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Sample records for vivo regeneration assay

  1. In vivo transgenic mutation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thybaud, Véronique; Dean, Stephen; Nohmi, Takehiko; de Boer, Johan; Douglas, George R; Glickman, Barry W; Gorelick, Nancy J; Heddle, John A; Heflich, Robert H; Lambert, Iain; Martus, Hans-Jörg; Mirsalis, Jon C; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Yajima, Nobuhiro

    2003-10-07

    Transgenic rodent gene-mutation models provide relatively quick and statistically reliable assays for gene mutations in the DNA from any tissue. This report summarizes those issues that have been agreed upon at a previous IWGT meeting [Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 35 (2000) 253], and discusses in depth those issues for which no consensus was reached before. It was previously agreed that for regulatory applications, assays should be based upon neutral genes, be generally available in several laboratories, and be readily transferable. For phage-based assays, five to ten animals per group should be analyzed, assuming a spontaneous mutant frequency (MF) of approximately 3x10(-5) mutants/locus and 125,000-300,000 plaque or colony forming units (pfu or cfu) per tissue per animal. A full set of data should be generated for a vehicle control and two dose groups. Concurrent positive control animals are only necessary during validation, but positive control DNA must be included in each plating. Tissues should be processed and analyzed in a blocked design, where samples from negative control, positive control and each treatment group are processed together. The total number of pfus or cfus and the MF for each tissue and animal are reported. Statistical tests should consider the animal as the experimental unit. Nonparametric statistical tests are recommended. A positive result is a statistically significant dose-response and/or statistically significant increase in any dose group compared to concurrent negative controls using an appropriate statistical model. A negative result is a statistically non-significant change, with all mean MFs within two standard deviations of the control. During the current workshop, a general protocol was agreed in which animals are treated daily for 28 consecutive days and tissues sampled 3 days after the final treatment. This recommendation could be modified by reducing or increasing the number of treatments or the length of the treatment period, when

  2. An assay for lateral line regeneration in adult zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, Gina C; Mason, Samantha M; Dhliwayo, Nyembezi; Intine, Robert V; Sarras, Michael P

    2014-04-08

    Due to the clinical importance of hearing and balance disorders in man, model organisms such as the zebrafish have been used to study lateral line development and regeneration. The zebrafish is particularly attractive for such studies because of its rapid development time and its high regenerative capacity. To date, zebrafish studies of lateral line regeneration have mainly utilized fish of the embryonic and larval stages because of the lower number of neuromasts at these stages. This has made quantitative analysis of lateral line regeneration/and or development easier in the earlier developmental stages. Because many zebrafish models of neurological and non-neurological diseases are studied in the adult fish and not in the embryo/larvae, we focused on developing a quantitative lateral line regenerative assay in adult zebrafish so that an assay was available that could be applied to current adult zebrafish disease models. Building on previous studies by Van Trump et al. that described procedures for ablation of hair cells in adult Mexican blind cave fish and zebrafish (Danio rerio), our assay was designed to allow quantitative comparison between control and experimental groups. This was accomplished by developing a regenerative neuromast standard curve based on the percent of neuromast reappearance over a 24 hr time period following gentamicin-induced necrosis of hair cells in a defined region of the lateral line. The assay was also designed to allow extension of the analysis to the individual hair cell level when a higher level of resolution is required.

  3. The in vitro and in vivo comet assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlinson, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The strategy for testing for genotoxicity covers three main areas, namely gene mutation, chromosome aberration or breakage (clastogenicity), and chromosome loss or gain (aneuploidy). The current generalized strategy consists of assays capable of detecting all of these endpoints using in vitro assays such as the Ames test for detecting gene mutations in bacteria, the human peripheral lymphocyte chromosome aberration (CA) test for detecting clastogenicity, and the in vitro micronucleus test for clastogenicity and aneuploidy. The primary in vivo assay, and generally the only in vivo assay required, is the in vivo rodent bone marrow micronucleus assay. However, there are instances when these assays alone are inadequate and further testing is required, especially in vivo. Historically, the preferred second assay has been the rodent liver unscheduled DNA synthesis assay but recently this has been superseded by the rodent single cell gel electrophoresis or Comet assay. This assay has numerous advantages especially in vivo, where virtually any tissue can be examined. The status of the in vitro comet assay in regulatory testing is much less clear although a preliminary review of data from the assay has shown it to be more specific than other in vitro genotoxicity tests and less prone to false positives.Detailed here are general protocols for both the in vitro and in vivo comet assays which will form the basis of the pending OECD guideline for the assay.

  4. In vivo bone regeneration using a novel porous bioactive composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie En [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Hu Yunyu [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China)], E-mail: orth1@fmmn.edu.cn; Chen Xiaofeng [College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology University, Guangzhou (China); Bai Xuedong; Li Dan [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Ren Li [College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology University, Guangzhou (China); Zhang Ziru [Foreign Languages School, Northwest University Xi' an (China)

    2008-11-15

    Many commercial bone graft substitutes (BGS) and experimental bone tissue engineering scaffolds have been developed for bone repair and regeneration. This study reports the in vivo bone regeneration using a newly developed porous bioactive and resorbable composite that is composed of bioactive glass (BG), collagen (COL), hyaluronic acid (HYA) and phosphatidylserine (PS), BG-COL-HYA-PS. The composite was prepared by a combination of sol-gel and freeze-drying methods. A rabbit radius defect model was used to evaluate bone regeneration at time points of 2, 4 and 8 weeks. Techniques including radiography, histology, and micro-CT were applied to characterize the new bone formation. 8 weeks results showed that (1) nearly complete bone regeneration was achieved for the BG-COL-HYA-PS composite that was combined with a bovine bone morphogenetic protein (BMP); (2) partial bone regeneration was achieved for the BG-COL-HYA-PS composites alone; and (3) control remained empty. This study demonstrated that the novel BG-COL-HYA-PS, with or without the grafting of BMP incorporation, is a promising BGS or a tissue engineering scaffold for non-load bearing orthopaedic applications.

  5. In vivo bone regeneration using a novel porous bioactive composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, En; Hu, Yunyu; Chen, Xiaofeng; Bai, Xuedong; Li, Dan; Ren, Li; Zhang, Ziru

    2008-11-01

    Many commercial bone graft substitutes (BGS) and experimental bone tissue engineering scaffolds have been developed for bone repair and regeneration. This study reports the in vivo bone regeneration using a newly developed porous bioactive and resorbable composite that is composed of bioactive glass (BG), collagen (COL), hyaluronic acid (HYA) and phosphatidylserine (PS), BG-COL-HYA-PS. The composite was prepared by a combination of sol-gel and freeze-drying methods. A rabbit radius defect model was used to evaluate bone regeneration at time points of 2, 4 and 8 weeks. Techniques including radiography, histology, and micro-CT were applied to characterize the new bone formation. 8 weeks results showed that (1) nearly complete bone regeneration was achieved for the BG-COL-HYA-PS composite that was combined with a bovine bone morphogenetic protein (BMP); (2) partial bone regeneration was achieved for the BG-COL-HYA-PS composites alone; and (3) control remained empty. This study demonstrated that the novel BG-COL-HYA-PS, with or without the grafting of BMP incorporation, is a promising BGS or a tissue engineering scaffold for non-load bearing orthopaedic applications.

  6. Guiding tissue regeneration with ultrasound in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalecki, Diane; Comeau, Eric S.; Raeman, Carol H.; Child, Sally Z.; Hobbs, Laura; Hocking, Denise C.

    2015-05-01

    Developing new technologies that enable the repair or replacement of injured or diseased tissues is a major focus of regenerative medicine. This paper will discuss three ultrasound technologies under development in our laboratories to guide tissue regeneration both in vitro and in vivo. A critical obstacle in tissue engineering is the need for rapid and effective tissue vascularization strategies. To address this challenge, we are developing acoustic patterning techniques for microvascular tissue engineering. Acoustic radiation forces associated with ultrasound standing wave fields provide a rapid, non-invasive approach to spatially pattern cells in three dimensions without affecting cell viability. Acoustic patterning of endothelial cells leads to the rapid formation of microvascular networks throughout the volumes of three-dimensional hydrogels, and the morphology of the resultant microvessel networks can be controlled by design of the ultrasound field. A second technology under development uses ultrasound to noninvasively control the microstructure of collagen fibers within engineered tissues. The microstructure of extracellular matrix proteins provides signals that direct cell functions critical to tissue regeneration. Thus, controlling collagen microfiber structure with ultrasound provides a noninvasive approach to regulate the mechanical properties of biomaterials and control cellular responses. The third technology employs therapeutic ultrasound to enhance the healing of chronic wounds. Recent studies demonstrate increased granulation tissue thickness and collagen deposition in murine dermal wounds exposed to pulsed ultrasound. In summary, ultrasound technologies offer noninvasive approaches to control cell behaviors and extracellular matrix organization and thus hold great promise to advance tissue regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Methylene Blue Assay for Estimation of Regenerative Re-Epithelialization In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milyavsky, Maresha; Dickie, Renee

    2017-02-01

    The rapidity with which epithelial cells cover a wound surface helps determine whether scarring or scar-less healing results. As methylene blue is a vital dye that is absorbed by damaged tissue but not undamaged epidermis, it can be used to assess wound closure. We sought to develop a quantitative methylene blue exclusion assay to estimate the timeframe for re-epithelialization in regenerating appendages in zebrafish and axolotls, two classic model systems of regeneration. Following application of methylene blue to the amputation plane and extensive washing, the regenerating tail was imaged in vivo until staining was no longer visible. The percent area of the amputation plane positive for methylene blue, representing the area of the amputation plane not yet re-epithelialized, was measured for each time point. The loss of methylene blue occurred rapidly, within ~2.5 h in larval and juvenile axolotls and <1 h in adult zebrafish, consistent with high rates of re-epithelialization in these models of regeneration. The assay allows simple, rapid estimation of the time course for regenerative re-epithelialization without affecting subsequent regenerative ability. This technique will permit comparison of re-epithelialization across different strains and stages, as well as under the influence of various pharmacological inhibitors that affect regeneration.

  8. Development and evaluation of an in vivo assay in Caenorhabditis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We developed a fluorescence-based in vivo assay using transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans worms that express the green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of various CYP promoters. Using this assay, we found striking similarities between the worm CYPs and their human orthologs in their response to treatment ...

  9. In vivo nanotoxicity assays in plant models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Mamta; Ernest, Vinita; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2012-01-01

    Increasing application of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) and zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnO) in consumer products like textiles, cosmetics, washing machines and other household products increases their chance to reach the environment. Intensive research is required to assess the nanoparticles' toxicity to the environmental system. The toxicological effect of nanoparticles has been studied at the miniscule scale and requires intensive research to be conducted to assess its unknown effects. Plants are the primary target species which need to be included to develop a comprehensive toxicity profile for nanoparticles. So far, the mechanisms of toxicity of nanoparticles to the plant system remains largely unknown and little information on the potential uptake of nanoparticles by plants and their subsequent fate within the food chain is available. The phytoxicological behaviour of silver and zinc oxide nanoparticles on Allium cepa and seeds of Zea mays (maize), Cucumis sativus (cucumber) and Lycopersicum esculentum (tomato) was done. The in vitro studies on A. cepa have been done to check the cytotoxicological effects including mitotic index, chromosomal aberrations, vagrant chromosomes, sticky chromosomes, disturbed metaphase, breaks and formation of micronucleus. In vitro and in vivo studies on seed systems exposed to different concentration of nanoparticles dispersion to check phytotoxicity end point as root length, germination effect, adsorption and accumulation of nanoparticles (uptake studies) into the plant systems. In vivo studies in a seed system was done using phytagel medium. Biochemical studies were done to check effect on protein, DNA and thiobarbituric acid reactive species concentration. FT-IR studies were done to analyze the functional and conformational changes in the treated and untreated samples. The toxicological effects of nanoparticles had to be studied at the miniscule scale to address existing environment problems or prevent future problems. The

  10. Recommendations for safety testing with the in vivo comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Marie Z

    2012-08-30

    While the in vivo comet assay increases its role in regulatory safety testing, deliberations about the interpretation of comet data continue. Concerns can arise regarding comet assay publications with limited data from non-blind testing of positive control compounds and using protocols (e.g. dose concentrations, sample times, and tissues) known to give an expected effect. There may be a tendency towards bias when the validation or interpretation of comet assay data is based on results generated by widely accepted but non-validated assays. The greatest advantages of the comet assay are its sensitivity and its ability to detect genotoxicity in tissues and at sample times that could not previously be evaluated. Guidelines for its use and interpretation in safety testing should take these factors into account. Guidelines should be derived from objective review of data generated by blind testing of unknown compounds dosed at non-toxic concentrations and evaluated in a true safety-testing environment, where the experimental design and conclusions must be defensible. However, positive in vivo comet findings with such compounds are rarely submitted to regulatory agencies and this data is typically unavailable for publication due to its proprietary nature. To enhance the development of guidelines for safety testing with the comet assay, and with the permission of several sponsors, this paper presents and discusses relevant data from multiple GLP comet studies conducted blind, with unknown pharmaceuticals and consumer products. Based on these data and the lessons we have learned through the course of conducting these studies, I suggest significant adjustments to the current conventions, and I provide recommendations for interpreting in vivo comet assay results in situations where risk must be evaluated in the absence of carcinogenicity or clinical data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. In vivo study of lens regeneration in Rana cyanophlyctis under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vitamin A and ascorbic acid enhanced the percentage lens regeneration not only in young tadpoles but also in froglets. Lens regeneration ability declined with age of animals in both control as well as treated groups. Keywords: Rana cyanophlyctis, pigmented epithelial cells, vitamin A, ascorbic acid. African Journal of ...

  12. An in vivo method of assay for Dermatophilus congolensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, D

    1983-01-01

    An in vivo method of assay for Dermatophitus congolensis in rats is described. The optimal conditions for preparing skin before infection and subsequently harvesting the zoospores from infected skin were investigated. These experiments showed that clipping the skin had no effect on infection with this bacterium and that when the infected skin was soaked in water, increased amounts of dissolved CO2 had no effect on the release of zoospores, which was maximal within 2.5 h of immersion. Vaccination studies demonstrated that this assay gave results comparable to previously published data, where these data were quantitative. Infection with D. congolensis was not related to the production of exudate on the skin surface. This is the first report that D. congolensis can infect skin without producing an exudate. Hypotheses linking skin damage and susceptibility to infection with this bacterium are discussed in the light of this observation.

  13. Human skeletal muscle fibroblasts stimulate in vitro myogenesis and in vivo muscle regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail L.; Magnan, Mélanie; Chazaud, Bénédicte

    2017-01-01

    Accumulation of skeletal muscle extracellular matrix is an unfavourable characteristic of many muscle diseases, muscle injury and sarcopenia. In addition to the indispensable role satellite cells play in muscle regeneration, there is emerging evidence in rodents for a regulatory influence...... and strongly stimulate both MPC differentiation and MPC fusion. It thus appears, in humans, that fibroblasts exert a strong positive regulatory influence on MPC activity, in line with observations during in vivo skeletal muscle regeneration....

  14. Macroscopic in vivo imaging of facial nerve regeneration in Thy1-GFP rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placheta, Eva; Wood, Matthew D; Lafontaine, Christine; Frey, Manfred; Gordon, Tessa; Borschel, Gregory H

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve injury leads to severe functional and aesthetic deficits. The transgenic Thy1-GFP rat is a new model for facial nerve injury and reconstruction research that will help improve clinical outcomes through translational facial nerve injury research. To determine whether serial in vivo imaging of nerve regeneration in the transgenic rat model is possible, facial nerve regeneration was imaged under the main paradigms of facial nerve injury and reconstruction. Fifteen male Thy1-GFP rats, which express green fluorescent protein (GFP) in their neural structures, were divided into 3 groups in the laboratory: crush-injury, direct repair, and cross-face nerve grafting (30-mm graft length). The distal nerve stump or nerve graft was predegenerated for 2 weeks. The facial nerve of the transgenic rats was serially imaged at the time of operation and after 2, 4, and 8 weeks of regeneration. The imaging was performed under a GFP-MDS-96/BN excitation stand (BLS Ltd). Facial nerve injury. Optical fluorescence of regenerating facial nerve axons. Serial in vivo imaging of the regeneration of GFP-positive axons in the Thy1-GFP rat model is possible. All animals survived the short imaging procedures well, and nerve regeneration was followed over clinically relevant distances. The predegeneration of the distal nerve stump or the cross-face nerve graft was, however, necessary to image the regeneration front at early time points. Crush injury was not suitable to sufficiently predegenerate the nerve (and to allow for degradation of the GFP through Wallerian degeneration). After direct repair, axons regenerated over the coaptation site in between 2 and 4 weeks. The GFP-positive nerve fibers reached the distal end of the 30-mm-long cross-face nervegrafts after 4 to 8 weeks of regeneration. The time course of facial nerve regeneration was studied by serial in vivo imaging in the transgenic rat model. Nerve regeneration was followed over clinically relevant distances in a small

  15. The planarian flatworm: an in vivo model for stem cell biology and nervous system regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Luca; Cebrià, Francesc; Bartscherer, Kerstin

    2011-01-01

    Planarian flatworms are an exception among bilaterians in that they possess a large pool of adult stem cells that enables them to promptly regenerate any part of their body, including the brain. Although known for two centuries for their remarkable regenerative capabilities, planarians have only recently emerged as an attractive model for studying regeneration and stem cell biology. This revival is due in part to the availability of a sequenced genome and the development of new technologies, such as RNA interference and next-generation sequencing, which facilitate studies of planarian regeneration at the molecular level. Here, we highlight why planarians are an exciting tool in the study of regeneration and its underlying stem cell biology in vivo, and discuss the potential promises and current limitations of this model organism for stem cell research and regenerative medicine. PMID:21135057

  16. The planarian flatworm: an in vivo model for stem cell biology and nervous system regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Gentile

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Planarian flatworms are an exception among bilaterians in that they possess a large pool of adult stem cells that enables them to promptly regenerate any part of their body, including the brain. Although known for two centuries for their remarkable regenerative capabilities, planarians have only recently emerged as an attractive model for studying regeneration and stem cell biology. This revival is due in part to the availability of a sequenced genome and the development of new technologies, such as RNA interference and next-generation sequencing, which facilitate studies of planarian regeneration at the molecular level. Here, we highlight why planarians are an exciting tool in the study of regeneration and its underlying stem cell biology in vivo, and discuss the potential promises and current limitations of this model organism for stem cell research and regenerative medicine.

  17. PhOTO zebrafish: a transgenic resource for in vivo lineage tracing during development and regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P Dempsey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elucidating the complex cell dynamics (divisions, movement, morphological changes, etc. underlying embryonic development and adult tissue regeneration requires an efficient means to track cells with high fidelity in space and time. To satisfy this criterion, we developed a transgenic zebrafish line, called PhOTO, that allows photoconvertible optical tracking of nuclear and membrane dynamics in vivo. METHODOLOGY: PhOTO zebrafish ubiquitously express targeted blue fluorescent protein (FP Cerulean and photoconvertible FP Dendra2 fusions, allowing for instantaneous, precise targeting and tracking of any number of cells using Dendra2 photoconversion while simultaneously monitoring global cell behavior and morphology. Expression persists through adulthood, making the PhOTO zebrafish an excellent tool for studying tissue regeneration: after tail fin amputation and photoconversion of a ∼100 µm stripe along the cut area, marked differences seen in how cells contribute to the new tissue give detailed insight into the dynamic process of regeneration. Photoconverted cells that contributed to the regenerate were separated into three distinct populations corresponding to the extent of cell division 7 days after amputation, and a subset of cells that divided the least were organized into an evenly spaced, linear orientation along the length of the newly regenerating fin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: PhOTO zebrafish have wide applicability for lineage tracing at the systems-level in the early embryo as well as in the adult, making them ideal candidate tools for future research in development, traumatic injury and regeneration, cancer progression, and stem cell behavior.

  18. 3D Printable Biophotopolymers for in Vivo Bone Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russmueller, Guenter; Liska, Robert; Stampfl, Juergen; Heller, Christian; Mautner, Andreas; Macfelda, Karin; Kapeller, Barbara; Lieber, Roman; Haider, Agnes; Mika, Kathrin; Schopper, Christian; Perisanidis, Christos; Seemann, Rudolf; Moser, Doris

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated two novel biophotopolymer classes that are chemically based on non-toxic poly (vinyl alcohol). These vinylesters and vinylcarbonates were compared to standard acrylates in vitro on MC3T3-E1 cells and in vivo in a small animal model. In vitro, both vinylester and vinylcarbonate monomers showed about tenfold less cytotoxicity when compared to acrylates (IC50: 2.922 mM and 2.392 mM vs. 0.201 mM) and at least threefold higher alkaline phosphatase activity (17.038 and 18.836 vs. 5.795, measured at [10 mM]). In vivo, polymerized 3D cellular structures were implanted into the distal femoral condyle of 16 New Zealand White Rabbits and were observed for periods from 4 to 12 weeks. New bone formation and bone to implant contact was evaluated by histomorphometry at end of observation. Vinylesters showed similar rates of new bone formation but significantly less (p = 0.002) bone to implant contact, when compared to acrylates. In contrast, the implantation of vinylcarbonate based biophotopolymers led to significantly higher rates of newly formed bone (p < 0.001) and bone to implant contact (p < 0.001). Additionally, distinct signs of polymer degradation could be observed in vinylesters and vinylcarbonates by histology. We conclude, that vinylesters and vinylcarbonates are promising new biophotopolymers, that outmatch available poly(lactic acid) and (meth)acrylate based materials.

  19. 3D Printable Biophotopolymers for in Vivo Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guenter Russmueller

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated two novel biophotopolymer classes that are chemically based on non-toxic poly (vinyl alcohol. These vinylesters and vinylcarbonates were compared to standard acrylates in vitro on MC3T3-E1 cells and in vivo in a small animal model. In vitro, both vinylester and vinylcarbonate monomers showed about tenfold less cytotoxicity when compared to acrylates (IC50: 2.922 mM and 2.392 mM vs. 0.201 mM and at least threefold higher alkaline phosphatase activity (17.038 and 18.836 vs. 5.795, measured at [10 mM]. In vivo, polymerized 3D cellular structures were implanted into the distal femoral condyle of 16 New Zealand White Rabbits and were observed for periods from 4 to 12 weeks. New bone formation and bone to implant contact was evaluated by histomorphometry at end of observation. Vinylesters showed similar rates of new bone formation but significantly less (p = 0.002 bone to implant contact, when compared to acrylates. In contrast, the implantation of vinylcarbonate based biophotopolymers led to significantly higher rates of newly formed bone (p < 0.001 and bone to implant contact (p < 0.001. Additionally, distinct signs of polymer degradation could be observed in vinylesters and vinylcarbonates by histology. We conclude, that vinylesters and vinylcarbonates are promising new biophotopolymers, that outmatch available poly(lactic acid and (methacrylate based materials.

  20. In Vivo Experiments with Dental Pulp Stem Cells for Pulp-Dentin Complex Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunil; Shin, Su-Jung; Song, Yunjung; Kim, Euiseong

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many studies have examined the pulp-dentin complex regeneration with DPSCs. While it is important to perform research on cells, scaffolds, and growth factors, it is also critical to develop animal models for preclinical trials. The development of a reproducible animal model of transplantation is essential for obtaining precise and accurate data in vivo. The efficacy of pulp regeneration should be assessed qualitatively and quantitatively using animal models. This review article sought to introduce in vivo experiments that have evaluated the potential of dental pulp stem cells for pulp-dentin complex regeneration. According to a review of various researches about DPSCs, the majority of studies have used subcutaneous mouse and dog teeth for animal models. There is no way to know which animal model will reproduce the clinical environment. If an animal model is developed which is easier to use and is useful in more situations than the currently popular models, it will be a substantial aid to studies examining pulp-dentin complex regeneration. PMID:26688616

  1. In Vivo Experiments with Dental Pulp Stem Cells for Pulp-Dentin Complex Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many studies have examined the pulp-dentin complex regeneration with DPSCs. While it is important to perform research on cells, scaffolds, and growth factors, it is also critical to develop animal models for preclinical trials. The development of a reproducible animal model of transplantation is essential for obtaining precise and accurate data in vivo. The efficacy of pulp regeneration should be assessed qualitatively and quantitatively using animal models. This review article sought to introduce in vivo experiments that have evaluated the potential of dental pulp stem cells for pulp-dentin complex regeneration. According to a review of various researches about DPSCs, the majority of studies have used subcutaneous mouse and dog teeth for animal models. There is no way to know which animal model will reproduce the clinical environment. If an animal model is developed which is easier to use and is useful in more situations than the currently popular models, it will be a substantial aid to studies examining pulp-dentin complex regeneration.

  2. Automated reporter quantification in vivo: high-throughput screening method for reporter-based assays in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Steven L; Ariga, Junko; Mathias, Jonathan R; Coothankandaswamy, Veena; Xie, Xiayang; Distel, Martin; Köster, Reinhard W; Parsons, Michael J; Bhalla, Kapil N; Saxena, Meera T; Mumm, Jeff S

    2012-01-01

    Reporter-based assays underlie many high-throughput screening (HTS) platforms, but most are limited to in vitro applications. Here, we report a simple whole-organism HTS method for quantifying changes in reporter intensity in individual zebrafish over time termed, Automated Reporter Quantification in vivo (ARQiv). ARQiv differs from current "high-content" (e.g., confocal imaging-based) whole-organism screening technologies by providing a purely quantitative data acquisition approach that affords marked improvements in throughput. ARQiv uses a fluorescence microplate reader with specific detection functionalities necessary for robust quantification of reporter signals in vivo. This approach is: 1) Rapid; achieving true HTS capacities (i.e., >50,000 units per day), 2) Reproducible; attaining HTS-compatible assay quality (i.e., Z'-factors of ≥0.5), and 3) Flexible; amenable to nearly any reporter-based assay in zebrafish embryos, larvae, or juveniles. ARQiv is used here to quantify changes in: 1) Cell number; loss and regeneration of two different fluorescently tagged cell types (pancreatic beta cells and rod photoreceptors), 2) Cell signaling; relative activity of a transgenic Notch-signaling reporter, and 3) Cell metabolism; accumulation of reactive oxygen species. In summary, ARQiv is a versatile and readily accessible approach facilitating evaluation of genetic and/or chemical manipulations in living zebrafish that complements current "high-content" whole-organism screening methods by providing a first-tier in vivo HTS drug discovery platform.

  3. Porous tantalum coatings prepared by vacuum plasma spraying enhance bmscs osteogenic differentiation and bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ze; Xie, Youtao; Yang, Fei; Huang, Yan; Wang, Chuandong; Dai, Kerong; Zheng, Xuebin; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2013-01-01

    Tantalum, as a potential metallic implant biomaterial, is attracting more and more attention because of its excellent anticorrosion and biocompatibility. However, its significantly high elastic modulus and large mechanical incompatibility with bone tissue make it unsuitable for load-bearing implants. In this study, porous tantalum coatings were first successfully fabricated on titanium substrates by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS), which would exert the excellent biocompatibility of tantalum and alleviate the elastic modulus of tantalum for bone tissue. We evaluated cytocompatibility and osteogenesis activity of the porous tantalum coatings using human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) and its ability to repair rabbit femur bone defects. The morphology and actin cytoskeletons of hBMSCs were observed via electron microscopy and confocal, and the cell viability, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation potential of hBMSCs were examined quantitatively by PrestoBlue assay, Ki67 immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR technology and ALP staining. For in vivo detection, the repaired femur were evaluated by histomorphology and double fluorescence labeling 3 months postoperation. Porous tantalum coating surfaces promoted hBMSCs adhesion, proliferation, osteogenesis activity and had better osseointegration and faster new bone formation rate than titanium coating control. Our observation suggested that the porous tantalum coatings had good biocompatibility and could enhance osseoinductivity in vitro and promote new bone formation in vivo. The porous tantalum coatings prepared by VPS is a promising strategy for bone regeneration.

  4. Porous tantalum coatings prepared by vacuum plasma spraying enhance bmscs osteogenic differentiation and bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze Tang

    Full Text Available Tantalum, as a potential metallic implant biomaterial, is attracting more and more attention because of its excellent anticorrosion and biocompatibility. However, its significantly high elastic modulus and large mechanical incompatibility with bone tissue make it unsuitable for load-bearing implants. In this study, porous tantalum coatings were first successfully fabricated on titanium substrates by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS, which would exert the excellent biocompatibility of tantalum and alleviate the elastic modulus of tantalum for bone tissue. We evaluated cytocompatibility and osteogenesis activity of the porous tantalum coatings using human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs and its ability to repair rabbit femur bone defects. The morphology and actin cytoskeletons of hBMSCs were observed via electron microscopy and confocal, and the cell viability, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation potential of hBMSCs were examined quantitatively by PrestoBlue assay, Ki67 immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR technology and ALP staining. For in vivo detection, the repaired femur were evaluated by histomorphology and double fluorescence labeling 3 months postoperation. Porous tantalum coating surfaces promoted hBMSCs adhesion, proliferation, osteogenesis activity and had better osseointegration and faster new bone formation rate than titanium coating control. Our observation suggested that the porous tantalum coatings had good biocompatibility and could enhance osseoinductivity in vitro and promote new bone formation in vivo. The porous tantalum coatings prepared by VPS is a promising strategy for bone regeneration.

  5. The effect of carrier type on bone regeneration of demineralized bone matrix in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakol, Shima; Khoshzaban, Ahad; Azami, Mahmoud; Kashani, Iraj Ragerdi; Tavakol, Hani; Yazdanifar, Mahbube; Sorkhabadi, Seyed Mahdi Rezayat

    2013-11-01

    Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) is a bone substitute biomaterial used as an excellent grafting material. Some factors such as carrier type might affect the healing potential of this material. The background data discuss the present status of the field: Albumin as a main protein in blood and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were applied frequently in the DBM gels. We investigated the bone-repairing properties of 2 DBMs with different carriers. Bone regeneration in 3 groups of rat calvaria treated with DBM from the Iranian Tissue Bank Research and Preparation Center, DBM from Hans Biomed Corporation, and an empty cavity was studied. Albumin and CMC as carriers were used. The results of bone regeneration in the samples after 1, 4, and 8 weeks of implantation were compared. The block of the histologic samples was stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and the percentage area of bone formation was calculated using the histomorphometry method. The results of in vivo tests showed a significantly stronger new regenerated bone occupation in the DBM with albumin carrier compared with the one with CMC 8 weeks after the implantation. The 2 types of DBM had a significant difference in bone regeneration. This difference is attributed to the type of carriers. Albumin could improve mineralization and bioactivity compared with CMC.

  6. Converted marine coral hydroxyapatite implants with growth factors: In vivo bone regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandi, Samit K., E-mail: samitnandi1967@gmail.com [Department of Veterinary Surgery and Radiology, West Bengal University of Animal and Fishery Sciences, Kolkata (India); Kundu, Biswanath, E-mail: biswa_kundu@rediffmail.com [Bioceramics and Coating Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata (India); Mukherjee, Jayanta [Institute of Animal Health and Veterinary Biologicals, Kolkata (India); Mahato, Arnab; Datta, Someswar; Balla, Vamsi Krishna [Bioceramics and Coating Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata (India)

    2015-04-01

    Herein we report rabbit model in vivo bone regeneration of hydrothermally converted coralline hydroxyapatite (HCCHAp) scaffolds without (group I) and with growth factors namely insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) (group II) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) (group III). All HCCHAp scaffolds have been characterized for phase purity and morphology before implantation. Calcined marine coral was hydrothermally converted using a mineralizer/catalyst to phase pure HAp retaining original pore structure and geometry. After sintering at 1250 °C, the HCCHAp found to have ~ 87% crystallinity, 70–75% porosity and 2 ± 0.5 MPa compressive strength. In vitro growth factor release study at day 28 revealed 77 and 98% release for IGF-1 and BMP-2, respectively. The IGF-1 release was more sustained than BMP-2. In vivo bone healing of different groups was compared using chronological radiology, histological evaluations, scanning electron microscopy and fluorochrome labeling up to 90 days of implantation. In vivo studies showed substantial reduction in radiolucent zone and decreased radiodensity of implants in group II followed by group III and group I. These observations clearly suggest in-growth of osseous tissue, initiation of bone healing and complete union between implants and natural bone in group II implants. A statistical score sheet based on histological observations showed an excellent osseous tissue formation in group II and group III scaffolds and moderate bone regeneration in group I scaffolds. - Highlights: • In vivo bone regeneration of hydrothermally converted coralline hydroxyapatite • Scaffolds with and without growth factors (IGF-1 and BMP-2) • In vitro drug release was more sustained for IGF-1 than BMP-2. • Growth factor significantly improved osseous tissue formation of implanted scaffold. • Established through detailed statistical score sheet from histological observations.

  7. In vivo reprogramming for heart regeneration: A glance at efficiency, environmental impacts, challenges and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Behnam

    2017-07-01

    Replacing dying or diseased cells of a tissue with new ones that are converted from patient's own cells is an attractive strategy in regenerative medicine. In vivo reprogramming is a novel strategy that can circumvent the hurdles of autologous/allogeneic cell injection therapies. Interestingly, studies have demonstrated that direct injection of cardiac transcription factors or specific miRNAs into the infarct border zone of murine hearts following myocardial infarction converts resident cardiac fibroblasts into functional cardiomyocytes. Moreover, in vivo cardiac reprogramming not only drives cardiac tissue regeneration, but also improves cardiac function and survival rate after myocardial infarction. Thanks to the influence of cardiac microenvironment and the same developmental origin, cardiac fibroblasts seem to be more amenable to reprogramming toward cardiomyocyte fate than other cell sources (e.g. skin fibroblasts). Thus, reprogramming of cardiac fibroblasts to functional induced cardiomyocytes in the cardiac environment holds great promises for induced regeneration and potential clinical purposes. Application of small molecules in future studies may represent a major advancement in this arena and pharmacological reprogramming would convey reprogramming technology to the translational medicine paradigm. This study reviews accomplishments in the field of in vitro and in vivo mouse cardiac reprogramming and then deals with strategies for the enhancement of the efficiency and quality of the process. Furthermore, it discusses challenges ahead and provides suggestions for future research. Human cardiac reprogramming is also addressed as a foundation for possible application of in vivo cardiac reprogramming for human heart regeneration in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Computational discovery and in vivo validation of hnf4 as a regulatory gene in planarian regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Daniel; Morokuma, Junji; Levin, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Automated computational methods can infer dynamic regulatory network models directly from temporal and spatial experimental data, such as genetic perturbations and their resultant morphologies. Recently, a computational method was able to reverse-engineer the first mechanistic model of planarian regeneration that can recapitulate the main anterior-posterior patterning experiments published in the literature. Validating this comprehensive regulatory model via novel experiments that had not yet been performed would add in our understanding of the remarkable regeneration capacity of planarian worms and demonstrate the power of this automated methodology. Using the Michigan Molecular Interactions and STRING databases and the MoCha software tool, we characterized as hnf4 an unknown regulatory gene predicted to exist by the reverse-engineered dynamic model of planarian regeneration. Then, we used the dynamic model to predict the morphological outcomes under different single and multiple knock-downs (RNA interference) of hnf4 and its predicted gene pathway interactors β-catenin and hh Interestingly, the model predicted that RNAi of hnf4 would rescue the abnormal regenerated phenotype (tailless) of RNAi of hh in amputated trunk fragments. Finally, we validated these predictions in vivo by performing the same surgical and genetic experiments with planarian worms, obtaining the same phenotypic outcomes predicted by the reverse-engineered model. These results suggest that hnf4 is a regulatory gene in planarian regeneration, validate the computational predictions of the reverse-engineered dynamic model, and demonstrate the automated methodology for the discovery of novel genes, pathways and experimental phenotypes. michael.levin@tufts.edu. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The in vivo rat skin photomicronucleus assay: Phototoxicity and photogenotoxicity evaluation of six fluoroquinolones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reus, A.A.; Usta, M.; Kenny, J.D.; Clements, P.J.; Pruimboom-Brees, I.; Aylott, M.; Lynch, A.M.; Krul, C.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    An in vivo photomicronucleus test (MNT) using rat skin, the target organ for photoirritancy and carcinogenicity, was recently described. The assay was evaluated using fluoroquinolone (FQ) antibiotics with varying degrees of phototoxic potency (i.e. sparflocacin [SPFX], lomefloxacin [LOFX],

  10. In Vitro and In Vivo Study of a Novel Porcine Collagen Membrane for Guided Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisner Salamanca

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available For years, in order to improve bone regeneration and prevent the need of a second stage surgery to remove non-resorbable membranes, biological absorbable membranes have gradually been developed and applied in guided tissue regeneration (GTR. The present study’s main objective was to achieve space maintenance and bone regeneration using a new freeze-dried developed porcine collagen membrane, and compare it with an already commercial collagen membrane, when both were used with a bovine xenograft in prepared alveolar ridge bone defects. Prior to surgery, the membrane’s vitality analysis showed statistically significant higher cell proliferation in the test membrane over the commercial one. In six beagle dogs, commercial bone xenograft was packed in lateral ridge bone defects prepared in the left and right side and then covered with test porcine collagen membrane or commercial collagen membrane. Alveolar height changes were measured. Histomorphometric results, in vitro and in vivo properties indicated that the new porcine collagen membrane is biocompatible, enhances bone xenograft osteoconduction, and reduces the alveolar ridge height reabsorption rate.

  11. A novel nanoparticle delivery system for in vivo targeting of the sciatic nerve: impact on regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Nádia Pereira; Oliveira, Hugo; Pêgo, Ana Paula; Saraiva, Maria João

    2012-08-01

    Innovative solutions in the development of drug delivery systems targeting the nerve tissue are awaited. In this regard, a novel system for the delivery of drugs to the sciatic nerve was created using nanomedical principles. Chitosan was the vehicle material used in the experiment. Heparin bound to growth factors has been administered to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration, and since heparin possesses the appropriate charge to be able to form nanoparticles with chitosan, it appears to be a good candidate to base this new delivery system on. Maximal absorption took place throughout the extracellular matrix at day 15. No major inflammatory response was observed, indicating that this is a safe and biocompatible system for drug delivery to nerves. Sensorimotor performance and nerve regeneration of mice receiving these nanoparticles were superior as compared with controls. Our work demonstrates a versatile nanoparticle delivery system that successfully targets drugs 'in vivo' to the sciatic nerve, opening novel avenues in the field of nanomedicine to the design of therapeutic strategies that enhance axonal regeneration.

  12. The comet assay: assessment of in vitro and in vivo DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpayee, Mahima; Kumar, Ashutosh; Dhawan, Alok

    2013-01-01

    Rapid industrialization and pursuance of a better life have led to an increase in the amount of chemicals in the environment, which are deleterious to human health. Pesticides, automobile exhausts, and new chemical entities all add to air pollution and have an adverse effect on all living organisms including humans. Sensitive test systems are thus required for accurate hazard identification and risk assessment. The Comet assay has been used widely as a simple, rapid, and sensitive tool for assessment of DNA damage in single cells from both in vitro and in vivo sources as well as in humans. Already, the in vivo comet assay has gained importance as the preferred test for assessing DNA damage in animals for some international regulatory guidelines. The advantages of the in vivo comet assay are its ability to detect DNA damage in any tissue, despite having non-proliferating cells, and its sensitivity to detect genotoxicity. The recommendations from the international workshops held for the comet assay have resulted in establishment of guidelines. The in vitro comet assay conducted in cultured cells and cell lines can be used for screening large number of compounds and at very low concentrations. The in vitro assay has also been automated to provide a high-throughput screening method for new chemical entities, as well as environmental samples. This chapter details the in vitro comet assay using the 96-well plate and in vivo comet assay in multiple organs of the mouse.

  13. Proliferation assays for estrogenicity testing with high predictive value for the in vivo uterotrophic effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, S.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Evers, N.M.; Peijnenburg, A.A.C.M.; Rietjens, I.; Bovee, T.F.H.

    2012-01-01

    Proliferation assays based on human cell lines are the most used in vitro tests to determine estrogenic properties of compounds. Our objective was to characterise to what extent these in vitro tests provide alternatives for the in vivo Allen and Doisy test, a uterotrophic assay in immature or

  14. A functional biphasic biomaterial homing mesenchymal stem cells for in vivo cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hongjie; Zhang, Xin; Hu, Xiaoqing; Shao, Zhenxing; Zhu, Jingxian; Dai, Linghui; Man, Zhentao; Yuan, Lan; Chen, Haifeng; Zhou, Chunyan; Ao, Yingfang

    2014-12-01

    Cartilage regeneration after trauma is still a great challenge for clinicians and researchers due to many reasons, such as joint load-bearing, synovial movement and the paucity of endogenous repair cells. To overcome these limitations, we constructed a functional biomaterial using a biphasic scaffold platform and a bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs)-specific affinity peptide. The biphasic scaffold platform retains more cells homogeneously within the sol-gel transition of chitosan and provides sufficient solid matrix strength. This biphasic scaffold platform is functionalized with an affinity peptide targeting a cell source of interest, BMSCs. The presence of conjugated peptide gives this system a biological functionality towards BMSC-specific homing both in vitro and in vivo. The functional biomaterial can stimulate stem cell proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation during in vitro culture. Six months after in vivo implantation, compared with routine surgery or control scaffolds, the functional biomaterials induced superior cartilage repair without complications, as indicated by histological observations, magnetic resonance imaging and biomechanical properties. Beyond cartilage repair, this functional biphasic scaffold may provide a biomaterial framework for one-step tissue engineering strategy by homing endogenous cells to stimulate tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells pre-implantation differentiation approach on periodontal regeneration in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xinjie; Yang, Fang; Yan, Xiangzhen; Yang, Wanxun; Yu, Na; Oortgiesen, Daniel A W; Wang, Yining; Jansen, John A; Walboomers, X Frank

    2015-04-01

    The implantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has previously been shown successful to achieve periodontal regeneration. However, the preferred pre-implantation differentiation strategy (e.g. maintenance of stemness, osteogenic or chondrogenic induction) to obtain optimal periodontal regeneration is still unknown. This in vivo study explored which differentiation approach is most suitable for periodontal regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells were obtained from Fischer rats and seeded onto poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/poly(ɛ-caprolactone) electrospun scaffolds, and then pre-cultured under different in vitro conditions: (i) retention of multilineage differentiation potential; (ii) osteogenic differentiation approach; and (iii) chondrogenic differentiation approach. Subsequently, the cell-scaffold constructs were implanted into experimental periodontal defects of Fischer rats, with empty scaffolds as controls. After 6 weeks of implantation, histomorphometrical analyses were applied to evaluate the regenerated periodontal tissues. The chondrogenic differentiation approach showed regeneration of alveolar bone and ligament tissues. The retention of multilineage differentiation potential supported only ligament regeneration, while the osteogenic differentiation approach boosted alveolar bone regeneration. Chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs before implantation is a useful strategy for regeneration of alveolar bone and periodontal ligament, in the currently used rat model. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Discriminating Different Cancer Cells Using a Zebrafish in Vivo Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Pardhanani

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the expanded understanding of tumor angiogenesis phenomenon and how it impacts cancer treatment outcomes, we have yet to develop a robust assay that can quickly, easily, and quantitatively measure tumor-induced angiogenesis. Since the zebrafish/tumor xenograft represents an emerging tool in this regard, the present study strives to capitalize on the ease, effectiveness, and the adaptability of this model to quantify tumor angiogenesis. In order to test a range of responses, we chose two different tumorigenic cell lines, the human non-small cell lung carcinoma (H1299 and the mouse lung adenocarcinoma (CL13. Non-tumorigenic 3T3-L1 cells served as negative control. The cells were grafted near to the perivitelline space of the zebrafish embryos and the angiogenic response was analyzed using whole-mount alkaline phosphatase (AP vessel staining and fluorescence microscopy. Angiogenic activity was scored based on the length and number of the newly formed ectopic vessels and the percentage of embryos with ectopic vessels. At 2 day-post-implantation, we detected a significant increase in the length and number of ectopic vessels with H1299 cell implantation compared to CL13 cell transplantation, both are higher than 3T3-L1 control. We also observed a significantly higher percentage of embryos with ectopic vessels with H1299 and CL13 transplantation compared to the 3T3-L1 control, but this parameter is not as robust and reliable as measuring the length and number of ectopic vessels. Furthermore, the systemic exposure of zebrafish embryos to an anti-angiogenesis drug (PTK 787, inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibited tumor-induced angiogenesis, suggesting that the assay can be used to evaluate anti-angiogenic drugs. This study implicates the feasibility of using zebrafish xenotransplantation to perform quantitative measurement of the angiogenic activity of cancer cells which can be further extended to

  17. Discriminating Different Cancer Cells Using a Zebrafish in Vivo Assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moshal, Karni S.; Ferri-Lagneau, Karine F.; Haider, Jamil; Pardhanani, Pooja; Leung, TinChung, E-mail: tleung@nccu.edu [Biomedical/Biotechnology Research Institute, North Carolina Central University, North Carolina Research Campus, Nutrition Research Center, 500 Laureate Way, Kannapolis, NC 28081 (United States)

    2011-10-31

    Despite the expanded understanding of tumor angiogenesis phenomenon and how it impacts cancer treatment outcomes, we have yet to develop a robust assay that can quickly, easily, and quantitatively measure tumor-induced angiogenesis. Since the zebrafish/tumor xenograft represents an emerging tool in this regard, the present study strives to capitalize on the ease, effectiveness, and the adaptability of this model to quantify tumor angiogenesis. In order to test a range of responses, we chose two different tumorigenic cell lines, the human non-small cell lung carcinoma (H1299) and the mouse lung adenocarcinoma (CL13). Non-tumorigenic 3T3-L1 cells served as negative control. The cells were grafted near to the perivitelline space of the zebrafish embryos and the angiogenic response was analyzed using whole-mount alkaline phosphatase (AP) vessel staining and fluorescence microscopy. Angiogenic activity was scored based on the length and number of the newly formed ectopic vessels and the percentage of embryos with ectopic vessels. At 2 day-post-implantation, we detected a significant increase in the length and number of ectopic vessels with H1299 cell implantation compared to CL13 cell transplantation, both are higher than 3T3-L1 control. We also observed a significantly higher percentage of embryos with ectopic vessels with H1299 and CL13 transplantation compared to the 3T3-L1 control, but this parameter is not as robust and reliable as measuring the length and number of ectopic vessels. Furthermore, the systemic exposure of zebrafish embryos to an anti-angiogenesis drug (PTK 787, inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase) inhibited tumor-induced angiogenesis, suggesting that the assay can be used to evaluate anti-angiogenic drugs. This study implicates the feasibility of using zebrafish xenotransplantation to perform quantitative measurement of the angiogenic activity of cancer cells which can be further extended to measure cancer cell

  18. Comparison of In Vitro Assays in Selecting Radiotracers for In Vivo P-Glycoprotein PET Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaphorst, Renske M; Savolainen, Heli; Cantore, Mariangela; van de Steeg, Evita; van Waarde, Aren; Colabufo, Nicola A; Elsinga, Philip H; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Windhorst, Albert D; Luurtsema, Gert

    2017-09-20

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in the blood-brain barrier can be important in neurological diseases where P-gp is affected, such as Alzheimer´s disease. Radiotracers used in the imaging studies are present at very small, nanomolar, concentration, whereas in vitro assays where these tracers are characterized, are usually performed at micromolar concentration, causing often discrepant in vivo and in vitro data. We had in vivo rodent PET data of [(11)C]verapamil, (R)-N-[(18)F]fluoroethylverapamil, (R)-O-[(18)F]fluoroethyl-norverapamil, [(18)F]MC225 and [(18)F]MC224 and we included also two new molecules [(18)F]MC198 and [(18)F]KE64 in this study. To improve the predictive value of in vitro assays, we labeled all the tracers with tritium and performed bidirectional substrate transport assay in MDCKII-MDR1 cells at three different concentrations (0.01, 1 and 50 µM) and also inhibition assay with P-gp inhibitors. As a comparison, we used non-radioactive molecules in transport assay in Caco-2 cells at a concentration of 10 µM and in calcein-AM inhibition assay in MDCKII-MDR1 cells. All the P-gp substrates were transported dose-dependently. At the highest concentration (50 µM), P-gp was saturated in a similar way as after treatment with P-gp inhibitors. Best in vivo correlation was obtained with the bidirectional transport assay at a concentration of 0.01 µM. One micromolar concentration in a transport assay or calcein-AM assay alone is not sufficient for correct in vivo prediction of substrate P-gp PET ligands.

  19. Comparison of In Vitro Assays in Selecting Radiotracers for In Vivo P-Glycoprotein PET Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renske M. Raaphorst

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET imaging of P-glycoprotein (P-gp in the blood-brain barrier can be important in neurological diseases where P-gp is affected, such as Alzheimer´s disease. Radiotracers used in the imaging studies are present at very small, nanomolar, concentration, whereas in vitro assays where these tracers are characterized, are usually performed at micromolar concentration, causing often discrepant in vivo and in vitro data. We had in vivo rodent PET data of [11C]verapamil, (R-N-[18F]fluoroethylverapamil, (R-O-[18F]fluoroethyl-norverapamil, [18F]MC225 and [18F]MC224 and we included also two new molecules [18F]MC198 and [18F]KE64 in this study. To improve the predictive value of in vitro assays, we labeled all the tracers with tritium and performed bidirectional substrate transport assay in MDCKII-MDR1 cells at three different concentrations (0.01, 1 and 50 µM and also inhibition assay with P-gp inhibitors. As a comparison, we used non-radioactive molecules in transport assay in Caco-2 cells at a concentration of 10 µM and in calcein-AM inhibition assay in MDCKII-MDR1 cells. All the P-gp substrates were transported dose-dependently. At the highest concentration (50 µM, P-gp was saturated in a similar way as after treatment with P-gp inhibitors. Best in vivo correlation was obtained with the bidirectional transport assay at a concentration of 0.01 µM. One micromolar concentration in a transport assay or calcein-AM assay alone is not sufficient for correct in vivo prediction of substrate P-gp PET ligands.

  20. Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) in vivo assay for screening imidazolinone-resistance in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, T; Breccia, G; Gil, M; Zorzoli, R; Picardi, L; Nestares, G

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the in vivo acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) activity response to imidazolinones and its possible use as a selection method for evaluating AHAS inhibitor resistance. In vivo AHAS assay and the comparison of parameters from dose-response curves have been used as a valid tool for comparing sunflower lines and hybrids differing in imidazolinone resistance. The sunflower resistant genotypes evaluated here were 100-fold and 20-fold more resistant compared with the susceptible line for imazethapyr and imazapyr, respectively. This assay also allowed discrimination of homozygous from heterozygous genotypes for I(mr1) locus that codify for the catalytic subunit of AHAS. The in vivo AHAS assay described in this study was useful for the selection of sunflower genotypes differing in herbicide resistance and could be a useful tool when breeding for imidazolinone resistance in sunflower. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. The Angiogenic Potential of DPSCs and SCAPs in an In Vivo Model of Dental Pulp Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Hilkens

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adequate vascularization, a restricting factor for the survival of engineered tissues, is often promoted by the addition of stem cells or the appropriate angiogenic growth factors. In this study, human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs and stem cells from the apical papilla (SCAPs were applied in an in vivo model of dental pulp regeneration in order to compare their regenerative potential and confirm their previously demonstrated paracrine angiogenic properties. 3D-printed hydroxyapatite scaffolds containing DPSCs and/or SCAPs were subcutaneously transplanted into immunocompromised mice. After twelve weeks, histological and ultrastructural analysis demonstrated the regeneration of vascularized pulp-like tissue as well as mineralized tissue formation in all stem cell constructs. Despite the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor in vitro, the stem cell constructs did not display a higher vascularization rate in comparison to control conditions. Similar results were found after eight weeks, which suggests both osteogenic/odontogenic differentiation of the transplanted stem cells and the promotion of angiogenesis in this particular setting. In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate the successful formation of vascularized pulp-like tissue in 3D-printed scaffolds containing dental stem cells, emphasizing the promising role of this approach in dental tissue engineering.

  2. In Vivo Bone Regeneration Using Tubular Perfusion System Bioreactor Cultured Nanofibrous Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeatts, Andrew B.; Both, Sanne K.; Yang, Wanxun; Alghamdi, Hamdan S.; Yang, Fang; Jansen, John A.

    2014-01-01

    The use of bioreactors for the in vitro culture of constructs for bone tissue engineering has become prevalent as these systems may improve the growth and differentiation of a cultured cell population. Here we utilize a tubular perfusion system (TPS) bioreactor for the in vitro culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and implant the cultured constructs into rat femoral condyle defects. Using nanofibrous electrospun poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/poly(ɛ-caprolactone) scaffolds, hMSCs were cultured for 10 days in vitro in the TPS bioreactor with cellular and acellular scaffolds cultured statically for 10 days as a control. After 3 and 6 weeks of in vivo culture, explants were removed and subjected to histomorphometric analysis. Results indicated more rapid bone regeneration in defects implanted with bioreactor cultured scaffolds with a new bone area of 1.23±0.35 mm2 at 21 days compared to 0.99±0.43 mm2 and 0.50±0.29 mm2 in defects implanted with statically cultured scaffolds and acellular scaffolds, respectively. At the 21 day timepoint, statistical differences (pbioreactor to improve bone tissue regeneration and highlights the benefits of utilizing perfusion bioreactor systems to culture MSCs for bone tissue engineering. PMID:23865551

  3. Recapitulating endochondral ossification: a promising route to in vivo bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Emmet M; Matsiko, Amos; Farrell, Eric; Kelly, Daniel J; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2015-08-01

    Despite its natural healing potential, bone is unable to regenerate sufficient tissue within critical-sized defects, resulting in a non-union of bone ends. As a consequence, interventions are required to replace missing, damaged or diseased bone. Bone grafts have been widely employed for the repair of such critical-sized defects. However, the well-documented drawbacks associated with autografts, allografts and xenografts have motivated the development of alternative treatment options. Traditional tissue engineering strategies have typically attempted to direct in vitro bone-like matrix formation within scaffolds prior to implantation into bone defects, mimicking the embryological process of intramembranous ossification (IMO). Tissue-engineered constructs developed using this approach often fail once implanted, due to poor perfusion, leading to avascular necrosis and core degradation. As a result of such drawbacks, an alternative tissue engineering strategy, based on endochondral ossification (ECO), has begun to emerge, involving the use of in vitro tissue-engineered cartilage as a transient biomimetic template to facilitate bone formation within large defects. This is driven by the hypothesis that hypertrophic chondrocytes can secrete angiogenic and osteogenic factors, which play pivotal roles in both the vascularization of constructs in vivo and the deposition of a mineralized extracellular matrix, with resulting bone deposition. In this context, this review focuses on current strategies taken to recapitulate ECO, using a range of distinct cells, biomaterials and biochemical stimuli, in order to facilitate in vivo bone formation. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. In vivo assay to identify bacteria with β-glucosidase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Strahsburger

    2017-11-01

    Conclusion: This in vivo β-glucosidase assay can be used as an enzymatic test on living cells without cell disruption. The method is simple, quantitative, and recommended, especially in studies screening for bacteria not only with β-glucosidase activity but also with high β-glucosidase activity.

  5. Stem cell-like differentiation potentials of endometrial side population cells as revealed by a newly developed in vivo endometrial stem cell assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Miyazaki

    Full Text Available Endometrial stem/progenitor cells contribute to the cyclical regeneration of human endometrium throughout a woman's reproductive life. Although the candidate cell populations have been extensively studied, no consensus exists regarding which endometrial population represents the stem/progenitor cell fraction in terms of in vivo stem cell activity. We have previously reported that human endometrial side population cells (ESP, but not endometrial main population cells (EMP, exhibit stem cell-like properties, including in vivo reconstitution of endometrium-like tissues when xenotransplanted into immunodeficient mice. The reconstitution efficiency, however, was low presumably because ESP cells alone could not provide a sufficient microenvironment (niche to support their stem cell activity. The objective of this study was to establish a novel in vivo endometrial stem cell assay employing cell tracking and tissue reconstitution systems and to examine the stem cell properties of ESP through use of this assay.ESP and EMP cells isolated from whole endometrial cells were infected with lentivirus to express tandem Tomato (TdTom, a red fluorescent protein. They were mixed with unlabeled whole endometrial cells and then transplanted under the kidney capsule of ovariectomized immunodeficient mice. These mice were treated with estradiol and progesterone for eight weeks and nephrectomized. All of the grafts reconstituted endometrium-like tissues under the kidney capsules. Immunofluorescence revealed that TdTom-positive cells were significantly more abundant in the glandular, stromal, and endothelial cells of the reconstituted endometrium in mice transplanted with TdTom-labeled ESP cells than those with TdTom-labeled EMP cells.We have established a novel in vivo endometrial stem cell assay in which multi-potential differentiation can be identified through cell tracking during in vivo endometrial tissue reconstitution. Using this assay, we demonstrated that ESP

  6. Stem Cell-Like Differentiation Potentials of Endometrial Side Population Cells as Revealed by a Newly Developed In Vivo Endometrial Stem Cell Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Kaoru; Maruyama, Tetsuo; Masuda, Hirotaka; Yamasaki, Akiko; Uchida, Sayaka; Oda, Hideyuki; Uchida, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Yasunori

    2012-01-01

    Background Endometrial stem/progenitor cells contribute to the cyclical regeneration of human endometrium throughout a woman's reproductive life. Although the candidate cell populations have been extensively studied, no consensus exists regarding which endometrial population represents the stem/progenitor cell fraction in terms of in vivo stem cell activity. We have previously reported that human endometrial side population cells (ESP), but not endometrial main population cells (EMP), exhibit stem cell-like properties, including in vivo reconstitution of endometrium-like tissues when xenotransplanted into immunodeficient mice. The reconstitution efficiency, however, was low presumably because ESP cells alone could not provide a sufficient microenvironment (niche) to support their stem cell activity. The objective of this study was to establish a novel in vivo endometrial stem cell assay employing cell tracking and tissue reconstitution systems and to examine the stem cell properties of ESP through use of this assay. Methodology/Principal Findings ESP and EMP cells isolated from whole endometrial cells were infected with lentivirus to express tandem Tomato (TdTom), a red fluorescent protein. They were mixed with unlabeled whole endometrial cells and then transplanted under the kidney capsule of ovariectomized immunodeficient mice. These mice were treated with estradiol and progesterone for eight weeks and nephrectomized. All of the grafts reconstituted endometrium-like tissues under the kidney capsules. Immunofluorescence revealed that TdTom-positive cells were significantly more abundant in the glandular, stromal, and endothelial cells of the reconstituted endometrium in mice transplanted with TdTom-labeled ESP cells than those with TdTom-labeled EMP cells. Conclusions/Significance We have established a novel in vivo endometrial stem cell assay in which multi-potential differentiation can be identified through cell tracking during in vivo endometrial tissue

  7. ANTIOXIDATIVE PROPERTIES OF WHITE SAFFRON EXTRACT (Curcuma mangga Val. IN THE IN VIVO ASSAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwiyati Pujimulyani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A study on the antioxidative properties of white saffron extract (in vivo has been conducted. The purpose of this study was to determine the antioxidative effects of white saffron extract in in vivo assay. Fresh white saffrons were peeled, washed, blanched at 100˚C in 0.5% citric acid solution for 5 minutes and grated. The ratio between grated white saffron and distilled water was 1:1; 1:2; 1:3 and 1:4. Then it was filtered in order to obtain white saffron extract. The extract was evaluated in terms of its antioxidant activity by using in vivo. Five-week old male Wistar rats were purchased from Experimental Animal Development Unit, Gadjah Mada University. After one week of adaptation, the rats were divided into six groups, feed and drinking water were provided ad libitum. White saffron extract was orally administrated using a syringe at 09.00 a.m and 14.00 p.m daily, for 14 days. The livers and serum were removed for analysis of thiobarbituric acid reactive subtances (TBARS, α-tocopherols and superoxide dismutase (SOD. The results of this study showed that white saffron extract has an antioxidative activity in the in vivo assay. The higher concentration of white saffron extract, the higher α-tocopherols and superoxide dismutase, but the TBARS value was lower. Keywords: Curcuma mangga Val., rat, antioxidant activity, in vivo

  8. Utility of PDL progenitors for in vivo tissue regeneration: a report of 3 cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, F; Akiyama, K; Liu, Y; Yamaza, T; Wang, T-M; Chen, J-H; Wang, BB; Huang, G T-J; Wang, S; Shi, S

    2010-01-01

    Objective Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disorder with widespread morbidities involving both oral and systemic health. The primary goal of periodontal treatment is the regeneration of the lost or diseased periodontium. In this study, we retrospectively examined feasibility and safety of reconstructing the periodontal intrabony defects with autologous periodontal ligament progenitor (PDLP) implantation in three patients. Materials and Methods In this retrospective pilot study, we treated 16 teeth with at least one deep intrabony defect of probing depth (PD) ≥ 6 mm with PDLP transplantation and evaluated clinical outcome measures in terms of probing depth, gingival recession and attachment gain for a duration of 32–72 months. Furthermore, we compare PDLPs with standard PDL stem cells (PDLSCs) and confirmed that PDLPs possessed progenitor characters. Results Clinical examination indicated that transplantation of PDLPs may provide therapeutic benefit for the periodontal defects. All treated patients showed no adverse effects during the entire course of follow up. We also found that PDLPs were analogous to PDLSCs in terms of high proliferation, expression of mesenchymal surface molecules, multipotent differentiation, and in vivo tissue regain. However, PDLPs failed to express scleraxis, a marker of tendon, as seen in PDLSCs. Conclusions This study demonstrated clinical and experimental evidences supporting a potential efficacy and safety of utilizing autologous PDL cells in the treatment of human periodontitis. PMID:20355278

  9. In Vivo Articular Cartilage Regeneration Using Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Cultured in an Alginate Scaffold: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Mata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is an inflammatory disease in which all joint-related elements, articular cartilage in particular, are affected. The poor regeneration capacity of this tissue together with the lack of pharmacological treatment has led to the development of regenerative medicine methodologies including microfracture and autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI. The effectiveness of ACI has been shown in vitro and in vivo, but the use of other cell types, including bone marrow and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells, is necessary because of the poor proliferation rate of isolated articular chondrocytes. In this investigation, we assessed the chondrogenic ability of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs to regenerate cartilage in vitro and in vivo. hDPSCs and primary isolated rabbit chondrocytes were cultured in chondrogenic culture medium and found to express collagen II and aggrecan. Both cell types were cultured in 3% alginate hydrogels and implanted in a rabbit model of cartilage damage. Three months after surgery, significant cartilage regeneration was observed, particularly in the animals implanted with hDPSCs. Although the results presented here are preliminary, they suggest that hDPSCs may be useful for regeneration of articular cartilage.

  10. The ability of human periodontium-derived stem cells to regenerate periodontal tissues: a preliminary in vivo investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Wolf-Dieter; Dannan, Aous; Becher, Sebastian; Gassmann, Georg; Arnold, Wolfgang; Varga, Gabor; Dittmar, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Periodontium-derived stem cells (pdSCs) can be cultured as dentospheres and differentiated into various cells of the neuronal lineage such as glial cells, thereby demonstrating their stem cell state. This study investigated whether pdSCs could be differentiated into the osteogenic lineage and, if so, whether these cells are able to regenerate periodontal tissue in vivo in an athymic rat model. Human adult pdSCs were isolated during minimally invasive periodontal surgery and expanded in vitro. To induce osteogenic differentiation, expanded pdSCs were cultured for 3 weeks in osteogenic differentiation media. Staining for alkaline phosphatase expression was positive, suggesting osteogenic differentiation. For in vivo studies, pdSCs were delivered onto suitable collagen sponges and implanted into periodontal defects on the right buccal cortex of the mandible in 16 immunodeficient nude rats. Histologic analysis of samples from the test side revealed reformation of periodontal ligament-like tissue, collagen fibers, and elements of bone, but no functional periodontal tissue regeneration. The data show that human adult pdSCs are capable of regenerating elements of bone and collagen fibers in an in vivo animal model.

  11. Thyroid endocrine system disruption by pentachlorophenol: an in vitro and in vivo assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yongyong; Zhou, Bingsheng

    2013-10-15

    The present study aimed to evaluate the disruption caused to the thyroid endocrine system by pentachlorophenol (PCP) using in vitro and in vivo assays. In the in vitro assay, rat pituitary GH3 cells were exposed to 0, 0.1, 0.3, and 1.0 μM PCP. PCP exposure significantly downregulated basal and triiodothyronine (T3)-induced Dio 1 transcription, indicating the antagonistic activity of PCP in vitro. In the in vivo assay, zebrafish embryos were exposed to 0, 1, 3, and 10 μg/L of PCP until 14 days post-fertilization. PCP exposure resulted in decreased thyroxine (T4) levels, but elevated contents of whole-body T3. PCP exposure significantly upregulated the mRNA expression of genes along hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis, including those encoding thyroid-stimulating hormone, sodium/iodide symporter, thyroglobulin, Dio 1 and Dio 2, alpha and beta thyroid hormone receptor, and uridinediphosphate-glucuronosyl-transferase. PCP exposure did not influence the transcription of the transthyretin (TTR) gene. The results indicate that PCP potentially disrupts the thyroid endocrine system both in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A Mos1 transposase in vivo assay to screen new HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancian, Mariana; Loreto, Elgion L S

    2018-01-19

    The integrase and transposase enzymes of retrovirus and transposons, respectively, share the catalytic DDE domain. In vitro assays showed that inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase generally inhibit the mariner Mos1 transposase. Using a Drosophila strain in which the mobilisation of the mariner element can be quantified by mosaic eyes, we showed that flies maintained in medium containing 210 µM to 4 mM of raltegravir, or 1 or 2 mM of dolutegravir, which are HIV-1 integrase inhibitor used in AIDS treatment, have 23-33% less somatic mobilisation in mosaic eyes when treated with raltegravir and 28-32% when treated with dolutegravir. The gene expression of the mariner transposase gene, estimated by qPCR, is similar among treated and control flies. The results suggest that in vivo assays using Drosophila can be used as a primary screening of inhibitory drugs for transposase and retroviral integrase. The advantages of this assay are that it is easy, quick, cheap and is an in vivo test, meaning that the tested substance has to have been taken in by cells and has arrived at the target site, which is not the case when in vitro assays are applied.

  13. Dietary Flaxseed Mitigates Impaired Skeletal Muscle Regeneration: in Vivo, in Vitro and in Silico Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenuto, Felicia; Costa, Alessandra; Albertini, Maria Cristina; Rocchi, Marco Bruno Luigi; Rudov, Alexander; Coletti, Dario; Minieri, Marilena; Di Nardo, Paolo; Teodori, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diets enriched with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) have been shown to exert a positive impact on muscle diseases. Flaxseed is one of the richest sources of n-3 PUFA acid α-linolenic acid (ALA). The aim of this study was to assess the effects of flaxseed and ALA in models of skeletal muscle degeneration characterized by high levels of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF). Methods: The in vivo studies were carried out on dystrophic hamsters affected by muscle damage associated with high TNF plasma levels and fed with a long-term 30% flaxseed-supplemented diet. Differentiating C2C12 myoblasts treated with TNF and challenged with ALA represented the in vitro model. Skeletal muscle morphology was scrutinized by applying the Principal Component Analysis statistical method. Apoptosis, inflammation and myogenesis were analyzed by immunofluorescence. Finally, an in silico analysis was carried out to predict the possible pathways underlying the effects of n-3 PUFAs. Results: The flaxseed-enriched diet protected the dystrophic muscle from apoptosis and preserved muscle myogenesis by increasing the myogenin and alpha myosin heavy chain. Moreover, it restored the normal expression pattern of caveolin-3 thereby allowing protein retention at the sarcolemma. ALA reduced TNF-induced apoptosis in differentiating myoblasts and prevented the TNF-induced inhibition of myogenesis, as demonstrated by the increased expression of myogenin, myosin heavy chain and caveolin-3, while promoting myotube fusion. The in silico investigation revealed that FAK pathways may play a central role in the protective effects of ALA on myogenesis. Conclusions: These findings indicate that flaxseed may exert potent beneficial effects by preserving skeletal muscle regeneration and homeostasis partly through an ALA-mediated action. Thus, dietary flaxseed and ALA may serve as a useful strategy for treating patients with muscle dystrophies. PMID:26941581

  14. In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of a nHA/PA66 Composite Membrane for Guided Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jidong; Man, Yi; Zuo, Yi; Zhang, Li; Huang, Cui; Liu, Man; Li, Yubao

    2011-01-01

    A nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 (nHA/PA66) composite with good bioactivity and osteoconductivity is employed to develop a novel porous membrane with an asymmetric structure. In order to investigate the biocompatibility and the effect on guided bone regeneration (GBR) of nHA/PA66 porous membrane, the proliferation, viability, morphology and alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) of the osteoblast-like cell line (MG63) cultured on the membrane were studied in vitro. In vivo biocompatibility and osteogenesis of the fabricated membrane were assessed by comparing guiding rats calvarial bone defects regeneration with "gold standard" GBR material, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) membrane. In vitro experiments showed that the nHA/PA66 composite membrane had good cell affinity and cytocompatibility, in favor of cell proliferation. The in vivo study showed that the nHA/PA66 asymmetric porous membrane had a good GBR effect. All the results indicate that the asymmetric porous nHA/PA66 composite GBR membrane with good biocompatibility, high bioactivity and osteoconductivity exhibits good GBR effect and has a potential to be applied in GBR fields, especially in dental tissue regeneration.

  15. Bone regeneration based on nano-hydroxyapatite and hydroxyapatite/chitosan nanocomposites: an in vitro and in vivo comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakol, S.; Nikpour, M. R.; Amani, A.; Soltani, M.; Rabiee, S. M.; Rezayat, S. M.; Chen, P.; Jahanshahi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Surface morphology, surface wettability, and size distribution of biomaterials affect their in vitro and in vivo bone regeneration potential. Since nano-hydroxyapatite has a great chemical and structural similarity to natural bone and dental tissues, incorporated biomaterial of such products could improve bioactivity and bone bonding ability. In this research, nano-hydroxyapatite (23 ± 0.09 nm) and its composites with variety of chitosan content [2, 4, and 6 g (45 ± 0.19, 32 ± 0.12, and 28 ± 0.12 nm, respectively)] were prepared via an in situ hybridization route. Size distribution of the particles, protein adsorption, and calcium deposition of powders by the osteoblast cells, gene expression and percentage of new bone formation area were investigated. The highest degree of bone regeneration potential was observed in nano-hydroxyapatite powder, while the bone regeneration was lowest in nano-hydroxyapatite with 6 g of chitosan. Regarding these data, suitable size distribution next to size distribution of hydroxyapatite in bone, smaller size, higher wettability, lower surface roughness of the nano-hydroxyapatite particles and homogeneity in surface resulted in higher protein adsorption, cell differentiation and percentage of bone formation area. Results obtained from in vivo and in vitro tests confirmed the role of surface morphology, surface wettability, mean size and size distribution of biomaterial besides surface chemistry as a temporary bone substitute.

  16. Bone regeneration based on nano-hydroxyapatite and hydroxyapatite/chitosan nanocomposites: an in vitro and in vivo comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavakol, S. [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Nanotechnology, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikpour, M. R. [Babol University of Technology, Nanotechnology Research Institute, Nanobiotechnology Research Group (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amani, A. [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Nanotechnology, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soltani, M. [University of Waterloo, Department of Chemical Engineering, Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology (Canada); Rabiee, S. M. [Babol University of Technology, Nanotechnology Research Institute, Nanobiotechnology Research Group (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezayat, S. M. [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Nanotechnology, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chen, P., E-mail: p4chen@uwaterloo.ca [University of Waterloo, Department of Chemical Engineering, Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology (Canada); Jahanshahi, M., E-mail: mjahan@nit.ac.ir [Babol University of Technology, Nanotechnology Research Institute, Nanobiotechnology Research Group (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Surface morphology, surface wettability, and size distribution of biomaterials affect their in vitro and in vivo bone regeneration potential. Since nano-hydroxyapatite has a great chemical and structural similarity to natural bone and dental tissues, incorporated biomaterial of such products could improve bioactivity and bone bonding ability. In this research, nano-hydroxyapatite (23 {+-} 0.09 nm) and its composites with variety of chitosan content [2, 4, and 6 g (45 {+-} 0.19, 32 {+-} 0.12, and 28 {+-} 0.12 nm, respectively)] were prepared via an in situ hybridization route. Size distribution of the particles, protein adsorption, and calcium deposition of powders by the osteoblast cells, gene expression and percentage of new bone formation area were investigated. The highest degree of bone regeneration potential was observed in nano-hydroxyapatite powder, while the bone regeneration was lowest in nano-hydroxyapatite with 6 g of chitosan. Regarding these data, suitable size distribution next to size distribution of hydroxyapatite in bone, smaller size, higher wettability, lower surface roughness of the nano-hydroxyapatite particles and homogeneity in surface resulted in higher protein adsorption, cell differentiation and percentage of bone formation area. Results obtained from in vivo and in vitro tests confirmed the role of surface morphology, surface wettability, mean size and size distribution of biomaterial besides surface chemistry as a temporary bone substitute.

  17. White Blood Cell-Based Detection of Asymptomatic Scrapie Infection by Ex Vivo Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliez, Sophie; Jaumain, Emilie; Huor, Alvina; Douet, Jean-Yves; Lugan, Séverine; Cassard, Hervé; Lacroux, Caroline; Béringue, Vincent; Andréoletti, Olivier; Vilette, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Prion transmission can occur by blood transfusion in human variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and in experimental animal models, including sheep. Screening of blood and its derivatives for the presence of prions became therefore a major public health issue. As infectious titer in blood is reportedly low, highly sensitive and robust methods are required to detect prions in blood and blood derived products. The objectives of this study were to compare different methods - in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo assays - to detect prion infectivity in cells prepared from blood samples obtained from scrapie infected sheep at different time points of the disease. Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) and bioassays in transgenic mice expressing the ovine prion protein were the most efficient methods to identify infected animals at any time of the disease (asymptomatic to terminally-ill stages). However scrapie cell and cerebellar organotypic slice culture assays designed to replicate ovine prions in culture also allowed detection of prion infectivity in blood cells from asymptomatic sheep. These findings confirm that white blood cells are appropriate targets for preclinical detection and introduce ex vivo tools to detect blood infectivity during the asymptomatic stage of the disease. PMID:25122456

  18. Recent advances in in vivo genotoxicity testing: prediction of carcinogenic potential using comet and micronucleus assay in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seung Hun; Kwon, Jee Young; Lee, Jong Kwon; Seo, Young Rok

    2013-12-01

    Genotoxic events have been known as crucial step in the initiation of cancer. To assess the risk of cancer, genotoxicity assays, including comet, micronucleus (MN), chromosomal aberration, bacterial reverse, and sister chromatid exchange assay, can be performed. Compared with in vitro genotoxicity assay, in vivo genotoxicity assay has been used to verify in vitro assay result and definitely provide biological significance for certain organs or cell types. The comet assay can detect DNA strand breaks as markers of genotoxicity. Methods of the in vivo comet assay have been established by Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM) validation studies depending on tissue and sample types. The MN can be initiated by segregation error and lagging acentric chromosome fragment. Methods of the in vivo MN assay have been established by Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guidelines and many studies. Combining the in vivo comet and MN assay has been regarded as useful methodology for evaluating genetic damage, and it has been used in the assessment of potential carcinogenicity by complementarily presenting two distinct endpoints of the in vivo genotoxicity individual test. Few studies have investigated the quantitative relation between in vivo genotoxicity results and carcinogenicity. Extensive studies emphasizes that positive correlation is detectable. This review summarizes the results of the in vivo comet and MN assays that have investigated the genotoxicity of carcinogens as classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) carcinogenicity database. As a result, these genotoxicity data may provide meaningful information for the assessment of potential carcinogenicity and for implementation in the prevention of cancer.

  19. In vivo biocompatibility of boron nitride nanotubes: effects on stem cell biology and tissue regeneration in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvetti, Alessandra; Rossi, Leonardo; Iacopetti, Paola; Li, Xia; Nitti, Simone; Pellegrino, Teresa; Mattoli, Virgilio; Golberg, Dmitri; Ciofani, Gianni

    2015-07-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) represent an extremely interesting class of nanomaterials, and recent findings have suggested a number of applications in the biomedical field. Anyhow, extensive biocompatibility investigations are mandatory before any further advancement toward preclinical testing. Here, we report on the effects of multiwalled BNNTs in freshwater planarians, one of the best-characterized in vivo models for developmental biology and regeneration research. Obtained results indicate that BNNTs are biocompatible in the investigated model, since they do not induce oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis, and do not show adverse effects on planarian stem cell biology and on de novo tissue regeneration. In summary, collected findings represent another important step toward BNNT realistic applications in nanomedicine.

  20. Characterization of a migrative subpopulation of adult human nasoseptal chondrocytes with progenitor cell features and their potential for in vivo cartilage regeneration strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaesser, A F; Schwarz, S; Joos, H; Koerber, L; Brenner, R E; Rotter, N

    2016-01-01

    Progenitor cells display interesting features for tissue repair and reconstruction. In the last years, such cells have been identified in different cartilage types. In this study, we isolated a migrative subpopulation of adult human nasoseptal chondrocytes with progenitor cell features by outgrowth from human nasal septum cartilage. These putative progenitor cells were comparatively characterized with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and human nasal septum chondrocytes with respect to their cellular characteristics as well as surface marker profile using flow cytometric analyses. Differentiation capacity was evaluated on protein and gene expression levels. The migrative subpopulation differentiated into osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages with distinct differences to chondrocytes and MSC. Cells of the migrative subpopulation showed an intermediate surface marker profile positioned between MSC and chondrocytes. Significant differences were found for CD9, CD29, CD44, CD90, CD105 and CD106. The cells possessed a high migratory ability in a Boyden chamber assay and responded to chemotactic stimulation. To evaluate their potential use in tissue engineering applications, a decellularized septal cartilage matrix was either seeded with cells from the migrative subpopulation or chondrocytes. Matrix production was demonstrated immunohistochemically and verified on gene expression level. Along with secretion of matrix metalloproteinases, cells of the migrative subpopulation migrated faster into the collagen matrix than chondrocytes, while synthesis of cartilage specific matrix was comparable. Cells of the migrative subpopulation, due to their migratory characteristics, are a potential cell source for in vivo regeneration of nasal cartilage. The in vivo mobilization of nasal cartilage progenitor cells is envisioned to be the basis for in situ tissue engineering procedures, aiming at the use of unseeded biomaterials which are able to recruit local progenitor cells for cartilage

  1. Planarians as a model to assess in vivo the role of matrix metalloproteinase genes during homeostasis and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isolani, Maria Emilia; Abril, Josep F; Saló, Emili; Deri, Paolo; Bianucci, Anna Maria; Batistoni, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are major executors of extracellular matrix remodeling and, consequently, play key roles in the response of cells to their microenvironment. The experimentally accessible stem cell population and the robust regenerative capabilities of planarians offer an ideal model to study how modulation of the proteolytic system in the extracellular environment affects cell behavior in vivo. Genome-wide identification of Schmidtea mediterranea MMPs reveals that planarians possess four mmp-like genes. Two of them (mmp1 and mmp2) are strongly expressed in a subset of secretory cells and encode putative matrilysins. The other genes (mt-mmpA and mt-mmpB) are widely expressed in postmitotic cells and appear structurally related to membrane-type MMPs. These genes are conserved in the planarian Dugesia japonica. Here we explore the role of the planarian mmp genes by RNA interference (RNAi) during tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Our analyses identify essential functions for two of them. Following inhibition of mmp1 planarians display dramatic disruption of tissues architecture and significant decrease in cell death. These results suggest that mmp1 controls tissue turnover, modulating survival of postmitotic cells. Unexpectedly, the ability to regenerate is unaffected by mmp1(RNAi). Silencing of mt-mmpA alters tissue integrity and delays blastema growth, without affecting proliferation of stem cells. Our data support the possibility that the activity of this protease modulates cell migration and regulates anoikis, with a consequent pivotal role in tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Our data provide evidence of the involvement of specific MMPs in tissue homeostasis and regeneration and demonstrate that the behavior of planarian stem cells is critically dependent on the microenvironment surrounding these cells. Studying MMPs function in the planarian model provides evidence on how individual proteases work in vivo in adult tissues. These results

  2. Planarians as a model to assess in vivo the role of matrix metalloproteinase genes during homeostasis and regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Emilia Isolani

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are major executors of extracellular matrix remodeling and, consequently, play key roles in the response of cells to their microenvironment. The experimentally accessible stem cell population and the robust regenerative capabilities of planarians offer an ideal model to study how modulation of the proteolytic system in the extracellular environment affects cell behavior in vivo. Genome-wide identification of Schmidtea mediterranea MMPs reveals that planarians possess four mmp-like genes. Two of them (mmp1 and mmp2 are strongly expressed in a subset of secretory cells and encode putative matrilysins. The other genes (mt-mmpA and mt-mmpB are widely expressed in postmitotic cells and appear structurally related to membrane-type MMPs. These genes are conserved in the planarian Dugesia japonica. Here we explore the role of the planarian mmp genes by RNA interference (RNAi during tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Our analyses identify essential functions for two of them. Following inhibition of mmp1 planarians display dramatic disruption of tissues architecture and significant decrease in cell death. These results suggest that mmp1 controls tissue turnover, modulating survival of postmitotic cells. Unexpectedly, the ability to regenerate is unaffected by mmp1(RNAi. Silencing of mt-mmpA alters tissue integrity and delays blastema growth, without affecting proliferation of stem cells. Our data support the possibility that the activity of this protease modulates cell migration and regulates anoikis, with a consequent pivotal role in tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Our data provide evidence of the involvement of specific MMPs in tissue homeostasis and regeneration and demonstrate that the behavior of planarian stem cells is critically dependent on the microenvironment surrounding these cells. Studying MMPs function in the planarian model provides evidence on how individual proteases work in vivo in adult tissues

  3. Nanostructured polyurethane-poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid scaffolds increase bladder tissue regeneration: an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Chang; Hedrick, Matt; Pareek, Gyan; Renzulli, Joseph; Haleblian, George; Webster, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Although showing much promise for numerous tissue engineering applications, polyurethane and poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) have suffered from a lack of cytocompatibility, sometimes leading to poor tissue integration. Nanotechnology (or the use of materials with surface features or constituent dimensions less than 100 nm in at least one direction) has started to transform currently implanted materials (such as polyurethane and PLGA) to promote tissue regeneration. This is because nanostructured surface features can be used to change medical device surface energy to alter initial protein adsorption events important for promoting tissue-forming cell functions. Thus, due to their altered surface energetics, the objective of the present in vivo study was to create nanoscale surface features on a new polyurethane and PLGA composite scaffold (by soaking the polyurethane side and PLGA side in HNO₃ and NaOH, respectively) and determine bladder tissue regeneration using a minipig model. The novel nanostructured scaffolds were further functionalized with IKVAV and YIGSR peptides to improve cellular responses. Results provided the first evidence of increased in vivo bladder tissue regeneration when using a composite of nanostructured polyurethane and PLGA compared with control ileal segments. Due to additional surgery, extended potentially problematic healing times, metabolic complications, donor site morbidity, and sometimes limited availability, ileal segment repair of a bladder defect is not optimal and, thus, a synthetic analog is highly desirable. In summary, this study indicates significant promise for the use of nanostructured polyurethane and PLGA composites to increase bladder tissue repair for a wide range of regenerative medicine applications, such as regenerating bladder tissue after removal of cancerous tissue, disease, or other trauma.

  4. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay for the study of human bone regeneration: a refinement animal model for tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Jiménez, Inés; Hulsart-Billstrom, Gry; Lanham, Stuart A.; Janeczek, Agnieszka A.; Kontouli, Nasia; Kanczler, Janos M.; Evans, Nicholas D.; Oreffo, Richard Oc

    2016-08-01

    Biomaterial development for tissue engineering applications is rapidly increasing but necessitates efficacy and safety testing prior to clinical application. Current in vitro and in vivo models hold a number of limitations, including expense, lack of correlation between animal models and human outcomes and the need to perform invasive procedures on animals; hence requiring new predictive screening methods. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) can be used as a bioreactor to culture and study the regeneration of human living bone. We extracted bone cylinders from human femoral heads, simulated an injury using a drill-hole defect, and implanted the bone on CAM or in vitro control-culture. Micro-computed tomography (μCT) was used to quantify the magnitude and location of bone volume changes followed by histological analyses to assess bone repair. CAM blood vessels were observed to infiltrate the human bone cylinder and maintain human cell viability. Histological evaluation revealed extensive extracellular matrix deposition in proximity to endochondral condensations (Sox9+) on the CAM-implanted bone cylinders, correlating with a significant increase in bone volume by μCT analysis (p animal research and a step towards a humanized in vivo model for tissue engineering.

  5. Validation and Optimization of an Ex Vivo Assay of Intestinal Mucosal Biopsies in Crohn's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadstrup, Kasper; Galsgaard, Elisabeth Douglas; Gerwien, Jens

    2016-01-01

    are non-responders. This study demonstrates this version of an ex vivo culture as a valid and robust assay to assess inflammation in mucosal biopsies and test of the efficacy of novel drug candidates and current treatments on individual patients-potentially for a personalized medicine approach....... human explant method to test drug candidates and pathophysiological conditions in CD intestinal biopsies. Mucosal biopsies from 27 CD patients and 6 healthy individuals were collected to validate an explant assay test where the polarized tissue was cultured on a novel metal mesh disk, slightly immersed......Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic illness demanding better therapeutics. The marketed biologics only benefit some patients or elicit diminishing effect over time. To complement the known methods in drug development and to obtain patient specific drug responses, we optimized and validated a known...

  6. In vivo comet assay of acrylonitrile, 9-aminoacridine hydrochloride monohydrate and ethanol in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yuzuki; Toyoizumi, Tomoyasu; Sui, Hajime; Ohta, Ryo; Kumagai, Fumiaki; Usumi, Kenji; Saito, Yoshiaki; Yamakage, Kohji

    2015-07-01

    As part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM)-initiative international validation study of the in vivo rat alkaline comet assay, we examined the ability of acrylonitrile, 9-aminoacridine hydrochloride monohydrate (9-AA), and ethanol to induce DNA damage in the liver and glandular stomach of male rats. Acrylonitrile is a genotoxic carcinogen, 9-AA is a genotoxic non-carcinogen, and ethanol is a non-genotoxic carcinogen. Positive results were obtained in the liver cells of male rats treated with known genotoxic compounds, acrylonitrile and 9-AA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Blocking LINGO-1 in vivo reduces degeneration and enhances regeneration of the optic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresle, Melissa M; Liu, Yaou; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Kemper, Dennis; Wu, Qi-Zhu; Hu, Bing; Fu, Qing-Ling; So, Kwok-Fai; Sheng, Guoqing; Huang, Guanrong; Pepinsky, Blake; Butzkueven, Helmut; Mi, Sha

    2016-01-01

    Two ongoing phase II clinical trials (RENEW and SYNERGY) have been developed to test the efficacy of anti-LINGO-1 antibodies in acute optic neuritis and relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis, respectively. Across a range of experimental models, LINGO-1 has been found to inhibit neuron and oligodendrocyte survival, axon regeneration, and (re)myelination. The therapeutic effects of anti-LINGO-1 antibodies on optic nerve axonal loss and regeneration have not yet been investigated. In this series of studies we investigate if LINGO-1 antibodies can prevent acute inflammatory axonal loss, and promote axonal regeneration after injury in rodent optic nerves. The effects of anti-LINGO-1 antibody on optic nerve axonal damage were assessed using rodent myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), and its effects on axonal regeneration were assessed in optic nerve crush injury models. In the optic nerve, anti-LINGO-1 antibody therapy was associated with improved optic nerve parallel diffusivity measures on MRI in mice with EAE and reduced axonal loss in rat EAE. Both anti-LINGO-1 antibody therapy and the genetic deletion of LINGO-1 reduced nerve crush-induced axonal degeneration and enhanced axonal regeneration. These data demonstrate that LINGO-1 blockade is associated with axonal protection and regeneration in the injured optic nerve.

  8. Reference control data obtained from an in vivo comet-micronucleus combination assay using Sprague Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasamoto, Sawako; Masumori, Shoji; Tanaka, Jin; Ueda, Maya; Fukumuro, Masahito; Nagai, Miho; Yamate, Jyoji; Hayashi, Makoto

    2017-04-04

    According to the International Conference on Harmonization Guidance on Genotoxicity Testing and Data Interpretation for Pharmaceuticals Intended for Human Use (ICH S2(R1)), a positive response in any in vitro assay necessitates additional in vivo test(s) (other tissue/endpoint) in addition to the erythrocyte micronucleus test when Option 1 of the test battery is selected. When Option 2 of the test battery is selected, a bacterial gene mutation test and two in vivo tests with different tissues/endpoint are required. The in vivo alkaline comet assay is recommended as the second in vivo test because it can detect a broad spectrum of DNA damage in any tissue and can be combined with the erythrocyte micronucleus test. Considering animal welfare, a combination assay is preferable to an individual assay. Thus, we validated the protocol for the in vivo comet-micronucleus combination assay in rats with three daily administrations and determined the dose of the positive control (ethyl methanesulfonate; EMS, 200mg/kg/day). We also collected the negative control (vehicle) and positive control (EMS) data from the comet (liver, stomach, and kidney) and micronucleus (bone marrow) combination assay using male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. The negative control data were comparable to our historical control data obtained from stand-alone assays. The positive control data showed clear and consistent positive responses in both endpoints. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. On-chip cellomics: Single-cell-based constructive cell-network assay for quasi-in vivo screening of cardiotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    We have developed methods and systems of analyzing epigenetic information in cells, as well as that of genetic information, to expand our understanding of how living systems are determined. A system of analyzing epigenetic information was developed starting from the twin complementary viewpoints of cell regulation as an 'algebraic' system (emphasis on temporal aspects) and as a 'geometric' system (emphasis on spatial aspects). As an example of the 'geometric' system, we have developed an quasi-in vivo hiPS cardiomyocyte network assay and confirmed that it can predict the risk of lethal arrythmia correctly in 22 compounds. The knowlege acquired from this study may lead to the use of cells that fully control practical applications like cell-based drug screening and the regeneration of organs.

  10. The type I error rate for in vivo Comet assay data when the hierarchical structure is disregarded

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Merete Kjær; Kulahci, Murat

    The Comet assay is a sensitive technique for detection of DNA strand breaks. The experimental design of in vivo Comet assay studies are often hierarchically structured, which should be reWected in the statistical analysis. However, the hierarchical structure sometimes seems to be disregarded...... the exposition of the statistical methodology and to suitably account for the hierarchical structure of Comet assay data whenever present....

  11. A composite critical-size rabbit mandibular defect for evaluation of craniofacial tissue regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, S.R.; Young, S.; Goldman, J.L.; Jansen, J.A.; Wong, M.E.; Mikos, A.G.

    2016-01-01

    Translational biomaterials targeted toward the regeneration of large bone defects in the mandible require a preclinical model that accurately recapitulates the regenerative challenges present in humans. Computational modeling and in vitro assays do not fully replicate the in vivo environment.

  12. Adipose-derived stem cells incorporated into platelet-rich plasma improved bone regeneration and maturation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Ariadne Cristiane Cabral; Caon, Thiago; Menin, Álvaro; Granato, Rodrigo; Boabaid, Fernanda; Simões, Cláudia Maria Oliveira

    2015-02-01

    Some cases of tooth loss related to dental trauma require bone-grafting procedures to improve the aesthetics before prosthetic rehabilitation or to enable the installation of dental implants. Bone regeneration is often a challenge and could be largely improved by mesenchymal stem cells therapy. However, the appropriate scaffold for these cells still a problem. This study evaluated the in vivo effect of human adipose-derived stem cells incorporated into autogenous platelet-rich plasma in bone regeneration and maturation. Adipose-derived stem cells were isolated from lipoaspirate tissues and used at passage 4. Immunophenotyping and multilineage differentiation of cells were performed and mesenchymal stem cells characteristics confirmed. Bicortical bone defects (10 mm diameter) were created in the tibia of six beagle dogs to evaluate the effect of adipose-derived stem cells incorporated into platelet-rich plasma scaffolds, platelet-rich plasma alone, autogenous bone grafts, and clot. Samples were removed 6 weeks postsurgeries and analyzed by quantification of primary and secondary bone formation and granulation tissue. Adipose-derived stem cells incorporated into platelet-rich plasma scaffolds promoted the highest bone formation (primary + secondary bone) (P platelet-rich plasma scaffolds promote more bone formation and maturation, and less granulation tissue in bone defects created in canine tibia. Therefore, platelet-rich plasma can be considered as a candidate scaffold for adipose-derived stem cells to promote bone regeneration. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. In vivo periodontal tissue regeneration by periodontal ligament stem cells and endothelial cells in three-dimensional cell sheet constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panduwawala, C P; Zhan, X; Dissanayaka, W L; Samaranayake, L P; Jin, L; Zhang, C

    2017-06-01

    Chronic periodontitis causes damage to tooth-supporting tissues, resulting in tooth loss in adults. Recently, cell-sheet-based approaches have been studied to overcome the limitations of conventional cytotherapeutic procedures for periodontal regeneration. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the regenerative potential of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in three-dimensional (3D) cell sheet constructs for periodontal regeneration in vivo. PDLSCs, HUVECs or co-cultures of both cells were seeded onto temperature-responsive culture dishes, and intact cell sheets were fabricated. Cell sheets were wrapped around the prepared human roots in three different combinations and implanted subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. Histological evaluation revealed that after 2, 4 and 8 wk of implantation, periodontal ligament-like tissue arrangements were observed around the implanted roots in experimental groups compared with controls. Vascular lumens were also observed in periodontal compartments of HUVEC-containing groups. Periodontal ligament regeneration, cementogenesis and osteogenesis were evident in the experimental groups at both weeks 4 and 8, as shown by immunostaining for periostin and bone sialoprotein. Human cells in the transplanted cell sheets were stained by immunohistochemistry for the presence of human mitochondria. The 3D cell sheet-based approach may be potentially beneficial and is thus encouraged for future regenerative periodontal therapy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Field evaluation for anthelmintic-resistant ovine gastrointestinal nematodes by in vitro and in vivo assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez-Baños, P; Pedreira, J; Sánchez-Andrade, R; Francisco, I; Suárez, J L; Díaz, P; Panadero, R; Arias, M; Painceira, A; Paz-Silva, A; Morrondo, P

    2008-08-01

    A coprological survey to analyze the presence of flock resistance to benzimidazoles (BZ) and macrocyclic lactones (ML) was performed in sheep under field conditions. Fecal samples were collected from 2,625 sheep in 72 commercial farms from Galicia (NW Spain). The in vitro (FECRT, fecal egg count reduction test) and in vivo (EHA, egg hatch assay, and LFIA, larval feeding inhibition assay) tests were used to assess the efficacy of these anthelmintics. Coprocultures were also developed to obtain knowledge on the main genera of trichostrongylid nematoda prior to, and after, the administration of the anthelmintics. By using the FECRT, BZ resistance was observed in 13 (18%) flocks, whereas ML resistance was only detected in 2 (3%) farms. The number of resistant flocks to BZ was 21 (29%) by using the EHA and 7 (10%) by means of the LFIA. None of the flocks used in this study showed simultaneous resistance to both employed anthelmintics. The results from the in vitro and in vivo tests revealed that 92% of the flocks FECRT resistant to BZ were also resistant with the EHA. The LFIA confirmed all the farms resistant to ML by using the in vivo test. After the administration of BZ, nematode larvae belonging to Teladorsagia circumcincta (32.2%), Trichostrongylus spp. (29%), Nematodirus spp. (6.5%), and Chabertia ovis (3.2%) were identified. In the flocks receiving ML, only T. circumcincta was identified (57%). We recommend the use of in vitro tests because they are more efficient. As the use of macrocyclic lactones is increasing in this region, further investigation is needed for detecting resistance to the anthelmintic family compounds by the LFIA.

  15. Genotoxicity of nano/microparticles in in vitro micronuclei, in vivo comet and mutation assay systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukumori Nobutaka

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, manufactured nano/microparticles such as fullerenes (C60, carbon black (CB and ceramic fiber are being widely used because of their desirable properties in industrial, medical and cosmetic fields. However, there are few data on these particles in mammalian mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. To examine genotoxic effects by C60, CB and kaolin, an in vitro micronuclei (MN test was conducted with human lung cancer cell line, A549 cells. In addition, DNA damage and mutations were analyzed by in vivo assay systems using male C57BL/6J or gpt delta transgenic mice which were intratracheally instilled with single or multiple doses of 0.2 mg per animal of particles. Results In in vitro genotoxic analysis, increased MN frequencies were observed in A549 cells treated with C60, CB and kaolin in a dose-dependent manner. These three nano/microparticles also induced DNA damage in the lungs of C57BL/6J mice measured by comet assay. Moreover, single or multiple instillations of C60 and kaolin, increased either or both of gpt and Spi- mutant frequencies in the lungs of gpt delta transgenic mice. Mutation spectra analysis showed transversions were predominant, and more than 60% of the base substitutions occurred at G:C base pairs in the gpt genes. The G:C to C:G transversion was commonly increased by these particle instillations. Conclusion Manufactured nano/microparticles, CB, C60 and kaolin, were shown to be genotoxic in in vitro and in vivo assay systems.

  16. Enhancing pancreatic Beta-cell regeneration in vivo with pioglitazone and alogliptin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Yin

    Full Text Available Pancreatic beta-cells retain limited ability to regenerate and proliferate after various physiologic triggers. Identifying therapies that are able to enhance beta-cell regeneration may therefore be useful for the treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes.In this study we investigated endogenous and transplanted beta-cell regeneration by serially quantifying changes in bioluminescence from beta-cells from transgenic mice expressing firefly luciferase under the control of the mouse insulin I promoter. We tested the ability of pioglitazone and alogliptin, two drugs developed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, to enhance beta-cell regeneration, and also defined the effect of the immunosuppression with rapamycin and tacrolimus on transplanted islet beta mass.Pioglitazone is a stimulator of nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma while alogliptin is a selective dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor. Pioglitazone alone, or in combination with alogliptin, enhanced endogenous beta-cell regeneration in streptozotocin-treated mice, while alogliptin alone had modest effects. In a model of syngeneic islet transplantation, immunosuppression with rapamycin and tacrolimus induced an early loss of beta-cell mass, while treatment with insulin implants to maintain normoglycemia and pioglitazone plus alogliptin was able to partially promote beta-cell mass recovery.These data highlight the utility of bioluminescence for serially quantifying functional beta-cell mass in living mice. They also demonstrate the ability of pioglitazone, used either alone or in combination with alogliptin, to enhance regeneration of endogenous islet beta-cells as well as transplanted islets into recipients treated with rapamycin and tacrolimus.

  17. Enhancing Pancreatic Beta-Cell Regeneration In Vivo with Pioglitazone and Alogliptin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Jun; Misawa, Ryosuke; Grossman, Eric J.; Tao, Jing; Zhong, Rong; Witkowski, Piotr; Bell, Graeme I.; Chong, Anita S.

    2013-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis Pancreatic beta-cells retain limited ability to regenerate and proliferate after various physiologic triggers. Identifying therapies that are able to enhance beta-cell regeneration may therefore be useful for the treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Methods In this study we investigated endogenous and transplanted beta-cell regeneration by serially quantifying changes in bioluminescence from beta-cells from transgenic mice expressing firefly luciferase under the control of the mouse insulin I promoter. We tested the ability of pioglitazone and alogliptin, two drugs developed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, to enhance beta-cell regeneration, and also defined the effect of the immunosuppression with rapamycin and tacrolimus on transplanted islet beta mass. Results Pioglitazone is a stimulator of nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma while alogliptin is a selective dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor. Pioglitazone alone, or in combination with alogliptin, enhanced endogenous beta-cell regeneration in streptozotocin-treated mice, while alogliptin alone had modest effects. In a model of syngeneic islet transplantation, immunosuppression with rapamycin and tacrolimus induced an early loss of beta-cell mass, while treatment with insulin implants to maintain normoglycemia and pioglitazone plus alogliptin was able to partially promote beta-cell mass recovery. Conclusions/Interpretation These data highlight the utility of bioluminescence for serially quantifying functional beta-cell mass in living mice. They also demonstrate the ability of pioglitazone, used either alone or in combination with alogliptin, to enhance regeneration of endogenous islet beta-cells as well as transplanted islets into recipients treated with rapamycin and tacrolimus. PMID:23762423

  18. Salidroside promotes peripheral nerve regeneration based on tissue engineering strategy using Schwann cells and PLGA: in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Lv, Peizhen; Zhu, Yongjia; Wu, Huayu; Zhang, Kun; Xu, Fuben; Zheng, Li; Zhao, Jinmin

    2017-01-01

    Salidriside (SDS), a phenylpropanoid glycoside derived from Rhodiola rosea L, has been shown to be neuroprotective in many studies, which may be promising in nerve recovery. In this study, the neuroprotective effects of SDS on engineered nerve constructed by Schwann cells (SCs) and Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) were studied in vitro. We further investigated the effect of combinational therapy of SDS and PLGA/SCs based tissue engineering on peripheral nerve regeneration based on the rat model of nerve injury by sciatic transection. The results showed that SDS dramatically enhanced the proliferation and function of SCs. The underlying mechanism may be that SDS affects SCs growth through the modulation of neurotrophic factors (BDNF, GDNF and CNTF). 12 weeks after implantation with a 12 mm gap of sciatic nerve injury, SDS-PLGA/SCs achieved satisfying outcomes of nerve regeneration, as evidenced by morphological and functional improvements upon therapy by SDS, PLGA/SCs or direct suture group assessed by sciatic function index, nerve conduction assay, HE staining and immunohistochemical analysis. Our results demonstrated the significant role of introducing SDS into neural tissue engineering to promote nerve regeneration.

  19. Three dimensional printing of calcium sulfate and mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds for improving bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xin; Pei, Peng; Zhu, Min; Du, Xiaoyu; Xin, Chen; Zhao, Shichang; Li, Xiaolin; Zhu, Yufang

    2017-02-01

    In the clinic, bone defects resulting from infections, trauma, surgical resection and genetic malformations remain a significant challenge. In the field of bone tissue engineering, three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds are promising for the treatment of bone defects. In this study, calcium sulfate hydrate (CSH)/mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG) scaffolds were successfully fabricated using a 3D printing technique, which had a regular and uniform square macroporous structure, high porosity and excellent apatite mineralization ability. Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) were cultured on scaffolds to evaluate hBMSC attachment, proliferation and osteogenesis-related gene expression. Critical-sized rat calvarial defects were applied to investigate the effect of CSH/MBG scaffolds on bone regeneration in vivo. The in vitro results showed that CSH/MBG scaffolds stimulated the adhesion, proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteogenesis-related gene expression of hBMSCs. In vivo results showed that CSH/MBG scaffolds could significantly enhance new bone formation in calvarial defects compared to CSH scaffolds. Thus 3D printed CSH/MBG scaffolds would be promising candidates for promoting bone regeneration.

  20. Long-term in vivo regeneration of peripheral nerves through bioengineered nerve grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Summa, P G; Kalbermatten, D F; Pralong, E; Raffoul, W; Kingham, P J; Terenghi, G

    2011-05-05

    Although autologous nerve graft is still the first choice strategy in nerve reconstruction, it has the severe disadvantage of the sacrifice of a functional nerve. Cell transplantation in a bioartificial conduit is an alternative strategy to improve nerve regeneration. Nerve fibrin conduits were seeded with various cell types: primary Schwann cells (SC), SC-like differentiated bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (dMSC), SC-like differentiated adipose-derived stem cells (dASC). Two further control groups were fibrin conduits without cells and autografts. Conduits were used to bridge a 1 cm rat sciatic nerve gap in a long term experiment (16 weeks). Functional and morphological properties of regenerated nerves were investigated. A reduction in muscle atrophy was observed in the autograft and in all cell-seeded groups, when compared with the empty fibrin conduits. SC showed significant improvement in axon myelination and average fiber diameter of the regenerated nerves. dASC were the most effective cell population in terms of improvement of axonal and fiber diameter, evoked potentials at the level of the gastrocnemius muscle and regeneration of motoneurons, similar to the autografts. Given these results and other advantages of adipose derived stem cells such as ease of harvest and relative abundance, dASC could be a clinically translatable route towards new methods to enhance peripheral nerve repair. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Clones of ectopic stem cells in the regeneration of muscle defects in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rujing Yang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about whether clones of ectopic, non-muscle stem cells contribute to muscle regeneration. Stem/progenitor cells that are isolated for experimental research or therapeutics are typically heterogeneous. Non-myogenic lineages in a heterogeneous population conceptually may compromise tissue repair. In this study, we discovered that clones of mononucleated stem cells of human tooth pulp fused into multinucleated myotubes that robustly expressed myosin heavy chain in vitro with or without co-culture with mouse skeletal myoblasts (C2C12 cells. Cloned cells were sustainably Oct4+, Nanog+ and Stro1+. The fusion indices of myogenic clones were approximately 16-17 folds greater than their parent, heterogeneous stem cells. Upon infusion into cardio-toxin induced tibialis anterior muscle defects, undifferentiated clonal progenies not only engrafted and colonized host muscle, but also expressed human dystrophin and myosin heavy chain more efficaciously than their parent heterogeneous stem cell populations. Strikingly, clonal progenies yielded ∼9 times more human myosin heavy chain mRNA in regenerating muscles than those infused with their parent, heterogeneous stem cells. The number of human dystrophin positive cells in regenerating muscles infused with clonal progenies was more than ∼3 times greater than muscles infused with heterogeneous stem cells from which clonal progenies were derived. These findings suggest the therapeutic potential of ectopic myogenic clones in muscle regeneration.

  2. In Vitro and in Vivo Studies of Novel Poly(D,L-lactic acid), Superhydrophilic Carbon Nanotubes, and Nanohydroxyapatite Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Idalia A W B; Corat, Marcus Alexandre F; Cavalcanti, Bruno das Neves; Ribeiro Neto, Wilson Alves; Martin, Airton Abrahao; Bretas, Rosario Elida Suman; Marciano, Fernanda Roberta; Lobo, Anderson Oliveira

    2015-05-13

    Poly(D,L-lactide acid, PDLLA) has been researched for scaffolds in bone regeneration. However, its hydrophobocity and smooth surface impedes its interaction with biological fluid and cell adhesion. To alter the surface characteristics, different surface modification techniques have been developed to facilitate biological application. The present study compared two different routes to produce PDLLA/superhydrophilic vertically aligned carbon nanotubes:nanohydroxyapatite (PDLLA/VACNT-O:nHAp) scaffolds. For this, we used electrodeposition and immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). Characterization by goniometry, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and infrared spectroscopy confirmed the polymer modifications, the in vitro bioactivity, and biomineralization. Differential scanning calorimetry and thermal gravimetric analyses showed that the inclusion of VACNT-O:nHA probably acts as a nucleating agent increasing the crystallization rate in the neat PDLLA without structural alteration. Our results showed the formation of a dense nHAp layer on all scaffolds after 14 days of immersion in SBF solution; the most intense carbonated nHAp peaks observed in the PDLLA/VACNT-O:nHAp samples suggest higher calcium precipitation compared to the PDLLA control. Both cell viability and alkaline phosphatase assays showed favorable results, because no cytotoxic effects were present and all produced scaffolds were able to induce detectable mineralization. Bone defects were used to evaluate the bone regeneration; the confocal Raman and histological results confirmed high potential for bone applications. In vivo study showed that the PDLLA/VACNT-O:nHAp scaffolds mimicked the immature bone and induced bone remodeling. These findings indicate surface improvement and the applicability of this new nanobiomaterial for bone regenerative medicine.

  3. Bacteroides fragilis induce necrosis on mice peritoneal macrophages: In vitro and in vivo assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, J.M.B.D., E-mail: jmanya@terra.com.br [Laboratorio de Tecnologia em Cultura de Celulas, UEZO, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Laboratorio de Biologia de Anaerobios, IMPPG, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Seabra, S.H. [Laboratorio de Tecnologia em Cultura de Celulas, UEZO, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Vallim, D.C. [Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Americo, M.A.; Fracallanza, S.E.L. [Laboratorio de Bacteriologia Medica, IMPPG, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Vommaro, R.C. [Laboratorio de Ultra-estrutura Celular Hertha Meyer, IBCCF, UFRJ (Brazil); Domingues, R.M.C.P. [Laboratorio de Biologia de Anaerobios, IMPPG, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2009-10-02

    Bacteroides fragilis is an anaerobic bacteria component of human intestinal microbiota and agent of infections. In the host B. fragilis interacts with macrophages, which produces toxic radicals like NO. The interaction of activated mice peritoneal macrophages with four strains of B. fragilis was evaluated on this study. Previously was shown that such strains could cause metabolic and morphologic alterations related to macrophage death. In this work propidium iodide staining showed the strains inducing macrophage necrosis in that the labeling was evident. Besides nitroblue tetrazolium test showed that B. fragilis stimulates macrophage to produce oxygen radicals. In vivo assays performed in BalbC mice have results similar to those for in vitro tests as well as scanning electron microscopy, which showed the same surface pore-like structures observed in vitro before. The results revealed that B. fragilis strains studied lead to macrophage death by a process similar to necrosis.

  4. Recapitulating endochondral ossification: a promising route to in vivo bone regeneration.

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Emmet M; Matsiko, Amos; Farrell, Eric; Kelly, Daniel J; O'Brien, Fergal

    2015-01-01

    Despite its natural healing potential, bone is unable to regenerate sufficient tissue within critical-sized defects, resulting in a non-union of bone ends. As a consequence, interventions are required to replace missing, damaged or diseased bone. Bone grafts have been widely employed for the repair of such critical-sized defects. However, the well-documented drawbacks associated with autografts, allografts and xenografts have motivated the development of alternative treatment options. Traditi...

  5. Dual delivery of PDGF and simvastatin to accelerate periodontal regeneration in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Po-Chun; Dovban, Alex S; Lim, Lum Peng; Chong, Li Yen; Kuo, Mark Y; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2013-12-01

    The emphasis on periodontal regeneration has been shifted towards the harmonization of bioactive molecules and physiological phases during regeneration. This study investigated whether the combination and sequential-release of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, mitogen) and simvastatin (differentiation factor) facilitated periodontal regeneration. PDGF and simvastatin were encapsulated in double-walled poly-( d,l-lactide) and poly-(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PDLLA-PLGA) microspheres using the co-axial electrohydrodynamic atomization technique. Critical-sized periodontal defects on rat maxillae were filled with microspheres encapsulating BSA-in-core-shell (BB), PDGF-in-shell (XP), simvastatin-in-core and BSA-in-shell (SB), simvastatin-in-core and PDGF-in-shell, or unfilled with microspheres (XX), and examined at 14 and 28 days post-operatively. The resultant microspheres were around 15 μm diameter with distinct core-shell structure, and the fast-release of PDGF followed by slow-release of simvastatin was noted in the SP group. The SP group demonstrated significantly greater bone volume fraction and decreased trabecular separation compared to the XX group at day 14, and milder inflammatory cells infiltration and elevated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase level were noted at day 28. Fibers were also well-aligned and obliquely inserted onto the root surface similar to native periodontal ligament with signs of cementogenesis in the SP group. In conclusion, the combination and sequential-release of PDGF-simvastatin accelerates the regeneration of the periodontal apparatus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Critical issues with the in vivo comet assay: A report of the comet assay working group in the 6th International Workshop on Genotoxicity Testing (IWGT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speit, Günter; Kojima, Hajime; Burlinson, Brian; Collins, Andrew R; Kasper, Peter; Plappert-Helbig, Ulla; Uno, Yoshifumi; Vasquez, Marie; Beevers, Carol; De Boeck, Marlies; Escobar, Patricia A; Kitamoto, Sachiko; Pant, Kamala; Pfuhler, Stefan; Tanaka, Jin; Levy, Dan D

    2015-05-01

    As a part of the 6th IWGT, an expert working group on the comet assay evaluated critical topics related to the use of the in vivo comet assay in regulatory genotoxicity testing. The areas covered were: identification of the domain of applicability and regulatory acceptance, identification of critical parameters of the protocol and attempts to standardize the assay, experience with combination and integration with other in vivo studies, demonstration of laboratory proficiency, sensitivity and power of the protocol used, use of different tissues, freezing of samples, and choice of appropriate measures of cytotoxicity. The standard protocol detects various types of DNA lesions but it does not detect all types of DNA damage. Modifications of the standard protocol may be used to detect additional types of specific DNA damage (e.g., cross-links, bulky adducts, oxidized bases). In addition, the working group identified critical parameters that should be carefully controlled and described in detail in every published study protocol. In vivo comet assay results are more reliable if they were obtained in laboratories that have demonstrated proficiency. This includes demonstration of adequate response to vehicle controls and an adequate response to a positive control for each tissue being examined. There was a general agreement that freezing of samples is an option but more data are needed in order to establish generally accepted protocols. With regard to tissue toxicity, the working group concluded that cytotoxicity could be a confounder of comet results. It is recommended to look at multiple parameters such as histopathological observations, organ-specific clinical chemistry as well as indicators of tissue inflammation to decide whether compound-specific toxicity might influence the result. The expert working group concluded that the alkaline in vivo comet assay is a mature test for the evaluation of genotoxicity and can be recommended to regulatory agencies for use

  7. In vivo genotoxicity study of titanium dioxide nanoparticles using comet assay following intratracheal instillation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naya, Masato; Kobayashi, Norihiro; Ema, Makoto; Kasamoto, Sawako; Fukumuro, Masahito; Takami, Shigeaki; Nakajima, Madoka; Hayashi, Makoto; Nakanishi, Junko

    2012-02-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO₂) is widely used as a white pigment in paints, plastics, inks, paper, creams, cosmetics, drugs and foods. In the present study, the genotoxicity of anatase TiO₂ nanoparticles was evaluated in vivo using the comet assay after a single or repeated intratracheal instillation in rats. The nanoparticles were instilled intratracheally at a dosage of 1.0 or 5.0 mg/kg body weight (single instillation group) and 0.2 or 1.0 mg/kg body weight once a week for 5 weeks (repeated instillation group) into male Sprague-Dawley rats. A positive control, ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) at 500 mg/kg, was administered orally 3 h prior to dissection. Histopathologically, macrophages and neutrophils were detected in the alveolus of the lung in the 1.0 and 5.0 mg/kg TiO₂ groups. In the comet assay, there was no increase in % tail DNA in any of the TiO₂ groups. In the EMS group, there was a significant increase in % tail DNA compared with the negative control group. TiO₂ nanoparticles in the anatase crystal phase are not genotoxic following intratracheal instillation in rats. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. In vivo Comet assay--statistical analysis and power calculations of mice testicular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Merete Kjær; Sharma, Anoop Kumar; Dybdahl, Marianne; Boberg, Julie; Kulahci, Murat

    2014-11-01

    The in vivo Comet assay is a sensitive method for evaluating DNA damage. A recurrent concern is how to analyze the data appropriately and efficiently. A popular approach is to summarize the raw data into a summary statistic prior to the statistical analysis. However, consensus on which summary statistic to use has yet to be reached. Another important consideration concerns the assessment of proper sample sizes in the design of Comet assay studies. This study aims to identify a statistic suitably summarizing the % tail DNA of mice testicular samples in Comet assay studies. A second aim is to provide curves for this statistic outlining the number of animals and gels to use. The current study was based on 11 compounds administered via oral gavage in three doses to male mice: CAS no. 110-26-9, CAS no. 512-56-1, CAS no. 111873-33-7, CAS no. 79-94-7, CAS no. 115-96-8, CAS no. 598-55-0, CAS no. 636-97-5, CAS no. 85-28-9, CAS no. 13674-87-8, CAS no. 43100-38-5 and CAS no. 60965-26-6. Testicular cells were examined using the alkaline version of the Comet assay and the DNA damage was quantified as % tail DNA using a fully automatic scoring system. From the raw data 23 summary statistics were examined. A linear mixed-effects model was fitted to the summarized data and the estimated variance components were used to generate power curves as a function of sample size. The statistic that most appropriately summarized the within-sample distributions was the median of the log-transformed data, as it most consistently conformed to the assumptions of the statistical model. Power curves for 1.5-, 2-, and 2.5-fold changes of the highest dose group compared to the control group when 50 and 100 cells were scored per gel are provided to aid in the design of future Comet assay studies on testicular cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Alterations in the in vitro and in vivo regulation of muscle regeneration in healthy ageing and the influence of sarcopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzeszczyńska, Joanna; Meyer, Angelika; McGregor, Robin; Schilb, Alain; Degen, Simone; Tadini, Valentina; Johns, Neil; Langen, Ramon; Schols, Annemie; Glass, David J.; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Ross, James A.; Fearon, Kenneth C.H.; Greig, Carolyn A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Sarcopenia is defined as the age‐related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function. While all humans lose muscle with age, 2–5% of elderly adults develop functional consequences (disabilities). The aim of this study was to investigate muscle myogenesis in healthy elderly adults, with or without sarcopenia, compared with middle‐aged controls using both in vivo and in vitro approaches to explore potential biomarker or causative molecular pathways associated with sarcopenic versus non‐sarcopenic skeletal muscle phenotypes during ageing. Methods Biomarkers of multiple molecular pathways associated with muscle regeneration were analysed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction in quadriceps muscle samples obtained from healthy elderly sarcopenic (HSE, n = 7) or non‐sarcopenic (HENS, n = 21) and healthy middle‐aged control (HMC, n = 22) groups. An in vitro system of myogenesis (using myoblasts from human donors aged 17–83 years) was used to mimic the environmental challenges of muscle regeneration over time. Results The muscle biopsies showed evidence of satellite cell activation in HENS (Pax3, P HSE biopsy samples showed satellite cell activation (Pax7, P HSE group. In contrast, there was 10‐fold higher upregulation of HSPA1A a stress‐induced chaperone acting upon misfolded proteins in HSE compared with the HENS group. Conclusions Both pathological and adaptive processes are active in skeletal muscle during healthy ageing. Muscle regeneration pathways are activated during healthy ageing, but there is evidence of dysregulation in sarcopenia. In addition, increased cellular stress, with an impaired oxidative‐stress and mis‐folded protein response (HSPA1A), may be associated with the development of sarcopenia. The in vitro system of young and old myoblasts replicated some of the differences between young and old muscle. PMID:29214748

  10. Nanogel-based scaffolds fabricated for bone regeneration with mesoporous bioactive glass and strontium: In vitro and in vivo characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiao; Chen, Xiaohui; Geng, Shinan; Wei, Lingfei; Miron, Richard J; Zhao, Yanbing; Zhang, Yufeng

    2017-04-01

    The delivery of novel bioactive scaffolds for the repair of bone defects remains a prominent challenge worldwide. Currently osteoporosis, a disease caused by low bone mineral density affects over 200 million people worldwide with up to half of this population experiencing at least one fracture within their lifetime. Recently temperature-sensitive p(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-butyl methylacrylate) nanogel (PIB nanogel) scaffolds have emerged as biomaterial candidate for regenerative therapies. It has the advantage of being injected from syringes as a soluble gel form (capable of delivering growth and/or living progenitor cells) yet hardens once it reaches body temperatures. Although this material demonstrates optimal clinical delivery of scaffolds, its main drawback is its low osteoconductivity and bioactivity. Recently we have demonstrated that mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG) loaded with strontium was able to regenerate osteoporotic defects in vivo and enhance osteoblast differentiation in vitro. The aim of this study was to combine the advantages of these two therapies and prepare PIB-nanogel scaffolds containing Sr-MBG and investigate their ability to regenerate femur defects created in ovarectamized rats. The results demonstrate that groups containing Sr-MBG within the nanogel formulation had significantly higher new bone formation when compared with other modalities. We further demonstrate that although nanogel demonstrated poor osteogenic ability, the addition of osteoblasts worked synergistically with Sr-MBG particles to enhance the regeneration of the created femur defects in osteoporotic animals. In conclusion, PIB nanogel scaffolds are a viable treatment modality for bone tissue engineering and may serve as a carrier-scaffold for osteogenic cells and/or bioactive scaffolds such as Sr-MBG. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1175-1183, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. In vivo evaluation of rabbit sciatic nerve regeneration with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI): correlations with histology and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Tetsuro; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Oda, Ryo; Mikami, Yasuo; Ikeda, Takumi; Nagae, Masateru; Shirai, Toshiharu; Morisaki, Shinsuke; Ikoma, Kazuya; Masugi-Tokita, Miwako; Yamada, Kei; Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is widely used in the study of the central nervous system. DTI represents a potential diagnostic tool for the peripheral nerve. However, more detailed information is needed for application of DTI in the clinical setting. In this study, peripheral degeneration and regeneration were evaluated using DTI-based analyses in a rabbit model. The changes in DTI parameters were compared to histological and functional changes after nerve injury. We used a high magnetic field (7.04T) MRI system. Japanese white male rabbits were used as the model of sciatic nerve crush injury. MR images were obtained before injury and at 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks post-injury. The DTI parameters of fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (λ||), and radial diffusivity (λ⊥) were calculated. Our results showed decreased FA and increased λ⊥ during the degenerative phase after sciatic nerve injury. In contrast, increased FA and decreased λ⊥ were observed during the regenerative phase. FA changes were correlated with axon number and with motor function recovery, assessed with the toe-spreading index. This study clearly demonstrates the validity of applying DTI parameters to the in vivo evaluation of peripheral nerve regeneration. Furthermore, results suggest that DTI can be a potent tool for predicting the extent of functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Optically-Induced Neuronal Activity Is Sufficient to Promote Functional Motor Axon Regeneration In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia J Ward

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injuries are common, and functional recovery is very poor. Beyond surgical repair of the nerve, there are currently no treatment options for these patients. In experimental models of nerve injury, interventions (such as exercise and electrical stimulation that increase neuronal activity of the injured neurons effectively enhance axon regeneration. Here, we utilized optogenetics to determine whether increased activity alone is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration. In thy-1-ChR2/YFP transgenic mice in which a subset of motoneurons express the light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin (ChR2, we activated axons in the sciatic nerve using blue light immediately prior to transection and surgical repair of the sciatic nerve. At four weeks post-injury, direct muscle EMG responses evoked with both optical and electrical stimuli as well as the ratio of these optical/electrical evoked EMG responses were significantly greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, significantly more ChR2+ axons successfully re-innervated the gastrocnemius muscle in mice that received optical treatment. Sections of the gastrocnemius muscles were reacted with antibodies to Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2 (SV2 to quantify the number of re-occupied motor endplates. The number of SV2+ endplates was greater in mice that received optical treatment. The number of retrogradely-labeled motoneurons following intramuscular injection of cholera toxin subunit B (conjugated to Alexa Fluor 555 was greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, the acute (1 hour, one-time optical treatment resulted in robust, long-lasting effects compared to untreated animals as well as untreated axons (ChR2-. We conclude that neuronal activation is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration, and this regenerative effect is specific to the activated neurons.

  13. Endochondral ossification for enhancing bone regeneration: converging native extracellular matrix biomaterials and developmental engineering in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, S Connor; Berkland, Cory J; Bonewald, Lynda F; Detamore, Michael S

    2015-06-01

    Autologous bone grafting (ABG) remains entrenched as the gold standard of treatment in bone regenerative surgery. Consequently, many marginally successful bone tissue engineering strategies have focused on mimicking portions of ABG's "ideal" osteoconductive, osteoinductive, and osteogenic composition resembling the late reparative stage extracellular matrix (ECM) in bone fracture repair, also known as the "hard" or "bony" callus. An alternative, less common approach that has emerged in the last decade harnesses endochondral (EC) ossification through developmental engineering principles, which acknowledges that the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in developmental skeletogenesis, specifically EC ossification, are closely paralleled during native bone healing. EC ossification naturally occurs during the majority of bone fractures and, thus, can potentially be utilized to enhance bone regeneration for nearly any orthopedic indication, especially in avascular critical-sized defects where hypoxic conditions favor initial chondrogenesis instead of direct intramembranous ossification. The body's native EC ossification response, however, is not capable of regenerating critical-sized defects without intervention. We propose that an underexplored potential exists to regenerate bone through the native EC ossification response by utilizing strategies which mimic the initial inflammatory or fibrocartilaginous ECM (i.e., "pro-" or "soft" callus) observed in the early reparative stage of bone fracture repair. To date, the majority of strategies utilizing this approach rely on clinically burdensome in vitro cell expansion protocols. This review will focus on the confluence of two evolving areas, (1) native ECM biomaterials and (2) developmental engineering, which will attempt to overcome the technical, business, and regulatory challenges that persist in the area of bone regeneration. Significant attention will be given to native "raw" materials and ECM-based designs that

  14. Critical role of p38 MAPK for regeneration of the sciatic nerve following crush injury in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kato Naoki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiological function of p38α, which is an isoform of p38 MAPK, has been investigated previously in several studies using pharmacological inhibitors. However, the results regarding whether p38α promotes or inhibits nerve regeneration in vivo have been controversial. Methods We generated novel p38α mutant mice (sem mice with a point mutation in the region encoding the p38α substrate-docking-site, which serves as a limited loss-of-function model of p38α. In the present study, we utilized sem mice and wild-type littermates (wt mice to investigate the physiological role of p38α in nerve regeneration following crush injuries. Results At four weeks after crush injury, the average axon diameter and the average axon area in sem mice were significantly smaller than those in wt mice. The average myelin sheath thickness in sem mice was reduced compared to wt mice, but no significant difference was observed in the G-ratio between the two groups. The sciatic functional index value demonstrated that functional nerve recovery in sem mice following crush injury was delayed, which is consistent with the histological findings. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of these findings, we examined inflammatory responses of the sciatic nerve by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. At an early phase following crush injury, sem mice showed remarkably lower expression of inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-1β, than wt mice. The expression of Caspase-3 and Tenascin-C were also lower in sem mice. Conversely, at a late phase of the response, sem mice showed considerably higher expression of TNF-α and of IL-1β with lower expression of S-100 than wt mice. Conclusions This is the first study of the physiological role of p38 MAPK in nerve regeneration that does not rely on the use of pharmacological inhibitors. Our results indicate that p38α insufficiency may cause an inflammatory disorder, resulting in a delay of

  15. Effect of Residual Bacteria on the Outcome of Pulp Regeneration In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, P; Nosrat, A; Kim, J R; Price, J B; Wang, P; Bair, E; Xu, H H; Fouad, A F

    2017-01-01

    It is not known to what extent residual infection may interfere with the success of pulp regeneration procedures. The aim of this study was to determine, radiographically and histologically, the effect of residual bacteria on the outcome of pulp regeneration mediated by a tissue-engineered construct as compared with traditional revascularization. Periapical lesions were induced in 24 canine teeth of 6 ferrets. After disinfection with 1.25% NaOCl and triple antibiotic paste, ferret dental pulp stem cells, encapsulated in a hydrogel scaffold, were injected into half the experimental teeth. The other half were treated with the traditional revascularization protocol with a blood clot scaffold. After 3 mo, block sections of the canine teeth were imaged radiographically and processed for histologic and histobacteriologic analyses. Associations between variables of interest were evaluated through mixed effects regression models. There were no significant differences between the 2 experimental groups in radiographic root development ( P > 0.05). There was a significant association between the presence of persistent periapical radiolucency and root wall thickness ( P = 0.02). There was also no significant difference in histologic findings between the 2 experimental groups ( P > 0.05). The presence of residual bacteria was significantly associated with lack of radiographic growth ( P bacteria was significantly less than in teeth with no residual bacteria ( P bacteria have a critical negative effect on the outcome of regenerative endodontic procedures.

  16. In vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation of xenoestrogens using an estrogen responsive in vitro transcriptional activation assay and the in vivo uterotrophic assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widespread contamination of waters with both natural and synthetic estrogens is a concern for potential adverse ecological and human health effects. In vitro assays are valuable screening tools for identifying contaminated environmental samples and chemical specific mechanisms o...

  17. In vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation of xenoestrogens using an estrogen responsive in vitro transcriptional activation assay and the in vivo uterotrophic assay##

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widespread contamination of waters with both natural and synthetic estrogens is a concern for potential adverse ecological and human health effects. In vitro assays are valuable screening tools for identifying contaminated environmental samples and chemical specific mechanisms of...

  18. In vivo visualisation of murine corneal nerve fibre regeneration in response to ciliary neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Maria; Hovakimyan, Marina; Guthoff, Rudolf F; Stachs, Oliver

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the murine subbasal nerve fibre plexus (SNP) regeneration altered by surgical dissection. Investigations in the mouse model addressed the regeneration capabilities of the SNP, and the influence of local ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) application on the regeneration process. In preliminary experiments, the healthy mouse cornea was monitored using in vivo confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) from the age of 8-52 weeks, to reveal and rule out the age-dependent changes in SNP. Nerve fibre density (NFD) was determined with the semi-automatic nerve tracing program NeuronJ. No quantitative or qualitative changes in NFD were detected in untreated animals over time; mean NFD in mice aged 8 weeks (28.30 ± 9.12 mm/mm2), 16 weeks (29.23 ± 7.28 mm/mm2), 30 weeks (26.31 ± 8.58 mm/mm2) and 52 weeks (26.34 ± 6.04 mm/mm2) showed no statistically significant differences between time points (p > 0.05). For regeneration studies a circular incision through corneal epithelium and anterior stroma of minimum 60 μm depth was generated with a custom-made guided trephine system to cut the subbasal corneal nerves in adult mice. The corneal nerve pattern was monitored and NFD was measured before and up to 8 weeks after surgery. Animals were divided in three groups each comprising 6 mice. The CNTF group received eye drops containing CNTF (25 ng/ml) 3 times daily for 3 weeks, whereas the control group received no further medication. In the sham group the same treatment schedule was applied as in CNTF group, using vehicle. The regenerating subbasal nerve fibres sprouted out of stromal nerves within the cut and additionally regrew over the scar rim from outside. They showed parallel orientation but were thinner than before incision. Whorl patterning was observed after 4 weeks. All three groups revealed a marked NFD reduction starting at one week after incision, followed by continuous recovery. After 8 weeks the NFD reached 23.5 ± 2.4 mm/mm2 (78

  19. Aptamers as the Agent in Decontamination Assays (Apta-Decontamination Assays: From the Environment to the Potential Application In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mawethu Pascoe Bilibana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The binding specificity and affinity of aptamers have long been harnessed as the key elements in the development of aptamer-based assays, particularly aptasensing application. One promising avenue that is currently explored based on the specificity and affinity of aptamers is the application of aptamers in the decontamination assays. Aptamers have been successfully harnessed as the decontamination agents to remove contaminants from the environment and to decontaminate infectious elements. The reversible denaturation property inherent in aptamers enables the repeated usage of aptamers, which can immensely save the cost of decontamination. Analogous to the point-of-care diagnostics, there is no doubt that aptamers can also be deployed in the point-of-care aptamer-based decontamination assay, whereby decontamination can be performed anywhere and anytime for instantaneous decision-making. It is also prophesied that aptamers can also serve more than as a decontaminant, probably as a tool to capture and kill hazardous elements, particularly pathogenic agents.

  20. 9 CFR 147.16 - Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). 147.16 Section 147.16 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT AUXILIARY...

  1. In Vivo Performance of Bilayer Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Regeneration in the Rabbit Radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    no treatments and the pres- ence of periosteal callus-like layer surrounding defects with scaffold implantation were observed after 8 weeks post...vivo evaluation of resorbable bone graft substitutes in a rabbit tibial defect model. Biomaterials. 2004; 25(20):5037–44. 20. Lu JX, Gallur A, Flautre

  2. Pilot in vivo animal study of bone regeneration by fractional Er: YAG-laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altshuler, Gregory B.; Belikov, Andrey V.; Shatilova, Ksenia V.; Yaremenko, Andrey I.; Zernitskiy, Alexander Y.; Zernitckaia, Ekaterina A.

    2016-04-01

    The histological structure of the rabbit parietal bone during its regeneration after fractional Er: YAG-laser (λ=2.94μm) treatment was investigated by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain. In 48 days after fractional laser treatment, bone samples contained micro-cavities and fragments of necrotic tissue with empty cellular lacuna and coagulated protein of bone matrix. In this case, necrotic lesions appeared around the periphery of micro-cavities created by laser radiation. Fragmentation of detrital mass and partial substitution of micro-cavities with fatty bone marrow were observed in bone samples in 100 days after fractional laser treatment, in contrast to the earlier period. Partial filling of micro-cavities edges by fibrous tissue with presence of osteoblasts on their inner surface was observed in 100 days also, that indicates regenerative processes in the bone.

  3. A split luciferase complementation assay for studying in vivo protein-protein interactions in filamentous ascomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Kyoung; Cho, Eun Ji; Jo, Seong mi; Sung, Bo Reum; Lee, Seunghoon; Yun, Sung-Hwan

    2012-06-01

    Protein-protein interactions play important roles in controlling many cellular events. To date, several techniques have been developed for detection of protein-protein interactions in living cells, among which split luciferase complementation has been applied in animal and plant cells. Here, we examined whether the split luciferase assay could be used in filamentous ascomycetes, such as Gibberella zeae and Cochliobolus heterostrophus. The coding sequences of two strongly interacting proteins (the F-box protein, FBP1, and its partner SKP1) in G. zeae, under the control of the cryparin promoter from Cryphonectria parasitica, were translationally fused to the C- and N-terminal fragments of firefly luciferase (luc), respectively. Each fusion product inserted into a fungal transforming vector carrying the gene for resistance to either geneticin or hygromycin B, was transformed into both fungi. We detected complementation of split luciferase proteins driven by interaction of the two fungal proteins with a high luminescence intensity-to-background ratio only in the fungal transformants expressing both N-luc and C-luc fusion constructs. Using this system, we also confirmed a novel protein interaction between transcription factors, GzMCM1 and FST12 in G. zeae, which could hardly be proven by the yeast two-hybrid method. This is the first study demonstrating that monitoring of split luciferase complementation is a sensitive and efficient method of studying in vivo protein-protein interactions in filamentous ascomycetes.

  4. Novel screening assay for in vivo selection of Klebsiella pneumoniae genes promoting gastrointestinal colonisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important opportunistic pathogen causing pneumonia, sepsis and urinary tract infections. Colonisation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a key step in the development of infections; yet the specific factors important for K. pneumoniae to colonize and reside in the GI tract of the host are largely unknown. To identify K. pneumoniae genes promoting GI colonisation, a novel genomic-library-based approach was employed. Results Screening of a K. pneumoniae C3091 genomic library, expressed in E. coli strain EPI100, in a mouse model of GI colonisation led to the positive selection of five clones containing genes promoting persistent colonisation of the mouse GI tract. These included genes encoding the global response regulator ArcA; GalET of the galactose operon; and a cluster of two putative membrane-associated proteins of unknown function. Both ArcA and GalET are known to be involved in metabolic pathways in Klebsiella but may have additional biological actions beneficial to the pathogen. In support of this, GalET was found to confer decreased bile salt sensitivity to EPI100. Conclusions The present work establishes the use of genomic-library-based in vivo screening assays as a valuable tool for identification and characterization of virulence factors in K. pneumoniae and other bacterial pathogens. PMID:22967317

  5. A flow cytometric assay to quantify invasion of red blood cells by rodent Plasmodium parasites in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelliott, Patrick M; Lampkin, Shelley; McMorran, Brendan J; Foote, Simon J; Burgio, Gaetan

    2014-03-17

    Malaria treatments are becoming less effective due to the rapid spread of drug resistant parasites. Increased understanding of the host/parasite interaction is crucial in order to develop treatments that will be less prone to resistance. Parasite invasion of the red blood cell (RBC) is a critical aspect of the parasite life cycle and is, therefore, a promising target for the development of malaria treatments. Assays for analysing parasite invasion in vitro have been developed, but no equivalent assays exist for in vivo studies. This article describes a novel flow cytometric in vivo parasite invasion assay. Experiments were conducted with mice infected with erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium chabaudi adami strain DS. Exogenously labelled blood cells were transfused into infected mice at schizogony, and collected blood samples stained and analysed using flow cytometry to specifically detect and measure proportions of labelled RBC containing newly invaded parasites. A combination of antibodies (CD45 and CD71) and fluorescent dyes, Hoechst (DNA) and JC-1 (mitochondrial membrane potential), were used to differentiate parasitized RBCs from uninfected cells, RBCs containing Howell-Jolly bodies, leukocytes and RBC progenitors. Blood cells were treated ex vivo with proteases to examine the effects on in vivo parasite invasion. The staining and flow cytometry analysis method was accurate in determining the parasitaemia down to 0.013% with the limit of detection at 0.007%. Transfused labelled blood supported normal rates of parasite invasion. Protease-treated red cells resulted in 35% decrease in the rate of parasite invasion within 30 minutes of introduction into the bloodstream of infected mice. The invasion assay presented here is a versatile method for the study of in vivo red cell invasion efficiency of Plasmodium parasites in mice, and allows direct comparison of invasion in red cells derived from two different populations. The method also serves as an accurate

  6. In vitro and in vivo bioactivity assessment of a polylactic acid/hydroxyapatite composite for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danoux, Charlène B; Barbieri, Davide; Yuan, Huipin; de Bruijn, Joost D; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Habibovic, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic bone graft substitutes based on composites consisting of a polymer and a calcium-phosphate (CaP) ceramic are developed with the aim to satisfy both mechanical and bioactivity requirements for successful bone regeneration. In the present study, we have employed extrusion to produce a composite consisting of 50 wt.% poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PLA) and 50 wt.% nano-sized hydroxyapatite (HA) powder, achieving homogeneous distribution of the ceramic within the polymeric phase. In vitro, in both a simulated physiological saline (SPS) and a simulated body fluid (SBF), a greater weight loss was observed for PLA/HA than for PLA particles upon 12-week immersion. Furthermore, in SPS, a continuous release of calcium and phosphate from the composite was measured, whereas in SBF, decrease of the amount of the two ions in the solution was observed both for PLA and PLA/HA accompanied with the formation of a CaP layer on the surface. In vitro characterization of the composite bioactivity was performed by culturing human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) and assessing proliferation and osteogenic differentiation, with PLA as a control. Both PLA/HA composite and PLA control were shown to support hMSCs proliferation over a period of two weeks. In addition, the composite significantly enhanced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of hMSCs in osteogenic medium as compared with the polymer control. A novel implant design was employed to develop implants from dense, extruded materials, suitable for testing osteoinductivity in vivo. In a preliminary study in dogs, PLA/HA composite implants induced heterotopic bone formation upon 12-week intramuscular implantation in all animals, in contrast to PLA control, which was not osteoinductive. Unlike in vitro, a more pronounced degradation of PLA was observed in vivo as compared with PLA/HA composite.

  7. Pulmonary toxicity of nanomaterials: a critical comparison of published in vitro assays and in vivo inhalation or instillation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsiedel, Robert; Sauer, Ursula G; Ma-Hock, Lan; Schnekenburger, Jürgen; Wiemann, Martin

    2014-11-01

    To date, guidance on how to incorporate in vitro assays into integrated approaches for testing and assessment of nanomaterials is unavailable. In addressing this shortage, this review compares data from in vitro studies to results from in vivo inhalation or intratracheal instillation studies. Globular nanomaterials (ion-shedding silver and zinc oxide, poorly soluble titanium dioxide and cerium dioxide, and partly soluble amorphous silicon dioxide) and nanomaterials with higher aspect ratios (multiwalled carbon nanotubes) were assessed focusing on the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) reference nanomaterials for these substances. If in vitro assays are performed with dosages that reflect effective in vivo dosages, the mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity can be assessed. In early tiers of integrated approaches for testing and assessment, knowledge on mechanisms of toxicity serves to group nanomaterials thereby reducing the need for animal testing.

  8. PK of immunoconjugate anticancer agent CMD-193 in rats: ligand-binding assay approach to determine in vivo immunoconjugate stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Azher; Gorovits, Boris; Leal, Mauricio; Fluhler, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are a new generation of anticancer therapeutics. The objective of this manuscript is to propose a methodology that can be used to assess the stability of the ADCs by using the PK data obtained by ligand-binding assays that measure various components of ADCs. The ligand-binding assays format of different components of ADCs provided unique valuable PK information. The mathematical manipulation of the bioanalytical data provided an insight into the in vivo integrity, indicating that the loading of the calicheamicin on the G193 antibody declines in an apparent slow first-order process. This report demonstrates the value of analyzing various components of the ADC and their PK profiles to better understand the disposition and in vivo stability of ADCs.

  9. The interplay of dental pulp stem cells and endothelial cells in an injectable peptide hydrogel on angiogenesis and pulp regeneration in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayaka, Waruna Lakmal; Hargreaves, Kenneth M; Jin, Lijian; Samaranayake, Lakshman P; Zhang, Chengfei

    2015-02-01

    Securing an adequate blood supply for the survival of cell transplants is critical for a successful outcome in tissue engineering. Interactions between endothelial and progenitor/stem cells are important for vascularization of regenerating tissue. Recently, self-assembling peptide nanofibers were described as a promising environment for pulp regeneration due to their synthetic nature and controlled physicochemical properties. In this study, the peptide hydrogel PuraMatrix™ was used as a scaffold system to investigate the role of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in triggering angiogenesis and the potential for regenerating vascularized pulp in vivo. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), DPSCs, or cocultures of both cell types were encapsulated in three-dimensional PuraMatrix. The peptide nanofiber microenvironment supported cell survival, cell migration, and capillary network formation in the absence of exogenous growth factors. DPSCs increased early vascular network formation by facilitating the migration of HUVECs and by increasing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. Both the DPSC-monoculture and coculture groups exhibited vascularized pulp-like tissue with patches of osteodentin after transplantation in mice. The cocultured groups exhibited more extracellular matrix, vascularization, and mineralization than the DPSC-monocultures in vivo. The DPSCs play a critical role in initial angiogenesis, whereas coordinated efforts by the HUVECs and DPSCs are required to achieve a balance between extracellular matrix deposition and mineralization. The findings of this study also highlighted the importance of a microenvironment that supports cell-cell interactions and cell migration, which contribute to successful dental pulp regeneration.

  10. Compounds used to produce cloned animals are genotoxic and mutagenic in mammalian assays in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, R.J. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia Celular e Molecular, Instituto de Biociências de Rio Claro, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Centro de Estudos em Células Tronco, Terapia Celular e Genética Toxicológica, Núcleo de Hospital Universitário, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Saúde em Desenvolvimento na Região Centro-Oeste, Faculdade de Medicina “Dr. Hélio Mandetta”, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Programa de Mestrado em Farmácia, Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Mantovani, M.S.; Silva, A.F. da [Departamento de Biologia Geral, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Pesarini, J.R. [Centro de Estudos em Células Tronco, Terapia Celular e Genética Toxicológica, Núcleo de Hospital Universitário, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Saúde em Desenvolvimento na Região Centro-Oeste, Faculdade de Medicina “Dr. Hélio Mandetta”, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Mauro, M.O. [Centro de Estudos em Células Tronco, Terapia Celular e Genética Toxicológica, Núcleo de Hospital Universitário, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Programa de Doutorado em Biotecnologia e Biodiversidade - Rede Pró Centro-Oeste, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Ribeiro, L.R. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia Celular e Molecular, Instituto de Biociências de Rio Claro, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2014-03-28

    The compounds 6-dimethylaminopurine and cycloheximide promote the successful production of cloned mammals and have been used in the development of embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. This study investigated the effects of 6-dimethylaminopurine and cycloheximide in vitro, using the thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay to assess cytotoxicity, the trypan blue exclusion assay to assess cell viability, the comet assay to assess genotoxicity, and the micronucleus test with cytokinesis block to test mutagenicity. In addition, the comet assay and the micronucleus test were also performed on peripheral blood cells of 54 male Swiss mice, 35 g each, to assess the effects of the compounds in vivo. The results indicated that both 6-dimethylaminopurine and cycloheximide, at the concentrations and doses tested, were cytotoxic in vitro and genotoxic and mutagenic in vitro and in vivo, altered the nuclear division index in vitro, but did not diminish cell viability in vitro. Considering that alterations in DNA play important roles in mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, and morphofunctional teratogenesis and reduce embryonic viability, this study indicated that 6-dimethylaminopurine and cycloheximide utilized in the process of mammalian cloning may be responsible for the low embryo viability commonly seen in nuclear transfer after implantation in utero.

  11. Development of in vivo biotransformation enzyme assays for ecotoxicity screening: In vivo measurement of phases I and II enzyme activities in freshwater planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei-Hui

    2016-08-01

    The development of a high-throughput tool is required for screening of environmental pollutants and assessing their impacts on aquatic animals. Freshwater planarians can be used in rapid and sensitive toxicity bioassays. Planarians are known for their remarkable regeneration ability but much less known for their metabolic and xenobiotic biotransformation abilities. In this study, the activities of different phase I and II enzymes were determined in vivo by directly measuring fluorescent enzyme substrate disappearance or fluorescent enzyme metabolite production in planarian culture media. For phase I enzyme activity, O-deethylation activities with alkoxyresorufin could not be detected in planarian culture media. By contrast, O-deethylation activities with alkoxycoumarin were detected in planarian culture media. Increases in 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (ECOD) activities was only observed in planarians exposed to 1μM, but not 10μM, β-naphthoflavone for 24h. ECOD activity was inhibited in planarians exposed to 10 and 100μM rifampicin or carbamazepine for 24h. For phase II enzyme activity, DT-diaphorase, arylsulfatases, uridine 5'-diphospho (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferase or catechol-O-methyltransferase activity was determined in culture media containing planarians. The results of this study indicate that freshwater planarians are a promising model organism to monitor exposure to environmental pollutants or assess their impacts through the in vivo measurement of phase I and II enzyme activities. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Assessing anti-malarial drug effects ex vivo using the haemozoin detection assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebelo, Maria; Tempera, Carolina; Fernandes, José F.; Grobusch, Martin P.; Hänscheid, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In vitro sensitivity assays are crucial to detect and monitor drug resistance. Plasmodium falciparum has developed resistance to almost all anti-malarial drugs. Although different in vitro drug assays are available, some of their inherent characteristics limit their application, especially in the

  13. Formulation and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of a new osteoprotegerin-chitosan gel for bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayash, Soher Nagi; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Misran, Misni; Baharuddin, N A

    2017-02-01

    The osteoprotegerin (OPG) system plays a critical role in bone remodelling by regulating osteoclast formation and activity. The study aimed to determine the physicochemical properties and biocompatibility of a newly formulated OPG-chitosan gel. The OPG-chitosan gel was formulated using human OPG protein and water-soluble chitosan. The physicochemical properties were determined using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Gel morphology was determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and then it was subjected to a protein release assay and biodegradability test. An in vitro cytotoxicity test on normal human periodontal ligament (NHPL) fibroblasts and normal human (NH) osteoblasts was carried out using the AlamarBlue assay. In vivo evaluation in a rabbit model involved creating critical-sized defects in calvarial bone, filling with the OPG-chitosan gel and sacrificing at 12 weeks. In vitro results demonstrated that the 25 kDa OPG-chitosan gel had the highest rate of protein release and achieved 90% degradation in 28 days. At 12 weeks, the defects filled with 25 kDa OPG-chitosan gel showed significant (p < 0.05) new bone formation and the highest expression of osteocalcin and osteopontin compared to controls. Thus, the 25 kDa OPG-chitosan gel could be a promising new biomaterial for tissue engineering. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 398-407, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Comparison of a modified hemoglobin regeneration efficiency method with a slope-ratio assay in measuring relative bioavailability of cocoa powder iron using rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Katsuhiko; Konomi, Aki; Otagi, Miki

    2011-11-01

    The slope-ratio assay is being used as a gold standard for determining iron bioavailability in foods. We compared the modified hemoglobin (Hb) regeneration efficiency (HRE) method (Yokoi K, Konomi A, & Otagi M (2009) Br J Nutr 102: 215-220) with the slope-ratio assay for measurement of iron bioavailability. The relative bioavailability of iron in cocoa powder was measured by both methods using ferric citrate as a control (i.e., 1.00). In the slope-ratio assay, thirty-two 4-week-old male F/344 N rats were depleted in iron stores for 28 days, and then eight groups of four rats each were repleted for 25 days using graded levels of dietary ferric citrate or the cocoa powder. The slope for the cocoa powder 1.720 g Hb/L/(mg Fe/kg) was 0.99 that of ferric citrate 1.727 g Hb/L/(mg Fe/kg). On the other hand, the HRE value of the cocoa powder was 0.96 that of ferric citrate, based on the previous report. The relative iron bioavailabilities measured by both methods agreed, indicating that the modified HRE method is compatible with the slope-ratio assay in measuring the bioavailability of iron in foods.

  15. Ex-vivo Potential of Cadaveric and Fresh Limbal Tissues to Regenerate Cultured Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vemuganti Geeta

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate and compare the ex-vivo growth potential and formation of cultured corneal epithelium from residual corneo-limbal rings obtained from the operating room after penetrating keratoplasty, and fresh limbal tissues from patients undergoing routine cataract surgery. Methods: With the approval of the Institutional Review Board and informed consent from patients, 1-2mm of limbal tissues from 15 patients and 31 tissues from the cadaveric limbal ring preserved in MK medium (16 tissues and Optisol (15 tissues were used for the study. Donor data included age, time lapse between death and collection, collection and preservation and preservation and culture. Tiny bits of the limbal tissue were explanted on the de-epithelialised human amniotic membrane prepared following standard guidelines, and cultured using Human Corneal Epithelial cell medium. Radial growth from the explant was observed and measured by phase contrast microscopy over 2-4 weeks. After adequate confluent growth, whole mount preparation of the membrane was made and stained with haematoxylin and eosin. Part of the membrane was fixed in formalin and processed for routine histologic examination. The sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin. Results: Forty-six tissues were evaluated from 42 eyes (15 from patients, 31 from cadaveric eyes with a mean age of 55.3 years ± 21.23 years (range 18 years - 110 years. The growth pattern observed was similar in all the positive cases with clusters of cells budding from the explant over 24- 72 hours, and subsequent formation of a monolayer over the next 2-3 weeks. The stained whole mount preparation showed a radial growth of cells around explants with diameter ranging from 5 to 16mm. Histologic evaluation of the membrane confirmed the growth of 2-3 cell-layered epithelium over the amniotic membrane. Cultivated epithelium around explant cell cultures was observed in 100% (15/15 of limbal tissue obtained from patients, as against

  16. Modified in vivo comet assay detects the genotoxic potential of 14-hydroxycodeinone, an α,β-unsaturated ketone in oxycodone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Kamala; Roden, Nicholas; Zhang, Charles; Bruce, Shannon; Wood, Craig; Pendino, Kimberly

    2015-12-01

    14-Hydroxycodeinone (14-HC) is an α,β-unsaturated ketone impurity found in oxycodone drug substance and has a structural alert for genotoxicity. 14-HC was tested in a combined Modified and Standard Comet Assay to determine if the slight decrease in % Tail DNA noted in a previously conducted Standard Comet Assay with 14-HC could be magnified to clarify if the response was due to cross-linking activity. One limitation of the Standard Comet Assay is that DNA cross-links cannot be reliably detected. However, under certain modified testing conditions, DNA cross-links and chemical moieties that elicit such cross-links can be elucidated. One such modification involves the induction of additional breakages of DNA strands by gamma or X-ray irradiation. To determine if 14-HC is a DNA crosslinker in vivo, a Modified Comet Assay was conducted using X-ray irradiation as the modification to visualize crosslinking activity. In this assay, 14-HC was administered orally to mice up to 320 mg/kg/day. Results showed a statistically significant reduction in percent tail DNA in duodenal cells at 320 mg/kg/day, with a nonstatistically significant but dose-related reduction in percent tail DNA also observed at the mid dose of 160 mg/kg/day. Similar decreases were not observed in cells from the liver or stomach, and no increases in percent tail DNA were noted for any tissue in the concomitantly conducted Standard Comet Assay. Taken together, 14-HC was identified as a cross-linking agent in the duodenum in the Modified Comet Assay. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. In vivo dynamics of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia stimulated by GDNF signals using a bead transplantation assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Aya; Kishi, Kasane; Aiyama, Yoshimi; Miura, Kento [Department of Veterinary Anatomy, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Tokyo, 113-8657 (Japan); Takase, Hinako M.; Suzuki, Hitomi; Kanai-Azuma, Masami [Department of Experimental Animal Model for Human Disease, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, 113-8510 (Japan); Iwamori, Tokuko [Center of Biomedical Research, Kyusyu University, Fukuoka, 812-8582 (Japan); Kurohmaru, Masamichi; Tsunekawa, Naoki [Department of Veterinary Anatomy, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Tokyo, 113-8657 (Japan); Kanai, Yoshiakira, E-mail: aykanai@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Veterinary Anatomy, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Tokyo, 113-8657 (Japan)

    2016-08-05

    In mouse testes, spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), a subpopulation of GFRα1 (GDNF family receptor-α1)-positive spermatogonia, are widely distributed along the convoluted seminiferous tubules. The proliferation and differentiation of the SSCs are regulated in part by local expression of GDNF (glial cell-derived neurotorphic factor), one of major niche factors for SSCs. However, the in vivo dynamics of the GDNF-stimulated GFRα1-positive spermatogonia remains unclear. Here, we developed a simple method for transplanting DiI-labeled and GDNF-soaked beads into the mouse testicular interstitium. By using this method, we examined the dynamics of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia in the tubular walls close to the transplanted GDNF-soaked beads. The bead-derived GDNF signals were able to induce the stratified aggregate formation of GFRα1-positive undifferentiated spermatogonia by day 3 post-transplantation. Each aggregate consisted of tightly compacted A{sub single} and marginal A{sub paired}–A{sub aligned} GFRα1-positive spermatogonia and was surrounded by A{sub aligned} GFRα1-negative spermatogonia at more advanced stages. These data not only provide in vivo evidence for the inductive roles of GDNF in forming a rapid aggregation of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia but also indicate the usefulness of this in vivo assay system of various growth factors for the stem/progenitor spermatogonia in mammalian spermatogenesis. - Highlights: • A novel bead transplantation assay was developed to examine the in vivo effects of growth factors on spermatogonia. • A rapid aggregation of GFRα1-positive spermatogonia was induced by the transplanted GDNF-soaked beads. • Tightly-compacted A{sub single} and marginal A{sub paired}–A{sub aligned} spermatogonia were formed in each GFRα1-positive aggregate.

  18. Comparison of In-Vitro and Ex-Vivo Wound Healing Assays for the Investigation of Diabetic Wound Healing and Demonstration of a Beneficial Effect of a Triterpene Extract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Ueck

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a frequent cause for chronic, difficult-to-treat wounds. New therapies for diabetic wounds are urgently needed and in-vitro or ex-vivo test systems are essential for the initial identification of new active molecules. The aim of this study is to compare in-vitro and ex-vivo test systems for their usability for early drug screening and to investigate the efficacy of a birch bark triterpene extract (TE that has been proven ex-vivo and clinically to accelerate non-diabetic wound healing (WH, in a diabetic context. We investigated in-vitro models for diabetic WH, i.e. scratch assays with human keratinocytes from diabetic donors or cultured under hyperglycaemic conditions and a newly developed porcine ex-vivo hyperglycaemic WH model for their potential to mimic delayed diabetic WH and for the influence of TE in these test systems. We show that keratinocytes from diabetic donors often fail to exhibit significantly delayed WH. For cells under hyperglycaemic conditions significant decrease is observed but is influenced by choice of medium and presence of supplements. Also, donor age plays a role. Interestingly, hyperglycaemic effects are mainly hyperosmolaric effects in scratch assays. Ex-vivo models under hyperglycaemic conditions show a clear and substantial decrease of WH, and here both glucose and hyperosmolarity effects are involved. Finally, we provide evidence that TE is also beneficial for ex-vivo hyperglycaemic WH, resulting in significantly increased length of regenerated epidermis to 188±16% and 183±11% (SEM; p<0.05 compared to controls when using two different TE formulations. In conclusion, our results suggest that microenvironmental influences are important in WH test systems and that therefore the more complex hyperglycaemic ex-vivo model is more suitable for early drug screening. Limitations of the in-vitro and ex-vivo models are discussed. Furthermore our data recommend TE as a promising candidate for in-vivo

  19. An easy and efficient permeabilization protocol for in vivo enzyme activity assays in cyanobacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Randi Engelberth; Erstad, Simon Matthé; Ramos Martinez, Erick Miguel

    2016-01-01

    , lysis of cyanobacterial cells is inefficient and often laborious. In some cases radioisotope-labeled substrates can be fed directly to intact cells; however, label-free assays are often favored due to safety and practical reasons. RESULTS: Here we show an easy and highly efficient method...... and subsequent activity assays were successfully adapted to the 96-well plate system. CONCLUSIONS: An easy, efficient and scalable permeabilization protocol was established for cyanobacteria. The permeabilized cells can be directly applied for measurement of G6PDH and Rubisco activities without using...... radioisotopes and the protocol may be readily adapted to studies of other cyanobacterial species and other intracellular enzymes. The permeabilization and enzyme assays can be performed in 96-well plates in a high-throughput manner....

  20. In vivo Comet assay – statistical analysis and power calculations of mice testicular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Merete Kjær; Sharma, Anoop Kumar; Dybdahl, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    . A linear mixed-effects model was fitted to the summarized data and the estimated variance components were used to generate power curves as a function of sample size. The statistic that most appropriately summarized the within-sample distributions was the median of the log-transformed data, as it most...... consistently conformed to the assumptions of the statistical model. Power curves for 1.5-, 2-, and 2.5-fold changes of the highest dose group compared to the control group when 50 and 100 cells were scored per gel are provided to aid in the design of future Comet assay studies on testicular cells....... statistic to use has yet to be reached. Another important consideration concerns the assessment of proper sample sizes in the design of Comet assay studies. This study aims to identify a statistic suitably summarizing the % tail DNA of mice testicular samples in Comet assay studies. A second aim...

  1. Nitric Oxide and Nitrous Oxide Production by Soybean and Winged Bean during the in Vivo Nitrate Reductase Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, J V; Harper, J E

    1986-11-01

    This study was conducted to determine by gas chromatography (GC) and mass spectrometry (MS) the identity and the quantity of volatile N products produced during the helium-purged in vivo NR assay of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Williams) and winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus [L.] DC. cv Lunita) leaflets. Gaseous material for identification and quantitation was collected by cryogenic trapping of volatile compounds carried in the He-purge gas stream. As opposed to an earlier report, acetaldehyde oxime production was not detected by our GC method, and acetaldehyde oxime was shown to be much more soluble in water than the compound(s) evolved from soybean leaflets. Nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) were identified by GC and GC/MS as the main N products formed. NO and N(2)O produced from soybean leaflets were both labeled with (15)N when (15)N-nitrate was used in the assay medium, demonstrating that both were produced from nitrate during nitrate reduction. Other compounds co-trapped with NO and N(2)O were identified as air (N(2), O(2)), CO(2), methanol, acetaldehyde, and ethanol. Leaves of winged bean, subjected to the purged in vivo NR assay, evolved greater quantities of NO and N(2)O (13.9 and 0.37 micromole per gram fresh weight per 30 minutes, respectively) than did the soybean cv Williams (1.67 and 0.09 micromole per gram fresh weight per 30 minutes, respectively). In both species NO production was dominant. In contrast, with similar assays, NO and N(2)O were not evolved from leaves of the nr(1) soybean mutant which lacks the constitutive NR enzymes. In addition to soybean cv Williams, six other Glycine sp. examined evolved significant quantities of NO((x)) (NO and NO(2)). Other species including Neonotonia wightii (Arn.) Lackey comb. nov., Pueraria montana (Lour.) Merr., and Pueraria thunbergiana Benth. evolved lower levels of NO((x)).

  2. Assessment of bone formation capacity using in vivo transplantation assays: procedure and tissue analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem; Ditzel, Nicholas; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    , by employing human specific antibodies or in situ hybridization using human specific Alu-repeat probes. Recently, several methods have been developed to quantitate the newly formed bone using histomorphometric methods or using non-invasive imaging methods. This chapter describes the use of in vivo...

  3. Effects of Immobilized BMP-2 and Nanofiber Morphology on In Vitro Osteogenic Differentiation of hMSCs and In Vivo Collagen Assembly of Regenerated Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perikamana, Sajeesh Kumar Madhurakkat; Lee, Jinkyu; Ahmad, Taufiq; Jeong, Yonghoon; Kim, Do-Gyoon; Kim, Kyobum; Shin, Heungsoo

    2015-04-29

    Engineering bone tissue is particularly challenging because of the distinctive structural features of bone within a complex biochemical environment. In the present study, we fabricated poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) electrospun nanofibers with random and aligned morphology immobilized with bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2) and investigated how these signals modulate (1) in vitro osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and (2) in vivo bone growth rate, mechanical properties, and collagen assembly of newly formed bone. The orientation of adherent cells followed the underlying nanofiber morphology; however, nanofiber alignment did not show any difference in alkaline phosphate activity or in calcium mineralization of hMSCs after 14 days of in vitro culture in osteogenic differentiation media. In vivo bone regeneration was significantly higher in the nanofiber implanted groups (approximately 65-79%) as compared to the defect-only group (11.8 ± 0.2%), while no significant difference in bone regeneration was observed between random and aligned groups. However, nanoindentation studies of regenerated bone revealed Young's modulus and contact hardness with anisotropic feature for aligned group as compared to random group. More importantly, structural analysis of collagen at de novo bone showed the ability of nanofiber morphology to guide collagen deposition. SEM and TEM images revealed regular, highly ordered collagen assemblies on aligned nanofibers as compared to random fibers, which showed irregular, randomly organized collagen deposition. Taken together, we conclude that nanofibers in the presence of osteoinductive signals are a potent tool for bone regeneration, and nanofiber alignment can be used for engineering bone tissues with structurally assembled collagen fibers with defined direction.

  4. How to best freeze liver samples to perform the in vivo mammalian alkaline comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Enciso Gadea

    2015-06-01

    None of the different methods used was capable of giving good results, except immersing the liver samples in liquid nitrogen, followed by Jackson’s et al. (2013 thawing protocol, suggesting that the thawing process may be as critical as the freezing process. To sum up, these results highlight the importance of deepening the possibility to perform the comet assay with frozen tissue.

  5. 40 CFR 79.65 - In vivo sister chromatid exchange assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., the following definitions apply: C-metaphase means a state of arrested cell growth typically seen... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGISTRATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Testing Requirements for Registration § 79.65... a duplicating chromosome. The most commonly used assays employ mammalian bone marrow cells or...

  6. The Hydra regeneration assay reveals ecological risks in running waters: a new proposal to detect environmental teratogenic threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traversetti, Lorenzo; Del Grosso, Floriano; Malafoglia, Valentina; Colasanti, Marco; Ceschin, Simona; Larsen, Stefano; Scalici, Massimiliano

    2017-03-01

    The regenerative ability of Hydra vulgaris was tested as potential biomarker for the development of a new eco-toxicological index. The test is based on the regeneration rate and the aberration frequency of the columna (body and adhesive foot) after separation from head and tentacles by a bistoury. Particularly, 45 columnae were submerged in the rearing solution (that is Hydra medium) to have control, and 285 in potential contaminated waters to have treatments, collected from 19 sites along 10 rivers in central Italy. ANCOVA and chi-square tests were used to compare values from each site to a laboratory control. Subsequently the values on regeneration rate and aberration frequency were inserted in a double entry matrix, where the match of the two entries in the matrix provides the score of the proposed Teratogenic Risk Index (TRI). Each score corresponded to one of the 5 teratogenic risk classes, to which a risk level was associated: from 1 (no risk) to 5 (very high risk). On the whole, 32% of the studied sites were classified as no teratogenic risk while the remaining showed a variable risk level from low to very high. This study proposed for the first time an early warning system to detect the presence of teratogens in running waters, providing a rapid and cost-effective evaluation method. Therefore, TRI may contribute to initiate adequate measures to manage riverine habitats, and to monitor the running water teratogenic status. Specifically, this index may provide the opportunity to identify the disturbance sources and then to drive the decisions, together with competent authorities, on the catchment and landscape management and on the possible use of waters for urban, agricultural, and industrial activities, since they may show significant effects on the human health.

  7. Focal release of neurotrophic factors by biodegradable microspheres enhance motor and sensory axonal regeneration in vitro and in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors (NTFs) promote nerve regeneration and neuronal survival after peripheral nerve injury. However, drawbacks related with administration and bioactivity during long periods limit their therapeutic application. In this study, PLGA microspheres (MPs) were used to locally release different NTFs and evaluate whether they accelerate axonal regeneration in comparison with free NTFs or controls. ELISA, SEM, UV/visible light microscopy, organotypic cultures of DRG explants and spina...

  8. Ex vivo assays to study self-renewal, long-term expansion, and leukemic transformation of genetically modified human hematopoietic and patient-derived leukemic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sontakke, Pallavi; Carretta, Marco; Capala, Marta; Schepers, Hein; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2014-01-01

    With the emergence of the concept of the leukemic stem cell (LSC), assays to study them remain pivotal in understanding (leukemic) stem cell biology. Although the in vivo NOD-SCID or NSG xenotransplantation model is currently still the favored assay of choice in most cases, this system has some

  9. Fibrin glue repair leads to enhanced axonal elongation during early peripheral nerve regeneration in an in vivo mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Koulaxouzidis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microsurgical suturing is the gold standard of nerve coaptation. Although literature on the usefulness of fibrin glue as an alternative is becoming increasingly available, it remains contradictory. Furthermore, no data exist on how both repair methods might influence the morphological aspects (arborization; branching of early peripheral nerve regeneration. We used the sciatic nerve transplantation model in thy-1 yellow fluorescent protein mice (YFP; n = 10. Pieces of nerve (1cm were grafted from YFP-negative mice (n = 10 into those expressing YFP. We performed microsuture coaptations on one side and used fibrin glue for repair on the contralateral side. Seven days after grafting, the regeneration distance, the percentage of regenerating and arborizing axons, the number of branches per axon, the coaptation failure rate, the gap size at the repair site and the time needed for surgical repair were all investigated. Fibrin glue repair resulted in regenerating axons travelling further into the distal nerve. It also increased the percentage of arborizing axons. No coaptation failure was detected. Gap sizes were comparable in both groups. Fibrin glue significantly reduced surgical repair time. The increase in regeneration distance, even after the short period of time, is in line with the results of others that showed faster axonal regeneration after fibrin glue repair. The increase in arborizing axons could be another explanation for better functional and electrophysiological results after fibrin glue repair. Fibrin glue nerve coaptation seems to be a promising alternative to microsuture repair.

  10. Use of macroporous gelatine spheres as a biodegradable scaffold for guided tissue regeneration of healthy dermis in humans: an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, Fredrik R M; Nyman, Erika; Bolin, Johanna S C; Kratz, Gunnar

    2010-05-01

    If a biodegradable scaffold is applied, the dermis can be regenerated by guided tissue regeneration. Scaffolds can stimulate in-growth of cells from the surroundings that migrate into them and start to produce autologous extracellular matrix as the scaffold is degraded. Several materials are available, but most of them are in the form of sheets and need to be laid on an open wound surface. A number of injectable fillers have been developed to correct soft-tissue defects. However, none of these has been used for guided tissue regeneration. We present a new technique that could possibly be used to correct dermal defects by using macroporous gelatine spheres as a biodegradable scaffold for guided tissue regeneration. In eight healthy volunteers, intradermal injections of macroporous gelatine spheres were compared with injections of saline and hyaluronic acid (Restylane). Full-thickness skin biopsy specimens of the implants and surrounding tissue were removed 2, 8, 12 and 26 weeks after injection, and the (immuno)histological results were analysed. The Restylane merely occupied space. It shattered the dermal tissue and compressed collagen fibres and cells at the interface between the implant and the dermis. No regeneration of tissue was found with this material at any time. The macroporous gelatine spheres were populated with fibroblasts already after 2 weeks. After 8 weeks the spheres were completely populated by fibroblasts producing dermal tissue. After 12 and 26 weeks, the gelatine spheres had been more or less completely resorbed and replaced by vascularised neodermis. There were no signs of capsular formation, rejection or adverse events in any subject. Further in vivo studies in humans are needed to evaluate the effect of the macroporous spheres fully as a matrix for guided tissue regeneration with and without cellular pre-seeding. However, the results of this study indicate the possibility of using macroporous gelatine spheres as an injectable, three

  11. In vitro and in vivo estrogenic activity of BPA, BPF and BPS in zebrafish-specific assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Fol, Vincent; Aït-Aïssa, Selim; Sonavane, Manoj; Porcher, Jean-Marc; Balaguer, Patrick; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Zalko, Daniel; Brion, François

    2017-08-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used chemical that has been extensively studied as an endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC). Other bisphenols sharing close structural features with BPA, are increasingly being used as alternatives, increasing the need to assess associated hazards to the endocrine system. In the present study, the estrogenic activity of BPA, bisphenol S (BPS) and bisphenol F (BPF) was assessed by using a combination of zebrafish-specific mechanism-based in vitro and in vivo assays. The three bisphenols were found to efficiently transactivate all zebrafish estrogen receptor (zfER) subtypes in zebrafish hepatic reporter cell lines (ZELH-zfERs). BPA was selective for zfERα while BPS and BPF were slightly more potent on zfERβ subtypes. We further documented the estrogenic effect in vivo by quantifying the expression of brain aromatase using a transgenic cyp19a1b-GFP zebrafish embryo assay. All three bisphenols induced GFP in a concentration-dependent manner. BPS only partially induced brain aromatase at the highest tested concentrations (>30µM) while BPA and BPF strongly induced GFP, in an ER-dependent manner, at 1-10µM. Furthermore, we show that BPF strongly induced vitellogenin synthesis in adult male zebrafish. Overall, this study demonstrates the estrogenic activity of BPA, BPF and BPS in different cell- and tissue-contexts and at different stages of development. Differences between in vitro and in vivo responses are discussed in light of selective ER activation and the fate of the compounds in the models. This study confirms the relevance of combining cellular and whole-organism bioassays in a unique model species for the hazard assessment of candidate EDCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Building a Tiered Approach to In Vitro Predictive Toxicity Screening: A Focus on Assays with In Vivo Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKim, James M

    2010-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges facing the pharmaceutical industry today is the failure of promising new drug candidates due to unanticipated adverse effects discovered during preclinical animal safety studies and clinical trials. Late stage attrition increases the time required to bring a new drug to market, inflates development costs, and represents a major source of inefficiency in the drug discovery/development process. It is generally recognized that early evaluation of new drug candidates is necessary to improve the process. Building in vitro data sets that can accurately predict adverse effects in vivo would allow compounds with high risk profiles to be deprioritized, while those that possess the requisite drug attributes and a lower risk profile are brought forward. In vitro cytotoxicity assays have been used for decades as a tool to understand hypotheses driven questions regarding mechanisms of toxicity. However, when used in a prospective manner, they have not been highly predictive of in vivo toxicity. Therefore, the issue may not be how to collect in vitro toxicity data, but rather how to translate in vitro toxicity data into meaningful in vivo effects. This review will focus on the development of an in vitro toxicity screening strategy that is based on a tiered approach to data collection combined with data interpretation. PMID:20053163

  13. Macroporous gelatine spheres as culture substrate, transplantation vehicle, and biodegradable scaffold for guided regeneration of soft tissues. In vivo study in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, Fredrik R M; Junker, Johan P E; Johnson, Hans; Kratz, Gunnar

    2007-01-01

    In the course of development of a new type of filler for the correction of small defects in soft tissues we studied macroporous gelatine spheres as culture substrate, transplantation vehicle, and biodegradable scaffold for guided regeneration of soft tissues in vivo. We injected intradermally in nude mice gelatine spheres that had either been preseeded with human fibroblasts or preadipocytes, or left unseeded. We compared the extent of regenerated tissue with that found after injections of saline or single-cell suspensions of human fibroblasts or preadipocytes. Routine histological examinations and immunohistochemical staining for von Willebrand factor (indicating neoangiogenesis) were made after 7, 21, and 56 days. Injected saline or single-cell suspensions had no effect. However, a quick and thorough tissue regeneration with developing neoangiogenesis was elicited by the gelatine spheres and the effect of spheres preseeded with preadipocytes surpassed the effect of spheres preseeded with fibroblasts, which in turn surpassed the effect of unseeded gelatine spheres. We suggest that minor soft tissue defects such as wrinkles or creases can be corrected by injection of naked macroporous gelatine spheres, whereas larger defects are best corrected by injection of macroporous gelatine spheres preseeded with fibroblasts, or preadipocytes, or both.

  14. In vivo natriuretic peptide reporter assay identifies chemical modifiers of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jason R; Robinson, Tamara Y; Sachidanandan, Chetana; Kelly, Amy E; Coy, Shannon; Peterson, Randall T; MacRae, Calum A

    2012-03-01

    Despite increased understanding of the fundamental biology regulating cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and heart failure, it has been challenging to find novel chemical or genetic modifiers of these pathways. Traditional cell-based methods do not model the complexity of an intact cardiovascular system and mammalian models are not readily adaptable to chemical or genetic screens. Our objective was to create an in vivo model suitable for chemical and genetic screens for hypertrophy and heart failure modifiers. Using the developing zebrafish, we established that the cardiac natriuretic peptide genes (nppa and nppb), known markers of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and heart failure, were induced in the embryonic heart by pathological cardiac stimuli. This pathological induction was distinct from the developmental regulation of these genes. We created a luciferase-based transgenic reporter line that accurately modelled the pathological induction patterns of the zebrafish nppb gene. Utilizing this reporter line, we were able to show remarkable conservation of pharmacological responses between the larval zebrafish heart and adult mammalian models. By performing a focused screen of chemical agents, we were able to show a distinct response of a genetic model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to the histone deacetylase inhibitor, Trichostatin A, and the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibitor, U0126. We believe this in vivo reporter line will offer a unique approach to the identification of novel chemical or genetic regulators of myocardial hypertrophy and heart failure.

  15. Validation and Optimization of an Ex Vivo Assay of Intestinal Mucosal Biopsies in Crohn's Disease: Reflects Inflammation and Drug Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadstrup, Kasper; Galsgaard, Elisabeth Douglas; Gerwien, Jens; Vester-Andersen, Marianne Kajbæk; Pedersen, Julie Steen; Rasmussen, Julie; Neermark, Søren; Kiszka-Kanowitz, Marianne; Jensen, Teis; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic illness demanding better therapeutics. The marketed biologics only benefit some patients or elicit diminishing effect over time. To complement the known methods in drug development and to obtain patient specific drug responses, we optimized and validated a known human explant method to test drug candidates and pathophysiological conditions in CD intestinal biopsies. Mucosal biopsies from 27 CD patients and 6 healthy individuals were collected to validate an explant assay test where the polarized tissue was cultured on a novel metal mesh disk, slightly immersed in medium imitating an air-liquid interphase. After culture in high oxygen for 24 hours with or without biological treatment in the medium, biopsy integrity and penetration of antibodies was measured by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Nine cytokines were quantified in the conditioned medium as a read-out for degree of inflammation in individual biopsies and used to evaluate treatment efficacy. The biopsies were well-preserved, showing few structural changes. IHC revealed tissue penetration of antibodies demonstrating ability to test therapeutic antibodies. The cytokine release to the medium showed that the assay can distinguish between inflammation states and then validate the known effect of two treatment biologics confirmed by a detection panel of five specific cytokines. Our data also suggest that the assay would be able to indicate which patients are responders to anti-TNF-α therapeutics, and which are non-responders. This study demonstrates this version of an ex vivo culture as a valid and robust assay to assess inflammation in mucosal biopsies and test of the efficacy of novel drug candidates and current treatments on individual patients-potentially for a personalized medicine approach.

  16. Light-activation of the Archaerhodopsin H+-pump reverses age-dependent loss of vertebrate regeneration: sparking system-level controls in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dany Spencer Adams

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetics, the regulation of proteins by light, has revolutionized the study of excitable cells, and generated strong interest in the therapeutic potential of this technology for regulating action potentials in neural and muscle cells. However, it is currently unknown whether light-activated channels and pumps will allow control of resting potential in embryonic or regenerating cells in vivo. Abnormalities in ion currents of non-excitable cells are known to play key roles in the etiology of birth defects and cancer. Moreover, changes in transmembrane resting potential initiate Xenopus tadpole tail regeneration, including regrowth of a functioning spinal cord, in tails that have been inhibited by natural inactivity of the endogenous H+-V-ATPase pump. However, existing pharmacological and genetic methods allow neither non-invasive control of bioelectric parameters in vivo nor the ability to abrogate signaling at defined time points. Here, we show that light activation of a H+-pump can prevent developmental defects and induce regeneration by hyperpolarizing transmembrane potentials. Specifically, light-dependent, Archaerhodopsin-based, H+-flux hyperpolarized cells in vivo and thus rescued Xenopus embryos from the craniofacial and patterning abnormalities caused by molecular blockade of endogenous H+-flux. Furthermore, light stimulation of Arch for only 2 days after amputation restored regenerative capacity to inhibited tails, inducing cell proliferation, tissue innervation, and upregulation of notch1 and msx1, essential genes in two well-known endogenous regenerative pathways. Electroneutral pH change, induced by expression of the sodium proton exchanger, NHE3, did not rescue regeneration, implicating the hyperpolarizing activity of Archaerhodopsin as the causal factor. The data reveal that hyperpolarization is required only during the first 48 hours post-injury, and that expression in the spinal cord is not necessary for the effect to occur. Our study shows that

  17. Nitric Oxide and Nitrous Oxide Production by Soybean and Winged Bean during the in Vivo Nitrate Reductase Assay 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, John V.; Harper, James E.

    1986-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine by gas chromatography (GC) and mass spectrometry (MS) the identity and the quantity of volatile N products produced during the helium-purged in vivo NR assay of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Williams) and winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus [L.] DC. cv Lunita) leaflets. Gaseous material for identification and quantitation was collected by cryogenic trapping of volatile compounds carried in the He-purge gas stream. As opposed to an earlier report, acetaldehyde oxime production was not detected by our GC method, and acetaldehyde oxime was shown to be much more soluble in water than the compound(s) evolved from soybean leaflets. Nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) were identified by GC and GC/MS as the main N products formed. NO and N2O produced from soybean leaflets were both labeled with 15N when 15N-nitrate was used in the assay medium, demonstrating that both were produced from nitrate during nitrate reduction. Other compounds co-trapped with NO and N2O were identified as air (N2, O2), CO2, methanol, acetaldehyde, and ethanol. Leaves of winged bean, subjected to the purged in vivo NR assay, evolved greater quantities of NO and N2O (13.9 and 0.37 micromole per gram fresh weight per 30 minutes, respectively) than did the soybean cv Williams (1.67 and 0.09 micromole per gram fresh weight per 30 minutes, respectively). In both species NO production was dominant. In contrast, with similar assays, NO and N2O were not evolved from leaves of the nr1 soybean mutant which lacks the constitutive NR enzymes. In addition to soybean cv Williams, six other Glycine sp. examined evolved significant quantities of NO(x) (NO and NO2). Other species including Neonotonia wightii (Arn.) Lackey comb. nov., Pueraria montana (Lour.) Merr., and Pueraria thunbergiana Benth. evolved lower levels of NO(x). PMID:16665099

  18. In vivo guided vascular regeneration with a non-porous elastin-like polypeptide hydrogel tubular scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahara, Atsushi; Kiick, Kristi L; Yamaoka, Tetsuji

    2017-06-01

    Herein, we demonstrate a new approach for small-caliber vascular reconstruction using a non-porous elastin-like polypeptide hydrogel tubular scaffold, based on the concept of guided vascular regeneration (GVR). The scaffolds are composed of elastin-like polypeptide, (Val-Pro-Gly-Ile-Gly)n , for compliance matching and antithrombogenicity and an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif for connective tissue regeneration. When the polypeptide was mixed with an aqueous solution of β-[Tris(hydroxymethyl)phosphino]propionic acid at 37°C, the polypeptide hydrogel was rapidly formed. The elastic modulus of the hydrogel was 4.4 kPa. The hydrogel tubular scaffold was formed in a mold and reinforced with poly(lactic acid) nanofibers. When tubular scaffolds with an inner diameter of 1 mm and length of 5 mm were implanted into rat abdominal aortae, connective tissue grew along the scaffold luminal surface from the flanking native tissues, resulting in new blood vessel tissue with a thickness of 200 μm in 1 month. In contrast, rats implanted with control scaffolds without the RGD motif died. These results indicate that the non-porous hydrogel tubular scaffold containing the RGD motif effectively induced rapid tissue regeneration and that GVR is a promising strategy for the regeneration of small-diameter blood vessels. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1746-1755, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. In vitro and in vivo bioactivity assessment of a polylactic acid/hydroxyapatite composite for bone regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danoux, Charlene; Barbieri, D.; Yuan, Huipin; de Bruijn, Joost Dick; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Habibovic, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic bone graft substitutes based on composites consisting of a polymer and a calcium-phosphate (CaP) ceramic are developed with the aim to satisfy both mechanical and bioactivity requirements for successful bone regeneration. In the present study, we have employed extrusion to produce a

  20. Influence of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells pre-implantation differentiation approach on periodontal regeneration in vivo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cai, X; Yang, F.; Yan, X.; Yang, W; Yu, N.; Oortgiesen, D.A.; Wang, Y.; Jansen, J.A.; Walboomers, X.F.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The implantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has previously been shown successful to achieve periodontal regeneration. However, the preferred pre-implantation differentiation strategy (e.g. maintenance of stemness, osteogenic or chondrogenic induction) to obtain optimal

  1. Tooth Germ-Like Construct Transplantation for Whole-Tooth Regeneration: An In Vivo Study in the Miniature Pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai-Chiang; Kitamura, Yutaka; Wu, Chang-Chin; Chang, Hao-Hueng; Ling, Thai-Yen; Kuo, Tzong-Fu

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of whole-tooth regeneration using a tooth germ-like construct. Dental pulp from upper incisors, canines, premolars, and molars were extracted from sexually mature miniature pigs. Pulp tissues were cultured and expanded in vitro to obtain dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), and cells were differentiated into odontoblasts and osteoblasts. Epithelial cells were isolated from gingival epithelium. The epithelial cells, odontoblasts, and osteoblasts were seeded onto the surface, upper, and lower layers, respectively, of a bioactive scaffold. The lower first and second molar tooth germs were removed bilaterally and the layered cell/scaffold constructs were transplanted to the mandibular alveolar socket of a pig. At 13.5 months postimplantation, seven of eight pigs developed two teeth with crown, root, and pulp structures. Enamel-like tissues, dentin, cementum, odontoblasts, and periodontal tissues were found upon histological inspection. The regenerated tooth expressed dentin matrix protein-1 and osteopontin. All pigs had regenerated molar teeth regardless of the original tooth used to procure the DPSCs. Pigs that had tooth germs removed or who received empty scaffolds did not develop teeth. Although periodontal ligaments were generated, ankylosis was found in some animals. This study revealed that implantation of a tooth germ-like structure generated a complete tooth with a high success rate. The implant location may influence the morphology of the regenerated tooth. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. In vivo MRI monitoring nerve regeneration of acute peripheral nerve traction injury following mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Xiao-Hui, E-mail: duanxiaohui-128@163.com [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Cheng, Li-Na, E-mail: kobe10716@163.com [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Zhang, Fang, E-mail: xinxin110007@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Liu, Jun, E-mail: docliujun@hotmail.com [Department of Neurology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Guo, Ruo-Mi, E-mail: guoruomi-521@163.com [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Zhong, Xiao-Mei, E-mail: enough300@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Wen, Xue-Hua, E-mail: xuehuasuqian@126.com [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Shen, Jun, E-mail: junshenjun@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: To assess the continuous process of nerve regeneration in acute peripheral nerve traction injury treated with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation using MRI. Materials and methods: 1 week after acute nerve traction injury was established in the sciatic nerve of 48 New Zealand white rabbits, 5 × 10{sup 5} MSCs and vehicle alone were grafted to the acutely distracted sciatic nerves each in 24 animals. Serial MRI and T1 and T2 measurements of the injured nerves were performed with a 1.5-T scanner and functional recovery was recorded over a 10-week follow-up period, with histological assessments performed at regular intervals. Results: Compared with vehicle control, nerves grafted with MSCs had better functional recovery and showed improved nerve regeneration, with a sustained increase of T1 and T2 values during the phase of regeneration. Conclusion: MRI could be used to monitor the enhanced nerve regeneration in acute peripheral nerve traction injury treated with MSC transplantation, reflected by a prolonged increase in T1 and T2 values of the injured nerves.

  3. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Assay for the Identification of Arabidopsis Protein-DNA Interactions In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komar, Dorota N; Mouriz, Alfonso; Jarillo, José A; Piñeiro, Manuel

    2016-01-14

    Intricate gene regulatory networks orchestrate biological processes and developmental transitions in plants. Selective transcriptional activation and silencing of genes mediate the response of plants to environmental signals and developmental cues. Therefore, insights into the mechanisms that control plant gene expression are essential to gain a deep understanding of how biological processes are regulated in plants. The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) technique described here is a procedure to identify the DNA-binding sites of proteins in genes or genomic regions of the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. The interactions with DNA of proteins of interest such as transcription factors, chromatin proteins or posttranslationally modified versions of histones can be efficiently analyzed with the ChIP protocol. This method is based on the fixation of protein-DNA interactions in vivo, random fragmentation of chromatin, immunoprecipitation of protein-DNA complexes with specific antibodies, and quantification of the DNA associated with the protein of interest by PCR techniques. The use of this methodology in Arabidopsis has contributed significantly to unveil transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that control a variety of plant biological processes. This approach allowed the identification of the binding sites of the Arabidopsis chromatin protein EBS to regulatory regions of the master gene of flowering FT. The impact of this protein in the accumulation of particular histone marks in the genomic region of FT was also revealed through ChIP analysis.

  4. Quantification of fullerenes by LC/ESI-MS and its application to in vivo toxicity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, Carl W; Usenko, Crystal Y; Tanguay, Robert L; Field, Jennifer A

    2007-12-01

    With production and use of carbon nanoparticles increasing, it is imperative that the toxicity of these materials be determined; yet such testing requires specific and selective analytical methodologies that do not yet exist. Quantitative liquid-liquid extraction was coupled with liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the quantitative determination of fullerenes from C60 to C98. Isotopically enriched, 13C60, was used as an internal standard. The method was applied to determine the loss of C60 from exposure water solution and uptake of C60 by embryonic zebrafish. The average recovery of C60 from zebrafish embryo extracts and 1% DMSO in aqueous-exposure solutions was 90 and 93%, respectively, and precision, as indicated by the relative standard deviation, was 2 and 7%, respectively. The method quantification limit was 0.40 microg/L and the detection limit was 0.02 microg/L. During the toxicological assay, loss of C60 due to sorption to test vials resulted in the reduction of exposure-solution concentrations over 6 h to less than 50% of the initial concentration. Time-course experiments indicated embryo uptake increased over course of the 12-h exposure. A lethal concentration that caused 50% mortality was determined to be 130 microg/L and was associated with a zebrafish embryo concentration, LD50, of 0.079 microg/g of embryo.

  5. H2O2-responsive liposomal nanoprobe for photoacoustic inflammation imaging and tumor theranostics via in vivo chromogenic assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Liang, Chao; Sun, Xiaoqi; Chen, Jiawen; Yang, Zhijuan; Zhao, He; Feng, Liangzhu; Liu, Zhuang

    2017-05-23

    Abnormal H2O2 levels are closely related to many diseases, including inflammation and cancers. Herein, we simultaneously load HRP and its substrate, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), into liposomal nanoparticles, obtaining a Lipo@HRP&ABTS optical nanoprobe for in vivo H2O2-responsive chromogenic assay with great specificity and sensitivity. In the presence of H2O2, colorless ABTS would be converted by HRP into the oxidized form with strong near-infrared (NIR) absorbance, enabling photoacoustic detection of H2O2 down to submicromolar concentrations. Using Lipo@HRP&ABTS as an H2O2-responsive nanoprobe, we could accurately detect the inflammation processes induced by LPS or bacterial infection in which H2O2 is generated. Meanwhile, upon systemic administration of this nanoprobe we realize in vivo photoacoustic imaging of small s.c. tumors (∼2 mm in size) as well as orthotopic brain gliomas, by detecting H2O2 produced by tumor cells. Interestingly, local injection of Lipo@HRP&ABTS further enables differentiation of metastatic lymph nodes from those nonmetastatic ones, based on their difference in H2O2 contents. Moreover, using the H2O2-dependent strong NIR absorbance of Lipo@HRP&ABTS, tumor-specific photothermal therapy is also achieved. This work thus develops a sensitive H2O2-responsive optical nanoprobe useful not only for in vivo detection of inflammation but also for tumor-specific theranostic applications.

  6. Human breast cancer cells are redirected to mammary epithelial cells upon interaction with the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment in-vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M Bussard

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. At present, the etiology of breast cancer is unknown; however the possibility of a distinct cell of origin, i.e. a cancer stem cell, is a heavily investigated area of research. Influencing signals from the tissue niche are known to affect stem cells. Literature has shown that cancer cells lose their tumorigenic potential and display 'normal' behavior when placed into 'normal' ontogenic environments. Therefore, it may be the case that the tissue microenvironment is able to generate signals to redirect cancer cell fate. Previously, we showed that pluripotent human embryonal carcinoma cells could be redirected by the regenerating mammary gland microenvironment to contribute epithelial progeny for 'normal' gland development in-vivo. Here, we show that that human metastatic, non-metastatic, and metastasis-suppressed breast cancer cells proliferate and contribute to normal mammary gland development in-vivo without tumor formation. Immunochemistry for human-specific mitochondria, keratin 8 and 14, as well as human-specific milk proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, impregnated transplant hosts confirmed the presence of human cell progeny. Features consistent with normal mammary gland development as seen in intact hosts (duct, lumen formation, development of secretory acini were recapitulated in both primary and secondary outgrowths from chimeric implants. These results suggest the dominance of the tissue microenvironment over cancer cell fate. This work demonstrates that cultured human breast cancer cells (metastatic and non-metastatic respond developmentally to signals generated by the mouse mammary gland microenvironment during gland regeneration in-vivo.

  7. A high throughput in vivo assay for taste quality and palatability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Kyle Palmer

    Full Text Available Taste quality and palatability are two of the most important properties measured in the evaluation of taste stimuli. Human panels can report both aspects, but are of limited experimental flexibility and throughput capacity. Relatively efficient animal models for taste evaluation have been developed, but each of them is designed to measure either taste quality or palatability as independent experimental endpoints. We present here a new apparatus and method for high throughput quantification of both taste quality and palatability using rats in an operant taste discrimination paradigm. Cohorts of four rats were trained in a modified operant chamber to sample taste stimuli by licking solutions from a 96-well plate that moved in a randomized pattern beneath the chamber floor. As a rat's tongue entered the well it disrupted a laser beam projecting across the top of the 96-well plate, consequently producing two retractable levers that operated a pellet dispenser. The taste of sucrose was associated with food reinforcement by presses on a sucrose-designated lever, whereas the taste of water and other basic tastes were associated with the alternative lever. Each disruption of the laser was counted as a lick. Using this procedure, rats were trained to discriminate 100 mM sucrose from water, quinine, citric acid, and NaCl with 90-100% accuracy. Palatability was determined by the number of licks per trial and, due to intermediate rates of licking for water, was quantifiable along the entire spectrum of appetitiveness to aversiveness. All 96 samples were evaluated within 90 minute test sessions with no evidence of desensitization or fatigue. The technology is capable of generating multiple concentration-response functions within a single session, is suitable for in vivo primary screening of tastant libraries, and potentially can be used to evaluate stimuli for any taste system.

  8. An ex vivo assay of XRT-induced Rad51 foci formation predicts response to PARP-inhibition in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Monjri M; Dobbin, Zachary C; Nowsheen, Somaira; Wielgos, Monica; Katre, Ashwini A; Alvarez, Ronald D; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A; Yang, Eddy S; Landen, Charles N

    2014-08-01

    BRCA-positive ovarian cancer patients derive benefit PARP inhibitors. Approximately 50% of ovarian cancer tumors have homologous recombination (HR) deficiencies and are therefore "BRCA-like," possibly rendering them sensitive to PARP inhibition. However, no predictive assay exists to identify these patients. We sought to determine if irradiation-induced Rad51 foci formation, a known marker of HR, correlated to PARP inhibitor response in an ovarian cancer model. Ovarian cancer cell lines were exposed to PARP-inhibitor ABT-888 to determine effect on growth. Rad51 protein expression prior to irradiation was determined via Western blot. Cultured cells and patient-derived xenograft tumors (PDX) were irradiated and probed for Rad51 foci. In vivo PDX tumors were treated with ABT-888 and carboplatin; these results were correlated with the ex vivo ionizing radiation assay. Three of seven cell lines were sensitive to ABT-888. Sensitive lines had the lowest Rad51 foci formation rate after irradiation, indicating functional HR deficiency. Approximately 50% of the PDX samples had decreased Rad51 foci formation. Total Rad51 protein levels were consistently low, suggesting that DNA damage induction is required to characterize HR status. The ex vivo IR assay accurately predicted which PDX models were sensitive to PARP inhibition in vitro and in vivo. ABT-888 alone reduced orthotopic tumor growth by 51% in A2780ip2 cell line, predicted to respond by the ex vivo assay. Three PDX models' response also correlated with the assay. The ex vivo IR assay correlates with response to PARP inhibition. Analysis of total Rad51 protein is not a reliable substitute. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Use of the ES-D3 cell differentiation assay, combined with the BeWo transport model, to predict relative in vivo developmental toxicity of antifungal compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hequn; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Louisse, Jochem; Blok, Martine; Wang, Xinyi; Snijders, Linda; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the applicability of the ES-D3 cell differentiation assay combined with the in vitro BeWo transport model to predict the relative in vivo developmental toxicity potencies. To this purpose, the in vitro developmental toxicity of five antifungal compounds was investigated by characterizing their inhibitory effect on the differentiation of ES-D3 cells into cardiomyocytes. The BeWo transport model, consisting of BeWo b30 cells grown on transwell inserts and mimicking the placental barrier, was used to determine the relative placental transport velocity. The ES-D3 cell differentiation data were first compared to benchmark doses (BMDs) for in vivo developmental toxicity as derived from data reported in the literature. Correlation between the benchmark concentration for 50% effect (BMCd50) values, obtained in the ES-D3 cell differentiation assay, with in vivo BMD10 values showed a reasonable correlation (R(2)=0.57). When the ES-D3 cell differentiation data were combined with the relative transport rates obtained from the BeWo model, the correlation with the in vivo data increased (R(2)=0.95). In conclusion, we show that the ES-D3 cell differentiation assay is able to better predict the in vivo developmental toxicity ranking of antifungal compounds when combined with the BeWo transport model, than as a stand-alone assay. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. In situ printing of mesenchymal stromal cells, by laser-assisted bioprinting, for in vivo bone regeneration applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keriquel, Virginie; Oliveira, Hugo; Rémy, Murielle; Ziane, Sophia; Delmond, Samantha; Rousseau, Benoit; Rey, Sylvie; Catros, Sylvain; Amédée, Joelle; Guillemot, Fabien; Fricain, Jean-Christophe

    2017-05-11

    Bioprinting has emerged as a novel technological approach with the potential to address unsolved questions in the field of tissue engineering. We have recently shown that Laser Assisted Bioprinting (LAB), due to its unprecedented cell printing resolution and precision, is an attractive tool for the in situ printing of a bone substitute. Here, we show that LAB can be used for the in situ printing of mesenchymal stromal cells, associated with collagen and nano-hydroxyapatite, in order to favor bone regeneration, in a calvaria defect model in mice. Also, by testing different cell printing geometries, we show that different cellular arrangements impact on bone tissue regeneration. This work opens new avenues on the development of novel strategies, using in situ bioprinting, for the building of tissues, from the ground up.

  11. Detrimental effect of expression of Bt endotoxin Cry1Ac on in vitro regeneration, in vivo growth and development of tobacco and cotton transgenics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Preeti; Singh, Amarjeet Kumar; Ray, Krishna; Chaudhary, Bhupendra; Kumar, Sanjeev; Gautam, Taru; Kanoria, Shaveta; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kumar, Paritosh; Pental, Deepak; Burma, Pradeep Kumar

    2011-06-01

    High levels of expression of the cry1Ac gene from Bacillus thuringiensis cannot be routinely achieved in transgenic plants despite modifications made in the gene to improve its expression. This has been attributed to the instability of the transcript in a few reports. In the present study, based on the genetic transformation of cotton and tobacco, we show that the expression of the Cry1Ac endotoxin has detrimental effects on both the in vitro and in vivo growth and development of transgenic plants. A number of experiments on developing transgenics in cotton with different versions of cry1Ac gene showed that the majority of the plants did not express any Cry1Ac protein. Based on Southern blot analysis, it was also observed that a substantial number of lines did not contain the cry1Ac gene cassette although they contained the marker gene nptII. More significantly, all the lines that showed appreciable levels of expression were found to be phenotypically abnormal. Experiments on transformation of tobacco with different constructs expressing the cry1Ac gene showed that in vitro regeneration was inhibited by the encoded protein. Further, out of a total of 145 independent events generated with the different cry1Ac gene constructs in tobacco, only 21 showed expression of the Cry1Ac protein, confirming observations made in cotton that regenerants that express high levels of the Cry1Ac protein are selected against during regeneration of transformed events. This problem was circumvented by targeting the Cry1Ac protein to the chloroplast, which also significantly improved the expression of the protein.

  12. High-resolution in vivo imaging of regenerating dendrites of Drosophila sensory neurons during metamorphosis: local filopodial degeneration and heterotypic dendrite-dendrite contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Daisuke; Suyama, Ritsuko; Kimura, Ken-ichi; Uemura, Tadashi

    2012-12-01

    Neuronal circuits that are formed in early development are reorganized at later developmental stages to support a wide range of adult behaviors. At Drosophila pupal stages, one example of this reorganization is dendritic remodeling of multidendritic neurons, which is accomplished by pruning and subsequent regeneration of branches in environments quite distinct from those in larval life. Here, we used long-term in vivo time-lapse recordings at high spatiotemporal resolution and analyzed the dynamics of two adjacent cell types that remodel dendritic arbors, which eventually innervate the lateral plate of the adult abdomen. These neurons initially exhibited dynamic extension, withdrawal and local degeneration of filopodia that sprouted from all along the length of regenerating branches. At a midpupal stage, branches extending from the two cell types started fasciculating with each other, which prompted us to test the hypothesis that this heterotypic contact may serve as a guiding scaffold for shaping dendritic arbors. Unexpectedly, our cell ablation study gave only marginal effects on the branch length and the arbor shape. This result suggests that the arbor morphology of the adult neurons in this study can be specified mostly in the absence of the dendrite-dendrite contact. © 2012 The Authors Genes to Cells © 2012 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Guided Bone Regeneration Using Collagen Scaffolds, Growth Factors, and Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells for Treatment of Peri-Implant Bone Defects In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peer W. Kämmerer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of the study was an evaluation of different approaches for guided bone regeneration (GBR of peri-implant defects in an in vivo animal model. Materials and Methods. In minipigs (n=15, peri-implant defects around calcium phosphate- (CaP-; n=46 coated implants were created and randomly filled with (1 blank, (2 collagen/hydroxylapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate scaffold (CHT, (3 CHT + growth factor cocktail (GFC, (4 jellyfish collagen matrix, (5 jellyfish collagen matrix + GFC, (6 collagen powder, and (7 collagen powder + periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSC. Additional collagen membranes were used for coverage of the defects. After 120 days of healing, bone growth was evaluated histologically (bone to implant contact (BIC;%, vertical bone apposition (VBA; mm, and new bone height (NBH; %. Results. In all groups, new bone formation was seen. Though, when compared to the blank group, no significant differences were detected for all parameters. BIC and NBH in the group with collagen matrix as well as the group with the collagen matrix + GFC were significantly less when compared to the collagen powder group (all: p<0.003. Conclusion. GBR procedures, in combination with CaP-coated implants, will lead to an enhancement of peri-implant bone growth. There was no additional significant enhancement of osseous regeneration when using GFC or PDLSC.

  14. Sandcastle Worm-Inspired Blood-Resistant Bone Graft Binder Using a Sticky Mussel Protein for Augmented In Vivo Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo Jeong; Choi, Bong-Hyuk; Jun, Sang Ho; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2016-12-01

    Xenogenic bone substitutes are commonly used during orthopedic reconstructive procedures to assist bone regeneration. However, huge amounts of blood accompanied with massive bone loss usually increase the difficulty of placing the xenograft into the bony defect. Additionally, the lack of an organic matrix leads to a decrease in the mechanical strength of the bone-grafted site. For effective bone grafting, this study aims at developing a mussel adhesion-employed bone graft binder with great blood-resistance and enhanced mechanical properties. The distinguishing water (or blood) resistance of the binder originates from sandcastle worm-inspired complex coacervation using negatively charged hyaluronic acid (HA) and a positively charged recombinant mussel adhesive protein (rMAP) containing tyrosine residues. The rMAP/HA coacervate stabilizes the agglomerated bone graft in the presence of blood. Moreover, the rMAP/HA composite binder enhances the mechanical and hemostatic properties of the bone graft agglomerate. These outstanding features improve the osteoconductivity of the agglomerate and subsequently promote in vivo bone regeneration. Thus, the blood-resistant coacervated mussel protein glue is a promising binding material for effective bone grafting and can be successfully expanded to general bone tissue engineering. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Magnetic hydroxyapatite bone substitutes to enhance tissue regeneration: evaluation in vitro using osteoblast-like cells and in vivo in a bone defect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Panseri

    Full Text Available In case of degenerative disease or lesion, bone tissue replacement and regeneration is an important clinical goal. In particular, nowadays, critical size defects rely on the engineering of scaffolds that are 3D structural supports, allowing cellular infiltration and subsequent integration with the native tissue. Several ceramic hydroxyapatite (HA scaffolds with high porosity and good osteointegration have been developed in the past few decades but they have not solved completely the problems related to bone defects. In the present study we have developed a novel porous ceramic composite made of HA that incorporates magnetite at three different ratios: HA/Mgn 95/5, HA/Mgn 90/10 and HA/Mgn 50/50. The scaffolds, consolidated by sintering at high temperature in a controlled atmosphere, have been analysed in vitro using human osteoblast-like cells. Results indicate high biocompatibility, similar to a commercially available HA bone graft, with no negative effects arising from the presence of magnetite or by the use of a static magnetic field. HA/Mgn 90/10 was shown to enhance cell proliferation at the early stage. Moreover, it has been implanted in vivo in a critical size lesion of the rabbit condyle and a good level of histocompatibility was observed. Such results identify this scaffold as particularly relevant for bone tissue regeneration and open new perspectives for the application of a magnetic field in a clinical setting of bone replacement, either for magnetic scaffold fixation or magnetic drug delivery.

  16. PDLLA honeycomb-like scaffolds with a high loading of superhydrophilic graphene/multi-walled carbon nanotubes promote osteoblast in vitro functions and guided in vivo bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Edmundo; Vasconcellos, Luana Marotta Reis de; Rodrigues, Bruno V M; Dos Santos, Danilo Martins; Campana-Filho, Sergio P; Marciano, Fernanda Roberta; Webster, Thomas J; Lobo, Anderson Oliveira

    2017-04-01

    Herein, we developed honeycomb-like scaffolds by combining poly (d, l-lactic acid) (PDLLA) with a high amount of graphene/multi-walled carbon nanotube oxides (MWCNTO-GO, 50% w/w). From pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) powders, we produced MWCNTO-GO via oxygen plasma etching (OPE), which promoted their exfoliation and oxidation. Initially, we evaluated PDLLA and PDLLA/MWCNTO-GO scaffolds for tensile strength tests, cell adhesion and cell viability (with osteoblast-like MG-63 cells), alkaline phosphatase (ALP, a marker of osteoblast differentiation) activity and mineralized nodule formation. In vivo tests were carried out using PDLLA and PDLLA/MWCNTO-GO scaffolds as fillers for critical defects in the tibia of rats. MWCNTO-GO loading was responsible for decreasing the tensile strength and elongation-at-break of PDLLA scaffolds, although the high mechanical performance observed (~600MPa) assures their application in bone tissue regeneration. In vitro results showed that the scaffolds were not cytotoxic and allowed for osteoblast-like cell interactions and the formation of mineralized matrix nodules. Furthermore, MG-63 cells grown on PDLLA/MWCNTO-GO significantly enhanced osteoblast ALP activity compared to controls (cells alone), while the PDLLA group showed similar ALP activity when compared to controls and PDLLA/MWCNTO-GO. Most impressively, in vivo tests suggested that compared to PDLLA scaffolds, PDLLA/MWCNTO-GO had a superior influence on bone cell activity, promoting greater new bone formation. In summary, the results of this study highlighted that this novel scaffold (MWCNTO-GO, 50% w/w) is a promising alternative for bone tissue regeneration and, thus, should be further studied. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of unidirectional permeability in asymmetric poly(DL-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) conduits on peripheral nerve regeneration: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chen-Jung; Hsu, Shan-Hui; Yen, Hung-Jen; Chang, Han; Hsu, Shih-Kuang

    2007-10-01

    The high outflow permeability of the nerve conduit used to emit the drained waste generated from the traumatized host nerve stump is critical in peripheral nerve regeneration. Our earlier studies have established that asymmetric conduits fulfill the basic requirements for use as nerve guide conduits. In this study, the inflow characteristics of optimal nerve conduits were further examined using in vivo and in vitro trials. Various asymmetric poly(DL-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) conduits were controlled by modifying precipitation baths using 0, 20, and 95% isopropyl alcohol, with high-porosity (permeability), medium-porosity (high outflow and low inflow), and low-porosity (permeability), respectively. In the in vitro trial, the Schwann cells and fibroblasts were seeded on either side of the asymmetric PLGA films in a newly designed coculture system that simulated the repaired nerve conduit environment. The results of the directional permeable films indicated the statistically significant proliferation of Schwann cells and the inhibition of the division of fibroblasts in lactate dehydrogenase release and inhibition of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction, compared with the other films. In the in vivo trial, the PLGA conduits seeded with Schwann cells were implanted into 10 mm right sciatic nerve defects in rats. After 6 weeks, implanted conduits were harvested. Histological examination verified that directional permeable conduits had markedly more A-type and B-type myelin fibers in the midconduit and distal nerve. In this work, the directional transport characteristics were established as an extremely important factor to the design and development of optimal nerve guide conduits in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  18. Vehicle and positive control values from the in vivo rodent comet assay and biomonitoring studies using human lymphocytes: historical database and influence of technical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Kamala; Springer, S; Bruce, S; Lawlor, T; Hewitt, N; Aardema, M J

    2014-10-01

    There is increased interest in the in vivo comet assay in rodents as a follow-up approach for determining the biological relevance of chemicals that are genotoxic in in vitro assays. This is partly because, unlike other assays, DNA damage can be assessed in this assay in virtually any tissue. Since background levels of DNA damage can vary with the species, tissue, and cell processing method, a robust historical control database covering multiple tissues is essential. We describe extensive vehicle and positive control data for multiple tissues from rats and mice. In addition, we report historical data from control and genotoxin-treated human blood. Technical issues impacting comet results are described, including the method of cell preparation and freezing. Cell preparation by scraping (stomach and other GI tract organs) resulted in higher % tail DNA than mincing (liver, spleen, kidney etc) or direct collection (blood or bone marrow). Treatment with the positive control genotoxicant, ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) in rats and methyl methanesulfonate in mice, resulted in statistically significant increases in % tail DNA. Background DNA damage was not markedly increased when cell suspensions were stored frozen prior to preparing slides, and the outcome of the assay was unchanged (EMS was always positive). In conclusion, historical data from our laboratory for the in vivo comet assay for multiple tissues from rats and mice, as well as human blood show very good reproducibility. These data and recommendations provided are aimed at contributing to the design and proper interpretation of results from comet assays. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Adenovirus vector-mediated ex vivo gene transfer of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) tohuman umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs) promotescrush-injured rat sciatic nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, Wei-Hong; Almansoori, Akram A; Sung, Mi-Ae; Ju, Kyung-Won; Seo, Nari; Lee, Sung-Ho; Kim, Bong-Ju; Kim, Soung-Min; Jahng, Jeong Won; He, Hong; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2017-03-16

    This study was designed toinvestigate the efficacy of adenovirus vector-mediated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) ex vivo gene transfer to human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs) in a rat sciatic nerve crush injury model. BDNF protein and mRNA expression after infection was checked through an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (200-250g, 6 weeks old) were distributed into threegroups (n=20 each): the control group, UCB-MSC group, and BDNF-adenovirus infected UCB-MSC (BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSC) group. UCB-MSCs (1×10 6 cells/10μl/rat) or BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSCs (1×10 6 cells/10μl/rat)were transplantedinto the rats at the crush site immediately after sciatic nerve injury. Cell tracking was done with PKH26-labeled UCB-MSCs and BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSCs (1×10 6 cells/10μl/rat). The rats were monitored for 4 weeks post-surgery. Results showed that expression of BDNF at both the protein and mRNA levels was higher inthe BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSC group compared to theUCB-MSC group in vitro.Moreover, BDNF mRNA expression was higher in both UCB-MSC group and BDNF-Ad+ UCB-MSC group compared tothe control group, and BDNF mRNA expression in theBDNF-Ad+UCB-MSC group was higher than inboth other groups 5days after surgeryin vivo. Labeled neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), axon counts, axon density, and sciatic function index were significantly increased in the UCB-MSC and BDNF-Ad+ UCB-MSCgroupscompared to the controlgroup four weeksaftercell transplantation. Importantly,the BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSCgroup exhibited more peripheral nerve regeneration than the other two groups.Our results indicate thatboth UCB-MSCs and BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSCscan improve rat sciatic nerve regeneration, with BDNF-Ad+UCB-MSCsshowing a greater effectthan UCB-MSCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Role of Feature Selection and Statistical Weighting in Predicting In Vivo Toxicity Using In Vitro Assay and QSAR Data (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our study assesses the value of both in vitro assay and quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) data in predicting in vivo toxicity using numerous statistical models and approaches to process the data. Our models are built on datasets of (i) 586 chemicals for which bo...

  1. Ex vivo assays to study self-renewal and long-term expansion of genetically modified primary human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Schepers, Hein

    2009-01-01

    With the emergence of the concept of the leukemia stem cell, assays to study them remain pivotal in understanding (leukemic) stem cell biology. Although the in vivo NOD-SCID xenotransplantation model is still the favored model of choice in most cases, this system has some limitations as well, such

  2. The Combined Utility of Ex vivo IFN-γ Release Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSpot Assay and In vivo Skin Testing in Patients With Antibiotic-Associated Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubiano, Jason A; Strautins, Kaija; Redwood, Alec J; Pavlos, Rebecca; Konvinse, Katherine C; Aung, Ar Kar; Slavin, Monica A; Thursky, Karin A; Grayson, M Lindsay; Phillips, Elizabeth J

    2017-10-31

    For severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs) associated with multiple antibiotics dosed concurrently, clinical causality is challenging and diagnostic approaches are limited, leading to constricted future antibiotic choices. To examine the combined utility of in vivo and ex vivo diagnostic approaches at assigning drug causality in a cohort of patients with antibiotic-associated (AA)-SCARs. Patients with AA-SCARs were prospectively recruited between April 2015 and February 2017. In vivo testing (patch testing or delayed intradermal testing) was performed to the implicated antibiotic(s) at the highest nonirritating concentration and read at 24 hours through 1 week. Ex vivo testing used patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with a range of pharmacologically relevant concentrations of implicated antibiotics to measure dose-dependent IFN-γ release from CD4+ and CD8+ T cells via an enzyme-linked immunoSpot assay. In 19 patients with AA-SCARs, combined in vivo and ex vivo testing assigned antibiotic causality in 15 (79%) patients. Ten patients (53%) with AA-SCARs were positive on IFN-γ release enzyme-linked immunoSpot assay, with an overall reported sensitivity of 52% (95% CI, 29-76) and specificity of 100% (95% CI, 79-100), with improved sensitivity noted in acute (within 1 day to 6 weeks after SCAR onset) testing (75%) and in patients with higher phenotypic scores (59%). There was increased use of narrow-spectrum beta-lactams and antibiotics from within the implicated class following testing in patients with a positive ex vivo or in vivo test result. We demonstrate the potential utility of combined in vivo and ex vivo testing in patients with AA-SCARs to assign drug causality with high specificity. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Lack of in vivo clastogenic activity of grape seed and grape skin extracts in a mouse micronucleus assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erexson, G L

    2003-03-01

    Meganatural brand grape seed extract (GSE) and grape skin extract (GSKE), containing proanthocyanidin polyphenolic compounds, are intended for use in food as functional ingredients exhibiting antioxidant activity. Proanthocyanidins, as well as the minor constituent phenolic compounds in GSE and GSKE, are present naturally in many foods such as fruits, vegetables, chocolate, tea, etc., and on average people consume 460-1000 mg/day of these combined substances. While some polyphenolic compounds, tested individually, have demonstrated antitumorigenic or antipromotional activity, at least one minor component of GSE and GSKE, quercitin, has exhibited positive activity in Salmonella and other in vitro mutagenicity assays. As part of a program to investigate the safety of GSE and GSKE, these products were tested for in vivo clastogenic activity and/or disruption of the mitotic apparatus by detecting micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocyte (PCE) cells in Crl:CD-1(ICR) BR mouse bone marrow. The appropriate test article was dissolved in 0.5% carboxymethylcellulose and dosed by oral gavage to five males/test article/dose level/harvest time point. Animals were dosed at 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg. Five animals dosed with either test article at 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg dose levels and five animals dosed with the cyclophosphamide (80 mg/kg) positive control were euthanized approximately 24 h after dosing for extraction of bone marrow. Five animals dosed with either test article at the 2000 mg/kg dose level and five animals dosed with the vehicle control article were euthanized approximately 24 and 48 h after dosing for extraction of bone marrow. At least 2000 PCEs per animal were analyzed for frequency of micronuclei. Cytotoxicity was assessed by scoring the number of PCEs and normochromatic erythrocytes (NCEs) in at least the first 500 erythrocytes for each animal. For both GSE and GSKE, no statistically significant increase in micronucleated PCEs was observed at any dose level

  4. In vitro effects of heparin and tissue factor pathway inhibitor on factor VII assays. possible implications for measurements in vivo after heparin therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladbjerg, E-M; Larsen, L F; Ostergaard, P

    2000-01-01

    The coagulant activity of blood coagulation factor VII (FVII:C) can be lowered by changes in lifestyle and by therapeutic intervention, e.g. heparin infusion. The question is, however, whether FVII:C determined ex vivo is a valid measure of the FVII activity in vivo. We measured plasma FVII......:C, activated FVII (FVIIa), FVII protein (FVII:Ag), tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), triglycerides, and free fatty acids (FFA) before and 15 min after infusion of a bolus of unfractionated heparin (50 IU/kg body weight) in 12 healthy subjects. Additionally, we conducted in vitro experiments...... activity by means of FVII clotting assays. These assays should therefore not be used to measure the coagulation status of patients in heparin therapy, unless extraordinary precautions are taken to eliminate TFPI and heparin effects ex vivo. The observed effect of heparin on FVII:Ag should be investigated...

  5. Appraisal of Total Phenol, Flavonoid Contents, and Antioxidant Potential of Folkloric Lannea coromandelica Using In Vitro and In Vivo Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tekeshwar Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the impending antioxidant properties of different extracts of crude methanolic extract (CME of leaves of Lannea coromandelica (L. coromandelica and its two ethyl acetate (EAF and aqueous (AqF subfractions by employing various established in vitro systems and estimation of total phenolic and flavonoid content. The results showed that extract and fractions possessed strong antioxidant activity in vitro and among them, EAF had the strongest antioxidant activity. EAF was confirmed for its highest phenolic content, total flavonoid contents, and total antioxidant capacity. The EAF was found to show remarkable scavenging activity on 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH (EC50 63.9 ± 0.64 µg/mL, superoxide radical (EC50 8.2 ± 0.12 mg/mL, and Fe2+ chelating activity (EC50 6.2 ± 0.09 mg/mL. Based on our in vitro results, EAF was investigated for in vivo antioxidant assay. Intragastric administration of the EAF can significantly increase levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione (GSH, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px levels, and decrease malondialdehyde (MDA content in the liver and kidney of CCl4-intoxicated rats. These new evidences show that L. coromandelica bared antioxidant activity.

  6. Toward in vitro-to-in vivo translation of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics: Application of a neonatal Fc receptor-mediated transcytosis assay to understand the interplaying clearance mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Claudia A Castro; Belli, Sara; Cascais, Anne-Christine; Dudal, Sherri; Edelmann, Martin R; Haak, Markus; Brun, Marie-Elise; Otteneder, Michael B; Ullah, Mohammed; Funk, Christoph; Schuler, Franz; Simon, Silke

    2017-07-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a rapidly growing drug class for which great efforts have been made to optimize certain molecular features to achieve the desired pharmacokinetic (PK) properties. One approach is to engineer the interactions of the mAb with the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) by introducing specific amino acid sequence mutations, and to assess their effect on the PK profile with in vivo studies. Indeed, FcRn protects mAbs from intracellular degradation, thereby prolongs antibody circulation time in plasma and modulates its systemic clearance. To allow more efficient and focused mAb optimization, in vitro input that helps to identify and quantitatively predict the contribution of different processes driving non-target mediated mAb clearance in vivo and supporting translational PK modeling activities is essential. With this aim, we evaluated the applicability and in vivo-relevance of an in vitro cellular FcRn-mediated transcytosis assay to explain the PK behavior of 25 mAbs in rat or monkey. The assay was able to capture species-specific differences in IgG-FcRn interactions and overall correctly ranked Fc mutants according to their in vivo clearance. However, it could not explain the PK behavior of all tested IgGs, indicating that mAb disposition in vivo is a complex interplay of additional processes besides the FcRn interaction. Overall, the transcytosis assay was considered suitable to rank mAb candidates for their FcRn-mediated clearance component before extensive in vivo testing, and represents a first step toward a multi-factorial in vivo clearance prediction approach based on in vitro data.

  7. In vivo clonal analysis reveals lineage-restricted progenitor characteristics in mammalian kidney development, maintenance, and regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinkevich, Y.; Montoro, D.T.; Contreras-Trujillo, H.; Harari-Steinberg, O.; Newman, A.M.; Tsai, J.M.; Lim, X.; van Amerongen, R.; Bowman, A.; Januszyk, M.; Pleniceanu, O.; Nusse, R.; Longaker, M.T.; Weissman, I.L.; Dekel, B.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism and magnitude by which the mammalian kidney generates and maintains its proximal tubules, distal tubules, and collecting ducts remain controversial. Here, we use long-term in vivo genetic lineage tracing and clonal analysis of individual cells from kidneys undergoing development,

  8. Tantalum coating of porous carbon scaffold supplemented with autologous bone marrow stromal stem cells for bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaowei; Zhao, Dewei; Wang, Benjie; Wang, Wei; Kang, Kai; Xie, Hui; Liu, Baoyi; Zhang, Xiuzhi; Zhang, Jinsong; Yang, Zhenming

    2016-03-01

    Porous tantalum metal with low elastic modulus is similar to cancellous bone. Reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) can provide three-dimensional pore structure and serves as the ideal scaffold of tantalum coating. In this study, the biocompatibility of domestic porous tantalum was first successfully tested with bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) in vitro and for bone tissue repair in vivo. We evaluated cytotoxicity of RVC scaffold and tantalum coating using BMSCs. The morphology, adhesion, and proliferation of BMSCs were observed via laser scanning confocal microscope and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, porous tantalum rods with or without autologous BMSCs were implanted on hind legs in dogs, respectively. The osteogenic potential was observed by hard tissue slice examination. At three weeks and six weeks following implantation, new osteoblasts and new bone were observed at the tantalum-host bone interface and pores. At 12 weeks postporous tantalum with autologous BMSCs implantation, regenerated trabecular equivalent to mature bone was found in the pore of tantalum rods. Our results suggested that domestic porous tantalum had excellent biocompatibility and could promote new bone formation in vivo. Meanwhile, the osteogenesis of porous tantalum associated with autologous BMSCs was more excellent than only tantalum implantation. Future clinical studies are warranted to verify the clinical efficacy of combined implantation of this domestic porous tantalum associated with autologous BMSCs implantation and compare their efficacy with conventional autologous bone grafting carrying blood vessel in patients needing bone repairing. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  9. Longitudinal in vivo evaluation of bone regeneration by combined measurement of multi-pinhole SPECT and micro-CT for tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienemann, Philipp S.; Metzger, Stéphanie; Kiveliö, Anna-Sofia; Blanc, Alain; Papageorgiou, Panagiota; Astolfo, Alberto; Pinzer, Bernd R.; Cinelli, Paolo; Weber, Franz E.; Schibli, Roger; Béhé, Martin; Ehrbar, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Over the last decades, great strides were made in the development of novel implants for the treatment of bone defects. The increasing versatility and complexity of these implant designs request for concurrent advances in means to assess in vivo the course of induced bone formation in preclinical models. Since its discovery, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has excelled as powerful high-resolution technique for non-invasive assessment of newly formed bone tissue. However, micro-CT fails to provide spatiotemporal information on biological processes ongoing during bone regeneration. Conversely, due to the versatile applicability and cost-effectiveness, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) would be an ideal technique for assessing such biological processes with high sensitivity and for nuclear imaging comparably high resolution (guide the healing of critical sized calvarial bone defects. By combined in vivo longitudinal multi-pinhole SPECT and micro-CT evaluations we determine the spatiotemporal course of bone formation and remodeling within this synthetic hydrogel implant. End point evaluations by high resolution micro-CT and histological evaluation confirm the value of this approach to follow and optimize bone-inducing biomaterials.

  10. Avian extraintestinal Escherichia coli exhibits enterotoxigenic-like activity in the in vivo rabbit ligated ileal loop assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluta, Renato Pariz; Gatti, Maria Silvia Viccari; Joazeiro, Paulo Pinto; de Paiva, Jacqueline Boldrin; Rojas, Thaís Cabrera Galvão; Silveira, Flávio; Houle, Sébastien; Kobayashi, Renata Katsuko Takayama; Dozois, Charles M; Dias da Silveira, Wanderley

    2014-06-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) strains harbor a number of virulence genes and cause extraintestinal diseases, such as septicemia, swollen-head syndrome, salpingitis, and omphalitis in poultry. APEC strains are not known to cause intestinal diseases. Herein, for the first time, it is reported that APEC strains were able to induce an enterotoxigenic-like effect in rabbit ligated ileal loops. Strain SEPT362 caused cell detachment of the intestinal villi, which also showed a flattened and wilted appearance, but the integrity of the tight junctions was maintained. Additionally, this strain did not adhere to enterocytes in vivo, although adhesin encoding genes ( fimH, csgA, lpfA2-3, and ECP) were present while other lpfA types, sfa, afa, papC, and ral genes were not. This enterotoxigenic-like activity was conserved after thermal treatment of the supernatant at 65°C but not at 100°C. Moreover, experiments based on filtering with different molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) pore sizes demonstrated that the component associated with the observed biological effect has a molecular weight >100 kDa. Blast search and polymerase chain reaction assays for known E. coli virulence factors showed that strain SEPT362 harbors the gene encoding for the toxin EAST-1 and the serine protease autotransporter (SPATE) Tsh, but is negative for genes encoding for the toxins LT-I, STh, STp, Stx1, Stx2, CNF-1, CNF-2, CDT and the SPATEs Sat, Pic, Vat, SigA, SepA, EatA, EspP, or EspC. A cloned copy of the tsh gene in E. coli K-12 was also tested and was shown to have an enterotoxic effect. These results suggest that APEC might induce fluid accumulation in the rabbit gut. The Tsh autotransporter seems to be one of the factors associated with this phenotype.

  11. Semaphorin 3A Shifts Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cells towards Osteogenic Phenotype and Promotes Bone Regeneration In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangwei Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs are considered as the promising seed cells for bone regeneration. However, the lower osteogenic differentiation capacity limits its therapeutic efficacy. Identification of the key molecules governing the differences between ASCs and BMSCs would shed light on manipulation of ASCs towards osteogenic phenotype. In this study, we screened semaphorin family members in ASCs and BMSCs and identified Sema3A as an osteogenic semaphorin that was significantly and predominantly expressed in BMSCs. The analyses in vitro showed that the overexpression of Sema3A in ASCs significantly enhanced the expression of bone-related genes and extracellular matrix calcium deposition, while decreasing the expression of adipose-related genes and thus lipid droplet formation, resembling a BMSCs phenotype. Furthermore, Sema3A modified ASCs were then engrafted into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA scaffolds to repair the critical-sized calvarial defects in rat model. As expected, Sema3A modified ASCs encapsulation significantly promoted new bone formation with higher bone volume fraction and bone mineral density. Additionally, Sema3A was found to simultaneously increase multiple Wnt related genes and thus activating Wnt pathway. Taken together, our study here identifies Sema3A as a critical gene for osteogenic phenotype and reveals that Sema3A-modified ASCs would serve as a promising candidate for bettering bone defect repair.

  12. In vivo testing of a 3D bifurcating microchannel scaffold inducing separation of regenerating axon bundles in peripheral nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanova, Irina I.; van Wezel, Richard J. A.; Rutten, Wim L. C.

    2013-12-01

    Artificial nerve guidance channels enhance the regenerative effectiveness in an injured peripheral nerve but the existing design so far has been limited to basic straight tubes simply guiding the growth to bridge the gap. Hence, one of the goals in development of more effective neuroprostheses is to create bidirectional highly selective neuro-electronic interface between a prosthetic device and the severed nerve. A step towards improving selectivity for both recording and stimulation have been made with some recent in vitro studies which showed that three-dimensional (3D) bifurcating microchannels can separate neurites growing on a planar surface and bring them into contact with individual electrodes. Since the growing axons in vivo have the innate tendency to group in bundles surrounded by connective tissue, one of the big challenges in neuro-prosthetic interface design is how to overcome it. Therefore, we performed experiments with 3D bifurcating guidance scaffolds implanted in the sciatic nerve of rats to test if this new channel architecture could trigger separation pattern of ingrowth also in vivo. Our results showed that this new method enabled the re-growth of neurites into channels with gradually diminished width (80, 40 and 20 µm) and facilitated the separation of the axonal bundles with 91% success. It seems that the 3D bifurcating scaffold might contribute towards conveying detailed neural control and sensory feedback to users of prosthetic devices, and thus could improve the quality of their daily life.

  13. The fabrication of an ICA-SF/PLCL nanofibrous membrane by coaxial electrospinning and its effect on bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lihua; Wang, Kaijuan; Lv, Xiaoqin; Sun, Rui; Yang, Shaohua; Yang, Yujie; Liu, Yanyun; Liu, Jiatao; Zhou, Jing; Yu, Zhanhai

    2017-08-17

    GBR is currently accepted as one of the most effective approaches for bone defect regeneration relating to dental implant. Icariin is the main active ingredient in the extraction of total flavonoids from the Chinese traditional herb Epimediumbrevicornum Maxim. In this study, ICA was successfully incorporated into the nanofibers barrier membrane (ICA-SF/PLCL) as osteoinduction factor by coaxial electrospinning and was released in a sustained and controlled manner. The entire release period included two stages: an initial burst stage (47.54 ± 0.06% on 5 d) and a decreasing and constant stage (82.09 ± 1.86% on 30 d). The membrane has good biocompatibility with BMMSCs anchored and significantly promoted its osteogenic activity. Moreover, in vivo experiment, bone defect covered by ICA-SF/PLCL membrane in rat cranium were statistically repaired compare to other groups. 12 weeks after implantation, in the test group, the new bone formation spread to cover most of the defect region with volume and density of approximately 15.95 ± 3.58 mm 3 and 14.02 ± 0.93%. These results demonstrated that ICA-SF/PLCL nanofibrous membrane could be a promising barrier applicated for GBR.

  14. Transportation conditions for prompt use of ex vivo expanded and freshly harvested clinical-grade bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Elena; Murgia, Alba; Caselli, Anna; Grisendi, Giulia; Piccinno, Maria Serena; Rasini, Valeria; Giordano, Rosaria; Montemurro, Tiziana; Bourin, Philippe; Sensebé, Luc; Rojewski, Markus T; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Layrolle, Pierre; Ginebra, Maria Pau; Panaitescu, Carmen Bunu; Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Catani, Fabio; Paolucci, Paolo; Burns, Jorge S; Dominici, Massimo

    2014-03-01

    Successful preliminary studies have encouraged a more translational phase for stem cell research. Nevertheless, advances in the culture of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hBM-MSC) and osteoconductive qualities of combined biomaterials can be undermined if necessary cell transportation procedures prove unviable. We aimed at evaluating the effect of transportation conditions on cell function, including the ability to form bone in vivo, using procedures suited to clinical application. hBM-MSC expanded in current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) facilities (cGMP-hBM-MSC) to numbers suitable for therapy were transported overnight within syringes and subsequently tested for viability. Scaled-down experiments mimicking shipment for 18 h at 4°C tested the influence of three different clinical-grade transportation buffers (0.9% saline alone or with 4% human serum albumin [HSA] from two independent sources) compared with cell maintenance medium. Cell viability after shipment was >80% in all cases, enabling evaluation of (1) adhesion to plastic flasks and hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate osteoconductive biomaterial (HA/β-TCP 3D scaffold); (2) proliferation rate; (3) ex vivo osteogenic differentiation in contexts of 2D monolayers on plastic and 3D HA/β-TCP scaffolds; and (4) in vivo ectopic bone formation after subcutaneous implantation of cells with HA/β-TCP scaffold into NOD/SCID mice. Von Kossa staining was used to assess ex vivo osteogenic differentiation in 3D cultures, providing a quantifiable test of 3D biomineralization ex vivo as a rapid, cost-effective potency assay. Near-equivalent capacities for cell survival, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation were found for all transportation buffers. Moreover, cGMP-hBM-MSC transported from a production facility under clinical-grade conditions of 4% HSA in 0.9% saline to a destination 18 h away showed prompt adhesion to HA/β-TCP 3D scaffold and subsequent in vivo bone formation

  15. Evaluation of 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether in the rat comet assay: Part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM)-initiative international validation study of in vivo rat alkaline comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priestley, Catherine C; Walker, Joanne S; O'Donovan, Michael R; Doherty, Ann T

    2015-07-01

    As a part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM)-initiative international validation study of the in vivo rat alkaline comet assay, 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether (DPE), a known rodent genotoxic carcinogen, was tested in this laboratory. Sprague Dawley rats (7-9 weeks of age) were given three oral doses of DPE, 24 and 21 h apart and liver or stomach sampled 3h after the final dose. Under the conditions of the test, no increases in DNA damage in liver and stomach were observed with DPE (up to 200 mg/kg/day). A dose-dependent decrease in DNA migration, compared to vehicle controls, was noted for DPE in rat stomach. Further analysis is required to elucidate fully whether this decrease is a consequence of the mode of action or due to the toxicity of DPE. What is perhaps surprising is the inability of the comet assay to detect a known rat genotoxic carcinogen in liver. Further investigation is needed to clarify whether this apparent lack of response results from limited tissue exposure or metabolic differences between species. This finding highlights a need for careful consideration of study design when evaluating assay performance as a measure of in vivo genotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantitative Correlation of in Vivo Properties with in Vitro Assay Results: The in Vitro Binding of a Biotin–DNA Analogue Modifier with Streptavidin Predicts the in Vivo Avidin-Induced Clearability of the Analogue-Modified Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Shuping; Virostko, John; Greiner, Dale L.; Powers, Alvin C.; Liu, Guozheng

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative prediction of in vivo behavior using an in vitro assay would dramatically accelerate pharmaceutical development. However, studies quantitatively correlating in vivo properties with in vitro assay results are rare because of the difficulty in quantitatively understanding the in vivo behavior of an agent. We now demonstrate such a correlation as a case study based on our quantitative understanding of the in vivo chemistry. In an ongoing pretargeting project, we designed a trifunctional antibody (Ab) that concomitantly carried a biotin and a DNA analogue (hereafter termed MORF). The biotin and the MORF were fused into one structure prior to conjugation to the Ab for the concomitant attachment. Because it was known that avidin-bound Ab molecules leave the circulation rapidly, this design would theoretically allow complete clearance by avidin. The clearability of the trifunctional Ab was determined by calculating the blood MORF concentration ratio of avidin-treated Ab to non-avidin-treated Ab using mice injected with these compounds. In theory, any compromised clearability should be due to the presence of impurities. In vitro, we measured the biotinylated percentage of the Ab-reacting (MORF-biotin)⊃-NH2 modifier, by addition of streptavidin to the radiolabeled (MORF-biotin)⊃-NH2 samples and subsequent high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. On the basis of our previous quantitative understanding, we predicted that the clearability of the Ab would be equal to the biotinylation percentage measured via HPLC. We validated this prediction within a 3% difference. In addition to the high avidin-induced clearability of the trifunctional Ab (up to ~95%) achieved by the design, we were able to predict the required quality of the (MORF-biotin)⊃-NH2 modifier for any given in vivo clearability. This approach may greatly reduce the steps and time currently required in pharmaceutical development in the process of synthesis, chemical analysis, in

  17. Quantitative Correlation of in Vivo Properties with in Vitro Assay Results: The in Vitro Binding of a Biotin-DNA Analogue Modifier with Streptavidin Predicts the in Vivo Avidin-Induced Clearability of the Analogue-Modified Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Shuping; Virostko, John; Greiner, Dale L; Powers, Alvin C; Liu, Guozheng

    2015-08-03

    Quantitative prediction of in vivo behavior using an in vitro assay would dramatically accelerate pharmaceutical development. However, studies quantitatively correlating in vivo properties with in vitro assay results are rare because of the difficulty in quantitatively understanding the in vivo behavior of an agent. We now demonstrate such a correlation as a case study based on our quantitative understanding of the in vivo chemistry. In an ongoing pretargeting project, we designed a trifunctional antibody (Ab) that concomitantly carried a biotin and a DNA analogue (hereafter termed MORF). The biotin and the MORF were fused into one structure prior to conjugation to the Ab for the concomitant attachment. Because it was known that avidin-bound Ab molecules leave the circulation rapidly, this design would theoretically allow complete clearance by avidin. The clearability of the trifunctional Ab was determined by calculating the blood MORF concentration ratio of avidin-treated Ab to non-avidin-treated Ab using mice injected with these compounds. In theory, any compromised clearability should be due to the presence of impurities. In vitro, we measured the biotinylated percentage of the Ab-reacting (MORF-biotin)⊃-NH2 modifier, by addition of streptavidin to the radiolabeled (MORF-biotin)⊃-NH2 samples and subsequent high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. On the basis of our previous quantitative understanding, we predicted that the clearability of the Ab would be equal to the biotinylation percentage measured via HPLC. We validated this prediction within a 3% difference. In addition to the high avidin-induced clearability of the trifunctional Ab (up to ∼95%) achieved by the design, we were able to predict the required quality of the (MORF-biotin)⊃-NH2 modifier for any given in vivo clearability. This approach may greatly reduce the steps and time currently required in pharmaceutical development in the process of synthesis, chemical analysis, in

  18. In vitro P-glycoprotein assays to predict the in vivo interactions of P-glycoprotein with drugs in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bo; Mills, Jessica B; Davidson, Ralph E; Mireles, Rouchelle J; Janiszewski, John S; Troutman, Matthew D; de Morais, Sonia M

    2008-02-01

    Thirty-one structurally diverse marketed central nervous system (CNS)-active drugs, one active metabolite, and seven non-CNS-active compounds were tested in three P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in vitro assays: transwell assays using MDCK, human MDR1-MDCK, and mouse Mdr1a-MDCK cells, ATPase, and calcein AM inhibition. Additionally, the permeability for these compounds was measured in two in vitro models: parallel artificial membrane permeation assay and apical-to-basolateral apparent permeability in MDCK. The exposure of the same set of compounds in brain and plasma was measured in P-gp knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice after subcutaneous administration. One drug and its metabolite, risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone, of the 32 CNS compounds, and 6 of the 7 non-CNS drugs were determined to have positive efflux using ratio of ratios in MDR1-MDCK versus MDCK transwell assays. Data from transwell studies correlated well with the brain-to-plasma area under the curve ratios between P-gp KO and WT mice for the 32 CNS compounds. In addition, 3300 Pfizer compounds were tested in MDR1-MDCK and Mdr1a-MDCK transwell assays, with a good correlation (R(2) = 0.92) between the efflux ratios in human MDR1-MDCK and mouse Mdr1a-MDCK cells. Permeability data showed that the majority of the 32 CNS compounds have moderate to high passive permeability. This work has demonstrated that in vitro transporter assays help in understanding the role of P-gp-mediated efflux activity in determining the disposition of CNS drugs in vivo, and the transwell assay is a valuable in vitro assay to evaluate human P-gp interaction with compounds for assessing brain penetration of new chemical entities to treat CNS disorders.

  19. Use of in vivo and in vitro assays for the characterization of mammalian excision repair and isolation of repair proteins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); A.P.M. Eker (André); R.D. Wood (Richard); P. Robins

    1990-01-01

    textabstractElucidation of the molecular mechanism of mammalian nucleotide excision repair requires the availability of purified proteins, DNA substrates with defined lesions and suitable repair assays. Repair assays introduced in recent years vary from testing individual steps and successions of

  20. Biomaterial Selection for Tooth Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Zhenglin; Nie, Hemin; Wang, Shuang; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Fu, Susan Y.; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Lili(Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007, China); MAO, JEREMY J.

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or s...

  1. In Vitro and in Vivo Assays of 3,5-Disubstituted-Tetrahydro-2H-1,3,5-Thiadiazin-2-Thione Derivatives against Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muelas Susana

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxicity assays of 24 new 3,5-disubstituted-tetrahydro-2H-1,3,5-thiadiazin-2-thione derivatives were performed. The 17 compounds with higher anti-epimastigote activity and lower cytotoxicity were, thereafter, screened against amastigote of Trypanosoma cruzi. Out of these 17 derivatives S-2d was selected to be assayed in vivo, because of its remarkable trypanocidal properties. To determine toxicity against J774 macrophages, a method based on quantification of cell damage, after 24 h, was used. Cell respiration, an indicator of cell viability, was assessed by the reduction of MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] to formazan. Anti-amastigote activity was estimated after 48 h by microscopic counts of May Grünwald-Giemsa-stained monolayers. Nifurtimox and benznidazole were used as reference drugs. For the in vivo experiences, mice were infected with 10(4 blood trypomastigotes and then treated during 15 days with S-2d or nifurtimox by oral route. All of the compounds were highly toxic at 100 mg/ml for macrophages and a few of them maintained this cytotoxicity even at 10 mg/ml. Of the derivatives assayed against amastigotes 3k and S-2d showed an interesting activity, that was held even at 1mg/ml. It is demonstrated that the high anti-epimastigote activity previously reported is mainly due to the non-specific toxicity of these compounds. In vivo assays assessed a reduction of parasitemia after administration of S-2d to infected mice.

  2. Guided bone regeneration of non-contained mandibular buccal bone defects using deproteinized bovine bone mineral and a collagen membrane: an experimental in vivo investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Mariano; Ferrantino, Luca; Vignoletti, Fabio; de Sanctis, Massimo; Berglundh, Tord

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this pre-clinical in vivo study was to analyse different stages of wound healing after guided bone regeneration in non-contained mandibular buccal bone defects. Eighteen female beagle dogs, between 1.5 and 2 years old, were used. Buccal bone defects were created in the mandible following extraction of the mesial roots of M1, P4, the distal root of P3 and booth roots of P2. Augmentation procedures of the healed defects were performed 3 months later using a bone replacement graft (T1), an absorbable collagen membrane (T2) or a combination of both procedures (T3). Using a randomized block study design, four stages of healing in two groups of dogs were examined (4 days, 2, 6 weeks and 3 months). The animals were euthanized, and biopsies obtained at the end of each of the study periods were prepared for histological examination. The different reconstructive procedures resulted in regenerated tissue compartments of varying size that contained newly formed bone, non-mineralized tissue and bone augmentation biomaterial when a bone replacement graft was used. While the proportions of mineralized tissue increased and non-mineralized tissue decreased over time in the three groups, the changes in proportions of the DBBM material were small. Initial defect depth, healing time and treatment group significantly influenced the percentage of mineralized tissue obtained. The multivariate multilevel analysis showed that significantly larger area proportions of mineralized tissue were obtained when the T2 sites were compared with T1 and T3 sites, what highlights the importance of the barrier membrane effect for attaining new bone formation. Only in the larger size defects (M1) total ROI at T3 and T1 sites was significantly larger than at T2, what highlights the importance of using a bone replacement graft as a space maintenance scaffold. It is suggested that healing following augmentation of non-contained buccal bone defects was characterized by a gradual shift in the

  3. A new tool for tuberculosis vaccine screening: Ex vivo Mycobacterial Growth Inhibition Assay indicates BCG-mediated protection in a murine model of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelmer, Andrea; Tanner, Rachel; Stylianou, Elena; Damelang, Timon; Morris, Sheldon; Izzo, Angelo; Williams, Ann; Sharpe, Sally; Pepponi, Ilaria; Walker, Barry; Hokey, David A; McShane, Helen; Brennan, Michael; Fletcher, Helen

    2016-08-12

    In the absence of a validated animal model and/or an immune correlate which predict vaccine-mediated protection, large-scale clinical trials are currently the only option to prove efficacy of new tuberculosis candidate vaccines. Tools to facilitate testing of new tuberculosis (TB) vaccines are therefore urgently needed. We present here an optimized ex vivo mycobacterial growth inhibition assay (MGIA) using a murine Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection model. This assay assesses the combined ability of host immune cells to inhibit mycobacterial growth in response to vaccination. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and growth inhibition of mycobacteria by splenocytes was assessed. Mice were also challenged with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Erdman, and bacterial burden was assessed in lungs and spleen. Using the growth inhibition assay, we find a reduction in BCG CFU of 0.3-0.8 log10 after co-culture with murine splenocytes from BCG vaccinated versus naïve C57BL/6 mice. BCG vaccination in our hands led to a reduction in bacterial burden after challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis of approx. 0.7 log10 CFU in lung and approx. 1 log10 CFU in spleen. This effect was also seen when using Mycobacterium smegmatis as the target of growth inhibition. An increase in mycobacterial numbers was found when splenocytes from interferon gamma-deficient mice were used, compared to wild type controls, indicating that immune mechanisms may also be investigated using this assay. We believe that the ex vivo mycobacterial growth inhibition assay could be a useful tool to help assess vaccine efficacy in future, alongside other established methods. It could also be a valuable tool for determination of underlying immune mechanisms.

  4. Platelet-rich plasma enhanced umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells-based bone tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yong; Gu, Weiting; Cui, Jun; Yu, Meijiao; Zhang, Yunpeng; Tang, Cuizhu; Yang, Pishan; Xu, Xin

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on the proliferation and differentiation of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) and explore the possibility that PRP combined with UC-MSCs may be useful for bone tissue regeneration in vivo. The proliferation potential of UC-MSCs was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The pluripotent differentiation capacity and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression were further determined by ALP staining. The expression of osteoblast-associated genes was evaluated by real-time PCR. In addition, rat critical-sized calvarial defects were examined to evaluate bone regeneration in vivo. PRP enhanced UC-MSC proliferation, and 10% PRP caused the strongest ALP and Alizarin red staining. At 7 days, the expression levels of ALP, Collagen 1 (COL-1) and Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) in the PRP group were higher than those in the FBS group. Newly regenerated bone was observed in the defect areas, and PRP combined with UC-MSCs can accelerate bone regeneration at an early stage. Our current data suggest that UC-MSCs may be utilized in alternative stem cell-based approaches for the reconstruction and regeneration of bone defects, and PRP combined with UC-MSCs can enhance bone regeneration in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Novel phenotypic assays for the detection of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Cambodia: in-vitro and ex-vivo drug-response studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Benoit; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Khim, Nimol; Sreng, Sokunthea; Chim, Pheaktra; Kim, Saorin; Lim, Pharath; Mao, Sivanna; Sopha, Chantha; Sam, Baramey; Anderson, Jennifer M; Duong, Socheat; Chuor, Char Meng; Taylor, Walter R J; Suon, Seila; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Fairhurst, Rick M; Menard, Didier

    2013-12-01

    Artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum lengthens parasite clearance half-life during artemisinin monotherapy or artemisinin-based combination therapy. Absence of in-vitro and ex-vivo correlates of artemisinin resistance hinders study of this phenotype. We aimed to assess whether an in-vitro ring-stage survival assay (RSA) can identify culture-adapted P falciparum isolates from patients with slow-clearing or fast-clearing infections, to investigate the stage-dependent susceptibility of parasites to dihydroartemisinin in the in-vitro RSA, and to assess whether an ex-vivo RSA can identify artemisinin-resistant P falciparum infections. We culture-adapted parasites from patients with long and short parasite clearance half-lives from a study done in Pursat, Cambodia, in 2010 (registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00341003) and used novel in-vitro survival assays to explore the stage-dependent susceptibility of slow-clearing and fast-clearing parasites to dihydroartemisinin. In 2012, we implemented the RSA in prospective parasite clearance studies in Pursat, Preah Vihear, and Ratanakiri, Cambodia (NCT01736319), to measure the ex-vivo responses of parasites from patients with malaria. Continuous variables were compared with the Mann-Whitney U test. Correlations were analysed with the Spearman correlation test. In-vitro survival rates of culture-adapted parasites from 13 slow-clearing and 13 fast-clearing infections differed significantly when assays were done on 0-3 h ring-stage parasites (10·88% vs 0·23%; p=0·007). Ex-vivo survival rates significantly correlated with in-vivo parasite clearance half-lives (n=30, r=0·74, 95% CI 0·50-0·87; p<0·0001). The in-vitro RSA of 0-3 h ring-stage parasites provides a platform for the molecular characterisation of artemisinin resistance. The ex-vivo RSA can be easily implemented where surveillance for artemisinin resistance is needed. Institut Pasteur du Cambodge and the Intramural Research Program, NIAID, NIH

  6. In vivo genotoxic effects of dietary heme iron on rat colon mucosa and ex vivo effects on colon cells monitored by an optimized alkaline comet assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Océane, C Martin

    2015-04-01

    In conclusion, our results offer a suitable protocol to evaluate genotoxicity on in vivo cryopreserved colon mucosa and on in vitro murine colonic cells, with a middle throughput capacity. This protocol confirms the increase of genotoxicity in rat colon mucosa after an heme-iron diet. Moreover, this protocol enables the demonstration that aldehydes from heme-induced lipoperoxidation are responsible for this increase of genotoxicity.

  7. Experimental Assessment of Moringa oleifera Leaf and Fruit for Its Antistress, Antioxidant, and Scavenging Potential Using In Vitro and In Vivo Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suaib Luqman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated effect of Moringa oleifera leaf and fruit extracts on markers of oxidative stress, its toxicity evaluation, and correlation with antioxidant properties using in vitro and in vitro assays. The aqueous extract of leaf was able to increase the GSH and reduce MDA level in a concentration-dependent manner. The ethanolic extract of fruit showed highest phenolic content, strong reducing power and free radical scavenging capacity. The antioxidant capacity of ethanolic extract of both fruit and leaf was higher in the in vitro assay compared to aqueous extract which showed higher potential in vivo. Safety evaluation studies showed no toxicity of the extracts up to a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight. Our results support the potent antioxidant activity of aqueous and ethanolic extract of Moringa oleifera which adds one more positive attribute to its known pharmacological importance.

  8. Experimental Assessment of Moringa oleifera Leaf and Fruit for Its Antistress, Antioxidant, and Scavenging Potential Using In Vitro and In Vivo Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luqman, Suaib; Srivastava, Suchita; Kumar, Ritesh; Maurya, Anil Kumar; Chanda, Debabrata

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated effect of Moringa oleifera leaf and fruit extracts on markers of oxidative stress, its toxicity evaluation, and correlation with antioxidant properties using in vitro and in vitro assays. The aqueous extract of leaf was able to increase the GSH and reduce MDA level in a concentration-dependent manner. The ethanolic extract of fruit showed highest phenolic content, strong reducing power and free radical scavenging capacity. The antioxidant capacity of ethanolic extract of both fruit and leaf was higher in the in vitro assay compared to aqueous extract which showed higher potential in vivo. Safety evaluation studies showed no toxicity of the extracts up to a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight. Our results support the potent antioxidant activity of aqueous and ethanolic extract of Moringa oleifera which adds one more positive attribute to its known pharmacological importance. PMID:22216055

  9. Dihydropyrrolopyrazol-6-one MCHR1 antagonists for the treatment of obesity: Insights on in vivo efficacy from a novel FLIPR assay setup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devasthale, Pratik; Wang, Wei; Hernandez, Andres S; Moore, Fang; Renduchintala, Kishore; Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Pelleymounter, Mary Ann; Longhi, Daniel; Huang, Ning; Flynn, Neil; Azzara, Anthony V; Rohrbach, Kenneth; Devenny, James; Rooney, Suzanne; Thomas, Michael; Glick, Susan; Godonis, Helen; Harvey, Susan; Cullen, Mary Jane; Zhang, Hongwei; Caporuscio, Christian; Stetsko, Paul; Grubb, Mary; Huang, Christine; Zhang, Lisa; Freeden, Chris; Li, Yi-Xin; Murphy, Brian J; Robl, Jeffrey A; Washburn, William N

    2015-07-15

    Our investigation of the structure-activity and structure-liability relationships for dihydropyrrolopyrazol-6-one MCHR1 antagonists revealed that off-rate characteristics, inferred from potencies in a FLIPR assay following a 2 h incubation, can impact in vivo efficacy. The in vitro and exposure profiles of dihydropyrrolopyrazol-6-ones 1b and 1e were comparable to that of the thienopyrimidinone counterparts 41 and 43 except for a much faster MCHR1 apparent off-rate. The greatly diminished dihydropyrrolopyrazol-6-one anti-obesity response may be the consequence of this rapid off-rate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A novel circular invasion assay mimics in vivo invasive behavior of cancer cell lines and distinguishes single-cell motility in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estrada Lourdes

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classical in vitro wound-healing assays and other techniques designed to study cell migration and invasion have been used for many years to elucidate the various mechanisms associated with metastasis. However, many of these methods are limited in their ability to achieve reproducible, quantitative results that translate well in vivo. Such techniques are also commonly unable to elucidate single-cell motility mechanisms, an important factor to be considered when studying dissemination. Therefore, we developed and applied a novel in vitro circular invasion assay (CIA in order to bridge the translational gap between in vitro and in vivo findings, and to distinguish between different modes of invasion. Method Our method is a modified version of a standard circular wound-healing assay with an added matrix barrier component (Matrigel™, which better mimics those physiological conditions present in vivo. We examined 3 cancer cell lines (MCF-7, SCOV-3, and MDA-MB-231, each with a different established degree of aggressiveness, to test our assay's ability to detect diverse levels of invasiveness. Percent wound closure (or invasion was measured using time-lapse microscopy and advanced image analysis techniques. We also applied the CIA technique to DLD-1 cells in the presence of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, a bioactive lipid that was recently shown to stimulate cancer cell colony dispersal into single migratory cells, in order to validate our method's ability to detect collective and individual motility. Results CIA method was found to be highly reproducible, with negligible levels of variance measured. It successfully detected the anticipated low, moderate, and high levels of invasion that correspond to in vivo findings for cell lines tested. It also captured that DLD-1 cells exhibit individual migration upon LPA stimulation, and collective behavior in its absence. Conclusion Given its ability to both determine pseudo-realistic invasive

  11. In vivo assessment of DNA damage and protective effects of extracts from Miconia species using the comet assay and micronucleus test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpeloni, Juliana Mara; Bisarro dos Reis, Mariana; Rodrigues, Juliana; Campaner dos Santos, Lourdes; Vilegas, Wagner; Varanda, Eliana A; Dokkedal, Anne L; Cólus, Ilce Mara S

    2008-11-01

    The genus Miconia comprises approximately 1000 species belonging to the Melastomataceae family. Several crude plant extracts from Miconia and their isolated compounds have shown biological activities, such as analgesic and anti-neoplastic action; however, no studies concerning their effects on DNA are available. The present study aimed to evaluate, in vivo, the genotoxic and mutagenic effects of four species of plants from Miconia genus using the comet assay and micronucleus test. Their possible protective effects were also evaluated in experiments associating the plant extracts with cyclophosphamide (CPA). The methanolic extracts of Miconia albicans, Miconia cabucu, Miconia rubiginosa, Miconia stenostachya and the chloroformic extract of M. albicans were investigated. For genotoxic and mutagenic evaluations, three concentrations were tested, 200, 400 and 540 mg/kg body weight (bw), based on the solubility limit of the extract in distilled water. For the protective effects, only the highest dose was evaluated against 40 mg/kg bw of CPA. Blood was removed from mice tails pre- (T0) and post-treatment (T1-30 h) for the micronucleus test and 24 h post-treatment for the comet assay. The Student's t-test was used to compare data obtained at T0 and T1, the analysis of variance-Tukey test was used to compare between groups in the micronucleus test and the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's test were used to compare different groups in the comet assay. All the extracts induced alterations in DNA migration (comet assay); however, no mutagenic effect was observed in the micronucleus assay. All extracts showed a protective effect against CPA in both assays. Our study showed that the use of crude extracts could be more advantageous than the use of isolated compounds. The interaction between phytochemicals in the extracts showed efficacy in reducing mutagenicity and improving the protective effects.

  12. Optimization and pharmacological validation of a leukocyte migration assay in zebrafish larvae for the rapid in vivo bioactivity analysis of anti-inflammatory secondary metabolites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Lorena Cordero-Maldonado

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, zebrafish (Danio rerio have emerged as an attractive model for in vivo drug discovery. In this study, we explore the suitability of zebrafish larvae to rapidly evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of natural products (NPs and medicinal plants used in traditional medicine for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. First, we optimized a zebrafish assay for leukocyte migration. Inflammation was induced in four days post-fertilization (dpf zebrafish larvae by tail transection and co-incubation with bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS, resulting in a robust recruitment of leukocytes to the zone of injury. Migrating zebrafish leukocytes were detected in situ by myeloperoxidase (MPO staining, and anti-inflammatory activity was semi-quantitatively scored using a standardized scale of relative leukocyte migration (RLM. Pharmacological validation of this optimized assay was performed with a panel of anti-inflammatory drugs, demonstrating a concentration-responsive inhibition of leukocyte migration for both steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (SAIDs and NSAIDs. Subsequently, we evaluated the bioactivity of structurally diverse NPs with well-documented anti-inflammatory properties. Finally, we further used this zebrafish-based assay to quantify the anti-inflammatory activity in the aqueous and methanolic extracts of several medicinal plants. Our results indicate the suitability of this LPS-enhanced leukocyte migration assay in zebrafish larvae as a front-line screening platform in NP discovery, including for the bioassay-guided isolation of anti-inflammatory secondary metabolites from complex NP extracts.

  13. Relative developmental toxicity potencies of retinoids in the embryonic stem cell test compared with their relative potencies in in vivo and two other in vitro assays for developmental toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louisse, J.; Gönen, S.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Verwei, M.

    2011-01-01

    The present study determines the relative developmental toxicity potencies of retinoids in the embryonic stem (ES)-D3 cell differentiation assay of the embryonic stem cell test, and compares the outcomes with their relative potencies in in vivo and two other in vitro assays for developmental

  14. Detection of genotoxicity of water from an urbanized stream, in Corbicula fluminea (Mollusca) (in vivo) and CHO-K1 cells (in vitro) using comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigonato, Janaina; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio; Jordão, Berenice Quinzani

    2010-07-01

    The comet assay was utilized to investigate the quality of water from seven locations along the Cambé Stream, in vivo (Corbicula fluminea hemolymph), in vitro (CHO-K1 cells), in situ, and in laboratory studies. The Cambé Stream basin (Londrina, PR, Brazil) is almost completely urbanized and receives different forms of industrial and domestic runoff. The data indicated the occurrence of DNA damage in cells examined in vivo and in vitro, shown by the significant increase in frequencies of cells with DNA damage after exposure to water from all seven locations used in the study. Our results strongly suggest the presence of genotoxic agent(s) in water at all of the sampled locations, demonstrated by elevated numbers of cells with DNA damaged in field and laboratory tests. In all of the places sampled, domestic sewage influence appeared to be one important cause for the introduction of xenobiotics, environmental genotoxins, and pollutants into the water. Thus, the comet assay applied in these cell systems was able to detect adverse environmental conditions, proving to be a very adequate short-term test and should be included in batteries of tests utilized in the monitoring of aquatic environments.

  15. Effect of copper-doped silicate 13–93 bioactive glass scaffolds on the response of MC3T3-E1 cells in vitro and on bone regeneration and angiogenesis in rat calvarial defects in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yinan; Xiao, Wei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Bal, B. Sonny [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65212 (United States); Rahaman, Mohamed N., E-mail: rahaman@mst.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The release of inorganic ions from biomaterials could provide an alternative approach to the use of growth factors for improving tissue healing. In the present study, the release of copper (Cu) ions from bioactive silicate (13–93) glass scaffolds on the response of cells in vitro and on bone regeneration and angiogenesis in vivo was studied. Scaffolds doped with varying concentrations of Cu (0–2.0 wt.% CuO) were created with a grid-like microstructure by robotic deposition. When immersed in simulated body fluid in vitro, the Cu-doped scaffolds released Cu ions into the medium in a dose-dependent manner and converted partially to hydroxyapatite. The proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity of pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on the scaffolds were not affected by 0.4 and 0.8 wt.% CuO in the glass but they were significantly reduced by 2.0 wt.% CuO. The percent new bone that infiltrated the scaffolds implanted for 6 weeks in rat calvarial defects (46 ± 8%) was not significantly affected by 0.4 or 0.8 wt.% CuO in the glass whereas it was significantly inhibited (0.8 ± 0.7%) in the scaffolds doped with 2.0 wt.% CuO. The area of new blood vessels in the fibrous tissue that infiltrated the scaffolds increased with CuO content of the glass and was significantly higher for the scaffolds doped with 2.0 wt.% CuO. Loading the scaffolds with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (1 μg/defect) significantly enhanced bone infiltration and reduced fibrous tissue in the scaffolds. These results showed that doping the 13–93 glass scaffolds with up to 0.8 wt.% CuO did not affect their biocompatibility whereas 2.0 wt.% CuO was toxic to cells and detrimental to bone regeneration. - Highlights: • First study to evaluate Cu ion release from silicate (13-93) bioactive glass scaffolds on osteogenesis in vivo • Released Cu ions influenced bone regeneration in a dose dependent manner • Lower concentrations of Cu ions had little effect on bone regeneration • Cu ion

  16. Gene expression profile of the cartilage tissue spontaneously regenerated in vivo by using a novel double-network gel: Comparisons with the normal articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurokawa Takayuki

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently found a phenomenon that spontaneous regeneration of a hyaline cartilage-like tissue can be induced in a large osteochondral defect by implanting a double-network (DN hydrogel plug, which was composed of poly-(2-Acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid and poly-(N, N'-Dimetyl acrylamide, at the bottom of the defect. The purpose of this study was to clarify gene expression profile of the regenerated tissue in comparison with that of the normal articular cartilage. Methods We created a cylindrical osteochondral defect in the rabbit femoral grooves. Then, we implanted the DN gel plug at the bottom of the defect. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, the regenerated tissue was analyzed using DNA microarray and immunohistochemical examinations. Results The gene expression profiles of the regenerated tissues were macroscopically similar to the normal cartilage, but showed some minor differences. The expression degree of COL2A1, COL1A2, COL10A1, DCN, FMOD, SPARC, FLOD2, CHAD, CTGF, and COMP genes was greater in the regenerated tissue than in the normal cartilage. The top 30 genes that expressed 5 times or more in the regenerated tissue as compared with the normal cartilage included type-2 collagen, type-10 collagen, FN, vimentin, COMP, EF1alpha, TFCP2, and GAPDH genes. Conclusions The tissue regenerated by using the DN gel was genetically similar but not completely identical to articular cartilage. The genetic data shown in this study are useful for future studies to identify specific genes involved in spontaneous cartilage regeneration.

  17. Induction of mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenic differentiation and functional cartilage microtissue formation for in vivo cartilage regeneration by cartilage extracellular matrix-derived particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Heyong; Wang, Yu; Sun, Zhen; Sun, Xun; Xu, Yichi; Li, Pan; Meng, Haoye; Yu, Xiaoming; Xiao, Bo; Fan, Tian; Wang, Yiguo; Xu, Wenjing; Wang, Aiyuan; Guo, Quanyi; Peng, Jiang; Lu, Shibi

    2016-03-01

    We propose a method of preparing a novel cell carrier derived from natural cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM), designated cartilage ECM-derived particles (CEDPs). Through a series of processes involving pulverization, sieving, and decellularization, fresh cartilage was made into CEDPs with a median diameter of 263 ± 48 μm. Under microgravity culture conditions in a rotary cell culture system (RCCS), bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can proliferate rapidly on the surface of CEDPs with high viability. Histological evaluation and gene expression analysis indicated that BMSCs were differentiated into mature chondrocytes after 21 days of culture without the use of exogenous growth factors. Functional cartilage microtissue aggregates of BMSC-laden CEDPs formed as time in culture increased. Further, the microtissue aggregates were directly implanted into trochlear cartilage defects in a rat model (CEDP+MSC group). Gait analysis and histological results indicated that the CEDP+MSC group obtained better and more rapid joint function recovery and superior cartilage repair compared to the control groups, in which defects were treated with CEDPs alone or only fibrin glue, at both 6 and 12 weeks after surgery. In conclusion, the innovative cell carrier derived from cartilage ECM could promote chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs, and the direct use of functional cartilage microtissue facilitated cartilage regeneration. This strategy for cell culture, stem cell differentiation and one-step surgery using cartilage microtissue for cartilage repair provides novel prospects for cartilage tissue engineering and may have further broad clinical applications. We proposed a method to prepare a novel cell carrier derived from natural cartilage ECM, termed cartilage ECM-derived particles (CEDPs), which can support proliferation of MSCs and facilitate their chondrogenic differentiation. Further, the direct use of functional cartilage microtissue of MSC-laden CEDP aggregates for

  18. Limb regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, András; Tanaka, Elly M

    2013-01-01

    Limb regeneration is observed in certain members of the animal phyla. Some animals keep this ability during their entire life while others lose it at some time during development. How do animals regenerate limbs? Is it possible to find unifying, conserved mechanisms of limb regeneration or have different species evolved distinct means of replacing a lost limb? How is limb regeneration similar or different to limb development? Studies on many organisms, including echinoderms, arthropods, and chordates have provided significant knowledge about limb regeneration. In this focus article, we concentrate on tetrapod limb regeneration as studied in three model amphibians: newts, axolotls, and frogs. We review recent progress on tissue interactions during limb regeneration, and place those findings into an evolutionary context. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Assessment of the in vivo genotoxicity of cadmium chloride, chloroform, and D,L-menthol as coded test chemicals using the alkaline comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Kunio; Fukuyama, Tomoki; Nakashima, Nobuaki; Matsumoto, Kyomu

    2015-07-01

    As part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM) international validation study of in vivo rat alkaline comet assays, we examined cadmium chloride, chloroform, and D,L-menthol under blind conditions as coded chemicals in the liver and stomach of Sprague-Dawley rats after 3 days of administration. Cadmium chloride showed equivocal responses in the liver and stomach, supporting previous reports of its poor mutagenic potential and non-carcinogenic effects in these organs. Treatment with chloroform, which is a non-genotoxic carcinogen, did not induce DNA damage in the liver or stomach. Some histopathological changes, such as necrosis and degeneration, were observed in the liver; however, they did not affect the comet assay results. D,L-Menthol, a non-genotoxic non-carcinogen, did not induce liver or stomach DNA damage. These results indicate that the comet assay can reflect genotoxic properties under blind conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Ex vivo drug sensitivity profiles of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from Cambodia and Thailand, 2005 to 2010, determined by a histidine-rich protein-2 assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyner, Stuart D; Lon, Chanthap; Se, Youry; Bethell, Delia; Socheat, Doung; Noedl, Harald; Sea, Darapiseth; Satimai, Wichai; Schaecher, Kurt; Rutvisuttinunt, Wiriya; Fukuda, Mark M; Chaorattanakawee, Suwanna; Yingyuen, Kritsanai; Sundrakes, Siratchana; Chaichana, Panjaporn; Saingam, Piyaporn; Buathong, Nillawan; Sriwichai, Sabaithip; Chann, Soklyda; Timmermans, Ans; Saunders, David L; Walsh, Douglas S

    2012-06-13

    In vitro drug susceptibility assay of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates processed "immediate ex vivo" (IEV), without culture adaption, and tested using histidine-rich protein-2 (HRP-2) detection as an assay, is an expedient way to track drug resistance. From 2005 to 2010, a HRP-2 in vitro assay assessed 451 P. falciparum field isolates obtained from subjects with malaria in western and northern Cambodia, and eastern Thailand, processed IEV, for 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) against seven anti-malarial drugs, including artesunate (AS), dihydroartemisinin (DHA), and piperaquine. In western Cambodia, from 2006 to 2010, geometric mean (GM) IC50 values for chloroquine, mefloquine, quinine, AS, DHA, and lumefantrine increased. In northern Cambodia, from 2009-2010, GM IC50 values for most drugs approximated the highest western Cambodia GM IC50 values in 2009 or 2010. Western Cambodia is associated with sustained reductions in anti-malarial drug susceptibility, including the artemisinins, with possible emergence, or spread, to northern Cambodia. This potential public health crisis supports continued in vitro drug IC50 monitoring of P. falciparum isolates at key locations in the region.

  1. The effect of gamma radiation on the Common carp (Cyprinus carpio): In vivo genotoxicity assessment with the micronucleus and comet assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M K, Praveen Kumar; Soorambail K, Shyama; Bhagatsingh Harisingh, Sonaye; D'costa, Avelyno; Ramesh Chandra, Chaubey

    2015-10-01

    Radioactive wastes may be leached into freshwater, either accidentally or in industrial effluents. We have studied gamma radiation-induced DNA damage in the freshwater fish Cyprinus carpio. Fish were irradiated with 2-10Gy gamma radiation and genotoxic effects in blood cells were studied with the micronucleus (MN) and comet assays. Micronuclei and a dose-dependent increase in comet-tail DNA were seen in dose- and time-dependent studies. The highest % tail DNA was observed at 24h, declining until 72h, which may indicate the repair of radiation-induced DNA single-strand breaks after gamma radiation. However, double-stranded DNA damage may not have been repaired, as indicated by increased micronuclei at later periods. A positive correlation was observed between the comet and micronucleus assay results. This study confirms the mutagenic/genotoxic potential of gamma radiation in the Common carp, as well as the possible combined use of the micronucleus and comet assays for in vivo laboratory studies with fresh-water fish for screening the genotoxic potential of radioactive pollution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. An in vivo root hair assay for determining rates of apoptotic-like programmed cell death in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogg Bridget V

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Arabidopsis thaliana we demonstrate that dying root hairs provide an easy and rapid in vivo model for the morphological identification of apoptotic-like programmed cell death (AL-PCD in plants. The model described here is transferable between species, can be used to investigate rates of AL-PCD in response to various treatments and to identify modulation of AL-PCD rates in mutant/transgenic plant lines facilitating rapid screening of mutant populations in order to identify genes involved in AL-PCD regulation.

  3. ALA-PpIX variability quantitatively imaged in A431 epidermoid tumors using in vivo ultrasound fluorescence tomography and ex vivo assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    DSouza, Alisha V.; Flynn, Brendan P.; Gunn, Jason R.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Anand, Sanjay; Maytin, Edward V.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-03-01

    Treatment monitoring of Aminolevunilic-acid (ALA) - Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) of basal-cell carcinoma (BCC) calls for superficial and subsurface imaging techniques. While superficial imagers exist for this purpose, their ability to assess PpIX levels in thick lesions is poor; additionally few treatment centers have the capability to measure ALA-induced PpIX production. An area of active research is to improve treatments to deeper and nodular BCCs, because treatment is least effective in these. The goal of this work was to understand the logistics and technical capabilities to quantify PpIX at depths over 1mm, using a novel hybrid ultrasound-guided, fiber-based fluorescence molecular spectroscopictomography system. This system utilizes a 633nm excitation laser and detection using filtered spectrometers. Source and detection fibers are collinear so that their imaging plane matches that of ultrasound transducer. Validation with phantoms and tumor-simulating fluorescent inclusions in mice showed sensitivity to fluorophore concentrations as low as 0.025μg/ml at 4mm depth from surface, as presented in previous years. Image-guided quantification of ALA-induced PpIX production was completed in subcutaneous xenograft epidermoid cancer tumor model A431 in nude mice. A total of 32 animals were imaged in-vivo, using several time points, including pre-ALA, 4-hours post-ALA, and 24-hours post-ALA administration. On average, PpIX production in tumors increased by over 10-fold, 4-hours post-ALA. Statistical analysis of PpIX fluorescence showed significant difference among all groups; p<0.05. Results were validated by exvivo imaging of resected tumors. Details of imaging, analysis and results will be presented to illustrate variability and the potential for imaging these values at depth.

  4. Establishment of an in vivo potency assay for the recombinant hepatit is B surface antigen in monovalent and combined vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabel Izquierdo-López

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the development of potency assay in animals (mice was made, with the objective of demonstrating the immunogenic power of the recombinant Hepatitis B surface antigen in monovalent and combined vaccines, produced at the Center of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology. The potency test is a parameter in quality control and it is also a tool to demonstrate the consistency of the production process. Parameters such as duration of the test, number of animals in the test, as well as different areas for the maintenance of the animals were evaluated. The results on the applicability of the potency test, to two presentations of the vaccines; monovalent Heberbiovac HB and pentavalent liquid in one vial Heberpenta-L are shown, for which specificity studies, evaluating different vaccine lots, the behavior of linearity, and parallelism, as well as establishing quality specification of the test were performed. This assay led to the obtainment of reliable results for the vaccines evaluated, the consistent evaluation of the immunogenic power and the monitoring of different production processes.

  5. Promoting nerve regeneration in a neurotmesis rat model using poly(DL-lactide-ε-caprolactone) membranes and mesenchymal stem cells from the Wharton's jelly: in vitro and in vivo analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, T; Gärtner, A; Amorim, I; Almeida, A; Caseiro, A R; Armada-da-Silva, Paulo A S; Amado, Sandra; Fregnan, Federica; Varejão, A S P; Santos, J D; Bartolo, P J; Geuna, S; Luís, A L; Mauricio, A C

    2014-01-01

    In peripheral nerves MSCs can modulate Wallerian degeneration and the overall regenerative response by acting through paracrine mechanisms directly on regenerating axons or upon the nerve-supporting Schwann cells. In the present study, the effect of human MSCs from Wharton's jelly (HMSCs), differentiated into neuroglial-like cells associated to poly (DL-lactide-ε-caprolactone) membrane, on nerve regeneration, was evaluated in the neurotmesis injury rat sciatic nerve model. Results in vitro showed successful differentiation of HMSCs into neuroglial-like cells, characterized by expression of specific neuroglial markers confirmed by immunocytochemistry and by RT-PCR and qPCR targeting specific genes expressed. In vivo testing evaluated during the healing period of 20 weeks, showed no evident positive effect of HMSCs or neuroglial-like cell enrichment at the sciatic nerve repair site on most of the functional and nerve morphometric predictors of nerve regeneration although the nociception function was almost normal. EPT on the other hand, recovered significantly better after HMSCs enriched membrane employment, to values of residual functional impairment compared to other treated groups. When the neurotmesis injury can be surgically reconstructed with an end-to-end suture or by grafting, the addition of a PLC membrane associated with HMSCs seems to bring significant advantage, especially concerning the motor function recovery.

  6. Promoting Nerve Regeneration in a Neurotmesis Rat Model Using Poly(DL-lactide-ε-caprolactone Membranes and Mesenchymal Stem Cells from the Wharton’s Jelly: In Vitro and In Vivo Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In peripheral nerves MSCs can modulate Wallerian degeneration and the overall regenerative response by acting through paracrine mechanisms directly on regenerating axons or upon the nerve-supporting Schwann cells. In the present study, the effect of human MSCs from Wharton’s jelly (HMSCs, differentiated into neuroglial-like cells associated to poly (DL-lactide-ε-caprolactone membrane, on nerve regeneration, was evaluated in the neurotmesis injury rat sciatic nerve model. Results in vitro showed successful differentiation of HMSCs into neuroglial-like cells, characterized by expression of specific neuroglial markers confirmed by immunocytochemistry and by RT-PCR and qPCR targeting specific genes expressed. In vivo testing evaluated during the healing period of 20 weeks, showed no evident positive effect of HMSCs or neuroglial-like cell enrichment at the sciatic nerve repair site on most of the functional and nerve morphometric predictors of nerve regeneration although the nociception function was almost normal. EPT on the other hand, recovered significantly better after HMSCs enriched membrane employment, to values of residual functional impairment compared to other treated groups. When the neurotmesis injury can be surgically reconstructed with an end-to-end suture or by grafting, the addition of a PLC membrane associated with HMSCs seems to bring significant advantage, especially concerning the motor function recovery.

  7. Endocrine potency of wastewater: Contents of endocrine disrupting chemicals and effects measured by in vivo and in vitro assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, Kresten Ole; Krüger, Tanja; Long, Manhai

    2011-01-01

    properties: phthalate metabolites, parabens, industrial phenols, ultraviolet screens, and natural and synthetic steroid estrogens. The endocrine disrupting bioactivity and toxicity of the extracts were analyzed in cell culture assay for the potency to affect the function of the estrogen, androgen, aryl...... hydrocarbon, and thyroid receptors as well as the steroid hormone synthesis. The early-life stage (ELS) development was tested in a marine copepod. The concentrations of all analyzed chemicals were reduced in effluents compared with influents, and for some to below the detection limit. Influent as well...... of EDCs was reduced in the STPs but not eliminated, as verified by the applied bioassays that all responded to the extracts of effluent samples. Our data suggest that the wastewater treatment processes are not efficient enough to prevent contamination of environmental surface waters. © 2010 SETAC....

  8. An in vivo assay of the mutagenic potential of imidacloprid using sperm head abnormality test and dominant lethal test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagri, Preeti; Kumar, Vinod; Sikka, Anil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    To assess the mutagenic effects of imidacloprid in germ cells of Swiss albino male mice by sperm head abnormality (SHA) assay and dominant lethal test (DLT). Swiss albino mice were exposed to imidacloprid (22, 11 and 5.5 mg/kg/day) along with 3% gum acacia as vehicle control through oral route for 7, 14 and 28 days for SHA assay and for 28 days for DLT. The epididymal sperm smear in 1% eosin stain was analyzed for SHAs. In DLT, male mice were allowed to mate with females after 1, 3 and 6 weeks of end of pesticide treatment. The uterine contents of the sacrificed females were observed for live and dead implants. The analysis of test and control groups data was done by one way ANOVA at p imidacloprid (22, 11 and 5.5 mg/kg/day) for seven days did not induce significant SHAs while they induced significant SHAs compared with the control group following exposure for 14 and 28 days. The analysis of uterine content revealed a significant increase in the number of dead implants/female compared with the vehicle control in only those females which were mated with male mice after six weeks of treatment of highest dose level of imidacloprid. The dominant lethal mutations were observed only at spermatogonial stage. Long-term exposure of pesticide generated SHAs even at lowest dose level (5.5 mg/kg/day for 14 days) and mutagenic effects at spermatogonial stage at highest dose level (22 mg/kg/day for 28 days).

  9. Functional Ginger Extracts from Supercritical Fluid Carbon Dioxide Extraction via In Vitro and In Vivo Assays: Antioxidation, Antimicroorganism, and Mice Xenografts Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chen Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide extraction technology was developed to gain the active components from a Taiwan native plant, Zingiber officinale (ginger. We studied the biological effects of ginger extracts via multiple assays and demonstrated the biofunctions in each platform. Investigations of ginger extracts indicated antioxidative properties in dose-dependant manners on radical scavenging activities, reducing powers and metal chelating powers. We found that ginger extracts processed moderate scavenging values, middle metal chelating levels, and slight ferric reducing powers. The antibacterial susceptibility of ginger extracts on Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus sobrinus, S. mutans, and Escherichia coli was determined with the broth microdilution method technique. The ginger extracts had operative antimicroorganism potentials against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We further discovered the strong inhibitions of ginger extracts on lethal carcinogenic melanoma through in vivo xenograft model. To sum up, the data confirmed the possible applications as medical cosmetology agents, pharmaceutical antibiotics, and food supplements.

  10. Re-analysis results using medians of the data from the JaCVAM-organized international validation study of the in vivo rat alkaline comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Yoshifumi; Omori, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    The data from the JaCVAM-organized international validation study of the in vivo rat alkaline comet assay were reported and analyzed statistically using the simple means of % tail DNA. However, OECD test guideline TG 489 recommends use of the median for data analysis due to the hierarchical nature of the data. Comparison between the simple mean approach and the median based approach for positive/negative/equivocal chemical calls was conducted using the % tail DNA data for the 40 chemicals tested in the JaCVAM-organized international validation study of the in vivo rat alkaline comet assay, using liver and stomach as target organs. In the liver, two genotoxic chemicals, o-anisidine and 9-aminoacridine hydrochloride monohydrate, were positive using the median based approach but negative using the simple mean approach, and two genotoxic chemicals, 2-acetylaminofluorene and busulfan were equivocal using the median based approach but negative using the simple mean approach. In contrast, cadmium chloride (genotoxic carcinogen) was equivocal in both organs using the median based approach, while positive and equivocal in liver and stomach, respectively, using the simple mean approach. Two data sets of sodium arsenite showed equivocal and negative results for liver using the median based approach, although both data sets were equivocal using the simple mean approach. Overall, there are no large differences in terms of the genotoxic call between both approaches. However, the median based approach recommended in OECD TG 489 has an advantage toward higher precision within the groups treated with a test chemical, whereas the approach might show the lower values for the effect. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. In vivo genotoxicity testing of the amnesic shellfish poison (domoic acid) in piscine erythrocytes using the micronucleus test and the comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavas, Tolga [Mersin University, Faculty of Sciences and Letters, Department of Biology, 33343 Mersin (Turkey)], E-mail: tcavas@mersin.edu.tr; Koenen, Serpil [Mersin University, Faculty of Sciences and Letters, Department of Biology, 33343 Mersin (Turkey)

    2008-11-11

    Domoic acid (DA) is a neurotoxic amino acid naturally produced in the marine environment by some diatom species belonging to the genus Pseudo-nitzschia. Although the neurotoxic properties of DA have been demonstrated, very little is known about in vivo genotoxicity of DA on aquatic organisms. In the present paper, an in vivo study on the genotoxic effects of domoic acid was carried out on a fish, Oreochromis niloticus, using the micronucleus test and the comet assay. The fish were exposed to three doses of domoic acid (1, 5 and 10 {mu}g/g body weight) by intracoelomic injections. Ethyl methane sulphonate at a single dose of 5 mg/l was used as positive control. Analysis of micronuclei, nuclear abnormalities and DNA damage were carried out on peripheral erythrocytes sampled 24, 48 and 72 h post-treatment. Our results revealed significant increases in the frequencies of micronuclei, nuclear abnormalities as well as DNA strand breaks and thus demonstrated the genotoxic potential of DA on fish.

  12. Development of a pHrodo-based assay for the assessment of in vitro and in vivo erythrophagocytosis during experimental trypanosomosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Stijlemans

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular trypanosomes can cause a wide range of diseases and pathological complications in a broad range of mammalian hosts. One common feature of trypanosomosis is the occurrence of anemia, caused by an imbalance between erythropoiesis and red blood cell clearance of aging erythrocytes. In murine models for T. brucei trypanosomosis, anemia is marked by a very sudden non-hemolytic loss of RBCs during the first-peak parasitemia control, followed by a short recovery phase and the subsequent gradual occurrence of an ever-increasing level of anemia. Using a newly developed quantitative pHrodo based in vitro erythrophagocytosis assay, combined with FACS-based ex vivo and in vivo results, we show that activated liver monocytic cells and neutrophils as well as activated splenic macrophages are the main cells involved in the occurrence of the early-stage acute anemia. In addition, we show that trypanosomosis itself leads to a rapid alteration of RBC membrane stability, priming the cells for accelerated phagocytosis.

  13. In vitro and in vivo study of microporous ceramics using MC3T3 cells, CAM assay and a pig animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomco, Marek; Petrovova, Eva; Giretova, Maria; Almasiova, Viera; Holovska, Katarina; Cigankova, Viera; Jenca, Andrej; Jencova, Janka; Jenca, Andrej; Boldizar, Martin; Balazs, Kosa; Medvecky, Lubomir

    2017-09-01

    Bone tissue engineering combines biomaterials with biologically active factors and cells to hold promise for reconstructing craniofacial defects. In this study the biological activity of biphasic hydroxyapatite ceramics (HA; a bone substitute that is a mixture of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate in fixed ratios) was characterized (1) in vitro by assessing the growth of MC3T3 mouse osteoblast lineage cells, (2) in ovo by using the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay and (3) in an in vivo pig animal model. Biocompatibility, bioactivity, bone formation and biomaterial degradation were detected microscopically and by radiology and histology. HA ceramics alone demonstrated great biocompatibility on the CAM as well as bioactivity by increased proliferation and alkaline phosphatase secretion of mouse osteoblasts. The in vivo implantation of HA ceramics with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MMSCs) showed de novo intramembranous bone healing of critical-size bone defects in the right lateral side of pig mandibular bodies after 3 and 9 weeks post-implantation. Compared with the HA ceramics without MMSCs, the progress of bone formation was slower with less-developed features. This article highlights the clinical use of microporous biphasic HA ceramics despite the unusually shaped elongated micropores with a high length/width aspect ratio (up to 20) and absence of preferable macropores (>100 µm) in bone regenerative medicine.

  14. Ethamsylate (Dicynone) interference in determination of serum creatinine, uric acid, triglycerides, and cholesterol in assays involving the Trinder reaction; in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastych, Milan; Wiewiorka, Ondrej; Benovská, Miroslava

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our research was the quantification of interfering properties of the haemostatic drug Dicynone (ethamsylate) in serum creatinine, uric acid, cholesterol, and triglyceride assays using the Trinder reaction. Blood from patients was collected before and 15 minutes after administration of 500 mg Dicynone dose i.v. and the above mentioned analytes were quantified using Roche assays (Cobas 8000). In our in vitro experiment, we measured concentrations of the analytes in pooled serum aliquots with final concentrations of Dicynone additions 0, 30, 60, 150, and 300 mg/L. Aliquots with 60 mg/L Dicynone were also measured at 2, 6, and 8 hours after initial measurement when stored in 22 degrees C and 4 degrees C for comparison. Concentrations of the measured analytes in samples from patients administered with a 500 mg dose of Dicynone were lower in all cases (n = 10) when compared to values in samples taken immediately before treatment. The in vitro samples showed that considerable negative interference occurred even with the low concentrations of Dicynone additions (30 and 60 mg/L), showing the strongest negative interference in creatinine values, followed by uric acid, triglycerides, and cholesterol. Using in vitro samples, we showed strong time and temperature dependence on Dicynone interference. We found and proved significant negative interference of the drug Dicynone (ethamsylate) in the clinical analysis of blood using in vivo and in vitro experiments. Furthermore, we observed a change of this effect in serum matrix over time and at different storage temperatures.

  15. Tumor lysis syndrome associated with chemotherapy in primary retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma by ex vivo ATP-based tumor chemo-sensitivity assay (ATP-TCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Qing Qian

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Ke-Qing Qian1, Heng Ye1, Yi-Wen Xiao1, Yong-Yi Bao2, Chun-Jian Qi11Department of Oncology; 2Department of Pathology, the Changzhou No. 2 People’s Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Changzhou, ChinaAbstract: Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS, a result of rapid cell lysis following tumor therapy, is a well recognized complication during the treatment of rapidly growing tumors. TLS rarely occurs in solid tumors. We present a case report of TLS in a patient with primary retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma. TLS occurred in the patient after four days’ combinational chemotherapy with cisplatin, adriamycin, and dacarbazine. These drugs were selected on the basis of an ex vivo ATP-based tumor sensitivity assay. TLS was properly controlled in the patient with concomitant remission of the sarcoma. Therefore, precautions should be taken to avoid this potentially fatal complication during treatment of solid tumors, especially with tumors highly sensitive to drugs.Keywords: tumor lysis syndrome, retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma, ATP-based tumor sensitivity assay (ATP-TCA

  16. Stem/Progenitor Cell–Mediated De Novo Regeneration of Dental Pulp with Newly Deposited Continuous Layer of Dentin in an In Vivo Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaza, Takayoshi; Shea, Lonnie D.; Djouad, Farida; Kuhn, Nastaran Z.; Tuan, Rocky S.; Shi, Songtao

    2010-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this study is to regenerate lost dental pulp and dentin via stem/progenitor cell–based approaches and tissue engineering technologies. In this study, we tested the possibility of regenerating vascularized human dental pulp in emptied root canal space and producing new dentin on existing dentinal walls using a stem/progenitor cell–mediated approach with a human root fragment and an immunocompromised mouse model. Stem/progenitor cells from apical papilla and dental pulp stem cells were isolated, characterized, seeded onto synthetic scaffolds consisting of poly-D,L-lactide/glycolide, inserted into the tooth fragments, and transplanted into mice. Our results showed that the root canal space was filled entirely by a pulp-like tissue with well-established vascularity. In addition, a continuous layer of dentin-like tissue was deposited onto the canal dentinal wall. This dentin-like structure appeared to be produced by a layer of newly formed odontoblast-like cells expressing dentin sialophosphoprotein, bone sialoprotein, alkaline phosphatase, and CD105. The cells in regenerated pulp-like tissue reacted positively to anti-human mitochondria antibodies, indicating their human origin. This study provides the first evidence showing that pulp-like tissue can be regenerated de novo in emptied root canal space by stem cells from apical papilla and dental pulp stem cells that give rise to odontoblast-like cells producing dentin-like tissue on existing dentinal walls. PMID:19737072

  17. Generation of Tg(cyp1a:gfp) Transgenic Zebrafish for Development of a Convenient and Sensitive In Vivo Assay for Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hongyan; Li, Caixia; Li, Yan; Ng, Grace Hwee Boon; Liu, Chunsheng; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2015-12-01

    Both dioxins/dioxin-like compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are persistent organic pollutants and cause multiple adverse health effects on human and wildlife. Cyp1a is the most commonly used biomarker induced by these pollutants through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway. Here we generated Tg(cyp1a:gfp) transgenic zebrafish for establishing a convenient in vivo assay for analysing these xenobiotic compounds. The Tg(cyp1a:gfp) larvae at 4 day post-fertilization were tested with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), and GFP induction was observed mainly in the kidney, liver and gut. Similar GFP expression was also induced strongly by two dioxin-like chemicals, co-planar polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB126) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-furan (PeCDF) and relatively weakly by two PAHs, 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) and benzo[a]pyrene (BAP). The lowest observed effective concentration (LOEC) of TCDD was estimated to be ∼1 pM and the EC50 (effective concentration to induce GFP in 50 % of Tg(cyp1a:gfp) larvae) was ∼10 pM. PCB126 and PeCDF had ∼10× lower potencies in GFP induction than TCDD, while the potencies for 3-MC and BAP were at least 1000× lower. The sensitivity of Tg(cyp1a:gfp) larvae to respond TCDD was also favourable compared to that of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) assay in both zebrafish larvae and adult livers. As GFP-based assay in transgenic zebrafish can be easily accommodated in multi-well dishes, the Tg(cyp1a:gfp) zebrafish should provide not only a valuable biomonitoring tool for aquatic contaminants but also a potential high-throughput chemical screening platform for identification of new AhR agonists.

  18. Upregulation of reggie-1/flotillin-2 promotes axon regeneration in the rat optic nerve in vivo and neurite growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Jan C; Solis, Gonzalo P; Bodrikov, Vsevolod; Michel, Uwe; Haralampieva, Deana; Shypitsyna, Aleksandra; Tönges, Lars; Bähr, Mathias; Lingor, Paul; Stuermer, Claudia A O

    2013-03-01

    The ability of fish retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) to regenerate their axons was shown to require the re-expression and function of the two proteins reggie-1 and -2. RGCs in mammals fail to upregulate reggie expression and to regenerate axons after lesion suggesting the possibility that induced upregulation might promote regeneration. In the present study, RGCs in adult rats were induced to express reggie-1 by intravitreal injection of adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV2/1) expressing reggie-1 (AAV.R1-EGFP) 14d prior to optic nerve crush. Four weeks later, GAP-43-positive regenerating axons had crossed the lesion and grown into the nerve at significantly higher numbers and length (up to 5mm) than the control transduced with AAV.EGFP. Consistently, after transduction with AAV.R1-EGFP as opposed to AAV.EGFP, primary RGCs in vitro grew long axons on chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) and Nogo-A, both glial cell-derived inhibitors of neurite growth, suggesting that reggie-1 can provide neurons with the ability to override inhibitors of neurite growth. This reggie-1-mediated enhancement of growth was reproduced in mouse hippocampal and N2a neurons which generated axons 40-60% longer than their control counterparts. This correlates with the reggie-1-dependent activation of Src and PI3 kinase (PI3K), of the Rho family GTPase Rac1 and downstream effectors such as cofilin. This increased growth also depends on TC10, the GTPase involved in cargo delivery to the growth cone. Thus, the upregulation of reggie-1 in mammalian neurons provides nerve cells with neuron-intrinsic properties required for axon growth and successful regeneration in the adult mammalian CNS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Direct Comparison of the Histidine-rich Protein-2 Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (HRP-2 ELISA) and Malaria SYBR Green I Fluorescence (MSF) Drug Sensitivity Tests in Plasmodium falciparum Reference Clones and Fresh ex vivo Field Isolates from Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    fluorescence (MSF) drug sensitivity tests in Plasmodium falciparum reference clones and fresh ex vivo field isolates from Cambodia Suwanna...assay (HRP-2 ELISA) and malaria SYBR Green I fluorescence (MSF) drug sensitivity tests were directly compared using Plasmodium falciparum reference... Plasmodium falciparum reference clones and fresh ex vivo field isolates from Cambodia Suwanna Chaorattanakawee 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  20. Assessment of two medicinal plants, Psidium guajava L. and Achillea millefolium L., in in vitro and in vivo assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teixeira Rosangela de Oliveira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of medicinal plants by the general population is an old and still widespread practice, which makes studies of their genotoxicity essential. Psidium guajava L. and Achillea millefolium L. are examples of plants commonly used in popular medicine. P. guajava L. is indicated for diarrhea and also as an antiseptic, while A. millefolium L. is indicated as an analgesic, antispasmodic, digestive, diuretic, antiseptic, astringent, emollient, wound healer and hemorrhoid medication. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of the infusions of these two plant species on chromosomes and the cell cycle. Leaves from the plants were used to prepare infusions, in the same manner as teas, but at two different concentrations. Allium cepa L. root-tip cells (P. guajava L. - 2.62 and 26.2 mg/mL, and A. millefolium L. - 3.5 and 35.0 mg/mL and Wistar rat bone marrow cells (P. guajava L. - 2.62 and 26.2 mg/100g body weight, and A. millefolium L. - 3.5 and 35.0 mg/100g body weight were used as in vivo plant and animal test systems, respectively. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes (P. guajava L. - 0.262 and 2.62 mg/mL culture medium, and A. millefolium L. - 0.35 and 3.5 mg/mL culture medium were used as in vitro test system. The P. guajava L. infusion at the higher concentration caused a statistically significant inhibition of cellular division in the onion root-tip cells, not observed in onion root-tip cells treated with A. millefolium L. No statistically significant alterations were found, as compared to untreated controls, in either the cell cycle or the number of chromosome alterations, after treatments with either plant, in rat cells or in cultured human lymphocytes. These results regarding the cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of these plants provide valuable information about the safety of using them as therapeutic agents.

  1. The anti-estrogenic activity of sediments from agriculturally-intense watersheds: Assessment using in vivo and in vitro assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellin Jeffries, Marlo K.; Conoan, Nicholas H.; Cox, Marc B.; Sangster, Jodi L.; Balsiger, Heather A.; Bridges, Andrew A.; Cowman, Tim; Knight, Lindsey A.; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L.; Kolok, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to determine whether sediments from agriculturally-intense watersheds can act as a potential source of anti-estrogenic endocrine-disrupting compounds. The specific objectives of the current study were to determine 1) whether female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) experience alterations in endocrine function when exposed to sediments collected from agriculturally-intense watersheds and 2) if these sediments display anti-estrogenic activity in an in vitro assay. In addition, sediment samples were analyzed for the presence of steroid hormones and pesticides associated with local agricultural practices. To accomplish this, sediments and water were collected from three sites within two agriculturally-intense Nebraska watersheds (Bow Creek and the Elkhorn River). In 2009, minnows were exposed to sediment and/or water collected from the two Bow Creek sites (East Bow Creek and the Confluence) in the laboratory, while in 2010, minnows were exposed to sediment and/or water from East Bow Creek, the Confluence and the Elkhorn River. Following the 7-d exposure period, the hepatic mRNA expression of two-estrogen responsive genes, estrogen receptor α (ERα) and vitellogenin (Vtg) was determined. In 2009, females exposed to Confluence sediments, in the presence of laboratory water or Confluence water, experienced significant reductions in ERα expression relative to unexposed and Confluence water-exposed females. The defeminization of these females suggests the presence of a biologically-available anti-estrogenic compound in sediments collected from this site. In 2010, sediments were assessed for anti-estrogenic activity on days 0 and 7 of the exposure period using a four-hour yeast estrogen screen. Lipophilic extracts (LEs) of day 0 sediments collected from the Confluence and the Elkhorn River induced significant reductions in the estrogenic reporter activity of treated yeast cultures suggesting the presence of a lipophilic anti

  2. The anti-estrogenic activity of sediments from agriculturally intense watersheds: assessment using in vivo and in vitro assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellin Jeffries, Marlo K; Conoan, Nicholas H; Cox, Marc B; Sangster, Jodi L; Balsiger, Heather A; Bridges, Andrew A; Cowman, Tim; Knight, Lindsey A; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L; Kolok, Alan S

    2011-09-01

    The goal of the current study was to determine whether sediments from agriculturally intense watersheds can act as a potential source of anti-estrogenic endocrine-disrupting compounds. The specific objectives of the current study were to determine (1) whether female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) experience alterations in endocrine function when exposed to sediments collected from agriculturally intense watersheds and (2) if these sediments display anti-estrogenic activity in an in vitro assay. In addition, sediment samples were analyzed for the presence of steroid hormones and pesticides associated with local agricultural practices. To accomplish this, sediments and water were collected from three sites within two agriculturally intense Nebraska watersheds (Bow Creek and the Elkhorn River). In 2009, minnows were exposed to sediment and/or water collected from the two Bow Creek sites (East Bow Creek and the Confluence) in the laboratory, while in 2010, minnows were exposed to sediment and/or water from East Bow Creek, the Confluence and the Elkhorn River. Following the 7-day exposure period, the hepatic mRNA expression of two-estrogen responsive genes, estrogen receptor α (ERα) and vitellogenin (Vtg) was determined. In 2009, females exposed to Confluence sediments, in the presence of laboratory water or Confluence water, experienced significant reductions in ERα expression relative to unexposed and Confluence water-exposed females. The defeminization of these females suggests the presence of a biologically available anti-estrogenic compound in sediments collected from this site. In 2010, sediments were assessed for anti-estrogenic activity on days 0 and 7 of the exposure period using a 4-h yeast estrogen screen. Lipophilic extracts (LEs) of day 0 sediments collected from the Confluence and the Elkhorn River induced significant reductions in the estrogenic reporter activity of treated yeast cultures suggesting the presence of a lipophilic anti

  3. [H-3]thymidine incorporation into whole liver as an alternative to [H-3]thymidine incorporation into DNA as a parameter of cell proliferation in regenerating liver tissue in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, KP; Brinker, M; van Veen, M; Daemen, T; Scherphof, GL; Slooff, MJH

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To monitor liver regeneration following partial hepatectomy, liver cell proliferation can be measured by assaying in vivo [H-3]thymidine incorporation into liver cell DNA. We hypothesized that [H-3]thymidine incorporation into whole liver tissue parallels [H-3]thymidine incorporation into

  4. Functionalized Collagen Scaffold Neutralizing the Myelin-Inhibitory Molecules Promoted Neurites Outgrowth in Vitro and Facilitated Spinal Cord Regeneration in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing; Han, Jin; Zhao, Yannan; Ding, Wenyong; Wei, Jianshu; Han, Sufang; Shang, Xianping; Wang, Bin; Chen, Bing; Xiao, Zhifeng; Dai, Jianwu

    2015-07-01

    Research has demonstrated that many myelin-associated inhibitory molecules jointly contribute to the failure of adult spinal cord regeneration. Therapies comprehensively targeting the multiple inhibitory nature of the injured spinal cord are being concerned. Here, two collagen-binding proteins, CBD-EphA4LBD and CBD-PlexinB1LBD, were constructed, respectively, to neutralize the axon guidance molecules ephrinB3 and sema4D that inhibit the regeneration of nerve fibers. The two neutralizing proteins have proven their ability to specifically bind collagen and to continuously release from collagen scaffolds. They could also promote neurites outgrowth of cerebellar granular neurons and dorsal root ganglion neurons in vitro. Subsequently, the functionalized collagen scaffolds by physically absorbing NEP1-40 and immobilizing CBD-EphA4LBD and CBD-PlexinB1LBD were transplanted into a rat T10 complete spinal cord transection model. Our results showed that rats that received the treatment of transplanting the functionalized collagen scaffold exhibited great advantage on axonal regeneration and locomotion recovery after spinal cord injury.

  5. In vivo exposure to microcystins induces DNA damage in the haemocytes of the zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, as measured with the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhel, Guillaume; O'Halloran, John; Culloty, Sarah C; O'riordan, Ruth M; Davenport, John; O'Brien, Nora M; James, Kevin F; Furey, Ambrose; Allis, Orla

    2007-01-01

    The Comet assay was used to investigate the potential of the biotoxin microcystin (MC) to induce DNA damage in the freshwater zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha. Mussels maintained in the laboratory were fed daily, over a 21-day period, with one of four strains of the cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa. Three of the strains produced different profiles of MC toxin, while the fourth strain did not produce MCs. The mussels were sampled at 0, 7, 14, and 21 days by withdrawing haemocytes from their adductor muscle. In addition, a positive control was performed by exposing a subsample of the mussels to water containing cadmium chloride (CdCl(2)). Cell viability, measured with the Fluorescein Diacetate/Ethidium Bromide test, indicated that the MC concentrations, to which the mussels were exposed, were not cytotoxic to the haemocytes. The Comet assay performed on the haemocytes indicated that exposure to CdCl(2) produced a dose-responsive increase in DNA damage, demonstrating that mussel haemocytes were sensitive to DNA-damaging agents. DNA damage, measured as percentage tail DNA (%tDNA), was observed in mussels exposed to the three toxic Microcystis strains, but not in mussels exposed to the nontoxic strain. Toxin analysis of the cyanobacterial cultures confirmed that the three MC-producing strains exhibit different toxin profiles, with the two MC variants detected being MC-LF and MC-LR. Furthermore, the DNA damage that was observed appeared to be strain-specific, with high doses of MC-LF being associated with a higher level of genotoxicity than low concentrations of MC-LR. High levels of MC-LF also seemed to induce relatively more persistent DNA damage than small quantities of MC-LR. This study is the first to demonstrate that in vivo exposure to MC-producing strains of cyanobacteria induces DNA damage in the haemocytes of zebra mussels and confirms the sublethal toxicity of these toxins.

  6. Antioxidant activity and protection against oxidative-induced damage of Acacia shaffneri and Acacia farnesiana pods extracts: in vitro and in vivo assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgadillo Puga, Claudia; Cuchillo Hilario, Mario; Espinosa Mendoza, José Guillermo; Medina Campos, Omar; Molina Jijón, Eduardo; Díaz Martínez, Margarita; Álvarez Izazaga, Marsela Alejandra; Ledesma Solano, José Ángel; Pedraza Chaverri, José

    2015-12-15

    Obesity is a worldwide public health issue, reaching epidemic condition in developing countries associated to chronic diseases. Oxidative damage is another side effect of obesity. Antioxidant activity from plant components regulates at some extent this imbalance. Main goal of the present study was to determine the antioxidant activity and protection against oxidative-induced damage of Acacia shaffneri (AS) and Acacia farnesiana (AF) pods extracts. To evaluated antioxidant activity and radical scavenging capacity of AS and AF extracts, two experiments were performed: 1) pods extracts were challenged against H2O2 using kidney cells in an in vitro assay; and 2) (Meriones unguiculatus) was employed in an in vivo assay to observe the effect of pods extracts on scavenging properties in plasma. Both pods extracts presented an important protective effect on radical scavenging capacity against ABTS• + and DPPH(+), and also in TBARS formation in vitro. Vegetal pods extracts did not induce any pro-oxidative effect when added to kidney cells in DMEM. Cells damage in DMEM with addition of H2O2 was significantly higher than those when vegetal pods extracts were added at 50 (P extracts were administered. The antioxidant protection of the acacia pods extracts reported in this study suggests the possible transference of antioxidant components and protective effects to animal products (milk, meat, and by-products) from Acacia pods when this vegetation is included in the diet. In order to evaluate, the possible transference of theirs antioxidant components to animal products, the incorporation of these non-conventional resources to ruminant feeding is a good opportunity of study. Profiling of Acacia farnesiana pods extract is necessary to identify the responsible bioactive compounds of protective properties.

  7. ESAT-6/CFP-10 fusion protein and peptides for optimal diagnosis of mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by ex vivo enzyme-linked immunospot assay in the Gambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Philip C; Jackson-Sillah, Dolly; Fox, Annette; Franken, Kees L M C; Lugos, Moses D; Jeffries, David J; Donkor, Simon A; Hammond, Abdulrahman S; Adegbola, Richard A; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Klein, Michel R; Brookes, Roger H

    2005-05-01

    Overlapping peptides of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens ESAT-6 and CFP-10 offer increased specificity over the purified protein derivative skin test when they were used in an ex vivo enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay for gamma interferon detection for the diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infection from recent exposure. We assessed whether equivalent results could be obtained for a fusion protein of the two antigens and whether a combined readout would offer increased sensitivity in The Gambia. We studied the ELISPOT assay results for 488 household contacts of 88 sputum smear-positive tuberculosis (TB) cases. The proportions of subjects positive by each test and by the tests combined were assessed across an exposure gradient, defined according to sleeping proximity to a TB case. Eighty-eight (18%) subjects were positive for CFP-10 peptides, 148 (30%) were positive for ESAT-6 peptides, 161 (33%) were positive for both peptides, and 168 (34%) were positive for the fusion protein; 188 (39%) subjects had either a positive result for a peptide or a positive result for the fusion protein. There was reasonable agreement between the peptide and the protein results (kappa statistic = 0.78) and no significant discordance (P = 0.38). There was a strong correlation between the fusion protein and combined peptide spot counts (r = 0.9), and responses to the peptide and the proteins all increased significantly according to M. tuberculosis exposure. The proportion of subjects positive for either the pool of peptides or the fusion protein offered maximum sensitivity, being significantly higher than the proportion of subjects positive for ESAT-6 peptides alone (P = 0.007). A fusion protein of ESAT-6 and CFP-10 is equivalent to overlapping peptides for the diagnosis of latent M. tuberculosis infection. Use of a combination of peptides and fusion protein offers improved sensitivity.

  8. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R Inhibits Osteosarcoma Angiogenesis in the In Vivo Gelfoam® Assay Visualized by Color-coded Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyuna, Tasuku; Tome, Yasunori; Uehara, Fuminari; Murakami, Takashi; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Ming; Kanaya, Fuminori; Hoffman, Robert M

    2018-01-01

    We previously developed a color-coded imaging model that can quantify the length of nascent blood vessels using Gelfoam® implanted in nestin-driven green fluorescent protein (ND-GFP) nude mice. In this model, nascent blood vessels selectively express GFP. We also previously showed that osteosarcoma cells promote angiogenesis in this assay. We have also previously demonstrated the tumor-targeting bacteria Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (S. typhimurium A1-R) can inhibit or regress all tested tumor types in mouse models. The aim of the present study was to determine if S. typhimurium A1-R could inhibit osteosarcoma angiogenesis in the in vivo Gelfoam® color-coded imaging assay. Gelfoam® was implanted subcutaneously in ND-GFP nude mice. Skin flaps were made 7 days after implantation and 143B-RFP human osteosarcoma cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) were injected into the implanted Gelfoam. After establishment of tumors in the Gelfoam®, control-group mice were treated with phosphate buffered saline via tail-vein injection (iv) and the experimental group was treated with S. typhimurium A1-R iv Skin flaps were made at day 7, 14, 21, and 28 after implantation of the Gelfoam® to allow imaging of vascularization in the Gelfoam® using a variable-magnification small-animal imaging system and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Nascent blood vessels expressing ND-GFP extended into the Gelfoam® over time in both groups. However, the extent of nascent blood-vessel growth was significantly inhibited by S. typhimurium A1-R treatment by day 28. The present results indicate S. typhimurium A1-R has potential for anti-angiogenic targeted therapy of osteosarcoma. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  9. Ergot Alkaloids (Regenerate New Leads as Antiparasitics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Chan

    Full Text Available Praziquantel (PZQ is a key therapy for treatment of parasitic flatworm infections of humans and livestock, but the mechanism of action of this drug is unresolved. Resolving PZQ-engaged targets and effectors is important for identifying new druggable pathways that may yield novel antiparasitic agents. Here we use functional, genetic and pharmacological approaches to reveal that serotonergic signals antagonize PZQ action in vivo. Exogenous 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT rescued PZQ-evoked polarity and mobility defects in free-living planarian flatworms. In contrast, knockdown of a prevalently expressed planarian 5-HT receptor potentiated or phenocopied PZQ action in different functional assays. Subsequent screening of serotonergic ligands revealed that several ergot alkaloids possessed broad efficacy at modulating regenerative outcomes and the mobility of both free living and parasitic flatworms. Ergot alkaloids that phenocopied PZQ in regenerative assays to cause bipolar regeneration exhibited structural modifications consistent with serotonergic blockade. These data suggest that serotonergic activation blocks PZQ action in vivo, while serotonergic antagonists phenocopy PZQ action. Importantly these studies identify the ergot alkaloid scaffold as a promising structural framework for designing potent agents targeting parasitic bioaminergic G protein coupled receptors.

  10. Use of an in vivo FTA assay to assess the magnitude, functional avidity and epitope variant cross-reactivity of T cell responses following HIV-1 recombinant poxvirus vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danushka K Wijesundara

    Full Text Available Qualitative characteristics of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells (CTLs are important in measuring the effectiveness of CTLs in controlling HIV-1 infections. Indeed, in recent studies patients who are naturally resistant to HIV-1 infections have been shown to possess CTLs that are of high functional avidity and have a high capacity to recognize HIV epitope variants, when compared to HIV-1 infection progressors. When developing efficacious vaccines, assays that can effectively measure CTL quality specifically in vivo are becoming increasingly important. Here we report the use of a recently developed high-throughput multi-parameter technique, known as the fluorescent target array (FTA assay, to simultaneously measure CTL killing magnitude, functional avidity and epitope variant cross-reactivity in real time in vivo. In the current study we have applied the FTA assay as a screening tool to assess a large cohort of over 20 different HIV-1 poxvirus vaccination strategies in mice. This screen revealed that heterologous poxvirus prime-boost vaccination regimes (i.e., recombinant fowlpox (FPV-HIV prime followed by a recombinant vaccinia virus (VV-HIV booster were the most effective in generating high quality CTL responses in vivo. In conclusion, we have demonstrated how the FTA assay can be utilized as a cost effective screening tool (by reducing the required number of animals by >100 fold, to evaluate a large range of HIV-1 vaccination strategies in terms of CTL avidity and variant cross-reactivity in an in vivo setting.

  11. Two zinc-aminoclays' in-vitro cytotoxicity assessment in HeLa cells and in-vivo embryotoxicity assay in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Hang-Suk; Park, Duckshin; Eun Lim, Song; Jeong, Kwang-Hun; Park, Ji-Seon; Park, Han-Jin; Kang, Shinyoung; Kang, Kyoung Suk; Park, Hyun Gyu; An, Ha-Rim; Huh, Yun Suk; Lee, Young-Chul

    2017-03-01

    Two zinc-aminoclays [ZnACs] with functionalized primary amines [(-CH2)3NH2] were prepared by a simple sol-gel reaction using cationic metal precursors of ZnCl2 and Zn(NO3)2 with 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane [APTES] under ambient conditions. Due to the facile interaction of heavy metals with primary amine sites and Zn-related intrinsic antimicrobial activity, toxicity assays of ZnACs nanoparticles (NPs) prior to their environmental and human-health applications are essential. However, such reports remain rare. Thus, in the present study, a cell viability assay of in-vitro HeLa cells comparing ZnCl2, Zn(NO3)2 salts, and ZnO (~50nm average diameter) NPs was performed. Interestingly, compared with the ZnCl2, and Zn(NO3)2 salts, and ZnO NPs (18.73/18.12/51.49µg/mL and 18.12/15.19/46.10µg/mL of IC50 values for 24 and 48h), the two ZnACs NPs exhibited the highest toxicity (IC50 values of 21.18/18.36µg/mL and 18.37/17.09µg/mL for 24 and 48h, respectively), whose concentrations were calculated on Zn elemental composition. This might be due to the enhanced bioavailability and uptake into cells of ZnAC NPs themselves and their positively charged hydrophilicity by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, particularly as ZnACs exist in cationic NP's form, not in released Zn(2+) ionic form (i.e., dissolved nanometal). However, in an in-vivo embryotoxicity assay in zebrafish, ZnACs and ZnO NPs showed toxic effects at 50-100µg/mL (corresponding to 37.88-75.76 of Zn wt% µg/mL). The hatching rate (%) of zebrafish was lowest for the ZnO NPs, particularly where ZnAC-[(NO3)2] is slightly more toxic than ZnAC-[Cl2]. These results are all very pertinent to the issue of ZnACs' potential applications in the environmental and biomedical fields. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Lack of rivaroxaban influence on a prothrombinase-based assay for the detection of activated C protein resistance: an Italian ex vivo and in vitro study in normal subjects and factor V Leiden carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessoni, G; Valverde, S; Valle, L; Gessoni, F; Caruso, P; Valle, R

    2017-08-01

    Activated protein C resistance (APCr) leads to hypercoagulability and is due, often but not exclusively, to Factor V Leiden (FVL). The aim of this study was to assess the ex vivo and in vitro interference of the direct factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban (RIV) on a prothrombinase-based assay for APCr detection. An ex vivo study was performed on fresh plasma samples obtained from 44 subjects with FV wild-type and seven with FVL heterozygous, all treated with RIV. An in vitro study was performed on 15 plasma samples (six from normal subjects, six from heterozygous, and three from homozygous FVL carriers, all frozen specimens) spiked with RIV. RIV concentration was evaluated using a chromogenic assay, and APCr was evaluated by a prothrombinase-based assay. No significant interference of RIV on APCr results obtained by a prothrombinase-based assay was observed for drug concentrations up to 400 ng/mL in FV wild-type and FVL carriers (homozygous and heterozygous). These results were confirmed both ex vivo and in vitro. RIV did not significantly interfere with the prothrombinase-based assay used for the assessment of APCr, and this was observed to occur independently of FV status. However, only concentrations up to 400 ng/mL were tested and, therefore, what occurs in the presence of higher doses remains to be investigated. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Angiopoietin-like 5 and IGFBP2 stimulate ex vivo expansion of human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells as assayed by NOD/SCID transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Kaba, Megan; Iizuka, Satoru; Huynh, HoangDinh; Lodish, Harvey F

    2008-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the basis of bone marrow transplantation and are attractive target cells for hematopoietic gene therapy, but these important clinical applications have been severely hampered by difficulties in ex vivo expansion of HSCs. In particular, the use of cord blood for adult transplantation is greatly limited by the number of HSCs. Previously we identified angiopoietin-like proteins and IGF-binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) as new hormones that, together with other factors, can expand mouse bone marrow HSCs in culture. Here, we measure the activity of multipotent human severe combined immunodeficient (SCID)-repopulating cells (SRCs) by transplantation into the nonobese diabetic SCID (NOD/SCID) mice; secondary transplantation was performed to evaluate the self-renewal potential of SRCs. A serum-free medium containing SCF, TPO, and FGF-1 or Flt3-L cannot significantly support expansion of the SRCs present in human cord blood CD133+ cells. Addition of either angiopoietin-like 5 or IGF-binding protein 2 to the cultures led to a sizable expansion of HSC numbers, as assayed by NOD/SCID transplantation. A serum-free culture containing SCF, TPO, FGF-1, angiopoietin-like 5, and IGFBP2 supports an approximately 20-fold net expansion of repopulating human cord blood HSCs, a number potentially applicable to several clinical processes including HSC transplantation.

  14. Pharmacological Suppression of CNS Scarring by Deferoxamine Reduces Lesion Volume and Increases Regeneration in an In Vitro Model for Astroglial-Fibrotic Scarring and in Rat Spinal Cord Injury In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelaar, Christina Francisca; König, Brigitte; Krafft, Stefanie; Estrada, Veronica; Brazda, Nicole; Ziegler, Brigida; Faissner, Andreas; Müller, Hans Werner

    2015-01-01

    Lesion-induced scarring is a major impediment for regeneration of injured axons in the central nervous system (CNS). The collagen-rich glial-fibrous scar contains numerous axon growth inhibitory factors forming a regeneration-barrier for axons. We demonstrated previously that the combination of the iron chelator 2,2'-bipyridine-5,5'-decarboxylic acid (BPY-DCA) and 8-Br-cyclic AMP (cAMP) inhibits scar formation and collagen deposition, leading to enhanced axon regeneration and partial functional recovery after spinal cord injury. While BPY-DCA is not a clinical drug, the clinically approved iron chelator deferoxamine mesylate (DFO) may be a suitable alternative for anti-scarring treatment (AST). In order to prove the scar-suppressing efficacy of DFO we modified a recently published in vitro model for CNS scarring. The model comprises a co-culture system of cerebral astrocytes and meningeal fibroblasts, which form scar-like clusters when stimulated with transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). We studied the mechanisms of TGF-β-induced CNS scarring and compared the efficiency of different putative pharmacological scar-reducing treatments, including BPY-DCA, DFO and cAMP as well as combinations thereof. We observed modulation of TGF-β-induced scarring at the level of fibroblast proliferation and contraction as well as specific changes in the expression of extracellular matrix molecules and axon growth inhibitory proteins. The individual and combinatorial pharmacological treatments had distinct effects on the cellular and molecular aspects of in vitro scarring. DFO could be identified as a putative anti-scarring treatment for CNS trauma. We subsequently validated this by local application of DFO to a dorsal hemisection in the rat thoracic spinal cord. DFO treatment led to significant reduction of scarring, slightly increased regeneration of corticospinal tract as well as ascending CGRP-positive axons and moderately improved locomotion. We conclude that the in vitro

  15. Biological Evaluation (In Vitro and In Vivo) of Bilayered Collagenous Coated (Nano Electrospun and Solid Wall) Chitosan Membrane for Periodontal Guided Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Ghogha; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Mofid, Rasoul; Abbas, Fatemeh Mashhadi; Ghanavati, Farzin; Baghban, Alireza Akbarzadeh; Yavari, Seyedeh Kimia; Pajoumshariati, Seyedramin

    2016-07-01

    The application of barrier membranes in guided bone regeneration (GBR) has become a commonly used surgical technique in periodontal research. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the in vitro biocompatibility and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on two different collagenous coatings (nano electrospun fibrous vs. solid wall) of bilayered collagen/chitosan membrane and their histological evaluation on bone regeneration in rabbit calvarial defects. It was found that chitosan-nano electrospun collagen (CNC) membranes had higher proliferation/metabolic activity compared to the chitosan-collagen (CC) and pristine chitosan membranes. The qRT-PCR analysis demonstrated the CNC membranes induced significant expression of osteogenic genes (Osteocalcin, RUNX2 and Col-α1) in MSCs. Moreover, higher calcium content and alkaline phosphatase activity of MSCs were observed compared to the other groups. Histologic and histomorphometric evaluations were performed on the uncovered (negative control) as well as covered calvarial defects of ten adult white rabbits with different membranes (CNC, CC, BioGide (BG, positive control)) at 1 and 2 months after surgery. More bone formation was detected in the defects covered with CNC and BG membranes than those covered by CC and the negative control. No inflammation and residual biomaterial particles were observed on the membrane surface or in the surrounding tissues in the surgical areas. These results suggest that bilayer CNC membrane can have the potential for use as a GBR membrane material facilitating bone formation.

  16. Biomaterial selection for tooth regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhenglin; Nie, Hemin; Wang, Shuang; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Fu, Susan Y; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Lili; Mao, Jeremy J

    2011-10-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or synthetic polymers, three-dimensional scaffold fabrication, stem cell transplantation, and stem cell homing. A tooth is a complex biological organ. Tooth loss represents the most common organ failure. Tooth regeneration encompasses not only regrowth of an entire tooth as an organ, but also biological restoration of individual components of the tooth including enamel, dentin, cementum, or dental pulp. Regeneration of tooth root represents perhaps more near-term opportunities than the regeneration of the whole tooth. In the adult, a tooth owes its biological vitality, arguably more, to the root than the crown. Biomaterials are indispensible for the regeneration of tooth root, tooth crown, dental pulp, or an entire tooth. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  17. Biomaterial Selection for Tooth Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhenglin; Nie, Hemin; Wang, Shuang; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Fu, Susan Y.; Zhou, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or synthetic polymers, three-dimensional scaffold fabrication, stem cell transplantation, and stem cell homing. A tooth is a complex biological organ. Tooth loss represents the most common organ failure. Tooth regeneration encompasses not only regrowth of an entire tooth as an organ, but also biological restoration of individual components of the tooth including enamel, dentin, cementum, or dental pulp. Regeneration of tooth root represents perhaps more near-term opportunities than the regeneration of the whole tooth. In the adult, a tooth owes its biological vitality, arguably more, to the root than the crown. Biomaterials are indispensible for the regeneration of tooth root, tooth crown, dental pulp, or an entire tooth. PMID:21699433

  18. Expression of VEGFR-2 during Liver Regeneration after Partial Hepatectomy in a Bioluminescence Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizai, Patrick Hamid; Bertram, Lea; Kroy, Daniela; Kummer, Julia; Andert, Anne; Neumann, Ulf Peter; Ulmer, Tom Florian; Fragoulis, Athanassious

    2017-10-26

    Liver regeneration requires the formation of new blood vessels. Endothelial cell proliferation is stimulated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR-2. The aim of this study was to investigate VEGFR-2 expression in vivo during liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy (PHx). Transgenic VEGFR-2-luc mice were used in which the luciferase reporter gene was under control of the VEGFR-2 promoter. Following 2/3 PHx, the mice underwent in vivo bioluminescence imaging until the 14th postoperative day. Additionally, liver tissue was analyzed by immunohistochemistry, in vitro luminescence assays, and quantitative RT-PCR. In vivo bioluminescence imaging showed a significant increase in VEGFR-2 promoter activity after PHx. Maximum signal was recorded on the 3rd day; 8 days postoperatively the signal intensity decreased significantly. On the 14th day, bioluminescence signal reached almost baseline levels. Immunohistochemistry, quantitative RT-PCR, and in vitro luminescence confirmed a significant increase on the 3rd day following resection. The mRNA expression of VEGFR-2 was significantly higher on day 3 than preoperatively as well as on day 8. In vivo bioluminescence imaging with transgenic VEGFR-2-luc mice is feasible and provides a convenient model for noninvasively studying VEGFR-2 expression during liver regeneration. This may facilitate further experiments with modulation of angiogenesis by different substances. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Gene expression analysis of zebrafish heart regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Ling Lien

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian hearts cannot regenerate. In contrast, zebrafish hearts regenerate even when up to 20% of the ventricle is amputated. The mechanism of zebrafish heart regeneration is not understood. To systematically characterize this process at the molecular level, we generated transcriptional profiles of zebrafish cardiac regeneration by microarray analyses. Distinct gene clusters were identified based on temporal expression patterns. Genes coding for wound response/inflammatory factors, secreted molecules, and matrix metalloproteinases are expressed in regenerating heart in sequential patterns. Comparisons of gene expression profiles between heart and fin regeneration revealed a set of regeneration core molecules as well as tissue-specific factors. The expression patterns of several secreted molecules around the wound suggest that they play important roles in heart regeneration. We found that both platelet-derived growth factor-a and -b (pdgf-a and pdgf-b are upregulated in regenerating zebrafish hearts. PDGF-B homodimers induce DNA synthesis in adult zebrafish cardiomyocytes. In addition, we demonstrate that a chemical inhibitor of PDGF receptor decreases DNA synthesis of cardiomyocytes both in vitro and in vivo during regeneration. Our data indicate that zebrafish heart regeneration is associated with sequentially upregulated wound healing genes and growth factors and suggest that PDGF signaling is required.

  20. Advanced Ring-Shaped Microelectrode Assay Combined with Small Rectangular Electrode for Quasi-In vivo Measurement of Cell-to-Cell Conductance in Cardiomyocyte Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Fumimasa; Kaneko, Tomoyuki; Hamada, Tomoyo; Hattori, Akihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2013-06-01

    To predict the risk of fatal arrhythmia induced by cardiotoxicity in the highly complex human heart system, we have developed a novel quasi-in vivo electrophysiological measurement assay, which combines a ring-shaped human cardiomyocyte network and a set of two electrodes that form a large single ring-shaped electrode for the direct measurement of irregular cell-to-cell conductance occurrence in a cardiomyocyte network, and a small rectangular microelectrode for forced pacing of cardiomyocyte beating and for acquiring the field potential waveforms of cardiomyocytes. The advantages of this assay are as follows. The electrophysiological signals of cardiomyocytes in the ring-shaped network are superimposed directly on a single loop-shaped electrode, in which the information of asynchronous behavior of cell-to-cell conductance are included, without requiring a set of huge numbers of microelectrode arrays, a set of fast data conversion circuits, or a complex analysis in a computer. Another advantage is that the small rectangular electrode can control the position and timing of forced beating in a ring-shaped human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPS)-derived cardiomyocyte network and can also acquire the field potentials of cardiomyocytes. First, we constructed the human iPS-derived cardiomyocyte ring-shaped network on the set of two electrodes, and acquired the field potential signals of particular cardiomyocytes in the ring-shaped cardiomyocyte network during simultaneous acquisition of the superimposed signals of whole-cardiomyocyte networks representing cell-to-cell conduction. Using the small rectangular electrode, we have also evaluated the response of the cell network to electrical stimulation. The mean and SD of the minimum stimulation voltage required for pacing (VMin) at the small rectangular electrode was 166+/-74 mV, which is the same as the magnitude of amplitude for the pacing using the ring-shaped electrode (179+/-33 mV). The results showed that the

  1. Development and application of a quantitative PCR assay to study equine herpesvirus 5 invasion and replication in equine tissues in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarski, Lila M; High, Emily A; Nelli, Rahul K; Bolin, Steven R; Williams, Kurt J; Hussey, Gisela

    2017-10-01

    Equine herpesvirus 5 (EHV-5) infection is associated with pulmonary fibrosis in horses, but further studies on EHV-5 persistence in equine cells are needed to fully understand viral and host contributions to disease pathogenesis. Our aim was to develop a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay to measure EHV-5 viral copy number in equine cell cultures, blood lymphocytes, and nasal swabs of horses. Furthermore, we used a recently developed equine primary respiratory cell culture system to study EHV-5 pathogenesis at the respiratory tract. PCR primers and a probe were designed to target gene E11 of the EHV-5 genome. Sensitivity and repeatability were established, and specificity was verified by testing multiple isolates of EHV-5, as well as DNA from other equine herpesviruses. Four-week old fully differentiated (mature), newly seeded (immature) primary equine respiratory epithelial cell (ERECs), and equine dermal cell cultures were inoculated with EHV-5 and the cells and supernatants collected daily for 14days. Blood lymphocytes and nasal swabs were collected from horses experimentally infected with equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1). The qPCR assay detected EHV-5 at stable concentrations throughout 14days in inoculated mature EREC and equine dermal cell cultures (peaking at 202 and 5861 viral genomes per 10(6) cellular β actin, respectively). EHV-5 copies detected in the immature EREC cultures increased over 14days and reached levels greater than 10,000 viral genomes per 10(6) cellular β actin. Moreover, EHV-5 was detected in the lymphocytes of 76% of horses and in the nasal swabs of 84% of horses experimentally infected with EHV-1 pre-inoculation with EHV-1. Post-inoculation with EHV-1, EHV-5 was detected in lymphocytes of 52% of horses while EHV-5 levels in nasal swabs were not significantly different from pre-inoculation levels. In conclusion, qPCR was a reliable technique to investigate viral load in in vivo and in vitro samples, and EHV-5 replication in equine epithelial

  2. Development of a convenient in vivo hepatotoxin assay using a transgenic zebrafish line with liver-specific DsRed expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Zhang

    provide a rapid and convenient in vivo hepatotoxicity assay that should be applicable to high-throughput hepatotoxicity test in drug screening as well as in biomonitoring environmental toxicants.

  3. The development of an “in vivo assay technique” as a tool for measuring protective immune responses of vaccine against myiasis in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Partoutomo

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available An “in vivo assay technique” is urgently needed for measuring protective immune effects of a myiasis vaccine in sheep. Such a technique is being developed simultaneously with the development of a vaccine against myiasis caused by the screwworm fly Chrysomya bezziana under a collaborative project undertaken by Balitvet, ITB and CSIRO (Australia and funded by ACIAR. Experiments were conducted in naive sheep. C. bezziana larvae were allowed to develop on abraded skin in aluminium rings which had been attached to the sheep by means of a glue (Aibon on the day prior to infection. Rings were arranged on clipped areas close to the mid line of the sheep’s back, two rings on the right side and two rings on the left. Four trials were performed, involving studies on the effects of including wet sponges in the rings to maintain humidity (Trial 1; the effects of sponge and blended meat as counting and transferring media during infection (Trial 2; the effects of the repellants citronella, eucalyptus oil and neem extract in assisting the recovery of larvae (Trial 3; and the effects of the reducing the infective dose from 50 to 25 1st instar larvae/ring and using a fine brush for counting and transferring larvae instead of using a forceps as in the previous groups (Trial 4 on the larval recovery rates (LRR. The results indicated that the inclusion of wet sponges in the rings, the use of sponge and blended meat as counting and transferring media during infection, and the application of repellants all increased the LRR to some extent; however, variations among individual rings remained high. On the other hand, the reduction of infective dose of larvae from 50 to 25 1st instar larvae/ring and using a fine brush for counting and transferring larvae sharply increased the LRR while substantially decreasing the coefficient variations.

  4. Relative embryotoxic potency of p-substituted phenols in the embryonic stem cell test (EST) and comparison to their toxic potency in vivo and in the whole embryo culture (WEC) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strikwold, Marije; Woutersen, Ruud A; Spenkelink, Bert; Punt, Ans; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2012-09-03

    The applicability of the embryonic stem cell test (EST) as an alternative for in vivo embryotoxicity testing was evaluated for a series of five p-substituted phenols. To this purpose, the potency ranking for this class of compounds derived from the inhibition of cardiomyocyte differentiation in the EST was compared to in vivo embryotoxic potency data obtained from literature and to the potency ranking defined in the in vitro whole embryo culture (WEC) assay. From the results obtained it appears that the EST was able to identify the embryotoxic potential for p-substituted phenols, providing an identical potency ranking compared to the WEC assay. However, the EST was not able to predict an accurate ranking for the phenols compared to their potency observed in vivo. Only phenol, the least potent compound within this series, was correctly ranked. Furthermore, p-mercaptophenol was correctly identified as a relative potent congener of the phenols tested, but its ranking was distorted by p-heptyloxyphenol, of which the toxicity was overestimated in the EST. It is concluded that when attempting to explain the observed disparity in potency rankings between in vitro and in vivo embryotoxicity, the in vitro models should be combined with a kinetic model describing in vivo absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion processes of the compounds. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The PIGRET assay, a method for measuring Pig-a gene mutation in reticulocytes, is reliable as a short-term in vivo genotoxicity test: Summary of the MMS/JEMS-collaborative study across 16 laboratories using 24 chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Takafumi; Horibata, Katsuyoshi; Miura, Daishiro; Chikura, Satsuki; Okada, Yuki; Ukai, Akiko; Itoh, Satoru; Nakayama, Shiho; Sanada, Hisakazu; Koyama, Naomi; Muto, Shigeharu; Uno, Yoshifumi; Yamamoto, Mika; Suzuki, Yuta; Fukuda, Takayuki; Goto, Ken; Wada, Kunio; Kyoya, Takahiro; Shigano, Miyuki; Takasawa, Hironao; Hamada, Shuichi; Adachi, Hideki; Uematsu, Yasuaki; Tsutsumi, Eri; Hori, Hisako; Kikuzuki, Ryuta; Ogiwara, Yosuke; Yoshida, Ikuma; Maeda, Akihisa; Narumi, Kazunori; Fujiishi, Yohei; Morita, Takeshi; Yamada, Masami; Honma, Masamitsu

    2016-11-15

    The in vivo mutation assay using the X-linked phosphatidylinositol glycan class A gene (Pig-a in rodents, PIG-A in humans) is a promising tool for evaluating the mutagenicity of chemicals. Approaches for measuring Pig-a mutant cells have focused on peripheral red blood cells (RBCs) and reticulocytes (RETs) from rodents. The recently developed PIGRET assay is capable of screening >1×10 6 RETs for Pig-a mutants by concentrating RETs in whole blood prior to flow cytometric analysis. Additionally, due to the characteristics of erythropoiesis, the PIGRET assay can potentially detect increases in Pig-a mutant frequency (MF) sooner after exposure compared with a Pig-a assay targeting total RBCs (RBC Pig-a assay). In order to test the merits and limitations of the PIGRET assay as a short-term genotoxicity test, an interlaboratory trial involving 16 laboratories was organized by the Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group of the Japanese Environmental Mutagenicity Society (MMS/JEMS). First, the technical proficiency of the laboratories and transferability of the assay were confirmed by performing both the PIGRET and RBC Pig-a assays on rats treated with single doses of N-nitroso-N-ethylurea. Next, the collaborating laboratories used the PIGRET and RBC Pig-a assays to assess the mutagenicity of a total of 24 chemicals in rats, using a single treatment design and mutant analysis at 1, 2, and 4 weeks after the treatment. Thirteen chemicals produced positive responses in the PIGRET assay; three of these chemicals were not detected in the RBC Pig-a assay. Twelve chemicals induced an increase in RET Pig-a MF beginning 1 week after dosing, while only 3 chemicals positive for RBC Pig-a MF produced positive responses 1 week after dosing. Based on these results, we conclude that the PIGRET assay is useful as a short-term test for in vivo mutation using a single-dose protocol. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Tantalum coating of porous carbon scaffold supplemented with autologous bone marrow stromal stem cells for bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Xiaowei; Zhao, Dewei; Wang, Benjie; Wang, Wei; Kang, Kai; Xie, Hui; Liu, Baoyi; Zhang, Xiuzhi; Zhang, Jinsong; Yang, Zhenming

    2016-01-01

    Porous tantalum metal with low elastic modulus is similar to cancellous bone. Reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) can provide three-dimensional pore structure and serves as the ideal scaffold of tantalum coating. In this study, the biocompatibility of domestic porous tantalum was first successfully tested with bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) in vitro and for bone tissue repair in vivo. We evaluated cytotoxicity of RVC scaffold and tantalum coating using BMSCs. The morphology, adhesion, a...

  7. αTCP ceramic doped with dicalcium silicate for bone regeneration applications prepared by powder metallurgy method: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Pablo; Luklinska, Zofia B; Meseguer-Olmo, Luis; Mate-Sanchez de Val, Jose E; Delgado-Ruiz, Rafael A; Calvo-Guirado, Jose L; Ramirez-Fernandez, Ma P; de Aza, Piedad N

    2013-07-01

    This study reports on the in vitro and in vivo behavior of α-tricalcium phosphate (αTCP) and also αTCP doped with either 1.5 or 3.0 wt % of dicalcium silicate (C2 S). The ceramics were successfully prepared by powder metallurgy method combined with homogenization and heat treatment procedures. All materials were composed of a single-phase, αTCP in the case of a pure material, or solid solution of C2 S in αTCP for the doped αTCP, which were stable at room temperature. The ceramics were tested for bioactivity in simulated body fluid, cell culture medium containing adult mesenchymal stem cells of human origin, and in animals. Analytical scanning electron microscopy combined with chemical elemental analysis was used and Fourier transform infrared and conventional histology methods. The in vivo behavior of the ceramics matched the in vitro results, independently of the C2 S content in αTCP. Carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) layer was formed on the surface and within the inner parts of the specimens in all cases. A fully mineralized new bone growing in direct contact with the implants was found under the in vivo conditions. The bioactivity and biocompatibility of the implants increased with the C2 S content in αTCP. The C2 S doped ceramics also favoured a phase transformation of αTCP into CHA, important for full implant integration during the natural bone healing processes. αTCP ceramic doped with 3.0 wt % C2 S showed the best bioactive in vitro and in vivo properties of all the compositions and hence could be of interest in specific applications for bone restorative purposes. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Chitosan-Based Trilayer Scaffold for Multitissue Periodontal Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varoni, E M; Vijayakumar, S; Canciani, E; Cochis, A; De Nardo, L; Lodi, G; Rimondini, L; Cerruti, M

    2017-10-01

    Periodontal regeneration is still a challenge for periodontists and tissue engineers, as it requires the simultaneous restoration of different tissues-namely, cementum, gingiva, bone, and periodontal ligament (PDL). Here, we synthetized a chitosan (CH)-based trilayer porous scaffold to achieve periodontal regeneration driven by multitissue simultaneous healing. We produced 2 porous compartments for bone and gingiva regeneration by cross-linking with genipin either medium molecular weight (MMW) or low molecular weight (LMW) CH and freeze-drying the resulting scaffolds. We synthetized a third compartment for PDL regeneration by CH electrochemical deposition; this allowed us to produce highly oriented microchannels of about 450-µm diameter intended to drive PDL fiber growth toward the dental root. In vitro characterization showed rapid equilibrium water content for MMW-CH and LMW-CH compartments (equilibrium water content after 5 min >85%). The MMW-CH compartment degraded more slowly and provided significantly more resistance to compression (28% ± 1% of weight loss at 4 wk; compression modulus HA = 18 ± 6 kPa) than the LMW-CH compartment (34% ± 1%; 7.7 ± 0.8 kPa) as required to match the physiologic healing rates of bone and gingiva and their mechanical properties. More than 90% of all human primary periodontal cell populations tested on the corresponding compartment survived during cytocompatibility tests, showing active cell metabolism in the alkaline phosphatase and collagen deposition assays. In vivo tests showed high biocompatibility in wild-type mice, tissue ingrowth, and vascularization within the scaffold. Using the periodontal ectopic model in nude mice, we preseeded scaffold compartments with human gingival fibroblasts, osteoblasts, and PDL fibroblasts and found a dense mineralized matrix within the MMW-CH region, with weakly mineralized deposits at the dentin interface. Together, these results support this resorbable trilayer scaffold as a promising

  9. Characterization of Morphological and Cellular Events Underlying Oral Regeneration in the Sea Anemone, Nematostella vectensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldine R. Amiel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cnidarians, the extant sister group to bilateria, are well known for their impressive regenerative capacity. The sea anemone Nematostella vectensis is a well-established system for the study of development and evolution that is receiving increased attention for its regenerative capacity. Nematostella is able to regrow missing body parts within five to six days after its bisection, yet studies describing the morphological, cellular, and molecular events underlying this process are sparse and very heterogeneous in their experimental approaches. In this study, we lay down the basic framework to study oral regeneration in Nematostella vectensis. Using various imaging and staining techniques we characterize in detail the morphological, cellular, and global molecular events that define specific landmarks of this process. Furthermore, we describe in vivo assays to evaluate wound healing success and the initiation of pharynx reformation. Using our described landmarks for regeneration and in vivo assays, we analyze the effects of perturbing either transcription or cellular proliferation on the regenerative process. Interestingly, neither one of these experimental perturbations has major effects on wound closure, although they slightly delay or partially block it. We further show that while the inhibition of transcription blocks regeneration in a very early step, inhibiting cellular proliferation only affects later events such as pharynx reformation and tentacle elongation.

  10. Characterization of Morphological and Cellular Events Underlying Oral Regeneration in the Sea Anemone, Nematostella vectensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiel, Aldine R; Johnston, Hereroa T; Nedoncelle, Karine; Warner, Jacob F; Ferreira, Solène; Röttinger, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Cnidarians, the extant sister group to bilateria, are well known for their impressive regenerative capacity. The sea anemone Nematostella vectensis is a well-established system for the study of development and evolution that is receiving increased attention for its regenerative capacity. Nematostella is able to regrow missing body parts within five to six days after its bisection, yet studies describing the morphological, cellular, and molecular events underlying this process are sparse and very heterogeneous in their experimental approaches. In this study, we lay down the basic framework to study oral regeneration in Nematostella vectensis. Using various imaging and staining techniques we characterize in detail the morphological, cellular, and global molecular events that define specific landmarks of this process. Furthermore, we describe in vivo assays to evaluate wound healing success and the initiation of pharynx reformation. Using our described landmarks for regeneration and in vivo assays, we analyze the effects of perturbing either transcription or cellular proliferation on the regenerative process. Interestingly, neither one of these experimental perturbations has major effects on wound closure, although they slightly delay or partially block it. We further show that while the inhibition of transcription blocks regeneration in a very early step, inhibiting cellular proliferation only affects later events such as pharynx reformation and tentacle elongation.

  11. Use of poly(DL-lactide-ε-caprolactone) membranes and mesenchymal stem cells from the Wharton's jelly of the umbilical cord for promoting nerve regeneration in axonotmesis: in vitro and in vivo analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, A; Pereira, T; Alves, Marco G; Armada-da-Silva, P A S; Amorim, I; Gomes, R; Ribeiro, J; França, M L; Lopes, C; Carvalho, Rui A; Socorro, S; Oliveira, Pedro F; Porto, B; Sousa, R; Bombaci, A; Ronchi, G; Fregnan, F; Varejão, A S P; Luís, A L; Geuna, S; Maurício, A C

    2012-12-01

    Cellular systems implanted into an injured nerve may produce growth factors or extracellular matrix molecules, modulate the inflammatory process and eventually improve nerve regeneration. In the present study, we evaluated the therapeutic value of human umbilical cord matrix MSCs (HMSCs) on rat sciatic nerve after axonotmesis injury associated to Vivosorb® membrane. During HMSCs expansion and differentiation in neuroglial-like cells, the culture medium was collected at 48, 72 and 96 h for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis in order to evaluate the metabolic profile. To correlate the HMSCs ability to differentiate and survival capacity in the presence of the Vivosorb® membrane, the [Ca(2+)]i of undifferentiated HMSCs or neuroglial-differentiated HMSCs was determined by the epifluorescence technique using the Fura-2AM probe. The Vivosorb® membrane proved to be adequate and used as scaffold associated with undifferentiated HMSCs or neuroglial-differentiated HMSCs. In vivo testing was carried out in adult rats where a sciatic nerve axonotmesis injury was treated with undifferentiated HMSCs or neuroglial differentiated HMSCs with or without the Vivosorb® membrane. Motor and sensory functional recovery was evaluated throughout a healing period of 12 weeks using sciatic functional index (SFI), extensor postural thrust (EPT), and withdrawal reflex latency (WRL). Stereological analysis was carried out on regenerated nerve fibers. In vitro investigation showed the formation of typical neuroglial cells after differentiation, which were positively stained for the typical specific neuroglial markers such as the GFAP, the GAP-43 and NeuN. NMR showed clear evidence that HMSCs expansion is glycolysis-dependent but their differentiation requires the switch of the metabolic profile to oxidative metabolism. In vivo studies showed enhanced recovery of motor and sensory function in animals treated with transplanted undifferentiated and differentiated HMSCs that was

  12. Assessment of immune response in periparturient dairy cows using ex vivo whole blood stimulation assay with lipopolysaccharides and carrageenan skin test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahan, N; Minuti, A; Trevisi, E

    2015-06-15

    The transition period is known to be the most critical phase in the life of high yielding dairy cow. Changes in the immune functions have been observed during the transition period which may account for the onset of clinical and subclinical (e.g. inflammatory response) problems at calving or at the beginning of lactation however this relationship has not yet been adequately investigated. Thus, to establish the potential of the periparturient dairy cow's immune system to respond to stimuli, two challenges [an ex vivo whole blood stimulation assay (WBA) with lipopolysaccharides and a carrageenan skin test (CST)] were performed in addition to characterizing the metabolic and inflammatory profile. The WBA was performed using 0, 0.01 and 5 μg LPS/mL on whole blood and CST was administered by subcutaneous injection of 0.7 mL solution containing 4.2mg of carrageenan to the shoulder region of the cows. These tests were performed on 10 Holstein-Friesian cows at -45 ± 2, -20 ± 2, -3, 3, 7, 28 ± 2 days from parturition (DFP). Cows were also monitored for health status, body condition score, milk yield. The results demonstrate a higher production of IL-1β and IL-6 from leukocytes after LPS stimulation around calving (from -3 to 3 DFP) compared to -45 DFP (P response at the lower stimulus intensity (0.01 μg LPS/mL), maintaining a higher response over a longer time in early lactation. The release of higher levels of IL-6 in the transition period, with low LPS dose, suggests its crucial role in the regulation of inflammatory response around calving. The response of cows to CST decreased a few days before calving (-3 DFP) compared with response at -45 and 28 DFP (Pchanges in immunocompetence around calving. These tests are able to better describe the changes of the innate immune response at a local and systemic level, mainly when combined with conventional metabolic and inflammatory indices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. On-chip constructive cell-network study (II): on-chip quasi-in vivo cardiac toxicity assay for ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation measurement using ring-shaped closed circuit microelectrode with lined-up cardiomyocyte cell network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Fumimasa; Kaneko, Tomoyuki; Hattori, Akihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2011-09-19

    Conventional in vitro approach using human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) assay has been considered worldwide as the first screening assay for cardiac repolarization safety. However, it does not always oredict the potential QT prolongation risk or pro-arrhythmic risk correctly. For adaptable preclinical strategiesto evaluate global cardiac safety, an on-chip quasi-in vivo cardiac toxicity assay for lethal arrhythmia (ventricular tachyarrhythmia) measurement using ring-shaped closed circuit microelectrode chip has been developed. The ventricular electrocardiogram (ECG)-like field potential data, which includes both the repolarization and the conductance abnormality, was acquired from the self-convolutied extracellular field potentials (FPs) of a lined-up cardiomyocyte network on a circle-shaped microelectrode in an agarose microchamber. When Astemisol applied to the closed-loop cardiomyocyte network, self-convoluted FP profile of normal beating changed into an early afterdepolarization (EAD) like waveform, and then showed ventricular tachyarrhythmias and ventricular fibrilations (VT/Vf). QT-prolongation-like self-convoluted FP duration prolongation and its fluctuation increase was also observed according to the increase of Astemizole concentration. The results indicate that the convoluted FPs of the quasi-in vivo cell network assay includes both of the repolarization data and the conductance abnormality of cardiomyocyte networks has the strong potential to prediction lethal arrhythmia.

  14. On-chip constructive cell-network study (II: on-chip quasi-in vivo cardiac toxicity assay for ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation measurement using ring-shaped closed circuit microelectrode with lined-up cardiomyocyte cell network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuda Kenji

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgrounds Conventional in vitro approach using human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG assay has been considered worldwide as the first screening assay for cardiac repolarization safety. However, it does not always oredict the potential QT prolongation risk or pro-arrhythmic risk correctly. For adaptable preclinical strategiesto evaluate global cardiac safety, an on-chip quasi-in vivo cardiac toxicity assay for lethal arrhythmia (ventricular tachyarrhythmia measurement using ring-shaped closed circuit microelectrode chip has been developed. Results The ventricular electrocardiogram (ECG-like field potential data, which includes both the repolarization and the conductance abnormality, was acquired from the self-convolutied extracellular field potentials (FPs of a lined-up cardiomyocyte network on a circle-shaped microelectrode in an agarose microchamber. When Astemisol applied to the closed-loop cardiomyocyte network, self-convoluted FP profile of normal beating changed into an early afterdepolarization (EAD like waveform, and then showed ventricular tachyarrhythmias and ventricular fibrilations (VT/Vf. QT-prolongation-like self-convoluted FP duration prolongation and its fluctuation increase was also observed according to the increase of Astemizole concentration. Conclusions The results indicate that the convoluted FPs of the quasi-in vivo cell network assay includes both of the repolarization data and the conductance abnormality of cardiomyocyte networks has the strong potential to prediction lethal arrhythmia.

  15. Periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovski, S

    2009-09-01

    The ultimate goal of periodontal therapy is the regeneration of the tissues destroyed as a result of periodontal disease. Currently, two clinical techniques, based on the principles of "guided tissue regeneration" (GTR) or utilization of the biologically active agent "enamel matrix derivative" (EMD), can be used for the regeneration of intrabony and Class II mandibular furcation periodontal defects. In cases where additional support and space-making requirements are necessary, both of these procedures can be combined with a bone replacement graft. There is no evidence that the combined use of GTR and EMD results in superior clinical results compared to the use of each material in isolation. Great variability in clinical outcomes has been reported in relation to the use of both EMD and GTR, and these procedures can be generally considered to be unpredictable. Careful case selection and treatment planning, including consideration of patient, tooth, site and surgical factors, is required in order to optimize the outcomes of treatment. There are limited data available for the clinical effectiveness of other biologically active molecules, such as growth factors and platelet concentrates, and although promising results have been reported, further clinical trials are required in order to confirm their effectiveness. Current active areas of research are centred on tissue engineering and gene therapy strategies which may result in more predictable regenerative outcomes in the future.

  16. Microarray analysis of microRNA expression during axolotl limb regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna C Holman

    Full Text Available Among vertebrates, salamanders stand out for their remarkable capacity to quickly regrow a myriad of tissues and organs after injury or amputation. The limb regeneration process in axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum has been well studied for decades at the cell-tissue level. While several developmental genes are known to be reactivated during this epimorphic process, less is known about the role of microRNAs in urodele amphibian limb regeneration. Given the compelling evidence that many microRNAs tightly regulate cell fate and morphogenetic processes through development and adulthood by modulating the expression (or re-expression of developmental genes, we investigated the possibility that microRNA levels change during limb regeneration. Using two different microarray platforms to compare the axolotl microRNA expression between mid-bud limb regenerating blastemas and non-regenerating stump tissues, we found that miR-21 was overexpressed in mid-bud blastemas compared to stump tissue. Mature A. mexicanum ("Amex" miR-21 was detected in axolotl RNA by Northern blot and differential expression of Amex-miR-21 in blastema versus stump was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. We identified the Amex Jagged1 as a putative target gene for miR-21 during salamander limb regeneration. We cloned the full length 3'UTR of Amex-Jag1, and our in vitro assays demonstrated that its single miR-21 target recognition site is functional and essential for the response of the Jagged1 gene to miR-21 levels. Our findings pave the road for advanced in vivo functional assays aimed to clarify how microRNAs such as miR-21, often linked to pathogenic cell growth, might be modulating the redeployment of developmental genes such as Jagged1 during regenerative processes.

  17. Foamy virus for efficient gene transfer in regeneration studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattak, Shahryar; Sandoval-Guzmán, Tatiana; Stanke, Nicole; Protze, Stephanie; Tanaka, Elly M; Lindemann, Dirk

    2013-05-03

    Molecular studies of appendage regeneration have been hindered by the lack of a stable and efficient means of transferring exogenous genes. We therefore sought an efficient integrating virus system that could be used to study limb and tail regeneration in salamanders. We show that replication-deficient foamy virus (FV) vectors efficiently transduce cells in two different regeneration models in cell culture and in vivo. Injection of EGFP-expressing FV but not lentivirus vector particles into regenerating limbs and tail resulted in widespread expression that persisted throughout regeneration and reamputation pointing to the utility of FV for analyzing adult phenotypes in non-mammalian models. Furthermore, tissue specific transgene expression is achieved using FV vectors during limb regeneration. FV vectors are efficient mean of transferring genes into axolotl limb/tail and infection persists throughout regeneration and reamputation. This is a nontoxic method of delivering genes into axolotls in vivo/ in vitro and can potentially be applied to other salamander species.

  18. Use of a standardized JaCVAM in vivo rat comet assay protocol to assess the genotoxicity of three coded test compounds; ampicillin trihydrate, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride, and N-nitrosodimethylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, J P; Bellier, P V

    2015-07-01

    As part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM)-initiative international validation study of the in vivo rat alkaline comet assay (comet assay), our laboratory examined ampicillin trihydrate (AMP), 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH), and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDA) using a standard comet assay validation protocol (v14.2) developed by the JaCVAM validation management team (VMT). Coded samples were received by our laboratory along with basic MSDS information. Solubility analysis and range-finding experiments of the coded test compounds were conducted for dose selection. Animal dosing schedules, the comet assay processing and analysis, and statistical analysis were conducted in accordance with the standard protocol. Based upon our blinded evaluation, AMP was not found to exhibit evidence of genotoxicity in either the rat liver or stomach. However, both NDA and DMH were observed to cause a significant increase in % tail DNA in the rat liver at all dose levels tested. While acute hepatoxicity was observed for these compounds in the high dose group, in the investigators opinion there were a sufficient number of consistently damaged/measurable cells at the medium and low dose groups to judge these compounds as genotoxic. There was no evidence of genotoxicity from either NDA or DMH in the rat stomach. In conclusion, our laboratory observed increased DNA damage from two blinded test compounds in rat liver (later identified as genotoxic carcinogens), while no evidence of genotoxicity was observed for the third blinded test compound (later identified as a non-genotoxic, non-carcinogen). This data supports the use of a standardized protocol of the in vivo comet assay as a cost-effective alternative genotoxicity assay for regulatory testing purposes. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells conditioned medium promote primary wound healing regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Liliek Kusindarta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This research was conducted to clarify the capability of human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells conditioned medium (HU-MSCM to promote regenerations of primary wound healing on the incision skin injury. Materials and Methods: In this study, two approaches in vitro and in vivo already done. On in vitro analysis, tube formation was performed using HU vein endothelial cells in the presence of HU-MSCM, in some experiments cells line was incubated prior the presence of lipopolysaccharide and HU-MSCM then apoptosis assay was performed. Furthermore, in vivo experiments 12 female rats (Rattus norvegicus were used after rats anesthetized, 7 mm wound was made by incision on the left side of the body. The wound was treated with HU-MSCM containing cream, povidone iodine was run as a control. Wound healing regenerations on the skin samples were visualized by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Results: In vitro models elucidate HU-MSCM may decreasing inflammation at the beginning of wound healing, promote cell migration and angiogenesis. In addition in vivo models show that the incision length on the skin is decreasing and more smaller, HE staining describe decreasing of inflammation phase, increasing of angiogenesis, accelerate fibroplasia, and maturation phase. Conclusions: Taken together our observation indicates that HU-MSCM could promote the acceleration of skin tissue regenerations in primary wound healing process.

  20. Human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells conditioned medium promote primary wound healing regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusindarta, Dwi Liliek; Wihadmadyatami, Hevi; Fibrianto, Yuda Heru; Nugroho, Widagdo Sri; Susetya, Heru; Musana, Dewi Kania; Wijayanto, Hery; Prihatna, Surya Agus; Wahyuni, A. E. T. H.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This research was conducted to clarify the capability of human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells conditioned medium (HU-MSCM) to promote regenerations of primary wound healing on the incision skin injury. Materials and Methods: In this study, two approaches in vitro and in vivo already done. On in vitro analysis, tube formation was performed using HU vein endothelial cells in the presence of HU-MSCM, in some experiments cells line was incubated prior the presence of lipopolysaccharide and HU-MSCM then apoptosis assay was performed. Furthermore, in vivo experiments 12 female rats (Rattus norvegicus) were used after rats anesthetized, 7 mm wound was made by incision on the left side of the body. The wound was treated with HU-MSCM containing cream, povidone iodine was run as a control. Wound healing regenerations on the skin samples were visualized by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Results: In vitro models elucidate HU-MSCM may decreasing inflammation at the beginning of wound healing, promote cell migration and angiogenesis. In addition in vivo models show that the incision length on the skin is decreasing and more smaller, HE staining describe decreasing of inflammation phase, increasing of angiogenesis, accelerate fibroplasia, and maturation phase. Conclusions: Taken together our observation indicates that HU-MSCM could promote the acceleration of skin tissue regenerations in primary wound healing process. PMID:27397984

  1. Development and validation of a new in vitro assay for selection of probiotic bacteria that express immunestimulating properties in chickens in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenen, M.E.; Hulst, van der R.G.M.; Leering, M.; Jeurissen, S.H.M.; Boersma, W.J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Oral administration of immunoprobiotic bacteria may support animal health. Species specificity of such microorganisms requires appropriate selection. An in vitro assay for the selection of immunoprobiotic lactic acid bacteria was developed in chicken. The assay allowed testing of large numbers of

  2. Tissue dynamics and regenerative outcome in two resorbable non-cross-linked collagen membranes for guided bone regeneration: A preclinical molecular and histological study in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Omar; Dahlin, Anna; Gasser, Angelines; Dahlin, Christer

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the molecular and structural patterns of bone healing during guided bone regeneration (GBR), comparing two resorbable non-cross-linked collagen membranes. Trabecular bone defects in rat femurs were filled with deproteinized bovine bone (DBB) and covered with either a membrane comprising collagen and elastin (CXP) or collagen (BG). Samples were harvested after 3 and 21 days for histology/histomorphometry and gene expression analysis. Gene expression analysis was performed on the membrane (at 3 days) and the underlying defect compartment (at 3 and 21 days). At the total defect level, no differences in bone area percentage were found between the CXP and BG. When evaluating the central area of the defect, a higher percentage of de novo bone formation was seen for the CXP membrane (34.9%) compared to BG (15.5%) at 21 days (p = .01). Gene expression analysis revealed higher expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (Bmp2) in the membrane compartment at 3 days in the BG group. By contrast, higher Bmp2 expression was found in the defect compartment treated with the CXP membrane, both at 3 and 21 days. A significant temporal increase (from 3 to 21 days) in the remodeling activity, cathepsin K (Catk) and calcitonin receptor (Calcr), was found in the CXP group. Molecular analysis demonstrated expression of several growth factors and cytokines in the membrane compartment irrespective of the membrane type. Bmp2 expression in the membrane correlated positively with Bmp2 expression in the defect, whereas fibroblast growth factor-2 (Fgf2) expression in the membrane correlated positively with inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (Tnfa) and interleukin-6 (Il6) in the defect. The results provide histological and molecular evidence that different resorbable collagen membranes contribute differently to the GBR healing process. In the BG group, bone formation was primarily localized to the peripheral part of the defect. By contrast, the CXP group

  3. Positional information in axolotl and mouse limb extracellular matrix is mediated via heparan sulfate and fibroblast growth factor during limb regeneration in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Anne Q; Lee, Jangwoo; Oei, Michelle; Flath, Craig; Hwe, Caitlyn; Mariano, Rachele; Vu, Tiffany; Shu, Cynthia; Dinh, Andrew; Simkin, Jennifer; Muneoka, Ken; Bryant, Susan V; Gardiner, David M

    2015-08-01

    Urodele amphibians are unique among adult vertebrates in their ability to regenerate complex body structures after traumatic injury. In salamander regeneration, the cells maintain a memory of their original position and use this positional information to recreate the missing pattern. We used an in vivo gain-of-function assay to determine whether components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have positional information required to induce formation of new limb pattern during regeneration. We discovered that salamander limb ECM has a position-specific ability to either inhibit regeneration or induce de novo limb structure, and that this difference is dependent on heparan sulfates that are associated with differential expression of heparan sulfate sulfotransferases. We also discovered that an artificial ECM containing only heparan sulfate was sufficient to induce de novo limb pattern in salamander limb regeneration. Finally, ECM from mouse limbs is capable of inducing limb pattern in axolotl blastemas in a position-specific, developmental-stage-specific, and heparan sulfate-dependent manner. This study demonstrates a mechanism for positional information in regeneration and establishes a crucial functional link between salamander regeneration and mammals.

  4. BrdU Pulse Labelling In Vivo to Characterise Cell Proliferation during Regeneration and Repair following Injury to the Airway Wall in Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Yahaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of S-phase cells labelled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU in sheep airways undergoing repair in response to endobronchial brush biopsy was investigated in this study. Separate sites within the airway tree of anaesthetised sheep were biopsied at intervals prior to pulse labelling with BrdU, which was administered one hour prior to euthanasia. Both brushed and spatially disparate unbrushed (control sites were carefully mapped, dissected, and processed to facilitate histological analysis of BrdU labelling. Our study indicated that the number and location of BrdU-labelled cells varied according to the age of the repairing injury. There was little evidence of cell proliferation in either control airway tissues or airway tissues examined six hours after injury. However, by days 1 and 3, BrdU-labelled cells were increased in number in the airway wall, both at the damaged site and in the regions flanking either side of the injury. Thereafter, cell proliferative activity largely declined by day 7 after injury, when consistent evidence of remodelling in the airway wall could be appreciated. This study successfully demonstrated the effectiveness of in vivo pulse labelling in tracking cell proliferation during repair which has a potential value in exploring the therapeutic utility of stem cell approaches in relevant lung disease models.

  5. Spinal cord regeneration in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards-Faret, Gabriela; Muñoz, Rosana; Méndez-Olivos, Emilio E; Lee-Liu, Dasfne; Tapia, Victor S; Larraín, Juan

    2017-02-01

    Here we present a protocol for the husbandry of Xenopus laevis tadpoles and froglets, and procedures to study spinal cord regeneration. This includes methods to induce spinal cord injury (SCI); DNA and morpholino electroporation for genetic studies; in vivo imaging for cell analysis; a swimming test to measure functional recovery; and a convenient model for screening for new compounds that promote neural regeneration. These protocols establish X. laevis as a unique model organism for understanding spinal cord regeneration by comparing regenerative and nonregenerative stages. This protocol can be used to understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in nervous system regeneration, including neural stem and progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation and neurogenesis, extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms involved in axon regeneration, glial response and scar formation, and trophic factors. For experienced personnel, husbandry takes 1-2 months; SCI can be achieved in 5-15 min; and swimming recovery takes 20-30 d.

  6. Ex vivo drug sensitivity profiles of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from Cambodia and Thailand, 2005 to 2010, determined by a histidine-rich protein-2 assay

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tyner, Stuart D; Lon, Chanthap; Se, Youry; Bethell, Delia; Socheat, Doung; Noedl, Harald; Sea, Darapiseth; Satimai, Wichai; Schaecher, Kurt; Rutvisuttinunt, Wiriya; Fukuda, Mark M; Chaorattanakawee, Suwanna; Yingyuen, Kritsanai; Sundrakes, Siratchana; Chaichana, Panjaporn; Saingam, Piyaporn; Buathong, Nillawan; Sriwichai, Sabaithip; Chann, Soklyda; Timmermans, Ans; Saunders, David L; Walsh, Douglas S

    2012-01-01

    .... From 2005 to 2010, a HRP-2 in vitro assay assessed 451 P. falciparum field isolates obtained from subjects with malaria in western and northern Cambodia, and eastern Thailand, processed IEV, for 50...

  7. Direct comparison of the histidine-rich protein-2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (HRP-2 ELISA) and malaria SYBR green I fluorescence (MSF) drug sensitivity tests in Plasmodium falciparum reference clones and fresh ex vivo field isolates from Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaorattanakawee, Suwanna; Tyner, Stuart D; Lon, Chanthap; Yingyuen, Kritsanai; Ruttvisutinunt, Wiriya; Sundrakes, Siratchana; Sai-gnam, Piyaporn; Johnson, Jacob D; Walsh, Douglas S; Saunders, David L; Lanteri, Charlotte A

    2013-07-12

    Performance of the histidine-rich protein-2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (HRP-2 ELISA) and malaria SYBR Green I fluorescence (MSF) drug sensitivity tests were directly compared using Plasmodium falciparum reference strains and fresh ex vivo isolates from Cambodia against a panel of standard anti-malarials. The objective was to determine which of these two common assays is more appropriate for studying drug susceptibility of "immediate ex vivo" (IEV) isolates, analysed without culture adaption, in a region of relatively low malaria transmission. Using the HRP-2 and MSF methods, the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values against a panel of malaria drugs were determined for P. falciparum reference clones (W2, D6, 3D7 and K1) and 41 IEV clinical isolates from an area of multidrug resistance in Cambodia. Comparison of the IC50 values from the two methods was made using Wilcoxon matched pair tests and Pearson's correlation. The lower limit of parasitaemia detection for both methods was determined for reference clones and IEV isolates. Since human white blood cell (WBC) DNA in clinical samples is known to reduce MSF assay sensitivity, SYBR Green I fluorescence linearity of P. falciparum samples spiked with WBCs was evaluated to assess the relative degree to which MSF sensitivity is reduced in clinical samples. IC50 values correlated well between the HRP-2 and MSF methods when testing either P. falciparum reference clones or IEV isolates against 4-aminoquinolines (chloroquine, piperaquine and quinine) and the quinoline methanol mefloquine (Pearson r = 0.85-0.99 for reference clones and 0.56-0.84 for IEV isolates), whereas a weaker IC50 value correlation between methods was noted when testing artemisinins against reference clones and lack of correlation when testing IEV isolates. The HRP-2 ELISA produced a higher overall success rate (90% for producing IC50 best-fit sigmoidal curves), relative to only a 40% success rate for the MSF assay, when evaluating ex

  8. Functional Tooth Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Masamitsu; Ogawa, Miho; Tsuji, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional organogenesis in vivo is principally regulated by the spatiotemporal developmental process that relies on the cellular behavior such as cell growth, migration, differentiation, and cell-to-cell interaction. Organ development and morphogenesis have been elucidated to be regulated by the proper transient expression of various signaling molecules including cytokines, extracellular matrix, and adhesion molecules based on the epithelial and mesenchymal interactions. Current bioengineering technology for regenerating three-dimensional organ has progressed to the replication of organogenesis, thereby enabling the development of fully functional bioengineered organs using bioengineered organ germs that are generated from immature stem cells via tissue engineering technology in vitro.To achieve precise replication of organogenesis, we have developed a novel three-dimensional cell manipulation method designated the organ germ method, and enabled the generation of a structurally correct and fully functional bioengineered tooth in vivo. This method is also expected to be utilized for analyzing gene and protein functions during organogenesis. Here, we describe protocols for the tooth germ reconstitution by using the organ germ method and for the functional analysis of tooth development in vitro and in vivo.

  9. Effects of 3D-Printed Polycaprolactone/β-Tricalcium Phosphate Membranes on Guided Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jin-Hyung; Won, Joo-Yun; Park, Jung-Hyung; Bae, Ji-Hyeon; Ahn, Geunseon; Kim, Chang-Hwan; Lim, Dong-Hyuk; Cho, Dong-Woo; Yun, Won-Soo; Bae, Eun-Bin; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2017-04-25

    This study was conducted to compare 3D-printed polycaprolactone (PCL) and polycaprolactone/β-tricalcium phosphate (PCL/β-TCP) membranes with a conventional commercial collagen membrane in terms of their abilities to facilitate guided bone regeneration (GBR). Fabricated membranes were tested for dry and wet mechanical properties. Fibroblasts and preosteoblasts were seeded into the membranes and rates and patterns of proliferation were analyzed using a kit-8 assay and by scanning electron microscopy. Osteogenic differentiation was verified by alizarin red S and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining. An in vivo experiment was performed using an alveolar bone defect beagle model, in which defects in three dogs were covered with different membranes. CT and histological analyses at eight weeks after surgery revealed that 3D-printed PCL/β-TCP membranes were more effective than 3D-printed PCL, and substantially better than conventional collagen membranes in terms of biocompatibility and bone regeneration and, thus, at facilitating GBR.

  10. In vitro assays in natural products research - a matter of concentration and relevance to in vivo administration using resveratrol, α-mangostin/γ-mangostin and xanthohumol as examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, C M; Grundmann, O

    2017-03-01

    Herbal or botanical dietary supplements are an ever increasingly popular category of products in the United States and around the world. In vitro data can provide meaningful insight into the potential target and mechanism of action for a proposed active compound but may also be misused to promote a supplement to consumers with unverified health claims. In vitro data need to be considered alongside pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data in preclinical animal and clinical human trials. While considerable activity of compounds and extracts in vitro may lead to further testing in vivo, in many instances, concentrations tested in cell lines or isolated targets are not achievable at the target site in vivo. Thus, whether the in vitro data are relevant to humans after oral administration is questionable. This review will discuss this discrepancy using in vitro and in vivo data of resveratrol, xanthones (α-mangostin and γ-mangostin) and xanthohumol.

  11. Evaluation of methyl methanesulfonate, 2,6-diaminotoluene and 5-fluorouracil: Part of the Japanese center for the validation of alternative methods (JaCVAM) international validation study of the in vivo rat alkaline comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plappert-Helbig, Ulla; Junker-Walker, Ursula; Martus, Hans-Joerg

    2015-07-01

    As a part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM)-initiative international validation study of the in vivo rat alkaline comet assay (comet assay), we examined methyl methanesulfonate, 2,6-diaminotoluene, and 5-fluorouracil under coded test conditions. Rats were treated orally with the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and two additional descending doses of the respective compounds. In the MMS treated groups liver and stomach showed significantly elevated DNA damage at each dose level and a significant dose-response relationship. 2,6-diaminotoluene induced significantly elevated DNA damage in the liver at each dose and a statistically significant dose-response relationship whereas no DNA damage was obtained in the stomach. 5-fluorouracil did not induce DNA damage in either liver or stomach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of neem (Azadirachta indica) seed oil in the in vitro Ames Salmonella/microsome assay and in vivo mouse bone marrow micronucleus test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinod, V; Tiwari, P K; Meshram, G P

    2011-04-12

    The possible mutagenic and antimutagenic activity of neem oil (NO) and its DMSO extract (NDE) were, examined in the Ames Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity test and the mouse bone marrow micronucleus assay. Eight different strains of Salmonella typhimurium were, used to study the genotoxicity of neem oil both in the presence and absence of Aroclor-1254 induced rat liver homogenate (S9). Two-dose treatment protocol was, employed to study the cytogenetic activity in micronucleus assay. Similarly, the antimutagenic activity of neem oil and NDE was studied against mitomycin (MMC) and 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) in the above two test systems. Neem oil was non-mutagenic in all the eight tester strains of Salmonella typhimurium both in the presence and absence of S9 mix. In the present study, there was no significant increase in the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MNPCEs) in neem oil treated groups over the negative control (DMSO) group of animals, indicating the non-clastogenic activity of neem oil in the micronucleus test. Neem oil showed good antimutagenic activity against DMBA induced mutagenicity compared to its DMSO extract. However, neem oil showed comparatively less antimutagenicity against MMC in the Ames assay. In vivo anticlastogenic assays shows that neem oil exhibited better activity against DMBA induced clastogenicity. These results indicate non-mutagenic activity of neem oil and significant antimutagenic activity of neem oil suggesting its pharmacological importance for the prevention of cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of bone regeneration potential of dental follicle stem cells for treatment of craniofacial defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezai-Rad, Maryam; Bova, Jonathan F; Orooji, Mahdi; Pepping, Jennifer; Qureshi, Ammar; Del Piero, Fabio; Hayes, Daniel; Yao, Shaomian

    2015-11-01

    Stem cell-based tissue regeneration offers potential for treatment of craniofacial bone defects. The dental follicle, a loose connective tissue surrounding the unerupted tooth, has been shown to contain progenitor/stem cells. Dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs) have strong osteogenesis capability, which makes them suitable for repairing skeletal defects. The objective of this study was to evaluate bone regeneration capability of DFSCs loaded into polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold for treatment of craniofacial defects. DFSCs were isolated from the first mandibular molars of postnatal Sprague-Dawley rats and seeded into the PCL scaffold. Cell attachment and cell viability on the scaffold were examined with the use of scanning electron microscopy and alamar blue reduction assay. For in vivo transplantation, critical-size defects were created on the skulls of 5-month-old immunocompetent rats, and the cell-scaffold constructs were transplanted into the defects. Skulls were collected at 4 and 8 weeks after transplantation, and bone regeneration in the defects was evaluated with the use of micro-computed tomography and histological analysis. Scanning electron microscopy and Alamar blue assay demonstrated attachment and proliferation of DFSCs in the PCL scaffold. Bone regeneration was observed in the defects treated with DFSC transplantation but not in the controls without DFSC transplant. Transplanting DFSC-PCL with or without osteogenic induction before transplantation achieved approximately 50% bone regeneration at 8 weeks. Formation of woven bone was observed in the DFSC-PCL treatment group. Similar results were seen when osteogenic-induced DFSC-PCL was transplanted to the critical-size defects. This study demonstrated that transplantation of DFSCs seeded into PCL scaffolds can be used to repair craniofacial defects. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Genotoxicity assessment of NIM-76 and its formulation (pessary) in an in vitro Ames Salmonella/microsome assay and in vivo mouse bone marrow micronucleus test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, Vinod; Meshram, Ghansham P

    2013-10-01

    The possible genotoxic potential of NIM-76, a volatile fraction obtained from neem oil, having promising contraceptive activity, as well as its formulation product, called pessary (7.5% NIM-76 in polyethylene glycol), were evaluated in the Ames assay and mouse bone marrow micronucleus (MN) assay. Genotoxicity of NIM-76 (0.1-1000 µg/plate) and pessary (0.1-10,000 µg/plate) were studied using the liquid preincubation protocol of the Ames assay both in the presence and absence of S9. Likewise, the ability of NIM-76 [1-1000 mg/kg body weight (b.w.)] and its formulation product (18.75-300 mg/kg b.w.) to induce clastogenic effects were studied in the female mouse bone marrow MN test by using a two-dose intraperitoneal treatment protocol. There was no increase in the number of revertant colonies resulting from NIM-76 or pessary at any of their doses over the respective negative control plates, either in the presence or absence of S9. Similarly, in the MN assay, neither of them showed any clastogenic activity because there was no significant increase in the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes, over the negative control group of animals. The use of this compound in humans is therefore not likely to have mutagenic effects and may be considered as safe with regard to genotoxic potential.

  15. Cartilage formation measured by a novel PIINP assay suggests that IGF-I does not stimulate but maintains cartilage formation ex vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, S H; Sondergaard, B C; Jensen, Anne-Christine Bay

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the time-dependent effect of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF)-I on cartilage, evaluated by a novel procollagen type II N-terminal propeptide (PIINP) formation assay. This was performed in a cartilage model. METHODS: Bovine articular cartilage...... and more than 3000% (p cartilage formation. The current developed...

  16. Cellularized Bilayer Pullulan-Gelatin Hydrogel for Skin Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Mathew N; Jeschke, Marc G; Amini-Nik, Saeid

    2016-05-01

    Skin substitutes significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality of patients with burn injuries and chronic wounds. However, current skin substitutes have disadvantages related to high costs and inadequate skin regeneration due to highly inflammatory wounds. Thus, new skin substitutes are needed. By combining two polymers, pullulan, an inexpensive polysaccharide with antioxidant properties, and gelatin, a derivative of collagen with high water absorbency, we created a novel inexpensive hydrogel-named PG-1 for "pullulan-gelatin first generation hydrogel"-suitable for skin substitutes. After incorporating human fibroblasts and keratinocytes onto PG-1 using centrifugation over 5 days, we created a cellularized bilayer skin substitute. Cellularized PG-1 was compared to acellular PG-1 and no hydrogel (control) in vivo in a mouse excisional skin biopsy model using newly developed dome inserts to house the skin substitutes and prevent mouse skin contraction during wound healing. PG-1 had an average pore size of 61.69 μm with an ideal elastic modulus, swelling behavior, and biodegradability for use as a hydrogel for skin substitutes. Excellent skin cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and morphology were visualized through live/dead assays, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine proliferation assays, and confocal microscopy. Trichrome and immunohistochemical staining of excisional wounds treated with the cellularized skin substitute revealed thicker newly formed skin with a higher proportion of actively proliferating cells and incorporation of human cells compared to acellular PG-1 or control. Excisional wounds treated with acellular or cellularized hydrogels showed significantly less macrophage infiltration and increased angiogenesis 14 days post skin biopsy compared to control. These results show that PG-1 has ideal mechanical characteristics and allows ideal cellular characteristics. In vivo evidence suggests that cellularized PG-1 promotes skin regeneration and may

  17. Use of the immature rat uterotrophic assay for specific measurements of chorionic gonadotropins and follicle-stimulating hormones in vivo bioactivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecompte, F; Harbeby, E; Cahoreau, C; Klett, D; Combarnous, Y

    2010-09-15

    The uterine weight growth stimulation by equine Chorionic Gonadotropin (eCG/PMSG) was found to occur at much lower eCG concentrations than ovarian growth. Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) which has only LH activity, was found to be as active as eCG in the uterotrophic assay whereas equine Luteinizing Hormone (eLH) which has dual LH+FSH activities like eCG, exhibited a much lower potency. In contrast to hCG, porcine and ovine LH as well as pFSH and oFSH exhibited no uterotrophic activity indicating that only gonadotropins with both LH activity and long half-lives are active alone in this assay. The FSH preparations were nevertheless found to trigger a dose-dependent response, but only in the presence of a subactive dose of hCG. The uterotrophic activity of hCG was found to be suppressed in ovariectomized immature rats and to be diminished after injection of GnRH antagonist suggesting an indirect pathway implicating the hypothalamo-pituitary complex. The data in this report together with the analysis of literature suggest that choriogonadotropins exert their stimulatory role on uterine growth by an indirect mechanism involving an increase in ovarian FSH receptors and FSH release by the pituitary. At the lowest concentrations of hCG, the increase in ovarian FSH receptors without endogenous FSH release is thought to be responsible for the sensitivity of the uterotrophic assay to exogenous FSHs. In conclusion, the immature rat uterotrophic assay is a sensitive and convenient assay for eCG and hCG as well as for FSHs in the presence of a sub-active dose of hCG. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Ex vivo drug sensitivity profiles of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from Cambodia and Thailand, 2005 to 2010, determined by a histidine-rich protein-2 assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyner Stuart D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vitro drug susceptibility assay of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates processed “immediate ex vivo” (IEV, without culture adaption, and tested using histidine-rich protein-2 (HRP-2 detection as an assay, is an expedient way to track drug resistance. Methods From 2005 to 2010, a HRP-2 in vitro assay assessed 451 P. falciparum field isolates obtained from subjects with malaria in western and northern Cambodia, and eastern Thailand, processed IEV, for 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50 against seven anti-malarial drugs, including artesunate (AS, dihydroartemisinin (DHA, and piperaquine. Results In western Cambodia, from 2006 to 2010, geometric mean (GM IC50 values for chloroquine, mefloquine, quinine, AS, DHA, and lumefantrine increased. In northern Cambodia, from 2009–2010, GM IC50 values for most drugs approximated the highest western Cambodia GM IC50 values in 2009 or 2010. Conclusions Western Cambodia is associated with sustained reductions in anti-malarial drug susceptibility, including the artemisinins, with possible emergence, or spread, to northern Cambodia. This potential public health crisis supports continued in vitro drug IC50 monitoring of P. falciparum isolates at key locations in the region.

  19. Comparing in vivo biodistribution with radiolabeling and Franz cell permeation assay to validate the efficacy of both methodologies in the evaluation of nanoemulsions: a safety approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira-Coutinho, C. S.; De Campo, V. E. B.; Rossi, A. L.; Veiga, V. F.; Holandino, C.; Freitas, Z. M. F.; Ricci-Junior, E.; Mansur, C. R. E.; Santos, E. P.; Santos-Oliveira, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Franz cells permeation assay has been performed for over 25 years. However, the advent of nanotechnology created a whole new world, especially with regard to topical products. In this new global scenario an increasing number of nanostructure-based delivery systems (NDSs) have emerged and a global warning relating to the safety of these NDSs is arising. This work studied the efficacy of the Franz cells assay, comparing it with the radiolabeling biodistribution test. For this purpose a formulation of sunscreen based on an NDS was developed and characterized. The results demonstrated both that the NDS did not present in vitro cytotoxicity and that the radiolabeling biodistribution test is more precise for the evaluation of NDS cosmetics than the Franz cells assay, since it detected the permeation of the NDS at a picogram order. Due to this fact, and considering all the concerns related to NDSs and nanoparticles in general, more precise methods must be used in order to guarantee the safe use of these new classes of products.

  20. Genotoxicity of three food processing contaminants in transgenic mice expressing human sulfotransferases 1A1 and 1A2 as assessed by the in vivo alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høie, Anja Hortemo; Svendsen, Camilla; Brunborg, Gunnar; Glatt, Hansruedi; Alexander, Jan; Meinl, Walter; Husøy, Trine

    2015-10-01

    The food processing contaminants 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and 2,5 dimethylfuran (DMF) are potentially both mutagenic and carcinogenic in vitro and/or in vivo, although data on DMF is lacking. The PHIP metabolite N-hydroxy-PhIP and HMF are bioactivated by sulfotransferases (SULTs). The substrate specificity and tissue distribution of SULTs differs between species. A single oral dose of PhIP, HMF or DMF was administered to wild-type (wt) mice and mice expressing human SULT1A1/1A2 (hSULT mice). DNA damage was studied using the in vivo alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay. No effects were detected in wt mice. In the hSULT mice, PhIP and HMF exposure increased the levels of DNA damage in the liver and kidney, respectively. DMF was not found to be genotoxic. The observation of increased DNA damage in hSULT mice compared with wt mice supports the role of human SULTs in the bioactivation of N-hydroxy-PhIP and HMF in vivo. © 2015 The Authors. Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Axon regeneration in C. elegans: Worming our way to mechanisms of axon regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Alexandra B; Hammarlund, Marc

    2017-01-01

    How axons repair themselves after injury is a fundamental question in neurobiology. With its conserved genome, relatively simple nervous system, and transparent body, C. elegans has recently emerged as a productive model to uncover the cellular mechanisms that regulate and execute axon regeneration. In this review, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the C. elegans model of regeneration. We explore the technical advances that enable the use of C. elegans for in vivo regeneration studies, review findings in C. elegans that have contributed to our understanding of the regeneration response across species, discuss the potential of C. elegans research to provide insight into mechanisms that function in the injured mammalian nervous system, and present potential future directions of axon regeneration research using C. elegans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. In vitro regeneration, detection of somaclonal variation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test was performed to detect the presence of sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) in the regenerated plantlets and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to evaluate the genetic variation at DNA level between the parent's plants and regenerated somaclones of the ...

  3. Platform technologies for tubular organ regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Joydeep; Ludlow, John W

    2010-10-01

    As a result of recent successes in regenerative medicine approaches to engineering multiple disparate tubular organs, methodology commonalities are emerging. Principal themes include the importance of a biodegradable scaffold seeded with a population of smooth muscle cells. Such composites trigger a regenerative response following in vivo implantation, resulting in de novo organogenesis. In this review, we examine bladder regeneration as a foundational platform technology to highlight key principles applicable to the regeneration of any tubular organ, and illustrate how these general concepts underlie current strategies to regenerate components of gastrointestinal, vascular, pulmonary and genitourinary systems. We focus on identifying the elements of this platform that have facilitated the transition of tubular organ regeneration from academic proof-of-concept to commercial viability. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. In vitro regeneration in Allium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauber, M; Grunewaldt, J

    1988-10-01

    An attempt to induce shoot regeneration from leaf disc explants from Allium sativum L., A. porrum L., and A. schoenoprasum L. and the induction of shoot regeneration from single flower-bud receptacles in A. porrum is presented. While the regeneration rate from leaf disc explants was low, an efficient method for propagating A. porrum in vitro was obtained by cultivating single flower-bud receptacles. The shoot regeneration ability was strongly controlled by the genotype. Up to 294 shoots per leek plant could be harvested. Simultaneously the same plant could be used for seed production and bulbil formation in vivo. The efficiency of the in vitro multiplication method described allows the integration of this procedure into breeding programmes of A. porrum.

  5. Evaluation of the In Vivo Therapeutic Effects of Radix Paeoniae Rubra Ethanol Extract with the Hypoglycemic Activities Measured from Multiple Cell-Based Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Chuan Chang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Radix Paeoniae Rubra (Chi Shao contains several phytochemicals with hypoglycemic actions. Current research aims to explore potential insulinotropic effects and long-term therapeutic efficacy of such herb against type 2 diabetes. Methods. Composition analysis for the ethanol extract (PRExt was executed by high performance liquid chromatography. Polyphenol-enriched fraction was characterized by high pressure size exclusion chromatography. Multiple cell platforms were employed to evaluate hypoglycemic bioactivities. In animal experiments, blood glucose, the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-index assessment, glucose tolerance test, and in vivo glucose uptake were all measured. Additional effects of PRExt on obesity and hepatic steatosis were evaluated by serum and histological analysis. Results. PRExt provides multiple hypoglycemic effects including the enhancement of glucose-mediated insulin secretion. Pentagalloylglucose and polyphenol-enriched fraction are two insulinotropic constituents. Moreover, PRExt intraperitoneal injection causes acute hypoglycemic effects on fasted db/db mice. Oral administration of PRExt (200 mg/kg b.w. gradually reduces blood glucose in db/db mice to the level similar to that in C57J/B6 mice after 30 days. The improvement of glucose intolerance, HOMA-index, and in vivo glucose uptake is evident in addition to the weight loss effect and attenuation of hepatic steatosis. Conclusion. PRExt is an effective antidiabetic herbal extract with multiple hypoglycemic bioactivities.

  6. Promoting Nerve Regeneration in a Neurotmesis Rat Model Using Poly(DL-lactide-ε-caprolactone) Membranes and Mesenchymal Stem Cells from the Wharton's Jelly: In Vitro and In Vivo Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, T.; Gärtner, A; Amorim, I; Almeida, A.; Caseiro, A.R.; Armada-da-Silva, Paulo A. S.; Sandra Amado; Federica Fregnan; Varejão, A. S. P.; Santos, J. D.; Bartolo, P. J.; Geuna, S; Luís, A. L.; Mauricio, A. C.

    2014-01-01

    In peripheral nerves MSCs can modulate Wallerian degeneration and the overall regenerative response by acting through paracrine mechanisms directly on regenerating axons or upon the nerve-supporting Schwann cells. In the present study, the effect of human MSCs from Wharton’s jelly (HMSCs), differentiated into neuroglial-like cells associated to poly (DL-lactide-ε-caprolactone) membrane, on nerve regeneration, was evaluated in the neurotmesis injury rat sciatic nerve model. Results in vitro sh...

  7. Evaluation of DNA damage in Chinese toad (Bufo bufo gargarizans) after in vivo exposure to sublethal concentrations of four herbicides using the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiao Hui; Li, Shao Nan; Zhang, Le; Zhu, Guo Nian; Zhuang, Hui Sheng

    2008-05-01

    Chinese toad, Bufo bufo gargarizans, is frequently found in rice fields, muddy ponds, wetlands and other aquatic ecosystems in China. Because of its habitat, it has many chances of being exposed to pesticides, such as acetochlor, butachlor, chlorimuron-ethyl, and paraquat, which are extensively used in rice or cereal fields. Amphibians may serve as model organisms for determining the genotoxic effects of pollutants contaminating these areas. In the present study DNA damage was evaluated in the Chinese toad using the comet assay, as a potential tool for the assessment of ecogenotoxicity. The first step was to determine the acute toxicity of the above-mentioned herbicides. In acute tests, tadpoles were exposed to a series of relatively high concentrations of acetochlor, butachlor, chlorimuron-ethyl, and paraquat for 96 h. The LC(50 )(96 h) of acetochlor, butachlor, chlorimuron-ethyl and paraquat were measured as 0.76, 1.32, 20.1 and 164 mg l(-1), respectively. Also, negative effects on the behavior of tadpoles were observed with acetochlor, butachlor, and paraquat. Secondly, the comet assay was used for detecting DNA damage in Chinese toad tadpoles exposed to sublethal concentrations of four herbicides. Significant (P Bufo bufo gargarizans for genotoxicity assessment of herbicides.

  8. 45S5-Bioglass(®)-based 3D-scaffolds seeded with human adipose tissue-derived stem cells induce in vivo vascularization in the CAM angiogenesis assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handel, Marina; Hammer, Timo R; Nooeaid, Patcharakamon; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Hoefer, Dirk

    2013-12-01

    Poor vascularization is the key limitation for long-term acceptance of large three-dimensional (3D) tissue engineering constructs in regenerative medicine. 45S5 Bioglass(®) was investigated given its potential for applications in bone engineering. Since native Bioglass(®) shows insufficient angiogenic properties, we used a collagen coating, to seed human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASC) confluently onto 3D 45S5 Bioglass(®)-based scaffolds. To investigate vascularization by semiquantitative analyses, these biofunctionalized scaffolds were then subjected to in vitro human umbilical vein endothelial cells formation assays, and were also investigated in the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) angiogenesis model, an in vivo angiogenesis assay, which uses the CAM of the hen's egg. In their native, nonbiofunctionalized state, neither Bioglass(®)-based nor biologically inert fibrous polypropylene control scaffolds showed angiogenic properties. However, significant vascularization was induced by hASC-seeded scaffolds (Bioglass(®) and polypropylene) in the CAM angiogenesis assay. Biofunctionalized scaffolds also showed enhanced tube lengths, compared to unmodified scaffolds or constructs seeded with fibroblasts. In case of biologically inert hernia meshes, the quantification of vascular endothelial growth factor secretion as the key angiogenic stimulus strongly correlated to the tube lengths and vessel numbers in all models. This correlation proved the CAM angiogenesis assay to be a suitable semiquantitative tool to characterize angiogenic effects of larger 3D implants. In addition, our results suggest that combinations of suitable scaffold materials, such as 45S5 Bioglass(®), with hASC could be a promising approach for future tissue engineering applications.

  9. 45S5-Bioglass®-Based 3D-Scaffolds Seeded with Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells Induce In Vivo Vascularization in the CAM Angiogenesis Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handel, Marina; Hammer, Timo R.; Nooeaid, Patcharakamon; Boccaccini, Aldo R.

    2013-01-01

    Poor vascularization is the key limitation for long-term acceptance of large three-dimensional (3D) tissue engineering constructs in regenerative medicine. 45S5 Bioglass® was investigated given its potential for applications in bone engineering. Since native Bioglass® shows insufficient angiogenic properties, we used a collagen coating, to seed human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASC) confluently onto 3D 45S5 Bioglass®-based scaffolds. To investigate vascularization by semiquantitative analyses, these biofunctionalized scaffolds were then subjected to in vitro human umbilical vein endothelial cells formation assays, and were also investigated in the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) angiogenesis model, an in vivo angiogenesis assay, which uses the CAM of the hen's egg. In their native, nonbiofunctionalized state, neither Bioglass®-based nor biologically inert fibrous polypropylene control scaffolds showed angiogenic properties. However, significant vascularization was induced by hASC-seeded scaffolds (Bioglass® and polypropylene) in the CAM angiogenesis assay. Biofunctionalized scaffolds also showed enhanced tube lengths, compared to unmodified scaffolds or constructs seeded with fibroblasts. In case of biologically inert hernia meshes, the quantification of vascular endothelial growth factor secretion as the key angiogenic stimulus strongly correlated to the tube lengths and vessel numbers in all models. This correlation proved the CAM angiogenesis assay to be a suitable semiquantitative tool to characterize angiogenic effects of larger 3D implants. In addition, our results suggest that combinations of suitable scaffold materials, such as 45S5 Bioglass®, with hASC could be a promising approach for future tissue engineering applications. PMID:23837884

  10. Comparison of in-house biotin-avidin tetanus IgG enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with gold standard in vivo mouse neutralization test for the detection of low level antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Cemile; Coplu, Nilay; Gozalan, Aysegul; Akin, Lutfu; Esen, Berrin

    2017-06-01

    Detection of anti-tetanus antibody levels is necessary for both determination of the immune status of individuals and also for planning preventive measures. ELISA is the preferred test among in vitro tests however it can be affected by the cross reacting antibodies. A previously developed in-house ELISA test was found not reliable for the antibody levels ≤1.0IU/ml. A new method was developed to detect low antibody levels correctly. The aim of the present study was to compare the results of the newly developed in-house biotin-avidin tetanus IgG ELISA test with the in vivo mouse neutralization test, for the antibody levels ≤1.0IU/ml. A total of 54 serum samples with the antibody levels of three different levels, =0.01IU/ml, 0.01-0.1IU/ml, 0.1-1IU/ml, which were detected by in vivo mouse neutralization test were studied by the newly developed in-house biotin-avidin tetanus IgG ELISA test. Test was validated by using five different concentrations (0.01IU/ml, 0.06IU/ml, 0.2IU/ml, 0.5IU/ml, 1.0IU/ml). A statistically significant correlation (r(2)=0.9967 p=0,001) between in vivo mouse neutralization test and in-house biotin-avidin tetanus IgG ELISA test, was observed. For the tested concentrations intra-assay, inter-assay, accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and coefficients of variations were determined as ≤15%. In-house biotin-avidin tetanus IgG ELISA test can be an alternative method to in vivo mouse neutralization method for the detection of levels ≤1.0IU/ml. By using in-house biotin-avidin tetanus IgG ELISA test, individuals with non protective levels, will be reliably detected. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. 35Sulphate incorporation assay as a new tool for measuring early cartilage degradation following blood exposure in vitro and in vivo in f8 ko rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pulles, A. E.; Christensen, K. R.; Coeleveld, K.

    2017-01-01

    blood. After four days proteoglycan synthesis rate was determined by adding 35SO42- to the cultures for four hours. The 35SO42- becomes incorporated in new synthesized proteoglycans. After digesting the cartilage pieces, cetylpyridinium chloride was added to the samples to precipitate the proteoglycans...... degeneration research uses smaller rodent models with histology as the primary outcome measure. However, histological changes take time to develop and are subject to interpretation despite initiatives to harmonize semi-quantitative scores. Determining proteoglycan synthesis rate, by incorporation...... incorporation assay applied to study cartilage degradation following blood exposure. Methods: A total of 13 factor VIII knock out (F8 KO) rats were bred and housed at Novo Nordisk A/S, Maaloev, Denmark. After euthanasia, the legs were removed and transported to UMC Utrecht, The Netherlands. In vitro: within 24...

  12. Helping the Retina Regenerate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... report summarized two possible therapeutic strategies for RGC regeneration. The first would use stem cells to grow ... recommendations in the report include systematic comparisons of animal models that do and do not regenerate RGCs, ...

  13. The Use of NMR Metabolite Profiling and in vivo Hypoglycemic Assay for Comparison of Unfractionated Aqueous Leaf Extracts of Two Ocimum Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Livia Marques; Espíndola-Netto, Jair Machado; Tinoco, Luzineide Wanderley; Sola-Penna, Mauro; Costa, Sônia Soares

    2016-06-01

    Ocimum basilicum and Ocimum gratissimum (Lamiaceae) are used to treat diabetes mellitus in Africa. In a previous work, we identified chicoric acid as a hypoglycemic substance in O. gratissimum. This study aims to compare the chemical metabolite profile and the hypoglycemic activity of unfractionated aqueous extracts from leaves of both Lamiaceae species. The metabolite composition of OB and OG decoctions (10% w/v) was analyzed using HPLC-DAD and NMR tools. Chicoric acid showed to be the major phenolic in both extracts, besides caftaric, caffeic, and rosmarinic acids; nevertheless, there is approximately three times more of this substance in OG. From 1D- and 2D-NMR analyses, 19 substances were identified in OB, while 12 in OG. The in vivo acute hypoglycemic activity of the extracts was assessed intraperitoneally in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. The doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg of both extracts significantly reduced their glycemia, compared to controls (P Ocimum species by NMR. Our findings confirmed the potential of both species in DM treatment in spite of marked differences in their chemical composition. However, long-term studies are necessary in order to identify the most promising of the two species for the development of an herbal medicine. © 2016 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  14. High-Yield Production in Escherichia coli of Fungal Immunomodulatory Protein Isolated from Flammulina velutipes and Its Bioactivity Assay in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenkui Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A fungal immunomodulatory protein isolated from Flammulina velutipes (FIP-fve has structural similarity to the variable region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain. In the present study, the recombinant bioactive FIP-fve protein with a His-tag in N-terminal of recombinant protein was expressed in transetta (DE3 at a high level under the optimized culturing conditions of 0.2 mM IPTG and 28 °C. The efficiency of the purification was improved with additional ultrasonication to the process of lysozyme lysis. The yield of the bioactive FIP-fve protein with 97.1% purity reached 29.1 mg/L with a large quantity for industrial applications. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed a maximum increase in interleukin-2 (IL-2 and gamma interferon (IFN-γ for the mice serum group of 5 mg/kg body mass (p < 0.01 with three doses of His-FIP-fve. However, the production of IL-4 had no apparent difference compared to the control.

  15. Using an RNAi Signature Assay To Guide the Design of Three-Drug-Conjugated Nanoparticles with Validated Mechanisms, In Vivo Efficacy, and Low Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jonathan C; Bruno, Peter M; Nguyen, Hung V-T; Liao, Longyan; Liu, Jenny; Hemann, Michael T; Johnson, Jeremiah A

    2016-09-28

    Single-nanoparticle (NP) combination chemotherapeutics are quickly emerging as attractive alternatives to traditional chemotherapy due to their ability to increase drug solubility, reduce off-target toxicity, enhance blood circulation lifetime, and increase the amount of drug delivered to tumors. In the case of NP-bound drugs, that is, NP-prodrugs, the current standard of practice is to assume that the subcellular mechanism of action for each drug released from the NP mirrors that of the unbound, free-drug. Here, we use an RNAi signature assay for the first time to examine the mechanism of action of multidrug-conjugated NP prodrugs relative to their small molecule prodrugs and native drug mechanisms of action. Additionally, the effective additive contribution of three different drugs in a single-NP platform is characterized. The results indicate that some platinum(IV) cisplatin prodrugs, although cytotoxic, may not have the expected mechanism of action for cisplatin. This insight was utilized to develop a novel platinum(IV) oxaliplatin prodrug and incorporate it into a three-drug-conjugated NP, where each drug's mechanism of action is preserved, to treat tumor-bearing mice with otherwise lethal levels of chemotherapy.

  16. The Effect of the Uncariae Ramulus et Uncus on the Regeneration Following CNS Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jin-Goo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Following central nervous system(CNS injury, inhibitory influences at the site of axonal damage occur. Glial cells become reactive and form a glial scar, gliosis. Also myelin debris such as MAG inhibits axonal regeneration. Astrocyte-rich gliosis relates with up-regulation of GFAP and CD81, and eventually becomes physical and mechanical barrier to axonal regeneration. MAG is one of several endogenous axon regeneration inhibitors that limit recovery from CNS injury and disease. It was reported that molecules that block such inhibitors enhanced axon regeneration and functional recovery. Recently it was reported that treatment with anti-CD81 antibodies enhanced functional recovery in the rat with spinal cord injury. So in this current study, the author investigated the effect of the water extract of Uncariae Ramulus et Uncus on the regulation of CD81, GFAP and MAG that increase when gliosis occurs. Methods : MTT assay was performed to examine cell viability, and cell-based ELISA, western blot and PCR were used to detect the expression of CD81, GFAP and MAG. Then also immunohistochemistry was performed to confirm in vivo. Results : Water extract of Uncariae Ramulus et Uncus showed relatively high cell viability at the concentration of 0.05%, 0.1% and 0.5%. The expression of CD81, GFAP and MAG in astrocytes was decreased after the administration of Uncariae Ramulus et Uncus water extract. These results was confirmed in the brain sections following cortical stab injury by immunohistochemistry. Conclusion : The authors observed that Uncariae Ramulus et Uncus significantly down-regulates the expression of CD81, GFAP and MAG. These results suggest that Uncariae Ramulus et Uncus can be a candidate to regenerate CNS injury.

  17. Evaluation of first generation synthetic cannabinoids on binding at non-cannabinoid receptors and in a battery of in vivo assays in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Jenny L; Lefever, Timothy W; Marusich, Julie A; Grabenauer, Megan; Moore, Katherine N; Huffman, John W; Thomas, Brian F

    2016-11-01

    Anecdotal reports suggest that abused synthetic cannabinoids produce cannabis-like "highs," but some of their effects may also differ from traditional cannabinoids such as Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). This study examined the binding affinities of first-generation indole-derived synthetic cannabinoids at cannabinoid and noncannabinoid receptors and their effects in a functional observational battery (FOB) and drug discrimination in mice. All seven compounds, except JWH-391, had favorable affinity (≤159 nM) for both cannabinoid receptors. In contrast, binding at noncannabinoid receptors was absent or weak. In the FOB, THC and the six active compounds disrupted behaviors in CNS activation and muscle tone/equilibrium domains. Unlike THC, however, synthetic cannabinoids impaired behavior across a wider dose and domain range, producing autonomic effects and signs of CNS excitability and sensorimotor reactivity. In addition, mice acquired JWH-018 discrimination, and THC and JWH-073 produced full substitution whereas the 5-HT2B antagonist mianserin did not substitute in mice trained to discriminate JWH-018 or THC. Urinary metabolite analysis showed that the compounds were extensively metabolized, with metabolites that could contribute to their in vivo effects. Together, these results show that, while first-generation synthetic cannabinoids shared some effects that were similar to those of THC, they also possessed effects that differed from traditional cannabinoids. The high nanomolar (or absent) affinities of these compounds at receptors for most major neurotransmitters suggests that these divergent effects may be related to the greater potencies and/or efficacies at CB1 receptors; however, action(s) at noncannabinoid receptors yet to be assessed or via different signaling pathways cannot be ruled out. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Antidiabetic activity of the ethyl acetate fraction of Ficus lutea (Moraceae) leaf extract: comparison of an in vitro assay with an in vivo obese mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaokun, Oyinlola O; McGaw, Lyndy J; Janse van Rensburg, Ilse; Eloff, Jacobus N; Naidoo, Vinny

    2016-03-31

    Ficus lutea crude acetone leaf extracts were previously shown to stimulate glucose uptake and insulin secretion of established cells and, inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities. For this study, F. lutea acetone extracts were subjected to solvent-solvent fractionation to yield fractions with differing polarities (hexane, chloroform, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, n-butanol and water) in an attempt to obtain a more potent fraction with in vitro and probably in vivo activity. Among these fractions, the ethyl acetate fraction had the highest total polyphenol content (100.5 ± 1.6 mg GAE/g dried extract) and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (126.8 ± 30.6 μg/ml). It also stimulated the highest glucose uptake of C2C12 muscle cells and decreased extracellular glucose concentration of H-4-II-E liver cells with low cytotoxic activity. The ethyl acetate fraction (10.88 ± 0.55 μg/L at 250 μg/ml) enhanced insulin secretion in RIN-m5F pancreatic β-cells to the same degree as the positive control glibenclamide (11.09 ± 0.07 μg/L at 1μM). While fractionation increased α-glucosidase inhibition and glucose uptake of cells, in the ethyl acetate fraction, the α-amylase inhibition and insulin secretion decreased. The weight reducing and glucose control potential of the ethyl acetate fraction in an obese mouse model, important factors in the amelioration of type II diabetes was determined. The extract had no statistical significant weight reducing activity. A major finding was the decrease in the area under the curve of the glucose concentration over time in animals that were treated with both a change in diet and with the plant extract. This is linked to increased glucose uptake within the cells, the most likely mechanism is either an increased insulin response or increased insulin secretion.

  19. Evaluation of leishmanicidal activity and cytotoxicity of Ricinus communis and Azadirachta indica extracts from western Kenya: in vitro and in vivo assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumba, Bernard N; Anjili, Christopher O; Makwali, Judith; Ingonga, Johnstone; Nyamao, Rose; Marango, Sylvia; Choge, Joseph K; Khayeka-Wandabwa, Christopher

    2015-11-05

    Despite advances to targeted leishmanicidal chemotherapy, defies around severe toxicity, recent emergence of resistant variants and absence of rational vaccine still persist. This necessitates search and/or progressive validation of accessible medicinal remedies including plant based. The study examined both in vivo and in vitro response of L. major infection to combined therapy of Ricinus communis and Azadirachta indica extracts in BALB/c mice as the mouse model. A comparative study design was applied. BALB/c mice, treated with combination therapy resulted in significantly (p indica and R. communis on amastigote with a 50 % inhibitory concentration (IC50) was of 11.5 and 16.5 µg mL(-1) respectively while combination therapy gave 9.0 µg ml(-1) compared to the standard drugs, Pentostam and amphotericin B which had an IC50 of 6.5 and 4.5 µg ml(-1) respectively. Optimal efficacy of A. indica and R. communis was 72 and 59.5 % respectively, combination therapy gave 88 %, while Pentostam and amphotericin B had 98 and 92 % respectively against amastigotes. Against promastigotes A. indica and R. Communis gave an IC50 of 10.1, 25.5 µg mL(-1) respectively, while combination, 12.2 µg mL(-1) against 4.1 and 5.0 µg ml(-1) for Pentostam and amphotericin B respectively. The optimal efficacy of the compounds against promastigotes was 78.0, 61.5 and 91.2 % (A. indica, R. communis and A. indica + R. communis respectively) against 96.5 and 98 % for Pentostam and amphotericin B respectively. The concentrations at optimal efficacy were significantly different (p indica and R. communis had best antileishmanial activity than the monotherapies. The active ingredients of both R. communis and A. indica need to be fractionated, and studied further for activity against Leishmania parasites.

  20. Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis: characterization of a family with STAT‐1 gain‐of‐function and development of an ex‐vivo assay for Th17 deficiency of diagnostic utility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, H.; Davenport, E. E.; Sadler, R.; Anzilotti, C.; van Schouwenburg, P. A.; Ferry, B.; Chapel, H.; Knight, J. C.; Patel, S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) is characterized by recurrent and persistent superficial infections, with Candida albicans affecting the mucous membranes, skin and nails. It can be acquired or caused by primary immune deficiencies, particularly those that impair interleukin (IL)−17 and IL‐22 immunity. We describe a single kindred with CMC and the identification of a STAT1 GOF mutation by whole exome sequencing (WES). We show how detailed clinical and immunological phenotyping of this family in the context of WES has enabled revision of disease status and clinical management. Together with analysis of other CMC cases within our cohort of patients, we used knowledge arising from the characterization of this family to develop a rapid ex‐vivo screening assay for the detection of T helper type 17 (Th17) deficiency better suited to the routine diagnostic setting than established in‐vitro techniques, such as intracellular cytokine staining and enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using cell culture supernatants. We demonstrate that cell surface staining of unstimulated whole blood for CCR6+CXCR3–CCR4+CD161+ T helper cells generates results that correlate with intracellular cytokine staining for IL‐17A, and is able to discriminate between patients with molecularly defined CMC and healthy controls with 100% sensitivity and specificity within the cohort tested. Furthermore, removal of CCR4 and CD161 from the antibody staining panel did not affect assay performance, suggesting that the enumeration of CCR6+CXCR3–CD4+ T cells is sufficient for screening for Th17 deficiency in patients with CMC and could be used to guide further investigation aimed at identifying the underlying molecular cause. PMID:26621323

  1. Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis: characterization of a family with STAT-1 gain-of-function and development of an ex-vivo assay for Th17 deficiency of diagnostic utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhalla, F; Fox, H; Davenport, E E; Sadler, R; Anzilotti, C; van Schouwenburg, P A; Ferry, B; Chapel, H; Knight, J C; Patel, S Y

    2016-05-01

    Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) is characterized by recurrent and persistent superficial infections, with Candida albicans affecting the mucous membranes, skin and nails. It can be acquired or caused by primary immune deficiencies, particularly those that impair interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-22 immunity. We describe a single kindred with CMC and the identification of a STAT1 GOF mutation by whole exome sequencing (WES). We show how detailed clinical and immunological phenotyping of this family in the context of WES has enabled revision of disease status and clinical management. Together with analysis of other CMC cases within our cohort of patients, we used knowledge arising from the characterization of this family to develop a rapid ex-vivo screening assay for the detection of T helper type 17 (Th17) deficiency better suited to the routine diagnostic setting than established in-vitro techniques, such as intracellular cytokine staining and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using cell culture supernatants. We demonstrate that cell surface staining of unstimulated whole blood for CCR6⁺ CXCR3⁻ CCR4⁺ CD161⁺ T helper cells generates results that correlate with intracellular cytokine staining for IL-17A, and is able to discriminate between patients with molecularly defined CMC and healthy controls with 100% sensitivity and specificity within the cohort tested. Furthermore, removal of CCR4 and CD161 from the antibody staining panel did not affect assay performance, suggesting that the enumeration of CCR6⁺ CXCR3⁻ CD4⁺ T cells is sufficient for screening for Th17 deficiency in patients with CMC and could be used to guide further investigation aimed at identifying the underlying molecular cause. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical & Experimental Immunology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Society for Immunology.

  2. Tube-Forming Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ryan M; Meah, Christopher J; Heath, Victoria L; Styles, Iain B; Bicknell, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis involves the generation of new blood vessels from the existing vasculature and is dependent on many growth factors and signaling events. In vivo angiogenesis is dynamic and complex, meaning assays are commonly utilized to explore specific targets for research into this area. Tube-forming assays offer an excellent overview of the molecular processes in angiogenesis. The Matrigel tube forming assay is a simple-to-implement but powerful tool for identifying biomolecules involved in angiogenesis. A detailed experimental protocol on the implementation of the assay is described in conjunction with an in-depth review of methods that can be applied to the analysis of the tube formation. In addition, an ImageJ plug-in is presented which allows automatic quantification of tube images reducing analysis times while removing user bias and subjectivity.

  3. Dental pulp regeneration via cell homing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eramo, S; Natali, A; Pinna, R; Milia, E

    2017-10-19

    The typical treatment for irreversibly inflamed/necrotic pulp tissue is root canal treatment. As an alternative approach, regenerative endodontics aims to regenerate dental pulp-like tissues using two possible strategies: cell transplantation and cell homing. The former requires exogenously transplanted stem cells, complex procedures and high costs; the latter employs the host's endogenous cells to achieve tissue repair/regeneration, which is more clinically translatable. This systematic review examines cell homing for dental pulp regeneration, selecting articles on in vitro experiments, in vivo ectopic transplantation models and in situ pulp revascularization. MEDLINE/PubMed and Scopus databases were electronically searched for articles without limits in publication date. Two reviewers independently screened and included papers according to the predefined selection criteria. The electronic searches identified 46 studies. After title, abstract and full-text examination, 10 articles met the inclusion criteria. In vitro data highlighted that multiple cytokines have the capacity to induce migration, proliferation and differentiation of dental pulp stem/progenitor cells. The majority of the in vivo studies obtained regenerated connective pulp-like tissues with neovascularization. In some cases, the samples showed new innervation and new dentine deposition. The in situ pulp revascularization regenerated intracanal pulp-like tissues with neovascularization, innervation and dentine formation. Cell homing strategies for pulp regeneration need further understanding and improvement if they are to become a reliable and effective approach in endodontics. Nevertheless, cell homing currently represents the most clinically viable pathway for dental pulp regeneration. © 2017 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Regeneration of periodontal tissues: guided tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Cristina C; Cochran, David L

    2010-01-01

    The concept that only fibroblasts from the periodontal ligament or undifferentiated mesenchymal cells have the potential to re-create the original periodontal attachment has been long recognized. Based on this concept, guided tissue regeneration has been applied with variable success to regenerate periodontal defects. Quantitative analysis of clinical outcomes after guided tissue regeneration suggests that this therapy is a successful and predictable procedure to treat narrow intrabony defects and class II mandibular furcations, but offers limited benefits in the treatment of other types of periodontal defects.

  5. Results of the International Validation of the in vivo rodent alkaline comet assay for the detection of genotoxic carcinogens: Individual data for 1,2-dibromoethane, p-anisidine, and o-anthranilic acid in the 2nd step of the 4th phase Validation Study under the JaCVAM initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasawa, Hironao; Takashima, Rie; Narumi, Kazunori; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Hattori, Akiko; Kawabata, Masayoshi; Hamada, Shuichi

    2015-07-01

    As part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM)-initiative International Validation Study of an in vivo rat alkaline comet assay, we examined 1,2-dibromoethane (DBE), p-anisidine (ASD), and o-anthranilic acid (ANT) to investigate the effectiveness of the comet assay in detecting genotoxic carcinogens. Each of the three test chemicals was administered to 5 male Sprague-Dawley rats per group by oral gavage at 48, 24, and 3h before specimen preparation. Single cells were collected from the liver and glandular stomach at 3h after the final dosing, and the specimens prepared from these two organs were subjected to electrophoresis under alkaline conditions (pH>13). The percentage of DNA intensity in the comet tail was then assessed using an image analysis system. A micronucleus (MN) assay was also conducted using these three test chemicals with the bone marrow (BM) cells collected from the same animals simultaneously used in the comet assay, i.e., combination study of the comet assay and BM MN assay. A genotoxic (Ames positive) rodent carcinogen, DBE gave a positive result in the comet assay in the present study, while a genotoxic (Ames positive) non-carcinogen, ASD and a non-genotoxic (Ames negative) non-carcinogen, ANT showed negative results in the comet assay. All three chemicals produced negative results in the BM MN assay. While the comet assay findings in the present study were consistent with those obtained from the rodent carcinogenicity studies for the three test chemicals, we consider the positive result in the comet assay for DBE to be particularly meaningful, given that this chemical produced a negative result in the BM MN assay. Therefore, the combination study of the comet assay and BM MN assay is a useful method to detect genotoxic carcinogens that are undetectable with the BM MN assay alone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Enzyme assays

    OpenAIRE

    Bisswanger, Hans

    2014-01-01

    The essential requirements for enzyme assays are described and frequently occurring errors and pitfalls as well as their avoidance are discussed. The main factors, which must be considered for assaying enzymes, are temperature, pH, ionic strength and the proper concentrations of the essential components like substrates and enzymes. Standardization of these parameters would be desirable, but the diversity of the features of different enzymes prevents unification of assay conditions. Neverthele...

  7. Evaluation of p-phenylenediamine, o-phenylphenol sodium salt, and 2,4-diaminotoluene in the rat comet assay as part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM)-initiated international validation study of in vivo rat alkaline comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boeck, Marlies; van der Leede, Bas-jan; De Vlieger, Kathleen; Geys, Helena; Vynckier, An; Van Gompel, Jacky

    2015-07-01

    As part of the Japanese Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM)-initiated international validation study of in vivo rat alkaline comet assay (comet assay), p-phenylenediamine dihydrochloride (PPD), o-phenylphenol sodium salt (OPP), and 2,4-diaminotoluene (2,4-DAT), were analyzed in this laboratory as coded test chemicals. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (7-9 weeks of age) were given three oral doses of the test compounds, 24 and 21 h apart and liver and stomach were sampled 3h after the final dose administration. Under the conditions of the test, no increases in DNA damage were observed in liver and stomach with PPD and OPP up to 100 and 1000 mg/kg/day, respectively. 2,4-DAT, a known genotoxic carcinogen, induced a weak but reproducible, dose-related and statistically significant increase in DNA damage in liver cells while no increases were observed in stomach cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Desulfurization sorbent regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalan, V.M.; Frost, D.G.

    1982-07-07

    A spent solid sorbent resulting from the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a fuel gas flow is regenerated with a steam-air mixture. The mixture of steam and air may also include additional nitrogen or carbon dioxide. The gas mixture contacts the spent sorbent containing metal sulfide at a temperature above 500/sup 0/C to regenerate the sulfide to metal oxide or carbonate. Various metal species including the period four transition metals and the lanthanides are suitable sorbents that may be regenerated by this method. In addition, the introduction of carbon dioxide gas permits carbonates such as those of strontium, barium and calcium to be regenerated. The steam permits regeneration of spent sorbent without formation of metal sulfate. Moreover, the regeneration will proceed with low oxygen concentrations and will occur without the increase in temperature to minimize the risk of sintering and densification of the sorbent. This method may be used for high-temperature fuel cells.

  9. Adipose stem cells for intervertebral disc regeneration: Current status and concepts for the future: Tissue Engineering Review Series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, R.J.W.; Lu, Z.F.; Kroeze, R.J.; Bank, R.A.; Wuisman, P.I.; Helder, M.N.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Degenerative disc disease and emerging biological treatment approaches Stem cell sources Integration of ASC-based regenerative medicine and surgery In vitro studies Animal models Cells in disc regeneration in vivo In vivo studies Perspective Conclusions Abstract New regenerative

  10. The Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Lipoxygenase and Cyclo-Oxygenase Inhibitors in Inflammation-Induced Human Fetal Glia Cells and the Aβ Degradation Capacity of Human Fetal Astrocytes in an Ex vivo Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rea Pihlaja

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation is a common phenomenon present in the background of multiple neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD. The arachidonic acid pathway overproduces proinflammatory eicosanoids during these states and glial cells in the brain gradually lose their vital functions of protecting and supporting neurons. In this study, the role of different key enzymes of the eicosanoid pathway mediating inflammatory responses was examined in vitro and ex vivo using human fetal glial cells. Astrocytes and microglia were exposed to proinflammatory agents i.e., cytokines interleukin 1-β (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α. ELISA assays were used to examine the effects of inhibitors of key enzymes in the eicosanoid pathway. Inhibitors for 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX and cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2 in both cell types and 5-, 12-, and 15-LOX-inhibitor in astrocytes reduced significantly IL-6 secretion, compared to exposed glial cells without inhibitors. The cytokine antibody array showed that especially treatments with 5, -12, and -15 LOX inhibitor in astrocytes, 5-LOX inhibitor in microglia and COX-2 inhibitor in both glial cell types significantly reduced the expression of multiple proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, human fetal astrocytes and microglia were cultured on top of AD-affected and control human brain sections for 30 h. According to the immunochemical evaluation of the level of total Aβ, astrocytes were very efficient at degrading Aβ from AD-affected brain sections ex vivo; simultaneously added enzyme inhibitors did not increase their Aβ degradation capabilities. Microglia were not able to reduce the level of total Aβ during the 30 h incubation time.

  11. Regeneration in Swimming

    OpenAIRE

    Lehocký, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Topic: Regeneration in the swimming Aim: Using a questionnaire to find out information and views on the need of regeneration and its use. Process the results and evaluate the survey data into synoptic tables and graphs. Giving a comprehensive overview of the field of regeneration in the swimming sport. Method: The research group of our work happened 30 swimmers - participants Championship Czech Republic 2005 in short swimming pool at the age of 15-33 years. Results: It was confirmed that most...

  12. Optic nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benowitz, Larry I; Yin, Yuqin

    2010-08-01

    Retinal ganglion cells are usually not able to regenerate their axons after optic nerve injury or degenerative disorders, resulting in lifelong visual loss. This situation can be partially reversed by activating the intrinsic growth state of retinal ganglion cells, maintaining their viability, and counteracting inhibitory signals in the extracellular environment. Advances during the past few years continue to extend the amount of regeneration that can be achieved in animal models. These findings give hope that clinically meaningful regeneration may become a reality within a few years if regenerating axons can be guided to their appropriate destinations.

  13. Improvement of sciatic nerve regeneration using laminin-binding human NGF-beta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sciatic nerve injuries often cause partial or total loss of motor, sensory and autonomic functions due to the axon discontinuity, degeneration, and eventual death which finally result in substantial functional loss and decreased quality of life. Nerve growth factor (NGF plays a critical role in peripheral nerve regeneration. However, the lack of efficient NGF delivery approach limits its clinical applications. We reported here by fusing with the N-terminal domain of agrin (NtA, NGF-beta could target to nerve cells and improve nerve regeneration. METHODS: Laminin-binding assay and sustained release assay of NGF-beta fused with NtA (LBD-NGF from laminin in vitro were carried out. The bioactivity of LBD-NGF on laminin in vitro was also measured. Using the rat sciatic nerve crush injury model, the nerve repair and functional restoration by utilizing LBD-NGF were tested. FINDINGS: LBD-NGF could specifically bind to laminin and maintain NGF activity both in vitro and in vivo. In the rat sciatic nerve crush injury model, we found that LBD-NGF could be retained and concentrated at the nerve injury sites to promote nerve repair and enhance functional restoration following nerve damages. CONCLUSION: Fused with NtA, NGF-beta could bind to laminin specifically. Since laminin is the major component of nerve extracellular matrix, laminin binding NGF could target to nerve cells and improve the repair of peripheral nerve injuries.

  14. Retina regeneration in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jin; Goldman, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Unlike mammals, zebrafish are able to regenerate a damaged retina. Key to this regenerative response are Müller glia that respond to retinal injury by undergoing a reprogramming event that allows them to divide and generate a retinal progenitor that is multipotent and responsible for regenerating all major retinal neuron types. The fish and mammalian retina are composed of similar cell types with conserved function. Because of this it is anticipated that studies of retina regeneration in fish may suggest strategies for stimulating Müller glia reprogramming and retina regeneration in mammals. In this review we describe recent advances and future directions in retina regeneration research using zebrafish as a model system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of chemotactic smart scaffold for use in tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokugo, Akishige; Li, Andrew; Segovia, Luis A; Yalom, Anisa; Rezzadeh, Kameron; Zhou, Situo; Zhang, Zheyu; Zuk, Patricia A; Jarrahy, Reza

    2015-05-01

    Regenerative medicine aims to obviate the need for autologous grafting through the use of bioengineered constructs that combine stem cells, growth factors, and biocompatible vehicles. Human mesenchymal stem cells and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) have both shown promise for use in this context, the former because of their pluripotent capacity and the latter because of its chemotactic activity. The authors harnessed the regenerative potential of human mesenchymal stem cells and VEGF to develop a chemotactic scaffold for use in tissue engineering. Human mesenchymal stem cells were transduced with human VEGF via lentivirus particles to secrete VEGF. The chemotactic activity of the VEGF-transduced stem cells was evaluated via a trans-well assay. Migration through semipermeable membranes was significantly greater in chambers filled with medium conditioned by VEGF-transduced cells. VEGF-transduced cells were then seeded on apatite-coated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffolds, thereby creating the Smart Scaffold. To determine in vivo angiogenesis, the Smart Scaffolds were implanted into subcutaneous pockets in the backs of nude mice. Significantly larger numbers of capillaries were observed in the Smart Scaffold compared with control implants on immunohistologic studies. For the chemotactic in vivo study, human mesenchymal stem cells tagged with a fluorescent dye (1,1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3-tetramethylindotricarbocyanine iodide) were injected intravenously via tail vein after the subcutaneous implantation of the Smart Scaffolds. In vivo fluorescent imaging revealed that fluorescent dye-tagged human mesenchymal stem cells successfully accumulated within the Smart Scaffolds. These observations suggest that VEGF may play a vital role in the design of clinically relevant tissue regeneration graft substitutes through its angiogenic effects and ability to chemoattract mesenchymal stem cells.

  16. Acemannan sponges stimulate alveolar bone, cementum and periodontal ligament regeneration in a canine class II furcation defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantarawaratit, P; Sangvanich, P; Banlunara, W; Soontornvipart, K; Thunyakitpisal, P

    2014-04-01

    Periodontal disease is a common infectious disease, found worldwide, causing the destruction of the periodontium. The periodontium is a complex structure composed of both soft and hard tissues, thus an agent applied to regenerate the periodontium must be able to stimulate periodontal ligament, cementum and alveolar bone regeneration. Recent studies demonstrated that acemannan, a polysaccharide extracted from Aloe vera gel, stimulated both soft and hard tissue healing. This study investigated effect of acemannan as a bioactive molecule and scaffold for periodontal tissue regeneration. Primary human periodontal ligament cells were treated with acemannan in vitro. New DNA synthesis, expression of growth/differentiation factor 5 and runt-related transcription factor 2, expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, bone morphogenetic protein-2 and type I collagen, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineralized nodule formation were determined using [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay, biochemical assay and alizarin red staining, respectively. In our in vivo study, premolar class II furcation defects were made in four mongrel dogs. Acemannan sponges were applied into the defects. Untreated defects were used as a negative control group. The amount of new bone, cementum and periodontal ligament formation were evaluated 30 and 60 d after the operation. Acemannan significantly increased periodontal ligament cell proliferation, upregulation of growth/differentiation factor 5, runt-related transcription factor 2, vascular endothelial growth factor, bone morphogenetic protein 2, type I collagen and alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineral deposition as compared with the untreated control group in vitro. Moreover, acemannan significantly accelerated new alveolar bone, cementum and periodontal ligament formation in class II furcation defects. Our data suggest that acemannan could be a candidate

  17. Automated optical sensing system for biochemical assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroszlan, Peter; Duveneck, Gert L.; Ehrat, Markus; Widmer, H. M.

    1994-03-01

    In this paper, we present a new system called FOBIA that was developed and optimized with respect to automated operation of repetitive assay cycles with regenerable bioaffinity sensors. The reliability and precision of the new system is demonstrated by an application in a competitive assay for the detection of the triazine herbicide Atrazine. Using one sensor in more than 300 repetitive cycles, a signal precision better than 5% was achieved.

  18. Modality-specific axonal regeneration: toward selective regenerative neural interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Parisa; Garde, Kshitija; Chouhan, Amit K; Bengali, Ebrahim; Romero-Ortega, Mario I

    2011-01-01

    Regenerative peripheral nerve interfaces have been proposed as viable alternatives for the natural control of robotic prosthetic devices. However, sensory and motor axons at the neural interface are of mixed sub-modality types, which difficult the specific recording from motor axons and the eliciting of precise sensory modalities through selective stimulation. Here we evaluated the possibility of using type specific neurotrophins to preferentially entice the regeneration of defined axonal populations from transected peripheral nerves into separate compartments. Segregation of mixed sensory fibers from dorsal root ganglion neurons was evaluated in vitro by compartmentalized diffusion delivery of nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), to preferentially entice the growth of TrkA+ nociceptive and TrkC+ proprioceptive subsets of sensory neurons, respectively. The average axon length in the NGF channel increased 2.5-fold compared to that in saline or NT-3, whereas the number of branches increased threefold in the NT-3 channels. These results were confirmed using a 3D "Y"-shaped in vitro assay showing that the arm containing NGF was able to entice a fivefold increase in axonal length of unbranched fibers. To address if such segregation can be enticed in vivo, a "Y"-shaped tubing was used to allow regeneration of the transected adult rat sciatic nerve into separate compartments filled with either NFG or NT-3. A significant increase in the number of CGRP+ pain fibers were attracted toward the sural nerve, while N-52+ large-diameter axons were observed in the tibial and NT-3 compartments. This study demonstrates the guided enrichment of sensory axons in specific regenerative chambers, and supports the notion that neurotrophic factors can be used to segregate sensory and perhaps motor axons in separate peripheral interfaces.

  19. Direct in vitro regeneration of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omran, V G; Bagheri, A; Moshtaghi, N

    2008-09-15

    This study surveyed a rapid, efficient and reproducible protocol for in vitro shoot regeneration and rooting by different explants and different concentration of BAP. Due to optimization of shoot regeneration, two media including of MS and modified MS (MS salts with double concentration of CaC21, and B5 vitamins), different explants such as decapitated embryo axes, epicotyls and cotyledonary nodes and different concentrations of BAP hormone (1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3 and 4 mg L(-1)) in two genotypes (Gachsaran and Flip. 92-12 L) were used. The results showed that modified MS is a suitable medium for in vitro shoot regeneration of lentil. High levels of BAP caused increasing of shoot regeneration in lentil genotypes. Three milligram per liter of BAP induced the highest level of shoot regeneration. In addition, decapitated embryo explants were the best explants for highest shoot regeneration (5.8) (p rooting, the in vitro-in vivo method of rooting was better than only in vitro method. The shoots regenerated in 2 mg L(-1) BAP had higher rooting percentage than the shoots were regenerated in 3 and 4 mg L(-1) BAP. These results indicate on the inhibitory effect of high concentration of BAP on root induction. But the genotype didn't have any significant effect on rooting percentage and length of roots.

  20. Tooth regeneration: Current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadu Shifali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Regeneration of a functional tooth has the potential to be a promising therapeutic strategy. Experiments have shown that with the use of principles of bioengineering along with adult stem cells, scaffold material, and signaling molecules, tooth regeneration is possible. Research work is in progress on creating a viable bioroot with all its support. A new culture needs to be created that can possibly provide all the nutrients to the stem cells. With the ongoing research, tissue engineering is likely to revolutionize dental health and well-being of people by regenerating teeth over the next decade.

  1. Tooth regeneration: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadu, Shifali S

    2009-01-01

    Regeneration of a functional tooth has the potential to be a promising therapeutic strategy. Experiments have shown that with the use of principles of bioengineering along with adult stem cells, scaffold material, and signaling molecules, tooth regeneration is possible. Research work is in progress on creating a viable bioroot with all its support. A new culture needs to be created that can possibly provide all the nutrients to the stem cells. With the ongoing research, tissue engineering is likely to revolutionize dental health and well-being of people by regenerating teeth over the next decade.

  2. The Comet Assay: Tails of the (Unexpected. Use of the comet assay in pharmaceutical development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas-jan Van Der Leede

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In genotoxicity testing of pharmaceuticals the rodent alkaline comet assay is being increasingly used as a second in vivo assay in addition to the in vivo micronucleus assay to mitigate in vitro positive results as recommended by regulatory guidance. In this presentation we want to give insight into the circumstances in vivo comet assay is deployed in a Genetic Toxicology Department of a pharmaceutical company. As the in vivo comet assay is a salvage assay, it means that some events have occurred in an in vitro assay and that the compound (or metabolite responsible for this signal is potentially deselected for further development. More than often the decision to perform an in vivo comet assay is at a very early stage in development and the first time that the compound will be tested in vivo at high/toxic dose levels. As almost no toxicokinetic data and tissue distribution data are available a careful design with maximizes the chances for successful mitigation is necessary. Decisions on acute or repeated dosing need to be made and arrangements for combining the in vivo comet assay with the in vivo micronucleus assay are to be considered. Often synthesis methods need to be scaled up fast to provide the required amount of compound and information on suitable formulations needs to be in place. As exposure data is crucial for interpretation of results, analytical methods need to be brought in place rapidly. An experienced multi skilled and communicative team needs to be available to deploy successfully this kind of assays at an early stage of development. We will present a few scenarios on study conduct and demonstrate how this assay can make a difference for the further development of a new drug.

  3. Detailed review of transgenic rodent mutation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Iain B; Singer, Timothy M; Boucher, Sherri E; Douglas, George R

    2005-09-01

    Induced chromosomal and gene mutations play a role in carcinogenesis and may be involved in the production of birth defects and other disease conditions. While it is widely accepted that in vivo mutation assays are more relevant to the human condition than are in vitro assays, our ability to evaluate mutagenesis in vivo in a broad range of tissues has historically been quite limited. The development of transgenic rodent (TGR) mutation models has given us the ability to detect, quantify, and sequence mutations in a range of somatic and germ cells. This document provides a comprehensive review of the TGR mutation assay literature and assesses the potential use of these assays in a regulatory context. The information is arranged as follows. (1) TGR mutagenicity models and their use for the analysis of gene and chromosomal mutation are fully described. (2) The principles underlying current OECD tests for the assessment of genotoxicity in vitro and in vivo, and also nontransgenic assays available for assessment of gene mutation, are described. (3) All available information pertaining to the conduct of TGR assays and important parameters of assay performance have been tabulated and analyzed. (4) The performance of TGR assays, both in isolation and as part of a battery of in vitro and in vivo short-term genotoxicity tests, in predicting carcinogenicity is described. (5) Recommendations are made regarding the experimental parameters for TGR assays, and the use of TGR assays in a regulatory context.

  4. Bone marrow-derived stromal cells are more beneficial cell sources for tooth regeneration compared with adipose-derived stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lanfeng; Chen, Lin; Feng, Fan; Cui, Junhui; Li, Kaide; Li, Zhiyong; Liu, Lei

    2015-10-01

    Tooth loss is presently a global epidemic and tooth regeneration is thought to be a feasible and ideal treatment approach. Choice of cell source is a primary concern in tooth regeneration. In this study, the odontogenic differentiation potential of two non-dental-derived stem cells, adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) and bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs), were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. ADSCs and BMSCs were induced in vitro in the presence of tooth germ cell-conditioned medium (TGC-CM) prior to implantation into the omentum majus of rats, in combination with inactivated dentin matrix (IDM). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to detect the mRNA expression levels of odontogenic-related genes. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical assays were used to detect the protein levels of odontogenic-specific genes, such as DSP and DMP-1 both in vitro and in vivo. The results suggest that both ADSCs and BMSCs have odontogenic differentiation potential. However, the odontogenic potential of BMSCs was greater compared with ADSCs, showing that BMSCs are a more appropriate cell source for tooth regeneration. © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  5. Regeneration review reprise

    OpenAIRE

    Whited, Jessica LaMae; Tabin, Clifford James

    2010-01-01

    There have been notable advances in the scientific understanding of regeneration within the past year alone, including two recently published in BMC Biology. Increasingly, progress in the regeneration field is being inspired by comparisons with stem cell biology and enabled by newly developed techniques that allow simultaneous examination of thousands of genes and proteins. See research articles http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/7/83 and http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/5.

  6. Mineralization and bone regeneration using a bioactive elastin-like recombinamer membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tejeda-Montes, E.; Klymov, A.; Nejadnik, M.R.; Alonso, M.; Rodriguez-Cabello, J.C.; Walboomers, X.F.; Mata, A.

    2014-01-01

    The search for alternative therapies to improve bone regeneration continues to be a major challenge for the medical community. Here we report on the enhanced mineralization, osteogenesis, and in vivo bone regeneration properties of a bioactive elastin-like recombinamer (ELR) membrane. Three

  7. Conserved loop cysteines of vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1-like 1 (VKORC1L1) are involved in its active site regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Jian-Ke; Jin, Da-Yun; Stafford, Darrel W

    2014-03-28

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1) reduces vitamin K epoxide in the vitamin K cycle for post-translational modification of proteins that are involved in a variety of biological functions. However, the physiological function of VKORC1-like 1 (VKORC1L1), a paralogous enzyme sharing about 50% protein identity with VKORC1, is unknown. Here we determined the structural and functional differences of these two enzymes using fluorescence protease protection (FPP) assay and an in vivo cell-based activity assay. We show that in vivo VKORC1L1 reduces vitamin K epoxide to support vitamin K-dependent carboxylation as efficiently as does VKORC1. However, FPP assays show that unlike VKORC1, VKORC1L1 is a four-transmembrane domain protein with both its termini located in the cytoplasm. Moreover, the conserved loop cysteines, which are not required for VKORC1 activity, are essential for VKORC1L1's active site regeneration. Results from domain exchanges between VKORC1L1 and VKORC1 suggest that it is VKORC1L1's overall structure that uniquely allows for active site regeneration by the conserved loop cysteines. Intermediate disulfide trapping results confirmed an intra-molecular electron transfer pathway for VKORC1L1's active site reduction. Our results allow us to propose a concerted action of the four conserved cysteines of VKORC1L1 for active site regeneration; the second loop cysteine, Cys-58, attacks the active site disulfide, forming an intermediate disulfide with Cys-139; the first loop cysteine, Cys-50, attacks the intermediate disulfide resulting in active site reduction. The different membrane topologies and reaction mechanisms between VKORC1L1 and VKORC1 suggest that these two proteins might have different physiological functions.

  8. An RNA interference screen uncovers a new molecule in stem cell self-renewal and long-term regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Heller, Evan; Beronja, Slobodan; Oshimori, Naoki; Stokes, Nicole; Fuchs, Elaine

    2012-04-04

    Adult stem cells sustain tissue maintenance and regeneration throughout the lifetime of an animal. These cells often reside in specific signalling niches that orchestrate the stem cell's balancing act between quiescence and cell-cycle re-entry based on the demand for tissue regeneration. How stem cells maintain their capacity to replenish themselves after tissue regeneration is poorly understood. Here we use RNA-interference-based loss-of-function screening as a powerful approach to uncover transcriptional regulators that govern the self-renewal capacity and regenerative potential of stem cells. Hair follicle stem cells provide an ideal model. These cells have been purified and characterized from their native niche in vivo and, in contrast to their rapidly dividing progeny, they can be maintained and passaged long-term in vitro. Focusing on the nuclear proteins and/or transcription factors that are enriched in stem cells compared with their progeny, we screened ∼2,000 short hairpin RNAs for their effect on long-term, but not short-term, stem cell self-renewal in vitro. To address the physiological relevance of our findings, we selected one candidate that was uncovered in the screen: TBX1. This transcription factor is expressed in many tissues but has not been studied in the context of stem cell biology. By conditionally ablating Tbx1 in vivo, we showed that during homeostasis, tissue regeneration occurs normally but is markedly delayed. We then devised an in vivo assay for stem cell replenishment and found that when challenged with repetitive rounds of regeneration, the Tbx1-deficient stem cell niche becomes progressively depleted. Addressing the mechanism of TBX1 action, we discovered that TBX1 acts as an intrinsic rheostat of BMP signalling: it is a gatekeeper that governs the transition between stem cell quiescence and proliferation in hair follicles. Our results validate the RNA interference screen and underscore its power in unearthing new molecules that

  9. In situ tissue regeneration: chemoattractants for endogenous stem cell recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanden Berg-Foels, Wendy S

    2014-02-01

    Tissue engineering uses cells, signaling molecules, and/or biomaterials to regenerate injured or diseased tissues. Ex vivo expanded mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have long been a cornerstone of regeneration therapies; however, drawbacks that include altered signaling responses and reduced homing capacity have prompted investigation of regeneration based on endogenous MSC recruitment. Recent successful proof-of-concept studies have further motivated endogenous MSC recruitment-based approaches. Stem cell migration is required for morphogenesis and organogenesis during development and for tissue maintenance and injury repair in adults. A biomimetic approach to in situ tissue regeneration by endogenous MSC requires the orchestration of three main stages: MSC recruitment, MSC differentiation, and neotissue maturation. The first stage must result in recruitment of a sufficient number of MSC, capable of effecting regeneration, to the injured or diseased tissue. One of the challenges for engineering endogenous MSC recruitment is the selection of effective chemoattractant(s). The objective of this review is to synthesize and evaluate evidence of recruitment efficacy by reported chemoattractants, including growth factors, chemokines, and other more recently appreciated MSC chemoattractants. The influence of MSC tissue sources, cell culture methods, and the in vitro and in vivo environments is discussed. This growing body of knowledge will serve as a basis for the rational design of regenerative therapies based on endogenous MSC recruitment. Successful endogenous MSC recruitment is the first step of successful tissue regeneration.

  10. Syndecan Promotes Axon Regeneration by Stabilizing Growth Cone Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyson J. Edwards

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Growth cones facilitate the repair of nervous system damage by providing the driving force for axon regeneration. Using single-neuron laser axotomy and in vivo time-lapse imaging, we show that syndecan, a heparan sulfate (HS proteoglycan, is required for growth cone function during axon regeneration in C. elegans. In the absence of syndecan, regenerating growth cones form but are unstable and collapse, decreasing the effective growth rate and impeding regrowth to target cells. We provide evidence that syndecan has two distinct functions during axon regeneration: (1 a canonical function in axon guidance that requires expression outside the nervous system and depends on HS chains and (2 an intrinsic function in growth cone stabilization that is mediated by the syndecan core protein, independently of HS. Thus, syndecan is a regulator of a critical choke point in nervous system repair.

  11. Loading of a novel angiogenic agent, ginsenoside Rg1 in an acellular biological tissue for tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huang-Chien; Chen, Chiung-Tong; Chang, Yen; Huang, Ya-Chun; Chen, Sung-Ching; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the effects of ginsenoside Rg1, a natural compound isolated from Panax ginseng, on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) behavior in vitro, and on angiogenesis and tissue regeneration in genipin-fixed acellular tissue (extracellular matrix, ECM) in vivo, were investigated. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) was used as a control. The in vitro results indicated that in the presence of bFGF or Rg1, HUVEC proliferation was significantly increased. Both bFGF and Rg1 promoted HUVEC migration in a Transwell plate assay. In addition, bFGF or Rg1 significantly increased the formation of capillary-like network by HUVECs on Matrigel. Thus, both bFGF and Rg1 enhanced multiple components of angiogenic activity in vitro. The in vivo results obtained 1 week postoperatively showed that the extent of angiogenesis in ECMs was significantly enhanced by bFGF or Rg1. At 1 month postoperatively, vascularized neoconnective tissues were found to fill the pores within ECMs loaded with bFGF or Rg1. There was a significant increase in neocapillary density from 1 week to 1 month for ECMs loaded with Rg1, whereas that observed in ECMs loaded with bFGF stayed approximately the same because of the limitations of protein stability. These results suggested that Rg1 may be a new class of angiogenic agent and may be loaded in ECMs to accelerate tissue regeneration.

  12. Activity of daptomycin or linezolid in combination with rifampin or gentamicin against biofilm-forming Enterococcus faecalis or E. faecium in an in vitro pharmacodynamic model using simulated endocardial vegetations and an in vivo survival assay using Galleria mellonella larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Megan K; Arvanitis, Marios; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; LaPlante, Kerry L

    2014-08-01

    Enterococci are the third most frequent cause of infective endocarditis. A high-inoculum stationary-phase in vitro pharmacodynamic model with simulated endocardial vegetations was used to simulate the human pharmacokinetics of daptomycin at 6 or 10 mg/kg of body weight/day or linezolid at 600 mg every 12 h (q12h), alone or in combination with gentamicin at 1.3 mg/kg q12h or rifampin at 300 mg q8h or 900 mg q24h. Biofilm-forming, vancomycin-susceptible Enterococcus faecalis and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (vancomycin-resistant enterococcus [VRE]) strains were tested. At 24, 48, and 72 h, all daptomycin-containing regimens demonstrated significantly more activity (decline in CFU/g) than any linezolid-containing regimen against biofilm-forming E. faecalis. The addition of gentamicin to daptomycin (at 6 or 10 mg/kg) in the first 24 h significantly improved bactericidal activity. In contrast, the addition of rifampin delayed the bactericidal activity of daptomycin against E. faecalis, and the addition of rifampin antagonized the activities of all regimens against VRE at 24 h. Also, against VRE, the addition of gentamicin to linezolid at 72 h improved activity and was bactericidal. Rifampin significantly antagonized the activity of linezolid against VRE at 72 h. In in vivo Galleria mellonella survival assays, linezolid and daptomycin improved survival. Daptomycin at 10 mg/kg improved survival significantly over that with linezolid against E. faecalis. The addition of gentamicin improved the efficacy of daptomycin against E. faecalis and those of linezolid and daptomycin against VRE. We conclude that in enterococcal infection models, daptomycin has more activity than linezolid alone. Against biofilm-forming E. faecalis, the addition of gentamicin in the first 24 h causes the most rapid decline in CFU/g. Of interest, the addition of rifampin decreased the activity of daptomycin against both E. faecalis and VRE. Copyright © 2014, American Society for

  13. Endothelial-regenerating cells: an expanding universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Martin; Nickenig, Georg; Werner, Nikos

    2010-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most common cause for cardiovascular diseases and is based on endothelial dysfunction. A growing body of evidence suggests the contribution of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells, monocytic cells, and mature endothelial cells to vessel formation and endothelial rejuvenation. To this day, various subsets of these endothelial-regenerating cells have been identified according to cellular origin, phenotype, and properties in vivo and in vitro. However, the definition and biology, especially of endothelial progenitor cells, is complex and under heavy debate. In this review, we focus on current definitions of endothelial progenitor cells, highlight the clinical relevance of endothelial-regenerating cells, and provide new insights into cell-cell interactions involved in endothelial cell rejuvenation.

  14. High-frequency shoot regeneration of nodal explants from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-06-29

    Jun 29, 2011 ... develop a rapid and efficient in vitro multiplication and regeneration system using nodal explants. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Plant material and initiation of in vitro shoot cultures. Young in vivo shoots with six to eight nodes of T. hemsleyanum were collected from wild population in Zhejiang Province, ...

  15. Ex vivo drug sensitivity profiles of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from Cambodia and Thailand, 2005 to 2010, determined by a histidine-rich protein-2 assay

    OpenAIRE

    Tyner Stuart D; Lon Chanthap; Se Youry; Bethell Delia; Socheat Doung; Noedl Harald; Sea Darapiseth; Satimai Wichai; Schaecher Kurt; Rutvisuttinunt Wiriya; Fukuda Mark M; Chaorattanakawee Suwanna; Yingyuen Kritsanai; Sundrakes Siratchana; Chaichana Panjaporn

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background In vitro drug susceptibility assay of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates processed “immediate ex vivo” (IEV), without culture adaption, and tested using histidine-rich protein-2 (HRP-2) detection as an assay, is an expedient way to track drug resistance. Methods From 2005 to 2010, a HRP-2 in vitro assay assessed 451 P. falciparum field isolates obtained from subjects with malaria in western and northern Cambodia, and eastern Thailand, processed IEV, for 50% inhibitory co...

  16. Inflammation and axon regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benowitz, Larry I; Popovich, Phillip G

    2011-12-01

    The inflammatory response that accompanies neural injury involves multiple cell types and effector molecules with both positive and negative effects. Inflammation is essential for normal regeneration in the peripheral nervous system, and here we review evidence that augmenting inflammation can enhance regeneration in areas of the central nervous system in which it normally does not occur. Within the spinal cord, inflammation enables transplanted sensory neurons to regenerate lengthy axons and enhances the ability of a trophic factor to promote corticospinal tract sprouting. Induction of inflammation in the eye supports survival of retinal ganglion cells and enables them to regenerate injured axons through the optic nerve. These effects are linked to an atypical trophic factor, oncomodulin, along with other, better known molecules. Induction of inflammation within dorsal root ganglia, when combined with other treatments, enables peripheral sensory neurons to regenerate axons into the spinal cord. However, inflammation also has negative effects that impede recovery. In light of the importance of inflammation for neural repair, it is important to identify the specific cell types and molecules responsible for the positive and negative effects of inflammation and to develop treatments that tip the balance to favor repair.

  17. Effects of 3D-Printed Polycaprolactone/β-Tricalcium Phosphate Membranes on Guided Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hyung Shim

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to compare 3D-printed polycaprolactone (PCL and polycaprolactone/β-tricalcium phosphate (PCL/β-TCP membranes with a conventional commercial collagen membrane in terms of their abilities to facilitate guided bone regeneration (GBR. Fabricated membranes were tested for dry and wet mechanical properties. Fibroblasts and preosteoblasts were seeded into the membranes and rates and patterns of proliferation were analyzed using a kit-8 assay and by scanning electron microscopy. Osteogenic differentiation was verified by alizarin red S and alkaline phosphatase (ALP staining. An in vivo experiment was performed using an alveolar bone defect beagle model, in which defects in three dogs were covered with different membranes. CT and histological analyses at eight weeks after surgery revealed that 3D-printed PCL/β-TCP membranes were more effective than 3D-printed PCL, and substantially better than conventional collagen membranes in terms of biocompatibility and bone regeneration and, thus, at facilitating GBR.

  18. Functionalized d-form self-assembling peptide hydrogels for bone regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bin; Ou, Yunsheng; Zhou, Ao; Chen, Shuo; Zhao, Weikang; Zhao, Jinqiu; Li, Hong; Zhu, Yong; Zhao, Zenghui; Jiang, Dianming

    2016-01-01

    Bone defects are very common in orthopedics, and there is great need to develop suitable bone grafts for transplantation in vivo. However, current bone grafts still encounter some limitations, including limited availability, immune rejection, poor osteoinduction and osteoconduction, poor biocompatibility and degradation properties, etc. Self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds have emerged as an important substrate for cell culture and bone regeneration. We report on the structural features (eg, Congo red staining, circular dichroism spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and rheometry assays) and osteogenic ability of d-RADA16-RGD peptide hydrogels (with or without basic fibroblast growth factor) due to the better stability of peptide bonds formed by these peptides compared with those formed by l-form peptides, and use them to fill the femoral condyle defect of Sprague Dawley rat model. The bone morphology change, two-dimensional reconstructions using microcomputed tomography, quantification of the microcomputed tomography analyses as well as histological analyses have demonstrated that RGD-modified d-form peptide scaffolds are able to enhance extensive bone regeneration. PMID:27114701

  19. Bioactive and biodegradable silica biomaterial for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shunfeng; Wang, Xiaohong; Draenert, Florian G; Albert, Olga; Schröder, Heinz C; Mailänder, Volker; Mitov, Gergo; Müller, Werner E G

    2014-10-01

    Biosilica, a biocompatible, natural inorganic polymer that is formed by an enzymatic, silicatein-mediated reaction in siliceous sponges to build up their inorganic skeleton, has been shown to be morphogenetically active and to induce mineralization of human osteoblast-like cells (SaOS-2) in vitro. In the present study, we prepared beads (microspheres) by encapsulation of β-tricalcium phosphate [β-TCP], either alone (control) or supplemented with silica or silicatein, into the biodegradable copolymer poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) [PLGA]. Under the conditions used, ≈5% β-TCP, ≈9% silica, and 0.32μg/mg of silicatein were entrapped into the PLGA microspheres (diameter≈800μm). Determination of the biocompatibility of the β-TCP microspheres, supplemented with silica or silicatein, revealed no toxicity in the MTT based cell viability assay using SaOS-2 cells. The adherence of SaOS-2 cells to the surface of silica-containing microspheres was higher than for microspheres, containing only β-TCP. In addition, the silica-containing β-TCP microspheres and even more pronounced, a 1:1 mixture of microspheres containing β-TCP and silica, and β-TCP and silicatein, were found to strongly enhance the mineral deposition by SaOS-2 cells. Using these microspheres, first animal experiments with silica/biosilica were performed in female, adult New Zealand White rabbits to study the effect of the inorganic polymer on bone regeneration in vivo. The microspheres were implanted into 5mm thick holes, drilled into the femur of the animals, applying a bilateral comparison study design (3 test groups with 4-8 animals each). The control implant on one of the two hind legs contained microspheres with only β-TCP, while the test implant on the corresponding leg consisted either of microspheres containing β-TCP and silica, or a 1:1 mixture of microspheres, supplemented with β-TCP and silica, and β-TCP and silicatein. The results revealed that tissue/bone sections of silica

  20. Proteases from the regenerating gut of the holothurian Eupentacta fraudatrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina E Lamash

    Full Text Available Four proteases with molecular masses of 132, 58, 53, and 47 kDa were detected in the digestive system of the holothurian Eupentacta fraudatrix. These proteases displayed the gelatinase activity and characteristics of zinc metalloproteinases. The 58 kDa protease had similar protease inhibitor sensitivity to that of mammalian matrix metalloproteinases. Zymographic assay revealed different lytic activities of all four proteases during intestine regeneration in the holothurian. The 132 kDa protease showed the highest activity at the first stage. During morphogenesis (stages 2-4 of regeneration, the highest activity was measured for the 53 and 58 kDa proteases. Inhibition of protease activity exerts a marked effect on regeneration, which was dependent on the time when 1,10-phenanthroline injections commenced. When metalloproteinases were inhibited at the second stage of regeneration, the restoration rates were decreased. However, such an effect proved to be reversible, and when inhibition ceased, the previous rate of regeneration was recovered. When protease activity is inhibited at the first stage, regeneration is completely abolished, and the animals die, suggesting that early activation of the proteases is crucial for triggering the regenerative process in holothurians. The role of the detected proteases in the regeneration processes of holothurians is discussed.

  1. A biocompatibility study of new nanofibrous scaffolds for nervous system regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspa, A.; Marchini, A.; Pugliese, R.; Mauri, M.; Maleki, M.; Vasita, R.; Gelain, F.

    2015-12-01

    The development of therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury (SCI) is still a challenging goal to achieve. The pathophysiological features of chronic SCI are glial scar and cavity formation: an effective therapy will require contribution of different disciplines such as materials science, cell biology, drug delivery and nanotechnology. One of the biggest challenges in SCI regeneration is to create an artificial scaffold that could mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) and support nervous system regeneration. Electrospun constructs and hydrogels based on self-assembling peptides (SAPs) have been recently preferred. In this work SAPs and polymers were assembled by using a coaxial electrospinning setup. We tested the biocompatibility of two types of coaxially electrospun microchannels: the first one made by a core of poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PCL-PLGA) and a shell of an emulsion of PCL-PLGA and a functionalized self-assembling peptide Ac-FAQ and the second one made by a core of Ac-FAQ and a shell of PCL-PLGA. Moreover, we tested an annealed scaffold by PCL-PLGA microchannel heat-treatment. The properties of coaxial scaffolds were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform spectroscopy (FTIR), contact angle measurements and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In vitro cytotoxicity was assessed via viability and differentiation assays with neural stem cells (NSCs); whereas in vivo inflammatory response was evaluated following scaffold implantation in rodent spinal cords. Emulsification of the outer shell turned out to be the best choice in terms of cell viability and tissue response: thus suggesting the potential of using functionalized SAPs in coaxial electrospinning for applications in regenerative medicine.The development of therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury (SCI) is still a challenging goal to achieve. The pathophysiological features of chronic SCI are glial scar and cavity formation: an

  2. Functionalized D-form self-assembling peptide hydrogels for bone regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He B

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bin He,1 Yunsheng Ou,1 Ao Zhou,1 Shuo Chen,1 Weikang Zhao,1 Jinqiu Zhao,2 Hong Li,3 Yong Zhu,1 Zenghui Zhao,1 Dianming Jiang1 1Department of Orthopedics, 2Department of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China; 3School of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Bone defects are very common in orthopedics, and there is great need to develop suitable bone grafts for transplantation in vivo. However, current bone grafts still encounter some limitations, including limited availability, immune rejection, poor osteoinduction and osteoconduction, poor biocompatibility and degradation properties, etc. Self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds have emerged as an important substrate for cell culture and bone regeneration. We report on the structural features (eg, Congo red staining, circular dichroism spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and rheometry assays and osteogenic ability of D-RADA16-RGD peptide hydrogels (with or without basic fibroblast growth factor due to the better stability of peptide bonds formed by these peptides compared with those formed by L-form peptides, and use them to fill the femoral condyle defect of Sprague Dawley rat model. The bone morphology change, two-dimensional reconstructions using microcomputed tomography, quantification of the microcomputed tomography analyses as well as histological analyses have demonstrated that RGD-modified D-form peptide scaffolds are able to enhance extensive bone regeneration. Keywords: bone defect, functionalized D-form self-assembling peptide, D-RADA16-RGD, peptide hydrogel, bone regeneration

  3. Sulfated hyaluronan improves bone regeneration of diabetic rats by binding sclerostin and enhancing osteoblast function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picke, Ann-Kristin; Salbach-Hirsch, Juliane; Hintze, Vera; Rother, Sandra; Rauner, Martina; Kascholke, Christian; Möller, Stephanie; Bernhardt, Ricardo; Rammelt, Stefan; Pisabarro, M Teresa; Ruiz-Gómez, Gloria; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela; Hacker, Michael C; Scharnweber, Dieter; Hofbauer, Christine; Hofbauer, Lorenz C

    2016-07-01

    Bone fractures in patients with diabetes mellitus heal poorly and require innovative therapies to support bone regeneration. Here, we assessed whether sulfated hyaluronan included in collagen-based scaffold coatings can improve fracture healing in diabetic rats. Macroporous thermopolymerized lactide-based scaffolds were coated with collagen including non-sulfated or sulfated hyaluronan (HA/sHA3) and inserted into 3 mm femoral defects of non-diabetic and diabetic ZDF rats. After 12 weeks, scaffolds coated with collagen/HA or collagen/sHA3 accelerated bone defect regeneration in diabetic, but not in non-diabetic rats as compared to their non-coated controls. At the tissue level, collagen/sHA3 promoted bone mineralization and decreased the amount of non-mineralized bone matrix. Moreover, collagen/sHA3-coated scaffolds from diabetic rats bound more sclerostin in vivo than the respective controls. Binding assays confirmed a high binding affinity of sHA3 to sclerostin. In vitro, sHA3 induced BMP-2 and lowered the RANKL/OPG expression ratio, regardless of the glucose concentration in osteoblastic cells. Both sHA3 and high glucose concentrations decreased the differentiation of osteoclastic cells. In summary, scaffolds coated with collagen/sHA3 represent a potentially suitable biomaterial to improve bone defect regeneration in diabetic conditions. The underlying mechanism involves improved osteoblast function and binding sclerostin, a potent inhibitor of Wnt signaling and osteoblast function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization of Light Lesion Paradigms and Optical Coherence Tomography as Tools to Study Adult Retina Regeneration in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Anke; Hochmann, Sarah; Cimalla, Peter; Gärtner, Maria; Kuscha, Veronika; Hans, Stefan; Geffarth, Michaela; Kaslin, Jan; Koch, Edmund; Brand, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Light-induced lesions are a powerful tool to study the amazing ability of photoreceptors to regenerate in the adult zebrafish retina. However, the specificity of the lesion towards photoreceptors or regional differences within the retina are still incompletely understood. We therefore characterized the process of degeneration and regeneration in an established paradigm, using intense white light from a fluorescence lamp on swimming fish (diffuse light lesion). We also designed a new light lesion paradigm where light is focused through a microscope onto the retina of an immobilized fish (focused light lesion). Focused light lesion has the advantage of creating a locally restricted area of damage, with the additional benefit of an untreated control eye in the same animal. In both paradigms, cell death is observed as an immediate early response, and proliferation is initiated around 2 days post lesion (dpl), peaking at 3 dpl. We furthermore find that two photoreceptor subtypes (UV and blue sensitive cones) are more susceptible towards intense white light than red/green double cones and rods. We also observed specific differences within light lesioned areas with respect to the process of photoreceptor degeneration: UV cone debris is removed later than any other type of photoreceptor in light lesions. Unspecific damage to retinal neurons occurs at the center of a focused light lesion territory, but not in the diffuse light lesion areas. We simulated the fish eye optical properties using software simulation, and show that the optical properties may explain the light lesion patterns that we observe. Furthermore, as a new tool to study retinal degeneration and regeneration in individual fish in vivo, we use spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Collectively, the light lesion and imaging assays described here represent powerful tools for studying degeneration and regeneration processes in the adult zebrafish retina. PMID:24303018

  5. Infection and Pulp Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahng G. Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The regeneration of the pulp-dentin complex has been a great challenge to both scientists and clinicians. Previous work has shown that the presence of prior infection may influence the characteristics of tissues formed in the root canal space after regenerative endodontic treatment. The formation of ectopic tissues such as periodontal ligament, bone, and cementum has been observed in the root canal space of immature necrotic teeth with apical periodontitis, while the regeneration of dentin and pulp has been identified in previously non-infected teeth. The current regenerative endodontic therapy utilizes disinfection protocols, which heavily rely on chemical irrigation using conventional disinfectants. From a microbiological point of view, the current protocols may not allow a sufficiently clean root canal microenvironment, which is critical for dentin and pulp regeneration. In this article, the significance of root canal disinfection in regenerating the pulp-dentin complex, the limitations of the current regenerative endodontic disinfection protocols, and advanced disinfection techniques designed to reduce the microorganisms and biofilms in chronic infection are discussed.

  6. Regenerated Fe is tasty!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuester, J.; Twining, B. S.

    2012-12-01

    Bioavailability of nutrients is an essential factor controlling primary productivity in the ocean. In addition to macronutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous, availability of the trace element iron unequivocally affects growth rates and community structure of phytoplankton and thereby primary productivity in many ocean regions. External sources of iron such as Aeolian dust, upwelling of Fe-rich waters, and hydrothermal are reduced in high-nutrient low-chlorophyll regions, and most Fe used by phytoplankton has been regenerated by zooplankton. While zooplankton regeneration of Fe was first shown two decades ago, major factors controlling this process such as chemical composition of prey and grazer taxonomy are not well constrained. As pH varies significantly in digestive systems between protozoa and mesozooplankton, we hypothesize that the extent and the bioavailability of regenerated Fe is a function of the digestive physiology. Furthermore, major element components such as silica for diatoms and calcium carbonate for cocolithophores may be able to buffer the pH of digestive systems of different grazer taxa. Such effects may further influence the magnitude and bioavailability of regenerated Fe. In order to constrain the effect of grazer taxonomy and chemical composition of prey on Fe bioavailability, 55Fe-labeled phytoplankton were fed to different grazers and unlabeled phytoplankton were subsequently inoculated to the filtrate of the grazing experiment in the regrowth phase of the experiment, and the uptake of 55Fe into the phytoplankton biomass was monitored over time. A parallel uptake experiment using inorganic 55Fe was used to compare the bioavailability of regenerated and inorganic Fe to the same phytoplankton species. Furthermore, some samples of the inorganic and the regenerated uptake experiments were treated with an oxalate rinse to remove any adsorbed Fe. This allowed us to estimate the adsorption of 55Fe from either source to the cell walls of

  7. Inhibition and enhancement of neural regeneration by chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Rauvala

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current dogma in neural regeneration research implies that chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs inhibit plasticity and regeneration in the adult central nervous system (CNS. We argue that the role of the CSPGs can be reversed from inhibition to activation by developmentally expressed CSPG-binding factors. Heparin-binding growth-associated molecule (HB-GAM; also designated as pleiotrophin has been studied as a candidate molecule that might modulate the role of CSPG matrices in plasticity and regeneration. Studies in vitro show that in the presence of soluble HB-GAM chondroitin sulfate (CS chains of CSPGs display an enhancing effect on neurite outgrowth. Based on the in vitro studies, we suggest a model according to which the HB-GAM/CS complex binds to the neuron surface receptor glypican-2, which induces neurite growth. Furthermore, HB-GAM masks the CS binding sites of the neurite outgrowth inhibiting receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase sigma (PTPσ, which may contribute to the HB-GAM-induced regenerative effect. In vivo studies using two-photon imaging after local HB-GAM injection into prick-injury of the cerebral cortex reveal regeneration of dendrites that has not been previously demonstrated after injuries of the mammalian nervous system. In the spinal cord, two-photon imaging displays HB-GAM-induced axonal regeneration. Studies on the HB-GAM/CS mechanism in vitro and in vivo are expected to pave the way for drug development for injuries of brain and spinal cord.

  8. Stimulating endogenous cardiac regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda eFinan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration,a combination of these approaches couldameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation ofmultiple cell players.

  9. Decellularized Swine Dental Pulp as a Bioscaffold for Pulp Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lei; Gao, Zhenhua; Zhu, Zhao; Zhang, Chunmei; Wang, Jinsong

    2017-01-01

    Endodontic regeneration shows promise in treating dental pulp diseases; however, no suitable scaffolds exist for pulp regeneration. Acellular natural extracellular matrix (ECM) is a favorable scaffold for tissue regeneration since the anatomical structure and ECM of the natural tissues or organs are well-preserved. Xenogeneic ECM is superior to autologous or allogeneic ECM in tissue engineering for its unlimited resources. This study investigated the characteristics of decellularized dental pulp ECM from swine and evaluated whether it could mediate pulp regeneration. Dental pulps were acquired from the mandible anterior teeth of swine 12 months of age and decellularized with 10% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) combined with Triton X-100. Pulp regeneration was conducted by seeding human dental pulp stem cells into decellularized pulp and transplanted subcutaneously into nude mice for 8 weeks. The decellularized pulp demonstrated preserved natural shape and structure without any cellular components. Histological analysis showed excellent ECM preservation and pulp-like tissue, and newly formed mineralized tissues were regenerated after being transplanted in vivo. In conclusion, decellularized swine dental pulp maintains ECM components favoring stem cell proliferation and differentiation, thus representing a suitable scaffold for improving clinical outcomes and functions of teeth with dental pulp diseases. PMID:29387727

  10. Mitochondria Localize to Injured Axons to Support Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sung Min; Baig, Huma S; Hammarlund, Marc

    2016-12-21

    Axon regeneration is essential to restore the nervous system after axon injury. However, the neuronal cell biology that underlies axon regeneration is incompletely understood. Here we use in vivo, single-neuron analysis to investigate the relationship between nerve injury, mitochondrial localization, and axon regeneration. Mitochondria translocate into injured axons so that average mitochondria density increases after injury. Moreover, single-neuron analysis reveals that axons that fail to increase mitochondria have poor regeneration. Experimental alterations to axonal mitochondrial distribution or mitochondrial respiratory chain function result in corresponding changes to regeneration outcomes. Axonal mitochondria are specifically required for growth-cone migration, identifying a key energy challenge for injured neurons. Finally, mitochondrial localization to the axon after injury is regulated in part by dual-leucine zipper kinase 1 (DLK-1), a conserved regulator of axon regeneration. These data identify regulation of axonal mitochondria as a new cell-biological mechanism that helps determine the regenerative response of injured neurons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Tracking chromatid segregation to identify human cardiac stem cells that regenerate extensively the infarcted myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajstura, Jan; Bai, Yingnan; Cappetta, Donato; Kim, Junghyun; Arranto, Christian; Sanada, Fumihiro; D'Amario, Domenico; Matsuda, Alex; Bardelli, Silvana; Ferreira-Martins, João; Hosoda, Toru; Leri, Annarosa; Rota, Marcello; Loscalzo, Joseph; Anversa, Piero

    2012-09-14

    According to the immortal DNA strand hypothesis, dividing stem cells selectively segregate chromosomes carrying the old template DNA, opposing accumulation of mutations resulting from nonrepaired replication errors and attenuating telomere shortening. Based on the premise of the immortal DNA strand hypothesis, we propose that stem cells retaining the old DNA would represent the most powerful cells for myocardial regeneration. Division of human cardiac stem cells (hCSCs) by nonrandom and random segregation of chromatids was documented by clonal assay of bromodeoxyuridine-tagged hCSCs. Additionally, their growth properties were determined by a series of in vitro and in vivo studies. We report that a small class of hCSCs retain during replication the mother DNA and generate 2 daughter cells, which carry the old and new DNA, respectively. hCSCs with immortal DNA form a pool of nonsenescent cells with longer telomeres and higher proliferative capacity. The self-renewal and long-term repopulating ability of these cells was shown in serial-transplantation assays in the infarcted heart; these cells created a chimeric organ, composed of spared rat and regenerated human cardiomyocytes and coronary vessels, leading to a remarkable restoration of cardiac structure and function. The documentation that hCSCs divide by asymmetrical and symmetrical chromatid segregation supports the view that the human heart is a self-renewing organ regulated by a compartment of resident hCSCs. The impressive recovery in ventricular hemodynamics and anatomy mediated by clonal hCSCs carrying the "mother" DNA underscores the clinical relevance of this stem cell class for the management of heart failure in humans.

  12. Tooth regeneration: a revolution in stomatology and evolution in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Sibel; Fu, Susan Y; Kim, Keith; Zhou, Hong; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Kim, Sahng Gyoon; Wang, Shuang; Mao, Jeremy J

    2011-07-01

    A tooth is a complex biological organ and consists of multiple tissues including the enamel, dentin, cementum and pulp. Tooth loss is the most common organ failure. Can a tooth be regenerated? Can adult stem cells be orchestrated to regenerate tooth structures such as the enamel, dentin, cementum and dental pulp, or even an entire tooth? If not, what are the therapeutically viable sources of stem cells for tooth regeneration? Do stem cells necessarily need to be taken out of the body, and manipulated ex vivo before they are transplanted for tooth regeneration? How can regenerated teeth be economically competitive with dental implants? Would it be possible to make regenerated teeth affordable by a large segment of the population worldwide? This review article explores existing and visionary approaches that address some of the above-mentioned questions. Tooth regeneration represents a revolution in stomatology as a shift in the paradigm from repair to regeneration: repair is by metal or artificial materials whereas regeneration is by biological restoration. Tooth regeneration is an extension of the concepts in the broad field of regenerative medicine to restore a tissue defect to its original form and function by biological substitutes.

  13. Regenerating reptile retinas: a comparative approach to restoring retinal ganglion cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D L

    2017-02-01

    Transection or damage to the mammalian optic nerve generally results in loss of retinal ganglion cells by apoptosis. This cell death is seen less in fish or amphibians where retinal ganglion cell survival and axon regeneration leads to recovery of sight. Reptiles lie somewhere in the middle of this spectrum of nerve regeneration, and different species have been reported to have a significant variation in their retinal ganglion cell regenerative capacity. The ornate dragon lizard Ctenophoris ornatus exhibits a profound capacity for regeneration, whereas the Tenerife wall lizard Gallotia galloti has a more variable response to optic nerve damage. Some individuals regain visual activity such as the pupillomotor responses, whereas in others axons fail to regenerate sufficiently. Even in Ctenophoris, although the retinal ganglion cell axons regenerate adequately enough to synapse in the tectum, they do not make long-term topographic connections allowing recovery of complex visually motivated behaviour. The question then centres on where these intraspecies differences originate. Is it variation in the innate ability of retinal ganglion cells from different species to regenerate with functional validity? Or is it variances between different species in the substrate within which the nerves regenerate, the extracellular environment of the damaged nerve or the supporting cells surrounding the regenerating axons? Investigations of retinal ganglion cell regeneration between different species of lower vertebrates in vivo may shed light on these questions. Or perhaps more interesting are in vitro studies comparing axon regeneration of retinal ganglion cells from various species placed on differing substrates.

  14. Evaluation of 3D printed PCL/PLGA/β-TCP versus collagen membranes for guided bone regeneration in a beagle implant model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, J-Y; Park, C-Y; Bae, J-H; Ahn, G; Kim, C; Lim, D-H; Cho, D-W; Yun, W-S; Shim, J-H; Huh, J-B

    2016-10-07

    Here, we compared 3D-printed polycaprolactone/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/β-tricalcium phosphate (PCL/PLGA/β-TCP) membranes with the widely used collagen membranes for guided bone regeneration (GBR) in beagle implant models. For mechanical property comparison in dry and wet conditions and cytocompatibility determination, we analyzed the rate and pattern of cell proliferation of seeded fibroblasts and preosteoblasts using the cell counting kit-8 assay and scanning electron microscopy. Osteogenic differentiation was verified using alizarin red S staining. At 8 weeks following implantation in vivo using beagle dogs, computed tomography and histological analyses were performed after sacrifice. Cell proliferation rates in vitro indicated that early cell attachment was higher in collagen than in PCL/PLGA/β-TCP membranes; however, the difference subsided by day 7. Similar outcomes were found for osteogenic differentiation, with approximately 2.5 times greater staining in collagen than PCL/PLGA/β-TCP, but without significant difference by day 14. In vivo, bone regeneration in the defect area, represented by new bone formation and bone-to-implant contact, paralleled those associated with collagen membranes. However, tensile testing revealed that whereas the PCL/PLGA/β-TCP membrane mechanical properties were conserved in both wet and dry states, the tensile property of collagen was reduced by 99% under wet conditions. Our results demonstrate in vitro and in vivo that PCL/PLGA/β-TCP membranes have similar levels of biocompatibility and bone regeneration as collagen membranes. In particular, considering that GBR is always applied to a wet environment (e.g. blood, saliva), we demonstrated that PCL/PLGA/β-TCP membranes maintained their form more reliably than collagen membranes in a wet setting, confirming their appropriateness as a GBR membrane.

  15. Dual role of delta-like 1 homolog (DLK1) in skeletal muscle development and adult muscle regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Laborda, Jorge; Baladron, Victoriano

    2013-01-01

    Muscle development and regeneration is tightly orchestrated by a specific set of myogenic transcription factors. However, factors that regulate these essential myogenic inducers remain poorly described. Here, we show that delta-like 1 homolog (Dlk1), an imprinted gene best known for its ability t...... fat deposition during in vivo regeneration. Collectively, our results suggest a novel and surprising dual biological function of DLK1 as an enhancer of muscle development, but as an inhibitor of adult muscle regeneration....

  16. Localization of QTLs for in vitro plant regeneration in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuez Fernando

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low regeneration ability limits biotechnological breeding approaches. The influence of genotype in the regeneration response is high in both tomato and other important crops. Despite the various studies that have been carried out on regeneration genetics, little is known about the key genes involved in this process. The aim of this study was to localize the genetic factors affecting regeneration in tomato. Results We developed two mapping populations (F2 and BC1 derived from a previously selected tomato cultivar (cv. Anl27 with low regeneration ability and a high regeneration accession of the wild species Solanum pennellii (PE-47. The phenotypic assay indicated dominance for bud induction and additive effects for both the percentage of explants with shoots and the number of regenerated shoots per explant. Two linkage maps were developed and six QTLs were identified on five chromosomes (1, 3, 4, 7 and 8 in the BC1 population by means of the Interval Mapping and restricted Multiple QTL Mapping methods. These QTLs came from S. pennellii, with the exception of the minor QTL located on chromosome 8, which was provided by cv. Anl27. The main QTLs correspond to those detected on chromosomes 1 and 7. In the F2 population, a QTL on chromosome 7 was identified on a similar region as that detected in the BC1 population. Marker segregation distortion was observed in this population in those areas where the QTLs of BC1 were detected. Furthermore, we located two tomato candidate genes using a marker linked to the high regeneration gene: Rg-2 (a putative allele of Rg-1 and LESK1, which encodes a serine/threonine kinase and was proposed as a marker for regeneration competence. As a result, we located a putative allele of Rg-2 in the QTL detected on chromosome 3 that we named Rg-3. LESK1, which is also situated on chromosome 3, is outside Rg-3. In a preliminary exploration of the detected QTL peaks, we found several genes that may be related

  17. Localization of QTLs for in vitro plant regeneration in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo-Moya, Carlos; Gisbert, Carmina; Vilanova, Santiago; Nuez, Fernando

    2011-10-20

    Low regeneration ability limits biotechnological breeding approaches. The influence of genotype in the regeneration response is high in both tomato and other important crops. Despite the various studies that have been carried out on regeneration genetics, little is known about the key genes involved in this process. The aim of this study was to localize the genetic factors affecting regeneration in tomato. We developed two mapping populations (F2 and BC1) derived from a previously selected tomato cultivar (cv. Anl27) with low regeneration ability and a high regeneration accession of the wild species Solanum pennellii (PE-47). The phenotypic assay indicated dominance for bud induction and additive effects for both the percentage of explants with shoots and the number of regenerated shoots per explant. Two linkage maps were developed and six QTLs were identified on five chromosomes (1, 3, 4, 7 and 8) in the BC1 population by means of the Interval Mapping and restricted Multiple QTL Mapping methods. These QTLs came from S. pennellii, with the exception of the minor QTL located on chromosome 8, which was provided by cv. Anl27. The main QTLs correspond to those detected on chromosomes 1 and 7. In the F2 population, a QTL on chromosome 7 was identified on a similar region as that detected in the BC1 population. Marker segregation distortion was observed in this population in those areas where the QTLs of BC1 were detected. Furthermore, we located two tomato candidate genes using a marker linked to the high regeneration gene: Rg-2 (a putative allele of Rg-1) and LESK1, which encodes a serine/threonine kinase and was proposed as a marker for regeneration competence. As a result, we located a putative allele of Rg-2 in the QTL detected on chromosome 3 that we named Rg-3. LESK1, which is also situated on chromosome 3, is outside Rg-3. In a preliminary exploration of the detected QTL peaks, we found several genes that may be related to regeneration. In this study we have

  18. Bionanomaterials for skin regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Leonida, Mihaela D

    2016-01-01

    This book gives a concise overview of bionanomaterials with applications for skin regeneration. The advantages and challenges of nanoscale materials are covered in detail, giving a basic view of the skin structure and conditions that require transdermal or topical applications. Medical applications, such as wound healing, care for burns, skin disease, and cosmetic care, such as aging of the skin and photodamage, and how they benefit from bionanomaterials, are described in detail. A final chapter is devoted to the ethical and social issues related to the use of bionanomaterials for skin regeneration. This is an ideal book for researchers in materials science, medical scientists specialized in dermatology, and cosmetic chemists working in formulations. It can also serve as a reference for nanotechnologists, dermatologists, microbiologists, engineers, and polymer chemists, as well as students studying in these fields.

  19. Biomaterials for cardiac regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Ruel, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This book offers readers a comprehensive biomaterials-based approach to achieving clinically successful, functionally integrated vasculogenesis and myogenesis in the heart. Coverage is multidisciplinary, including the role of extracellular matrices in cardiac development, whole-heart tissue engineering, imaging the mechanisms and effects of biomaterial-based cardiac regeneration, and autologous bioengineered heart valves. Bringing current knowledge together into a single volume, this book provides a compendium to students and new researchers in the field and constitutes a platform to allow for future developments and collaborative approaches in biomaterials-based regenerative medicine, even beyond cardiac applications. This book also: Provides a valuable overview of the engineering of biomaterials for cardiac regeneration, including coverage of combined biomaterials and stem cells, as well as extracellular matrices Presents readers with multidisciplinary coverage of biomaterials for cardiac repair, including ...

  20. Hyperactivated Stat3 boosts axon regeneration in the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Saloni T; Luo, Xueting; Park, Kevin K; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2016-06-01

    Axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) is intrinsically and extrinsically inhibited by multiple factors. One major factor contributing to intrinsic regeneration failure is the inability of mature neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) to activate regeneration-associated transcription factors (TFs) post-injury. A prior study identified TFs overexpressed in neurons of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) compared to the CNS; some of these could be involved in the ability of PNS neurons to regenerate. Of these, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), as well its downstream regeneration-associated targets, showed a significant upregulation in PNS neurons relative to CNS neurons, and a constitutively active variant of Stat3 (Stat3CA) promoted neurite growth when expressed in cerebellar neurons (Lerch et al., 2012; Smith et al., 2011). To further enhance STAT3's neurite outgrowth enhancing activity, Stat3CA was fused with a viral activation domain (VP16). VP16 hyperactivates TFs by recruiting transcriptional co-factors to the DNA binding domain (Hirai et al., 2010). Overexpression of this VP16-Stat3CA chimera in primary cortical neurons led to a significant increase of neurite outgrowth as well as Stat3 transcriptional activity in vitro. Furthermore, in vivo transduction of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) with AAV constructs expressing VP16-Stat3CA resulted in regeneration of optic nerve axons after injury, to a greater degree than for those expressing Stat3CA alone. These findings confirm and extend the concept that overexpression of hyperactivated transcription factors identified as functioning in PNS regeneration can promote axon regeneration in the CNS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Retinoic acid signaling in axonal regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika ePuttagunta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Following an acute central nervous system injury, axonal regeneration and functional recovery are extremely limited. This is due to an extrinsic inhibitory growth environment and the lack of intrinsic growth competence. Retinoic acid (RA signaling, essential in developmental dorsoventral patterning and specification of spinal motor neurons, has been shown through its receptor, the transcription factor RA receptor β2 (RARß2, to induce axonal regeneration following spinal cord injury (SCI. Recently, it has been shown that in dorsal root ganglia neurons, cAMP levels were greatly increased by lentiviral RARβ2 expression and contributed to neurite outgrowth. Moreover, RARβ agonists, in cerebellar granule neurons and in the brain in vivo, induced phosphoinositide 3-kinase dependent phosphorylation of AKT that was involved in RARβ-dependent neurite outgrowth. More recently, RA-RARß pathways were shown to directly transcriptionally repress a member of the inhibitory Nogo receptor complex, Lingo-1, under an axonal growth inhibitory environment in vitro as well as following spinal injury in vivo. This perspective focuses on these newly discovered molecular mechanisms and future directions in the field.

  2. Low Temperature Regenerator Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    program and as used in Table 4 is typical of well designed Stirling qycle or VM cycle machines, and the gross third-stage refrigeration of 2.785w is a...0. McMahon, "A New Refrigeration Process", Proc. 10th Int. Cong. of Refrig. (1959). 26. G. Walker, Stirling - Cycle Machines, Clarendon Press, Oxford...PERFORMANCE ............ 64 3.1 Introduction ..... 0 ... . ......... ... . 64 3.2 Stirling Cycle Analysis ................. 71 3.2.1 Simple Regenerator Model

  3. Regeneration of Optic Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok-Fai So

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The optic nerve is part of the central nervous system (CNS and has a structure similar to other CNS tracts. The axons that form the optic nerve originate in the ganglion cell layer of the retina and extend through the optic tract. As a tissue, the optic nerve has the same organization as the white matter of the brain in regard to its glia. There are three types of glial cells: Oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia. Little structural and functional regeneration of the CNS takes place spontaneously following injury in adult mammals. In contrast, the ability of the mammalian peripheral nervous system (PNS to regenerate axons after injury is well documented. A number of factors are involved in the lack of CNS regeneration, including: (i the response of neuronal cell bodies against the damage; (ii myelin-mediated inhibition by oligodendrocytes; (iii glial scarring, by astrocytes; (iv macrophage infiltration; and (v insufficient trophic factor support. The fundamental difference in the regenerative capacity between CNS and PNS neuronal cell bodies has been the subject of intensive research. In the CNS the target normally conveys a retrograde trophic signal to the cell body. CNS neurons die because of trophic deprivation. Damage to the optic nerve disconnects the neuronal cell body from its target-derived trophic peptides, leading to the death of retinal ganglion cells. Furthermore, the axontomized neurons become less responsive to the peptide trophic signals they do receive. On the other hand, adult PNS neurons are intrinsically responsive to neurotrophic factors and do not lose trophic responsiveness after axotomy. In this talk different strategies to promote optic-nerve regeneration in adult mammals are reviewed. Much work is still needed to resolve many issues. This is a very important area of neuroregeneration and neuroprotection, as currently there is no cure after traumatic optic nerve injury or retinal disease such as glaucoma, which

  4. Epithelial cells as alternative human biomatrices for comet assay

    OpenAIRE

    Emilio eRojas; Yolanda eLorenzo; Kristiane eHuag-Berg; Bjørn eNicolaissen; Mahara eValverde

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a valuable experimental tool aimed at mapping DNA damage in human cells in vivo for environmental and occupational monitoring, as well as for therapeutic purposes, such as storage prior to transplant, during tissue engineering, and in experimental ex vivo assays. Furthermore, due to its great versatility, the comet assay allows to explore the use of alternative cell types to assess DNA damage, such as epithelial cells. Epithelial cells, as specialized components of many org...

  5. Relative embryotoxic potency of p-substituted phenols in the embryonic stem cell test (EST) and comparison to their toxic potency in vivo and in the whole embryo culture (WEC) assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strikwold, M.; Woutersen, R.A.; Spenkelink, A.; Punt, A.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    The applicability of the embryonic stem cell test (EST) as an alternative for in vivo embryotoxicity testing was evaluated for a series of five p-substituted phenols. To this purpose, the potency ranking for this class of compounds derived from the inhibition of cardiomyocyte differentiation in the

  6. Therapeutic progenitor cell application for tissue regeneration: Analyzing the impact of toll-like receptor signaling on c-kit+ cell migration following ischemia-reperfusion injury in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donndorf, Peter; Abubaker, Saifullah; Vollmar, Brigitte; Rimmbach, Christian; Steinhoff, Gustav; Kaminski, Alexander

    2017-07-01

    Toll-like-receptor (TLR) mediated immune response has been shown to regulate myocardial damage following cardiac ischemia-reperfusion (IR). It has not been described conclusively so far whether migration of therapeutically applied progenitor cells following an IR event depends on TLR-signaling. In vivo migratory capacity murine c-kit+ cells following IR injury was quantified by intravital fluorescence microscopy, utilizing the mouse cremaster muscle model and analyzing early (rolling) and late (adhesion) c-kit+ cell interaction with the local endothelium. The role of TLR-2 and TLR-4, as well as MyD88 and TRIF was analyzed by applying specific knock-out models. A sequence of 15min ischemia followed by 15min of reperfusion induced firm endothelial c-kit+ cell adhesion (5.6±1.3cells/mm2 in Control vs. 30.2±10.1cells/mm2 in IR, pcell-endothelial cell interactions (67.6±2.3% c-kit+ cell rolling in IR vs. 46.3±4.8% c-kit+ cell rolling in IR-TLR-2-ko vs. 45.3±4.8% c-kit+ cell rolling in IR-TLR-4-ko, pcell adhesion (30.2±10.1cells/mm2 in IR vs. 16.3±3.9cells/mm2 in IR-TLR-2-ko vs. 14.5±4.4cells/mm2 in IR-TLR-4-ko, pprotein knock-out resulted in a significantly decreased firm endothelial c-kit+ cell adhesion only in MyD88 knock-out but not in TRIF knock-out (9.2±2.2cells/mm2 in IR-MyD88-ko vs. 30.1±9.9cells/mm2 in IR-WT, pcells interact with the target organ endothelium following IR injury. This interaction seems to depend on TLR-MyD88 signaling. Therapeutic blockade of TLR signaling for anti-inflammatory purposes might interfere with regenerative cell-based therapy protocols. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Subclass of individual IgA-secreting human lymphocytes. Investigation of in vivo pneumococcal polysaccharide-induced and in vitro mitogen-induced blood B cells by monolayer plaque-forming cell assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilmann, C; Barington, T; Sigsgaard, T

    1988-01-01

    The subclass of individual human IgA B cells was investigated by means of monolayer plaque-forming cell assays permitting analysis of all IgA-secreting cells as well as of cells secreting IgA anti-pneumococcal polysaccharide antibody. Center cells were examined by indirect immunofluorescence...

  8. SnoN facilitates axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiun L Do

    Full Text Available Adult CNS neurons exhibit a reduced capacity for growth compared to developing neurons, due in part to downregulation of growth-associated genes as development is completed. We tested the hypothesis that SnoN, an embryonically regulated transcription factor that specifies growth of the axonal compartment, can enhance growth in injured adult neurons. In vitro, SnoN overexpression in dissociated adult DRG neuronal cultures significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth. Moreover, TGF-β1, a negative regulator of SnoN, inhibited neurite outgrowth, and SnoN over-expression overcame this inhibition. We then examined whether SnoN influenced axonal regeneration in vivo: indeed, expression of a mutant form of SnoN resistant to degradation significantly enhanced axonal regeneration following cervical spinal cord injury, despite peri-lesional upregulation of TGF-β1. Thus, a developmental mechanism that specifies extension of the axonal compartment also promotes axonal regeneration after adult CNS injury.

  9. Small Molecule Agonists of Cell Adhesion Molecule L1 Mimic L1 Functions In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Hardeep; Lutz, David; Chaudhary, Harshita; Schachner, Melitta; Loers, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    Lack of permissive mechanisms and abundance of inhibitory molecules in the lesioned central nervous system of adult mammals contribute to the failure of functional recovery after injury, leading to severe disabilities in motor functions and pain. Peripheral nerve injury impairs motor, sensory, and autonomic functions, particularly in cases where nerve gaps are large and chronic nerve injury ensues. Previous studies have indicated that the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 constitutes a viable target to promote regeneration after acute injury. We screened libraries of known drugs for small molecule agonists of L1 and evaluated the effect of hit compounds in cell-based assays in vitro and in mice after femoral nerve and spinal cord injuries in vivo. We identified eight small molecule L1 agonists and showed in cell-based assays that they stimulate neuronal survival, neuronal migration, and neurite outgrowth and enhance Schwann cell proliferation and migration and myelination of neurons in an L1-dependent manner. In a femoral nerve injury mouse model, enhanced functional regeneration and remyelination after application of the L1 agonists were observed. In a spinal cord injury mouse model, L1 agonists improved recovery of motor functions, being paralleled by enhanced remyelination, neuronal survival, and monoaminergic innervation, reduced astrogliosis, and activation of microglia. Together, these findings suggest that application of small organic compounds that bind to L1 and stimulate the beneficial homophilic L1 functions may prove to be a valuable addition to treatments of nervous system injuries.

  10. Synthetic Phage for Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Yoo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlling structural organization and signaling motif display is of great importance to design the functional tissue regenerating materials. Synthetic phage, genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage has been recently introduced as novel tissue regeneration materials to display a high density of cell-signaling peptides on their major coat proteins for tissue regeneration purposes. Structural advantages of their long-rod shape and monodispersity can be taken together to construct nanofibrous scaffolds which support cell proliferation and differentiation as well as direct orientation of their growth in two or three dimensions. This review demonstrated how functional synthetic phage is designed and subsequently utilized for tissue regeneration that offers potential cell therapy.

  11. The effect of platelet-rich plasma on human mesenchymal stem cell-induced bone regeneration of canine alveolar defects with calcium phosphate-based scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reihaneh Shafieian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Autologous bone transplantation known as the “gold standard” to reconstruction of osseous defects has known disadvantages. This study was designed to explore the effects of hydroxy-apatite/tricalcium-phosphate (HA/TCP and platelet-rich plasma (PRP on the osteogenesis ability of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAdMSCs in vitro and in vivo. Materials and Methods: hAdMSCs were incubated with HA/TCP granules and/or PRP in vitro and then, cell proliferation and differentiation was assessed by MTT assay, AZR S staining and SEM examination. In vivo, four cylindrical defects were drilled in the mandibular bones of 5 mongrel dogs and divided randomly into the following groups: I-autologous crushed bone, II- no filling material, III- HA/TCP and PRP, IV- PRP-enriched hAdMSCs seeded on HA/TCP granules. Inserted hAdMSCs were labeled to trace their contribution to bone tissue regeneration. Finally, cell tracing and tissue regeneration were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and histomorphometry methods, respectively.    Results: In vitro, co-incubation with HA/TCP granules significantly reduced proliferation and osteogenic differentiation ability of hAdMSCs; while PRP application promoted these capacities (P

  12. Skeletal muscle regeneration in Xenopus tadpoles and zebrafish larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Alexandre

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammals are not able to restore lost appendages, while many amphibians are. One important question about epimorphic regeneration is related to the origin of the new tissues and whether they come from mature cells via dedifferentiation and/or from stem cells. Several studies in urodele amphibians (salamanders indicate that, after limb or tail amputation, the multinucleated muscle fibres do dedifferentiate by fragmentation and proliferation, thereby contributing to the regenerate. In Xenopus laevis tadpoles, however, it was shown that muscle fibres do not contribute directly to the tail regenerate. We set out to study whether dedifferentiation was present during muscle regeneration of the tadpole limb and zebrafish larval tail, mainly by cell tracing and histological observations. Results Cell tracing and histological observations indicate that zebrafish tail muscle do not dedifferentiate during regeneration. Technical limitations did not allow us to trace tadpole limb cells, nevertheless we observed no signs of dedifferentiation histologically. However, ultrastructural and gene expression analysis of regenerating muscle in tadpole tail revealed an unexpected dedifferentiation phenotype. Further histological studies showed that dedifferentiating tail fibres did not enter the cell cycle and in vivo cell tracing revealed no evidences of muscle fibre fragmentation. In addition, our results indicate that this incomplete dedifferentiation was initiated by the retraction of muscle fibres. Conclusions Our results show that complete skeletal muscle dedifferentiation is less common than expected in lower vertebrates. In addition, the discovery of incomplete dedifferentiation in muscle fibres of the tadpole tail stresses the importance of coupling histological studies with in vivo cell tracing experiments to better understand the regenerative mechanisms.

  13. Skeletal muscle regeneration in Xenopus tadpoles and zebrafish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Alexandre Miguel Cavaco; Christen, Bea; Martí, Mercé; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2012-02-27

    Mammals are not able to restore lost appendages, while many amphibians are. One important question about epimorphic regeneration is related to the origin of the new tissues and whether they come from mature cells via dedifferentiation and/or from stem cells. Several studies in urodele amphibians (salamanders) indicate that, after limb or tail amputation, the multinucleated muscle fibres do dedifferentiate by fragmentation and proliferation, thereby contributing to the regenerate. In Xenopus laevis tadpoles, however, it was shown that muscle fibres do not contribute directly to the tail regenerate. We set out to study whether dedifferentiation was present during muscle regeneration of the tadpole limb and zebrafish larval tail, mainly by cell tracing and histological observations. Cell tracing and histological observations indicate that zebrafish tail muscle do not dedifferentiate during regeneration. Technical limitations did not allow us to trace tadpole limb cells, nevertheless we observed no signs of dedifferentiation histologically. However, ultrastructural and gene expression analysis of regenerating muscle in tadpole tail revealed an unexpected dedifferentiation phenotype. Further histological studies showed that dedifferentiating tail fibres did not enter the cell cycle and in vivo cell tracing revealed no evidences of muscle fibre fragmentation. In addition, our results indicate that this incomplete dedifferentiation was initiated by the retraction of muscle fibres. Our results show that complete skeletal muscle dedifferentiation is less common than expected in lower vertebrates. In addition, the discovery of incomplete dedifferentiation in muscle fibres of the tadpole tail stresses the importance of coupling histological studies with in vivo cell tracing experiments to better understand the regenerative mechanisms.

  14. Skeletal muscle regeneration in Xenopus tadpoles and zebrafish larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Mammals are not able to restore lost appendages, while many amphibians are. One important question about epimorphic regeneration is related to the origin of the new tissues and whether they come from mature cells via dedifferentiation and/or from stem cells. Several studies in urodele amphibians (salamanders) indicate that, after limb or tail amputation, the multinucleated muscle fibres do dedifferentiate by fragmentation and proliferation, thereby contributing to the regenerate. In Xenopus laevis tadpoles, however, it was shown that muscle fibres do not contribute directly to the tail regenerate. We set out to study whether dedifferentiation was present during muscle regeneration of the tadpole limb and zebrafish larval tail, mainly by cell tracing and histological observations. Results Cell tracing and histological observations indicate that zebrafish tail muscle do not dedifferentiate during regeneration. Technical limitations did not allow us to trace tadpole limb cells, nevertheless we observed no signs of dedifferentiation histologically. However, ultrastructural and gene expression analysis of regenerating muscle in tadpole tail revealed an unexpected dedifferentiation phenotype. Further histological studies showed that dedifferentiating tail fibres did not enter the cell cycle and in vivo cell tracing revealed no evidences of muscle fibre fragmentation. In addition, our results indicate that this incomplete dedifferentiation was initiated by the retraction of muscle fibres. Conclusions Our results show that complete skeletal muscle dedifferentiation is less common than expected in lower vertebrates. In addition, the discovery of incomplete dedifferentiation in muscle fibres of the tadpole tail stresses the importance of coupling histological studies with in vivo cell tracing experiments to better understand the regenerative mechanisms. PMID:22369050

  15. Differentially activated macrophages orchestrate myogenic precursor cell fate during human skeletal muscle regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saclier, Marielle; Yacoub-Youssef, Houda; Mackey, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    , we explored both in vitro and in vivo, in human, the interactions of differentially activated MPs with myogenic precursor cells (MPCs) during adult myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration. We showed in vitro that through the differential secretion of cytokines and growth factors, proinflammatory...... MPs inhibited MPC fusion while anti-inflammatory MPs strongly promoted MPC differentiation by increasing their commitment into differentiated myocytes and the formation of mature myotubes. Furthermore, the in vivo time course of expression of myogenic and MP markers was studied in regenerating human...... healthy muscle after damage. We observed that regenerating areas containing proliferating MPCs were preferentially associated with MPs expressing proinflammatory markers. In the same muscle, regenerating areas containing differentiating myogenin-positive MPCs were preferentially coupled to MPs harboring...

  16. Transcriptional and Chromatin Dynamics of Muscle Regeneration after Severe Trauma

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    Carlos A. Aguilar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Following injury, adult skeletal muscle undergoes a well-coordinated sequence of molecular and physiological events to promote repair and regeneration. However, a thorough understanding of the in vivo epigenomic and transcriptional mechanisms that control these reparative events is lacking. To address this, we monitored the in vivo dynamics of three histone modifications and coding and noncoding RNA expression throughout the regenerative process in a mouse model of traumatic muscle injury. We first illustrate how both coding and noncoding RNAs in tissues and sorted satellite cells are modified and regulated during various stages after trauma. Next, we use chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing to evaluate the chromatin state of cis-regulatory elements (promoters and enhancers and view how these elements evolve and influence various muscle repair and regeneration transcriptional programs. These results provide a comprehensive view of the central factors that regulate muscle regeneration and underscore the multiple levels through which both transcriptional and epigenetic patterns are regulated to enact appropriate repair and regeneration.

  17. Inducing myoblast re-entry into the cell cycle: a potential mechanism for laser-enhanced skeletal muscle regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T.; Fang, Y.; Zhang, C. P.; Chen, P.; Wang, C. Z.; Kang, H. X.; Shen, B. J.; Liang, J.; Fu, X. B.

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) on the cell cycle and proliferative activity of cultured myoblasts, and sought to elucidate the possible cellular mechanism by which LLLI promotes the regeneration of skeletal muscle in vivo. Primary myoblasts isolated from rat hindlegs were irradiated with helium-neon laser light at different energy densities. Distributions of cell-cycle subpopulations and the expression of cell-cycle regulatory proteins in myoblasts were assessed using flow cytometric analysis and western blot assay. It was found that laser irradiation stimulated cell-cycle entry; induced the expression of cyclin A and cyclin D; and increased cell proliferation index and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation as compared to the unirradiated control cells, indicating LLLI augmented the number of proliferative myoblasts in the S phase and G2/M phase of the cell cycle. These results suggest that LLLI at certain fluxes and wavelengths could activate quiescent myoblasts, leading to cell division and facilitating new myofiber formation. This could contribute to the improvement of skeletal muscle regeneration following trauma and myopathic diseases.

  18. Successive Release of Tissue Inhibitors of Metalloproteinase-1 Through Graphene Oxide-Based Delivery System Can Promote Skin Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Cheng; Shi, Dike; Zheng, Yixiong; Nelson, Peter J.; Bao, Qi

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to testify the hypothesis that graphene oxide (GO) could act as an appropriate vehicle for the release of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) protein in the context of skin repair. GO characteristics were observed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and thermal gravimetric analysis. After TIMP-1 absorbing GO, the release profiles of various concentrations of TIMP-1 from GO were compared. GO biocompatibility with fibroblast viability was assessed by measuring cell cycle and apoptosis. In vivo wound healing assays were used to determine the effect of TIMP-1-GO on skin regeneration. The greatest intensity of GO was 1140 nm, and the most intensity volume was 10,674.1 nm (nanometer). TIMP-1 was shown to be continuously released for at least 40 days from GO. The proliferation and viability of rat fibroblasts cultured with TIMP-1-GO were not significantly different as compared with the cells grown in GO or TIMP-1 alone ( p > 0.05). Skin defect of rats treated with TIMP-1 and TIMP-1-GO showed significant differences in histological and immunohistochemical scores ( p regeneration in skin defect.

  19. Absence of genotoxic effects of the chalcone (E)-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-3-(4-methylphenyl)-prop-2-en-1-one) and its potential chemoprevention against DNA damage using in vitro and in vivo assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Débora Cristina da Silva; Vale, Camila Regina do; Véras, Jefferson Hollanda; Bernardes, Aline; Pérez, Caridad Noda; Chen-Chen, Lee

    2017-01-01

    The chalcone (E)-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-3-(4-methylphenyl)-prop-2-en-1-one), or 2HMC, displays antileishmanial, antimalarial, and antioxidant activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, and protective effects of 2HMC using the Ames mutagenicity test, the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test, and the comet assay in mice. In the assessment using the Ames test, 2HMC did not increase the number of His+ revertants in Salmonella typhimurium strains, demonstrating lack of mutagenicity. 2HMC showed no significant increase in micronucleated polychromatic erythrocyte frequency (MNPCE) in the micronucleus test, or in DNA strand breaks using the comet assay, evidencing absence of genotoxicity. Regarding cytotoxicity, 2HMC exhibited moderate cytotoxicity in mouse bone marrow cells by micronucleus test. 2HMC showed antimutagenic action in co-administration with the positive controls, sodium azide (SA) and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO), in the Ames test. Co-administered and mainly pre-administered with cyclophosphamide (CPA), 2HMC caused a decrease in the frequency of MNPCE using the micronucleus test and in DNA strand breaks using the comet assay. Thus, 2HMC exhibited antimutagenic and antigenotoxic effects, displaying a DNA-protective effect against CPA, SA, and 4NQO carcinogens. In conclusion, 2HMC presented antimutagenic, antigenotoxic and moderate cytotoxic effects; therefore it is a promising molecule for cancer prevention.

  20. Nanobiomaterials for neural regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuan Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diseases and disorders associated with nervous system such as injuries by trauma and neurodegeneration are shown to be one of the most serious problems in medicine, requiring innovative strategies to trigger and enhance the nerve regeneration. Tissue engineering aims to provide a highly biomimetic environment by using a combination of cells, materials and suitable biological cues, by which the lost body part may be regenerated or even fully rebuilt. Electrospinning, being able to produce extracellular matrix (ECM-like nanostructures with great flexibility in design and choice of materials, have demonstrated their great potential for fabrication of nerve tissue engineered scaffolds. The review here begins with a brief description of the anatomy of native nervous system, which provides basic knowledge and ideas for the design of nerve tissue scaffolds, followed by five main parts in the design of electrospun nerve tissue engineered scaffolds including materials selection, structural design, in vitro bioreactor, functionalization and cellular support. Performances of biomimetic electrospun nanofibrous nerve implant devices are also reviewed. Finally, future directions for advanced electrospun nerve tissue engineered scaffolds are discussed.

  1. Manipulations to regenerate aspen ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne D. Shepperd

    2001-01-01

    Vegetative regeneration of aspen can be initiated through manipulations that provide hormonal stimulation, proper growth environment, and sucker protection - the three elements of the aspen regeneration triangle. The correct course of action depends upon a careful evaluation of the size, vigor, age, and successional status of the existing clone. Soils and site...

  2. Concentrated growth factor increases Schwann cell proliferation and neurotrophic factor secretion and promotes functional nerve recovery in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jie; Wang, Lin; Sun, Yue; Sun, Xiaolin; Wen, Chaoju; Shahmoradi, Mahdi; Zhou, Yanmin

    2016-02-01

    Concentrated growth factor (CGF) is a newly generated complex that comprises a fibrin matrix incorporating growth factors and plasmatic and leukocyte cytokines. It has been widely used in bone regenerative medicine. However, the effect of CGF on peripheral nerve regeneration had not been previously investigated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possibility of using CGF for nerve regeneration by i) investigating the effect of CGF on the proliferation of Schwann cells (SCs) and secretion of neurotrophic factors nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line‑derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in vitro; and ii) analyzing the effect of CGF on functional nerve recovery after nerve injury in vivo. CGF was prepared from venous blood taken from rats, and using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) we noted that it featured a fiber‑like appearance with pore size ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 µm. The soluble component of CGF was used to produce conditioned media with which to treat the Schwann cell line. A cell counting kit-8 assay and cell cycle analysis were both used to study the proliferative effect of CGF on SCs. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR and western blot analysis demonstrated that there was an increase in the mRNA and protein expression of NGF and GDNF, both of which are markers of SC neurotrophic secretion. A model of sciatic nerve crush injury was established for the in vivo experiment, and CGF was found to increase the sciatic functional index (indicative of nerve function). We noted that CGF increased SC proliferation and secretion of neurotrophic factors in vitro, and promoted functional recovery after peripheral nerve injuries in vivo. These results suggest that CGF is a promising candidate biomaterial for peripheral nerve regeneration, and may potentially be utilized to repair nerve injuries.

  3. Development of a Novel Degradation-Controlled Magnesium-Based Regeneration Membrane for Future Guided Bone Regeneration (GBR Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Jun Lin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop and evaluate the ECO-friendly Mg-5Zn-0.5Zr (ECO505 alloy for application in dental-guided bone regeneration (GBR. The microstructure and surface properties of biomedical Mg materials greatly influence anti-corrosion performance and biocompatibility. Accordingly, for the purpose of microstructure and surface modification, heat treatments and surface coatings were chosen to provide varied functional characteristics. We developed and integrated both an optimized solution heat-treatment condition and surface fluoride coating technique to fabricate a Mg-based regeneration membrane. The heat-treated Mg regeneration membrane (ARRm-H380 and duplex-treated regeneration membrane group (ARRm-H380-F24 h were thoroughly investigated to characterize the mechanical properties, as well as the in vitro corrosion and in vivo degradation behaviors. Significant enhancement in ductility and corrosion resistance for the ARRm-H380 was obtained through the optimized solid-solution heat treatment; meanwhile, the corrosion resistance of ARRm-H380-F24 h showed further improvement, resulting in superior substrate integrity. In addition, the ARRm-H380 provided the proper amount of Mg-ion concentration to accelerate bone growth in the early stage (more than 80% new bone formation. From a specific biomedical application point of view, these research results point out a successful manufacturing route and suggest that the heat treatment and duplex treatment could be employed to offer custom functional regeneration membranes for different clinical patients.

  4. Gene expression following induction of regeneration in Drosophila wing imaginal discs. Expression profile of regenerating wing discs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanco Enrique

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regeneration is the ability of an organism to rebuild a body part that has been damaged or amputated, and can be studied at the molecular level using model organisms. Drosophila imaginal discs, which are the larval primordia of adult cuticular structures, are capable of undergoing regenerative growth after transplantation and in vivo culture into the adult abdomen. Results Using expression profile analyses, we studied the regenerative behaviour of wing discs at 0, 24 and 72 hours after fragmentation and implantation into adult females. Based on expression level, we generated a catalogue of genes with putative role in wing disc regeneration, identifying four classes: 1 genes with differential expression within the first 24 hours; 2 genes with differential expression between 24 and 72 hours; 3 genes that changed significantly in expression levels between the two time periods; 4 genes with a sustained increase or decrease in their expression levels throughout regeneration. Among these genes, we identified members of the JNK and Notch signalling pathways and chromatin regulators. Through computational analysis, we recognized putative binding sites for transcription factors downstream of these pathways that are conserved in multiple Drosophilids, indicating a potential relationship between members of the different gene classes. Experimental data from genetic mutants provide evidence of a requirement of selected genes in wing disc regeneration. Conclusions We have been able to distinguish various classes of genes involved in early and late steps of the regeneration process. Our data suggests the integration of signalling pathways in the promoters of regulated genes.

  5. Coupling between Myogenesis and Angiogenesis during Skeletal Muscle Regeneration Is Stimulated by Restorative Macrophages

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    Claire Latroche

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: In skeletal muscle, new functions for vessels have recently emerged beyond oxygen and nutrient supply, through the interactions that vascular cells establish with muscle stem cells. Here, we demonstrate in human and mouse that endothelial cells (ECs and myogenic progenitor cells (MPCs interacted together to couple myogenesis and angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo during skeletal muscle regeneration. Kinetics of gene expression of ECs and MPCs sorted at different time points of regeneration identified three effectors secreted by both ECs and MPCs. Apelin, Oncostatin M, and Periostin were shown to control myogenesis/angiogenesis coupling in vitro and to be required for myogenesis and vessel formation during muscle regeneration in vivo. Furthermore, restorative macrophages, which have been previously shown to support myogenesis in vivo, were shown in a 3D triculture model to stimulate myogenesis/angiogenesis coupling, notably through Oncostatin M production. Our data demonstrate that restorative macrophages orchestrate muscle regeneration by controlling myogenesis/angiogenesis coupling. : In this study, Chazaud et al. demonstrate that endothelial cells (ECs and myogenic progenitor cells (MPCs interacted to couple myogenesis and angiogenesis during skeletal muscle regeneration. EC- and MPC-derived Apelin, Oncostatin M, and Periostin controlled myogenesis/angiogenesis coupling and were required for myogenesis and vessel formation. They show that, via the production of Oncostatin M, restorative macrophages promoted myogenesis/angiogenesis coupling. Keywords: muscle stem cells, myogenesis, angiogenesis, skeletal muscle regeneration, macrophages

  6. Acoustic field modulation in regenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J. Y.; Wang, W.; Luo, E. C.; Chen, Y. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The regenerator is a key component that transfers energy between heat and work. The conversion efficiency is significantly influenced by the acoustic field in the regenerator. Much effort has been spent to quantitatively determine this influence, but few comprehensive experimental verifications have been performed because of difficulties in modulating and measuring the acoustic field. In this paper, a method requiring two compressors is introduced and theoretically investigated that achieves acoustic field modulation in the regenerator. One compressor outputs the acoustic power for the regenerator; the other acts as a phase shifter. A RC load dissipates the acoustic power out of both the regenerator and the latter compressor. The acoustic field can be modulated by adjusting the current in the two compressors and opening the RC load. The acoustic field is measured with pressure sensors instead of flow-field imaging equipment, thereby greatly simplifying the experiment.

  7. The Basis of Muscle Regeneration

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    Antonio Musarò

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle regeneration recapitulates many aspects of embryonic myogenesis and is an important homeostatic process of the adult skeletal muscle, which, after development, retains the capacity to regenerate in response to appropriate stimuli, activating the muscle compartment of stem cells, namely, satellite cells, as well as other precursor cells. Moreover, significant evidence suggests that while stem cells represent an important determinant for tissue regeneration, a “qualified” environment is necessary to guarantee and achieve functional results. It is therefore plausible that the loss of control over these cell fate decisions could lead to a pathological transdifferentiation, leading to pathologic defects in the regenerative process. This review provides an overview about the general aspects of muscle development and discusses the cellular and molecular aspects that characterize the five interrelated and time-dependent phases of muscle regeneration, namely, degeneration, inflammation, regeneration, remodeling, and maturation/functional repair.

  8. Human treated dentin matrix as a natural scaffold for complete human dentin tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Guo, Weihua; Yang, Bo; Guo, Lijuan; Sheng, Lei; Chen, Gang; Li, Ye; Zou, Qing; Xie, Dan; An, Xiaoxue; Chen, Yali; Tian, Weidong

    2011-07-01

    An essential aspect of tooth tissue engineering is the identification of suitable scaffolding materials to support cell growth and tissue regeneration. Treated dentin matrix (TDM) from a rat has recently been shown to be a suitable scaffold for rat dentin regeneration. However, due to species-specific differences, it remains unclear whether a similar fabrication method can be extended to human TDM and human dentin regeneration. Therefore, this present study explored the biological response to a human TDM (hTDM) created using a modified dentin treatment method. Various biological characteristics, including cell proliferation, cell migration, cell viability, and cytotoxity were investigated. To assess the inductive capacity of hTDM, dental follicle cells (DFCs) were combined with hTDM and were implanted in vivo for 8 weeks in a mouse model. The resulting grafts were studied histologically. The results showed hTDM released dentinogenic factors, indicating that hTDM could play a sustained role in odontogenesis. DFC attachment, growth, viability, and cytotoxicity on the surface of hTDM showed a notable improvement over those on calcium phosphate controls. Most importantly, in vivo hTDM induced and supported regeneration of complete dentin tissues, which expressed dentin markers DSP and DMP-1. As cells in and around the regenerated dentin were positive for human mitochondria, implanted DFCs and hTDM were responsible for the regenerated dentin tissues. In conclusion, hTDM is indicated as an ideal biomaterial for human dentin regeneration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay for Marfey's derivatives of L-Ala, D-Ala, and D-Ala-D-Ala: application to the in vivo confirmation of alanine racemase as the target of cycloserine in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamindar, Darshan; Gutheil, William G

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial cell wall biosynthesis is the target of several antibacterial agents and is also of interest as a target for future antibacterial agent development. Given the now widespread availability of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) instruments, the development of LC-MS/MS assays for cell wall biosynthesis intermediates would fill a needed gap in the analytical methodology available for antibacterial agent discovery and characterization. An LC-MS/MS assay for several early cell wall intermediates-L-Ala, D-Ala, and D-Ala-D-Ala-has been developed. This method relies on derivatization of bacterial extracts with Marfey's reagent. Marfey's reagent adducts of L-Ala and D-Ala were cleanly separated chromatographically, allowing Marfey's adducts of D-Ala and L-Ala to be separated prior to mass spectrometry (MS) detection and quantitation. The Marfey's adduct of D-Ala-D-Ala was also readily detectable using this same approach. This method shows good linearity (R(2)>0.99), with a lower limit of quantitation of 1 pmol. This assay was demonstrated for characterization of the in vivo effect of cycloserine on Escherichia coli. Cycloserine resulted in a dramatic lowering of both D-Ala and D-Ala-D-Ala levels. Ampicillin had little effect on levels of these three metabolites, consistent with the actions of ampicillin on the later stages of cell wall biosynthesis. These observations indicate that cycloserine inhibits alanine racemase production of D-Ala in E. coli and demonstrates the utility of this assay in directly assessing D-Ala branch targeted antibacterial agents.

  10. Bone regeneration in dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonelli, Paolo; Duvina, Marco; Barbato, Luigi; Biondi, Eleonora; Nuti, Niccolò; Brancato, Leila; Rose, Giovanna Delle

    2011-01-01

    Summary The edentulism of the jaws and the periodontal disease represent conditions that frequently leads to disruption of the alveolar bone. The loss of the tooth and of its bone of support lead to the creation of crestal defects or situation of maxillary atrophy. The restoration of a functional condition involves the use of endosseous implants who require adequate bone volume, to deal with the masticatory load. In such situations the bone need to be regenerated, taking advantage of the biological principles of osteogenesis, osteoinduction and osteoconduction. Several techniques combine these principles with different results, due to the condition of the bone base on which we operate changes, the surgical technique that we use, and finally for the bone metabolic conditions of the patient who can be in a state of systemic osteopenia or osteoporosis; these can also affect the result of jaw bone reconstruction. PMID:22461825

  11. Electroporation in the Regenerating Tail of the Xenopus Tadpole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochii, Makoto; Taniguchi, Yuka

    Xenopus laevis is a model system widely used to investigate embryogenesis, metamorphosis, and regeneration. The tail of the Xenopus tadpole is very useful in analyzing the molecular mechanisms underlying appendage regeneration (Slack et al., 2004; Mochii et al., 2007; Slack et al., 2008). It is transparent and suitable for whole-mount observation at the cellular level. The tail regenerates within 2 weeks of amputation. The conventional injection of blastomeres with mRNA, DNA, or antisense oligonucleotides is a powerful tool with which to study genetic mechanisms in early embryos, but it is not effective in late embryos or larvae. A transgenic approach has been used to analyze tail regeneration (Beck et al., 2003, 2006), but its success is largely dependent on the activity of the promoter used. There are limited numbers of promoters available that precisely regulate gene expression spatially and/or temporally. In vivo electroporation is an alternative method that can be used to manipulate gene expression in late embryos and larvae. The introduction of DNA or RNA into the cells of neurula and tailbud embryos has been reported (Eide et al., 2000; Sasagawa et al., 2002; Falk et al., 2007). Targeting larval tissues with in vivo electroporation also has been used to investigate neural networks, metamorphosis, and regeneration (Haas et al., 2001, 2002; Nakajima and Yaoita, 2003; Javaherian and Cline, 2005; Bestman et al., 2006; Boorse et al., 2006; Lin et al., 2007; Mochii et al., 2007). In this chapter, we report a procedure to introduce DNA into the tissues of the tadpole tail.

  12. Animal Models for Cartilage Regeneration and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczodry, Michal; Bruno, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage injury and degeneration are leading causes of disability. Animal studies are critically important to developing effective treatments for cartilage injuries. This review focuses on the use of animal models for the study of the repair and regeneration of focal cartilage defects. Animals commonly used in cartilage repair studies include murine, lapine, canine, caprine, porcine, and equine models. There are advantages and disadvantages to each model. Small animal rodent and lapine models are cost effective, easy to house, and useful for pilot and proof-of-concept studies. The availability of transgenic and knockout mice provide opportunities for mechanistic in vivo study. Athymic mice and rats are additionally useful for evaluating the cartilage repair potential of human cells and tissues. Their small joint size, thin cartilage, and greater potential for intrinsic healing than humans, however, limit the translational value of small animal models. Large animal models with thicker articular cartilage permit study of both partial thickness and full thickness chondral repair, as well as osteochondral repair. Joint size and cartilage thickness for canine, caprine, and mini-pig models remain significantly smaller than that of humans. The repair and regeneration of chondral and osteochondral defects of size and volume comparable to that of clinically significant human lesions can be reliably studied primarily in equine models. While larger animals may more closely approximate the human clinical situation, they carry greater logistical, financial, and ethical considerations. A multifactorial analysis of each animal model should be carried out when planning in vivo studies. Ultimately, the scientific goals of the study will be critical in determining the appropriate animal model. PMID:19831641

  13. Infiltration of plasma rich in growth factors enhances in vivo angiogenesis and improves reperfusion and tissue remodeling after severe hind limb ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitua, Eduardo; Pelacho, Beatriz; Prado, Roberto; Aguirre, José Javier; Sánchez, Mikel; Padilla, Sabino; Aranguren, Xabier L; Abizanda, Gloria; Collantes, María; Hernandez, Milagros; Perez-Ruiz, Ana; Peñuelas, Ivan; Orive, Gorka; Prosper, Felipe

    2015-03-28

    PRGF is a platelet concentrate within a plasma suspension that forms an in situ-generated fibrin-matrix delivery system, releasing multiple growth factors and other bioactive molecules that play key roles in tissue regeneration. This study was aimed at exploring the angiogenic and myogenic effects of PRGF on in vitro endothelial cells (HUVEC) and skeletal myoblasts (hSkMb) as well as on in vivo mouse subcutaneously implanted matrigel and on limb muscles after a severe ischemia. Human PRGF was prepared and characterized. Both proliferative and anti-apoptotic responses to PRGF were assessed in vitro in HUVEC and hSkMb. In vivo murine matrigel plug assay was conducted to determine the angiogenic capacity of PRGF, whereas in vivo ischemic hind limb model was carried out to demonstrate PRGF-driven vascular and myogenic regeneration. Primary HUVEC and hSkMb incubated with PRGF showed a dose dependent proliferative and anti-apoptotic effect and the PRGF matrigel plugs triggered an early and significant sustained angiogenesis compared with the control group. Moreover, mice treated with PRGF intramuscular infiltrations displayed a substantial reperfusion enhancement at day 28 associated with a fibrotic tissue reduction. These findings suggest that PRGF-induced angiogenesis is functionally effective at expanding the perfusion capacity of the new vasculature and attenuating the endogenous tissue fibrosis after a severe-induced skeletal muscle ischemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. In vitro and in vivo bioluminescent quantification of viable stem cells in engineered constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logeart-Avramoglou, Delphine; Oudina, Karim; Bourguignon, Marianne; Delpierre, Laetitia; Nicola, Marie-Anne; Bensidhoum, Morad; Arnaud, Eric; Petite, Herve

    2010-06-01

    Bioluminescent quantification of viable cells inside three-dimensional porous scaffolds was performed in vitro and in vivo. The assay quantified the bioluminescence of murine stem (C3H10T1/2) cells tagged with the luciferase gene reporter and distributed inside scaffolds of either soft, translucent, AN69 polymeric hydrogel or hard, opaque, coral ceramic materials. Quantitative evaluation of bioluminescence emitted from tagged cells adhering to these scaffolds was performed in situ using either cell lysates and a luminometer or intact cells and a bioluminescence imaging system. Despite attenuation of the signal when compared to cells alone, the bioluminescence correlated with the number of cells (up to 1.5 x 10(5)) present on each material scaffold tested, both in vitro and noninvasively in vivo (subcutaneous implants in the mouse model). The noninvasive bioluminescence measurement technique proved to be comparable to the cell-destructive bioluminescence measurement technique. Monitoring the kinetics of luciferase expression via bioluminescence enabled real-time assessment of cell survival and proliferation on the scaffolds tested over prolonged (up to 59 days) periods of time. This novel, sensitive, easy, fast-to-implement, quantitative bioluminescence assay has great, though untapped, potential for screening and determining noninvasively the presence of viable cells on biomaterial constructs in the tissue engineering and tissue regeneration fields.

  15. Regeneration of the radial nerve cord in the sea cucumber Holothuria glaberrima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Arrarás José E

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regeneration of neurons and fibers in the mammalian spinal cord has not been plausible, even though extensive studies have been made to understand the restrictive factors involved. New experimental models and strategies are necessary to determine how new nerve cells are generated and how fibers regrow and connect with their targets in adult animals. Non-vertebrate deuterostomes might provide some answers to these questions. Echinoderms, with their amazing regenerative capacities could serve as model systems; however, very few studies have been done to study the regeneration of their nervous system. Results We have studied nerve cord regeneration in the echinoderm Holothuria glaberrima. These are sea cucumbers or holothurians members of the class Holothuroidea. One radial nerve cord, part of the echinoderm CNS, was completely transected using a scalpel blade. Animals were allowed to heal for up to four weeks (2, 6, 12, 20, and 28 days post-injury before sacrificed. Tissues were sectioned in a cryostat and changes in the radial nerve cord were analyzed using classical dyes and immmuohistochemistry. In addition, the temporal and spatial distribution of cell proliferation and apoptosis was assayed using BrdU incorporation and the TUNEL assay, respectively. We found that H. glaberrima can regenerate its radial nerve cord within a month following transection. The regenerated cord looks amazingly similar in overall morphology and cellular composition to the uninjured cord. The cellular events associated to radial cord regeneration include: (1 outgrowth of nerve fibers from the injured radial cord stumps, (2 intense cellular division in the cord stumps and in the regenerating radial nerve cords, (3 high levels of apoptosis in the RNC adjacent to the injury and within the regenerating cord and (4 an increase in the number of spherule-containing cells. These events are similar to those that occur in other body wall tissues during wound

  16. Comet assay on mice testicular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anoop Kumar

    2015-01-01

    for germ cell mutagens (Speit et al., 2009). The in vivo Comet assay is considered a useful tool for investigating germ cell genotoxicity. In the present study DNA strand breaks in testicular cells of mice were investigated. Different classes of chemicals were tested in order to evaluate the sensitivity...... of the comet assay in testicular cells. The chemicals included environmentally relevant substances such as Bisphenol A, PFOS and Tetrabrombisphenol A. Statistical power calculations will be presented to aid in the design of future Comet assay studies on testicular cells. Power curves were provided...... with different fold changes in % tail DNA, different number of cells scored and different number of gels (Hansen et al., 2014). An example is shown in Figure 1. A high throughput version of the Comet assay was used. Samples were scored with a fully automatic comet assay scoring system that provided faster...

  17. Comparison of Callus induction and plant regeneration

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sang-Hoon Lee

    2012-02-21

    Feb 21, 2012 ... regeneration frequency from transgenic callus, but also useful for molecular breeding of tall fescue through ... Plant regeneration. The plant regeneration culture medium (Lee et al., 2007) was used to regenerate plants from the mature seed-derived calluses. It was ..... bioassays with tobacco tissue cultures.

  18. Development, regeneration, and evolution of feathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Feng; Foley, John; Tang, Pin-Chi; Li, Ang; Jiang, Ting Xin; Wu, Ping; Widelitz, Randall B; Chuong, Cheng Ming

    2015-01-01

    The feather is a complex ectodermal organ with hierarchical branching patterns. It provides functions in endothermy, communication, and flight. Studies of feather growth, cycling, and health are of fundamental importance to avian biology and poultry science. In addition, feathers are an excellent model for morphogenesis studies because of their accessibility, and their distinct patterns can be used to assay the roles of specific molecular pathways. Here we review the progress in aspects of development, regeneration, and evolution during the past three decades. We cover the development of feather buds in chicken embryos, regenerative cycling of feather follicle stem cells, formation of barb branching patterns, emergence of intrafeather pigmentation patterns, interplay of hormones and feather growth, and the genetic identification of several feather variants. The discovery of feathered dinosaurs redefines the relationship between feathers and birds. Inspiration from biomaterials and flight research further fuels biomimetic potential of feathers as a multidisciplinary research focal point.

  19. Neuronal RARβ Signaling Modulates PTEN Activity Directly in Neurons and via Exosome Transfer in Astrocytes to Prevent Glial Scar Formation and Induce Spinal Cord Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Maria B; Malmqvist, Tony; Clarke, Earl; Hubens, Chantal J; Grist, John; Hobbs, Carl; Trigo, Diogo; Risling, Mårten; Angeria, Maria; Damberg, Peter; Carlstedt, Thomas P; Corcoran, Jonathan P T

    2015-11-25

    Failure of axonal regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is mainly attributed to a lack of intrinsic neuronal growth programs and an inhibitory environment from a glial scar. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a major negative regulator of neuronal regeneration and, as such, inhibiting its activity has been considered a therapeutic target for spinal cord (SC) injuries (SCIs). Using a novel model of rat cervical avulsion, we show that treatment with a retinoic acid receptor β (RARβ) agonist results in locomotor and sensory recovery. Axonal regeneration from the severed roots into the SC could be seen by biotinylated dextran amine labeling. Light micrographs of the dorsal root entry zone show the peripheral nervous system (PNS)-CNS transition of regrown axons. RARβ agonist treatment also resulted in the absence of scar formation. Mechanism studies revealed that, in RARβ-agonist-treated neurons, PTEN activity is decreased by cytoplasmic phosphorylation and increased secretion in exosomes. These are taken up by astrocytes, resulting in hampered proliferation and causing them to arrange in a normal-appearing scaffold around the regenerating axons. Attribution of the glial modulation to neuronal PTEN in exosomes was demonstrated by the use of an exosome inhibitor in vivo and PTEN siRNA in vitro assays. The dual effect of RARβ signaling, both neuronal and neuronal-glial, results in axonal regeneration into the SC after dorsal root neurotmesis. Targeting this pathway may open new avenues for the treatment of SCIs. Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) often result in permanent damage in the adult due to the very limited capacity of axonal regeneration. Intrinsic neuronal programs and the formation of a glial scar are the main obstacles. Here, we identify a single target, neuronal retinoic acid receptor β (RARβ), which modulates these two aspects of the postinjury physiological response. Activation of RARβ in the neuron inactivates phosphatase and tensin

  20. An active magnetic regenerator device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    A rotating active magnetic regenerator (AMR) device comprising two or more regenerator beds, a magnet arrangement and a valve arrangement. The valve arrangement comprises a plurality of valve elements arranged substantially immovably with respect to the regenerator beds along a rotational direction....... A cam surface is arranged substantially immovably with respect to the magnet arrangement along the rotational direction, and comprises a plurality of cam elements arranged to cooperate with the valve elements in order to control opening degrees of the valve elements, in accordance with a relative...... position of the cam elements and the valve elements. Thereby the opening degree of each valve element is controlled in accordance with a relative angular position of the regenerator beds and the magnet arrangement....

  1. DECOLORIZATION AND CHEMICAL REGENERATION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    2006-09-26

    Received September 26, 2006; revised September 22, 2008). ABSTRACT. Citric acid fermentation (CAF) liquor decolorization by granular activated carbon (GAC) was studied and an improved chemical regeneration method of the exhausted ...

  2. Regenerable Contaminant Removal System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Regenerable Contaminant Removal System (RCRS) is an innovative method to remove sulfur and halide compounds from contaminated gas streams to part-per-billion...

  3. DECOLORIZATION AND CHEMICAL REGENERATION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GAC) was studied and an improved chemical regeneration method of the exhausted GAC by the color of CAF liquor was investigated. The effects of the GAC dosage, time and temperature on the decoloring efficiency (DE %) were studied.

  4. Engineering membranes for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caridade, Sofia Glória Ferreira; Mano, João Filipe Colardelle da Luz

    2017-09-13

    This review is focused on the use of membranes for the specific application of bone regeneration. The first section focuses on the relevance of membranes in this context and what are the specifications that they should possess in order to improve the regeneration of bone. Afterwards, several techniques to engineer bone membranes by using "bulk"-like methods are discussed where different parameters to induce bone formation are disclosed in a way to have desirable structural and functional properties. Subsequently, the production of nanostructured membranes using a bottom-up approach are discussed by highlighting the main advances in the field of bone regeneration. Primordial importance is given to the promotion of osteoconductive and osteoinductive capability during the membrane design. Whenever possible the films prepared using different techniques are compared in terms of handability, bone guiding ability, osteoinductivity, adequate mechanical properties or biodegradability. A last chapter contemplates membranes only composed by cells, disclosing their potential to regenerate bone.

  5. CD133 does not enrich for the stem cell activity in vivo in adult mouse prostates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Wei

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available CD133 is widely used as a marker for stem/progenitor cells in many organ systems. Previous studies using in vitro stem cell assays have suggested that the CD133-expressing prostate basal cells may serve as the putative prostate stem cells. However, the precise localization of the CD133-expressing cells and their contributions to adult murine prostate homeostasis in vivo remain undetermined. We show that loss of function of CD133 does not impair murine prostate morphogenesis, homeostasis and regeneration, implying a dispensable role for CD133 in prostate stem cell function. Using a CD133-CreERT2 model in conjunction with a fluorescent report line, we show that CD133 is not only expressed in a fraction of prostate basal cells, but also in some luminal cells and stromal cells. CD133+ basal cells possess higher in vitro sphere-forming activities than CD133− basal cells. However, the in vivo lineage tracing study reveals that the two cell populations possess the same regenerative capacity and contribute equally to the maintenance of the basal cell lineage. Similarly, CD133+ and CD133− luminal cells are functionally equivalent in maintaining the luminal cell lineage. Collectively, our study demonstrates that CD133 does not enrich for the stem cell activity in vivo in adult murine prostate. This study does not contradict previous reports showing CD133+ cells as prostate stem cells in vitro. Instead, it highlights a substantial impact of biological contexts on cellular behaviors.

  6. Approaches towards endogenous pancreatic regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Meenal; Kanitkar, Meghana; Bhonde, Ramesh R

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenon of pancreatic regeneration in mammals has been well documented. It has been shown that pancreatic tissue is able to regenerate in several species of mammal after surgical insult. This tissue is also known to have the potential to maintain or increase its beta-cell mass in response to metabolic demands during pregnancy and obesity. Since deficiency in beta-cell mass is the hallmark of most forms of diabetes, it is worthwhile understanding pancreatic regeneration in the context of this disease. With this view in mind, this article aims to discuss the potential use in clinical strategies of knowledge that we obtained from studies carried out in animal models of diabetes. Approaches to achieve this goal involve the use of biomolecules, adult stem cells and gene therapy. Various molecules, such as glucagon-like peptide-1, beta-cellulin, nicotinamide, gastrin, epidermal growth factor-1 and thyroid hormone, play major roles in the initiation of endogenous islet regeneration in diabetes. The most accepted hypothesis is that these molecules stimulate islet precursor cells to undergo neogenesis or to induce replication of existing beta-cells, emphasizing the importance of pancreas-resident stem/progenitor cells in islet regeneration. Moreover, the potential of adult stem cell population from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, liver, spleen, or amniotic membrane, is also discussed with regard to their potential to induce pancreatic regeneration.

  7. Ginsenoside Re Promotes Nerve Regeneration by Facilitating the Proliferation, Differentiation and Migration of Schwann Cells via the ERK- and JNK-Dependent Pathway in Rat Model of Sciatic Nerve Crush Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yuan, Damin; Zhang, Dongmei; Zhang, Weidong; Liu, Chun; Cheng, Hongbing; Song, Yan; Tan, Qian

    2015-08-01

    Exploring effective drugs that are capable of promoting nerve regeneration has gained much attention. Ginsenoside Re (Re) is the main ingredient of ginseng berries and roots. Research in the area has shown that ginsenoside Re exhibits multiple pharmacological activities via different mechanisms both in vivo and in vitro. But the potential therapeutic effects of Re on sciatic nerve crush injury (SNC) have been little investigated. Herein, we investigated the protect effect of Re on peripheral nerve regeneration in a rat SNC model. Walking track analysis revealed that Re treatment significantly promoted functional recovery of crushed sciatic nerve in rats. The expression of PCNA in rat sciatic nerve was up-regulated by Re treatment, and peaked when the concentration of Re was 2.0 mg/kg. Using immunofluorescent staining, we found that Re greatly increased the expression of GAP-43 and S100 in injured rat sciatic nerve. Furthermore, we evaluated the effects of Re on proliferation, differentiation, and migration of Schwann cells in SNC rat models. Our studies reveal that Re promotes nerve regeneration is depend on ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 signaling pathway. Elevated Oct-6 expression and featured morphological changes indicated that Re facilitated the differentiation of Schwann cells following SNC. Also, transwell and wound-healing assay demonstrated that the migration capabilities of Schwann cell were significantly enhanced after Re treatment.

  8. Regenerable biocide delivery unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Richard L. (Inventor); Colombo, Gerald V. (Inventor); Jolly, Clifford D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for maintaining continuous, long-term microbial control in the water supply for potable, hygiene, and experimental water for space activities, as well as treatment of water supplies on Earth. The water purification is accomplished by introduction of molecular iodine into the water supply to impart a desired iodine residual. The water is passed through an iodinated anion exchange resin bed. The iodine is bound as I-(sub n) at the anion exchange sites and releases I(sub 2) into the water stream flowing through the bed. The concentration of I(sub 2) in the flowing water gradually decreases and, in the prior art, the ion-exchange bed has had to be replaced. In a preferred embodiment, a bed of iodine crystals is provided with connections for flowing water therethrough to produce a concentrated (substantially saturated) aqueous iodine solution which is passed through the iodinated resin bed to recharge the bed with bound iodine. The bed of iodine crystals is connected in parallel with the iodinated resin bed and is activated periodically (e.g., by timer, by measured flow of water, or by iodine residual level) to recharge the bed. Novelty resides in the capability of inexpensively and repeatedly regenerating the ion-exchange bed in situ.

  9. Standardisation of sheep model for endodontic regeneration/revitalisation research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaii, Milad; Broberg, Marita; Cathro, Peter; Richards, Lindsay

    2016-05-01

    Different endodontic regeneration/revitalisation protocols have been suggested for the treatment of immature permanent teeth with pulp necrosis. Many aspects of these protocols require further investigating necessitating a suitable standardised animal model for research purposes. The focus of this study was to examine the anatomy and histology of sheep teeth at different stages of development to find an appropriate dental age for endodontic regeneration/revitalisation research. Sheep teeth at mature and immature dental ages were investigated. Standardized radiography, computed tomography, and histology were used to measure root length, apical-third dentine thickness and apex diameter, and to evaluate tissue development stages. A mature sheep tooth has an apical area which consists of a major foramen, intermediate dilatation and minor foramen. From the time of eruption to maturation no major changes occur in the incisor root lengths, but the apical foramen width decreases and the dentinal wall thickness increases. The two-tooth age exhibited the most similar features to that of an immature permanent human tooth. Sheep appears to be an appropriate animal model for endodontic regeneration/revitalization research with similar dimension and characteristics to human anterior teeth. Each dental age has its advantages and disadvantages. The two-tooth age showed the most favourable criteria making this age the most suitable for in vivo regeneration/revitalisation research. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. P21 deficiency delays regeneration of skeletal muscular tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuaki Chinzei

    Full Text Available The potential relationship between cell cycle checkpoint control and tissue regeneration has been indicated. Despite considerable research being focused on the relationship between p21 and myogenesis, p21 function in skeletal muscle regeneration remains unclear. To clarify this, muscle injury model was recreated by intramuscular injection of bupivacaine hydrochloride in the soleus of p21 knockout (KO mice and wild type (WT mice. The mice were sacrificed at 3, 14, and 28 days post-operation. The results of hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunofluorescence of muscle membrane indicated that muscle regeneration was delayed in p21 KO mice. Cyclin D1 mRNA expression and both Ki-67 and PCNA immunohistochemistry suggested that p21 deficiency increased cell cycle and muscle cell proliferation. F4/80 immunohistochemistry also suggested the increase of immune response in p21 KO mice. On the other hand, both the mRNA expression and western blot analysis of MyoD, myogenin, and Pax7 indicated that muscular differentiation was delayed in p21KO mice. Considering these results, we confirmed that muscle injury causes an increase in cell proliferation. However, muscle differentiation in p21 KO mice was inhibited due to the low expression of muscular synthesis genes, leading to a delay in the muscular regeneration. Thus, we conclude that p21 plays an important role in the in vivo healing process in muscular injury.

  11. Antioxidants and the Comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cemeli, Eduardo; Baumgartner, Adolf; Anderson, Diana

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted that antioxidants, either endogenous or from the diet, play a key role in preserving health. They are able to quench radical species generated in situations of oxidative stress, either triggered by pathologies or xenobiotics, and they protect the integrity of DNA from genotoxicants. Nevertheless, there are still many compounds with unclear or unidentified prooxidant/antioxidant activities. This is of concern since there is an increase in the number of compounds synthesized or extracted from vegetables to which humans might be exposed. Despite the well-established protective effects of fruit and vegetables, the antioxidant(s) responsible have not all been clearly identified. There might also be alternative mechanisms contributing to the protective effects for which a comprehensive description is lacking. In the last two decades, the Comet assay has been extensively used for the investigation of the effects of antioxidants and many reports can be found in the literature. The Comet assay, a relatively fast, simple, and sensitive technique for the analysis of DNA damage in all cell types, has been applied for the screening of chemicals, biomonitoring and intervention studies. In the present review, several of the most well-known antioxidants are considered. These include: catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, selenium, iron chelators, melatonin, melanin, vitamins (A, B, C and E), carotenes, flavonoids, isoflavones, tea polyphenols, wine polyphenols and synthetic antioxidants. Investigations showing beneficial as well as non-beneficial properties of the antioxidants selected, either at the in vitro, ex vivo or in vivo level are discussed.

  12. Demineralized Freeze-Dried Bovine Cortical Bone: Its Potential for Guided Bone Regeneration Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Kamadjaja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bovine pericardium collagen membrane (BPCM had been widely used in guided bone regeneration (GBR whose manufacturing process usually required chemical cross-linking to prolong its biodegradation. However, cross-linking of collagen fibrils was associated with poorer tissue integration and delayed vascular invasion. Objective. This study evaluated the potential of bovine cortical bone collagen membrane for GBR by evaluating its antigenicity potential, cytotoxicity, immune and tissue response, and biodegradation behaviors. Material and Methods. Antigenicity potential of demineralized freeze-dried bovine cortical bone membrane (DFDBCBM was done with histology-based anticellularity evaluation, while cytotoxicity was analyzed using MTT Assay. Evaluation of immune response, tissue response, and biodegradation was done by randomly implanting DFDBCBM and BPCM in rat’s subcutaneous dorsum. Samples were collected at 2, 5, and 7 days and 7, 14, 21, and 28 days for biocompatibility and tissue response-biodegradation study, respectively. Result. DFDBCBM, histologically, showed no retained cells; however, it showed some level of in vitro cytotoxicity. In vivo study exhibited increased immune response to DFDBCBM in early healing phase; however, normal tissue response and degradation rate were observed up to 4 weeks after DFDBCBM implantation. Conclusion. Demineralized freeze-dried bovine cortical bone membrane showed potential for clinical application; however, it needs to be optimized in its biocompatibility to fulfill all requirements for GBR membrane.

  13. Double emulsion electrospun nanofibers as a growth factor delivery vehicle for salivary gland regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foraida, Zahraa I.; Sharikova, Anna; Peerzada, Lubna N.; Khmaladze, Alexander; Larsen, Melinda; Castracane, James

    2017-08-01

    Sustained delivery of growth factors, proteins, drugs and other biologically active molecules is necessary for tissue engineering applications. Electrospun fibers are attractive tissue engineering scaffolds as they partially mimic the topography of the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, they do not provide continuous nourishment to the tissue. In search of a biomimetic scaffold for salivary gland tissue regeneration, we previously developed a blend nanofiber scaffold composed of the protein elastin and the synthetic polymer polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA). The nanofiber scaffold promoted in vivo-like salivary epithelial cell tissue organization and apicobasal polarization. However, in order to enhance the salivary cell proliferation and biomimetic character of the scaffold, sustained growth factor delivery is needed. The composite nanofiber scaffold was optimized to act as a growth factor delivery system using epidermal growth factor (EGF) as a model protein. The nanofiber/EGF hybrid nanofibers were synthesized by double emulsion electrospinning where EGF is emulsified within a water/oil/water (w/o/w) double emulsion system. Successful incorporation of EGF was confirmed using Raman spectroscopy. EGF release profile was characterized using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELIZA) of the EGF content. Double emulsion electrospinning resulted in slower release of EGF. We demonstrated the potential of the proposed double emulsion electrospun nanofiber scaffold for the delivery of growth factors and/or drugs for tissue engineering and pharmaceutical applications.

  14. Ex vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Kant M; Lopes-Calcas, Ana; Honke, Michael L; O'Brien-Moran, Zoe; Buist, Richard; West, Michael; Martin, Melanie

    2017-07-01

    To advance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies further for in vivo tissue characterization with histopathologic validation, we investigated the feasibility of ex vivo tissue imaging of a surgically removed human brain tumor as a comprehensive approach for radiology-pathology correlation in histoanatomically identical fashion in a rare case of pigmented ganglioglioma with complex paramagnetic properties. Pieces of surgically removed ganglioglioma, containing melanin and hemosiderin pigments, were imaged with a small bore 7-T MRI scanner to obtain T1-, T2-, and T2*-weighted image and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Corresponding histopathological slides were prepared for routine hematoxylin and eosin stain and special stains for melanin and iron/hemosiderin to correlate with MRI signal characteristics. Furthermore, mean diffusivity (MD) maps were generated from DTI data and correlated with cellularity using image analysis. While the presence of melanin was difficult to interpret in in vivo MRI with certainty due to concomitant hemosiderin pigments and calcium depositions, ex vivo tissue imaging clearly demonstrated pieces of tissue exhibiting the characteristic MR signal pattern for melanin with pathologic confirmation in a histoanatomically identical location. There was also concordant correlation between MD and cellularity. Although it is still in an initial phase of development, ex vivo tissue imaging is a promising approach, which offers radiology-pathology correlation in a straightforward and comprehensive manner.

  15. Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A New Therapeutic Option for Tooth Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuanwei; Yu, Yongchun; Chen, Lin; Ye, Lanfeng; Cui, Junhui; Sun, Quan; Li, Kaide; Li, Zhiyong; Liu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Tooth regeneration is considered to be an optimistic approach to replace current treatments for tooth loss. It is important to determine the most suitable seed cells for tooth regeneration. Recently, human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) have been regarded as a promising candidate for tissue regeneration. However, it has not been reported whether hUCMSCs can be employed in tooth regeneration. Here, we report that hUCMSCs can be induced into odontoblast-like cells in vitro and in vivo. Induced hUCMSCs expressed dentin-related proteins including dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1), and their gene expression levels were similar to those in native pulp tissue cells. Moreover, DSP- and DMP-1-positive calcifications were observed after implantation of hUCMSCs in vivo. These findings reveal that hUCMSCs have an odontogenic differentiation potency to differentiate to odontoblast-like cells with characteristic deposition of dentin-like matrix in vivo. This study clearly demonstrates hUCMSCs as an alternative therapeutic cell source for tooth regeneration.

  16. Stem cell proliferation patterns as an alternative for in vivo prediction and discrimination of carcinogenic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, An-Sofie; Willems, Maxime; Plusquin, Michelle; Ploem, Jan-Pieter; Winckelmans, Ellen; Artois, Tom; Smeets, Karen

    2017-05-03

    One of the major challenges in the development of alternative carcinogenicity assays is the prediction of non-genotoxic carcinogens. The variety of non-genotoxic cancer pathways complicates the search for reliable parameters expressing their carcinogenicity. As non-genotoxic and genotoxic carcinogens have different cancer risks, the objective of this study was to develop a concept for an in vivo test, based on flatworm stem cell dynamics, to detect and classify carcinogenic compounds. Our methodology entails an exposure to carcinogenic compounds during the animal's regeneration process, which revealed differences in proliferative responses between non-genotoxic and genotoxic carcinogens during the initial stages of the regeneration process. A proof of concept was obtained after an extensive study of proliferation dynamics of a genotoxic and a non-genotoxic compound. A pilot validation with a limited set of compounds showed that the proposed concept not only enabled a simple prediction of genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens, but also had the power to discriminate between both. We further optimized this discrimination by combining stem cell proliferation responses with a phenotypic screening and by using specific knockdowns. In the future, more compounds will be tested to further validate and prove this concept.

  17. Recent advances in 3D bioprinting for the regeneration of functional cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiongfa, Ji; Hao, Zhu; Liming, Zhao; Jun, Xiao

    2018-01-19

    The field of regeneration for functional cartilage has progressed tremendously. Conventional approaches for regenerating the damaged tissue based on integrated manufacturing are limited by their inability to produce precise and customized biomimetic tissues. On the other hand, 3D bioprinting is a promising technique with increased versatility because it can co-deliver cells and biomaterials with proper compositions and spatial distributions. In the present article, we review recent progress in the complete 3D printing process involved in functional cartilage regeneration, including printing techniques, biomaterials and cells. We also discuss the combination of 3D in vivo hybrid bioprinting with spheroids, gene delivery strategies and zonal cartilage design as a future direction of cartilage regeneration research.

  18. Stereotactic injection of shrna GSK-3β-AAV promotes axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yu-Chao; Xiong, Nan-Xiang; Zhao, Hong-Yang

    2016-08-01

    Evidence suggested that glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) is involved in Nogo-66 inhibiting axonal regeneration in vitro, but its effect in vivo was poorly understood. We showed that stereotactic injection of shRNA GSK-3β-adeno associated virus (GSK-3β-AAV) diminished syringomyelia and promoted axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI), using stereotactic injection of shRNA GSK-3β-AAV (tested with Western blotting and RT-PCR) into the sensorimotor cortex of rats with SCI and by the detection of biotin dextran amine (BDA)-labeled axonal regeneration. We also determined the right position to inject into the sensorimotor cortex. Our findings consolidate the hypothesis that downregulation of GSK-3β promotes axonal regeneration after SCI.

  19. Morphogenetic changes occurring in the regenerating newt tail under changed gravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radugina, Elena A.; Grigoryan, Eleonora N.; Dvorochkin, Natasha; Almeida, Eduardo

    2012-07-01

    It is widely accepted that gravity greatly affects animal physiology, development, and alters gene expression. Recently it became apparent that it can also affect tissue morphogenesis. In our work, we developed special laboratory conditions that allow us to produce the gravity-dependent alterations in tail regenerates of the newt Pleurodeles waltl. We examined the dynamic morphogenetic changes during 50-day tail regeneration using computer morphometric analysis. Changes that we observed under these conditions were comparable with those found earlier in our spaceflight experiments. The newts kept in aquarium deep water (low g) after 1/3 tail amputation developed normal lanceolate regenerates. In contrast, the animals that stayed on the moist mat (1g) developed tail regenerates curved ventrally, with tips almost touching the mat. The similar results were obtained with a 12-day centrifugation at 2g. The study of the regenerate morphology in low g, 1g, and 2g animal groups allowed us to determine the stage at which the morphological changes in regenerates become apparent, and to detect the main morphological events associated with the development of tail curve, such as bending of ependymal tube and reorientation of the forming cartilage. We describe cellular processes foregoing observed tissue morphogenetic changes, such as cell migration, condensation in cell population, and unequal proliferation in different areas of epidermis and blastema. Cell proliferation in epidermis and blastema of tails regenerated under the conditions of different gravitational load was evaluated by BrdU assay. In 1g newts, cell proliferation increased within the dorso-apical region of the regenerates compared with that in low g group. These results provide us with a valuable insight into the regenerative tissue homostasis that involves cell division, cell death, and migration in the newt regenerating tail. In addition, these findings could provide us with better understanding of the

  20. In situ regeneration of bioactive coatings enabled by an evolved Staphylococcus aureus sortase A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Hyun Ok; Qu, Zheng; Haller, Carolyn A.; Dorr, Brent M.; Dai, Erbin; Kim, Wookhyun; Liu, David R.; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2016-04-01

    Surface immobilization of bioactive molecules is a central paradigm in the design of implantable devices and biosensors with improved clinical performance capabilities. However, in vivo degradation or denaturation of surface constituents often limits the long-term performance of bioactive films. Here we demonstrate the capacity to repeatedly regenerate a covalently immobilized monomolecular thin film of bioactive molecules through a two-step stripping and recharging cycle. Reversible transpeptidation by a laboratory evolved Staphylococcus aureus sortase A (eSrtA) enabled the rapid immobilization of an anti-thrombogenic film in the presence of whole blood and permitted multiple cycles of film regeneration in vitro that preserved its biological activity. Moreover, eSrtA transpeptidation facilitated surface re-engineering of medical devices in situ after in vivo implantation through removal and restoration film constituents. These studies establish a rapid, orthogonal and reversible biochemical scheme to regenerate selective molecular constituents with the potential to extend the lifetime of bioactive films.

  1. Analysis of the in vitro degradation and the in vivo tissue response to bi-layered 3D-printed scaffolds combining PLA and biphasic PLA/bioglass components – Guidance of the inflammatory response as basis for osteochondral regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Barbeck

    2017-12-01

    Altogether, the results showed that the addition of G5 enables to reduce scaffold weight loss and to increase mechanical strength. Furthermore, the addition of G5 lead to a higher vascularization of the implant bed required as basis for bone tissue regeneration mediated by higher numbers of BMGCs, while within the PLA parts a significantly lower vascularization was found optimally for chondral regeneration. Thus, this data show that the analyzed bi-layered scaffold may serve as an ideal basis for the regeneration of osteochondral tissue defects. Additionally, the results show that it might be able to reduce the number of experimental animals required as it may be possible to analyze the tissue response to more than one implant in one experimental animal.

  2. Electric fish: new insights into conserved processes of adult tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unguez, Graciela A

    2013-07-01

    Biology is replete with examples of regeneration, the process that allows animals to replace or repair cells, tissues and organs. As on land, vertebrates in aquatic environments experience the occurrence of injury with varying frequency and to different degrees. Studies demonstrate that ray-finned fishes possess a very high capacity to regenerate different tissues and organs when they are adults. Among fishes that exhibit robust regenerative capacities are the neotropical electric fishes of South America (Teleostei: Gymnotiformes). Specifically, adult gymnotiform electric fishes can regenerate injured brain and spinal cord tissues and restore amputated body parts repeatedly. We have begun to identify some aspects of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of tail regeneration in the weakly electric fish Sternopygus macrurus (long-tailed knifefish) with a focus on regeneration of skeletal muscle and the muscle-derived electric organ. Application of in vivo microinjection techniques and generation of myogenic stem cell markers are beginning to overcome some of the challenges owing to the limitations of working with non-genetic animal models with extensive regenerative capacity. This review highlights some aspects of tail regeneration in S. macrurus and discusses the advantages of using gymnotiform electric fishes to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that produce new cells during regeneration in adult vertebrates.

  3. Studies on plant regeneration and somaclonal variation in Saintpaulia ionantha Wendl. (African violet).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, Norhayati; Taha, Rosna Mat; Hasbullah, Nor Azlina

    2008-05-01

    Efficient plant regeneration of Saintpaulia ionantha (African violet) has been obtained in the present study. MS medium supplemented with 1.0 mg L(-1) IAA and 2.0 mg L(-1) Zeatin resulted in 100% shoot regeneration and induced the highest number of shoots (average 15.0 +/- 0.8 shoots per explant) after being cultured for 8 weeks. The above hormone combination was optimum for shoot regeneration. Most of Saintpaulia ionantha plantlets derived from tissue culture system could be hardened and transferred to the greenhouse conditions with 84.0 +/- 1.6% success rate. However, regenerated plantlets of Saintpaulia ionantha (even after 12-months-old) failed to flower. Morphological characters of regenerated plantlets of Saintpaulia ionantha were observed and compared with in vivo (intact) plants. Regenerated plantlets showed some differences in morphological characters, such as height and leaf size, texture and colour, but the plantlets showed no variation in leaf arrangement and leaf margin. However, the morphological characters of the regenerated plantlets were found to be unstable.

  4. Fibroblast Growth Factors: Biology, Function, and Application for Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye-Rang Yun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs that signal through FGF receptors (FGFRs regulate a broad spectrum of biological functions, including cellular proliferation, survival, migration, and differentiation. The FGF signal pathways are the RAS/MAP kinase pathway, PI3 kinase/AKT pathway, and PLCγ pathway, among which the RAS/MAP kinase pathway is known to be predominant. Several studies have recently implicated the in vitro biological functions of FGFs for tissue regeneration. However, to obtain optimal outcomes in vivo, it is important to enhance the half-life of FGFs and their biological stability. Future applications of FGFs are expected when the biological functions of FGFs are potentiated through the appropriate use of delivery systems and scaffolds. This review will introduce the biology and cellular functions of FGFs and deal with the biomaterials based delivery systems and their current applications for the regeneration of tissues, including skin, blood vessel, muscle, adipose, tendon/ligament, cartilage, bone, tooth, and nerve tissues.

  5. Planarian brain regeneration as a model system for developmental neurotoxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagstrom, Danielle; Cochet‐Escartin, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Freshwater planarians, famous for their regenerative prowess, have long been recognized as a valuable in vivo animal model to study the effects of chemical exposure. In this review, we summarize the current techniques and tools used in the literature to assess toxicity in the planarian system. We focus on the planarian's particular amenability for neurotoxicology and neuroregeneration studies, owing to the planarian's unique ability to regenerate a centralized nervous system. Zooming in from the organismal to the molecular level, we show that planarians offer a repertoire of morphological and behavioral readouts while also being amenable to mechanistic studies of compound toxicity. Finally, we discuss the open challenges and opportunities for planarian brain regeneration to become an important model system for modern toxicology. PMID:27499880

  6. Model for muscle regeneration around fibrotic lesions in recurrent strain injuries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefte, S.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Torensma, R.; Hoff, J.W. Von den

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to establish an in vivo model for muscle regeneration after strain injury in the presence of a fibrotic discontinuity. METHODS: The musculus soleus of 5-wk-old male rats was exposed, completely lacerated, and sutured together with or without a collagen scaffold

  7. Bone morphogenetic proteins: periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Subramaniam M; Ugale, Gauri M; Warad, Shivaraj B

    2013-03-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious inflammatory disease that results in attachment loss and bone loss. Regeneration of the periodontal tissues entails de novo formation of cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. Several different approaches are currently being explored to achieve complete, reliable, and reproducible regeneration of periodontal tissues. The therapeutic management of new bone formation is one of the key issues in successful periodontal regeneration. Bone morphogenetic proteins form a unique group of proteins within the transforming growth factor superfamily of genes and have a vital role in the regulation in the bone induction and maintenance. The activity of bone morphogenetic proteins was first identified in the 1960s, but the proteins responsible for bone induction were unknown until the purification and cloning of human bone morphogenetic proteins in the 1980s, because of their osteoinductive potential. Bone morphogenetic proteins have gained a lot of interest as therapeutic agents for treating periodontal defects. A systematic search for data related to the use of bone morphogenetic proteins for the regeneration of periodontal defects was performed to recognize studies on animals and human (PUBMED, MEDLINE, COCHRANE, and Google search). All the studies included showed noticeable regeneration of periodontal tissues with the use of BMP.

  8. Mechanisms of urodele limb regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This review explores the historical and current state of our knowledge about urodele limb regeneration. Topics discussed are (1) blastema formation by the proteolytic histolysis of limb tissues to release resident stem cells and mononucleate cells that undergo dedifferentiation, cell cycle entry and accumulation under the apical epidermal cap. (2) The origin, phenotypic memory, and positional memory of blastema cells. (3) The role played by macrophages in the early events of regeneration. (4) The role of neural and AEC factors and interaction between blastema cells in mitosis and distalization. (5) Models of pattern formation based on the results of axial reversal experiments, experiments on the regeneration of half and double half limbs, and experiments using retinoic acid to alter positional identity of blastema cells. (6) Possible mechanisms of distalization during normal and intercalary regeneration. (7) Is pattern formation is a self‐organizing property of the blastema or dictated by chemical signals from adjacent tissues? (8) What is the future for regenerating a human limb? PMID:29299322

  9. Composite cell sheet for periodontal regeneration: crosstalk between different types of MSCs in cell sheet facilitates complex periodontal-like tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Shiyu; Zhu, Bin; Xu, Qiu; Ding, Yin; Jin, Yan

    2016-11-14

    Tissue-engineering strategies based on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and cell sheets have been widely used for periodontal tissue regeneration. However, given the complexity in periodontal structure, the regeneration methods using a single species of MSC could not fulfill the requirement for periodontal regeneration. We researched the interaction between the periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and jaw bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (JBMMSCs), and constructed a composite cell sheet comprising both of the above MSCs to regenerate complex periodontium-like structures in nude mice. Our results show that by co-culturing PDLSCs and JBMMSCs, the expressions of bone and extracellular matrix (ECM)-related genes and proteins were significantly improved in both MSCs. Further investigations showed that, compared to the cell sheet using PDLSCs or JBMMSCs, the composite stem cell sheet (CSCS), which comprises these two MSCs, expressed higher levels of bone- and ECM-related genes and proteins, and generated a composite structure more similar to the native periodontal tissue physiologically in vivo. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the crosstalk between PDLSCs and JBMMSCs in cell sheets facilitate regeneration of complex periodontium-like structures, providing a promising new strategy for physiological and functional regeneration of periodontal tissue.

  10. Regeneration of three layers vascular wall by using BMP2-treated MSC involving HIF-1α and Id1 expressions through JAK/STAT pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmokhtar, Karim; Bourguignon, Thierry; Worou, Morel E; Khamis, Georges; Bonnet, Pierre; Domenech, Jorge; Eder, Véronique

    2011-11-01

    Engineering living, multilayered blood vessels to form in vivo arteries is a promising alternative to peripheral artery bypass using acellular grafts restricted by thrombosis and occlusion at long term. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 (BMP2) is a growth factor determining in the early vascular embryonic development. The aim of the present study was evaluate the collaborative effect of recombinant human--BMP2 and Bone marrow--Mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) seeded on vascular patch to regenerate a vascular arterial wall in a rat model. BM-MSCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) seeded on vascular patch were cultured in presence of recombinant human-BMP2 [100 ng/mL] during 1 week before their implantation on the abdominal aorta of Wistar rats. We observed after 2 weeks under physiological arterial flow a regeneration of a three layers adult-like arterial wall with a middle layer expressing smooth muscle proteins and a border layer expressing endothelial marker. In vitro study, using Matrigel assay and co-culture of BM-MSCs with endothelial cells demonstrated that rh-BMP2 promoted tube-like formation even at long term (90 days) allowing the organization of thick rails. We demonstrated using inhibitors and siRNAs that rh-BMP2 enhanced the expression of HIF-1α and Id1 through, at least in part, the stimulation of JAK2/STAT3/STAT5 signaling pathways. Rh-BMP2 by mimicking embryological conditions allowed vascular BM-MSCs differentiation.

  11. Enhancing plant regeneration in tissue culture: a molecular approach through manipulation of cytokinin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kristine; Schaller, G Eric

    2013-10-01

    Micropropagation is used for commercial purposes worldwide, but the capacity to undergo somatic organogenesis and plant regeneration varies greatly among species. The plant hormones auxin and cytokinin are critical for plant regeneration in tissue culture, with cytokinin playing an instrumental role in shoot organogenesis. Type-B response regulators govern the transcriptional output in response to cytokinin and are required for plant regeneration. In our paper published in Plant Physiology, we explored the functional redundancy among the 11 type-B Arabidopsis response regulators (ARRs). Interestingly, we discovered that the enhanced expression of one family member, ARR10, induced hypersensitivity to cytokinin in multiple assays, including callus greening and shoot induction of explants. Here we 1) discuss the hormone dependence for in vitro plant regeneration, 2) how manipulation of the cytokinin response has been used to enhance plant regeneration, and 3) the potential of the ARR10 transgene as a tool to increase the regeneration capacity of agriculturally important crop plants. The efficacy of ARR10 for enhancing plant regeneration likely arises from its ability to transcriptionally regulate key cytokinin responsive genes combined with an enhanced protein stability of ARR10 compared with other type-B ARRs. By increasing the capacity of key tissues and cell types to respond to cytokinin, ARR10, or other type-B response regulators with similar properties, could be used as a tool to combat the recalcitrance of some crop species to tissue culture techniques.

  12. Selective amputation of the pharynx identifies a FoxA-dependent regeneration program in planaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Carolyn E; Seidel, Chris W; McKinney, Sean A; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Planarian flatworms regenerate every organ after amputation. Adult pluripotent stem cells drive this ability, but how injury activates and directs stem cells into the appropriate lineages is unclear. Here we describe a single-organ regeneration assay in which ejection of the planarian pharynx is selectively induced by brief exposure of animals to sodium azide. To identify genes required for pharynx regeneration, we performed an RNAi screen of 356 genes upregulated after amputation, using successful feeding as a proxy for regeneration. We found that knockdown of 20 genes caused a wide range of regeneration phenotypes and that RNAi of the forkhead transcription factor FoxA, which is expressed in a subpopulation of stem cells, specifically inhibited regrowth of the pharynx. Selective amputation of the pharynx therefore permits the identification of genes required for organ-specific regeneration and suggests an ancient function for FoxA-dependent transcriptional programs in driving regeneration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02238.001 PMID:24737865

  13. Loss of Mgat5a-mediated N-glycosylation stimulates regeneration in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Wuhong; Huang, Sunny C; Xu, Lisha; Pettie, Kade; Ceci, María Laura; Sánchez, Mario; Allende, Miguel L; Burgess, Shawn M

    2016-01-01

    We are using genetics to identify genes specifically involved in hearing regeneration. In a large-scale genetic screening, we identified mgat5a, a gene in the N-glycosylation biosynthesis pathway whose activity negatively impacts hair cell regeneration. We used a combination of mutant analysis in zebrafish and a hair cell regeneration assay to phenotype the loss of Mgat5a activity in zebrafish. We used pharmacological inhibition of N-glycosylation by swansonine. We also used over-expression analysis by mRNA injections to demonstrate how changes in N-glycosylation can alter cell signaling. We found that mgat5a was expressed in multiple tissues during zebrafish embryo development, particularly enriched in neural tissues including the brain, retina, and lateral line neuromasts. An mgat5a insertional mutation and a CRISPR/Cas9-generated truncation mutation both caused an enhancement of hair cell regeneration which could be phenocopied by pharmacological inhibition with swansonine. In addition to hair cell regeneration, inhibition of the N-glycosylation pathway also enhanced the regeneration of lateral line axon and caudal fins. Further analysis showed that N-glycosylation altered the responsiveness of TGF-beta signaling. The findings from this study provide experimental evidence for the involvement of N-glycosylation in tissue regeneration and cell signaling.

  14. Bone regeneration during distraction osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Lisa R; Everts, Vincent; Bronckers, Antonius L J J

    2009-07-01

    Bone has the capacity to regenerate in response to injury. During distraction osteogenesis, the renewal of bone is enhanced by gradual stretching of the soft connective tissues in the gap area between two separated bone segments. This procedure has received much clinical attention as a way to correct congenital growth retardation of bone tissue or to generate bone to fill skeletal defects. The process of bone regeneration involves a complex system of biological changes whereby mechanical stress is converted into a cascade of signals that activate cellular behavior resulting in (enhanced) formation of bone. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made in understanding the bone regeneration process during distraction osteogenesis. The mechanical and biological factors that are important for the success of the distraction treatment have been partially characterized and are discussed in this review.

  15. Electrospun human keratin matrices as templates for tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sow, Wan Ting; Lui, Yuan Siang; Ng, Kee Woei

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work was to study the feasibility of fabricating human hair keratin matrices through electrospinning and to evaluate the potential of these matrices for tissue regeneration. Keratin was extracted from human hair using Na2S and blended with poly(ethylene oxide) in the weight ratio of 60:1 for electrospinning. Physical morphology and chemical properties of the matrices were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Cell viability and morphology of murine and human fibroblasts cultured on the matrices were evaluated through the Live/Dead(®) assay and scanning electron microscopy. Electrospun keratin matrices were successfully produced without affecting the chemical conformation of keratin. Fibroblasts cultured on keratin matrices showed healthy morphology and penetration into matrices at day 7. Electrospun human hair keratin matrices provide a bioinductive and structural environment for cell growth and are thus attractive as alternative templates for tissue regeneration.

  16. A rat model for muscle regeneration in the soft palate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola L Carvajal Monroy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Children with a cleft in the soft palate have difficulties with speech, swallowing, and sucking. Despite successful surgical repositioning of the muscles, optimal function is often not achieved. Scar formation and defective regeneration may hamper the functional recovery of the muscles after cleft palate repair. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the anatomy and histology of the soft palate in rats, and to establish an in vivo model for muscle regeneration after surgical injury. METHODS: Fourteen adult male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups. Groups 1 (n = 4 and 2 (n = 2 were used to investigate the anatomy and histology of the soft palate, respectively. Group 3 (n = 6 was used for surgical wounding of the soft palate, and group 4 (n = 2 was used as unwounded control group. The wounds (1 mm were evaluated by (immunohistochemistry (AZAN staining, Pax7, MyoD, MyoG, MyHC, and ASMA after 7 days. RESULTS: The present study shows that the anatomy and histology of the soft palate muscles of the rat is largely comparable with that in humans. All wounds showed clinical evidence of healing after 7 days. AZAN staining demonstrated extensive collagen deposition in the wound area, and initial regeneration of muscle fibers and salivary glands. Proliferating and differentiating satellite cells were identified in the wound area by antibody staining. CONCLUSIONS: This model is the first, suitable for studying muscle regeneration in the rat soft palate, and allows the development of novel adjuvant strategies to promote muscle regeneration after cleft palate surgery.

  17. QPSK regeneration without active phase-locking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøller, Niels-Kristian; Da Ros, Francesco; Røge, Kasper Meldgaard

    2016-01-01

    QPSK regeneration without active phase stabilization is investigated in numerical simulations. We propose an improved scheme for phase-locking free QPSK regeneration showing significant improvements in the error vector magnitude of the signal....

  18. Economics and policy environments for forest regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald F. Flora

    1970-01-01

    MOST OF YOUR DAILY CONCERNS IN FOREST REGENERATION are biologic, technologic, and mechanical. But periodically, perhaps once a year, many of you must consider regeneration in a context that includes alternative uses for the financial resources you have.

  19. Fingernails Yield Clues to Limb Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spotlight on Research Fingernails Yield Clues to Limb Regeneration By Kirstie Saltsman, Ph.D. | January 5, 2014 ... Diseases has uncovered chemical signals that drive the regeneration of lost digit tips in mice. The findings, ...

  20. Optimization of Brassica napus (canola) explant regeneration for genetic transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Priti; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2011-12-15

    Brassica napus (canola) is the second largest oilseed crop in the world. It is among the first crops to be genetically transformed, and genetically modified cultivars are in commercial production at very significant levels. Despite the early lead with respect to transgenesis, there remain cultivars that are recalcitrant to transformation. To address this, we have conducted an elaborate investigation of the conditions for regenerating shoots from hypocotyl explants from four genetic lines: Invigor 5020, Westar and Topas as well as a microspore culture derived line of Topas (Line 4079). We analyzed the effect of hormonal combinations in regeneration medium, donor plant age and explant type on the regeneration capacity of these plants. The analysis showed that hypocotyls of eight-day-old seedlings grown on media supplemented with 1mg/L dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-D) produced the most shoots. Globular somatic embryos emerged following two weeks of 2,4-D treatment. When transferred to the medium containing 5mg/L benzyladenine (BA), approximately 82% of embryos produced shoots within six weeks. Invigor plants were shown to regenerate more efficiently than Topas; the number of plantlets regenerated from Invigor was approximately 40-50% more as compared to Topas or Line 4079. When hypocotyl explants were co-cultivated with the Agrobacterium strain GV3101 harboring a binary vector carrying a firefly luciferase reporter gene (LUC), significant numbers of plantlets were LUC-positive in a luciferase assay. Frequency of such plants were: Invigor 5020 (54.2 ± 2.5%), Westar (53.7 ± 5.3), Topas (16.0 ± 0.24) and Line 4079 (13.4 ± 4). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Microbead agglutination based assays

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2013-01-21

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microbeads in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling the macroscopic observation. Such tests are most often used to explore antibody-antigen reactions. Agglutination has been used for protein assays using a biotin/streptavidin system as well as a hybridization based assay. The agglutination systems are prone to selftermination of the linking analyte, prone to active site saturation and loss of agglomeration at high analyte concentrations. We investigated the molecular target/ligand interaction, explaining the common agglutination problems related to analyte self-termination, linkage of the analyte to the same bead instead of different microbeads. We classified the agglutination process into three kinds of assays: a two- component assay, a three-component assay and a stepped three- component assay. Although we compared these three kinds of assays for recognizing DNA and protein molecules, the assay can be used for virtually any molecule, including ions and metabolites. In total, the optimized assay permits detecting analytes with high sensitivity in a short time, 5 min, at room temperature. Such a system is appropriate for POC testing.

  2. In vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Bruce A; Lenning, Jacob; Khetarpal, Nikita; Tran, Catherine; Wu, Johnny Y; Berri, Ali M; Dernay, Kristin; Haacke, E Mark; Shafie-Khorassani, Fatema; Podolsky, Robert H; Gant, John C; Maimaiti, Shaniya; Thibault, Olivier; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Bennett, Brian M; Roberts, Robin

    2017-09-01

    Hippocampus oxidative stress is considered pathogenic in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease (AD), and in neurodevelopmental disorders, such as Angelman syndrome (AS). Yet clinical benefits of antioxidant treatment for these diseases remain unclear because conventional imaging methods are unable to guide management of therapies in specific hippocampus subfields in vivo that underlie abnormal behavior. Excessive production of paramagnetic free radicals in nonhippocampus brain tissue can be measured in vivo as a greater-than-normal 1/ T 1 that is quenchable with antioxidant as measured by quench-assisted (Quest) MRI. Here, we further test this approach in phantoms, and we present proof-of-concept data in models of AD-like and AS hippocampus oxidative stress that also exhibit impaired spatial learning and memory. AD-like models showed an abnormal gradient along the CA1 dorsal-ventral axis of excessive free radical production as measured by Quest MRI, and redox-sensitive calcium dysregulation as measured by manganese-enhanced MRI and electrophysiology. In the AS model, abnormally high free radical levels were observed in dorsal and ventral CA1. Quest MRI is a promising in vivo paradigm for bridging brain subfield oxidative stress and behavior in animal models and in human patients to better manage antioxidant therapy in devastating neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases.-Berkowitz, B. A., Lenning, J., Khetarpal, N., Tran, C., Wu, J. Y., Berri, A. M., Dernay, K., Haacke, E. M., Shafie-Khorassani, F., Podolsky, R. H., Gant, J. C., Maimaiti, S., Thibault, O., Murphy, G. G., Bennett, B. M., Roberts, R. In vivo imaging of prodromal hippocampus CA1 subfield oxidative stress in models of Alzheimer disease and Angelman syndrome. © FASEB.

  3. Active Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin plays an ancillary rather than essential role in Zebrafish CNS axon regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike eDiekmann

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The developmental decrease of the intrinsic regenerative ability of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS is associated with reduced activity of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR in mature neurons such as retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. While mTOR activity is further decreased upon axonal injury, maintenance of its pre-injury level, for instance by genetic deletion of the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN, markedly promotes axon regeneration in mammals. The current study now addressed the question whether active mTOR might generally play a central role in axon regeneration by analyzing its requirement in regeneration-competent zebrafish. Remarkably, regulation of mTOR activity after optic nerve injury in zebrafish is fundamentally different compared to mammals. Hardly any activity was detected in naïve RGCs, whereas it was markedly increased upon axotomy in vivo as well as in dissociated cell cultures. After a short burst, mTOR activity was quickly attenuated, which is contrary to the requirements for axon regeneration in mammals. Surprisingly, mTOR activity was not essential for axonal growth per se, but correlated with cytokine- and PTEN inhibitor-induced neurite extension in vitro. Moreover, inhibition of mTOR using rapamycin significantly reduced axonal regeneration in vivo and delayed functional recovery after optic nerve injury. Therefore, axotomy-induced mTOR activity is involved in CNS axon regeneration in zebrafish similar to mammals, although it plays an ancillary rather than essential role in this regeneration-competent species.

  4. The comet assay in nanotoxicology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Hanna L

    2010-09-01

    Nanoscale particles can have impressive and useful characteristics, but the same properties may be problematic for human health. From this perspective it is critical to assess the ability of nanoparticles to cause DNA damage. This review focuses on the use of the comet assay in nanotoxicology research. In the alkaline version of the assay, DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites are detected and oxidatively damaged DNA can be analyzed using the enzyme formamidopyrimidine glycosylase. The article reviews studies that have used the comet assay to investigate the toxicity of manufactured nanoparticles. It is shown that at least 46 cellular in vitro studies and several in vivo studies have used the comet assay and that the majority of the nanoparticles tested cause DNA strand breaks or oxidative DNA lesions. This is not surprising considering the sensitivity of the method and the reactivity of many nanomaterials. Interactions between the particles and the assay cannot be totally excluded and need further consideration. It is concluded that studies including several particle types, to enable the assessment of their relative potency, are valuable as are studies focusing both on comet assay end points and mutagenicity. Finally, the article discusses the potential future use of the comet assay in human biomonitoring studies, which could provide valuable information for hazard identification of nanoparticles.

  5. Antimutagenic activity of casein against MNNG in the E. coli DNA repair host-mediated assay.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekel, van M.A.J.S.; Goeptar, A.R.; Alink, G.M.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of caseinate and soy protein in the diet on the mutagenicity induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) was assessed in-vivo and ex-vivo in the DNA-repair host-mediated assay and liquid suspension assay, respectively. Of the two proteins only casein showed a strong

  6. Bone regeneration by lactoferrin released from a gelatin hydrogel.

    OpenAIRE

    Takaoka, Ryohei; HIKASA, Yoshiaki; Hayashi, Kentaro; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential of lactoferrin (LF), an iron-binding glycoprotein, to induce bone regeneration. A biodegradable gelatin hydrogel was prepared to allow LF release in vivo in a sustained fashion. When subcutaneously implanted into the back of mice, the gelatin hydrogel incorporating LF showed a longer LF retention period at the site of implantation than that of LF solution injection. An in vitro culture experiment with 3T3E1 cells (mouse-derived osteobla...

  7. Periodontal tissue regeneration with PRP incorporated gelatin hydrogel sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Dai; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Sato, Soh

    2015-10-20

    Gelatin hydrogels have been designed and prepared for the controlled release of the transforming growth factor (TGF-b1) and the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB). PRP (Platelet rich plasma) contains many growth factors including the PDGF and TGF-b1. The objective of this study was to evaluate the regeneration of periodontal tissue following the controlled release of growth factors in PRP. For the periodontal ligament cells and osteoblast, PRP of different concentrations was added. The assessment of DNA, mitochondrial activity and ALP activity were measured. To evaluate the TGF-β1 release from PRP incorporated gelatin sponge, amounts of TGF-β1 in each supernatant sample were determined by the ELISA. Transplantation experiments to prepare a bone defect in a rat alveolar bone were an implanted gelatin sponge incorporated with different concentration PRP. In DNA assay and MTT assay, after the addition of PRP to the periodontal ligament cells and osteoblast, the cell count and mitochondrial activity had increased the most in the group with the addition of 5  ×  PRP. In the ALP assay, after the addition of PRP to the periodontal ligament cells, the cell activity had increased the most in the group with the addition of 3  ×  PRP. In the transplantation, the size of the bone regenerated in the defect with 3  ×  PRP incorporated gelatin sponge was larger than that of the other group.

  8. Regeneration of southern hardwoods: some ecological concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    David L. Loftis

    1989-01-01

    Classical concepts of post-disturbance succession through well-defined seral stages to a well-defined ,climax stage( s) are not a useful conceptual framework for predicting species composition of regeneration resulting from the application of regeneration treatments in complex southern hardwood forests. Hardwood regeneration can be better understood, and more useful...

  9. Semiconductor devices for all-optical regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, Filip; Bischoff, Svend; Tromborg, Bjarne

    2003-01-01

    We review different implementations of semiconductor devices for all-optical regeneration. A general model will be presented for all-optical regeneration in fiber links, taking into consideration the trade-off between non-linearity and noise. Furthermore we discuss a novel regenerator type, based...

  10. All optical regeneration using semiconductor devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Öhman, Filip; Tromborg, Bjarne

    All-optical regeneration is a key functionality for implementing all-optical networks. We present a simple theory for the bit-error-rate in links employing all-optical regenerators, which elucidates the interplay between the noise and and nonlinearity of the regenerator. A novel device structure ...... is analyzed, emphasizing general aspects of active semiconductor waveguides....

  11. An experimental study of passive regenerator geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrecht, Kurt; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Pryds, Nini

    2011-01-01

    experimental uncertainty associated with magnetocaloric material properties, all regenerators are made of aluminum. The performance of corrugated plates and dimpled plates are compared to traditional flat plate regenerators for a range of cycle times and utilizations. Each regenerator is built using 18...

  12. On-chip immobilization of planarians for in vivo imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Joseph P; Tamme, Mary B; Lind, Christine H; Collins, Eva-Maria S

    2014-09-17

    Planarians are an important model organism for regeneration and stem cell research. A complete understanding of stem cell and regeneration dynamics in these animals requires time-lapse imaging in vivo, which has been difficult to achieve due to a lack of tissue-specific markers and the strong negative phototaxis of planarians. We have developed the Planarian Immobilization Chip (PIC) for rapid, stable immobilization of planarians for in vivo imaging without injury or biochemical alteration. The chip is easy and inexpensive to fabricate, and worms can be mounted for and removed after imaging within minutes. We show that the PIC enables significantly higher-stability immobilization than can be achieved with standard techniques, allowing for imaging of planarians at sub-cellular resolution in vivo using brightfield and fluorescence microscopy. We validate the performance of the PIC by performing time-lapse imaging of planarian wound closure and sequential imaging over days of head regeneration. We further show that the device can be used to immobilize Hydra, another photophobic regenerative model organism. The simple fabrication, low cost, ease of use, and enhanced specimen stability of the PIC should enable its broad application to in vivo studies of stem cell and regeneration dynamics in planarians and Hydra.

  13. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  14. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  15. MECHANICAL REGENERATION OF SAND WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Gnir

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental activation of the sand regenerator of the firm SINTO is carried out at ОАО “MZOO". It is shown that sand grains are cleared from films of binding agents, that allows to use the treated sand for preparation of agglutinant and core sands.

  16. Bone regeneration during distraction osteogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amir, L.R.; Everts, V.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Bone has the capacity to regenerate in response to injury. During distraction osteogenesis, the renewal of bone is enhanced by gradual stretching of the soft connec- tive tissues in the gap area between two separated bone segments. This procedure has received much clinical atten- tion as a way to

  17. Skeletal muscle development and regeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefte, S.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Torensma, R.; Hoff, J.W. Von den

    2007-01-01

    In the late stages of muscle development, a unique cell population emerges that is a key player in postnatal muscle growth and muscle regeneration. The location of these cells next to the muscle fibers triggers their designation as satellite cells. During the healing of injured muscle tissue,

  18. Nonwoven scaffolds for bone regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Durham, Elaine R.; Tronci, Giuseppe; Yang,Xuebin; Wood, David J.; Russell, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Developing successful scaffolds requires clinicians to adopt a multidisciplinary approach in order to understand and stimulate the natural bone regeneration process. A variety of natural and synthetic biomaterials, including naturally extracted, chemically functionalised collagen and synthetic Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), can be manufactured into fibres, enabling the formation of nonwoven scaffolds. Many different nonwoven architectures and structural features can then be introduced, dep...

  19. Gene therapy for tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutroneo, Kenneth R

    2003-02-01

    Tissue repair and regeneration are the normal biological responses of many different tissues in the body to injury. During the healing process, profound changes occur in cell composition and extracellular matrix (ECM) formation. Fibroblasts and equivalent reparative cells migrate to the wounded area and subsequently proliferate. These cells and reparative cells from the surrounding tissue are responsible for the rapid repair which results in tissue regeneration. Growth factors, one of which is transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), stimulate fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells to proliferate and synthesize ECM proteins. This process of early repair provides a rapid way to restore new tissue and mechanical integrity. This early tissue repair process is normally followed by involution, which requires the production and activation of proteases, tissue maturation and remodeling, reorganization and finally regeneration. Alternately, failure to replace the critical components of the ECM, including elastin and basement membrane, results in abnormal regeneration of the epithelial cell layer. Although remodeling should occur during healing, provisional repair may be followed by excessive synthesis and deposition of collagen, which results in irreversible fibrosis and scarring. This excessive fibrosis which occurs in aberrant healing is at least in part mediated by persistent TGF-beta. Because of the central role of collagen in the wound healing process, the pharmacological control of collagen synthesis has been of paramount importance as a possible way to abrogate aberrant healing and prevent irreversible fibrosis. Fibrosis is an abnormal response to tissue injury. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Mechanical device for tissue