNA structurome and its biological roles to be interrogated on a genome-wide scale and should be applicable to any organism.

  18. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and its role in environmental standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattson, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    The NRC and its predecessors in the Atomic Energy Commission represent considerable experience in environmental standards setting. The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, the 1970 Supreme Court decision on Federal pre-emption of radiation standards, the Calvert Cliffs decision of 1971, the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and the Appendix I ''as low as reasonably achievable'' decision of 1975, to name a few of our landmarks, are representative of the scars and the achievements of being in a role of national leadership in radiation protection. The NRC, through a variety of legislative authorities, administrative regulations, regulatory guides, and national consensus standards regulates the commercial applications of nuclear energy. The purposes of regulation are the protection of the environment, public health and safety, and national security. To understand NRC's responsibilities relative to those of other Federal and state agencies concerned with environmental protection, we will briefly review the legislative authorities which underlie our regulatory program. Then we will examine the intent or the spirit of that program as embodied in our system of regulations, guides, and standards. Finally we will speak to what's happening today and what we see in the future for environmental standards

  19. Institutions, regulatory role and economic growth of national economies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladen Vedriš

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present time, characterized by the rapid disturbances in all time more connected global economy, territorially as well as structurally, the role of the state’s influence and responsibility with the adequate institutional addresses and procedures, defined in larger context, becomes the essential point not only of the further growth but also of the existing relations viability. It is simply because the encirclement does not function on the principle of status quo situation any more. Therefore, the role and significance of institutions, adequate regulatory role of these addresses, in the context of demand of permanent and stable economic growth, are of particular interest in the creation of this model. This analysis gains in importance studying the realized accelerated economic growth of states from some parts of the world, notably in the period after WW II. This question turned out to be exceptionally essential during the analysis of national strategies of accelerated economic growth (catch up strategy. On the other side of analysis are the transition period and the processes realized on the territory of the East and Central European states up to 1990 that were under the strong influence of the USSR. The attempts and mistakes in the quest for adequate balance of the market role were initially indoctrinated and led by the predominant conviction that the principles of Washington consensus will lead up to accelerated and efficient change of the entire structure of national economies and new frames for future behaviour. The problems that appeared very soon led to the establishment of significantly more balanced first the understanding and then to establishing significantly, more appropriate concept of balance and complementarity of market development with the permanently present role and responsibility of the state in this process and on this road.

  20. Regulatory focus and the family-work interface : the role of regulatory fit between cohabiting partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demerouti, E.; Bakker, A.B.; Tetrick, L.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of regulatory focus in goal pursuit and regulatory fit between marital partners on family conditions and the family–work interface. We hypothesized that when both partners are high on promotion focus (fit) they experience higher developmental

  1. The role of effective communications in Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Counsil, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    Communications are essential to the licensing and general regulatory program of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This paper attempts to identify and address certain aspects of, and approaches to, maintaining effective and efficient communications. It considers, from the perspective of the high-level radioactive waste repository program, both internal communication within the DOE itself and external communication with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and interested parties. Many of the points presented are based on lessons learned from electric utility experience with nuclear plants

  2. Opposing roles for interferon regulatory factor-3 (IRF-3 and type I interferon signaling during plague.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ami A Patel

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFN-I broadly control innate immunity and are typically transcriptionally induced by Interferon Regulatory Factors (IRFs following stimulation of pattern recognition receptors within the cytosol of host cells. For bacterial infection, IFN-I signaling can result in widely variant responses, in some cases contributing to the pathogenesis of disease while in others contributing to host defense. In this work, we addressed the role of type I IFN during Yersinia pestis infection in a murine model of septicemic plague. Transcription of IFN-β was induced in vitro and in vivo and contributed to pathogenesis. Mice lacking the IFN-I receptor, Ifnar, were less sensitive to disease and harbored more neutrophils in the later stage of infection which correlated with protection from lethality. In contrast, IRF-3, a transcription factor commonly involved in inducing IFN-β following bacterial infection, was not necessary for IFN production but instead contributed to host defense. In vitro, phagocytosis of Y. pestis by macrophages and neutrophils was more effective in the presence of IRF-3 and was not affected by IFN-β signaling. This activity correlated with limited bacterial growth in vivo in the presence of IRF-3. Together the data demonstrate that IRF-3 is able to activate pathways of innate immunity against bacterial infection that extend beyond regulation of IFN-β production.

  3. The Tumorigenic Roles of the Cellular REDOX Regulatory Systems

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    Stéphanie Anaís Castaldo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cellular REDOX regulatory systems play a central role in maintaining REDOX homeostasis that is crucial for cell integrity, survival, and proliferation. To date, a substantial amount of data has demonstrated that cancer cells typically undergo increasing oxidative stress as the tumor develops, upregulating these important antioxidant systems in order to survive, proliferate, and metastasize under these extreme oxidative stress conditions. Since a large number of chemotherapeutic agents currently used in the clinic rely on the induction of ROS overload or change of ROS quality to kill the tumor, the cancer cell REDOX adaptation represents a significant obstacle to conventional chemotherapy. In this review we will first examine the different factors that contribute to the enhanced oxidative stress generally observed within the tumor microenvironment. We will then make a comprehensive assessment of the current literature regarding the main antioxidant proteins and systems that have been shown to be positively associated with tumor progression and chemoresistance. Finally we will make an analysis of commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs that induce ROS. The current knowledge of cancer cell REDOX adaptation raises the issue of developing novel and more effective therapies for these tumors that are usually resistant to conventional ROS inducing chemotherapy.

  4. In vivo cardiac role of migfilin during experimental pressure overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubner, Bernhard Johannes; Moik, Daniel; Schuetz, Thomas; Reiner, Martin F; Voelkl, Jakob G; Streil, Katrin; Bader, Kerstin; Zhao, Lei; Scheu, Claudia; Mair, Johannes; Pachinger, Otmar; Metzler, Bernhard

    2015-06-01

    Increased myocardial wall strain triggers the cardiac hypertrophic response by increasing cardiomyocyte size, reprogramming gene expression, and enhancing contractile protein synthesis. The LIM protein, migfilin, is a cytoskeleton-associated protein that was found to translocate in vitro into the nucleus in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, where it co-activates the pivotal cardiac transcription factor Csx/Nkx2.5. However, the in vivo role of migfilin in cardiac function and stress response is unclear. To define the role of migfilin in cardiac hypertrophy, we induced hypertension by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and compared cardiac morphology and function of migfilin knockout (KO) with wild-type (WT) hearts. Heart size and myocardial contractility were comparable in untreated migfilin KO and WT hearts, but migfilin-null hearts presented a reduced extent of hypertrophic remodelling in response to chronic hypertensile stress. Migfilin KO mice maintained their cardiac function for a longer time period compared with WT mice, which presented extensive fibrosis and death due to heart failure. Migfilin translocated into the nucleus of TAC-treated cardiomyocytes, and migfilin KO hearts showed reduced Akt activation during the early response to pressure overload. Our findings indicate an important role of migfilin in the regulation of cardiac hypertrophy upon experimental TAC. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Chaperoning Roles of Macromolecules Interacting with Proteins in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baik L. Seong

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The principles obtained from studies on molecular chaperones have provided explanations for the assisted protein folding in vivo. However, the majority of proteins can fold without the assistance of the known molecular chaperones, and little attention has been paid to the potential chaperoning roles of other macromolecules. During protein biogenesis and folding, newly synthesized polypeptide chains interact with a variety of macromolecules, including ribosomes, RNAs, cytoskeleton, lipid bilayer, proteolytic system, etc. In general, the hydrophobic interactions between molecular chaperones and their substrates have been widely believed to be mainly responsible for the substrate stabilization against aggregation. Emerging evidence now indicates that other features of macromolecules such as their surface charges, probably resulting in electrostatic repulsions, and steric hindrance, could play a key role in the stabilization of their linked proteins against aggregation. Such stabilizing mechanisms are expected to give new insights into our understanding of the chaperoning functions for de novo protein folding. In this review, we will discuss the possible chaperoning roles of these macromolecules in de novo folding, based on their charge and steric features.

  6. Regulatory focus at work : the moderating role of regulatory focus in the job demands-resources model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenninkmeijer, V.; Demerouti, E.; Blanc, Le P.M.; Emmerik, van I.J.H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to examine the moderating role of regulatory focus in the job demands-resources model. Design/methodology/approach – A questionnaire survey was conducted among 146 teachers in secondary education. It was expected that detrimental effects of job demands (i.e.

  7. Causality analysis detects the regulatory role of maternal effect genes in the early Drosophila embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zara Ghodsi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In developmental studies, inferring regulatory interactions of segmentation genetic network play a vital role in unveiling the mechanism of pattern formation. As such, there exists an opportune demand for theoretical developments and new mathematical models which can result in a more accurate illustration of this genetic network. Accordingly, this paper seeks to extract the meaningful regulatory role of the maternal effect genes using a variety of causality detection techniques and to explore whether these methods can suggest a new analytical view to the gene regulatory networks. We evaluate the use of three different powerful and widely-used models representing time and frequency domain Granger causality and convergent cross mapping technique with the results being thoroughly evaluated for statistical significance. Our findings show that the regulatory role of maternal effect genes is detectable in different time classes and thereby the method is applicable to infer the possible regulatory interactions present among the other genes of this network.

  8. Deciphering Fur transcriptional regulatory network highlights its complex role beyond iron metabolism in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; Latif, Haythem

    2014-01-01

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of iron metabolism. However, the full regulatory potential of Fur remains undefined. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the Fur transcriptional regulatory network in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 in response...

  9. Interpersonal goal support in achieving ideals and oughts: The role of dispositional regulatory focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Righetti, F.; Kumashiro, M.

    2012-01-01

    The present work examines the role of each partner's regulatory focus in the phenomenon of interpersonal goal support in close relationships. We examined the impact of regulatory orientation for interpersonal support of both ideal and ought self goals. Consistent with expectations, two studies

  10. Adolescent threat-related interpretive bias and its modification: the moderating role of regulatory control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salemink, E.; Wiers, R.W.

    2012-01-01

    Dual process models describe psychopathology as the consequence of an imbalance between a fast, impulsive system and a regulatory control system and have recently been applied to anxiety disorders. The aim of the current study was to specifically examine the role of a regulatory control system in

  11. Sales Growth of New Pharmaceuticals Across the Globe: The Role of Regulatory Regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Stremersch (Stefan); A. Lemmens (Aurélie)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPrior marketing literature has overlooked the role of regulatory regimes in explaining international sales growth of new products. This paper addresses this gap in the context of new pharmaceuticals (15 new molecules in 34 countries) and sheds light on the effect regulatory regimes have

  12. Competitive mindsets, creativity, and the role of regulatory focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bittner, Jenny; Heidemeier, Heike

    2013-01-01

    We examined how regulatory focus and intentions to compete rather than cooperate with group members relate to creativity. Study 1 showed that a promotion focus (i.e., a focus on ideals) activated a cooperative mindset, whereas a prevention focus (i.e., a focus on responsibilities) activated a

  13. Role of cooperation activities for capacity building of Romanian Regulatory Authority (CNCAN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biro, L.; Ciurea-Ercau, C.

    2010-01-01

    With a slow but active nuclear development program of sector since 1980, Romanian regulatory authority had to permanently adapt to the changes in national and international environment in order ensure continuously increase of capacity building and effectiveness, commensurate with the growing nuclear sector. Limited human resources available at the national level put the Romanian Regulatory Authority in the position of building the Technical Support Organization as part of its on organization. International cooperation played an important role in capacity building of Romanian regulatory body and providing necessary assistance in performing regulatory activities or support in development of regulatory framework. Fellowships and technical visits, workshops and training courses provided through IAEA TC at national or regional level, technical assistance provided by European Commission (EC) through PHARE Projects, all provided valuable contribution in assuring training of regulatory staff and development of proper regulatory framework in Romania. Therefore, Romanian Regulatory Authority is putting a strong accent on strengthening and promoting international cooperation through IAEA Technical Cooperation Programme, Molls between regulatory bodies, as one of the key elements in supporting capacity building of regulatory authorities in countries having small or embarking on nuclear power program. Building networks between training centers and research facilities and establishments of regional training centers represent one of the future viable options in preserving knowledge in nuclear field. (author)

  14. Regulatory role for the memory B cell as suppressor-inducer of feedback control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, M.W.; Thomas, D.B.

    1983-01-01

    A regulatory role is proposed for the antigen-responsive B cell, as suppressor-inducer of feedback control during the secondary response in vivo. In a double adoptive transfer of memory cells primed to a thymus-dependent antigen from one irradiated host to another, antigen-specific suppressors are generated after a critical time in the primary recipient, able to entirely ablate a secondary anti-hapten response. Positive cell selection in the fluorescence-activated cell sorter confirmed that suppression was mediated by an Lyt-2+ T cell; however, positively selected B cells were also inhibitory and able to induce suppressors in a carrier-specific manner: B hapten induced suppressors in a carrier-primed population, and B carrier induced suppressors in a hapten-carrier population. At the peak of the antibody response in the primary host, memory B cells and their progeny were unable to differentiate further to plasma cells due to their intrinsic suppressor-inducer activity, but this autoregulatory circuit could be severed by adoptive transfer to carrier-primed, X-irradiated recipients

  15. Ex vivo modulation of the Foxo1 phosphorylation state does not lead to dysfunction of T regulatory cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Kelley Penberthy

    Full Text Available Peripheral regulatory CD4+ T cells (Treg cells prevent maladaptive inflammatory responses to innocuous foreign antigens. Treg cell dysfunction has been linked to many inflammatory diseases, including allergic airway inflammation. Glucocorticoids that are used to treat allergic airway inflammation and asthma are thought to work in part by promoting Treg cell differentiation; patients who are refractory to these drugs have defective induction of anti-inflammatory Treg cells. Previous observations suggest that Treg cells deficient in the transcription factor FoxO1 are pro-inflammatory, and that FoxO1 activity is regulated by its phosphorylation status and nuclear localization. Here, we asked whether altering the phosphorylation state of FoxO1 through modulation of a regulatory phosphatase might affect Treg cell function. In a mouse model of house dust mite-induced allergic airway inflammation, we observed robust recruitment of Treg cells to the lungs and lymph nodes of diseased mice, without an apparent increase in the Treg cytokine interleukin-10 in the airways. Intriguingly, expression of PP2A, a serine/threonine phosphatase linked to the regulation of FoxO1 phosphorylation, was decreased in the mediastinal lymph nodes of HDM-treated mice, mirroring the decreased PP2A expression seen in peripheral blood monocytes of glucocorticoid-resistant asthmatic patients. When we asked whether modulation of PP2A activity alters Treg cell function via treatment with the PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid, we observed increased phosphorylation of FoxO1 and decreased nuclear localization. However, dysregulation of FoxO1 did not impair Treg cell differentiation ex vivo or cause Treg cells to adopt a pro-inflammatory phenotype. Moreover, inhibition of PP2A activity did not affect the suppressive function of Treg cells ex vivo. Collectively, these data suggest that modulation of the phosphorylation state of FoxO1 via PP2A inhibition does not modify Treg cell function ex

  16. The role of T regulatory cells in kidney transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Urbanová, Anna

    2011-01-01

    T regulatory lymphocytes (Treg) belong to the CD4+ cell group. They are an essential part of the immunity system. Treg cells prevent from excessive activation of effector T cells and they keep the tolerance to the tissues of the body. They have high expression of CD25 and the transcription factor Foxp3. We distinguish two basic populations of Treg cells: natural Treg cells (nTreg) created in the thym and representing 5-10 % of all CD4+ cells, and induced Treg cells (iTreg), created from naive...

  17. A critical appraisal of the process of regulatory implementation of novel in vivo and in vitro methods for chemical hazard and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piersma, Aldert H; Ezendam, Janine; Luijten, Mirjam; Muller, J J Andre; Rorije, Emiel; van der Ven, Leo T M; van Benthem, Jan

    2014-11-01

    Regulatory toxicology urgently needs applicable alternative test systems that reduce animal use, testing time, and cost. European regulation on cosmetic ingredients has already banned animal experimentation for hazard identification, and public awareness drives toward additional restrictions in other regulatory frameworks as well. In addition, scientific progress stimulates a more mechanistic approach of hazard identification. Nevertheless, the implementation of alternative methods is lagging far behind their development. In search for general bottlenecks for the implementation of alternative methods, this manuscript reviews the state of the art as to the development and implementation of 10 diverse test systems in various areas of toxicological hazard assessment. They vary widely in complexity and regulatory acceptance status. The assays are reviewed as to parameters assessed, biological system involved, standardization, interpretation of results, extrapolation to human hazard, position in testing strategies, and current regulatory acceptance status. Given the diversity of alternative methods in many aspects, no common bottlenecks could be identified that hamper implementation of individual alternative assays in general. However, specific issues for the regulatory acceptance and application were identified for each assay. Acceptance of one-in-one replacement of complex in vivo tests by relatively simple in vitro assays is not feasible. Rather, innovative approaches using test batteries are required together with metabolic information and in vitro to in vivo dose extrapolation to convincingly provide the same level of information of current in vivo tests. A mechanistically based alternative approach using the Adverse Outcome Pathway concept could stimulate further (regulatory) acceptance of non-animal tests.

  18. Role of the Regulatory Body in Implementing Defence in Depth in Nuclear Installations - Regulatory Oversight in Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sheikh, B. M., E-mail: badawymel@yahoo.com [Egyptian Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority Cairo (Egypt)

    2014-10-15

    The fundamental objective of all nuclear safety regulatory bodies is to ensure that nuclear facilities are operated at all times in an acceptably safe manner including the safe conduct of decommissioning activities. Defence in depth is recognized as one of the fundamental safety principles that underlie the safety of nuclear power plants. Defence in depth is implemented to provide a graded protection against a wide variety of transients, incidents and accidents, including equipment failures and human errors within nuclear power plants and events initiated outside plants. The Regulator Body plays an important role in implementing defence in depth in nuclear installations in the context of a clear allocation of responsibilities with an operating organization. This role starting with setting safety objectives and by its own independent review and technical assessment of the safety justifications provided by the operating organization in addition to safety culture investigating within relevant organizations. This paper briefly reviews this role in normal operation and post accidents, and its effects on overall nuclear safety in nuclear installations with reference to Egyptian regulatory oversight. (author)

  19. Transcriptional control by G-quadruplexes: In vivo roles and perspectives for specific intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Pablo; David, Aldana; Calcaterra, Nora B

    2017-01-01

    G-quadruplexes are non-canonical DNA secondary structures involved in several genomic and molecular processes. Here, we summarize the main G-quadruplex features and evidences proving the in vivo role on the transcriptional regulation of genes required for zebrafish embryonic development. We also discuss alternative strategies for specifically interfering G-quadruplex in vivo.

  20. The role of women in nuclear - attracting public participation in regulatory decision-making process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Jais, Azlina; Hassan, Najwa

    2018-01-01

    Public participation is vital in demonstrating transparency and enhancing effectiveness of a nuclear regulatory process. As such, it is necessary for nuclear practitioners to involve the public in key nuclear delivery milestones. This paper specifically discusses challenges faced in attracting public participation throughout the nuclear regulatory decision-making process, and highlights the roles of women in nuclear (WiN) in initiating the said public discourse.

  1. The role of risk assessment in the nuclear regulatory process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, S.

    1979-01-01

    Since the publication of the Reactor Safety Study in the USA, the basic tasks of which are summarised, the use of quantitative risk-assessment techniques for the safety of nuclear power plants has increased considerably. Some of the viewpoints expressed on the use of these techniques are examined, and their limitations are discussed. Areas where risk-assessment techniques are applied by the NRC are listed and some recent examples are discussed. Risk assessment has also been used as a criteria for deciding the topics for the NRC's recommendations for research programs. It is concluded that the major contribution of risk assessment techniques should be in the form of background analyses that will aid decision making and could also significantly affect the scope and content of regulatory reviews. (UK)

  2. Role of human neurobehavioural tests in regulatory activity on chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, R.; Barker, P.

    1998-01-01

    Psychological performance tests have been used since the mid-1960s in occupational and environmental health toxicology. The interpretation of significantly different test scores in neurobehavioural studies is not straightforward in the regulation of chemicals. This paper sets out some issues which emerged from discussions at an international workshop, organised by the United Kingdom Health and Safety Executive (HSE), to discuss differences in interpretation of human neurobehavioural test data in regulatory risk assessments. The difficulties encountered by regulators confronted with neurobehavioural studies seem to be twofold; some studies lack scientific rigor; other studies, although scientifically sound, are problematic because it is not clear what interpretation to place on the results. Issues relating to each of these points are discussed. Next, scenarios within which to consider the outcomes of neurobehavioural studies are presented. Finally, conclusions and recommendations for further work are put forward.   PMID:9624273

  3. Antioxidant and Ex Vivo Immune System Regulatory Properties of Boswellia serrata Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Beghelli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Boswellia serrata (BS is an important traditional medicinal plant that currently represents an interesting topic for pharmaceutical research since it possesses several pharmacological properties (e.g., anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antitumour. The safety and versatility of this dietary supplement should allow for its use in numerous pathological conditions; however the quality of the extracts needs to be standardized to increase the clinical success rate resulting from its use. In the present study, different commercially available B. serrata extracts were employed to compare their AKBA content and in vitro antioxidant power. Furthermore, their ability to modulate the immune system regulatory properties was investigated. Our results showed that the AKBA content varied from 3.83±0.10 to 0.03±0.004%, with one sample in which it was not detectable. The highest antioxidant power and phenolic content were shown by the same extract, which also exhibited the highest AKBA concentration. Finally, the BS extracts showed the ability to influence the regulatory and effector T-cell compartments. Our results suggest that frankincense should be further investigated for its promising potentiality to modulate not only inflammation/oxidative stress but also immune dysregulation, but attention should be paid to the composition of the commercial extracts.

  4. Inferring the role of transcription factors in regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Borgne Michel

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression profiles obtained from multiple perturbation experiments are increasingly used to reconstruct transcriptional regulatory networks, from well studied, simple organisms up to higher eukaryotes. Admittedly, a key ingredient in developing a reconstruction method is its ability to integrate heterogeneous sources of information, as well as to comply with practical observability issues: measurements can be scarce or noisy. In this work, we show how to combine a network of genetic regulations with a set of expression profiles, in order to infer the functional effect of the regulations, as inducer or repressor. Our approach is based on a consistency rule between a network and the signs of variation given by expression arrays. Results We evaluate our approach in several settings of increasing complexity. First, we generate artificial expression data on a transcriptional network of E. coli extracted from the literature (1529 nodes and 3802 edges, and we estimate that 30% of the regulations can be annotated with about 30 profiles. We additionally prove that at most 40.8% of the network can be inferred using our approach. Second, we use this network in order to validate the predictions obtained with a compendium of real expression profiles. We describe a filtering algorithm that generates particularly reliable predictions. Finally, we apply our inference approach to S. cerevisiae transcriptional network (2419 nodes and 4344 interactions, by combining ChIP-chip data and 15 expression profiles. We are able to detect and isolate inconsistencies between the expression profiles and a significant portion of the model (15% of all the interactions. In addition, we report predictions for 14.5% of all interactions. Conclusion Our approach does not require accurate expression levels nor times series. Nevertheless, we show on both data, real and artificial, that a relatively small number of perturbation experiments are enough to determine

  5. Role of in-house safety analysis and research activities in regulatory decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, Santosh K.; Nagrale, Dhanesh B.; Gaikwad, Avinash J.

    2015-01-01

    Achievement of an acceptable level of nuclear safety is an essential requirement for the peaceful utilization of nuclear energy. The success of Global Nuclear Safety Regime is built upon a foundation of research. Such research has been sponsored by Governments and industry and has led to improved designs, safer and more reliable plant operation, and improvements in operating plant efficiency. A key element of this research has been the nuclear safety research performed or sponsored by regulatory organizations. In part, it has been the safety research performed or sponsored by regulatory organizations that has contributed to improved safety and has laid the foundation for activities such as risk-informed regulation, plant life extension, improved plant performance (e.g. power uprates) and new plant designs. The regulatory research program is meant to improve the regulatory authority’s knowledge where uncertainty exists, where safety margins are not well-characterized, and where regulatory decisions need to be confirmed in existing or new designs and technologies. The regulatory body get research initiated either in-house or by the licensee or through technical support organizations (TSOs). Research and analysis carried out within the regulatory body is of immense value in this context. This could be in the form of analysis of safety significant events, analysis of severe accidents, review of operating experience, independent checks of critical designs and even review of operator responses under different situations towards arriving at modifications to training programmes and licensing procedures for operating personnel. A latent benefit of regulatory research carried out by the regulators themselves is that it improves their technical competence considerably which in turn leads to high quality safety reviews and improved regulation in general. The aim of the present paper is to provide an overview of role of regulatory research and the in-house regulatory safety

  6. Regulatory Role of Small Nucleolar RNAs in Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigory A. Stepanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs are appreciable players in gene expression regulation in human cells. The canonical function of box C/D and box H/ACA snoRNAs is posttranscriptional modification of ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs, namely, 2′-O-methylation and pseudouridylation, respectively. A series of independent studies demonstrated that snoRNAs, as well as other noncoding RNAs, serve as the source of various short regulatory RNAs. Some snoRNAs and their fragments can also participate in the regulation of alternative splicing and posttranscriptional modification of mRNA. Alterations in snoRNA expression in human cells can affect numerous vital cellular processes. SnoRNA level in human cells, blood serum, and plasma presents a promising target for diagnostics and treatment of human pathologies. Here we discuss the relation between snoRNAs and oncological, neurodegenerative, and viral diseases and also describe changes in snoRNA level in response to artificial stress and some drugs.

  7. Negative regulatory role of PI3-kinase in TNF-induced tumor necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matschurat, Susanne; Blum, Sabine; Mitnacht-Kraus, Rita; Dijkman, Henry B P M; Kanal, Levent; De Waal, Robert M W; Clauss, Matthias

    2003-10-20

    Tissue factor is the prime initiator of blood coagulation. Expression of tissue factor in tumor endothelial cells leads to thrombus formation, occlusion of vessels and development of hemorrhagic infarctions in the tumor tissue, often followed by regression of the tumor. Tumor cells produce endogenous vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which sensitizes endothelial cells for systemically administered tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) and synergistically enhances the TNF-induced expression of tissue factor. We have analyzed the pathways involved in the induction of tissue factor in human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) after combined stimulation with TNF and VEGF. By using specific low molecular weight inhibitors, we demonstrated that protein kinase C (PKC), p44/42 and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, and stress-activated protein kinase (JNK) are essentially involved in the induction of tissue factor. In contrast, the application of wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI3)-kinase, led to strongly enhanced expression of tissue factor in TNF- and VEGF-treated cells, implicating a negative regulatory role for PI3-kinase. In vivo, the application of wortmannin promoted the formation of TNF-induced hemorrhages and intratumoral necroses in murine meth A tumors. The co-injection of wortmannin lowered the effective dose of applied TNF. Therefore, it is conceivable that the treatment of TNF-sensitive tumors with a combination of TNF and wortmannin will ensure the selective damage of the tumor endothelium and minimize the risk of systemic toxicity of TNF. TNF-treatment in combination with specific inhibition of PI3-kinase is a novel concept in anti-cancer therapy. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Leptin: regulatory role in bone metabolism and in flogosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.D. Ferraccioli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Leptin is a peptidic molecule synthesized almost exclusively by adipocytes, that regulates appetite and energy expenditure at the hypothalamic level. In the last few years, further actions have been attributed to this molecule, as modulating the immune response and affecting the bone metabolism. We have reviewed if leptin contributes to the metabolic changes leading to cachexia and to the regulation of flogosis, paying attention to the pathogenetic mechanisms of cronic arthritis. Besides, considering the relationship between body mass index (BMI e bone mineral density (BMD and the protective role of the obesity towards osteoporosis, we have analysed the role of leptin on the bone metabolism

  9. Role of In Vitro Release Methods in Liposomal Formulation Development: Challenges and Regulatory Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Deepak; Gupta, Nilesh; Mulla, Nihal S; Shukla, Snehal; Guerrero, Yadir A; Gupta, Vivek

    2017-11-01

    In the past few years, measurement of drug release from pharmaceutical dosage forms has been a focus of extensive research because the release profile obtained in vitro can give an indication of the drug's performance in vivo. Currently, there are no compendial in vitro release methods designed for liposomes owing to a range of experimental challenges, which has created a major hurdle for both development and regulatory acceptance of liposome-based drug products. In this paper, we review the current techniques that are most often used to assess in vitro drug release from liposomal products; these include the membrane diffusion techniques (dialysis, reverse dialysis, fractional dialysis, and microdialysis), the sample-and-separate approach, the in situ method, the continuous flow, and the modified United States Pharmacopeia methods (USP I and USP IV). We discuss the principles behind each of the methods and the criteria that assist in choosing the most appropriate method for studying drug release from a liposomal formulation. Also, we have included information concerning the current regulatory requirements for liposomal drug products in the United States and in Europe. In light of increasing costs of preclinical and clinical trials, applying a reliable in vitro release method could serve as a proxy to expensive in vivo bioavailability studies. Graphical Abstract Appropriate in-vitro drug release test from liposomal products is important to predict the in-vivo performance.

  10. Discovery of transcription factors and regulatory regions driving in vivo tumor development by ATAC-seq and FAIRE-seq open chromatin profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristofer Davie

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Genomic enhancers regulate spatio-temporal gene expression by recruiting specific combinations of transcription factors (TFs. When TFs are bound to active regulatory regions, they displace canonical nucleosomes, making these regions biochemically detectable as nucleosome-depleted regions or accessible/open chromatin. Here we ask whether open chromatin profiling can be used to identify the entire repertoire of active promoters and enhancers underlying tissue-specific gene expression during normal development and oncogenesis in vivo. To this end, we first compare two different approaches to detect open chromatin in vivo using the Drosophila eye primordium as a model system: FAIRE-seq, based on physical separation of open versus closed chromatin; and ATAC-seq, based on preferential integration of a transposon into open chromatin. We find that both methods reproducibly capture the tissue-specific chromatin activity of regulatory regions, including promoters, enhancers, and insulators. Using both techniques, we screened for regulatory regions that become ectopically active during Ras-dependent oncogenesis, and identified 3778 regions that become (over-activated during tumor development. Next, we applied motif discovery to search for candidate transcription factors that could bind these regions and identified AP-1 and Stat92E as key regulators. We validated the importance of Stat92E in the development of the tumors by introducing a loss of function Stat92E mutant, which was sufficient to rescue the tumor phenotype. Additionally we tested if the predicted Stat92E responsive regulatory regions are genuine, using ectopic induction of JAK/STAT signaling in developing eye discs, and observed that similar chromatin changes indeed occurred. Finally, we determine that these are functionally significant regulatory changes, as nearby target genes are up- or down-regulated. In conclusion, we show that FAIRE-seq and ATAC-seq based open chromatin profiling

  11. Cholesterol: a novel regulatory role in myelin formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saher, Gesine; Quintes, Susanne; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2011-02-01

    Myelin consists of tightly compacted membranes that form an insulating sheath around axons. The function of myelin for rapid saltatory nerve conduction is dependent on its unique composition, highly enriched in glycosphingolipids and cholesterol. Cholesterol emerged as the only integral myelin component that is essential and rate limiting for the development of CNS and PNS myelin. Experiments with conditional mouse mutants that lack cholesterol biosynthesis in oligodendrocytes revealed that only minimal changes of the CNS myelin lipid composition are tolerated. In Schwann cells of the PNS, protein trafficking and myelin compaction depend on cholesterol. In this review, the authors summarize the role of cholesterol in myelin biogenesis and myelin disease.

  12. Beyond toxicity: a regulatory role for mitochondrial cyanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Irene; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C

    2014-01-01

    In non-cyanogenic plants, cyanide is a co-product of ethylene and camalexin biosynthesis. To maintain cyanide at non-toxic levels, Arabidopsis plants express the mitochondrial β-cyanoalanine synthase CYS-C1. CYS-C1 knockout leads to an increased level of cyanide in the roots and leaves and a severe defect in root hair morphogenesis, suggesting that cyanide acts as a signaling factor in root development. During compatible and incompatible plant-bacteria interactions, cyanide accumulation and CYS-C1 gene expression are negatively correlated. Moreover, CYS-C1 mutation increases both plant tolerance to biotrophic pathogens and their susceptibility to necrotrophic fungi, indicating that cyanide could stimulate the salicylic acid-dependent signaling pathway of the plant immune system. We hypothesize that CYS-C1 is essential for maintaining non-toxic concentrations of cyanide in the mitochondria to facilitate cyanide's role in signaling.

  13. THE ROLE OF SELF-REGULATORY AUDITING ASSOCIATIONS IN ARRANGEMENT OF AUDIT ACTIVITIES QUALITY CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinaida P. Arharova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of self-regulatory organizations in audit activities quality control is revealed in this article. Creation of a united audit association is the basis of certain regulating and auditing functions transfer from the government to the public sector.

  14. Safeguards decision making in the public and regulatory environment, and the potential role of quantitative approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherr, T.S.

    1981-01-01

    This paper briefly examines the nature of the safeguards program's objectives and constraints, and the inherent limitations on comprehensive quantification. It discusses the nature of the public and regulatory processes employed in safeguards decision making, and examines their implications regarding the potential role of quantitative approaches to safeguards policy and operational decision making

  15. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's role in the management of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernero, R.M.; Kalman, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) role in the management of radioactive waste. It provides an overview of the NRC's programs for the management of High-Level and Low-Level radioctive wastes and uranium mill tailings. (author) 7 refs

  16. The intrinsic roles of regulatory instruments in mining operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kola O. Odeku

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Prospecting and exploiting natural mineral resources for economic growth and development could be beneficial if done in sustainable ways and manners. However, if the operation is done in such a way that cause harm to the environment and people, this will amount to unsustainable mining activity and anti-sustainable development. Therefore, there is need to ensure that appropriate and adequate plans and programmes are put in place in order to mitigate, minimise and avoid negative environmental impacts. Against the backdrop of these concerns and the need to ensure that the environment is not degraded and destroyed, South Africa, as part of the countries that promotes sustainable prospecting and mining has put in place and currently implementing tools known as environmental management plan and programme to regulate and control all prospecting and mining activities. These tools contain a bundle of remedial actions in the forms of compensation, rehabilitation and restoration of any harm done to the environment during the course of mining activities. They also contain information on mitigation, ingredients for good practice approach on how to conduct sustainable prospecting and mining. This article looks at the intrinsic roles of these tools and accentuates the importance and operations of their use in the decision making processe

  17. DMPD: The role of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family in dendritic celldevelopment and function. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17702640 The role of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family in dendritic celldevelopment and function...in dendritic celldevelopment and function. PubmedID 17702640 Title The role of th...e interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family in dendritic celldevelopment and function. Authors Gabriele L, O

  18. Role of technical and scientific support organization In Indonesian regulatory body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusri Heni, N.A.; Zarkasih, A.S.; Liliana, Y.P.; Salman, S.

    2007-01-01

    Indonesian Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) has the function in controlling the utility of nuclear energy through regulation, licensing and inspection, with the aim, interalia, to ensure the welfare, the security and the peace of people, to assure the safety and the health of workers and public, and the environmental protection, and to prevent diversion of purpose of the nuclear material utilization (Article 14 and 15 of Act no 10, 1997 on Nuclear Energy). The role and quality of technical and scientific expertise in supporting regulatory systems are importance increase the effectiveness and public confidence. The Center for Regulatory Assessment of Nuclear Installation and Nuclear Material and Center for Regulatory Assessment of Radiation Facilities and Radioactive Sources as part of BAPETEN organization has a function as technical and scientific support for regulatory systems. The purpose of this function is to provide technical and scientific basis for decisions and activities regarding nuclear and radiation safety during regulatory processes, such as in the developing and establishing regulation, technical verification for licensing, assessment of inspection funding and enforcement. In order to meet the quality and effectiveness of technical and scientific result activity, those two centers for regulatory assesment used internal and external technical experts and joint cooperation with universities, research institutes or laboratories. The development of technical and scientific strategic planning in enhancing nuclear and radiation safety is done by the following increasing of : Human resources and expertise by internal and external training or on the job training; number for computer code to perform safety analysis, capability and quality for review and assessment, national and international cooperation, etc. (author)

  19. The role of self-regulatory efficacy, moral disengagement and guilt on doping likelihood: A social cognitive theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Christopher; Kavussanu, Maria

    2018-03-01

    Given the concern over doping in sport, researchers have begun to explore the role played by self-regulatory processes in the decision whether to use banned performance-enhancing substances. Grounded on Bandura's (1991) theory of moral thought and action, this study examined the role of self-regulatory efficacy, moral disengagement and anticipated guilt on the likelihood to use a banned substance among college athletes. Doping self-regulatory efficacy was associated with doping likelihood both directly (b = -.16, P self-regulatory efficacy influences the likelihood to use banned performance-enhancing substances both directly and indirectly via moral disengagement.

  20. WTO+ commitments on services in Asian PTAs: The role of regulatory homogeneity and goods trade complementarity

    OpenAIRE

    Shingal, Anirudh; Ro, Martin; Sauvé, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    This paper looks at the role of applied services regulations in accounting for WTO+ commitments on trade in services in preferential trade agreements (PTAs) among Asian economies. The empirical findings suggest that Asian trading dyads with regulatory frameworks that are more similar and more trade-restrictive tend to undertake higher levels of WTO+ commitments on services in their PTAs. There is also evidence in the results for such WTO+ commitments being driven by goods trade complementarit...

  1. Security of handling radioactive sources and the role of the regulatory body in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, M.

    1998-01-01

    The motivation of the present paper was undertaken to discuss the system adopted by the National Centre for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control (NCNSRC) in handling the radioactive sources inside the country. The system concentrates mainly on the role of the centre concerning three main categories namely regulations, licensing and training. The mutual co-operation between the regulatory body and the other agencies concerning this matter is going to be presented. (author)

  2. Role of the regulatory authority in preparation of the NPP self assessment of safety culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gantchev, T [Committee on the Use of Atomic Energy for Peaceful Purposes, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1997-12-31

    We believe that with the assistance of the IAEA(ASSET Training Mission) the plant personnel will be able to prepare high quality Self Assessment Report. The main role of the Regulatory Body is to ensure correspondence with the IAEA requirements and to provide clear guidance for the most important items of the Plant Self Assessment Report. The involvement of the Operating Organization is also desirable in order to ensure the necessary resources for the implementation of the action plan. Figs.

  3. Role of the regulatory authority in preparation of the NPP self assessment of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantchev, T.

    1996-01-01

    We believe that with the assistance of the IAEA(ASSET Training Mission) the plant personnel will be able to prepare high quality Self Assessment Report. The main role of the Regulatory Body is to ensure correspondence with the IAEA requirements and to provide clear guidance for the most important items of the Plant Self Assessment Report. The involvement of the Operating Organization is also desirable in order to ensure the necessary resources for the implementation of the action plan. Figs

  4. Role of Resistive Self-Regulatory Efficacy and Moral Disengagement in the Relationship between Values and Aggressiveness in Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Albouza Y; d'Arripe-Longueville F; Corrion K

    2017-01-01

    This study examined whether athletes’ values are related to aggressiveness through self-regulatory mechanisms. Athletes (N=225) completed four questionnaires to assess their values, resistive self-regulatory efficacy, moral disengagement and aggressiveness. The results of structural equation modeling showed a good fit to the data and illustrated that: (a) The status and moral values were indirectly associated with aggressiveness through the mediating roles of resistive self-regulatory efficac...

  5. The role of metabolism in Diclofenac-induced intestinal toxicity in human ex vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; Makkinje, Miriam; de Graaf, Inge; Groothuis, Genoveva

    2012-01-01

    The use of Diclofenac (DCF: 2-(2,6-dichloranilino) phenyl acetic acid ), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug is associated with severe gastro-intestinal side-effects. In vivo rat studies suggest that reactive metabolites of DCF, produced by the liver, play an important role in the intestinal

  6. Personality Correlates of Self-Report, Role-Playing, and In Vivo Measures of Assertiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Samuel B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Undergraduates completed self-report inventories of assertiveness, participated in behavior role-playing tasks and in vivo measures of assertiveness, and completed the Personality Research Form E (PRF-E). Of 22 PRF-E scales, 11 had at least one significant correlation with assertiveness measures. Some composites of PRF-E scales were related to…

  7. Current role of the USNRC safety research program in support of the regulatory process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, S.

    1979-01-01

    The current role of the USNRC's safety research program is shown. Some aspects of this role in the wake of the TMI accident are discused as well as some historical perspective on the development of USNRC's program, its relationship with the NRC mission, an overview of the program activities and some recent research results, and finally the impact of the TMI accident in clarifiying needs for expedited and new research activities, including the need for a greatly enhanced use of probabilistic analysis techniques to improve the coherence of its regulatory process. (author)

  8. Regulatory Roles for Long ncRNA and mRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karapetyan, Armen R.; Buiting, Coen; Kuiper, Renske A.; Coolen, Marcel W., E-mail: M.Coolen@gen.umcn.nl [Department of Human Genetics, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences (NCMLS), Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen 6500 HB (Netherlands)

    2013-04-26

    Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technology have identified the transcription of a much larger portion of the genome than previously anticipated. Especially in the context of cancer it has become clear that aberrant transcription of both protein-coding and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are frequent events. The current dogma of RNA function describes mRNA to be responsible for the synthesis of proteins, whereas non-coding RNA can have regulatory or epigenetic functions. However, this distinction between protein coding and regulatory ability of transcripts may not be that strict. Here, we review the increasing body of evidence for the existence of multifunctional RNAs that have both protein-coding and trans-regulatory roles. Moreover, we demonstrate that coding transcripts bind to components of the Polycomb Repressor Complex 2 (PRC2) with similar affinities as non-coding transcripts, revealing potential epigenetic regulation by mRNAs. We hypothesize that studies on the regulatory ability of disease-associated mRNAs will form an important new field of research.

  9. Regulatory Roles for Long ncRNA and mRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karapetyan, Armen R.; Buiting, Coen; Kuiper, Renske A.; Coolen, Marcel W.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technology have identified the transcription of a much larger portion of the genome than previously anticipated. Especially in the context of cancer it has become clear that aberrant transcription of both protein-coding and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are frequent events. The current dogma of RNA function describes mRNA to be responsible for the synthesis of proteins, whereas non-coding RNA can have regulatory or epigenetic functions. However, this distinction between protein coding and regulatory ability of transcripts may not be that strict. Here, we review the increasing body of evidence for the existence of multifunctional RNAs that have both protein-coding and trans-regulatory roles. Moreover, we demonstrate that coding transcripts bind to components of the Polycomb Repressor Complex 2 (PRC2) with similar affinities as non-coding transcripts, revealing potential epigenetic regulation by mRNAs. We hypothesize that studies on the regulatory ability of disease-associated mRNAs will form an important new field of research

  10. Regulatory Roles for Long ncRNA and mRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel W. Coolen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technology have identified the transcription of a much larger portion of the genome than previously anticipated. Especially in the context of cancer it has become clear that aberrant transcription of both protein-coding and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs are frequent events. The current dogma of RNA function describes mRNA to be responsible for the synthesis of proteins, whereas non-coding RNA can have regulatory or epigenetic functions. However, this distinction between protein coding and regulatory ability of transcripts may not be that strict. Here, we review the increasing body of evidence for the existence of multifunctional RNAs that have both protein-coding and trans-regulatory roles. Moreover, we demonstrate that coding transcripts bind to components of the Polycomb Repressor Complex 2 (PRC2 with similar affinities as non-coding transcripts, revealing potential epigenetic regulation by mRNAs. We hypothesize that studies on the regulatory ability of disease-associated mRNAs will form an important new field of research.

  11. Moving through the stressed genome: Emerging regulatory roles for transposons in plant stress tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negi Pooja

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The recognition of a positive correlation between organism genome size with its transposable element (TE content, represents a key discovery of the field of genome biology. Considerable evidence accumulated since then suggests the involvement of TEs in genome structure, evolution and function. The global genome reorganization brought about by transposon activity might play an adaptive/regulatory role in the host response to environmental challenges, reminiscent of McClintock’s original ’Controlling Element’ hypothesis. This regulatory aspect of TEs is also garnering support in light of the recent evidences which project TEs as distributed genomic control modules. According to this view, TEs are capable of actively reprogramming host genes circuits and ultimately fine-tuning the host response to specific environmental stimuli. Moreover, the stress-induced changes in epigenetic status of TE activity may allow TEs to propagate their stress responsive elements to host genes; the resulting genome fluidity can permit phenotypic plasticity and adaptation to stress. Given their predominating presence in the plant genomes, nested organization in the genic regions and potential regulatory role in stress response, TEs hold unexplored potential for crop improvement programs. This review intends to present the current information about the roles played by TEs in plant genome organization, evolution and function, and highlight the regulatory mechanisms in plant stress responses. We will also briefly discuss the connection between TE activity, host epigenetic response and phenotypic plasticity as a critical link for traversing the translational bridge from a purely basic study of TEs, to the applied field of stress adaptation and crop improvement.

  12. Moving through the Stressed Genome: Emerging Regulatory Roles for Transposons in Plant Stress Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Pooja; Rai, Archana N; Suprasanna, Penna

    2016-01-01

    The recognition of a positive correlation between organism genome size with its transposable element (TE) content, represents a key discovery of the field of genome biology. Considerable evidence accumulated since then suggests the involvement of TEs in genome structure, evolution and function. The global genome reorganization brought about by transposon activity might play an adaptive/regulatory role in the host response to environmental challenges, reminiscent of McClintock's original 'Controlling Element' hypothesis. This regulatory aspect of TEs is also garnering support in light of the recent evidences, which project TEs as "distributed genomic control modules." According to this view, TEs are capable of actively reprogramming host genes circuits and ultimately fine-tuning the host response to specific environmental stimuli. Moreover, the stress-induced changes in epigenetic status of TE activity may allow TEs to propagate their stress responsive elements to host genes; the resulting genome fluidity can permit phenotypic plasticity and adaptation to stress. Given their predominating presence in the plant genomes, nested organization in the genic regions and potential regulatory role in stress response, TEs hold unexplored potential for crop improvement programs. This review intends to present the current information about the roles played by TEs in plant genome organization, evolution, and function and highlight the regulatory mechanisms in plant stress responses. We will also briefly discuss the connection between TE activity, host epigenetic response and phenotypic plasticity as a critical link for traversing the translational bridge from a purely basic study of TEs, to the applied field of stress adaptation and crop improvement.

  13. Moving through the Stressed Genome: Emerging Regulatory Roles for Transposons in Plant Stress Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Pooja; Rai, Archana N.; Suprasanna, Penna

    2016-01-01

    The recognition of a positive correlation between organism genome size with its transposable element (TE) content, represents a key discovery of the field of genome biology. Considerable evidence accumulated since then suggests the involvement of TEs in genome structure, evolution and function. The global genome reorganization brought about by transposon activity might play an adaptive/regulatory role in the host response to environmental challenges, reminiscent of McClintock's original ‘Controlling Element’ hypothesis. This regulatory aspect of TEs is also garnering support in light of the recent evidences, which project TEs as “distributed genomic control modules.” According to this view, TEs are capable of actively reprogramming host genes circuits and ultimately fine-tuning the host response to specific environmental stimuli. Moreover, the stress-induced changes in epigenetic status of TE activity may allow TEs to propagate their stress responsive elements to host genes; the resulting genome fluidity can permit phenotypic plasticity and adaptation to stress. Given their predominating presence in the plant genomes, nested organization in the genic regions and potential regulatory role in stress response, TEs hold unexplored potential for crop improvement programs. This review intends to present the current information about the roles played by TEs in plant genome organization, evolution, and function and highlight the regulatory mechanisms in plant stress responses. We will also briefly discuss the connection between TE activity, host epigenetic response and phenotypic plasticity as a critical link for traversing the translational bridge from a purely basic study of TEs, to the applied field of stress adaptation and crop improvement. PMID:27777577

  14. The role of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in the management of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, H.L. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    In general, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for reviewing and making licensing decisions to ensure that the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) high-level waste repository is designed, constructed, and operated without unreasonable risk to public health and safety. In implementing this responsibility, however, the commission's guidance to the staff is that, in the absence of unresolved safety concerns, the NRC regulatory program will not delay the executive branch's program as set forth in the DOE project decision schedule. The NRC role for the next several years will be to develop its licensing framework and to consult with DOE on its plans. An essential ingredient in the success of both NRC's and DOE's respective missions is the need for free and open exchange of information, which will assure us that the concerns of all parties are addressed. With regard to low-level radioactive waste, the states have the lead responsibility for disposal. The NRC also provides assistance to the states and compacts on such items as regulatory programs, site characterization, and mixed waste disposal. Another of the NRC's roles is in the management of uranium mill tailings. Currently, most of the NRC's attention is focused on ensuring adequate long-term stabilization of tailings

  15. Dynamic in vivo binding of transcription factors to cis-regulatory modules of cer and gsc in the stepwise formation of the Spemann–Mangold organizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudou, Norihiro; Yamamoto, Shinji; Ogino, Hajime; Taira, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    How multiple developmental cues are integrated on cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) for cell fate decisions remains uncertain. The Spemann–Mangold organizer in Xenopus embryos expresses the transcription factors Lim1/Lhx1, Otx2, Mix1, Siamois (Sia) and VegT. Reporter analyses using sperm nuclear transplantation and DNA injection showed that cerberus (cer) and goosecoid (gsc) are activated by the aforementioned transcription factors through CRMs conserved between X. laevis and X. tropicalis. ChIP-qPCR analysis for the five transcription factors revealed that cer and gsc CRMs are initially bound by both Sia and VegT at the late blastula stage, and subsequently bound by all five factors at the gastrula stage. At the neurula stage, only binding of Lim1 and Otx2 to the gsc CRM, among others, persists, which corresponds to their co-expression in the prechordal plate. Based on these data, together with detailed expression pattern analysis, we propose a new model of stepwise formation of the organizer, in which (1) maternal VegT and Wnt-induced Sia first bind to CRMs at the blastula stage; then (2) Nodal-inducible Lim1, Otx2, Mix1 and zygotic VegT are bound to CRMs in the dorsal endodermal and mesodermal regions where all these genes are co-expressed; and (3) these two regions are combined at the gastrula stage to form the organizer. Thus, the in vivo dynamics of multiple transcription factors highlight their roles in the initiation and maintenance of gene expression, and also reveal the stepwise integration of maternal, Nodal and Wnt signaling on CRMs of organizer genes to generate the organizer. PMID:22492356

  16. Dynamic in vivo binding of transcription factors to cis-regulatory modules of cer and gsc in the stepwise formation of the Spemann-Mangold organizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudou, Norihiro; Yamamoto, Shinji; Ogino, Hajime; Taira, Masanori

    2012-05-01

    How multiple developmental cues are integrated on cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) for cell fate decisions remains uncertain. The Spemann-Mangold organizer in Xenopus embryos expresses the transcription factors Lim1/Lhx1, Otx2, Mix1, Siamois (Sia) and VegT. Reporter analyses using sperm nuclear transplantation and DNA injection showed that cerberus (cer) and goosecoid (gsc) are activated by the aforementioned transcription factors through CRMs conserved between X. laevis and X. tropicalis. ChIP-qPCR analysis for the five transcription factors revealed that cer and gsc CRMs are initially bound by both Sia and VegT at the late blastula stage, and subsequently bound by all five factors at the gastrula stage. At the neurula stage, only binding of Lim1 and Otx2 to the gsc CRM, among others, persists, which corresponds to their co-expression in the prechordal plate. Based on these data, together with detailed expression pattern analysis, we propose a new model of stepwise formation of the organizer, in which (1) maternal VegT and Wnt-induced Sia first bind to CRMs at the blastula stage; then (2) Nodal-inducible Lim1, Otx2, Mix1 and zygotic VegT are bound to CRMs in the dorsal endodermal and mesodermal regions where all these genes are co-expressed; and (3) these two regions are combined at the gastrula stage to form the organizer. Thus, the in vivo dynamics of multiple transcription factors highlight their roles in the initiation and maintenance of gene expression, and also reveal the stepwise integration of maternal, Nodal and Wnt signaling on CRMs of organizer genes to generate the organizer.

  17. A compact, in vivo screen of all 6-mers reveals drivers of tissue-specific expression and guides synthetic regulatory element design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robin P; Riesenfeld, Samantha J; Holloway, Alisha K; Li, Qiang; Murphy, Karl K; Feliciano, Natalie M; Orecchia, Lorenzo; Oksenberg, Nir; Pollard, Katherine S; Ahituv, Nadav

    2013-07-18

    Large-scale annotation efforts have improved our ability to coarsely predict regulatory elements throughout vertebrate genomes. However, it is unclear how complex spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression driven by these elements emerge from the activity of short, transcription factor binding sequences. We describe a comprehensive promoter extension assay in which the regulatory potential of all 6 base-pair (bp) sequences was tested in the context of a minimal promoter. To enable this large-scale screen, we developed algorithms that use a reverse-complement aware decomposition of the de Bruijn graph to design a library of DNA oligomers incorporating every 6-bp sequence exactly once. Our library multiplexes all 4,096 unique 6-mers into 184 double-stranded 15-bp oligomers, which is sufficiently compact for in vivo testing. We injected each multiplexed construct into zebrafish embryos and scored GFP expression in 15 tissues at two developmental time points. Twenty-seven constructs produced consistent expression patterns, with the majority doing so in only one tissue. Functional sequences are enriched near biologically relevant genes, match motifs for developmental transcription factors, and are required for enhancer activity. By concatenating tissue-specific functional sequences, we generated completely synthetic enhancers for the notochord, epidermis, spinal cord, forebrain and otic lateral line, and show that short regulatory sequences do not always function modularly. This work introduces a unique in vivo catalog of short, functional regulatory sequences and demonstrates several important principles of regulatory element organization. Furthermore, we provide resources for designing compact, reverse-complement aware k-mer libraries.

  18. The role of learning environment on high school chemistry students' motivation and self-regulatory processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Jeffrey S.

    Changes to the global workforce and technological advancements require graduating high school students to be more autonomous, self-directed, and critical in their thinking. To reflect societal changes, current educational reform has focused on developing more problem-based, collaborative, and student-centered classrooms to promote effective self-regulatory learning strategies, with the goal of helping students adapt to future learning situations and become life-long learners. This study identifies key features that may characterize these "powerful learning environments", which I term "high self-regulating learning environments" for ease of discussion, and examine the environment's role on students' motivation and self-regulatory processes. Using direct observation, surveys, and formal and informal interviews, I identified perceptions, motivations, and self-regulatory strategies of 67 students in my high school chemistry classes as they completed academic tasks in both high and low self-regulating learning environments. With social cognitive theory as a theoretical framework, I then examined how students' beliefs and processes changed after they moved from low to a high self-regulating learning environment. Analyses revealed that key features such as task meaning, utility, complexity, and control appeared to play a role in promoting positive changes in students' motivation and self-regulation. As embedded cases, I also included four students identified as high self-regulating, and four students identified as low self-regulating to examine whether the key features of high and low self-regulating learning environments played a similar role in both groups. Analysis of findings indicates that key features did play a significant role in promoting positive changes in both groups, with high self-regulating students' motivation and self-regulatory strategies generally remaining higher than the low self-regulating students; this was the case in both environments. Findings

  19. Adenylyl cyclase plays a regulatory role in development, stress resistance and secondary metabolism in Fusarium fujikuroi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge García-Martínez

    Full Text Available The ascomycete fungus Fusarium fujikuroi (Gibberella fujikuroi MP-C produces secondary metabolites of biotechnological interest, such as gibberellins, bikaverin, and carotenoids. Production of these metabolites is regulated by nitrogen availability and, in a specific manner, by other environmental signals, such as light in the case of the carotenoid pathway. A complex regulatory network controlling these processes is recently emerging from the alterations of metabolite production found through the mutation of different regulatory genes. Here we show the effect of the targeted mutation of the acyA gene of F. fujikuroi, coding for adenylyl cyclase. Mutants lacking the catalytic domain of the AcyA protein showed different phenotypic alterations, including reduced growth, enhanced production of unidentified red pigments, reduced production of gibberellins and partially derepressed carotenoid biosynthesis in the dark. The phenotype differs in some aspects from that of similar mutants of the close relatives F. proliferatum and F. verticillioides: contrary to what was observed in these species, ΔacyA mutants of F. fujikuroi showed enhanced sensitivity to oxidative stress (H(2O(2, but no change in heavy metal resistance or in the ability to colonize tomato tissue, indicating a high versatility in the regulatory roles played by cAMP in this fungal group.

  20. Hematopoietic chimerism and transplantation tolerance: a role for regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise ePasquet

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The major obstacle in transplantation medicine is rejection of donor tissues by the host’s immune system. Immunosuppressive drugs can delay but not prevent loss of transplants, and their efficiency is strongly impacted by inter-individual pharmacokinetic differences. Moreover, due to the global immunosuppression induced and to the broad distribution of their targets amongst human tissues, these drugs have severe side effects. Induction of donor-specific non-responsiveness (i.e. immunological tolerance to transplants would solve these problems and would substantially ameliorate patients’ quality of life. It is widely believed that bone marrow or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and resulting (mixed hematopoietic chimerism, invariably leads to immunological tolerance to organs of the same donor. A careful analysis of the literature, reviewed here, indeed shows that chimerism consistently prolongs allograft survival. However, in absence of additional conditioning leading to the development of active regulatory mechanisms, it does not prevent chronic rejection. A central role for active tolerance in transplantation-tolerance is also supported by recent data showing that genuine immunological tolerance to organ allografts can be achieved by combining induction of hematopoietic chimerism with infusion of regulatory T lymphocytes. Therefore, conditioning regimens that lead to the establishment of hematopoietic chimerism plus active regulatory mechanisms appear required for induction of genuine tolerance to allogeneic grafts.

  1. TSO Role in Supporting the Regulatory Authority in View of Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamaza, A.; Vasilishin, A.

    2016-01-01

    Human and organizational factors are always of paramount importance at nuclear and radiation safety as well as in the safety regulation provision. Major NPP accidents occurred merely reaffirm this fact. The role of an authority that regulates nuclear safety increases each time in the aftermath of accidents perceived as a shock together with the importance of scientific and technical support. SEC NRS was established in 1987, the next year after the Chernobyl NPP accident aiming to strengthen supervision over works carried out at the nuclear industry enterprises. Currently SEC NRS provides comprehensive scientific and technical support to Rostechnadzor including safety review and regulatory legal documents development to regulate safety along with safety culture.

  2. The role of regulatory uncertainty in certificate markets: A case study of the Swedish/Norwegian market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fagiani, Riccardo; Hakvoort, Rudi

    2014-01-01

    Price volatility in green certificate markets reflects uncertainty over future prices, representing a major source of risk for renewable energy generators. Price risk is considered the principal deficiency of this market-based policy since it causes investors to require higher returns. Moreover, investors are exposed to regulatory risk; namely, the risk that a change in the regulation will materially impact the certificate price. Regulatory uncertainty is reflected in market volatility exacerbating certificate price risk. Using an econometric approach, we investigate the role of regulatory changes on price volatility in the Swedish certificate market. The results of our analysis indicate that regulatory changes strongly affect certificate markets, resulting in periods of higher volatility. Moreover, we analyze whether certificate price volatility has changed after creating a joint Swedish/Norwegian market. Results indicate that the ambivalence surrounding the creation of this bigger market led to a period of increased price volatility between 2010 and 2011. Overall, this article brings a better understanding of the role of regulatory uncertainty on certificate markets, and gives evidence for its negative impact in terms of increased price volatility. - Highlights: • Paper analyzes the impact of regulatory changes on certificate price volatility. • Regulatory changes affect market volatility and price risk. • Regulatory uncertainty harms certificate markets. • The bigger Swedish/Norwegian market has not resulted in lower volatility yet

  3. The Role of Level-3 PSA in the Regulatory Structure for the Licensing of Future NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jong Tae; Han, Sang Hoon

    2008-01-01

    The probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) provides a systematic analysis to identify and quantify all risks that the plant imposed to the operators, general public and the environment and thus demonstrates compliance to regulatory risk criteria. Therefore, the PSA has been being played an important role in the development of safety requirements for the existing plants, mainly reactors using light water technology. However, the existing safety requirements may not be fully applicable to the future reactors due to the advances in technology, new safety options, and new strategies for managing abnormal plant conditions. Therefore, a comprehensive set of technology-neutral safety requirements are being developed by the IAEA and USNRC. Especially, USNRC is developing a basis for a regulatory structure that is applicable to all types of reactor designs, including gas-cooled, liquid metal, and heavy and light water-moderated reactors because metrics such as core damage and large early release may not be applicable to some advanced reactor designs. They are developing this kind of basis for a regulatory structure in order to provide a technology neutral safety approach that will guide the design, construction and operation, as well as safety assessment, of innovative reactors. They are using the quantitative safety goals expressed by means of a frequency-consequence diagram. Within this approach, the scope of the PSA needs to encompass a whole spectrum of off-normal events including frequent, infrequent, and rare initiating events and event sequences. These events include a spectrum of releases from minor to major, and sequences that address conditions less than the core damage sequences. It also needs to address the dose consequences of these event sequences as measured at the exclusion area boundary (EAB). In order to obtain dose consequences for the whole spectrum of off-normal events, the dose evaluation by using the deterministic and probabilistic approaches has to be

  4. [Regulatory role of NKT cells in the prevention of type 1 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazarian, Liana; Simoni, Yannick; Pingris, Karine; Beaudoin, Lucie; Lehuen, Agnès

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease resulting from the destruction of pancreatic β cells by the immune system. NKT cells are innate-like T cells that can exert potent immuno-regulatory functions. The regulatory role of NKT cells was initially proposed after the observed decreased frequency of this subset in mouse models of type 1 diabetes, as well as in patients developing various autoimmune pathologies. Increasing NKT cell frequency and function prevent the development of type 1 diabetes in mouse models. Several mechanisms including IL-4 and IL-10 production by NKT cells and the accumulation of tolerogenic dendritic cells are critical for the dampening of pathogenic anti-islet T cell responses by NKT cells. Importantly, these cells can at the same time prevent diabetes and promote efficient immune responses against infectious agents. These results strengthen the potential role of NKT cells as a key target for the development of therapeutic strategies against type 1 diabetes. © 2013 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  5. Negative emotions and behaviour: The role of regulatory emotional self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesurado, Belén; Vidal, Elisabeth Malonda; Mestre, Anna Llorca

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study is to test a longitudinal model that analyses the direct effect of negative emotions (anger, depression and anxiety, wave 1) on prosocial and aggressive behaviour (wave 2) in adolescents. And the indirect effect of negative emotions (wave 1) on prosocial and aggressive behaviour (wave 2) through regulatory emotional self-efficacy. Data was obtained from 417 adolescents in a two-wave longitudinal study (225 girls, M age = 14.70 years) from schools located in Valencia, Spain. SEM was employed to explore longitudinal models. The results showed that anger had a direct relationship with prosocial behaviour and aggression, measured two years later. However, the depression and anxiety states did not predict prosociality and aggressiveness. The mediation role of regulatory emotional self-efficacy between negative emotion and behaviours was only partially confirmed. Finally, only the perception of self-efficacy in expressing positive affect is related to prosociality and aggressiveness. Copyright © 2018 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Spot 42 RNA: A regulatory small RNA with roles in the central metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bækkedal, Cecilie; Haugen, Peik

    2015-01-01

    The Spot 42 RNA is a 109 nucleotide long (in Escherichia coli) noncoding small regulatory RNA (sRNA) encoded by the spf (spot fourty-two) gene. spf is found in gamma-proteobacteria and the majority of experimental work on Spot 42 RNA has been performed using E. coli, and recently Aliivibrio salmonicida. In the cell Spot 42 RNA plays essential roles as a regulator in carbohydrate metabolism and uptake, and its expression is activated by glucose, and inhibited by the cAMP-CRP complex. Here we summarize the current knowledge on Spot 42, and present the natural distribution of spf, show family-specific secondary structural features of Spot 42, and link highly conserved structural regions to mRNA target binding. PMID:26327359

  7. Regulatory T cells (Treg and Their Roles in Immune System with Respect to Immunopathological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Kondělková

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs are a specialized subpopulation of T cells that act to suppress immune response, thereby maintaining homeostasis and self-tolerance. It has been shown that Tregs are able to inhibit T cell proliferation and cytokine production and play a critical role in preventing autoimmunity. Different subsets with various functions of Treg cells exist. Tregs can be usually identified by flow cytometry. The most specific marker for these cells is FoxP3, which is localized intracellulary. Selected surface markers such as CD25high (high molecular density and CD127low (low molecular density could serve as surrogate markers to detect Tregs in a routine clinical practice. Dysregulation in Treg cell frequency or functions may lead to the development of autoimmune disease. Therapeutical Treg modulation is considered to be a promising therapeutical approach to treat some selected disorders, such as allergies, and to prevent allograft rejection.

  8. The Spot 42 RNA: A regulatory small RNA with roles in the central metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bækkedal, Cecilie; Haugen, Peik

    2015-01-01

    The Spot 42 RNA is a 109 nucleotide long (in Escherichia coli) noncoding small regulatory RNA (sRNA) encoded by the spf (spot fourty-two) gene. spf is found in gamma-proteobacteria and the majority of experimental work on Spot 42 RNA has been performed using E. coli, and recently Aliivibrio salmonicida. In the cell Spot 42 RNA plays essential roles as a regulator in carbohydrate metabolism and uptake, and its expression is activated by glucose, and inhibited by the cAMP-CRP complex. Here we summarize the current knowledge on Spot 42, and present the natural distribution of spf, show family-specific secondary structural features of Spot 42, and link highly conserved structural regions to mRNA target binding.

  9. Regulatory role of prolactin in paternal behavior in male parents: A narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Hashemian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In all mammalian species, a combination of neuroendocrine and experiential factors contributes to the emergence of remarkable behavioral changes observed in parental behavior. Yet, our understanding of neuroendocrine bases of paternal behavior in humans is still preliminary and more research is needed in this area. In the present review, the authors summarized hormonal bases of paternal behavior in both human and nonhuman mammalian species and focused on studies on the regulatory role of prolactin in occurrence of paternal behavior. All peer-reviewed journal articles published before 2015 for each area discussed (parental brain, hormonal bases of maternal behavior, hormonal bases of paternal behavior and the role of prolactin in regulation of paternal behavior in nonhuman mammalian species, hormonal bases of paternal behavior and the role of prolactin in regulation of paternal behavior in humans were searched by PubMed, Medline, and Scopus for original research and review articles. Publications between 1973 and 2015 were included. Similar to female parents, elevated prolactin levels in new fathers most probably contribute to child-caring behavior and facilitate behavioral and emotional states attributed to child care. Moreover, elevated parental prolactin levels after childbirth decrease the parents′ libidos so that they invest more in parental care than in fertility behavior. According to the available clinical studies, elevation in the amounts of prolactin levels after childbirth in male parents are probably associated with paternal behavior observed in humans.

  10. Induction of regulatory T cells: A role for probiotics and prebiotics to suppress autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Mitesh; Kumar, Prasant; Laddha, Naresh C; Kemp, E Helen

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are comprised of a heterogeneous population of cells that play a vital role in suppressing inflammation and maintaining immune tolerance. Given the crucial role of Tregs in maintaining immune homeostasis, it is probably not surprising that many microbial species and their metabolites have the potential to induce Tregs. There is now great interest in the therapeutic potential of probiotics and prebiotics based strategies for a range of autoimmune disorders. This review will summarise recent findings concerning the role of probiotics and prebiotics in induction of Tregs to ameliorate the autoimmune conditions. In addition, the article is focused to explain the different mechanisms of Treg induction and function by these probiotics and prebiotics, based on the available studies till date. The article further proposes that induction of Tregs by probiotics and prebiotics could lead to the development of new therapeutic approach towards curbing the autoimmune response and as an alternative to detrimental immunosuppressive drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The potential regulatory roles of NAD(+) and its metabolism in autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong-Xia; Zhang, Jia-Ping; Hu, Jiong-Yu; Huang, Yue-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    (Macro)autophagy mediates the bulk degradation of defective organelles, long-lived proteins and protein aggregates in lysosomes and plays a critical role in cellular and tissue homeostasis. Defective autophagy processes have been found to contribute to a variety of metabolic diseases. However, the regulatory mechanisms of autophagy are not fully understood. Increasing data indicate that nicotinamide adenine nucleotide (NAD(+)) homeostasis correlates intimately with autophagy. NAD(+) is a ubiquitous coenzyme that functions primarily as an electron carrier of oxidoreductase in multiple redox reactions. Both NAD(+) homeostasis and its metabolism are thought to play critical roles in regulating autophagy. In this review, we discuss how the regulation of NAD(+) and its metabolism can influence autophagy. We focus on the regulation of NAD(+)/NADH homeostasis and the effects of NAD(+) consumption by poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), NAD(+)-dependent deacetylation by sirtuins and NAD(+) metabolites on autophagy processes and the underlying mechanisms. Future studies should provide more direct evidence for the regulation of autophagy processes by NAD(+). A better understanding of the critical roles of NAD(+) and its metabolites on autophagy will shed light on the complexity of autophagy regulation, which is essential for the discovery of new therapeutic tools for autophagy-related diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Regulatory Roles of MicroRNAs in Bone Remodeling and Perspectives as Biomarkers in Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengge Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are involved in many cellular and molecular activities and played important roles in many biological and pathological processes, such as tissue formation, cancer development, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, it has been reported that microRNAs can modulate the differentiation and activities of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, the key cells that are involved in bone remodeling process. Meanwhile, the results from our and other research groups showed that the expression profiles of microRNAs in the serum and bone tissues are significantly different in postmenopausal women with or without fractures compared to the control. Therefore, it can be postulated that microRNAs might play important roles in bone remodeling and that they are very likely to be involved in the pathological process of postmenopausal osteoporosis. In this review, we will present the updated research on the regulatory roles of microRNAs in osteoblasts and osteoclasts and the expression profiles of microRNAs in osteoporosis and osteoporotic fracture patients. The perspective of serum microRNAs as novel biomarkers in bone loss disorders such as osteoporosis has also been discussed.

  13. Information to Improve Public Perceptions of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA’s Tobacco Regulatory Role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Osman

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available While the Food and Drug Administration (FDA has had regulatory authority over tobacco products since 2009, public awareness of this authority remains limited. This research examines several broad types of information about FDA tobacco regulatory mission that may improve the perceptions of FDA as a tobacco regulator. Using Amazon Mechanical Turk, 1766 adults, smokers and non-smokers, were randomly assigned to view a statement about FDA regulatory authority that varied three information types in a 2 × 2 × 2 between subjects experimental design: (1 FDA’s roles in regulating tobacco (yes/no; (2 The scientific basis of regulations (yes/no; and (3 A potential protective function of regulations (yes/no. Using factorial ANOVA, we estimated the main and interactive effects of all three types of information and of smoking status on the perceptions of FDA. Participants that were exposed to information on FDA roles reported higher FDA credibility and a greater perceived knowledge of FDA than those who did not. Exposure to information about the scientific basis of regulations led to more negative views of the tobacco industry. Participants who learned of the FDA’s commitment to protecting the public reported higher FDA credibility and more positive attitudes toward regulations than those who did not learn of this commitment. We observed no significant interaction effects. The findings suggest that providing information about the regulatory roles and protective characterization of the FDA’s tobacco regulatory mission positively influence public perceptions of FDA and tobacco regulations.

  14. Role of regulatory T cells in acute myeloid leukemia patients undergoing relapse-preventive immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Frida Ewald; Nilsson, Malin; Rydström, Anna; Aurelius, Johan; Riise, Rebecca E; Movitz, Charlotta; Bernson, Elin; Kiffin, Roberta; Ståhlberg, Anders; Brune, Mats; Foà, Robin; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Thorén, Fredrik B; Martner, Anna

    2017-11-01

    Regulatory T cells (T regs ) have been proposed to dampen functions of anti-neoplastic immune cells and thus promote cancer progression. In a phase IV trial (Re:Mission Trial, NCT01347996, http://www.clinicaltrials.gov ) 84 patients (age 18-79) with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR) received ten consecutive 3-week cycles of immunotherapy with histamine dihydrochloride (HDC) and low-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) to prevent relapse of leukemia in the post-consolidation phase. This study aimed at defining the features, function and dynamics of Foxp3 + CD25 high CD4 + T regs during immunotherapy and to determine the potential impact of T regs on relapse risk and survival. We observed a pronounced increase in T reg counts in peripheral blood during initial cycles of HDC/IL-2. The accumulating T regs resembled thymic-derived natural T regs (nT regs ), showed augmented expression of CTLA-4 and suppressed the cell cycle proliferation of conventional T cells ex vivo. Relapse of AML was not prognosticated by T reg counts at onset of treatment or after the first cycle of immunotherapy. However, the magnitude of T reg induction was diminished in subsequent treatment cycles. Exploratory analyses implied that a reduced expansion of T regs in later treatment cycles and a short T reg telomere length were significantly associated with a favorable clinical outcome. Our results suggest that immunotherapy with HDC/IL-2 in AML entails induction of immunosuppressive T regs that may be targeted for improved anti-leukemic efficiency.

  15. Crucial role of vinexin for keratinocyte migration in vitro and epidermal wound healing in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kioka, Noriyuki; Ito, Takuya; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Uekawa, Natsuko; Umemoto, Tsutomu; Motoyoshi, Soh; Imai, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kenzo; Watanabe, Hideto; Yamada, Masayasu; Ueda, Kazumitsu

    2010-01-01

    In the process of tissue injury and repair, epithelial cells rapidly migrate and form epithelial sheets. Vinexin is a cytoplasmic molecule of the integrin-containing cell adhesion complex localized at focal contacts in vitro. Here, we investigated the roles of vinexin in keratinocyte migration in vitro and wound healing in vivo. Vinexin knockdown using siRNA delayed migration of both HaCaT human keratinocytes and A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells in scratch assay but did not affect cell proliferation. Induction of cell migration by scratching the confluent monolayer culture of these cells activated both EGFR and ERK, and their inhibitors AG1478 and U0126 substantially suppressed scratch-induced keratinocyte migration. Vinexin knockdown in these cells inhibited the scratch-induced activation of EGFR, but not that of ERK, suggesting that vinexin promotes cell migration via activation of EGFR. We further generated vinexin (-/-) mice and isolated their keratinocytes. They similarly showed slow migration in scratch assay. Furthermore, vinexin (-/-) mice exhibited a delay in cutaneous wound healing in both the back skin and tail without affecting the proliferation of keratinocytes. Together, these results strongly suggest a crucial role of vinexin in keratinocyte migration in vitro and cutaneous wound healing in vivo.

  16. Uncovering a Dual Regulatory Role for Caspases During Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-induced Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anania, Veronica G; Yu, Kebing; Gnad, Florian; Pferdehirt, Rebecca R; Li, Han; Ma, Taylur P; Jeon, Diana; Fortelny, Nikolaus; Forrest, William; Ashkenazi, Avi; Overall, Christopher M; Lill, Jennie R

    2016-07-01

    Many diseases are associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which results from an accumulation of misfolded proteins. This triggers an adaptive response called the "unfolded protein response" (UPR), and prolonged exposure to ER stress leads to cell death. Caspases are reported to play a critical role in ER stress-induced cell death but the underlying mechanisms by which they exert their effect continue to remain elusive. To understand the role caspases play during ER stress, a systems level approach integrating analysis of the transcriptome, proteome, and proteolytic substrate profile was employed. This quantitative analysis revealed transcriptional profiles for most human genes, provided information on protein abundance for 4476 proteins, and identified 445 caspase substrates. Based on these data sets many caspase substrates were shown to be downregulated at the protein level during ER stress suggesting caspase activity inhibits their cellular function. Additionally, RNA sequencing revealed a role for caspases in regulation of ER stress-induced transcriptional pathways and gene set enrichment analysis showed expression of multiple gene targets of essential transcription factors to be upregulated during ER stress upon inhibition of caspases. Furthermore, these transcription factors were degraded in a caspase-dependent manner during ER stress. These results indicate that caspases play a dual role in regulating the cellular response to ER stress through both post-translational and transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. Moreover, this study provides unique insight into progression of the unfolded protein response into cell death, which may help identify therapeutic strategies to treat ER stress-related diseases. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Interferon Regulatory Factor 6 Has a Protective Role in the Host Response to Endotoxic Shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Joly

    Full Text Available Interferon Regulatory Factor (IRF 6, a member of the IRF family, is essential for epidermal and orofacial embryonic development. Irf6 is strongly expressed in keratinocytes, in which it regulates epidermal proliferation, differentiation, and migration. A recent role for Irf6 in Toll-like receptor 2-dependent chemokine gene expression was also reported in an epithelial cell line. However, a function for Irf6 in innate immune cells was not previously reported. In the present study, we investigated the expression and function of Irf6 in bone marrow-derived neutrophils and macrophages. We show here, using a conditional knockout of Irf6 in lysosymeM expressing cells, that Irf6 is required for resistance to LPS-induced endotoxic shock. In addition, Irf6-deficient bone marrow-derived neutrophils exhibited increased chemotactic index and velocity compared with wild-type cells in vitro. TLR4-specific KC and IL6 secretions were upregulated in Irf6-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro. These cells also exhibited an increased level of phosphorylated IkBa. Collectively, our findings suggest a role for Irf6 in the resistance to endotoxic shock due to NFk-B-mediated alteration of cytokine production.

  18. The roles of antitrust law and regulatory oversight in the restructured electricity industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glazer, C.A.; Little, M.B.

    1999-05-01

    The introduction of retail wheeling is changing the roles of regulators and the courts. When states unbundle the vertically integrated investor-owned utility (IOU) into generation companies, transmission companies, and distribution companies, antitrust enforcement and policy setting by the state public utility/service commissions (PUCs) will be paramount. As was seen in the deregulation of the airline industry, vigorous enforcement of antitrust laws by the courts and proper policy setting by the regulators are the keys to a successful competitive market. Many of the problems raised in the airline deregulation movement came about due to laxity in correcting clear antitrust violations and anti-competitive conditions before they caused damage to the market. As retail wheeling rolls out, it is critical for state PUCs to become attuned to these issues and, most of all, to have staff trained in these disciplines. The advent of retail wheeling changes the application of the State Action Doctrine and, in turn, may dramatically alter the role of the state PUC--meaning antitrust law and regulatory oversight must step in to protect competitors and consumers from monopolistic abuse.

  19. Circular RNA Profiling and Bioinformatic Modeling Identify Its Regulatory Role in Hepatic Steatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xing-Ya; He, Chong-Xin; Wang, Yu-Qin; Sun, Chao; Li, Guang-Ming; Su, Qing; Pan, Qin; Fan, Jian-Gao

    2017-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) exhibit a wide range of physiological and pathological activities. To uncover their role in hepatic steatosis, we investigated the expression profile of circRNAs in HepG2-based hepatic steatosis induced by high-fat stimulation. Differentially expressed circRNAs were subjected to validation using QPCR and functional analyses using principal component analysis, hierarchical clustering, target prediction, gene ontology (GO), and pathway annotation, respectively. Bioinformatic integration established the circRNA-miRNA-mRNA regulatory network so as to identify the mechanisms underlying circRNAs' metabolic effect. Here we reported that hepatic steatosis was associated with a total of 357 circRNAs. Enrichment of transcription-related GOs, especially GO: 0006355, GO: 004589, GO: 0045944, GO: 0045892, and GO: 0000122, demonstrated their specific actions in transcriptional regulation. Lipin 1 (LPIN1) was recognized to mediate the transcriptional regulatory effect of circRNAs on metabolic pathways. circRNA-miRNA-mRNA network further identified the signaling cascade of circRNA_021412/miR-1972/LPIN1, which was characterized by decreased level of circRNA_021412 and miR-1972-based inhibition of LPIN1. LPIN1-induced downregulation of long chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs) expression finally resulted in the hepatosteatosis. These findings identify circRNAs to be important regulators of hepatic steatosis. Transcription-dependent modulation of metabolic pathways may underlie their effects, partially by the circRNA_021412/miR-1972/LPIN1 signaling.

  20. Reconstruction of the yeast Snf1 kinase regulatory network reveals its role as a global energy regulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usaite, Renata; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Soberano de Oliveira, Ana Paula

    2009-01-01

    Highly conserved among eukaryotic cells, the AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) is a central regulator of carbon metabolism. To map the complete network of interactions around AMPK in yeast (Snf1) and to evaluate the role of its regulatory subunit Snf4, we measured global mRNA, protein and metabolite...

  1. Possible regulatory role of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase in the production of anthocyanins in asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flores, F.B.; Oosterhaven, J.; Martinez-Madrid, M.C.; Romojaro, F.

    2005-01-01

    The regulatory role of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) in the light-induced accumulation of anthocyanins in the epidermis of asparagus spears has been analysed. A correlation between the stimulation of PAL activity and the rise in total anthocyanin content has been observed. Light radiation

  2. Regulatory elements in vivo in the promoter of the abscisic acid responsive gene rab17 from maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busk, P K; Jensen, A B; Pagès, M

    1997-06-01

    The rab17 gene from maize is transcribed in late embryonic development and is responsive to abscisic acid and water stress in embryo and vegetative tissues. In vivo footprinting and transient transformation of rab17 were performed in embryos and vegetative tissues to characterize the cis-elements involved in regulation of the gene. By in vivo footprinting, protein binding was observed to nine elements in the promoter, which correspond to five putative ABREs (abscisic acid responsive elements) and four other sequences. The footprints indicated that distinct proteins interact with these elements in the two developmental stages. In transient transformation, six of the elements were important for high level expression of the rab17 promoter in embryos, whereas only three elements were important in leaves. The cis-acting sequences can be divided in embryo-specific, ABA-specific and leaf-specific elements on the basis of protein binding and the ability to confer expression of rab17. We found one positive, new element, called GRA, with the sequence CACTGGCCGCCC. This element was important for transcription in leaves but not in embryos. Two other non-ABRE elements that stimulated transcription from the rab17 promoter resemble previously described abscisic acid and drought-inducible elements. There were differences in protein binding and function of the five ABREs in the rab17 promoter. The possible reasons for these differences are discussed. The in vivo data obtained suggest that an embryo-specific pathway regulates transcription of the rab genes during development, whereas another pathway is responsible for induction in response to ABA and drought in vegetative tissues.

  3. Role of HTRA1 in bone formation and regeneration: In vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Filliat

    Full Text Available The role of mammalian high temperature requirement protease A1 (HTRA1 in somatic stem cell differentiation and mineralized matrix formation remains controversial, having been demonstrated to impart either anti- or pro-osteogenic effects, depending on the in vitro cell model used. The aim of this study was therefore to further evaluate the role of HTRA1 in regulating the differentiation potential and lineage commitment of murine mesenchymal stem cells in vitro, and to assess its influence on bone structure and regeneration in vivo. Our results demonstrated that short hairpin RNA-mediated ablation of Htra1 in the murine mesenchymal cell line C3H10T1/2 increased the expression of several osteogenic gene markers, and significantly enhanced matrix mineralization in response to BMP-2 stimulation. These effects were concomitant with decreases in the expression of chondrogenic gene markers, and increases in adipogenic gene expression and lipid accrual. Despite the profound effects of loss-of-function of HTRA1 on this in vitro osteochondral model, these were not reproduced in vivo, where bone microarchitecture and regeneration in 16-week-old Htra1-knockout mice remained unaltered as compared to wild-type controls. By comparison, analysis of femurs from 52-week-old mice revealed that bone structure was better preserved in Htra1-knockout mice than age-matched wild-type controls. These findings therefore provide additional insights into the role played by HTRA1 in regulating mesenchymal stem cell differentiation, and offer opportunities for improving our understanding of how this multifunctional protease may act to influence bone quality.

  4. Ex vivo generation of human alloantigen-specific regulatory T cells from CD4(posCD25(high T cells for immunotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorieke H Peters

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regulatory T cell (Treg based immunotherapy is a potential treatment for several immune disorders. By now, this approach proved successful in preclinical animal transplantation and auto-immunity models. In these models the success of Treg based immunotherapy crucially depends on the antigen-specificity of the infused Treg population. For the human setting, information is lacking on how to generate Treg with direct antigen-specificity ex vivo to be used for immunotherapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we demonstrate that in as little as two stimulation cycles with HLA mismatched allogeneic stimulator cells and T cell growth factors a very high degree of alloantigen-specificity was reached in magnetic bead isolated human CD4(posCD25(high Treg. Efficient increases in cell numbers were obtained. Primary allogeneic stimulation appeared a prerequisite in the generation of alloantigen-specific Treg, while secondary allogeneic or polyclonal stimulation with anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28 monoclonal antibodies enriched alloantigen-specificity and cell yield to a similar extent. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The ex vivo expansion protocol that we describe will very likely increase the success of clinical Treg-based immunotherapy, and will help to induce tolerance to selected antigens, while minimizing general immune suppression. This approach is of particular interest for recipients of HLA mismatched transplants.

  5. Ex vivo instability of glycated albumin: A role for autoxidative glycation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffs, Joshua W; Ferdosi, Shadi; Yassine, Hussein N; Borges, Chad R

    2017-09-01

    Ex vivo protein modifications occur within plasma and serum (P/S) samples due to prolonged exposure to the thawed state-which includes temperatures above -30 °C. Herein, the ex vivo glycation of human serum albumin from healthy and diabetic subjects was monitored in P/S samples stored for hours to months at -80 °C, -20 °C, and room temperature, as well as in samples subjected to multiple freeze-thaw cycles, incubated at different surface area-to-volume ratios or under different atmospheric compositions. A simple dilute-and-shoot method utilizing trap-and-elute LC-ESI-MS was employed to determine the relative abundances of the glycated forms of albumin-including forms of albumin bearing more than one glucose molecule. Significant increases in glycated albumin were found to occur within hours at room temperature, and within days at -20 °C. These increases continued over a period of 1-2 weeks at room temperature and over 200 days at -20 °C, ultimately resulting in a doubling of glycated albumin in both healthy and diabetic patients. It was also shown that samples stored at lower surface area-to-volume ratios or incubated under a nitrogen atmosphere experienced less rapid glucose adduction of albumin-suggesting a role for oxidative glycation in the ex vivo glycation of albumin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Immunosuppressive Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Derived from Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Induce Human Regulatory T Cells In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Clémence; Saviane, Gaëlle; Pini, Jonathan; Belaïd, Nourhène; Dhib, Gihen; Voha, Christine; Ibáñez, Lidia; Boutin, Antoine; Mazure, Nathalie M; Wakkach, Abdelilah; Blin-Wakkach, Claudine; Rouleau, Matthieu

    2017-01-01

    Despite mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are considered as a promising source of cells to modulate immune functions on cells from innate and adaptive immune systems, their clinical use remains restricted (few number, limited in vitro expansion, absence of a full phenotypic characterization, few insights on their in vivo fate). Standardized MSCs derived in vitro from human-induced pluripotent stem (huIPS) cells, remediating part of these issues, are considered as well as a valuable tool for therapeutic approaches, but their functions remained to be fully characterized. We generated multipotent MSCs derived from huiPS cells (huiPS-MSCs), and focusing on their immunosuppressive activity, we showed that human T-cell activation in coculture with huiPS-MSCs was significantly reduced. We also observed the generation of functional CD4 + FoxP3 + regulatory T (Treg) cells. Further tested in vivo in a model of human T-cell expansion in immune-deficient NSG mice, huiPS-MSCs immunosuppressive activity prevented the circulation and the accumulation of activated human T cells. Intracytoplasmic labeling of cytokines produced by the recovered T cells showed reduced percentages of human-differentiated T cells producing Th1 inflammatory cytokines. By contrast, T cells producing IL-10 and FoxP3 + -Treg cells, absent in non-treated animals, were detected in huiPS-MSCs treated mice. For the first time, these results highlight the immunosuppressive activity of the huiPS-MSCs on human T-cell stimulation with a concomitant generation of human Treg cells in vivo . They may favor the development of new tools and strategies based on the use of huiPS cells and their derivatives for the induction of immune tolerance.

  7. Immunosuppressive Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Derived from Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Induce Human Regulatory T Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémence Roux

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are considered as a promising source of cells to modulate immune functions on cells from innate and adaptive immune systems, their clinical use remains restricted (few number, limited in vitro expansion, absence of a full phenotypic characterization, few insights on their in vivo fate. Standardized MSCs derived in vitro from human-induced pluripotent stem (huIPS cells, remediating part of these issues, are considered as well as a valuable tool for therapeutic approaches, but their functions remained to be fully characterized. We generated multipotent MSCs derived from huiPS cells (huiPS-MSCs, and focusing on their immunosuppressive activity, we showed that human T-cell activation in coculture with huiPS-MSCs was significantly reduced. We also observed the generation of functional CD4+ FoxP3+ regulatory T (Treg cells. Further tested in vivo in a model of human T-cell expansion in immune-deficient NSG mice, huiPS-MSCs immunosuppressive activity prevented the circulation and the accumulation of activated human T cells. Intracytoplasmic labeling of cytokines produced by the recovered T cells showed reduced percentages of human-differentiated T cells producing Th1 inflammatory cytokines. By contrast, T cells producing IL-10 and FoxP3+-Treg cells, absent in non-treated animals, were detected in huiPS-MSCs treated mice. For the first time, these results highlight the immunosuppressive activity of the huiPS-MSCs on human T-cell stimulation with a concomitant generation of human Treg cells in vivo. They may favor the development of new tools and strategies based on the use of huiPS cells and their derivatives for the induction of immune tolerance.

  8. RNA SURVEILLANCE– AN EMERGING ROLE FOR RNA REGULATORY NETWORKS IN AGING

    OpenAIRE

    Montano, Monty; Long, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we describe recent advances in the field of RNA regulatory biology and relate these advances to aging science. We introduce a new term, RNA surveillance, an RNA regulatory process that is conserved in metazoans, and describe how RNA surveillance represents molecular cross-talk between two emerging RNA regulatory systems – RNA interference and RNA editing. We discuss how RNA surveillance mechanisms influence mRNA and microRNA expression and activity during lifespan. Additionall...

  9. Role of xanthine oxidoreductase in the anti-thrombotic effects of nitrite in rats in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramkowski, K; Leszczynska, A; Przyborowski, K; Kaminski, T; Rykaczewska, U; Sitek, B; Zakrzewska, A; Proniewski, B; Smolenski, R T; Chabielska, E; Buczko, W; Chlopicki, S

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying nitrite-induced effects on thrombosis and hemostasis in vivo are not clear. The goal of the work described here was to investigate the role of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) in the anti-platelet and anti-thrombotic activities of nitrite in rats in vivo. Arterial thrombosis was induced electrically in rats with renovascular hypertension by partial ligation of the left renal artery. Sodium nitrite (NaNO2, 0.17 mmol/kg twice daily for 3 days, p.o) was administered with or without one of the XOR-inhibitors: allopurinol (ALLO) and febuxostat (FEB) (100 and 5 mg/kg, p.o., for 3 days). Nitrite treatment (0.17 mmol/kg), which was associated with a significant increase in NOHb, nitrite/nitrate plasma concentration, resulted in a substantial decrease in thrombus weight (TW) (0.48 ± 0.03 mg vs. vehicle [VEH] 0.88 ± 0.08 mg, p < 0.001) without a significant hypotensive effect. The anti-thrombotic effect of nitrite was partially reversed by FEB (TW = 0.63 ± 0.06 mg, p < 0.05 vs. nitrites), but not by ALLO (TW = 0.43 ± 0.02 mg). In turn, profound anti-platelet effect of nitrite measured ex vivo using collagen-induced whole-blood platelet aggregation (70.5 ± 7.1% vs. VEH 100 ± 4.5%, p < 0.05) and dynamic thromboxaneB2 generation was fully reversed by both XOR-inhibitors. In addition, nitrite decreased plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 concentration (0.47 ± 0.13 ng/ml vs. VEH 0.62 ± 0.04 ng/ml, p < 0.05) and FEB/ALLO reversed this effect. In vitro the anti-platelet effect of nitrite (1 mM) was reversed by FEB (0.1 mM) under hypoxia (0.5%O2) and normoxia (20%O2). Nitrite treatment had no effect on coagulation parameters. In conclusion, the nitrite-induced anti-platelet effect in rats in vivo is mediated by XOR, but XOR does not fully account for the anti-thrombotic effects of nitrite.

  10. The regulatory role of the Hungarian Geological Survey in the closure of Mecsek uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamor, T.; Gombor, L.

    2001-01-01

    Under Mining Act XLIII established in 1993, the Hungarian Geological Survey was given a wide range of authority related to the environment, mining, nuclear and general constructions. In implementing these task the Survey will be supported by the well established Geological Institute of Hungary and the Eoetvoes Lorand Geophysical Institute. The Survey's role in the nuclear field includes the licensing of plans and reports on geologically related research to any nuclear facilities. The Hungarian Geological Survey is also co-authority on matters related to the establishment, construction, modification and closure, environmental protection of nuclear facilities in general and all matter related to uranium mining. The Survey's regulatory activity in radioactive waste management follows the Decree of the Minister of Industry and Tourism 62/1997 which is based on the Atomic Energy Act CXVI of 1966. These regulations were prepared in harmony with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency conventions, standards and guides and those of other countries. Case histories on the applications of these regulations to the closure of Mecsek uranium mine and the operation of the research laboratory tunnel for long-lived, high level radioactive waste are presented here. (author)

  11. Regulatory T cells as suppressors of anti-tumor immunity: Role of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, Veronica; Di Rella, Francesca; Di Giacomo, Antonio; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2017-06-01

    Novel concepts in immunometabolism support the hypothesis that glucose consumption is also used to modulate anti-tumor immune responses, favoring growth and expansion of specific cellular subsets defined in the past as suppressor T cells and currently reborn as regulatory T (Treg) cells. During the 1920s, Otto Warburg and colleagues observed that tumors consumed high amounts of glucose compared to normal tissues, even in the presence of oxygen and completely functioning mitochondria. However, the role of the Warburg Effect is still not completely understood, particularly in the context of an ongoing anti-tumor immune response. Current experimental evidence suggests that tumor-derived metabolic restrictions can drive T cell hyporesponsiveness and immune tolerance. For example, several glycolytic enzymes, deregulated in cancer, contribute to tumor progression independently from their canonical metabolic activity. Indeed, they can control apoptosis, gene expression and activation of specific intracellular pathways, thus suggesting a direct link between metabolic switches and pro-tumorigenic transcriptional programs. Focus of this review is to define the specific metabolic pathways controlling Treg cell immunobiology in the context of anti-tumor immunity and tumor progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Exploring the regulatory role of isocitrate dehydrogenase mutant protein on glioma stem cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H-C; Ma, J; Zhuang, Z; Qiu, F; Cheng, H-L; Shi, J-X

    2016-08-01

    Glioma is the most lethal form of cancer that originates mostly from the brain and less frequently from the spine. Glioma is characterized by abnormal regulation of glial cell differentiation. The severity of the glioma was found to be relaxed in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutant. The present study focused on histological discrimination and regulation of cancer stem cell between IDH1 mutant and in non-IDH1 mutant glioma tissue. Histology, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting techniques are used to analyze the glioma nature and variation in glioma stem cells that differ between IDH1 mutant and in non-IDH1 mutant glioma tissue. The aggressive form of non-IDH1 mutant glioma shows abnormal cellular histological variation with prominent larger nucleus along with abnormal clustering of cells. The longer survival form of IDH1 mutant glioma has a control over glioma stem cell proliferation. Immunohistochemistry with stem cell markers, CD133 and EGFRvIII are used to demonstrate that the IDH1 mutant glioma shows limited dependence on cancer stem cells and it shows marked apoptotic signals in TUNEL assay to regulate abnormal cells. The non-IDH1 mutant glioma failed to regulate misbehaving cells and it promotes cancer stem cell proliferation. Our finding supports that the IDH1 mutant glioma has a regulatory role in glioma stem cells and their survival.

  13. Evidence for roles of the Escherichia coli Hda protein beyond regulatory inactivation of DnaA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Jamie C; Sutton, Mark D

    2012-08-01

    The ATP-bound form of the Escherichia coli DnaA protein binds 'DnaA boxes' present in the origin of replication (oriC) and operator sites of several genes, including dnaA, to co-ordinate their transcription with initiation of replication. The Hda protein, together with the β sliding clamp, stimulates the ATPase activity of DnaA via a process termed regulatory inactivation of DnaA (RIDA), to regulate the activity of DnaA in DNA replication. Here, we used the mutant dnaN159 strain, which expresses the β159 clamp protein, to gain insight into how the actions of Hda are co-ordinated with replication. Elevated expression of Hda impeded growth of the dnaN159 strain in a Pol II- and Pol IV-dependent manner, suggesting a role for Hda managing the actions of these Pols. In a wild-type strain, elevated levels of Hda conferred sensitivity to nitrofurazone, and suppressed the frequency of -1 frameshift mutations characteristic of Pol IV, while loss of hda conferred cold sensitivity. Using the dnaN159 strain, we identified 24 novel hda alleles, four of which supported E. coli viability despite their RIDA defect. Taken together, these findings suggest that although one or more Hda functions are essential for cell viability, RIDA may be dispensable. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. The Regulatory Role of MicroRNAs in EMT and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolos Zaravinos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT is a powerful process in tumor invasion, metastasis, and tumorigenesis and describes the molecular reprogramming and phenotypic changes that are characterized by a transition from polarized immotile epithelial cells to motile mesenchymal cells. It is now well known that miRNAs are important regulators of malignant transformation and metastasis. The aberrant expression of the miR-200 family in cancer and its involvement in the initiation and progression of malignant transformation has been well demonstrated. The metastasis suppressive role of the miR-200 members is strongly associated with a pathologic EMT. This review describes the most recent advances regarding the influence of miRNAs in EMT and the control they exert in major signaling pathways in various cancers. The ability of the autocrine TGF-β/ZEB/miR-200 signaling regulatory network to control cell plasticity between the epithelial and mesenchymal state is further discussed. Various miRNAs are reported to directly target EMT transcription factors and components of the cell architecture, as well as miRNAs that are able to reverse the EMT process by targeting the Notch and Wnt signaling pathways. The link between cancer stem cells and EMT is also reported and the most recent developments regarding clinical trials that are currently using anti-miRNA constructs are further discussed.

  15. Role of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority in the final disposal of radioactive wastes in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petraitis, E.J.; Siraky, G.; Novo, R.G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes briefly the legislative and regulatory framework in which the final disposal of radioactive wastes is carried out in Argentina. The activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) and the applied approaches in relation to inspection of facilities, safety assessments of associated systems and collaboration in the matter with international agencies are also exposed. (author) [es

  16. Broadening the cancer and cognition landscape: the role of self-regulatory challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Jamie; Das, Enny; Schagen, Sanne B; Reid-Arndt, Stephanie A; Cameron, Linda D; Ahles, Tim A

    2014-01-01

    The potentially detrimental effects of cancer and related treatments on cognitive functioning have emerged as one of the key foci of cancer survivorship research, but little is known about how psychological variables other than depression influence these relationships. To illustrate the potential of social psychological perspectives, we examine how a self-regulatory analysis and specific self-regulatory challenges of contending with cancer-related expectancies and stereotypes provide conceptual frameworks for understanding some of the potential causes and consequences of cancer-related cognitive deficits. Literatures on cancer-related cognitive deficits, self-regulatory ego depletion, expectancy stereotypes, and their points of convergence are briefly reviewed. A review and conceptual integration of relevant literatures suggest that coping with cancer can impair self-regulatory capacity. There is an overlap between cognitive deficits associated with self-regulatory challenge and with cancer and its treatment, and restoring self-regulatory resources can attenuate cancer-related cognitive deficits. Examination of specific regulatory challenges of contending with expectancies and stereotypes related to treatment suggests insights that can inform when and among whom cognitive deficits may most likely emerge. Integrating social psychological ideas with a substantial knowledge base can illustrate novel research trajectories that can deepen our understanding of cancer-related cognitive deficits and their impact on psychosocial well-being. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. The role of interleukin-5 (IL-5 in vivo: studies with IL-5 deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus I Matthaei

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophil recruitment is a characteristic feature of a number of pathological conditions and was the topic of the recent International Symposium on allergic inflammation, asthma, parasitic and infectious diseases (Rio de Janeiro, June 3-5, 1996. Since interleukin5 (IL5 is believed to regulate the growth, differentiation and activation of eosinophils (Coffman et al. 1989, Sanderson 1992, the role of eosinophils and IL5 are closely linked. Although IL5 specifically regulates eosinophilia in vivo and this is its most well established activity, it is becoming clear that IL5 also has other biological effects. The recent derivation of an IL5 deficient mouse (Kopf et al. 1996, provides a model for exploring not only the role of IL5 and eosinophils but also other novel activities of IL5. Of note is that although the IL5 deficient mice cannot elicit a pronounced eosinophilia in response to inflammatory stimulation following aeroallergen challenge or parasite infection they still produce basal levels of eosinophils that appear to be morphologically and functionally normal. However, the basal levels of eosinophils appear insufficient for normal host defence as IL5 deficiency has now been shown to compromise defence against several helminth infections. In addition, IL5 deficient mice appear to have functional deficiencies in B-1 B lymphocytes and in IgA production.

  18. Inferring Broad Regulatory Biology from Time Course Data: Have We Reached an Upper Bound under Constraints Typical of In Vivo Studies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Vashishtha

    Full Text Available There is a growing appreciation for the network biology that regulates the coordinated expression of molecular and cellular markers however questions persist regarding the identifiability of these networks. Here we explore some of the issues relevant to recovering directed regulatory networks from time course data collected under experimental constraints typical of in vivo studies. NetSim simulations of sparsely connected biological networks were used to evaluate two simple feature selection techniques used in the construction of linear Ordinary Differential Equation (ODE models, namely truncation of terms versus latent vector projection. Performance was compared with ODE-based Time Series Network Identification (TSNI integral, and the information-theoretic Time-Delay ARACNE (TD-ARACNE. Projection-based techniques and TSNI integral outperformed truncation-based selection and TD-ARACNE on aggregate networks with edge densities of 10-30%, i.e. transcription factor, protein-protein cliques and immune signaling networks. All were more robust to noise than truncation-based feature selection. Performance was comparable on the in silico 10-node DREAM 3 network, a 5-node Yeast synthetic network designed for In vivo Reverse-engineering and Modeling Assessment (IRMA and a 9-node human HeLa cell cycle network of similar size and edge density. Performance was more sensitive to the number of time courses than to sample frequency and extrapolated better to larger networks by grouping experiments. In all cases performance declined rapidly in larger networks with lower edge density. Limited recovery and high false positive rates obtained overall bring into question our ability to generate informative time course data rather than the design of any particular reverse engineering algorithm.

  19. Differential effects of Rhodiola rosea on regulatory T cell differentiation and interferon‑γ production in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xi; Li, Pingping; Zhang, Peng; Chu, Ming; Liu, Hongju; Chen, Xiaoping; Ge, Qing

    2016-07-01

    Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea), a type of adaptogen, has been previously reported to exhibit immunostimulating activity in rodents and in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro. To examine the effect of R. rosea on T cells under simulated microgravity, spaceflight analogs of human head‑down bed rest (HDBR) at ‑6˚ and murine hind limb unloading (HU) were used. A decrease in the levels of interferon‑γ (IFN‑γ) and interleukin‑17 (IL‑17) and an increase in regulatory T (Treg) cells were observed in the placebo group following HDBR. The R. rosea treated HBDR group demonstrated further decreased IFN‑γ production, however, R. rosea exhibited no effect on the ratio of circulating Tregs or Treg cell differentiation. By contrast, the treatment of R. rosea on human T cells in vitro did not alter IFN‑γ secretion, however, Treg differentiation was significantly reduced. An R. rosea‑induced upregulation of hypoxia‑inducible factor 1α (HIF‑1α) contributed to the suppression of Treg differentiation in vitro. Differences in the effect of R. rosea in vitro and in vivo were also observed using a mouse model of microgravity. The results of the current study suggest that R. rosea has differential modulatory effects on T cells in vivo and in vitro and care should be taken when evaluating the effects of R. rosea on the immune system.

  20. The role of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in liver transplant tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W; Carper, K; Zheng, X X; Kuhr, C S; Reyes, J D; Liang, Y; Perkins, D L; Thomson, A W; Perkins, J D

    2006-12-01

    The liver has long been considered a tolerogenic organ that favors the induction of peripheral tolerance. The mechanisms underlying liver tolerogenicity remain largely undefined. In this study, we characterized Foxp3-expressing CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg) in liver allograft recipients and examined the role of Treg in inherent liver tolerogenicity by employing the mouse spontaneous liver transplant tolerance model. Orthotopic liver transplantation was performed from C57BL/10 (H2b) to C3H/HeJ (H2k) mice. The percentage of CD4+ CD25+ Treg was expanded in the liver grafts and recipient spleens from day 5 up to day 100 posttransplantation, associated with high intracellular Foxp3 and CTLA4 expression. Immunohistochemistry further demonstrated significant numbers of Foxp3+ cells in the liver grafts and recipient spleens and increased transforming growth factor beta expression in the recipient spleens throughout the time courses. Adoptive transfer of spleen cells from the long-term liver allograft survivors significantly prolonged donor heart graft survival. Depletion of recipient CD4+ CD25+ Treg using anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody (250 microg/d) induced acute liver allograft rejection, associated with elevated anti-donor T-cell proliferative responses, CTL and natural killer activities, enhanced interleukin (IL)-2, interferon-gamma, IL-10, and decreased IL-4 production, and decreased T-cell apoptotic activity in anti-CD25-treated recipients. Moreover, CTLA4 blockade by anti-CTLA4 monoclonal antibody administration exacerbated liver graft rejection when combined with anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody. Thus, Foxp3+ CD4+ CD25+ Treg appear to underpin spontaneous acceptance of major histocompatability complex- mismatched liver allografts in mice. CTLA4, IL-4, and apoptosis of alloreactive T cells appear to contribute to the function of Treg and regulation of graft outcome.

  1. Regulatory activity of azabisphosphonate-capped dendrimers on human CD4+ T cell proliferation enhances ex-vivo expansion of NK cells from PBMCs for immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caminade Anne-Marie

    2009-09-01

    specificity of the interaction of dendrimers with CD4+ T cell, we hypothesize that regulatory activity may signal through a specific receptor that remains to be indentified. Therefore phosphonate-capped dendrimers constitute not only tools for the ex-vivo expansion of NK cells in immunotherapy of cancers but their mode of action could also lead to further medical applications where T cell activation and proliferation need to be dampened.

  2. Measurement of Assertive Behavior: Construct and Predictive Validity of Self-Report, Role-Playing, and In-Vivo Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Barry R.

    1979-01-01

    Seventy-five subjects, who spanned the range of assertiveness, completed two self-report measures of assertiveness, eight role-playing situations involving positive and negative assertiveness, and a telephone in-vivo task. Correlations between the three measurement methods were examined. (Author/SJL)

  3. Good Manufacturing Practice-Compliant Production and Lot-Release of Ex Vivo Expanded Regulatory T Cells As Basis for Treatment of Patients with Autoimmune and Inflammatory Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Wiesinger

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the exploration of regulatory T cell (Treg-based cellular therapy has become an attractive strategy to ameliorate inflammation and autoimmunity in various clinical settings. The main obstacle to the clinical application of Treg in human is their low number circulating in peripheral blood. Therefore, ex vivo expansion is inevitable. Moreover, isolation of Treg bears the risk of concurrent isolation of unwanted effector cells, which may trigger or deteriorate inflammation upon adoptive Treg transfer. Here, we present a protocol for the GMP-compliant production, lot-release and validation of ex vivo expanded Tregs for treatment of patients with autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. In the presented production protocol, large numbers of Treg, previously enriched from a leukapheresis product by using the CliniMACS® system, are ex vivo expanded in the presence of anti-CD3/anti-CD28 expander beads, exogenous IL-2 and rapamycin during 21 days. The expanded Treg drug product passed predefined lot-release criteria. These criteria include (i sterility testing, (ii assessment of Treg phenotype, (iii assessment of non-Treg cellular impurities, (iv confirmation of successful anti-CD3/anti-CD28 expander bead removal after expansion, and (v confirmation of the biological function of the Treg product. Furthermore, the Treg drug product was shown to retain its stability and suppressive function for at least 1 year after freezing and thawing. Also, dilution of the Treg drug product in 0.9% physiological saline did not affect Treg phenotype and Treg function for up to 90 min. These data indicate that these cells are ready to use in a clinical setting in which a cell infusion time of up to 90 min can be expected. The presented production process has recently undergone on site GMP-conform evaluation and received GMP certification from the Bavarian authorities in Germany. This protocol can now be used for Treg-based therapy of various

  4. Effects of in vivo injection of anti-chicken CD25 monoclonal antibody on regulatory T cell depletion and CD4+CD25- T cell properties in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugasundaram, Revathi; Selvaraj, Ramesh K

    2012-03-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are defined as CD4(+)CD25(+) cells in chickens. This study examined the effects of an anti-chicken CD25 monoclonal antibody injection (0.5 mg/bird) on in vivo depletion of Tregs and the properties of CD4(+)CD25(-) cells in Treg-depleted birds. The CD4(+)CD25(+) cell percentage in the blood was lower at 8 d post injection than at 0 d. Anti-CD25-mediated CD4(+)CD25(+) cell depletion in blood was maximum at 12 d post injection. The anti-CD25 antibody injection depleted CD4(+)CD25(+) cells in the spleen and cecal tonsils, but not in the thymus, at 12 d post antibody injection. CD4(+)CD25(-) cells from the spleen and cecal tonsils of birds injected with the anti-chicken CD25 antibody had higher proliferation and higher IL-2 and IFNγ mRNA amounts than the controls at 12 d post injection. At 20 d post injection, CD4(+)CD25(+) cell percentages in the blood, spleen and thymus were comparable to that of the 0 d post injection. It could be concluded that anti-chicken CD25 injection temporarily depleted Treg population and increased and IL-2 and IFNγ mRNA amounts in CD4(+)CD25(-) cells at 12d post injection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessing the role of regulatory bodies in managing health professional issues and errors in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso-Gill, Isabelle; Legido-Quigley, H; Panteli, D; Mckee, M

    2014-08-01

    This paper explores how medical regulatory bodies in nine European countries manage professional issues involving quality and patient safety, to build on limited existing information on procedures for regulating medical professionals in Europe. Twelve vignettes describing scenarios of concerns about standards of physicians were developed, covering clinical, criminal and administrative matters. Medical regulatory bodies in nine European countries were asked what action they would normally take in each situation. Their responses were related to their regulatory mandate. Responses varied greatly across participating countries. Regulators are always involved where patients are at risk or where a criminal offence is committed within the clinical setting. Non-criminal medical issues were generally handled by the employer, if any, at their discretion. Countries varied in the use of punitive measures, the extent to which they took an interest in issues arising outside professional activities, and whether they dealt with issues themselves or referred cases to another regulatory authority or took no action at all. There is little consistency across Europe on the regulation of medical professionals. There is considerable diversity in the range of topics that regulatory bodies oversee, with almost all covering health care quality and safety and others encompassing issues related to reputation, respect and trust. These inconsistencies have significant implications for professional mobility, patient safety and quality of care. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  6. The role of regulatory council in the energy sector from the aspect of consumers' protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banovac, E.; Pavlovic, D.; Boljesic, K.

    2003-01-01

    The consumers' protection legal base, with few factors of new legislative consumers' protection legislation in European Union, in the Law on Consumers' Protection, and in the set of the Croatian Energy Laws is shown in this paper. Special attention in this paper is paid on five factors of regulatory body's orientation to the consumers' protection field, which energy regulatory body's policy should be included. The model of consumers' protection in the energy sector is shown, with the scheme of Three-component interactive subsystems: basic legislation which is determined consumers' protection policy, planning activities for consumers' protection (short and long time plans), and performing activities for consumers' protection. Furthermore, the approach of consumers' protection in the energy sectors in European Union are described. The paper gives the model of consumers' protection in the Croatian energy sector, and Croatian Energy Regulatory Council' approach to this issue. The table, with the data of specific consumers' protection problems in practice, those the Croatian Energy Regulatory Council as a regulatory body have been settled, is shown.(author)

  7. Critical role of acrolein in secondary injury following ex vivo spinal cord trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Kristin; Durkes, Abigail; Ouyang, Hui; Uchida, Koji; Pond, Amber; Shi, Riyi

    2008-11-01

    The pathophysiology of spinal cord injury (SCI) is characterized by the initial, primary injury followed by secondary injury processes in which oxidative stress is a critical component. Secondary injury processes not only exacerbate pathology at the site of primary injury, but also result in spreading of injuries to the adjacent, otherwise healthy tissue. The lipid peroxidation byproduct acrolein has been implicated as one potential mediator of secondary injury. To further and rigorously elucidate the role of acrolein in secondary injury, a unique ex vivo model is utilized to isolate the detrimental effects of mechanical injury from toxins such as acrolein that are produced endogenously following SCI. We demonstrate that (i) acrolein-Lys adducts are capable of diffusing from compressed tissue to adjacent, otherwise uninjured tissue; (ii) secondary injury by itself produces significant membrane damage and increased superoxide production; and (iii) these injuries are significantly attenuated by the acrolein scavenger hydralazine. Furthermore, hydralazine treatment results in significantly less membrane damage 2 h following compression injury, but not immediately after. These findings support our hypothesis that, following SCI, acrolein is increased to pathologic concentrations, contributes significantly to secondary injury, and thus represents a novel target for scavenging to promote improved recovery.

  8. Targeted resequencing of regulatory regions at schizophrenia risk loci: Role of rare functional variants at chromatin repressive states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Peñas, Javier; Amigo, Jorge; Santomé, Luis; Sobrino, Beatriz; Brenlla, Julio; Agra, Santiago; Paz, Eduardo; Páramo, Mario; Carracedo, Ángel; Arrojo, Manuel; Costas, Javier

    2016-07-01

    There is mounting evidence that regulatory variation plays an important role in genetic risk for schizophrenia. Here, we specifically search for regulatory variants at risk by sequencing promoter regions of twenty-three genes implied in schizophrenia by copy number variant or genome-wide association studies. After strict quality control, a total of 55,206bp per sample were analyzed in 526 schizophrenia cases and 516 controls from Galicia, NW Spain, using the Applied Biosystems SOLiD System. Variants were filtered based on frequency from public databases, chromatin states from the RoadMap Epigenomics Consortium at tissues relevant for schizophrenia, such as fetal brain, mid-frontal lobe, and angular gyrus, and prediction of functionality from RegulomeDB. The proportion of rare variants at polycomb repressive chromatin state at relevant tissues was higher in cases than in controls. The proportion of rare variants with predicted regulatory role was significantly higher in cases than in controls (P=0.0028, OR=1.93, 95% C.I.=1.23-3.04). Combination of information from both sources led to the identification of an excess of carriers of rare variants with predicted regulatory role located at polycomb repressive chromatin state at relevant tissues in cases versus controls (P=0.0016, OR=19.34, 95% C.I.=2.45-2495.26). The variants are located at two genes affected by the 17q12 copy number variant, LHX1 and HNF1B. These data strongly suggest that a specific epigenetic mechanism, chromatin remodeling by histone modification during early development, may be impaired in a subset of schizophrenia patients, in agreement with previous data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Regulation and regulatory role of WNT signaling in potentiating FSH action during bovine dominant follicle selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S P Gupta

    Full Text Available Follicular development occurs in wave like patterns in monotocous species such as cattle and humans and is regulated by a complex interaction of gonadotropins with local intrafollicular regulatory molecules. To further elucidate potential mechanisms controlling dominant follicle selection, granulosa cell RNA harvested from F1 (largest and F2 (second largest follicles isolated at predeviation (PD and onset of diameter deviation (OD stages of the first follicular wave was subjected to preliminary RNA transcriptome analysis. Expression of numerous WNT system components was observed. Hence experiments were performed to test the hypothesis that WNT signaling modulates FSH action on granulosa cells during follicular waves. Abundance of mRNA for WNT pathway members was evaluated in granulosa cells harvested from follicles at emergence (EM, PD, OD and early dominance (ED stages of the first follicular wave. In F1 follicles, abundance of CTNNB1 and DVL1 mRNAs was higher and AXIN2 mRNA was lower at ED versus EM stages and DVL1 and FZD6 mRNAs were higher and AXIN2 mRNA was lower in F1 versus F2 follicle at the ED stage. Bovine granulosa cells were treated in vitro with increasing doses of the WNT inhibitor IWR-1+/- maximal stimulatory dose of FSH. IWR-1 treatment blocked the FSH-induced increase in granulosa cell numbers and reduced the FSH-induced increase in estradiol. Granulosa cells were also cultured in the presence or absence of FSH +/- IWR-1 and hormonal regulation of mRNA for WNT pathway members and known FSH targets determined. FSH treatment increased CYP19A1, CCND2, CTNNB1, AXIN2 and FZD6 mRNAs and the stimulatory effect on CYP19A1 mRNA was reduced by IWR-1. In contrast, FSH reduced CARTPT mRNA and IWR-1 partially reversed the inhibitory effect of FSH. Results support temporal and hormonal regulation and a potential role for WNT signaling in potentiating FSH action during dominant follicle selection.

  10. The pleasures and pains of distinct self-construals: the role of interdependence in regulatory focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A Y; Aaker, J L; Gardner, W L

    2000-06-01

    Regulatory focus theory distinguishes between self-regulatory processes that focus on promotion and prevention strategies for goal pursuit. Five studies provide support for the hypothesis that these strategies differ for individuals with distinct self-construals. Specifically, individuals with a dominant independent self-construal were predicted to place more emphasis on promotion-focused information, and those with a dominant interdependent self-construal on prevention-focused information. Support for this hypothesis was obtained for participants who scored high versus low on the Self-Construal Scale, participants who were presented with an independent versus interdependent situation, and participants from a Western versus Eastern culture. The influence of interdependence on regulatory focus was observed in both importance ratings of information and affective responses consistent with promotion or prevention focus.

  11. Quality and safety of nuclear installations: the role of administration, and, nuclear safety and regulatory procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queniart, D.

    1979-12-01

    In the first paper the author defines the concepts of safety and quality and describes the means of intervention by the Public Authorities in safety matters of nuclear installations. These include individual authorisations, definition and application of technical rules and surveillance of installations. In the second paper he defines the distinction between radiation protection and safety and presents the legislative and regulatory plan for nuclear safety in France. A central safety service for nuclear installations was created in March 1973 within the Ministry of Industrial and Scientific Development, where, amongst other tasks, it draws up regulatory procedures and organizes inspections of the installations. The main American regulations for light water reactors are outlined and the French regulatory system for different types of reactors discussed

  12. The role of the US regulatory process in public acceptance of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowden, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper focuses, on NRC's regulatory responsibilities in relation to public acceptance of nuclear power. Since public attitudes in the United States may influence reaction to nuclear power in other nations, it is fair to say that the credibility of our regulatory program has international significance. Stated simply, unless the public is convinced that the regulatory process is effective in assuring safety, safeguarding nuclear facilities and materials, and protecting the environment, the use of nuclear power could be curtailed or even brought to a halt. Not only must the regulatory process be effective, it must at the same time be recognized by the public as being effective. Opinion polls in the United States have shown consistently that a majority of Americans believe it is important to develop nuclear power to help meet our future energy needs. The direction of public concern has shifted from year to year. Most recently, public apprehension has been expressed about the potential hazards of long-term storage of the high-level wastes from spent fuel reprocessing, and about the risks that nuclear materials and facilities may be subject to theft or diversion or sabotage. Uppermost in the public mind is the question whether the regulatory process can cope with these potential threats to public health and safety. The licensing process of the NRC is conducted in full public view. Issues of a generic nature are aired in rulemaking hearings, while each proposal to construct and operate a nuclear power plant or a facility such as fuel reprocessing plant is the subject of public hearings, which are held near the site of the proposed plant. During the last two years, we have noted that some persons who object to nuclear power plants have indicated that they believe that decisions to permit construction of such plants should be made at the State government level, rather than by a Federal agency. As a result, there now are movements to enact State laws and to set up State

  13. Probabilistic risk analysis and its role in regulatory activity in a developing country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arredondo-Sanchez, C.

    1985-01-01

    The author discusses the criterion adopted for regulatory activity in a developing country with a nuclear power plant. He describes the problems that have to be overcome as a result of changes in the regulations during construction of the plant. There is discussion of the action taken by the regulatory body when introducing the method of probabilistic risk analysis. The part played by this form of analysis in quantifying the safety objectives proposed in the USA together with its limitations and the problems involved in this methodology are examined. Lastly, the author gives an opinion on the use that probabilistic risk analysis should be put to in developing countries such as Mexico. (author)

  14. Regulatory role of melatonin and BMP-4 in prolactin production by rat pituitary lactotrope GH3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura-Ochi, Kanako; Fujisawa, Satoshi; Iwata, Nahoko; Komatsubara, Motoshi; Nishiyama, Yuki; Tsukamoto-Yamauchi, Naoko; Inagaki, Kenichi; Wada, Jun; Otsuka, Fumio

    2017-08-01

    The effects of melatonin on prolactin production and its regulatory mechanism remain uncertain. We investigated the regulatory role of melatonin in prolactin production using rat pituitary lactotrope GH3 cells by focusing on the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) system. Melatonin receptor activation, induced by melatonin and its receptor agonist ramelteon, significantly suppressed basal and forskolin-induced prolactin secretion and prolactin mRNA expression in GH3 cells. The melatonin MT2 receptor was predominantly expressed in GH3 cells, and the inhibitory effects of melatonin on prolactin production were reversed by treatment with the receptor antagonist luzindole, suggesting functional involvement of MT2 action in the suppression of prolactin release. Melatonin receptor activation also suppressed BMP-4-induced prolactin expression by inhibiting phosphorylation of Smad and transcription of the BMP-target gene Id-1, while BMP-4 treatment upregulated MT2 expression. Melatonin receptor activation suppressed basal, BMP-4-induced and forskolin-induced cAMP synthesis; however, BtcAMP-induced prolactin mRNA expression was not affected by melatonin or ramelteon, suggesting that MT2 activation leads to inhibition of prolactin production through the suppression of Smad signaling and cAMP synthesis. Experiments using intracellular signal inhibitors revealed that the ERK pathway is, at least in part, involved in prolactin induction by GH3 cells. Thus, a new regulatory role of melatonin involving BMP-4 in prolactin secretion was uncovered in lactotrope GH3 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. On the role of sparseness in the evolution of modularity in gene regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Soto, Carlos

    2018-05-01

    Modularity is a widespread property in biological systems. It implies that interactions occur mainly within groups of system elements. A modular arrangement facilitates adjustment of one module without perturbing the rest of the system. Therefore, modularity of developmental mechanisms is a major factor for evolvability, the potential to produce beneficial variation from random genetic change. Understanding how modularity evolves in gene regulatory networks, that create the distinct gene activity patterns that characterize different parts of an organism, is key to developmental and evolutionary biology. One hypothesis for the evolution of modules suggests that interactions between some sets of genes become maladaptive when selection favours additional gene activity patterns. The removal of such interactions by selection would result in the formation of modules. A second hypothesis suggests that modularity evolves in response to sparseness, the scarcity of interactions within a system. Here I simulate the evolution of gene regulatory networks and analyse diverse experimentally sustained networks to study the relationship between sparseness and modularity. My results suggest that sparseness alone is neither sufficient nor necessary to explain modularity in gene regulatory networks. However, sparseness amplifies the effects of forms of selection that, like selection for additional gene activity patterns, already produce an increase in modularity. That evolution of new gene activity patterns is frequent across evolution also supports that it is a major factor in the evolution of modularity. That sparseness is widespread across gene regulatory networks indicates that it may have facilitated the evolution of modules in a wide variety of cases.

  16. Reducing the Effect of Stereotype Threat: The Role of Coaction Contexts and Regulatory Fit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fangfang; Zuo, Bin; Wu, Yang; Dong, Xuanhao; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Two experiments examined the effects of competition and cooperation contexts, as well as regulatory fit, on reducing the negative influence of stereotype threat. Experiment 1 demonstrated that in high stereotype threat conditions, participants in the cooperation context scored significantly higher on a math test than those in the competition…

  17. Development of safety culture at Kozloduy NPP: The role of the regulatory body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miliovsky, Ventzislav

    2002-01-01

    An evolution is made upon external factor that accompany the development of safety culture at Kozloduy NPP (KNPP). The two basic stages and the major results achieved independently and with external assistance were considered in the process of development of safety culture. The areas in which the regulatory body insists on having active participation were defined. (author)

  18. Role of phospholipases A2 in diabetic retinopathy: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Gabriella; Motta, Carla; Giurdanella, Giovanni; Anfuso, Carmelina Daniela; Alberghina, Mario; Drago, Filippo; Salomone, Salvatore; Bucolo, Claudio

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the leading causes of blindness and the most common complication of diabetes with no cure available. We investigated the role of phospholipases A2 (PLA2) in diabetic retinopathy using an in vitro blood-retinal barrier model (BRB) and an in vivo streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic model. Mono- and co-cultures of endothelial cells (EC) and pericytes (PC), treated with high or fluctuating concentrations of glucose, to mimic the diabetic condition, were used. PLA2 activity, VEGF and PGE2 levels and cell proliferation were measured, with or without PLA2 inhibition. Diabetes was induced in rats by STZ injection and PLA2 activity along with VEGF, TNFα and ICAM-1 levels were measured in retina. High or fluctuating glucose induced BRB breakdown, and increased PLA2 activity, PGE2 and VEGF in EC/PC co-cultures; inhibition of PLA2 in mono- or co-cultures treated with high or fluctuating glucose dampened PGE2 and VEGF production down to the levels of controls. High or fluctuating glucose increased EC number and reduced PC number in co-cultures; these effects were reversed after transfecting EC with small interfering RNA targeted to PLA2. PLA2 and COX-2 protein expressions were significantly increased in microvessels from retina of diabetic rats. Diabetic rats had also high retinal levels of VEGF, ICAM-1 and TNFα that were reduced by treatment with a cPLA2 inhibitor. In conclusion, the present findings indicate that PLA2 upregulation represents an early step in glucose-induced alteration of BRB, possibly upstream of VEGF; thus, PLA2 may be an interesting target in managing diabetic retinopathy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The lncRNA Malat1 Is Dispensable for Mouse Development but Its Transcription Plays a cis-Regulatory Role in the Adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide studies have identified thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs lacking protein-coding capacity. However, most lncRNAs are expressed at a very low level, and in most cases there is no genetic evidence to support their in vivo function. Malat1 (metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 is among the most abundant and highly conserved lncRNAs, and it exhibits an uncommon 3′-end processing mechanism. In addition, its specific nuclear localization, developmental regulation, and dysregulation in cancer are suggestive of it having a critical biological function. We have characterized a Malat1 loss-of-function genetic model that indicates that Malat1 is not essential for mouse pre- and postnatal development. Furthermore, depletion of Malat1 does not affect global gene expression, splicing factor level and phosphorylation status, or alternative pre-mRNA splicing. However, among a small number of genes that were dysregulated in adult Malat1 knockout mice, many were Malat1 neighboring genes, thus indicating a potential cis-regulatory role of Malat1 gene transcription.

  20. The Role of Regulatory Pressure in Banks’ Capital and Risk Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Tanda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Capital regulation represents the core of prudential regulation in banking. Despite the aim of the regulators to have a safer and more robust banking industry, the effects of capital regulation on banks’ capital and risk decisions appear ambiguous. The paper analyses the relationship between capital and risk changes and the impact of regulatory pressure for a sample of European banks during the period 2006–2010, which encompasses the start of the latest financial crisis. Results highlight that banks tend to adopt a different behaviour depending on the capital ratio considered, supporting the so-called ‘gamble for resurrection’ hypothesis. Evidence supports the rethinking of the regulatory framework, especially with reference to higher and stricter capital requirements.

  1. Role of Sodium Bicarbonate Cotransporters in Intracellular pH Regulation and Their Regulatory Mechanisms in Human Submandibular Glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkoong, Eun; Shin, Yong-Hwan; Bae, Jun-Seok; Choi, Seulki; Kim, Minkyoung; Kim, Nahyun; Hwang, Sung-Min; Park, Kyungpyo

    2015-01-01

    Sodium bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCs) are involved in the pH regulation of salivary glands. However, the roles and regulatory mechanisms among different NBC isotypes have not been rigorously evaluated. We investigated the roles of two different types of NBCs, electroneutral (NBCn1) and electrogenic NBC (NBCe1), with respect to pH regulation and regulatory mechanisms using human submandibular glands (hSMGs) and HSG cells. Intracellular pH (pHi) was measured and the pHi recovery rate from cell acidification induced by an NH4Cl pulse was recorded. Subcellular localization and protein phosphorylation were determined using immunohistochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation techniques. We determined that NBCn1 is expressed on the basolateral side of acinar cells and the apical side of duct cells, while NBCe1 is exclusively expressed on the apical membrane of duct cells. The pHi recovery rate in hSMG acinar cells, which only express NBCn1, was not affected by pre-incubation with 5 μM PP2, an Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor. However, in HSG cells, which express both NBCe1 and NBCn1, the pHi recovery rate was inhibited by PP2. The apparent difference in regulatory mechanisms for NBCn1 and NBCe1 was evaluated by artificial overexpression of NBCn1 or NBCe1 in HSG cells, which revealed that the pHi recovery rate was only inhibited by PP2 in cells overexpressing NBCe1. Furthermore, only NBCe1 was significantly phosphorylated and translocated by NH4Cl, which was inhibited by PP2. Our results suggest that both NBCn1 and NBCe1 play a role in pHi regulation in hSMG acinar cells, and also that Src kinase does not regulate the activity of NBCn1.

  2. Role of Sodium Bicarbonate Cotransporters in Intracellular pH Regulation and Their Regulatory Mechanisms in Human Submandibular Glands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Namkoong

    Full Text Available Sodium bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCs are involved in the pH regulation of salivary glands. However, the roles and regulatory mechanisms among different NBC isotypes have not been rigorously evaluated. We investigated the roles of two different types of NBCs, electroneutral (NBCn1 and electrogenic NBC (NBCe1, with respect to pH regulation and regulatory mechanisms using human submandibular glands (hSMGs and HSG cells. Intracellular pH (pHi was measured and the pHi recovery rate from cell acidification induced by an NH4Cl pulse was recorded. Subcellular localization and protein phosphorylation were determined using immunohistochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation techniques. We determined that NBCn1 is expressed on the basolateral side of acinar cells and the apical side of duct cells, while NBCe1 is exclusively expressed on the apical membrane of duct cells. The pHi recovery rate in hSMG acinar cells, which only express NBCn1, was not affected by pre-incubation with 5 μM PP2, an Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor. However, in HSG cells, which express both NBCe1 and NBCn1, the pHi recovery rate was inhibited by PP2. The apparent difference in regulatory mechanisms for NBCn1 and NBCe1 was evaluated by artificial overexpression of NBCn1 or NBCe1 in HSG cells, which revealed that the pHi recovery rate was only inhibited by PP2 in cells overexpressing NBCe1. Furthermore, only NBCe1 was significantly phosphorylated and translocated by NH4Cl, which was inhibited by PP2. Our results suggest that both NBCn1 and NBCe1 play a role in pHi regulation in hSMG acinar cells, and also that Src kinase does not regulate the activity of NBCn1.

  3. An essential regulatory role of downstream of kinase-1 in the ovalbumin-induced murine model of asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Min Lee

    Full Text Available The downstream of kinase (DOK-1 is involved in the protein tyrosine kinase (PTK pathway in mast cells, but the role of DOK-1 in the pathogenesis of asthma has not been defined. In this study, we have demonstrated a novel regulatory role of DOK-1 in airway inflammation and physiologic responses in a murine model of asthma using lentiviral vector containing DOK-1 cDNA or DOK-1-specific ShRNA. The OVA-induced inflammatory cells, airway hyperresponsiveness, Th2 cytokine expression, and mucus response were significantly reduced in DOK-1 overexpressing mice compared to OVA-challenged control mice. The transgenic introduction of DOK-1 significantly stimulated the activation and expression of STAT-4 and T-bet, while impressively inhibiting the activation and expression of STAT-6 and GATA-3 in airway epithelial cells. On the other hand, DOK-1 knockdown mice enhanced STAT-6 expression and its nuclear translocation compared to OVA-challenged control mice. When viewed in combination, our studies demonstrate DOK-1 regulates allergen-induced Th2 immune responses by selective stimulation and inhibition of STAT-4 and STAT-6 signaling pathways, respectively. These studies provide a novel insight on the regulatory role of DOK-1 in allergen-induced Th2 inflammation and airway responses, which has therapeutic potential for asthma and other allergic diseases.

  4. Role of plant MicroRNA in cross-species regulatory networks of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Yanpu; Liu, Yuanning; Liu, Haiming; Wang, Hongyu; Jin, Wen; Zhang, Yanmei; Zhang, Chao; Xu, Dong

    2016-08-08

    It has been found that microRNAs (miRNAs) can function as a regulatory factor across species. For example, food-derived plant miRNAs may pass through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, enter into the plasma and serum of mammals, and interact with endogenous RNAs to regulate their expression. Although this new type of regulatory mechanism is not well understood, it provides a fresh look at the relationship between food consumption and physiology. To investigate this new type of mechanism, we conducted a systematic computational study to analyze the potential functions of these dietary miRNAs in the human body. In this paper, we predicted human and plant target genes using RNAhybrid and set some criteria to further filter them. Then we built the cross-species regulatory network according to the filtered targets, extracted central nodes by PageRank algorithm and built core modules. We summarized the functions of these modules to three major categories: ion transport, metabolic process and stress response, and especially some target genes are highly related to ion transport, polysaccharides and the lipid metabolic process. Through functional analysis, we found that human and plants have similar functions such as ion transport and stress response, so our study also indicates the existence of a close link between exogenous plant miRNA targets and digestive/urinary organs. According to our analysis results, we suggest that the ingestion of these plant miRNAs may have a functional impact on consuming organisms in a cross-kingdom way, and the dietary habit may affect the physiological condition at a genetic level. Our findings may be useful for discovering cross-species regulatory mechanism in further study.

  5. The impact of the new regulatory paradigm on the role of banks in financing the economy

    OpenAIRE

    Barut, M.-L.; Rouillé, N.; Sanchez, M.

    2015-01-01

    The financial crisis exposed the weaknesses and excesses of the banking system, notably its growing reliance on short-term market financing, excessive levels of leverage, and the fact that many banks were conducting high-risk market activities alongside retail banking activities. In 2009, in reaction to the crisis, regulatory authorities embarked on an ambitious agenda of reforms to financial regulations, aimed at cleaning up and reinforcing the banking system and ensuring it can meet the cre...

  6. Childhood cumulative risk and obesity: the mediating role of self-regulatory ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Gary W; Fuller-Rowell, Thomas E; Doan, Stacey N

    2012-01-01

    We tested whether early childhood risk exposures are related to weight gain in adolescence and evaluate an underlying mechanism, self-regulatory behavior, for the risk-obesity link. Cumulative risk exposure to 9 sociodemographic (eg, poverty), physical (eg, substandard housing), and psychosocial (eg, family turmoil) stressors was assessed in 244 nine-year-old children. BMI was calculated at age 9 and then 4 years later. At age 9, children's ability to delay gratification as an index of self-regulatory behavior was assessed. Path analyses were then estimated to evaluate our mediational model (Cumulative risk → Self-regulation → BMI) over a 4-year period in a prospective, longitudinal design. Nine-year-old children exposed to a greater accumulation of multiple risk factors show larger gains in adiposity over the next four year period, net of their initial BMI. These gains in BMI during early adolescence are largely accounted for by deteriorated self-regulatory abilities among children facing more cumulative risks. Early childhood risk exposure leads to larger gains in BMI in adolescence. Given the importance of childhood adiposity to the development of obesity later in life, understanding the underlying mechanisms that link early experience to weight gain is an essential task. Deficiencies in self-regulation in response to chronic stress appears to be an important agent in the obesity epidemic.

  7. The mass media role in acceptance activities of Slovak Republic's Nuclear Regulatory Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seliga, Mojmir

    1998-01-01

    Communication is the vital link between Nuclear Regulatory Authority and the public. If people do not know and understand the facts on which optimal a safety energy choice decisions should be based they cannot make informed decisions on how their own objectives can be met. The following ten commandments of communications are pointed out: be yourself; be comfortable and confident; be honest; be brief; be human; be personal; be positive and consistent; be attentive; be energetic; be committed and sincere. The important aspect is to test whether the nuclear energy in the Slovak Republic is acceptable according to mandatory rules and if its operation is regulated by the state through the independent institution - the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD). The media in Slovakia has on important power. Many organizations are therefore apprehensive when dealing with the press, radio and television. Many people would simply prefer not to get panicked when the dreaded microphones and cameras do appear. UJD considers the whole area of public relations as an essential component of its activity. UJD intends to offer the public true, systematic, qualified, understandable and independent information, regarding the safety of nuclear power plants, as well as regarding the methods and results of UJD work. Generally, public information is considered a significant contribution to the creation of confidence into the regulatory work. The paper presents the UJD communication program and relations with media as well as the preparedness of public information in case of emergency

  8. Collective statement on the role of research in a nuclear regulatory context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    In the present context of deregulation and privatisation of the nuclear industry, maintaining an adequate level of nuclear safety research is a primary concern for nuclear regulators, researchers and nuclear power plant licensees, as well as for government officials and the public. While these different stakeholders may have common concerns and interests, there may also be differences. At the international level, it is important to understand that divisions exist both within and among countries, not only in national cultures but also in the way regulators, researchers and licensees view the rote of research. An international gathering under the auspices of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) took place in June 2001, bringing together heads of nuclear regulatory bodies of NEA Member countries, senior regulators, senior executives of research organisations and leaders from the nuclear industry to discuss their perceptions of the rote of research in a nuclear regulatory context. This collective statement represents an international consensus on a rationale for regulatory research for currently operating nuclear reactors and for future reactors, and sets forth specific recommendations to NEA standing technical committees and Member countries. The intended audience is primarily nuclear safety regulators, senior researchers and industry leaders. Government authorities, nuclear power plant operators and the general public may also be interested. (author)

  9. Dual Role of GM-CSF as a Pro-Inflammatory and a Regulatory Cytokine: Implications for Immune Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Palash; Budnick, Isadore; Singh, Medha; Thiruppathi, Muthusamy; Alharshawi, Khaled; Elshabrawy, Hatem; Holterman, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is generally recognized as an inflammatory cytokine. Its inflammatory activity is primarily due its role as a growth and differentiation factor for granulocyte and macrophage populations. In this capacity, among other clinical applications, it has been used to bolster anti-tumor immune responses. GM-CSF-mediated inflammation has also been implicated in certain types of autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Thus, agents that can block GM-CSF or its receptor have been used as anti-inflammatory therapies. However, a review of literature reveals that in many situations GM-CSF can act as an anti-inflammatory/regulatory cytokine. We and others have shown that GM-CSF can modulate dendritic cell differentiation to render them “tolerogenic,” which, in turn, can increase regulatory T-cell numbers and function. Therefore, the pro-inflammatory and regulatory effects of GM-CSF appear to depend on the dose and the presence of other relevant cytokines in the context of an immune response. A thorough understanding of the various immunomodulatory effects of GM-CSF will facilitate more appropriate use and thus further enhance its clinical utility. PMID:25803788

  10. Measurement of assertive behavior: construct and predictive validity of self-report, role-playing, and in-vivo measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, B R; Green, S B; Harrison, W H

    1979-04-01

    Examined the predictive validity and construct equivalence of the three major procedures used to measure assertive behavior: Self-report, behavioral role-playing, and in-vivo assessment. Seventy-five Ss, who spanned the range of assertiveness, completed two self-report measures of assertiveness, the Rathus Assertiveness Scale (RAS) and the College Self-Expression Scale (CSES); two scales from the Endler S-R Inventory of General Trait Anxiousness, the interpersonal and general anxiety scales; eight role-playing situations that involved the expression of positive and negative assertiveness; and a telephone in-vivo task. In general, the study revealed the following: (1) assertiveness measures are task-dependent in that there was more overlap within task than between tasks; (2) there is a moderate degree of correspondence between self-report and role-playing measures, although this was true only for negative assertion; (3) positive and negative assertion do not appear to have the same topography of responding; and (4) there appears to be no consistent relationship between the in-vivo measure and any other type of assertiveness measure.

  11. Regulatory role of XynR (YagI) in catabolism of xylonate in Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Tomohiro; Momiyama, Eri; Yamanaka, Yuki; Watanabe, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ishihama, Akira

    2017-12-01

    The genome of Escherichia coli K-12 contains ten cryptic phages, altogether constituting about 3.6% of the genome in sequence. Among more than 200 predicted genes in these cryptic phages, 14 putative transcription factor (TF) genes exist, but their regulatory functions remain unidentified. As an initial attempt to make a breakthrough for understanding the regulatory roles of cryptic phage-encoded TFs, we tried to identify the regulatory function of CP4-6 cryptic prophage-encoded YagI with unknown function. After SELEX screening, YagI was found to bind mainly at a single site within the spacer of bidirectional transcription units, yagA (encoding another uncharacterized TF) and yagEF (encoding 2-keto-3-deoxy gluconate aldolase, and dehydratase, respectively) within this prophage region. YagEF enzymes are involved in the catabolism of xylose downstream from xylonate. We then designated YagI as XynR (regulator of xylonate catabolism), one of the rare single-target TFs. In agreement with this predicted regulatory function, the activity of XynR was suggested to be controlled by xylonate. Even though low-affinity binding sites of XynR were identified in the E. coli K-12 genome, they all were inside open reading frames, implying that the regulation network of XynR is still fixed within the CR4-6 prophage without significant influence over the host E. coli K-12. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Reflections on the role of the pharmacy regulatory authority in enhancing quality related event reporting in community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Todd A; Bishop, Andrea C; Mahaffey, Thomas; Mackinnon, Neil J; Ashcroft, Darren M; Zwicker, Bev; Reid, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    Given the demanding nature of providing pharmacy services, coupled with the expanded scope of practice of the professions in jurisdictions around the world, greater commitment to continuous quality improvement through adoption of quality-related event (QRE) reporting is necessary to ensure patient safety. Pharmacy regulatory authorities (PRAs) are in a unique position to enhance QRE reporting and learning through the standardization of expected practice. This study was aimed to gain a better understanding of the perceived roles of PRAs in enhancing QRE reporting and learning in community pharmacies, and identifying regulatory best practices to execute such roles. A purposive case sampling approach was used to identify PRA staff members from two groups (Deputy registrars and pharmacy inspectors) in 10 Canadian jurisdictions to participate in focus groups in the fall of 2011. Focus groups were used to explore perceptions of the role of PRAs in enhancing and promoting QRE reporting and learning, and perceived barriers to effective implementation in practice. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the qualitative data. Two focus groups were conducted, one with seven Deputy registrars/Practice managers, and one with nine pharmacy inspectors. Five themes were identified, including (1) defining QRE reporting and compliance, (2) navigating role conflict, (3) educating for enhanced QRE reporting and learning, (4) promoting the positive/removing the fear of QREs, and (5) tailoring QRE reporting and learning consistency. Overall, participants perceived a strong role for PRAs in enhancing QRE reporting and learning and providing education for pharmacies to support their compliance with reporting standards. However, PRAs must navigate the conflict inherent in both educating and promoting a process for achieving a standard while simultaneously inspecting compliance to that standard. Ensuring pharmacies have autonomy in operationalizing standards may help to mitigate this conflict

  13. REFLECTIONS ON THE ROLE OF THE PHARMACY REGULATORY AUTHORITY IN ENHANCING QUALITY RELATED EVENT REPORTING IN COMMUNITY PHARMACIESi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Todd A.; Bishop, Andrea C.; Mahaffey, Thomas; MacKinnon, Neil J.; Ashcroft, Darren; Zwicker, Bev; Reid, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Background Given the demanding nature of providing pharmacy services, coupled with the expanded scope of practice of the professions in jurisdictions around the world, greater commitment to continuous quality improvement through adoption of quality related event (QRE) reporting is necessary to ensure patient safety. Pharmacy regulatory authorities (PRAs) are in a unique position to enhance QRE reporting and learning through the standardization of expected practice Objective This study aims to better understand the perceived roles of PRAs in enhancing QRE reporting and learning in community pharmacies and identifying regulatory best practices to execute such roles. Methods A purposive case sampling approach was used to identify PRA staff members from two groups (deputy registrars and pharmacy inspectors) in 10 Canadian jurisdictions to participate in focus groups in the fall of 2011. Focus groups were used to explore perceptions of the role of PRAs in enhancing and promoting QRE reporting and learning, and perceived barriers to effective implementation in practice. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the qualitative data. Results Two focus groups were conducted, one with seven deputy registrars/practice managers and one with nine pharmacy inspectors. Five themes were identified, including (1) defining QRE reporting and compliance, (2) navigating role conflict, (3) educating for enhanced QRE reporting and learning, (4) promoting the positive/removing the fear of QREs, and (5) tailoring QRE reporting and learning consistency. Conclusions Overall, participants perceived a strong role for PRAs in enhancing QRE reporting and learning and providing education for pharmacies to support their compliance with reporting standards. However, PRAs must navigate the conflict inherent in both educating and promoting a process for achieving a standard while simultaneously inspecting compliance to that standard. Ensuring pharmacies have autonomy in operationalizing standards may

  14. Benzimidazoles Promote Anti-TNF Mediated Induction of Regulatory Macrophages and Enhance Therapeutic Efficacy in a Murine Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildenberg, Manon E.; Levin, Alon D.; Ceroni, Alessandro; Guo, Zhen; Koelink, Pim J.; Hakvoort, Theodorus B. M.; Westera, Liset; Bloemendaal, Felicia M.; Brandse, Johannan F.; Simmons, Alison; D'Haens, Geert R.; Ebner, Daniel; van den Brink, Gijs R.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: Regulatory macrophages play a critical role in tissue repair, and we have previously shown that anti-tumour necrosis factor [TNF] antibodies induce these macrophages in vitro and in vivo in IBD patients. The induction of regulatory macrophages can be potentiated using the

  15. In honor of the Teratology Society's 50th anniversary: The role of Teratology Society members in the development and evolution of in vivo developmental toxicity test guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyl, Rochelle W

    2010-06-01

    Members of the Teratology Society (established in 1960) were involved in the first governmental developmental and reproductive toxicity testing guidelines (1966) by FDA following the thalidomide epidemic, followed by other national and international governmental testing guidelines. The Segment II (developmental toxicity) study design, described in rodents and rabbits, has evolved with additional enhanced endpoints and better descriptions, mechanistic insights, range-finding studies, and toxico/pharmacokinetic ADME information (especially for pharmaceuticals). Society members were also involved in the development of the current screening assays and tests for endocrine disruptors (beginning in 1996) and are now involved with developing new testing guidelines (e.g., the extended one-generation protocol), and evaluating the current test guidelines and new initiatives under ILSI/HESI sponsorship. New initiatives include ToxCast from the U.S. EPA to screen, prioritize, and predict toxic chemicals by high throughput and high-content in vitro assays, bioinformation, and modeling to reduce (or eliminate) in vivo whole animal studies. Our Society and its journal have played vital roles in the scientific and regulatory accomplishments in birth defects research over the past 50 years and will continue to do so in the future. Happy 50th anniversary! (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. [Regulatory Mechanisms of PD-L1 Expression and Its Role in Immune Evasion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Keisuke

    2017-11-01

    Immune checkpoint blockade therapy using anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 antibodies can unleash anti-tumor immunity and induce durable remission in a variety ofhuman cancers. However, the regulatory mechanisms of PD-L1 expression mediating immune evasion ofcancer cells have not been fully elucidated, including the genetic alterations causing PD-L1 overexpression. Recently, we have reported a novel genetic mechanism ofimmune evasion associated with structural variations(SVs)disrupting the 3'-untranslated region(UTR)ofthe PD-L1 gene in various malignancies, such as aggressive lymphomas and gastrointestinal cancers. Despite a heterogenous nature ofthese SVs, they are closely associated with a marked upregulation of PD-L1 expression, which augments tumor growth and escape from anti-tumor immunity. Here we present an overview of the regulatory mechanisms of PD-L1 expression in cancer cells, highlighting the genetic mechanisms of PD-L1 constitutive activation, with specific focus on PD-L1 3'-UTR disruption.

  17. Regulatory Mode and Risk-Taking: The Mediating Role of Anticipated Regret.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panno, Angelo; Lauriola, Marco; Pierro, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We propose that decision maker's regulatory mode affects risk-taking through anticipated regret. In the Study 1 either a locomotion or an assessment orientation were experimentally induced, and in the Studies 2 and 3 these different orientations were assessed as chronic individual differences. To assess risk-taking we used two behavioral measures of risk: BART and hot-CCT. The results show that experimentally induced assessment orientation--compared to locomotion--leads to decreased risk-taking through increased anticipated regret (Study 1). People chronically predisposed to be in the assessment state take less risk through increased anticipated regret (Study 2 and Study 3). Study 2 results also show a marginally non-significant indirect effect of chronic locomotion mode on BART through anticipated regret. Differently, Study 3 shows that people chronically predisposed to be in the locomotion state take greater risk through decreased anticipated regret, when play a dynamic risk task triggering stronger emotional arousal. Through all three studies, the average effect size for the relationship of assessment with anticipated regret was in the moderate-large range, whereas for risk-taking was in the moderate range. The average effect size for the relationship of locomotion with anticipated regret was in the moderate range, whereas for risk-taking was in the small-moderate range. These results increase our understanding of human behavior under conditions of risk obtaining novel insights into regulatory mode theory and decision science.

  18. Role of partnership in enhancing the performance of radiation regulatory authority in Zambia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banda, S.C.

    2003-01-01

    The National Radiation Infrastructure includes legislation, human resource, technical capacity to execute responsibilities of the regulatory (1). In cases of developing countries like Zambia, special challenges arise in view of the constraints both in terms of human resource and funding. This paper will highlight same measures that may be undertaken to improve the operations of nation radiation protection infrastructure. The measures include collaboration with Science and Technology organisations that have technical capacity, delegation of responsible to key institutions that may have competence and generation of funds through training and provision of reliable quality service. (2). In Zambia, some achievements in this line have been registered by Radiation Protection Board working with the University of Zambia and National Institute for Scientific and Industrial Research (3). Some measures of generation of funds have been done though utilization of the generated remains to be the limiting factor to exploit fully benefits that may arise from the use of the monies generated from services. Partnerships with private sector may be used as regulatory authorities for support to its programme in particular the public awareness campaign. Sponsorship by a Private Cellar Phone Company (Telecel Zambia) and Rotary Club of Lusaka for Radiation Week to Radiation Protection Service under Theme 'Safe Radiation Use' is one such an example. The other opportunity is the technical cooperation with regional and international organisations such as SADC, IAEA, WHO, Interpol, EU and WCO for technical capacity building, human resource development and information access. (author)

  19. Understanding the relative roles of pharmacogenetics and ontogeny in pediatric drug development and regulatory science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeder, J Steven; Kearns, Gregory L; Spielberg, Stephen P; van den Anker, John

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the dose-exposure-response relationship across the pediatric age spectrum from preterm and term newborns to infants, children, adolescents, and adults is a major challenge for clinicians, pharmaceutical companies, and regulatory agencies. Over the past 3 decades, clinical investigations of many drugs commonly used in pediatric therapeutics have provided valuable insights into age-associated differences in drug disposition and action. However, our understanding of the contribution of genetic variation to variability in drug disposition and response in children generally has lagged behind that of adults. This article proposes a systematic approach that can be used to assess the relative contributions of ontogeny and genetic variation for a given compound. Application of the strategy is illustrated using the current regulatory dilemma posed by the safety and effectiveness of over-the-counter cough and cold remedies as an example. The results of the analysis can be used to aid in the design of studies to yield maximally informative data in pediatric populations of different ages and developmental stages and thereby improve the efficiency of study design.

  20. Multiple regulatory roles of the mouse transmembrane adaptor protein NTAL in gene transcription and mast cell physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Polakovicova

    Full Text Available Non-T cell activation linker (NTAL; also called LAB or LAT2 is a transmembrane adaptor protein that is expressed in a subset of hematopoietic cells, including mast cells. There are conflicting reports on the role of NTAL in the high affinity immunoglobulin E receptor (FcεRI signaling. Studies carried out on mast cells derived from mice with NTAL knock out (KO and wild type mice suggested that NTAL is a negative regulator of FcεRI signaling, while experiments with RNAi-mediated NTAL knockdown (KD in human mast cells and rat basophilic leukemia cells suggested its positive regulatory role. To determine whether different methodologies of NTAL ablation (KO vs KD have different physiological consequences, we compared under well defined conditions FcεRI-mediated signaling events in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs with NTAL KO or KD. BMMCs with both NTAL KO and KD exhibited enhanced degranulation, calcium mobilization, chemotaxis, tyrosine phosphorylation of LAT and ERK, and depolymerization of filamentous actin. These data provide clear evidence that NTAL is a negative regulator of FcεRI activation events in murine BMMCs, independently of possible compensatory developmental alterations. To gain further insight into the role of NTAL in mast cells, we examined the transcriptome profiles of resting and antigen-activated NTAL KO, NTAL KD, and corresponding control BMMCs. Through this analysis we identified several genes that were differentially regulated in nonactivated and antigen-activated NTAL-deficient cells, when compared to the corresponding control cells. Some of the genes seem to be involved in regulation of cholesterol-dependent events in antigen-mediated chemotaxis. The combined data indicate multiple regulatory roles of NTAL in gene expression and mast cell physiology.

  1. Role of connexin43 and ATP in long-range bystander radiation damage and oncogenesis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, M; Pasquali, E; Leonardi, S; Rebessi, S; Tanori, M; Giardullo, P; Borra, F; Pazzaglia, S; Naus, C C; Di Majo, V; Saran, A

    2011-11-10

    Ionizing radiation is a genotoxic agent and human carcinogen. Recent work has questioned long-held dogmas by showing that cancer-associated genetic alterations occur in cells and tissues not directly exposed to radiation, questioning the robustness of the current system of radiation risk assessment. In vitro, diverse mechanisms involving secreted soluble factors, gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and oxidative metabolism are proposed to mediate these indirect effects. In vivo, the mechanisms behind long-range 'bystander' responses remain largely unknown. Here, we investigate the role of GJIC in propagating radiation stress signals in vivo, and in mediating radiation-associated bystander tumorigenesis in mouse central nervous system using a mouse model in which intercellular communication is downregulated by targeted deletion of the connexin43 (Cx43) gene. We show that GJIC is critical for transmission of oncogenic radiation damage to the non-targeted cerebellum, and that a mechanism involving adenosine triphosphate release and upregulation of Cx43, the major GJIC constituent, regulates transduction of oncogenic damage to unirradiated tissues in vivo. Our data provide a novel hypothesis for transduction of distant bystander effects and suggest that the highly branched nervous system, similar to the vascular network, has an important role.

  2. Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated microRNA Delivery into the Postnatal Mouse Brain Reveals a Role for miR-134 in Dendritogenesis in Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette; Larsen, Lars A; Kauppinen, Sakari

    2010-01-01

    delivery of microRNAs in vivo by use of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV). rAAV-mediated overexpression of miR-134 in neurons of the postnatal mouse brain provided evidence for a negative role of miR-134 in dendritic arborization of cortical layer V pyramidal neurons in vivo, thereby confirming...

  3. In vivo Expansion of Naïve CD4+CD25high FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells in Patients with Colorectal Carcinoma after IL-2 Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Marc; Schumak, Beatrix; Weihrauch, Martin R.; Andres, Bettina; Giese, Thomas; Endl, Elmar; Knolle, Percy A.; Classen, Sabine; Limmer, Andreas; Schultze, Joachim L.

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are increased in context of malignancies and their expansion can be correlated with higher disease burden and decreased survival. Initially, interleukin 2 (IL-2) has been used as T-cell growth factor in clinical vaccination trials. In murine models, however, a role of IL-2 in development, differentiation, homeostasis, and function of Treg cells was established. In IL-2 treated cancer patients a further Treg-cell expansion was described, yet, the mechanism of expansion is still elusive. Here we report that functional Treg cells of a naïve phenotype - as determined by CCR7 and CD45RA expression - are significantly expanded in colorectal cancer patients. Treatment of 15 UICC stage IV colorectal cancer patients with IL-2 in a phase I/II peptide vaccination trial further enlarges the already increased naïve Treg-cell pool. Higher frequencies of T-cell receptor excision circles in naïve Treg cells indicate IL-2 dependent thymic generation of naïve Treg cells as a mechanism leading to increased frequencies of Treg cells post IL-2 treatment in cancer patients. This finding could be confirmed in naïve murine Treg cells after IL-2 administration. These results point to a more complex regulation of Treg cells in context of IL-2 administration. Future strategies therefore might aim at combining IL-2 therapy with novel strategies to circumvent expansion and differentiation of naïve Treg cells. PMID:22276195

  4. The role of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Roselle) in maintenance of ex vivo murine bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Hamid, Zariyantey; Lin Lin, Winnie Hii; Abdalla, Basma Jibril; Bee Yuen, Ong; Latif, Elda Surhaida; Mohamed, Jamaludin; Rajab, Nor Fadilah; Paik Wah, Chow; Wak Harto, Muhd Khairul Akmal; Budin, Siti Balkis

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells- (HSCs-) based therapy requires ex vivo expansion of HSCs prior to therapeutic use. However, ex vivo culture was reported to promote excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), exposing HSCs to oxidative damage. Efforts to overcome this limitation include the use of antioxidants. In this study, the role of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Roselle) in maintenance of cultured murine bone marrow-derived HSCs was investigated. Aqueous extract of Roselle was added at varying concentrations (0-1000 ng/mL) for 24 hours to the freshly isolated murine bone marrow cells (BMCs) cultures. Effects of Roselle on cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, glutathione (GSH) level, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and DNA damage were investigated. Roselle enhanced the survival (P Roselle increased (P Roselle showed significant cellular genoprotective potency against H2O2-induced DNA damage. Conclusively, Roselle shows novel property as potential supplement and genoprotectant against oxidative damage to cultured HSCs.

  5. Regulatory aspects of teratology: role of the Food and Drug Administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsey, F.O.

    1982-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration is a scientific regulatory agency whose consumer protection activities cover a wide range of products including foods and additives, and pesticide residues on foods; drugs; cosmetics; medical devices; and radiation-emitting electronic products. Amongst its concerns is the possible teratogen effects of regulated products to which the pregnant woman is exposed. The policies and programs of the agency directed toward reducing such risks to the unborn are reviewed. These measures include guidelines for animal reproduction studies and for clinical trials involving women to childbearing potential; labeling of products to disclose known or possible harm to the fetus or embryo; surveillance procedures designed to detect previously unsuspected adverse effects of marketed products; research activities designed to develop better understanding of developmental toxicology and improved techniques for detecting embryocidal and embryotoxic effects; and educational efforts directed both to professionals and the public regarding hazards to the unborn of agency-regulated products

  6. Pathogenesis and pharmacologic treatment of obesity: the role of energy regulatory mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manulu, Mangatas S M; Sutanegara, I N Dwi

    2006-01-01

    Obesity has become a worldwide public health problem affecting millions of people. This is a chronic, stigmatized, and costly disease, rarely curable and is increasing in prevalence to a point today where we define obesity as an epidemic disease that not only in developed but also on developing countries. The pathogenesis of obesity is largely unknown, especially about energy regulatory mechanism that involved wide area of neuroendocrinology that is very interesting but very complex and makes internists "refuse" to learn. Obesity occurs through a longstanding imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure, influenced by a complex biologic system that regulates appetite and adiposity. Obesity influences the pathogenesis of hypertension, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, kidney, heart, and cerebrovascular disease. It is very wise for every internist to learn the pathogenesis and treatment of this worldwide diseases. Until now, the available treatments, including drugs, are palliative and are effective only while the treatment is being actively used; and besides so many side effects reported.

  7. Regulatory role and approach of BARC Safety Council in safety and occupational health in BARC facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajdeep; Jayarajan, K.; Taly, Y.K.

    2016-01-01

    Bhabha Atomic Research Centre is involved in multidisciplinary research and developmental activities, related to peaceful use of nuclear energy and its societal benefits. In order to achieve high level of performance of these facilities, the best efforts are made to maintain good health of the plant personnel and good working conditions. BARC Safety Council (BSC), which is the regulatory body for BARC facilities, regulates radiation safety, industrial safety and surveillance of occupational health, by implementing various rules and guidelines in BARC facilities. BARC Safety framework consists of various committees in a 3-tier system. The first tier is BSC, which is the apex body authorized for issuing directives, permissions, consents and authorizations. It is having responsibility of ensuring protection and safety of public, environment, personnel and facilities of BARC through enforcement of radiation protection and industrial safety programmes. Besides the 18 committees in 2"n"d tier, there are 6 other expert committees which assist in functioning of BSC. (author)

  8. The dual effects of leading for safety: The mediating role of employee regulatory focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kark, Ronit; Katz-Navon, Tal; Delegach, Marianna

    2015-09-01

    This study examined the underlying mechanisms through which transformational and transactional leadership influence employee safety behaviors. Linking leadership theory with self-regulatory focus (SRF) theory, we examined a model of dual effects of leadership on safety initiative and safety compliance behaviors as mediated by promotion and prevention self-regulations. We conducted an experimental study (N = 107), an online study (N = 99) and a field study (N = 798 employees and 49 managers). Results demonstrated that followers' situational promotion focus mediated the positive relationship between transformational leadership and safety initiative behaviors. Through all 3 studies, transactional active leadership was positively associated with followers' situational prevention focus, however, the association between followers' prevention focus and safety compliance behaviors was inconsistent, showing the expected mediation relationships in the experimental setting, but not in the online and field studies. We discuss theoretical and practical implications of the findings. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Open Wound Healing In Vivo: Monitoring Binding and Presence of Adhesion/Growth-Regulatory Galectins in Rat Skin during the Course of Complete Re-Epithelialization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gál, Peter; Vasilenko, Tomáš; Kostelníková, Martina; Jakubco, Ján; Kovác, Ivan; Sabol, František; André, Sabine; Kaltner, Herbert; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Smetana, Karel Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Galectins are a family of carbohydrate-binding proteins that modulate inflammation and immunity. This functional versatility prompted us to perform a histochemical study of their occurrence during wound healing using rat skin as an in vivo model. Wound healing is a dynamic process that exhibits three basic phases: inflammation, proliferation, and maturation. In this study antibodies against keratins-10 and -14, wide-spectrum cytokeratin, vimentin, and fibronectin, and non-cross-reactive antibodies to galectins-1, -2, and -3 were applied to frozen sections of skin specimens two days (inflammatory phase), seven days (proliferation phase), and twenty-one days (maturation phase) after wounding. The presence of binding sites for galectins-1, -2, -3, and -7 as a measure for assessing changes in reactivity was determined using labeled proteins as probes. Our study detected a series of alterations in galectin parameters during the different phases of wound healing. Presence of galectin-1, for example, increased during the early phase of healing, whereas galectin-3 rapidly decreased in newly formed granulation tissue. In addition, nuclear reactivity of epidermal cells for galectin-2 occurred seven days post-trauma. The dynamic regulation of galectins during re-epithelialization intimates a role of these proteins in skin wound healing, most notably for galectin-1 increasing during the early phases and galectin-3 then slightly increasing during later phases of healing. Such changes may identify a potential target for the development of novel drugs to aid in wound repair and patients’ care

  10. Role of bundle helices in a regulatory crosstalk in the trimeric betaine transporter BetP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, Rebecca M; Perez, Camilo; Koshy, Caroline; Ziegler, Christine

    2011-12-02

    The Na(+)-coupled betaine symporter BetP regulates transport activity in response to hyperosmotic stress only in its trimeric state, suggesting a regulatory crosstalk between individual protomers. BetP shares the overall fold of two inverted structurally related five-transmembrane (TM) helix repeats with the sequence-unrelated Na(+)-coupled symporters LeuT, vSGLT, and Mhp1, which are neither trimeric nor regulated in transport activity. Conformational changes characteristic for this transporter fold involve the two first helices of each repeat, which form a four-TM-helix bundle. Here, we identify two ionic networks in BetP located on both sides of the membrane that might be responsible for BetP's unique regulatory behavior by restricting the conformational flexibility of the four-TM-helix bundle. The cytoplasmic ionic interaction network links both first helices of each repeat in one protomer to the osmosensing C-terminal domain of the adjacent protomer. Moreover, the periplasmic ionic interaction network conformationally locks the four-TM-helix bundle between the same neighbor protomers. By a combination of site-directed mutagenesis, cross-linking, and betaine uptake measurements, we demonstrate how conformational changes in individual bundle helices are transduced to the entire bundle by specific inter-helical interactions. We suggest that one purpose of bundle networking is to assist crosstalk between protomers during transport regulation by specifically modulating the transition from outward-facing to inward-facing state. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Transgenic Mice: In Vivo and Ex Vivo Models for the Role of hIAPP in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. M. Höppener

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP, a pancreatic islet protein of 37 amino acids, is the main component of islet amyloid, seen at autopsy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2. To investigate the roles of hIAPP and islet amyloid in DM2, we generated transgenic mice expressing hIAPP in their islet beta cells. In this study, we found that after a long-term, high-fat diet challenge islet amyloid was observed in only 4 of 19 hIAPP transgenic mice. hIAPP transgenic females exhibited severe glucose intolerance, which was associated with a downregulation of GLUT-2 mRNA expression. In isolated islets from hIAPP males cultured for 3 weeks on high-glucose medium, the percentage of amyloid containing islets increased from 5.5% to 70%. This ex vivo system will allow a more rapid, convenient, and specific study of factors influencing islet amyloidosis as well as of therapeutic strategies to interfere with this pathological process.

  12. In vivo expansion of naïve CD4+ CD25(high FOXP3+ regulatory T cells in patients with colorectal carcinoma after IL-2 administration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Beyer

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (T(reg cells are increased in context of malignancies and their expansion can be correlated with higher disease burden and decreased survival. Initially, interleukin 2 (IL-2 has been used as T-cell growth factor in clinical vaccination trials. In murine models, however, a role of IL-2 in development, differentiation, homeostasis, and function of T(reg cells was established. In IL-2 treated cancer patients a further T(reg-cell expansion was described, yet, the mechanism of expansion is still elusive. Here we report that functional T(reg cells of a naïve phenotype--as determined by CCR7 and CD45RA expression--are significantly expanded in colorectal cancer patients. Treatment of 15 UICC stage IV colorectal cancer patients with IL-2 in a phase I/II peptide vaccination trial further enlarges the already increased naïve T(reg-cell pool. Higher frequencies of T-cell receptor excision circles in naïve T(reg cells indicate IL-2 dependent thymic generation of naïve T(reg cells as a mechanism leading to increased frequencies of T(reg cells post IL-2 treatment in cancer patients. This finding could be confirmed in naïve murine T(reg cells after IL-2 administration. These results point to a more complex regulation of T(reg cells in context of IL-2 administration. Future strategies therefore might aim at combining IL-2 therapy with novel strategies to circumvent expansion and differentiation of naïve T(reg cells.

  13. France's Efforts to Promote NPP Exports and the Implications on the Role of Nuclear Regulatory Body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Chae-Woon; Chang, Hyun-Sop; Choi, Young-Sung

    2008-01-01

    The global society facing sky-rocketing oil prices, global warming effects, and increased demand for electricity recognizes the comparative advantages of nuclear energy in terms of environmental impact and economic efficiency over the other energy sources of current use. Approximately 300 nuclear power plants (NPPs) expect to be constructed until 2030 worldwide. Accordingly, the global market size of nuclear power industry becomes scaled up to the extent of U$75 billion on the assumption that the construction of one reactor costs around U$2.5 billion. The nations in possession of advanced nuclear technology such as the U.S., France, Japan, etc not only recognized an abounding profitability in nuclear industry and anticipated nuclear renaissance but also prepared long before whatever necessary to expand their nuclear programs beyond their domestic boundaries. Amongst those nations, it seems to be France that has unfolded a remarkable array of government-led activities to export Evolutionary Pressurized Reactors (EPRs) under the cooperation of President, relevant government administration, utilities even a regulatory body. The omni-directional activities of France and its implications are presented in this paper

  14. A regulatory perspective of the role of construction in revitalizing the United States nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stello, V. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Technical and managerial experience in nuclear power plant construction is presented from the perspective of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). In the context of actions that would contribute to revitalizing the nuclear industry in the United States of America, greater effectiveness of utility management during construction is proposed. The reasons why management effectiveness is so important are developed beginning with summaries of defects that were built into several US plants under construction. The root causes of these significant defects were management failures. In terms of benefits, effective management is important because of its effects on nuclear safety, project construction costs, and future reliability of the plant after commissioning. Actions that would enhance good management include emphasizing the inseparable nature of production and quality, that quality cannot be inspected into a plant, and that a strong construction management staff and exchanges of experience and information are essential. Techniques that have been used successfully in construction management are discussed. NRC and industry initiatives are in progress to improve management responsibility and learning from experience. Projects include Owner's Certification, assessments of licensee performance, fostering good practices across the industry, and improving the NRC inspection programme. Revitalization will not be easy, but it is achievable. (author)

  15. Apoptosis following interleukin-2 withdrawal from T cells: evidence for a regulatory role of CD18 (beta 2-integrin) molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Röpke, C; Gladstone, P; Nielsen, M

    1996-01-01

    , these findings suggest that CD18 molecules (beta 2-integrins) play a regulatory role in the apoptotic response following cytokine withdrawal, and that the regulation is mediated, at least partly, through T-T cell interactions. Thus, apoptotic death following IL-2 deprivation appears to be under "social" control...... activated T cells. Thus, removal of IL-2 from proliferating T cells not only induces growth arrest, but triggers a massive cell death due to apoptosis. While the apoptotic response involves a series of well-described events, it remains less clear how apoptosis is regulated following IL-2 withdrawal. Here...... molecules (CD28, CD29, CD49d, CD80, CD86) did not. Secondly, IL-2 withdrawal resulted in a retarded apoptotic response in LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18) negative T cells obtained from a leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) patient, as compared to LFA-1 positive T cell lines. Thirdly, co-culture of LFA-1 positive...

  16. Reconstruction of the yeast Snf1 kinase regulatory network reveals its role as a global energy regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usaite, Renata; Jewett, Michael C; Oliveira, Ana Paula; Yates, John R; Olsson, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Highly conserved among eukaryotic cells, the AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) is a central regulator of carbon metabolism. To map the complete network of interactions around AMPK in yeast (Snf1) and to evaluate the role of its regulatory subunit Snf4, we measured global mRNA, protein and metabolite levels in wild type, Δsnf1, Δsnf4, and Δsnf1Δsnf4 knockout strains. Using four newly developed computational tools, including novel DOGMA sub-network analysis, we showed the benefits of three-level ome-data integration to uncover the global Snf1 kinase role in yeast. We for the first time identified Snf1's global regulation on gene and protein expression levels, and showed that yeast Snf1 has a far more extensive function in controlling energy metabolism than reported earlier. Additionally, we identified complementary roles of Snf1 and Snf4. Similar to the function of AMPK in humans, our findings showed that Snf1 is a low-energy checkpoint and that yeast can be used more extensively as a model system for studying the molecular mechanisms underlying the global regulation of AMPK in mammals, failure of which leads to metabolic diseases. PMID:19888214

  17. Deep transcriptome profiling of mammalian stem cells supports a regulatory role for retrotransposons in pluripotency maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fort, Alexandre; Hashimoto, Kosuke; Yamada, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    The importance of microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs in the regulation of pluripotency has been documented; however, the noncoding components of stem cell gene networks remain largely unknown. Here we investigate the role of noncoding RNAs in the pluripotent state, with particular emphasis on nucl...

  18. Protective roles of pulmonary rehabilitation mixture in experimental pulmonary fibrosis in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.; Ji, Y.X.; Jiang, W.L.; Lv, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal high mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) activation is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary rehabilitation mixture (PRM), which combines extracts from eight traditional Chinese medicines, has very good lung protection in clinical use. However, it is not known if PRM has anti-fibrotic activity. In this study, we investigated the effects of PRM on transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-mediated and bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. The effects of PRM on TGF-β1-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in A549 cells, on the proliferation of human lung fibroblasts (HLF-1) in vitro, and on BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo were investigated. PRM treatment resulted in a reduction of EMT in A549 cells that was associated with attenuating an increase of vimentin and a decrease of E-cadherin. PRM inhibited the proliferation of HLF-1 at an IC 50 of 0.51 µg/mL. PRM ameliorated BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats, with reduction of histopathological scores and collagen deposition, and a decrease in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and HMGB1 expression. An increase in receptor for advanced glycation end-product (RAGE) expression was found in BLM-instilled lungs. PRM significantly decreased EMT and prevented pulmonary fibrosis through decreasing HMGB1 and regulating RAGE in vitro and in vivo. PRM inhibited TGF-β1-induced EMT via decreased HMGB1 and vimentin and increased RAGE and E-cadherin levels. In summary, PRM prevented experimental pulmonary fibrosis by modulating the HMGB1/RAGE pathway

  19. Protective roles of pulmonary rehabilitation mixture in experimental pulmonary fibrosis in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, L.; Ji, Y.X.; Jiang, W.L.; Lv, C.J. [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Binzhou Medical University, Yantai (China)

    2015-05-08

    Abnormal high mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) activation is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary rehabilitation mixture (PRM), which combines extracts from eight traditional Chinese medicines, has very good lung protection in clinical use. However, it is not known if PRM has anti-fibrotic activity. In this study, we investigated the effects of PRM on transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-mediated and bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. The effects of PRM on TGF-β1-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in A549 cells, on the proliferation of human lung fibroblasts (HLF-1) in vitro, and on BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo were investigated. PRM treatment resulted in a reduction of EMT in A549 cells that was associated with attenuating an increase of vimentin and a decrease of E-cadherin. PRM inhibited the proliferation of HLF-1 at an IC{sub 50} of 0.51 µg/mL. PRM ameliorated BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats, with reduction of histopathological scores and collagen deposition, and a decrease in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and HMGB1 expression. An increase in receptor for advanced glycation end-product (RAGE) expression was found in BLM-instilled lungs. PRM significantly decreased EMT and prevented pulmonary fibrosis through decreasing HMGB1 and regulating RAGE in vitro and in vivo. PRM inhibited TGF-β1-induced EMT via decreased HMGB1 and vimentin and increased RAGE and E-cadherin levels. In summary, PRM prevented experimental pulmonary fibrosis by modulating the HMGB1/RAGE pathway.

  20. In vivo evidence for a functional role of both tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptors and transmembrane TNF in experimental hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küsters, S; Tiegs, G; Alexopoulou, L; Pasparakis, M; Douni, E; Künstle, G; Bluethmann, H; Wendel, A; Pfizenmaier, K; Kollias, G; Grell, M

    1997-11-01

    The significance of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) for TNF function in vivo is well documented, whereas the role of TNFR2 so far remains obscure. In a model of concanavalin A (Con A)-induced, CD4+ T cell-dependent experimental hepatitis in mice, in which TNF is a central mediator of apoptotic and necrotic liver damage, we now provide evidence for an essential in vivo function of TNFR2 in this pathophysiological process. We demonstrate that a cooperation of TNFR1 and TNFR2 is required for hepatotoxicity as mice deficient of either receptor were resistant against Con A. A significant role of TNFR2 for Con A-induced hepatitis is also shown by the enhanced sensitivity of transgenic mice overexpressing the human TNFR2. The ligand for cytotoxic signaling via both TNF receptors is the precursor of soluble TNF, i.e. transmembrane TNF. Indeed, transmembrane TNF is sufficient to mediate hepatic damage, as transgenic mice deficient in wild-type soluble TNF but expressing a mutated nonsecretable form of TNF developed inflammatory liver disease.

  1. The regulatory role of heparin on c-Met signaling in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İşcan, Evin; Güneş, Aysim; Korhan, Peyda; Yılmaz, Yeliz; Erdal, Esra; Atabey, Neşe

    2017-06-01

    The role of heparin as an anticoagulant is well defined; however, its role in tumorigenesis and tumor progression is not clear yet. Some studies have shown that anticoagulant treatment in cancer patients improve overall survival, however, recent clinical trials have not shown a survival benefit in cancer patients receiving heparin treatment. In our previous studies we have shown the inhibitory effects of heparin on Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF)-induced invasion and migration in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. In this study, we showed the differential effects of heparin on the behaviors of HCC cells based on the presence or absence of HGF. In the absence of HGF, heparin activated HGF/c-Met signaling and promoted motility and invasion in HCC cells. Heparin treatment led to c-Met receptor dimerization and activated c-Met signaling in an HGF independent manner. Heparin-induced c-Met activation increased migration and invasion through ERK1/2, early growth response factor 1 (EGR1) and Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMP) axis. Interestingly, heparin modestly decreased the proliferation of HCC cells by inhibiting activatory phosphorylation of Akt. The inhibition of c-Met signaling reversed heparin-induced increase in motility and invasion and, proliferation inhibition. Our study provides a new perspective into the role of heparin on c-Met signaling in HCC.

  2. Protein Kinase A Regulatory Subunit Isoforms Regulate Growth and Differentiation in Mucor circinelloides: Essential Role of PKAR4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, J.; McCormack, B.; Navarro, E.; Moreno, S.; Garre, V.

    2012-01-01

    The protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway plays a role in regulating growth and differentiation in the dimorphic fungus Mucor circinelloides. PKA holoenzyme is comprised of two catalytic (C) and two regulatory (R) subunits. In M. circinelloides, four genes encode the PKAR1, PKAR2, PKAR3, and PKAR4 isoforms of R subunits. We have constructed null mutants and demonstrate that each isoform has a different role in growth and differentiation. The most striking finding is that pkaR4 is an essential gene, because only heterokaryons were obtained in knockout experiments. Heterokaryons with low levels of wild-type nuclei showed an impediment in the emission of the germ tube, suggesting a pivotal role of this gene in germ tube emergence. The remaining null strains showed different alterations in germ tube emergence, sporulation, and volume of the mother cell. The pkaR2 null mutant showed an accelerated germ tube emission and was the only mutant that germinated under anaerobic conditions when glycine was used as a nitrogen source, suggesting that pkaR2 participates in germ tube emergence by repressing it. From the measurement of the mRNA and protein levels of each isoform in the wild-type and knockout strains, it can be concluded that the expression of each subunit has its own mechanism of differential regulation. The PKAR1 and PKAR2 isoforms are posttranslationally modified by ubiquitylation, suggesting another regulation point in the specificity of the signal transduction. The results indicate that each R isoform has a different role in M. circinelloides physiology, controlling the dimorphism and contributing to the specificity of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-PKA pathway. PMID:22635921

  3. Protective role of gambogic acid in experimental pulmonary fibrosis in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yubei; Zhang, Guanghua; Ji, Yunxia; Zhua, Haibo; Lv, Changjun; Jiang, Wanglin

    2016-04-15

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive disorder with poor prognosis. The treatment options for IPF are very limited. Gambogic acid (GA) has anticancer effect and anti-proliferative activity which is extracted from a dried yellow resin of the Garcinia hanburyi Hook.f. [Clusiaceae (Guttiferae)] in Southeast Asia. However, the anti-fibrotic activities of GA have not been previously investigated. In this study, the effects of GA on TGF-β1-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in A549 cells and endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EndoMT) in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs), on the proliferation of human lung fibroblasts (HLF-1) were investigated in vitro, and on bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis was investigated in vivo. In TGF-β1 stimulated A549 cells, treatment with GA resulted in a reduction of EMT with a decrease in vimentin and p-Smad3 and an increase in E-cadherin instead. In TGF-β1 stimulated HPMECs, treatment with GA resulted in a reduction of EndoMT with a decrease in vimentin, and an increase in VE-cadherin instead. In the hypoxic HPMECs, treatment with GA reduced Vasohibin-2 (VASH-2), whereas increased VASH-1. In TGF-β1 stimulated HLF-1, treatment with GA reduced HLF-1 proliferation with a decrease in platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) expressions. In vivo, treatment with GA for 2 weeks resulted in an amelioration of the BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats with a lower VASH-2. Instead, it was observed a higher VASH-1 expression at early stage of fibrosis at 1 mg/kg, with reductions of the pathological score, collagen deposition, α-SMA, PDGF and FGF-2 expressions at fibrotic stage at 0.5 mg/kg and 1 mg/kg. In summary, GA reversed EMT and EndoMT, as well as HLF-1 proliferation in vitro and prevented pulmonary fibrosis in vivo by modulating VASH-2/VASH-1 and suppressing the TGF-β1/Smad3 pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Regulatory roles and therapeutic potential of microRNA in sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hui Jun; Yang, Jia-Lin

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are single-stranded noncoding RNAs involved in various biological processes, including cell differentiation and development. They play multiple key roles as tumour suppressors, oncogenes or both in particular cases. This review aims to summarise current findings of the expression of miRNAs and their role in clinical oncology. Current knowledge regarding the involvement of miRNAs in different sarcoma subtypes will be assessed, in conjunction with their potential application as therapeutic targets. Relevant articles in scientific databases were identified using a combination of search terms, including "microRNA," "deregulation," "sarcoma," and "targeted therapy". These databases included Medline, Embase, Cochrane Review, Pubmed and Scopus. Aberrant miRNA expression patterns have been identified in a range of sarcoma subtypes, and differences in miRNA expression profiles between malignant cells and their normal counterparts suggests that miRNAs play key roles in sarcoma development. The identification of unique miRNA patterns in individual tumour types could possibly be used as a diagnostic tool in sarcoma. Moreover, identification of these miRNAs provides novel targets for the development of therapeutic strategies in distinct sarcoma subtypes. miRNAs hold significant potential as diagnostic biomarkers, as well as therapeutic targets in sarcoma. Possible future clinical applications include the use of miRNA pathways as therapeutic targets or miRNA expression profiling as a means of patient selection. The involvement miRNAs will undoubtedly contribute to the advancement of future targeted therapeutic interventions in sarcoma, and further establishment of appropriate delivery systems is vital for their use in clinical settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Novel Gibberellin-Induced Gene from Rice and Its Potential Regulatory Role in Stem Growth1

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Knaap, Esther; Kim, Jeong Hoe; Kende, Hans

    2000-01-01

    Os-GRF1 (Oryza sativa-GROWTH-REGULATING FACTOR1) was identified in a search for genes that are differentially expressed in the intercalary meristem of deepwater rice (Oryza sativa L.) internodes in response to gibberellin (GA). Os-GRF1 displays general features of transcription factors, contains a functional nuclear localization signal, and has three regions with similarities to sequences in the database. One of these regions is similar to a protein interaction domain of SWI2/SNF2, which is a subunit of a chromatin-remodeling complex in yeast. The two other domains are novel and found only in plant proteins of unknown function. To study its role in plant growth, Os-GRF1 was expressed in Arabidopsis. Stem elongation of transformed plants was severely inhibited, and normal growth could not be recovered by the application of GA. Our results indicate that Os-GRF1 belongs to a novel class of plant proteins and may play a regulatory role in GA-induced stem elongation. PMID:10712532

  6. Drosophila Protein Kinase CK2: Genetics, Regulatory Complexity and Emerging Roles during Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohna Bandyopadhyay

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available CK2 is a Ser/Thr protein kinase that is highly conserved amongst all eukaryotes. It is a well-known oncogenic kinase that regulates vital cell autonomous functions and animal development. Genetic studies in the fruit fly Drosophila are providing unique insights into the roles of CK2 in cell signaling, embryogenesis, organogenesis, neurogenesis, and the circadian clock, and are revealing hitherto unknown complexities in CK2 functions and regulation. Here, we review Drosophila CK2 with respect to its structure, subunit diversity, potential mechanisms of regulation, developmental abnormalities linked to mutations in the gene encoding CK2 subunits, and emerging roles in multiple aspects of eye development. We examine the Drosophila CK2 “interaction map” and the eye-specific “transcriptome” databases, which raise the prospect that this protein kinase has many additional targets in the developing eye. We discuss the possibility that CK2 functions during early retinal neurogenesis in Drosophila and mammals bear greater similarity than has been recognized, and that this conservation may extend to other developmental programs. Together, these studies underscore the immense power of the Drosophila model organism to provide new insights and avenues to further investigate developmentally relevant targets of this protein kinase.

  7. Emergency planning and response - role nad responsibilities of the regulatory body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nizamska, M.

    1999-01-01

    The development of a emergency plan and organisation of adequate emergency preparedness in case of radiological accident in NPP cannot be effective without the appropriate preparatory work. In most countries, also in Republic of Bulgaria, several organisations are identified to have a potential role to play in a radiological emergency. For these reason is very important to have a national organisation, with a mandate to organise, inspect and co-ordinate the possibility of ministries and institution to react in case of radiological emergency, i.e. to quarantine the possibility for implementation of adequate counter measure for protection of the population and environment in case of radiological emergency in NPP. For the purposes of the emergency planning and response the NPP operator, ministries and the institutions developed an Emergency plan - NPP Emergency Plan and National Emergency Plan. The development of the emergency plans will be impossible without the good co-operation of the organisations which have a responsibilities in a radiological emergency. Once emergency plans are adopted, each individual organisation, also the NPP operator, must ensure that in can carry out its role effectively in accordance with the emergency plan and can develop the appropriate organisation for action and implementation of protection counter measures. For testing the emergency plans a regular exercise must be organised. Periodic reviews of the plan and modifications, based on actual events and exercise experience must be performed. The main aim of these report is to present the Bulgarian emergency planning organisation and response by explaining the national emergency panning and response legislation, implementation of IAEA recommendations and exercise experience

  8. Sequence and Expression Analysis of Interferon Regulatory Factor 10 (IRF10 in Three Diverse Teleost Fish Reveals Its Role in Antiviral Defense.

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    Qiaoqing Xu

    Full Text Available Interferon regulatory factor (IRF 10 was first found in birds and is present in the genome of other tetrapods (but not humans and mice, as well as in teleost fish. The functional role of IRF10 in vertebrate immunity is relatively unknown compared to IRF1-9. The target of this research was to clone and characterize the IRF10 genes in three economically important fish species that will facilitate future evaluation of this molecule in fish innate and adaptive immunity.In the present study, a single IRF10 gene was cloned in grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella and Asian swamp eel Monopterus albus, and two, named IRF10a and IRF10b, in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. The fish IRF10 molecules share highest identities to other vertebrate IRF10s, and have a well conserved DNA binding domain, IRF-associated domain, and an 8 exon/7 intron structure with conserved intron phase. The presence of an upstream ATG or open reading frame (ORF in the 5'-untranslated region of different fish IRF10 cDNA sequences suggests potential regulation at the translational level, and this has been verified by in vitro transcription/translation experiments of the trout IRF10a cDNA, but would still need to be validated in fish cells.Both trout IRF10 paralogues are highly expressed in thymus, blood and spleen but are relatively low in head kidney and caudal kidney. Trout IRF10b expression is significantly higher than IRF10a in integumentary tissues i.e. gills, scales, skin, intestine, adipose fin and tail fins, suggesting that IRF10b may be more important in mucosal immunity. The expression of both trout IRF10 paralogues is up-regulated by recombinant IFN-γ. The expression of the IRF10 genes is highly induced by Poly I:C in vitro and in vivo, and by viral infection, but is less responsive to peptidoglycan and bacterial infection, suggesting an important role of fish IRF10 in antiviral defense.

  9. The regulatory mechanism of Hsp90α secretion from endothelial cells and its role in angiogenesis during wound healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Xiaomin; Luo, Yongzhang

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Growth factors such as bFGF, VEGF, PDGF and SDF-1 stimulate Hsp90α secretion from endothelial cells. → Secreted Hsp90α localizes on the leading edge of activated endothelial cells. → Secreted Hsp90α promotes angiogenesis in wound healing. -- Abstract: Heat shock protein 90α (Hsp90α) is a ubiquitously expressed molecular chaperone, which is essential for the maintenance of eukaryote homeostasis. Hsp90α can also be secreted extracellularly and is associated with several physiological and pathological processes including wound healing, cancer, infectious diseases and diabetes. Angiogenesis, defined as the sprouting of new blood vessels from pre-existing capillaries via endothelial cell proliferation and migration, commonly occurs in and contributes to the above mentioned processes. However, the secretion of Hsp90α from endothelial cells and also its function in angiogenesis are still unclear. Here we investigated the role of extracellular Hsp90α in angiogenesis using dermal endothelial cells in vitro and a wound healing model in vivo. We find that the secretion of Hsp90α but not Hsp90β is increased in activated endothelial cells with the induction of angiogenic factors and matrix proteins. Secreted Hsp90α localizes on the leading edge of endothelial cells and promotes their angiogenic activities, whereas Hsp90α neutralizing antibodies reverse the effect. Furthermore, using a mouse skin wound healing model in vivo, we demonstrate that extracellular Hsp90α localizes on blood vessels in granulation tissues of wounded skin and promotes angiogenesis during wound healing. Taken together, our study reveals that Hsp90α can be secreted by activated endothelial cells and is a positive regulator of angiogenesis, suggesting the potential application of Hsp90α as a stimulator for wound repair.

  10. The regulatory mechanism of Hsp90{alpha} secretion from endothelial cells and its role in angiogenesis during wound healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Xiaomin [National Engineering Laboratory for Anti-tumor Protein Therapeutics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory for Protein Therapeutics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Cancer Biology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Luo, Yongzhang, E-mail: yluo@tsinghua.edu.cn [National Engineering Laboratory for Anti-tumor Protein Therapeutics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory for Protein Therapeutics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Cancer Biology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Growth factors such as bFGF, VEGF, PDGF and SDF-1 stimulate Hsp90{alpha} secretion from endothelial cells. {yields} Secreted Hsp90{alpha} localizes on the leading edge of activated endothelial cells. {yields} Secreted Hsp90{alpha} promotes angiogenesis in wound healing. -- Abstract: Heat shock protein 90{alpha} (Hsp90{alpha}) is a ubiquitously expressed molecular chaperone, which is essential for the maintenance of eukaryote homeostasis. Hsp90{alpha} can also be secreted extracellularly and is associated with several physiological and pathological processes including wound healing, cancer, infectious diseases and diabetes. Angiogenesis, defined as the sprouting of new blood vessels from pre-existing capillaries via endothelial cell proliferation and migration, commonly occurs in and contributes to the above mentioned processes. However, the secretion of Hsp90{alpha} from endothelial cells and also its function in angiogenesis are still unclear. Here we investigated the role of extracellular Hsp90{alpha} in angiogenesis using dermal endothelial cells in vitro and a wound healing model in vivo. We find that the secretion of Hsp90{alpha} but not Hsp90{beta} is increased in activated endothelial cells with the induction of angiogenic factors and matrix proteins. Secreted Hsp90{alpha} localizes on the leading edge of endothelial cells and promotes their angiogenic activities, whereas Hsp90{alpha} neutralizing antibodies reverse the effect. Furthermore, using a mouse skin wound healing model in vivo, we demonstrate that extracellular Hsp90{alpha} localizes on blood vessels in granulation tissues of wounded skin and promotes angiogenesis during wound healing. Taken together, our study reveals that Hsp90{alpha} can be secreted by activated endothelial cells and is a positive regulator of angiogenesis, suggesting the potential application of Hsp90{alpha} as a stimulator for wound repair.

  11. Marked in Vivo Donor Regulatory T Cell Expansion via Interleukin-2 and TL1A-Ig Stimulation Ameliorates Graft-versus-Host Disease but Preserves Graft-versus-Leukemia in Recipients after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Dietlinde; Barreras, Henry; Bader, Cameron S; Copsel, Sabrina; Lightbourn, Casey O; Pfeiffer, Brent J; Altman, Norman H; Podack, Eckhard R; Komanduri, Krishna V; Levy, Robert B

    2017-05-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are critical for self-tolerance. Although adoptive transfer of expanded Tregs limits graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), ex vivo generation of large numbers of functional Tregs remains difficult. Here, we demonstrate that in vivo targeting of the TNF superfamily receptor TNFRSF25 using the TL1A-Ig fusion protein, along with IL-2, resulted in transient but massive Treg expansion in donor mice, which peaked within days and was nontoxic. Tregs increased in multiple compartments, including blood, lymph nodes, spleen, and colon (GVHD target tissue). Tregs did not expand in bone marrow, a critical site for graft-versus-malignancy responses. Adoptive transfer of in vivo-expanded Tregs in the setting of MHC-mismatched or MHC-matched allogeneic HSCT significantly ameliorated GVHD. Critically, transplantation of Treg-expanded donor cells facilitated transplant tolerance without GVHD, with complete sparing of graft-versus-malignancy. This approach may prove valuable as a therapeutic strategy promoting transplantation tolerance. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The regulatory role of the state strategic management in the development of the regional entrepreneurial sphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukhneva Nina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The system of state strategic management (SGSO today is an Outpost of the state, exercising the functions of strategic management, development and predicates, and conducting an evaluation of the effectiveness and quality of the planned trajectories of economic development of the regions, regions and the state as a whole. It SGSW today is designed to ensure that the nationally oriented domestic policies that contribute to progressive and bold actions of the Russian Federation on the world stage. SHSU today is to create conditions for the development of science, research training, new knowledge-based economy. SHSU should form a system of state orders, which is of fundamental importance for the development of strategic projects in the field of medicine and health, agriculture, defense industry, etc. And, most importantly, SHSU needs today and support the process of re-industrialization of the country, technical re-equipment of all areas of production and management. In the new knowledge economy SHSU performs the role of the intellectual and information center regulation and strategic planning of development of the entire socio-economic sphere of the society centre to ensure the development of a database of fundamental and applied research, development, centre, guaranteeing the protection of copyright and introduction of innovative products, including new technical and technological solutions.

  13. The Regulatory Role of Signaling Crosstalk in Hypertrophy of MSCs and Human Articular Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Zhong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes is a main barrier in application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs for cartilage repair. In addition, hypertrophy occurs occasionally in osteoarthritis (OA. Here we provide a comprehensive review on recent literature describing signal pathways in the hypertrophy of MSCs-derived in vitro differentiated chondrocytes and chondrocytes, with an emphasis on the crosstalk between these pathways. Insight into the exact regulation of hypertrophy by the signaling network is necessary for the efficient application of MSCs for articular cartilage repair and for developing novel strategies for curing OA. We focus on articles describing the role of the main signaling pathways in regulating chondrocyte hypertrophy-like changes. Most studies report hypertrophic differentiation in chondrogenesis of MSCs, in both human OA and experimental OA. Chondrocyte hypertrophy is not under the strict control of a single pathway but appears to be regulated by an intricately regulated network of multiple signaling pathways, such as WNT, Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP/Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ, Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP, Indian hedgehog (IHH, Fibroblast growth factor (FGF, Insulin like growth factor (IGF and Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF. This comprehensive review describes how this intricate signaling network influences tissue-engineering applications of MSCs in articular cartilage (AC repair, and improves understanding of the disease stages and cellular responses within an OA articular joint.

  14. Regulatory role of neuron-restrictive silencing factor in expression of TRPC1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohba, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Yoichiro; Suzuki, Takashi; Miyoshi, Ichiro; Nakayama, Shinnsuke; Satoh, Eisaku; Iino, Kenji; Sasano, Hironobu; Mori, Yasuo; Kuromitsu, Sadao; Imagawa, Keiichi; Saito, Yoshihiko; Iijima, Toshihiko; Ito, Hiroshi; Murakami, Manabu

    2006-01-01

    Neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF) binds its consensus element to repress the transcription of various genes. The dominant-negative form (dnNRSF) has a hypertrophic effect on cardiogenesis through an unidentified mechanism. We examined the involvement of transient receptor potential (TRP) channel proteins, using transgenic mice overexpressing dnNRSF (dnNRSF mice). Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays revealed an interaction between NRSF and a neuron-restrictive silencer element-like sequence in intron 4 of TRPC1 genomic DNA. According to RT-PCR and Western analyses, TRPC1 was up-regulated in dnNRSF mouse heart. Transient overexpression of TRPC1 in HEK 293T cells increased the activity of the nuclear factor in activated T cells (NFAT) promoter and stimulated store-operated Ca 2+ channel (SOCC)-mediated Ca 2+ entry. Transfection of TRPC1 into primary cardiomyocytes increased NFAT activity, indicating a major role for TRPC1 in NFAT activation. Our findings strongly suggest that NRSF regulates TRP1 gene expression and causes changes in the levels of calcium entry through SOCCs

  15. Regulatory mechanisms of RNA function: emerging roles of DNA repair enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobert, Laure; Nilsen, Hilde

    2014-07-01

    The acquisition of an appropriate set of chemical modifications is required in order to establish correct structure of RNA molecules, and essential for their function. Modification of RNA bases affects RNA maturation, RNA processing, RNA quality control, and protein translation. Some RNA modifications are directly involved in the regulation of these processes. RNA epigenetics is emerging as a mechanism to achieve dynamic regulation of RNA function. Other modifications may prevent or be a signal for degradation. All types of RNA species are subject to processing or degradation, and numerous cellular mechanisms are involved. Unexpectedly, several studies during the last decade have established a connection between DNA and RNA surveillance mechanisms in eukaryotes. Several proteins that respond to DNA damage, either to process or to signal the presence of damaged DNA, have been shown to participate in RNA quality control, turnover or processing. Some enzymes that repair DNA damage may also process modified RNA substrates. In this review, we give an overview of the DNA repair proteins that function in RNA metabolism. We also discuss the roles of two base excision repair enzymes, SMUG1 and APE1, in RNA quality control.

  16. Regulatory Role of N6 -methyladenosine (m6 A) Methylation in RNA Processing and Human Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wenqiang; Ji, Xinying; Guo, Xiangqian; Ji, Shaoping

    2017-09-01

    N 6 -methyladenosine (m 6 A) modification is an abundant and conservative RNA modification in bacterial and eukaryotic cells. m 6 A modification mainly occurs in the 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) and near the stop codons of mRNA. Diverse strategies have been developed for identifying m 6 A sites in single nucleotide resolution. Dynamic regulation of m 6 A is found in metabolism, embryogenesis, and developmental processes, indicating a possible epigenetic regulation role along RNA processing and exerting biological functions. It has been known that m 6 A editing involves in nuclear RNA export, mRNA degradation, protein translation, and RNA splicing. Deficiency of m 6 A modification will lead to kinds of diseases, such as obesity, cancer, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), infertility, and developmental arrest. Some specific inhibitors against methyltransferase and demethylase have been developed to selectively regulate m 6 A modification, which may be advantageous for treatment of m 6 A related diseases. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 2534-2543, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The Role of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Roselle) in Maintenance of Ex Vivo Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Hamid, Zariyantey; Lin Lin, Winnie Hii; Abdalla, Basma Jibril; Bee Yuen, Ong; Latif, Elda Surhaida; Mohamed, Jamaludin; Rajab, Nor Fadilah; Paik Wah, Chow; Budin, Siti Balkis

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells- (HSCs-) based therapy requires ex vivo expansion of HSCs prior to therapeutic use. However, ex vivo culture was reported to promote excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), exposing HSCs to oxidative damage. Efforts to overcome this limitation include the use of antioxidants. In this study, the role of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Roselle) in maintenance of cultured murine bone marrow-derived HSCs was investigated. Aqueous extract of Roselle was added at varying concentrations (0–1000 ng/mL) for 24 hours to the freshly isolated murine bone marrow cells (BMCs) cultures. Effects of Roselle on cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, glutathione (GSH) level, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and DNA damage were investigated. Roselle enhanced the survival (P < 0.05) of BMCs at 500 and 1000 ng/mL, increased survival of Sca-1+ cells (HSCs) at 500 ng/mL, and maintained HSCs phenotype as shown from nonremarkable changes of surface marker antigen (Sca-1) expression in all experimental groups. Roselle increased (P < 0.05) the GSH level and SOD activity but the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was unaffected. Moreover, Roselle showed significant cellular genoprotective potency against H2O2-induced DNA damage. Conclusively, Roselle shows novel property as potential supplement and genoprotectant against oxidative damage to cultured HSCs. PMID:25405216

  18. The Role of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Roselle in Maintenance of Ex Vivo Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zariyantey Abdul Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells- (HSCs- based therapy requires ex vivo expansion of HSCs prior to therapeutic use. However, ex vivo culture was reported to promote excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, exposing HSCs to oxidative damage. Efforts to overcome this limitation include the use of antioxidants. In this study, the role of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Roselle in maintenance of cultured murine bone marrow-derived HSCs was investigated. Aqueous extract of Roselle was added at varying concentrations (0–1000 ng/mL for 24 hours to the freshly isolated murine bone marrow cells (BMCs cultures. Effects of Roselle on cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS production, glutathione (GSH level, superoxide dismutase (SOD activity, and DNA damage were investigated. Roselle enhanced the survival (P<0.05 of BMCs at 500 and 1000 ng/mL, increased survival of Sca-1+ cells (HSCs at 500 ng/mL, and maintained HSCs phenotype as shown from nonremarkable changes of surface marker antigen (Sca-1 expression in all experimental groups. Roselle increased (P<0.05 the GSH level and SOD activity but the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS was unaffected. Moreover, Roselle showed significant cellular genoprotective potency against H2O2-induced DNA damage. Conclusively, Roselle shows novel property as potential supplement and genoprotectant against oxidative damage to cultured HSCs.

  19. Novel mitochondrial substrates of omi indicate a new regulatory role in neurodegenerative disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicity Johnson

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial protease OMI (also known as HtrA2 has been implicated in Parkinson's Disease (PD and deletion or protease domain point mutations have shown profound neuropathologies in mice. A beneficial role by OMI, in preserving cell viability, is assumed to occur via the avoidance of dysfunctional protein turnover. However relatively few substrates for mitochondrial Omi are known. Here we report our identification of three novel mitochondrial substrates that impact metabolism and ATP production. Using a dual proteomic approach we have identified three interactors based upon ability to bind to OMI, and/or to persist in the proteome after OMI activity has been selectively inhibited. One candidate, the chaperone HSPA8, was common to each independent study. Two others (PDHB subunit and IDH3A subunit did not appear to bind to OMI, however persisted in the mito-proteome when OMI was inhibited. Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH are two key Kreb's cycle enzymes that catalyse oxidative decarboxylation control points in mitochondrial respiration. We verified both PDHB and IDH3A co-immunoprecipitate with HSPA8 and after elution, were degraded by recombinant HtrA2 in vitro. Additionally our gene expression studies, using rotenone (an inhibitor of Complex I showed Omi expression was silenced when pdhb and idh3a were increased when a sub-lethal dose was applied. However higher dose treatment caused increased Omi expression and decreased levels of pdhb and idh3a transcripts. This implicates mitochondrial OMI in a novel mechanism relating to metabolism.

  20. Relative Expression Levels Rather Than Specific Activity Plays the Major Role in Determining In Vivo AKT Isoform Substrate Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel S. Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The AKT protooncogene mediates many cellular processes involved in normal development and disease states such as cancer. The three structurally similar isoforms: AKT1, AKT2, and AKT3 exhibit both functional redundancy and isoform-specific functions; however the basis for their differential signalling remains unclear. Here we show that in vitro, purified AKT3 is ∼47-fold more active than AKT1 at phosphorylating peptide and protein substrates. Despite these marked variations in specific activity between the individual isoforms, a comprehensive analysis of phosphorylation of validated AKT substrates indicated only subtle differences in signalling via individual isoforms in vivo. Therefore, we hypothesise, at least in this model system, that relative tissue/cellular abundance, rather than specific activity, plays the dominant role in determining AKT substrate specificity in situ.

  1. Vasculogenic Mimicry of HT1080 Tumour Cells In Vivo: Critical Role of HIF-1α-Neuropilin-1 Axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Roli M.; Bajaj, Manmohan S.; Kale, Vaijayanti P.

    2012-01-01

    HT1080 - a human fibrosarcoma-derived cell line – forms aggressive angiogenic tumours in immuno-compromised mice. In spite of its extensive use as a model of tumour angiogenesis, the molecular event(s) initiating the angiogenic program in these cells are not known. Since hypoxia stimulates tumour angiogenesis, we examined the hypoxia-induced events evoked in these cells. In contrast to cells grown under normoxic conditions, hypoxia-primed (1% O2) HT1080 cells formed robust tubules on growth factor-reduced matrigel and formed significantly larger tumours in xenograft models in a chetomin-sensitive manner, indicating the role of HIF-1α-mediated transcription in these processes. Immuno-histochemical analyses of tumours formed by GFP-expressing HT1080 cells clearly showed that the tumour cells themselves expressed various angiogenic markers including Neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) and formed functional vessels containing red blood cells, thereby unambiguously demonstrating the vasculogenic mimicry of HT1080 cells in vivo. Experiments performed with the HT1080 cells stably transfected with plasmid constructs expressing shNRP-1 or full-length NRP-1 clearly established that the HIF1α-mediated up-regulation of NRP-1 played a deterministic role in the process. Hypoxia-exposure resulted in an up-regulation of c-Myc and OCT3/4 and a down-regulation of KLF4 mRNAs, suggesting their involvement in the tumour formation and angiogenesis. However, silencing of NRP-1 alone, though not affecting proliferation in culture, was sufficient to abrogate the tumour formation completely; clearly establishing that the hypoxia-mediated HIF-1α-dependent up-regulation of NRP-1 is a critical molecular event involved in the vasculogenic mimicry and tumor formation by HT1080 cells in vivo. PMID:23185562

  2. Regulatory T-cells in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia: their role in disease progression and autoimmune cytopenias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lad, Deepesh P; Varma, Subhash; Varma, Neelam; Sachdeva, Man Updesh Singh; Bose, Parveen; Malhotra, Pankaj

    2013-05-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) have been shown to be important for the balance of autoimmunity and oncogenesis. Tregs have a protective role in autoimmune diseases and conversely promote oncogenesis. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is unique in being at the cross-roads of oncogenesis and autoimmunity. We studied Tregs, defined as CD4+CD25(high)CD127(low)FOXP3+, in 32 treatment-naive patients with CLL. Our study shows that patients with CLL had a higher absolute Treg count than the control group (p < 0.001). A progressive increase of Tregs was noted in advanced stages of the disease (p < 0.001). The increase in absolute Treg count is more significant than the increase in percentage Tregs. The absolute Treg count appears to be more important in disease pathogenesis. The absolute Treg count was significantly higher in those patients having autoimmune cytopenias. There was an inverse correlation between lymphocyte doubling time and absolute Treg count (p = 0.03). The absolute Treg count may be used as a prognostic marker in CLL.

  3. APS, an adaptor molecule containing PH and SH2 domains, has a negative regulatory role in B cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iseki, Masanori; Kubo-Akashi, Chiyomi; Kwon, Sang-Mo; Yamaguchi, Akiko; Takatsu, Kiyoshi; Takaki, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    Adaptor molecule containing PH and SH2 domains (APS) is an intracellular adaptor protein that forms part of an adaptor family along with Lnk and SH2-B. APS transcripts are expressed in various tissues including brain, kidney, and muscle, as well as in splenic B cells but not in T cells. We investigated the functions of APS in B cell development and activation by generating APS-transgenic (APS-Tg) mice that overexpressed APS in lymphocytes. The number of B-1 cells in the peritoneal cavity was reduced in APS-Tg mice, as were B-2 cells in the spleen. B cell development in the bone marrow was partially impaired at the transition stage from proliferating large pre-B to small pre-B cells. B cell proliferation induced by B cell receptor (BCR) crosslinking but not by other B cell mitogens was also impaired in APS-Tg mice. APS co-localized with BCR complexes and filamentous actin in activated APS-Tg B cells. Thus, APS appears to play novel negative regulatory roles in BCR signaling, actin reorganization pathways, and control of compartment sizes of B-lineage cells

  4. Critical role for thymic CD19+CD5+CD1dhiIL-10+ regulatory B cells in immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Chen; Ma, Ning; Xiao, He; Wang, Xiaoqian; Zheng, Mingke; Han, Gencheng; Chen, Guojiang; Hou, Chunmei; Shen, Beifen; Li, Yan; Wang, Renxi

    2015-03-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that besides the spleen, LNs, peripheral blood, and thymus contain a regulatory IL-10-producing CD19(+)CD5(+)CD1d(high) B cell subset that may play a critical role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis. Indeed, this population was identified in the murine thymus, and furthermore, when cocultured with CD4(+) T cells, this population of B cells supported the maintenance of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs in vitro, in part, via the CD5-CD72 interaction. Mice homozygous for Cd19(Cre) (CD19(-/-)) express B cells with impaired signaling and humoral responses. Strikingly, CD19(-/-) mice produce fewer CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs and a greater percentage of CD4(+)CD8(-) and CD4(-)CD8(+) T cells. Consistent with these results, transfer of thymic CD19(+)CD5(+)CD1d(hi) B cells into CD19(-/-) mice resulted in significantly up-regulated numbers of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs with a concomitant reduction in CD4(+)CD8(-) and CD4(-)CD8(+) T cell populations in the thymus, spleen, and LNs but not in the BM of recipient mice. In addition, thymic CD19(+)CD5(+)CD1d(hi) B cells significantly suppressed autoimmune responses in lupus-like mice via up-regulation of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs and IL-10-producing Bregs. This study suggests that thymic CD19(+)CD5(+)CD1d(hi)IL-10(+) Bregs play a critical role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  5. Role of the DmpR-mediated regulatory circuit in bacterial biodegradation properties in methylphenol-amended soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarand, I; Skärfstad, E; Forsman, M; Romantschuk, M; Shingler, V

    2001-01-01

    Pathway substrates and some structural analogues directly activate the regulatory protein DmpR to promote transcription of the dmp operon genes encoding the (methyl)phenol degradative pathway of Pseudomonas sp. strain CF600. While a wide range of phenols can activate DmpR, the location and nature of substituents on the basic phenolic ring can limit the level of activation and thus utilization of some compounds as assessed by growth on plates. Here we address the role of the aromatic effector response of DmpR in determining degradative properties in two soil matrices that provide different nutritional conditions. Using the wild-type system and an isogenic counterpart containing a DmpR mutant with enhanced ability to respond to para-substituted phenols, we demonstrate (i) that the enhanced in vitro biodegradative capacity of the regulator mutant strain is manifested in the two different soil types and (ii) that exposure of the wild-type strain to 4-methylphenol-contaminated soil led to rapid selection of a subpopulation exhibiting enhanced capacities to degrade the compound. Genetic and functional analyses of 10 of these derivatives demonstrated that all harbored a single mutation in the sensory domain of DmpR that mediated the phenotype in each case. These findings establish a dominating role for the aromatic effector response of DmpR in determining degradation properties. Moreover, the results indicate that the ability to rapidly adapt regulator properties to different profiles of polluting compounds may underlie the evolutionary success of DmpR-like regulators in controlling aromatic catabolic pathways.

  6. FOXP3: required but not sufficient. the role of GARP (LRRC32) as a safeguard of the regulatory phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst-Kepper, M; Balling, R; Buer, J

    2010-08-01

    FOXP3 is essential for the development and function of regulatory CD4(+)CD25(hi) T (T(reg)) cells. However, recent evidence suggests that FOXP3 alone is not sufficient to completely explain the regulatory phenotype of these key players in autoimmunity and inflammation: after being activated, conventional human CD4(+) T cells transiently up-regulate FOXP3 without acquiring a regulatory function. Researchers have recently found that glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP, or LRRC32) is a T(reg)-specific receptor that binds latent TGF-beta and dominantly controls FOXP3 and the regulatory phenotype via a positive feedback loop. This finding provides a missing link in our molecular understanding of FOXP3 in T(reg) cells. This viewpoint focuses on GARP as safeguard of FOXP3 and the regulatory phenotype.

  7. Role of AtCDC48 & the AtCDC48 Regulatory Protein Family, PUX, in Plant Cell Morphogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bednarek, Sebastian, Y.

    2009-11-08

    The long-term objective of this work is to understand the molecular events and mechanisms involved in secretory membrane trafficking and organelle biogenesis, which are crucial for normal plant growth and development. Our studies have suggested a vital role for the cytosolic chaperone Cdc48p/p97 during cytokinesis and cell expansion which are highly dependent upon secretory membrane trafficking. Localization studies have shown that the plant Cdc48p/p97, AtCDC48, and the Arabidopsis ortholog of the ER- and Golgi-associated SNARE, syntaxin 5, (referred to as SYP31) are targeted to the division plane during cytokinesis. In addition, AtCDC48 and SYP31 were shown to interact in vitro and in vivo. To characterize further the function of AtCDC48 and SYP31 we have utilized affinity chromatography and MALDI-MS to identify several plant-specific proteins that interact with SYP31 and/or modulate the activity of AtCDC48 including two UBX (i.e. ubiquitin-like) domain containing proteins, PUX1 and PUX2 (Proteins containing UBX domain). These proteins define a plant protein family consisting of 15 uncharacterized members that we postulate interact with AtCDC48. Biochemical studies have demonstrated that PUX2 is a novel membrane adapter for AtCDC48 that mediates AtCDC48/SYP31 interaction and is likely to control AtCDC48-dependent membrane fusion. In contrast, PUX1 negatively regulates AtCDC48 by inhibiting its ATPase activity and by promoting the disassembly of the active hexamer. These findings provide the first evidence that the assembly and disassembly of the CDC48/p97complex is actually a dynamic process. This new unexpected level of regulation for CDC48/p97 was demonstrated to be critical in vivo as pux1 loss-of-function mutants grow faster than wild-type plants. These studies suggest a role for AtCDC48 in plant cell cycle progression including cytokinesis and/or cell expansion. The proposed studies are designed to: 1) characterize further the localization and function of At

  8. Roles of the adenosine receptor and CD73 in the regulatory effect of γδ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongchun Liang

    Full Text Available The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR, the main functional adenosine receptor on murine T cells, plays a unique role in the attenuation of inflammation and tissue damage in vivo. Here, we showed that, of the immune cell types tested, activated γδ T cells expressed the highest levels of A2AR mRNA and that A2AR ligation inhibited αβ T cell activation, but enhanced γδ T cell activation. We also showed that the inhibitory effect of an adenosine receptor agonist on autoreactive T cells was prevented by addition of a low percentage of activated γδ T cells. Furthermore, compared to resting cells, activated γδ T cells expressed significantly lower levels of CD73, an enzyme involved in the generation of extracellular adenosine. Exogenous AMP had a significant inhibitory effect on autoreactive T cell responses, but only in the presence of CD73+ γδ T cells, and this effect was abolished by a CD73 inhibitor. Our results show that expression of increased amounts of A2AR allows γδ T cells to bind adenosine and thereby attenuate its suppressive effect, while decreased expression of CD73 results in less generation of adenosine in the inflammatory site. Together, these events allow activated γδ T cells to acquire increased proinflammatory activity, leading to augmented autoimmune responses.

  9. Immunosuppressive Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Derived from Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Induce Human Regulatory T Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Clémence Roux; Clémence Roux; Clémence Roux; Gaëlle Saviane; Gaëlle Saviane; Jonathan Pini; Jonathan Pini; Nourhène Belaïd; Nourhène Belaïd; Gihen Dhib; Gihen Dhib; Christine Voha; Christine Voha; Christine Voha; Lidia Ibáñez

    2018-01-01

    Despite mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are considered as a promising source of cells to modulate immune functions on cells from innate and adaptive immune systems, their clinical use remains restricted (few number, limited in vitro expansion, absence of a full phenotypic characterization, few insights on their in vivo fate). Standardized MSCs derived in vitro from human-induced pluripotent stem (huIPS) cells, remediating part of these issues, are considered as well as a valuable tool for th...

  10. Potential Role of In Vivo Confocal Microscopy for Imaging Corneal Nerves in Transthyretin Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Antoine; Cauquil, Cecile; Dupas, Benedicte; Labbé, Antoine; Baudouin, Christophe; Barreau, Emmanuel; Théaudin, Marie; Lacroix, Catherine; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Benmalek, Anouar; Labetoulle, Marc; Adams, David

    2016-09-01

    Small fiber neuropathy (SFN) is an important feature of transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP). A practical and objective method for the clinical evaluation of SFN is needed to improve the management of this disease. In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) of the corneal nerves, a rapid noninvasive technique, may be used as a surrogate marker of SFN. To determine the correlation of SFN with IVCM in patients with TTR-FAP. A prospective, single-center, cross-sectional controlled study was conducted at the French National Reference Center for TTR-FAP from June 1, 2013, to June 30, 2014. Fifteen patients with TTR-FAP underwent a complete neurologic examination, including Neuropathy Impairment Score of the Lower Limbs, hand grip strength, and evaluation of vegetative dysfunction, as well as electrophysiologic studies (nerve conduction and electrochemical skin conductance) and intraepidermal nerve fiber density quantification. Patients and 15 controls (matched for age and sex) underwent ophthalmologic assessments, including corneal esthesiometry and IVCM. Correlation of corneal nerve fiber length (CNFL) with the severity of SFN. Of the 15 patients enrolled in the study, 6 were women (40%); mean (SD) age was 54.4 [13.7] years. The CNFL was shorter in the patients than in controls (13.08 vs 17.57 mm/mm2; difference of 4.49 [95% CI, 0.72 to 8.27]; P = .02). The patients' CNFL correlated with the severity of both autonomic neuropathy assessed by the Compound Autonomic Dysfunction Test (rs = 0.66 [95% CI, 0.22 to 0.87]; P = .008) or electrochemical skin conductance (rs = 0.80 [95% CI, 0.50 to 0.93]; P < .001) and sensorimotor neuropathy assessed using the Neuropathy Impairment Score of the Lower Limbs (rs = -0.58 [95% CI, -0.84 to -0.11]; P = .02). Patients with altered sensory nerve action potentials and intraepidermal nerve fiber density had a shorter CNFL (P = .04 and P = .02, respectively). The CNFL could be measured in all

  11. In vivo roles of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), catalase and the microsomal ethanol oxidizing system (MEOS) in deermice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, T.; Alderman, J.; Lieber, C.S.

    1985-01-01

    The relative importance of ADH and MEOS for ethanol oxidation in the liver has yet to be elucidated. The discovery of a strain of deermice genetically lacking ADH (ADH-) which can consume ethanol at greater than 50% of the rates seen in deermice having ADH (ADH+) suggested a significant role for non-ADH pathways in vivo. To quantitate contributions of the various pathways, the authors examined first the ethanol oxidation rates with or without 4-methylpyrazole in isolated deermice hepatocytes. 4-Methylpyrazole significantly reduced the ethanol oxidation in both ADH+ and ADH- hepatocytes. The reduction seen in ADH- cells can be applied to correct for the effect of 4-methylpyrazole on non-ADH pathways of ADH+ deermouse hepatocytes. After correction, non-ADH pathways were found to contribute 28% of ethanol metabolism at 10 mM and 52% at 50 mM. When using a different approach namely measurement of the isotope effect, MEOS was calculated to account for 35% at low and about 70% at high blood ethanol concentrations. Thus, they found that two different complementary approaches yielded similar results, namely that non-ADH pathways play a significant role in ethanol oxidation even in the presence of ADH

  12. Modelling the role of Tax expression in HTLV-I persistence in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Michael Y; Lim, Aaron G

    2011-12-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is a persistent human retrovirus characterized by life-long infection and risk of developing HAM/TSP, a progressive neurological and inflammatory disease, and adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). Chronically infected individuals often harbor high proviral loads despite maintaining a persistently activated immune response. Based on a new hypothesis for the persistence of HTLV-I infection, a three-dimensional compartmental model is constructed that describes the dynamic interactions among latently infected target cells, target-cell activation, and immune responses to HTLV-I, with an emphasis on understanding the role of Tax expression in the persistence of HTLV-I.

  13. Ascorbate concentrations in vitro and in vivo, and their role in the radiation response of cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratford, M.R.L.; Hodgkiss, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrogen-atom or electron-transfer reactions of ascorbate are often invoked in discussing its potential role in radiobiology and free radical damage by cytotoxins, but detailed information on actual levels in experimental systems is lacking. A range of 0-250 μM ascorbate is present in several commonly used mammalian cell culture media. V79 379A Chinese hamster cells can concentrate ascorbate from medium containing 200 or 500 μM ascorbate but when ascorbate is absent in medium, cells do not appear to contain a significant amount. Tumour concentrations are approximately 1mM, similar to that of glutathione (GSH). There is much current interest in depleting cells of GSH to enhance radiosensitivity, and ascorbate is maintained by a GSH dependent enzyme, glutathione dehydrogenase. Data is presented on the effect of GSH depletion by buthionine sulphoximine on cell and tumour ascorbate levels, and the effect of ascorbate on in vitro radiosensitivity, and misonidazole sensitizing efficiency

  14. Role of calpain in eccentric contraction-induced proteolysis of Ca2+-regulatory proteins and force depression in rat fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, Keita; Watanabe, Daiki; Kuratani, Mai; Yamada, Takashi; Matsunaga, Satoshi; Wada, Masanobu

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the in vivo effects of eccentric contraction (ECC) on calpain-dependent proteolysis of Ca 2+ -regulatory proteins and force production in fast-twitch skeletal muscles. Rat extensor digitorum longus muscles were exposed to 200 repeated ECC in situ and excised immediately [recovery 0 (REC0)] or 3 days [recovery 3 (REC3)] after cessation of ECC. Calpain inhibitor (CI)-treated rats were intraperitoneally injected with MDL-28170 before ECC and during REC3. Tetanic force was markedly reduced at REC0 and remained reduced at REC3. CI treatment ameliorated the ECC-induced force decline but only at REC3. No evidence was found for proteolysis of dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), junctophilin (JP)1, JP2, ryanodine receptor (RyR), sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase (SERCA)1a, or junctional face protein-45 at REC0. At REC3, ECC resulted in decreases in DHPR, JP1, JP2, RyR, and SERCA1a. CI treatment prevented the decreases in DHPR, JP1, and JP2, whereas it had little effect on RyR and SERCA1a. These findings suggest that DHPR, JP1, and JP2, but not RyR and SERCA1a, undergo calpain-dependent proteolysis in in vivo muscles subjected to ECC and that impaired function of DHPR and/or JP might cause prolonged force deficits with ECC. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Calpain-dependent proteolysis is one of the contributing factors to muscle damage that occurs with eccentric contraction (ECC). It is unclear, however, whether calpains account for proteolysis of Ca 2+ -regulatory proteins in in vivo muscles subjected to ECC. Here, we provide evidence that dihydropyridine receptor and junctophilin, but not ryanodine receptor and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase, undergo calpain-dependent proteolysis. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. In Vivo FRET Imaging of Tumor Endothelial Cells Highlights a Role of Low PKA Activity in Vascular Hyperpermeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Fumio; Kamioka, Yuji; Yano, Tetsuya; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2016-09-15

    Vascular hyperpermeability is a pathological hallmark of cancer. Previous in vitro studies have elucidated roles of various signaling molecules in vascular hyperpermeability; however, the activities of such signaling molecules have not been examined in live tumor tissues for technical reasons. Here, by in vivo two-photon excitation microscopy with transgenic mice expressing biosensors based on Förster resonance energy transfer, we examined the activity of protein kinase A (PKA), which maintains endothelial barrier function. The level of PKA activity was significantly lower in the intratumoral endothelial cells than the subcutaneous endothelial cells. PKA activation with a cAMP analogue alleviated the tumor vascular hyperpermeability, suggesting that the low PKA activity in the endothelial cells may be responsible for the tumor-tissue hyperpermeability. Because the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor is a canonical inducer of vascular hyperpermeability and a molecular target of anticancer drugs, we examined the causality between VEGF receptor activity and the PKA activity. Motesanib, a kinase inhibitor for VEGF receptor, activated tumor endothelial PKA and reduced the vascular permeability in the tumor. Conversely, subcutaneous injection of VEGF decreased endothelial PKA activity and induced hyperpermeability of subcutaneous blood vessels. Notably, in cultured human umbilical vascular endothelial cells, VEGF activated PKA rather than decreasing its activity, highlighting the remarkable difference between its actions in vitro and in vivo These data suggested that the VEGF receptor signaling pathway increases vascular permeability, at least in part, by reducing endothelial PKA activity in the live tumor tissue. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5266-76. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. In Vivo Measurement of Mesokinesis in Gekko gecko: The Role of Cranial Kinesis during Gape Display, Feeding and Biting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane J Montuelle

    Full Text Available Cranial kinesis refers to movements of skeletal sub-units relative to one another at mobile sutures within the skull. The presence and functional significance of cranial kinesis has been investigated in various vertebrates, with much of our understanding coming from comparative studies and manipulation of ligamentous specimens. Drawing on these studies, cranial kinesis in lizards has been modeled as a four-bar linkage system involving streptostyly (rotation of the quadrate, hypokinesis (dorsoventral flexion and extension of the palato-maxillary sub-unit, mesokinesis (dorsoventral flexion and extension of the snout at the fronto-parietal suture and metakinesis (sliding movements between parietal and supraocciptal bones. In vivo studies, although limited, suggest that cranial kinesis serves an important role during routine behaviors such as feeding. Here, we use X-ray Reconstruction Of Moving Morphology to further quantify mesokinesis in vivo in Gekko gecko during three routine behaviors: gape display, biting and post-ingestion feeding. During gape display, the snout rotates dorsally above rest position, with mesokinesis accounting for a 10% increase in maximum gape over that achieved solely by the depression of the lower jaw. During defensive biting, the snout rotates ventrally below rest position to participate in gape closure. Finally, ventroflexion of the snout also occurs during post-ingestion feeding, accounting for 42% of gape closure during intra-oral transport, 86% during puncture-crushing, and 61% during pharyngeal packing. Mesokinesis thus appears to facilitate prey puncturing by allowing the snout to rotate ventrally so that the upper teeth pierce the prey item, thus limiting the need for large movements of the lower jaw. This is suggested to maintain a firm grip on the prey and reduce the possibility of prey escape. More generally, this study demonstrates that mesokinesis is a key component of defensive biting and gape display

  17. Role of gene 59 of bacteriophage T4 in repair of uv-irradiated and alkylated DNA in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, R.; Wu, J.L.; Yeh, Y.C.

    1975-01-01

    Nonsense mutants in gene 59 (amC5, am HL628) were used to study the role of this gene in the repair of uv-damaged and alkylated DNA of bacteriophage T4 in vivo. The higher sensitivity to uv irradiation and alkylation of gene 59 mutants after exposure to these agents was established by a comparison of the survival fractions with wild type. Zonal centrifugal analysis of both parental and nascent mutant intracellular DNA molecules after uv irradiation showed that immediately after exposure the size of single-stranded DNA fragments was the same as the wild-type intracellular DNA. However, the capability of rejoining fragmented intracellular DNA was greatly reduced in the mutant. In contrast, the wild-type-infected cells under the same condition resumed DNA replication and repaired its DNA to normal size. Methyl methanesulfonate induced more randomly fragmented intracellular DNA, when compared to uv irradiation. The rate of rejoining under these conditions as judged from their sedimentation profiles was also greatly reduced in mutant-infected cells. Further evidence is presented that uv repair is not a simple consequence of arrested DNA replication, which is a phenotype of the mutant when infected in a nonpermissive host, Escherichia coli B(su - ), but rather that the DNA repair function of gene 59 is independent of the replication function. These and other data presented indicate that a product(s) of gene 59 is essential for both repair of uv lesions and repair of alkylation damage of DNA in vivo. It is suggested that gene 59 may have two functions during viral development: DNA replication and replication repair of DNA molecules

  18. Restraint stress enhances arterial thrombosis in vivo--role of the sympathetic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stämpfli, Simon F; Camici, Giovanni G; Keller, Stephan; Rozenberg, Izabela; Arras, Margarete; Schuler, Beat; Gassmann, Max; Garcia, Irene; Lüscher, Thomas F; Tanner, Felix C

    2014-01-01

    Stress is known to correlate with the incidence of acute myocardial infarction. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this correlation are not known. This study was designed to assess the effect of experimental stress on arterial thrombus formation, the key event in acute myocardial infarction. Mice exposed to 20 h of restraint stress displayed an increased arterial prothrombotic potential as assessed by photochemical injury-induced time to thrombotic occlusion. This increase was prevented by chemical sympathectomy performed through 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Blood-born tissue factor (TF) activity was enhanced by stress and this increase could be prevented by 6-OHDA treatment. Vessel wall TF, platelet count, platelet aggregation, coagulation times (PT, aPTT), fibrinolytic system (t-PA and PAI-1) and tail bleeding time remained unaltered. Telemetric analysis revealed only minor hemodynamic changes throughout the stress protocol. Plasma catecholamines remained unaffected after restraint stress. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) plasma levels were unchanged and inhibition of TNF-α had no effect on stress-enhanced thrombosis. These results indicate that restraint stress enhances arterial thrombosis via the sympathetic nervous system. Blood-borne TF contributes, at least in part, to the observed effect whereas vessel wall TF, platelets, circulating coagulation factors, fibrinolysis and inflammation do not appear to play a role. These findings shed new light on the understanding of stress-induced cardiovascular events.

  19. Evidence for a role of regulatory T cells in mediating the atheroprotective effect of apolipoprotein B peptide vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigren, M; Kolbus, D; Dunér, P; Ljungcrantz, I; Söderberg, I; Björkbacka, H; Fredrikson, G N; Nilsson, J

    2011-05-01

    Autoimmune responses against oxidized low-density lipoprotein are considered to play an important pro-inflammatory role in atherosclerosis and to promote disease progression. T-regulatory cells (Tregs) are immunosuppressive cells that have an important part in maintaining self-tolerance and protection against autoimmunity. We investigated whether aBp210, a prototype atherosclerosis vaccine based on a peptide sequence derived from apolipoprotein B, inhibits atherosclerosis through the activation of Tregs. Six-week-old Apoe(-/-) mice were immunized with aBp210 and received booster immunizations 3 and 5 weeks later, as well as 1 week before being killed at 25 weeks of age. At 12 weeks, immunized mice had increased expression of the Treg marker CD25 on circulating CD4 cells, and concanavalin A (Con A)-induced interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-4, and IL-10 release from splenocytes was markedly depressed. At 25 weeks, there was a fivefold expansion of splenic CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3 Tregs, a 65% decrease in Con A-induced splenic T-cell proliferation and a 37% reduction in the development of atherosclerosis in immunized mice. Administration of blocking antibodies against CD25 neutralized aBp210-induced Treg activation as well as the reduction of atherosclerosis. The present findings demonstrate that immunization of Apoe(-/-) mice with the apolipoprotein B peptide vaccine aBp210 is associated with activation of Tregs. Administration of antibodies against CD25 results in depletion of Tregs and blocking of the atheroprotective effect of the vaccine. Modulation in atherosclerosis-related autoimmunity by antigen-specific activation of Tregs represents a novel approach for treatment of atherosclerosis. © 2010 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  20. The regulatory role of endogenous iron on greenhouse gas emissions under intensive nitrogen fertilization in subtropical soils of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiangpei; Shi, Liangsheng; Wang, Yakun; Chen, Zhuowei; Wu, Laosheng

    2018-05-01

    Anaerobic batch experiments were conducted to study the regulatory role of endogenous iron in greenhouse gas emissions under intensive nitrogen fertilization in subtropical soils of China. Fe 2+ , Fe 3+ , and NO 3 - -N dynamics and N 2 O, CH 4 , and CO 2 emissions, as well as the relationships between N fertilizer, endogenous iron, and greenhouse gas emissions were investigated. The emissions of N 2 O increased to different extents from all the test soils by N1 (260 mg N kg -1 ) application compared with N0. After 24 days of anaerobic incubation, the cumulative emissions of N 2 O from red soils in De'an (DR) were significantly higher than that from paddy soils in De'an (DP) and Qujialing (QP) under N1. However, N application enhanced CH 4 and CO 2 emissions from the red soils slightly but inhibited the emissions from paddy soils. The maximal CH 4 and CO 2 emission fluxes occurred in DP soil without N input. Pearson's correlation analysis showed that there were significant correlations (P greenhouse gas emissions mainly through the involvement in denitrification. The proportion of the electrons donated by Fe 2+ used for N 2 O production in denitrification in DP soil was approximately 37.53%. Moreover, positive correlations between Fe 2+ and CH 4 , CO 2 were found in both DR and QP soils, suggesting that endogenous iron might regulate the anaerobic decomposition of organic carbon to CH 4 and CO 2 in the two soils. Soil pH was also an important factor controlling greenhouse gas emissions by affecting endogenous iron availability and C and N transformation processes.

  1. A dynamic dual role of IL-2 signaling in the two-step differentiation process of adaptive regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhiyong; Khattar, Mithun; Schroder, Paul M; Miyahara, Yoshihiro; Wang, Guohua; He, Xiaoshung; Chen, Wenhao; Stepkowski, Stanislaw M

    2013-04-01

    The molecular mechanism of the extrathymic generation of adaptive, or inducible, CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (iTregs) remains incompletely defined. We show that exposure of splenic CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(-) cells to IL-2, but not other common γ-chain cytokines, resulted in Stat5 phosphorylation and induced Foxp3 expression in ∼10% of the cells. Thus, IL-2/Stat5 signaling may be critical for Foxp3 induction in peripheral CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(-) iTreg precursors. In this study, to further define the role of IL-2 in the formation of iTreg precursors as well as their subsequent Foxp3 expression, we designed a two-step iTreg differentiation model. During the initial "conditioning" step, CD4(+)CD25(-)Foxp3(-) naive T cells were activated by TCR stimulation. Inhibition of IL-2 signaling via Jak3-Stat5 was required during this step to generate CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(-) cells containing iTreg precursors. During the subsequent Foxp3-induction step driven by cytokines, IL-2 was the most potent cytokine to induce Foxp3 expression in these iTreg precursors. This two-step method generated a large number of iTregs with relatively stable expression of Foxp3, which were able to prevent CD4(+)CD45RB(high) cell-mediated colitis in Rag1(-/-) mice. In consideration of this information, whereas initial inhibition of IL-2 signaling upon T cell priming generates iTreg precursors, subsequent activation of IL-2 signaling in these precursors induces the expression of Foxp3. These findings advance the understanding of iTreg differentiation and may facilitate the therapeutic use of iTregs in immune disorders.

  2. The influence of regulatory fit on evaluation and intentions to buy genetically modified foods: The mediating role of social identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, M.L.; Reinders, M.J.; Bartels, J.; Maassen, R.L.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines how communicated messages could be effective in affecting consumers' attitudes and behavioural intentions regarding genetically modified (GM) foods. Based on Regulatory Focus Theory, it was hypothesized that exposure to a communication message matching a consumer's

  3. An enhanced computational platform for investigating the roles of regulatory RNA and for identifying functional RNA motifs

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Tzu-Hao; Huang, Hsi-Yuan; Hsu, Justin Bo-Kai; Weng, Shun-Long; Horng, Jorng-Tzong; Huang, Hsien-Da

    2013-01-01

    Background Functional RNA molecules participate in numerous biological processes, ranging from gene regulation to protein synthesis. Analysis of functional RNA motifs and elements in RNA sequences can obtain useful information for deciphering RNA regulatory mechanisms. Our previous work, RegRNA, is widely used in the identification of regulatory motifs, and this work extends it by incorporating more comprehensive and updated data sources and analytical approaches into a new platform. Methods ...

  4. Campylobacter jejuni type VI secretion system: roles in adaptation to deoxycholic acid, host cell adherence, invasion, and in vivo colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertpiriyapong, Kvin; Gamazon, Eric R; Feng, Yan; Park, Danny S; Pang, Jassia; Botka, Georgina; Graffam, Michelle E; Ge, Zhongming; Fox, James G

    2012-01-01

    The recently identified type VI secretion system (T6SS) of proteobacteria has been shown to promote pathogenicity, competitive advantage over competing microorganisms, and adaptation to environmental perturbation. By detailed phenotypic characterization of loss-of-function mutants, in silico, in vitro and in vivo analyses, we provide evidence that the enteric pathogen, Campylobacter jejuni, possesses a functional T6SS and that the secretion system exerts pleiotropic effects on two crucial processes--survival in a bile salt, deoxycholic acid (DCA), and host cell adherence and invasion. The expression of T6SS during initial exposure to the upper range of physiological levels of DCA (0.075%-0.2%) was detrimental to C. jejuni proliferation, whereas down-regulation or inactivation of T6SS enabled C. jejuni to resist this effect. The C. jejuni multidrug efflux transporter gene, cmeA, was significantly up-regulated during the initial exposure to DCA in the wild type C. jejuni relative to the T6SS-deficient strains, suggesting that inhibition of proliferation is the consequence of T6SS-mediated DCA influx. A sequential modulation of the efflux transporter activity and the T6SS represents, in part, an adaptive mechanism for C. jejuni to overcome this inhibitory effect, thereby ensuring its survival. C. jejuni T6SS plays important roles in host cell adhesion and invasion as T6SS inactivation resulted in a reduction of adherence to and invasion of in vitro cell lines, while over-expression of a hemolysin co-regulated protein, which encodes a secreted T6SS component, greatly enhanced these processes. When inoculated into B6.129P2-IL-10(tm1Cgn) mice, the T6SS-deficient C. jejuni strains did not effectively establish persistent colonization, indicating that T6SS contributes to colonization in vivo. Taken together, our data demonstrate the importance of bacterial T6SS in host cell adhesion, invasion, colonization and, for the first time to our knowledge, adaptation to DCA

  5. Campylobacter jejuni type VI secretion system: roles in adaptation to deoxycholic acid, host cell adherence, invasion, and in vivo colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvin Lertpiriyapong

    Full Text Available The recently identified type VI secretion system (T6SS of proteobacteria has been shown to promote pathogenicity, competitive advantage over competing microorganisms, and adaptation to environmental perturbation. By detailed phenotypic characterization of loss-of-function mutants, in silico, in vitro and in vivo analyses, we provide evidence that the enteric pathogen, Campylobacter jejuni, possesses a functional T6SS and that the secretion system exerts pleiotropic effects on two crucial processes--survival in a bile salt, deoxycholic acid (DCA, and host cell adherence and invasion. The expression of T6SS during initial exposure to the upper range of physiological levels of DCA (0.075%-0.2% was detrimental to C. jejuni proliferation, whereas down-regulation or inactivation of T6SS enabled C. jejuni to resist this effect. The C. jejuni multidrug efflux transporter gene, cmeA, was significantly up-regulated during the initial exposure to DCA in the wild type C. jejuni relative to the T6SS-deficient strains, suggesting that inhibition of proliferation is the consequence of T6SS-mediated DCA influx. A sequential modulation of the efflux transporter activity and the T6SS represents, in part, an adaptive mechanism for C. jejuni to overcome this inhibitory effect, thereby ensuring its survival. C. jejuni T6SS plays important roles in host cell adhesion and invasion as T6SS inactivation resulted in a reduction of adherence to and invasion of in vitro cell lines, while over-expression of a hemolysin co-regulated protein, which encodes a secreted T6SS component, greatly enhanced these processes. When inoculated into B6.129P2-IL-10(tm1Cgn mice, the T6SS-deficient C. jejuni strains did not effectively establish persistent colonization, indicating that T6SS contributes to colonization in vivo. Taken together, our data demonstrate the importance of bacterial T6SS in host cell adhesion, invasion, colonization and, for the first time to our knowledge

  6. Enhancing Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Product Commercialization: The Role of Science in Regulatory Decision-Making for the TE/RM Product Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Timothy A; Johnson, Peter C; Tawil, Bill J; Van Dyke, Mark; Hellman, Kiki B

    2015-10-01

    TERMIS-AM Industry Committee (TERMIS-AM/IC), in collaboration with the TERMIS-Europe (EU)/IC, conducted a symposium involving the European Medicines Agency and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) toward building an understanding of the rational basis for regulatory decision-making and providing a framework for decisions made during the evaluation of safety and efficacy of TE/RM technologies. This symposium was held in August 2012 during the TERMIS-WC in Vienna, Austria. Emerging from this international initiative by the European Union and the United States, representatives from the respective agencies demonstrated that there are ongoing interagency efforts for developing common national practices toward harmonization of regulatory requirements for the TE/RM products. To extend a broad-based understanding of the role of science in regulatory decision-making, TERMIS-AM/IC, in cooperation with the FDA, organized a symposium at the 2014 TERMIS-AM Annual Meeting, which was held in Washington, DC. This event provided insights from leaders in the FDA and TERMIS on the current status of regulatory approaches for the approved TE/RM products, the use of science in making regulatory decisions, and TE/RM technologies that are in the development pipeline to address unmet medical needs. A far-ranging discussion with FDA representatives, industrialists, physicians, regenerative medicine biologists, and tissue engineers considered the gaps in today's scientific and regulatory understanding of TE/RM technologies. The identified gaps represent significant opportunities to advance TE/RM technologies toward commercialization.

  7. A large-scale, in vivo transcription factor screen defines bivalent chromatin as a key property of regulatory factors mediating Drosophila wing development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertel, Claus; Albarca, Monica; Rockel-Bauer, Claudia; Kelley, Nicholas W; Bischof, Johannes; Hens, Korneel; van Nimwegen, Erik; Basler, Konrad; Deplancke, Bart

    2015-04-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are key regulators of cell fate. The estimated 755 genes that encode DNA binding domain-containing proteins comprise ∼ 5% of all Drosophila genes. However, the majority has remained uncharacterized so far due to the lack of proper genetic tools. We generated 594 site-directed transgenic Drosophila lines that contain integrations of individual UAS-TF constructs to facilitate spatiotemporally controlled misexpression in vivo. All transgenes were expressed in the developing wing, and two-thirds induced specific phenotypic defects. In vivo knockdown of the same genes yielded a phenotype for 50%, with both methods indicating a great potential for misexpression to characterize novel functions in wing growth, patterning, and development. Thus, our UAS-TF library provides an important addition to the genetic toolbox of Drosophila research, enabling the identification of several novel wing development-related TFs. In parallel, we established the chromatin landscape of wing imaginal discs by ChIP-seq analyses of five chromatin marks and RNA Pol II. Subsequent clustering revealed six distinct chromatin states, with two clusters showing enrichment for both active and repressive marks. TFs that carry such "bivalent" chromatin are highly enriched for causing misexpression phenotypes in the wing, and analysis of existing expression data shows that these TFs tend to be differentially expressed across the wing disc. Thus, bivalently marked chromatin can be used as a marker for spatially regulated TFs that are functionally relevant in a developing tissue. © 2015 Schertel et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  8. Organismo e função reguladora: determinações do vivo em Georges Canguilhem = Organism and regulatory function: determinations of the living in Georges Canguilhem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labrea, Vanessa Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo compreende o cerne da obra de Georges Canguilhem (1904-1995 como um ponto de cruzamento entre problemáticas fundamentalmente médico-biológicas e problemáticas sócio-políticas. A consideração histórica descontinuísta do desenvolvimento de conceitos científicos e a classificação da técnica enquanto prótese do organismo vivo, entre outras particularidades, situam o pensamento canguilhemeano na fronteira entre áreas do conhecimento demarcadas separadamente. O que integra e individualiza o seu trabalho filosófico é a ponderação do vital enquanto categoria de base para intelecção e reconstrução de problemas interdisciplinares. Após indicar o posicionamento de Canguilhem dentro do quadro da filosofia francesa do século XX, o artigo procura demonstrar de que maneira a função de regulação é um dos pilares organizadores do pensamento do “vivo” (le vivant em sua obra

  9. Mimicry of the regulatory role of urokinase in lamellipodia formation by introduction of a non-native interdomain disulfide bond in its receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Kjærgaard, Magnus; Jacobsen, Benedikte

    2011-01-01

    The high-affinity interaction between the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its glycolipid-anchored receptor (uPAR) plays a regulatory role for both extravascular fibrinolysis and uPAR-mediated adhesion and migration on vitronectin-coated surfaces. We have recently proposed that the ......The high-affinity interaction between the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its glycolipid-anchored receptor (uPAR) plays a regulatory role for both extravascular fibrinolysis and uPAR-mediated adhesion and migration on vitronectin-coated surfaces. We have recently proposed...... that the adhesive function of uPAR is allosterically regulated via a "tightening" of its three-domain structure elicited by uPA binding. To challenge this proposition, we redesigned the uPAR structure to limit its inherent conformational flexibility by covalently tethering domains DI and DIII via a non...... adhering to vitronectin. In this respect, the engineered constraint in uPAR(H47C-N259C) thus bypasses the regulatory role of uPA binding, resulting in a constitutively active uPAR. In conclusion, our data argue for a biological relevance of the interdomain dynamics of the glycolipid-anchored u...

  10. Trust in regulatory regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Six, Frédérique; Verhoest, Koen

    2017-01-01

    Within political and administrative sciences generally, trust as a concept is contested, especially in the field of regulatory governance. This groundbreaking book is the first to systematically explore the role and dynamics of trust within regulatory regimes. Conceptualizing, mapping and analyzing

  11. Regulatory agencies and regulatory risk

    OpenAIRE

    Knieps, Günter; Weiß, Hans-Jörg

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show that regulatory risk is due to the discretionary behaviour of regulatory agencies, caused by a too extensive regulatory mandate provided by the legislator. The normative point of reference and a behavioural model of regulatory agencies based on the positive theory of regulation are presented. Regulatory risk with regard to the future behaviour of regulatory agencies is modelled as the consequence of the ex ante uncertainty about the relative influence of inter...

  12. Assessment of the role of circulating breast cancer cells in tumor formation and metastatic potential using in vivo flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwu, Derrick; Boutrus, Steven; Greiner, Cherry; Dimeo, Theresa; Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2011-04-01

    The identification of breast cancer patients who will ultimately progress to metastatic disease is of significant clinical importance. The quantification and assessment of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proposed as one strategy to monitor treatment effectiveness and disease prognosis. However, CTCs have been an elusive population of cells to study because of their small number and difficulties associated with isolation protocols. In vivo flow cytometry (IVFC) can overcome these limitations and provide insights in the role these cells play during primary and metastatic tumor growth. In this study, we used two-color IVFC to examine, for up to ten weeks following orthotopic implantation, changes in the number of circulating human breast cells expressing GFP and a population of circulating hematopoietic cells with strong autofluorescence. We found that the number of detected CTCs in combination with the number of red autofluorescent cells (650 to 690 nm) during the first seven days following implantation was predictive in development of tumor formation and metastasis eight weeks later. These results suggest that the combined detection of these two cell populations could offer a novel approach in the monitoring and prognosis of breast cancer progression, which in turn could aid significantly in their effective treatment.

  13. Comprehensively Characterizing the Thioredoxin Interactome In Vivo Highlights the Central Role Played by This Ubiquitous Oxidoreductase in Redox Control*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Isabelle S.; Vertommen, Didier; Baldin, Francesca; Laloux, Géraldine; Collet, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a ubiquitous oxidoreductase maintaining protein-bound cysteine residues in the reduced thiol state. Here, we combined a well-established method to trap Trx substrates with the power of bacterial genetics to comprehensively characterize the in vivo Trx redox interactome in the model bacterium Escherichia coli. Using strains engineered to optimize trapping, we report the identification of a total 268 Trx substrates, including 201 that had never been reported to depend on Trx for reduction. The newly identified Trx substrates are involved in a variety of cellular processes, ranging from energy metabolism to amino acid synthesis and transcription. The interaction between Trx and two of its newly identified substrates, a protein required for the import of most carbohydrates, PtsI, and the bacterial actin homolog MreB was studied in detail. We provide direct evidence that PtsI and MreB contain cysteine residues that are susceptible to oxidation and that participate in the formation of an intermolecular disulfide with Trx. By considerably expanding the number of Trx targets, our work highlights the role played by this major oxidoreductase in a variety of cellular processes. Moreover, as the dependence on Trx for reduction is often conserved across species, it also provides insightful information on the interactome of Trx in organisms other than E. coli. PMID:27081212

  14. Increased in vivo glucose utilization in 30-day-old obese Zucker rat: Role of white adipose tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krief, S.; Bazin, R.; Dupuy, F.; Lavau, M.

    1988-01-01

    In vivo whole-body glucose utilization and uptake in multiple individual tissues were investigated in conscious 30-day-old Zucker rats, which when obese are hyperphagic, hyperinsulinemic, and normoglycemic. Whole-body glucose metabolism (assessed by [3- 3 H]glucose) was 40% higher in obese (fa/fa) than in lean (Fa/fa) rats, suggesting that obese rats were quite responsive to their hyperinsulinemia. In obese compared with lean rats, tissue glucose uptake was increased by 15, 12, and 6 times in dorsal, inguinal, perigonadal white depots, respectively; multiplied by 2.5 in brown adipose tissue; increased by 50% in skin from inguinal region but not in that from cranial, thoracic, or dorsal area; and increased twofold in diaphragm but similar in heart in proximal intestine, and in total muscular mass of limbs. The data establish that in young obese rats the hypertrophied white adipose tissue was a major glucose-utilizing tissue whose capacity for glucose disposal compared with that of half the muscular mass. Adipose tissue could therefore play an important role in the homeostasis of glucose in obese rats in the face of their increased carbohydrate intake

  15. Regulatory effects of the AMPKα-SIRT1 molecular pathway on insulin resistance in PCOS mice: An in vitro and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xin; Chen, Lei; Cai, Lisi; Ge, Shuqi; Deng, Xuanying

    2017-12-16

    In order to preliminarily explore the correlation between the AMPKα-SIRT1 pathway and insulin resistance and reproductive function in PCOS mice and find the pathogenesis molecular mechanism and potential therapeutic target of PCOS, we carried out in vitro study of human granulosa KGN cells and in vivo study of PCOS mouse model which was constructed with DHEA, and AICAR and Compound C were applied. We have found that SIRT1 and AMPKα expression in KGN cells gradually decreased as DHEA concentration increased; Mice of the PCOS model were in an obvious status of IR (P PCOS and may serve as a therapeutic target for the development of potential treatments for improving metabolic and reproductive function in PCOS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of mastocytes in the development of in vivo radiation proctitis and in vitro endothelial response to irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blirando, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy is used alone or in combination with chemotherapy in more than 50 % of cancer treatments. Despite recent advances in treatment delivery such as dose-sculpting techniques, irradiation of healthy tissues surrounding the tumor and the associated side effects limit the radiation amount used. Those side effects when concerning the gastro-intestinal tract have profound repercussions on patient's quality of life and may even engage their vital prognosis. The comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in the development of these lesions is thus a major stake in the identification of therapeutic targets allowing their prevention and treatment. During my PhD, we studied the role of mast cells in the development of radiation proctitis in vivo and in the endothelial response to irradiation in vitro. Our results suggest that mast cells have a deleterious role in the development of human and murine radiation proctitis, in particular by the influence of some of its mediators such as histamine and proteases on the phenotype of the smooth muscle cells of the muscularis propria. Targeting mast cells mediators may represent new therapeutic tools to prevent and / or limit digestive radiation damage. Other shares our work shows that mast cells mediators such as histamine can exacerbate the endothelial inflammatory response to irradiation by mechanisms involving the activation of the p38MAP-Kinase pathway and the transcription factor NF-κB. The study of intracellular signaling pathways activated during radiation damage development may offer new therapeutic possibilities in the management of healthy tissues radiation damage. (author)

  17. A minor role of WNK3 in regulating phosphorylation of renal NKCC2 and NCC co-transporters in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuyuki Oi

    2012-02-01

    Mutations in WNK1 and WNK4 kinase genes have been shown to cause a human hereditary hypertensive disease, pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII. We previously discovered that WNK kinases phosphorylate and activate OSR1/SPAK kinases that regulate renal SLC12A family transporters such as NKCC2 and NCC, and clarified that the constitutive activation of this cascade causes PHAII. WNK3, another member of the WNK kinase family, was reported to be a strong activator of NCC/NKCC2 when assayed in Xenopus oocytes, suggesting that WNK3 also plays a major role in regulating blood pressure and sodium reabsorption in the kidney. However, it remains to be determined whether WNK3 is in fact involved in the regulation of these transporters in vivo. To clarify this issue, we generated and analyzed WNK3 knockout mice. Surprisingly, phosphorylation and expression of OSR1, SPAK, NKCC2 and NCC did not decrease in knockout mouse kidney under normal and low-salt diets. Similarly, expression of epithelial Na channel and Na/H exchanger 3 were not affected in knockout mice. Na+ and K+ excretion in urine in WNK3 knockout mice was not affected under different salt diets. Blood pressure in WNK3 knockout mice was not lower under normal diet. However, lower blood pressure was observed in WNK3 knockout mice fed low-salt diet. WNK4 and WNK1 expression was slightly elevated in the knockout mice under low-salt diet, suggesting compensation for WNK3 knockout by these WNKs. Thus, WNK3 may have some role in the WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NCC/NKCC2 signal cascade in the kidney, but its contribution to total WNK kinase activity may be minimal.

  18. A multi-site comparison of in vivo safety pharmacology studies conducted to support ICH S7A & B regulatory submissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewart, Lorna; Milne, Aileen; Adkins, Debbie; Benjamin, Amanda; Bialecki, Russell; Chen, Yafei; Ericsson, Ann-Christin; Gardner, Stacey; Grant, Claire; Lengel, David; Lindgren, Silvana; Lowing, Sarah; Marks, Louise; Moors, Jackie; Oldman, Karen; Pietras, Mark; Prior, Helen; Punton, James; Redfern, Will S; Salmond, Ross; Skinner, Matt; Some, Margareta; Stanton, Andrea; Swedberg, Michael; Finch, John; Valentin, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Parts A and B of the ICH S7 guidelines on safety pharmacology describe the in vivo studies that must be conducted prior to first time in man administration of any new pharmaceutical. ICH S7A requires a consideration of the sensitivity and reproducibility of the test systems used. This could encompass maintaining a dataset of historical pre-dose values, power analyses, as well as a demonstration of acceptable model sensitivity and robust pharmacological validation. During the process of outsourcing safety pharmacology studies to Charles River Laboratories, AstraZeneca set out to ensure that models were performed identically in each facility and saw this as an opportunity to review the inter-laboratory variability of these essential models. The five in vivo studies outsourced were the conscious dog telemetry model for cardiovascular assessment, the rat whole body plethysmography model for respiratory assessment, the rat modified Irwin screen for central nervous system assessment, the rat charcoal meal study for gastrointestinal assessment and the rat metabolic cage study for assessment of renal function. Each study was validated with known reference compounds and data were compared across facilities. Statistical power was also calculated for each model. The results obtained indicated that each of the studies could be performed with comparable statistical power and could achieve a similar outcome, independent of facility. The consistency of results obtained from these models across multiple facilities was high thus providing confidence that the models can be run in different facilities and maintain compliance with ICH S7A and B. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cell-intrinsic role for NF-kappa B-inducing kinase in peripheral maintenance but not thymic development of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan E Murray

    Full Text Available NF-κB inducing kinase (NIK, MAP3K14 is a key signaling molecule in non-canonical NF-κB activation, and NIK deficient mice have been instrumental in deciphering the immunologic role of this pathway. Global ablation of NIK prevents lymph node development, impairs thymic stromal development, and drastically reduces B cells. Despite altered thymic selection, T cell numbers are near normal in NIK deficient mice. The exception is CD4(+ regulatory T cells (Tregs, which are reduced in the thymus and periphery. Defects in thymic stroma are known to contribute to impaired Treg generation, but whether NIK also plays a cell intrinsic role in Tregs is unknown. Here, we compared intact mice with single and mixed BM chimeric mice to assess the intrinsic role of NIK in Treg generation and maintenance. We found that while NIK expression in stromal cells suffices for normal thymic Treg development, NIK is required cell-intrinsically to maintain peripheral Tregs. In addition, we unexpectedly discovered a cell-intrinsic role for NIK in memory phenotype conventional T cells that is masked in intact mice, but revealed in BM chimeras. These results demonstrate a novel role for NIK in peripheral regulatory and memory phenotype T cell homeostasis.

  20. In Vivo Roles of Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Enzymes in Biosynthesis of Biotin and α-Lipoic Acid in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Masato; Nagashima, Takashi; Nakamura, Eri; Kato, Ryosuke; Ohshita, Masakazu; Hayashi, Mikiro; Takeno, Seiki

    2017-10-01

    For fatty acid biosynthesis, Corynebacterium glutamicum uses two type I fatty acid synthases (FAS-I), FasA and FasB, in addition to acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase (ACC) consisting of AccBC, AccD1, and AccE. The in vivo roles of the enzymes in supplying precursors for biotin and α-lipoic acid remain unclear. Here, we report genetic evidence demonstrating that the biosynthesis of these cofactors is linked to fatty acid biosynthesis through the FAS-I pathway. For this study, we used wild-type C. glutamicum and its derived biotin vitamer producer BFI-5, which was engineered to express Escherichia coli bioBF and Bacillus subtilis bioI Disruption of either fasA or fasB in strain BFI-5 led to decreased production of biotin vitamers, whereas its amplification contributed to increased production, with a larger impact of fasA in both cases. Double disruptions of fasA and fasB resulted in no biotin vitamer production. The acc genes showed a positive effect on production when amplified simultaneously. Augmented fatty acid biosynthesis was also reflected in pimelic acid production when carbon flow was blocked at the BioF reaction. These results indicate that carbon flow down the FAS-I pathway is destined for channeling into the biotin biosynthesis pathway, and that FasA in particular has a significant impact on precursor supply. In contrast, fasB disruption resulted in auxotrophy for lipoic acid or its precursor octanoic acid in both wild-type and BFI-5 strains. The phenotypes were fully complemented by plasmid-mediated expression of fasB but not fasA These results reveal that FasB plays a specific physiological role in lipoic acid biosynthesis in C. glutamicum IMPORTANCE For the de novo biosynthesis of fatty acids, C. glutamicum exceptionally uses a eukaryotic multifunctional type I fatty acid synthase (FAS-I) system comprising FasA and FasB, in contrast to most bacteria, such as E. coli and B. subtilis , which use an individual nonaggregating type II fatty acid synthase

  1. Mutation of the regulatory phosphorylation site of tobacco nitrate reductase results in constitutive activation of the enzyme in vivo and nitrite accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo, Cathrine; Lea, Unni S; Leydecker, Marie-Thérèse; Meyer, Christian

    2003-09-01

    In wild-type Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and other higher plants, nitrate reductase (NR) is rapidly inactivated/activated in response to dark/light transitions. Inactivation of NR is believed to be caused by phosphorylation at a special conserved regulatory Ser residue, Ser 521, and interactions with divalent cations and inhibitory 14-3-3 proteins. A transgenic N. plumbaginifolia line (S(521)) was constructed where the Ser 521 had been changed by site-directed mutagenesis into Asp. This mutation resulted in complete abolishment of inactivation in response to light/dark transitions or other treatments known to inactivate NR. During prolonged darkness, NR in wild-type plants is in the inactivated form, whereas NR in the S(521) line is always in the active form. Differences in degradation rate between NR from S(521) and lines with non-mutated NR were not found. Kinetic constants like Km values for NADH and NO3(-) were not changed, but a slightly different pH profile was observed for mutated NR as opposed to non-mutated NR. Under optimal growth conditions, the phenotype of the S(521) plants was not different from the wild type (WT). However, when plants were irrigated with high nitrate concentration, 150 mM, the transgenic plants accumulated nitrite in darkness, and young leaves showed chlorosis.

  2. Where we stand, where we are moving: Surveying computational techniques for identifying miRNA genes and uncovering their regulatory role

    KAUST Repository

    Kleftogiannis, Dimitrios A.; Korfiati, Aigli; Theofilatos, Konstantinos A.; Likothanassis, Spiridon D.; Tsakalidis, Athanasios K.; Mavroudi, Seferina P.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional biology was forced to restate some of its principles when the microRNA (miRNA) genes and their regulatory role were firstly discovered. Typically, miRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules which have the ability to bind to the 3'untraslated region (UTR) of their mRNA target genes for cleavage or translational repression. Existing experimental techniques for their identification and the prediction of the target genes share some important limitations such as low coverage, time consuming experiments and high cost reagents. Hence, many computational methods have been proposed for these tasks to overcome these limitations. Recently, many researchers emphasized on the development of computational approaches to predict the participation of miRNA genes in regulatory networks and to analyze their transcription mechanisms. All these approaches have certain advantages and disadvantages which are going to be described in the present survey. Our work is differentiated from existing review papers by updating the methodologies list and emphasizing on the computational issues that arise from the miRNA data analysis. Furthermore, in the present survey, the various miRNA data analysis steps are treated as an integrated procedure whose aims and scope is to uncover the regulatory role and mechanisms of the miRNA genes. This integrated view of the miRNA data analysis steps may be extremely useful for all researchers even if they work on just a single step. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  3. Where we stand, where we are moving: Surveying computational techniques for identifying miRNA genes and uncovering their regulatory role

    KAUST Repository

    Kleftogiannis, Dimitrios A.

    2013-06-01

    Traditional biology was forced to restate some of its principles when the microRNA (miRNA) genes and their regulatory role were firstly discovered. Typically, miRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules which have the ability to bind to the 3\\'untraslated region (UTR) of their mRNA target genes for cleavage or translational repression. Existing experimental techniques for their identification and the prediction of the target genes share some important limitations such as low coverage, time consuming experiments and high cost reagents. Hence, many computational methods have been proposed for these tasks to overcome these limitations. Recently, many researchers emphasized on the development of computational approaches to predict the participation of miRNA genes in regulatory networks and to analyze their transcription mechanisms. All these approaches have certain advantages and disadvantages which are going to be described in the present survey. Our work is differentiated from existing review papers by updating the methodologies list and emphasizing on the computational issues that arise from the miRNA data analysis. Furthermore, in the present survey, the various miRNA data analysis steps are treated as an integrated procedure whose aims and scope is to uncover the regulatory role and mechanisms of the miRNA genes. This integrated view of the miRNA data analysis steps may be extremely useful for all researchers even if they work on just a single step. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  4. Rationalization and prediction of in vivo metabolite exposures: The role of metabolite kinetics, clearance predictions and in vitro parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Justin D.; Fujioka, Yasushi; Isoherranen, Nina

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Due to growing concerns over toxic or active metabolites, significant efforts have been focused on qualitative identification of potential in vivo metabolites from in vitro data. However, limited tools are available to quantitatively predict their human exposures. Areas covered in this review Theory of clearance predictions and metabolite kinetics is reviewed together with supporting experimental data. In vitro and in vivo data of known circulating metabolites and their parent drugs was collected and the predictions of in vivo exposures of the metabolites were evaluated. What the reader will gain The theory and data reviewed will be useful in early identification of human metabolites that will circulate at significant levels in vivo and help in designing in vivo studies that focus on characterization of metabolites. It will also assist in rationalization of metabolite-to-parent ratios used as markers of specific enzyme activity. Take home message The relative importance of a metabolite in comparison to the parent compound as well as other metabolites in vivo can only be predicted using the metabolites in vitro formation and elimination clearances, and the in vivo disposition of a metabolite can only be rationalized when the elimination pathways of that metabolite are known. PMID:20557268

  5. Physical Activity in the Transition to University: The Role of Past Behavior and Concurrent Self-Regulatory Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, Alyson J.; Gierc, Madelaine S. H.; Locke, Sean R.; Brawley, Lawrence R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Two studies were conducted to examine the relationship between past physical activity, concurrent self-regulatory efficacy (CSRE), and current physical activity during the transition to university. Participants: Study 1 included 110 first-year undergraduate students recruited during October/November of 2012. Study 2 involved 86…

  6. ‘Fit for charity’: the moderating role of private self-focus in the persuasiveness of regulatory fit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, M.L.; Fennis, B.M.; Vohs, K.D.; Pruyn, A.T.H.

    2009-01-01

    The present research extends work on the ‘the value from fit’ principle by showing that regulatory fit effects on charitable behavior are stronger for consumers high in private self-focus. Based on previous research showing that individuals high in private self-focus are more affected by external

  7. Generation in vivo of peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells and presence of regulatory T cells during vaccination with hTERT (class I and II peptide-pulsed DCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satthaporn Sukchai

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimal techniques for DC generation for immunotherapy in cancer are yet to be established. Study aims were to evaluate: (i DC activation/maturation milieu (TNF-α +/- IFN-α and its effects on CD8+ hTERT-specific T cell responses to class I epitopes (p540 or p865, (ii CD8+ hTERT-specific T cell responses elicited by vaccination with class I alone or both class I and II epitope (p766 and p672-pulsed DCs, prepared without IFN-α, (iii association between circulating T regulatory cells (Tregs and clinical responses. Methods Autologous DCs were generated from 10 patients (HLA-0201 with advanced cancer by culturing CD14+ blood monocytes in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4 supplemented with TNF-α [DCT] or TNF-α and IFN-α [DCTI]. The capacity of the DCs to induce functional CD8+ T cell responses to hTERT HLA-0201 restricted nonapeptides was assessed by MHC tetramer binding and peptide-specific cytotoxicity. Each DC preparation (DCT or DCTI was pulsed with only one type of hTERT peptide (p540 or p865 and both preparations were injected into separate lymph node draining regions every 2–3 weeks. This vaccination design enabled comparison of efficacy between DCT and DCTI in generating hTERT peptide specific CD8+ T cells and comparison of class I hTERT peptide (p540 or p865-loaded DCT with or without class II cognate help (p766 and p672 in 6 patients. T regulatory cells were evaluated in 8 patients. Results (i DCTIs and DCTs, pulsed with hTERT peptides, were comparable (p = 0.45, t-test in inducing peptide-specific CD8+ T cell responses. (ii Class II cognate help, significantly enhanced (p (iii Clinical responders had significantly lower (p Conclusion Addition of IFN-α to ex vivo monocyte-derived DCs, did not significantly enhance peptide-specific T cell responses in vivo, compared with TNF-α alone. Class II cognate help significantly augments peptide-specific T cell responses. Clinically favourable responses were seen in patients

  8. In Vivo Role of TLR2 and MyD88 Signaling in Eliciting Innate Immune Responses in Staphylococcal Endophthalmitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talreja, Deepa; Singh, Pawan Kumar; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective mechanisms evoked by TLR2 and MyD88 signaling in bacterial endophthalmitis in vivo. Methods. Endophthalmitis was induced in wild-type (WT), TLR2−/−, MyD88−/−, and Cnlp−/− mice by intravitreal injections of a laboratory strain (RN6390) and two endophthalmitis isolates of Staphylococcus aureus. Disease progression was monitored by assessing corneal and vitreous haze, bacterial burden, and retinal tissue damage. Levels of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines were determined using quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and ELISA. Flow cytometry was used to assess neutrophil infiltration. Cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) expression was determined by immunostaining and dot blot. Results. Eyes infected with either laboratory or clinical isolates exhibited higher levels of inflammatory mediators at the early stages of infection (≤24 hours) in WT mice than in TLR2−/− or MyD88−/− mice. However, their levels surpassed that of WT mice at the later stages of infection (>48 hours), coinciding with increased bacterial burden and retinal damage. Both TLR2−/− and MyD88−/− retinas produced reduced levels of CRAMP, and its deficiency (Cnlp−/−) rendered the mice susceptible to increased bacterial burden and retinal tissue damage as early as 1 day post infection. Analyses of inflammatory mediators and neutrophil levels in WT versus Cnlp−/− mice showed a trend similar to that observed in TLR2 and MyD88 KO mice. Furthermore, we observed that even a 10-fold lower infective dose of S. aureus was sufficient to cause endophthalmitis in TLR2−/− and MyD88−/− mice. Conclusions. TLR2 and MyD88 signaling plays an important role in protecting the retina from staphylococcal endophthalmitis by production of the antimicrobial peptide CRAMP. PMID:25678692

  9. Ex vivo expanded human regulatory T cells delay islet allograft rejection via inhibiting islet-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production in CD34+ stem cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fang; Ma, Liang; Zhao, Min; Huang, Guocai; Mirenda, Vincenzo; Dorling, Anthony; Lechler, Robert; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease caused by immune-mediated destruction of insulin-secreting β cells of the pancreas. Near complete dependence on exogenous insulin makes T1DM very difficult to control, with the result that patients are exposed to high blood glucose and risk of diabetic complications and/or intermittent low blood glucose that can cause unconsciousness, fits and even death. Allograft transplantation of pancreatic islets restores normoglycemia with a low risk of surgical complications. However, although successful immediately after transplantation, islets are progressively lost, with most of the patients requiring exogenous insulin within 2 years post-transplant. Therefore, there is an urgent requirement for the development of new strategies to prevent islet rejection. In this study, we explored the importance of human regulatory T cells in the control of islets allograft rejection. We developed a pre-clinical model of human islet transplantation by reconstituting NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice with cord blood-derived human CD34+ stem cells and demonstrated that although the engrafted human immune system mediated the rejection of human islets, their survival was significantly prolonged following adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded human Tregs. Mechanistically, Tregs inhibited the infiltration of innate immune cells and CD4+ T cells into the graft by down-regulating the islet graft-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Our findings might contribute to the development of clinical strategies for Treg therapy to control human islet rejection. We also show for the first time that CD34+ cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mouse model could be beneficial for investigating human innate immunity in vivo.

  10. Ex Vivo Expanded Human Regulatory T Cells Delay Islet Allograft Rejection via Inhibiting Islet-Derived Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 Production in CD34+ Stem Cells-Reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fang; Ma, Liang; Zhao, Min; Huang, Guocai; Mirenda, Vincenzo; Dorling, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease caused by immune-mediated destruction of insulin-secreting β cells of the pancreas. Near complete dependence on exogenous insulin makes T1DM very difficult to control, with the result that patients are exposed to high blood glucose and risk of diabetic complications and/or intermittent low blood glucose that can cause unconsciousness, fits and even death. Allograft transplantation of pancreatic islets restores normoglycemia with a low risk of surgical complications. However, although successful immediately after transplantation, islets are progressively lost, with most of the patients requiring exogenous insulin within 2 years post-transplant. Therefore, there is an urgent requirement for the development of new strategies to prevent islet rejection. In this study, we explored the importance of human regulatory T cells in the control of islets allograft rejection. We developed a pre-clinical model of human islet transplantation by reconstituting NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice with cord blood-derived human CD34+ stem cells and demonstrated that although the engrafted human immune system mediated the rejection of human islets, their survival was significantly prolonged following adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded human Tregs. Mechanistically, Tregs inhibited the infiltration of innate immune cells and CD4+ T cells into the graft by down-regulating the islet graft-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Our findings might contribute to the development of clinical strategies for Treg therapy to control human islet rejection. We also show for the first time that CD34+ cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mouse model could be beneficial for investigating human innate immunity in vivo. PMID:24594640

  11. Ex vivo expanded human regulatory T cells delay islet allograft rejection via inhibiting islet-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production in CD34+ stem cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Xiao

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is an autoimmune disease caused by immune-mediated destruction of insulin-secreting β cells of the pancreas. Near complete dependence on exogenous insulin makes T1DM very difficult to control, with the result that patients are exposed to high blood glucose and risk of diabetic complications and/or intermittent low blood glucose that can cause unconsciousness, fits and even death. Allograft transplantation of pancreatic islets restores normoglycemia with a low risk of surgical complications. However, although successful immediately after transplantation, islets are progressively lost, with most of the patients requiring exogenous insulin within 2 years post-transplant. Therefore, there is an urgent requirement for the development of new strategies to prevent islet rejection. In this study, we explored the importance of human regulatory T cells in the control of islets allograft rejection. We developed a pre-clinical model of human islet transplantation by reconstituting NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice with cord blood-derived human CD34+ stem cells and demonstrated that although the engrafted human immune system mediated the rejection of human islets, their survival was significantly prolonged following adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded human Tregs. Mechanistically, Tregs inhibited the infiltration of innate immune cells and CD4+ T cells into the graft by down-regulating the islet graft-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Our findings might contribute to the development of clinical strategies for Treg therapy to control human islet rejection. We also show for the first time that CD34+ cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mouse model could be beneficial for investigating human innate immunity in vivo.

  12. Roles of molecular layer interneurons in sensory information processing in mouse cerebellar cortex Crus II in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ping Chu

    Full Text Available Cerebellar cortical molecular layer interneurons (MLIs play essential roles in sensory information processing by the cerebellar cortex. However, recent experimental and modeling results are questioning traditional roles for molecular layer inhibition in the cerebellum.Synaptic responses of MLIs and Purkinje cells (PCs, evoked by air-puff stimulation of the ipsilateral whisker pad were recorded from cerebellar cortex Crus II in urethane-anesthetized ICR mice by in vivo whole-cell patch-clamp recording techniques. Under current-clamp (I = 0, air-puff stimuli were found to primarily produce inhibition in PCs. In MLIs, this stimulus evoked spike firing regardless of whether they made basket-type synaptic connections or not. However, MLIs not making basket-type synaptic connections had higher rates of background activity and also generated spontaneous spike-lets. Under voltage-clamp conditions, excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs were recorded in MLIs, although the predominant response of recorded PCs was an inhibitory postsynaptic potential (IPSP. The latencies of EPSCs were similar for all MLIs, but the time course and amplitude of EPSCs varied with depth in the molecular layer. The highest amplitude, shortest duration EPSCs were recorded from MLIs deep in the molecular layer, which also made basket-type synaptic connections. Comparing MLI to PC responses, time to peak of PC IPSP was significantly slower than MLI recorded EPSCs. Blocking GABA(A receptors uncovered larger EPSCs in PCs whose time to peak, half-width and 10-90% rising time were also significantly slower than in MLIs. Biocytin labeling indicated that the MLIs (but not PCs are dye-coupled.These findings indicate that tactile face stimulation evokes rapid excitation in MLIs and inhibition occurring at later latencies in PCs in mouse cerebellar cortex Crus II. These results support previous suggestions that the lack of parallel fiber driven PC activity is due to the effect

  13. Negative Correlation between Circulating CD4+FOXP3+CD127− Regulatory T Cells and Subsequent Antibody Responses to Infant Measles Vaccine but Not Diphtheria–Tetanus–Pertussis Vaccine Implies a Regulatory Role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorjoh Ndure

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs play a key homeostatic role by suppressing immune responses. They have been targeted in mouse and human cancer studies to improve vaccine immunogenicity and tumor clearance. A number of commercially available drugs and experimental vaccine adjuvants have been shown to target Tregs. Infants have high numbers of Tregs and often have poor responses to vaccination, yet the role Tregs play in controlling vaccine immunogenicity has not been explored in this age group. Herein, we explore the role of CD4+FOXP3+CD127− Tregs in controlling immunity in infant males and females to vaccination with diphtheria–tetanus–whole cell pertussis (DTP and/or measles vaccine (MV. We find correlative evidence that circulating Tregs at the time of vaccination suppress antibody responses to MV but not DTP; and Tregs 4 weeks after DTP vaccination may suppress vaccine-specific cellular immunity. This opens the exciting possibility that Tregs may provide a future target for improved vaccine responses in early life, including reducing the number of doses of vaccine required. Such an approach would need to be safe and the benefits outweigh the risks, thus further research in this area is required.

  14. Roles and contributions of pharmacists in regulatory affairs at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for public health emergency preparedness and response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavsar, Tina R; Kim, Hye-Joo; Yu, Yon

    To provide a general description of the roles and contributions of three pharmacists from the Regulatory Affairs program (RA) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) who are involved in emergency preparedness and response activities, including the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) public health emergency. Atlanta, GA. RA consists of a staff of nine members, three of whom are pharmacists. The mission of RA is to support CDC's preparedness and emergency response activities and to ensure regulatory compliance for critical medical countermeasures against potential threats from natural, chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear events. RA was well involved in the response to the H1N1 outbreak through numerous activities, such as submitting multiple Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) requests to the Food and Drug Administration, including those for medical countermeasures to be deployed from the Strategic National Stockpile, and developing the CDC EUA website (www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/eua). RA will continue to support current and future preparedness and emergency response activities by ensuring that the appropriate regulatory mechanisms are in place for the deployment of critical medical countermeasures from the Strategic National Stockpile against threats to public health.

  15. IL-2-Mediated In Vivo Expansion of Regulatory T Cells Combined with CD154–CD40 Co-Stimulation Blockade but Not CTLA-4 Ig Prolongs Allograft Survival in Naive and Sensitized Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dela Golshayan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, regulatory T cells (Treg-based immunotherapy has emerged as a promising strategy to promote operational tolerance after solid organ transplantation (SOT. However, a main hurdle for the therapeutic use of Treg in transplantation is their low frequency, particularly in non-lymphopenic hosts. We aimed to expand Treg directly in vivo and determine their efficacy in promoting donor-specific tolerance, using a stringent experimental model. Administration of the IL-2/JES6-1 immune complex at the time of transplantation resulted in significant expansion of donor-specific Treg, which suppressed alloreactive T cells. IL-2-mediated Treg expansion in combination with short-term CD154–CD40 co-stimulation blockade, but not CTLA-4 Ig or rapamycin, led to tolerance to MHC-mismatched skin grafts in non-lymphopenic mice, mainly by hindering alloreactive CD8+ effector T cells and the production of alloantibodies. Importantly, this treatment also allowed prolonged survival of allografts in the presence of either donor-specific or cross-reactive memory cells. However, late rejection occurred in sensitized hosts, partly mediated by activated B cells. Overall, these data illustrate the potential but also some important limitations of Treg-based therapy in clinical SOT as well as the importance of concomitant immunomodulatory strategies in particular in sensitized hosts.

  16. Inferring the Impact of Regulatory Mechanisms that Underpin CD8+ T Cell Control of B16 Tumor Growth In vivo Using Mechanistic Models and Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinke, David J; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    A major barrier for broadening the efficacy of immunotherapies for cancer is identifying key mechanisms that limit the efficacy of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. Yet, identifying these mechanisms using human samples and mouse models for cancer remains a challenge. While interactions between cancer and the immune system are dynamic and non-linear, identifying the relative roles that biological components play in regulating anti-tumor immunity commonly relies on human intuition alone, which can be limited by cognitive biases. To assist natural intuition, modeling and simulation play an emerging role in identifying therapeutic mechanisms. To illustrate the approach, we developed a multi-scale mechanistic model to describe the control of tumor growth by a primary response of CD8+ T cells against defined tumor antigens using the B16 C57Bl/6 mouse model for malignant melanoma. The mechanistic model was calibrated to data obtained following adenovirus-based immunization and validated to data obtained following adoptive transfer of transgenic CD8+ T cells. More importantly, we use simulation to test whether the postulated network topology, that is the modeled biological components and their associated interactions, is sufficient to capture the observed anti-tumor immune response. Given the available data, the simulation results also provided a statistical basis for quantifying the relative importance of different mechanisms that underpin CD8+ T cell control of B16F10 growth. By identifying conditions where the postulated network topology is incomplete, we illustrate how this approach can be used as part of an iterative design-build-test cycle to expand the predictive power of the model.

  17. Regulatory networks, legal federalism, and multi-level regulatory systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kerber, Wolfgang; Wendel, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Transnational regulatory networks play important roles in multi-level regulatory regimes, as e.g, the European Union. In this paper we analyze the role of regulatory networks from the perspective of the economic theory of legal federalism. Often sophisticated intermediate institutional solutions between pure centralisation and pure decentralisation can help to solve complex tradeoff problems between the benefits and problems of centralised and decentralised solutions. Drawing upon the insight...

  18. The Role of Phosphoramidon on the Biological Activity of Big Endothelin-1 in the Rat Mesenteric Microcirculation in Vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelhalim, Mohamed A K

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to clarify the role of metalloprotease inhibitor phosphoramidon on the effects induced by big endothelin-1 (big ET-1) in the rat mesenteric microcirculation in vivo, through investigating the systemic blood pressure, diameter and blood flow velocity of arterioles and venules of the rat mesentery. For this purpose, the rat mesentery was arranged for in situ intravital microscopic observation under transillumination and separate cumulative injections of big ET-1 and phosphoramidon were infused into the right jugular vein, respectively. In these experiments twenty-five rats (Charles River, 130 - 140 g) were used. The experiments were divided into two groups. In the first group of experiments, cumulative injections of big ET-1 (1000-8000 pmole/kg) were infused through a catheter inserted into the right jugular vein. Each dose of big ET-1 was infused 25 min prior to the infusion of the following dose. Infusion of big ET-1 (1000-8000 pmole/kg) elicited a long-lasting pressor effect. The infusion of low doses of big ET-1 (1000-2000 pmole/kg) elicited a significant (p < 0.05) dose-dependent increase in the microvascular blood flow velocity both in arterioles (20 - 30 ?m) and venules (30 - 50 ?m), and diameters of arterioles and venules exhibited a slight not significant vasodilator effect. The infusion of high doses of big ET-1 (4000-8000 pmole/kg) elicited significant dose-dependant decrease in the blood flow velocity of arterioles and venules, and diameters returned to the control runs. This may be attributed to the gradual conversion of big ET-1 to ET-1, and ET-1 is a potent vasoconstrictor. In the second group of experiments, cumulative injections of phosphoramidon (30 mg/kg /10 min) were administered 10 min prior to the infusion of big ET-1. These findings suggested that phosphoramidon significantly suppressed long-lasting pressor effect, dose-dependent increase, dose-dependent decrease and slow vasodilator effect produced by big ET-1

  19. In vivo analysis of the role of metabotropic glutamate receptors in the afferent regulation of chick cochlear nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carzoli, Kathryn L; Hyson, Richard L

    2011-02-01

    Cochlea removal results in the death of approximately 20-30% of neurons in the chick nucleus magnocellularis (NM). One early event in NM neuronal degradation is the disruption of their ribosomes. This can be visualized in the first few hours following cochlea removal using Y10B, an antibody that recognizes ribosomal RNA. Previous studies using a brain slice preparation suggest that maintenance of ribosomal integrity in NM neurons requires metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) activation. Isolating the brain slice in vitro, however, may eliminate other potential sources of trophic support and only allows for evaluation of the early changes that occur in NM neurons following deafferentation. Consequently, it is not known if mGluR activation is truly required for the maintenance of NM neurons in the intact system. The current experiments evaluated the importance of mGluRs in vivo. The effects of short-term receptor blockade were assessed through Y10B labeling and the effects of long-term blockade were assessed through stereological counting of NM neurons in Nissl-stained tissue. mGluR antagonists or vehicle were administered intracerebroventricularly following unilateral cochlea removal. Vehicle-treated subjects replicated the previously reported effects of cochlea removal, showing lighter Y10B labeling and fewer Nissl-stained NM neurons on the deafened side of the brain. Blockade of mGluRs prevented the rapid activity-dependent difference in Y10B labeling, and in some cases, had the reverse effect, yielding lighter labeling of NM neurons on the intact side of the brain. Similarly, mGluR blockade over longer survival periods resulted in a reduction in number of cells on both intact and deafferented sides of the brain, and in some cases, yielded a reverse effect of fewer neurons on the intact side versus deafened side. These data are consistent with in vitro findings and suggest that mGluR activation plays a vital role in the afferent maintenance of NM neurons

  20. Regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This publication, compiled in 8 chapters, presents the regulatory system developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) of the Argentine Republic. The following activities and developed topics in this document describe: the evolution of the nuclear regulatory activity in Argentina; the Argentine regulatory system; the nuclear regulatory laws and standards; the inspection and safeguards of nuclear facilities; the emergency systems; the environmental systems; the environmental monitoring; the analysis laboratories on physical and biological dosimetry, prenatal irradiation, internal irradiation, radiation measurements, detection techniques on nuclear testing, medical program on radiation protection; the institutional relations with national and international organization; the training courses and meeting; the technical information

  1. The effects of message framing and risk perceptions for HPV vaccine campaigns: focus on the role of regulatory fit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun-Young

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of framing and risk perception, and their interaction effects on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. Based on a 2 (message frames) × 2 (perceived risk) experimental design, the interaction effects reveal the effectiveness of loss- (vs. gain-) framed messages would be maximized for high (vs. low) perceived risk condition. Based on regulatory fit principles the synergy effects are shown in terms of attitudes toward advertising and HPV vaccination, HPV vaccination intention, and ad-promoted behavioral intention. The findings indicate right message appeals should be selected for the right target audiences in the setting of HPV vaccine promotions.

  2. A PTEN-COL17A1 fusion gene and its novel regulatory role in Collagen XVII expression and GBM malignance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Chuanbao; Liang, Tingyu; Yang, Fan; Wang, Haoyuan; Wu, Fan; Wang, Wen; Wang, Zheng; Cheng, Wen; Xu, Jiangnan; Jiang, Tao; Chen, Jing; Ding, Yaozhong

    2017-10-17

    Collagen XVII expression has recently been demonstrated to be correlated with the tumor malignance. While Collagen XVII is known to be widely distributed in neurons of the human brain, its precise role in pathogenesis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is unknown. In this study, we identified and characterized a new PTEN-COL17A1 fusion gene in GMB using transcriptome sequencing. Although fusion gene did not result in measurable fusion protein production, its presence is accompanied with high levels of COL17A1 expression, revealed a novel regulatory mechanism of Collagen XVII expression by PTEN-COL17A1 gene fusion. Knocked down Collagen XVII expression in glioma cell lines resulted in decreased tumor invasiveness, along with significant reduction of MMP9 expression, while increased Collagen XVII expression promotes invasive activities of glioma cells and associated with GBM recurrences. Together, our results uncovered a new PTEN-COL17A1 fusion gene and its novel regulatory role in Collagen XVII expression and GBM malignance, and demonstrated that COL17A1 could serve as a useful prognostic biomarker and therapeutic targets for GBM.

  3. The Role of Interferon Regulatory Factor-1 (IRF1) in Overcoming Antiestrogen Resistance in the Treatment of Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.L.; Shajahan, A.N.; Clarke, R.

    2011-01-01

    Resistance to endocrine therapy is common among breast cancer patients with estrogen receptor alpha-positive (ER+) tumors and limits the success of this therapeutic strategy. While the mechanisms that regulate endocrine responsiveness and cell fate are not fully understood, interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF1) is strongly implicated as a key regulatory node in the underlying signaling network. IRF1 is a tumor suppressor that mediates cell fate by facilitating apoptosis and can do so with or without functional p53. Expression of IRF1 is down regulated in endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells, protecting these cells from IRF1-induced inhibition of proliferation and/or induction of cell death. Nonetheless, when IRF1 expression is induced following IFN treatment, antiestrogen sensitivity is restored by a process that includes the inhibition of pro survival BCL2 family members and caspase activation. These data suggest that a combination of endocrine therapy and compounds that effectively induce IRF1 expression may be useful for the treatment of many ER+ breast cancers. By understanding IRF1 signaling in the context of endocrine responsiveness, we may be able to develop novel therapeutic strategies and better predict how patients will respond to endocrine therapy

  4. How Stereotype Threat Affects Healthy Older Adults' Performance on Clinical Assessments of Cognitive Decline: The Key Role of Regulatory Fit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Sarah J; Mather, Mara; Gatz, Margaret

    2015-11-01

    Stereotype threat can impair older adults' performance on clinical assessments for cognitive decline. We examined why this occurs. Based upon the regulatory focus account of stereotype threat, we predicted that the effects of stereotype threat should depend upon the assessments' reward structure. Stereotype threat should be associated with poor performance when the assessment emphasizes gaining correct answers, but not when it emphasizes avoiding mistakes. Healthy older adults completed a series of mental status examinations. Half of the participants completed these examinations under stereotype threat about their cognitive abilities. Monetary incentives were also manipulated. For half of the participants correct responding led to gains. For the remaining participants incorrect responding/forgetting led to losses. Consistent with the regulatory focus account, stereotype threat was associated with poor performance when the mental status examinations had a gains-based structure, but not when they had a losses-based structure. Older adults respond to stereotype threat by becoming vigilant to avoid the losses that will make them their worst. Researchers and clinicians can capitalize on this motivational change to combat stereotype threat's negative effects. By using a loss-avoidance frame, stereotype threat's negative effects can be attenuated or even eliminated. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. How Stereotype Threat Affects Healthy Older Adults’ Performance on Clinical Assessments of Cognitive Decline: The Key Role of Regulatory Fit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Mara; Gatz, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Stereotype threat can impair older adults’ performance on clinical assessments for cognitive decline. We examined why this occurs. Based upon the regulatory focus account of stereotype threat, we predicted that the effects of stereotype threat should depend upon the assessments’ reward structure. Stereotype threat should be associated with poor performance when the assessment emphasizes gaining correct answers, but not when it emphasizes avoiding mistakes. Method. Healthy older adults completed a series of mental status examinations. Half of the participants completed these examinations under stereotype threat about their cognitive abilities. Monetary incentives were also manipulated. For half of the participants correct responding led to gains. For the remaining participants incorrect responding/forgetting led to losses. Results. Consistent with the regulatory focus account, stereotype threat was associated with poor performance when the mental status examinations had a gains-based structure, but not when they had a losses-based structure. Discussion. Older adults respond to stereotype threat by becoming vigilant to avoid the losses that will make them their worst. Researchers and clinicians can capitalize on this motivational change to combat stereotype threat’s negative effects. By using a loss-avoidance frame, stereotype threat’s negative effects can be attenuated or even eliminated. PMID:25752896

  6. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Role and Activities Related to U.S. Department of Energy Incidental Waste Determinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, A.H.; Esh, D.W.; Ridge, A.C.

    2006-01-01

    Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA) requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to consult with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for certain non-high level waste (HLW) determinations. Under the NDAA, NRC performs consultative technical reviews of DOE's waste determinations and monitors DOE's disposal actions for such waste, but the NRC does not have regulatory authority over DOE's waste disposal activities. The NDAA provides the criteria that must be met to determine that waste is not HLW. The criteria require that the waste does not need to be disposed of in a geologic repository, that highly radioactive radionuclides be removed to the maximum extent practical, and that the performance objectives of 10 CFR 61, Subpart C, be met. The performance objectives contain criteria for protection of the public, protection of inadvertent intruders, protection of workers, and stability of the disposal site after closure. This paper describes NRC's approach to implementing its responsibilities under the NDAA, as well as similar activities being performed for sites not covered by the NDAA. (authors)

  7. Regulatory behavior and frontal activity: Considering the role of revised-BIS in relative right frontal asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gable, Philip A; Neal, Lauren B; Threadgill, A Hunter

    2018-01-01

    Essential to human behavior are three core personality systems: approach, avoidance, and a regulatory system governing the two motivational systems. Decades of research has linked approach motivation with greater relative left frontal-cortical asymmetry. Other research has linked avoidance motivation with greater relative right frontal-cortical asymmetry. However, past work linking withdrawal motivation with greater relative right frontal asymmetry has been mixed. The current article reviews evidence suggesting that activation of the regulatory system (revised Behavioral Inhibition System [r-BIS]) may be more strongly related to greater relative right frontal asymmetry than withdrawal motivation. Specifically, research suggests that greater activation of the r-BIS is associated with greater relative right frontal activity, and reduced r-BIS activation is associated with reduced right frontal activity (greater relative left frontal activity). We review evidence examining trait and state frontal activity using EEG, source localization, lesion studies, neuronal stimulation, and fMRI supporting the idea that r-BIS may be the core personality system related to greater relative right frontal activity. In addition, the current review seeks to disentangle avoidance motivation and r-BIS as substrates of relative right frontal asymmetry. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  8. Materialists on Facebook: the self-regulatory role of social comparisons and the objectification of Facebook friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozimek, Phillip; Baer, Fiona; Förster, Jens

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we examine chronic materialism as a possible motive for Facebook usage. We test an explanatory mediation model predicting that materialists use Facebook more frequently, because they compare themselves to others, they objectify and instrumentalize others, and they accumulate friends. For this, we conducted two online surveys ( N 1 = 242, N 2 = 289) assessing demographic variables, Facebook use, social comparison, materialism, objectification and instrumentalization. Results confirm the predicted mediation model. Our findings suggest that Facebook can be used as a means to an end in a way of self-regulatory processes, like satisfying of materialistic goals. The findings are the first evidence for our Social Online Self-regulation Theory (SOS-T), which contains numerous predictions that can be tested in the future.

  9. Materialists on Facebook: the self-regulatory role of social comparisons and the objectification of Facebook friends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Ozimek

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we examine chronic materialism as a possible motive for Facebook usage. We test an explanatory mediation model predicting that materialists use Facebook more frequently, because they compare themselves to others, they objectify and instrumentalize others, and they accumulate friends. For this, we conducted two online surveys (N1 = 242, N2 = 289 assessing demographic variables, Facebook use, social comparison, materialism, objectification and instrumentalization. Results confirm the predicted mediation model. Our findings suggest that Facebook can be used as a means to an end in a way of self-regulatory processes, like satisfying of materialistic goals. The findings are the first evidence for our Social Online Self-regulation Theory (SOS-T, which contains numerous predictions that can be tested in the future. Keywords: Psychology, Information science

  10. Rol de las células T regulatorias en esclerosis múltiple Role of T-regulatory cells in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Rojas

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available La esclerosis múltiple (EM es una enfermedad inflamatoria autoinmune desmielinizante del sistema nervioso central (SNC. La mayoría de las enfermedades autoinmunes se originan por la activación anormal de la respuesta inflamatoria contra auto-antígenos (la mayoría de ellos desconocidos a la fecha como consecuencia de la pérdida de la tolerancia periférica. Las células T-regulatorias constituyen un grupo esencial de linfocitos T encargados del mantenimiento de la tolerancia periférica, la prevención de enfermedades autoinmunes y la limitación de enfermedades inflamatorias crónicas. Teniendo en cuenta la importancia de la tolerancia periférica, las células T-regulatorias serían componentes cruciales en el escenario fisiopatológico de los procesos autoinmunes, incluyendo la EM. El presente trabajo recopila los conocimientos actuales sobre la función de las células T-regulatorias en la EM, la enfermedad autoinmune desmielinizante del SNC más prevalente en los seres humanos.Multiple sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS. Most of autoimmune diseases arise by an abnormal activation of the inflammatory response against self-antigens (most of them unknown up to date as a consequence of dysfunction in peripheral tolerance. Regulatory T-cells are essential for maintaining peripheral tolerance, preventing autoimmune diseases and limiting chronic inflammatory conditions. Based on that knowledge, T-regulatory cells have emerged as a key component of the physiopathology of autoimmune diseases including MS. This review compiles the current knowledge on the role and function of T-regulatory cells in MS, the most prevalent CNS autoimmune disease in humans.

  11. Selective abrogation of the uPA-uPAR interaction in vivo reveals a novel role in suppression of fibrin-associated inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, Brian M; Choi, Eun Young; Gårdsvoll, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    the interaction between endogenous uPA and uPAR is selectively abrogated, whereas other functions of both the protease and its receptor are retained. Specifically, we introduced 4 amino acid substitutions into the growth factor domain (GFD) of uPA that abrogate uPAR binding while preserving the overall structure...... a principal in vivo role of the uPA-uPAR interaction in cell-associated fibrinolysis critical for suppression of fibrin accumulation and fibrin-associated inflammation and provides a valuable model for further exploration of this multifunctional receptor....

  12. Reconstruction of the gene regulatory network involved in the sonic hedgehog pathway with a potential role in early development of the mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua Liu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling pathway is crucial for pattern formation in early central nervous system development. By systematically analyzing high-throughput in situ hybridization data of E11.5 mouse brain, we found that Shh and its receptor Ptch1 define two adjacent mutually exclusive gene expression domains: Shh+Ptch1- and Shh-Ptch1+. These two domains are associated respectively with Foxa2 and Gata3, two transcription factors that play key roles in specifying them. Gata3 ChIP-seq experiments and RNA-seq assays on Gata3-knockdown cells revealed that Gata3 up-regulates the genes that are enriched in the Shh-Ptch1+ domain. Important Gata3 targets include Slit2 and Slit3, which are involved in the process of axon guidance, as well as Slc18a1, Th and Qdpr, which are associated with neurotransmitter synthesis and release. By contrast, Foxa2 both up-regulates the genes expressed in the Shh+Ptch1- domain and down-regulates the genes characteristic of the Shh-Ptch1+ domain. From these and other data, we were able to reconstruct a gene regulatory network governing both domains. Our work provides the first genome-wide characterization of the gene regulatory network involved in the Shh pathway that underlies pattern formation in the early mouse brain.

  13. Through the regulatory hoop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirner, N.P.

    1985-01-01

    There are many regulatory hoops through which waste generators, brokers, and disposal site operators must jump to dispose of waste safely. As the proposed exclusionary date of January 1, 1986, approaches, these regulatory hoops have the distinct possibility of multiplying or at least changing shape. The state of Washington, in its role as an Agreement State with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, licenses and inspects the commercial operator of the Northwest Compact's low-level radioactive waste disposal site on the Hanford Reservation. Washington has received as much as 53%, or 1.4 million cubic feet per year, of the nation's total volume of waste disposed. To control such a large volume of waste, a regulatory program involving six agencies has developed over the years in Washington

  14. The role of national regulatory authority in monitoring of radioactivity and in case of seizure of radioactive or nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morkunas, G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The Radiation Protection Centre is a regulatory authority in radiation protection in Lithuania. Its main tasks are licensing of practices, supervision, control and enforcement of radiation protection requirements, dosimetric, radiometric and spectrometric measurements, evaluation of exposure and its sources, expertise and advice on optimization of radiation protection. Its activities may be divided into two main parts -- regulatory and analytical ones. Food, drinking water, environmental, wipe and other samples are monitored, the appropriate evaluation of doses is done. The data on concentrations of artificial radionuclides in different bodies are available. The laboratory is to be accredited according to the ISO 17025 standard in the framework of Phare Twinning Project. In case of seized radioactive or nuclear material the Radiation Protection Centre has to identify the necessary radiation protection means for members of public and emergency workers, perform measurements of dose rate and radioactive contamination, and, if necessary, evaluate doses received due to the seized radioactive or nuclear material. Since the Radiation Protection Centre has its departments in the largest cities of Lithuania the above mentioned measures can be taken very urgently, especially the ones connected with primary evaluation of situation and identification of optimized radiation protection measures. The Radiation Protection Centre has its own possibilities of identification of radionuclides in the seized material. Such installations as HpGe spectrometers (Oxford and Canberra), equipment for radiochemical separation of U, Pu and actinides, alpha spectrometer, liquid scintillation spectrometer and neutron rem counter are available. There were a few cases when seized material had to be analyzed also. Different sources were found in different places of Lithuania, and it was necessary to define the activity and isotopic content of these sources. The following scheme is used in

  15. The Plasmodium serine-type SERA proteases display distinct expression patterns and non-essential in vivo roles during life cycle progression of the malaria parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putrianti, Elyzana D; Schmidt-Christensen, Anja; Arnold, Iris; Heussler, Volker T; Matuschewski, Kai; Silvie, Olivier

    2010-06-01

    Parasite proteases play key roles in several fundamental steps of the Plasmodium life cycle, including haemoglobin degradation, host cell invasion and parasite egress. Plasmodium exit from infected host cells appears to be mediated by a class of papain-like cysteine proteases called 'serine repeat antigens' (SERAs). A SERA subfamily, represented by Plasmodium falciparum SERA5, contains an atypical active site serine residue instead of a catalytic cysteine. Members of this SERAser subfamily are abundantly expressed in asexual blood stages, rendering them attractive drug and vaccine targets. In this study, we show by antibody localization and in vivo fluorescent tagging with the red fluorescent protein mCherry that the two P. berghei serine-type family members, PbSERA1 and PbSERA2, display differential expression towards the final stages of merozoite formation. Via targeted gene replacement, we generated single and double gene knockouts of the P. berghei SERAser genes. These loss-of-function lines progressed normally through the parasite life cycle, suggesting a specialized, non-vital role for serine-type SERAs in vivo. Parasites lacking PbSERAser showed increased expression of the cysteine-type PbSERA3. Compensatory mechanisms between distinct SERA subfamilies may thus explain the absence of phenotypical defect in SERAser disruptants, and challenge the suitability to develop potent antimalarial drugs based on specific inhibitors of Plasmodium serine-type SERAs.

  16. Mechanisms of andrographolide-induced platelet apoptosis in human platelets: regulatory roles of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Li-Ming; Su, Cheng-Chen; Hsu, Wen-Hsien; Lu, Wan-Jung; Chung, Chi-Li; Yen, Ting-Lin; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Lin, Kuan-Hung

    2013-11-01

    Andrographolide, a novel nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitor, is isolated from the leaves of Andrographis paniculata. Platelet activation is relevant to a variety of coronary heart diseases. Our recent studies revealed that andrographolide possesses potent antiplatelet activity by inhibition of the p38 MAPK/(●) HO-NF-κB-ERK2 cascade. Although platelets are anucleated cells, apoptotic machinery apparatus recently has been found to regulate platelet activation and limit platelet lifespan. Therefore, we further investigated the regulatory effects of andrographolide on platelet apoptotic events. In this study, apoptotic signaling events for caspase-3, -8, and Bid were time (10-60 min)- and dose (25-100 μΜ)-dependently activated by andrographolide in human platelets. Andrographolide could also disrupt mitrochondrial membrane potential. In addition, caspase-8 inhibitor (z-IETD-fmk, 50 μΜ) was found to reverse andrographolide-induced caspase-8 activation, whereas the antagonistic anti-Fas receptor (ZB4, 500 ng/mL) and anti-tumor necrosis factor-R1 (H398, 10 µg/mL) monoclonal antibodies did not. In conclusion, this study for the first time demonstrated that andrographolide might limit platelet lifespan by initiating the caspase-8-dependent extrinsic apoptotic pathway, in spite of no direct evidence that death receptors are involved in this process proved. Overall, the various medicinal properties of andrographolide suggest its potential value in treating patients with thromboembolic disorders. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Role of the SaeRS two-component regulatory system in Staphylococcus epidermidis autolysis and biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE) has emerged as one of the most important causes of nosocomial infections. The SaeRS two-component signal transduction system (TCS) influences virulence and biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus. The deletion of saeR in S. epidermidis results in impaired anaerobic growth and decreased nitrate utilization. However, the regulatory function of SaeRS on biofilm formation and autolysis in S. epidermidis remains unclear. Results The saeRS genes of SE1457 were deleted by homologous recombination. The saeRS deletion mutant, SE1457ΔsaeRS, exhibited increased biofilm formation that was disturbed more severely (a 4-fold reduction) by DNase I treatment compared to SE1457 and the complementation strain SE1457saec. Compared to SE1457 and SE1457saec, SE1457ΔsaeRS showed increased Triton X-100-induced autolysis (approximately 3-fold) and decreased cell viability in planktonic/biofilm states; further, SE1457ΔsaeRS also released more extracellular DNA (eDNA) in the biofilms. Correlated with the increased autolysis phenotype, the transcription of autolysis-related genes, such as atlE and aae, was increased in SE1457ΔsaeRS. Whereas the expression of accumulation-associated protein was up-regulated by 1.8-fold in 1457ΔsaeRS, the expression of an N-acetylglucosaminyl transferase enzyme (encoded by icaA) critical for polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) synthesis was not affected by the deletion of saeRS. Conclusions Deletion of saeRS in S. epidermidis resulted in an increase in biofilm-forming ability, which was associated with increased eDNA release and up-regulated Aap expression. The increased eDNA release from SE1457ΔsaeRS was associated with increased bacterial autolysis and decreased bacterial cell viability in the planktonic/biofilm states. PMID:21702925

  18. Role of the SaeRS two-component regulatory system in Staphylococcus epidermidis autolysis and biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois Patrice

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE has emerged as one of the most important causes of nosocomial infections. The SaeRS two-component signal transduction system (TCS influences virulence and biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus. The deletion of saeR in S. epidermidis results in impaired anaerobic growth and decreased nitrate utilization. However, the regulatory function of SaeRS on biofilm formation and autolysis in S. epidermidis remains unclear. Results The saeRS genes of SE1457 were deleted by homologous recombination. The saeRS deletion mutant, SE1457ΔsaeRS, exhibited increased biofilm formation that was disturbed more severely (a 4-fold reduction by DNase I treatment compared to SE1457 and the complementation strain SE1457saec. Compared to SE1457 and SE1457saec, SE1457ΔsaeRS showed increased Triton X-100-induced autolysis (approximately 3-fold and decreased cell viability in planktonic/biofilm states; further, SE1457ΔsaeRS also released more extracellular DNA (eDNA in the biofilms. Correlated with the increased autolysis phenotype, the transcription of autolysis-related genes, such as atlE and aae, was increased in SE1457ΔsaeRS. Whereas the expression of accumulation-associated protein was up-regulated by 1.8-fold in 1457ΔsaeRS, the expression of an N-acetylglucosaminyl transferase enzyme (encoded by icaA critical for polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA synthesis was not affected by the deletion of saeRS. Conclusions Deletion of saeRS in S. epidermidis resulted in an increase in biofilm-forming ability, which was associated with increased eDNA release and up-regulated Aap expression. The increased eDNA release from SE1457ΔsaeRS was associated with increased bacterial autolysis and decreased bacterial cell viability in the planktonic/biofilm states.

  19. Circulating Regulatory T-Cells in Monoclonal Gammopathies of Uncertain Significance and Multiple Myeloma: In Search of a Role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni D’Arena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequency and function of regulatory T-cells (Tregs in multiple myeloma (MM are still matter of debate. The percentage and absolute number of circulating Tregs (CD4+CD25+high  densityCD127-/low  density from 39 patients with untreated MM and 44 patients with monoclonal gammopathies of uncertain significance (MGUS were tested and compared with 20 healthy subjects as controls. The mean percentage number of circulating Tregs was 2.1%  ± 1.0 (range 0.75–6.1% in MM patients; 2.1%  ± 0.9 (range 0.3–4.4% in MGUS; and 1.5%  ± 0.4 (range 0.9–2.1% in controls (p ns. Mean absolute number of Tregs was 36.3/μL ± 23.7 (range 6.7–149/μL in MM; 38.8/μL ± 19.1 (range 4.3–87/μL in MGUS; and 39.4/μL ± 12.5 (range 18–63/μL in controls (p ns. After a median follow-up of 38 months, 5 MGUS and 2 smoldering MM (SMM transformed into overt MM; however Tregs number did not predict this evolution. With respect to MM patients and after a median follow-up of 33 months, Tregs did not show any significant correlation with main clinical and laboratory characteristics. Finally, from a functional point of view, Tregs displayed an effective suppressor function, irrespective of disease status. This study indicates that the number of circulating Tregs does not differ in different monoclonal gammopathies and normal subjects and do not correlate with clinical features of MM.

  20. Dominant role of antigen dose in CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cell induction and expansion1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Michael S.; Kane, Lawrence P.; Morel, Penelope A.

    2009-01-01

    The definitions of tolerogenic vs. immunogenic dendritic cells (DC) remain controversial. Immature DC have been shown to induce T regulatory cells (Treg) specific for foreign and allo-antigens. However, we have previously reported that mature DC (G4DC) prevented the onset of autoimmune diabetes whereas immature DC (GMDC) were therapeutically ineffective. In this study, islet-specific CD4+ T cells from BDC2.5 TCR Tg mice were stimulated, in the absence of exogenous cytokine, with GMDC or G4DC pulsed with high- or low-affinity antigenic peptides and examined for Treg induction. Both GMDC and G4DC presenting low peptide doses induced weak TCR signaling via the Akt/mTOR pathway, resulting in significant expansion of Foxp3+ Treg. Furthermore, unpulsed G4DC, but not GMDC, also induced Treg. High peptide doses induced strong Akt/mTOR signaling and favored the expansion of Foxp3neg Th cells. The inverse correlation of Foxp3 and Akt/mTOR signaling was also observed in DO11.10 and OT-II TCR-Tg T cells and was recapitulated with anti-CD3/CD28 stimulation in the absence of DC. IL-6 production in these cultures correlated positively with antigen dose and inversely with Treg expansion. Studies with T cells or DC from IL-6−/− mice revealed that IL-6 production by T cells was more important in the inhibition of Treg induction at low antigen doses. These studies indicate that strength of Akt/mTOR signaling, a critical T cell intrinsic determinant for Treg vs Th induction, can be controlled by adjusting the dose of antigenic peptide. Furthermore, this operates in a dominant fashion over DC phenotype and cytokine production. PMID:19801514

  1. RNA Sequencing and Bioinformatics Analysis Implicate the Regulatory Role of a Long Noncoding RNA-mRNA Network in Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Can-Jie; Xiao, Xiao; Sheng, Li; Chen, Lili; Zhong, Wei; Li, Hai; Hua, Jing; Ma, Xiong

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the long noncoding (lncRNA)-mRNA expression network and potential roles in rat hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) during activation. LncRNA expression was analyzed in quiescent and culture-activated HSCs by RNA sequencing, and differentially expressed lncRNAs verified by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) were subjected to bioinformatics analysis. In vivo analyses of differential lncRNA-mRNA expression were performed on a rat model of liver fibrosis. We identified upregulation of 12 lncRNAs and 155 mRNAs and downregulation of 12 lncRNAs and 374 mRNAs in activated HSCs. Additionally, we identified the differential expression of upregulated lncRNAs (NONRATT012636.2, NONRATT016788.2, and NONRATT021402.2) and downregulated lncRNAs (NONRATT007863.2, NONRATT019720.2, and NONRATT024061.2) in activated HSCs relative to levels observed in quiescent HSCs, and Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analyses showed that changes in lncRNAs associated with HSC activation revealed 11 significantly enriched pathways according to their predicted targets. Moreover, based on the predicted co-expression network, the relative dynamic levels of NONRATT013819.2 and lysyl oxidase (Lox) were compared during HSC activation both in vitro and in vivo. Our results confirmed the upregulation of lncRNA NONRATT013819.2 and Lox mRNA associated with the extracellular matrix (ECM)-related signaling pathway in HSCs and fibrotic livers. Our results detailing a dysregulated lncRNA-mRNA network might provide new treatment strategies for hepatic fibrosis based on findings indicating potentially critical roles for NONRATT013819.2 and Lox in ECM remodeling during HSC activation. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. HPRT deficiency coordinately dysregulates canonical Wnt and presenilin-1 signaling: a neuro-developmental regulatory role for a housekeeping gene?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Hyuk Kang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have used microarray-based methods of global gene expression together with quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis to identify dysregulation of genes and aberrant cellular processes in human fibroblasts and in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells made HPRT-deficient by transduction with a retrovirus stably expressing an shRNA targeted against HPRT. Analysis of the microarray expression data by Gene ontology (GO and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA as well as significant pathway analysis by GeneSpring GX10 and Panther Classification System reveal that HPRT deficiency is accompanied by aberrations in a variety of pathways known to regulate neurogenesis or to be implicated in neurodegenerative disease, including the canonical Wnt/β-catenin and the Alzheimer's disease/presenilin signaling pathways. Dysregulation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is confirmed by Western blot demonstration of cytosolic sequestration of β-catenin during in vitro differentiation of the SH-SY5Y cells toward the neuronal phenotype. We also demonstrate that two key transcription factor genes known to be regulated by Wnt signaling and to be vital for the generation and function of dopaminergic neurons; i.e., Lmx1a and Engrailed 1, are down-regulated in the HPRT knockdown SH-SY5Y cells. In addition to the Wnt signaling aberration, we found that expression of presenilin-1 shows severely aberrant expression in HPRT-deficient SH-SY5Y cells, reflected by marked deficiency of the 23 kDa C-terminal fragment of presenilin-1 in knockdown cells. Western blot analysis of primary fibroblast cultures from two LND patients also shows dysregulated presenilin-1 expression, including aberrant proteolytic processing of presenilin-1. These demonstrations of dysregulated Wnt signaling and presenilin-1 expression together with impaired expression of dopaminergic transcription factors reveal broad pleitropic neuro-regulatory defects played by HPRT expression and suggest new directions for

  3. Advancing regulatory science to bring novel medical devices for use in emergency care to market: the role of the Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Christopher G; Forrest, Shawn; Galeotti, Loriano; Schwartz, Suzanne B; Strauss, David G

    2015-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) performs regulatory science to provide science-based medical product regulatory decisions. This article describes the types of scientific research the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health performs and highlights specific projects related to medical devices for emergency medicine. In addition, this article discusses how results from regulatory science are used by the FDA to support the regulatory process as well as how the results are communicated to the public. Regulatory science supports the FDA's mission to assure safe, effective, and high-quality medical products are available to patients. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. In vivo measurements of relaxation process in the human liver by MRI. The role of respiratory gating/triggering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O; Ring, P

    1988-01-01

    In vivo estimation of relaxation processes in the liver by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be helpful for characterization of various pathological conditions in the liver. However, such measurements may be significantly hampered by movement of the liver with the respiration. The effect...... of synchronization of data acquisition to the respiratory cycle on measured T1- and T2-relaxation curves was studied in normal subjects, patients with diffuse liver disease, and patients with focal liver pathology. Multi spin echo sequences with five different repetition times were used. The measurements were...... carried out with and without respiratory gating/triggering. In the healthy subjects as well as in the patients with diffuse liver diseases respiratory synchronization did not alter the obtained relaxation curves. However, in the patients with focal pathology the relaxation curves were significantly...

  5. Antibody-mediated allotype suppression in adult mice: the role of antigen, effector isotype and regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curling, E M; Dresser, D W

    1984-10-01

    It has been reported (Contemp. Top. Immunobiol. 1974. 3:41) that allotype-specific T suppressor cells can be induced after monoclonal anti-allotype treatment of neonatal (BALB/c X SJL)F1 (Igha/b) mice. Here we show that (BALB/c X CB20)F1 adult-derived spleen cells (SC) are, by contrast, potently suppressed by monoclonal allotype-specific reagents, (when transferred into irradiated BALB/c recipients) in the absence of primary T suppressor cell induction. Such suppression is only induced in activated B cells [exposed to lipopolysaccharide or sheep red blood cells (SRBC)], and is probably dependent on the isotype of the anti-allotype sera administered. For example, two independently produced IgG1 monoclonal reagents raised against the Igh-1b allotype were poorly suppressive or nonsuppressive, whereas an IgG3 and an IgG2a monoclonal antibody induced a 90% suppression of the target allotype in transferred adult SC. It was found that suppression was not due to a depletion of antigen-specific T cell help since: (a) the addition of SRBC-educated T cells did not break suppression and (b) suppressed SC were as good a source of T cell help as normal SC, in the response of virgin or memory B cell (Thy-1-depleted) responses to SRBC in vivo. Suppression was maintained in suppressed cells which had been rechallenged with SRBC after transfer into a second irradiated recipient, but was not induced in normal SC when these were admixed with an equal number from this suppressed SC population. These findings point to a possible mechanism for the regulation of B cell expression, through the formation of an antibody-Ig receptor complex at the surface of the B lymphocyte. After complexing the target cell is either deleted or inactivated. The response to SRBC was reduced or ablated for at least 70 days after treatment with a single dose of anti-allotype serum.

  6. Regulatory role of NKG2D+ NK cells in intestinal lamina propria by secreting double-edged Th1 cytokines in ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fan; Peng, Pai-Lan; Lin, Xue; Chang, Ying; Liu, Jing; Zhou, Rui; Nie, Jia-Yan; Dong, Wei-Guo; Zhao, Qiu; Li, Jin

    2017-11-17

    The role of intestinal lamina propria (LP) NKG2D+ NK cells is unclear in regulating Th1/Th2 balance in ulcerative colitis (UC). In this study, we investigated the frequency of LP NKG2D+ NK cells in DSS-induced colitis model and intestinal mucosal samples of UC patients, as well as the secretion of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines in NK cell lines after MICA stimulation. The role of Th1 cytokines in UC was validated by bioinformatics analysis. We found that DSS-induced colitis in mice was characterized by a Th2-mediated process. In acute phrase, the frequency of LP NKG2D+ lymphocytes increased significantly and decreased in remission, while the frequency of LP NKG2D+ NK cells decreased significantly in acute phase and increased in remission. No obvious change was found in the frequency of total LP NK cells. Similarly, severe UC patients had a higher expression of mucosal NKG2D and a lower number of NKG2D+ NK cells than mild to moderate UC. In NK cell lines, the MICA stimulation could induce a predominant secretion of Th1 cytokines (TNF, IFN-γ). Furthermore, in bioinformatics analysis, mucosal Th1 cytokine of TNF, showed a double-edged role in UC when compared to the Th1-mediated disease of Crohn's colitis. In conclusion, LP NKG2D+ NK cells partially played a regulatory role in UC through secreting Th1 cytokines to regulate the Th2-predominant Th1/Th2 imbalance, despite of the concomitant pro-inflammatory effects of Th1 cytokines.

  7. The role of First Nations in oil and gas development under federal regulatory regimes: Options for change and lessons from New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, T. R. [Borden, Ladner, Gervais, LLP., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    This thesis was prepared at the University of Ottawa in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Laws (LL.M.). It is included here in its entirety. It outlines the role played by First Nations under federal oil and gas regulatory regimes and makes recommendations designed to enable First Nations groups to participate in oil and gas development. A persuasive argument is made on legal and policy grounds for an active role for First Nations in oil and gas development within their traditional territories. This position is supported by a comprehensive analysis of three federal oil and gas regimes -- the Northern, Offshore and Indian Reserve regimes -- their legislative frameworks and recent developments in aboriginal jurisprudence and policy. Further support for the recommendations is adduced by comparing the Canadian situation with relevant contemporary resource management issues in New Zealand. The author recommends the immediate creation of a Consultation Model for a range of consultation processes that vary depending upon the nature of the issue. Over the longer term, development of First Nation Models is recommended. These models should be adjustable by careful monitoring of the successes and failures of First Nation oil and gas management regimes under Comprehensive Land Claim Agreements. It is suggested that internal capacity issues with respect to infrastructure and expertise must be addressed before First Nation groups can establish economically viable oil and gas models. [320 refs.].

  8. Non-coding RNAs in Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles: Deciphering Regulatory Roles in Stem Cell Potency, Inflammatory Resolve, and Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Fatima

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are heterogeneous populations of nano- and micro-sized vesicles secreted by various cell types. There is mounting evidence that EVs have widespread roles in transporting proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids between cells and serve as mediators of intercellular communication. EVs secreted from stem cells could function as paracrine factors, and appear to mimic and recapitulate several features of their secreting cells. EV-mediated transport of regulatory RNAs provides a novel source of trans-regulation between cells. As such, stem cells have evolved unique forms of paracrine mechanisms for recapitulating their potencies with specialized functions by transporting non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs via EVs. This includes the dissemination of stem cell-derived EV-ncRNAs and their regulatory effects elicited in differentiation, self-renewal, pluripotency, and the induction of reparative programs. Here, we summarize and discuss the therapeutic effects of mesenchymal stem cell-derived EV-ncRNAs in the induction of intrinsic regenerative programs elicited through regulating several mechanisms. Among them, most noticeable are the EV-mediated enrichment of ncRNAs at the injury sites contributing the regulation of matrix remodeling, epithelial mesenchymal transitions, and attraction of fibroblasts. Additionally, we emphasize EV-mediated transmission of anti-inflammatory RNAs from stem cells to injury site that potentially orchestrate the resolution of the inflammatory responses and immune alleviation to better facilitate healing processes. Collectively, this knowledge indicates a high value and potential of EV-mediated RNA-based therapeutic approaches in regenerative medicine.

  9. Conserved regulatory modules in the Sox9 testis-specific enhancer predict roles for SOX, TCF/LEF, Forkhead, DMRT, and GATA proteins in vertebrate sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri-Fam, Stefan; Sinclair, Andrew H; Koopman, Peter; Harley, Vincent R

    2010-03-01

    While the primary sex determining switch varies between vertebrate species, a key downstream event in testicular development, namely the male-specific up-regulation of Sox9, is conserved. To date, only two sex determining switch genes have been identified, Sry in mammals and the Dmrt1-related gene Dmy (Dmrt1bY) in the medaka fish Oryzias latipes. In mice, Sox9 expression is evidently up-regulated by SRY and maintained by SOX9 both of which directly activate the core 1.3 kb testis-specific enhancer of Sox9 (TESCO). How Sox9 expression is up-regulated and maintained in species without Sry (i.e. non-mammalian species) is not understood. In this study, we have undertaken an in-depth comparative genomics approach and show that TESCO contains an evolutionarily conserved region (ECR) of 180 bp which is present in marsupials, monotremes, birds, reptiles and amphibians. The ECR contains highly conserved modules that predict regulatory roles for SOX, TCF/LEF, Forkhead, DMRT, and GATA proteins in vertebrate sex determination/differentiation. Our data suggest that tetrapods share common aspects of Sox9 regulation in the testis, despite having different sex determining switch mechanisms. They also suggest that Sox9 autoregulation is an ancient mechanism shared by all tetrapods, raising the possibility that in mammals, SRY evolved by mimicking this regulation. The validation of ECR regulatory sequences conserved from human to frogs will provide new insights into vertebrate sex determination. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Final disposal of spent nuclear fuel - regulatory system and roles of different actors during the decision process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-03-01

    In November 2006 Swedish Nuclear Fuels Co. applied for a license to build a plant for encapsulation of spent nuclear fuels at Oskarshamn, Sweden. The company also have plans to apply, in 2009, for a license to construct a underground repository for spent nuclear fuels. KASAM arranged a seminar in November 2006 in order to describe and discuss the licensing rules and regulations and the roles of different parties in the decision making. Another objective of the seminar was to point out possible ambiguities in this process. Another interesting question under discussion was in what ways the basic data for the decision should be produced. The seminar covered the part of the process beginning with the application for a license and ending with the government approval/rejection of the application. Most time was spent on the legal aspects of the process

  11. Final disposal of spent nuclear fuel - regulatory system and roles of different actors during the decision process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-03-15

    In November 2006 Swedish Nuclear Fuels Co. applied for a license to build a plant for encapsulation of spent nuclear fuels at Oskarshamn, Sweden. The company also have plans to apply, in 2009, for a license to construct a underground repository for spent nuclear fuels. KASAM arranged a seminar in November 2006 in order to describe and discuss the licensing rules and regulations and the roles of different parties in the decision making. Another objective of the seminar was to point out possible ambiguities in this process. Another interesting question under discussion was in what ways the basic data for the decision should be produced. The seminar covered the part of the process beginning with the application for a license and ending with the government approval/rejection of the application. Most time was spent on the legal aspects of the process

  12. In vivo approaches reveal a key role for DCs in CD4+ T cell activation and parasite clearance during the acute phase of experimental blood-stage malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Borges da Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are phagocytes that are highly specialized for antigen presentation. Heterogeneous populations of macrophages and DCs form a phagocyte network inside the red pulp (RP of the spleen, which is a major site for the control of blood-borne infections such as malaria. However, the dynamics of splenic DCs during Plasmodium infections are poorly understood, limiting our knowledge regarding their protective role in malaria. Here, we used in vivo experimental approaches that enabled us to deplete or visualize DCs in order to clarify these issues. To elucidate the roles of DCs and marginal zone macrophages in the protection against blood-stage malaria, we infected DTx (diphtheria toxin-treated C57BL/6.CD11c-DTR mice, as well as C57BL/6 mice treated with low doses of clodronate liposomes (ClLip, with Plasmodium chabaudi AS (Pc parasites. The first evidence suggesting that DCs could contribute directly to parasite clearance was an early effect of the DTx treatment, but not of the ClLip treatment, in parasitemia control. DCs were also required for CD4+ T cell responses during infection. The phagocytosis of infected red blood cells (iRBCs by splenic DCs was analyzed by confocal intravital microscopy, as well as by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence, at three distinct phases of Pc malaria: at the first encounter, at pre-crisis concomitant with parasitemia growth and at crisis when the parasitemia decline coincides with spleen closure. In vivo and ex vivo imaging of the spleen revealed that DCs actively phagocytize iRBCs and interact with CD4+ T cells both in T cell-rich areas and in the RP. Subcapsular RP DCs were highly efficient in the recognition and capture of iRBCs during pre-crisis, while complete DC maturation was only achieved during crisis. These findings indicate that, beyond their classical role in antigen presentation, DCs also contribute to the direct elimination of iRBCs during acute Plasmodium infection.

  13. In vivo approaches reveal a key role for DCs in CD4+ T cell activation and parasite clearance during the acute phase of experimental blood-stage malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges da Silva, Henrique; Fonseca, Raíssa; Cassado, Alexandra Dos Anjos; Machado de Salles, Érika; de Menezes, Maria Nogueira; Langhorne, Jean; Perez, Katia Regina; Cuccovia, Iolanda Midea; Ryffel, Bernhard; Barreto, Vasco M; Marinho, Cláudio Romero Farias; Boscardin, Silvia Beatriz; Álvarez, José Maria; D'Império-Lima, Maria Regina; Tadokoro, Carlos Eduardo

    2015-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are phagocytes that are highly specialized for antigen presentation. Heterogeneous populations of macrophages and DCs form a phagocyte network inside the red pulp (RP) of the spleen, which is a major site for the control of blood-borne infections such as malaria. However, the dynamics of splenic DCs during Plasmodium infections are poorly understood, limiting our knowledge regarding their protective role in malaria. Here, we used in vivo experimental approaches that enabled us to deplete or visualize DCs in order to clarify these issues. To elucidate the roles of DCs and marginal zone macrophages in the protection against blood-stage malaria, we infected DTx (diphtheria toxin)-treated C57BL/6.CD11c-DTR mice, as well as C57BL/6 mice treated with low doses of clodronate liposomes (ClLip), with Plasmodium chabaudi AS (Pc) parasites. The first evidence suggesting that DCs could contribute directly to parasite clearance was an early effect of the DTx treatment, but not of the ClLip treatment, in parasitemia control. DCs were also required for CD4+ T cell responses during infection. The phagocytosis of infected red blood cells (iRBCs) by splenic DCs was analyzed by confocal intravital microscopy, as well as by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence, at three distinct phases of Pc malaria: at the first encounter, at pre-crisis concomitant with parasitemia growth and at crisis when the parasitemia decline coincides with spleen closure. In vivo and ex vivo imaging of the spleen revealed that DCs actively phagocytize iRBCs and interact with CD4+ T cells both in T cell-rich areas and in the RP. Subcapsular RP DCs were highly efficient in the recognition and capture of iRBCs during pre-crisis, while complete DC maturation was only achieved during crisis. These findings indicate that, beyond their classical role in antigen presentation, DCs also contribute to the direct elimination of iRBCs during acute Plasmodium infection.

  14. Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Plays a Critical Role in Naive and Effector Murine T Cells but Not Natural Regulatory T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ramadan A; Camick, Christina; Wiles, Katherine; Walseth, Timothy F; Slama, James T; Bhattacharya, Sumit; Giovannucci, David R; Wall, Katherine A

    2016-02-26

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), the most potent Ca(2+) mobilizing second messenger discovered to date, has been implicated in Ca(2+) signaling in some lymphomas and T cell clones. In contrast, the role of NAADP in Ca(2+) signaling or the identity of the Ca(2+) stores targeted by NAADP in conventional naive T cells is less clear. In the current study, we demonstrate the importance of NAADP in the generation of Ca(2+) signals in murine naive T cells. Combining live-cell imaging methods and a pharmacological approach using the NAADP antagonist Ned-19, we addressed the involvement of NAADP in the generation of Ca(2+) signals evoked by TCR stimulation and the role of this signal in downstream physiological end points such as proliferation, cytokine production, and other responses to stimulation. We demonstrated that acidic compartments in addition to the endoplasmic reticulum were the Ca(2+) stores that were sensitive to NAADP in naive T cells. NAADP was shown to evoke functionally relevant Ca(2+) signals in both naive CD4 and naive CD8 T cells. Furthermore, we examined the role of this signal in the activation, proliferation, and secretion of effector cytokines by Th1, Th2, Th17, and CD8 effector T cells. Overall, NAADP exhibited a similar profile in mediating Ca(2+) release in effector T cells as in their counterpart naive T cells and seemed to be equally important for the function of these different subsets of effector T cells. This profile was not observed for natural T regulatory cells. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Plays a Critical Role in Naive and Effector Murine T Cells but Not Natural Regulatory T Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ramadan A.; Camick, Christina; Wiles, Katherine; Walseth, Timothy F.; Slama, James T.; Bhattacharya, Sumit; Giovannucci, David R.; Wall, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), the most potent Ca2+ mobilizing second messenger discovered to date, has been implicated in Ca2+ signaling in some lymphomas and T cell clones. In contrast, the role of NAADP in Ca2+ signaling or the identity of the Ca2+ stores targeted by NAADP in conventional naive T cells is less clear. In the current study, we demonstrate the importance of NAADP in the generation of Ca2+ signals in murine naive T cells. Combining live-cell imaging methods and a pharmacological approach using the NAADP antagonist Ned-19, we addressed the involvement of NAADP in the generation of Ca2+ signals evoked by TCR stimulation and the role of this signal in downstream physiological end points such as proliferation, cytokine production, and other responses to stimulation. We demonstrated that acidic compartments in addition to the endoplasmic reticulum were the Ca2+ stores that were sensitive to NAADP in naive T cells. NAADP was shown to evoke functionally relevant Ca2+ signals in both naive CD4 and naive CD8 T cells. Furthermore, we examined the role of this signal in the activation, proliferation, and secretion of effector cytokines by Th1, Th2, Th17, and CD8 effector T cells. Overall, NAADP exhibited a similar profile in mediating Ca2+ release in effector T cells as in their counterpart naive T cells and seemed to be equally important for the function of these different subsets of effector T cells. This profile was not observed for natural T regulatory cells. PMID:26728458

  16. Neuroprotective Role of Atractylenolide-I in an In Vitro and In Vivo Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep More

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is an age-related neurological disorder characterized by a loss of dopaminergic neurons within the midbrain. Neuroinflammation has been nominated as one of the key pathogenic features of PD. Recently, the inadequate pharmacotherapy and adverse effects of conventional drugs have spurred the development of unconventional medications in the treatment of PD. The purpose of this study is to investigate the anti-neuroinflammatory mechanisms of Atractylenolide-I (ATR-I in in vivo and in vitro models of PD. Nitrite assay was measured via Griess reaction in lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulated BV-2 cells. mRNA and protein levels were determined by a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis, respectively. Further, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and immunohistochemistry were employed in BV-2 cells and MPTP-intoxicated C57BL6/J mice. Pre-treatment with ATR-I attenuated the inflammatory response in BV-2 cells by abating the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB and by inducing heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1. The intraperitoneal administration of ATR-I reversed MPTP-induced behavioral deficits, decreased microglial activation, and conferred protection to dopaminergic neurons in the mouse model of PD. Our experimental reports establish the involvement of multiple benevolent molecular events by ATR-I in MPTP-induced toxicity, which may aid in the development of ATR-I as a new therapeutic agent for the treatment of PD.

  17. Quantitative FLIM-FRET Microscopy to Monitor Nanoscale Chromatin Compaction In Vivo Reveals Structural Roles of Condensin Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Llères

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available How metazoan genomes are structured at the nanoscale in living cells and tissues remains unknown. Here, we adapted a quantitative FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer-based fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM approach to assay nanoscale chromatin compaction in living organisms. Caenorhabditis elegans was chosen as a model system. By measuring FRET between histone-tagged fluorescent proteins, we visualized distinct chromosomal regions and quantified the different levels of nanoscale compaction in meiotic cells. Using RNAi and repetitive extrachromosomal array approaches, we defined the heterochromatin state and showed that its architecture presents a nanoscale-compacted organization controlled by Heterochromatin Protein-1 (HP1 and SETDB1 H3-lysine-9 methyltransferase homologs in vivo. Next, we functionally explored condensin complexes. We found that condensin I and condensin II are essential for heterochromatin compaction and that condensin I additionally controls lowly compacted regions. Our data show that, in living animals, nanoscale chromatin compaction is controlled not only by histone modifiers and readers but also by condensin complexes.

  18. Influence of melanocytes in the ex-vivo reconstructed epidermal melanin unit following an acute UV irradiation; Role des melanocytes dans l'unite epidermique de melanisation reconstruite ex-vivo apres une irradiation UV aigue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cario-Andre, M

    2000-11-15

    Influence of melanocytes in skin pigmentation is well documented, however its photo-protective role has given rise to controversy. The role of melanocytes have been investigated on reconstructed epidermis with 100 % of keratinocytes or 95 % of keratinocytes and 5 % of melanocytes. In a first time, the effect of an acute UVB dose has been studied on both reconstructed epidermis, next we have investigated UVA and UVA+B effects on these epidermis. Following irradiation, the presence of melanocytes in reconstructed epidermis protects against apoptosis without protecting significantly against DNA damage formation (CPD, 6-4PP) and protects against UV-induced unbalance of the SOD/catalase ratio (antioxidants enzymes). On the contrary, the presence of melanocytes in reconstructed epidermis amplifies lipids and proteins oxidations but seems to protect against DNA oxidations. Melanocytes differ from keratinocytes by their melanin content and their more important concentration in polyunsaturated fatty acids. To evaluate what is the part of melanin and the part of polyunsaturated fatty acids in epidermal UV responses, reconstructed epidermis with keratinocytes have been supplemented with polyunsaturated fatty acid. This study indicates that polyunsaturated fatty acids are responsible for lipids and proteins oxidations and that melanin protect against DNA oxidation induced by lipid peroxidation. All these studies demonstrate that, model of reconstructed epidermis and epidermis in-vivo have the same behaviour following UV irradiation. In the last part, sunscreens and antioxidants have been tested on reconstructed epidermis and have demonstrated that model of reconstructed epidermis is suitable for photo-protective molecules screening. (author)

  19. Influence of melanocytes in the ex-vivo reconstructed epidermal melanin unit following an acute UV irradiation; Role des melanocytes dans l'unite epidermique de melanisation reconstruite ex-vivo apres une irradiation UV aigue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cario-Andre, M

    2000-11-15

    Influence of melanocytes in skin pigmentation is well documented, however its photo-protective role has given rise to controversy. The role of melanocytes have been investigated on reconstructed epidermis with 100 % of keratinocytes or 95 % of keratinocytes and 5 % of melanocytes. In a first time, the effect of an acute UVB dose has been studied on both reconstructed epidermis, next we have investigated UVA and UVA+B effects on these epidermis. Following irradiation, the presence of melanocytes in reconstructed epidermis protects against apoptosis without protecting significantly against DNA damage formation (CPD, 6-4PP) and protects against UV-induced unbalance of the SOD/catalase ratio (antioxidants enzymes). On the contrary, the presence of melanocytes in reconstructed epidermis amplifies lipids and proteins oxidations but seems to protect against DNA oxidations. Melanocytes differ from keratinocytes by their melanin content and their more important concentration in polyunsaturated fatty acids. To evaluate what is the part of melanin and the part of polyunsaturated fatty acids in epidermal UV responses, reconstructed epidermis with keratinocytes have been supplemented with polyunsaturated fatty acid. This study indicates that polyunsaturated fatty acids are responsible for lipids and proteins oxidations and that melanin protect against DNA oxidation induced by lipid peroxidation. All these studies demonstrate that, model of reconstructed epidermis and epidermis in-vivo have the same behaviour following UV irradiation. In the last part, sunscreens and antioxidants have been tested on reconstructed epidermis and have demonstrated that model of reconstructed epidermis is suitable for photo-protective molecules screening. (author)

  20. Regulatory role of OsMADS34 in the determination of glumes fate, grain yield and quality in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyong Ren

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Grasses produce seeds on spikelets, a unique type of inflorescence. Despite the importance of grass crops for food, the genetic mechanisms that control spikelet development remain poorly understood. In this study, we used m34-z, a new mutant allele of the rice (Oryza sativa E-class gene OsMADS34, to examine OsMADS34 function in determining the identities of glumes (rudimentary glume and sterile lemma and grain size. In the m34-z mutant, both the rudimentary glume and sterile lemma were homeotically converted to the lemma-like organs and acquired the lemma identity, suggesting that OsMADS34 plays important roles in the development of glumes. In the m34-z mutant, most of the grains from the secondary panicle branches were decreased in size, compared with grains from wild type, but no differences were observed in the grains from the primary panicle branches. The amylose content and gel consistency, and a seed-setting rate from the secondary panicle branches were reduced in the m34-z mutant. Interesting, transcriptional activity analysis revealed that OsMADS34 protein was a transcription repressor and it may influence grain yield by suppressing the expressions of BG1, GW8, GW2 and GL7 in the m34-z mutant. These findings revealed that OsMADS34 largely affects grain yield by affecting the size of grains from the secondary branches.

  1. Old Yellow Enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi Exhibits In Vivo Prostaglandin F2α Synthase Activity and Has a Key Role in Parasite Infection and Drug Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia Díaz-Viraqué

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The discovery that trypanosomatids, unicellular organisms of the order Kinetoplastida, are capable of synthesizing prostaglandins raised questions about the role of these molecules during parasitic infections. Multiple studies indicate that prostaglandins could be related to the infection processes and pathogenesis in trypanosomatids. This work aimed to unveil the role of the prostaglandin F2α synthase TcOYE in the establishment of Trypanosoma cruzi infection, the causative agent of Chagas disease. This chronic disease affects several million people in Latin America causing high morbidity and mortality. Here, we propose a prokaryotic evolutionary origin for TcOYE, and then we used in vitro and in vivo experiments to show that T. cruzi prostaglandin F2α synthase plays an important role in modulating the infection process. TcOYE overexpressing parasites were less able to complete the infective cycle in cell culture infections and increased cardiac tissue parasitic load in infected mice. Additionally, parasites overexpressing the enzyme increased PGF2α synthesis from arachidonic acid. Finally, an increase in benznidazole and nifurtimox susceptibility in TcOYE overexpressing parasites showed its participation in activating the currently anti-chagasic drugs, which added to its observed ability to confer resistance to hydrogen peroxide, highlights the relevance of this enzyme in multiple events including host–parasite interaction.

  2. Immunotherapeutical role of Flt3 ligand amplification of pulmonary dendritic cells in murine multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-wei WANG

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the therapeutic effect of Flt3 ligand (Flt3L on multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS model via amplification of lung dendritic cells. Methods Animal model of MODS was replicated by injecting zymosan into the peritoneal cavity of BALB/c mice, and then the mice were randomly divided into Flt3L treatment group, MODS group, Flt3L group and control group. Mortality rate was observed. After 12 days, lung mononuclear cells were isolated by density gradient centrifugation and analyzed with flow cytometry. Blood AST, ALT, creatinine, lipase, amylase and glucose were determined by automatic biochemical analyzer. Pathological changes in lung tissue were observed under light microscope. Results Mortality in Flt3L treatment group decreased dramatically compared with MODS group. The proportions of myeloid, plasmacytoid and I-Ad+ DCs in Flt3L group were remarkably increased compared with control group, and the proportion of the three DC subsets in MODS group was much lower than that in control group. Howerver, Flt3L treatment dramatically increased the proportion of them in MODS group. In MODS group, the level of ALT, AST, lipase, amylase and creatinine remarkably increased and blood glucose decreased compared with that of Flt3L and control groups; but in Flt3L treatment group, the level of ALT, AST, lipase, amylase and creatinine decreased and blood glucose increased dramatically, and lung injury mitigated obviously compared with MODS group. Conclusion Flt3L could attenuate lung tissue injury in MODS model, improve organ function, and lower the mortality of experimental animals, thus exerting its immunotherapeutic effects by in vivo amplification of lung dendritic cells.

  3. Role of early growth response 1 in arteriogenesis: impact on vascular cell proliferation and leukocyte recruitment in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagel, Judith-Irina; Ziegelhoeffer, Tibor; Heil, Matthias; Fischer, Silvia; Fernández, Borja; Schaper, Wolfgang; Preissner, Klaus T; Deindl, Elisabeth

    2012-03-01

    Based on previous findings that early growth response 1 (Egr-1) participates in leukocyte recruitment and cell proliferation in vitro, this study was designed to investigate its mode of action during arteriogenesis in vivo. In a model of peripheral arteriogenesis, Egr-1 was significantly upregulated in growing collaterals of wild-type (WT) mice, both on mRNA and protein level. Egr-1(-/-) mice demonstrated delayed arteriogenesis after femoral artery ligation. They further showed increased levels of monocytes and granulocytes in the circulation, but reduced levels in adductor muscles under baseline conditions. After femoral artery ligation, elevated numbers of macrophages were detected in the perivascular zone of collaterals in Egr-1(-/-) mice and mRNA of leukocyte recruitment mediators was upregulated. Other Egr family members (Egr-2 to -4) were significantly upregulated only in Egr-1(-/-) mice, suggesting a mechanism of counterbalancing Egr-1 deficiency. Moreover, splicing factor-1, downregulated in WT mice after femoral artery ligation in the process of increased vascular cell proliferation, was upregulated in Egr-1(-/-) mice. αSM-actin on the other hand, significantly downregulated in WT mice, showed no differential expression in Egr-1(-/-) mice. While cell cycle regulator cyclin E and cdc20 were upregulated in Egr-1(-/-) mice, cyclin D1 expression decreased below the detection limit in collaterals, and the proliferation marker ki67 was not differentially expressed. In conclusion, compensation for deficiency in Egr-1 function in leukocyte recruitment can presumably be mediated by other transcription factors; however, Egr-1 is indispensable for effective vascular cell cycle progression in arteriogenesis.

  4. Obesity impairs skeletal muscle AMPK signaling during exercise: role of AMPKα2 in the regulation of exercise capacity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Young, R S; Ayala, J E; Fueger, P T; Mayes, W H; Kang, L; Wasserman, D H

    2011-07-01

    Skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)α2 activity is impaired in obese, insulin-resistant individuals during exercise. We determined whether this defect contributes to the metabolic dysregulation and reduced exercise capacity observed in the obese state. C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) mice and/or mice expressing a kinase dead AMPKα2 subunit in skeletal muscle (α2-KD) were fed chow or high-fat (HF) diets from 3 to 16 weeks of age. At 15 weeks, mice performed an exercise stress test to determine exercise capacity. In WT mice, muscle glucose uptake and skeletal muscle AMPKα2 activity was assessed in chronically catheterized mice (carotid artery/jugular vein) at 16 weeks. In a separate study, HF-fed WT and α2-KD mice performed 5 weeks of exercise training (from 15 to 20 weeks of age) to test whether AMPKα2 is necessary to restore work tolerance. HF-fed WT mice had reduced exercise tolerance during an exercise stress test, and an attenuation in muscle glucose uptake and AMPKα2 activity during a single bout of exercise (Pfeeding further reduced running time ∼25% (Pexercise training, HF-fed WT and α2-KD mice increased maximum running speed ∼35% (PExercise training restored running speed to levels seen in healthy, chow-fed mice. HF feeding impairs AMPKα2 activity in skeletal muscle during exercise in vivo. Although this defect directly contributes to reduced exercise capacity, findings in HF-fed α2-KD mice show that AMPKα2-independent mechanisms are also involved. Importantly, α2-KD mice on a HF-fed diet adapt to regular exercise by increasing exercise tolerance, demonstrating that this adaptation is independent of skeletal muscle AMPKα2 activity.

  5. Psoas muscle architectural design, in vivo sarcomere length range, and passive tensile properties support its role as a lumbar spine stabilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Gilad J; Kim, Choll W; Tomiya, Akihito; Lee, Yu Po; Ghofrani, Hossein; Garfin, Steven R; Lieber, Richard L; Ward, Samuel R

    2011-12-15

    Controlled laboratory and cross-sectional study designs. To determine psoas major (PM) muscle architectural properties, in vivo sarcomere-length operating range, and passive mechanical properties. PM is an important hip flexor but its role in lumbar spine function is not fully understood. Several investigators have detailed the gross anatomy of PM, but comprehensive architectural data and in vivo length-tension and passive mechanical behaviors have not been documented. PM was isolated in 13 cadaver specimens, permitting architectural measurements of physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), normalized fiber length (Lf), and Lf:muscle length (Lm) ratio. Sarcomere lengths were measured in vivo from intraoperative biopsies taken with the hip joint in flexed and extended positions. Single-fiber and fiber bundle tensile properties and titin molecular weight were then measured from separate biopsies. Architecturally, average PCSA was 18.45 ± 1.32 cm2, average Lf was 12.70 ± 2 cm, and average Lf: Lm was 0.48 ± 0.06. Intraoperative sarcomere length measurements revealed that the muscle operates from 3.18 ± 0.20 μm with hip flexed at 10.7° ± 13.9° to 3.03 ± 0.22 μm with hip flexed at 55.9° ± 21.4°. Passive mechanical data demonstrated that the elastic modulus of the PM muscle fibers was 37.44 ± 9.11 kPa and of fiber bundles was 55.3 ± 11.8 kPa. Analysis of PM architecture demonstrates that its average Lf and passive biomechanical properties resemble those of the lumbar erector spinae muscles. In addition, PM sarcomere lengths were confined to the descending portion of the length-tension curve allowing the muscle to become stronger as the hip is flexed and the spine assumes a forward leaning posture. These findings suggest that the human PM has architectural and physiologic features that support its role as both a flexor of the hip and a dynamic stabilizer of the lumbar spine.

  6. The role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling pathway in cardiotoxicity of acute lead intoxication in vivo and in vitro rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Mushtaq A; Maayah, Zaid H; Bakheet, Saleh A; El-Kadi, Ayman O; Korashy, Hesham M

    2013-04-05

    Lead (Pb(2+)) is a naturally occurring systemic toxicant heavy metal that affects several organs in the body including the kidneys, liver, and central nervous system. However, Pb(2+)-induced cardiotoxicity has never been investigated yet and the exact mechanism of Pb(2+) associated cardiotoxicity has not been studied. The current study was designed to investigate the potential effect of Pb(2+) to induce cardiotoxicity in vivo and in vitro rat model and to explore the molecular mechanisms and the role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and regulated gene, cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1), in Pb(2+)-mediated cardiotoxicity. For these purposes, Wistar albino rats were treated with Pb(2+) (25, 50 and 100mg/kg, i.p.) for three days and the effects on physiological and histopathological parameters of cardiotoxicity were determined. At the in vitro level, rat cardiomyocyte H9c2 cell lines were incubated with increasing concentration of Pb(2+) (25, 50, and 100 μM) and the expression of hypertrophic genes, α- and β-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC and β-MHC), brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP), and CYP1A1 were determined at the mRNA and protein levels using real-time PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. The results showed that Pb(2+) significantly induced cardiotoxicity and heart failure as evidenced by increase cardiac enzymes, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase and changes in histopathology in vivo. In addition, Pb(2+) treatment induced β-MHC and BNP whereas inhibited α-MHC mRNA and protein levels in vivo in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, at the in vitro level, Pb(2+) treatment induced both β-MHC and α-MHC mRNA levels in time- and dose-dependent manner. Importantly, these changes were accompanied with a proportional increase in the expression of CYP1A1 mRNA and protein expression levels, suggesting a role for the CYP1A1 in cardiotoxicity. The direct evidence for the involvement of CYP1A1 in the induction of cardiotoxicity by Pb(2+) was evidenced by the

  7. Perceptions of regulatory approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halin, Magnus; Leinonen, Ruusaliisa

    2012-01-01

    Ms. Ruusaliisa Leinonen and Mr. Magnus Halin from Fortum gave a joint presentation on industry perceptions of regulatory oversight of LMfS/SC. It was concluded that an open culture of discussion exists between the regulator (STUK) and the licensee, based on the common goal of nuclear safety. An example was provided of on how regulatory interventions helped foster improvements to individual and collective dose rate trends, which had remained static. Regulatory interventions included discussions on the ALARA concept to reinforce the requirement to continuously strive for improvements in safety performance. Safety culture has also been built into regulatory inspections in recent years. Training days have also been organised by the regulatory body to help develop a shared understanding of safety culture between licensee and regulatory personnel. Fortum has also developed their own training for managers and supervisors. Training and ongoing discussion on LMfS/SC safety culture is considered particularly important because both Fortum and the regulatory body are experiencing an influx of new staff due to the demographic profile of their organisations. It was noted that further work is needed to reach a common understanding of safety culture on a practical level (e.g., for a mechanic setting to work), and in relation to the inspection criteria used by the regulator. The challenges associated with companies with a mix of energy types were also discussed. This can make it more difficult to understand responsibilities and decision making processes, including the role of the parent body organisation. It also makes communication more challenging due to increased complexity and a larger number of stakeholders

  8. Regulatory role of tetR gene in a novel gene cluster of Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae RS-1 under oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He eLiu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae is the causal agent of bacterial brown stripe disease in rice. In this study, we characterized a novel horizontal transfer of a gene cluster, including tetR, on the chromosome of A. avenae subsp. avenae RS-1 by genome-wide analysis. TetR acted as a repressor in this gene cluster and the oxidative stress resistance was enhanced in tetR-deletion mutant strain. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA demonstrated that TetR regulator bound directly to the promoter of this gene cluster. Consistently, the results of quantitative real-time PCR also showed alterations in expression of associated genes. Moreover, the proteins affected by TetR under oxidative stress were revealed by comparing proteomic profiles of wild-type and mutant strains via 1D SDS-PAGE and LC-MS/MS analyses. Taken together, our results demonstrated that tetR gene in this novel gene cluster contributed to cell survival under oxidative stress, and TetR protein played an important regulatory role in growth kinetics, biofilm-forming capability, SOD and catalase activity, and oxide detoxicating ability.

  9. Regulatory role of tetR gene in a novel gene cluster of Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae RS-1 under oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, He; Yang, Chun-Lan; Ge, Meng-Yu; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Li, Bin; Zhao, Wen-Jun; Chen, Gong-You; Zhu, Bo; Xie, Guan-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae is the causal agent of bacterial brown stripe disease in rice. In this study, we characterized a novel horizontal transfer of a gene cluster, including tetR, on the chromosome of A. avenae subsp. avenae RS-1 by genome-wide analysis. TetR acted as a repressor in this gene cluster and the oxidative stress resistance was enhanced in tetR-deletion mutant strain. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that TetR regulator bound directly to the promoter of this gene cluster. Consistently, the results of quantitative real-time PCR also showed alterations in expression of associated genes. Moreover, the proteins affected by TetR under oxidative stress were revealed by comparing proteomic profiles of wild-type and mutant strains via 1D SDS-PAGE and LC-MS/MS analyses. Taken together, our results demonstrated that tetR gene in this novel gene cluster contributed to cell survival under oxidative stress, and TetR protein played an important regulatory role in growth kinetics, biofilm-forming capability, superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, and oxide detoxicating ability.

  10. Homeostatic regulatory role of Pokemon in NF-κB signaling: stimulating both p65 and IκBα expression in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan-Nan; Sun, Qin-Sheng; Chen, Zhe; Liu, Feng; Jiang, Yu-Yang

    2013-01-01

    NF-κB consists of p50, p65 (RelA), p52, c-Rel, and RelB, and among them p65 is a representative protein to investigate the regulation and function of this signaling. NF-κB integrates inflammation and carcinogenesis and regulates the expression of a variety of genes in response to immunity, inflammation, and apoptosis. IκBα acts as an inhibitor of NF-κB through forming an inactive NF-κB/IκBα complex. Pokemon is a ubiquitous transcription factor involved in different signaling pathways, playing a pivotal role in cell proliferation, anti-apoptosis, embryonic development, and maintenance. In this study, we found that p65 and IκBα are both novel regulatory targets of Pokemon. Ectopic expression of Pokemon in immortalized liver cells HL7702 enhanced p65 and IκBα expression, whereas silencing of Pokemon in hepatocellular carcinoma cells QGY7703 reduced cellular p65 levels. ChIP assay and targeted mutagenesis revealed that Pokemon directly binds to the element of -434 to -430 bp in p65 promoter and of -453 to -448 bp in IκBα promoter and stimulates luciferase reporter gene expression. Co-transfection of Pokemon with p65 or IκBα promoter-reporter notably enhanced their promoter activity. These data suggest that Pokemon activates the expression of both p65 and IκBα by sequence-specific binding to their promoters and plays a dual role in regulating NF-κB signaling.

  11. Regulatory Anatomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeyer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes the term “safety logics” to understand attempts within the European Union (EU) to harmonize member state legislation to ensure a safe and stable supply of human biological material for transplants and transfusions. With safety logics, I refer to assemblages of discourses, le...... they arise. In short, I expose the regulatory anatomy of the policy landscape....

  12. Regulatory Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Poul F.; Vetterlein, Antje

    2018-01-01

    Regulatory governance frameworks have become essential building blocks of world society. From supply chains to the regimes surrounding international organizations, extensive governance frameworks have emerged which structure and channel a variety of social exchanges, including economic, political...... by the International Transitional Administrations (ITAs) in Kosovo and Iraq as well as global supply chains and their impact on the garment industry in Bangladesh....

  13. The role of the Staphylococcal VraTSR regulatory system on vancomycin resistance and vanA operon expression in vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Nadia K; Yin, Shaohui; Boyle-Vavra, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Vancomycin is often the preferred treatment for invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. With the increase in incidence of MRSA infections, the use of vancomycin has increased and, as feared, isolates of vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) have emerged. VRSA isolates have acquired the entercoccal vanA operon contained on transposon (Tn) 1546 residing on a conjugal plasmid. VraTSR is a vancomycin and β-lactam-inducible three-component regulatory system encoded on the S. aureus chromosome that modulates the cell-wall stress response to cell-wall acting antibiotics. Mutation in vraTSR has shown to increase susceptibility to β-lactams and vancomycin in clinical VISA strains and in recombinant strain COLVA-200 which expresses a plasmid borne vanA operon. To date, the role of VraTSR in vanA operon expression in VRSA has not been demonstrated. In this study, the vraTSR operon was deleted from the first clinical VRSA strain (VRS1) by transduction with phage harvested from a USA300 vraTSR operon deletion strain. The absence of the vraTSR operon and presence of the vanA operon were confirmed in the transductant (VRS1Δvra) by PCR. Broth MIC determinations, demonstrated that the vancomycin MIC of VRS1Δvra (64 µg/ml) decreased by 16-fold compared with VRS1 (1024 µg/ml). The effect of the vraTSR operon deletion on expression of the van gene cluster (vanA, vanX and vanR) was examined by quantitative RT-PCR using relative quantification. A 2-5-fold decreased expression of the vanA operon genes occured in strain VRS1Δvra at stationary growth phase compared with the parent strain, VRS1. Both vancomycin resistance and vancomycin-induced expression of vanA and vanR were restored by complementation with a plasmid harboring the vraTSR operon. These findings demonstrate that expression in S. aureus of the horizontally acquired enterococcal vanA gene cluster is enhanced by the staphylococcal three-component cell wall stress regulatory

  14. The Role of B Cells for in Vivo T Cell Responses to a Friend Virus-Induced Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kirk R.; Klarnet, Jay P.; Gieni, Randall S.; Hayglass, Kent T.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    1990-08-01

    B cells can function as antigen-presenting cells and accessory cells for T cell responses. This study evaluated the role of B cells in the induction of protective T cell immunity to a Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV)-induced leukemia (FBL). B cell-deficient mice exhibited significantly reduced tumor-specific CD4^+ helper and CD8^+ cytotoxic T cell responses after priming with FBL or a recombinant vaccinia virus containing F-MuLV antigens. Moreover, these mice had diminished T cell responses to the vaccinia viral antigens. Tumor-primed T cells transferred into B cell-deficient mice effectively eradicated disseminated FBL. Thus, B cells appear necessary for efficient priming but not expression of tumor and viral T cell immunity.

  15. Role of glutamate receptors and nitric oxide on the effects of glufosinate ammonium, an organophosphate pesticide, on in vivo dopamine release in rat striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faro, Lilian R F; Ferreira Nunes, Brenda V; Alfonso, Miguel; Ferreira, Vania M; Durán, Rafael

    2013-09-15

    The purpose of the present work was to assess the possible role of glutamatergic receptors and nitric oxide (NO) production on effects of glufosinate ammonium (GLA), an organophosphate pesticide structurally related to glutamate, on in vivo striatal dopamine release in awake and freely moving rats. For this, we used antagonists of NMDA (MK-801 and AP5) or AMPA/kainate (CNQX) receptors, or nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors (l-NAME and 7-NI), to study the effects of GLA on release of dopamine from rat striatum. So, intrastriatal infusion of 10mM GLA significantly increased dopamine levels (1035±140%, compared with basal levels) and administration of GLA to MK-801 (250μM) or AP5 (650μM) pretreated animals, produced increases in dopamine overflow that were ∼40% and ∼90% smaller than those observed in animals not pretreated with MK-801 or AP5. Administration of GLA to CNQX (500μM) pretreated animals produced an effect that was not significantly different from the one produced in animals not pretreated with CNQX. On the other hand, administration of GLA to l-NAME (100μM) or 7-NI (100μM) pretreated animals, produced increases in dopamine overflow that were ∼80% and ∼75% smaller than those observed in animals not pretreated with these inhibitors. In summary, GLA appears to act, at least in part, through an overstimulation of NMDA (and not AMPA/kainate) receptors with possible NO production to induce in vivo dopamine release. Administration of NMDA receptor antagonists and NOS inhibitors partially blocks the release of dopamine from rat striatum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A new in vivo model of pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration reveals a surprising role for transcriptional regulation in pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun ePandey

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pantothenate Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration (PKAN is a neurodegenerative disorder with a poorly understood molecular mechanism. It is caused by mutations in Pantothenate Kinase, the first enzyme in the Coenzyme A (CoA biosynthetic pathway. Here, we developed a Drosophila model of PKAN (tim-fbl flies that allows us to continuously monitor the modeled disease in the brain. In tim-fbl flies, downregulation of fumble, the Drosophila PanK homologue in the cells containing a circadian clock results in characteristic features of PKAN such as developmental lethality, hypersensitivity to oxidative stress, and diminished life span. Despite quasi-normal circadian transcriptional rhythms, tim-fbl flies display brain-specific aberrant circadian locomotor rhythms, and a unique transcriptional signature. Comparison with expression data from flies exposed to paraquat demonstrates that, as previously suggested, pathways others than oxidative stress are affected by PANK downregulation. Surprisingly we found a significant decrease in the expression of key components of the photoreceptor recycling pathways, which could lead to retinal degeneration, a hallmark of PKAN. Importantly, these defects are not accompanied by changes in structural components in eye genes suggesting that changes in gene expression in the eye precede and may cause the retinal degeneration. Indeed tim-fbl flies have diminished response to light transitions, and their altered day/night patterns of activity demonstrates defects in light perception. This suggest that retinal lesions are not solely due to oxidative stress and demonstrates a role for the transcriptional response to CoA deficiency underlying the defects observed in dPanK deficient flies. Moreover, in the present study we developed a new fly model that can be applied to other diseases and that allows the assessment of neurodegeneration in the brains of living flies.

  17. Arterial grafts exhibiting unprecedented cellular infiltration and remodeling in vivo: the role of cells in the vascular wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Row, Sindhu; Peng, Haofan; Schlaich, Evan M; Koenigsknecht, Carmon; Andreadis, Stelios T; Swartz, Daniel D

    2015-05-01

    To engineer and implant vascular grafts in the arterial circulation of a pre-clinical animal model and assess the role of donor medial cells in graft remodeling and function. Vascular grafts were engineered using Small Intestinal Submucosa (SIS)-fibrin hybrid scaffold and implanted interpositionally into the arterial circulation of an ovine model. We sought to demonstrate implantability of SIS-Fibrin based grafts; examine the remodeling; and determine whether the presence of vascular cells in the medial wall was necessary for cellular infiltration from the host and successful remodeling of the implants. We observed no occlusions or anastomotic complications in 18 animals that received these grafts. Notably, the grafts exhibited unprecedented levels of host cell infiltration that was not limited to the anastomotic sites but occurred through the lumen as well as the extramural side, leading to uniform cell distribution. Incoming cells remodeled the extracellular matrix and matured into functional smooth muscle cells as evidenced by expression of myogenic markers and development of vascular reactivity. Interestingly, tracking the donor cells revealed that their presence was beneficial but not necessary for successful grafting. Indeed, the proliferation rate and number of donor cells decreased over time as the vascular wall was dominated by host cells leading to significant remodeling and development of contractile function. These results demonstrate that SIS-Fibrin grafts can be successfully implanted into the arterial circulation of a clinically relevant animal model, improve our understanding of vascular graft remodeling and raise the possibility of engineering mural cell-free arterial grafts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Exploring Regulatory Mechanisms of Atrial Myocyte Hypertrophy of Mitral Regurgitation through Gene Expression Profiling Analysis: Role of NFAT in Cardiac Hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Hao Chang

    Full Text Available Left atrial enlargement in mitral regurgitation (MR predicts a poor prognosis. The regulatory mechanisms of atrial myocyte hypertrophy of MR patients remain unknown.This study comprised 14 patients with MR, 7 patients with aortic valve disease (AVD, and 6 purchased samples from normal subjects (NC. We used microarrays, enrichment analysis and quantitative RT-PCR to study the gene expression profiles in the left atria. Microarray results showed that 112 genes were differentially up-regulated and 132 genes were differentially down-regulated in the left atria between MR patients and NC. Enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes demonstrated that "NFAT in cardiac hypertrophy" pathway was not only one of the significant associated canonical pathways, but also the only one predicted with a non-zero score of 1.34 (i.e. activated through Ingenuity Pathway Analysis molecule activity predictor. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Global Molecular Network analysis exhibited that the highest score network also showed high association with cardiac related pathways and functions. Therefore, 5 NFAT associated genes (PPP3R1, PPP3CB, CAMK1, MEF2C, PLCE1 were studies for validation. The mRNA expressions of PPP3CB and MEF2C were significantly up-regulated, and CAMK1 and PPP3R1 were significantly down-regulated in MR patients compared to NC. Moreover, MR patients had significantly increased mRNA levels of PPP3CB, MEF2C and PLCE1 compared to AVD patients. The atrial myocyte size of MR patients significantly exceeded that of the AVD patients and NC.Differentially expressed genes in the "NFAT in cardiac hypertrophy" pathway may play a critical role in the atrial myocyte hypertrophy of MR patients.

  19. Elucidation of the regulatory role of the fructose operon reveals a novel target for enhancing the NADPH supply in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihao; Chan, Siu Hung Joshua; Sudarsan, Suresh; Blank, Lars M; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Solem, Christian

    2016-11-01

    The performance of Corynebacterium glutamicum cell factories producing compounds which rely heavily on NADPH has been reported to depend on the sugar being metabolized. While some aspects of this phenomenon have been elucidated, there are still many unresolved questions as to how sugar metabolism is linked to redox and to the general metabolism. We here provide new insights into the regulation of the metabolism of this important platform organism by systematically characterizing mutants carrying various lesions in the fructose operon. Initially, we found that a strain where the dedicated fructose uptake system had been inactivated (KO-ptsF) was hampered in growth on sucrose minimal medium, and suppressor mutants appeared readily. Comparative genomic analysis in conjunction with enzymatic assays revealed that suppression was linked to inactivation of the pfkB gene, encoding a fructose-1-phosphate kinase. Detailed characterization of KO-ptsF, KO-pfkB and double knock-out (DKO) derivatives revealed a strong role for sugar-phosphates, especially fructose-1-phosphate (F1P), in governing sugar as well as redox metabolism due to effects on transcriptional regulation of key genes. These findings allowed us to propose a simple model explaining the correlation between sugar phosphate concentration, gene expression and ultimately the observed phenotype. To guide us in our analysis and help us identify bottlenecks in metabolism we debugged an existing genome-scale model onto which we overlaid the transcriptome data. Based on the results obtained we managed to enhance the NADPH supply and transform the wild-type strain into delivering the highest yield of lysine ever obtained on sucrose and fructose, thus providing a good example of how regulatory mechanisms can be harnessed for bioproduction. Copyright © 2016 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. RegA Plays a Key Role in Oxygen-Dependent Establishment of Persistence and in Isocitrate Lyase Activity, a Critical Determinant of In vivo Brucella suis Pathogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Abdou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available For aerobic human pathogens, adaptation to hypoxia is a critical factor for the establishment of persistent infections, as oxygen availability is low inside the host. The two-component system RegB/A of Brucella suis plays a central role in the control of respiratory systems adapted to oxygen deficiency, and in persistence in vivo. Using an original “in vitro model of persistence” consisting in gradual oxygen depletion, we compared transcriptomes and proteomes of wild-type and ΔregA strains to identify the RegA-regulon potentially involved in the set-up of persistence. Consecutive to oxygen consumption resulting in growth arrest, 12% of the genes in B. suis were potentially controlled directly or indirectly by RegA, among which numerous transcriptional regulators were up-regulated. In contrast, genes or proteins involved in envelope biogenesis and in cellular division were repressed, suggesting a possible role for RegA in the set-up of a non-proliferative persistence state. Importantly, the greatest number of the RegA-repressed genes and proteins, including aceA encoding the functional IsoCitrate Lyase (ICL, were involved in energy production. A potential consequence of this RegA impact may be the slowing-down of the central metabolism as B. suis progressively enters into persistence. Moreover, ICL is an essential determinant of pathogenesis and long-term interactions with the host, as demonstrated by the strict dependence of B. suis on ICL activity for multiplication and persistence during in vivo infection. RegA regulates gene or protein expression of all functional groups, which is why RegA is a key regulator of B. suis in adaptation to oxygen depletion. This function may contribute to the constraint of bacterial growth, typical of chronic infection. Oxygen-dependent activation of two-component systems that control persistence regulons, shared by several aerobic human pathogens, has not been studied in Brucella sp. before. This work

  1. Role of the two-component regulatory system arlRS in ica operon and aap positive but non-biofilm-forming Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates from hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yang; Liu, Jingran; Jiang, Juan; Hu, Jian; Xu, Tao; Wang, Jiaxue; Qu, Di

    2014-11-01

    The ica operon and aap gene are important factors for Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation. However, we found 15 out of 101 S. epidermidis strains isolated from patients had both the ica operon and the aap gene in the genome but could not form biofilms (ica(+)aap(+)/BF(-) isolates). Compared with standard strain RP62A, the 15 ica(+)aap(+)/BF(-) isolates had similar growth curves and initial attachment abilities, but had much lower apparent transcription levels of the icaA gene and significantly less production of polysaccharide intercellular adhesion (PIA). Furthermore, the expression of accumulation-associated protein in ica(+)aap(+)/BF(-) isolates was much weaker than in RP62A. The mRNA levels of icaADBC transcription-related regulatory genes, including icaR, sarA, rsbU, srrA, arlRS and luxS, were measured in the 15 ica(+)aap(+)/BF(-) clinical isolates. The mRNA levels of arlR and rsbU in all of the ica(+)aap(+)/BF(-) isolates were lower than in RP62A at 4 h. At 10 h, 14/15 of the isolates showed lower mRNA levels of arlR and rsbU than shown by RP62A. However, expression of sarA, luxS, srrA and icaR varied in different ica(+)aap(+)/BF(-) isolates. To further investigate the role of arlRS in biofilm formation, we analyzed icaA, sarA and rsbU transcription, PIA synthesis, Aap expression and biofilm formation in an arlRS deletion mutant of S. epidermidis strain 1457 and all were much less than in the wild type strain. This is consistent with the hypothesis that ArlRS may play an important role in regulating biofilm formation by the ica(+)aap(+)/BF(-)S. epidermidis clinical isolates and operate via both ica-dependent and Aap-dependent pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bacterial lipoprotein delays apoptosis in human neutrophils through inhibition of caspase-3 activity: regulatory roles for CD14 and TLR-2.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, Colm P

    2012-02-03

    The human sepsis syndrome resulting from bacterial infection continues to account for a significant proportion of hospital mortality. Neutralizing strategies aimed at individual bacterial wall products (such as LPS) have enjoyed limited success in this arena. Bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) is a major constituent of the wall of diverse bacterial forms and profoundly influences cellular function in vivo and in vitro, and has been implicated in the etiology of human sepsis. Delayed polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) apoptosis is a characteristic feature of human sepsis arising from Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacterial infection. Bacterial wall product ligation and subsequent receptor-mediated events upstream of caspase inhibition in neutrophils remain incompletely understood. BLP has been shown to exert its cellular effects primarily through TLR-2, and it is now widely accepted that lateral associations with the TLRs represent the means by which CD14 communicates intracellular messages. In this study, we demonstrate that BLP inhibits neutrophil mitochondrial membrane depolarization with a subsequent reduction in caspase-3 processing, ultimately leading to a significant delay in PMN apoptosis. Pretreatment of PMNs with an anti-TLR-2 mAb or anti-CD14 mAb prevented BLP from delaying PMN apoptosis to such a marked degree. Combination blockade using both mAbs completely prevented the effects of BLP (in 1 and 10 ng\\/ml concentrations) on PMN apoptosis. At higher concentrations of BLP, the antiapoptotic effects were observed, but were not as pronounced. Our findings therefore provide the first evidence of a crucial role for both CD14 and TLR-2 in delayed PMN apoptosis arising from bacterial infection.

  3. Developing regulatory approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axelsson, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Lars Axelsson presented SSM progress on oversight of LMfS/SC since the Chester 1 Workshop in 2007. Current SSM approaches for safety culture oversight include targeted safety management and safety culture inspections, compliance inspections which cover aspects of safety management/safety culture and multi-disciplinary team inspections. Examples of themes for targeted inspections include management of ambiguous operational situations or other weak signals, understanding of and attitudes to Human Performance tools, the Safety Department's role and authority and Leadership for safety. All regulatory activities provide inputs for the SSM yearly safety evaluation of each licensee. A form has been developed to capture safety culture observations from inspections and other interactions with licensees. Analysis will be performed to identify patterns and provide information to support planning of specific Safety Culture activities. Training has been developed for regulatory staff to enhance the quality of regulatory interventions on safety culture. This includes a half-day seminar to provide an overview of safety culture, and a workshop which provides more in-depth discussion on cultural issues and how to capture those during regulatory activities. Future plans include guidance for inspectors, and informal seminars on safety culture with licensees

  4. The role of CD154-CD40 versus CD28-B7 costimulatory pathways in regulating allogeneic Th1 and Th2 responses in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kishimoto, K; Dong, V M; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh

    2000-01-01

    We used signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4) and STAT6 gene knockout (-/-) mice as recipients of fully mismatched cardiac allografts to study the role of T-cell costimulatory pathways in regulating allogeneic T-helper 1 (Th1) versus Th2 responses in vivo. STAT4(-/-) mice have...... impaired Th1 responses, whereas STAT6(-/-) mice do not generate normal Th2 responses. Cardiac allografts from C57BL/6 mice were transplanted into normal wild-type (WT), STAT4(-/-), and STAT6(-/-) BALB/c recipients. STAT4(-/-) and STAT6(-/-) mice rejected their grafts with the same tempo as untreated WT....... Furthermore, there was a similar differential effect of CD28-B7 versus CD154-CD40 blockade in inhibiting immune responses in animals immunized with ovalbumin and complete Freund's adjuvant. These novel data indicate that Th1 and Th2 cells are differentially regulated by CD28-B7 versus CD154-CD40 costimulation...

  5. An in vivo genetic screen for genes involved in spliced leader trans-splicing indicates a crucial role for continuous de novo spliced leader RNP assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Lucas; Pandarakalam, George C; Fasimoye, Rotimi; Harrison, Neale; Connolly, Bernadette; Pettitt, Jonathan; Müller, Berndt

    2017-08-21

    Spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing is a critical element of gene expression in a number of eukaryotic groups. This process is arguably best understood in nematodes, where biochemical and molecular studies in Caenorhabditis elegans and Ascaris suum have identified key steps and factors involved. Despite this, the precise details of SL trans-splicing have yet to be elucidated. In part, this is because the systematic identification of the molecules involved has not previously been possible due to the lack of a specific phenotype associated with defects in this process. We present here a novel GFP-based reporter assay that can monitor SL1 trans-splicing in living C. elegans. Using this assay, we have identified mutants in sna-1 that are defective in SL trans-splicing, and demonstrate that reducing function of SNA-1, SNA-2 and SUT-1, proteins that associate with SL1 RNA and related SmY RNAs, impairs SL trans-splicing. We further demonstrate that the Sm proteins and pICln, SMN and Gemin5, which are involved in small nuclear ribonucleoprotein assembly, have an important role in SL trans-splicing. Taken together these results provide the first in vivo evidence for proteins involved in SL trans-splicing, and indicate that continuous replacement of SL ribonucleoproteins consumed during trans-splicing reactions is essential for effective trans-splicing. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Metabolic determinants of electrical failure in ex-vivo canine model of cardiac arrest: evidence for the protective role of inorganic pyrophosphate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Shibayama

    Full Text Available Deterioration of ventricular fibrillation (VF into asystole or severe bradycardia (electrical failure heralds a fatal outcome of cardiac arrest. The role of metabolism in the timing of electrical failure remains unknown.To determine metabolic factors of early electrical failure in an ex-vivo canine model of cardiac arrest (VF+global ischemia.Metabolomic screening was performed in left ventricular biopsies collected before and after 0.3, 2, 5, 10 and 20 min of VF and global ischemia. Electrical activity was monitored via plunge needle electrodes and pseudo-ECG. Four out of nine hearts exhibited electrical failure at 10.1±0.9 min (early-asys, while 5/9 hearts maintained VF for at least 19.7 min (late-asys. As compared to late-asys, early-asys hearts had more ADP, less phosphocreatine, and higher levels of lactate at some time points during VF/ischemia (all comparisons p<0.05. Pre-ischemic samples from late-asys hearts contained ∼25 times more inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi than early-asys hearts. A mechanistic role of PPi in cardioprotection was then tested by monitoring mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ during 20 min of simulated-demand ischemia using potentiometric probe TMRM in rabbit adult ventricular myocytes incubated with PPi versus control group. Untreated myocytes experienced significant loss of ΔΨ while in the PPi-treated myocytes ΔΨ was relatively maintained throughout 20 min of simulated-demand ischemia as compared to control (p<0.05.High tissue level of PPi may prevent ΔΨm loss and electrical failure at the early phase of ischemic stress. The link between the two protective effects may involve decreased rates of mitochondrial ATP hydrolysis and lactate accumulation.

  7. Novel ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS-induced null alleles of the Drosophila homolog of LRRK2 reveal a crucial role in endolysosomal functions and autophagy in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W. Dodson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in LRRK2 cause a dominantly inherited form of Parkinson’s disease (PD and are the most common known genetic determinant of PD. Inhibitor-based therapies targeting LRRK2 have emerged as a key therapeutic strategy in PD; thus, understanding the consequences of inhibiting the normal cellular functions of this protein is vital. Despite much interest, the physiological functions of LRRK2 remain unclear. Several recent studies have linked the toxicity caused by overexpression of pathogenic mutant forms of LRRK2 to defects in the endolysosomal and autophagy pathways, raising the question of whether endogenous LRRK2 might play a role in these processes. Here, we report the characterization of multiple novel ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS-induced nonsense alleles in the Drosophila LRRK2 homolog, lrrk. Using these alleles, we show that lrrk loss-of-function causes striking defects in the endolysosomal and autophagy pathways, including the accumulation of markedly enlarged lysosomes that are laden with undigested contents, consistent with a defect in lysosomal degradation. lrrk loss-of-function also results in the accumulation of autophagosomes, as well as the presence of enlarged early endosomes laden with mono-ubiquitylated cargo proteins, suggesting an additional defect in lysosomal substrate delivery. Interestingly, the lysosomal abnormalities in these lrrk mutants can be suppressed by a constitutively active form of the small GTPase rab9, which promotes retromer-dependent recycling from late endosomes to the Golgi. Collectively, our data provides compelling evidence of a vital role for lrrk in lysosomal function and endolysosomal membrane transport in vivo, and suggests a link between lrrk and retromer-mediated endosomal recycling.

  8. Novel ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-induced null alleles of the Drosophila homolog of LRRK2 reveal a crucial role in endolysosomal functions and autophagy in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Mark W; Leung, Lok K; Lone, Mohiddin; Lizzio, Michael A; Guo, Ming

    2014-12-01

    Mutations in LRRK2 cause a dominantly inherited form of Parkinson's disease (PD) and are the most common known genetic determinant of PD. Inhibitor-based therapies targeting LRRK2 have emerged as a key therapeutic strategy in PD; thus, understanding the consequences of inhibiting the normal cellular functions of this protein is vital. Despite much interest, the physiological functions of LRRK2 remain unclear. Several recent studies have linked the toxicity caused by overexpression of pathogenic mutant forms of LRRK2 to defects in the endolysosomal and autophagy pathways, raising the question of whether endogenous LRRK2 might play a role in these processes. Here, we report the characterization of multiple novel ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-induced nonsense alleles in the Drosophila LRRK2 homolog, lrrk. Using these alleles, we show that lrrk loss-of-function causes striking defects in the endolysosomal and autophagy pathways, including the accumulation of markedly enlarged lysosomes that are laden with undigested contents, consistent with a defect in lysosomal degradation. lrrk loss-of-function also results in the accumulation of autophagosomes, as well as the presence of enlarged early endosomes laden with mono-ubiquitylated cargo proteins, suggesting an additional defect in lysosomal substrate delivery. Interestingly, the lysosomal abnormalities in these lrrk mutants can be suppressed by a constitutively active form of the small GTPase rab9, which promotes retromer-dependent recycling from late endosomes to the Golgi. Collectively, our data provides compelling evidence of a vital role for lrrk in lysosomal function and endolysosomal membrane transport in vivo, and suggests a link between lrrk and retromer-mediated endosomal recycling. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Differential effects of IL-2 and IL-21 on expansion of the CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ T regulatory cells with redundant roles in natural killer cell mediated antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Aruna; Ramanunni, Asha; Cheney, Carolyn; Rozewski, Darlene; Kindsvogel, Wayne; Lehman, Amy; Jarjoura, David; Caligiuri, Michael; Byrd, John C; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2010-01-01

    CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells are expanded in solid and hematological malignancies including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Several cytokines and co-stimulatory molecules are required for generation, survival and maintenance of their suppressive effect. We and others have shown direct cytotoxic effect of the novel common gamma chain cytokine interleukin (IL)-21 on primary B cells from CLL patients. Since members of this family of cytokines are known to exhibit their effects on diverse immune cells, we have examined the effects of IL-21 on CLL patient derived regulatory T cell (Treg) induction, expansion and the inhibitory effect on natural killer cells in vitro. We demonstrate here the expression of IL-21 receptor in CD4(+)CD25(High) regulatory cells from CLL patients. In contrast to IL-2, the IL-21 cytokine failed to mediate expansion of regulatory T cells or induced expression of Foxp3 in CD4(+)CD25(Intermediate) or CD4(+)CD25(Dim/-) T cells in whole blood derived from CLL patients. Interestingly, in contrast to their differential effects on expansion of the CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)T cells, IL-2 and IL-21 exhibited a redundant role in Treg mediated suppression of NK cell mediated antibody dependent cytotoxicity function. Given the infusion related toxicities and pro-survival effect of IL-2 in CLL, these studies provide a rationale to explore IL-21 as an alternate gamma chain cytokine in CLL therapy.

  10. Regulatory Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Helen W.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Putcha, Lakshmi; Baker, Ellen; Smith, Scott M.; Stewart, Karen; Gretebeck, Randall; Nimmagudda, R. R.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Davis-Street, Janis

    1999-01-01

    As noted elsewhere in this report, a central goal of the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was to ensure that cardiovascular and muscle function were adequate to perform an emergency egress after 16 days of spaceflight. The goals of the Regulatory Physiology component of the EDOMP were to identify and subsequently ameliorate those biochemical and nutritional factors that deplete physiological reserves or increase risk for disease, and to facilitate the development of effective muscle, exercise, and cardiovascular countermeasures. The component investigations designed to meet these goals focused on biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrition and metabolism, the risk of renal (kidney) stone formation, gastrointestinal function, and sleep in space. Investigations involved both ground-based protocols to validate proposed methods and flight studies to test those methods. Two hardware tests were also completed.

  11. Regulatory Benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators. The appli......Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators....... The application of bench-marking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publications, leading to discussions about regulatory stability and economic feasibility of these techniques...

  12. Regulatory Benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators. The appli......Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators....... The application of benchmarking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publications, leading to discussions about regulatory stability and economic feasibility of these techniques...

  13. Role of MCT1 and CAII in skeletal muscle pH homeostasis, energetics, and function: in vivo insights from MCT1 haploinsufficient mice

    KAUST Repository

    Chatel, Benjamin; Bendahan, David; Hourdé , Christophe; Pellerin, Luc; Lengacher, Sylvain; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Le Fur, Yann; Vilmen, Christophe; Bernard, Monique; Messonnier, Laurent A.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a partial suppression of monocarboxylate transporter (MCT)-1 on skeletal muscle pH, energetics, and function (MCT1(+/-) mice). Twenty-four MCT1(+/-) and 13 wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to a rest-exercise-recovery protocol, allowing assessment of muscle energetics (by magnetic resonance spectroscopy) and function. The study included analysis of enzyme activities and content of protein involved in pH regulation. Skeletal muscle of MCT1(+/-) mice had lower MCT1 (-61%; P < 0.05) and carbonic anhydrase (CA)-II (-54%; P < 0.05) contents. Although intramuscular pH was higher in MCT1(+/-) mice at rest (P < 0.001), the mice showed higher acidosis during the first minute of exercise (P < 0.01). Then, the pH time course was similar among groups until exercise completion. MCT1(+/-) mice had higher specific peak (P < 0.05) and maximum tetanic (P < 0.01) forces and lower fatigability (P < 0.001) when compared to WT mice. We conclude that both MCT1 and CAII are involved in the homeostatic control of pH in skeletal muscle, both at rest and at the onset of exercise. The improved muscle function and resistance to fatigue in MCT1(+/-) mice remain unexplained.-Chatel, B., Bendahan, D., Hourdé, C., Pellerin, L., Lengacher, S., Magistretti, P., Fur, Y. L., Vilmen, C., Bernard, M., Messonnier, L. A. Role of MCT1 and CAII in skeletal muscle pH homeostasis, energetics, and function: in vivo insights from MCT1 haploinsufficient mice.

  14. Role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor in the regulation of Neuropeptide W in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rikang; Yan, Fengxia; Liao, Rifang; Wan, Pei; Little, Peter J; Zheng, Wenhua

    2017-05-15

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are neurotrophic factors involved in the growth, survival and functioning of neurons. In addition, a possible role of neurotrophins, particularly BDNF, in HPA axis hyperactivation has recently been proposed. Neuropeptide W (NPW) is an endogenous peptide ligand for the GPR7 and GPR8 and a stress mediator in the hypothalamus. It activates the HPA axis by working on hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH). No information is available about the interrelationships between neurotrophines like NGF/BDNF and NPW. We studied the effect and underlying mechanisms of NGF/BDNF on the production of NPW in PC12 cells and hypothalamus. NGF time- and concentration-dependently stimulated the expression of NPW in PC12 cells. The effect of NGF was blocked by the inhibition of PI3K/Akt signal pathway with specific inhibitors for PI3K or AktsiRNA for Akt while inhibition of ERK pathway had no effect. Moreover, BDNF concentration-dependently induced the expression of NPW mRNA and decreased the expression of NPY mRNA in primary cultured hypothalamic neurons which was also blocked by a PI3K kinase inhibitor. Finally, in vivo study showed that exogenous BDNF injected icv increased NPW production in the hypothalamus and this effect was reversed by a PI3 kinase inhibitor. These results and the fact that BDNF was able to stimulate the expression of CRH demonstrated that neurotrophines can modulate the expression of NPW in neuronal cells via the PI3K/Akt pathway and suggest that BDNF might be involved in functions of the HPA axis, at least in part by modulating the expression of NPW/NPY and CRH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of MCT1 and CAII in skeletal muscle pH homeostasis, energetics, and function: in vivo insights from MCT1 haploinsufficient mice

    KAUST Repository

    Chatel, Benjamin

    2017-03-03

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a partial suppression of monocarboxylate transporter (MCT)-1 on skeletal muscle pH, energetics, and function (MCT1(+/-) mice). Twenty-four MCT1(+/-) and 13 wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to a rest-exercise-recovery protocol, allowing assessment of muscle energetics (by magnetic resonance spectroscopy) and function. The study included analysis of enzyme activities and content of protein involved in pH regulation. Skeletal muscle of MCT1(+/-) mice had lower MCT1 (-61%; P < 0.05) and carbonic anhydrase (CA)-II (-54%; P < 0.05) contents. Although intramuscular pH was higher in MCT1(+/-) mice at rest (P < 0.001), the mice showed higher acidosis during the first minute of exercise (P < 0.01). Then, the pH time course was similar among groups until exercise completion. MCT1(+/-) mice had higher specific peak (P < 0.05) and maximum tetanic (P < 0.01) forces and lower fatigability (P < 0.001) when compared to WT mice. We conclude that both MCT1 and CAII are involved in the homeostatic control of pH in skeletal muscle, both at rest and at the onset of exercise. The improved muscle function and resistance to fatigue in MCT1(+/-) mice remain unexplained.-Chatel, B., Bendahan, D., Hourdé, C., Pellerin, L., Lengacher, S., Magistretti, P., Fur, Y. L., Vilmen, C., Bernard, M., Messonnier, L. A. Role of MCT1 and CAII in skeletal muscle pH homeostasis, energetics, and function: in vivo insights from MCT1 haploinsufficient mice.

  16. The Role of Endogenous D2 Receptor Levels in Morphine Addiction: A Correlative Study of Morphine Place Conditioning and In Vivo [3H]-Raclopride Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, N.; Gatley, S.

    2004-01-01

    Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that has a wide array of effects on an individual’s mental state. It is vital in the regulation of motor skills and in generating the effects of substance abuse. This study examined the dopamine D2 receptors found in the striatum of the brain. The impetus for investigating this receptor lies in the perception that it plays an influential role in drug addiction. It has been conjectured on the basis of human PET studies that possession of low levels of D2 receptors will heighten an individual’s susceptibility to drug addiction. However, an alternative explanation of low D2 receptor levels in drug dependent individuals is that these levels are a consequence of drug abuse. To understand this phenomenon, the present study employed the paradigm of conditioned place preference (CPP). In CPP, individuals of an out-bred mouse strain are observed to spend time in environments where they had previously been exposed to a drug that is abused by humans. The drug chosen for our studies was morphine because it has been previously shown to generate a robust place preference in mice and is a prototypic abused drug in humans. D2 receptor levels were quantified using an in vivo binding study involving [3H]raclopride, a radioactive compound that binds to D2 receptors. The results showed a significant place preference for morphine following the conditioning procedure. Additionally, data from the binding analysis agreed with previous studies that the striatum contains high levels of D2 receptors. However, there was no consistent relationship between the extent of morphine CPP and D2 receptor levels as revealed by [3H]-RAC binding. This finding does not support the hypothesis that low levels of D2 receptors predispose a mouse to easy morphine conditioning. Further experiments are required to determine the ability to generalize our findings to other species and other drugs of abuse.

  17. Role of regulatory subunits and protein kinase inhibitor (PKI) in determining nuclear localization and activity of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, J C; Wailes, L A; Idzerda, R L; McKnight, G S

    1999-03-05

    Regulation of protein kinase A by subcellular localization may be critical to target catalytic subunits to specific substrates. We employed epitope-tagged catalytic subunit to correlate subcellular localization and gene-inducing activity in the presence of regulatory subunit or protein kinase inhibitor (PKI). Transiently expressed catalytic subunit distributed throughout the cell and induced gene expression. Co-expression of regulatory subunit or PKI blocked gene induction and prevented nuclear accumulation. A mutant PKI lacking the nuclear export signal blocked gene induction but not nuclear accumulation, demonstrating that nuclear export is not essential to inhibit gene induction. When the catalytic subunit was targeted to the nucleus with a nuclear localization signal, it was not sequestered in the cytoplasm by regulatory subunit, although its activity was completely inhibited. PKI redistributed the nuclear catalytic subunit to the cytoplasm and blocked gene induction, demonstrating that the nuclear export signal of PKI can override a strong nuclear localization signal. With increasing PKI, the export process appeared to saturate, resulting in the return of catalytic subunit to the nucleus. These results demonstrate that both the regulatory subunit and PKI are able to completely inhibit the gene-inducing activity of the catalytic subunit even when the catalytic subunit is forced to concentrate in the nuclear compartment.

  18. TLR5 signaling enhances the proliferation of human allogeneic CD40-activated B cell induced CD4hiCD25+ regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Lung Chan

    Full Text Available Although diverse functions of different toll-like receptors (TLR on human natural regulatory T cells have been demonstrated recently, the role of TLR-related signals on human induced regulatory T cells remain elusive. Previously our group developed an ex vivo high-efficient system in generating human alloantigen-specific CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells from naïve CD4(+CD25(- T cells using allogeneic CD40-activated B cells as stimulators. In this study, we investigated the role of TLR5-related signals on the generation and function of these novel CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells. It was found that induced CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells expressed an up-regulated level of TLR5 compared to their precursors. The blockade of TLR5 using anti-TLR5 antibodies during the co-culture decreased CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells proliferation by induction of S phase arrest. The S phase arrest was associated with reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. However, TLR5 blockade did not decrease the CTLA-4, GITR and FOXP3 expressions, and the suppressive function of CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells. In conclusion, we discovered a novel function of TLR5-related signaling in enhancing the proliferation of CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells by promoting S phase progress but not involved in the suppressive function of human CD40-activated B cell-induced CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells, suggesting a novel role of TLR5-related signals in the generation of induced regulatory T cells.

  19. Computational modeling identifies key gene regulatory interactions underlying phenobarbital-mediated tumor promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisier, Raphaëlle; Unterberger, Elif B.; Goodman, Jay I.; Schwarz, Michael; Moggs, Jonathan; Terranova, Rémi; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Gene regulatory interactions underlying the early stages of non-genotoxic carcinogenesis are poorly understood. Here, we have identified key candidate regulators of phenobarbital (PB)-mediated mouse liver tumorigenesis, a well-characterized model of non-genotoxic carcinogenesis, by applying a new computational modeling approach to a comprehensive collection of in vivo gene expression studies. We have combined our previously developed motif activity response analysis (MARA), which models gene expression patterns in terms of computationally predicted transcription factor binding sites with singular value decomposition (SVD) of the inferred motif activities, to disentangle the roles that different transcriptional regulators play in specific biological pathways of tumor promotion. Furthermore, transgenic mouse models enabled us to identify which of these regulatory activities was downstream of constitutive androstane receptor and β-catenin signaling, both crucial components of PB-mediated liver tumorigenesis. We propose novel roles for E2F and ZFP161 in PB-mediated hepatocyte proliferation and suggest that PB-mediated suppression of ESR1 activity contributes to the development of a tumor-prone environment. Our study shows that combining MARA with SVD allows for automated identification of independent transcription regulatory programs within a complex in vivo tissue environment and provides novel mechanistic insights into PB-mediated hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:24464994

  20. Regulatory BC1 RNA in Cognitive Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacoangeli, Anna; Dosunmu, Aderemi; Eom, Taesun; Stefanov, Dimitre G.; Tiedge, Henri

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic regulatory BC1 RNA is a non-protein-coding (npc) RNA that operates in the translational control of gene expression. The absence of BC1 RNA in BC1 knockout (KO) animals causes translational dysregulation that entails neuronal phenotypic alterations including prolonged epileptiform discharges, audiogenic seizure activity in vivo, and…

  1. Strengthening Regulatory Competence in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadiq, M.

    2016-01-01

    Capacity building of Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority is considered an essential element in pursuit of its vision to become a world class regulatory body. Since its inception in 2001, PNRA has continuously endeavoured to invest in its people, develop training infrastructure and impart sound knowledge and professional skills with the aim to improve its regulatory effectiveness. The use of nuclear and radioactive material in Pakistan has increased manifold in recent years, thus induction of more manpower was needed for regulatory oversight. PNRA adopted two pronged approach for meeting the manpower demand (a) employment of university graduates through fast track recruitment drive and (b) induction of graduates by offering fellowships for Master degree programs. Although, the newly employed staff was selected on the basis of their excellent academic qualifications in basic and applied sciences, but they required rigorous knowledge and skills in regulatory perspectives. In order to implement a structured training program, PNRA conducted Training Needs Assessment (TNA) and identified competency gaps of the regulatory staff in legal, technical, regulatory practice and behavioural domains. PNRA took several initiatives for capacity building which included establishment of a training centre for sustainability of trainings, initiation of a fellowship scheme for Master program, attachment of staff at local institutes for on-the-job training and placement at foreign regulatory bodies and organizations for technical development with the assistance of IAEA. The above strategies have been very beneficial in competence building of the PNRA staff to perform all regulatory activities indigenously for nuclear power plants, research reactors and radiation facilities. Provision of vibrant technical support to IAEA and Member States in various programs by PNRA is a landmark of these competence development efforts. This paper summarizes PNRA initiatives and the International Atomic

  2. The changing regulatory environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caron, G.

    1999-01-01

    The role and value of regulation in the energy sector was discussed, demonstrating how, despite common perception, regulation is an essential part of Canada's strategy to find and develop new opportunities. The future vision of regulation for industry participants was presented with particular focus on issues related to streamlining the regulatory process. As far as pipelines are concerned, regulatory actions are necessary to facilitate capacity increases and to ensure the line's integrity, safety and environmental record. Furthermore, regulation provides economic solutions where market forces cannot provide them, as for example where business has elements of monopoly. It arbitrates interests of landowners, business, consumers, and environmental groups. It looks for ways to ensure conditions under which competition can flourish. It acts as the guardian of citizens' rights in a democratic society by providing citizens with an opportunity to be heard on the building or expansion of pipelines and associated facilities. As citizens become more and more concerned about their property and the land that surrounds them, citizen involvement in decision making about how industry activity affects their quality of life will become correspondingly more important. Regulatory agencies are committed to facilitate this engagement by flexible hearing procedures and by making use of evolving communication and information technology

  3. Regulatory aspects of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristensen, K.

    1985-01-01

    Regulatory systems in the field of radiopharmaceuticals have two main purposes: efficacy and safety. Efficacy expresses the quality of the diagnostic and therapeutic process for the patient. Safety involves the patient, the staff, and the environment. The world situation regarding regulations for radiopharmaceuticals is reviewed on the basis of a survey in WHO Member States. The main content of such regulations is discussed. The special properties of radiopharmaceuticals compared with ordinary drugs may call for modified regulations. Several countries are preparing such regulations. Close co-operation and good understanding among scientists working in hospital research, industry and regulatory bodies will be of great importance for the fast and safe introduction of new radiopharmaceuticals for the benefit of the patient. Before introducing new legislation in this field, a radiopharmaceutical expert should analyse the situation in the country and the relationship to the existing regulations. It is expected that the most important factor in promoting the fast introduction of new, safe and effective radiopharmaceuticals will be the training of people working within the regulatory bodies. It is foreseen that the IAEA and WHO will have an important role to play by providing expert advice and training in this area. (author)

  4. In vitro and in vivo approaches to study osteocyte biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalajzic, Ivo; Matthews, Brya G; Torreggiani, Elena; Harris, Marie A; Divieti Pajevic, Paola; Harris, Stephen E

    2013-06-01

    Osteocytes, the most abundant cell population of the bone lineage, have been a major focus in the bone research field in recent years. This population of cells that resides within mineralized matrix is now thought to be the mechanosensory cell in bone and plays major roles in the regulation of bone formation and resorption. Studies of osteocytes had been impaired by their location, resulting in numerous attempts to isolate primary osteocytes and to generate cell lines representative of the osteocytic phenotype. Progress has been achieved in recent years by utilizing in vivo genetic technology and generation of osteocyte directed transgenic and gene deficiency mouse models. We will provide an overview of the current in vitro and in vivo models utilized to study osteocyte biology. We discuss generation of osteocyte-like cell lines and isolation of primary osteocytes and summarize studies that have utilized these cellular models to understand the functional role of osteocytes. Approaches that attempt to selectively identify and isolate osteocytes using fluorescent protein reporters driven by regulatory elements of genes that are highly expressed in osteocytes will be discussed. In addition, recent in vivo studies utilizing overexpression or conditional deletion of various genes using dentin matrix protein (Dmp1) directed Cre recombinase are outlined. In conclusion, evaluation of the benefits and deficiencies of currently used cell lines/genetic models in understanding osteocyte biology underlines the current progress in this field. The future efforts will be directed towards developing novel in vitro and in vivo models that would additionally facilitate in understanding the multiple roles of osteocytes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The role of radiation regulatory agencies of the Republic of the Philippines in the education and training of workers occupationally exposed to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perio Peralta, Agnette de

    2008-01-01

    In the Republic of the Philippines, there are two national radiation regulatory agencies. One is the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) which has the regulatory mandate over radioactive materials. The other one is the Bureau of Health Devices and Technology (BHDT) which has the regulatory mandate over radiation devices. Since a major requirement in regulating use of radiation sources is the appropriate qualification of the workers occupationally exposed to radiation, the paper discusses the strategies and activities of these two agencies to ensure that these workers have the necessary education and training to do their work properly. Some of these are the conduct of training courses in cooperation with the relevant professional societies, conduct of distance aided training in cooperation with the IAEA, initiation and active involvement in the establishment and continued existence of the masteral degree program in medical physics which was established with IAEA technical assistance, assistance to lawmakers in drafting pertinent legislation, and creation of joint technical working groups to ensure harmonization of standards and regulations, among others. The Philippines has adopted a national policy that users of radiation and radioactive materials have the primary responsibility for radiation safety. The PNRI and the BHDT have adopted strategies which have been very useful in the effective implementation of their regulations. (author)

  6. Galectin-1 is required for the regulatory function of B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhabbab, R; Blair, P; Smyth, L A; Ratnasothy, K; Peng, Q; Moreau, A; Lechler, R; Elgueta, R; Lombardi, G

    2018-02-09

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1) is required for the development of B cells in the bone marrow (BM), however very little is known about the contribution of Gal-1 to the development of B cell regulatory function. Here, we report an important role for Gal-1 in the induction of B cells regulatory function. Mice deficient of Gal-1 (Gal-1 -/- ) showed significant loss of Transitional-2 (T2) B cells, previously reported to include IL-10 + regulatory B cells. Gal-1 -/- B cells stimulated in vitro via CD40 molecules have impaired IL-10 and Tim-1 expression, the latter reported to be required for IL-10 production in regulatory B cells, and increased TNF-α expression compared to wild type (WT) B cells. Unlike their WT counterparts, T2 and T1 Gal-1 -/- B cells did not suppress TNF-α expression by CD4 + T cells activated in vitro with allogenic DCs (allo-DCs), nor were they suppressive in vivo, being unable to delay MHC-class I mismatched skin allograft rejection following adoptive transfer. Moreover, T cells stimulated with allo-DCs show an increase in their survival when co-cultured with Gal-1 -/- T2 and MZ B cells compared to WT T2 and MZ B cells. Collectively, these data suggest that Gal-1 contributes to the induction of B cells regulatory function.

  7. Regulatory structure of the biosynthetic pathway for the aspartate family of amino acids in Lemna paucicostata Hegelm. 6746, with special reference to the role of aspartokinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovanelli, J.; Mudd, S.H.; Datko, A.H.

    1989-01-01

    Comprehensive studies were made with Lemna paucicostate Hegelm. 6746 of the effects of combinations of lysine, methionine, and threonine on growth rates, soluble amino acid contents, aspartokinase activities, and fluxes of 4-carbon moieties from aspartate through the aspartokinase step into the amino acids of the aspartate family. These studies show that flux in vitro through the aspartokinase step is insensitive to inhibition by lysine or threonine, and confirm previous in vitro data in establishing that aspartokinase in vivo is present in two orders of magnitude excess of its requirements. No evidence of channeling of the products of the lysine- and threonine-sensitive aspartokinases was obtained, either form of the enzyme along being more than adequate for the combined in vivo flux through the aspartokinase step. The marked insensitivity of flux through the aspartokinase step to inhibition by lysine or threonine strongly suggests that inhibition of aspartokinase by these amino acids is not normally a major factor in regulation of entry of 4-carbon units into the aspartate family of amino acids. Direct measurement of fluxes of 4-carbon units demonstrated that: (a) Lysine strongly feedback regulates its own synthesis, probably at the step catalyzed by dihydrodipicolinate synthase. (b) Threonine alone does not regulate its own synthesis in vivo, thereby confirming previous studies of the metabolism of [ 14 C]threonine and [ 14 C]homoserine in Lemna

  8. Regulatory Expectations for Safety Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Su Jin; Oh, Jang Jin; Choi, Young Sung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The oversight of licensee's safety culture becomes an important issue that attracts great public and political concerns recently in Korea. Beginning from the intended violation of rules, a series of corruptions, documents forgery and disclosure of wrong-doings made the public think that the whole mindset of nuclear workers has been inadequate. Thus, they are demanding that safety culture shall be improved and that regulatory body shall play more roles and responsibilities for the improvements and oversight for them. This paper introduces, as an effort of regulatory side, recent changes in the role of regulators in safety culture, regulatory expectations on the desired status of licensee's safety culture, the pilot inspection program for safety culture and research activity for the development of oversight system. After the Fukushima accident in Japan 2011, many critics has searched for cultural factors that caused the unacceptable negligence pervaded in Japan nuclear society and the renewed emphasis has been placed on rebuilding safety culture by operators, regulators, and relevant institutions globally. Significant progress has been made in how to approach safety culture and led to a new perspective different from the existing normative assessment method both in operators and regulatory side. Regulatory expectations and oversight of them are based on such a new holistic concept for human, organizational and cultural elements to maintain and strengthen the integrity of defense in depth and consequently nuclear safety.

  9. Regulatory Expectations for Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Su Jin; Oh, Jang Jin; Choi, Young Sung

    2014-01-01

    The oversight of licensee's safety culture becomes an important issue that attracts great public and political concerns recently in Korea. Beginning from the intended violation of rules, a series of corruptions, documents forgery and disclosure of wrong-doings made the public think that the whole mindset of nuclear workers has been inadequate. Thus, they are demanding that safety culture shall be improved and that regulatory body shall play more roles and responsibilities for the improvements and oversight for them. This paper introduces, as an effort of regulatory side, recent changes in the role of regulators in safety culture, regulatory expectations on the desired status of licensee's safety culture, the pilot inspection program for safety culture and research activity for the development of oversight system. After the Fukushima accident in Japan 2011, many critics has searched for cultural factors that caused the unacceptable negligence pervaded in Japan nuclear society and the renewed emphasis has been placed on rebuilding safety culture by operators, regulators, and relevant institutions globally. Significant progress has been made in how to approach safety culture and led to a new perspective different from the existing normative assessment method both in operators and regulatory side. Regulatory expectations and oversight of them are based on such a new holistic concept for human, organizational and cultural elements to maintain and strengthen the integrity of defense in depth and consequently nuclear safety

  10. Genetic deletion of cdc42 reveals a crucial role for astrocyte recruitment to the injury site in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robel, Stefanie; Bardehle, Sophia; Lepier, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    signals, the small RhoGTPase Cdc42, selectively in mouse astrocytes in vitro and in vivo. We used an in vitro scratch assay as a minimal wounding model and found that astrocytes lacking Cdc42 (Cdc42Δ) were still able to form protrusions, although in a nonoriented way. Consequently, they failed to migrate...... in a directed manner toward the scratch. When animals were injured in vivo through a stab wound, Cdc42Δ astrocytes developed protrusions properly oriented toward the lesion, but the number of astrocytes recruited to the lesion site was significantly reduced. Surprisingly, however, lesions in Cdc42Δ animals...

  11. Asymmetrical distribution of non-conserved regulatory sequences at PHOX2B is reflected at the ENCODE loci and illuminates a possible genome-wide trend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCallion Andrew S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcriptional regulatory elements are central to development and interspecific phenotypic variation. Current regulatory element prediction tools rely heavily upon conservation for prediction of putative elements. Recent in vitro observations from the ENCODE project combined with in vivo analyses at the zebrafish phox2b locus suggests that a significant fraction of regulatory elements may fall below commonly applied metrics of conservation. We propose to explore these observations in vivo at the human PHOX2B locus, and also evaluate the potential evidence for genome-wide applicability of these observations through a novel analysis of extant data. Results Transposon-based transgenic analysis utilizing a tiling path proximal to human PHOX2B in zebrafish recapitulates the observations at the zebrafish phox2b locus of both conserved and non-conserved regulatory elements. Analysis of human sequences conserved with previously identified zebrafish phox2b regulatory elements demonstrates that the orthologous sequences exhibit overlapping regulatory control. Additionally, analysis of non-conserved sequences scattered over 135 kb 5' to PHOX2B, provides evidence of non-conserved regulatory elements positively biased with close proximity to the gene. Furthermore, we provide a novel analysis of data from the ENCODE project, finding a non-uniform distribution of regulatory elements consistent with our in vivo observations at PHOX2B. These observations remain largely unchanged when one accounts for the sequence repeat content of the assayed intervals, when the intervals are sub-classified by biological role (developmental versus non-developmental, or by gene density (gene desert versus non-gene desert. Conclusion While regulatory elements frequently display evidence of evolutionary conservation, a fraction appears to be undetected by current metrics of conservation. In vivo observations at the PHOX2B locus, supported by our analyses of in

  12. Regulation of the expression of GARP/latent-TGF-β1 complexes on mouse T cells and their role in Regulatory T Cell and Th17 differentiation1

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Justin P.; Fujii, Hodaka; Zhou, Angela X.; Creemers, John; Unutmaz, Derya; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2013-01-01

    GARP/LRRC32 has previously been defined as a marker of activated human regulatory T-cells (Tregs) that is responsible for surface localization of latent TGF-β1. We find that GARP and latent TGF-β1 are also found on mouse Tregs activated via TCR stimulation, but in contrast to human Tregs, GARP is also expressed at a low level on resting Tregs. The expression of GARP can be upregulated on mouse Tregs by IL-2 or IL-4 exposure in the absence of TCR signaling. GARP is expressed at a low level on ...

  13. Modernizing the Regulatory System for Biotechnology Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Web page describes the continuing effort to modernize the federal regulatory system for biotechnology products as well as clarify various roles of EPA, FDA and USDA in evaluating new biotechnology products.

  14. The role of Personal Self-Regulation and Regulatory Teaching to predict motivational-affective variables, achievement and satisfaction: A structural model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus ede la Fuente

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation examines how personal self-regulation (presage variable and regulatory teaching (process variable of teaching relate to learning approaches, strategies for coping with stress, and self-regulated learning (process variables of learning and, finally, how they relate to performance and satisfaction with the learning process (product variables. The objective was to clarify the associative and predictive relations between these variables, as contextualized in two different models that use the presage-process-product paradigm (the Biggs and DEDEPRO models. A total of 1101 university students participated in the study. The design was cross-sectional and retrospective with attributional (or selection variables, using correlations and structural analysis. The results provide consistent and significant empirical evidence for the relationships hypothesized, incorporating variables that are part of and influence the teaching-learning process in Higher Education. Findings confirm the importance of interactive relationships within the teaching-learning process, where personal self-regulation is assumed to take place in connection with regulatory teaching. Variables that are involved in the relationships validated here reinforce the idea that both personal factors and teaching and learning factors should be taken into consideration when dealing with a formal teaching-learning context at university.

  15. Branching of the PIF3 regulatory network in Arabidopsis: roles of PIF3-regulated MIDAs in seedling development in the dark and in response to light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentandreu, Maria; Leivar, Pablo; Martín, Guiomar; Monte, Elena

    2012-04-01

    Plants need to accurately adjust their development after germination in the underground darkness to ensure survival of the seedling, both in the dark and in the light upon reaching the soil surface. Recent studies have established that the photoreceptors phytochromes and the bHLH phytochrome interacting factors PIFs regulate seedling development to adjust it to the prevailing light environment during post-germinative growth. However, complete understanding of the downstream regulatory network implementing these developmental responses is still lacking. In a recent work, published in The Plant Cell, we report a subset of PIF3-regulated genes in dark-grown seedlings that we have named MIDAs (MISREGULATED IN DARK). Analysis of their functional relevance using mutants showed that four of them present phenotypic alterations in the dark, and that each affected a particular facet of seedling development, suggesting organ-specific branching in the signal that PIF3 relays downstream. Furthermore, our results also showed an altered response to light in seedlings with an impaired PIF3/MIDA regulatory network, indicating that these factors might also be essential to initiate and optimize the developmental adjustment of the seedling to the light environment.

  16. The role of personal self-regulation and regulatory teaching to predict motivational-affective variables, achievement, and satisfaction: a structural model

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fuente, Jesus; Zapata, Lucía; Martínez-Vicente, Jose M.; Sander, Paul; Cardelle-Elawar, María

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation examines how personal self-regulation (presage variable) and regulatory teaching (process variable of teaching) relate to learning approaches, strategies for coping with stress, and self-regulated learning (process variables of learning) and, finally, how they relate to performance and satisfaction with the learning process (product variables). The objective was to clarify the associative and predictive relations between these variables, as contextualized in two different models that use the presage-process-product paradigm (the Biggs and DEDEPRO models). A total of 1101 university students participated in the study. The design was cross-sectional and retrospective with attributional (or selection) variables, using correlations and structural analysis. The results provide consistent and significant empirical evidence for the relationships hypothesized, incorporating variables that are part of and influence the teaching–learning process in Higher Education. Findings confirm the importance of interactive relationships within the teaching–learning process, where personal self-regulation is assumed to take place in connection with regulatory teaching. Variables that are involved in the relationships validated here reinforce the idea that both personal factors and teaching and learning factors should be taken into consideration when dealing with a formal teaching–learning context at university. PMID:25964764

  17. Inference of Low and High-Grade Glioma Gene Regulatory Networks Delineates the Role of Rnd3 in Establishing Multiple Hallmarks of Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Clarke

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas are a highly heterogeneous group of brain tumours that are refractory to treatment, highly invasive and pro-angiogenic. Glioblastoma patients have an average survival time of less than 15 months. Understanding the molecular basis of different grades of glioma, from well differentiated, low-grade tumours to high-grade tumours, is a key step in defining new therapeutic targets. Here we use a data-driven approach to learn the structure of gene regulatory networks from observational data and use the resulting models to formulate hypothesis on the molecular determinants of glioma stage. Remarkably, integration of available knowledge with functional genomics datasets representing clinical and pre-clinical studies reveals important properties within the regulatory circuits controlling low and high-grade glioma. Our analyses first show that low and high-grade gliomas are characterised by a switch in activity of two subsets of Rho GTPases. The first one is involved in maintaining normal glial cell function, while the second is linked to the establishment of multiple hallmarks of cancer. Next, the development and application of a novel data integration methodology reveals novel functions of RND3 in controlling glioma cell migration, invasion, proliferation, angiogenesis and clinical outcome.

  18. As to achieve regulatory action, regulatory approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cid, R.; Encinas, D.

    2014-01-01

    The achievement of the effectiveness in the performance of a nuclear regulatory body has been a permanent challenge in the recent history of nuclear regulation. In the post-Fukushima era this challenge is even more important. This article addresses the subject from two complementary points of view: the characteristics of an effective regulatory body and the regulatory approaches. This work is based on the most recent studies carried out by the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities, CNRA (OECD/NEA), as well as on the experience of the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, CSN, the Spanish regulatory body. Rafael Cid is the representative of CSN in these project: Diego Encinas has participated in the study on regulatory approaches. (Author)

  19. Human Epidermal Langerhans Cells Maintain Immune Homeostasis in Skin by Activating Skin Resident Regulatory T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneschal, Julien; Clark, Rachael A.; Gehad, Ahmed; Baecher-Allan, Clare M.; Kupper, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent discoveries indicate that the skin of a normal individual contains 10-20 billion resident memory T cells ( which include various T helper, T cytotoxic, and T regulatory subsets, that are poised to respond to environmental antigens. Using only autologous human tissues, we report that both in vitro and in vivo, resting epidermal Langerhan cells (LC) selectively and specifically induced the activation and proliferation of skin resident regulatory T cells (Treg), a minor subset of skin resident memory T cells. In the presence of foreign pathogen, however, the same LC activated and induced proliferation of effector memory T (Tem) cells and limited Treg cells activation. These underappreciated properties of LC: namely maintenance of tolerance in normal skin, and activation of protective skin resident memory T cells upon infectious challenge, help clarify the role of LC in skin. PMID:22560445

  20. The Role of Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated Protein 4 (CTLA-4) Gene, Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR) Gene and Regulatory T-cells as Risk Factors for Relapse in Patients with Graves Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliana, Fatimah; Suwondo, Pradana; Asmarinah, Asmarinah; Harahap, Alida; Djauzi, Samsuridjal; Prihartono, Joedo; Pemayun, Tjokorda Gde Dalem

    2017-07-01

    graves' disease (GD) is the most common condition of thyrotoxicosis. The management of GD is initiated with the administration of antithyroid drugs; however, it requires a long time to achieve remission. In reality more than 50% of patients who had remission may be at risk for relapse after the drug is stopped. This study aimed to evaluate the role of clinical factors such as smoking habit, degree of ophtalmopathy, degree of thyroid enlargement; genetic factors such as CTLA-4 gene on nucleotide 49 at codon 17 of exon 1, CTLA-4 gene of promotor -318, TSHR gene polymorphism rs2268458 of intron 1; and immunological factors such as regulatory T cells (Treg) and thyroid receptor antibody (TRAb); that affecting the relapse of patients with Graves' disease in Indonesia. this was a case-control study, that compared 72 subjects who had relapse and 72 subjects without relapse at 12 months after cessation of antithyroid treatment, who met the inclusion criteria. Genetic polymorphism examination was performed using PCR-RFLP. The number of regulatory T cells was counted using flow cytometry analysis and ELISA was used to measure TRAb. The logistic regression was used since the dependent variables were categorical variables. the analysis of this study demonstrated that there was a correlation between relapse of disease and family factors (p=0.008), age at diagnosis (p=0.021), 2nd degree of Graves' ophthalmopathy (p=0.001), enlarged thyroid gland, which exceeded the lateral edge of the sternocleidomastoid muscles (p=0.040), duration of remission period (p=0.029), GG genotype of CTLA-4 gene on the nucleotide 49 at codon 17 of exon 1 (p=0.016), CC genotype of TSHR gene on the rs2268458 of intron 1 (p=0.003), the number of regulatory T cells (p=0.001) and TRAb levels (p=0.002). genetic polymorphisms of CTLA-4 gene on the nucleotide 49 at codon 17 of exon 1, TSHR gene SNP rs2268458 of intron 1, number of regulatory T cells and TRAb levels play a role as risk factors for relapse in

  1. The Role of Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated Protein 4 (CTLA-4 Gene, Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR Gene and Regulatory T-cells as Risk Factors for Relapse in Patients with Graves Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimah Eliana

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: graves’ disease (GD is the most common condition of thyrotoxicosis. The management of GD is initiated with the administration of antithyroid drugs; however, it requires a long time to achieve remission. In reality more than 50% of patients who had remission may be at risk for relapse after the drug is stopped. This study aimed to evaluate the role of clinical factors such as smoking habit, degree of ophtalmopathy, degree of thyroid enlargement; genetic factors such as CTLA-4 gene on nucleotide 49 at codon 17 of exon 1, CTLA-4 gene of promotor -318, TSHR gene polymorphism rs2268458 of intron 1; and immunological factors such as regulatory T cells (Treg and thyroid receptor antibody (TRAb; that affecting the relapse of patients with Graves’ disease in Indonesia. Methods: this was a case-control study, that compared 72 subjects who had relapse and 72 subjects without relapse at 12 months after cessation of antithyroid treatment, who met the inclusion criteria. Genetic polymorphism examination was performed using PCR-RFLP. The number of regulatory T cells was counted using flow cytometry analysis and ELISA was used to measure TRAb. The logistic regression was used since the dependent variables were categorical variables. Results: the analysis of this study demonstrated that there was a correlation between relapse of disease and family factors (p=0.008, age at diagnosis (p=0.021, 2nd degree of Graves’ ophthalmopathy (p=0.001, enlarged thyroid gland, which exceeded the lateral edge of the sternocleidomastoid muscles (p=0.040, duration of remission period (p=0.029, GG genotype of CTLA-4 gene on the nucleotide 49 at codon 17 of exon 1 (p=0.016, CC genotype of TSHR gene on the rs2268458 of intron 1 (p=0.003, the number of regulatory T cells (p=0.001 and TRAb levels (p=0.002. Conclusion: genetic polymorphisms of CTLA-4 gene on the nucleotide 49 at codon 17 of exon 1, TSHR gene SNP rs2268458 of intron 1, number of regulatory T cells and

  2. Regulatory effects of fisetin on microglial activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Jing-Yuan; Chang, Pei-Chun; Shen, Yi-Chun; Lin, Chingju; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Chen, Jia-Hong; Yeh, Wei-Lan; Wu, Ling-Hsuan; Lin, Hsiao-Yun; Liu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Dah-Yuu

    2014-06-26

    Increasing evidence suggests that inflammatory processes in the central nervous system that are mediated by microglial activation play a key role in neurodegeneration. Fisetin, a plant flavonol commonly found in fruits and vegetables, is frequently added to nutritional supplements due to its antioxidant properties. In the present study, treatment with fisetin inhibited microglial cell migration and ROS (reactive oxygen species) production. Treatment with fisetin also effectively inhibited LPS plus IFN-γ-induced nitric oxide (NO) production, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in microglial cells. Furthermore, fisetin also reduced expressions of iNOS and NO by stimulation of peptidoglycan, the major component of the Gram-positive bacterium cell wall. Fisetin also inhibited the enhancement of LPS/IFN-γ- or peptidoglycan-induced inflammatory mediator IL (interlukin)-1 β expression. Besides the antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of fisetin, our study also elucidates the manner in fisetin-induced an endogenous anti-oxidative enzyme HO (heme oxygenase)-1 expression. Moreover, the regulatory molecular mechanism of fisetin-induced HO-1 expression operates through the PI-3 kinase/AKT and p38 signaling pathways in microglia. Notably, fisetin also significantly attenuated inflammation-related microglial activation and coordination deficit in mice in vivo. These findings suggest that fisetin may be a candidate agent for the development of therapies for inflammation-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Regulatory Effects of Fisetin on Microglial Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Yuan Chuang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that inflammatory processes in the central nervous system that are mediated by microglial activation play a key role in neurodegeneration. Fisetin, a plant flavonol commonly found in fruits and vegetables, is frequently added to nutritional supplements due to its antioxidant properties. In the present study, treatment with fisetin inhibited microglial cell migration and ROS (reactive oxygen species production. Treatment with fisetin also effectively inhibited LPS plus IFN-γ-induced nitric oxide (NO production, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression in microglial cells. Furthermore, fisetin also reduced expressions of iNOS and NO by stimulation of peptidoglycan, the major component of the Gram-positive bacterium cell wall. Fisetin also inhibited the enhancement of LPS/IFN-γ- or peptidoglycan-induced inflammatory mediator IL (interlukin-1 β expression. Besides the antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of fisetin, our study also elucidates the manner in fisetin-induced an endogenous anti-oxidative enzyme HO (heme oxygenase-1 expression. Moreover, the regulatory molecular mechanism of fisetin-induced HO-1 expression operates through the PI-3 kinase/AKT and p38 signaling pathways in microglia. Notably, fisetin also significantly attenuated inflammation-related microglial activation and coordination deficit in mice in vivo. These findings suggest that fisetin may be a candidate agent for the development of therapies for inflammation-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Recommendations for safety testing with the in vivo comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Marie Z

    2012-08-30

    While the in vivo comet assay increases its role in regulatory safety testing, deliberations about the interpretation of comet data continue. Concerns can arise regarding comet assay publications with limited data from non-blind testing of positive control compounds and using protocols (e.g. dose concentrations, sample times, and tissues) known to give an expected effect. There may be a tendency towards bias when the validation or interpretation of comet assay data is based on results generated by widely accepted but non-validated assays. The greatest advantages of the comet assay are its sensitivity and its ability to detect genotoxicity in tissues and at sample times that could not previously be evaluated. Guidelines for its use and interpretation in safety testing should take these factors into account. Guidelines should be derived from objective review of data generated by blind testing of unknown compounds dosed at non-toxic concentrations and evaluated in a true safety-testing environment, where the experimental design and conclusions must be defensible. However, positive in vivo comet findings with such compounds are rarely submitted to regulatory agencies and this data is typically unavailable for publication due to its proprietary nature. To enhance the development of guidelines for safety testing with the comet assay, and with the permission of several sponsors, this paper presents and discusses relevant data from multiple GLP comet studies conducted blind, with unknown pharmaceuticals and consumer products. Based on these data and the lessons we have learned through the course of conducting these studies, I suggest significant adjustments to the current conventions, and I provide recommendations for interpreting in vivo comet assay results in situations where risk must be evaluated in the absence of carcinogenicity or clinical data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Global mapping of cell type-specific open chromatin by FAIRE-seq reveals the regulatory role of the NFI family in adipocyte differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori Waki

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Identification of regulatory elements within the genome is crucial for understanding the mechanisms that govern cell type-specific gene expression. We generated genome-wide maps of open chromatin sites in 3T3-L1 adipocytes (on day 0 and day 8 of differentiation and NIH-3T3 fibroblasts using formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements coupled with high-throughput sequencing (FAIRE-seq. FAIRE peaks at the promoter were associated with active transcription and histone modifications of H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. Non-promoter FAIRE peaks were characterized by H3K4me1+/me3-, the signature of enhancers, and were largely located in distal regions. The non-promoter FAIRE peaks showed dynamic change during differentiation, while the promoter FAIRE peaks were relatively constant. Functionally, the adipocyte- and preadipocyte-specific non-promoter FAIRE peaks were, respectively, associated with genes up-regulated and down-regulated by differentiation. Genes highly up-regulated during differentiation were associated with multiple clustered adipocyte-specific FAIRE peaks. Among the adipocyte-specific FAIRE peaks, 45.3% and 11.7% overlapped binding sites for, respectively, PPARγ and C/EBPα, the master regulators of adipocyte differentiation. Computational motif analyses of the adipocyte-specific FAIRE peaks revealed enrichment of a binding motif for nuclear family I (NFI transcription factors. Indeed, ChIP assay showed that NFI occupy the adipocyte-specific FAIRE peaks and/or the PPARγ binding sites near PPARγ, C/EBPα, and aP2 genes. Overexpression of NFIA in 3T3-L1 cells resulted in robust induction of these genes and lipid droplet formation without differentiation stimulus. Overexpression of dominant-negative NFIA or siRNA-mediated knockdown of NFIA or NFIB significantly suppressed both induction of genes and lipid accumulation during differentiation, suggesting a physiological function of these factors in the adipogenic program. Together, our

  6. The role of regulatory T cells during the attenuation of graft-versus-leukemia activity following donor leukocyte infusion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mi-Sun; Lim, Ji-Young; Cho, Byung-Sik; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Jeong, Dae Chul; Youn, Hyewon; Lee, Chulbom; Choi, Eun Young; Min, Chang-Ki

    2011-12-01

    We investigated how the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect is attenuated in the tumor microenvironment using a murine model of non-myeloablative allo-HSCT (NM-HSCT) plus delayed donor leukocyte infusion (DLI) in a haploidentical B6→F1 strain combination. In-line with aggravated leukemia growth, the proportions of effector T cells expressing IFN-γ (Teffs) in spleen were reduced and attenuated GVL activity was found to be accompanied by a rebound in CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) in tumor-draining lymph nodes and tumor tissues. DLI-derived Tregs and Teffs may be potential indicators of presence of leukemic progression after DLI in this GVL model. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The role of research-article writing motivation and self-regulatory strategies in explaining research-article abstract writing ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-Chia; Cheng, Yuh-Show; Lin, Sieh-Hwa; Hsieh, Pei-Jung

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of research-article writing motivation and use of self-regulatory writing strategies in explaining second language (L2) research-article abstract writing ability, alongside the L2 literacy effect. Four measures were administered: a L2 literacy test, a research abstract performance assessment, and inventories of writing motivation and strategy. Participants were L2 graduate students in Taiwan (N=185; M age=25.8 yr., SD=4.5, range=22-53). Results of structural equation modeling showed a direct effect of motivation on research-article writing ability, but no direct effect of strategy or indirect effect of motivation via strategy on research-article writing ability, with L2 literacy controlled. The findings suggest research-article writing instruction should address writing motivation, besides L2 literacy.

  8. The regulatory dynamic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dybwad, C.

    2001-01-01

    An outline of the activities and efforts expanded by the National Energy Board to adjust to the changing natural gas market was provided in this presentation. The author began by defining the role of the National Energy Board in energy markets. It must ensure the adoption of rules and procedures that result in a more competitive and efficient market. Light-handed regulatory techniques are the norm, and the National Energy Board is now committed to facilitating the availability and flow of information so that all parties know where opportunities exist, the terms offered to buy or sell goods and services, their quality and costs. It will specialize in providing new participants with information on the workings of the market, who the players are, the regulatory processes in place, and how, when and where the market can be accessed. The manner in which the Board deals with information was reviewed, providing examples along the way to clarify some points. Some of the documents produced by the National Energy Board are being reviewed with the intent of making them easier to read and understand. Audio streaming over the Internet is another avenue being pursued to ensure individuals can listen in real time to hearings without having to be present in the room. The National Energy Board is also exploring alternative dispute resolution techniques. Consultation with energy market participants represents another facet of these efforts to be more accessible and responsive

  9. Proteomic characterization of EL4 lymphoma-derived tumors upon chemotherapy treatment reveals potential roles for lysosomes and caspase-6 during tumor cell death in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David A; Eldeeb, Mohamed A; Wuest, Melinda; Mercer, John; Fahlman, Richard P

    2017-06-01

    The murine mouse lymphoblastic lymphoma cell line (EL4) tumor model is an established in vivo apoptosis model for the investigation of novel cancer imaging agents and immunological treatments due to the rapid and significant response of the EL4 tumors to cyclophosphamide and etoposide combination chemotherapy. Despite the utility of this model system in cancer research, little is known regarding the molecular details of in vivo tumor cell death. Here, we report the first in-depth quantitative proteomic analysis of the changes that occur in these tumors upon cyclophosphamide and etoposide treatment in vivo. Using a label-free quantitative proteomic approach a total of 5838 proteins were identified in the treated and untreated tumors, of which 875 were determined to change in abundance with statistical significance. Initial analysis of the data reveals changes that may have been predicted, such as the downregulation of ribosomes, but demonstrates the robustness of the dataset. Analysis of the dataset also reveals the unexpected downregulation of caspase-3 and an upregulation of caspase-6 in addition to a global upregulation of lysosomal proteins in the bulk of the tumor. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. The Regulatory Independence of FANR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALNuaimi, Fatema; Choi, Kwang Shik

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory independence is meant to provide a conservative system of policy making in order to comply with the problems that are forecasted upon the basis of assumptions. The Federal Authorization of Nuclear Regulation (FANR) is a regulatory commission that was formed to be regulatory body that governs the generation of nuclear power in United Arab Emirates. It was established under the UAE nuclear law (9/2009) as an independent regulatory body that was tasked with the regulation of all nuclear activities in the United Arab Emirates. As an independent body, FANR was tasked with ensuring that the regulation of the nuclear sector is done in effective and transparent manner to ensure its accountability to the people. Being independent, the regulatory body develops national nuclear regulations based on laid down safety standards by the International Atomic Energy Agency, ensuring that they are based on scientific and proven technologies The role of FANR is to ensure that the all corporations that undertake nuclear activities follow the laid down procedures and objectives and ensure safety measures are taken keenly to ensure the safety of the workers and the general public while at the same time ensuring the environment is free from nuclear radiations

  11. The Regulatory Independence of FANR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALNuaimi, Fatema; Choi, Kwang Shik [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Regulatory independence is meant to provide a conservative system of policy making in order to comply with the problems that are forecasted upon the basis of assumptions. The Federal Authorization of Nuclear Regulation (FANR) is a regulatory commission that was formed to be regulatory body that governs the generation of nuclear power in United Arab Emirates. It was established under the UAE nuclear law (9/2009) as an independent regulatory body that was tasked with the regulation of all nuclear activities in the United Arab Emirates. As an independent body, FANR was tasked with ensuring that the regulation of the nuclear sector is done in effective and transparent manner to ensure its accountability to the people. Being independent, the regulatory body develops national nuclear regulations based on laid down safety standards by the International Atomic Energy Agency, ensuring that they are based on scientific and proven technologies The role of FANR is to ensure that the all corporations that undertake nuclear activities follow the laid down procedures and objectives and ensure safety measures are taken keenly to ensure the safety of the workers and the general public while at the same time ensuring the environment is free from nuclear radiations

  12. Legal principles of regulatory administration and nuclear safety regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyeong Hui; Cheong, Sang Kee [Hannam Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    This research presents a critical analysis and evaluation of principles of administrative laws in order to provide framework of structural reform on the nuclear safety regulation system. The focus of this analysis and evaluation is centered around the area of origin of regulatory administrative laws; authorities of regulation; procedures of regulatory actions; regulatory enforcement; and administrative relief system. In chapter 2 the concept of regulatory administration is analysed. Chapter 3 identifies the origin of regulatory administration and the principles of administration laws. It also examines legal nature of the nuclear safety standard. In relation to regulatory authorities. Chapter 4 identifies role and responsibility of administration authorities and institutions. It also examines fundamental principles of delegation of power. Then the chapter discusses the nuclear safety regulation authorities and their roles and responsibilities. Chapter 5 classifies and examines regulatory administration actions. Chapter 6 evaluates enforcement measure for effectiveness of regulation. Finally, chapter 7 discusses the administrative relief system for reviewing unreasonable regulatory acts.

  13. A minimal murine Msx-1 gene promoter. Organization of its cis-regulatory motifs and their role in transcriptional activation in cells in culture and in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, T; Guron, C; Shetty, S; Matsui, H; Raghow, R

    1997-09-05

    To dissect the cis-regulatory elements of the murine Msx-1 promoter, which lacks a conventional TATA element, a putative Msx-1 promoter DNA fragment (from -1282 to +106 base pairs (bp)) or its congeners containing site-specific alterations were fused to luciferase reporter and introduced into NIH3T3 and C2C12 cells, and the expression of luciferase was assessed in transient expression assays. The functional consequences of the sequential 5' deletions of the promotor revealed that multiple positive and negative regulatory elements participate in regulating transcription of the Msx-1 gene. Surprisingly, however, the optimal expression of Msx-1 promoter in either NIH3T3 or C2C12 cells required only 165 bp of the upstream sequence to warrant detailed examination of its structure. Therefore, the functional consequences of site-specific deletions and point mutations of the cis-acting elements of the minimal Msx-1 promoter were systematically examined. Concomitantly, potential transcriptional factor(s) interacting with the cis-acting elements of the minimal promoter were also studied by gel electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting. Combined analyses of the minimal promoter by DNase I footprinting, electrophoretic mobility shift assays, and super shift assays with specific antibodies revealed that 5'-flanking regions from -161 to -154 and from -26 to -13 of the Msx-1 promoter contains an authentic E box (proximal E box), capable of binding a protein immunologically related to the upstream stimulating factor 1 (USF-1) and a GC-rich sequence motif which can bind to Sp1 (proximal Sp1), respectively. Additionally, we observed that the promoter activation was seriously hampered if the proximal E box was removed or mutated, and the promoter activity was eliminated completely if the proximal Sp1 site was similarly altered. Absolute dependence of the Msx-1 minimal promoter on Sp1 could be demonstrated by transient expression assays in the Sp1-deficient

  14. Professional and Regulatory Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Professional and Regulatory search are designed for people who use EPA web resources to do their job. You will be searching collections where information that is not relevant to Environmental and Regulatory professionals.

  15. Development of an ex vivo cellular model of rheumatoid arthritis: critical role of CD14-positive monocyte/macrophages in the development of pannus tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Toshiko; Takahashi, Kyoko; Ishii, Osamu; Endo, Sachio; Hioki, Kyoji; Mori, Toshihito; Kikukawa, Tadahiro; Boumpas, Dimitrios T; Ozaki, Shoichi; Yamada, Hidehiro

    2007-09-01

    To establish an ex vivo cellular model of pannus, the aberrant overgrowth of human synovial tissue (ST). Inflammatory cells that infiltrated pannus tissue from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were collected without enzyme digestion, and designated as ST-derived inflammatory cells. Single-cell suspensions of ST-derived inflammatory cells were cultured in medium alone. Levels of cytokines produced in culture supernatants were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. ST-derived inflammatory cells were transferred into the joints of immunodeficient mice to explore whether these cells could develop pannus. CD14 and CD2 cells were depleted by negative selection. Culture of ST-derived inflammatory cells from 92 of 111 patients with RA resulted in spontaneous reconstruction of inflammatory tissue in vitro within 4 weeks. Ex vivo tissue contained fibroblasts, macrophages, T cells, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive multinucleated cells. On calcium phosphate-coated slides, ST-derived inflammatory cell cultures showed numerous resorption pits. ST-derived inflammatory cell cultures continuously produced matrix metalloproteinase 9 and proinflammatory cytokines associated with osteoclastogenesis, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-8, and macrophage colony-stimulating factor. More importantly, transferring ST-derived inflammatory cells into the joints of immunodeficient mice resulted in the development of pannus tissue and erosive joint lesions. Both in vitro development and in vivo development of pannus tissue by ST-derived inflammatory cells were inhibited by depleting CD14-positive, but not CD2-positive, cells from ST-derived inflammatory cells. These findings suggest that overgrowth of inflammatory cells from human rheumatoid synovium simulates the development of pannus. This may prove informative in the screening of potential antirheumatic drugs.

  16. Adenoviral vector-mediated GM-CSF gene transfer improves anti-mycobacterial immunity in mice - role of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singpiel, Alena; Kramer, Julia; Maus, Regina; Stolper, Jennifer; Bittersohl, Lara Friederike; Gauldie, Jack; Kolb, Martin; Welte, Tobias; Sparwasser, Tim; Maus, Ulrich A

    2018-03-01

    Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor involved in differentiation, survival and activation of myeloid and non-myeloid cells with important implications for lung antibacterial immunity. Here we examined the effect of pulmonary adenoviral vector-mediated delivery of GM-CSF (AdGM-CSF) on anti-mycobacterial immunity in M. bovis BCG infected mice. Exposure of M. bovis BCG infected mice to AdGM-CSF either applied on 6h, or 6h and 7days post-infection substantially increased alveolar recruitment of iNOS and IL-12 expressing macrophages, and significantly increased accumulation of IFNγ pos T cells and particularly regulatory T cells (Tregs). This was accompanied by significantly reduced mycobacterial loads in the lungs of mice. Importantly, diphtheria toxin-induced depletion of Tregs did not influence mycobacterial loads, but accentuated immunopathology in AdGM-CSF-exposed mice infected with M. bovis BCG. Together, the data demonstrate that AdGM-CSF therapy improves lung protective immunity against M. bovis BCG infection in mice independent of co-recruited Tregs, which however critically contribute to limit lung immunopathology in BCG-infected mice. These data may be relevant to the development of immunomodulatory strategies to limit immunopathology-based lung injury in tuberculosis in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification and characterization of PhbF: a DNA binding protein with regulatory role in the PHB metabolism of Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadowaki, Marco A S; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Rego, Fabiane G M; Souza, Emanuel M; Yates, Marshall G; Monteiro, Rose A; Pedrosa, Fabio O; Chubatsu, Leda S; Steffens, Maria B R

    2011-10-14

    Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1 is a nitrogen fixing endophyte associated with important agricultural crops. It produces polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) which is stored intracellularly as granules. However, PHB metabolism and regulatory control is not yet well studied in this organism. In this work we describe the characterization of the PhbF protein from H. seropedicae SmR1 which was purified and characterized after expression in E. coli. The purified PhbF protein was able to bind to eleven putative promoters of genes involved in PHB metabolism in H. seropedicae SmR1. In silico analyses indicated a probable DNA-binding sequence which was shown to be protected in DNA footprinting assays using purified PhbF. Analyses using lacZ fusions showed that PhbF can act as a repressor protein controlling the expression of PHB metabolism-related genes. Our results indicate that H. seropedicae SmR1 PhbF regulates expression of phb-related genes by acting as a transcriptional repressor. The knowledge of the PHB metabolism of this plant-associated bacterium may contribute to the understanding of the plant-colonizing process and the organism's resistance and survival in planta.

  18. Identification and characterization of PhbF: A DNA binding protein with regulatory role in the PHB metabolism of Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedrosa Fabio O

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1 is a nitrogen fixing endophyte associated with important agricultural crops. It produces polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB which is stored intracellularly as granules. However, PHB metabolism and regulatory control is not yet well studied in this organism. Results In this work we describe the characterization of the PhbF protein from H. seropedicae SmR1 which was purified and characterized after expression in E. coli. The purified PhbF protein was able to bind to eleven putative promoters of genes involved in PHB metabolism in H. seropedicae SmR1. In silico analyses indicated a probable DNA-binding sequence which was shown to be protected in DNA footprinting assays using purified PhbF. Analyses using lacZ fusions showed that PhbF can act as a repressor protein controlling the expression of PHB metabolism-related genes. Conclusions Our results indicate that H. seropedicae SmR1 PhbF regulates expression of phb-related genes by acting as a transcriptional repressor. The knowledge of the PHB metabolism of this plant-associated bacterium may contribute to the understanding of the plant-colonizing process and the organism's resistance and survival in planta.

  19. Future nuclear regulatory challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royen, J.

    1998-01-01

    In December 1996, the NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities concluded that changes resulting from economic deregulation and other recent developments affecting nuclear power programmes have consequences both for licensees and regulatory authorities. A number of potential problems and issues which will present a challenge to nuclear regulatory bodies over the next ten years have been identified in a report just released. (author)

  20. Evidence for Deep Regulatory Similarities in Early Developmental Programs across Highly Diverged Insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinan; Samee, Md. Abul Hassan; Halfon, Marc S.; Sinha, Saurabh

    2014-01-01

    Many genes familiar from Drosophila development, such as the so-called gap, pair-rule, and segment polarity genes, play important roles in the development of other insects and in many cases appear to be deployed in a similar fashion, despite the fact that Drosophila-like “long germband” development is highly derived and confined to a subset of insect families. Whether or not these similarities extend to the regulatory level is unknown. Identification of regulatory regions beyond the well-studied Drosophila has been challenging as even within the Diptera (flies, including mosquitoes) regulatory sequences have diverged past the point of recognition by standard alignment methods. Here, we demonstrate that methods we previously developed for computational cis-regulatory module (CRM) discovery in Drosophila can be used effectively in highly diverged (250–350 Myr) insect species including Anopheles gambiae, Tribolium castaneum, Apis mellifera, and Nasonia vitripennis. In Drosophila, we have successfully used small sets of known CRMs as “training data” to guide the search for other CRMs with related function. We show here that although species-specific CRM training data do not exist, training sets from Drosophila can facilitate CRM discovery in diverged insects. We validate in vivo over a dozen new CRMs, roughly doubling the number of known CRMs in the four non-Drosophila species. Given the growing wealth of Drosophila CRM annotation, these results suggest that extensive regulatory sequence annotation will be possible in newly sequenced insects without recourse to costly and labor-intensive genome-scale experiments. We develop a new method, Regulus, which computes a probabilistic score of similarity based on binding site composition (despite the absence of nucleotide-level sequence alignment), and demonstrate similarity between functionally related CRMs from orthologous loci. Our work represents an important step toward being able to trace the evolutionary

  1. TGF-beta and 'adaptive' Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wanjun; Konkel, Joanne E

    2010-02-01

    In naïve T cells transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) induces Foxp3, a transcription factor essential for programming and developing T regulatory cells (Treg cells). This finding reveals a physiological factor which can turn on the Foxp3 gene and establishes an experimental approach to induce antigen-specific Treg cells as a potential therapy for human diseases. While this role for TGF-beta is well confirmed, several critical questions remain largely unanswered and await further investigation. In this regard, it is imperative to understand the molecular pathways by which TGF-beta signaling initiates and regulates Foxp3 expression. It is also important to elucidate which factors and/or cytokines influence the TGF-beta-mediated conversion of naïve T cells and how to create an immunologically regulatory milieu to facilitate Treg cell generation in vivo. In this short article, we will highlight the key findings and recent progress in the field, discuss the molecular mechanisms underlying the TGF-beta-mediated induction of Foxp3, and attempt to outline the challenges ahead.

  2. Single-base resolution maps of cultivated and wild rice methylomes and regulatory roles of DNA methylation in plant gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xin; Zhu, Jingde; Hu, Fengyi

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation plays important biological roles in plants and animals. To examine the rice genomic methylation landscape and assess its functional significance, we generated single-base resolution DNA methylome maps for Asian cultivated rice Oryza sativa ssp. japonica, indica and their wild rela...

  3. A potential role for muscle in glucose homeostasis: in vivo kinetic studies in glycogen storage disease type 1a and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huidekoper, Hidde H.; Visser, Gepke; Ackermans, Mariëtte T.; Sauerwein, Hans P.; Wijburg, Frits A.

    2010-01-01

    A potential role for muscle in glucose homeostasis was recently suggested based on characterization of extrahepatic and extrarenal glucose-6-phosphatase (glucose-6-phosphatase-beta). To study the role of extrahepatic tissue in glucose homeostasis during fasting glucose kinetics were studied in two

  4. Regulation of the expression of GARP/latent-TGF-β1 complexes on mouse T cells and their role in Regulatory T Cell and Th17 differentiation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Justin P.; Fujii, Hodaka; Zhou, Angela X.; Creemers, John; Unutmaz, Derya; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2013-01-01

    GARP/LRRC32 has previously been defined as a marker of activated human regulatory T-cells (Tregs) that is responsible for surface localization of latent TGF-β1. We find that GARP and latent TGF-β1 are also found on mouse Tregs activated via TCR stimulation, but in contrast to human Tregs, GARP is also expressed at a low level on resting Tregs. The expression of GARP can be upregulated on mouse Tregs by IL-2 or IL-4 exposure in the absence of TCR signaling. GARP is expressed at a low level on Tregs within the thymus and Treg precursors from the thymus concomitantly express GARP and Foxp3 upon exposure to IL-2. The expression of GARP is independent of TGF-β1 and TGF-β1 loading into GARP and is independent of furin-mediated processing of pro-TGF-β1 to latent TGF-β1. Specific deletion of GARP in CD4+ T cells results in lack of expression of latent-TGF-β1 on activated Tregs. GARP-deficient Tregs develop normally, are present in normal numbers in peripheral tissues, and are fully competent suppressors of the activation of T conventional cells in vitro. Activated Tregs expressing GARP/latent-TGF-β1 complexes are potent inducers of Th17 differentiation in the presence of exogenous IL-6 and inducers of Treg in the presence of IL-2. Induction of both Th17 producing cells and Treg is preferentially induced by Tregs expressing the latent-TGF-β1/GARP complex on their cell surface rather than by secreted latent-TGF-β1. PMID:23645881

  5. Regulation of the expression of GARP/latent TGF-β1 complexes on mouse T cells and their role in regulatory T cell and Th17 differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Justin P; Fujii, Hodaka; Zhou, Angela X; Creemers, John; Unutmaz, Derya; Shevach, Ethan M

    2013-06-01

    GARP/LRRC32 was defined as a marker of activated human regulatory T cells (Tregs) that is responsible for surface localization of latent TGF-β1. We find that GARP and latent TGF-β1 are also found on mouse Tregs activated via TCR stimulation; however, in contrast to human Tregs, GARP is also expressed at a low level on resting Tregs. The expression of GARP can be upregulated on mouse Tregs by IL-2 or IL-4 exposure in the absence of TCR signaling. GARP is expressed at a low level on Tregs within the thymus, and Treg precursors from the thymus concomitantly express GARP and Foxp3 upon exposure to IL-2. The expression of GARP is independent of TGF-β1 and TGF-β1 loading into GARP and is independent of furin-mediated processing of pro-TGF-β1 to latent TGF-β1. Specific deletion of GARP in CD4(+) T cells results in lack of expression of latent TGF-β1 on activated Tregs. GARP-deficient Tregs develop normally, are present in normal numbers in peripheral tissues, and are fully competent suppressors of the activation of conventional T cells in vitro. Activated Tregs expressing GARP/latent TGF-β1 complexes are potent inducers of Th17 differentiation in the presence of exogenous IL-6 and inducers of Treg in the presence of IL-2. Induction of both Th17-producing cells and Tregs is caused preferentially by Tregs expressing the latent TGF-β1/GARP complex on their cell surface rather than by secreted latent TGF-β1.

  6. The suppression of tomato defence response genes upon potato cyst nematode infection indicates a key regulatory role of miRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Święcicka, Magdalena; Skowron, Waldemar; Cieszyński, Piotr; Dąbrowska-Bronk, Joanna; Matuszkiewicz, Mateusz; Filipecki, Marcin; Koter, Marek Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis is an obligate parasite of solanaceous plants, triggering metabolic and morphological changes in roots which may result in substantial crop yield losses. Previously, we used the cDNA-AFLP to study the transcriptional dynamics in nematode infected tomato roots. Now, we present the rescreening of already published, upregulated transcript-derived fragment dataset using the most current tomato transcriptome sequences. Our reanalysis allowed to add 54 novel genes to 135, already found as upregulated in tomato roots upon G. rostochiensis infection (in total - 189). We also created completely new catalogue of downregulated sequences leading to the discovery of 76 novel genes. Functional classification of candidates showed that the 'wound, stress and defence response' category was enriched in the downregulated genes. We confirmed the transcriptional dynamics of six genes by qRT-PCR. To place our results in a broader context, we compared the tomato data with Arabidopsis thaliana, revealing similar proportions of upregulated and downregulated genes as well as similar enrichment of defence related transcripts in the downregulated group. Since transcript suppression is quite common in plant-nematode interactions, we assessed the possibility of miRNA-mediated inverse correlation on several tomato sequences belonging to NB-LRR and receptor-like kinase families. The qRT-PCR of miRNAs and putative target transcripts showed an opposite expression pattern in 9 cases. These results together with in silico analyses of potential miRNA targeting to the full repertoire of tomato R-genes show that miRNA mediated gene suppression may be a key regulatory mechanism during nematode parasitism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Promoting Implementation of Safety Culture in Nuclear Application for Industrial Facilities; an Important Role of Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setianingsih, Lilis Susanti [KINS-KAIST Master Degree Program, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Implementation of nuclear energy for industrial purposes has reached its highest peak. BAPETEN, as Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency of Indonesia has published regulations regarding nuclear energy utilization. As high risk associating such utilization requires direct and thoroughly supervision in order to assure its compliance to safety and security aspect, procedures related to operational activities must by fully applied. Radiation Protection Program as one type of procedures that must be available in nuclear energy utilization operation is intended to provide operators specifically technical guidance to avoid undesired negative effects of incidents or accidents. It is the responsibility of managerial level in a company to provide the procedures and to further supervise their application in the field. Radiation workers, those are all employees working in or within radiation area must understand how to execute the procedures properly. The radiation protection program is intended to protect workers, member of community and property as well as the environment from the negative impacts of nuclear utilization operational due to its radiation exposure. Safety culture, a compound of nature derived from behavior of organization and people within the organization to pay a full attention and give main priority in radiation safety matters, is expected to be achieved by implementing the radiation protection program as safety habits at the work place. It requires a management commitment to ensure that all aspect in safety and, whenever necessary, security are accomplished within the radiation protection program in order to build a safety culture in a radiation work place. Government Regulation No. 33 2007 about Safety for Ionizing Radiation and Security for Radioactive Source and Government Regulation No. 29 2008 regarding Licensing for Utilization of Ionizing Radiation and Nuclear Material present regulation and arrangement related to radiation protection program as a basic

  8. Promoting Implementation of Safety Culture in Nuclear Application for Industrial Facilities; an Important Role of Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setianingsih, Lilis Susanti

    2012-01-01

    Implementation of nuclear energy for industrial purposes has reached its highest peak. BAPETEN, as Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency of Indonesia has published regulations regarding nuclear energy utilization. As high risk associating such utilization requires direct and thoroughly supervision in order to assure its compliance to safety and security aspect, procedures related to operational activities must by fully applied. Radiation Protection Program as one type of procedures that must be available in nuclear energy utilization operation is intended to provide operators specifically technical guidance to avoid undesired negative effects of incidents or accidents. It is the responsibility of managerial level in a company to provide the procedures and to further supervise their application in the field. Radiation workers, those are all employees working in or within radiation area must understand how to execute the procedures properly. The radiation protection program is intended to protect workers, member of community and property as well as the environment from the negative impacts of nuclear utilization operational due to its radiation exposure. Safety culture, a compound of nature derived from behavior of organization and people within the organization to pay a full attention and give main priority in radiation safety matters, is expected to be achieved by implementing the radiation protection program as safety habits at the work place. It requires a management commitment to ensure that all aspect in safety and, whenever necessary, security are accomplished within the radiation protection program in order to build a safety culture in a radiation work place. Government Regulation No. 33 2007 about Safety for Ionizing Radiation and Security for Radioactive Source and Government Regulation No. 29 2008 regarding Licensing for Utilization of Ionizing Radiation and Nuclear Material present regulation and arrangement related to radiation protection program as a basic

  9. Identification and Characterization of 5′ Untranslated Regions (5′UTRs in Zymomonas mobilis as Regulatory Biological Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hee Cho

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory RNA regions within a transcript, particularly in the 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR, have been shown in a variety of organisms to control the expression levels of these mRNAs in response to various metabolites or environmental conditions. Considering the unique tolerance of Zymomonas mobilis to ethanol and the growing interest in engineering microbial strains with enhanced tolerance to industrial inhibitors, we searched natural cis-regulatory regions in this microorganism using transcriptomic data and bioinformatics analysis. Potential regulatory 5′UTRs were identified and filtered based on length, gene function, relative gene counts, and conservation in other organisms. An in vivo fluorescence-based screening system was developed to confirm the responsiveness of 36 5′UTR candidates to ethanol, acetate, and xylose stresses. UTR_ZMO0347 (5′UTR of gene ZMO0347 encoding the RNA binding protein Hfq was found to down-regulate downstream gene expression under ethanol stress. Genomic deletion of UTR_ZMO0347 led to a general decrease of hfq expression at the transcript level and increased sensitivity for observed changes in Hfq expression at the protein level. The role of UTR_ZMO0347 and other 5′UTRs gives us insight into the regulatory network of Z. mobilis in response to stress and unlocks new strategies for engineering robust industrial strains as well as for harvesting novel responsive regulatory biological parts for controllable gene expression platforms in this organism.

  10. Regulatory activities; Actividades regulatorias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This publication, compiled in 8 chapters, presents the regulatory system developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) of the Argentine Republic. The following activities and developed topics in this document describe: the evolution of the nuclear regulatory activity in Argentina; the Argentine regulatory system; the nuclear regulatory laws and standards; the inspection and safeguards of nuclear facilities; the emergency systems; the environmental systems; the environmental monitoring; the analysis laboratories on physical and biological dosimetry, prenatal irradiation, internal irradiation, radiation measurements, detection techniques on nuclear testing, medical program on radiation protection; the institutional relations with national and international organization; the training courses and meeting; the technical information.

  11. Qualichem in vivo: a tool for assessing the quality of in vivo studies and its application for bisphenol A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Maxim

    Full Text Available In regulatory toxicology, quality assessment of in vivo studies is a critical step for assessing chemical risks. It is crucial for preserving public health studies that are considered suitable for regulating chemicals are robust. Current procedures for conducting quality assessments in safety agencies are not structured, clear or consistent. This leaves room for criticism about lack of transparency, subjective influence and the potential for insufficient protection provided by resulting safety standards. We propose a tool called "Qualichem in vivo" that is designed to systematically and transparently assess the quality of in vivo studies used in chemical health risk assessment. We demonstrate its use here with 12 experts, using two controversial studies on Bisphenol A (BPA that played an important role in BPA regulation in Europe. The results obtained with Qualichem contradict the quality assessments conducted by expert committees in safety agencies for both of these studies. Furthermore, they show that reliance on standardized guidelines to ensure scientific quality is only partially justified. Qualichem allows experts with different disciplinary backgrounds and professional experiences to express their individual and sometimes divergent views-an improvement over the current way of dealing with minority opinions. It provides a transparent framework for expressing an aggregated, multi-expert level of confidence in a study, and allows a simple graphical representation of how well the study integrates the best available scientific knowledge. Qualichem can be used to compare assessments of the same study by different health agencies, increasing transparency and trust in the work of expert committees. In addition, it may be used in systematic evaluation of in vivo studies submitted by industry in the dossiers that are required for compliance with the REACH Regulation. Qualichem provides a balanced, common framework for assessing the quality of

  12. Suppressor mutations identify amino acids in PAA-1/PR65 that facilitate regulatory RSA-1/B″ subunit targeting of PP2A to centrosomes in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Karen I; Heinrichs, Jeffrey; Cheung, Karen; Srayko, Martin

    2013-01-15

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation is a key mechanism for the spatial and temporal regulation of many essential developmental processes and is especially prominent during mitosis. The multi-subunit protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) enzyme plays an important, yet poorly characterized role in dephosphorylating proteins during mitosis. PP2As are heterotrimeric complexes comprising a catalytic, structural, and regulatory subunit. Regulatory subunits are mutually exclusive and determine subcellular localization and substrate specificity of PP2A. At least 3 different classes of regulatory subunits exist (termed B, B', B″) but there is no obvious similarity in primary sequence between these classes. Therefore, it is not known how these diverse regulatory subunits interact with the same holoenzyme to facilitate specific PP2A functions in vivo. The B″ family of regulatory subunits is the least understood because these proteins lack conserved structural domains. RSA-1 (regulator of spindle assembly) is a regulatory B″ subunit required for mitotic spindle assembly in Caenorhabditis elegans. In order to address how B″ subunits interact with the PP2A core enzyme, we focused on a conditional allele, rsa-1(or598ts), and determined that this mutation specifically disrupts the protein interaction between RSA-1 and the PP2A structural subunit, PAA-1. Through genetic screening, we identified a putative interface on the PAA-1 structural subunit that interacts with a defined region of RSA-1/B″. In the context of previously published results, these data propose a mechanism of how different PP2A B-regulatory subunit families can bind the same holoenzyme in a mutually exclusive manner, to perform specific tasks in vivo.

  13. Suppressor mutations identify amino acids in PAA-1/PR65 that facilitate regulatory RSA-1/B″ subunit targeting of PP2A to centrosomes in C. elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen I. Lange

    2012-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation is a key mechanism for the spatial and temporal regulation of many essential developmental processes and is especially prominent during mitosis. The multi-subunit protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A enzyme plays an important, yet poorly characterized role in dephosphorylating proteins during mitosis. PP2As are heterotrimeric complexes comprising a catalytic, structural, and regulatory subunit. Regulatory subunits are mutually exclusive and determine subcellular localization and substrate specificity of PP2A. At least 3 different classes of regulatory subunits exist (termed B, B′, B″ but there is no obvious similarity in primary sequence between these classes. Therefore, it is not known how these diverse regulatory subunits interact with the same holoenzyme to facilitate specific PP2A functions in vivo. The B″ family of regulatory subunits is the least understood because these proteins lack conserved structural domains. RSA-1 (regulator of spindle assembly is a regulatory B″ subunit required for mitotic spindle assembly in Caenorhabditis elegans. In order to address how B″ subunits interact with the PP2A core enzyme, we focused on a conditional allele, rsa-1(or598ts, and determined that this mutation specifically disrupts the protein interaction between RSA-1 and the PP2A structural subunit, PAA-1. Through genetic screening, we identified a putative interface on the PAA-1 structural subunit that interacts with a defined region of RSA-1/B″. In the context of previously published results, these data propose a mechanism of how different PP2A B-regulatory subunit families can bind the same holoenzyme in a mutually exclusive manner, to perform specific tasks in vivo.

  14. Ontario regulatory update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of recent events which when combined add up to a gradual but unmistakable movement of the energy sector in Ontario towards a fully competitive market. Some of the events precipitating this movement towards competition include the passing of the Energy Competition Act of 1998 (Bill 35), electricity deregulation, regulatory reform of the natural gas sector, and changes to the consumer protection legislation. The role of the Ontario Energy Board was also updated to bring it in line with the demands of the competitive marketplace. Among the new roles that the Board will assume are to facilitate competition, to maintain fair and reasonable rates, and to facilitate rational expansion. Another objective is to provide opportunities for including energy efficiency in government policies. Implications of the changes in the OEB's mandate for market participants were also discussed, including (1) regulated gas sales and delivery mechanisms, (2) transactional services, (3) contract restructuring, (4) consumer protection, (5) supervision of competitive market participants, and (6) market surveillance

  15. The role of dietary sodium intake on the modulation of T helper 17 cells and regulatory T cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaro, Laura; Barbati, Cristiana; Vomero, Marta; Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Spinelli, Francesca Romana; Riccieri, Valeria; Spagnoli, Alessandra; Alessandri, Cristiano; Desideri, Giovambattista; Conti, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    We aimed at investigating whether the frequency and function of T helper 17 (Th17) and regulatory T cells (Treg) are affected by a restriction of dietary sodium intake in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We enrolled RA and SLE patients not receiving drugs known to increase urinary sodium excretion. Patients underwent a dietary regimen starting with a restricted daily sodium intake followed by a normal-sodium daily intake. The timepoints were identified at baseline (T0), after 3 weeks of low-sodium dietary regimen (T3), after 2 weeks of normal-sodium dietary regimen (T5). On these visits, we measured the 24-hour urinary sodium excretion, the frequency and function of Th17 and Treg cells in the peripheral blood, the serum levels of cytokines. Analysis of urinary sodium excretion confirmed adherence to the dietary regimen. In RA patients, a trend toward a reduction in the frequencies of Th17 cells over the low-sodium dietary regimen followed by an increase at T5 was observed, while Treg cells exhibited the opposite trend. SLE patients showed a progressive reduction in the percentage of Th17 cells that reached a significance at T5 compared to T0 (p = 0.01) and an increase in the percentage of Treg cells following the low-sodium dietary regimen at both T1 and T3 compared to T0 (p = 0.04 and p = 0.02, respectively). No significant apoptosis or proliferation modulation was found. In RA patients, we found a reduction at T5 compared to T0 in serum levels of both TGFβ (p = 0.0016) and IL-9 (p = 0.0007); serum IL-9 levels were also reduced in SLE patients at T5 with respect to T0 (p = 0.03). This is the first study investigating the effects of dietary sodium intake on adaptive immunity. Based on the results, we hypothesize that a restricted sodium dietary intake may dampen the inflammatory response in RA and SLE patients. PMID:28877244

  16. RNA-FISH to Study Regulatory RNA at the Site of Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Marta; Boque-Sastre, Raquel; Guil, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    The increasing role of all types of regulatory RNAs in the orchestration of cellular programs has enhanced the development of a variety of techniques that allow its precise detection, quantification, and functional scrutiny. Recent advances in imaging and fluoresecent in situ hybridization (FISH) methods have enabled the utilization of user-friendly protocols that provide highly sensitive and accurate detection of ribonucleic acid molecules at both the single cell and subcellular levels. We herein describe the approach originally developed by Stellaris ® , in which the target RNA molecule is fluoresecently labeled with multiple tiled complementary probes each carrying a fluorophore, thus improving sensitivity and reducing the chance of false positives. We have applied this method to the detection of nascent RNAs that partake of special regulatory structures called R loops. Their growing role in active gene expression regulation (Aguilera and Garcia-Muse, Mol Cell 46:115-124, 2012; Ginno et al., Mol Cell 45:814-825, 2012; Sun et al., Science 340:619-621, 2013; Bhatia et al., Nature 511:362-365, 2014) imposes the use of a combination of in vivo and in vitro techniques for the detailed analysis of the transcripts involved. Therefore, their study is a good example to illustrate how RNA FISH, combined with transcriptional arrest and/or cell synchronization, permits localization and temporal characterization of potentially regulatory RNA sequences.

  17. Regulatory governance of telecommunications liberalisation in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Kuo-Tai; Hebenton, Bill

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the changing role of government and market in regulating the telecommunications sector from since 1996 in Taiwan. It contextualises the theoretical aspects of regulatory governance for institutional design and practices, and reviews the concepts and mechanisms for appraising privatisation and regulatory systems. Using a conceptual framework for researching privatisation and regulation, it describes the process and issues pertinent to telecommunications liberalisation and privatisation in Taiwan, supported by a brief presentation of theoretical points of view as well as practitioners' views. The paper presents results concerning criteria for appraising privatisation and regulatory governance and considers policy lessons that can be learned from the experiences of the Taiwanese telecommunications sector's liberalisation. (author)

  18. Nuclear Regulatory Commission: more aggressive leadership needed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staats, E.B.

    1980-01-01

    The Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 which established the Nuclear Regulatory Commission required GAO to evaluate the Commission's performance by January 18, 1980. This report responds to that requirement. GAO concluded that, although improvements have been made, the Commission's nuclear regulatory performance can be characterized best as slow, indecisive, cautious - in a word, complacent. This has largely resulted from a lack of aggressive leadership as evidenced by the Commissioners' failure to establish regulatory goals, control policymaking, and most importantly, clearly define their roles in nuclear regulation

  19. Functional and topological characteristics of mammalian regulatory domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symmons, Orsolya; Uslu, Veli Vural; Tsujimura, Taro; Ruf, Sandra; Nassari, Sonya; Schwarzer, Wibke; Ettwiller, Laurence; Spitz, François

    2014-01-01

    Long-range regulatory interactions play an important role in shaping gene-expression programs. However, the genomic features that organize these activities are still poorly characterized. We conducted a large operational analysis to chart the distribution of gene regulatory activities along the mouse genome, using hundreds of insertions of a regulatory sensor. We found that enhancers distribute their activities along broad regions and not in a gene-centric manner, defining large regulatory domains. Remarkably, these domains correlate strongly with the recently described TADs, which partition the genome into distinct self-interacting blocks. Different features, including specific repeats and CTCF-binding sites, correlate with the transition zones separating regulatory domains, and may help to further organize promiscuously distributed regulatory influences within large domains. These findings support a model of genomic organization where TADs confine regulatory activities to specific but large regulatory domains, contributing to the establishment of specific gene expression profiles. PMID:24398455

  20. Resistin Regulates Pituitary Lipid Metabolism and Inflammation In Vivo and In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rodriguez-Pacheco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The adipokine resistin is an insulin-antagonizing factor that also plays a regulatory role in inflammation, immunity, food intake, and gonadal function and also regulates growth hormone (GH secretion in rat adenopituitary cells cultures with the adipokine. Although adipose tissue is the primary source of resistin, it is also expressed in other tissues, including the pituitary. The aim of this study is to investigate the possible action of resistin on the lipid metabolism in the pituitary gland in vivo (rats in two different nutritional status, fed and fast, treated with resistin on acute and a chronic way and in vitro (adenopituitary cell cultures treated with the adipokine. Here, by a combination of in vivo and in vitro experimental models, we demonstrated that central acute and chronic administration of resistin enhance mRNA levels of the lipid metabolic enzymes which participated on lipolysis and moreover inhibiting mRNA levels of the lipid metabolic enzymes involved in lipogenesis. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that resistin has a regulatory role on lipid metabolism in the pituitary gland providing a novel insight in relation to the mechanism by which this adipokine can participate in the integrated control of lipid metabolism.

  1. Resistin Regulates Pituitary Lipid Metabolism and Inflammation In Vivo and In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Pacheco, F.; Novelle, M. G.; Vazquez, M. J.; Garcia-Escobar, E.; Soriguer, F.; Rojo-Martinez, G.; García-Fuentes, E.; Malagon, M. M.; Dieguez, C.

    2013-01-01

    The adipokine resistin is an insulin-antagonizing factor that also plays a regulatory role in inflammation, immunity, food intake, and gonadal function and also regulates growth hormone (GH) secretion in rat adenopituitary cells cultures with the adipokine. Although adipose tissue is the primary source of resistin, it is also expressed in other tissues, including the pituitary. The aim of this study is to investigate the possible action of resistin on the lipid metabolism in the pituitary gland in vivo (rats in two different nutritional status, fed and fast, treated with resistin on acute and a chronic way) and in vitro (adenopituitary cell cultures treated with the adipokine). Here, by a combination of in vivo and in vitro experimental models, we demonstrated that central acute and chronic administration of resistin enhance mRNA levels of the lipid metabolic enzymes which participated on lipolysis and moreover inhibiting mRNA levels of the lipid metabolic enzymes involved in lipogenesis. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that resistin has a regulatory role on lipid metabolism in the pituitary gland providing a novel insight in relation to the mechanism by which this adipokine can participate in the integrated control of lipid metabolism. PMID:23710116

  2. The ERK5 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways play opposing regulatory roles during chondrogenesis of adult human bone marrow-derived multipotent progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobick, Brent E; Matsche, Alexander I; Chen, Faye H; Tuan, Rocky S

    2010-07-01

    Adult human bone marrow-derived multipotent progenitor cells (MPCs) are able to differentiate into a variety of specialized cell types, including chondrocytes, and are considered a promising candidate cell source for use in cartilage tissue engineering. In this study, we examined the regulation of MPC chondrogenesis by mitogen-activated protein kinases in an attempt to better understand how to generate hyaline cartilage in the laboratory that more closely resembles native tissue. Specifically, we employed the high-density pellet culture model system to assess the roles of ERK5 and ERK1/2 pathway signaling in MPC chondrogenesis. Western blotting revealed that high levels of ERK5 phosphorylation correlate with low levels of MPC chondrogenesis and that as TGF-beta 3-enhanced MPC chondrogenesis proceeds, phospho-ERK5 levels steadily decline. Conversely, levels of phospho-ERK1/2 paralleled the progression of MPC chondrogenesis. siRNA-mediated knockdown of ERK5 pathway components MEK5 and ERK5 resulted in increased MPC pellet mRNA transcript levels of the cartilage-characteristic marker genes SOX9, COL2A1, AGC, L-SOX5, and SOX6, as well as enhanced accumulation of SOX9 protein, collagen type II protein, and Alcian blue-stainable proteoglycan. In contrast, knockdown of ERK1/2 pathway members MEK1 and ERK1 decreased expression of all chondrogenic markers tested. Finally, overexpression of MEK5 and ERK5 also depressed MPC chondrogenesis, as indicated by diminished activity of a co-transfected collagen II promoter-luciferase reporter construct. In conclusion, our results suggest a novel role for the ERK5 pathway as an important negative regulator of adult human MPC chondrogenesis and illustrate that the ERK5 and ERK1/2 kinase cascades play opposing roles regulating MPC cartilage formation. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Molecular characterization of EcCIPK24 gene of finger millet (Eleusine coracana) for investigating its regulatory role in calcium transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinchole, Mahadev; Pathak, Rajesh Kumar; Singh, Uma M; Kumar, Anil

    2017-08-01

    Finger millet grains contain exceptionally high levels of calcium which is much higher compared to other cereals and millets. Since calcium is an important macronutrient in human diet, it is necessary to explore the molecular basis of calcium accumulation in the seeds of finger millet. CIPK is a calcium sensor gene, having role in activating Ca 2+ exchanger protein by interaction with CBL proteins. To know the role of EcCIPK24 gene in seed Ca 2+ accumulation, sequence is retrieved from the transcriptome data of two finger millet genotypes GP1 (low Ca 2+ ) and GP45 (high Ca 2+ ), and the expression was determined through qRT-PCR. The higher expression was found in root, shoot, leaf and developing spike tissue of GP45 compared to GP1; structural analysis showed difference of nine SNPs and one extra beta sheet domain as well as differences in vacuolar localization was predicted; besides, the variation in amino acid composition among both the genotypes was also investigated. Molecular modeling and docking studies revealed that both EcCBL4 and EcCBL10 showed strong binding affinity with EcCIPK24 (GP1) compared to EcCIPK24 (GP45). It indicates a genotypic structural variation, which not only affects the affinity but also calcium transport efficiency after interaction of CIPK-CBL with calcium exchanger ( Ec CAX1b) to pull calcium in the vacuole. Based on the expression and in silico study, it can be suggested that by activating EcCAX1b protein, EcCIPK24 plays an important role in high seed Ca 2+ accumulation.

  4. Zooming in on regulatory intermediaries: The impact of non-state regulators on sustainable construction practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, J.

    2014-01-01

    Levi-Faur and Starobin (2013) have recently drawn our attention to the important role of regulatory intermediates in contemporary regulatory regimes. Among others they argue that regulatory intermediaries come in a wide variety of appearances, and that these can influence the outcomes of regulatory

  5. CD4 T cells mediate both positive and negative regulation of the immune response to HIV infection: complex role of T follicular helper cells and Regulatory T cells in pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chansavath ePhetsouphanh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection results in chronic activation of cells in lymphoid tissue, including T cells, B cells and myeloid lineage cells. The resulting characteristic hyperplasia is an amalgam of proliferating host immune cells in the adaptive response, increased concentrations of innate response mediators due to viral and bacterial products, and homeostatic responses to inflammation. While it is generally thought that CD4 T cells are greatly depleted, in fact, two types of CD4 T cells appear to be increased, namely regulatory T cells (Tregs and T follicular helper cells (Tfh. These cells have opposing roles, but may both be important in the pathogenic process. Whether Tregs are failing in their role to limit lymphocyte activation is unclear, but there is no doubt now that Tfh are associated with B cell hyperplasia and increased germinal centre activity. Antiretroviral therapy (ART may reduce the lymphocyte activation, but not completely, and therefore there is a need for interventions that selectively enhance normal CD4 function without exacerbating Tfh, B cell or Treg dysfunction.

  6. Experimental studies on possible regulatory role of nitric oxide on the differential effects of chronic predictable and unpredictable stress on adaptive immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Tarun; Gulati, Kavita; Rai, Nishant; Ray, Arunabha

    2017-09-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of chronic predictable stress (CPS) and chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) on immunological responses in KLH-sensitized rats and involvement of NOergic signaling pathways mediating such responses. Male Wistar rats (200-250g) were exposed to either CPS or CUS for 14days and IgG antibody levels and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response was determined to assess changes in adaptive immunity. To evaluate the role of nitric oxide during such immunomodulation, biochemical estimation of stable metabolite of nitric oxide (NOx) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT, a marker of peroxynitrite formation) were done in both blood and brain. Chronic stress exposure resulted in suppression of IgG and DTH response and elevated NOx and 3-NT levels, with a difference in magnitude of response in CPS vs CUS. Pretreatment with aminoguanidine (iNOS inhibitor) caused further reduction of adaptive immune responses and attenuated the increased NOx and 3-NT levels in CPS or CUS exposed rats. On the other hand 7-NI (nNOS inhibitor) did not significantly affect these estimated parameters. The results suggest involvement of iNOS and lesser/no role of nNOS during modulation of adaptive immunity to stress. Thus, the result showed that predictability of stressors results in differential degree of modulation of immune responses and complex NO-mediated signaling mechanisms may be involved during responses. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Regulatory control of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to support IAEA training courses and workshops in the field of regulatory control of nuclear power plants as well as to support the regulatory bodies of Member States in their own training activities. The target group is the professional staff members of nuclear safety regulatory bodies supervising nuclear power plants and having duties and responsibilities in the following regulatory fields: regulatory framework; regulatory organization; regulatory guidance; licensing and licensing documents; assessment of safety; and regulatory inspection and enforcement. Important topics such as regulatory competence and quality of regulatory work as well as emergency preparedness and public communication are also covered. The book also presents the key issues of nuclear safety such as 'defence-in-depth' and safety culture and explains how these should be taken into account in regulatory work, e.g. during safety assessment and regulatory inspection. The book also reflects how nuclear safety has been developed during the years on the basis of operating experience feedback and results of safety research by giving topical examples. The examples cover development of operating procedures and accident management to cope with complicated incidents and severe accidents to stress the importance of regulatory role in nuclear safety research. The main target group is new staff members of regulatory bodies, but the book also offers good examples for more experienced inspectors to be used as comparison and discussion basis in internal workshops organized by the regulatory bodies for refreshing and continuing training. The book was originally compiled on the basis of presentations provided during the two regulatory control training courses in 1997 and 1998. The textbook was reviewed at the beginning of the years 2000 and 2002 by IAEA staff members and consistency with the latest revisions of safety standards have been ensured. The textbook was completed in the

  8. Role of pirenoxine in the effects of catalin on in vitro ultraviolet-induced lens protein turbidity and selenite-induced cataractogenesis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chao-Chien; Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Hsu, Kuang-Yang; Lin, I-Lin; Tsai, Ming-Hsuan; Wu, Wen-Hsin; Wei, Tzu-Tang; Huang, Yi-Shiang; Chiu, Shih-Jiuan; Chen, Hsiang-Yin; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Wu, Tzu-Hua

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the biochemical pharmacology of pirenoxine (PRX) and catalin under in vitro selenite/calcium- and ultraviolet (UV)-induced lens protein turbidity challenges. The systemic effects of catalin were determined using a selenite-induced cataractogenesis rat model. In vitro cataractogenesis assay systems (including UVB/C photo-oxidation of lens crystallins, calpain-induced proteolysis, and selenite/calcium-induced turbidity of lens crystallin solutions) were used to screen the activity of PRX and catalin eye drop solutions. Turbidity was identified as the optical density measured using spectroscopy at 405 nm. We also determined the in vivo effects of catalin on cataract severity in a selenite-induced cataract rat model. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was applied to analyze the integrity of crystallin samples. PRX at 1,000 μM significantly delayed UVC-induced turbidity formation compared to controls after 4 h of UVC exposure (pturbidity induced by 4 h of UVC exposure was ameliorated in the presence of catalin equivalent to 1~100 μM PRX in a concentration-dependent manner. Samples with catalin-formulated vehicle only (CataV) and those containing PRX equivalent to 100 μM had a similar protective effect after 4 h of UVC exposure compared to the controls (pturbidity formation compared to controls on days 0~4 (pturbidity on day 1 (pturbidity but required millimolar levels to protect against UVC irradiation. The observed inhibition of UVC-induced turbidity of lens crystallins by catalin at micromolar concentrations may have been a result of the catalin-formulated vehicle. Transient protection by catalin against selenite-induced turbidity of crystallin solutions in vitro was supported by the ameliorated cataract scores in the early stage of cataractogenesis in vivo by subcutaneously administered catalin. PRX could not inhibit calpain-induced proteolysis activated by calcium or catalin itself, and may be

  9. Elucidation of the regulatory role of the fructose operon reveals a novel target for enhancing the NADPH supply in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhihao; Chan, Siu Hung Joshua; Sudarsan, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    is linked to redox and to the general metabolism. We here provide new insights into the regulation of the metabolism of this important platform organism by systematically characterizing mutants carrying various lesions in the fructose operon. Initially, we found that a strain where the dedicated fructose...... uptake system had been inactivated (KO-ptsF) was hampered in growth on sucrose minimal medium, and suppressor mutants appeared readily. Comparative genomic analysis in conjunction with enzymatic assays revealed that suppression was linked to inactivation of the pfkB gene, encoding a fructose-1-phosphate...... kinase. Detailed characterization of KO-ptsF, KO-pfkB and double knock-out (DKO) derivatives revealed a strong role for sugar-phosphates, especially fructose-1-phosphate (F1P), in governing sugar as well as redox metabolism due to effects on transcriptional regulation of key genes. These findings allowed...

  10. The inhibition of the mitochondrial F1FO-ATPase activity when activated by Ca2+ opens new regulatory roles for NAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesci, Salvatore; Trombetti, Fabiana; Ventrella, Vittoria; Pirini, Maurizio; Pagliarani, Alessandra

    2018-01-26

    The mitochondrial F1FO-ATPase is uncompetitively inhibited by NAD+ only when the natural cofactor Mg2+ is replaced by Ca2+, a mode putatively involved in cell death. The Ca2+-dependent F1FO-ATPase is also inhibited when NAD+ concentration in mitochondria is raised by acetoacetate. The enzyme inhibition by NAD+ cannot be ascribed to any de-ac(et)ylation or ADP-ribosylation by sirtuines, as it is not reversed by nicotinamide. Moreover, the addition of acetyl-CoA or palmitate, which would favor the enzyme ac(et)ylation, does not affect the F1FO-ATPase activity. Consistently, NAD+ may play a new role, not associated with redox and non-redox enzymatic reactions, in the Ca2+-dependent regulation of the F1FO-ATPase activity.

  11. Handling of timescales in safety assessments of geological disposal: an IRSN-GRS standpoint on the possible role of regulatory guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, D.; Rohlig, K.J.

    2002-01-01

    Due to the physical process of radioactive decay, the question of time is an inherent factor of any activity associated with nuclear materials. Hence time has naturally played a role in the definition of radioactive waste management strategies. This has eventually led to differences with other types of hazardous waste and notably to an earlier consideration of potential impacts in the long-term. Time has therefore been early accounted for in the basic objectives of radioactive waste management. These objectives explicitly require the protection of human beings and of the environment now and in the future. In other words this implies the need to adequately manage the waste for 'as long as it contains dangerous amounts of toxic substance', or, in the case of radioactive waste, 'until sufficient decay has occurred'. (authors)

  12. Physiological and Proteomic Analysis of the Rice Mutant cpm2 Suggests a Negative Regulatory Role of Jasmonic Acid in Drought Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Dhakarey

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available It is widely known that numerous adaptive responses of drought-stressed plants are stimulated by chemical messengers known as phytohormones. Jasmonic acid (JA is one such phytohormone. But there are very few reports revealing its direct implication in drought related responses or its cross-talk with other phytohormones. In this study, we compared the morpho-physiological traits and the root proteome of a wild type (WT rice plant with its JA biosynthesis mutant coleoptile photomorphogenesis 2 (cpm2, disrupted in the allene oxide cyclase (AOC gene, for insights into the role of JA under drought. The mutant had higher stomatal conductance, higher water use efficiency and higher shoot ABA levels under severe drought as compared to the WT. Notably, roots of cpm2 were better developed compared to the WT under both, control and drought stress conditions. Root proteome was analyzed using the Tandem Mass Tag strategy to better understand this difference at the molecular level. Expectedly, AOC was unique but notably highly abundant under drought in the WT. Identification of other differentially abundant proteins (DAPs suggested increased energy metabolism (i.e., increased mobilization of resources and reactive oxygen species scavenging in cpm2 under drought. Additionally, various proteins involved in secondary metabolism, cell growth and cell wall synthesis were also more abundant in cpm2 roots. Proteome-guided transcript, metabolite, and histological analyses provided further insights into the favorable adaptations and responses, most likely orchestrated by the lack of JA, in the cpm2 roots. Our results in cpm2 are discussed in the light of JA crosstalk to other phytohormones. These results together pave the path for understanding the precise role of JA during drought stress in rice.

  13. The transcription factor Ste12 mediates the regulatory role of the Tmk1 MAP kinase in mycoparasitism and vegetative hyphal fusion in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma atroviride.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Gruber

    Full Text Available Mycoparasitic species of the fungal genus Trichoderma are potent antagonists able to combat plant pathogenic fungi by direct parasitism. An essential step in this mycoparasitic fungus-fungus interaction is the detection of the fungal host followed by activation of molecular weapons in the mycoparasite by host-derived signals. The Trichoderma atroviride MAP kinase Tmk1, a homolog of yeast Fus3/Kss1, plays an essential role in regulating the mycoparasitic host attack, aerial hyphae formation and conidiation. However, the transcription factors acting downstream of Tmk1 are hitherto unknown. Here we analyzed the functions of the T. atroviride Ste12 transcription factor whose orthologue in yeast is targeted by the Fus3 and Kss1 MAP kinases. Deletion of the ste12 gene in T. atroviride not only resulted in reduced mycoparasitic overgrowth and lysis of host fungi but also led to loss of hyphal avoidance in the colony periphery and a severe reduction in conidial anastomosis tube formation and vegetative hyphal fusion events. The transcription of several orthologues of Neurospora crassa hyphal fusion genes was reduced upon ste12 deletion; however, the Δste12 mutant showed enhanced expression of mycoparasitism-relevant chitinolytic and proteolytic enzymes and of the cell wall integrity MAP kinase Tmk2. Based on the comparative analyses of Δste12 and Δtmk1 mutants, an essential role of the Ste12 transcriptional regulator in mediating outcomes of the Tmk1 MAPK pathway such as regulation of the mycoparasitic activity, hyphal fusion and carbon source-dependent vegetative growth is suggested. Aerial hyphae formation and conidiation, in contrast, were found to be independent of Ste12.

  14. Further evidence of the in vivo role of erythropoietin or companion molecules induced by hypoxia on proliferation and continuing differentiation of BFU-e in PCDC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harigaya, K.; Cronkite, E.P.; Miller, M.E.; Moccia, G.

    1981-01-01

    Normal and plethoric bone marrow cells were grown in plasma clot diffusion chambers (PCDC) implanted into the peritoneum of normal mice or mice submitted to 7 h of hypoxia (23,000 ft) daily, on a single day or on 2 consecutive days at different times after implantation of the PCDC's. Daily discontinuous hypoxia (DDH) produced more 6-day bursts than other treatments. Hypoxia on days 1 and 2 after implantation was nearly as effective as DDH on day-6 bursts. Erythropoietin (Ep) levels were measured by bioassay on both diffusion chamber (DC) contents and serum. Serum Ep levels peaked after a 7-hr hypoxic exposure while the DC content Ep levels were in the nondetectable range. The data implies that either higher than normal Ep levels or a companion molecule(s) produced by hypoxia are required for 1 to 2 days early in the culture period to force an increasing number of BFU-d-e down the erythrocytic pathway and thus increase red cell production at times of need in vivo

  15. Chlorogenic Acid and Rutin Play a Major Role in the In Vivo Anti-Diabetic Activity of Morus alba Leaf Extract on Type II Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunyadi, Attila; Martins, Ana; Hsieh, Tusty-Jiuan; Seres, Adrienn; Zupkó, István

    2012-01-01

    The leaves of the white mulberry tree (Morus alba L.) are used worldwide in traditional medicine as anti-diabetics. Various constituents of mulberry leaves, such as iminosugars (i.e. 1-deoxynojirimicin), flavonoids and related compounds, polysaccharides, glycopeptides and ecdysteroids, have been reported to exert anti-diabetic activity, but knowledge about their contribution to the overall activity is limited. The objective of the present work was to determine the in vivo anti-diabetic activity of an extract of mulberry leaves (MA), and to examine to what extent three major constituents, chlorogenic acid, rutin and isoquercitrin, might contribute to the observed activity. Quantities of the three constituents of interest in the extract were determined by using HPLC-DAD. Activity was determined by using a type II diabetic rat model. After 11 days of per os administration of 250 or 750 mg/kg of MA or the corresponding amounts of each individual compound, a dose dependent decrease of non-fasting blood glucose levels were found for MA, chlorogenic acid and rutin, but not for isoquercitrin. Based on our results, chlorogenic acid and rutin might account for as much as half the observed anti-diabetic activity of MA, hence they can be considered as excellent markers for the quality control of mulberry products. PMID:23185641

  16. Elucidation of the role of biological factors and device design in cerebral NIRS using an in vivo hematoma model based on high-intensity focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianting; Huang, Stanley; Myers, Matthew; Chen, Yu; Welle, Cristin; Pfefer, Joshua

    2016-03-01

    Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) is an emerging medical countermeasure for rapid, field detection of hematomas caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI). Bench and animal tests to determine NIRS sensitivity and specificity are needed. However, current animal models involving non-invasively induced, localized neural damage are limited. We investigated an in vivo murine hematoma model in which cerebral hemorrhage was induced noninvasively by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) with calibrated positioning and parameters. To characterize the morphology of induced hematomas, we used skull-intact histological evaluation. A multi-wavelength fiber-optic NIRS system with three source-detector separation distances was used to detect hematoma A 1.1 MHz transducer produced consistent small-to-medium hematoma localized to a single hemisphere, along with bruising of the scalp, with a low mortality rate. A 220 kHz transducer produced larger, more diffuse hematomas, with higher variability in size and a correspondingly higher mortality rate. No skin bruising or blood accumulation between the skin and skull was observed following injury application with the 220 kHz transducer. Histological analysis showed higher sensitivity for larger hematomas (>4x4 mm2). NIRS optical density change after HIFU was able to detect all hematomas, with sensitivity dependent on wavelength and separation distance. While improvements in methods for validating cerebral blood distribution are needed, the HIFU hematoma model provided useful insights that will inform development of biologically relevant, performance test methods for cerebral NIRS systems.

  17. The current role of in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy within the continuum of actinic keratosis and squamous cell carcinoma: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kim P; Peppelman, Malou; Hoogedoorn, Lisa; Van Erp, Piet E J; Gerritsen, Marie-Jeanne P

    2016-12-01

    Clinical differentiation between actinic keratosis (AK), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in situ, and invasive SCC and its variants may be difficult. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a non-invasive technique for in vivo skin imaging. To explicate the diagnostic and monitoring use of RCM within the spectrum of AK and SCC, and evaluate the accuracy of RCM for these diagnoses relative to histopathology. A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and Web of Science databases. The quality was assessed using the STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) checklist. Twenty-five eligible studies were included. Different diagnostic RCM features have been described for AK, actinic cheilitis (AC), erythroplasia of Queyrat, Bowen disease, invasive SCC, and keratoacanthoma (KA). The overall range of sensitivity and specificity of RCM for the diagnosis of SCC, AK, SCC in situ, and KA was 79-100% and 78-100%, respectively. The current literature describes the use of RCM for diagnosing AK, AC, erythroplasia of Queyrat, Bowen disease, invasive SCC, and KA, as well as for monitoring treatments of AK, with good accuracy. Unfortunately, studies with high methodological quality are lacking. Pre-treatment of hyperkeratotic lesions and uniform definitions of RCM features are required to simplify the differentiation between AKs, SCC in situ, and SCC and its variants in clinical practice.

  18. Research and regulatory review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macleod, J.S.; Fryer, D.R.H.

    1979-01-01

    To enable the regulatory review to be effectively undertaken by the regulatory body, there is a need for it to have ready access to information generated by research activities. Certain advantages have been seen to be gained by the regulatory body itself directly allocating and controlling some portion of these activities. The princial reasons for reaching this conclusion are summarised and a brief description of the Inspectorates directly sponsored programme outlined. (author)

  19. Regulatory T cell suppressive potency dictates the balance between bacterial proliferation and clearance during persistent Salmonella infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanner M Johanns

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of persistent infection is dictated by the balance between opposing immune activation and suppression signals. Herein, virulent Salmonella was used to explore the role and potential importance of Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells in dictating the natural progression of persistent bacterial infection. Two distinct phases of persistent Salmonella infection are identified. In the first 3-4 weeks after infection, progressively increasing bacterial burden was associated with delayed effector T cell activation. Reciprocally, at later time points after infection, reductions in bacterial burden were associated with robust effector T cell activation. Using Foxp3(GFP reporter mice for ex vivo isolation of regulatory T cells, we demonstrate that the dichotomy in infection tempo between early and late time points is directly paralleled by drastic changes in Foxp3(+ Treg suppressive potency. In complementary experiments using Foxp3(DTR mice, the significance of these shifts in Treg suppressive potency on infection outcome was verified by enumerating the relative impacts of regulatory T cell ablation on bacterial burden and effector T cell activation at early and late time points during persistent Salmonella infection. Moreover, Treg expression of CTLA-4 directly paralleled changes in suppressive potency, and the relative effects of Treg ablation could be largely recapitulated by CTLA-4 in vivo blockade. Together, these results demonstrate that dynamic regulation of Treg suppressive potency dictates the course of persistent bacterial infection.

  20. Adaptation of Tri-molecular fluorescence complementation allows assaying of regulatory Csr RNA-protein interactions in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelderman, Grant; Sivakumar, Anusha; Lipp, Sarah; Contreras, Lydia

    2015-02-01

    sRNAs play a significant role in controlling and regulating cellular metabolism. One of the more interesting aspects of certain sRNAs is their ability to make global changes in the cell by interacting with regulatory proteins. In this work, we demonstrate the use of an in vivo Tri-molecular Fluorescence Complementation assay to detect and visualize the central regulatory sRNA-protein interaction of the Carbon Storage Regulatory system in E. coli. The Carbon Storage Regulator consists primarily of an RNA binding protein, CsrA, that alters the activity of mRNA targets and of an sRNA, CsrB, that modulates the activity of CsrA. We describe the construction of a fluorescence complementation system that detects the interactions between CsrB and CsrA. Additionally, we demonstrate that the intensity of the fluorescence of this system is able to detect changes in the affinity of the CsrB-CsrA interaction, as caused by mutations in the protein sequence of CsrA. While previous methods have adopted this technique to study mRNA or RNA localization, this is the first attempt to use this technique to study the sRNA-protein interaction directly in bacteria. This method presents a potentially powerful tool to study complex bacterial RNA protein interactions in vivo. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Critical role of FcR gamma-chain, LAT, PLCgamma2 and thrombin in arteriolar thrombus formation upon mild, laser-induced endothelial injury in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalia, Neena; Auger, Jocelyn M; Atkinson, Ben; Watson, Steve P

    2008-05-01

    The role of collagen receptor complex GPVI-FcR gamma-chain, PLCgamma2 and LAT in laser-induced thrombosis is unclear. Controversy surrounds whether collagen is exposed in this model or whether thrombosis is dependent on thrombin. This study hypothesized that collagen exposure plays a critical role in thrombus formation in this model, which was tested by investigating contributions of FcR gamma-chain, LAT, PLCgamma2 and thrombin. Thrombi were monitored using intravital microscopy in anesthetized wild-type and FcR gamma-chain, LAT and PLCgamma2 knockout mice. Hirudin (thrombin inhibitor) was administered to wild-type and FcR gamma-chain knockout mice. Significantly reduced thrombus formation was observed in FcR gamma-chain and PLCgamma2 knockouts with a greater decrease observed in LAT knockouts. Dramatic reduction was observed in wild-types treated with hirudin, with abolished thrombus formation only observed in FcR gamma-chain knockouts treated with hirudin. GPVI-FcR gamma-chain, LAT and PLCgamma2 are essential for thrombus generation and stability in this laser-induced model of injury. More importantly, a greater role for LAT was identified, which may reflect a role for it downstream of a second matrix protein receptor. However, inhibition of platelet activation by matrix proteins and thrombin generation are both required to maximally prevent thrombus formation.

  2. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells control CD8+ T-cell effector differentiation by modulating IL-2 homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Alice; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Sparwasser, Tim; Thomas, Ranjeny; Steptoe, Raymond J.

    2011-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg) play a crucial role in the regulation of immune responses. Although many mechanisms of Treg suppression in vitro have been described, the mechanisms by which Treg modulate CD8+ T cell differentiation and effector function in vivo are more poorly defined. It has been proposed, in many instances, that modulation of cytokine homeostasis could be an important mechanism by which Treg regulate adaptive immunity; however, direct experimental evidence is sparse. Here we demonstrate that CD4+CD25+ Treg, by critically regulating IL-2 homeostasis, modulate CD8+ T-cell effector differentiation. Expansion and effector differentiation of CD8+ T cells is promoted by autocrine IL-2 but, by competing for IL-2, Treg limit CD8+ effector differentiation. Furthermore, a regulatory loop exists between Treg and CD8+ effector T cells, where IL-2 produced during CD8+ T-cell effector differentiation promotes Treg expansion. PMID:21502514

  3. Regulatory Commission of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Map Help Regulatory Commission of Alaska Login Forgot Password Arrow Image Forgot password? View Cart login Procedures for Requesting Login For Consumers General Information Telephone Electric Natural Gas

  4. Gene mdpC plays a regulatory role in the methyl-tert-butyl ether degradation pathway of Methylibium petroleiphilum strain PM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Geetika; Schmidt, Radomir; Scow, Kate M; Denison, Michael S; Hristova, Krassimira R

    2015-04-01

    Among the few bacteria known to utilize methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as a sole carbon source, Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1 is a well-characterized organism with a sequenced genome; however, knowledge of the genetic regulation of its MTBE degradation pathway is limited. We investigated the role of a putative transcriptional activator gene, mdpC, in the induction of MTBE-degradation genes mdpA (encoding MTBE monooxygenase) and mdpJ (encoding tert-butyl alcohol hydroxylase) of strain PM1 in a gene-knockout mutant mdpC(-). We also utilized quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR assays targeting genes mdpA, mdpJ and mdpC to determine the effects of the mutation on transcription of these genes. Our results indicate that gene mdpC is involved in the induction of both mdpA and mdpJ in response to MTBE and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) exposure in PM1. An additional independent mechanism may be involved in the induction of mdpJ in the presence of TBA. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Major regulatory factors in the evolution of development: the roles of goosecoid and Msx in the evolution of the direct-developing sea urchin Heliocidaris erythrogramma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Keen A; Andrews, Mary E; Rudolf Turner, F; Raff, Rudolf A

    2005-01-01

    The transcription factors Gsc and Msx are expressed in the oral ectoderm of the indirect-developing sea urchin Heliocidaris tuberculata. Their patterns of expression are highly modified in the direct developer Heliocidaris erythrogramma, which lacks an oral ectoderm. We here test the hypothesis that they are large effect genes responsible for the loss of the oral ectoderm module in the direct-developing larva of H. erythrogramma as well as for the restoration of an overt oral ectoderm in H.e. xH.t. hybrids. We undertook misexpression/overexpression and knockdown assays in the two species and in hybrids by mRNA injection. The results indicate that dramatic changes of function of these transcription factors has occurred. One of these genes, Gsc, has the ability when misexpressed to partially restore oral ectoderm in H. erythrogramma. On the other hand, Msx has lost any oral function and instead has a role in mesoderm proliferation and patterning. In addition, we found that the H. tuberculataGsc is up regulated in H.e. xH.t. hybrids, showing a preferential use of the indirect developing parental gene in the development of the hybrid. We suggest that Gsc qualifies as a gene of large evolutionary effect and is partially responsible for the evolution of direct development of H. erythrogramma. We discuss these results in light of modularity and genetic networks in development, as well as in their implications for the rapid evolution of large morphological changes in development.

  6. Single-base resolution maps of cultivated and wild rice methylomes and regulatory roles of DNA methylation in plant gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methylation plays important biological roles in plants and animals. To examine the rice genomic methylation landscape and assess its functional significance, we generated single-base resolution DNA methylome maps for Asian cultivated rice Oryza sativa ssp. japonica, indica and their wild relatives, Oryza rufipogon and Oryza nivara. Results The overall methylation level of rice genomes is four times higher than that of Arabidopsis. Consistent with the results reported for Arabidopsis, methylation in promoters represses gene expression while gene-body methylation generally appears to be positively associated with gene expression. Interestingly, we discovered that methylation in gene transcriptional termination regions (TTRs can significantly repress gene expression, and the effect is even stronger than that of promoter methylation. Through integrated analysis of genomic, DNA methylomic and transcriptomic differences between cultivated and wild rice, we found that primary DNA sequence divergence is the major determinant of methylational differences at the whole genome level, but DNA methylational difference alone can only account for limited gene expression variation between the cultivated and wild rice. Furthermore, we identified a number of genes with significant difference in methylation level between the wild and cultivated rice. Conclusions The single-base resolution methylomes of rice obtained in this study have not only broadened our understanding of the mechanism and function of DNA methylation in plant genomes, but also provided valuable data for future studies of rice epigenetics and the epigenetic differentiation between wild and cultivated rice.

  7. The new insight on the regulatory role of the vitamin D3 in metabolic pathways characteristic for cancerogenesis and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubis, Adriana Maria; Piwowar, Agnieszka

    2015-11-01

    Apart from the classical function of regulating intestinal, bone and kidney calcium and phosphorus absorption as well as bone mineralization, there is growing evidence for the neuroprotective function of vitamin D3 through neuronal calcium regulation, the antioxidative pathway, immunomodulation and detoxification. Vitamin D3 and its derivates influence directly or indirectly almost all metabolic processes such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, inflammatory processes and mutagenesis. Such multifactorial effects of vitamin D3 can be a profitable source of new therapeutic solutions for two radically divergent diseases, cancer and neurodegeneration. Interestingly, an unusual association seems to exist between the occurrence of these two pathological states, called "inverse comorbidity". Patients with cognitive dysfunctions or dementia have considerably lower risk of cancer, whereas survivors of cancer have lower prevalence of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. To our knowledge, there are few publications analyzing the role of vitamin D3 in biological pathways existing in carcinogenic and neuropathological disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Novel positive regulatory role for the SPL6 transcription factor in the N TIR-NB-LRR receptor-mediated plant innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu S Padmanabhan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Following the recognition of pathogen-encoded effectors, plant TIR-NB-LRR immune receptors induce defense signaling by a largely unknown mechanism. We identify a novel and conserved role for the SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN (SBP-domain transcription factor SPL6 in enabling the activation of the defense transcriptome following its association with a nuclear-localized immune receptor. During an active immune response, the Nicotiana TIR-NB-LRR N immune receptor associates with NbSPL6 within distinct nuclear compartments. NbSPL6 is essential for the N-mediated resistance to Tobacco mosaic virus. Similarly, the presumed Arabidopsis ortholog AtSPL6 is required for the resistance mediated by the TIR-NB-LRR RPS4 against Pseudomonas syringae carrying the avrRps4 effector. Transcriptome analysis indicates that AtSPL6 positively regulates a subset of defense genes. A pathogen-activated nuclear-localized TIR-NB-LRR like N can therefore regulate defense genes through SPL6 in a mechanism analogous to the induction of MHC genes by mammalian immune receptors like CIITA and NLRC5.

  9. The Important Role of FLT3-L in Ex Vivo Expansion of Hematopoietic Stem Cells following Co-Culture with Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oubari, Farhad; Amirizade, Naser; Mohammadpour, Hemn; Nakhlestani, Mozhdeh; Zarif, Mahin Nikougoftar

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transplantation using umbilical cord blood (UCB) has improved during the last decade. Because of cell limitations, several studies focused on the ex vivo expansion of HSCs. Numerous investigations were performed to introduce the best cytokine cocktails for HSC expansion The majority used the Fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (FLT3-L) as a critical component. According to FLT3-L biology, in this study we have investigated the hypothesis that FLT3-L only effectively induces HSCs expansion in the presence of a mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) feeder. In this experimental study, HSCs and MSCs were isolated from UCB and placenta, respectively. HSCs were cultured in different culture conditions in the presence and absence of MSC feeder and cytokines. After ten days of culture, total nucleated cell count (TNC), cluster of differentiation 34+(CD34(+)) cell count, colony forming unit assay (CFU), long-term culture initiating cell (LTC-IC), homeobox protein B4 (HoxB4) mRNA and surface CD49d expression were evaluated. The fold increase for some culture conditions was compared by the t test. HSCs expanded in the presence of cytokines and MSCs feeder. The rate of expansion in the co-culture condition was two-fold more than culture with cytokines (Pculture condition at a level of 20-fold equal to the presence of stem cell factor (SCF), thrombopoietin (TPO) and FLT3-L without feeder cells. The number of extracted colonies from LTC-IC and CD49d expression compared with a cytokine cocktail condition meaningfully increased (Pculture with MSCs can induce high yield expansion of HSCs and be a substitute for the universal cocktail of SCF, TPO and FLT3-L in feeder-free culture.

  10. Comparative in vivo analysis of the role of the adventitia and the endothelium on arterial mechanical function: relevance for aortic counterpulsation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bia, Daniel; Zócalo, Yanina; Wray, Sandra; Cabrera-Fischer, Edmundo I

    2017-06-09

    The comparative effect of the intimal and adventitial layers on arterial biomechanics control, in basal and altered conditions, remains to be elucidated. This study aimed (1) to characterize the arterial conduit (CF) and buffering (distensibility) function of the iliac arteries in in vivo animals, in which the intimal and adventitial layers were removed; (2) to determine the effects of intra-aortic ballon pumping (IABP) on simultaneously de-adventitialized (DA) and de-endothelialized (DE) iliac arteries before and after induced heart failure. Pressure and diameter signals were measured in the iliac arteries of sheep (n = 7) in which the adventitial and intima layer were removed. Intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) assistance was used in a control state and after heart failure induction. Both DE and DA determined significant changes in arterial diameter, distensibility and CF. Changes were higher after DA than after DE in terms of distensibility and CF (p<0.05). DA followed by DE (DA + DE) showed significant increases in arterial diameter and CF, accompanied by a decrease in distensibility (p<0.05) with respect to intact arteries. Heart failure induction caused significant hemodynamic changes without modifying the already impaired local biomechanical parameters. Nonsignificant improvements in the biomechanical parameters of DA + DE iliac arteries were observed during IABP before and after heart failure induction. Biomechanical changes caused by DA of iliac arteries were more important than those observed after DE. The DA + DE arteries showed significant differences with respect to intact arteries and with DA or DE arteries. IABP-related effects on arterial mechanics were absent in DA + DE arteries.

  11. Essential role of the electroneutral Na+-HCO3- cotransporter NBCn1 in murine duodenal acid-base balance and colonic mucus layer build-up in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anurag Kumar; Xia, Weiliang; Riederer, Brigitte; Juric, Marina; Li, Junhua; Zheng, Wen; Cinar, Ayhan; Xiao, Fang; Bachmann, Oliver; Song, Penghong; Praetorius, Jeppe; Aalkjaer, Christian; Seidler, Ursula

    2013-04-15

    Duodenal epithelial cells need efficient defence strategies during gastric acidification of the lumen, while colonic mucosa counteracts damage by pathogens by building up a bacteria-free adherent mucus layer. Transport of HCO3(-) is considered crucial for duodenal defence against acid as well as for mucus release and expansion, but the transport pathways involved are incompletely understood. This study investigated the significance of the electroneutral Na(+)-HCO3(-) cotransporter NBCn1 for duodenal defence against acid and colonic mucus release. NBCn1 was localized to the basolateral membrane of duodenal villous enterocytes and of colonic crypt cells, with predominant expression in goblet cells. Duodenal villous enterocyte intracellular pH was studied before and during a luminal acid load by two-photon microscopy in exteriorized, vascularly perfused, indicator (SNARF-1 AM)-loaded duodenum of isoflurane-anaesthetized, systemic acid-base-controlled mice. Acid-induced HCO3(-) secretion was measured in vivo by single-pass perfusion and pH-stat titration. After a luminal acid load, NBCn1-deficient duodenocytes were unable to recover rapidly from intracellular acidification and could not respond adequately with protective HCO3(-) secretion. In the colon, build-up of the mucus layer was delayed, and a decreased thickness of the adherent mucus layer was observed, suggesting that basolateral HCO3(-) uptake is essential for optimal release of mucus. The electroneutral Na(+)-HCO3(-) cotransporter NBCn1 displays a differential cellular distribution in the murine intestine and is essential for HCO3(-)-dependent mucosal protective functions, such as recovery of intracellular pH and HCO3(-) secretion in the duodenum and secretion of mucus in the colon.

  12. Expression of adrenomedullin in human colorectal tumors and its role in cell growth and invasion in vitro and in xenograft growth in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouguerède, Emilie; Berenguer, Caroline; Garcia, Stéphane; Bennani, Bahia; Delfino, Christine; Nanni, Isabelle; Dahan, Laetitia; Gasmi, Mohamed; Seitz, Jean-François; Martin, Pierre-Marie; Ouafik, L'Houcine

    2013-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a multifunctional peptide vasodilator that transduces its effects through calcitonin receptor-like receptor/receptor activity-modifying protein-2 and -3 (CLR/RAMP2 and CLR/RAMP3). In this study, real-time quantitative reverse transcription demonstrated a significant expression of AM mRNA in tumor samples from colorectal cancer (CRC) patients in clinical stage II, III, and IV when compared with normal colorectal tissue. AM, CLR, RAMP2, and RAMP3 proteins were immunohistochemically localized in the carcinomatous epithelial compartment of CRC tissue. Tissue microarray analysis revealed a clear increase of AM, CLR, RAMP2, and RAMP3 staining in lymph node and distant metastasis when compared with primary tumors. The human colon carcinoma cells HT-29 expressed and secreted AM into the culture medium with a significant increase under hypoxia. Treatment of HT-29 cells with synthetic AM stimulated cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. Incubation with anti-AM antibody (αAM), anti-AM receptors antibodies (αAMR), or AM antagonist AM 22–52 inhibited significantly basal levels of proliferation of HT-29 cells, suggesting that AM may function as an autocrine growth factor for CRC cells. Treatment with αAM significantly suppressed the growth of HT-29 tumor xenografts in vivo. Histological examination of αAM-treated tumors showed evidence of disruption of tumor vascularity with decreased microvessel density, depletion of endothelial cells and pericytes, and increased tumor cell apoptosis. These findings highlight the potential importance of AM and its receptors in the progression of CRC and support the conclusion that αAM treatment inhibits tumor growth by suppression of angiogenesis and tumor growth, suggesting that AM may be a useful therapeutic target

  13. Regulatory risk coherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remick, F.J.

    1992-01-01

    As one of the most progressive users of risk assessment in decision making, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is in a position to play an important role in influencing the development of standard government wide policies for the application of risk assessment in decision making. The NRC, with the support of the nuclear industry, should use the opportunity provided by its experience with risk assessment to actively encourage the adoption of standard national and international health-based safety goals and at the same time accelerate its own efforts to implement the safety goals it has already developed for itself. There are signs of increased recognition of the need for consistency and coherence in the application of risk assessment in government decision making. The NRC and the nuclear industry have recently taken a great step toward establishing a consistant and coherent risk assessment-based culture in the US nuclear industry. As a result of Generic Letter 88-20, which asks each commercial nuclear power plant licensee to perform an individual plant examination by September 1992, for the first time a risk assessment characterizing initiating events in each plant will exist

  14. Maize and Arabidopsis ARGOS Proteins Interact with Ethylene Receptor Signaling Complex, Supporting a Regulatory Role for ARGOS in Ethylene Signal Transduction[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinrui; Wang, Hongyu; Habben, Jeffrey E.

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone ethylene regulates plant growth and development as well as plant response to environmental cues. ARGOS genes reduce plant sensitivity to ethylene when overexpressed in transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays). A previous genetic study suggested that the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi-localized maize ARGOS1 targets the ethylene signal transduction components at or upstream of CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1, but the mechanism of ARGOS modulating ethylene signaling is unknown. Here, we demonstrate in Arabidopsis that ZmARGOS1, as well as the Arabidopsis ARGOS homolog ORGAN SIZE RELATED1, physically interacts with Arabidopsis REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 (RTE1), an ethylene receptor interacting protein that regulates the activity of ETHYLENE RESPONSE1. The protein-protein interaction was also detected with the yeast split-ubiquitin two-hybrid system. Using the same yeast assay, we found that maize RTE1 homolog REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 LIKE4 (ZmRTL4) and ZmRTL2 also interact with maize and Arabidopsis ARGOS proteins. Like AtRTE1 in Arabidopsis, ZmRTL4 and ZmRTL2 reduce ethylene responses when overexpressed in maize, indicating a similar mechanism for ARGOS regulating ethylene signaling in maize. A polypeptide fragment derived from ZmARGOS8, consisting of a Pro-rich motif flanked by two transmembrane helices that are conserved among members of the ARGOS family, can interact with AtRTE1 and maize RTL proteins in Arabidopsis. The conserved domain is necessary and sufficient to reduce ethylene sensitivity in Arabidopsis and maize. Overall, these results suggest a physical association between ARGOS and the ethylene receptor signaling complex via AtRTE1 and maize RTL proteins, supporting a role for ARGOS in regulating ethylene perception and the early steps of signal transduction in Arabidopsis and maize. PMID:27268962

  15. Regulatory role of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 in breast cancer by activating the protein kinase B/glycogen synthase kinase 3β signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hongyu; Li, Liangpeng; Yang, Sujin; Wang, Dandan; Zhou, Siying; Chen, Xiu; Tang, Jinhai

    2017-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) is an endogenous adaptor of innate and adaptive immune responses, and serves a crucial role in tumor necrosis factor receptor and toll‑like/interleukin‑1 receptor signaling. Although studies have demonstrated that TRAF6 has oncogenic activity, its potential contributions to breast cancer in human remains largely uninvestigated. The present study examined the expression levels and function of TRAF6 in breast carcinoma (n=32) and adjacent healthy (n=25) tissue samples. Compared with adjacent healthy tissues, TRAF6 protein expression levels were significantly upregulated in breast cancer tissues. Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed a significant upregulation of the cellular proliferative marker Ki‑67 and proliferation cell nuclear antigen expression levels in breast carcinoma specimens. Furthermore, protein expression levels of the accessory molecule, transforming growth factor β‑activated kinase 1 (TAK1), were significantly increased in breast cancer patients, as detected by western blot analysis. As determined by MTT assay, TRAF6 exerted profoundly proliferative effects in the MCF‑7 breast cancer cell line; however, these detrimental effects were ameliorated by TAK1 inhibition. Notably, protein kinase B (AKT)/glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3β phosphorylation levels were markedly upregulated in breast cancer samples, compared with adjacent healthy tissues. In conclusion, an altered TRAF6‑TAK1 axis and its corresponding downstream AKT/GSK3β signaling molecules may contribute to breast cancer progression. Therefore, TRAF6 may represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer.

  16. Development of multipurpose regulatory PSA model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Ju; Sung, Key Yong; Kim, Hho Jung; Yang, Joon Eon; Ha, Jae Joo

    2004-01-01

    Generally, risk information for nuclear facilities comes from the results of Probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). PSA is a systematic tool to ensure the safety of nuclear facilities, since it is based on thorough and consistent application of probability models. In particular, the PSA has been widely utilized for risk-informed regulation (RIR), including various licensee-initiated risk-informed applications (RIA). In any regulatory decision, the main goal is to make a sound safety decision based on technically defensible information. Also, due to the increased public requests for giving a safety guarantee, the regulator should provide the visible means of safety. The use of PSA by the regulator can give the answer on this problem. Therefore, in order to study the applicability of risk information for regulatory safety management, it is a demanding task to prepare a well-established regulatory PSA model and tool. In 2002, KINS and KAERI together made a research cooperation to form a working group to develop the regulatory PSA model - so-called MPAS model. The MPAS stands for multipurpose probabilistic analysis of safety. For instance, a role of the MPAS model is to give some risk insights in the preparation of various regulatory programs. Another role of this model is to provide an independent risk information to the regulator during regulatory decision-making, not depending on the licensee's information

  17. Astrocyte lipid metabolism is critical for synapse development and function in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Deijk, Anne-Lieke F; Camargo, Nutabi; Timmerman, Jaap; Heistek, Tim; Brouwers, Jos F; Mogavero, Floriana; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Smit, August B; Verheijen, Mark H G

    2017-04-01

    The brain is considered to be autonomous in lipid synthesis with astrocytes producing lipids far more efficiently than neurons. Accordingly, it is generally assumed that astrocyte-derived lipids are taken up by neurons to support synapse formation and function. Initial confirmation of this assumption has been obtained in cell cultures, but whether astrocyte-derived lipids support synapses in vivo is not known. Here, we address this issue and determined the role of astrocyte lipid metabolism in hippocampal synapse formation and function in vivo. Hippocampal protein expression for the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) and its target gene fatty acid synthase (Fasn) was found in astrocytes but not in neurons. Diminishing SREBP activity in astrocytes using mice in which the SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP) was deleted from GFAP-expressing cells resulted in decreased cholesterol and phospholipid secretion by astrocytes. Interestingly, SCAP mutant mice showed more immature synapses, lower presynaptic protein SNAP-25 levels as well as reduced numbers of synaptic vesicles, indicating impaired development of the presynaptic terminal. Accordingly, hippocampal short-term and long-term synaptic plasticity were defective in mutant mice. These findings establish a critical role for astrocyte lipid metabolism in presynaptic terminal development and function in vivo. GLIA 2017;65:670-682. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. NRC Regulatory Agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  19. NRC regulatory agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  20. NRC regulatory agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has proposed or is considering action and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  1. NRC regulatory agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action or has proposed, or is considering action and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  2. NRC Regulatory Agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action or has proposed, or is considering action and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  3. Nuclear Regulatory legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-06-01

    This compilation of statutes and material pertaining to nuclear regulatory legislation through the 97th Congress, 2nd Session, has been prepared by the Office of the Executive Legal Director, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, with the assistance of staff, for use as an internal resource document

  4. Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase or the Apoptotic Protein p53 Lowers the Threshold of Helium Cardioprotection In Vivo: The Role of Mitochondrial Permeability Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagel, Paul S.; Krolikowski, John G.; Pratt, Phillip F.; Shim, Yon Hee; Amour, Julien; Warltier, David C.; Weihrauch, Dorothee

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prosurvival signaling kinases inhibit glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) activity and stimulate apoptotic protein p53 degradation. Helium produces cardioprotection by activating prosurvival kinases, but whether GSK and p53 inhibition mediate this process is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that inhibition of GSK or p53 lowers the threshold of helium cardioprotection via a mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP)-dependent mechanism. METHODS Rabbits (n = 85) instrumented for hemodynamic measurement and subjected to a 30 min left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) occlusion and 3 h reperfusion received 0.9% saline (control), or 1, 3, or 5 cycles of 70% helium-30% oxygen administered for 5 min interspersed with 5 min of an air-oxygen mixture (fraction of inspired oxygen concentration = 0.30) before LAD occlusion. Other rabbits received the GSK inhibitor SB 216763 (SB21; 0.2 or 0.6 mg/kg), the p53 inhibitor pifithrin-α (PIF; 1.5 or 3.0 mg/kg), or SB21 (0.2 mg/kg) or PIF (1.5 mg/kg) plus helium (1 cycle) before LAD occlusion in the presence or absence of the mPTP opener atractyloside (5 mg/kg). RESULTS Helium reduced (P < 0.05) myocardial infarct size (35 ± 6 [n = 7], 25 ± 4 [n = 7], and 20 ± 3% [n = 6] of area at risk, 1, 3, and 5 cycles, respectively) compared with control (44 ± 6% [n = 7]). SB21 (0.6 [n = 7] but not 0.2 mg/kg [n = 6]) and PIF (3.0 [n = 6] but not 1.5 mg/kg [n = 7]) also reduced necrosis. SB21 (0.2 mg/kg) or 1.5 mg/kg PIF (1.5 mg/kg) plus helium (1 cycle; n = 6 per group) decreased infarct size to an equivalent degree as three cycles of helium alone, and this cardioprotection was blocked by atractyloside (n = 7 per group). CONCLUSIONS Inhibition of GSK or p53 lowers the threshold of helium-induced preconditioning via a mPTP-dependent mechanism in vivo. PMID:18713881

  5. KRAS Genotype Correlates with Proteasome Inhibitor Ixazomib Activity in Preclinical In Vivo Models of Colon and Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Potential Role of Tumor Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nibedita Chattopadhyay

    Full Text Available In non-clinical studies, the proteasome inhibitor ixazomib inhibits cell growth in a broad panel of solid tumor cell lines in vitro. In contrast, antitumor activity in xenograft tumors is model-dependent, with some solid tumors showing no response to ixazomib. In this study we examined factors responsible for ixazomib sensitivity or resistance using mouse xenograft models. A survey of 14 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and 6 colon xenografts showed a striking relationship between ixazomib activity and KRAS genotype; tumors with wild-type (WT KRAS were more sensitive to ixazomib than tumors harboring KRAS activating mutations. To confirm the association between KRAS genotype and ixazomib sensitivity, we used SW48 isogenic colon cancer cell lines. Either KRAS-G13D or KRAS-G12V mutations were introduced into KRAS-WT SW48 cells to generate cells that stably express activated KRAS. SW48 KRAS WT tumors, but neither SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors nor SW48-KRAS-G12V tumors, were sensitive to ixazomib in vivo. Since activated KRAS is known to be associated with metabolic reprogramming, we compared metabolite profiling of SW48-WT and SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors treated with or without ixazomib. Prior to treatment there were significant metabolic differences between SW48 WT and SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors, reflecting higher oxidative stress and glucose utilization in the KRAS-G13D tumors. Ixazomib treatment resulted in significant metabolic regulation, and some of these changes were specific to KRAS WT tumors. Depletion of free amino acid pools and activation of GCN2-eIF2α-pathways were observed both in tumor types. However, changes in lipid beta oxidation were observed in only the KRAS WT tumors. The non-clinical data presented here show a correlation between KRAS genotype and ixazomib sensitivity in NSCLC and colon xenografts and provide new evidence of regulation of key metabolic pathways by proteasome inhibition.

  6. KRAS Genotype Correlates with Proteasome Inhibitor Ixazomib Activity in Preclinical In Vivo Models of Colon and Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Potential Role of Tumor Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Nibedita; Berger, Allison J; Koenig, Erik; Bannerman, Bret; Garnsey, James; Bernard, Hugues; Hales, Paul; Maldonado Lopez, Angel; Yang, Yu; Donelan, Jill; Jordan, Kristen; Tirrell, Stephen; Stringer, Bradley; Xia, Cindy; Hather, Greg; Galvin, Katherine; Manfredi, Mark; Rhodes, Nelson; Amidon, Ben

    2015-01-01

    In non-clinical studies, the proteasome inhibitor ixazomib inhibits cell growth in a broad panel of solid tumor cell lines in vitro. In contrast, antitumor activity in xenograft tumors is model-dependent, with some solid tumors showing no response to ixazomib. In this study we examined factors responsible for ixazomib sensitivity or resistance using mouse xenograft models. A survey of 14 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 6 colon xenografts showed a striking relationship between ixazomib activity and KRAS genotype; tumors with wild-type (WT) KRAS were more sensitive to ixazomib than tumors harboring KRAS activating mutations. To confirm the association between KRAS genotype and ixazomib sensitivity, we used SW48 isogenic colon cancer cell lines. Either KRAS-G13D or KRAS-G12V mutations were introduced into KRAS-WT SW48 cells to generate cells that stably express activated KRAS. SW48 KRAS WT tumors, but neither SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors nor SW48-KRAS-G12V tumors, were sensitive to ixazomib in vivo. Since activated KRAS is known to be associated with metabolic reprogramming, we compared metabolite profiling of SW48-WT and SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors treated with or without ixazomib. Prior to treatment there were significant metabolic differences between SW48 WT and SW48-KRAS-G13D tumors, reflecting higher oxidative stress and glucose utilization in the KRAS-G13D tumors. Ixazomib treatment resulted in significant metabolic regulation, and some of these changes were specific to KRAS WT tumors. Depletion of free amino acid pools and activation of GCN2-eIF2α-pathways were observed both in tumor types. However, changes in lipid beta oxidation were observed in only the KRAS WT tumors. The non-clinical data presented here show a correlation between KRAS genotype and ixazomib sensitivity in NSCLC and colon xenografts and provide new evidence of regulation of key metabolic pathways by proteasome inhibition.

  7. Improving nuclear regulatory effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Ensuring that nuclear installations are operated and maintained in such a way that their impact on public health and safety is as low as reasonably practicable has been and will continue to be the cornerstone of nuclear regulation. In the past, nuclear incidents provided the main impetus for regulatory change. Today, economic factors, deregulation, technological advancements, government oversight and the general requirements for openness and accountability are leading regulatory bodies to review their effectiveness. In addition, seeking to enhance the present level of nuclear safety by continuously improving the effectiveness of regulatory bodies is seen as one of the ways to strengthen public confidence in the regulatory systems. This report covers the basic concepts underlying nuclear regulatory effectiveness, advances being made and future requirements. The intended audience is primarily nuclear safety regulators, but government authorities, nuclear power plant operators and the general public may also be interested. (author)

  8. Global regulatory roles of the cAMP/PKA pathway revealed by phenotypic, transcriptomic and phosphoproteomic analyses in a null mutant of the PKA catalytic subunit in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chengjun; Wu, Mei; Bing, Jian; Tao, Li; Ding, Xuefen; Liu, Xiaoyun; Huang, Guanghua

    2017-07-01

    The conserved cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) plays critical roles in the regulation of morphological transitions and virulence in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. It has long been thought that the PKA catalytic subunit is essential for cell viability in this fungus. Paradoxically, the single adenylyl cyclase-encoding gene, CYR1, which is required for the production of cAMP in C. albicans, is not essential for cell growth. Here, a double mutant of TPK1 and TPK2 (tpk2/tpk2 tpk1/tpk1, t2t1), which encode two isoforms of the PKA catalytic subunit was successfully generated, suggesting that this subunit is not essential for cell viability. Inactivation of the PKA catalytic subunit blocked filamentation and dramatically attenuated white-to-opaque switching, but promoted sexual mating. Comparative transcriptomic analyses demonstrated that the t2t1 and cyr1/cyr1 mutants exhibited similar global gene expression profiles. Compared with the WT strain, the general transcriptional activity and metabolism were significantly decreased in both the t2t1 and cyr1/cyr1 mutants. Using combined phosphoproteomic and bioinformatic analyses, we identified 181 potential PKA phosphorylation targets, which represent 148 unique proteins involved in a wide spectrum of biological processes. The study sheds new insights into the global regulatory features of the cAMP/PKA pathway in C. albicans. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Risk literacy for scientists. Invitation to regulatory science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Kyoko

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses a regulatory science, which fills a gap between scientific knowledge and regulatory actions. The author provides examples of the regulatory science employed in chemical risk assessment, such as the linear non-threshold theory. In the regulatory science, scientific data as well as scientific reasoning based on scientific knowledge - or regulatory rules - should play an important role. It is important to recognize that the rules facilitate transparent decision making under conditions of uncertainty and time constraints. Furthermore, the development of traditional or pure science results in the validation of regulatory rules, and subsequently, the regulatory science procedure develops more systematically. The concept of this science should be understood by those engaged in governmental decision making. (author)

  10. Tendon tissue engineering and its role on healing of the experimentally induced large tendon defect model in rabbits: a comprehensive in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid; Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Healing of large tendon defects is challenging. We studied the role of collagen implant with or without polydioxanone (PDS) sheath on the healing of a large Achilles tendon defect model, in rabbits. Sixty rabbits were divided into three groups. A 2 cm gap was created in the left Achilles tendon of all rabbits. In the control lesions, no implant was used. The other two groups were reconstructed by collagen and collagen-PDS implants respectively. The animals were clinically examined at weekly intervals and their lesions were observed by ultrasonography. Blood samples were obtained from the animals and were assessed for hematological analysis and determination of serum PDGF level, at 60 days post injury (DPI). The animals were then euthanized and their lesions were assessed for gross and histopathology, scanning electron microscopy, biomechanical testing, dry matter and hydroxyproline content. Another 65 pilot animals were also studied grossly and histopathologically to define the host implant interaction and graft incorporation at serial time points. The treated animals gained significantly better clinical scoring compared to the controls. Treatment with collagen and collagen-PDS implants significantly increased the biomechanical properties of the lesions compared to the control tendons at 60DPI (Ptendon. Implantation of the bioimplants had a significant role in initiating tendon healing and the implants were biocompatible, biodegradable and safe for application in tendon reconstructive surgery. The results of the present study may be valuable in clinical practice.

  11. Regulatory and administrative requirements for practice of nuclear medicine in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandon, Pankaj

    1998-01-01

    In order to ensure safety of the patients, staff and public in the practice of nuclear medicine, including in-vivo diagnostic investigations, radionuclide therapy and in research using unsealed radioactive substances a number of administrative and regulatory procedures are adopted. The salient features of regulatory and administrative requirements for practice of nuclear medicine in India are discussed

  12. The Regulatory Roles of Toll-Like Receptor 4 in Secretions of Type 1/Type 2 Relative Cytokines by Splenocytes and Dendritic Cells Exposed to Clonorchis sinensis Excretory/Secretory Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Hui; Du, Ying; Ma, Rui; Zhang, Bei-Bei; Yu, Qian; Li, Bo; Xu, Jiang-Tao; Li, Xiang-Yang; Tang, Ren-Xian; Yan, Chao; Zheng, Kui-Yang

    2018-02-01

    The roles of TLR4 in mediation of innate immune response and in regulation of adaptive immune responses triggered by Clonorchis sinensis remain unknown. In the present study, splenocytes derived from C3H/HeN (TLR4 wild ) and C3H/Hej mice (TLR4 mut ) that were infected with 45 metacercariae of C. sinensis were harvested, then stimulated by C. sinensis excretory/secretory products (ESP) or medium (control) for 48 h, respectively. Meanwhile, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) from normal C3H/HeN and C3H/Hej mice were prepared and stimulated with medium, ESP, LPS, or ESP+LPS for 24 h, respectively. The supernatants were collected, and the concentrations of type 1 and type 2 relative cytokines were determined by ELISA. The maturation of BMDCs indicated by surface markers of CD80, CD86, and MHC II was evaluated by flow cytometry. The results showed that the levels of IFN-γ, IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-10 in the splenocytes from C. sinensis-infected TLR4 mut mice were significantly lower than those from TLR4 wild mice when they were further exposed to ESP. For BMDCs, the productions of the cytokines IL-12p70 and IL-10, but not IL-4, in the BMDCs from TLR4 mutation mice were predominantly decreased compared with those from TLR4 wild mice when the BMDCs were co-stimulated by ESP combined with LPS. Flow cytometry analysis showed that ESP could significantly decrease the high levels of CD80, CD86, and MHC II which were elevated by LPS. In conclusion, these data suggest that TLR4 may play a regulatory role in type 1 immune responses during C. sinensis infection.

  13. In vivo wall shear measurements within the developing zebrafish heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Aidan Jamison

    Full Text Available Physical forces can influence the embryonic development of many tissues. Within the cardiovascular system shear forces resulting from blood flow are known to be one of the regulatory signals that shape the developing heart. A key challenge in investigating the role of shear forces in cardiac development is the ability to obtain shear force measurements in vivo. Utilising the zebrafish model system we have developed a methodology that allows the shear force within the developing embryonic heart to be determined. Accurate wall shear measurement requires two essential pieces of information; high-resolution velocity measurements near the heart wall and the location and orientation of the heart wall itself. We have applied high-speed brightfield imaging to capture time-lapse series of blood flow within the beating heart between 3 and 6 days post-fertilization. Cardiac-phase filtering is applied to these time-lapse images to remove the heart wall and other slow moving structures leaving only the red blood cell movement. Using particle image velocimetry to calculate the velocity of red blood cells in different regions within the heart, and using the signal-to-noise ratio of the cardiac-phase filtered images to determine the boundary of blood flow, and therefore the position of the heart wall, we have been able to generate the necessary information to measure wall shear in vivo. We describe the methodology required to measure shear in vivo and the application of this technique to the developing zebrafish heart. We identify a reduction in shear at the ventricular-bulbar valve between 3 and 6 days post-fertilization and demonstrate that the shear environment of the ventricle during systole is constantly developing towards a more uniform level.

  14. In vivo wall shear measurements within the developing zebrafish heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, R Aidan; Samarage, Chaminda R; Bryson-Richardson, Robert J; Fouras, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Physical forces can influence the embryonic development of many tissues. Within the cardiovascular system shear forces resulting from blood flow are known to be one of the regulatory signals that shape the developing heart. A key challenge in investigating the role of shear forces in cardiac development is the ability to obtain shear force measurements in vivo. Utilising the zebrafish model system we have developed a methodology that allows the shear force within the developing embryonic heart to be determined. Accurate wall shear measurement requires two essential pieces of information; high-resolution velocity measurements near the heart wall and the location and orientation of the heart wall itself. We have applied high-speed brightfield imaging to capture time-lapse series of blood flow within the beating heart between 3 and 6 days post-fertilization. Cardiac-phase filtering is applied to these time-lapse images to remove the heart wall and other slow moving structures leaving only the red blood cell movement. Using particle image velocimetry to calculate the velocity of red blood cells in different regions within the heart, and using the signal-to-noise ratio of the cardiac-phase filtered images to determine the boundary of blood flow, and therefore the position of the heart wall, we have been able to generate the necessary information to measure wall shear in vivo. We describe the methodology required to measure shear in vivo and the application of this technique to the developing zebrafish heart. We identify a reduction in shear at the ventricular-bulbar valve between 3 and 6 days post-fertilization and demonstrate that the shear environment of the ventricle during systole is constantly developing towards a more uniform level.

  15. Semaphorin 4C Protects against Allergic Inflammation: Requirement of Regulatory CD138+ Plasma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Di; Kaufman, Gabriel N; Dembele, Marieme; Beland, Marianne; Massoud, Amir H; Mindt, Barbara C; Fiter, Ryan; Fixman, Elizabeth D; Martin, James G; Friedel, Roland H; Divangahi, Maziar; Fritz, Jörg H; Mazer, Bruce D

    2017-01-01

    The regulatory properties of B cells have been studied in autoimmune diseases; however, their role in allergic diseases is poorly understood. We demonstrate that Semaphorin 4C (Sema4C), an axonal guidance molecule, plays a crucial role in B cell regulatory function. Mice deficient in Sema4C exhibited increased airway inflammation after allergen exposure, with massive eosinophilic lung infiltrates and increased Th2 cytokines. This phenotype was reproduced by mixed bone marrow chimeric mice with Sema4C deficient only in B cells, indicating that B lymphocytes were the key cells affected by the absence of Sema4C expression in allergic inflammation. We determined that Sema4C-deficient CD19 + CD138 + cells exhibited decreased IL-10 and increased IL-4 expression in vivo and in vitro. Adoptive transfer of Sema4c -/- CD19 + CD138 + cells induced marked pulmonary inflammation, eosinophilia, and increased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid IL-4 and IL-5, whereas adoptive transfer of wild-type CD19 + CD138 + IL-10 + cells dramatically decreased allergic airway inflammation in wild-type and Sema4c -/- mice. This study identifies a novel pathway by which Th2-mediated immune responses are regulated. It highlights the importance of plasma cells as regulatory cells in allergic inflammation and suggests that CD138 + B cells contribute to cytokine balance and are important for maintenance of immune homeostasis in allergic airways disease. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Sema4C is critical for optimal regulatory cytokine production in CD138 + B cells. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. Human skeletal muscle fibroblasts stimulate in vitro myogenesis and in vivo muscle regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail L; Magnan, Mélanie; Chazaud, Bénédicte

    2017-01-01

    immediately surrounding regenerating muscle fibres. These novel findings indicate an important role for fibroblasts in supporting the regeneration of muscle fibres, potentially through direct stimulation of satellite cell differentiation and fusion, and contribute to understanding of cell-cell cross......-talk during physiological and pathological muscle remodelling. ABSTRACT: Accumulation of skeletal muscle extracellular matrix is an unfavourable characteristic of many muscle diseases, muscle injury and sarcopenia. In addition to the indispensable role satellite cells play in muscle regeneration......, there is emerging evidence in rodents for a regulatory influence on fibroblast activity. However, the influence of fibroblasts on satellite cells and muscle regeneration in humans is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate this in vitro and during in vivo regeneration in humans. Following a muscle...

  17. Regulatory effects of cotranscriptional RNA structure formation and transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng-Rui; Hu, Chun-Gen; Zhang, Jin-Zhi

    2016-09-01

    RNAs, which play significant roles in many fundamental biological processes of life, fold into sophisticated and precise structures. RNA folding is a dynamic and intricate process, which conformation transition of coding and noncoding RNAs form the primary elements of genetic regulation. The cellular environment contains various intrinsic and extrinsic factors that potentially affect RNA folding in vivo, and experimental and theoretical evidence increasingly indicates that the highly flexible features of the RNA structure are affected by these factors, which include the flanking sequence context, physiochemical conditions, cis RNA-RNA interactions, and RNA interactions with other molecules. Furthermore, distinct RNA structures have been identified that govern almost all steps of biological processes in cells, including transcriptional activation and termination, transcriptional mutagenesis, 5'-capping, splicing, 3'-polyadenylation, mRNA export and localization, and translation. Here, we briefly summarize the dynamic and complex features of RNA folding along with a wide variety of intrinsic and extrinsic factors that affect RNA folding. We then provide several examples to elaborate RNA structure-mediated regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Finally, we illustrate the regulatory roles of RNA structure and discuss advances pertaining to RNA structure in plants. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:562-574. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1350 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The role of cDC1s in vivo: CD8 T cell priming through cross-presentation [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Theisen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The cDC1 subset of classical dendritic cells is specialized for priming CD8 T cell responses through the process of cross-presentation. The molecular mechanisms of cross-presentation remain incompletely understood because of limited biochemical analysis of rare cDC1 cells, difficulty in their genetic manipulation, and reliance on in vitro systems based on monocyte- and bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells. This review will discuss cross-presentation from the perspective of studies with monocyte- or bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells while highlighting the need for future work examining cDC1 cells. We then discuss the role of cDC1s as a cellular platform to combine antigen processing for class I and class II MHC presentation to allow the integration of “help” from CD4 T cells during priming of CD8 T cell responses.

  19. Impact of regulatory science on global public health

    OpenAIRE

    Meghal Patel; Margaret Ann Miller

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory science plays a vital role in protecting and promoting global public health by providing the scientific basis for ensuring that food and medical products are safe, properly labeled, and effective. Regulatory science research was first developed for the determination of product safety in the early part of the 20th Century, and continues to support innovation of the processes needed for regulatory policy decisions. Historically, public health laws and regulations were enacted followi...

  20. Regulatory guidance document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program Management System Manual requires preparation of the OCRWM Regulatory Guidance Document (RGD) that addresses licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance. The document provides: regulatory compliance policy; guidance to OCRWM organizational elements to ensure a consistent approach when complying with regulatory requirements; strategies to achieve policy objectives; organizational responsibilities for regulatory compliance; guidance with regard to Program compliance oversight; and guidance on the contents of a project-level Regulatory Compliance Plan. The scope of the RGD includes site suitability evaluation, licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance, in accordance with the direction provided by Section 4.6.3 of the PMS Manual. Site suitability evaluation and regulatory compliance during site characterization are significant activities, particularly with regard to the YW MSA. OCRWM's evaluation of whether the Yucca Mountain site is suitable for repository development must precede its submittal of a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Accordingly, site suitability evaluation is discussed in Chapter 4, and the general statements of policy regarding site suitability evaluation are discussed in Section 2.1. Although much of the data and analyses may initially be similar, the licensing process is discussed separately in Chapter 5. Environmental compliance is discussed in Chapter 6. Safety and Health compliance is discussed in Chapter 7

  1. Managing Regulatory Body Competence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    In 2001, the IAEA published TECDOC 1254, which examined the way in which the recognized functions of a regulatory body for nuclear facilities results in competence needs. Using the systematic approach to training (SAT), TECDOC 1254 provided a framework for regulatory bodies for managing training and developing and their maintaining their competence. It has been successfully used by many regulators. The IAEA has also introduced a methodology and an assessment tool - Guidelines for Systematic Assessment of Regulatory Competence Needs (SARCoN) - which provides practical guidance on analysing the training and development needs of a regulatory body and, through a gap analysis, guidance on establishing competence needs and how to meet them. In 2009, the IAEA established a steering committee (supported by a bureau) with the mission to advise the IAEA on how it could best assist Member States to develop suitable competence management systems for their regulatory bodies. The committee recommended the development of a safety report on managing staff competence as an integral part of a regulatory body's management system. This Safety Report was developed in response to this request. It supersedes TECDOC 1254, broadens its application to regulatory bodies for all facilities and activities, and builds upon the experience gained through the application of TECDOC 1254 and SARCoN and the feedback received from Member States. This Safety Report applies to the management of adequate competence as needs change, and as such is equally applicable to the needs of States 'embarking' on a nuclear power programme. It also deals with the special case of building up the competence of regulatory bodies as part of the overall process of establishing an 'embarking' State's regulatory system

  2. Implementation of in vitro replacement technologies in regulatory drug testing - An innovation systems perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, M.; Van Meer, P.J.K.; Moors, E.H.M.; Hekkert, M.P.; Schellekens, H.

    2011-01-01

    The replacement of in vivo methods by in vitro methods in regulatory drug testing is rare. The aim of this research is to identify barriers and drivers of the replacement of in vivo methods by in vitro methods in Europe. We studied two cases. The first case is the Draize eye test. Since 2009, the in

  3. O lugar da política na atuação das agências reguladoras independentes brasileiras: reflexões sobre a separação dos poderes no Estado moderno / The Role of Politics in the Brazilian Independent Regulatory Agencies: Reflections on the Separation of Powers in the Modern State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Carvalho Gomes

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – The purpose of the proposed article is to investigate the practice of politics in the performance of activities of Brazilian independent regulatory agencies Methodology/approach/design – ... The approach is based on the study of theories about separation of state powers and functions, evaluating the application of these theories in the understanding of the role played by independent regulatory agencies in Brazil Findings – It was concluded that the independence granted by the National Congress to the Brazilian regulatory agencies implied in the expansion of the space of politics in its operation, placing these agencies in a unique position in the context of the separation of powers, changing the traditional institutional arrangement of submission to the executive branch. Practical implications (if applicable –The conclusions permit new reflections on the limits of the influence of the President of the Republic and of the sectoral ministries in the decisions taken by the regulatory agencies, both in the decisions of a technical nature and those of a political nature, allowing the expansion of the debate on the instruments of democratic legitimation of these decisions. Originality/value (optional – The text is original, since there are few in-depth studies in Brazil about the space for politics in the field of independent regulatory agencies, usually understood as purely technical / administrative entities.

  4. As Gene Giants, os Agrotóxicos e as Sementes Transgênicas: o Papel Regulatório Brasileiro sob a perspectiva do Desenvolvimento Sustentável / The Gene Giants, Pesticides and Genetically Modified Seeds: The Brazilian Regulatory Role from the perspective of Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Tullius Fernandes dos Santos

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – The purpose of this study is to analyze the market performance of the gene giants with respect to the production and marketing of pesticides and genetically modified seeds in Brazil, checking the regulatory role regarding control and supervision by the federal government, on par with the discussion on the implementation of sustainable development. Methodology/approach/design – Research of the literature associated with data collection and documents in the period 2005-2015 was implemented at the institutions responsible for the registration, release, control and inspection of GM seeds and pesticides in Brazil, using the institutional theory of law. The main idea is that laws and institutions have not crystallized culture of sustainability, since in their application on cases involving the gene giants economic interests have overshadowed weak regulatory modeling. Findings – There is need to establish a smart regulatory model so that regulation can be implemented by abandoning the one-sided view of the preponderance of economic interest. Only with strong regulatory, social and economic pressures can address the transnational nature of sustainable development in face of the power of big business corporations. Practical implications – Regulatory criteria were developed by avoiding the preponderance of economic interests at the expense of sensitive environmental, social, cultural, and political values.

  5. Environment and T regulatory cells in allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, M; Schiavone, C; Di Gioacchino, G; De Angelis, I; Cavallucci, E; Lazzarin, F; Petrarca, C; Di Gioacchino, M

    2012-04-15

    The central role of T regulatory cells in the responses against harmless environmental antigens has been confirmed by many studies. Impaired T regulatory cell function is implicated in many pathological conditions, particularly allergic diseases. The "hygiene hypothesis" suggests that infections and infestations may play a protective role for allergy, whereas environmental pollutants favor the development of allergic diseases. Developing countries suffer from a variety of infections and are also facing an increasing diffusion of environmental pollutants. In these countries allergies increase in relation to the spreading use of xenobiotics (pesticides, herbicides, pollution, etc.) with a rate similar to those of developed countries, overcoming the protective effects of infections. We review here the main mechanisms of non-self tolerance, with particular regard to relations between T regulatory cell activity, infections and infestations such as helminthiasis, and exposure to environmental xenobiotics with relevant diffusion in developing countries. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Nomadic enhancers: tissue-specific cis-regulatory elements of yellow have divergent genomic positions among Drosophila species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizem Kalay

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available cis-regulatory DNA sequences known as enhancers control gene expression in space and time. They are central to metazoan development and are often responsible for changes in gene regulation that contribute to phenotypic evolution. Here, we examine the sequence, function, and genomic location of enhancers controlling tissue- and cell-type specific expression of the yellow gene in six Drosophila species. yellow is required for the production of dark pigment, and its expression has evolved largely in concert with divergent pigment patterns. Using Drosophila melanogaster as a transgenic host, we examined the expression of reporter genes in which either 5' intergenic or intronic sequences of yellow from each species controlled the expression of Green Fluorescent Protein. Surprisingly, we found that sequences controlling expression in the wing veins, as well as sequences controlling expression in epidermal cells of the abdomen, thorax, and wing, were located in different genomic regions in different species. By contrast, sequences controlling expression in bristle-associated cells were located in the intron of all species. Differences in the precise pattern of spatial expression within the developing epidermis of D. melanogaster transformants usually correlated with adult pigmentation in the species from which the cis-regulatory sequences were derived, which is consistent with cis-regulatory evolution affecting yellow expression playing a central role in Drosophila pigmentation divergence. Sequence comparisons among species favored a model in which sequential nucleotide substitutions were responsible for the observed changes in cis-regulatory architecture. Taken together, these data demonstrate frequent changes in yellow cis-regulatory architecture among Drosophila species. Similar analyses of other genes, combining in vivo functional tests of enhancer activity with in silico comparative genomics, are needed to determine whether the pattern of

  7. The influence of very low doses of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) on the apoptosis of rat neutrophils in vivo. The role of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, J; Jablonska, E; Chojnowski, M

    2001-08-13

    N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) causes the apoptosis of neutrophils in vitro experiments. This compound also has the ability to stimulate neutrophils for the production of reactive oxygen species. It has been decided to examine more closely whether the apoptosis of neutrophils by NDMA is caused by the influence of the radicals produced by these cells and whether the stimulation to undergo apoptosis of neutrophils is caused by NDMA in either the original form or by its metabolites. The experiment was conducted on rats. The animals were administered a one-time dose of NDMA intragastrically, 1.5 mg/kg. The research was conducted 1,2,4,12 h consecutively following NDMA administration. The concentration of NDMA in blood was evaluated by means of the gas chromatography method. The neutrophils were isolated from blood by means of differential centrifugation. Respiratory burst was assessed in cells, by means of the cytochrome c reduction method. The percentage of cells revealing morphological properties of apoptosis was determined under the fluorescent microscope. It has been observed that the activation of the respiratory burst is caused mainly by non-metabolised NDMA. Probably the non-metabolised molecules of this compound also have a decisive role in the initiation of apoptosis of neutrophils. It can be assumed that the main factor responsible for the apoptosis of neutrophil rats following a one-time NDMA administration is the induction of respiratory burst in neutrophils by this compound.

  8. Mechanism of immune suppression by ultraviolet irradiation in vivo. I. Evidence for the existence of a unique photoreceptor in skin and its role in photoimmunology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Fabo, E.C.; Noonan, F.P.

    1983-01-01

    UV irradiation of mice causes a systemic immune alteration that can be detected either by suppression of the immunologic rejection of UV-induced tumors, or by suppression of contact hypersensitivity (CHS). Suppression of these two immunologic responses has similar photobiologic characteristics and in both cases is associated with the generation of antigen-specific suppressor T cells. To identify whether a specific photoreceptor for this effect exists, the relative wavelength effectiveness (action spectrum) was determined for the UV-induced suppression of CHS. Narrow bands of UV (half bandwidth 3 nm) were used at 10 wavelengths from 250 to 320 nm to obtain dose-response curves. The action spectrum derived from the dose-response curves has a maximum between 260 and 270 nm, a shoulder at 280-290 nm, and declines steadily to approximately 3% of maximum at 320 nm. The finding of such a clearly defined wavelength dependence implies the presence of a specific photoreceptor for this effect. Removing the stratum corneum by tape stripping before UV irradiation prevented the suppression of CHS using 254-nm radiation, suggesting the photoreceptor is superficially located in the skin. The hypothesis is advanced that the photoreceptor for systemic UV-induced immunosuppression of contact hypersensitivity may be urocanic acid. As such, it may also play a role in UV-induced carcinogenesis via the production of tumor-specific suppressor cells

  9. The role of nuclear factor E2-Related factor 2 and uncoupling protein 2 in glutathione metabolism: Evidence from an in vivo gene knockout study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yanyan; Xu, Yuanyuan; Zheng, Hongzhi; Fu, Jingqi; Hou, Yongyong; Wang, Huihui; Zhang, Qiang; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Pi, Jingbo

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (NRF2) and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) are indicated to protect from oxidative stress. They also play roles in the homeostasis of glutathione. However, the detailed mechanisms are not well understood. In the present study, we found Nrf2-knockout (Nrf2-KO) mice exhibited altered glutathione homeostasis and reduced expression of various genes involved in GSH biosynthesis, regeneration, utilization and transport in the liver. Ucp2-knockout (Ucp2-KO) mice exhibited altered glutathione homeostasis in the liver, spleen and blood, as well as increased transcript of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in the liver, a protein capable of mediating glutathione efflux. Nrf2-Ucp2-double knockout (DKO) mice showed characteristics of both Nrf2-KO and Ucp2-KO mice. But no significant difference was observed in DKO mice when compared with Nrf2-KO or Ucp2-KO mice, except in blood glutathione levels. These data suggest that ablation of Nrf2 and Ucp2 leads to disrupted GSH balance, which could result from altered expression of genes involved in GSH metabolism. DKO may not evoke more severe oxidative stress than the single gene knockout. - Highlights: • Nrf2/Ucp2 deficiency leads to alteration of glutathione homeostasis. • Nrf2 regulates expression of genes in glutathione generation and utilization. • Ucp2 affects glutathione metabolism by regulating hepatic efflux of glutathione. • Nrf2 deficiency may not aggravate oxidative stress in Ucp2-deficient mice.

  10. In vitro characterization of a novel tissue engineered based hybridized nano and micro structured collagen implant and its in vivo role on tenoinduction, tenoconduction, tenogenesis and tenointegration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali; Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid

    2014-03-01

    Surgical reconstruction of large tendon defects is technically demanding. Tissue engineering is a new option. We produced a novel tissue engineered, collagen based, bioimplant and in vitro characterizations of the implant were investigated. In addition, we investigated role of the collagen implant on the healing of a large tendon defect model in rabbits. A two cm length of the left rabbit's Achilles tendon was transected and discarded. The injured tendons of all the rabbits were repaired by Kessler pattern to create and maintain a 2 cm tendon gap. The collagen implant was inserted in the tendon defect of the treatment group (n = 30). The defect area was left intact in the control group (n = 30). The animals were euthanized at 60 days post injury (DPI) and the macro- micro- and nano- morphologies and the biomechanical characteristics of the tendon samples were studied. Differences of P implant properly incorporated with the healing tissue and was replaced by the new tendinous structure which was superior both ultra-structurally and physically than the loose areolar connective tissue regenerated in the control lesions. The results of this study may be valuable in the clinical practice.

  11. The role of nuclear factor E2-Related factor 2 and uncoupling protein 2 in glutathione metabolism: Evidence from an in vivo gene knockout study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yanyan [The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning (China); The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Xu, Yuanyuan, E-mail: yyxu@cmu.edu.cn [School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning (China); Zheng, Hongzhi [The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning (China); The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Fu, Jingqi; Hou, Yongyong; Wang, Huihui [School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning (China); Zhang, Qiang [Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Yamamoto, Masayuki [Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Pi, Jingbo, E-mail: jbpi@cmu.edu.cn [School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning (China); The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2016-09-09

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (NRF2) and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) are indicated to protect from oxidative stress. They also play roles in the homeostasis of glutathione. However, the detailed mechanisms are not well understood. In the present study, we found Nrf2-knockout (Nrf2-KO) mice exhibited altered glutathione homeostasis and reduced expression of various genes involved in GSH biosynthesis, regeneration, utilization and transport in the liver. Ucp2-knockout (Ucp2-KO) mice exhibited altered glutathione homeostasis in the liver, spleen and blood, as well as increased transcript of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in the liver, a protein capable of mediating glutathione efflux. Nrf2-Ucp2-double knockout (DKO) mice showed characteristics of both Nrf2-KO and Ucp2-KO mice. But no significant difference was observed in DKO mice when compared with Nrf2-KO or Ucp2-KO mice, except in blood glutathione levels. These data suggest that ablation of Nrf2 and Ucp2 leads to disrupted GSH balance, which could result from altered expression of genes involved in GSH metabolism. DKO may not evoke more severe oxidative stress than the single gene knockout. - Highlights: • Nrf2/Ucp2 deficiency leads to alteration of glutathione homeostasis. • Nrf2 regulates expression of genes in glutathione generation and utilization. • Ucp2 affects glutathione metabolism by regulating hepatic efflux of glutathione. • Nrf2 deficiency may not aggravate oxidative stress in Ucp2-deficient mice.