WorldWideScience

Sample records for vivo phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase

  1. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and gluconeogenesis in grape pericarp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robert P; Battistelli, Alberto; Moscatello, Stefano; Técsi, László; Leegood, Richard C; Famiani, Franco

    2015-12-01

    Glycolysis from sugars is necessary at all stages of development of grape pericarp, and this raises the question as to why gluconeogenesis from malate occurs. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is required for gluconeogenesis in grape pericarp. In this study we determined the abundance of PEPCK protein and activity in different parts of grape pericarp during its development. Both PEPCK protein and activity were present throughout development, however, in both the skin and the flesh their abundance increased greatly at the start of ripening. This coincided with the onset of the decrease in the malate content of the berry. The location of PEPCK in the pericarp at different stages of development was determined using both immunohistochemistry and dissection. We provide a possible explanation for the occurrence of gluconeogenesis in grape pericarp. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Regulation by glucagon (cAMP) and insulin of the promotor of the human phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene (cytosolic) in cultured rat hepatocytes and in human hepatoblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rucktäschel, Anne K.; Granner, Daryl K.; Christ, Bruno

    2000-01-01

    gluconeogenesis, HepG2 cells, liver, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase......gluconeogenesis, HepG2 cells, liver, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase...

  3. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase and Protein Kinase C Contribute to the Inhibition by Interleukin 6 of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Gene Expression in Cultured Rat Hepatocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christ, Bruno; Yazici, Emine; Nath, Annegret

    2000-01-01

    Gluconeogenesis, hepatocytes, interleukin 6, liver, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase......Gluconeogenesis, hepatocytes, interleukin 6, liver, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase...

  4. Amino acid environment determines expression of carbamoylphosphate synthetase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in embryonic rat hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, W. H.; van Roon, M.; Mooren, P. G.; de Graaf, A.; Charles, R.

    1985-01-01

    A completely defined medium (EHM-1), which reflects the amino acid composition of fetal rat serum and contains albumin as the sole proteinaceous compound, allows the accumulation of carbamoylphosphate synthetase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in the presence of dexamethasone, dibutyryl cyclic

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Is Regulated by Redox Mechanisms and Interaction with Thioredoxin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová, Iva; Snášel, Jan; Zimmermann, M.; Laubitz, D.; Plocinski, P.; Oehlmann, W.; Singh, M.; Dostál, Jiří; Sauer, U.; Pichová, Iva

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 289, č. 19 (2014), s. 13066-13078 ISSN 0021-9258 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 241587 - SYSTEMTB Grant - others:OPPK(CZ) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : enzyme kinetics * hypoxia * metabolism * Mycobacterium tuberculosis * oxidation-reduction * thioredoxin * Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.573, year: 2014

  6. Synthesis, accumulation and turnover of carbamoylphosphate synthetase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in cultures of embryonic rat hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roon, M. A.; Charles, R.; Lamers, W. H.

    1987-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroid, thyroid hormones and cyclic AMP can induce the synthesis of carbamoylphosphate synthetase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in cultures of hepatocytes as soon as these cells differentiate from the embryonic foregut. The low levels of both enzymes that can accumulate in such

  7. Regulation of gene expression by carbohydrates. Part 1. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene; Tansui kabutsu ni yoru idenshi hatsugen seigyo ( 1 ). Phosphoenolpyruvate san carboxykinase idenshi ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, H. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    Focusing on Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), recent knowledge on the transcription regulating function by carbohydrates via hormone is introduced. PEPCK exists mainly in the liver, kidney, adipose tissue, and small intestine, and the synthetic rate of PEPCK protein is regulated virtually by the transcription of PEPCK gene. Most part of the change is regulated via insulin and glucagon, and glucagon accelerates transcription while insulin suppresses transcription. Suppression by insulin becomes smaller in transgenic mice having reporter genes which lack RE containing part, but sufficient suppression of PEPCK gene expression by high carbohydrate diet is observed. Fasting and high protein diet increase glucagon concentration in the blood to increase cAMP concentration in cells. High PEPCK gene expression is observed with diabetes, which is the main cause for the increase in the value of blood glucose in diabetes. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Glucocorticoid Antagonism by Endotoxin: Biological Effects during Stress and Basis for Inhibition of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    monkeys (83), but not in rats (81), piglets (14S) or Yucatan minipigs (57). The lLhal effects of LPS and RD-LPS were also studied during stress conditions...gluconeogenesis and the hypoglycemia of endotoxin shock. Am. J. Physiol. 227: 778-781. 5S. Foster , 0.0., P.D. Ray and H.A. Lardy. 1366. Studies on the...Lardy, R.C. Nordlie and 0.0. Foster . ISS3. Metabolic and hormonal control of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and malic enzyme in rat liver. J. Biol

  9. The Gluconeogenic Enzyme Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase in Arabidopsis Is Essential for Seedling Establishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylott, Elizabeth L.; Gilday, Alison D.; Graham, Ian A.

    2003-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) catalyzes the conversion of oxaloacetate to phosphoenolpyruvate in the gluconeogenic production of sugars from storage oil in germinating oilseeds. Here, we present the results of analysis on PEPCK antisense Arabidopsis plants with a range of enzyme activities from 20% to 80% of wild-type levels. There is a direct correlation between enzyme activity and seedling establishment during early post-germinative growth, thus demonstrating the absolute requirement of PEPCK and gluconeogenesis in this process. Soluble sugar levels in the 35S-PCK1 antisense seedlings are reduced and seedling establishment can be rescued with an exogenous supply of sucrose. We observed an increase in the respiration of acetyl coenzyme A units released from fatty acid β-oxidation and a corresponding decrease in the production of sugars with decreasing enzyme activity in 2-d-old antisense seedlings. The 35S-PCK1 antisense lines have a more extreme phenotype when compared with Arabidopsis mutants disrupted in the glyoxylate cycle. We conclude that the 35S-PCK1 antisense seedlings are compromised in the ability to use both storage lipid and storage protein through gluconeogenesis to produce soluble sugars. PMID:12692343

  10. Discovery of PPi-type Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Genes in Eukaryotes and Bacteria*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Yoko; Kamikawa, Ryoma; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is one of the pivotal enzymes that regulates the carbon flow of the central metabolism by fixing CO2 to phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to produce oxaloacetate or vice versa. Whereas ATP- and GTP-type PEPCKs have been well studied, and their protein identities are established, inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi)-type PEPCK (PPi-PEPCK) is poorly characterized. Despite extensive enzymological studies, its protein identity and encoding gene remain unknown. In this study, PPi-PEPCK has been identified for the first time from a eukaryotic human parasite, Entamoeba histolytica, by conventional purification and mass spectrometric identification of the native enzyme, followed by demonstration of its enzymatic activity. A homolog of the amebic PPi-PEPCK from an anaerobic bacterium Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii also exhibited PPi-PEPCK activity. The primary structure of PPi-PEPCK has no similarity to the functional homologs ATP/GTP-PEPCKs and PEP carboxylase, strongly suggesting that PPi-PEPCK arose independently from the other functional homologues and very likely has unique catalytic sites. PPi-PEPCK homologs were found in a variety of bacteria and some eukaryotes but not in archaea. The molecular identification of this long forgotten enzyme shows us the diversity and functional redundancy of enzymes involved in the central metabolism and can help us to understand the central metabolism more deeply. PMID:26269598

  11. Discovery of PPi-type Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Genes in Eukaryotes and Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Yoko; Kamikawa, Ryoma; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2015-09-25

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is one of the pivotal enzymes that regulates the carbon flow of the central metabolism by fixing CO2 to phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to produce oxaloacetate or vice versa. Whereas ATP- and GTP-type PEPCKs have been well studied, and their protein identities are established, inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi)-type PEPCK (PPi-PEPCK) is poorly characterized. Despite extensive enzymological studies, its protein identity and encoding gene remain unknown. In this study, PPi-PEPCK has been identified for the first time from a eukaryotic human parasite, Entamoeba histolytica, by conventional purification and mass spectrometric identification of the native enzyme, followed by demonstration of its enzymatic activity. A homolog of the amebic PPi-PEPCK from an anaerobic bacterium Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii also exhibited PPi-PEPCK activity. The primary structure of PPi-PEPCK has no similarity to the functional homologs ATP/GTP-PEPCKs and PEP carboxylase, strongly suggesting that PPi-PEPCK arose independently from the other functional homologues and very likely has unique catalytic sites. PPi-PEPCK homologs were found in a variety of bacteria and some eukaryotes but not in archaea. The molecular identification of this long forgotten enzyme shows us the diversity and functional redundancy of enzymes involved in the central metabolism and can help us to understand the central metabolism more deeply. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Enhancement of porcine intramuscular fat content by overexpression of the cytosolic form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Zijian Ren; Ying Wang; Yuanyuan Ren; Zhengwei Zhang; Weiwang Gu; Zhaoting Wu; Lingyi Chen; Lisha Mou; Rongfeng Li; Haiyuan Yang; Yifan Dai

    2017-01-01

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) content has been generally recognized as a desirable trait in pork meat because of its positive effect on eating quality. An effective approach to enhance IMF content in pork is the generation of transgenic pigs. In this study, we used somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to generate cloned pigs exhibiting ectopic expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) driven by an ?-skeletal-actin gene promoter, which was specifically expressed in skeletal muscle. U...

  13. Cytosolic Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase Does Not Solely Control the Rate of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis in the Intact Mouse Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Burgess, Shawn C.; He, TianTeng; Yan, Zheng; Lindner, Jill; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.; Browning, Jeffrey D.; Magnuson, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    When dietary carbohydrate is unavailable, glucose required to support metabolism in vital tissues is generated via gluconeogenesis in the liver. Expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), commonly considered the control point for liver gluconeogenesis, is normally regulated by circulating hormones to match systemic glucose demand. However, this regulation fails in diabetes. Because other molecular and metabolic factors can also influence gluconeogenesis, the explicit role of PEP...

  14. Ketogenic diet-fed rats have increased fat mass and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Letícia C; Chittó, Ana L; Müller, Alexandre P; Rocha, Juliana K; Castro da Silva, Mariane; Quincozes-Santos, André; Nardin, Patrícia; Rotta, Liane N; Ziegler, Denize R; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto; Da Silva, Roselis S M; Perry, Marcos L S; Gottfried, Carmem

    2008-11-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD), characterized by high fat and low carbohydrate and protein contents, has been proposed to be beneficial in children with epilepsy disorders not helped by conventional anti-epileptic drug treatment. Weight loss and inadequate growth is an important drawback of this diet and metabolic causes are not well characterized. The aim of this study was to examine body weight variation during KD feeding for 6 wk of Wistar rats; fat mass and adipocyte cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity were also observed. PEPCK activity was determined based on the [H(14)CO(3) (-)]-oxaloacetate exchange reaction. KD-fed rats gained weight at a less rapid rate than normal-fed rats, but with a significant increment in fat mass. The fat mass/body weight ratio already differed between ketogenic and control rats after the first week of treatment, and was 2.4 x higher in ketogenic rats. The visceral lipogenesis was supported by an increment in adipocyte PEPCK, aiming to provide glycerol 3-phosphate to triacylglycerol synthesis and this fat accumulation was accompanied by glucose intolerance. These data contribute to our understanding of the metabolic effects of the KD in adipose tissue and liver and suggest some potential risks of this diet, particularly visceral fat accumulation.

  15. The Role of Cysteine Residues in Catalysis of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Machová

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb, the causative agent of tuberculosis, can persist in macrophages for decades, maintaining its basic metabolic activities. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pck; EC 4.1.1.32 is a key player in central carbon metabolism regulation. In replicating MTb, Pck is associated with gluconeogenesis, but in non-replicating MTb, it also catalyzes the reverse anaplerotic reaction. Here, we explored the role of selected cysteine residues in function of MTb Pck under different redox conditions. Using mass spectrometry analysis we confirmed formation of S-S bridge between cysteines C391 and C397 localized in the C-terminal subdomain. Molecular dynamics simulations of C391-C397 bridged model indicated local conformation changes needed for formation of the disulfide. Further, we used circular dichroism and Raman spectroscopy to analyze the influence of C391 and C397 mutations on Pck secondary and tertiary structures, and on enzyme activity and specificity. We demonstrate the regulatory role of C391 and C397 that form the S-S bridge and in the reduced form stabilize Pck tertiary structure and conformation for gluconeogenic and anaplerotic reactions.

  16. Gluconeogenesis in Leishmania mexicana: contribution of glycerol kinase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and pyruvate phosphate dikinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Contreras, Dayana; Hamilton, Nicklas

    2014-11-21

    Gluconeogenesis is an active pathway in Leishmania amastigotes and is essential for their survival within the mammalian cells. However, our knowledge about this pathway in trypanosomatids is very limited. We investigated the role of glycerol kinase (GK), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), and pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK) in gluconeogenesis by generating the respective Leishmania mexicana Δgk, Δpepck, and Δppdk null mutants. Our results demonstrated that indeed GK, PEPCK, and PPDK are key players in the gluconeogenesis pathway in Leishmania, although stage-specific differences in their contribution to this pathway were found. GK participates in the entry of glycerol in promastigotes and amastigotes; PEPCK participates in the entry of aspartate in promastigotes, and PPDK is involved in the entry of alanine in amastigotes. Furthermore, the majority of alanine enters into the pathway via decarboxylation of pyruvate in promastigotes, whereas pathway redundancy is suggested for the entry of aspartate in amastigotes. Interestingly, we also found that l-lactate, an abundant glucogenic precursor in mammals, was used by Leishmania amastigotes to synthesize mannogen, entering the pathway through PPDK. On the basis of these new results, we propose a revision in the current model of gluconeogenesis in Leishmania, emphasizing the differences between amastigotes and promastigotes. This work underlines the importance of studying the trypanosomatid intracellular life cycle stages to gain a better understanding of the pathologies caused in humans. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in bovine tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) micro plus embryogenesis and starvation larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, J.G. de; Mentizingen, L.G.; Logullo, C. [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro (UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Biociencias e Biotecnologia. Lab.de Quimica e Funcao de Proteinas e Peptideos (LQFPP); Andrade, C.P. de; Vaz Junior, Itabajara [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Centro de Biotecnologia; Daffre, S.; Esteves, E. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biomedicas

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is considered a key rate controlling enzyme in gluconeogenesis pathway. Gluconeogenesis is a highly regulated process, catalyzed by several enzymes subject to regulation by insulin. Normally, insulin rapidly and substantially inhibits PEPCK gene transcription and the PEPCK activity is proportional to the rate of gene transcription. The transcriptional regulation of the PEPCK gene has been extensively studied. CREM is the transcription factor that bind efficiently to the putative cyclic AMP response element (CRE) in PEPCK gene. Several other transcription factors can bind to this element and activate transcription. In oviparous animals, such as bovine tick R. microplus, the embryonic development occurs outside the maternal organism, implying that all the nutrients necessary for embryogenesis must be present in the oocytes. We observed the relationship between the main energy sources and the morphogenetic changes that occur during R. microplus tick embryogenesis. Energy homeostasis is maintained by glycogen mobilization in the beginning of embryogenesis, as its content is drastically decreased during the first five days of development. Afterwards, the activity of the gluconeogenesis enzyme PEPCK increases enormously, as indicated by a concomitant increase in glucose content (Moraes et al., 2007). Here, we analyzed PEPCK gene transcription by qPCR during the embryogenesis and starvation larvae. The PEPCK transcription was higher at first and 15th day eggs of the development. In larvae the levels of PEPCK transcripts is increased at fifth day after hatch. However, the activity is continuous increased in larvae the form first up to 15th day. Now we are investigating the involvement of CREM in the PEPCK gene transcription in these cells. In this sense, we obtained CREM sequence from TIGR ESTs R. microplus bank and designed the specific primers to qPCR. Taken together our results suggest the involvement of PEPCK to the

  18. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase from Trypanosoma cruzi. Purification and physicochemical and kinetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cymeryng, C; Cazzulo, J J; Cannata, J J

    1995-07-01

    Phospho enolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) has been purified to homogeneity from epimastigotes of the Tul 0 strain of Trypanosoma cruzi. The physicochemical parameters determined allowed the calculation of an average molecular mass of 120 kDa; the subunit molecular mass, about 61 kDa, is in good agreement with the value of 58.6 kDa recently determined from the sequence by Sommer et al. (FEBS Lett. 359 (1994) 125-129). The PEPCK from T. cruzi presented, in addition to its molecular mass, typical properties of other ATP-linked PEPCKs, namely strict specificity for ADP in the carboxylation reaction and lower specificity in the decarboxylation and exchange reactions, and synergistic activation by CdCl2 or MgCl2 when added in addition to MnCl2. The enzyme presented hysteretic behaviour, shown by a lag period in the carboxylation reaction, which was affected by dilution and preincubation. The decarboxylation reaction catalyzed by the T. cruzi PEPCK was not inhibited by excess of ATP-Mn. The apparent Km values for the carboxylation reaction, including the low value for PEP (0.035 mM) are compatible with an important role of PEPCK, as suggested by previous NMR experiments, on the CO2 fixation in vivo which leads to succinate excretion during aerobic fermentation of glucose.

  19. A Role for Mitochondrial Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (PEPCK-M) in the Regulation of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Romana; Guebre-Egziabher, Fitsum; Zhao, Xiaojian; Feriod, Colleen; Dong, Jianying; Alves, Tiago C.; Ioja, Simona; Pongratz, Rebecca L.; Bhanot, Sanjay; Roden, Michael; Cline, Gary W.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Kibbey, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) from oxaloacetate is an absolute requirement for gluconeogenesis from mitochondrial substrates. Generally, this reaction has solely been attributed to the cytosolic isoform of PEPCK (PEPCK-C), although loss of the mitochondrial isoform (PEPCK-M) has never been assessed. Despite catalyzing the same reaction, to date the only significant role reported in mammals for the mitochondrial isoform is as a glucose sensor necessary for insulin secretion. We hypothesized that this nutrient-sensing mitochondrial GTP-dependent pathway contributes importantly to gluconeogenesis. PEPCK-M was acutely silenced in gluconeogenic tissues of rats using antisense oligonucleotides both in vivo and in isolated hepatocytes. Silencing PEPCK-M lowers plasma glucose, insulin, and triglycerides, reduces white adipose, and depletes hepatic glycogen, but raises lactate. There is a switch of gluconeogenic substrate preference to glycerol that quantitatively accounts for a third of glucose production. In contrast to the severe mitochondrial deficiency characteristic of PEPCK-C knock-out livers, hepatocytes from PEPCK-M-deficient livers maintained normal oxidative function. Consistent with its predicted role, gluconeogenesis rates from hepatocytes lacking PEPCK-M are severely reduced for lactate, alanine, and glutamine, but not for pyruvate and glycerol. Thus, PEPCK-M has a direct role in fasted and fed glucose homeostasis, and this mitochondrial GTP-dependent pathway should be reconsidered for its involvement in both normal and diabetic metabolism. PMID:24497630

  20. A role for mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-M) in the regulation of hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Romana; Guebre-Egziabher, Fitsum; Zhao, Xiaojian; Feriod, Colleen; Dong, Jianying; Alves, Tiago C; Ioja, Simona; Pongratz, Rebecca L; Bhanot, Sanjay; Roden, Michael; Cline, Gary W; Shulman, Gerald I; Kibbey, Richard G

    2014-03-14

    Synthesis of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) from oxaloacetate is an absolute requirement for gluconeogenesis from mitochondrial substrates. Generally, this reaction has solely been attributed to the cytosolic isoform of PEPCK (PEPCK-C), although loss of the mitochondrial isoform (PEPCK-M) has never been assessed. Despite catalyzing the same reaction, to date the only significant role reported in mammals for the mitochondrial isoform is as a glucose sensor necessary for insulin secretion. We hypothesized that this nutrient-sensing mitochondrial GTP-dependent pathway contributes importantly to gluconeogenesis. PEPCK-M was acutely silenced in gluconeogenic tissues of rats using antisense oligonucleotides both in vivo and in isolated hepatocytes. Silencing PEPCK-M lowers plasma glucose, insulin, and triglycerides, reduces white adipose, and depletes hepatic glycogen, but raises lactate. There is a switch of gluconeogenic substrate preference to glycerol that quantitatively accounts for a third of glucose production. In contrast to the severe mitochondrial deficiency characteristic of PEPCK-C knock-out livers, hepatocytes from PEPCK-M-deficient livers maintained normal oxidative function. Consistent with its predicted role, gluconeogenesis rates from hepatocytes lacking PEPCK-M are severely reduced for lactate, alanine, and glutamine, but not for pyruvate and glycerol. Thus, PEPCK-M has a direct role in fasted and fed glucose homeostasis, and this mitochondrial GTP-dependent pathway should be reconsidered for its involvement in both normal and diabetic metabolism.

  1. Enhancement of porcine intramuscular fat content by overexpression of the cytosolic form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zijian; Wang, Ying; Ren, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Zhengwei; Gu, Weiwang; Wu, Zhaoting; Chen, Lingyi; Mou, Lisha; Li, Rongfeng; Yang, Haiyuan; Dai, Yifan

    2017-03-02

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) content has been generally recognized as a desirable trait in pork meat because of its positive effect on eating quality. An effective approach to enhance IMF content in pork is the generation of transgenic pigs. In this study, we used somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to generate cloned pigs exhibiting ectopic expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) driven by an α-skeletal-actin gene promoter, which was specifically expressed in skeletal muscle. Using qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis, we demonstrated that PEPCK-C was functionally expressed and had a significant effect on total fatty acid content in the skeletal muscle of the transgenic pigs, while the n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) ratio showed no difference between transgenic and control pigs. Thus, genetically engineered PEPCK-Cmus pigs may be an effective solution for the production of IMF-enriched pork.

  2. Reciprocal Changes in Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase and Pyruvate Kinase with Age Are a Determinant of Aging in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yiyuan; Hakimi, Parvin; Kao, Clara; Kao, Allison; Liu, Ruifu; Janocha, Allison; Boyd-Tressler, Andrea; Hang, Xi; Alhoraibi, Hanna; Slater, Erin; Xia, Kevin; Cao, Pengxiu; Shue, Quinn; Ching, Tsui-Ting; Hsu, Ao-Lin; Erzurum, Serpil C; Dubyak, George R; Berger, Nathan A; Hanson, Richard W; Feng, Zhaoyang

    2016-01-15

    Aging involves progressive loss of cellular function and integrity, presumably caused by accumulated stochastic damage to cells. Alterations in energy metabolism contribute to aging, but how energy metabolism changes with age, how these changes affect aging, and whether they can be modified to modulate aging remain unclear. In locomotory muscle of post-fertile Caenorhabditis elegans, we identified a progressive decrease in cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C), a longevity-associated metabolic enzyme, and a reciprocal increase in glycolytic pyruvate kinase (PK) that were necessary and sufficient to limit lifespan. Decline in PEPCK-C with age also led to loss of cellular function and integrity including muscle activity, and cellular senescence. Genetic and pharmacologic interventions of PEPCK-C, muscle activity, and AMPK signaling demonstrate that declines in PEPCK-C and muscle function with age interacted to limit reproductive life and lifespan via disrupted energy homeostasis. Quantifications of metabolic flux show that reciprocal changes in PEPCK-C and PK with age shunted energy metabolism toward glycolysis, reducing mitochondrial bioenergetics. Last, calorie restriction countered changes in PEPCK-C and PK with age to elicit anti-aging effects via TOR inhibition. Thus, a programmed metabolic event involving PEPCK-C and PK is a determinant of aging that can be modified to modulate aging. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. A plant/fungal-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase located in the parasite mitochondrion ensures glucose-independent survival of Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzsche, Richard; Günay-Esiyok, Özlem; Tischer, Maximilian; Zagoriy, Vyacheslav; Gupta, Nishith

    2017-09-15

    Toxoplasma gondii is considered to be one of the most successful intracellular pathogens, because it can reproduce in varied nutritional milieus, encountered in diverse host cell types of essentially any warm-blooded organism. Our earlier work demonstrated that the acute (tachyzoite) stage of T. gondii depends on cooperativity of glucose and glutamine catabolism to meet biosynthetic demands. Either of these two nutrients can sustain the parasite survival; however, what determines the metabolic plasticity has not yet been resolved. Here, we reveal two discrete phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) enzymes in the parasite, one of which resides in the mitochondrion (TgPEPCKmt), whereas the other protein is not expressed in tachyzoites (TgPEPCKnet). Parasites with an intact glycolysis can tolerate genetic deletions of TgPEPCKmt as well as of TgPEPCKnet, indicating their nonessential roles for tachyzoite survival. TgPEPCKnet can also be ablated in a glycolysis-deficient mutant, while TgPEPCKmt is refractory to deletion. Consistent with this, the lytic cycle of a conditional mutant of TgPEPCKmt in the glycolysis-impaired strain was aborted upon induced repression of the mitochondrial isoform, demonstrating its essential role for the glucose-independent survival of parasites. Isotope-resolved metabolomics of the conditional mutant revealed defective flux of glutamine-derived carbon into RNA-bound ribose sugar as well as metabolites associated with gluconeogenesis, entailing a critical nodal role of PEPCKmt in linking catabolism of glucose and glutamine with anabolic pathways. Our data also suggest a homeostatic function ofTgPEPCKmt in cohesive operation of glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in a normal glucose-replete milieu. Conversely, we found that the otherwise integrative enzyme pyruvate carboxylase (TgPyC) is dispensable not only in glycolysis-competent but also in glycolysis-deficient tachyzoites despite a mitochondrial localization. Last but not least

  4. Phenobarbital reduces blood glucose and gluconeogenesis through down-regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (GTP) gene expression in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Hiroaki; Okuda, Yuji; Yoshida, Yukiko; Kimura, Noriko; Kakinuma, Atsushi

    2015-10-23

    The regulatory mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate carboykinase (GTP) (EC 4.1.1.32) (PEPCK) gene expression and gluconeogenesis by phenobarbital (PB), which is known to induce drug-metabolizing enzymes, was investigated. Higher level of PEPCK mRNA was observed in spherical rat primary hepatocytes on EHS-gel than monolayer hepatocytes on TIC (type I collagen). We found that PB directly suppressed PEPCK gene expression in spherical hepatocytes on EHS-gel, but not in those on TIC. PB strongly suppressed cAMP-dependent induction of PEPCK gene expression. Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT), another gluconeogenic enzyme, was induced by cAMP, but not suppressed by PB. Chronic administration of PB reduced hepatic PEPCK mRNA in streptozotocin-induced diabetic and nondiabetic rats, and PB reduced blood glucose level in diabetic rats. Increased TAT mRNA in diabetic rats was not suppressed by PB. These results indicated that PB-dependent reduction is specific to PEPCK. From pyrvate challenge test, PB suppressed the increased gluconeogenesis in diabetic rats. PEPCK gene promoter activity was suppressed by PB in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, we found that spherical hepatocytes cultured on EHS-gel are capable to respond to PB to suppress PEPCK gene expression. Moreover, our results indicate that hypoglycemic action of PB result from transcriptional repression of PEPCK gene and subsequent suppression of gluconeogenesis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase and isocitrate lyase in both tomato fruits and leaves, and in the flesh of peach and some other fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famiani, Franco; Paoletti, Andrea; Battistelli, Alberto; Moscatello, Stefano; Chen, Zhi-Hui; Leegood, Richard C; Walker, Robert P

    2016-09-01

    In this study the occurrence of a number of enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis was investigated in both tomato fruits and leaves during their development and senescence and in some other fruits. The enzymes studied were phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) and glyoxysomal isocitrate lyase (ICL). PPDK was detected in the ripe flesh of tomato, and much smaller amounts were detected in the flesh of both peach and pepper, whereas it was not detected (not present or at very low abundance) in the other fruits which were investigated (apricot, aubergine, blackberry, blueberry, cherry, grape, plum, raspberry and red current). By contrast PEPCK was present in the flesh of all the fruits investigated. Very small amounts of ICL were detected in ripe tomato flesh. PEPCK was present in the skin, flesh, locular gel and columella of tomato fruit, and in these its abundance increased greatly during ripening. PPDK showed a similar distribution, however, its abundance did not increase during ripening. PEPCK was not detected in tomato leaves at any stage of their development or senescence. The content of PPDK g(-1) fresh weight (FW) increased in tomato leaves as they matured, however, it declined during their senescence. In tomato leaves the content of ICL g(-1) FW increased until the mid-stage of development, then decreased as the leaf matured, and then increased during the latter stages of senescence. In the flesh of tomato fruits the contents of PPDK and PEPCK g(-1) FW decreased during senescence. The results suggest that in fruits other than tomato the bulk of any gluconeogenic flux proceeds via PEPCK, whereas in tomato both PEPCK and PPDK could potentially be utilised. Further, the results indicate that the conversion of pyruvate/acetyl-CoA to malate by the glyoxylate cycle, for which ICL is necessary, is not a major pathway utilised by gluconeogenesis in fruits under normal conditions of growth. Finally, the results contribute to

  6. Complex regulation of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene pck and characterization of its GntR-type regulator IolR as a repressor of myo-inositol utilization genes in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaffl, Simon; Brocker, Melanie; Kalinowski, Jörn; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Bott, Michael

    2013-09-01

    DNA affinity chromatography with the promoter region of the Corynebacterium glutamicum pck gene, encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, led to the isolation of four transcriptional regulators, i.e., RamA, GntR1, GntR2, and IolR. Determination of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity of the ΔramA, ΔgntR1 ΔgntR2, and ΔiolR deletion mutants indicated that RamA represses pck during growth on glucose about 2-fold, whereas GntR1, GntR2, and IolR activate pck expression about 2-fold irrespective of whether glucose or acetate served as the carbon source. The DNA binding sites of the four regulators in the pck promoter region were identified and their positions correlated with the predicted functions as repressor or activators. The iolR gene is located upstream and in a divergent orientation with respect to a iol gene cluster, encoding proteins involved in myo-inositol uptake and degradation. Comparative DNA microarray analysis of the ΔiolR mutant and the parental wild-type strain revealed strongly (>100-fold) elevated mRNA levels of the iol genes in the mutant, indicating that the primary function of IolR is the repression of the iol genes. IolR binding sites were identified in the promoter regions of iolC, iolT1, and iolR. IolR therefore is presumably subject to negative autoregulation. A consensus DNA binding motif (5'-KGWCHTRACA-3') which corresponds well to those of other GntR-type regulators of the HutC family was identified. Taken together, our results disclose a complex regulation of the pck gene in C. glutamicum and identify IolR as an efficient repressor of genes involved in myo-inositol catabolism of this organism.

  7. The contribution of stored malate and citrate to the substrate requirements of metabolism of ripening peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) flesh is negligible. Implications for the occurrence of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famiani, Franco; Farinelli, Daniela; Moscatello, Stefano; Battistelli, Alberto; Leegood, Richard C; Walker, Robert P

    2016-04-01

    The first aim of this study was to determine the contribution of stored malate and citrate to the substrate requirements of metabolism in the ripening flesh of the peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) cultivar Adriatica. In the flesh, stored malate accumulated before ripening could contribute little or nothing to the net substrate requirements of metabolism. This was because there was synthesis and not dissimilation of malate throughout ripening. Stored citrate could potentially contribute a very small amount (about 5.8%) of the substrate required by metabolism when the whole ripening period was considered, and a maximum of about 7.5% over the latter part of ripening. The second aim of this study was to investigate why phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) an enzyme utilised in gluconeogenesis from malate and citrate is present in peach flesh. The occurrence and localisation of enzymes utilised in the metabolism of malate, citrate and amino acids were determined in peach flesh throughout its development. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (essential for the synthesis of malate and citrate) was present in the same cells and at the same time as PEPCK and NADP-malic enzyme (both utilised in the dissimilation of malate and citrate). A hypothesis is presented to explain the presence of these enzymes and to account for the likely occurrence of gluconeogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase as the Sole Anaplerotic Enzyme in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, R.M.; Trueheart, J.; Harrison, J.C.; Pronk, J.T.; Van Maris, A.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase is the sole anaplerotic enzyme in glucose-grown cultures of wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pyruvate carboxylase-negative (Pyc–) S. cerevisiae strains cannot grow on glucose unless media are supplemented with C4 compounds, such as aspartic acid. In several

  9. Structural and Functional Studies of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová, Iva; Snášel, Jan; Dostál, Jiří; Brynda, Jiří; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Singh, M.; Tarábek, Ján; Vaněk, O.; Bednárová, Lucie; Pichová, Iva

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 3 (2015), e0120682/1-e0120682/21 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1302 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 241587 - SYSTEMTB Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : crystal structure * noncovalent complexes * Mycobacterium tuberculosis * mechanism Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.057, year: 2015 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0120682

  10. Structure of a GTP-dependent Bacterial PEP-carboxykinase from Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aich, Sanjukta; Prasad, Lata; Delbaere, Louis T.J. (Saskatchewan)

    2008-06-23

    GTP-dependent phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) is the key enzyme that controls the blood glucose level during fasting in higher animals. Here we report the first substrate-free structure of a GTP-dependent phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase from a bacterium, Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgPCK). The protein crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1} with four molecules per asymmetric unit. The 2.3 {angstrom} resolution structure was solved by molecular replacement using the human cytosolic PCK (hcPCK) structure (PDB ID: 1KHF) as the starting model. The four molecules in the asymmetric unit pack as two dimers, and is an artifact of crystal packing. However, the P-loop and the guanine binding loop of the substrate-free CgPCK structure have different conformations from the other published GTP-specific PCK structures, which all have bound substrates and/or metal ions. It appears that a change in the P-loop and guanine binding loop conformation is necessary for substrate binding in GTP-specific PCKs, as opposed to overall domain movement in ATP-specific PCKs.

  11. Phylogenetic Study of the Evolution of PEP-Carboxykinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjukta Aich

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK is the key enzyme to initiate the gluconeogenic pathway in vertebrates, yeast, plants and most bacteria. Nucleotide specificity divided all PCKs into two groups. All the eukaryotic mammalian and most archaeal PCKs are GTP-specifi c. Bacterial and fungal PCKs can be ATP-or GTP-specific but all plant PCKs are ATPspecific. Amino acid sequence alignment of PCK enzymes shows that the nucleotide binding sites are somewhat conserved within each class with few exceptions that do not have any clear ATP- or GTP-specific binding motif. Although the active site residues are mostly conserved in all PCKs, not much significant sequence homology persists between ATP- and GTPdependent PCK enzymes. There is only one planctomycetes PCK enzyme (from Cadidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis that shows sequence homology with both ATP-and GTP-dependent PCKs. Phylogenetic studies have been performed to understand the evolutionary relationship of various PCKs from different sources. Based on this study a flowchart of the evolution of PCK has been proposed.

  12. The Role of Cysteine Residues in Catalysis of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová, Iva; Hubálek, Martin; Lepšík, Martin; Bednárová, Lucie; Pazderková, Markéta; Kopecký, V. Jr.; Snášel, Jan; Dostál, Jiří; Pichová, Iva

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2017), č. článku e0170373. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1302; GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : structural insights * metabolism * parameters Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0170373

  13. Gestational high fat diet programs hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene expression and histone modification in neonatal offspring rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strakovsky, Rita S; Zhang, Xiyuan; Zhou, Dan; Pan, Yuan-Xiang

    2011-06-01

    In insulin resistance and type II diabetes, there is an elevation of hepatic gluconeogenesis, which contributes to hyperglycaemia. Studies in experimental animals have provided evidence that consumption of high fat (HF) diets by female rats programs the progeny for glucose intolerance in adulthood, but the mechanisms behind the in utero programming remain poorly understood. The present study analysed the effect of a maternal HF diet on fetal gluconeogenic gene expression and potential regulation mechanism related to histone modifications. Dams were fed either a Control (C, 16% kcal fat) or a high-fat (HF, 45% kcal fat) diet throughout gestation. Livers of the offspring were collected on gestational day 21 and analysed to determine the consequences of a maternal HF diet on molecular markers of fetal liver gluconeogenesis. We demonstrated that offspring of HF-fed dams were significantly heavier and had significantly higher blood glucose levels at the time of delivery than offspring of dams fed the C diet. While maternal gluconeogenesis and plasma glucose were not affected by the HF diet, offspring of HF-fed dams had significantly higher mRNA contents of gluconeogenic genes in addition to the elevated plasma glucose. In addition to increased transcription rate, a gestational HF diet resulted in modifications of the Pck1 histone code in livers of offspring. Our results demonstrate that in utero exposure to HF diet has the potential to program the gluconeogenic capacity of offspring through epigenetic modifications, which could potentially lead to excessive glucose production and altered insulin sensitivity in adulthood.

  14. Effect of iron deficiency on the localization of phosphoenolpyruvate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reading 7

    2012-05-08

    May 8, 2012 ... The results of immunolocalization using polyclonal antibody showed that this enzyme was detected in all regions ... pronounced in nodules of Fe-deficient plants than in those of Fe-sufficient plants for the sensitive cultivar Coco blanc. ... of bicarbonate to phosphoenolpyruvate to produce oxalo- acetate and ...

  15. Escherichia coli Phosphoenolpyruvate-Dependent Phosphotransferase System : Equilibrium Kinetics and Mechanism of Enzyme I Phosphorylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, H; Lolkema, Juke S.; Robillard, George T.

    1981-01-01

    The phosphorylation of enzyme I from the Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system was studied by means of isotope exchange between phosphoenolpyruvate and pyruvate. Experiments monitoring 1H-2H exchange showed that enzyme I phosphorylation is accompanied by the

  16. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from cherimoya fruit: properties, kinetics and effects of high CO(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, T; Escribano, M I; Merodio, C

    2001-12-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) regulatory properties were studied in non-photosynthetic (mesocarp) and photosynthetic (peel) tissues from cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) fruit stored in air, in order to gain a better understanding of in vivo enzyme regulation. Analyses were also performed with fruit treated with 20% CO(2)-20% O(2) to define the role of PEPC as part of an adaptive mechanism to high external carbon dioxide levels. The results revealed that the special kinetic characteristics of the enzyme from mesocarp--high V(max) and low sensibility to L-malate inhibition - are related to the active acid metabolism of these fruits and point to a high rate of reassimilation of respired CO(2) into keto-acids. With respect to fruit stored in air, PEPC in crude extracts from CO(2)-treated cherimoyas gave a similar V(max) (1.12+/-0.03 microkat x mg(-1) protein), a lower apparent K(m) (68+/-9 microM for PEP) and a higher I(50) of L-malate (5.95+/-0.3 mM). These kinetic values showed the increase in the affinity of this enzyme toward one of its substrate, PEP, by elevated external CO(2) concentrations. The lower K(m) value and lower sensitivity to L-malate are consistent with higher in vivo carboxylation reaction efficiency in CO(2)-treated cherimoyas, while pointing to an additional enzyme regulation system via CO(2).

  17. Ginsenoside Compound K suppresses the hepatic gluconeogenesis via activating adenosine-5'monophosphate kinase: A study in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shengnan; Li, Wei; Yu, Yang; Yao, Fan; A, Lixiang; Lan, Xiaoxin; Guan, Fengying; Zhang, Ming; Chen, Li

    2015-10-15

    Compound K (CK) is a final intestinal metabolite of protopanaxadiol-type ginsenoside. We have reported that CK presented anti-diabetic effect via diminishing the expressions of hepatic gluconeogenesis key enzyme. Here, we further explore the possible mechanism of CK on suppression hepatic gluconeogenesis via activation of adenosine-5'monophosphate kinase (AMPK) on type 2 diabetes mice in vivo and in HepG2 cells. Type 2 diabetes mice model was developed by high fat diet combined with STZ injection. 30mg/kg/d CK was orally administrated for 4weeks, the fasting blood glucose level and 2h OGTT were conducted, and the protein expression of AMPK, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) were examined. The mechanism of Compound K on hepatic gluconeogenesis was further explored in HepG2 hepatocytes. Glucose production, the protein expression of AMPK, PEPCK, G6pase and PGC-1α, hepatic nuclear factor 4α (HNF-4α) and forkhead transcription factor O1 (FOXO1) were determined after Compound K treatment at the presence of AMPK inhibitor Compound C. We observed that CK inhibited the expression of PEPCK and G6Pase in the liver and in HepG2 hepatocytes. Meanwhile, CK treatment remarkably increased the activation of AMPK, while decreasing the expressions of PGC-1α, HNF-4α and FOXO1. However, AMPK inhibitor Compound C could reverse these effects of CK on gluconeogenesis in part. The results indicated that the effect of CK on suppression hepatic gluconeogenesis might be via the activation the AMPK activity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Ixodes scapularis Tick Cells Control Anaplasma phagocytophilum Infection by Increasing the Synthesis of Phosphoenolpyruvate from Tyrosine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cabezas Cruz, Alejandro; Espinosa, P. J.; Obregon, D. A.; Alberdi, P.; de la Fuente, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, AUG 17 (2017), č. článku 375. ISSN 2235-2988 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : proteomics * transcriptomics * phosphoenolpyruvate * glycerol-3-phosphate * Ixodes scapularis * Anaplasma phagocytophilum Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.300, year: 2016

  19. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from C4 leaves is selectively targeted for inhibition by anionic phospholipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monreal, J.A.; McLoughlin, F.; Echevarría, C.; García-Mauriño, S.; Testerink, C.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) is an enzyme playing a crucial role in photosynthesis of C4 plants. Here, we identify anionic phospholipids as novel regulators that inhibit C4 PEPC activity and provide evidence that the enzyme partially localizes to membranes.

  20. Improvement of Escherichia coli production strains by modification of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gosset Guillermo

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The application of metabolic engineering in Escherichia coli has resulted in the generation of strains with the capacity to produce metabolites of commercial interest. Biotechnological processes with these engineered strains frequently employ culture media containing glucose as the carbon and energy source. In E. coli, the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS transports glucose when this sugar is present at concentrations like those used in production fermentations. This protein system is involved in phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar transport, therefore, its activity has an important impact on carbon flux distribution in the phosphoenolpyruvate and pyruvate nodes. Furthermore, PTS has a very important role in carbon catabolite repression. The properties of PTS impose metabolic and regulatory constraints that can hinder strain productivity. For this reason, PTS has been a target for modification with the purpose of strain improvement. In this review, PTS characteristics most relevant to strain performance and the different strategies of PTS modification for strain improvement are discussed. Functional replacement of PTS by alternative phosphoenolpyruvate-independent uptake and phosphorylation activities has resulted in significant improvements in product yield from glucose and productivity for several classes of metabolites. In addition, inactivation of PTS components has been applied successfully as a strategy to abolish carbon catabolite repression, resulting in E. coli strains that use more efficiently sugar mixtures, such as those obtained from lignocellulosic hydrolysates.

  1. AcEST: DK948798 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DLWWGKGSPNIEMDEKTFLINRERAVDYLNS 231 >sp|P49292|PEPC1_UROPA Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase [ATP] 1 OS=Urochloa panico... >sp|Q9XFA2|PEPC2_UROPA Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase [ATP] 2 OS=Urochloa panico

  2. Light Moderates the Induction of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase by NaCl and Abscisic Acid in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElwain, Elizabeth F.; Bohnert, Hans J.; Thomas, John C.

    1992-01-01

    In Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase is synthesized de novo in response to osmotic stress, as part of the switch from C3-photosynthesis to Crassulacean acid metabolism. To better understand the environmental signals involved in this pathway, we have investigated the effects of light on the induced expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase mRNA and protein in response to stress by 400 millimolar NaCl or 10 micromolar abscisic acid in hydroponically grown plants. When plants were grown in high-intensity fluorescent or incandescent light (850 microeinsteins per square meter per second), NaCl and abscisic acid induced approximately an eightfold accumulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase mRNA when compared to untreated controls. Levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase protein were high in these abscisic acid- and NaCl-treated plants, and detectable in the unstressed control. Growth in high-intensity incandescent (red) light resulted in approximately twofold higher levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase mRNA in the untreated plants when compared to control plants grown in high-intensity fluorescent light. In low light (300 microeinsteins per square meter per second fluorescent), only NaCl induced mRNA levels significantly above the untreated controls. Low light grown abscisic acid- and NaCl-treated plants contained a small amount of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase protein, whereas the (untreated) control plants did not contain detectable amounts of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. Environmental stimuli, such as light and osmotic stress, exert a combined effect on gene expression in this facultative halophyte. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:16668999

  3. Consequences of phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotranferase system and pyruvate kinase isozymes inactivation in central carbon metabolism flux distribution in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meza Eugenio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP is a key central metabolism intermediate that participates in glucose transport, as precursor in several biosynthetic pathways and it is involved in allosteric regulation of glycolytic enzymes. In this work we generated W3110 derivative strains that lack the main PEP consumers PEP:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS- and pyruvate kinase isozymes PykA and PykF (PTS-pykA- and PTS-pykF-. To characterize the effects of these modifications on cell physiology, carbon flux distribution and aromatics production capacity were determined. Results When compared to reference strain W3110, strain VH33 (PTS- displayed lower specific rates for growth, glucose consumption and acetate production as well as a higher biomass yield from glucose. These phenotypic effects were even more pronounced by the additional inactivation of PykA or PykF. Carbon flux analysis revealed that PTS inactivation causes a redirection of metabolic flux towards biomass formation. A cycle involving PEP carboxylase (Ppc and PEP carboxykinase (Pck was detected in all strains. In strains W3110, VH33 (PTS- and VH35 (PTS-, pykF-, the net flux in this cycle was inversely correlated with the specific rate of glucose consumption and inactivation of Pck in these strains caused a reduction in growth rate. In the PTS- background, inactivation of PykA caused a reduction in Ppc and Pck cycling as well as a reduction in flux to TCA, whereas inactivation of PykF caused an increase in anaplerotic flux from PEP to OAA and an increased flux to TCA. The wild-type and mutant strains were modified to overproduce L-phenylalanine. In resting cells experiments, compared to reference strain, a 10, 4 and 7-fold higher aromatics yields from glucose were observed as consequence of PTS, PTS PykA and PTS PykF inactivation. Conclusions Metabolic flux analysis performed on strains lacking the main activities generating pyruvate from PEP revealed the high

  4. Isolation and characterization of the carbon-phosphorus bond-forming enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate mutase from the mollusk Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A; Kim, J; Martin, B M; Dunaway-Mariano, D

    1998-02-20

    The enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate mutase was purified to homogeneity from the mollusk Mytilus edulis. The subunit size of the native homotetramer was determined to be 34,000 Da. The steady-state kinetic constants for catalysis of the conversion of phosphonopyruvate to phosphoenolpyruvate at pH 7.5 and 25 degrees C were measured at kcat = 34 s-1, phosphonopyruvate Km = 3 microM, and Mg2+ Km = 4 microM. The enzyme displayed a broad specificity for divalent metal ion activation; Co2+, Mn2+, Zn2+, and Ni2+ are activators, whereas Ca2+ is not. Analysis of the pH dependence of the Mg2+-activated mutase-catalyzed reaction of phosphonopyruvate revealed one residue that must be protonated (apparent pKa = 8.3) and a second residue that must be unprotonated (apparent pKa = 7.7) for maximal catalytic activity.

  5. Regulation of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase and Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Induction in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L. by Cytokinin 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Jürgen M.; Piepenbrock, Mechtild

    1992-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase), the key enzyme of Crassulacean acid metabolism, is induced by water stress in leaves of Mesembryanthemum crystallinum. In water-stressed plants or excised leaves, exogenous cytokinin suppresses PEPCase transcript accumulation in the leaves. Cytokinin (6-benzylaminopurine) used in concentrations from 5 to 500 micromolar (a) inhibits the upregulation of PEPCase transcripts, enzyme activity, and Crassulacean acid metabolism induction in salt-stressed intact plants when sprayed once daily during the stress period, (b) inhibits the accumulation of PEPCase mRNA in leaves from well-watered plants, (c) down-regulates PEPCase transcripts within 8 hours in prestressed, intact plants after a single spraying of an individual leaf, (d) inhibits accumulation of PEPCase transcripts in excised, wilting leaves, and (e) accelerates the net decrease of PEPCase transcripts in excised leaves from prestressed plants under rehydration conditions. When roots, the main site of cytokinin biosynthesis, are excised, PEPCase induction under drought stress is intensified. We propose that roots, acting as sensors of soil water status, may regulate PEPCase gene expression in the leaves with cytokinin as a signal transducer. ImagesFigure 2Figure 7 PMID:16669088

  6. Regulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in Pinus halepensis needles submitted to ozone and water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Véronique; Cabané, Mireille; Dizengremel, Pierre

    2003-04-01

    Effects of ozone and/or drought stresses on phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc, EC 4.1.1.31) regulation in Pinus halepensis Mill. needles were assessed over 3 months in controlled conditions. Whereas moderated water stress applied to Aleppo pine had no effect on PEPc activity compared to the control, which was probably related to the high tolerance of this species to drought, ozone stress induced a dramatic increase of PEPc activity in pine needles. This stimulation of the anaplerotic pathway could provide substrates to repair processes, well known for being enhanced upon ozone exposure. The ozone-increased PEPc activity was related, to a certain extent, to an increase in protein and mRNA levels. The possible role of the stimulation of the phosphorylation status of the enzyme in the increased PEPc activity under ozone was also investigated. Following the demonstration of the existence of the phosphorylation site at the N terminal part of Aleppo pine PEPc, it was shown that, under ozone treatment, the light/dark PEPc activity ratio and the Ki (malate) for PEPc were increased. This strengthens the hypothesis of an ozone-related post-translational process, which could be part of an adaptation of the plants to prolonged stress. When ozone and water stress were applied in combination, the enhancement in PEPc activity was only related to changes in gene expression. This difference in PEPc regulation, compared to the effect of single stress, could be the consequence of the specific action of each stress on the enzyme. This study brings new insights into the regulation of PEPc in a C3 plant, Aleppo pine under these stresses. A different regulatory mechanism of PEPc is occurring according to the stress. The physiological implications of the increase in PEPc activity in response to ozone and/or water stress are discussed.

  7. Functional analysis of putative phosphoenolpyruvate transporters localized to the Golgi apparatus in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoritsune, Ken-ichi; Higuchi, Yujiro; Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2014-11-01

    The cell surface of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is negatively charged due to the presence of pyruvylated oligosaccharides, which is important for cell-cell recognition. However, the mechanism of pyruvate supply to oligosaccharides is not clearly understood. Here, we analyzed three putative phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) transporter genes (pet1(+) , pet2(+) , and pet3(+) ) in S. pombe, identified by sequence homology search against the Arabidopsis thaliana PEP transporter AtPPT1. Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain carrying a disruption in pet1(+) (pet1Δ) or in pet2(+) (pet2Δ), but not the strain carrying a disruption in pet3(+) (pet3Δ), showed reduced pyruvate level on the cell surface. This reduction in pyruvate level was restored to the control level by expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Pet1p and Pet2p in respective disruptants. Fluorescence microscope studies revealed that GFP-tagged Pet1p and Pet2p were localized to the Golgi apparatus. Although expression of neither AtPPT1 nor AtPPT2 suppressed the pet1Δ phenotype, that of chimeric constructs, where the N-terminal regions of AtPPT1 and AtPPT2 were replaced by the N-terminal region of Pet1p, partially suppressed the pet1Δ phenotype. Furthermore, the reduction in cell surface negative charge in pet1Δ cells was restored by incubating these cells with recombinant Pvg1p and PEP. Thus, Pet1p and Pet2p are likely involved in transporting PEP from the cytoplasm into the Golgi. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Towards efficient photosynthesis: overexpression of Zea mays phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandoi, Deepika; Mohanty, Sasmita; Govindjee; Tripathy, Baishnab C

    2016-12-01

    Plants with C4 photosynthesis are efficient in carbon assimilation and have an advantage over C3 photosynthesis. In C4 photosynthesis, the primary CO2 fixation is catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Here, we show that overexpression of Zea mays PEPC cDNA, under the control of (35)S promoter, in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in ~7-10 fold higher protein abundance and ~7-10 fold increase in PEPC activity in the transgenic lines than that in the vector control. We suggest that overexpression of PEPC played an anaplerotic role to increase the supply of 4-carbon carboxylic acids, which provided carbon skeletons for increased amino acid and protein synthesis. Higher protein content must have been responsible for increased metabolic processes including chlorophyll biosynthesis, photosynthesis, and respiration. Consequently, the PEPC-overexpressed transgenic plants had higher chlorophyll content, enhanced electron transport rate (ETR), lower non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll a fluorescence, and a higher performance index (PI) than the vector control. Consistent with these observations, the rate of CO2 assimilation, the starch content, and the dry weight of PEPC-overexpressed plants increased by 14-18 %, 10-18 %, and 6.5-16 %, respectively. Significantly, transgenics were tolerant to salt stress as they had increased ability to synthesize amino acids, including the osmolyte proline. NaCl (150 mM)-treated transgenic plants had higher variable to maximum Chl a fluorescence (F v/F m) ratio, higher PI, higher ETR, and lower NPQ than the salt-treated vector controls. These results suggest that expression of C4 photosynthesis enzyme(s) in a C3 plant can improve its photosynthetic capacity with enhanced tolerance to salinity stress.

  9. Effects of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase desensitization on glutamic acid production in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Masaru; Sawada, Kazunori; Ogura, Kotaro; Shimono, Yuta; Hagiwara, Takuya; Sugimoto, Masakazu; Onuki, Akiko; Yokota, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032, a glutamic-acid producing actinobacterium, is subject to feedback inhibition by metabolic intermediates such as aspartic acid and 2-oxoglutaric acid, which implies the importance of PEPC in replenishing oxaloacetic acid into the TCA cycle. Here, we investigated the effects of feedback-insensitive PEPC on glutamic acid production. A single amino-acid substitution in PEPC, D299N, was found to relieve the feedback control by aspartic acid, but not by 2-oxoglutaric acid. A simple mutant, strain R1, having the D299N substitution in PEPC was constructed from ATCC 13032 using the double-crossover chromosome replacement technique. Strain R1 produced glutamic acid at a concentration of 31.0 g/L from 100 g/L glucose in a jar fermentor culture under biotin-limited conditions, which was significantly higher than that of the parent, 26.0 g/L (1.19-fold), indicative of the positive effect of desensitized PEPC on glutamic acid production. Another mutant, strain DR1, having both desensitized PEPC and PYK-gene deleted mutations, was constructed in a similar manner using strain D1 with a PYK-gene deleted mutation as the parent. This mutation had been shown to enhance glutamic acid production in our previous study. Although marginal, strain D1 produced higher glutamic acid, 28.8 g/L, than ATCC13032 (1.11-fold). In contrast, glutamic acid production by strain DR-1 was elevated up to 36.9 g/L, which was 1.42-fold higher than ATCC13032 and significantly higher than the other three strains. The results showed a synergistic effect of these two mutations on glutamic acid production in C. glutamicum. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Environmental Control of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Induction in Mature Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepenbrock, Mechtild; Schmitt, Jürgen M.

    1991-01-01

    Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L. plants shift the mode of carbon assimilation from C3 to Crassulacean acid metabolism when stressed by high salinity. A prerequisite for Crassulacean acid metabolism induction is the synthesis of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase). A moderate increase in the abundance of PEPCase transcripts and activity is observed in 7-week-old, well-watered plants. This increase in PEPCase coincides in time with a decrease in the growth rate of the shoots. The steady-state level of PEPCase activity is uniform along the leaves of well-watered plants, as can be shown by comparing leaves of different age from individual 7-week-old plants. In contrast, the rate of induction in response to salt stress varies with the age of plants and to a lesser extent with the age of the leaves. Two-week-old seedlings induce PEPCase slowly under a moderate salt stress regimen, whereas older plants induce faster. When individual leaves from a seven-week-old plant are compared with respect to induction velocity, no clear-cut correlation with leaf age is apparent. The highest induction rate is observed in leaves from node five that are about 2 weeks old at the beginning of the experiment. PEPCase transcripts are readily down-regulated to minute levels when detached leaves are hydrated. The levels reached after 8 hours of rehydration are very similar, regardless of whether the leaves were cut from young or old plants or whether the plants were previously salt-stressed or well-watered. It is concluded that environmental rather than developmental factors are predominant in determining abundance of PEPCase activity and transcripts in leaves of mature M. crystallinum plants. ImagesFigure 1Figure 3Figure 5 PMID:16668542

  11. Oxygen-18 incorporation into malic acid during nocturnal carbon dioxide fixation in crassulacean acid metabolism plants: a new approach to estimating in vivo carbonic anhydrase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtum, J.A.M.; Summons, R.; Roeske, C.A.; Comins, H.N.; O' Leary, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants fix carbon dioxide at night by the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate. If CO2 fixation is conducted with TC YO2, then in the absence of carbonic anhydrase, the malate formed by dark CO2 fixation should also contain high levels of carbon-13 and oxygen-18. Conversely, if carbonic anhydrase is present and highly active, oxygen exchange between CO2 and cellular H2O will occur more rapidly than carboxylation, and the ( TC) malate formed will contain little or no oxygen-18 above the natural abundance level. The presence of oxygen-18 in these molecules can be detected either by nuclear magnetic resonance or by mass spectrometry. Studies of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the presence and absence of carbonic anhydrase in vitro confirm the validity of the method. When CAM plants are studied by this method, we find that most species show incorporation of a significant amount of oxygen-18. Comparison of these results with results of isotope fractionation and gas exchange studies permits calculation of the in vivo activity of carbonic anhydrase toward HCO3 compared with that of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. The ratio (carbonic anhydrase activity/phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity) is species dependent and varies from a low of about 7 for Ananas comosus to values near 20 for Hoya carnosa and Bryophyllum pinnatum, 40 for Kalanchoee daigremontiana, and 100 or greater for Bryophyllum tubiflorum, Kalanchoee serrata, and Kalanchoae tomentosa. Carbonic anhydrase activity increases relative to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity at higher temperature. 37 references, 2 figures, 8 tables.

  12. Reticulate leaves and stunted roots are independent phenotypes pointing at opposite roles of the phosphoenolpyruvate/phosphate translocator defective in cue1 in the plastids of both organs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Staehr, P.; Loettgert, T.; Christmann, A.; Krueger, S.; Rosar, Ch.; Rolčík, Jakub; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; Bell, K.; Weber, A.P.M.; Fluegge, U-I.; Haeusler, R.E.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, APR 2014 (2014) ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : secondary metabolism * phosphate translocator * phosphoenolpyruvate Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.948, year: 2014

  13. The NMR side-chain assignments and solution structure of enzyme IIBcellobiose of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system of Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    AB, Eiso; Schuurman-Wolters, Gea; Reizer, Jonathan; Saier, Milton H.; Dijkstra, Klaas; Scheek, Ruud M.; Robillard, George T.

    The assignment of the side-chain Nh IR resonances and the determination of the three-dimensional solution structure of the C10S mutant of enzyme IIBcellobiose (IIBcel) of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system of Escherichia coli are presented. The side-chain resonances were

  14. Artificial miRNA inhibition of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase increases fatty acid production in a green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chaogang; Chen, Xi; Li, Hui; Wang, Jiangxin; Hu, Zhangli

    2017-01-01

    Nutrient limitation, such as nitrogen depletion, is the most widely used method for improving microalgae fatty acid production; however, these harsh conditions also inhibit algal growth significantly and even kill cells at all. To avoid these problems, we used artificial microRNA (amiRNA) technology as a useful tool to manipulate metabolic pathways to increase fatty acid contents effectively in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We down-regulated the expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), which catalyzes the formation of oxaloacetate from phosphoenolpyruvate and regulates carbon flux. amiRNAs against two CrPEPC genes were designed and transformed into Chlamydomonas cells and amiRNAs were induced by heat shock treatment. The transcription levels of amiRNAs increased 16-28 times, resulting in the remarkable decreases of the expression of CrPEPCs. In the end, inhibiting the expression of the CrPEPC genes dramatically increased the total fatty acid content in the transgenic algae by 28.7-48.6%, which mostly increased the content of C16-C22 fatty acids. Furthermore, the highest content was that of C18:3n3 with an average increase of 35.75%, while C20-C22 fatty acid content significantly increased by 85-160%. Overall our results suggest that heat shock treatment induced the expression of amiRNAs, which can effectively down-regulate the expression of CrPEPCs in C. reinhardtii, resulting in an increase of fatty acid synthesis with the most significant increase occurring for C16 to C22 fatty acids.

  15. AcEST: DK952213 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALKSTHIL 151 >sp|P49292|PEPC1_UROPA Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase [ATP] 1 OS=Urochloa panico...5 >sp|Q9XFA2|PEPC2_UROPA Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase [ATP] 2 OS=Urochloa panicoides GN=PCK2 PE=2 SV=1

  16. AcEST: DK954784 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available UROPA Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase [ATP] 2 OS=Urochloa panicoides GN=PCK2 PE=2 SV=1 Length = 626 Score ... Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase [ATP] 1 OS=Urochloa panicoides GN=PCK1 PE=1 SV=1 Length = 624 Score = 41.

  17. Phosphatidylcholine contributes to in vivo (31)P MRS signal from the human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmelík, Marek; Valkovič, Ladislav; Wolf, Peter; Bogner, Wolfgang; Gajdošík, Martin; Halilbasic, Emina; Gruber, Stephan; Trauner, Michael; Krebs, Michael; Trattnig, Siegfried; Krššák, Martin

    2015-07-01

    To demonstrate the overlap of the hepatic and bile phosphorus ((31)P) magnetic resonance (MR) spectra and provide evidence of phosphatidylcholine (PtdC) contribution to the in vivo hepatic (31)P MRS phosphodiester (PDE) signal, suggested in previous reports to be phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). Phantom measurements to assess the chemical shifts of PEP and PtdC signals were performed at 7 T. A retrospective analysis of hepatic 3D (31)P MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) data from 18 and five volunteers at 3 T and 7 T, respectively, was performed. Axial images were inspected for the presence of gallbladder, and PDE signals in representative spectra were quantified. Phantom experiments demonstrated the strong pH-dependence of the PEP chemical shift and proved the overlap of PtdC and PEP (~2 ppm relative to phosphocreatine) at hepatic pH. Gallbladder was covered in seven of 23 in vivo 3D-MRSI datasets. The PDE(gall)/γ-ATP(liver) ratio was 4.8-fold higher (p = 0.001) in the gallbladder (PDE(gall)/γ-ATP(liver) = 3.61 ± 0.79) than in the liver (PDE(liver)/γ-ATP(liver) = 0.75 ± 0.15). In vivo 7 T (31)P MRSI allowed good separation of PDE components. The gallbladder is a strong source of contamination in adjacent (31)P MR hepatic spectra due to biliary phosphatidylcholine. In vivo (31)P MR hepatic signal at 2.06 ppm may represent both phosphatidylcholine and phosphoenolpyruvate, with a higher phosphatidylcholine contribution due to its higher concentration. • In vivo (31)P MRS from the gallbladder shows a dominant biliary phosphatidylcholine signal at 2.06 ppm. • Intrahepatic (31)P MRS signal at 2.06 ppm may represent both intrahepatic phosphatidylcholine and phosphoenolpyruvate. • In vivo (31)P MRS has the potential to monitor hepatic phosphatidylcholine.

  18. Vibrio cholerae phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system control of carbohydrate transport, biofilm formation, and colonization of the germfree mouse intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houot, Laetitia; Chang, Sarah; Absalon, Cedric; Watnick, Paula I

    2010-04-01

    The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS) is a highly conserved phosphotransfer cascade whose components modulate many cellular functions in response to carbohydrate availability. Here, we further elucidate PTS control of Vibrio cholerae carbohydrate transport and activation of biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. We then define the role of the PTS in V. cholerae colonization of the adult germfree mouse intestine. We report that V. cholerae colonizes both the small and large intestines of the mouse in a distribution that does not change over the course of a month-long experiment. Because V. cholerae possesses many PTS-independent carbohydrate transporters, the PTS is not essential for bacterial growth in vitro. However, we find that the PTS is essential for colonization of the germfree adult mouse intestine and that this requirement is independent of PTS regulation of biofilm formation. Therefore, competition for PTS substrates may be a dominant force in the success of V. cholerae as an intestinal pathogen. Because the PTS plays a role in colonization of environmental surfaces and the mammalian intestine, we propose that it may be essential to successful transit of V. cholerae through its life cycle of pathogenesis and environmental persistence.

  19. Multiple isoforms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in the Orchidaceae (subtribe Oncidiinae): implications for the evolution of crassulacean acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvera, Katia; Winter, Klaus; Rodriguez, B Leticia; Albion, Rebecca L; Cushman, John C

    2014-07-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) catalyses the initial fixation of atmospheric CO2 into oxaloacetate and subsequently malate. Nocturnal accumulation of malic acid within the vacuole of photosynthetic cells is a typical feature of plants that perform crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). PEPC is a ubiquitous plant enzyme encoded by a small gene family, and each member encodes an isoform with specialized function. CAM-specific PEPC isoforms probably evolved from ancestral non-photosynthetic isoforms by gene duplication events and subsequent acquisition of transcriptional control elements that mediate increased leaf-specific or photosynthetic-tissue-specific mRNA expression. To understand the patterns of functional diversification related to the expression of CAM, ppc gene families and photosynthetic patterns were characterized in 11 closely related orchid species from the subtribe Oncidiinae with a range of photosynthetic pathways from C3 photosynthesis (Oncidium cheirophorum, Oncidium maduroi, Rossioglossum krameri, and Oncidium sotoanum) to weak CAM (Oncidium panamense, Oncidium sphacelatum, Gomesa flexuosa and Rossioglossum insleayi) and strong CAM (Rossioglossum ampliatum, Trichocentrum nanum, and Trichocentrum carthagenense). Phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of two main ppc lineages in flowering plants, two main ppc lineages within the eudicots, and three ppc lineages within the Orchidaceae. Our results indicate that ppc gene family expansion within the Orchidaceae is likely to be the result of gene duplication events followed by adaptive sequence divergence. CAM-associated PEPC isoforms in the Orchidaceae probably evolved from several independent origins. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  20. Salt Stress Increases the Level of Translatable mRNA for Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrem, James A.; Olson, Steve W.; Schmitt, Jürgen M.; Bohnert, Hans J.

    1987-01-01

    Mesembryanthemum crystallinum responds to salt stress by switching from C3 photosynthesis to Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). During this transition the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) increases in soluble protein extracts from leaf tissue. We monitored CAM induction in plants irrigated with 0.5 molar NaCl for 5 days during the fourth, fifth, and sixth week after germination. Our results indicate that the age of the plant influenced the response to salt stress. There was no increase in PEPCase protein or PEPCase enzyme activity when plants were irrigated with 0.5 molar NaCl during the fourth and fifth week after germination. However, PEPCase activity increased within 2 to 3 days when plants were salt stressed during the sixth week after germination. Immunoblot analysis with anti-PEPCase antibodies showed that PEPCase synthesis was induced in both expanded leaves and in newly developing axillary shoot tissue. The increase in PEPCase protein was paralleled by an increase in PEPCase mRNA as assayed by immunoprecipitation of PEPCase from the in vitro translation products of RNA from salt-stressed plants. These results demonstrate that salinity increased the level of PEPCase in leaf and shoot tissue via a stress-induced increase in the steady-state level of translatable mRNA for this enzyme. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16665596

  1. In vivo and in vitro antidiabetic effects of aqueous cinnamon extract and cinnamon polyphenol-enhanced food matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Diana M; Kuhn, Peter; Poulev, Alexander; Rojo, Leonel E; Lila, Mary Ann; Raskin, Ilya

    2012-12-15

    Cinnamon has a long history of medicinal use and continues to be valued for its therapeutic potential for improving metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes. In this study, a phytochemically-enhanced functional food ingredient that captures water soluble polyphenols from aqueous cinnamon extract (CE) onto a protein rich matrix was developed. CE and cinnamon polyphenol-enriched defatted soy flour (CDSF) were effective in acutely lowering fasting blood glucose levels in diet induced obese hyperglycemic mice at 300 and 600 mg/kg, respectively. To determine mechanisms of action, rat hepatoma cells were treated with CE and eluates of CDSF at a range of 1-25 μg/ml. CE and eluates of CDSF demonstrated dose-dependent inhibition of hepatic glucose production with significant levels of inhibition at 25 μg/ml. Furthermore, CE decreased the gene expression of two major regulators of hepatic gluconeogenesis, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose-6-phosphatase. The hypoglycemic and insulin-like effects of CE and CDSF may help to ameliorate type 2 diabetes conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent maltose:phosphotransferase activity in Fusobacterium mortiferum ATCC 25557: specificity, inducibility, and product analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robrish, S A; Fales, H M; Gentry-Weeks, C; Thompson, J

    1994-06-01

    Phosphoenolypyruvate-dependent maltose:phosphotransferase activity was induced in cells of Fusobacterium mortiferum ATCC 25557 during growth on maltose. The disaccharide was rapidly metabolized by washed cells maintained under anaerobic conditions, but fermentation ceased immediately upon exposure of the cell suspension to air. Coincidentally, high levels of a phosphorylated derivative accumulated within the cells. Chemical and enzymatic analyses, in conjunction with data from 1H, 13C, and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, established the structure of the purified compound as 6-O-phosphoryl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-4)-D-glucose (maltose 6-phosphate). A method for the preparation of substrate amounts of this commercially unavailable disaccharide phosphate is described. Permeabilized cells of F. mortiferum catalyzed the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphorylation of maltose under aerobic conditions. However, the hydrolysis of maltose 6-phosphate (to glucose 6-phosphate and glucose) by permeabilized cells or cell-free preparations required either an anaerobic environment or addition of dithiothreitol to aerobic reaction mixtures. The first step in dissimilation of the phosphorylated disaccharide appears to be catalyzed by an oxygen-sensitive maltose 6-phosphate hydrolase. Cells of F. mortiferum, grown previously on maltose, fermented a variety of alpha-linked glucosides, including maltose, turanose, palatinose, maltitol, alpha-methylglucoside, trehalose, and isomaltose. Conversely, cells grown on the separate alpha-glucosides also metabolized maltose. For this anaerobic pathogen, we suggest that the maltose:phosphotransferase and maltose 6-phosphate hydrolase catalyze the phosphorylative translocation and cleavage not only of maltose but also of structurally analogous alpha-linked glucosides.

  3. Influence of NaCl on Growth, Proline, and Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Levels in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum Suspension Cultures 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John C.; De Armond, Richard L.; Bohnert, Hans J.

    1992-01-01

    The facultative halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum responds to salt stress by increasing the levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) and other enzymes associated with Crassulacean acid metabolism. A more common response to salt stress in sensitive and tolerant species, including M. crystallinum, is the accumulation of proline. We have established M. crystallinum suspension cultures to investigate whether both these salt-induced responses occur at the cellular level. Leaf-and root-derived cultures maintain 5% of the total soluble amino acids as proline. Cell culture growth slows upon addition of 400 millimolar NaCl, and proline levels increase to 40% of the total soluble amino acids. These results suggest a functional salt-stress and response program in Mesembryanthemum cells. Suspension cultures grown with or without 400 millimolar NaCl have PEPCase levels that compare with those from roots and unstressed leaves. The predominant protein cross-reacting with an anti-PEPCase antibody corresponds to 105 kilodaltons (apparent molecular mass), whereas a second species of approximately 110 kilodaltons is present at low levels. In salt-stressed leaves, the 110 kilodalton protein is more prevalent. Levels of mRNA for both ppc1 (salt stress induced in leaves) and ppc2 (constitutive) genes in salt-treated suspensions cultures are equal to unstressed leaves, and only twice the levels found in untreated suspension cultures. Whereas cells accumulate proline in response to NaCl, PEPCase protein amounts remain similar in salt-treated and untreated cultures. The induction upon salt stress of the 110 kilodalton PEPCase protein and other Crassulacean acid metabolism enzymes in organized tissues is not observed in cell culture and may depend on tissue-dependent or photoautotrophy-dependent programs. ImagesFigure 4Figure 5 PMID:16668687

  4. Metabolic engineering for the production of shikimic acid in an evolved Escherichia coli strain lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolívar Francisco

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shikimic acid (SA is utilized in the synthesis of oseltamivir-phosphate, an anti-influenza drug. In this work, metabolic engineering approaches were employed to produce SA in Escherichia coli strains derived from an evolved strain (PB12 lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS- but with capacity to grow on glucose. Derivatives of PB12 strain were constructed to determine the effects of inactivating aroK, aroL, pykF or pykA and the expression of plasmid-coded genes aroGfbr, tktA, aroB and aroE, on SA synthesis. Results Batch cultures were performed to evaluate the effects of genetic modifications on growth, glucose consumption, and aromatic intermediate production. All derivatives showed a two-phase growth behavior with initial high specific growth rate (μ and specific glucose consumption rate (qs, but low level production of aromatic intermediates. During the second growth phase the μ decreased, whereas aromatic intermediate production reached its maximum. The double aroK- aroL- mutant expressing plasmid-coded genes (strain PB12.SA22 accumulated SA up to 7 g/L with a yield of SA on glucose of 0.29 mol/mol and a total aromatic compound yield (TACY of 0.38 mol/mol. Single inactivation of pykF or pykA was performed in PB12.SA22 strain. Inactivation of pykF caused a decrease in μ, qs, SA production, and yield; whereas TACY increased by 33% (0.5 mol/mol. Conclusions The effect of increased availability of carbon metabolites, their channeling into the synthesis of aromatic intermediates, and disruption of the SA pathway on SA production was studied. Inactivation of both aroK and aroL, and transformation with plasmid-coded genes resulted in the accumulation of SA up to 7 g/L with a yield on glucose of 0.29 mol/mol PB12.SA22, which represents the highest reported yield. The pykF and pykA genes were inactivated in strain PB12.SA22 to increase the production of aromatic compounds in the PTS

  5. Metabolic engineering for the production of shikimic acid in an evolved Escherichia coli strain lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante, Adelfo; Calderón, Rocío; Valdivia, Araceli; de Anda, Ramón; Hernández, Georgina; Ramírez, Octavio T; Gosset, Guillermo; Bolívar, Francisco

    2010-04-12

    Shikimic acid (SA) is utilized in the synthesis of oseltamivir-phosphate, an anti-influenza drug. In this work, metabolic engineering approaches were employed to produce SA in Escherichia coli strains derived from an evolved strain (PB12) lacking the phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS-) but with capacity to grow on glucose. Derivatives of PB12 strain were constructed to determine the effects of inactivating aroK, aroL, pykF or pykA and the expression of plasmid-coded genes aroGfbr, tktA, aroB and aroE, on SA synthesis. Batch cultures were performed to evaluate the effects of genetic modifications on growth, glucose consumption, and aromatic intermediate production. All derivatives showed a two-phase growth behavior with initial high specific growth rate (mu) and specific glucose consumption rate (qs), but low level production of aromatic intermediates. During the second growth phase the mu decreased, whereas aromatic intermediate production reached its maximum. The double aroK- aroL- mutant expressing plasmid-coded genes (strain PB12.SA22) accumulated SA up to 7 g/L with a yield of SA on glucose of 0.29 mol/mol and a total aromatic compound yield (TACY) of 0.38 mol/mol. Single inactivation of pykF or pykA was performed in PB12.SA22 strain. Inactivation of pykF caused a decrease in mu, qs, SA production, and yield; whereas TACY increased by 33% (0.5 mol/mol). The effect of increased availability of carbon metabolites, their channeling into the synthesis of aromatic intermediates, and disruption of the SA pathway on SA production was studied. Inactivation of both aroK and aroL, and transformation with plasmid-coded genes resulted in the accumulation of SA up to 7 g/L with a yield on glucose of 0.29 mol/mol PB12.SA22, which represents the highest reported yield. The pykF and pykA genes were inactivated in strain PB12.SA22 to increase the production of aromatic compounds in the PTS- background. Results indicate differential roles of Pyk

  6. In Vivo Hypoglycaemic Effect and Inhibitory Mechanism of the Branch Bark Extract of the Mulberry on STZ-Induced Diabetic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Yu Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Branch bark extract (BBE derived from the mulberry cultivar Husang 32 (Morus multicaulis L. with aqueous alcohol solution has been investigated as an inhibitor of α-glycosidase in vitro. Mulberry BBE was orally administered to STZ-induced diabetic mice for three weeks, and it improved the weight gain and ameliorated the swelling of liver and kidney in diabetic mice. Obviously, mulberry BBE not only can reduce the abnormally elevated levels of serum insulin and ameliorate insulin resistance induced by STZ, but also it regulates dyslipidemia in diabetic mice. To understand this therapeutic effect and the regulatory mechanisms of BBE in diabetic mice, a qRT-PCR experiment was performed, indicating that the mulberry BBE can regulate the mRNA expression of glycometabolism genes in diabetic mice, including glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase, glucokinase (GCK, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK, thereby regulating sugar metabolism and reducing the blood glucose level in diabetic mice. The mulberry BBE can increase the mRNA expression of the genes Ins1, Ins2 and pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1 and may decrease the insulin resistance in diabetic mice. Those results provide an important basis for making the best use of mulberry branch resources and producing biomedical drugs with added value.

  7. Control of Lactose Transport, β-Galactosidase Activity, and Glycolysis by CcpA in Streptococcus thermophilus : Evidence for Carbon Catabolite Repression by a Non-Phosphoenolpyruvate-Dependent Phosphotransferase System Sugar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaard, Patrick T.C. van den; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Vos, Willem M. de

    2000-01-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus, unlike many other gram-positive bacteria, prefers lactose over glucose as the primary carbon and energy source. Moreover, lactose is not taken up by a phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) but by the dedicated transporter LacS. In this paper we

  8. Effect of Phosphorylation on Hydrogen-Bonding Interactions of the Active Site Histidine of the Phosphocarrier Protein HPr of the Phosphoenolpyruvate-Dependent Phosphotransferase System Determined by 15N NMR Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Alard A. van; Lange, Liesbeth C.M. de; Bachovchin, William W.; Robillard, George T.

    1990-01-01

    The phosphocarrier protein HPr of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar transport system of Escherichia coli can exist in a phosphorylated and a nonphosphorylated form. During phosphorylation, the phosphoryl group is carried on a histidine residue, His15. The hydrogen-bonding state of this

  9. Details of Mannitol Transport in Escherichia coli Elucidated by Site-Specific Mutagenesis and Complementation of Phosphorylation Site Mutants of the Phosphoenolpyruvate-Dependent Mannitol-Specific Phosphotransferase System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weeghel, R.P. van; Hoek, Y.Y. van der; Pas, H.H.; Elferink, Maria; Keck, W.; Robillard, G.T.

    1991-01-01

    The mannitol transport protein (EIImtl) carries out translocation with concomitant phosphorylation of mannitol from the periplasm to the cytoplasm, at the expense of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). The phosphoryl group which is needed for this group translocation is sequentially transferred from PEP via

  10. Induction of mRNA for Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Is Correlated with a Decrease in Shoot Water Content in Well-Irrigated Mesembryanthemum crystallinum 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Jürgen M.; Piepenbrock, Mechtild

    1992-01-01

    The abundance of mRNA specific for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) was measured in leaves from well-watered plants of Mesembryanthemum crystallinum. Plants grown side by side in pots of four different volumes (0.16, 0.74, 2.6, 6.5 liters) were compared. The time of increase in the steady-state level of PEPCase mRNA in well-watered plants was dependent on soil volume. The larger the pot, the later PEPCase transcripts were increased. PEPCase mRNA induction started when shoot water content decreased to well below 4000% of dry weight. No positive correlation with the developmental status of the plants could be found. The data indicate that PEPCase mRNA induction in well-watered plants up to 10 weeks of age is controlled environmentally rather than developmentally. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:16668951

  11. Unraveling the evolutionary history of the phosphoryl-transfer chain of the phosphoenolpyruvate:phosphotransferase system through phylogenetic analyses and genome context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zúñiga Manuel

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS plays a major role in sugar transport and in the regulation of essential physiological processes in many bacteria. The PTS couples solute transport to its phosphorylation at the expense of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP and it consists of general cytoplasmic phosphoryl transfer proteins and specific enzyme II complexes which catalyze the uptake and phosphorylation of solutes. Previous studies have suggested that the evolution of the constituents of the enzyme II complexes has been driven largely by horizontal gene transfer whereas vertical inheritance has been prevalent in the general phosphoryl transfer proteins in some bacterial groups. The aim of this work is to test this hypothesis by studying the evolution of the phosphoryl transfer proteins of the PTS. Results We have analyzed the evolutionary history of the PTS phosphoryl transfer chain (PTS-ptc components in 222 complete genomes by combining phylogenetic methods and analysis of genomic context. Phylogenetic analyses alone were not conclusive for the deepest nodes but when complemented with analyses of genomic context and functional information, the main evolutionary trends of this system could be depicted. Conclusion The PTS-ptc evolved in bacteria after the divergence of early lineages such as Aquificales, Thermotogales and Thermus/Deinococcus. The subsequent evolutionary history of the PTS-ptc varied in different bacterial lineages: vertical inheritance and lineage-specific gene losses mainly explain the current situation in Actinobacteria and Firmicutes whereas horizontal gene transfer (HGT also played a major role in Proteobacteria. Most remarkably, we have identified a HGT event from Firmicutes or Fusobacteria to the last common ancestor of the Enterobacteriaceae, Pasteurellaceae, Shewanellaceae and Vibrionaceae. This transfer led to extensive changes in the metabolic and regulatory networks of these bacteria

  12. Justification for antioxidant preconditioning (or how to protect insulin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    dependent process with a more efficient glucagon-induced expression of the glu- coneogenic rate-limiting enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) at higher PO2. Reciprocally, insu- lin-induced expression of the glycolytic enzyme gluco ...

  13. Nitric oxide inhibits glycogen synthesis in isolated rat hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprangers, F.; Sauerwein, H. P.; Romijn, J. A.; van Woerkom, G. M.; Meijer, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the existence of intrahepatic regulation of glucose metabolism by Kupffer cell products. Nitric oxide (NO) is known to inhibit gluconeogenic flux through pyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. However, NO may also influence glucose metabolism at

  14. ORIGINAL ARTICLES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    perivenous hepatocytes are more involved in glycolysis and ketone body production. Biochemical alterations in hepatic function include increased phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity in the periportal area and reduced glucokinase activity in the perivenous region which enhances gluconeogenesis and ...

  15. In silico cloning and bioinformatic analysis of PEPCK gene in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-03-29

    Mar 29, 2010 ... Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), a critical gluconeogenic enzyme, catalyzes the first committed step in the diversion of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates toward gluconeogenesis. According to the relative conservation of homologous gene, a bioinformatics strategy was applied to.

  16. In silico cloning and bioinformatic analysis of PEPCK gene in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), a critical gluconeogenic enzyme, catalyzes the first committed step in the diversion of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates toward gluconeogenesis. According to the relative conservation of homologous gene, a bioinformatics strategy was applied to clone Fusarium ...

  17. Salt induction and the partial purification/characterization of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase protein-serine kinase from an inducible crassulacean-acid-metabolism (CAM) plant, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B; Chollet, R

    1994-10-01

    Treatment of the common ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum) with high salinity caused the well-documented increase in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) protein and a concomitant rise in the activity of a Ca(2+)-independent PEPC-kinase (PEPC-PK). When the plants were irrigated with 0.5 M NaCl, PEPC protein level and PEPC-PK activity started to increase after 2 days of treatment and continued to rise for the next 8 days, attaining about a 14- and 8-fold total increase, respectively. This salt-induced PEPC-kinase activity was detected only in leaves harvested from the stressed plants at night. This highly regulated protein kinase was partially purified about 3500-fold from these darkened, salt-stressed plants by sequential fast-protein liquid chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose, blue dextran-agarose, and Superdex 75. The gel-filtration data indicated that the native PEPC-kinase has a molecular weight around 33,000. Complementary analysis by denaturing electrophoresis and subsequent in situ renaturation and assay of PEPC-kinase activity revealed two major PEPC-PK polypeptides with approximate molecular masses of 39 and 32 kDa. The partially purified M. crystallinum PEPC-kinase readily phosphorylated PEPCs purified from maize, M. crystallinum, and tobacco leaves and a recombinant sorghum enzyme. In contrast, this Ca(2+)-independent protein kinase phosphorylated neither a recombinant sorghum mutant PEPC in which the target residue (Ser-8) was changed by site-directed mutagenesis to Asp nor histone III-S, casein, and bovine serum albumin. The optimal pH for PEPC-PK activity was pH 8.0 and this activity was affected by both the substrate (phosphoenolpyruvate) and the negative allosteric effector (L-malate) of PEPC in a pH-dependent manner. Overall, the molecular properties of this highly regulated PEPC-kinase from M. crystallinum are strikingly similar to those reported recently by this laboratory for the reversibly light-activated C4 enzyme from maize (Arch

  18. Carbon fixation in Pinus halepensis submitted to ozone. Opposite response of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontaine, V.; Pelloux, J.; Afif, D.; Gerant, D.; Dizengremel, P. [Univ. Henri Poincare-Nancy 1, Lab. de Biologie Forestiere, Vandauvre les Nancy cedex (France); Podor, M.; Grieu, P. [ENSAIA-INRA, Lab. Agronomie Environnement, Vandauvre les Nancy cedex (France)

    1999-06-01

    The effects of ozone exposure on carbon-fixation-related processes in Pinus halepensis Mill. needles were assessed over 3 months under controlled conditions. Ozone fumigation (200 ppb) did not induce a modification of either net CO{sub 2} assimilation or stomatal conductance in 1-year-old needles, whereas ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco, EC 4.1.1.39) activity was shown to be reduced by a half. Moreover, this ozone-induced reduction in Rubisco activity was associated with a decrease in the quantity of Rubisco, as determined by the decrease in the large subunit (LSU). On the other hand, 200-ppb ozone fumigation induced a strong increase in both activity and quantity of another carboxylating enzyme, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31), generally considered in C{sub 3} plants to participate in carbon catabolism processes. Ozone induced a significant decrease in the Rubisco/PEPC activity ratio which promotes the role of PEPC in trees under ozone stress. The role of this carboxylase will be discussed. (au) 42 refs.

  19. Cloning of cellobiose phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase genes: Functional expression in recombinant Escherichia coli and identification of a putative binding region for disaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Xiaokuang; Davis, F.C.; Ingram, L.O. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Hespell, R.B. [USDA Agricultural Research Service, Peoria, IL (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Genomic libraries from nine cellobiose-metabolizing bacteria were screened for cellobiose utilization. Positive clones were recovered from six libraries, all of which encode phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) proteins. Clones from Bacillus subtilis, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, and Klebsiella oxytoca allowed the growth of recombinant Escherichia coli in cellobiose-M9 minimal medium. The K. oxytoca clone, pLOI1906, exhibited an unusually broad substrate range (cellobiose, arbutin, salicin, and methylumbelliferyl derivatives of glucose, cellobiose, mannose, and xylose) and was sequenced. The insert in this plasmid encoded the carboxy-terminal region of a putative regulatory protein, cellobiose permease (single polypeptide), and phospho-{beta}-glucosidase, which appear to form an operon (casRAB). Subclones allowed both casA and casB to be expressed independently, as evidenced by in vitro complementation. An analysis of the translated sequences from the EIIC domains of cellobiose, aryl-{beta}-glucoside, and other disaccharide permeases allowed the identification of a 50-amino-acid conserved region. A disaccharide consensus sequence is proposed for the most conserved segment (13 amino acids), which may represent part of the EIIC active site for binding and phosphorylation. 63 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. CO2 reduction and organic compounds production by photosynthetic bacteria with surface displayed carbonic anhydrase and inducible expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ju-Yong; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2017-01-01

    In Rhodobacter sphaeroides, carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) is a zinc-containing metalloenzyme that catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO2 to HCO3- while phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; 4.1.1.31), an enzyme involved in the carbon metabolism that catalyzed the fixation of CO2 to PEP, is a key factor for biological fixation of CO2 and enhances the production of organic compounds. In this study, the recombinant R. sphaeroides with highly-expressed CA was developed based on a surface displayed system of CA (pJY-OmpCA) on the outer membrane of R. sphaeroides using outer membrane protein (Omp) in R. sphaeroides, Finally, two more different recombinant R. sphaeroides were developed, which transformed with a two-vector system harboring cytosolic expressed CA (pJY-OmpCA-CA)or PEPC (pJY-OMPCA-PEPC) in R. sphaeroides with surface displayed CA on the outer membrane. In case of recombinant R. sphaeroides with the pJY-OmpCA-PEPC, it has shown the highest CO2 reduction efficiency and the production of several organic compounds (carotenoids, polyhydroxybutyrate, malic acid, succinic acid). It means that the surface displayed CA on the R. sphaeroides would accelerate the CO2-bicabonate conversion on the bacterial outer membrane. Moreover, inducible over-expression of PEPC with surface-displayed CA was successfully used to facilitate a rapider CO2 reduction and quicker production of organic compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Phosphatidylcholine contributes to in vivo {sup 31}P MRS signal from the human liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmelik, Marek; Bogner, Wolfgang; Gajdosik, Martin; Gruber, Stephan; Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna, MR Centre of Excellence, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Valkovic, Ladislav [Medical University of Vienna, MR Centre of Excellence, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Institute of Measurement Science, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Department of Imaging Methods, Bratislava (Slovakia); Wolf, Peter; Krebs, Michael [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine III, Vienna (Austria); Halilbasic, Emina; Trauner, Michael [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine III, Vienna (Austria); Krssak, Martin [Medical University of Vienna, MR Centre of Excellence, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine III, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-07-15

    To demonstrate the overlap of the hepatic and bile phosphorus ({sup 31}P) magnetic resonance (MR) spectra and provide evidence of phosphatidylcholine (PtdC) contribution to the in vivo hepatic {sup 31}P MRS phosphodiester (PDE) signal, suggested in previous reports to be phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). Phantom measurements to assess the chemical shifts of PEP and PtdC signals were performed at 7 T. A retrospective analysis of hepatic 3D {sup 31}P MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) data from 18 and five volunteers at 3 T and 7 T, respectively, was performed. Axial images were inspected for the presence of gallbladder, and PDE signals in representative spectra were quantified. Phantom experiments demonstrated the strong pH-dependence of the PEP chemical shift and proved the overlap of PtdC and PEP (∝2 ppm relative to phosphocreatine) at hepatic pH. Gallbladder was covered in seven of 23 in vivo 3D-MRSI datasets. The PDE{sub gall}/γ-ATP{sub liver} ratio was 4.8-fold higher (p = 0.001) in the gallbladder (PDE{sub gall}/γ-ATP{sub liver} = 3.61 ± 0.79) than in the liver (PDE{sub liver}/γ-ATP{sub liver} = 0.75 ± 0.15). In vivo 7 T {sup 31}P MRSI allowed good separation of PDE components. The gallbladder is a strong source of contamination in adjacent {sup 31}P MR hepatic spectra due to biliary phosphatidylcholine. In vivo {sup 31}P MR hepatic signal at 2.06 ppm may represent both phosphatidylcholine and phosphoenolpyruvate, with a higher phosphatidylcholine contribution due to its higher concentration. (orig.)

  2. Ex vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Kant M; Lopes-Calcas, Ana; Honke, Michael L; O'Brien-Moran, Zoe; Buist, Richard; West, Michael; Martin, Melanie

    2017-07-01

    To advance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies further for in vivo tissue characterization with histopathologic validation, we investigated the feasibility of ex vivo tissue imaging of a surgically removed human brain tumor as a comprehensive approach for radiology-pathology correlation in histoanatomically identical fashion in a rare case of pigmented ganglioglioma with complex paramagnetic properties. Pieces of surgically removed ganglioglioma, containing melanin and hemosiderin pigments, were imaged with a small bore 7-T MRI scanner to obtain T1-, T2-, and T2*-weighted image and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Corresponding histopathological slides were prepared for routine hematoxylin and eosin stain and special stains for melanin and iron/hemosiderin to correlate with MRI signal characteristics. Furthermore, mean diffusivity (MD) maps were generated from DTI data and correlated with cellularity using image analysis. While the presence of melanin was difficult to interpret in in vivo MRI with certainty due to concomitant hemosiderin pigments and calcium depositions, ex vivo tissue imaging clearly demonstrated pieces of tissue exhibiting the characteristic MR signal pattern for melanin with pathologic confirmation in a histoanatomically identical location. There was also concordant correlation between MD and cellularity. Although it is still in an initial phase of development, ex vivo tissue imaging is a promising approach, which offers radiology-pathology correlation in a straightforward and comprehensive manner.

  3. AcEST: DK949893 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DKRV 192 >sp|Q9XFA2|PEPC2_UROPA Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase [ATP] 2 OS=Urochloa panicoides GN=PCK2 PE=...oenolpyruvate carboxykinase [ATP] 1 OS=Urochloa panicoides GN=PCK1 PE=1 SV=1 Length = 624 Score = 126 bits (

  4. Physiological investigation of C4-phosphoenolpyruvate-carboxylase-introduced rice line shows that sucrose metabolism is involved in the improved drought tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Li, Xia; He, Yafei; Zhang, Jinfei; Yan, Ting; Liu, Xiaolong

    2017-06-01

    We compared the drought tolerance of wild-type (WT) and transgenic rice plants (PC) over-expressing the maize C4PEPC gene, which encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) gene, and evaluated the roles of saccharide and sugar-related enzymes in the drought response. Pot-grown seedlings were subjected to real drought conditions outdoors, and the yield components were compared between PC and untransformed wild-type (WT) plants. The stable yield from PC plants was associated with higher net photosynthetic rate under the real drought treatment. The physiological characters of WT and PC seedlings under a simulated drought treatment (25% (w/v) polyethylene glycol-6000 for 3 h; PEG 6000 treatment) were analyzed in detail for the early response of drought. The relative water content was higher in PC than in WT, and PEPC activity and the C4-PEPC transcript level in PC were elevated under the simulated drought conditions. The endogenous saccharide responses also differed between PC and WT under simulated drought stress. The higher sugar decomposition rate in PC than in WT under drought analog stress was related to the increased activities of sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose synthase, acid invertase, and neutral invertase, increased transcript levels of VIN1, CIN1, NIN1, SUT2, SUT4, and SUT5, and increased activities of superoxide dismutase and peroxidase in the leaves. The greater antioxidant defense capacity of PC and its relationship with saccharide metabolism was one of the reasons for the improved drought tolerance. In conclusion, PEPC effectively alleviated oxidative damage and enhanced the drought tolerance in rice plants, which were more related to the increase of the endogenous saccharide decomposition. These findings show that components of C4 photosynthesis can be used to increase the yield of rice under drought conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Light-dependent activation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase by reversible phosphorylation in cluster roots of white lupin plants: diurnal control in response to photosynthate supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, Michael W; Feil, Regina; Lunn, John E; Plaxton, William C

    2016-04-10

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a tightly regulated enzyme that controls carbohydrate partitioning to organic acid anions (malate, citrate) excreted in copious amounts by cluster roots of inorganic phosphate (Pi)-deprived white lupin plants. Excreted malate and citrate solubilize otherwise inaccessible sources of mineralized soil Pi for plant uptake. The aim of this study was to test the hypotheses that (1) PEPC is post-translationally activated by reversible phosphorylation in cluster roots of illuminated white lupin plants, and (2) light-dependent phosphorylation of cluster root PEPC is associated with elevated intracellular levels of sucrose and its signalling metabolite, trehalose-6-phosphate. White lupin plants were cultivated hydroponically at low Pi levels (≤1 µm) and subjected to various light/dark pretreatments. Cluster root PEPC activity andin vivophosphorylation status were analysed to assess the enzyme's diurnal, post-translational control in response to light and dark. Levels of various metabolites, including sucrose and trehalose-6-phosphate, were also quantified in cluster root extracts using enzymatic and spectrometric methods. During the daytime the cluster root PEPC was activated by phosphorylation at its conserved N- terminal seryl residue. Darkness triggered a progressive reduction in PEPC phosphorylation to undetectable levels, and this was correlated with 75-80 % decreases in concentrations of sucrose and trehalose-6- phosphate. Reversible, light-dependent regulatory PEPC phosphorylation occurs in cluster roots of Pi-deprived white lupin plants. This likely facilitates the well-documented light- and sucrose-dependent exudation of Pi-solubilizing organic acid anions by the cluster roots. PEPC'sin vivophosphorylation status appears to be modulated by sucrose translocated from CO2-fixing leaves into the non-photosynthetic cluster roots. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany

  6. Boosting Anaplerotic Reactions by Pyruvate Kinase Gene Deletion and Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Desensitization for Glutamic Acid and Lysine Production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Atsushi; Sawada, Kazunori; Wada, Masaru

    In the 1980s, Shiio and coworkers demonstrated using random mutagenesis that the following three phenotypes were effective for boosting lysine production by Corynebacterium glutamicum: (1) low-activity-level citrate synthase (CSL), (2) phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) resistant to feedback inhibition by aspartic acid (PEPCR), and (3) pyruvate kinase (PYK) deficiency. Here, we reevaluated these phenotypes and their interrelationship in lysine production using recombinant DNA techniques.The pyk deletion and PEPCR (D299N in ppc) independently showed marginal effects on lysine production, but both phenotypes synergistically increased lysine yield, demonstrating the importance of PEPC as an anaplerotic enzyme in lysine production. Similar effects were also found for glutamic acid production. CSL (S252C in gltA) further increased lysine yield. Thus, using molecular techniques, the combination of these three phenotypes was reconfirmed to be effective for lysine production. However, a simple CSL mutant showed instabilities in growth and lysine yield.Surprisingly, the pyk deletion was found to increase biomass production in wild-type C. glutamicum ATCC13032 under biotin-sufficient conditions. The mutant showed a 37% increase in growth (based on OD660) compared with the ATCC13032 strain in a complex medium containing 100 g/L glucose. Metabolome analysis revealed the intracellular accumulation of excess precursor metabolites. Thus, their conversion into biomass was considered to relieve the metabolic distortion in the pyk-deleted mutant. Detailed physiological studies of various pyk-deleted mutants also suggested that malate:quinone oxidoreductase (MQO) is important to control both the intracellular oxaloacetic acid (OAA) level and respiration rate. These findings may facilitate the rational use of C. glutamicum in fermentation industries.

  7. In vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Bruce A; Lenning, Jacob; Khetarpal, Nikita; Tran, Catherine; Wu, Johnny Y; Berri, Ali M; Dernay, Kristin; Haacke, E Mark; Shafie-Khorassani, Fatema; Podolsky, Robert H; Gant, John C; Maimaiti, Shaniya; Thibault, Olivier; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Bennett, Brian M; Roberts, Robin

    2017-09-01

    Hippocampus oxidative stress is considered pathogenic in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease (AD), and in neurodevelopmental disorders, such as Angelman syndrome (AS). Yet clinical benefits of antioxidant treatment for these diseases remain unclear because conventional imaging methods are unable to guide management of therapies in specific hippocampus subfields in vivo that underlie abnormal behavior. Excessive production of paramagnetic free radicals in nonhippocampus brain tissue can be measured in vivo as a greater-than-normal 1/ T 1 that is quenchable with antioxidant as measured by quench-assisted (Quest) MRI. Here, we further test this approach in phantoms, and we present proof-of-concept data in models of AD-like and AS hippocampus oxidative stress that also exhibit impaired spatial learning and memory. AD-like models showed an abnormal gradient along the CA1 dorsal-ventral axis of excessive free radical production as measured by Quest MRI, and redox-sensitive calcium dysregulation as measured by manganese-enhanced MRI and electrophysiology. In the AS model, abnormally high free radical levels were observed in dorsal and ventral CA1. Quest MRI is a promising in vivo paradigm for bridging brain subfield oxidative stress and behavior in animal models and in human patients to better manage antioxidant therapy in devastating neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases.-Berkowitz, B. A., Lenning, J., Khetarpal, N., Tran, C., Wu, J. Y., Berri, A. M., Dernay, K., Haacke, E. M., Shafie-Khorassani, F., Podolsky, R. H., Gant, J. C., Maimaiti, S., Thibault, O., Murphy, G. G., Bennett, B. M., Roberts, R. In vivo imaging of prodromal hippocampus CA1 subfield oxidative stress in models of Alzheimer disease and Angelman syndrome. © FASEB.

  8. Reticulate leaves and stunted roots are independent phenotypes pointing at opposite roles of the phosphoenolpyruvate/phosphate translocator defective in cue1 in the plastids of both organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staehr, Pia; Löttgert, Tanja; Christmann, Alexander; Krueger, Stephan; Rosar, Christian; Rolčík, Jakub; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; Bell, Kirsten; Weber, Andreas P. M.; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Häusler, Rainer E.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) serves not only as a high energy carbon compound in glycolysis, but it acts also as precursor for plastidial anabolic sequences like the shikimate pathway, which produces aromatic amino acids (AAA) and subsequently secondary plant products. After conversion to pyruvate, PEP can also enter de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, the synthesis of branched-chain amino acids, and the non-mevalonate way of isoprenoid production. As PEP cannot be generated by glycolysis in chloroplasts and a variety of non-green plastids, it has to be imported from the cytosol by a phosphate translocator (PT) specific for PEP (PPT). A loss of function of PPT1 in Arabidopsis thaliana results in the chlorophyll a/b binding protein underexpressed1 (cue1) mutant, which is characterized by reticulate leaves and stunted roots. Here we dissect the shoot- and root phenotypes, and also address the question whether or not long distance signaling by metabolites is involved in the perturbed mesophyll development of cue1. Reverse grafting experiments showed that the shoot- and root phenotypes develop independently from each other, ruling out long distance metabolite signaling. The leaf phenotype could be transiently modified even in mature leaves, e.g. by an inducible PPT1RNAi approach or by feeding AAA, the cytokinin trans-zeatin (tZ), or the putative signaling molecule dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol glucoside (DCG). Hormones, such as auxins, abscisic acid, gibberellic acid, ethylene, methyl jasmonate, and salicylic acid did not rescue the cue1 leaf phenotype. The low cell density1 (lcd1) mutant shares the reticulate leaf-, but not the stunted root phenotype with cue1. It could neither be rescued by AAA nor by tZ. In contrast, tZ and AAA further inhibited root growth both in cue1 and wild-type plants. Based on our results, we propose a model that PPT1 acts as a net importer of PEP into chloroplast, but as an overflow valve and hence exporter in root plastids. PMID:24782872

  9. Reticulate leaves and stunted roots are independent phenotypes pointing at opposite roles of the phosphoenolpyruvate/phosphate translocator defective in cue1 in the plastids of both organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia eStaehr

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP serves not only as a high energy carbon compound in glycolysis, but it acts also as precursor for plastidial anabolic sequences like the shikimate pathway, which produces aromatic amino acids (AAA and subsequently secondary plant products. After conversion to pyruvate, PEP can also enter de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, the synthesis of branched-chain amino acids, and the non-mevalonate way of isoprenoid production. As PEP cannot be generated by glycolysis in chloroplasts and a variety of non-green plastids, it has to be imported from the cytosol by a phosphate translocator (PT specific for PEP (PPT. A loss of function of PPT1 in Arabidopsis thaliana results in the chlorophyll a/b binding protein underexpressed1 (cue1 mutant, which is characterised by reticulate leaves and stunted roots. Here we dissect the shoot- and root phenotypes, and also address the question whether or not long distance signalling by metabolites is involved in the perturbed mesophyll development of cue1. Reverse grafting experiments showed that the shoot- and root phenotypes develop independently from each other, ruling out long distance metabolite signalling. The leaf phenotype could be transiently modified even in mature leaves, e.g. by an inducible PPT1RNAi approach or by feeding aromatic amino acids (AAA, the cytokinin trans-zeatin (tZ, or the putative signalling molecule dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol glucoside (DCG. Hormones, such as auxins, abscisic acid, gibberellic acid, ethylene, methyl jasmonate, and salicylic acid did not rescue the cue1 leaf phenotype. The low cell density1 (lcd1 mutant shares the reticulate leaf-, but not the stunted root phenotype with cue1. It could neither be rescued by AAA nor by tZ. In contrast, tZ and AAA further inhibited root growth both in cue1 and wild-type plants. Based on our results, we propose a model that PPT1 acts as a net importer of PEP into chloroplast, but as an overflow valve and hence exporter in

  10. In vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenblum, Julia; Iglesias, José A; Hermann, Martin; Walsen, Tanja; Wilfinger, Armin; Meyer, Dirk; Kimmel, Robin A

    2018-02-08

    The three-dimensional architecture of the pancreatic islet is integral to beta cell function, but the process of islet formation remains poorly understood due to the difficulties of imaging internal organs with cellular resolution. Within transparent zebrafish larvae, the developing pancreas is relatively superficial and thus amenable to live imaging approaches. We performed in vivo time-lapse and longitudinal imaging studies to follow islet development, visualizing both naturally occurring islet cells and cells arising with an accelerated timecourse following an induction approach. These studies revealed previously unappreciated fine dynamic protrusions projecting between neighboring and distant endocrine cells. Using pharmacological compound and toxin interference approaches, and single-cell analysis of morphology and cell dynamics, we determined that endocrine cell motility is regulated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Linking cell dynamics to islet formation, perturbation of protrusion formation disrupted endocrine cell coalescence, and correlated with decreased islet cell differentiation. These studies identified novel cell behaviors contributing to islet morphogenesis, and suggest a model in which dynamic exploratory filopodia establish cell-cell contacts that subsequently promote cell clustering. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Melissa; Li, Jianli; Cline, Hollis T

    2017-01-01

    The neurovascular niche is a specialized microenvironment formed by the interactions between neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and the vasculature. While it is thought to regulate adult neurogenesis by signaling through vascular-derived soluble cues or contacted-mediated cues, less is known about the neurovascular niche during development. In Xenopus laevis tadpole brain, NPCs line the ventricle and extend radial processes tipped with endfeet to the vascularized pial surface. Using in vivo labeling and time-lapse imaging in tadpoles, we find that intracardial injection of fluorescent tracers rapidly labels Sox2/3-expressing NPCs and that vascular-circulating molecules are endocytosed by NPC endfeet. Confocal imaging indicates that about half of the endfeet appear to appose the vasculature, and time-lapse analysis of NPC proliferation and endfeet-vascular interactions suggest that proliferative activity does not correlate with stable vascular apposition. Together, these findings characterize the neurovascular niche in the developing brain and suggest that, while signaling to NPCs may occur through vascular-derived soluble cues, stable contact between NPC endfeet and the vasculature is not required for developmental neurogenesis.

  12. IN VIVO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamila, Nargis; Khan, Naeem; Khan, Amir Atlas; Khan, Imran; Khan, Sadiq Noor; Zakaria, Zainal Amiruddin; Khairuddean, Melati; Osman, Hasnah; Kim, Kyong Su

    2017-01-01

    Garcinia hombroniana , known as "manggis hutan" (jungle mangosteen) in Malaysia, is distributed in tropical Asia, Borneo, Thailand, Andaman, Nicobar Islands, Vietnam and India. In Malaysia, its ripened crimson sour fruit rind is used as a seasoning agent in curries and culinary dishes. Its roots and leaves decoction is used against skin infections and after child birth. This study aimed to evaluate in vivo hepatoprotective and in vitro cytotoxic activities of 20% methanolic ethyl acetate (MEA) G. hombroniana bark extract. In hepatoprotective activity, liver damage was induced by treating rats with 1.0 mL carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 )/kg and MEA extract was administered at a dose of 50, 250 and 500 mg/kg 24 h before intoxication with CCl 4 . Cytotoxicity study was performed on MCF-7 (human breast cancer), DBTRG (human glioblastoma), PC-3 (human prostate cancer) and U2OS (human osteosarcoma) cell lines. 1 H, 13 C-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance), and IR (infrared) spectral analyses were also conducted for MEA extract. In hepatoprotective activity evaluation, MEA extract at a higher dose level of 500 mg/kg showed significant (pIR spectra exhibited bands, signals and J (coupling constant) values representing aromatic/phenolic constituents. From the results, it could be concluded that MEA extract has potency to inhibit hepatotoxicity and MCF-7 and DBTRG cancer cell lines which might be due to the phenolic compounds depicted from NMR and IR spectra.

  13. The DeoR-type transcriptional regulator SugR acts as a repressor for genes encoding the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartmann Michelle

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major uptake system responsible for the transport of fructose, glucose, and sucrose in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 is the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS. The genes encoding PTS components, namely ptsI, ptsH, and ptsF belong to the fructose-PTS gene cluster, whereas ptsG and ptsS are located in two separate regions of the C. glutamicum genome. Due to the localization within and adjacent to the fructose-PTS gene cluster, two genes coding for DeoR-type transcriptional regulators, cg2118 and sugR, are putative candidates involved in the transcriptional regulation of the fructose-PTS cluster genes. Results Four transcripts of the extended fructose-PTS gene cluster that comprise the genes sugR-cg2116, ptsI, cg2118-fruK-ptsF, and ptsH, respectively, were characterized. In addition, it was shown that transcription of the fructose-PTS gene cluster is enhanced during growth on glucose or fructose when compared to acetate. Subsequently, the two genes sugR and cg2118 encoding for DeoR-type regulators were mutated and PTS gene transcription was found to be strongly enhanced in the presence of acetate only in the sugR deletion mutant. The SugR regulon was further characterized by microarray hybridizations using the sugR mutant and its parental strain, revealing that also the PTS genes ptsG and ptsS belong to this regulon. Binding of purified SugR repressor protein to a 21 bp sequence identified the SugR binding site as an AC-rich motif. The two experimentally identified SugR binding sites in the fructose-PTS gene cluster are located within or downstream of the mapped promoters, typical for transcriptional repressors. Effector studies using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA revealed the fructose PTS-specific metabolite fructose-1-phosphate (F-1-P as a highly efficient, negative effector of the SugR repressor, acting in the micromolar range. Beside F-1-P, other sugar-phosphates like fructose

  14. [The influence of Bordetella pertussis bvgAS operon on formation and resolution of plasmid-chromosome cointegrates in Escherichia coli K12 mutants with damages in common components of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umiarov, A M; Siniashina, L N; Amelina, I P; Datsenko, K A; Bol'shakova, T N; Dobrynina, O Iu; Karataev, G I

    2010-01-01

    The plasmids containing the genetically marked variants of Bordetela pertussi transposon TnBP were synthesized on the base of the plasmid with thermosensitive replication. The integration frequency of these plasmids into the E.coli K12 chromosome at non-permissive temperature (42 degrees C) was determined. It was found that the frequency of forming of RSBP-induced plasmid-chromosome cointegrated in bacteria E.coli K12 deficient in HPr or Enzyme I of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system was decreased. The bvgAS operon from B.pertussis in trans-position restores the ability of mutant E.coli K12 to form and resolve.

  15. AcEST: DK955588 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available efinition sp|P49292|PEPC1_UROPA Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase [ATP] 1 OS=Urochloa panicoides Align lengt...inase [ATP] 1 OS=Urochloa panicoides GN=PCK1 PE=1 SV=1 Length = 624 Score = 135 bits (339), Expect = 2e-31 I...ANHKIGVDGKLTEEILAAGP 669 >sp|Q9XFA2|PEPC2_UROPA Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase [ATP] 2 OS=Urochloa pani...coides GN=PCK2 PE=2 SV=1 Length = 626 Score = 128 bits (321), Expect = 2e-29 Identi

  16. Photosynthesis of C3, C3–C4, and C4 grasses at glacial CO2

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Harshini; Sharwood, Robert E.; Tissue, David T.; Ghannoum, Oula

    2014-01-01

    Most physiology comparisons of C3 and C4 plants are made under current or elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 which do not reflect the low CO2 environment under which C4 photosynthesis has evolved. Accordingly, photosynthetic nitrogen (PNUE) and water (PWUE) use efficiency, and the activity of the photosynthetic carboxylases [Rubisco and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC)] and decarboxylases [NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEP-CK)] were compared ...

  17. The in vivo biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, Maria; Alhede, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria can grow and proliferate either as single, independent cells or organized in aggregates commonly referred to as biofilms. When bacteria succeed in forming a biofilm within the human host, the infection often becomes very resistant to treatment and can develop into a chronic state. Biofilms...... have been studied for decades using various in vitro models, but it remains debatable whether such in vitro biofilms actually resemble in vivo biofilms in chronic infections. In vivo biofilms share several structural characteristics that differ from most in vitro biofilms. Additionally, the in vivo...... experimental time span and presence of host defenses differ from chronic infections and the chemical microenvironment of both in vivo and in vitro biofilms is seldom taken into account. In this review, we discuss why the current in vitro models of biofilms might be limited for describing infectious biofilms...

  18. The estrogen hypothesis of schizophrenia implicates glucose metabolism: association study in three independent samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Line; Hansen, Thomas; Jakobsen, Klaus D.

    2008-01-01

    ) and the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (PCK1) and fructose-1,6-biphosphatase (FBP1) were nominal significantly associated with schizophrenia, and several haplotypes within enolase 2 gene (ENO2) consist of the same SNP allele having elevated risk of schizophrenia. Importantly, we find no evidence of stratification due...

  19. Two novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 4-bp ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ripheral tissues, including liver and adipose tissues (Yang et al. 2005). Injection of RBP4 decreases insulin signalling in muscle and induces the expression of the gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in the liver of mice (Yang et al. 2005). RBP4 was seen to contribute to glucose and lipid metabolism ...

  20. Role of PGC-1{alpha} in exercise and fasting induced adaptations in mouse liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Tobias Nørresø; Jørgensen, Stine Ringholm; Leick, Lotte

    2011-01-01

    induced regulation of key proteins in gluconeogenesis and metabolism in the liver. In both wild type (WT) and PGC-1a KO mice liver, the mRNA content of the gluconeogenic proteins glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) was upregulated during fasting. Pyruvate...

  1. Recombinant E. coli expressing Vitreoscilla haemoglobin prefers ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-08-13

    Aug 13, 2012 ... citrate cycle, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and synthesis of secondary metabolites (supplementary section 2). Succinate dehydrogenase (1.5-fold), isocitrate dehydroge- nase (2.3-fold), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (1.5- fold) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (2.2-fold), involved in ...

  2. ex vivo DNA assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B Fisher

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Even with decreasing DNA synthesis costs there remains a need for inexpensive, rapid and reliable methods for assembling synthetic DNA into larger constructs or combinatorial libraries. Advances in cloning techniques have resulted in powerful in vitro and in vivo assembly of DNA. However, monetary and time costs have limited these approaches. Here, we report an ex vivo DNA assembly method that uses cellular lysates derived from a commonly used laboratory strain of Escherichia coli for joining double-stranded DNA with short end homologies embedded within inexpensive primers. This method concurrently shortens the time and decreases costs associated with current DNA assembly methods.

  3. Scaphoid kinematics in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moojen, Thybout M.; Snel, Jeroen G.; Ritt, Marco J. P. F.; Venema, Henk W.; Kauer, John M. G.; Bos, Kurt E.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify 3-dimensional (3-D) in vivo scaphoid kinematics during flexion-extension motion (FEM) and radial-ulnar deviation (RUD) of the hand. The right wrists of 11 healthy volunteers were imaged by spiral computed tomography during RUD and 5 of those wrists also

  4. In-vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Timothy C; Kim, Michele M; Liang, Xing; Finlay, Jarod C; Busch, Theresa M

    2015-02-01

    Dosimetry of singlet oxygen ( 1 O 2 ) is of particular interest because it is the major cytotoxic agent causing biological effects for type-II photosensitizers during photodynamic therapy (PDT). An in-vivo model to determine the singlet oxygen threshold dose, [ 1 O 2 ] rx,sh , for PDT was developed. An in-vivo radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumor mouse model was used to correlate the radius of necrosis to the calculation based on explicit PDT dosimetry of light fluence distribution, tissue optical properties, and photosensitizer concentrations. Inputs to the model include five photosensitizer-specific photochemical parameters along with [ 1 O 2 ] rx,sh . Photosensitizer-specific model parameters were determined for benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD) and compared with two other type-II photosensitizers, Photofrin ® and m-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorin (mTHPC) from the literature. The mean values (standard deviation) of the in-vivo [ 1 O 2 ] rx,sh are approximately 0.56 (0.26) and 0.72 (0.21) mM (or 3.6×10 7 and 4.6×10 7 singlet oxygen per cell to reduce the cell survival to 1/e) for Photofrin ® and BPD, respectively, assuming that the fraction of generated singlet oxygen that interacts with the cell is 1. While the values for the photochemical parameters (ξ, σ, g , β) used for BPD were preliminary and may need further refinement, there is reasonable confidence for the values of the singlet oxygen threshold doses. In comparison, the [ 1 O 2 ] rx,sh value derived from in-vivo mouse study was reported to be 0.4 mM for mTHPC-PDT. However, the singlet oxygen required per cell is reported to be 9×10 8 per cell per 1/ e fractional kill in an in-vitro mTHPC-PDT study on a rat prostate cancer cell line (MLL cells) and is reported to be 7.9 mM for a multicell in-vitro EMT6/Ro spheroid model for mTHPC-PDT. A theoretical analysis is provided to relate the number of in-vitro singlet oxygen required per cell to reach cell killing of 1/ e to in-vivo singlet

  5. Umsetzung des KDSF-Datenmodells in VIVO

    OpenAIRE

    Walther, Tatiana; Hauschke, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Im Rahmen des Projekts „Umsetzung Kerndatensatz Forschung in VIVO“ wird am Open Science Lab der Technischen Informationsbibliothek Hannover (TIB) der Versuch unternommen, den Kerndatensatz Forschung in das Forschungsinformationssystem VIVO zu integrieren. Entwurf KDSF-VIVO-Alignment und KDSF-VIVO-Extension: https://github.com/VIVO-DE/VIVO-KDSF-Integration

  6. Fermentation and the properties of some enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in the trematode Calicophoron ijimai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vykhrestyuk, N P; Burenina, E A; Yarygina, G V

    1984-09-01

    Glycogen content, glucose consumption and the production of metabolic end products by Calicophoron ijimai were determined under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The major end products of fermentation were identified as lactic, acetic, propionic, isobutyric and alpha-methylbutyric acids, propionic acid predominating. The activities and properties of some of the enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism were determined. The worms showed high phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, malate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase (decarboxylating) but relatively low pyruvate kinase and very low lactate dehydrogenase activities. The pH optima, coenzyme, cofactor and ionic requirements of the enzymes were similar to those of other helminths. Malate dehydrogenase had an 8-fold greater affinity for oxaloacetate than malate, and was about 14 times more active for oxaloacetate reduction than malate oxidation. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase was 2.4 times more active and had a 2-fold greater affinity for phosphoenolpyruvate and dinucleotide than pyruvate kinase. The low activities of lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase but high activities of malate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase suggest that anaerobic carbohydrate catabolism follows the fumarate reductase pathway.

  7. In vivo histamine optical nanosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, Kevin J; Clark, Heather A

    2012-01-01

    In this communication we discuss the development of ionophore based nanosensors for the detection and monitoring of histamine levels in vivo. This approach is based on the use of an amine-reactive, broad spectrum ionophore which is capable of recognizing and binding to histamine. We pair this ionophore with our already established nanosensor platform, and demonstrate in vitro and in vivo monitoring of histamine levels. This approach enables capturing rapid kinetics of histamine after injection, which are more difficult to measure with standard approaches such as blood sampling, especially on small research models. The coupling together of in vivo nanosensors with ionophores such as nonactin provide a way to generate nanosensors for novel targets without the difficult process of designing and synthesizing novel ionophores.

  8. In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy; In vivo magnetisk resonansspektroskopi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakken, Inger Johanne; Skjetne, Tore; Gribbestad, Ingrid S.; Kvistad, Kjell Arne

    2002-07-01

    Magnetic resonance tomography (MR) has become a highly useful tool for diagnostic imaging. The technology is in a process of rapid development with new and better methods emerging for the imaging of anatomic and pathologic aspects. With some additional equipment, the MR instrument may also be used for in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In vivo MRS provides biochemical information about metabolites in a given tissue volume. This type of biochemical information can be extracted from volumes the size of a sugar lump within a recording period of about five minutes. New technologies also allow extracting such information from several volumes during one recording in which the information is processed as metabolic pictures. The method has found clinical applications in several fields, including the evaluation of brain tumours and epilepsy. The use of in vivo MRS will probably increase in the years ahead, especially, perhaps, for the follow-up of various therapeutic regimens. All suppliers of MR equipment now provide in vivo MRS sets and routines for recording and data analysis have become very user-friendly. (author)

  9. Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo imaging of the microvasculature with 2-photon fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Joe; Koletar, Margaret; Stefanovic, Bojana; Sled, John G.

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluates 2-Photon fluorescence microscopy of in vivo and ex vivo cleared samples for visualizing cortical vasculature. Four mice brains were imaged with in vivo 2PFM. Mice were then perfused with a FITC gel and cleared in fructose. The same regions imaged in vivo were imaged ex vivo. Vessels were segmented automatically in both images using an in-house developed algorithm that accounts for the anisotropic and spatially varying PSF ex vivo. Through non-linear warping, the ex vivo image and tracing were aligned to the in vivo image. The corresponding vessels were identified through a local search algorithm. This enabled comparison of identical vessels in vivo/ex vivo. A similar process was conducted on the in vivo tracing to determine the percentage of vessels perfused. Of all the vessels identified over the four brains in vivo, 98% were present ex vivo. There was a trend towards reduced vessel diameter ex vivo by 12.7%, and the shrinkage varied between specimens (0% to 26%). Large diameter surface vessels, through a process termed 'shadowing', attenuated in vivo signal from deeper cortical vessels by 40% at 300 μm below the cortical surface, which does not occur ex vivo. In summary, though there is a mean diameter shrinkage ex vivo, ex vivo imaging has a reduced shadowing artifact. Additionally, since imaging depths are only limited by the working distance of the microscope objective, ex vivo imaging is more suitable for imaging large portions of the brain.

  10. Dietary starch types affect liver nutrient metabolism of finishing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chen; Li, Yanjiao; Li, Jiaolong; Zhang, Lin; Zhou, Guanghong; Gao, Feng

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different starch types on liver nutrient metabolism of finishing pigs. In all ninety barrows were randomly allocated to three diets with five replicates of six pigs, containing purified waxy maize starch (WMS), non-waxy maize starch (NMS) and pea starch (PS) (the amylose to amylopectin ratios were 0·07, 0·19 and 0·28, respectively). After 28 d of treatments, two per pen (close to the average body weight of the pen) were weighed individually, slaughtered and liver samples were collected. Compared with the WMS diet, the PS diet decreased the activities of glycogen phosphorylase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and the expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 in liver (P0·05). Compared with the WMS diet, the PS diet reduced the expressions of glutamate dehydrogenase and carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 in liver (Pliver compared with the WMS diet (Pliver of finishing pigs.

  11. In aqua vivo EPID dosimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wendling, Markus; McDermott, Leah N.; Mans, Anton; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Ígor; Pecharromán-Gallego, Raul; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Stroom, Joep; van Herk, Marcel; Mijnheer, Ben J.

    2012-01-01

    At the Netherlands Cancer Institute--Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in vivo dosimetry using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been implemented for almost all high-energy photon treatments of cancer with curative intent. Lung cancer treatments were initially excluded, because the

  12. In aqua vivo EPID dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendling, Markus; McDermott, Leah N.; Mans, Anton; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Pecharroman-Gallego, Raul; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Stroom, Joep; Herk, Marcel J.; Mijnheer, Ben van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: At the Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in vivo dosimetry using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been implemented for almost all high-energy photon treatments of cancer with curative intent. Lung cancer treatments were initially excluded, because the original back-projection dose-reconstruction algorithm uses water-based scatter-correction kernels and therefore does not account for tissue inhomogeneities accurately. The aim of this study was to test a new method, in aqua vivo EPID dosimetry, for fast dose verification of lung cancer irradiations during actual patient treatment. Methods: The key feature of our method is the dose reconstruction in the patient from EPID images, obtained during the actual treatment, whereby the images have been converted to a situation as if the patient consisted entirely of water; hence, the method is termed in aqua vivo. This is done by multiplying the measured in vivo EPID image with the ratio of two digitally reconstructed transmission images for the unit-density and inhomogeneous tissue situation. For dose verification, a comparison is made with the calculated dose distribution with the inhomogeneity correction switched off. IMRT treatment verification is performed for each beam in 2D using a 2D {gamma} evaluation, while for the verification of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatments in 3D a 3D {gamma} evaluation is applied using the same parameters (3%, 3 mm). The method was tested using two inhomogeneous phantoms simulating a tumor in lung and measuring its sensitivity for patient positioning errors. Subsequently five IMRT and five VMAT clinical lung cancer treatments were investigated, using both the conventional back-projection algorithm and the in aqua vivo method. The verification results of the in aqua vivo method were statistically analyzed for 751 lung cancer patients treated with IMRT and 50 lung cancer patients treated with VMAT. Results: The improvements by

  13. Significance of CO2 donor on the production of succinic acid by Actinobacillus succinogenes ATCC 55618

    OpenAIRE

    Zou Wei; Zhu Li-Wen; Li Hong-Mei; Tang Ya-Jie

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Succinic acid is a building-block chemical which could be used as the precursor of many industrial products. The dissolved CO2 concentration in the fermentation broth could strongly regulate the metabolic flux of carbon and the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase, which are the important committed steps for the biosynthesis of succinic acid by Actinobacillus succinogenes. Previous reports showed that succinic acid production could be promoted by regulating ...

  14. Photoactivated In Vivo Proximity Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, David B; Bonasio, Roberto

    2017-06-19

    Identification of molecular interactions is paramount to understanding how cells function. Most available technologies rely on co-purification of a protein of interest and its binding partners. Therefore, they are limited in their ability to detect low-affinity interactions and cannot be applied to proteins that localize to difficult-to-solubilize cellular compartments. In vivo proximity labeling (IPL) overcomes these obstacles by covalently tagging proteins and RNAs based on their proximity in vivo to a protein of interest. In IPL, a heterobifunctional probe comprising a photoactivatable moiety and biotin is recruited by a monomeric streptavidin tag fused to a protein of interest. Following UV irradiation, candidate interacting proteins and RNAs are covalently biotinylated with tight spatial and temporal control and subsequently recovered using biotin as an affinity handle. Here, we describe experimental protocols to discover novel protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions using IPL. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. In vivo imaging of sulfotransferases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, Jorge R; Kepe, Vladimir; Small, Gary W; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar

    2013-02-12

    Radiolabeled tracers for sulfotransferases (SULTs), their synthesis, and their use are provided. Included are substituted phenols, naphthols, coumarins, and flavones radiolabeled with .sup.18F, .sup.123I, .sup.124I, .sup.125I, or .sup.11C. Also provided are in vivo techniques for using these and other tracers as analytical and diagnostic tools to study sulfotransferase distribution and activity, in health and disease, and to evaluate therapeutic interventions.

  16. PEPCK-M expression in mouse liver potentiates, not replaces, PEPCK-C mediated gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Lucas, Andrés; Duarte, João André Gonçalves; Sunny, Nishanth E; Satapati, Santhosh; He, TianTeng; Fu, Xiaorong; Bermúdez, Jordi; Burgess, Shawn C; Perales, Jose C

    2013-07-01

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis helps maintain systemic energy homeostasis by compensating for discontinuities in nutrient supply. Liver-specific deletion of cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C) abolishes gluconeogenesis from mitochondrial substrates, deregulates lipid metabolism and affects TCA cycle. While the mouse liver almost exclusively expresses PEPCK-C, humans equally present a mitochondrial isozyme (PEPCK-M). Despite clear relevance to human physiology, the role of PEPCK-M and its gluconeogenic potential remain unknown. Here, we test the significance of PEPCK-M in gluconeogenesis and TCA cycle function in liver-specific PEPCK-C knockout and WT mice. The effects of the overexpression of PEPCK-M were examined by a combination of tracer studies and molecular biology techniques. Partial PEPCK-C re-expression was used as a positive control. Metabolic fluxes were evaluated in isolated livers by NMR using (2)H and (13)C tracers. Gluconeogenic potential, together with metabolic profiling, was investigated in vivo and in primary hepatocytes. PEPCK-M expression partially rescued defects in lipid metabolism, gluconeogenesis and TCA cycle function impaired by PEPCK-C deletion, while ∼10% re-expression of PEPCK-C normalized most parameters. When PEPCK-M was expressed in the presence of PEPCK-C, the mitochondrial isozyme amplified total gluconeogenic capacity, suggesting autonomous regulation of oxaloacetate to phosphoenolpyruvate fluxes by the individual isoforms. We conclude that PEPCK-M has gluconeogenic potential per se, and cooperates with PEPCK-C to adjust gluconeogenic/TCA flux to changes in substrate or energy availability, hinting at a role in the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism in the human liver. Copyright © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Nanomaterials for In Vivo Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bryan Ronain; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2017-02-08

    In vivo imaging, which enables us to peer deeply within living subjects, is producing tremendous opportunities both for clinical diagnostics and as a research tool. Contrast material is often required to clearly visualize the functional architecture of physiological structures. Recent advances in nanomaterials are becoming pivotal to generate the high-resolution, high-contrast images needed for accurate, precision diagnostics. Nanomaterials are playing major roles in imaging by delivering large imaging payloads, yielding improved sensitivity, multiplexing capacity, and modularity of design. Indeed, for several imaging modalities, nanomaterials are now not simply ancillary contrast entities, but are instead the original and sole source of image signal that make possible the modality's existence. We address the physicochemical makeup/design of nanomaterials through the lens of the physical properties that produce contrast signal for the cognate imaging modality-we stratify nanomaterials on the basis of their (i) magnetic, (ii) optical, (iii) acoustic, and/or (iv) nuclear properties. We evaluate them for their ability to provide relevant information under preclinical and clinical circumstances, their in vivo safety profiles (which are being incorporated into their chemical design), their modularity in being fused to create multimodal nanomaterials (spanning multiple different physical imaging modalities and therapeutic/theranostic capabilities), their key properties, and critically their likelihood to be clinically translated.

  18. /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C and /sup 31/P-NMR spectroscopic study of glucose metabolism of muscle larva Trichinella spiralis (U. S. A. strain), and the effects of the end-products on the host (mouse)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishina, Masami

    1988-11-01

    /sup 1/H- and /sup 13/C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to identify and quantitate metabolites excreted by muscle larva Trichinella spiralis maintained aerobically in the presence of D- (/sup 13/C/sub 6/) glucose and (1, 1'-/sup 13/C/sub 2/) succinate. End-products of glucose metabolism studied by /sup 1/H-NMR were lactate, acetate, succinate, proionate, n-valerate and alanine, at the molar ratio of 1:2:1:0.6:0.5:0.6. /sup 13/C-NMR measurement proved that all the products originated from the glucose in the medium via the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-succinate pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In vivo /sup 31/P-NMR spectra were also taken by the surface coil method from the leg muscle of mice which had been infected with T. spiralis. Intracelluar pH and relative amount of ATP in the leg muscle of the infected mice were found to decrease significantly as compared with that of control mice.

  19. Limited capacity for glucose oxidation in fetal sheep with intrauterine growth restriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura D.; Rozance, Paul J.; Bruce, Jennifer L.; Friedman, Jacob E.; Hay, William W.

    2015-01-01

    Intrauterine growth-restricted (IUGR) fetal sheep, produced by placental insufficiency, have lower oxygen concentrations, higher lactate concentrations, and increased hepatic glucose production that is resistant to suppression by insulin. We hypothesized that increased lactate production in the IUGR fetus results from reduced glucose oxidation, during basal and maximal insulin-stimulated conditions, and is used to support glucose production. To test this, studies were performed in late-gestation control (CON) and IUGR fetal sheep under basal and hyperinsulinemic-clamp conditions. The basal glucose oxidation rate was similar and increased by 30–40% during insulin clamp in CON and IUGR fetuses (P IUGR fetuses during basal and insulin-clamp periods (P = 0.05). IUGR fetuses also had four-fold higher lactate concentrations (P IUGR fetal muscle and liver, mRNA expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK4), an inhibitor of glucose oxidation, was increased over fourfold. In IUGR fetal liver, but not skeletal muscle, mRNA expression of lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) was increased nearly fivefold. Hepatic expression of the gluconeogenic genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK)1, and PCK2, was correlated with expression of PDK4 and LDHA. Collectively, these in vivo and tissue data support limited capacity for glucose oxidation in the IUGR fetus via increased PDK4 in skeletal muscle and liver. We speculate that lactate production also is increased, which may supply carbon for glucose production in the IUGR fetal liver. PMID:26224688

  20. Antiglucocorticoid activity of hepatocyte nuclear factor-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierreux, C E; Stafford, J; Demonte, D; Scott, D K; Vandenhaute, J; O'Brien, R M; Granner, D K; Rousseau, G G; Lemaigre, F P

    1999-08-03

    Glucocorticoids exert their effects on gene transcription through ubiquitous receptors that bind to regulatory sequences present in many genes. These glucocorticoid receptors are present in all cell types, yet glucocorticoid action is controlled in a tissue-specific way. One mechanism for this control relies on tissue-specific transcriptional activators that bind in the vicinity of the glucocorticoid receptor and are required for receptor action. We now describe a gene-specific and tissue-specific inhibitory mechanism through which glucocorticoid action is repressed by a tissue-restricted transcription factor, hepatocyte nuclear factor-6 (HNF-6). HNF-6 inhibits the glucocorticoid-induced stimulation of two genes coding for enzymes of liver glucose metabolism, namely 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Binding of HNF-6 to DNA is required for inhibition of glucocorticoid receptor activity. In vitro and in vivo experiments suggest that this inhibition is mediated by a direct HNF-6/glucocorticoid receptor interaction involving the amino-terminal domain of HNF-6 and the DNA-binding domain of the receptor. Thus, in addition to its known property of stimulating transcription of liver-expressed genes, HNF-6 can antagonize glucocorticoid-stimulated gene transcription.

  1. Storage oil breakdown during embryo development of Brassica napus (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Tansy Y P; Pike, Marilyn J; Rawsthorne, Stephen

    2005-05-01

    In this study it is shown that at least 10% of the major storage product of developing embryos of Brassica napus (L.), triacylglycerol, is lost during the desiccation phase of seed development. The metabolism of this lipid was studied by measurements of the fate of label from [1-(14)C]decanoate supplied to isolated embryos, and by measurements of the activities of enzymes of fatty acid catabolism. Measurements on desiccating embryos have been compared with those made on embryos during lipid accumulation and on germinating seedlings. Enzymes of beta-oxidation and the glyoxylate cycle, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase were present in embryos during oil accumulation, and increased in activity and abundance as the seeds matured and became desiccated. Although the activities were less than those measured during germination, they were at least comparable to the in vivo rate of fatty acid synthesis in the embryo during development. The pattern of labelling, following metabolism of decanoate by isolated embryos, indicated a much greater involvement of the glyoxylate cycle during desiccation than earlier in oil accumulation, and showed that much of the (14)C-label from decanoate was released as CO(2) at both stages. Sucrose was not a product of decanoate metabolism during embryo development, and therefore lipid degradation was not associated with net gluconeogenic activity. These observations are discussed in the context of seed development, oil yield, and the synthesis of novel fatty acids in plants.

  2. The oncoprotein HBXIP suppresses gluconeogenesis through modulating PCK1 to enhance the growth of hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hui; Fang, Runping; Li, Yinghui; Li, Leilei; Zhang, Weiying; Wang, Huawei; Chen, Fuquan; Zhang, Shuqin; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ye, Lihong

    2016-11-28

    Hepatitis B X-interacting protein (HBXIP) as an oncoprotein plays crucial roles in the development of cancer, involving glucose metabolism reprogramming. In this study, we are interested in whether the oncoprotein HBXIP is involved in the modulation of gluconeogenesis in liver cancer. Here, we showed that the expression level of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1), a key enzyme of gluconeogenesis, was lower in clinical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues than that in normal tissues. Mechanistically, HBXIP inhibited the expression of PCK1 through down-regulating transcription factor FOXO1 in hepatoma cells, and up-regulated miR-135a targeting the 3'UTR of FOXO1 mRNA in the cells. In addition, HBXIP increased the phosphorylation levels of FOXO1 protein by activating PI3K/Akt pathway, leading to the export of FOXO1 from nucleus to cytoplasm. Strikingly, over-expression of PCK1 could abolish the HBXIP-promoted growth of hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Thus, we conclude that the oncoprotein HBXIP is able to depress the gluconeogenesis through suppressing PCK1 to promote hepatocarcinogenesis, involving miR-135a/FOXO1 axis and PI3K/Akt/p-FOXO1 pathway. Our finding provides new insights into the mechanism by which oncoprotein HBXIP modulates glucose metabolism reprogramming in HCC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evodia alkaloids suppress gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis by activating the constitutive androstane receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lushan; Wang, Zhangting; Huang, Minmin; Li, Yingying; Zeng, Kui; Lei, Jinxiu; Hu, Haihong; Chen, Baian; Lu, Jing; Xie, Wen; Zeng, Su

    2016-09-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a key sensor in xenobiotic detoxification and endobiotic metabolism. Increasing evidence suggests that CAR also plays a role in energy metabolism by suppressing the hepatic gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of two evodia alkaloids, rutaecarpine (Rut) and evodiamine (Evo), on gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis through their activation of the human CAR (hCAR). We found that both Rut and Evo exhibited anti-lipogenic and anti-gluconeogenic effects in the hyperlipidemic HepG2 cells. Both compounds can potently activate hCAR, and treatment of cells with hCAR antagonists reversed the anti-lipogenic and anti-gluconeogenic effects of Rut and Evo. The anti-gluconeogenic effect of Rut and Evo was due to the CAR-mediated inhibition of the recruitment of forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) onto the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) gene promoters. In vivo, we showed that treatment of mice with Rut improved glucose tolerance in a CAR-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the evodia alkaloids Rut and Evo may have a therapeutic potential for the treatment of hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Involvement of KLF11 in hepatic glucose metabolism in mice via suppressing of PEPCK-C expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huabing Zhang

    Full Text Available Abnormal hepatic gluconeogenesis is related to hyperglycemia in mammals with insulin resistance. Despite the strong evidences linking Krüppel-like factor 11 (KLF11 gene mutations to development of Type 2 diabetes, the precise physiological functions of KLF11 in vivo remain largely unknown.In current investigation, we showed that KLF11 is involved in modulating hepatic glucose metabolism in mice. Overexpression of KLF11 in primary mouse hepatocytes could inhibit the expression of gluconeogenic genes, including phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (cytosolic isoform, PEPCK-C and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α, subsequently decreasing the cellular glucose output. Diabetic mice with overexpression of KLF11 gene in livers significantly ameliorated hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance; in contrast, the knockdown of KLF11 expression in db/m and C57BL/6J mice livers impaired glucose tolerance.Our data strongly indicated the involvement of KLF11 in hepatic glucose homeostasis via modulating the expression of PEPCK-C.

  5. Flux analysis of central metabolic pathways in Geobactermetallireducens during reduction of solubleFe(III)-NTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Chakraborty, Romy; Garcia-Martin, Hector; Chu,Jeannie; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the carbon fluxes in the central metabolism ofGeobacter metallireducens strain GS-15 using 13C isotopomer modeling.Acetate labeled in the 1st or 2nd position was the sole carbon source,and Fe-NTA was the sole terminal electron acceptor. The measured labeledacetate uptake rate was 21 mmol/gdw/h in the exponential growth phase.The resulting isotope labeling pattern of amino acids allowed an accuratedetermination of the in vivo global metabolic reaction rates (fluxes)through the central metabolic pathways using a computational isotopomermodel. The tracer experiments showed that G. metallireducens containedcomplete biosynthesis pathways for essential metabolism, and this strainmight also have an unusual isoleucine biosynthesis route (usingacetyl-CoA and pyruvate as the precursors). The model indicated that over90 percent of the acetate was completely oxidized to CO2 via a completetricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle while reducing iron. Pyruvate carboxylaseand phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase were present under theseconditions, but enzymes in the glyoxylate shunt and malic enzyme wereabsent. Gluconeogenesis and the pentose phosphate pathway were mainlyemployed for biosynthesis and accounted for less than 3 percent of totalcarbon consumption. The model also indicated surprisingly highreversibility in the reaction between oxoglutarate and succinate. Thisstep operates close to the thermodynamic equilibrium possibly becausesuccinate is synthesized via a transferase reaction, and the conversionof oxoglutarate to succinate is a rate limiting step for carbonmetabolism. These findings enable a better understanding of therelationship between genome annotation and extant metabolic pathways inG. metallireducens.

  6. Mass spectrometry-based microassay of (2)H and (13)C plasma glucose labeling to quantify liver metabolic fluxes in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenour, Clinton M; Wall, Martha L; Ridley, D Emerson; Hughey, Curtis C; James, Freyja D; Wasserman, David H; Young, Jamey D

    2015-07-15

    Mouse models designed to examine hepatic metabolism are critical to diabetes and obesity research. Thus, a microscale method to quantitatively assess hepatic glucose and intermediary metabolism in conscious, unrestrained mice was developed. [(13)C3]propionate, [(2)H2]water, and [6,6-(2)H2]glucose isotopes were delivered intravenously in short- (9 h) and long-term-fasted (19 h) C57BL/6J mice. GC-MS and mass isotopomer distribution (MID) analysis were performed on three 40-μl arterial plasma glucose samples obtained during the euglycemic isotopic steady state. Model-based regression of hepatic glucose and citric acid cycle (CAC)-related fluxes was performed using a comprehensive isotopomer model to track carbon and hydrogen atom transitions through the network and thereby simulate the MIDs of measured fragment ions. Glucose-6-phosphate production from glycogen diminished, and endogenous glucose production was exclusively gluconeogenic with prolonged fasting. Gluconeogenic flux from phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) remained stable, whereas that from glycerol modestly increased from short- to long-term fasting. CAC flux [i.e., citrate synthase (VCS)] was reduced with long-term fasting. Interestingly, anaplerosis and cataplerosis increased with fast duration; accordingly, pyruvate carboxylation and the conversion of oxaloacetate to PEP were severalfold higher than VCS in long-term fasted mice. This method utilizes state-of-the-art in vivo methodology and comprehensive isotopomer modeling to quantify hepatic glucose and intermediary fluxes during physiological stress in mice. The small plasma requirements permit serial sampling without stress and the affirmation of steady-state glucose kinetics. Furthermore, the approach can accommodate a broad range of modeling assumptions, isotope tracers, and measurement inputs without the need to introduce ad hoc mathematical approximations. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Reproducibility and Variation of Diffusion Measures in the Squirrel Monkey Brain, In Vivo and Ex Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Kurt; Gao, Yurui; Stepniewska, Iwona; Choe, Ann S; Landman, Bennett A; Anderson, Adam W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Animal models are needed to better understand the relationship between diffusion MRI (dMRI) and the underlying tissue microstructure. One promising model for validation studies is the common squirrel monkey, Saimiri sciureus. This study aims to determine (1) the reproducibility of in vivo diffusion measures both within and between subjects; (2) the agreement between in vivo and ex vivo data acquired from the same specimen and (3) normal diffusion values and their variation across brain regions. Methods Data were acquired from three healthy squirrel monkeys, each imaged twice in vivo and once ex vivo. Reproducibility of fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), and principal eigenvector (PEV) was assessed, and normal values were determined both in vivo and ex vivo. Results The calculated coefficients of variation (CVs) for both intra-subject and inter-subject MD were below 10% (low variability) while FA had a wider range of CVs, 2–14% intra-subject (moderate variability), and 3–31% inter-subject (high variability). MD in ex vivo tissue was lower than in vivo (30%–50% decrease), while FA values increased in all regions (30–39% increase). The mode of angular differences between in vivo and ex vivo PEVs was 12 degrees. Conclusion This study characterizes the diffusion properties of the squirrel monkey brain and serves as the groundwork for using the squirrel monkey, both in vivo and ex vivo, as a model for diffusion MRI studies. PMID:27587226

  8. In vivo dosimetry in brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Beddar, Sam; Andersen, Claus E; Kertzscher, Gustavo; Cygler, Joanna E

    2013-07-01

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) has been used in brachytherapy (BT) for decades with a number of different detectors and measurement technologies. However, IVD in BT has been subject to certain difficulties and complexities, in particular due to challenges of the high-gradient BT dose distribution and the large range of dose and dose rate. Due to these challenges, the sensitivity and specificity toward error detection has been limited, and IVD has mainly been restricted to detection of gross errors. Given these factors, routine use of IVD is currently limited in many departments. Although the impact of potential errors may be detrimental since treatments are typically administered in large fractions and with high-gradient-dose-distributions, BT is usually delivered without independent verification of the treatment delivery. This Vision 20/20 paper encourages improvements within BT safety by developments of IVD into an effective method of independent treatment verification.

  9. In vivo dosimetry in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanderup, Kari [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus 8000 (Denmark); Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus 8000 (Denmark); Beddar, Sam [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Andersen, Claus E.; Kertzscher, Gustavo [Center of Nuclear Technologies, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde 4000 (Denmark); Cygler, Joanna E. [Department of Physics, Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6 (Canada)

    2013-07-15

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) has been used in brachytherapy (BT) for decades with a number of different detectors and measurement technologies. However, IVD in BT has been subject to certain difficulties and complexities, in particular due to challenges of the high-gradient BT dose distribution and the large range of dose and dose rate. Due to these challenges, the sensitivity and specificity toward error detection has been limited, and IVD has mainly been restricted to detection of gross errors. Given these factors, routine use of IVD is currently limited in many departments. Although the impact of potential errors may be detrimental since treatments are typically administered in large fractions and with high-gradient-dose-distributions, BT is usually delivered without independent verification of the treatment delivery. This Vision 20/20 paper encourages improvements within BT safety by developments of IVD into an effective method of independent treatment verification.

  10. Effect of iron deficiency on the localization of phosphoenolpyruvate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reading 7

    2012-05-08

    May 8, 2012 ... nodules as compared to Fe-sufficient ones in the tolerant cultivar, whereas the intensity was less ... cultivar Coco blanc. This work showed that the symbiotic tolerance of Flamingo to iron deficiency was linked to the increase of PEPC enzymes expression. However, the ..... leaves. Planta, 185: 458-461.

  11. Effect of iron deficiency on the localization of phosphoenolpyruvate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since PEPC is important for nodules, and there is lack of information about the effect of some nutrient deficiency in the expression and localization of this enzyme in legume nodules, this work focused on the localization of PEPC in nodules under iron deficiency of two common bean cultivars: Flamingo tolerant and Coco ...

  12. A Comparison of General Case In Vivo and General Case Simulation Plus In Vivo Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, John J.; Ferguson, Brad

    1988-01-01

    The study examined the relative effectiveness and efficiency of general case in vivo and general case simulation plus in vivo training in teaching six students with moderate and severe disabilities to purchase items in fast-food restaurants. Although both strategies led to reliable performance in nontrained settings, the in vivo instruction…

  13. The effect of radiofrequency ablation on different organs: Ex vivo and in vivo comparative studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoo Na [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Rhim, Hyunchul, E-mail: rhimhc@skku.edu [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dongil; Kim, Young-sun; Lee, Min Woo; Chang, Ilsoo; Lee, Won Jae; Lim, Hyo K. [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: The purposes of this study are to evaluate the ex vivo and in vivo efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on different porcine tissues by the ablation of three different sites simultaneously. Materials and methods: A multichannel RFA system, enables three separate tumors to be ablated simultaneously, was used. RFA procedures were applied to normal porcine liver, kidney, and muscle together ex vivo (n = 12) and in vivo (n = 17). Pre-impedances, defined as baseline systemic impedances of tissues before beginning RFA, and the areas of ablation zones were measured and compared. Results: The areas of ablation zones among three organs had a significant difference in decreasing order as follows: liver, muscle, and kidney in the ex vivo study (p = 0.001); muscle, liver, and kidney in the in vivo study (p < 0.0001). The areas of ablation zones between ex vivo and in vivo had a significant difference in the liver and muscle (each p < 0.05). There was no significant correlation between the areas of ablation zones and pre-impedances in both studies. Conclusions: Renal RFA produced the smallest ablation zone in both in vivo and ex vivo studies. Muscular RFA demonstrated the largest ablation zone in the in vivo study, and hepatic RFA showed the largest ablation zone in the ex vivo study. This variability in the tissues should be considered for performing an optimized RFA for each organ site.

  14. Ex Vivo ERG analysis of photoreceptors using an In Vivo ERG system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinberg, Frans; Kolesnikov, Alexander V.; Kefalov, Vladimir J.

    2014-01-01

    The Function of the retina and effects of drugs on it can be assessed by recording transretinal voltage across isolated retina that is perfused with physiological medium. However, building ex vivo ERG apparatus requires substantial amount of time, resources and expertise. Here we adapted a commercial in vivo ERG system for transretinal ERG recordings from rod and cone photoreceptors and compared rod and cone signalling between ex vivo and in vivo environments. We found that the rod and cone a- and b-waves recorded with the transretinal ERG adapter and a standard in vivo ERG system are comparable to those obtained from live anesthetized animals. However, ex vivo responses are somewhat slower and their oscillatory potentials are suppressed as compared to those recorded in vivo. We found that rod amplification constant (A) was comparable between ex vivo and in vivo conditions, ∼10 - 30 s-2 depending on the choice of response normalization. We estimate that the A in cones is between 3 and 6 s-2 in ex vivo conditions and by assuming equal A in vivo we arrive to light funnelling factor of 3 for cones in the mouse retina. The ex vivo ERG adapter provides a simple and affordable alternative to designing a custom-built transretinal recordings setup for the study of photoreceptors. Our results provide a roadmap to the rigorous quantitative analysis of rod and cone responses made possible with such a system. PMID:24959652

  15. In vivo facilitated diffusion model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Bauer

    Full Text Available Under dilute in vitro conditions transcription factors rapidly locate their target sequence on DNA by using the facilitated diffusion mechanism. However, whether this strategy of alternating between three-dimensional bulk diffusion and one-dimensional sliding along the DNA contour is still beneficial in the crowded interior of cells is highly disputed. Here we use a simple model for the bacterial genome inside the cell and present a semi-analytical model for the in vivo target search of transcription factors within the facilitated diffusion framework. Without having to resort to extensive simulations we determine the mean search time of a lac repressor in a living E. coli cell by including parameters deduced from experimental measurements. The results agree very well with experimental findings, and thus the facilitated diffusion picture emerges as a quantitative approach to gene regulation in living bacteria cells. Furthermore we see that the search time is not very sensitive to the parameters characterizing the DNA configuration and that the cell seems to operate very close to optimal conditions for target localization. Local searches as implied by the colocalization mechanism are only found to mildly accelerate the mean search time within our model.

  16. In vivo and ex vivo confocal endomicroscopy of pancreatic cystic lesions: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Somashekar G; Modi, Rohan M; Kamboj, Amrit K; Swanson, Benjamin J; Hart, Phil A; Dillhoff, Mary E; Manilchuk, Andrei; Schmidt, Carl R; Conwell, Darwin L

    2017-05-14

    To investigate the reproducibility of the in vivo endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) - guided needle based confocal endomicroscopy (nCLE) image patterns in an ex vivo setting and compare these to surgical histopathology for characterizing pancreatic cystic lesions (PCLs). In a prospective study evaluating EUS-nCLE for evaluation of PCLs, 10 subjects underwent an in vivo nCLE (AQ-Flex nCLE miniprobe; Cellvizio, MaunaKea, Paris, France) during EUS and ex vivo probe based CLE (pCLE) of the PCL (Gastroflex ultrahigh definition probe, Cellvizio) after surgical resection. Biopsies were obtained from ex vivo CLE-imaged areas for comparative histopathology. All subjects received intravenous fluorescein prior to EUS and pancreatic surgery for in vivo and ex vivo CLE imaging respectively. A total of 10 subjects (mean age 53 ± 12 years; 5 female) with a mean PCL size of 34.8 ± 14.3 mm were enrolled. Surgical histopathology confirmed 2 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs), 3 mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs), 2 cystic neuroendocrine tumors (cystic-NETs), 1 serous cystadenoma (SCA), and 2 squamous lined PCLs. Characteristic in vivo nCLE image patterns included papillary projections for IPMNs, horizon-type epithelial bands for MCNs, nests and trabeculae of cells for cystic-NETs, and a "fern pattern" of vascularity for SCA. Identical image patterns were observed during ex vivo pCLE imaging of the surgically resected PCLs. Both in vivo and ex vivo CLE imaging findings correlated with surgical histopathology. In vivo nCLE patterns are reproducible in ex vivo pCLE for all major neoplastic PCLs. These findings add further support the application of EUS-nCLE as an imaging biomarker in the diagnosis of PCLs.

  17. Mobile in vivo biopsy and camera robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentschler, Mark E; Dumpert, Jason; Platt, Stephen R; Farritor, Shane M; Oleynikov, Dmitry

    2006-01-01

    A mobile in vivo biopsy robot has been developed to perform a biopsy from within the abdominal cavity while being remotely controlled. This robot provides a platform for effectively sampling tissue. The robot has been used in vivo in a porcine model to biopsy portions of the liver and mucosa layer of the bowel. After reaching the specified location, the grasper was actuated to biopsy the tissue of interest. The biopsy specimens were gathered from the grasper after robot retraction from the abdominal cavity. This paper outlines the steps towards the successful design of an in vivo biopsy robot. The clamping forces required for successful biopsy are presented and in vivo performance of this robot is addressed.

  18. Towards In Vivo Imaging of Cancer Sialylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Martinez-Duncker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In vivo assessment of tumor glucose catabolism by positron emission tomography (PET has become a highly valued study in the medical management of cancer. Emerging technologies offer the potential to evaluate in vivo another aspect of cancer carbohydrate metabolism related to the increased anabolic use of monosaccharides like sialic acid (Sia. Sia is used for the synthesis of sialylated oligosaccharides in the cell surface that in cancer cells are overexpressed and positively associated to malignancy and worse prognosis because of their role in invasion and metastasis. This paper addresses the key points of the different strategies that have been developed to image Sia expression in vivo and the perspectives to translate it from the bench to the bedside where it would offer the clinician highly valued complementary information on cancer carbohydrate metabolism that is currently unavailable in vivo.

  19. Comparison of In-Vivo and Ex-Vivo Viscoelastic Behavior of the Spinal Cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramo, Nicole L; Shetye, Snehal S; Streijger, Femke; Lee, Jae H T; Troyer, Kevin L; Kwon, Brian K; Cripton, Peter; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2017-12-26

    Despite efforts to simulate the in-vivo environment, post-mortem degradation and lack of blood perfusion complicate the use of ex-vivo derived material models in computational studies of spinal cord injury. In order to quantify the mechanical changes that manifest ex-vivo, the viscoelastic behavior of in-vivo and ex-vivo porcine spinal cord samples were compared. Stress-relaxation data from each condition were fit to a non-linear viscoelastic model using a novel characterization technique called the direct fit method. To validate the presented material models, the parameters obtained for each condition were used to predict the respective dynamic cyclic response. Both ex-vivo and in-vivo samples displayed non-linear viscoelastic behavior with a significant increase in relaxation with applied strain. However, at all three strain magnitudes compared, ex-vivo samples experienced a higher stress and greater relaxation than in-vivo samples. Significant differences between model parameters also showed distinct relaxation behaviors, especially in non-linear relaxation modulus components associated with the short-term response (0.1 to 1 second). The results of this study underscore the necessity of utilizing material models developed from in-vivo experimental data for studies of spinal cord injury, where the time-dependent properties are critical. The ability of each material model to accurately predict the dynamic cyclic response validates the presented methodology and supports the use of the in-vivo model in future high-resolution finite element modeling efforts. Neural tissues (such as the brain and spinal cord) display time-dependent, or viscoelastic, mechanical behavior making it difficult to model how they respond to various loading conditions, including injury. Methods that aim to characterize the behavior of the spinal cord almost exclusively use ex-vivo cadaveric or animal samples, despite evidence that time after death affects the behavior compared to that in a

  20. Muscle-Driven In Vivo Nanogenerator

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zhou

    2010-05-05

    (Figure Presented) A nanogenerator based on a single piezoelectric fine wire producing an alternating current (AC) is successfully used for the harvesting of biomechanical energy under in vivo conditions. We demonstrate the implanting and working of such a nanogenerator in a live rat where it harvests energy generated by its breathing or heart beating. This study shows the potential of applying these nanogenerators for driving in vivo nanodevices. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KCaA, Weinheim.

  1. Streptococcal and Staphylococcal L Forms in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-13

    4. Overturf, C-ary D.., and Mortimer, Edward A., Jr. Studies of the Relationship Between the Production of Bacteriocines bv Group A Streptococci and...unfavorable milieu because of some stabilizing substance in exudate, prob.ably a polyamine. Third, penicillin did not induce L form production in vivo. Fourth...substance in exudate, probably a polyamine. Third, penicillin did not induce L form production in vivo. Fourth, no evidence that L foim. behave as

  2. In-vivo optical investigation of psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapsokalyvas, Dimitrios; Cicchi, Riccardo; Bruscino, Nicola; Alfieri, Domenico; Massi, Daniela; Lotti, Torello; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2011-03-01

    Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease of the skin characterized by hyperkeratosis, hyperproliferation of the epidermis, inflammatory cell accumulation and increased dilatation of dermal papillary blood vessels. Cases of psoriasis were investigated in vivo with optical means in order to evaluate the potential of in vivo optical biopsy. A Polarization Multispectral Dermoscope was employed for the macroscopic observation. Features such as the 'dotted' blood vessels pattern was observed with high contrast. The average size of dot vessels in Psoriasis was measured to be 974 μm2 which is much higher compared to healthy skin. High resolution image sections of the epidermis and the dermis were produced with a custom made Multiphoton Microscope. Imaging extended from the surface of the lesion down to the papillary dermis, at a depth of 200 μm. In the epidermis, a characteristic morphology of the stratum corneum found only in Psoriasis was revealed. Additionally, the cytoplasmic area of the cells in the stratum spinosum layer was found to be smaller than normal. In the dermis the morphological features were more pronounced, where the elongated dermal papillae dominated the papillary layer. Their length exceeds 100μm, which is a far greater value compared to that of healthy skin. These in vivo observations are consistent with the ex vivo histopathological observations, supporting both the applicability and potentiality of multispectral dermoscopy and multiphoton microscopy in the field of in vivo optical investigation and biopsy of skin.

  3. In vivo studies of opiate receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Duelfer, T.; Burns, H.D.; Ravert, H.T.; Langstroem, B.; Balasubramanian, V.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    To study opiate receptors noninvasively in vivo using positron emission tomography, techniques for preferentially labeling opiate receptors in vivo can be used. The rate at which receptor-bound ligand clears from the brain in vivo can be predicted by measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) at 37 degrees C in the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride and 100 microM guanyl-5'-imidodiphosphate, the drug distribution coefficient, and the molecular weight. A suitable ligand for labeling opiate receptors in vivo is diprenorphine, which binds to mu, delta, and kappa receptors with approximately equal affinity in vitro. However, in vivo diprenorphine may bind predominantly to one opiate receptor subtype, possibly the mu receptor. To predict the affinity for binding to the opiate receptor, a Hansch correlation was determined between the 50% inhibitory concentration for a series of halogen-substituted fentanyl analogs and electronic, lipophilic, and steric parameters. Radiochemical methods for the synthesis of carbon-11-labeled diprenorphine and lofentanil are presented.

  4. In vivo and ex vivo methods of growing a liver bud through tissue connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Yusuke; Nakayama, Koichi; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Enosawa, Shin; Tamura, Tadashi; Yoshimaru, Koichiro; Matsuura, Toshiharu; Hayashida, Makoto; Kohashi, Kenichi; Oda, Yoshinao; Yamaza, Takayoshi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2017-10-26

    Cell-based therapy has been proposed as an alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation. The novel transplantation of an in vitro-generated liver bud might have therapeutic potential. In vivo and ex vivo methods for growing a liver bud are essential for paving the way for the clinical translation of liver bud transplantation. We herein report a novel transplantation method for liver buds that are grown in vivo involving orthotopic transplantation on the transected parenchyma of the liver, which showed long engraftment and marked growth in comparison to heterotopic transplantation. Furthermore, this study demonstrates a method for rapidly fabricating scalable liver-like tissue by fusing hundreds of liver bud-like spheroids using a 3D bioprinter. Its system to fix the shape of the 3D tissue with the needle-array system enabled the fabrication of elaborate geometry and the immediate execution of culture circulation after 3D printing-thereby avoiding an ischemic environment ex vivo. The ex vivo-fabricated human liver-like tissue exhibited self-tissue organization ex vivo and engraftment on the liver of nude rats. These achievements conclusively show both in vivo and ex vivo methods for growing in vitro-generated liver buds. These methods provide a new approach for in vitro-generated liver organoids transplantation.

  5. In vivo and ex vivo inflammatory markers of common metabolic phenotypes in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mærkedahl, Rasmus Baadsgaard; Frøkiær, Hanne; Stenbæk, Marie Grøntved

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low-grade systemic inflammation (LGSI) is often characterized by elevated levels of interleukin (IL)6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, and C-reactive protein (CRP). Other serum proteins, ex vivo-stimulated cytokine production, and leukocyte count have, however, also been suggested LGSI-markers...... also correlated with leukocyte count. Ex vivo-produced cytokines were intercorrelated and correlated with leukocyte count, but did not correlate with the serum immune markers. MS score, body mass index, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were associated with 8%-16% higher inflammatory score per standard...... fasting serum markers of LGSI and leukocyte counts associated best with measures of MS-associated LGSI, whereas ex vivo cytokine production was only associated with prevailing glycemia and dyslipidemia. Taken together, this indicates that the relationship between in vivo and ex vivo inflammatory markers...

  6. Ischemic small intestine-in vivo versus ex vivo bioimpedance measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand-Amundsen, Runar J; Reims, Henrik M; Tronstad, Christian; Kalvøy, Håvard; Martinsen, Ørjan G; Høgetveit, Jan O; Ruud, Tom E; Tønnessen, Tor I

    2017-05-01

    Bioimpedance has been used to investigate changes in electrical parameters during ischemia in various tissues. The small intestine is a multi-layered structure, with several distinct tissue types, and ischemia related changes occur at different times in the different intestinal layers. When investigating how the electrical properties in the small intestine is affected by ischemia, some researchers have used ex vivo models while others have used in vivo models. In this study, we compare ischemic time development of electrical parameters in ischemic in vivo versus ex vivo small intestine. Measurements were performed using a two-electrode setup, with a Solartron 1260/1294 impedance gain-phase analyser. Electrodes were placed on the surface of ischemic pig jejunum, applying a voltage and measuring the resulting electrical admittance. In each pig, 4 segments of the jejunum were made ischemic by clamping the mesenteric arteries and veins, resulting in a 30 cm central zone of warm ischemia and edema. The in vivo part of the experiment lasted 10 h, after which 3 pieces of perfused small intestine were resected, stored in Ringer-acetat at 38 °C, and measured during a 10 h ex vivo experiment. Main results and significance: We found significant differences (p  vivo and ex vivo measurements as a function of ischemic time development. We also observed some similarities in the trends. In vivo, we measured an overall decrease in impedance during the duration of the experiment, probably as a result from the formation of edema. Ex vivo, the low frequency impedance increased initially for approximately 3 h before starting to decrease.

  7. In vivo cell tracking with bioluminescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Eun; Kalimuthu, Senthilkumar; Ahn, Byeong Cheol [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine and Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Molecular imaging is a fast growing biomedical research that allows the visual representation, characterization and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within intact living organisms. In vivo tracking of cells is an indispensable technology for development and optimization of cell therapy for replacement or renewal of damaged or diseased tissue using transplanted cells, often autologous cells. With outstanding advantages of bioluminescence imaging, the imaging approach is most commonly applied for in vivo monitoring of transplanted stem cells or immune cells in order to assess viability of administered cells with therapeutic efficacy in preclinical small animal models. In this review, a general overview of bioluminescence is provided and recent updates of in vivo cell tracking using the bioluminescence signal are discussed.

  8. In vivo virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seunghoon, E-mail: hsh860504@gmail.com; Kim, Sehui, E-mail: sehui0916@nate.com; Kim, Jeehyun, E-mail: jeehk@knu.ac.kr, E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Changho, E-mail: ch31037@postech.edu; Jeon, Mansik, E-mail: msjeon@postech.edu [Department of Creative IT Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chulhong, E-mail: jeehk@knu.ac.kr, E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu [Department of Creative IT Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Engineering, The State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14221 (United States)

    2013-11-11

    We developed a virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy system by combining with a commercial surgical microscope and photoacoustic microscope (PAM). By sharing the common optical path in the microscope and PAM system, we could acquire the PAM and microscope images simultaneously. Moreover, by employing a beam projector to back-project 2D PAM images onto the microscope view plane as augmented reality, the conventional microscopic and 2D cross-sectional PAM images are concurrently mapped on the plane via an ocular lens of the microscope in real-time. Further, we guided needle insertion into phantom ex vivo and mice skins in vivo.

  9. Crosswalking Research Vocabularies in VIVO.pptx

    OpenAIRE

    Elsborg, Don; Gross, Benjamin; Ilik, Violeta; Porter, Simon; gov, pfrank loc; Javed, Muhammad; edu, jaf cornell

    2017-01-01

    Many VIVO sites use different vocabularies to indicate the research areas they are affiliated with. For example the biological sciences uses PubMed MeSH subject headings but the Physical sciences might use a controlled vocabulary from a commercial vendor like Clarivate’s Web of Science Keywords or FAST terms from the Library of Congress. This can lead to redundancy and confusion on a VIVO site that allows the end user to filter based on a vocabulary term. The same or similar terms might displ...

  10. In vivo (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the human liver at 7 T: an initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmelik, Marek; Považan, Michal; Krššák, Martin; Gruber, Stephan; Tkačov, Martin; Trattnig, Siegfried; Bogner, Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    Phosphorus ((31) P) MRS is a powerful tool for the non-invasive investigation of human liver metabolism. Four in vivo (31) P localization approaches (single voxel image selected in vivo spectroscopy (3D-ISIS), slab selective 1D-ISIS, 2D chemical shift imaging (CSI), and 3D-CSI) with different voxel volumes and acquisition times were demonstrated in nine healthy volunteers. Localization techniques provided comparable signal-to-noise ratios normalized for voxel volume and acquisition time differences, Cramer-Rao lower bounds (8.7 ± 3.3%1D-ISIS , 7.6 ± 2.5%3D-ISIS , 8.6 ± 4.2%2D-CSI , 10.3 ± 2.7%3D-CSI ), and linewidths (50 ± 24 Hz1D-ISIS , 34 ± 10 Hz3D-ISIS , 33 ± 10 Hz2D-CSI , 34 ± 11 Hz3D-CSI ). Longitudinal (T1 ) relaxation times of human liver metabolites at 7 T were assessed by 1D-ISIS inversion recovery in the same volunteers (n = 9). T1 relaxation times of hepatic (31) P metabolites at 7 T were the following: phosphorylethanolamine - 4.41 ± 1.55 s; phosphorylcholine - 3.74 ± 1.31 s; inorganic phosphate - 0.70 ± 0.33 s; glycerol 3-phosphorylethanolamine - 6.19 ± 0.91 s; glycerol 3-phosphorylcholine - 5.94 ± 0.73 s; γ-adenosine triphosphate (ATP) - 0.50 ± 0.08 s; α-ATP - 0.46 ± 0.07 s; β-ATP - 0.56 ± 0.07 s. The improved spectral resolution at 7 T enabled separation of resonances in the phosphomonoester and phosphodiester spectral region as well as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and uridine diphosphoglucose signals. An additional resonance at 2.06 ppm previously assigned to phosphoenolpyruvate or phosphatidylcholine is also detectable. These are the first (31) P metabolite relaxation time measurements at 7 T in human liver, and they will help in the exploration of new, exciting questions in metabolic research with 7 T MR. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. In vivo and ex vivo proton MR spectroscopy of primary and secondary melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourne, Roger M.; Stanwell, Peter; Stretch, Jonathan R.; Scolyer, Richard A.; Thompson, John F.; Mountford, Carolyn E.; Lean, Cynthia L

    2005-03-01

    In vivo magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy at 1.5T was performed on a large polypoid cutaneous melanoma, and two enlarged lymph nodes containing metastatic melanoma, from three patients. Spectra were acquired in vivo from voxels wholly within the primary tumour or secondary lymph node and were thus uncontaminated by signals from adjacent tissue. Tissue biopsies taken after resection of primary tumours and secondary lymph nodes were examined by 8.5T magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and the results compared with the in vivo spectra, and with spectra from normal skin and a benign skin lesion. There was good agreement between the dominant features of 1.5T spectra acquired in vivo and 8.5T spectra acquired from resected tissue. However, less intense resonances observed at 8.5T in malignant biopsy tissue were not consistently observed at 1.5T in vivo. In vivo spectra from primary and metastatic melanoma showed high levels of choline metabolites. An intense lactate resonance was also present in the in vivo spectrum of primary melanoma. All 8.5T spectra of biopsies from primary and secondary melanoma showed high levels of choline metabolites and lactate, and additional resonances consistent with elevated levels of taurine, alanine, lysine, and glutamate/glutamine relative to normal and benign tissue. Elevated levels of choline, lactate, taurine, and amino acids appear to be clinically useful markers for identifying the pathology of primary and metastatic melanoma.

  12. Ex-vivo MR Volumetry of Human Brain Hemispheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrotsou, Aikaterini; Bennett, David A.; Schneider, Julie A.; Dawe, Robert J.; Golak, Tom; Leurgans, Sue E.; Yu, Lei; Arfanakis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this work were to: a) develop an approach for ex-vivo MR volumetry of human brain hemispheres that does not contaminate the results of histopathological examination, b) longitudinally assess regional brain volumes postmortem, and c) investigate the relationship between MR volumetric measurements performed in-vivo and ex-vivo. Methods An approach for ex-vivo MR volumetry of human brain hemispheres was developed. Five hemispheres from elderly subjects were imaged ex-vivo longitudinally. All datasets were segmented. The longitudinal behavior of volumes measured ex-vivo was assessed. The relationship between in-vivo and ex-vivo volumetric measurements was investigated in seven elderly subjects imaged both ante-mortem and postmortem. Results The presented approach for ex-vivo MR volumetry did not contaminate the results of histopathological examination. For a period of 6 months postmortem, within-subject volume variation across time points was substantially smaller than inter-subject volume variation. A close linear correspondence was detected between in-vivo and ex-vivo volumetric measurements. Conclusion Regional brain volumes measured with the presented approach for ex-vivo MR volumetry remain relatively unchanged for a period of 6 months postmortem. Furthermore, the linear relationship between in-vivo and ex-vivo MR volumetric measurements suggests that the presented approach captures information linked to ante-mortem macrostructural brain characteristics. PMID:23440751

  13. In vivo dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mijnheer, Ben [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Beddar, Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Izewska, Joanna [Division of Human Health, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna 1400 (Austria); Reft, Chester [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) is in use in external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to detect major errors, to assess clinically relevant differences between planned and delivered dose, to record dose received by individual patients, and to fulfill legal requirements. After discussing briefly the main characteristics of the most commonly applied IVD systems, the clinical experience of IVD during EBRT will be summarized. Advancement of the traditional aspects of in vivo dosimetry as well as the development of currently available and newly emerging noninterventional technologies are required for large-scale implementation of IVD in EBRT. These new technologies include the development of electronic portal imaging devices for 2D and 3D patient dosimetry during advanced treatment techniques, such as IMRT and VMAT, and the use of IVD in proton and ion radiotherapy by measuring the decay of radiation-induced radionuclides. In the final analysis, we will show in this Vision 20/20 paper that in addition to regulatory compliance and reimbursement issues, the rationale for in vivo measurements is to provide an accurate and independent verification of the overall treatment procedure. It will enable the identification of potential errors in dose calculation, data transfer, dose delivery, patient setup, and changes in patient anatomy. It is the authors' opinion that all treatments with curative intent should be verified through in vivo dose measurements in combination with pretreatment checks.

  14. Ebola Virus Persistence in Semen Ex Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Robert J; Judson, Seth; Miazgowicz, Kerri; Bushmaker, Trent; Munster, Vincent J

    2016-02-01

    On March 20, 2015, a case of Ebola virus disease was identified in Liberia that most likely was transmitted through sexual contact. We assessed the efficiency of detecting Ebola virus in semen samples by molecular diagnostics and the stability of Ebola virus in ex vivo semen under simulated tropical conditions.

  15. In vivo conservation of animal genetic resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boettcher, P.; Martin, J.F.; Gandini, G.; Joshi, B.K.; Oldenbroek, J.K.

    2013-01-01

    These guidelines present the basic concepts involved in the development and implementation of in vivo conservation plans for animal genetic resources for food and agriculture. The guidelines are intended for use by policy-makers in the management of animal genetic resources, managers of animal

  16. Three-dimensional carpal kinematics in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moojen, T. M.; Snel, J. G.; Ritt, M. J. P. F.; Kauer, J. M. G.; Venema, H. W.; Bos, K. E.

    2002-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to accurately quantify three-dimensional in vivo kinematics of all carpal bones in flexion and extension and radial and ulnar deviation. Design and methods. The right wrists of 11 healthy volunteers were imaged by spiral CT with rotational increments of

  17. In vivo biomechanics of cruciate ligament injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Velde, S.K.

    2016-01-01

    Measuring biomechanics of the knee with an acceptable degree of accuracy is difficult. When the in vivo knee joint motion is analyzed in all its six degrees-of-freedom without compromising on physiological loading conditions, the task becomes even more challenging. This thesis offers a brief

  18. Ex vivo MRI in extracorporeal liver surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, RFE; Slooff, MJH; Peeters, PMJG; deJong, KP; Kamman, RL; Mooyaart, EL

    1995-01-01

    Extracorporeal resection of hepatic tumors that were considered inoperable in the past is now possible in selected cases, Such procedures require high-quality preoperative images for the exact delineation of the tumor extent and for an optimal planning of the line of parenchymal division, In-vivo CT

  19. Fiberoptic imaging of cavernous nerves in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyette, Lisa B; Reardon, Michael A; Mirelman, Andrew J; Kirkley, Terry D; Lysiak, Jeffrey J; Tuttle, Jeremy B; Steers, William D

    2007-12-01

    A critical intraoperative variable for the return of tumescence following radical prostatectomy is preservation of the cavernous nerves. We developed a nontoxic technique that would allow high resolution, in vivo real-time imaging specifically of the cavernous nerves. The cavernous nerves were labeled by injecting a fluorescent retrograde nerve tracer into the corpus cavernosum of male rats. Nerves were subsequently imaged in vivo using fiberoptic confocal fluorescent microscopy. Initial screening trials were performed to decide on a nerve tracer capable of axonal labeling, optimize injection concentration and characterize retrograde transport time. Toxicity studies included intracavernous pressure monitoring following electrical nerve stimulation, apoptotic staining of injected cavernous tissue and measurement of lipid peroxidation in nerves exposed to laser emissions during imaging. In vivo real-time video sequences of fluorescently labeled cavernous nerves were recorded. The screening trial indicated that the B subunit of cholera toxin conjugated to AlexaFluor 488 (Invitrogen) provided optimal imaging after 9 days of retrograde transport. Toxicity studies showed that maximal intracavernous pressure responses did not differ between labeled and unlabeled nerves (p = 0.9671). Tracer injection did not increase apoptosis in cavernous tissue and laser exposure did not increase lipid peroxidation in nerves. In vivo real-time imaging of the cavernous nerves is possible with no measurable toxicity, allowing the maintenance of erection. This novel imaging modality may allow urologists to identify cavernous nerves during pelvic surgery.

  20. Negative regulation of hepatic fat mass and obesity associated (Fto) gene expression by insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Tooru M; Lew, Pei San; Luo, Yanming; Leckstrom, Arnold

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the role of glucose and insulin in the regulation of hepatic fat mass and obesity associated (Fto) gene expression and the role of hepatic Fto in the regulation of gluconeogenic gene expression. To determine the effect of hyperglycemia on hepatic Fto expression, levels of Fto mRNA in liver were compared between normoglycemic/normoinsulinemic, hypereglycemic/hyperinsulinemic, and hyperglycemic/hypoinsulinemic mice. To determine the direct effect of insulin on Fto expression, levels of Fto, glucose-6-phosphatase (G6pase), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pepck) mRNA levels were compared between control and insulin-treated mouse liver tissues cultured ex vivo and immortalized mouse hepatocytes AML12. To determine the role of Fto in the regulation of gluconeogenic gene expression, we examined the effect of enhanced Fto expression on G6pase and Pepck mRNA levels in AML12 cells. Fto mRNA levels were significantly reduced in hyperglycemic/hyperinsulinemic mice compared to normoglycemic/normoinsulinemic mice, while they were indistinguishable between hyperglycemic/hypoinsulinemic mice and normoglycemic/normoinsulinemic mice. Insulin treatment reduced Fto, G6pase, and Pepck mRNA levels compared to control vehicle treatment in both ex vivo cultured mouse liver tissues and AML12 cells. Enhanced Fto expression significantly increased G6pase and Pepck mRNA level in AML12 cells. Our findings support the hypothesis that hepatic Fto participates in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis possibly by mediating the inhibitory effect of glucose and insulin on gluconeogenic gene expression in liver. It is further suggested that impairments in nutritional and hormonal regulation of hepatic Fto expression may lead to impairments in glycemic control in diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. In vivo gluten challenge in coeliac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HJ Ellis

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In vivo gluten challenge has been used since the early 1950s to study the role of cereal fractions in celiac disease. While early studies relied on crude indicators of celiac toxicity, the advent of jejunal biopsy and sophisticated immunohistochemical techniques has allowed accurate studies to be performed. Studies to determine the nature of the cereal component that is toxic to patients with celiac disease have concentrated on wheat because of its nutritional importance. A number of in vitro studies indicated the presence of one or more celiac-activating epitopes with the N-terminus of the A-gliadin molecule. In vivo challenge with three synthetic peptides subsequently indicated the toxicity of a peptide corresponding to amino acids 31 to 49 of A-gliadin. In vivo gluten challenge is the gold standard for the assessment of celiac toxicity; however, jejunal biopsy is a relatively invasive procedure, thus, other methods have been investigated. Direct infusion of the rectum with gluten has been shown to result in an increase in mucosal intraepithelial lymphocytes, occurring only in celiac patients. This method has been used to study the celiac toxicity of gliadin subfractions. The in vitro technique of small intestinal biopsy organ culture is also a useful tool and appears to give the same results as in vivo challenge. The importance of tiny amounts of gliadin in the diet, such as that which occurs in wheat starch, has been studied by in vivo challenge; this technique has clarified the position of oats in the gluten-free diet. Several studies suggest that this cereal may be included in the diet of most adult celiac patients. Studies of the transport of gliadin across the enterocyte following ingestion or challenge suggest that gliadin may be metabolized by a different pathway in celiac disease. This could result in an abnormal presentation to the immune system, triggering a pathogenic rather than a tolerogenic response.

  2. Antimicrobial Blue Light Therapy for Infectious Keratitis: Ex Vivo and In Vivo Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong; Kochevar, Irene E; Behlau, Irmgard; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Fenghua; Wang, Yucheng; Sun, Xiaodong; Hamblin, Michael R; Dai, Tianhong

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of antimicrobial blue light (aBL) as an alternative or adjunctive therapeutic for infectious keratitis. We developed an ex vivo rabbit model and an in vivo mouse model of infectious keratitis. A bioluminescent strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was used as the causative pathogen, allowing noninvasive monitoring of the extent of infection in real time via bioluminescence imaging. Quantitation of bacterial luminescence was correlated to colony-forming units (CFU). Using the ex vivo and in vivo models, the effectiveness of aBL (415 nm) for the treatment of keratitis was evaluated as a function of radiant exposure when aBL was delivered at 6 or 24 hours after bacterial inoculation. The aBL exposures calculated to reach the retina were compared to the American National Standards Institute standards to estimate aBL retinal safety. Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis fully developed in both the ex vivo and in vivo models at 24 hours post inoculation. Bacterial luminescence in the infected corneas correlated linearly to CFU (R2 = 0.921). Bacterial burden in the infected corneas was rapidly and significantly reduced (>2-log10) both ex vivo and in vivo after a single exposure of aBL. Recurrence of infection was observed in the aBL-treated mice at 24 hours after aBL exposure. The aBL toxicity to the retina is largely dependent on the aBL transmission of the cornea. Antimicrobial blue light is a potential alternative or adjunctive therapeutic for infectious keratitis. Further studies of corneal and retinal safety using large animal models, in which the ocular anatomies are similar to that of humans, are warranted.

  3. Evaluation of a novel electrosurgical sealing mode in an ex vivo and in vivo porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Karolin; Linzenbold, Walter; Enderle, Markus D; Nold, B; Königsrainer, Alfred; Schenk, Martin; Thiel, Christian

    2017-09-18

    Bipolar vessel sealing has been successfully introduced in a variety of procedures like prostatectomy, hysterectomy, and nephrectomy. In this study, we evaluated a new sealing mode-the thermoSEAL® mode (TSM)-operated with the VIO3 generator in an ex vivo and in vivo animal study and compared the results with the commercially available BiClamp mode (BCM), operated with the VIO300D generator. Two different instruments were used in combination with both modes, BiCision® and BiClamp® 201T (Erbe Elektromedizin GmbH). In the ex vivo experiment, the sealing of renal arteries was evaluated using both instruments and modes. For the in vivo study, different types of arteries and veins were sealed using both modes and instruments in a side-by-side comparison for acute complications in a total of four animals. Mean burst pressure was in all cases significantly above 360 mmHg (p vivo setting was significantly shorter for TSM compared to BCM: BiCision® (3.7 ± 0.4 vs. 7.1 ± 0.3 s; p vivo study was significantly shorter for TSM in combination with BiCision® for arteries [TSM 3.0 ± 0.7 s vs. BCM 6.5 ± 1.3 s, (p 90%) were noted for both instruments and modes. While both modes used with two different instruments reveal high safety characterized by a high burst pressure, low thermal damage (ex vivo) zones, and high sealing rates (in vivo), the thermoSEAL® mode convinces by its fast sealing speed probably helping to reduce operation time.

  4. Microwave ablation of primary and secondary liver tumours: ex vivo, in vivo, and clinical characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Claudio; Ahmed, Muneeb; Solbiati, Luigi; Meloni, Maria Franca; Solbiati, Marco; Cassarino, Simone; Tosoratti, Nevio; Nissenbaum, Yitzhak; Ierace, Tiziana; Goldberg, S Nahum

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the performance of a microwave ablation (MWA) apparatus in preclinical and clinical settings. The same commercial 2.45 GHz MWA apparatus was used throughout this study. In total 108 ablations at powers ranging from 20 to 130 W and lasting from 3 to 30 min were obtained on ex vivo bovine liver; 28 ablations at 60 W, 80 W and 100 W lasting 5 and 10 min were then obtained in an in vivo swine model. Finally, 32 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and 19 liver metastases in 46 patients were treated percutaneously by administering 60 W for either 5 or 10 min. The treatment outcome was characterised in terms of maximum longitudinal and transversal axis of the induced ablation zone. Ex vivo ablation volumes increased linearly with deposited energy (r2 = 0.97), with higher sphericity obtained at lower power for longer ablation times. Larger ablations were obtained on liver metastases compared to HCCs treated with 60 W for 10 min (p vivo swine model at 60 W were substantially smaller than the ex vivo and clinical results (either populations). No statistically significant difference was observed between ex vivo results at 60 W and HCC results (p > 0.08). For the selected MW ablation device, ex vivo data on bovine liver was more predictive of the actual clinical performance on liver malignancies than an in vivo porcine model. Equivalent MW treatments yielded a significantly different response for HCC and metastases at higher deposited energy, suggesting that outcomes are not only device-specific but must also be characterised on a tissue-by-tissue basis.

  5. In vivo percutaneous microwave ablation in kidneys: Correlation with ex vivo data and ablation work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelin, C; Leiner, J; Nasri, S; Petitpierre, F; Le Bras, Y; Yacoub, M; Grenier, N; Bernhard, J C; Cornelis, F

    2017-10-21

    To compare diameters of in vivo microwave ablation (MWA) performed in swine kidneys with ex vivo diameters, and to correlate with ablation work (AW), a new metric reflecting total energy delivered. Eighteen in vivo MWA were performed in 6 swine kidneys successively using one or two antennas (MicroThermX®). Ablation consisted in delivering power (45-120W) for 5-15minutes. Ex vivo diameters were provided by the vendors and obtained on bovine liver tissue. AW was defined as the sum of (power)*(time)*(number of antennas) for all phases of an ablation (in kJoules). Kidneys were removed laparoscopically immediately after ablation. After sacrifice, ablations zones were evaluated macroscopically, and maximum diameters of the zones were recorded. Wilcoxon sum rank test and Pearson's correlation were used for comparisons. For a single antenna (n=12), the in vivo diameters ranged from 12 to 35mm, and 15-49mm for 2 antennas (n=6). The in vivo diameters remained shorter than ex vivo diameters by 8.6%±30.1 on 1 antenna and 11.7%±26.5 on 2 antennas (P=0.31 and 0.44, respectively). AW ranged from 13.5 to 108kJ. Diameters increased linearly with AW both with 1 and 2 antennas, but only moderate correlations were observed (r=0.43 [95% confidence interval: -0.19; 0.81], P=0.16; and 0.57 [-0.44; 0.95], P=0.24, respectively). Although diameters after in vivo renal MWA increased linearly with AW, the moderate correlation and wide standard deviations observed may justify a careful imaging monitoring during treatment delivery and settings adaptation, if needed, for optimal ablation. Copyright © 2017 Editions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. In vivo and ex vivo effects of propofol on myocardial performance in rats with obstructive jaundice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Hong-Mei

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Responsiveness of the "jaundiced heart" to propofol is not completely understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of propofol on myocardial performance in rats with obstructive jaundice. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 40 were randomly allocated into two groups, twenty underwent bile duct ligation (BDL, and 20 underwent a sham operation. Seven days after the surgery, propofol was administered in vivo and ex vivo (Langendorff preparations. Heart rate, left ventricular end-systolic pressure (LVESP left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP, and maximal rate for left ventricular pressure rise and decline (± dP/dtmax were measured to determine the influence of propofol on the cardiac function of rats. Results Impaired basal cardiac function was observed in the isolated BDL hearts, whereas in vivo indices of basal cardiac function (LVESP and ± dP/dt in vivo were significantly higher in rats that underwent BDL compared with controls. With low or intermediate concentrations of propofol, these indices of cardiac function were within the normal physiologic range in both groups, and responsiveness to propofol was unaffected by BDL. When the highest concentration of propofol was administrated, a significant decline in cardiac function was observed in the BDL group. Conclusions In rats that underwent BDL, basal cardiac performance was better in vivo and worse ex vivo compared with controls. Low and intermediate concentrations of propofol did not appear to impair cardiac function in rats with obstructive jaundice.

  7. Digital Radiography for Determination of Primary Tooth Length: In Vivo and Ex Vivo Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria D. Basso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Methods for determining the root canal length of the primary tooth should yield accurate and reproducible results. In vitro studies show some limitations, which do not allow their findings to be directly transferred to a clinical situation. Aim. To compare the accuracy of radiographic tooth length obtained from in vivo digital radiograph with that obtained from ex vivo digital radiograph. Method. Direct digital radiographs of 20 upper primary incisors were performed in teeth (2/3 radicular resorption that were radiographed by an intraoral sensor, according to the long-cone technique. Teeth were extracted, measured, and mounted in a resin block, and then radiographic template was used to standardise the sensor-target distance (30 cm. The apparent tooth length (APTL was obtained from the computer screen by means of an electronic ruler accompanying the digital radiography software (CDR 2.0, whereas the actual tooth length (ACTL was obtained by means of a digital calliper following extraction. Data were compared to the ACTL by variance analysis and Pearson’s correlation test. Results. The values for APTL obtained from in vivo radiography were slightly underestimated, whereas those values obtained from ex vivo were slightly overestimated. No significance was observed (P≤0.48 between APTL and ACTL. Conclusion. The length of primary teeth estimated by in vivo and ex vivo comparisons using digital radiography was found to be similar to the actual tooth length.

  8. Development of a multilayered palate substitute in rabbits: a histochemical ex vivo and in vivo analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Piedra, M A; Alaminos, M; Fernández-Valadés-Gámez, R; España-López, A; Liceras-Liceras, E; Sánchez-Montesinos, I; Martínez-Plaza, A; Sánchez-Quevedo, M C; Fernández-Valadés, R; Garzón, I

    2017-03-01

    Current tissue engineering technology focuses on developing simple tissues, whereas multilayered structures comprising several tissue types have rarely been described. We developed a highly biomimetic multilayered palate substitute with bone and oral mucosa tissues using rabbit cells and biomaterials subjected to nanotechnological techniques based on plastic compression. This novel palate substitute was autologously grafted in vivo, and histological and histochemical analyses were used to evaluate biointegration, cell function, and cell differentiation in the multilayered palate substitute. The three-dimensional structure of the multilayered palate substitute was histologically similar to control tissues, but the ex vivo level of cell and tissue differentiation were low as determined by the absence of epithelial differentiation although cytokeratins 4 and 13 were expressed. In vivo grafting was associated with greater cell differentiation, epithelial stratification, and maturation, but the expression of cytokeratins 4, 13, 5, and 19 at did not reach control tissue levels. Histochemical analysis of the oral mucosa stroma and bone detected weak signals for proteoglycans, elastic and collagen fibers, mineralization deposits and osteocalcin in the multilayered palate substitute cultured ex vivo. However, in vivo grafting was able to induce cell and tissue differentiation, although the expression levels of these components were always significantly lower than those found in controls, except for collagen in the bone layer. These results suggest that generation of a full-thickness multilayered palate substitute is achievable and that tissues become partially differentiated upon in vivo grafting.

  9. Ex Vivo and in Vivo Administration of Fluorescent CNA35 Specifically Marks Cardiac Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne de Jong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac fibrosis is a major hallmark of cardiac diseases. For evaluation of cardiac fibrosis, the development of highly specific and preferably noninvasive methods is desired. Our aim was to evaluate CNA35, a protein known to specifically bind to collagen, as a specific marker of cardiac fibrosis. Fluorescently labeled CNA35 was applied ex vivo on tissue sections of fibrotic rat, mouse, and canine myocardium. After quantification of CNA35, sections were examined with picrosirius red (PSR and compared to CNA35. Furthermore, fluorescently labeled CNA35 was administered in vivo in mice. Hearts were isolated, and CNA35 labeling was examined in tissue sections. Serial sections were histologically examined with PSR. Ex vivo application of CNA35 showed specific binding to collagen and a high correlation with PSR (Pearson r = .86 for mice/rats and r = .98 for canine; both p < .001. After in vivo administration, CNA35 labeling was observed around individual cardiomyocytes, indicating its ability to penetrate cardiac endothelium. High correlation was observed between CNA35 and PSR (r = .91, p < .001. CNA35 specifically binds to cardiac collagen and can cross the endothelial barrier. Therefore, labeled CNA35 is useful to specifically detect collagen both ex vivo and in vivo and potentially can be converted to a noninvasive method to detect cardiac fibrosis.

  10. Quantification of carbon nanomaterials in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifang; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Cao, Aoneng; Liu, Yuanfang

    2013-03-19

    A diverse array of carbon nanomaterials (NMs), including fullerene, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene, nanodiamonds, and carbon nanoparticles, have been discovered and widely applied in a variety of industries. Carbon NMs have been detected in the environment and have a strong possibility of entering the human body. The safety of carbon NMs has thus become a serious concern in academia and society. To achieve strict biosafety assessments, researchers need to fully understand the effects and fates of NMs in the human body, including information about absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADME/T). To acquire the ADME data, researchers must quantify NMs, but carbon NMs are very difficult to quantify in vivo. The carbon background in a typical biological system is high, particularly compared with the much lower concentration of carbon NMs. Moreover, carbon NMs lack a specific detection signal. Therefore, isotopic labeling, with its high sensitivity and specificity, is the first choice to quantify carbon NMs in vivo. Previously, researchers have used many isotopes, including ¹³C, ¹⁴C, ¹²⁵I, ¹³¹I, ³H, ⁶⁴Cu, ¹¹¹In, ⁸⁶Y, 99mTc, and ⁶⁷Ga, to label carbon NMs. We used these isotopic labeling methods to study the ADME of carbon NMs via different exposure pathways in animal models. Except for the metabolism of carbon NMs, which has seldom been investigated, significant amounts of data have been reported on the in vivo absorption, distribution, excretion, and toxicity of carbon NMs, which have revealed characteristic behaviors of carbon NMs, such as reticuloendothelial system (RES) capture. However, the complexity of the biological systems and diverse preparation and functionalization of the same carbon NMs have led to inconsistent results across different studies. Therefore, the data obtained so far have not provided a compatible and systematic profile of biosafety. Further efforts are needed to address these problems. In

  11. 3D morphological analysis of the mouse cerebral vasculature: Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Joe; Koletar, Margaret M; Stefanovic, Bojana; Sled, John G

    2017-01-01

    Ex vivo 2-photon fluorescence microscopy (2PFM) with optical clearing enables vascular imaging deep into tissue. However, optical clearing may also produce spherical aberrations if the objective lens is not index-matched to the clearing material, while the perfusion, clearing, and fixation procedure may alter vascular morphology. We compared in vivo and ex vivo 2PFM in mice, focusing on apparent differences in microvascular signal and morphology. Following in vivo imaging, the mice (four total) were perfused with a fluorescent gel and their brains fructose-cleared. The brain regions imaged in vivo were imaged ex vivo. Vessels were segmented in both images using an automated tracing algorithm that accounts for the spatially varying PSF in the ex vivo images. This spatial variance is induced by spherical aberrations caused by imaging fructose-cleared tissue with a water-immersion objective. Alignment of the ex vivo image to the in vivo image through a non-linear warping algorithm enabled comparison of apparent vessel diameter, as well as differences in signal. Shrinkage varied as a function of diameter, with capillaries rendered smaller ex vivo by 13%, while penetrating vessels shrunk by 34%. The pial vasculature attenuated in vivo microvascular signal by 40% 300 μm below the tissue surface, but this effect was absent ex vivo. On the whole, ex vivo imaging was found to be valuable for studying deep cortical vasculature.

  12. Correlation of In Vivo and Ex Vivo ADC and T2 of In Situ and Invasive Murine Mammary Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaobing; Macleod, Kay; Mustafi, Devkumar; Conzen, Suzanne D.; Markiewicz, Erica; Zamora, Marta; Vosicky, James; Mueller, Jeffrey; Karczmar, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Ex vivo MRI may aid in the evaluation of surgical specimens, and provide valuable information regarding the micro-anatomy of mammary/breast cancer. The use of ex vivo MRI to study mouse mammary cancer would be enhanced if there is a strong correlation between parameters derived from in vivo and ex vivo scans. Here, we report the correlation between apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and T2 values measured in vivo and ex vivo in mouse mammary glands with in situ cancers (mammary intraepithelial neoplasia (MIN)) and invasive cancers (those which spread outside the ducts into surrounding tissue). MRI experiments were performed on the Polyoma middle T oncoprotein breast cancer mouse model (n = 15) in a 9.4T scanner. For in vivo experiments, T2-weighted (T2W) images were acquired to identify abnormal regions, then ADC and T2 values were measured for nine selected slices. For ex vivo experiments, a midline incision was made along the spine, and then skin, glands, and tumors were gently peeled from the body. Tissue was fixed in formalin, placed around a mouse-sized sponge, and sutured together mimicking the geometry of the gland when attached to the mouse. The same pulse sequences used for in vivo experiments were repeated for ex vivo scans at room temperature. Regions of interest were manually traced on T2W images defining features that could be identified on in vivo and ex vivo images. The results demonstrate a strong positive correlations between in vivo and ex vivo invasive cancers for ADC (r = 0.89, p vivo and ex vivo in situ cancers for ADC (r = 0.61, p vivo ADC value was about 54% of the in vivo value; and the average ex vivo T2 was similar to the in vivo value for cancers. Although motion, fixation, and temperature differences affect ADC and T2, these results show a reliable relationship between ADC and T2 in vivo and ex vivo. As a result ex vivo images can provide valuable information with clinical and research applications. PMID:26208092

  13. In vivo toxicity study of Lantana camara

    OpenAIRE

    Badakhshan Mahdi Pour; Sreenivasan Sasidharan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the toxicity of methanol extract of various parts (Root, Stem, Leaf, Flower and Fruit) of Lantana camara (L. Camara) in Artemia salina. Methods: The methanol extracts of L. camara were tested for in vivo brine shrimp lethality assay. Results: All the tested extract exhibited very low toxicity on brine shrimp larva. The results showed that the root extract was the most toxic part of L. camara and may have potential as anticancer agent. Conclusions: Methanolic...

  14. Gut proteases target Yersinia invasin in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freund Sandra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yersinia enterocolitica is a common cause of food borne gastrointestinal disease. After oral uptake, yersiniae invade Peyer's patches of the distal ileum. This is accomplished by the binding of the Yersinia invasin to β1 integrins on the apical surface of M cells which overlie follicle associated lymphoid tissue. The gut represents a barrier that severely limits yersiniae from reaching deeper tissues such as Peyer's patches. We wondered if gut protease attack on invasion factors could contribute to the low number of yersiniae invading Peyer's patches. Findings Here we show that invasin is rapidly degraded in vivo by gut proteases in the mouse infection model. In vivo proteolytic degradation is due to proteolysis by several gut proteases such as trypsin, α-chymotrypsin, pancreatic elastase, and pepsin. Protease treated yersiniae are shown to be less invasive in a cell culture model. YadA, another surface adhesin is cleaved by similar concentrations of gut proteases but Myf was not cleaved, showing that not all surface proteins are equally susceptible to degradation by gut proteases. Conclusions We demonstrate that gut proteases target important Yersinia virulence factors such as invasin and YadA in vivo. Since invasin is completely degraded within 2-3 h after reaching the small intestine of mice, it is no longer available to mediate invasion of Peyer's patches.

  15. Testicular cells exhibit similar molecular responses to cigarette smoke condensate ex vivo and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esakky, Prabagaran; Hansen, Deborah A; Drury, Andrea M; Felder, Paul; Cusumano, Andrew; Moley, Kelle H

    2017-08-24

    Male exposure to cigarette smoke is associated with seminal defects and with congenital anomalies and childhood cancers in offspring. In mice, paternal exposure to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) causes molecular defects in germ cells and phenotypic effects in their offspring. Here we used an ex vivo testicular explant model and in vivo exposure to determine the concentration at which CSC impairs spermatogenesis and offspring development. We explanted testis tissue at postnatal day (P)5.5 and cultured it until P11.5. Assessment of growth parameters by analyzing expression of cell-specific markers revealed that the explant system maintained structural and functional integrity. We exposed the P5.5 to -11.5 explants to various concentrations (40-160 µg/ml) of CSC and confirmed that nicotine in the CSC was metabolized to cotinine. We assessed various growth and differentiation parameters, as well as testosterone production, and observed that many spermatogenesis features were impaired at 160 µg/ml CSC. The same parameters were impaired by a similar CSC concentration in vivo Finally, females mated to males that were exposed to 160 µg/ml CSC neonatally had increased rates of pup resorption. We conclude that male exposure to CSC impairs offspring development and that the concentration at which CSC impairs spermatogenesis is similar in vivo and ex vivo. Given that the concentrations of CSC we used contained similar doses of nicotine as human smokers are exposed to, we argue that our model mimics human male reproductive effects of smoking.-Esakky, P., Hansen, D. A., Drury, A. M., Felder, P., Cusumano, A., Moley, K. H. Testicular cells exhibit similar molecular responses to cigarette smoke condensate ex vivo and in vivo. © FASEB.

  16. In vivo and ex vivo sentinel node mapping does not identify the same lymph nodes in colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Helene Schou; Bennedsen, Astrid Louise Bjørn; Burgdorf, Stefan Kobbelgaard

    2017-01-01

    sentinel node mapping in vivo with indocyanine green and ex vivo with methylene blue in order to evaluate if the sentinel lymph nodes can be identified by both techniques. METHODS: Patients with colon cancer UICC stage I-III were included from two institutions in Denmark from February 2015 to January 2016....... In vivo sentinel node mapping with indocyanine green during laparoscopy and ex vivo sentinel node mapping with methylene blue were performed in all patients. RESULTS: Twenty-nine patients were included. The in vivo sentinel node mapping was successful in 19 cases, and ex vivo sentinel node mapping...... mapping. Lymph node metastases were found in 10 patients, and only two had metastases in a sentinel node. CONCLUSION: Placing a deposit in relation to the tumor by indocyanine green in vivo or of methylene blue ex vivo could only identify sentinel lymph nodes in a small group of patients....

  17. Correlations between in vivo (1)H MRS and ex vivo (1)H HRMAS metabolite measurements in adult human gliomas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opstad, K.S.; Wright, A.J.; Bell, B.A.; Griffiths, J.R.; Howe, F.A.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess how accurately ex vivo high-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) from small biopsy tissues relate to in vivo (1)H MRS (from larger tumor volumes) in human astrocytomas. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In vivo (PRESS, TE = 30 msec) and ex

  18. Comparison of in vivo cardiac function with ex vivo cardiac performance of the rat heart after thoracic irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, N. A.; Camps, J. A.; van Ravels, F. J.; van der Laarse, A.; Pauwels, E. K.; Wondergem, J.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare in vivo cardiac function with ex vivo cardiac performance after local heart irradiation in the same rat. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was measured in vivo by radionuclide ventriculography in Sprague-Dawley rats up to 16 months after a single dose of

  19. Ocular ketoconazole-loaded proniosomal gels: formulation, ex vivo corneal permeation and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelbary, Ghada A; Amin, Maha M; Zakaria, Mohamed Y

    2017-11-01

    Vesicular drug carriers for ocular delivery have gained a real potential. Proniosomal gels as ocular drug carriers have been proven to be an effective way to improve bioavailability and patient compliance. Formulation and in vitro/ex vivo/in vivo characterization of ketoconazole (KET)-loaded proniosomal gels for the treatment of ocular keratitis. The effect of formulation variables; HLB value, type and concentration of non-ionic surfactants (Tweens, Spans, Brijs and Pluronics) with or without lecithin on the entrapment efficiency (EE%), vesicle size and in vitro KET release was evaluated. An ex vivo corneal permeation study to determine the level of KET in the external eye tissue of albino rabbits and an in vivo assessment of the level of KET in the aqueous humors were performed. In vivo evaluation showed an increase in bioavailability up to 20-folds from the optimum KET proniosomal gel formula in the aqueous humor compared to drug suspension (KET-SP). The selected formulae were composed of spans being hydrophobic suggesting the potential use of a more hydrophobic surfactant as Span during the formulation of formulae. Factors that stabilize the vesicle membrane and increase the entrapment efficiency of KET (namely low HLB, long alkyl chain, high phase transition temperature) slowed down the release profile. Proniosomal gels as drug delivery carriers were proven to be a promising approach to increase corneal contact and permeation as well as retention time in the eye resulting in a sustained action and enhanced bioavailability.

  20. Sleep deprivation decreases neuronal excitability and responsiveness in rats both in vivo and ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbély, Sándor; Világi, Ildikó; Haraszti, Zsófia; Szalontai, Örs; Hajnik, Tünde; Tóth, Attila; Détári, László

    2017-12-11

    Sleep deprivation has severe consequences for higher nervous functions. Its effects on neuronal excitability may be one of the most important factors underlying functional deterioration caused by sleep loss. In the present work, excitability changes were studied using two complementary in vivo and ex vivo models. Auditory evoked potentials were recorded from freely-moving animals in vivo. Amplitude of evoked responses showed a near-continuous decrease during deprivation. Prevention of sleep also reduced synaptic efficacy ex vivo, measured from brain slices derived from rats that underwent sleep deprivation. While seizure susceptibility was not affected significantly by sleep deprivation in these preparations, the pattern of spontaneous seizure activity was altered. If seizures developed, they lasted longer and tended to contain more spikes in slices obtained from sleep-deprived than from control rats. Current-source density analysis revealed that location and sequence of activation of local cortical networks recruited by seizures did not change by sleep deprivation. Moderate differences seen in the amplitude of individual sinks and sources might be explained by smaller net transmembrane currents as a consequence of decreased excitability. These findings contradict the widely accepted conception of synaptic homeostasis suggesting gradual increase of excitability during wakefulness. Our results also indicate that decreased neuronal excitability caused by sleep deprivation is preserved in slices prepared from rats immediately after deprivation. This observation might mean new opportunities to explore the effects of sleep deprivation in ex vivo preparations that allow a wider range of experimental manipulations and more sophisticated methods of analysis than in vivo preparations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Application of a Novel and Automated Branched DNA in Situ Hybridization Method for the Rapid and Sensitive Localization of mRNA Molecules in Plant Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Bowling

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: A novel branched DNA detection technology, RNAscope in situ hybridization (ISH, originally developed for use on human clinical and animal tissues, was adapted for use in plant tissue in an attempt to overcome some of the limitations associated with traditional ISH assays. Methods and Results: Zea mays leaf tissue was formaldehyde fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE and then probed with the RNAscope ISH assay for two endogenous genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK. Results from both manual and automated methods showed tissue- and cell-specific mRNA localization patterns expected from these well-studied genes. Conclusions: RNAscope ISH is a sensitive method that generates high-quality, easily interpretable results from FFPE plant tissues. Automation of the RNAscope method on the Ventana Discovery Ultra platform allows significant advantages for repeatability, reduction in variability, and flexibility of workflow processes.

  2. Application of a novel and automated branched DNA in situ hybridization method for the rapid and sensitive localization of mRNA molecules in plant tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, Andrew J; Pence, Heather E; Church, Jeffrey B

    2014-04-01

    A novel branched DNA detection technology, RNAscope in situ hybridization (ISH), originally developed for use on human clinical and animal tissues, was adapted for use in plant tissue in an attempt to overcome some of the limitations associated with traditional ISH assays. • Zea mays leaf tissue was formaldehyde fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) and then probed with the RNAscope ISH assay for two endogenous genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). Results from both manual and automated methods showed tissue- and cell-specific mRNA localization patterns expected from these well-studied genes. • RNAscope ISH is a sensitive method that generates high-quality, easily interpretable results from FFPE plant tissues. Automation of the RNAscope method on the Ventana Discovery Ultra platform allows significant advantages for repeatability, reduction in variability, and flexibility of workflow processes.

  3. In vivo Raman spectroscopy of cervix cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubina, S.; Sathe, Priyanka; Dora, Tapas Kumar; Chopra, Supriya; Maheshwari, Amita; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Cervix-cancer is the third most common female cancer worldwide. It is the leading cancer among Indian females with more than million new diagnosed cases and 50% mortality, annually. The high mortality rates can be attributed to late diagnosis. Efficacy of Raman spectroscopy in classification of normal and pathological conditions in cervix cancers on diverse populations has already been demonstrated. Our earlier ex vivo studies have shown the feasibility of classifying normal and cancer cervix tissues as well as responders/non-responders to Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). The present study was carried out to explore feasibility of in vivo Raman spectroscopic methods in classifying normal and cancerous conditions in Indian population. A total of 182 normal and 132 tumor in vivo Raman spectra, from 63 subjects, were recorded using a fiberoptic probe coupled HE-785 spectrometer, under clinical supervision. Spectra were acquired for 5 s and averaged over 3 times at 80 mW laser power. Spectra of normal conditions suggest strong collagenous features and abundance of non-collagenous proteins and DNA in case of tumors. Preprocessed spectra were subjected to Principal Component-Linear Discrimination Analysis (PCLDA) followed by leave-one-out-cross-validation. Classification efficiency of ~96.7% and 100% for normal and cancerous conditions respectively, were observed. Findings of the study corroborates earlier studies and suggest applicability of Raman spectroscopic methods in combination with appropriate multivariate tool for objective, noninvasive and rapid diagnosis of cervical cancers in Indian population. In view of encouraging results, extensive validation studies will be undertaken to confirm the findings.

  4. In vivo dosimetry during tangential breast treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heukelom, S; Lanson, J H; van Tienhoven, G; Mijnheer, B J

    1991-12-01

    The 3-dimensional (3-D) dose distribution as calculated in clinical practice for tangential breast treatment was verified by means of in vivo dosimetry. Clinical practice in our institution implies the use of 8 MV X-ray beams, a 2-D treatment planning system, collimator rotation and a limited set of patient data for dose calculations. By positioning diodes at the central beam axes as well as in the periphery of the breast the magnitude of the dose values at the isocentre and in points situated in the high-dose regions behind the lung could be assessed. The position of the diodes was verified by means of an on-line portal imaging device. The reproducibility of these in vivo dose measurements was better than 2% (1 SD). Our study showed that on the average the dose delivery at the isocentre is 2% less and at the points behind the lung, 5.7% higher with respect to the calculated dose values. Detailed analysis of these in vivo dosimetry results, based on dose measurements performed with a breast shaped phantom, yielded the magnitudes of the errors in the predicted dose due to several limitations in the dose calculation algorithms and dose calculation procedure. These limitations are each introducing an error of several percent but are compensating each other for the dose calculation at the isocentre. We concluded that the dose distribution in a patient for our treatment technique and dose calculation procedure can be predicted with a 2-D treatment planning system in an acceptable way. A more accurate prediction of the dose distribution can be performed but requires an estimation of the lack of scatter due to missing tissue, the change in the dose distribution due to oblique incident beams and the incorporation of the actual output of the treatment machine in the assessment of the number of monitor units.

  5. Sampling system for in vivo ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jorgen Arendt; Mathorne, Jan

    1991-01-01

    Newly developed algorithms for processing medical ultrasound images use the high frequency sampled transducer signal. This paper describes demands imposed on a sampling system suitable for acquiring such data and gives details about a prototype constructed. It acquires full clinical images at a s...... at a sampling frequency of 20 MHz with a resolution of 12 bits. The prototype can be used for real time image processing. An example of a clinical in vivo image is shown and various aspects of the data acquisition process are discussed....

  6. In vivo toxicity study of Lantana camara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pour, Badakhshan Mahdi; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the toxicity of methanol extract of various parts (Root, Stem, Leaf, Flower and Fruit) of Lantana camara (L. Camara) in Artemia salina. The methanol extracts of L. camara were tested for in vivo brine shrimp lethality assay. All the tested extract exhibited very low toxicity on brine shrimp larva. The results showed that the root extract was the most toxic part of L. camara and may have potential as anticancer agent. Methanolic extract of L. camara is relatively safe on short-term exposure.

  7. In vivo dosimetry during pelvic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heukelom, S; Lanson, J H; Mijnheer, B J

    1992-10-01

    High precision in vivo entrance and exit dose measurements have been performed with p-type diodes on patients during 8 MV X-ray irradiation of the pelvis, to investigate the accuracy of dose calculations in this region. Based on phantom measurements the accuracy of the p-type diode measuring system itself, i.e. the agreement with ionisation chamber dose measurements, was shown to be better than 0.7% while the reproducibility in the dose determination was 1.1%, 1.5% and 1.6% (1 S.D.) at the entrance point, isocentre and exit point, respectively, for the wedged lateral fields. Patient movement and the uncertainty in the diode position increased these values to 1.7%, 1.5% and 3.1% (1 S.D.) for dose determinations on patients. From the entrance and exit in vivo dose values the dose actually delivered to the isocentre was determined. For the anterior-posterior beams a good correspondence for most patients was observed at the entrance and exit point and at the isocentre between the in vivo and calculated dose values. For the wedged lateral beams a systematic deviation of about 3% was observed. In addition to the in vivo dose measurements phantom dose measurements have been performed to quantify the accuracy of the dose calculation algorithms including the computation of the number of monitor units. These measurements also served to quantify the effects of the actual patient on the dose delivery. The measurements showed that accurate calculation of the dose requires a separation of the head and phantom scatter contribution of the output of the treatment machine. The dependence of the wedge factor on field size, depth and source-skin-distance has also to be considered for accurate dose calculations. The effect of the patient on the dose calculation is mainly related to the actual electron densities of fat and bone structures compared to water: neglecting these densities in the dose computation could yield deviations up to 8.5% for the exit point in wedged beams. Based on

  8. Comparison of In Vivo and Ex Vivo MRI of the Human Hippocampal Formation in the Same Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisse, L E M; Adler, D H; Ittyerah, R; Pluta, J B; Robinson, J L; Schuck, T; Trojanowski, J Q; Grossman, M; Detre, J A; Elliott, M A; Toledo, J B; Liu, W; Pickup, S; Das, S R; Wolk, D A; Yushkevich, P A

    2017-11-01

    Multiple techniques for quantification of hippocampal subfields from in vivo MRI have been proposed. Linking in vivo MRI to the underlying histology can help validate and improve these techniques. High-resolution ex vivo MRI can provide an intermediate modality to map information between these very different imaging modalities. This article evaluates the ability to match information between in vivo and ex vivo MRI in the same subjects. We perform rigid and deformable registration on 10 pairs of in vivo (3 T, 0.4 × 0.4 × 2.6 mm3) and ex vivo (9.4 T, 0.2 × 0.2 × 0.2 mm3) scans, and describe differences in MRI appearance between these modalities qualitatively and quantitatively. The feasibility of using this dataset to validate in vivo segmentation is evaluated by applying an automatic hippocampal subfield segmentation technique (ASHS) to in vivo scans and comparing SRLM (stratum/radiatum/lacunosum/moleculare) surface to manual tracing on corresponding ex vivo scans (and in 2 cases, histology). Regional increases in thickness are detected in ex vivo scans adjacent to the ventricles and were not related to scanner, resolution differences, or susceptibility artefacts. Satisfactory in vivo/ex vivo registration and subvoxel accuracy of ASHS segmentation of hippocampal SRLM demonstrate the feasibility of using this dataset for validation, and potentially, improvement of in vivo segmentation methods. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Comparison of two in vivo and two ex vivo tests to assess the antibacterial activity of several antiseptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messager, S; Goddard, P A; Dettmar, P W; Maillard, J-Y

    2004-10-01

    An ex vivo test was adapted to mimic the in vivo conditions of testing antiseptic activity on human forearms and in the European Standard Hygienic Handwash Test (BSEN 1499). The study was to validate the ex vivo protocols using 4.8% (w/v) para-chloro-meta-xylenol (PCMX, neat Dettol), 0.5% (w/v) triclosan in 70% (v/v) isopropanol, and 2% (v/v) povidone-iodine against a high bacterial inoculum (>10(8) cfu/mL) of Escherichia coli NCTC 10538. Two ex vivo tests using human skin samples, including one introducing a mechanical rubbing effect, were compared with two corresponding in vivo tests (the forearm test and the BSEN handwashing test). All antiseptics assessed in vivo (forearm and handwash tests) produced reductions in bacterial counts that were significantly greater than those for the non-medicated soft soap control. When assessed ex vivo without rubbing, only PCMX and povidone-iodine achieved reductions significantly greater than soft soap. When assessed ex vivo with mechanical rubbing, only PCMX and triclosan achieved reductions significantly greater than soft soap. Overall, the antiseptics at the concentrations tested were more active when tested in vivo than ex vivo. The addition of a mechanical effect, either in vivo by the volunteers washing their hands or ex vivo by a drill rubbing two skin samples against each other, produced a significantly greater reduction in bacterial concentrations. The ex vivo tests were easily adapted to mimic in vivo protocols. The value of such tests, particularly the one that includes a rubbing effect, may be significant as they avoid the need for human volunteers.

  10. Does simvastatin stimulate bone formation in vivo?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chorev Michael

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statins, potent compounds that inhibit cholesterol synthesis in the liver have been reported to induce bone formation, both in tissue culture and in rats and mice. To re-examine potential anabolic effects of statins on bone formation, we compared the activity of simvastatin (SVS to the known anabolic effects of PTH in an established model of ovariectomized (OVX Swiss-Webster mice. Methods Mice were ovariectomized at 12 weeks of age (T0, remained untreated for 5 weeks to allow development of osteopenia (T5, followed by treatment for 8 weeks (T13. Whole, trabecular and cortical femoral bone was analyzed by micro-computed tomography (micro CT. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS was used to detect the presence of SVS and its active metabolite, simvastatin β-hydroxy acid (SVS-OH in the mouse serum. Results Trabecular BV/TV at T13 was 4.2 fold higher in animals treated with PTH (80 micro-g/kg/day compared to the OVX-vehicle treated group (p in vivo study. Conclusions While PTH demonstrated the expected anabolic effect on bone, SVS failed to stimulate bone formation, despite our verification by LC/MS of the active SVS-OH metabolite in mouse serum. While statins have clear effects on bone formation in vitro, the formulation of existing 'liver-targeted' statins requires further refinement for efficacy in vivo.

  11. Experimental in Vivo Models of Candidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Segal

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Candidiasis is a multifaceted fungal disease including mucosal-cutaneous, visceral, and disseminated infections caused by yeast species of the genus Candida. Candida infections are among the most common human mycoses. Candida species are the third to fourth most common isolates from bloodstream infections in neutropenic or immunocompromised hospitalized patients. The mucosal-cutaneous forms—particularly vaginal infections—have a high prevalence. Vaginitis caused by Candida species is the second most common vaginal infection. Hence, candidiasis is a major subject for research, including experimental in vivo models to study pathogenesis, prevention, or therapy of the disease. The following review article will focus on various experimental in vivo models in different laboratory animals, such as mammals (mice, rats, rabbits, the fruit fly–Drosophila melanogaster, the larvae of the moth Galleria mellonella, or the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The review will describe the induction of the different clinical forms of candidiasis in the various models and the validity of such models in mimicking the human clinical situations. The use of such models for the assessment of antifungal drugs, evaluation of potential vaccines to protect before candidiasis, exploration of Candida virulence factors, and comparison of pathogenicity of different Candida species will be included in the review. All of the above will be reported as based on published studies of numerous investigators as well as on the research of the author and his group.

  12. Responsive corneosurfametry following in vivo skin preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhoda, E; Goffin, V; Pierard, G E

    2003-12-01

    Skin is subjected to many environmental threats, some of which altering the structure and function of the stratum corneum. Among them, surfactants are recognized factors that may influence irritant contact dermatitis. The present study was conducted to compare the variations in skin capacitance and corneosurfametry (CSM) reactivity before and after skin exposure to repeated subclinical injuries by 2 hand dishwashing liquids. A forearm immersion test was performed on 30 healthy volunteers. 2 daily soak sessions were performed for 5 days. At inclusion and the day following the last soak session, skin capacitance was measured and cyanoacrylate skin-surface strippings were harvested. The latter specimens were used for the ex vivo microwave CSM. Both types of assessments clearly differentiated the 2 hand dishwashing liquids. The forearm immersion test allowed the discriminant sensitivity of CSM to increase. Intact skin capacitance did not predict CSM data. By contrast, a significant correlation was found between the post-test conductance and the corresponding CSM data. In conclusion, a forearm immersion test under realistic conditions can discriminate the irritation potential between surfactant-based products by measuring skin conductance and performing CSM. In vivo skin preconditioning by surfactants increases CSM sensitivity to the same surfactants.

  13. In vivo measurement of surgical gestures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Patrick; Thommen, Quentin; Jambon, Anne Claire

    2002-01-01

    Virtual reality techniques are now more and more widely used in the field of surgical training. However, the realism of the simulation devices requires a good knowledge of the mechanical behavior of the living organs. To provide perioperative measurement of laparoscopic surgical operations, we equipped a conventional operating grasper with a force sensor and a position sensor. The entire apparatus was connected to a PC that controlled the real-time data acquisition. After calibrating the sensors, we conducted three series of in vivo measurements on animals under video control. A standardized protocol was set up to perform various surgical gestures in a reproducible manner. Under these conditions, we can assess an original tool for a quantitative approach of surgical gestures' mechanics. The preliminary results will be extended by measurements during other operations and with other surgical instruments. The in vivo quantification of the mechanical interactions between operating instruments and anatomical structures is of great interest for the introduction of the force feedback in virtual surgery, for the modeling of the mechanical behavior of living organs, and for the design of new surgical instruments. This quantification of manipulations opens new prospects in the evaluation of surgical practices.

  14. In Vivo Pharmacodynamic Imaging of Proteasome Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin A. Kimbrel

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Inhibiting the proteolytic activity of the 26S proteasome has been shown to have selective apoptotic effects on cancer cells and to be clinically efficacious in certain malignancies. There is an unmet medical need for additional proteasome inhibitors, and their development will be facilitated by surrogate markers of proteasome function. Toward this end, ectopic fusion of the destruction domain from ornithine decarboxylase (ODC to reporter proteins is often used for assessing proteasome function. For luciferase-based reporters, we hypothesized that the oxygen-dependent destruction domain (ODD from hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α may provide improved sensitivity over luciferase-ODC, owing to its extremely rapid turnover by the proteasome (HIF-1α has a half-life of less than 5 minutes. In the current study, we show that ODD-luciferase affords a greater dynamic range and faster kinetics than luciferase-ODC in sensing proteasome inhibition in vitro. Importantly, ODD-luciferase also serves as an effective in vivo marker of proteasome function in xenograft tumor models, with inhibition being detected by noninvasive imaging within 3 hours of bortezomib administration. These data establish ODD-luciferase as a surrogate marker of proteasome function that can be used both in vitro and in vivo for the development of novel proteasome inhibitors.

  15. In Vivo Bioreactors for Mandibular Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatara, A.M.; Wong, M.E.; Mikos, A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Large mandibular defects are difficult to reconstruct with good functional and aesthetic outcomes because of the complex geometry of craniofacial bone. While the current gold standard is free tissue flap transfer, this treatment is limited in fidelity by the shape of the harvested tissue and can result in significant donor site morbidity. To address these problems, in vivo bioreactors have been explored as an approach to generate autologous prefabricated tissue flaps. These bioreactors are implanted in an ectopic site in the body, where ossified tissue grows into the bioreactor in predefined geometries and local vessels are recruited to vascularize the developing construct. The prefabricated flap can then be harvested with vessels and transferred to a mandibular defect for optimal reconstruction. The objective of this review article is to introduce the concept of the in vivo bioreactor, describe important preclinical models in the field, summarize the human cases that have been reported through this strategy, and offer future directions for this exciting approach. PMID:25139360

  16. The flavones apigenin and luteolin induce FOXO1 translocation but inhibit gluconeogenic and lipogenic gene expression in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Bumke-Vogt

    Full Text Available The flavones apigenin (4',5,7,-trihydroxyflavone and luteolin (3',4',5,7,-tetrahydroxyflavone are plant secondary metabolites with antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and anticancer activities. We evaluated their impact on cell signaling pathways related to insulin-resistance and type 2 diabetes. Apigenin and luteolin were identified in our U-2 OS (human osteosarcoma cell screening assay for micronutrients triggering rapid intracellular translocation of the forkhead box transcription factor O1 (FOXO1, an important mediator of insulin signal transduction. Insulin reversed the translocation of FOXO1 as shown by live cell imaging. The impact on the expression of target genes was evaluated in HepG2 (human hepatoma cells. The mRNA-expression of the gluconeogenic enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pc, the lipogenic enzymes fatty-acid synthase (FASN and acetyl-CoA-carboxylase (ACC were down-regulated by both flavones with smaller effective dosages of apigenin than for luteolin. PKB/AKT-, PRAS40-, p70S6K-, and S6-phosphorylation was reduced by apigenin and luteolin but not that of the insulin-like growth factor receptor IGF-1R by apigenin indicating a direct inhibition of the PKB/AKT-signaling pathway distal to the IGF-1 receptor. N-acetyl-L-cysteine did not prevent FOXO1 nuclear translocation induced by apigenin and luteolin, suggesting that these flavones do not act via oxidative stress. The roles of FOXO1, FOXO3a, AKT, sirtuin1 (SIRT1, and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived2-like2 (NRF2, investigated by siRNA knockdown, showed differential patterns of signal pathways involved and a role of NRF2 in the inhibition of gluconeogenic enzyme expression. We conclude that these flavones show an antidiabetic potential due to reduction of gluconeogenic and lipogenic capacity despite inhibition of the PKB/AKT pathway which justifies detailed investigation in vivo.

  17. Metformin induces PGC-1α expression and selectively affects hepatic PGC-1α functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aatsinki, Sanna-Mari; Buler, Marcin; Salomäki, Henriikka; Koulu, Markku; Pavek, Petr; Hakkola, Jukka

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The objective of this study was to determine how the AMPK activating antidiabetic drug metformin affects the major activator of hepatic gluconeogenesis, PPARγ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) and liver functions regulated by PGC-1α. Experimental Approach Mouse and human primary hepatocytes and mice in vivo were treated with metformin. Adenoviral overexpression, siRNA and reporter gene constructs were used for mechanistic studies. Key Results Metformin increased PGC-1α mRNA and protein expression in mouse primary hepatocytes. 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) (another AMPK activator) had the opposite effect. Metformin also increased PGC-1α in human primary hepatocytes; this effect of metformin was abolished by AMPK inhibitor compound C and sirtuin 1 siRNA. AMPK overexpression by AMPK-Ad also increased PGC-1α. Whereas metformin increased PGC-1α, it down-regulated gluconeogenic genes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). Furthermore, metformin attenuated the increase in PEPCK and G6Pase mRNAs induced by PGC-1α overexpression, but did not affect PGC-1α-mediated induction of mitochondrial genes. Metformin down-regulated several key transcription factors that mediate the effect of PGC-1α on gluconeogenic genes including Krüppel-like factor 15, forkhead box protein O1 and hepatocyte NF 4α, whereas it increased nuclear respiratory factor 1, which is involved in PGC-1α-mediated regulation of mitochondrial proteins. Conclusions and Implications Down-regulation of PGC-1α is not necessary for suppression of gluconeogenic genes by metformin. Importantly, metformin selectively affects hepatic PGC-1α-mediated gene regulation and prevents activation of gluconeogenesis, but does not influence its regulation of mitochondrial genes. These results identify selective modulation of hepatic PGC-1α functions as a novel mechanism involved in the therapeutic action of metformin. PMID:24428821

  18. Metformin induces PGC-1α expression and selectively affects hepatic PGC-1α functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aatsinki, Sanna-Mari; Buler, Marcin; Salomäki, Henriikka; Koulu, Markku; Pavek, Petr; Hakkola, Jukka

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine how the AMPK activating antidiabetic drug metformin affects the major activator of hepatic gluconeogenesis, PPARγ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) and liver functions regulated by PGC-1α. Mouse and human primary hepatocytes and mice in vivo were treated with metformin. Adenoviral overexpression, siRNA and reporter gene constructs were used for mechanistic studies. Metformin increased PGC-1α mRNA and protein expression in mouse primary hepatocytes. 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) (another AMPK activator) had the opposite effect. Metformin also increased PGC-1α in human primary hepatocytes; this effect of metformin was abolished by AMPK inhibitor compound C and sirtuin 1 siRNA. AMPK overexpression by AMPK-Ad also increased PGC-1α. Whereas metformin increased PGC-1α, it down-regulated gluconeogenic genes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). Furthermore, metformin attenuated the increase in PEPCK and G6Pase mRNAs induced by PGC-1α overexpression, but did not affect PGC-1α-mediated induction of mitochondrial genes. Metformin down-regulated several key transcription factors that mediate the effect of PGC-1α on gluconeogenic genes including Krüppel-like factor 15, forkhead box protein O1 and hepatocyte NF 4α, whereas it increased nuclear respiratory factor 1, which is involved in PGC-1α-mediated regulation of mitochondrial proteins. Down-regulation of PGC-1α is not necessary for suppression of gluconeogenic genes by metformin. Importantly, metformin selectively affects hepatic PGC-1α-mediated gene regulation and prevents activation of gluconeogenesis, but does not influence its regulation of mitochondrial genes. These results identify selective modulation of hepatic PGC-1α functions as a novel mechanism involved in the therapeutic action of metformin. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Canine Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Ameliorates Hyperglycemia Associated with Inhibiting Hepatic Gluconeogenesis and Improving Pancreatic Beta-Cell Survival in Diabetic Mice and Dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Xu

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a common endocrinopathy in dog. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF-21 is a secreted protein, which is involved in glucose homeostasis. We speculate that the recombinant canine FGF-21 (cFGF-21 has the potential to become a powerful therapeutics to treat canine diabetes. The cFGF-21 gene was cloned and expressed in E. coli Rosetta (DE3. After purification, a cFGF-21 protein with the purity exceeding 95% was obtained. Mouse 3T3-L1 adipocytes and type 1 diabetic mice/dogs induced by STZ were used to examine the biological activity of cFGF-21 in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Results showed that cFGF-21 stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes significantly in a dose-dependent manner, and reduced plasma glucose significantly in diabetic mice/dogs. After treatment with cFGF-21, the serum insulin level, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c level and the expressions of the hepatic gluconeogenesis genes (glucose-6-phosphatase, G6Pase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, PCK of the diabetic mice/dogs were attenuated significantly. In the mouse experiment, we also found that the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 and the expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3 were up-regulated significantly in the livers after treatment. Histopathological and immunohistochemical results showed that treatment with cFGF-21 promoted recovery of pancreatic islets from STZ-induced apoptosis. Besides, we also found that treatment with cFGF-21 protected liver against STZ or hyperglycemia induced damage and the mechanism of this action associated with inhibiting oxidative stress. In conclusion, cFGF-21 represents a promising candidate for canine diabetes therapeutics. The mechanism of cFGF-21 ameliorates hyperglycemia associated with inhibiting hepatic gluconeogenesis by regulation of STAT3 signal pathway and improving pancreatic beta-cell survival.

  20. Computational and Pharmacological Evaluation of Ferrocene-Based Acyl Ureas and Homoleptic Cadmium Carboxylate Derivatives for Anti-diabetic Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bano, Shahar; Khan, Arif-Ullah; Asghar, Faiza; Usman, Muhammad; Badshah, Amin; Ali, Saqib

    2017-01-01

    We investigated possible anti-diabetic effect of ferrocene-based acyl ureas: 4-ferrocenyl aniline (PFA), 1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-3-(4-ferrocenylphenyl) urea (DPC1), 1-(3-chlorobenzoyl)-3-(4-ferrocenylphenyl) urea (DMC1), 1-(2-chlorobenzoyl)-3-(4-ferrocenylphenyl) urea (DOC1) and homoleptic cadmium carboxylates: bis (diphenylacetato) cadmium (II) (DPAA), bis (4-chlorophenylacetato) cadmium (II) (CPAA), using in silico and in vivo techniques. PFA, DPC1, DMC1, DOC1, DPAA and CPAA exhibited high binding affinities (ACE ≥ -350 Kcal/mol) against targets: aldose reductase, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1, C-alpha glucosidase and glucokinase, while showed moderate affinities (ACE ≥ -250 Kcal/mol) against N-alpha glucosidase, dipeptidyl peptidase-IV, phosphorylated-Akt, glycogen synthase kinase-3β, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, whereas revealed lower affinities (ACE diabetic mice, DPAA and DPC1 (1-10 mg/Kg) at day 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20th decreased blood glucose levels, compared to diabetic control group and improved the treated animals body weight. DPAA (10 mg/Kg) and DPC1 (5 mg/Kg) in time-dependent manner (30-120 min.) enhanced tolerance of oral glucose overload in mice. DPAA and DPCI dose-dependently at 1, 5, and 10 mg/Kg decreased glycosylated hemoglobin levels in diabetic animals, as caused by metformin. These results indicate that aforementioned derivatives of ferrocene and cadmium possess anti-diabetic potential.

  1. Dexamethasone and rosiglitazone are sufficient and necessary for producing functional adipocytes from mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contador, David; Ezquer, Fernando; Espinosa, Maximiliano; Arango-Rodriguez, Martha; Puebla, Carlos; Sobrevia, Luis; Conget, Paulette

    2015-09-01

    The final product of adipogenesis is a functional adipocyte. This mature cell acquires the necessary machinery for lipid metabolism, loses its proliferation potential, increases its insulin sensitivity, and secretes adipokines. Multipotent mesechymal stromal cells have been recognized as a source of adipocytes both in vivo and in vitro. The in vitro adipogenic differentiation of human MSC (hMSC) has been induced up to now by using a complex stimulus which includes dexamethasone, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, indomethacin, and insulin (a classical cocktail) and evaluated according to morphological changes. The present work was aimed at demonstrating that the simultaneous activation of dexamethasone's canonical signaling pathways, through the glucocorticoid receptor and CCAAT-enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) and rosiglitazone through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-gamma) is sufficient yet necessary for inducing hMSC adipogenic differentiation. It was also ascertained that hMSC exposed just to dexamethasone and rosiglitazone (D&R) differentiated into cells which accumulated neutral lipid droplets, expressed C/EBP-alpha, PPAR-gamma, aP2, lipoprotein lipase, acyl-CoA synthetase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, adiponectin, and leptin genes but did not proliferate. Glucose uptake was dose dependent on insulin stimulus and high levels of adipokines were secreted (i.e. displaying not only the morphology but also expressing mature adipocytes' specific genes and functional characteristics). This work has demonstrated that (i) the activating C/EBPs and PPAR-gamma signaling pathways were sufficient to induce adipogenic differentiation from hMSC, (ii) D&R producing functional adipocytes from hMSC, (iii) D&R induce adipogenic differentiation from mammalian MSC (including those which are refractory to classical adipogenic differentiation stimuli). D&R would thus seem to be a useful tool for MSC characterization, studying adipogenesis pathways and

  2. Changing pattern of prevalence of insulin resistance in Psammomys obesus, a model of nutritionally induced type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, E; Shafrir, E; Kalman, R; Galer, S; Bar-On, H

    1999-12-01

    Psammomys obesus (a desert gerbil, nicknamed the "sand rat") with innate insulin resistance was transferred to a high-energy (HE) diet at a young (8 to 20 weeks) and older (38 to 45 weeks) age. The young Psammomys progressed to in vivo insulin resistance, followed by pronounced hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, as described previously. Analysis of the time dependency of these changes in response to the HE diet showed that the increase in serum glucose preceded the increase in insulin and plateaued earlier, reverting to normal together with insulin in the older Psammomys. Implants releasing insulin 2 IU/24 h did not induce appreciable hypoglycemia, a decrease in free fatty acids (FFAs), or a suppression of hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity in young animals after 5 hours, despite a markedly increased circulating insulin. However, in the older Psammomys, the exogenous hyperinsulinemia produced a significant decline in serum glucose and FFA and a suppression of hepatic PEPCK activity. A euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp confirmed that hepatic glucose production (HGP) was lower in older Psammomys versus the young and was almost completely abolished by insulin (from 5.6 +/- 0.6 to 0.2 +/- 0.1 mg x min(-1) x kg(-1) v 10.9 +/- 0.8 to 3.9 +/- 0.5 mg x min(-1) x kg(-1)). This indicates that HGP, rather than glucose underutilization, was the main contributor to the hyperglycemia and that the hepatic insulin resistance in Psammomys is attenuated with age. In relation to the human condition, these findings point out that while the type 2 diabetes prevalence in Western populations generally increases with age, the excessive nutritional intake in high-risk populations produces a pattern of diabetes prevalence that tapers off with age. As such, the nutritionally induced diabetes in Psammomys represents a similar model for a differing pattern of the age-related prevalence of diabetes.

  3. Quinoa extract enriched in 20-hydroxyecdysone protects mice from diet-induced obesity and modulates adipokines expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucault, Anne-Sophie; Mathé, Véronique; Lafont, René; Even, Patrick; Dioh, Waly; Veillet, Stanislas; Tomé, Daniel; Huneau, Jean-François; Hermier, Dominique; Quignard-Boulangé, Annie

    2012-02-01

    Besides their well-known effect in the molting control in insects, ecdysteroids are steroid hormones that display potential pharmacologic and metabolic properties in mammals. The most common ecdysteroid, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) is found in many plants such as quinoa. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of quinoa extract (Q) enriched in 20E supplementation to prevent the onset of diet-induced obesity and to regulate the expression of adipocyte-specific genes in mice. Mice were fed a standard low-fat (LF) or a high-fat (HF) diet with or without supplementation by 20E-enriched Q or pure 20E for 3 weeks. Supplementation with Q reduced adipose tissue development in HF mice without modification of their body weight gain. This adipose tissue-specific effect was mainly associated with a reduced adipocyte size and a decrease in the expression of several genes involved in lipid storage, including lipoprotein lipase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Furthermore, Q-treated mice exhibited marked attenuation of mRNA levels of several inflammation markers (monocyte chemotactic protein-1, CD68) and insulin resistance (osteopontin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1)) as compared to HF mice. Q supplementation also reversed the effects of HF-induced downregulation of the uncoupling protein(s) (UCP(s)) mRNA levels in muscle. Similar results were obtained in mice fed a HF diet supplemented with similar amounts of pure 20E, suggesting that the latter accounted for most of the Q effects. Our study indicates that Q has an antiobesity activity in vivo and could be used as a nutritional supplement for the prevention and treatment of obesity and obesity-associated disorders.

  4. Featured Article: Dexamethasone and rosiglitazone are sufficient and necessary for producing functional adipocytes from mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezquer, Fernando; Espinosa, Maximiliano; Arango-Rodriguez, Martha; Puebla, Carlos; Sobrevia, Luis; Conget, Paulette

    2015-01-01

    The final product of adipogenesis is a functional adipocyte. This mature cell acquires the necessary machinery for lipid metabolism, loses its proliferation potential, increases its insulin sensitivity, and secretes adipokines. Multipotent mesechymal stromal cells have been recognized as a source of adipocytes both in vivo and in vitro. The in vitro adipogenic differentiation of human MSC (hMSC) has been induced up to now by using a complex stimulus which includes dexamethasone, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, indomethacin, and insulin (a classical cocktail) and evaluated according to morphological changes. The present work was aimed at demonstrating that the simultaneous activation of dexamethasone’s canonical signaling pathways, through the glucocorticoid receptor and CCAAT-enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) and rosiglitazone through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-gamma) is sufficient yet necessary for inducing hMSC adipogenic differentiation. It was also ascertained that hMSC exposed just to dexamethasone and rosiglitazone (D&R) differentiated into cells which accumulated neutral lipid droplets, expressed C/EBP-alpha, PPAR-gamma, aP2, lipoprotein lipase, acyl-CoA synthetase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, adiponectin, and leptin genes but did not proliferate. Glucose uptake was dose dependent on insulin stimulus and high levels of adipokines were secreted (i.e. displaying not only the morphology but also expressing mature adipocytes’ specific genes and functional characteristics). This work has demonstrated that (i) the activating C/EBPs and PPAR-gamma signaling pathways were sufficient to induce adipogenic differentiation from hMSC, (ii) D&R producing functional adipocytes from hMSC, (iii) D&R induce adipogenic differentiation from mammalian MSC (including those which are refractory to classical adipogenic differentiation stimuli). D&R would thus seem to be a useful tool for MSC characterization, studying adipogenesis pathways and

  5. Role of human pregnane X receptor in high fat diet-induced obesity in pre-menopausal female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruiell, Krisstonia; Jones, Dominique Z; Cullen, John M; Awumey, Emmanuel M; Gonzalez, Frank J; Gyamfi, Maxwell A

    2014-06-01

    Obesity is a complex metabolic disorder that is more prevalent among women. Until now, the only relevant rodent models of diet-induced obesity were via the use of ovariectomized ("postmenopausal") females. However, recent reports suggest that the xenobiotic nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR) may contribute to obesity. Therefore, we compared the roles of mouse and human PXRs in diet-induced obesity between wild type (WT) and PXR-humanized (hPXR) transgenic female mice fed either control or high-fat diets (HFD) for 16 weeks. HFD-fed hPXR mice gained weight more rapidly than controls, exhibited hyperinsulinemia, and impaired glucose tolerance. Fundamental differences were observed between control-fed hPXR and WT females: hPXR mice possessed reduced estrogen receptor α (ERα) but enhanced uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) protein expression in white adipose tissue (WAT); increased protein expression of the hepatic cytochrome P450 3A11 (CYP3A11) and key gluconeogenic enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose 6-phosphatase, and increased total cholesterol. Interestingly, HFD ingestion induced both UCP1 and glucokinase protein expression in WT mice, but inhibited these enzymes in hPXR females. Unlike WT mice, CYP3A11 protein, serum 17β-estradiol levels, and WAT ERα expression were unaffected by HFD in hPXR females. Together, these studies indicate that the hPXR gene promotes obesity and metabolic syndrome by dysregulating lipid and glucose homeostasis while inhibiting UCP1 expression. Furthermore, our studies indicate that the human PXR suppresses the protective role of estrogen in metabolic disorders. Finally, these data identify PXR-humanized mice as a promising in vivo research model for studying obesity and diabetes in women. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Dibutyltin disrupts glucocorticoid receptor function and impairs glucocorticoid-induced suppression of cytokine production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel Gumy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Organotins are highly toxic and widely distributed environmental chemicals. Dibutyltin (DBT is used as stabilizer in the production of polyvinyl chloride plastics, and it is also the major metabolite formed from tributyltin (TBT in vivo. DBT is immunotoxic, however, the responsible targets remain to be defined. Due to the importance of glucocorticoids in immune-modulation, we investigated whether DBT could interfere with glucocorticoid receptor (GR function. METHODOLOGY: We used HEK-293 cells transiently transfected with human GR as well as rat H4IIE hepatoma cells and native human macrophages and human THP-1 macrophages expressing endogenous receptor to study organotin effects on GR function. Docking of organotins was used to investigate the binding mechanism. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that nanomolar concentrations of DBT, but not other organotins tested, inhibit ligand binding to GR and its transcriptional activity. Docking analysis indicated that DBT inhibits GR activation allosterically by inserting into a site close to the steroid-binding pocket, which disrupts a key interaction between the A-ring of the glucocorticoid and the GR. DBT inhibited glucocorticoid-induced expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK and tyrosine-aminotransferase (TAT and abolished the glucocorticoid-mediated transrepression of TNF-alpha-induced NF-kappaB activity. Moreover, DBT abrogated the glucocorticoid-mediated suppression of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and TNF-alpha production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated native human macrophages and human THP-1 macrophages. CONCLUSIONS: DBT inhibits ligand binding to GR and subsequent activation of the receptor. By blocking GR activation, DBT may disturb metabolic functions and modulation of the immune system, providing an explanation for some of the toxic effects of this organotin.

  7. The nuclear retinoid-related orphan receptor-α regulates adipose tissue glyceroneogenesis in addition to hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiri, Sarah; Monnier, Chloé; Ganbold, Munkhzul; Ledent, Tatiana; Capeau, Jacqueline; Antoine, Bénédicte

    2015-07-15

    Circadian rhythms have an essential role in feeding behavior and metabolism. RORα is a nuclear receptor involved in the interface of the circadian system and metabolism. The adipocyte glyceroneogenesis pathway derives free fatty acids (FFA) liberated by lipolysis to reesterification into triglycerides, thus regulating FFA homeostasis and fat mass. Glyceroneogenesis shares with hepatic gluconeogenesis the key enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase c (PEPCKc), whose gene is a RORα target in the liver. RORα-deficient mice (staggerer, ROR(sg/sg)) have been shown to exhibit a lean phenotype and fasting hypoglycemia for unsolved reasons. In the present study, we investigated whether adipocyte glyceroneogenesis might also be a target pathway of RORα, and we further evaluated the role of RORα in hepatocyte gluconeogenesis. In vivo investigations comparing ROR(sg/sg) mice with their wild-type (WT) littermates under fasting conditions demonstrated that, in the absence of RORα, the release of FFA into the bloodstream was altered and the rise in glycemia in response to pyruvate reduced. The functional analysis of each pathway, performed in adipose tissue or liver explants, confirmed the impairment of adipocyte glyceroneogenesis and liver gluconeogenesis in the ROR(sg/sg) mice; these reductions of FFA reesterification or glucose production were associated with decreases in PEPCKc mRNA and protein levels. Treatment of explants with RORα agonist or antagonist enhanced or inhibited these pathways, respectively, in tissues isolated from WT but not ROR(sg/sg) mice. Our results indicated that both adipocyte glyceroneogenesis and hepatocyte gluconeogenesis were regulated by RORα. This study demonstrates the physiological function of RORα in regulating both glucose and FFA homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. GdCl3 reduces hyperglycaemia through Akt/FoxO1-induced suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis in Type 2 diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Wang, Ning; Dong, Mei; Chen, Fang; Li, Zhong; Chen, Yuanyuan

    2014-07-01

    GdCl3 (gadolinium chloride) has been shown to reduce blood glucose; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Liver gluconeogenesis is an important pathway involved in the maintenance of glucose homoeostasis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of GdCl3 in hepatic gluconeogenesis and explore the precise molecular mechanism. Animals from a classical Type 2 diabetic mouse model, created by exposing C57BL/6J mice to a high-fat diet for 4 months, were treated with GdCl3 or saline. Body weight, blood glucose and insulin sensitivity were monitored. It was observed that GdCl3 significantly reduced blood glucose levels and improved insulin sensitivity. A pyruvate tolerance test showed further that GdCl3 suppressed gluconeogenesis in diabetic mice. In the livers of GdCl3-treated mice, the expression of Pepck (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase) and G6pase (glucose-6-phosphatase), the key enzymes in gluconeogenesis, were dramatically reduced. Furthermore, experiments in hepatocarcinoma cells revealed that GdCl3 activated the Akt pathway to promote the phosphorylation of FoxO1 (forkhead box O1), leading to the suppression of gluconeogenesis by reducing the expression of PEPCK and G6Pase and resulting in decreased cellular production of glucose. Comparable results were observed in the livers of GdCl3-treated mice. In addition, we have shown that GdCl3 augmented the role of insulin to control hepatic glucose production. We conclude that GdCl3 reduces hyperglycaemia via the Akt/FoxO1-induced suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis, both in Type 2 diabetic mice (in vivo) and in hepatocarcinoma cells (in vitro), suggesting that GdCl3 may be a potential therapeutic agent for diabetes.

  9. Alteration of 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1 and Glucocorticoid Receptor by Ethanol in Rat Liver and Mouse Hepatoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaojie Meng

    2013-01-01

    for 3 months and 100 mM for 48 h, respectively. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests in vivo were performed, and protein levels of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR in liver and Hepa 1–6 cells were measured. Alterations of key enzymes of gluconeogenesis phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK and glucose 6 phosphatase (G6Pase, as well as glycogen synthase kinase 3a (GSK3α, were also examined. The results revealed that glucose levels were increased, and insulin sensitivity was impaired accompanied with liver injury in rats exposed to ethanol compared with controls. The 11β-HSD1, GR, PEPCK, G6Pase, and GSK3α proteins were increased in the liver of rats treated with ethanol compared with controls. Ethanol-exposed Hepa 1–6 cells also showed higher expression of 11β-HSD1, GR, PEPCK, G6Pase, and GSK3α proteins than control cells. After treatment of Hepa 1–6 cells exposed to ethanol with the GR inhibitor RU486, the expression of 11β-HSD1 and GR was significantly decreased. At the same time the increases in PEPCK, G6Pase, and GSK3α levels induced by ethanol in Hepa 1–6 cells were also attenuated by RU486. The results indicate that ethanol causes glucose intolerance by increasing hepatic expression of 11β-HSD1 and GR, which leads to increased expression of gluconeogenic and glycogenolytic enzymes.

  10. Hypoglycemic effects of brassinosteroid in diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Debora; Kizelsztein, Pablo; Komarnytsky, Slavko; Raskin, Ilya

    2012-09-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing globally, and obesity is a major risk factor for metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes. Previously, we reported that oral administration of homobrassinolide (HB) to healthy rats triggered a selective anabolic response that was associated with lower blood glucose. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of HB administration on glucose metabolism, insulin sensitivity, body composition, and gluconeogenic gene expression profiles in liver of C57BL/6J high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Acute oral administration of 50-300 mg/kg HB to obese mice resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in fasting blood glucose within 3 h of treatment. Daily chronic administration of HB (50 mg/kg for 8 wk) ameliorated hyperglycemia and improved oral glucose tolerance associated with obesity without significantly affecting body weight or body composition. These changes were accompanied by lower expression of two key gluconeogenic enzymes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase), and increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase in the liver and muscle tissue. In vitro, HB treatment (1-15 μM) inhibited cyclic AMP-stimulated but not dexamethasone-stimulated upregulation of PEPCK and G-6-Pase mRNA levels in H4IIE rat hepatoma cells. Among a series of brassinosteroid analogs related to HB, only homocastasterone decreased glucose production in cell culture significantly. These results indicate the antidiabetic effects of brassinosteroids and begin to elucidate their putative cellular targets both in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Comparative In vivo, Ex vivo, and In vitro Toxicity Studies of Engineered Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efforts to reduce the number of animals in engineered nanomaterials (ENM) toxicity testing have resulted in the development of numerous alternative toxicity testing methods, but in vivo and in vitro results are still evolving and variable. This inconsistency could be due to the f...

  12. In-vivo multispectral video endoscopy towards in-vivo hyperspectral video endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohmann, Martin; Kanawade, R; Klämpfl, F; Douplik, A; Mudter, J; Neurath, M F; Albrecht, H

    2017-04-01

    For in-vivo diagnostics of cancer and pre-cancer in the stomach, there is no endoscopic procedure offering both high sensitivity and high specificity. Our data suggest that multispectral or hyperspectral imaging may be helpful to solve this problem. It is successfully applied to the detection and analysis of easily reachable carcinomas, ex-vivo samples of hollow organ mucosal carcinomas and also histological samples. An endoscopy system which allows flexible multispectral videoendoscopy for in-vivo diagnostics has so far been unavailable. To overcome this problem, we modified a standard Olympus endoscopy system to conduct in-vivo multispectral imaging of the upper GI tract. The pilot study is performed on 14 patients with adeno carcinomas in the stomach. For analysis, Support Vector Machine with linear and Gaussian Kernel, AdaBoost, RobustBoost and Random-Forest-walk are used and compared for the data classification with a leave-one-out strategy. The margin of the carcinoma for the training of the classifier is drawn by expert-labeling. The cancer findings are cross-checked by biopsies. We expect that the present study will help to improve the further development of hyperspectral endoscopy and to overcome some of the problems to be faced in this process. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. In vivo and ex vivo vessel wall MRI of the circle of Willis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harteveld, A.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413650286

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, several MRI sequences have been developed for direct evaluation of the intracranial vessel wall and its pathology in vivo. These MRI sequences enable detection of intracranial vessel wall abnormalities, including those that have not yet caused luminal narrowing. The research field

  14. Automated Segmentation of in Vivo and Ex Vivo Mouse Brain Magnetic Resonance Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alize E.H. Scheenstra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Segmentation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data is required for many applications, such as the comparison of different structures or time points, and for annotation purposes. Currently, the gold standard for automated image segmentation is nonlinear atlas-based segmentation. However, these methods are either not sufficient or highly time consuming for mouse brains, owing to the low signal to noise ratio and low contrast between structures compared with other applications. We present a novel generic approach to reduce processing time for segmentation of various structures of mouse brains, in vivo and ex vivo. The segmentation consists of a rough affine registration to a template followed by a clustering approach to refine the rough segmentation near the edges. Compared with manual segmentations, the presented segmentation method has an average kappa index of 0.7 for 7 of 12 structures in in vivo MRI and 11 of 12 structures in ex vivo MRI. Furthermore, we found that these results were equal to the performance of a nonlinear segmentation method, but with the advantage of being 8 times faster. The presented automatic segmentation method is quick and intuitive and can be used for image registration, volume quantification of structures, and annotation.

  15. Combined in vivo and ex vivo analysis of mesh mechanics in a porcine hernia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Lindsey G; Lake, Spencer P; McAllister, Jared M; Tan, Wen Hui; Yu, Jennifer; Thompson, Dominic; Brunt, L Michael; Blatnik, Jeffrey A

    2017-07-21

    Hernia meshes exhibit variability in mechanical properties, and their mechanical match to tissue has not been comprehensively studied. We used an innovative imaging model of in vivo strain tracking and ex vivo mechanical analysis to assess effects of mesh properties on repaired abdominal walls in a porcine model. We hypothesized that meshes with dissimilar mechanical properties compared to native tissue would alter abdominal wall mechanics more than better-matched meshes. Seven mini-pigs underwent ventral hernia creation and subsequent open repair with one of two heavyweight polypropylene meshes. Following mesh implantation with attached radio-opaque beads, fluoroscopic images were taken at insufflation pressures from 5 to 30 mmHg on postoperative days 0, 7, and 28. At 28 days, animals were euthanized and ex vivo mechanical testing performed on full-thickness samples across repaired abdominal walls. Testing was conducted on 13 mini-pig controls, and on meshes separately. Stiffness and anisotropy (the ratio of stiffness in the transverse versus craniocaudal directions) were assessed. 3D reconstructions of repaired abdominal walls showed stretch patterns. As pressure increased, both meshes expanded, with no differences between groups. Over time, meshes contracted 17.65% (Mesh A) and 0.12% (Mesh B; p = 0.06). Mesh mechanics showed that Mesh A deviated from anisotropic native tissue more than Mesh B. Compared to native tissue, Mesh A was stiffer both transversely and craniocaudally. Explanted repaired abdominal walls of both treatment groups were stiffer than native tissue. Repaired tissue became less anisotropic over time, as mesh properties prevailed over native abdominal wall properties. This technique assessed 3D stretch at the mesh level in vivo in a porcine model. While the abdominal wall expanded, mesh-ingrown areas contracted, potentially indicating stresses at mesh edges. Ex vivo mechanics demonstrate that repaired tissue adopts mesh properties, suggesting

  16. Evaluation of the In Vivo and Ex Vivo Binding of Novel BC1 Cannabinoid Receptor Radiotracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, A.; Gatley, J.; Gifford, A.

    2002-01-01

    The primary active ingredient of marijuana, 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, exerts its psychoactive effects by binding to cannabinoid CB1 receptors. These receptors are found throughout the brain with high concentrations in the hippocampus and cerebellum. The current study was conducted to evaluate the binding of a newly developed putative cannabinoid antagonist, AM630, and a classical cannabinoid 8-tetrahydrocannabinol as potential PET and/or SPECT imaging agents for brain CB1 receptors. For both of these ligands in vivo and ex vivo studies in mice were conducted. AM630 showed good overall brain uptake (as measure by %IA/g) and a moderately rapid clearance from the brain with a half-clearance time of approximately 30 minutes. However, AM630 did not show selective binding to CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Ex vivo autoradiography supported the lack of selective binding seen in the in vivo study. Similar to AM630, 8-tetrahydrocanibol also failed to show selective binding to CB1 receptor rich brain areas. The 8-tetrahydrocanibol showed moderate overall brain uptake and relatively slow brain clearance as compared to AM630. Further studies were done with AM2233, a cannabinoid ligand with a similar structure as AM630. These studies were done to develop an ex vivo binding assay to quantify the displacement of [131I]AM2233 binding by other ligands in Swiss-Webster and CB1 receptor knockout mice. By developing this assay we hoped to determine the identity of an unknown binding site for AM2233 present in the hippocampus of CB1 knockout mice. Using an approach based on incubation of brain slices prepared from mice given intravenous [131I]AM2233 in either the presence or absence of AM2233 (unlabelled) it was possible to demonstrate a significant AM2233-displacable binding in the Swiss-Webster mice. Future studies will determine if this assay is appropriate for identifying the unknown binding site for AM2233 in the CB1 knockout mice.

  17. In vivo and ex vivo sentinel node mapping does not identify the same lymph nodes in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Helene Schou; Bennedsen, Astrid Louise Bjørn; Burgdorf, Stefan Kobbelgaard; Eriksen, Jens Ravn; Eiholm, Susanne; Toxværd, Anders; Riis, Lene Buhl; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2017-07-01

    Identification of lymph nodes and pathological analysis is crucial for the correct staging of colon cancer. Lymph nodes that drain directly from the tumor area are called "sentinel nodes" and are believed to be the first place for metastasis. The purpose of this study was to perform sentinel node mapping in vivo with indocyanine green and ex vivo with methylene blue in order to evaluate if the sentinel lymph nodes can be identified by both techniques. Patients with colon cancer UICC stage I-III were included from two institutions in Denmark from February 2015 to January 2016. In vivo sentinel node mapping with indocyanine green during laparoscopy and ex vivo sentinel node mapping with methylene blue were performed in all patients. Twenty-nine patients were included. The in vivo sentinel node mapping was successful in 19 cases, and ex vivo sentinel node mapping was successful in 13 cases. In seven cases, no sentinel nodes were identified. A total of 51 sentinel nodes were identified, only one of these where identified by both techniques (2.0%). In vivo sentinel node mapping identified 32 sentinel nodes, while 20 sentinel nodes were identified by ex vivo sentinel node mapping. Lymph node metastases were found in 10 patients, and only two had metastases in a sentinel node. Placing a deposit in relation to the tumor by indocyanine green in vivo or of methylene blue ex vivo could only identify sentinel lymph nodes in a small group of patients.

  18. Comparison of ex vivo and in vivo micro-computed tomography of rat tibia at different scanning settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Amanda B; Salmon, Phil L; Ward, Wendy E

    2017-08-01

    The parameters of a micro-computed tomography (μCT) scan, including whether a bone is imaged in vivo or ex vivo, determine the quality of the resulting image. In turn, this impacts the accuracy of the trabecular and cortical outcomes. The absolute impact of μCT scanning at different voxel sizes and whether the sample is imaged in vivo or ex vivo on the morphological outcomes of the proximal tibia in the rat is unknown. The right proximal tibia of 6-month-old Sham-control and ovariectomized (OVX) rats (n = 8/group) was scanned using μCT (SkyScan 1176, Bruker, Kontich, Belgium) using three sets of parameters (9 μm ex vivo, 18 μm ex vivo, 18 μm in vivo) to compare the trabecular and cortical outcomes. Regardless of scan protocols, differences between Sham and OVX groups were observed as expected. At a voxel size of 18 μm, scanning in vivo or ex vivo had no effect on any of the outcomes measured. However, compared to a 9 μm voxel size scan, imaging at 18 μm resulted in significant underestimation of the connectivity density (p vivo scanning. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1690-1698, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. [Advances of in vivo confocal scanning laser microscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ke-bin; Zhou, Guo-yu

    2006-02-01

    In vivo confocal scanning laser microscopy is being widely established as a time-saving, non-invasive, investigative methods in the study of body surfaces. Skin can be observed in its native state in vivo without the fixing, sectioning and staining that is necessary for routine histology. It is a new technology that can provide detailed images of tissue architecture and cellular morphology of living tissue. This paper reviews the fundamentals of in vivo confocal imaging and its clinical applications.

  20. In Vivo Monitoring Program Manual, PNL-MA-574

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Timothy P.

    2010-07-01

    An overview of the administration for the In Vivo Monitoring Program (IVMP) for Hanford. This includes organizational structure and program responsibilities; coordination of in vivo measurements; scheduling measurements; performing measurements; reporting results; and quality assurance. Overall responsibility for the management of the IVMP rests with the Program Manager (PM). The PM is responsible for providing the required in vivo counting services for Hanford Site contractor employees in accordance with Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and the specific statements of work.

  1. Ex vivo lung perfusion review of a revolutionary technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makdisi, George; Makdisi, Tony; Jarmi, Tambi; Caldeira, Christiano C

    2017-09-01

    Donor lung shortage has been the main reason to the increasing number of patients waiting for lung transplant. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is widely expanding technology to assess and prepare the lungs who are considered marginal for transplantation. the outcomes are encouraging and comparable to the lungs transplanted according to the standard criteria. in this article, we will discuss the history of development, the techniques and protocols of ex vivo, and the logics and rationales for ex vivo use.

  2. In vivo endoscopic multi-beam optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, Beau A.; Lee, Kenneth K. C.; Mariampillai, Adrian; Munce, Nigel R.; Leung, Michael K. K.; Yang, Victor X. D.; Vitkin, I. Alex

    2010-02-01

    A multichannel optical coherence tomography (multi-beam OCT) system and an in vivo endoscopic imaging probe were developed using a swept-source OCT system. The distal optics were micro-machined to produce a high numerical aperture, multi-focus fibre optic array. This combination resulted in a transverse design resolution of rabbit study to acquire in vivo structural images of the colon and ex vivo images of the oesophagus and trachea. A good correlation between the structural multi-beam OCT images and H&E histology was achieved, demonstrating the feasibility of this high-resolution system and its potential for in vivo human endoscopic imaging.

  3. In vivo efficacy of oral and intraperitoneal administration of extracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vivo efficacy of oral and intraperitoneal administration of extracts of Warburgia ugandensis (Canellaceae) in experimental treatment of old world cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major .

  4. Quantifying drug-protein binding in vivo.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, B; Bench, G; Keating III, G; Palmblad, M; Vogel, J; Grant, P G; Hillegonds, D

    2004-02-17

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) provides precise quantitation of isotope labeled compounds that are bound to biological macromolecules such as DNA or proteins. The sensitivity is high enough to allow for sub-pharmacological (''micro-'') dosing to determine macromolecular targets without inducing toxicities or altering the system under study, whether it is healthy or diseased. We demonstrated an application of AMS in quantifying the physiologic effects of one dosed chemical compound upon the binding level of another compound in vivo at sub-toxic doses [4].We are using tissues left from this study to develop protocols for quantifying specific binding to isolated and identified proteins. We also developed a new technique to quantify nanogram to milligram amounts of isolated protein at precisions that are comparable to those for quantifying the bound compound by AMS.

  5. Implantable optoelectronic probes for in vivo optogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseri, Ege; Kuzum, Duygu

    2017-06-01

    More than a decade has passed since optics and genetics came together and lead to the emerging technologies of optogenetics. The advent of light-sensitive opsins made it possible to optically trigger the neurons into activation or inhibition by using visible light. The importance of spatiotemporally isolating a segment of a neural network and controlling nervous signaling in a precise manner has driven neuroscience researchers and engineers to invest great efforts in designing high precision in vivo implantable devices. These efforts have focused on delivery of sufficient power to deep brain regions, while monitoring neural activity with high resolution and fidelity. In this review, we report the progress made in the field of hybrid optoelectronic neural interfaces that combine optical stimulation with electrophysiological recordings. Different approaches that incorporate optical or electrical components on implantable devices are discussed in detail. Advantages of various different designs as well as practical and fundamental limitations are summarized to illuminate the future of neurotechnology development.

  6. In Vivo Cytogenetic Studies on Aspartame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Entissar S. AlSuhaibani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspartame (a-Laspartyl-L-phenylalanine 1-methylester is a dipeptide low-calorie artificial sweetener that is widely used as a nonnutritive sweetener in foods and drinks. The safety of aspartame and its metabolic breakdown products (phenylalanine, aspartic acid and methanol was investigated in vivo using chromosomal aberration (CA test and sister chromatid exchange (SCE test in the bone marrow cells of mice. Swiss Albino male mice were exposed to aspartame (3.5, 35, 350 mg/kg body weight. Bone marrow cells isolated from femora were analyzed for chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges. Treatment with aspartame induced dose dependently chromosome aberrations at all concentrations while it did not induce sister chromatid exchanges. On the other hand, aspartame did not decrease the mitotic index (MI. However, statistical analysis of the results show that aspartame is not significantly genotoxic at low concentration.

  7. Human skeletal muscle releases leptin in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolsk, Emil; Grøndahl, Thomas Sahl; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2012-01-01

    Leptin is considered an adipokine, however, cultured myocytes have also been found to release leptin. Therefore, as proof-of-concept we investigated if human skeletal muscle synthesized leptin by measuring leptin in skeletal muscle biopsies. Following this, we quantified human skeletal muscle...... and adipose tissue leptin release in vivo. We recruited 16 healthy male human participants. Catheters were inserted into the femoral artery and vein draining skeletal muscle, as well as an epigastric vein draining the abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue. By combining the veno-arterial differences in plasma...... leptin with measurements of blood flow, leptin release from both tissues was quantified. To induce changes in leptin, the participants were infused with either saline or adrenaline in normo-physiological concentrations. The presence of leptin in skeletal muscle was confirmed by western blotting. Leptin...

  8. Towards clinically translatable in vivo nanodiagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung-Min; Aalipour, Amin; Vermesh, Ophir; Yu, Jung Ho; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2017-05-01

    Nanodiagnostics as a field makes use of fundamental advances in nanobiotechnology to diagnose, characterize and manage disease at the molecular scale. As these strategies move closer to routine clinical use, a proper understanding of different imaging modalities, relevant biological systems and physical properties governing nanoscale interactions is necessary to rationally engineer next-generation bionanomaterials. In this Review, we analyse the background physics of several clinically relevant imaging modalities and their associated sensitivity and specificity, provide an overview of the materials currently used for in vivo nanodiagnostics, and assess the progress made towards clinical translation. This work provides a framework for understanding both the impressive progress made thus far in the nanodiagnostics field as well as presenting challenges that must be overcome to obtain widespread clinical adoption.

  9. High-wavenumber FT-Raman spectroscopy for in vivo and ex vivo measurements of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Flores, A. F.; Raniero, L.; Canevari, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    The identification of normal and cancer breast tissue of rats was investigated using high-frequency (HF) FT-Raman spectroscopy with a near-infrared excitation source on in vivo and ex vivo measurements. Significant differences in the Raman intensities of prominent Raman bands of lipids and proteins...... structures (2,800-3,100 cm(-1)) as well as in the broad band of water (3,100-3,550 cm(-1)) were observed in mean normal and cancer tissue spectra. The multivariate statistical analysis methods of principal components analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were performed on all high......-frequency Raman spectra of normal and cancer tissues. LDA results with the leave-one-out cross-validation option yielded a discrimination accuracy of 77.2, 83.3, and 100% for in vivo transcutaneous, in vivo skin-removed, and ex vivo biopsy HF Raman spectra. Despite the lower discrimination value for the in vivo...

  10. In vivo nanotoxicity assays in plant models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Mamta; Ernest, Vinita; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2012-01-01

    Increasing application of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) and zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnO) in consumer products like textiles, cosmetics, washing machines and other household products increases their chance to reach the environment. Intensive research is required to assess the nanoparticles' toxicity to the environmental system. The toxicological effect of nanoparticles has been studied at the miniscule scale and requires intensive research to be conducted to assess its unknown effects. Plants are the primary target species which need to be included to develop a comprehensive toxicity profile for nanoparticles. So far, the mechanisms of toxicity of nanoparticles to the plant system remains largely unknown and little information on the potential uptake of nanoparticles by plants and their subsequent fate within the food chain is available. The phytoxicological behaviour of silver and zinc oxide nanoparticles on Allium cepa and seeds of Zea mays (maize), Cucumis sativus (cucumber) and Lycopersicum esculentum (tomato) was done. The in vitro studies on A. cepa have been done to check the cytotoxicological effects including mitotic index, chromosomal aberrations, vagrant chromosomes, sticky chromosomes, disturbed metaphase, breaks and formation of micronucleus. In vitro and in vivo studies on seed systems exposed to different concentration of nanoparticles dispersion to check phytotoxicity end point as root length, germination effect, adsorption and accumulation of nanoparticles (uptake studies) into the plant systems. In vivo studies in a seed system was done using phytagel medium. Biochemical studies were done to check effect on protein, DNA and thiobarbituric acid reactive species concentration. FT-IR studies were done to analyze the functional and conformational changes in the treated and untreated samples. The toxicological effects of nanoparticles had to be studied at the miniscule scale to address existing environment problems or prevent future problems. The

  11. In vivo dedifferentiation of adult adipose cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunjun Liao

    Full Text Available Adipocytes can dedifferentiate into fibroblast-like cells in vitro and thereby acquire proliferation and multipotent capacities to participate in the repair of various organs and tissues. Whether dedifferentiation occurs under physiological or pathological conditions in vivo is unknown.A tissue expander was placed under the inguinal fat pads of rats and gradually expanded by injection of water. Samples were collected at various time points, and morphological, histological, cytological, ultrastructural, and gene expression analyses were conducted. In a separate experiment, purified green fluorescent protein+ adipocytes were transplanted into C57 mice and collected at various time points. The transplanted adipocytes were assessed by bioluminescence imaging and whole-mount staining.The expanded fat pad was obviously thinner than the untreated fat pad on the opposite side. It was also tougher in texture and with more blood vessels attached. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy indicated there were fewer monolocular adipocytes in the expanded fat pad and the morphology of these cells was altered, most notably their lipid content was discarded. Immunohistochemistry showed that the expanded fat pad contained an increased number of proliferative cells, which may have been derived from adipocytes. Following removal of the tissue expander, many small adipocytes were observed. Bioluminescence imaging suggested that some adipocytes survived when transplanted into an ischemic-hypoxic environment. Whole-mount staining revealed that surviving adipocytes underwent a process similar to adipocyte dedifferentiation in vitro. Monolocular adipocytes became multilocular adipocytes and then fibroblast-like cells.Mature adipocytes may be able to dedifferentiate in vivo, and this may be an adipose tissue self-repair mechanism. The capacity of adipocytes to dedifferentiate into stem cell-like cells may also have a more general role in the

  12. In vitro and in vivo Development of Cloned Ovine Embryos using in vitro and in vivo Matured Oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, P; Nagashima, H; Sun, F-J

    1995-01-01

    Cloning of sheep embryos by nucleus transplantation can be achieved by using in vivo matured (oviductal) oocytes and in vivo culture. However, these steps involve cumbersome procedures. Therefore, the effects of in vivo vs. the equivalent in vitro procedures on the pre-implantation development...... matured oocytes were enucleated and fused with inserted blastomeres from donor embryos. In vitro matured oocytes were enucleated and allowed to age prior to blastomere insertion and electrofusion. Fused embryos were cultured for approximately 132 h either in vivo in ligated sheep oviducts or in vitro...

  13. Avaliação e recondicionamento pulmonar ex vivo Ex vivo lung evaluation and reconditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Manuel Pêgo-Fernandes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apenas 15% dos pulmões doados são aproveitados para transplante. Um novo método de Perfusão Pulmonar Ex Vivo (PPEV foi desenvolvido e pode ser usado para avaliação e recondicionamento de pulmões "marginais" e rejeitados para o transplante. Esse trabalho relata nossa experiência com a avaliação funcional da PPEV. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados pulmões de 12 doadores considerados inapropriados para transplante pulmonar. Após a captação, os pulmões são perfundidos ex vivo com Steen Solution, uma solução de composição eletrolítica extracelular com alta pressão coloidosmótica. Um oxigenador de membrana ligado ao circuito recebe uma mistura gasosa (nitrogênio e dióxido de carbono e "desoxigena" o perfusato, mantendo uma concentração de gases semelhante a do sangue venoso. Os pulmões são gradualmente aquecidos, perfundidos e ventilados. A avaliação dos órgãos é feita por gasometrias e medidas como a resistência vascular pulmonar (RVP e complacência pulmonar (CP. RESULTADOS: A PaO2 (FiO2 100% passou de um valor médio de 193,3 mmHg no doador para 495,3 mmHg durante a PPEV. Após uma hora de PPEV, a RVP média era de 737,3 dinas/seg/ cm5 e a CP era de 42,2 ml/cmH2O. CONCLUSÕES: O modelo de avaliação pulmonar ex vivo pode melhorar a capacidade de oxigenação de pulmões "marginais" inicialmente rejeitados para transplante. Isso denota um grande potencial do método para aumentar a disponibilidade de pulmões para transplante e, possivelmente, reduzir o tempo de espera nas filas.OBJECTIVE: Only about 15% of the potential candidates for lung donation are considered suitable for transplantation. A new method for ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP has been developed and can be used for evaluation and reconditioning of "marginal" and unacceptable lungs. This is a report of functional evaluation experience with ex vivo perfusion of twelve donor lungs deemed unacceptable in São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: After harvesting, the

  14. Ex vivo and in vivo coherent Raman imaging of the peripheral and central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Terry Brandon

    A hallmark of nervous system disorders is damage or degradation of the myelin sheath. Unraveling the mechanisms underlying myelin degeneration and repair represent one of the great challenges in medicine. This thesis work details the development and utilization of advanced optical imaging methods to gain insight into the structure and function of myelin in both healthy and diseased states in the in vivo environment. This first part of this thesis discusses ex vivo studies of the effects of high-frequency stimulation of spinal tissues on the structure of the node of Ranvier as investigated by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging (manuscript submitted to Journal of Neurosciece). Reversible paranodal myelin retraction at the nodes of Ranvier was observed during 200 Hz electrical stimulation, beginning minutes after the onset and continuing for up to 10 min after stimulation was ceased. A mechanistic study revealed a Ca2+ dependent pathway: high-frequency stimulation induced paranodal myelin retraction via pathologic calcium influx into axons, calpain activation, and cytoskeleton degradation through spectrin break-down. Also, the construction of dual-scanning CARS microscope for large area mapping of CNS tissues is detailed (Optics Express, 2008, 16:19396-193409). A confocal scanning head equipped with a rotating polygon mirror provides high speed, high resolution imaging and is coupled with a motorized sample stage to generate high-resolution large-area images of mouse brain coronal section and guinea pig spinal cord cross section. The polygon mirror decreases the mosaic acquisition time significantly without reducing the resolution of individual images. The ex vivo studies are then extended to in vivo imaging of mouse sciatic nerve tissue by CARS and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging (Journal of Microscopy, 2007, 225: 175-182). Following a minimally invasive surgery to open the skin, CARS imaging of myelinated axons and SHG imaging of the

  15. Physiologic assessment of the ex vivo donor lung for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Cypel, Marcelo; Machuca, Tiago N; Koike, Terumoto; Cook, Douglas J; Bonato, Riccardo; Chen, Manyin; Sato, Masaaki; Waddell, Thomas K; Liu, Mingyao; Slutsky, Arthur S; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2012-10-01

    The evaluation of donor lungs by normothermic ex vivo acellular perfusion has improved the safety of organ utilization. However, this strategy requires a critical re-evaluation of the parameters used to assess lungs during ex vivo perfusion compared with those traditionally used to evaluate the donor lung in vivo. Using a porcine model, we studied the physiology of acellular lung perfusion with the aim of improving the accuracy of clinical ex vivo evaluation. Porcine lungs after 10 hours of brain death and 24 hours of cold ischemia and uninjured control lungs were perfused for 12 hours and then transplanted. PaO2, compliance, airway pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance were measured. Ventilation with 100% nitrogen and addition of red blood cells to the perfusate were used to clarify the physiologic disparities between in vivo blood perfusion and ex vivo acellular perfusion. During 12 hours of ex vivo perfusion, injured lungs developed edema with decreased compliance and increased airway pressure, but ex vivo PO2 remained stable. After transplantation, injured lungs demonstrated high vascular resistance and poor PaO2. A reduced effect of shunt on ex vivo lung perfusion PO2 was found to be attributable to the linearization of the relationship between oxygen content and PO2, which occurs with acellular perfusate. Ex vivo PO2 may not be the first indication of lung injury and, taken alone, may be misleading in assessing the ex vivo lung. Thus, evaluation of other physiologic parameters takes on greater importance. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Circulating Tumor Cell Detection and Capture by Photoacoustic Flow Cytometry in Vivo and ex Vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I. [Phillips Classic Laser and Nanomedicine Laboratories, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Zharov, Vladimir P., E-mail: zharovvladimirp@uams.edu [Phillips Classic Laser and Nanomedicine Laboratories, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Arkansas Nanomedicine Center, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2013-12-10

    Despite progress in detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs), existing assays still have low sensitivity (1–10 CTC/mL) due to the small volume of blood samples (5–10 mL). Consequently, they can miss up to 10{sup 3}–10{sup 4} CTCs, resulting in the development of barely treatable metastasis. Here we analyze a new concept of in vivo CTC detection with enhanced sensitivity (up to 10{sup 2}–10{sup 3} times) by the examination of the entire blood volume in vivo (5 L in adults). We focus on in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) of CTCs using label-free or targeted detection, photoswitchable nanoparticles with ultrasharp PA resonances, magnetic trapping with fiber-magnetic-PA probes, optical clearance, real-time spectral identification, nonlinear signal amplification, and the integration with PAFC in vitro. We demonstrate PAFC’s capability to detect rare leukemia, squamous carcinoma, melanoma, and bulk and stem breast CTCs and its clusters in preclinical animal models in blood, lymph, bone, and cerebrospinal fluid, as well as the release of CTCs from primary tumors triggered by palpation, biopsy or surgery, increasing the risk of metastasis. CTC lifetime as a balance between intravasation and extravasation rates was in the range of 0.5–4 h depending on a CTC metastatic potential. We introduced theranostics of CTCs as an integration of nanobubble-enhanced PA diagnosis, photothermal therapy, and feedback through CTC counting. In vivo data were verified with in vitro PAFC demonstrating a higher sensitivity (1 CTC/40 mL) and throughput (up to 10 mL/min) than conventional assays. Further developments include detection of circulating cancer-associated microparticles, and super-resolution PAFC beyond the diffraction and spectral limits.

  17. Circulating Tumor Cell Detection and Capture by Photoacoustic Flow Cytometry in Vivo and ex Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina I. Galanzha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite progress in detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs, existing assays still have low sensitivity (1–10 CTC/mL due to the small volume of blood samples (5–10 mL. Consequently, they can miss up to 103–104 CTCs, resulting in the development of barely treatable metastasis. Here we analyze a new concept of in vivo CTC detection with enhanced sensitivity (up to 102–103 times by the examination of the entire blood volume in vivo (5 L in adults. We focus on in vivo photoacoustic (PA flow cytometry (PAFC of CTCs using label-free or targeted detection, photoswitchable nanoparticles with ultrasharp PA resonances, magnetic trapping with fiber-magnetic-PA probes, optical clearance, real-time spectral identification, nonlinear signal amplification, and the integration with PAFC in vitro. We demonstrate PAFC’s capability to detect rare leukemia, squamous carcinoma, melanoma, and bulk and stem breast CTCs and its clusters in preclinical animal models in blood, lymph, bone, and cerebrospinal fluid, as well as the release of CTCs from primary tumors triggered by palpation, biopsy or surgery, increasing the risk of metastasis. CTC lifetime as a balance between intravasation and extravasation rates was in the range of 0.5–4 h depending on a CTC metastatic potential. We introduced theranostics of CTCs as an integration of nanobubble-enhanced PA diagnosis, photothermal therapy, and feedback through CTC counting. In vivo data were verified with in vitro PAFC demonstrating a higher sensitivity (1 CTC/40 mL and throughput (up to 10 mL/min than conventional assays. Further developments include detection of circulating cancer-associated microparticles, and super-rsesolution PAFC beyond the diffraction and spectral limits.

  18. Analysis of the ex vivo and in vivo antiretroviral activity of gemcitabine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine L Clouser

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Replication of retroviral and host genomes requires ribonucleotide reductase to convert rNTPs to dNTPs, which are then used as substrates for DNA synthesis. Inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase by hydroxyurea (HU has been previously used to treat cancers as well as HIV. However, the use of HU as an antiretroviral is limited by its associated toxicities such as myelosuppression and hepatotoxicity. In this study, we examined the ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, gemcitabine, both in cell culture and in C57Bl/6 mice infected with LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus (LP-BM5 MuLV, a murine AIDS model. Gemcitabine decreased infectivity of MuLV in cell culture with an EC50 in the low nanomolar range with no detectable cytotoxicity. Similarly, gemcitabine significantly decreased disease progression in mice infected with LP-BM5. Specifically, gemcitabine treatment decreased spleen size, plasma IgM, and provirus levels compared to LP-BM5 MuLV infected, untreated mice. Gemcitabine efficacy was observed at doses as low as 1 mg/kg/day in the absence of toxicity. Higher doses of gemcitabine (3 mg/kg/day and higher were associated with toxicity as determined by a loss in body mass. In summary, our findings demonstrate that gemcitabine has antiretroviral activity ex vivo and in vivo in the LP-BM5 MuLV model. These observations together with a recent ex vivo study with HIV-1, suggest that gemcitabine has broad antiretroviral activity and could be particularly useful in vivo when used in combination drug therapy.

  19. Effect of propionate on mRNA expression of key genes for gluconeogenesis in liver of dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Koser, Stephanie L; Bequette, Brian J; Donkin, Shawn S

    2015-12-01

    Elevated needs for glucose in lactating dairy cows are met through a combination of increased capacity for gluconeogenesis and increased supply of gluconeogenic precursors, primarily propionate. This study evaluated the effects of propionate on mRNA expression of cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1), mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK2), pyruvate carboxylase (PC), and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC), key gluconeogenic enzymes, and capacity for glucose synthesis in liver of dairy cattle. In experiment 1, six multiparous mid-lactation Holstein cows were used in a replicated 3×3 Latin square design consisting of a 6-d acclimation or washout phase followed by 8h of postruminal infusion of either propionate (1.68mol), glucose (0.84mol), or an equal volume (10mL/min) of water. In experiment 2, twelve male Holstein calves [39±4 kg initial body weight (BW)] were blocked by birth date and assigned to receive, at 7d of age, either propionate [2mmol·h(-1)·(BW(0.75))(-1)], acetate [3.5mmol·h(-1)·(BW(.75))(-1)], or an equal volume (4mL/min) of saline. In both experiments, blood samples were collected at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8h relative to the start of infusion and liver biopsy samples were collected at the end of the infusion for mRNA analysis. Liver explants from experiment 1 were used to measure tricarboxylic acid cycle flux and gluconeogenesis using (13)C mass isotopomer distribution analysis from (13)C3 propionate. Dry matter intake and milk yield were not altered by infusions in cows. Serum insulin concentration in cows receiving propionate was elevated than cows receiving water, but was not different from cows receiving glucose. Hepatic expression of PCK1 and G6PC mRNA and glucose production in cows receiving propionate were not different from cows receiving water, but tended to be higher compared with cows receiving glucose. Hepatic expression of PCK2 and PC mRNA was not altered by propionate infusion in cows. Blood glucose, insulin, and

  20. In vivo and ex vivo applications of gold nanoparticles for biomedical SERS imagingi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, Mehmet V; Medarova, Zdravka

    2012-01-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a signal-increasing phenomenon that occurs whenever Raman scattering on a metal surface is enhanced many orders of magnitude. Recently SERS has received considerable attention due to its ultrasensitive multiplex imaging capability with strong photostability. It provides rich molecular information on any Raman molecule adsorbed to rough metal surfaces. The signal enhancement is so remarkable that identification of a single molecule is possible. SERS has become a genuine molecular imaging technique. Gold nanoparticles, encoded with Raman reporters, provide a SERS signal and have been used as imaging probes, often referred to as SERS nanoparticles. They have been used for molecular imaging in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro. Detection of picomolar concentrations of target molecules has been achieved by functionalizing the nanoparticles with target recognition ligands. This review focuses on recent achievements in utilizing SERS nanoparticles for in vivo molecular imaging. In the near future, SERS technology may allow detection of disease markers at the single cell level. PMID:23133814

  1. In vivo prevention of transplant arteriosclerosis by ex vivo-expanded human regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadig, Satish N; Wieckiewicz, Joanna; Wu, Douglas C; Warnecke, Gregor; Zhang, Wei; Luo, Shiqiao; Schiopu, Alexandru; Taggart, David P; Wood, Kathryn J

    2010-07-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is the hallmark of chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) affecting transplanted organs in the long term. These fibroproliferative lesions lead to neointimal thickening of arteries in all transplanted allografts. Luminal narrowing then leads to graft ischemia and organ demise. To date, there are no known tolerance induction strategies that prevent transplant arteriosclerosis. Therefore, we designed this study to test the hypothesis that human regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) expanded ex vivo can prevent transplant arteriosclerosis. Here we show the comparative capacity of T(reg) cells, sorted via two separate strategies, to prevent transplant arteriosclerosis in a clinically relevant chimeric humanized mouse system. We found that the in vivo development of transplant arteriosclerosis in human arteries was prevented by treatment of ex vivo-expanded human T(reg) cells. Additionally, we show that T(reg) cells sorted on the basis of low expression of CD127 provide a more potent therapy to conventional T(reg) cells. Our results demonstrate that human T(reg) cells can inhibit transplant arteriosclerosis by impairing effector function and graft infiltration. We anticipate our findings to serve as a foundation for the clinical development of therapeutics targeting transplant arteriosclerosis in both allograft transplantation and other immune-mediated causes of vasculopathy.

  2. In vivo Prevention of Transplant Arteriosclerosis by ex vivo Expanded Human Regulatory T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadig, Satish N.; Więckiewicz, Joanna; Wu, Douglas C.; Warnecke, Gregor; Zhang, Wei; Luo, Shiqiao; Schiopu, Alexandru; Taggart, David P.; Wood, Kathryn J.

    2010-01-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis (TA) is the hallmark of chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) affecting transplanted organs in the long term [1,2]. These fibroproliferative lesions lead to neointimal thickening of arteries in all transplanted allografts [2]. Luminal narrowing then leads to graft ischemia and organ demise. To date, there are no known tolerance induction strategies that prevent TA [3,4]. Therefore, this study was designed to test the hypothesis that human regulatory T cells (Treg cells) expanded ex vivo could prevent TA. Here we show the comparative capacity of Treg cells, sorted via two separate strategies, to prevent TA in a clinically relevant chimeric humanized mouse system. We found that the in vivo development of TA in human arteries was prevented with the treatment of ex vivo expanded human Treg cells. Additionally, we show that Treg cells sorted based on the low expression of CD127 (IL-7Rα) provide a more potent therapy to conventional Treg cells. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that human Treg cells can inhibit TA by impairing effector function and graft infiltration. We anticipate our findings to serve as a foundation for the clinical development of therapeutics targeting TA in both allograft transplantation and other immune-mediated causes of vasculopathy [5]. PMID:20473306

  3. In vivo antimalarial and cytotoxic properties of Annona senegalensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The in vivo animal antimalarial and in vitro cytotoxic activities of the methanol extract of Annona senegalensis Pers. (Annonaceae) was investigated in this study. The in vivo antimalarial activity of the methanol extract against Plasmodium berghei was assessed using the 4-day suppressive test procedure. The extract of A.

  4. In vivo anti-inflammatory activity of Liquidambar formosana Hance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of Liquidambar formosana Hance infructescence (Liquidambaris fructus, ELF) in vivo, and clarify its underlying mechanisms. Methods: The in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of ELF was examined by xylene-induced ear swelling test in mice as well as carrageenan-induced ...

  5. Cancer ameliorating potential of Phyllanthus amarus: In vivo and in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It also significantly reduced the number of aberrant cells and frequency of aberrations per cell in vivo. Conclusion: Ameliorating potential of P. amarus was dose and duration dependant. These extracts significantly reduced the mutagenicity and genotoxicity that were produced due to AFB1 treatment both in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Comparison of ex vivo stability of copeptin and vasopressin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, Judith E; Boesten, Lianne S M; Ettema, Esmée M; Muller Kobold, Anneke C.; Franssen, Casper F M; Gansevoort, Ron T; Zittema, Debbie

    BACKGROUND: Copeptin, part of the vasopressin precursor, is increasingly used as marker for vasopressin and is claimed to have better ex vivo stability. However, no study has directly compared the ex vivo stability of copeptin and vasopressin. METHODS: Blood of ten healthy volunteers was collected

  7. In vivo monitoring of angiogenesis within Matrigel chambers using MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, David; Ley, Carsten Dan; Søgaard, Lise Vejby

    2006-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a critical process in tumour development and presents an important target for the development of a range of anti-cancer agents . To assess the in vivo efficacy of these ‘angiotherapeutics', a simple and reproducible in vivo model would be of significant value. Here we show...

  8. In vivo monitoring of angiogenesis within Matrigel chambers using MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, David Alberg; Ley, Carsten Dan; Simonsen, Helle Juhl

    Angiogenesis is a critical process in tumour de- velopment and presents an important target for the development of a range of anti-cancer agents1,2. To assess the in vivo efficacy of these ‘angiotherapeutics’, a sim ple and reproducible in vivo model would be of significant value. Here we show.......of angiogenesis and arteriogene- sis....

  9. Nevomelanocytic atypia detection by in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrida Vaišnorienė

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Nevus with histopathologically confirmed nevomelanocytic atypia (dysplastic nevus could not be distinguished from nevus without atypia using analyzed in vivo RCM features of melanocytic atypia. More accurate diagnostics by means of in vivo RCM needs further investigation on reflectance of single and nested cutaneous melanocytes in benign and malignant skin lesions.

  10. Effect of benzylaminopurine on in vivo multiplication of French ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2014-02-28

    Feb 28, 2014 ... Objective: In vivo macropropagation is an alternative simple and cheap technique for banana multiplication. However, the response of cv. “Itoke Sege” to in vivo macropropagation combined with different benzylaminopurine (BAP) concentrations is not known. This study was conducted to determine the.

  11. Mechanical properties of the human Achilles tendon, in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M; Nielsen, C H; Hegnsvad, S

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonography has been widely applied for in vivo measurements of tendon mechanical properties. Assessments of human Achilles tendon mechanical properties have received great interest. Achilles tendon injuries predominantly occur in the tendon region between the Achilles-soleus myotendinous...... Achilles tendon in vivo by the use of ultrasonography and 2) assess the between-day reproducibility of these measurements....

  12. Synovial tissue hypoxia and inflammation in vivo.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ng, C T

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hypoxia is a microenvironmental feature in the inflamed joint, which promotes survival advantage for cells. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of partial oxygen pressure in the synovial tissue (tPO(2)) in patients with inflammatory arthritis with macroscopic\\/microscopic inflammation and local levels of proinflammatory mediators. METHODS: Patients with inflammatory arthritis underwent full clinical assessment and video arthroscopy to quantify macroscopic synovitis and measure synovial tPO(2) under direct visualisation. Cell specific markers (CD3 (T cells), CD68 (macrophages), Ki67 (cell proliferation) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (cell apoptosis)) were quantified by immunohistology. In vitro migration was assessed in primary and normal synoviocytes (synovial fibroblast cells (SFCs)) using a wound repair scratch assay. Levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin 1beta (IL1beta), interferon gamma (IFNgamma), IL6, macrophage inflammatory protein 3alpha (MIP3alpha) and IL8 were quantified, in matched serum and synovial fluid, by multiplex cytokine assay and ELISA. RESULTS: The tPO(2) was 22.5 (range 3.2-54.1) mm Hg and correlated inversely with macroscopic synovitis (r=-0.421, p=0.02), sublining CD3 cells (-0.611, p<0.01) and sublining CD68 cells (r=-0.615, p<0.001). No relationship with cell proliferation or apoptosis was found. Primary and normal SFCs exposed to 1% and 3% oxygen (reflecting the median tPO(2) in vivo) induced cell migration. This was coupled with significantly higher levels of synovial fluid tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), IL1beta, IFNgamma and MIP3alpha in patients with tPO(2) <20 mm Hg (all p values <0.05). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to show a direct in vivo correlation between synovial tPO(2), inflammation and cell migration, thus it is proposed that hypoxia is a possible primary driver of inflammatory processes in the arthritic joint.

  13. Viral Vectors for in Vivo Gene Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thévenot, E.; Dufour, N.; Déglon, N.

    The transfer of DNA into the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell (gene transfer) is a central theme of modern biology. The transfer is said to be somatic when it refers to non-germline organs of a developed individual, and germline when it concerns gametes or the fertilised egg of an animal, with the aim of transmitting the relevant genetic modification to its descendents [1]. The efficient introduction of genetic material into a somatic or germline cell and the control of its expression over time have led to major advances in understanding how genes work in vivo, i.e., in living organisms (functional genomics), but also to the development of innovative therapeutic methods (gene therapy). The efficiency of gene transfer is conditioned by the vehicle used, called the vector. Desirable features for a vector are as follows: Easy to produce high titer stocks of the vector in a reproducible way. Absence of toxicity related to transduction (transfer of genetic material into the target cell, and its expression there) and no immune reaction of the organism against the vector and/or therapeutic protein. Stability in the expression of the relevant gene over time, and the possibility of regulation, e.g., to control expression of the therapeutic protein on the physiological level, or to end expression at the end of treatment. Transduction of quiescent cells should be as efficient as transduction of dividing cells. Vectors currently used fall into two categories: non-viral and viral vectors. In non-viral vectors, the DNA is complexed with polymers, lipids, or cationic detergents (described in Chap. 3). These vectors have a low risk of toxicity and immune reaction. However, they are less efficient in vivo than viral vectors when it comes to the number of cells transduced and long-term transgene expression. (Naked DNA transfer or electroporation is rather inefficient in the organism. This type of gene transfer will not be discussed here, and the interested reader is referred to the

  14. Persistence of DNA studied in different ex vivo and in vivo rat models simulating the human gut situation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilcks, A.; Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Joosten, R.G.; Jacobsen, B.B.L.; Aarts, H.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of DNA sequences from genetically modified plants to persist in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. PCR analysis and transformation assays were used to study DNA persistence and integrity in various ex vivo and in vivo systems using gnotobiotic rats. DNA

  15. Humanized In Vivo Model for Streptococcal Impetigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaramuzzino, Dominick A.; McNiff, Jennifer M.; Bessen, Debra E.

    2000-01-01

    An in vivo model for group A streptococcal (GAS) impetigo was developed, whereby human neonatal foreskin engrafted onto SCID mice was superficially damaged and bacteria were topically applied. Severe infection, indicated by a purulent exudate, could be induced with as few as 1,000 CFU of a virulent strain. Early findings (48 h) showed a loss of stratum corneum and adherence of short chains of gram-positive cocci to the external surface of granular keratinocytes. This was followed by an increasing infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) of mouse origin, until a thick layer of pus covered an intact epidermis, with massive clumps of cocci accumulated at the outer rim of the pus layer. By 7 days postinoculation, the epidermis was heavily eroded; in some instances, the dermis contained pockets (ulcers) filled with cocci, similar to that observed for ecthyma. Importantly, virulent GAS underwent reproduction, resulting in a net increase in CFU of 20- to 14,000-fold. The majority of emm pattern D strains had a higher gross pathology score than emm pattern A, B, or C (A–C) strains, consistent with epidemiological findings that pattern D strains have a strong tendency to cause impetigo, whereas pattern A–C strains are more likely to cause pharyngitis. PMID:10768985

  16. In vivo characterization of corneal biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñero, David P; Alcón, Natividad

    2014-06-01

    Interest in corneal biomechanics has increased with the development of new refractive surgery techniques aimed at modifying corneal properties and a variety of surgical options for corneal ectasia management. The human cornea behaves as soft biological material. It is a viscoelastic tissue and its response to a force applied to it depends not only on the magnitude of the force, but also on the velocity of the application. There are concerns about the limitations to measuring corneal biomechanical properties in vivo. To date, 2 systems are available for clinical use: the Ocular Response Analyzer, a dynamic bidirectional applanation device, and the Corvis ST, a dynamic Scheimpflug analyzer device. These devices are useful in clinical practice, especially for planning some surgical procedures and earlier detection of ectatic conditions, but further research is needed to connect the clinical measurements obtained with these devices to the standard mechanical properties. Neither author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2014 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. In vivo human buccal permeability of nicotine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adrian, Charlotte L; Olin, Helle B D; Dalhoff, Kim

    2006-01-01

    -smokers using a buccal perfusion cell. The disappearance of nicotine from perfusion solutions with pH 6.0, 7.4, and 8.1 was studied for 3h. The apparent permeability of nicotine (P(app)) was determined at each pH value. Parotid saliva was collected in an attempt to assess systemic levels of nicotine......(app) values and non-ionised nicotine, which indicates that the nicotine transfer occurred by means of passive diffusion. P(app) values of 0.60 x 10(-4) and 6.18 x 10(-4)cms(-1) were obtained for the mono-protonated and non-ionised species of nicotine, respectively. The analysis of the parotid saliva samples...... indicated that these samples might be useful in the assessment of systemic absorption of nicotine. Previous buccal in vitro models underestimated the in vivo human permeability of nicotine. However, the in vitro models were capable of predicting the effect of pH on the nicotine permeability....

  18. Experimental glomerular endothelial injury in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Haddad

    Full Text Available The microvascular endothelium of the kidney glomerulus is injured in Shiga-like toxigenic bacterial infection, genetic or acquired loss of complement regulatory protein function, and allo-immune responses of solid-organ or bone marrow transplantation. Existing models of diseases with glomerular endothelial cell (EC injury, collectively grouped as thrombotic microangiopathies, are problematic, impeding investigation of the mechanisms of microvascular defense and repair. To develop a model of glomerular endothelial injury in the mouse, we conjugated the M. oreades lectin to the cytotoxin, saporin, (LS to selectively injure the glomerular endothelium. Injury of the microvasculature was evaluated by light, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy, and by quantitative RT-PCR of cell-type specific transcripts. Renal function was evaluated by quantitation of serum creatinine. The toxin conjugate induced apoptosis of microvascular ECs in vitro, and subtle histologic features of thrombotic microangiopathy in vivo that were enhanced by co-injection of 50 μg/kg LPS. Among LS/LPS-treated animals, loss of glomerular EC staining correlated with decreased expression of EC-specific transcripts, and impaired kidney function. Selective injury of the glomerular microvasculature with LS toxin conjugate and LPS elicits histologic features of thrombotic microangiopathy and acute kidney failure.

  19. In vitro, ex vivo and in vivo anti-hypertensive activity of Chrysophyllum cainito L. extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Li-Mei; Qi, Xue-Wen; Hao, Ji-Heng; Liu, Hai-Feng; Xu, Qing-Hua; Bu, Pei-Li

    2015-01-01

    Chrysophyllum cainito L., a traditional herbal medicine, could have the potential for management of hypertension due to presence of polyphenolic compounds. The extracts and fractions of the pulp of plant were evaluated for in vitro (inhibition of angiotensin I converting enzyme/ACE assay), ex vivo (isolated aorta relaxation assay) and in vivo (salt induced hypertensive rat assay). The alcoholic and aqueous extract (ALE and AQE respectively) of fruit of plant C. cainito was having 14.8 and 9.2% yield respectively. The fractionation with ethyl alcohol (EAF) and butanol (BTF) yielded 2.52 & 2.17% respectively from ALE and 0.46 & 0.31% respectively from AQE with respect to fruit pulp dry weight. More phenolic content was found in ALE (3.75±0.15 mg gallic acid equivalent or GAE g(-1) of dry power of fruit pulp) compared to AQE and maximum in ethyl acetate fraction of ALE (ALE-EAF) (2.32±0.21 mg GAE g(-1) of dry power of fruit pulp) among all fractions. ACE inhibition activity was found to be maximum in ALE-EAF 62.5±7.34%. While ex vivo study using isolated tissue of aorta showed again showed maximum activity (62.82±6.19 and 46.47±8.32% relaxation with 50 µg mL(-1) and 10 µg mL(-1) GAE concentration respectively). ALE-EAF reduced the elevated arterial pressure of salt induced hypertensive rat significantly to the level of normotensive animal group. Results of ALE-EAF have shown its potential as a source for novel constituent for the treatment hypertension and should further be studied for isolation of specific constituent for more effectiveness.

  20. In vitro-in vivo correlation in skin permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, D; Matts, P J; Hadgraft, J; Lane, M E

    2014-02-01

    In vitro skin permeation studies have been used extensively in the development and optimisation of delivery of actives in vivo. However, there are few reported correlations of such in vitro studies with in vivo data. The aim of this study was to investigate the skin permeation of a model active, niacinamide, both in vitro and in vivo. Conventional diffusion cell studies were conducted in human skin to determine niacinamide permeation from a range of vehicles which included dimethyl isosorbide (DMI), propylene glycol (PG), propylene glycol monolaurate (PGML), N-methyl 2-pyrrolidone (NMP), Miglyol 812N® (MG), and mineral oil (MO). Single, binary or ternary systems were examined. The same vehicles were subsequently examined to investigate niacinamide delivery in vivo. For this proof-of-concept study one donor was used for the in vitro studies and one volunteer for the in vivo investigations to minimise biovariability. Analysis of in vitro samples was conducted using HPLC and in vivo uptake of niacinamide was evaluated using Confocal Raman spectroscopy (CRS). The amount of niacinamide permeated through skin in vitro was linearly proportional to the intensity of the niacinamide signal determined in the stratum corneum in vivo. A good correlation was observed between the signal intensities of selected vehicles and niacinamide signal intensity. The findings provide further support for the use of CRS to monitor drug delivery into and across the skin. In addition, the results highlight the critical role of the vehicle and its disposition in skin for effective dermal delivery.

  1. Phosphorescent nanosensors for in vivo tracking of histamine levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, Kevin J.; Clark, Heather A.

    2013-01-01

    Continuously tracking bio-analytes in vivo will enable clinicians and researchers to profile normal physiology and monitor diseased states. Current in vivo monitoring system designs are limited by invasive implantation procedures and bio-fouling, limiting the utility of these tools for obtaining physiologic data. In this work, we demonstrate the first success in optically tracking histamine levels in vivo using a modular, injectable sensing platform based on a diamine oxidase and a phosphorescent oxygen nanosensor. Our new approach increases the range of measureable analytes by combining an enzymatic recognition element with a reversible nanosensor capable of measuring the effects of enzymatic activity. We use these enzyme nanosensors (EnzNS) to monitor the in vivo histamine dynamics as the concentration rapidly increases and decreases due to administration and clearance. The EnzNS system measured kinetics that match those reported from ex vivo measurements. This work establishes a modular approach to in vivo nanosensor design for measuring a broad range of potential target analytes. Simply replacing the recognition enzyme, or both the enzyme and nanosensor, can produce a new sensor system capable of measuring a wide range of specific analytical targets in vivo. PMID:23767828

  2. Selective inhibition of enzyme synthesis under conditions of respiratory inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavell, R B; Woodward, D O

    1971-09-01

    When Neurospora mycelium is transferred from a medium containing sucrose to one containing acetate as sole source of carbon, a preferential synthesis of many Krebs cycle, glyoxylate cycle, and associated enzymes occurs. Respiration was inhibited during preferential enzyme synthesis in the following ways. (i) The amount of aeration (shaking) was reduced, (ii) cyanide was added to the culture, (iii) the carbon source, acetate, was removed, (iv) a mutant strain was starved of its Krebs cycle intermediates, and (v) respiration was inhibited by mutation. The effect of this respiratory inhibition on the synthesis of a number of enzymes was measured. It was found that the synthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-linked glutamate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase was significantly less inhibited under conditions of respiratory inhibition than was the synthesis of Krebs cycle, glyoxylate cycle, and most other cell proteins synthesized during the adaptation period. This differential inhibition of enzyme synthesis was almost certainly not due to differential repression by regulatory metabolic end product effectors. Inhibition of mitochondrial respiration under these conditions most likely results in a limitation of the energy supply of the cell. Thus, it is suggested that the inhibition of synthesis of most proteins after inhibition of mitochondrial respiration results from a lack of energy in a utilizable form. Possible reasons to account for the relative insensitivity of NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase to inhibition under these conditions are discussed.

  3. Nevomelanocytic atypia detection by in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaišnorienė, Ingrida; Rotomskis, Ričardas; Kulvietis, Vytautas; Eidukevičius, Rimantas; Zalgevičienė, Violeta; Laurinavičienė, Aida; Venius, Jonas; Didžiapetrienė, Janina

    2014-01-01

    In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a promising novel technology for non-invasive early diagnostics of cutaneous melanoma. However, the possibility to detect melanocytic atypia in nevi by means of in vivo RCM remains unknown. The aim of the study was to evaluate the significance of in vivo RCM features of melanocytic atypia for the diagnosis of melanocytic nevi, dysplastic nevi and cutaneous melanoma. A total of 138 melanocytic skin lesions comprising 25 melanocytic nevi, 69 dysplastic nevi and 44 melanomas were analyzed by means of dermoscopy, in vivo RCM and routine histopathology. In vivo RCM images were analyzed for the arrangement of keratinocytes in epidermis, pagetoid cells and junctional melanocytic nests and correlated refractivity aspects of nests with histopathology. Separately and all together taken the in vivo RCM features of melanocytic atypia were significant in differential diagnosis of benign and malignant melanocytic skin lesions, though none of the features was significant in discriminating nevi without cytologic atypia of dysplastic nevi. In vivo RCM feature of dense cell clusters corresponded with melanin containing nevomelanocytes on histopathology though exact correspondence of non-homogeneous and atypical sparse cell clusters remained questionable. Nevus with histopathologically confirmed nevomelanocytic atypia (dysplastic nevus) could not be distinguished from nevus without atypia using analyzed in vivo RCM features of melanocytic atypia. More accurate diagnostics by means of in vivo RCM needs further investigation on reflectance of single and nested cutaneous melanocytes in benign and malignant skin lesions. Copyright © 2014 Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Production and hosting by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  4. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Strain In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Seron, Juan Antonio; Medina-Porqueres, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Context: Distinct exercises have been proposed for knee rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. There is a need to understand ACL strain behavior during different rehabilitation exercises to protect the graft from excessive strain that could interfere with its healing process. Objective: To critically review studies that directly measured normal ACL strain in vivo during different movements, conditions, or exercises to gain insight into which of them may produce more strain on the ligament or the ligament graft in the case of reconstructed knees. Data Sources: A literature search of PubMed, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, and PEDro databases was conducted. Keywords included anterior cruciate ligament, strain, stress, deformation, transducer, rehabilitation, rehabilitation exercise, physical therapy, and physiotherapy. Study Selection: Inclusion criteria were (1) peer-reviewed studies published in English or Spanish, (2) research conducted on adult human subjects with normal ACLs and healthy knees, and (3) ACL strain directly measured during different movements, conditions, or exercises by using a transducer. Study Design: Systematic review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Data Extraction: Specific data were abstracted from the selected studies, including isometric quadriceps and hamstrings activity, active and passive flexion-extension of the knee, closed kinetic chain exercises, and application of joint compressive load. Results: A total of 10 studies met all criteria and were included in the final analysis. The strain values produced by closed kinetic chain and open kinetic chain exercises were similar. However, closed kinetic chain exercises appear to attenuate the strain increase that occurs in open kinetic chain exercises when increasing resistance. Conclusion: These data may be relevant to develop rehabilitation exercises or programs that do not endanger the healing ACL graft and to provide a basis for future clinical trials. PMID:27418161

  5. Electron microscopy methods for studying in vivo DNA replication intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    The detailed understanding of the DNA replication process requires structural insight. The combination of psoralen crosslinking and electron microscopy has been extensively exploited to reveal the fine architecture of in vivo DNA replication intermediates. This approach proved instrumental to uncover the basic mechanisms of DNA duplication, as well as the perturbation of this process by genotoxic treatments. The replication structures need to the stabilized in vivo (by psoralen crosslinking) prior to extraction and enrichment procedures, finally leading to the visualization at the transmission electron microscope. This chapter outlines the procedures required to visualize in vivo replication intermediates of genomic DNA, extracted from budding yeast or cultured mammalian cells.

  6. In vivo and In vitro Evaluations of Intestinal Gabapentin Absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Malte Selch; Frølund, Sidsel; Nøhr, Martha Kampp

    2015-01-01

    cells. The effect of co-application of the LAT-inhibitor, BCH, and the b(0,+)-substrate, L-lysine, on intestinal transport of gabapentin was evaluated in vivo and in vitro. RESULTS: Gabapentin showed dose-dependent oral absorption kinetics and dose-independent disposition kinetics. Co-application of BCH...... inhibited intestinal absorption in vivo and apical uptake in vitro, whereas no effect was observed following co-application of L-lysine. CONCLUSIONS: The present study shows for the first time that BCH was capable of inhibiting intestinal absorption of gabapentin in vivo. Furthermore, in Caco-2 cell...

  7. AAV serotype influences gene transfer in corneal stroma in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Ajay; Jonathan C K Tovey; Ghosh, Arkasubhra; Mohan, Rajiv R.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the cellular tropism and relative transduction efficiency of three AAV serotypes, AAV6, AAV8 and AAV9, for corneal gene delivery using mouse cornea in vivo and donor human cornea ex vivo. The AAV6, AAV8 and AAV9 serotypes having AAV2 plasmid encoding for alkaline phosphatase (AP) gene were generated by transfecting HEK293 cell line with pHelper, pARAP4 and pRep/Cap plasmids. Viral vectors (109 vg/μl) were topically applied onto mouse cornea in vivo and human cornea ex viv...

  8. VIVO Lab at the German National Library of Science and Technology: Review and Outlook

    OpenAIRE

    Walther, Tatiana; Blümel, Ina; Heller, Lambert

    2016-01-01

    This poster gives an overview about past, current and future activities of the VIVO Lab – a sub-group of the Open Science Lab at the German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB). In the past there have been several corporate projects and implementations around VIVO, including the past corporate VIVO project – VIVO for the TIB, which was complemented with the additional features (VIVOPath and VIVO Deutsches Handbuch). The current subject area of the VIVO Lab covers, among other thi...

  9. Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric pathology: insights from in vivo and ex vivo models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gastric colonization with Helicobacter pylori induces diverse human pathological conditions, including superficial gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma and its precursors. The treatment of these conditions often relies on the eradication of H. pylori, an intervention that is increasingly difficult to achieve and that does not prevent disease progression in some contexts. There is, therefore, a pressing need to develop new experimental models of H. pylori-associated gastric pathology to support novel drug development in this field. Here, we review the current status of in vivo and ex vivo models of gastric H. pylori colonization, and of Helicobacter-induced gastric pathology, focusing on models of gastric pathology induced by H. pylori, Helicobacter felis and Helicobacter suis in rodents and large animals. We also discuss the more recent development of gastric organoid cultures from murine and human gastric tissue, as well as from human pluripotent stem cells, and the outcomes of H. pylori infection in these systems. PMID:28151409

  10. Ex Vivo and In Vivo Characterization of Interpolymeric Blend/Nanoenabled Gastroretentive Levodopa Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndidi C. Ngwuluka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One approach for delivery of narrow absorption window drugs is to formulate gastroretentive drug delivery systems. This study was undertaken to provide insight into in vivo performances of two gastroretentive systems (PXLNET and IPB matrices in comparison to Madopar® HBS capsules. The pig model was used to assess gastric residence time and pharmacokinetic parameters using blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, and urine samples. Histopathology and cytotoxicity testing were also undertaken. The pharmacokinetic parameters indicated that levodopa was liberated from the drug delivery systems, absorbed, widely distributed, metabolized, and excreted. Cmax were 372.37, 257.02, and 461.28 ng/mL and MRT were 15.36, 14.98, and 13.30 for Madopar HBS capsules, PXLNET, and IPB, respectively. In addition, X-ray imaging indicated that the gastroretentive systems have the potential to reside in the stomach for 7 hours. There was strong in vitro-in vivo correlation for all formulations with r2 values of 0.906, 0.935, and 0.945 for Madopar HBS capsules, PXLNET, and IPB, respectively. Consequently, PXLNET and IPB matrices have pertinent potential as gastroretentive systems for narrow absorption window drugs (e.g., L-dopa and, in this application specifically, enhanced the central nervous system and/or systemic bioavailability of such drugs.

  11. Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric pathology: insights from in vivo and ex vivo models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Burkitt

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Gastric colonization with Helicobacter pylori induces diverse human pathological conditions, including superficial gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma and its precursors. The treatment of these conditions often relies on the eradication of H. pylori, an intervention that is increasingly difficult to achieve and that does not prevent disease progression in some contexts. There is, therefore, a pressing need to develop new experimental models of H. pylori-associated gastric pathology to support novel drug development in this field. Here, we review the current status of in vivo and ex vivo models of gastric H. pylori colonization, and of Helicobacter-induced gastric pathology, focusing on models of gastric pathology induced by H. pylori, Helicobacter felis and Helicobacter suis in rodents and large animals. We also discuss the more recent development of gastric organoid cultures from murine and human gastric tissue, as well as from human pluripotent stem cells, and the outcomes of H. pylori infection in these systems.

  12. Assembly and characterization of a nonlinear optical microscopy for in vivo and ex vivo tissue imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratavieira, S.; Buzzá, H. H.; Jorge, A. E.; Grecco, C.; Pires, L.; Cosci, A.; Bagnato, V. S.; Kurachi, C.

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study is the assembly and characterization of a custom-made non-linear microscope. The microscope allows the adjustment for in vitro, in vivo and ex vivo imaging of biological samples. Two galvanometer mirrors conjugated by two spherical mirrors are used for the lateral scan and for the axial scan a piezoeletric stage is utilized. The excitation is done using a tunable femtosecond Ti: Sapphire laser. The light is focused in tissue by an objective lens 20X, water immersion, numerical aperture of 1.0, and working distance of 2.0 mm. The detection system is composed by a cut off filter that eliminates laser light back reflections and diverse dichroic filters can be chosen to split the emitted signal for the two photomultiplier detector. The calibration and resolution of the microscope was done using a stage micrometer with 10 μm divisions and fluorescent particle slide, respectively. Fluorescence and second harmonic generation images were performed using epithelial and hepatic tissue, the images have a sub-cellular spatial resolution. Further characterization and differentiation of tissue layers can be obtained by performing axial scanning. By means of the microscope it is possible to have a three dimensional reconstruction of tissues with sub-cellular resolution.

  13. Population-averaged macaque brain atlas with high-resolution ex vivo DTI integrated into in vivo space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lei; Jeon, Tina; Yu, Qiaowen; Ouyang, Minhui; Peng, Qinmu; Mishra, Virendra; Pletikos, Mihovil; Sestan, Nenad; Miller, Michael I; Mori, Susumu; Hsiao, Steven; Liu, Shuwei; Huang, Hao

    2017-12-01

    Animal models of the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), the most widely used nonhuman primate, have been irreplaceable in neurobiological studies. However, a population-averaged macaque brain diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) atlas, including comprehensive gray and white matter labeling as well as bony and facial landmarks guiding invasive experimental procedures, is not available. The macaque white matter tract pathways and microstructures have been rarely recorded. Here, we established a population-averaged macaque brain atlas with high-resolution ex vivo DTI integrated into in vivo space incorporating bony and facial landmarks, and delineated microstructures and three-dimensional pathways of major white matter tracts in vivo MRI/DTI and ex vivo (postmortem) DTI of ten rhesus macaque brains were acquired. Single-subject macaque brain DTI template was obtained by transforming the postmortem high-resolution DTI data into in vivo space. Ex vivo DTI of ten macaque brains was then averaged in the in vivo single-subject template space to generate population-averaged macaque brain DTI atlas. The white matter tracts were traced with DTI-based tractography. One hundred and eighteen neural structures including all cortical gyri, white matter tracts and subcortical nuclei, were labeled manually on population-averaged DTI-derived maps. The in vivo microstructural metrics of fractional anisotropy, axial, radial and mean diffusivity of the traced white matter tracts were measured. Population-averaged digital atlas integrated into in vivo space can be used to label the experimental macaque brain automatically. Bony and facial landmarks will be available for guiding invasive procedures. The DTI metric measurements offer unique insights into heterogeneous microstructural profiles of different white matter tracts.

  14. Persistence of DNA studied in different ex vivo and in vivo rat models simulating the human gut situation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilcks, Andrea; van Hoek, A.H.A.M.; Joosten, R.G.

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of DNA sequences from genetically modified plants to persist in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. PCR analysis and transformation assays were used to study DNA persistence and integrity in various ex vivo and in vivo systems using gnotobiotic rats. DNA...... studied was either plasmid DNA, naked plant DNA or plant DNA embedded in maize flour. Ex vivo experiments performed by incubating plant DNA in intestinal samples, showed that DNA is rapidly degraded in the upper part of the GI tract whereas degradation is less severe in the lower part. In contrast...

  15. Selected recent in vivo studies on chemical measurements in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdi, S; Ren, L; Fathali, H; Li, X; Ewing, A G

    2015-06-07

    In vivo measurements of neurotransmitters and related compounds have provided a better understanding of the chemical interactions that are a major part in functioning of brains. In addition, a great deal of technology has been developed to measure chemical species in other areas of living organisms. A key part of this work has been sampling technologies as well as direct measurements in vivo. This is extremely important when sampling from the smallest animal systems. Yet, very small invertebrate systems are excellent models and often have better defined and more easily manipulated genetics. This review focuses on in vivo measurements, electrochemical methods, fluorescence techniques, and sampling and is further narrowed to work over approximately the last three years. Rapid developments of in vivo studies in these model systems should aid in finding solutions to biological and bioanalytical challenges related to human physiological functions and neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. In vivo endoscopic multi-beam optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Standish, Beau A; Mariampillai, Adrian; Munce, Nigel R; Leung, Michael K K; Vitkin, I Alex [Deptartment of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Lee, Kenneth K C; Yang, Victor X D [Ontario Cancer Institute/University Health Network, Toronto (Canada)], E-mail: standish@ee.ryerson.ca

    2010-02-07

    A multichannel optical coherence tomography (multi-beam OCT) system and an in vivo endoscopic imaging probe were developed using a swept-source OCT system. The distal optics were micro-machined to produce a high numerical aperture, multi-focus fibre optic array. This combination resulted in a transverse design resolution of <10 {mu}m full width half maximum (FWHM) throughout the entire imaging range, while also increasing the signal intensity within the focus of the individual channels. The system was used in a pre-clinical rabbit study to acquire in vivo structural images of the colon and ex vivo images of the oesophagus and trachea. A good correlation between the structural multi-beam OCT images and H and E histology was achieved, demonstrating the feasibility of this high-resolution system and its potential for in vivo human endoscopic imaging.

  17. The Expanding Toolbox of In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan; Handagama, Winode; Marr, Enolia; Sayler, Gary; Ripp, Steven

    2016-01-01

    In vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) permits the visualization of engineered bioluminescence from living cells and tissues to provide a unique perspective toward the understanding of biological processes as they occur within the framework of an authentic in vivo environment. The toolbox of in vivo BLI includes an inventory of luciferase compounds capable of generating bioluminescent light signals along with sophisticated and powerful instrumentation designed to detect and quantify these light signals non-invasively as they emit from the living subject. The information acquired reveals the dynamics of a wide range of biological functions that play key roles in the physiological and pathological control of disease and its therapeutic management. This mini review provides an overview of the tools and applications central to the evolution of in vivo BLI as a core technology in the preclinical imaging disciplines.

  18. A method to study in vivo stability of DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surana, Sunaina; Bhatia, Dhiraj; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2013-11-01

    DNA nanostructures are rationally designed, synthetic, nanoscale assemblies obtained from one or more DNA sequences by their self-assembly. Due to the molecularly programmable as well as modular nature of DNA, such designer DNA architectures have great potential for in cellulo and in vivo applications. However, demonstrations of functionality in living systems necessitates a method to assess the in vivo stability of the relevant nanostructures. Here, we outline a method to quantitatively assay the stability and lifetime of various DNA nanostructures in vivo. This exploits the property of intact DNA nanostructures being uptaken by the coelomocytes of the multicellular model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. These studies reveal that the present fluorescence based assay in coelomocytes of C. elegans is an useful in vivo test bed for measuring DNA nanostructure stability. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. ANTIOXIDANTS AMELIORATION OF ARSENICAL-INDUCED EFFECTS IN VIVO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antioxidant amelioration of arsenical-induced effects in vivo. ES Hunter and EH Rogers. Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, US EPA, RTP, NC. Antioxidants have been reported to ameliorate the effects of many developmental toxicants. We tested the hypothesis that oxi...

  20. Endocrine disrupting properties in vivo of widely used azole fungicides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taxvig, Camilla; Vinggaard, Anne; Hass, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    The endocrine-disrupting potential of four commonly used azole fungicides, propiconazole, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole and ketoconazole, were tested in two short-term in vivo studies. Initially, the antiandrogenic effects of propiconazole and tebuconazole (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg body weight/day eac...... as endocrine disruptors in vivo, although the profile of action in vivo varies. As ketoconazole is known to implicate numerous endocrine-disrupting effects in humans, the concern for the effects of the other tested azole fungicides in humans is growing.......The endocrine-disrupting potential of four commonly used azole fungicides, propiconazole, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole and ketoconazole, were tested in two short-term in vivo studies. Initially, the antiandrogenic effects of propiconazole and tebuconazole (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg body weight/day each...

  1. In vivo spectral micro-imaging of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, Stavros G; Urayama, Shiro; Lin, Bevin; Saroufeem, Ramez; Ghobrial, Moussa

    2012-11-27

    In vivo endoscopic methods an apparatuses for implementation of fluorescence and autofluorescence microscopy, with and without the use of exogenous agents, effectively (with resolution sufficient to image nuclei) visualize and categorize various abnormal tissue forms.

  2. Modulating Hippocampal Plasticity with In Vivo Brain Stimulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rohan, Joyce G; Carhuatanta, Kim A; McInturf, Shawn M; Miklasevich, Molly K; Jankord, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    .... However, the mechanisms by which tDCS effects brain function remain under scrutiny. We have demonstrated that in vivo tDCS in rats produced a lasting effect on hippocampal synaptic plasticity, as measured using extracellular recordings...

  3. In silico vs. in vivo human intestinal permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idkaidek, N M; Najib, N

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this research is to calculate human intestinal permeability in silico and correlate results with those measured in vivo. Optimized human intestinal permeability values were calculated for 16 drugs by de-convolution of human plasma profiles using Parameter Estimation module of SimCYP program V13. Results showed high in silico-in vivo correlation coefficient of 0.89 for drugs with high/low permeability values. In silico permeability, if properly optimized, can be used as surrogate for in vivo permeability for BCS class I drugs and hence is suggested that such methodology could be employed as a support for waiver of in vivo studies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Endothelial cells present antigens in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tellides George

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immune recognition of vascular endothelial cells (EC has been implicated in allograft rejection, protection against pathogens, and lymphocyte recruitment. However, EC pervade nearly all tissues and predominate in none, complicating any direct test of immune recognition. Here, we examined antigen presentation by EC in vivo by testing immune responses against E. coli β-galactosidase (β-gal in two lines of transgenic mice that express β-gal exclusively in their EC. TIE2-lacZ mice express β-gal in all EC and VWF-lacZ mice express β-gal in heart and brain microvascular EC. Results Transgenic and congenic wild type FVB mice immunized with β-gal expression vector DNA or β-gal protein generated high titer, high affinity antisera containing comparable levels of antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes, suggesting equivalent activation of T helper cell subsets. The immunized transgenic mice remained healthy, their EC continued to express β-gal, and their blood vessels showed no histological abnormalities. In response to β-gal in vitro, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from immunized transgenic and FVB mice proliferated, expressed CD25, and secreted IFN-γ. Infection with recombinant vaccinia virus encoding β-gal raised equivalent responses in transgenic and FVB mice. Hearts transplanted from transgenic mice into FVB mice continued to beat and the graft EC continued to express β-gal. These results suggested immunological ignorance of the transgene encoded EC protein. However, skin transplanted from TIE2-lacZ onto FVB mice lost β-gal+ EC and the hosts developed β-gal-specific antisera, demonstrating activation of host immune effector mechanisms. In contrast, skin grafted from TIE2-lacZ onto VWF-lacZ mice retained β-gal+ EC and no antisera developed, suggesting a tolerant host immune system. Conclusion Resting, β-gal+ EC in transgenic mice tolerize specific lymphocytes that would otherwise respond against β-gal expressed by EC within

  5. Semiconductor quantum dot toxicity in a mouse in vivo model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozrova, Svetlana V.; Baryshnikova, Maria A.; Nabiev, Igor; Sukhanova, Alyona

    2017-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are increasingly widely used in clinical medicine. Their most promising potential applications are cancer diagnosis, including in vivo tumour imaging and targeted drug delivery. In this connection, the main questions are whether or not QDs are toxic for humans and, if they are, what concentration is relatively harmless. We have carried out in vivo experiments with CdSe/ZnS fluorescent semiconductor core/shell QDs, which are currently the most widely used in research.

  6. Development and in vivo evaluation of mucoadhesive tablets of Rebapimide

    OpenAIRE

    Gudas, Ganesh Kumar; Jaswanth, A; Bhikshapathi, V.R.N.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was in vitro and in vivo evaluation of mucoadhesive tablets of rebapimide to prolong the gastric residence time after oral administration. The solubility of rebapimide was enhanced by kneading technique with that mixture formulations were prepared by using 33 full factorial designs to explore the effects of  gum Kondagogu, gum Olibanum and Guar  gum (as independent variables) on mucoadhesive strength, drug release and Ex vivo residence time (as dependent variables)...

  7. In vitro and in vivo production of pectic enzymes, polygalacturonase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Possible in vitro and in vivo production of pectic enzyme polygalacturonase and pH on the activity of the enzyme were investigated. The results of the assay for the production of polygalacturonase (PG) by the pathogen showed that the activity was 142.9 RVU in vitro and 166.7 RVU, in vivo at temperature 25°C. The optimum ...

  8. Dissecting Neuronal Participation to Focal Epileptic Events in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0631 TITLE: Dissecting Neuronal Participation to Focal Epileptic Events in Vivo PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stelios M...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Dissecting Neuronal Participation to Focal Epileptic Events in Vivo 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...rational approaches to therapy we need to understand the role that individual neurons of different types play in epileptic events. The two-photon

  9. Draft guidelines on in vivo conservation of animal genetic resources

    OpenAIRE

    Boettcher, P.; Martin, J.F.; Gandini, G.; Joshi, B.K.; Oldenbroek, J.K.; Sponenberg, P.

    2012-01-01

    These guidelines present the basic concepts involved in the establishment and implementation of in vivo conservation plans for animal genetic resources for food and agriculture. The guidelines are intended for use by policy makers in the management of animal genetic resources, managers of animal breeding organizations, persons responsible for training in animal genetic resource management and any stakeholders with a leading role in designing and implementing in vivo conservation of animal gen...

  10. Defining human mesenchymal stem cell efficacy in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennon Donald P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs can suppress graft versus host disease (GvHD and have profound anti-inflammatory and regenerative capacity in stroke, infarct, spinal cord injury, meniscus regeneration, tendinitis, acute renal failure, and heart disease in human and animal models of disease. There is significant clinical hMSC variability in efficacy and the ultimate response in vivo. The challenge in hMSC based therapy is defining the efficacy of hMSC in vivo. Models which may provide insight into hMSC bioactivity in vivo would provide a means to distinguish hMSCs for clinical utility. hMSC function has been described as both regenerative and trophic through the production of bioactive factors. The regenerative component involves the multi-potentiality of hMSC progenitor differentiation. The secreted factors generated by the hMSCs are milieu and injury specific providing unique niches for responses in vivo. These bioactive factors are anti-scarring, angiogenic, anti-apoptotic as well as regenerative. Further, from an immunological standpoint, hMSC's can avoid host immune response, providing xenographic applications. To study the in vivo immuno-regulatory effectiveness of hMSCs, we used the ovalbumin challenge model of acute asthma. This is a quick 3 week in vivo pulmonary inflammation model with readily accessible ways of measuring effectiveness of hMSCs. Our data show that there is a direct correlation between the traditional ceramic cube score to hMSCs attenuation of cellular recruitment due to ovalbumin challenge. The results from these studies verify the in vivo immuno-modulator effectiveness of hMSCs and support the potential use of the ovalbumin model as an in vivo model of hMSC potency and efficacy. Our data also support future directions toward exploring hMSCs as an alternative therapeutic for the treatment of airway inflammation associated with asthma.

  11. The recent in vivo ESR imaging in Yamagata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Hidekatsu; Ohya, Hiroaki [Inst. for Life Support Technology, Matsuei, Yamagata (Japan)

    2002-04-01

    In vivo ESR imaging systems operating at ca. 700 MHz were developed in our institute. ESR imaging of living small animals that had received some nitroxide radicals and their reduced form have been conducted. These imaging techniques can be applied to some disease models. We think that the ESR imaging of nitroxide radicals in the biological systems is useful to estimate in vivo reduction or oxidation, i.e., redox status in the target area (such as the brain). (author)

  12. The in vitro and in vivo comet assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlinson, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The strategy for testing for genotoxicity covers three main areas, namely gene mutation, chromosome aberration or breakage (clastogenicity), and chromosome loss or gain (aneuploidy). The current generalized strategy consists of assays capable of detecting all of these endpoints using in vitro assays such as the Ames test for detecting gene mutations in bacteria, the human peripheral lymphocyte chromosome aberration (CA) test for detecting clastogenicity, and the in vitro micronucleus test for clastogenicity and aneuploidy. The primary in vivo assay, and generally the only in vivo assay required, is the in vivo rodent bone marrow micronucleus assay. However, there are instances when these assays alone are inadequate and further testing is required, especially in vivo. Historically, the preferred second assay has been the rodent liver unscheduled DNA synthesis assay but recently this has been superseded by the rodent single cell gel electrophoresis or Comet assay. This assay has numerous advantages especially in vivo, where virtually any tissue can be examined. The status of the in vitro comet assay in regulatory testing is much less clear although a preliminary review of data from the assay has shown it to be more specific than other in vitro genotoxicity tests and less prone to false positives.Detailed here are general protocols for both the in vitro and in vivo comet assays which will form the basis of the pending OECD guideline for the assay.

  13. Vitamin E and selenium protection from in vivo lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappel, A L

    1980-01-01

    Some of the vitamins and many of the metals that are being considered at this symposium interact in lipid peroxidation. Some of these interactions have been studied in vivo. Measurement of in vivo lipid peroxidation in the rat is accomplished by gas chromatographic analysis of pentane, a minor peroxidation product that is exhaled in the breath. In the rat, lipid peroxidation is proportional to dietary polyunsaturated lipids when the animal is deficient in antioxygenic agents. The chain-breaking antioxidant vitamin E is the main protector against in vivo lipid peroxidation. Dietary selenium, through its involvement in the biosynthesis of glutathione peroxidase, functions in a secondary antioxygenic role as a hydroperoxide reducer. In rats fed a vitamin E-deficient diet, injection of some hydroperoxides, iron, or vitamin C leads to initiation of in vivo lipid peroxidation, apparently by decomposing hydroperoxides to free radicals. Carbon tetrachloride, a toxic halogenated hydrocarbon, is metabolized by liver microsomes and initiates in vivo lipid peroxidation in the liver. These examples show that practical information on interactions involving in vivo lipid peroxidation can be obtained by studies that use the pentane method.

  14. Repeated swim stress alters brain benzodiazepine receptors measured in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weizman, R.; Weizman, A.; Kook, K.A.; Vocci, F.; Deutsch, S.I.; Paul, S.M.

    1989-06-01

    The effects of repeated swim stress on brain benzodiazepine receptors were examined in the mouse using both an in vivo and in vitro binding method. Specific in vivo binding of (/sup 3/H)Ro15-1788 to benzodiazepine receptors was decreased in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and striatum after repeated swim stress (7 consecutive days of daily swim stress) when compared to nonstressed mice. In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding was unaltered after repeated swim stress in the cerebellum and pons medulla. The stress-induced reduction in in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding did not appear to be due to altered cerebral blood flow or to an alteration in benzodiazepine metabolism or biodistribution because there was no difference in (14C)iodoantipyrine distribution or whole brain concentrations of clonazepam after repeated swim stress. Saturation binding experiments revealed a change in both apparent maximal binding capacity and affinity after repeated swim stress. Moreover, a reduction in clonazepam's anticonvulsant potency was also observed after repeated swim stress (an increase in the ED50 dose for protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures), although there was no difference in pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure threshold between the two groups. In contrast to the results obtained in vivo, no change in benzodiazepine receptor binding kinetics was observed using the in vitro binding method. These data suggest that environmental stress can alter the binding parameters of the benzodiazepine receptor and that the in vivo and in vitro binding methods can yield substantially different results.

  15. Ex vivo and in vivo label-free imaging of lymphatic vessels using OCT lymphangiography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Peijun; Es'haghian, Shaghayegh; Karnowski, Karol; Rea, Suzanne; Wood, Fiona M.; Yu, Dao-Yi; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Sampson, David D.

    2017-02-01

    We have been developing an automated method to image lymphatic vessels both ex vivo and in vivo with optical coherence tomography (OCT), using their optical transparency. Our method compensates for the OCT signal attenuation for each A-scan in combination with the correction of the confocal function and sensitivity fall-off, enabling reliable thresholding of lymphatic vessels from the OCT scans. Morphological image processing with a segment-joining algorithm is also incorporated into the method to mitigate partial-volume artifacts, which are particularly evident with small lymphatic vessels. Our method is demonstrated for two different clinical application goals: the monitoring of conjunctival lymphatics for surgical guidance and assessment of glaucoma treatment; and the longitudinal monitoring of human burn scars undergoing laser ablation treatment. We present examples of OCT lymphangiography ex vivo on porcine conjunctivas and in vivo on human burn scars, showing the visualization of the lymphatic vessel network and their longitudinal changes due to treatment.

  16. Comparative Pharmaceutical Evaluation of Candesartan and Candesartan Cilexetil: Physicochemical Properties, In Vitro Dissolution and Ex Vivo In Vivo Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Ahmed M; Allam, Ahmed N; Abdallah, Ossama Y

    2017-09-25

    The aim of the present work is to answer the question is it possible to replace the ester prodrug candesartan cilexetil (CC) by its active metabolite candesartan (C) to bypass the in vivo variable effect of esterase enzymes. A comparative physicochemical evaluation was conducted through solubility, dissolution, and stability studies; additionally, ex vivo permeation and in vivo studies were assessed. C demonstrated higher solubility over CC at alkaline pH. Moreover, dissolution testing using the pharmacopeial method showed better release profile of C even in the absence of surfactant in the testing medium. Both drugs demonstrated a slight degradation in acidic pH after short-term stability. Instead, shifting to alkaline pH of 6.5 and 7.4 showed superiority of C solution stability compared to CC solution. The ex vivo permeation results demonstrated that the parent compound C has a significant (P candesartan for clinical use similarly to azilsartan and its prodrug.

  17. Passive cavitation detection during pulsed HIFU exposures of ex vivo tissues and in vivo mouse pancreatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tong; Chen, Hong; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Wang, Yak-Nam; Kreider, Wayne; He, Xuemei; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2014-07-01

    Pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) has been shown to enhance vascular permeability, disrupt tumor barriers and enhance drug penetration into tumor tissue through acoustic cavitation. Monitoring of cavitation activity during pHIFU treatments and knowing the ultrasound pressure levels sufficient to reliably induce cavitation in a given tissue are therefore very important. Here, three metrics of cavitation activity induced by pHIFU and evaluated by confocal passive cavitation detection were introduced: cavitation probability, cavitation persistence and the level of the broadband acoustic emissions. These metrics were used to characterize cavitation activity in several ex vivo tissue types (bovine tongue and liver and porcine adipose tissue and kidney) and gel phantoms (polyacrylamide and agarose) at varying peak-rare factional focal pressures (1-12 MPa) during the following pHIFU protocol: frequency 1.1 MHz, pulse duration 1 ms and pulse repetition frequency 1 Hz. To evaluate the relevance of the measurements in ex vivo tissue, cavitation metrics were also investigated and compared in the ex vivo and in vivo murine pancreatic tumors that develop spontaneously in transgenic KrasLSL.G12 D/+; p53 R172 H/+; PdxCretg/+ (KPC) mice and closely re-capitulate human disease in their morphology. The cavitation threshold, defined at 50% cavitation probability, was found to vary broadly among the investigated tissues (within 2.5-10 MPa), depending mostly on the water-lipid ratio that characterizes the tissue composition. Cavitation persistence and the intensity of broadband emissions depended both on tissue structure and lipid concentration. Both the cavitation threshold and broadband noise emission level were similar between ex vivo and in vivo pancreatic tumor tissue. The largest difference between in vivo and ex vivo settings was found in the pattern of cavitation occurrence throughout pHIFU exposure: it was sporadic in vivo, but it decreased rapidly and stopped

  18. Free radicals induced by sunlight in different spectral regions - in vivo versus ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohan, Silke B; Müller, Robert; Albrecht, Stephanie; Mink, Kathrin; Tscherch, Kathrin; Ismaeel, Fakher; Lademann, Jürgen; Rohn, Sascha; Meinke, Martina C

    2016-05-01

    Sunlight represents an exogenous factor stimulating formation of free radicals which can induce cell damage. To assess the effect of the different spectral solar regions on the development of free radicals in skin, in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) investigations with human volunteers and ex vivo studies on excised human and porcine skin were carried out. For all skin probes, the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region stimulates the most intensive radical formation, followed by the visible (VIS) and the near infrared (NIR) regions. A comparison between the different skin models shows that for UV light, the fastest and highest production of free radicals could be detected in vivo, followed by excised porcine and human skin. The same distribution pattern was found for the VIS/NIR spectral regions, whereby the differences in radical formation between in vivo and ex vivo were less pronounced. An analysis of lipid composition in vivo before and after exposure to UV light clearly showed modifications in several skin lipid components; a decrease of ceramide subclass [AP2] and an increase of ceramide subclass [NP2], sodium cholesterol sulphate and squalene (SQ) were detectable. In contrast, VIS/NIR irradiation led to an increase of ceramides [AP2] and SCS, and a decrease of SQ. These results, which are largely comparable for the different skin models investigated in vivo and ex vivo, indicate that radiation exposure in different spectral regions strongly influences radical production in skin and also results in changes in skin lipid composition, which is essential for barrier function. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Monitoring of radio frequency tissue ablation in an interventional magnetic resonance environment. Preliminary ex vivo and in vivo results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, P; Botnar, R; Goldberg, S N; Gazelle, G S; Debatin, J F

    1997-11-01

    The authors evaluate the feasibility of monitoring radio frequency (RF) ablation in an interventional, open-configuration, 0.5-tesla magnetic resonance (MR) environment. Ex vivo and in vivo RF coagulation necrosis were induced in porcine paraspinal muscle tissue using a 300 kHz monopolar RF generator applying 5 to 20 W over 3 to 9 minutes. Images were acquired simultaneous to RF application, after RF application, and in an intermittent mode (60 seconds of RF followed by 15 seconds of MR imaging). Temperature changes were monitored based on amplitude (ex vivo) and phase alterations (in vivo) of a T1-weighted graded refocused echo (GRE) sequence enabling an update every 2.5 seconds. A standardized color-coded subtraction technique enhanced signal changes. Additionally, T2- and T1-weighted spin echo (SE) images were acquired with and without intravenous contrast. Macroscopic coagulation size was compared with lesion size seen on MR images. Although lesion diameters were related directly to applied RF power, the application mode had no significant impact on coagulation size (P > 0.05). As could be expected, MR imaging during RF ablation resulted in major image distortion. Radio frequency effects were seen on images acquired in the continuous and intermittent modes. Coagulation size seen on GRE images correlated well with macroscopy both ex vivo (r = 0.89) and in vivo (r = 0.92). Poorer correlation was found with postinterventional SE sequences (r = 0.78-0.84). Magnetic resonance monitoring of RF effects is feasible both ex vivo as well as in vivo using temperature-sensitive sequences in an open-configuration MR environment.

  20. Ex vivo and in vivo evaluation of laser-induced thermotherapy for nodular thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, Jörg-P; Lehmann, Kai S; Zurbuchen, Urte; Knappe, Verena; Schumann, Thomas; Buhr, Heinz J; Holmer, Christoph

    2009-09-01

    The prevalence of thyroid nodules ranges between 2% and 60% depending on the population studied. However, minimally invasive procedures like laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) are increasingly used to treat tumors of parenchymatous organs and seem to be suitable for singular thyroid nodules as well. Their successful clinical application depends on the induction of sufficiently large lesions and a knowledge of the energy parameters required for complete thermal ablation. The aim of this study was to establish a dose-response relationship for LITT of thyroid nodules. Thermal lesions were induced in healthy porcine thyroid glands ex vivo (n = 110) and in vivo (n = 10) using an Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm). Laser energy was applied for 300 seconds in a power range of 10-20 W. During the ablation, continuous temperature measurement at a distance of 5 and 10 mm from the applicator was performed. The lesions were longitudinally and transversally measured, and the volume was calculated. Furthermore, enzyme histochemical analysis of the thyroid tissue was performed. The maximum inducible lesion volumes were between 0.74 +/- 0.18 cm(3) at a laser power of 10 W and 3.80 +/- 0.41 cm(3) at 20 W. The maximum temperatures after ablation were between 72.9 +/- 2.9 degrees C (10 W) and 112.9 +/- 9.2 degrees C (20 W) at a distance of 5 mm and between 49.5 +/- 2.2 degrees C (10 W) and 73.2 +/- 6.7 degrees C (20 W) at a distance of 10 mm from the applicator. The histochemical analysis demonstrates a complete loss of NADPH dehydrogenase activity in thermal lesions as a sign of irreversible cell damage. This study is the first to demonstrate a dose-response relationship for LITT of thyroid tissue. LITT is suitable for singular thyroid nodules and induces reproducible clinically relevant lesions with irreversible cell damage in an appropriate application time.

  1. Immunomodulatory effect of Moringa peregrina leaves, ex vivo and in vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Oran, Sawsan Atallah; Hassuneh, Mona Rushdie; Al-Qaralleh, Haitham Naief; Rayyan, Walid Abu; Al-Thunibat, Osama Yosef; Mallah, Eyad; Abu-Rayyan, Ahmed; Salem, Shadi

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the in vivo and ex vivo immunomodulatory effect of the ethanol leaves extract of Moringa peregrina in Balb/c mice. For this study, five groups of 5 Balb/c mice were given a single acute subtoxic oral dose of the ethanolic extract at 1.13, 11.30, 23.40 and 113.4 mg/kg and the immunomodulatory effect was assessed on the 6th day following the ingestion. In the (non-functional) assessment, the effect of the extract on the body weight, relative lymphoid organ weight, splenic cellularity and peripheral blood hematologic parameters were evaluated. While in the immunomodulation assessment (functional), we investigated the effect of the extract on the proliferative capacity of splenic lymphocytes and peripheral T and B lymphocytes using mitogen blastogenesis, mixed allogeneic MLR and IgM-Plaque forming cells assays. The ingestion of M. peregrina extract caused a significant increase in the body weight, weight and number of cells of spleen and lymph nodes of the treated mice. Furthermore, the count of RBCs, WBCs, platelets, hemoglobin concentration and PCV % were increased by the extract treatment in a dose-dependent manner. M. peregrina enhanced the proliferative responses of splenic lymphocytes for both T cell and B-cell mitogens. Likewise, the mixed lymphocyte reaction MLR assay has revealed a T-cell dependent proliferation enhancement in the extract treated mice. Moreover, the oral administration of M. peregrina leaves extracts significantly increased PFCs/106 splenocytes in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, subtoxic acute doses of M. peregrina extract demonstrated significant potential as an immunomodulatory agent even at the lowest dose of 1.13 mg/kg. PMID:29204086

  2. Immunomodulatory effect of Moringa peregrina leaves, ex vivo and in vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Salameh Al-Majali

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to assess the in vivo and ex vivo immunomodulatory effect of the ethanol leaves extract of Moringa peregrina in Balb/c mice. For this study, five groups of 5 Balb/c mice were given a single acute subtoxic oral dose of the ethanolic extract at 1.13, 11.30, 23.40 and 113.4 mg/kg and the immunomodulatory effect was assessed on the 6th day following the ingestion. In the (non-functional assessment, the effect of the extract on the body weight, relative lymphoid organ weight, splenic cellularity and peripheral blood hematologic parameters were evaluated. While in the immunomodulation assessment (functional, we investigated the effect of the extract on the proliferative capacity of splenic lymphocytes and peripheral T and B lymphocytes using mitogen blastogenesis, mixed allogeneic MLR and IgM-Plaque forming cells assays. The ingestion of M. peregrina extract caused a significant increase in the body weight, weight and number of cells of spleen and lymph nodes of the treated mice. Furthermore, the count of RBCs, WBCs, platelets, hemoglobin concentration and PCV % were increased by the extract treatment in a dose-dependent manner. M. peregrina enhanced the proliferative responses of splenic lymphocytes for both T cell and B-cell mitogens. Likewise, the mixed lymphocyte reaction MLR assay has revealed a T-cell dependent proliferation enhancement in the extract treated mice. Moreover, the oral administration of M. peregrina leaves extracts significantly increased PFCs/10 6 splenocytes in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, subtoxic acute doses of M. peregrina extract demonstrated significant potential as an immunomodulatory agent even at the lowest dose of 1.13 mg/kg.

  3. Enzymatic regulation of photosynthetic and light-independent carbon fixation in Laminaria setchellii (Phaeophyta, Ulva lactuca (Chlorophyta and Iridaea cordata (Rhodophyta Regulación enzimática de la fotosíntesis y la fijación de carbono en obscuridad por Laminaria setchellii (Phaeophyta, Ulva lactuca (Chlorophyta e Iridaea cordata (Rhodophyta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEJANDRO CABELLO-PASINI

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon is acquired through photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic processes in marine algae. However, little is known about the biochemical regulation of these metabolic pathways along the thallus of seaweeds. Consequently, the objective of this study was to assess the distribution of in vivo carboxylation pathways and to relate them to the in vitro activity of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RUBISCO, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC in the Phaeophyte Laminaria setchellii, the Chlorophyte Ulva lactuca, and the Rhodophyte Iridaea cordata. Chlorophyll-a levels did not vary in U. lactuca and I. cordata. However, pigment levels were significantly lower in the meristematic region of L. setchellii probably as a result of a lack of differentiation of the chloroplasts in this region. Similarly, net photosynthesis did not vary in the thallus of U. lactuca and I. cordata, while it increased from the stipe and meristem towards the lamina of L. setchellii. In contrast to photosynthesis, light-independent carbon fixation rates were significantly greater in the meristematic region of L. setchellii suggesting a compensating mechanism for carbon incorporation in photosynthetically limited tissue. The activity of RUBISCO and PEPCK followed a pattern similar to that of in vivo carboxylation processes indicating that in vivo carbon assimilation is regulated by the activity of the carboxylating enzymes throughout the thallus of L. setchelliiLa incorporación de carbono en algas marinas se lleva a cabo mediante procesos fotosintéticos y no-fotosintéticos. Sin embargo, poco se sabe sobre la regulación bioquímica de estas rutas metabólicas en el tejido de algas marinas. En consecuencia, el objetivo de este estudio fue el de evaluar la distribución de la carboxilación in vivo y relacionarlas a la actividad in vitro de ribulosa 1,5-bisfosfato carboxilasa/oxigenasa (RUBISCO, fosfoenolpiruvato

  4. Fiducial markers for MR histological correlation in ex vivo or short-term in vivo animal experiments: a screening study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouvière, Olivier; Reynolds, Carol; Le, Yuan; Lai, Jinping; Roberts, Lewis R; Felmlee, Joel P; Ehman, Richard L

    2006-01-01

    To test injectable fiducial markers for magnetic resonance (MR) histological correlation in ex vivo or in vivo animal experiments. A total of 35 potential markers were tested ex vivo in pork muscle. The end-points were: 1) visibility, size, and shape on MR images and at macroscopic examination; 2) 24-hour stability; and 3) microscopic appearance. Selected markers were injected in vivo (rabbit's muscle and breast tumor tissue) to test their three-hour in vivo stability and their potential toxicity. Finally, different dilutions of the two best markers were assessed again through the same screening tests to determine whether their size on MR images could be customized by dilution. Two fluid acrylic paints containing inorganic pigments were found to be potentially interesting markers. On MR images, they created well-defined susceptibility artifacts. The markers made with iridescent bronze paint (iron oxide coated mica particles) were readily visible on microscopy and their size on MR images could be customized by dilution. The iridescent stainless steel paint (iron, chromium, nickel) created ex vivo the smallest markers in tissue but needed colloidal iron staining to be visible on microscopy and could not be easily diluted. Fluid acrylic paints are potentially interesting markers for MR histological correlation. Further studies are needed to assess their long-term properties.

  5. In Vivo Tracking of Murine Adipose Tissue-Derived Multipotent Adult Stem Cells and Ex Vivo Cross-Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Garrovo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are characterized by the ability to renew themselves and to differentiate into specialized cell types, while stem cell therapy is believed to treat a number of different human diseases through either cell regeneration or paracrine effects. Herein, an in vivo and ex vivo near infrared time domain (NIR TD optical imaging study was undertaken to evaluate the migratory ability of murine adipose tissue-derived multipotent adult stem cells [mAT-MASC] after intramuscular injection in mice. In vivo NIR TD optical imaging data analysis showed a migration of DiD-labelled mAT-MASC in the leg opposite the injection site, which was confirmed by a fibered confocal microendoscopy system. Ex vivo NIR TD optical imaging results showed a systemic distribution of labelled cells. Considering a potential microenvironmental contamination, a cross-validation study by multimodality approaches was followed: mAT-MASC were isolated from male mice expressing constitutively eGFP, which was detectable using techniques of immunofluorescence and qPCR. Y-chromosome positive cells, injected into wild-type female recipients, were detected by FISH. Cross-validation confirmed the data obtained by in vivo/ex vivo TD optical imaging analysis. In summary, our data demonstrates the usefulness of NIR TD optical imaging in tracking delivered cells, giving insights into the migratory properties of the injected cells.

  6. Disposable Fluidic Actuators for Miniature In-Vivo Surgical Robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourghodrat, Abolfazl; Nelson, Carl A

    2017-03-01

    Fusion of robotics and minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has created new opportunities to develop diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Surgical robotics is advancing from externally actuated systems to miniature in-vivo robotics. However, with miniaturization of electric-motor-driven surgical robots, there comes a trade-off between the size of the robot and its capability. Slow actuation, low load capacity, sterilization difficulties, leaking electricity and transferring produced heat to tissues, and high cost are among the key limitations of the use of electric motors in in-vivo applications. Fluid power in the form of hydraulics or pneumatics has a long history in driving many industrial devices and could be exploited to circumvent these limitations. High power density and good compatibility with the in-vivo environment are the key advantages of fluid power over electric motors when it comes to in-vivo applications. However, fabrication of hydraulic/pneumatic actuators within the desired size and pressure range required for in-vivo surgical robotic applications poses new challenges. Sealing these types of miniature actuators at operating pressures requires obtaining very fine surface finishes which is difficult and costly. The research described here presents design, fabrication, and testing of a hydraulic/pneumatic double-acting cylinder, a limited-motion vane motor, and a balloon-actuated laparoscopic grasper. These actuators are small, seal-less, easy to fabricate, disposable, and inexpensive, thus ideal for single-use in-vivo applications. To demonstrate the ability of these actuators to drive robotic joints, they were modified and integrated in a robotic arm. The design and testing of this surgical robotic arm are presented to validate the concept of fluid-power actuators for in-vivo applications.

  7. Methods of in-vivo mouse lung micro-CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recheis, Wolfgang A.; Nixon, Earl; Thiesse, Jacqueline; McLennan, Geoffrey; Ross, Alan; Hoffman, Eric

    2005-04-01

    Micro-CT will have a profound influence on the accumulation of anatomical and physiological phenotypic changes in natural and transgenetic mouse models. Longitudinal studies will be greatly facilitated, allowing for a more complete and accurate description of events if in-vivo studies are accomplished. The purpose of the ongoing project is to establish a feasible and reproducible setup for in-vivo mouse lung micro-computed tomography (μCT). We seek to use in-vivo respiratory-gated μCT to follow mouse models of lung disease with subsequent recovery of the mouse. Methodologies for optimizing scanning parameters and gating for the in-vivo mouse lung are presented. A Scireq flexiVent ventilated the gas-anesthetized mice at 60 breaths/minute, 30 cm H20 PEEP, 30 ml/kg tidal volume and provided a respiratory signal to gate a Skyscan 1076 μCT. Physiologic monitoring allowed the control of vital functions and quality of anesthesia, e.g. via ECG monitoring. In contrary to longer exposure times with ex-vivo scans, scan times for in-vivo were reduced using 35μm pixel size, 158ms exposure time and 18μm pixel size, 316ms exposure time to reduce motion artifacts. Gating via spontaneous breathing was also tested. Optimal contrast resolution was achieved at 50kVp, 200μA, applying an aluminum filter (0.5mm). There were minimal non-cardiac related motion artifacts. Both 35μm and 1μm voxel size images were suitable for evaluation of the airway lumen and parenchymal density. Total scan times were 30 and 65 minutes respectively. The mice recovered following scanning protocols. In-vivo lung scanning with recovery of the mouse delivered reasonable image quality for longitudinal studies, e.g. mouse asthma models. After examining 10 mice, we conclude μCT is a feasible tool evaluating mouse models of lung pathology in longitudinal studies with increasing anatomic detail available for evaluation as one moves from in-vivo to ex-vivo studies. Further developments include automated

  8. In-vivo morphologic and spectroscopic investigation of Psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapsokalyvas, Dimitrios; Cicchi, Riccardo; Bruscino, Nicola; Alfieri, Domenico; Massi, Daniela; Lotti, Torello; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2011-07-01

    Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease of the skin characterized by hyperkeratosis, hyperproliferation of the epidermis, inflammatory cell accumulation and increased dilatation of dermal papillary blood vessels. Cases of psoriasis were investigated in vivo with optical means in order to evaluate the potential of in vivo optical biopsy. A Polarization Multispectral Dermoscope was employed for the macroscopic observation. Features such as the 'dotted' blood vessels pattern was observed with high contrast. High resolution image sections of the epidermis and the dermis were produced with a custom made Multiphoton Microscope. Imaging extended from the surface of the lesion down to the papillary dermis, at a depth of 200 μm. In the epidermis, a characteristic morphology of the stratum corneum found only in Psoriasis was revealed. Additionally, the cytoplasmic area of the cells in the stratum spinosum layer was found to be smaller than normal. In the dermis the morphological features were more pronounced, where the elongated dermal papillae dominated the papillary layer. Their length exceeds 100μm, which is a far greater value compared to that of healthy skin. These in vivo observations are consistent with the ex vivo histopathological observations, supporting both the applicability and potentiality of multispectral dermoscopy and multiphoton microscopy in the field of in vivo optical investigation and biopsy of skin.

  9. Motivations of Inter Vivos Transfers Among Malaysian Muslims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhaili Alma’amun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The surge of interest in inter vivos transfers has sparked a debate over its motivations. However, most of the academic research has focused on developed economies; and similar to many other countries, empirical research is scarce in Malaysia too. This study, aims to unravel motives for inter vivos transfers among Malaysian Muslims. It employs logit regression analysis in which the data is collected by means of questionnaires from October to December 2012.This research discovers that exchange motive is more prevailing than altruism motive among the respondents. More inter vivos transfers are given to daughters, children who provide more services and children with low opportunity cost of their time. However, inter vivos gifts among Muslims in Malaysia have one distinctive feature, they have been a part of the Malay culturally defined sphere enriched by the Islamic law. This is called „hibah‟ in Malay language, which originates from an Arabic word. It is concluded that the cultural aspect of the inter vivos transfers provides enhanced information as to how the transfer mechanism work.

  10. Ex vivo and in vivo topographic studies of bladder by optical coherence tomography (Invited Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniltchenko, Dmitri; Sachs, Markus D.; Lankenau, Eva; Koenig, Frank; Burkhardt, Mick; Huettmann, Gereon; Kristiansen, Glen; Schnorr, Dietmar; Al-Shukri, Salman; Loening, Stefan A.

    2005-06-01

    Conventional imaging modalities like CT or ultrasonography have a spatial resolution of 70-1000 rim. OCT is a new method by which light of a certain wavelength is introduced into a fiberglass optic to measure tissue structures of up to 2.5 mm depth with a spatial resolution of up to 10-15 μm. We utilized the Tomograph Sirius 713, developed at the Medical Laser Centre in cooperation with 4-Optics AG, Lubeck, Germany. This apparatus uses a special Super- Luminescence-Diode (SLD) that produces light within the near infrared wavelength, with a central wavelength of 1300 nm. The coherence length is reduced to 15 μm. The light is introduced into a fiberglass optic which is several meters long and is easy to handle. To measure the depth of invasion and position of urothelial bladder tumors, the fiberglass optic is attached to a regular endoscope (Wolf, Knittlingen, Germany) via an OCT adapter. That way, in parallel to the regular endoscopic view of the bladder mucosa with or without pathologic findings, an OCT picture of the superficial as well as the deeper muscle layers is visible online. OCT was used to obtain 945 images from the bladder in vivo und ex vivo of 65 patients. OCT of normal bladder mucosa allows to image a cross section of up to 2.5 mm. It is possible to distinguish transitional epithelium, lamina propria, smooth muscles and capillaries. In cystitis, the thickness of the mucosa is constant, but the distinction between the different layers is blurred. In squamous metaplasia there is thickening of the epithelial layer, with preservation of lamination of the lower layers. In transitional cell carcinoma there is a complete loss of the regular layered structure. It is easily possible to distinguish the border between tumour and normal bladder tissue. OCT is a new high-resolution imaging procedure. It has the potential to improve the diagnostics of the urothelium and its lesions. In conjunction with a highly sensitive orientating procedure like fluorescence

  11. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging of hyperpolarized silicon particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, M C; Chan, H R; Ross, B D; Bhattacharya, P K; Marcus, C M

    2013-05-01

    Silicon-based micro- and nanoparticles have gained popularity in a wide range of biomedical applications due to their biocompatibility and biodegradability in vivo, as well as their flexible surface chemistry, which allows drug loading, functionalization and targeting. Here, we report direct in vivo imaging of hyperpolarized (29)Si nuclei in silicon particles by magnetic resonance imaging. Natural physical properties of silicon provide surface electronic states for dynamic nuclear polarization, extremely long depolarization times, insensitivity to the in vivo environment or particle tumbling, and surfaces favourable for functionalization. Potential applications to gastrointestinal, intravascular and tumour perfusion imaging at subpicomolar concentrations are presented. These results demonstrate a new background-free imaging modality applicable to a range of inexpensive, readily available and biocompatible silicon particles.

  12. Tracking immune cells in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Eric T; Bulte, Jeff W M

    2013-10-01

    The increasing complexity of in vivo imaging technologies, coupled with the development of cell therapies, has fuelled a revolution in immune cell tracking in vivo. Powerful magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods are now being developed that use iron oxide- and ¹⁹F-based probes. These MRI technologies can be used for image-guided immune cell delivery and for the visualization of immune cell homing and engraftment, inflammation, cell physiology and gene expression. MRI-based cell tracking is now also being applied to evaluate therapeutics that modulate endogenous immune cell recruitment and to monitor emerging cellular immunotherapies. These recent uses show that MRI has the potential to be developed in many applications to follow the fate of immune cells in vivo.

  13. Imaging tumor microscopic viscosity in vivo using molecular rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimolina, Lyubov’ E.; Izquierdo, Maria Angeles; López-Duarte, Ismael; Bull, James A.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Klapshina, Larisa G.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Kuimova, Marina K.

    2017-01-01

    The microscopic viscosity plays an essential role in cellular biophysics by controlling the rates of diffusion and bimolecular reactions within the cell interior. While several approaches have emerged that have allowed the measurement of viscosity and diffusion on a single cell level in vitro, the in vivo viscosity monitoring has not yet been realized. Here we report the use of fluorescent molecular rotors in combination with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) to image microscopic viscosity in vivo, both on a single cell level and in connecting tissues of subcutaneous tumors in mice. We find that viscosities recorded from single tumor cells in vivo correlate well with the in vitro values from the same cancer cell line. Importantly, our new method allows both imaging and dynamic monitoring of viscosity changes in real time in live animals and thus it is particularly suitable for diagnostics and monitoring of the progress of treatments that might be accompanied by changes in microscopic viscosity. PMID:28134273

  14. In and ex vivo breast disease study by Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raniero, L.; Canevari, R. A.; Ramalho, L. N. Z.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, Raman spectra in the 900-1,800 cm(-1) wavenumber region of in vivo and ex vivo breast tissues of both healthy mice (normal) and mice with induced mammary gland tumors (abnormal) were measured. In the case of the in vivo tissues, the Raman spectra were collected for both transcutaneous...... (with skin) and skin-removed tissues. To identify the spectral differences between normal and cancer breast tissue, the paired t-test was carried out for each wavenumber using the whole spectral range from both groups. Quadratic discriminate analysis based on principal component analysis (PCA) was also...... used to determine and evaluate differences in the Raman spectra for the various samples as a basis for diagnostic purposes. The differences in the Raman spectra of the samples were due to biochemical changes at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels. The sensitivity and specificity...

  15. In vivo cellular imaging using fluorescent proteins - Methods and Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Monti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery and genetic engineering of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cell biology. What was previously invisible to the cell often can be made visible with the use of fluorescent proteins. With this words, Robert M. Hoffman introduces In vivo Cellular Imaging Using Fluorescent proteins, the eighteen chapters book dedicated to the description of how fluorescence proteins have changed the way to analyze cellular processes in vivo. Modern researches aim to study new and less invasive methods able to follow the behavior of different cell types in different biological contexts: for example, how cancer cells migrate or how they respond to different therapies. Also, in vivo systems can help researchers to better understand animal embryonic development so as how fluorescence proteins may be used to monitor different processes in living organisms at the molecular and cellular level.

  16. Towards in vivo focal cortical dysplasia phenotyping using quantitative MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Sophie; Lorio, Sara; Jacques, Thomas S; Benova, Barbora; Gunny, Roxana; Cross, J Helen; Baldeweg, Torsten; Carmichael, David W

    2017-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) are a range of malformations of cortical development each with specific histopathological features. Conventional radiological assessment of standard structural MRI is useful for the localization of lesions but is unable to accurately predict the histopathological features. Quantitative MRI offers the possibility to probe tissue biophysical properties in vivo and may bridge the gap between radiological assessment and ex-vivo histology. This review will cover histological, genetic and radiological features of FCD following the ILAE classification and will explain how quantitative voxel- and surface-based techniques can characterise these features. We will provide an overview of the quantitative MRI measures available, their link with biophysical properties and finally the potential application of quantitative MRI to the problem of FCD subtyping. Future research linking quantitative MRI to FCD histological properties should improve clinical protocols, allow better characterisation of lesions in vivo and tailored surgical planning to the individual.

  17. Microsensors for in vivo Measurement of Glutamate in Brain Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda van der Zeyden

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Several immobilized enzyme-based electrochemical biosensors for glutamate detection have been developed over the last decade. In this review, we compare first and second generation sensors. Structures, working mechanisms, interference prevention, in vitro detection characteristics and in vivo performance are summarized here for those sensors that have successfully detected brain glutamate in vivo. In brief, first generation sensors have a simpler structure and are faster in glutamate detection. They also show a better sensitivity to glutamate during calibration in vitro. For second generation sensors, besides their less precise detection, their fabrication is difficult to reproduce, even with a semi-automatic dip-coater. Both generations of sensors can detect glutamate levels in vivo, but the reported basal levels are different. In general, second generation sensors detect higher basal levels of glutamate compared with the results obtained from first generation sensors. However, whether the detected glutamate is indeed from synaptic sources is an issue that needs further attention.

  18. In Vivo Histamine Optical Nanosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather A. Clark

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this communication we discuss the development of ionophore based nanosensors for the detection and monitoring of histamine levels in vivo. This approach is based on the use of an amine-reactive, broad spectrum ionophore which is capable of recognizing and binding to histamine. We pair this ionophore with our already established nanosensor platform, and demonstrate in vitro and in vivo monitoring of histamine levels. This approach enables capturing rapid kinetics of histamine after injection, which are more difficult to measure with standard approaches such as blood sampling, especially on small research models. The coupling together of in vivo nanosensors with ionophores such as nonactin provide a way to generate nanosensors for novel targets without the difficult process of designing and synthesizing novel ionophores.

  19. Progress Toward In Vivo Use of siRNAs-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettig, Garrett R; Behlke, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been extensively employed for in vivo research since its use was first demonstrated in mammalian cells 10 years ago. Design rules have improved, and it is now routinely possible to obtain reagents that suppress expression of any gene desired. At the same time, increased understanding of the molecular basis of unwanted side effects has led to the development of chemical modification strategies that mitigate these concerns. Delivery remains the single greatest hurdle to widespread adoption of in vivo RNAi methods. However, exciting advances have been made and new delivery systems under development may help to overcome these barriers. This review discusses advances in RNAi biochemistry and biology that impact in vivo use and provides an overview of select publications that demonstrate interesting applications of these principles. Emphasis is placed on work with synthetic, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) published since the first installment of this review which appeared in 2006. PMID:22186795

  20. In vivo microsampling to capture the elusive exposome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessonneau, Vincent; Ings, Jennifer; McMaster, Mark; Smith, Richard; Bragg, Leslie; Servos, Mark; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2017-03-01

    Loss and/or degradation of small molecules during sampling, sample transportation and storage can adversely impact biological interpretation of metabolomics data. In this study, we performed in vivo sampling using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) in combination with non-targeted liquid chromatography and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to capture the fish tissue exposome using molecular networking analysis, and the results were contrasted with molecular differences obtained with ex vivo SPME sampling. Based on 494 MS/MS spectra comparisons, we demonstrated that in vivo SPME sampling provided better extraction and stabilization of highly reactive molecules, such as 1-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1-palmitoleoyl-glycero-3-phosphocholine, from fish tissue samples. This sampling approach, that minimizes sample handling and preparation, offers the opportunity to perform longitudinal monitoring of the exposome in biological systems and improve the reliability of exposure-measurement in exposome-wide association studies.

  1. Impact of in Vivo Ischemic Time on RNA Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jesper; Kirkeby, Lene T; Eiholm, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    immediately following the tumor removal. The time from clamping the main arterial supply to resection and removal of the tumor was used to estimate the in vivo ischemic time. We did not observe a significant difference in RNA quality between normal tissue and tumor tissue. We observed a significant...... correlation between in vivo ischemic time and RNA quality in normal tissue (r = -0.24, pgender and laparoscopic procedure were also significantly associated with lower RNA quality in normal tissue only. In tumor tissue, poor differentiation was associated with low RNA...... quality. In conclusion, in vivo ischemic time, surgical procedure, and gender have minor but significant effects on the quality of RNA from normal colon tissue but not tumor tissue. Poorly differentiated tumors are associated with lower RNA quality. Although its impact is low, it can still be considered...

  2. Visually Relating Gene Expression and in vivo DNA Binding Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Min-Yu; Mackey, Lester; Ker?,; nen, Soile V. E.; Weber, Gunther H.; Jordan, Michael I.; Knowles, David W.; Biggin, Mark D.; Hamann, Bernd

    2011-09-20

    Gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data provide important information for understanding gene regulatory networks: in vivo DNA binding data indicate genomic regions where transcription factors are bound, and expression data show the output resulting from this binding. Thus, there must be functional relationships between these two types of data. While visualization and data analysis tools exist for each data type alone, there is a lack of tools that can easily explore the relationship between them. We propose an approach that uses the average expression driven by multiple of ciscontrol regions to visually relate gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data. We demonstrate the utility of this tool with examples from the network controlling early Drosophila development. The results obtained support the idea that the level of occupancy of a transcription factor on DNA strongly determines the degree to which the factor regulates a target gene, and in some cases also controls whether the regulation is positive or negative.

  3. Quantitative assessment of human T lymphocytes in RAG2(-/-)gammac(-/-) mice: the impact of ex vivo manipulation on in vivo functionality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Rozemarijn S.; Simonetti, Elles R.; Hagenbeek, Anton; Bonyhadi, Mark; Storm, Gert; Martens, Anton C. M.; Ebeling, Saskia B.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Recent clinical trials of adoptive immunotherapy showed diminished reactivity of human T cells upon ex vivo manipulation. For a safe and effective clinical application of human T cells, it is necessary to improve ex vivo manipulation procedures and evaluate their impact on in vivo

  4. Formulation Optimization and Ex Vivo and In Vivo Evaluation of Celecoxib Microemulsion-Based Gel for Transdermal Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Mengyuan; Ren, Lili; Chen, Guoguang

    2017-08-01

    Celecoxib (CXB) is a poorly aqueous solubility sulfonamide non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Hence, the formulation of CXB was selected for solubilization and bioavailability. To find out suitable formulation for microemulsion, the solubility of CXB in triacetin (oil phase), Tween 80 (surfactant), and Transcutol-P (co-surfactant) was screened respectively and optimized by using orthogonal experimental design. The Km value and concentration of oil, Smix, and water were confirmed by pseudo-ternary phase diagram studies and central composite design. One percent carbopol 934 was added to form CXB microemulsion-based gel. The final formulation was evaluated for its appearance, pH, viscosity, stability, drug content determination, globule size, and zeta potential. Its ex vivo drug permeation and the in vivo pharmacokinetic was investigated. Further research was performed to ensure the safety and validity by skin irritation study and in vivo anti-inflammatory activity study. Ex vivo permeation study in mice was designed to compare permeation and transdermal ability between microemulsion formulation and conventional gel. The results revealed that optimized microemulsion-based gel gained higher permeation based on smaller globule size and high drug loading of microemulsion. Transdermal ability was also greatly improved. Bioavailability was compared to market Celebrex® by the in vivo pharmacokinetic study in rabbits. The results indicated that CXB microemulsion-based gel had better bioavailability than Celebrex®.

  5. Identification of in vivo induced genes in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, T E; Shea, R J; Thacker, B J; Mulks, M H

    1999-11-01

    We have developed an in vivo expression technology (IVET) system to identify Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae gene promoters that are specifically induced in vivo during infection. This system is based upon an avirulent riboflavin-requiring A. pleuropneumoniae mutant and a promoter-trap vector (pTF86) that contains, in sequence, the T4 terminator, a unique Bam HI site, a promoterless copy of the V. harveyi luxAB genes, and a promoterless copy of the B. subtilis ribBAH genes in the E. coli - A. pleuropneumoniae shuttle vector pGZRS19. Sau 3A fragments of A. pleuropneumoniae genomic DNA were cloned into the Bam HI site in pTF86 and transformed into the A. pleuropneumoniae Rib- mutant. Pigs were infected with pools of 300-600 transformants by endobronchial inoculation and surviving bacteria were isolated from the pigs' lungs at 12-16 h post-infection. Infection strongly selected for transformants containing cloned promoters which drove expression of the vector ribBAH genes and allowed survival of the Rib- mutant in vivo. Strains that survived in vivo, but which minimally expressed luciferase activity in vitro, should contain cloned promoters that are specifically induced in vivo. Ten clones, designated iviA-J, were isolated which contain promoters that are induced in vivo during infection. These ivi clones were shown to be induced in the animal by luminescence of infected tissue and by direct assay of bacteria recovered from bronchoalveolar lavage. Four of these clones were putatively identified by amino acid sequence similarity as ilvI, the ilvDA operon, the secE-nusG operon, and the mrp gene. This is the first report of an IVET system for use in the family Pasteurellaceae, as well as the first report of an IVET system utilizing an infection model of pneumonia in the natural host. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  6. Simulation of in vivo dynamics during robot assisted joint movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrowitsch, Evgenij; Lorenz, Andrea; Wülker, Nikolaus; Walter, Christian

    2014-12-16

    Robots are very useful tools in orthopedic research. They can provide force/torque controlled specimen motion with high repeatability and precision. A method to analyze dissipative energy outcome in an entire joint was developed in our group. In a previous study, a sheep knee was flexed while axial load remained constant during the measurement of dissipated energy. We intend to apply this method for the investigation of osteoarthritis. Additionally, the method should be improved by simulation of in vivo knee dynamics. Thus, a new biomechanical testing tool will be developed for analyzing in vitro joint properties after different treatments. Discretization of passive knee flexion was used to construct a complex flexion movement by a robot and simulate altering axial load similar to in vivo sheep knee dynamics described in a previous experimental study. The robot applied an in vivo like axial force profile with high reproducibility during the corresponding knee flexion (total standard deviation of 0.025 body weight (BW)). A total residual error between the in vivo and simulated axial force was 0.16 BW. Posterior-anterior and medio-lateral forces were detected by the robot as a backlash of joint structures. Their curve forms were similar to curve forms of corresponding in vivo measured forces, but in contrast to the axial force, they showed higher total standard deviation of 0.118 and 0.203 BW and higher total residual error of 0.79 and 0.21 BW for posterior-anterior and medio-lateral forces respectively. We developed and evaluated an algorithm for the robotic simulation of complex in vivo joint dynamics using a joint specimen. This should be a new biomechanical testing tool for analyzing joint properties after different treatments.

  7. Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion: Establishment and Operationalization in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafaghi, Shadi; Abbasi Dezfuli, Azizollah; Ansari Aval, Zahra; Sheikhy, Kambiz; Farzanegan, Behrooz; Mortaz, Esmaeil; Emami, Habib; Aigner, Clemens; Hosseini-Baharanchi, Fatemeh Sadat; Najafizadeh, Katayoun

    2017-02-01

    Although the number of lung transplants is limited because of general shortage of organ donors, ex vivo lung perfusion is a novel method with 2 main benefits, including better evaluation of lung potential and recovery of injured lungs. The main aim of this study was to establish and operationalize ex vivo lung perfusion as the first experience in Iran. This was a prospective operational research study on 5 cases, including 1 pig from Vienna Medical University and 4 patients from Masih Daneshvari Hospital. All organ donations from brain dead donors were evaluated according to lung transplant or ex vivo lung perfusion criteria from May 2013 to July 2015 in Tehran, Iran. If a donor did not have any sign of severe chest trauma or pneumonia but had poor oxygenation due to possible atelectasis or neurogenic pulmonary edema, their lungs were included for ex vivo lung perfusion. A successful trend in the difference between the pulmonary arterial Po2 and the left atrial Po2 was observed, as well as an increasing pattern in other functional parameters, including dynamic lung compliance and a decreasing trend in pulmonary vascular resistance. These initial trials indicate that ex vivo lung perfusion can lead to remarkable progress in lung transplant in Iran. They also provide several important pieces of guidance for successful ex vivo lung perfusion, including the necessity of following standard lung retrieval procedures and monitoring temperature and pressure precisely. The development of novel methods can provide opportunities for further research studies on lungs of deceased donors and lead to undiscovered findings. By keeping this science up to date in Iran and developing such new and creative methods, we can reveal effective strategies to promote the quality of donor lungs to support patients on transplant wait lists.

  8. A novel approach to in vivo mitral valve stress analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chun; Brinster, Clay J; Jassar, Arminder S; Vergnat, Mathieu; Eperjesi, Thomas J; Gorman, Robert C; Gorman, Joseph H; Jackson, Benjamin M

    2010-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) echocardiography allows the generation of anatomically correct and time-resolved geometric mitral valve (MV) models. However, as imaged in vivo, the MV assumes its systolic geometric configuration only when loaded. Customarily, finite element analysis (FEA) is used to predict material stress and strain fields rendered by applying a load on an initially unloaded model. Therefore, this study endeavors to provide a framework for the application of in vivo MV geometry and FEA to MV physiology, pathophysiology, and surgical repair. We hypothesize that in vivo MV geometry can be reasonably used as a surrogate for the unloaded valve in computational (FEA) simulations, yielding reasonable and meaningful stress and strain magnitudes and distributions. Three experiments were undertaken to demonstrate that the MV leaflets are relatively nondeformed during systolic loading: 1) leaflet strain in vivo was measured using sonomicrometry in an ovine model, 2) hybrid models of normal human MVs as constructed using transesophageal real-time 3-D echocardiography (rt-3DE) were repeatedly loaded using FEA, and 3) serial rt-3DE images of normal human MVs were used to construct models at end diastole and end isovolumic contraction to detect any deformation during isovolumic contraction. The average linear strain associated with isovolumic contraction was 0.02 ± 0.01, measured in vivo with sonomicrometry. Repeated loading of the hybrid normal human MV demonstrated little change in stress or geometry: peak von Mises stress changed by MV deformed minimally during isovolumic contraction, as measured by the mean absolute difference calculated over the surfaces of both leaflets between serial MV models: 0.53 ± 0.19 mm. FEA modeling of MV models derived from in vivo high-resolution truly 3-D imaging is reasonable and useful for stress prediction in MV pathologies and repairs.

  9. Imaging the glutamatergic system in vivo - relevance to schizophrenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bressan, R.A.; Pilowsky, L.S. [Inst. of Psychiatry, London (United Kingdom); Inst. of Nuclear Medicine, University College of London Medical School (United Kingdom)

    2000-11-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating psychiatric illness. Its pathophysiology is not fully clarified. Animal data, in vitro and indirect in vivo imaging support glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor hypofunction in the disorder. A lack of suitable ligands has obstructed direct evaluation of the NMDA receptor hypofunction hypothesis of schizophrenia. Many research groups are working towards developing appropriate single-photon emission tomography and positron emission tomography ligands for the NMDA receptor. This paper briefly presents evidence for links between glutamatergic system dysfunction and schizophrenia. It reviews the radioligands to evaluate glutamatergic receptors in vivo and discusses issues in developing novel ligands for the glutamatergic system. (orig.)

  10. Photoacoustic in-vivo spectra of recent stromatolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, W.; Giani, D.; Rongen, P.; Krumbein, W. E.; Schmidt, W.

    1980-03-01

    In-vivo photoacoustic spectra (PAS) of pure cultures of cyanobacteria and photosynthetic bacteria ( Chromatiaceae) which usually occur in stromatolitic microbial mats were measured. The PA spectra of the pure cultures were compared to PA spectra measured directly on different layers of microbial mats from Mellum (North Sea). The advantages of PAS of opaque, solid samples (e.g., sediment, rock), and of particle suspensions (e.g., light-scattering cell cultures with interference by sulfur globules) over conventional spectroscopy using classical in-vivo or extraction photometry are discussed.

  11. In vivo efficacy of griseofulvin against multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young; Alpmann, Petra; Blaum-Feder, Sabine; Krämer, Simon; Endo, Tomoyuki; Lu, Desheng; Carson, Dennis; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G H

    2011-08-01

    We recently confirmed that ciclopirox olamine inhibits Wnt/beta catenin signalling in myeloma. Griseofulvin (GF) has similar chemical features as compared to ciclopirox olamine. In this study the anti-tumor effect of GF was investigated. GF demonstrated a major apoptotic activity in various human and murine myeloma and lymphoma cell lines as well as in human primary cells. In vivo, tumor growth as well as overall survival were significantly reduced in mice treated with GF as compared to untreated mice. In conclusion, our results reveal a significant selective induction of apoptosis by GF and suggest a significant in vivo effect against myeloma. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Full field-of-view photoacoustic endoscopy in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Riqiang; Li, Yan; Chen, Jianhua; Song, Liang

    2017-03-01

    We developed a miniaturized, simple and full field-of-view photoacoustic/ultrasonic endoscopy system, and used a flexible coil to transmit the rotational torque from the rotary stage, which enables a 360o field-of-view imaging in vivo. The developed imaging catheter was fully encapsulated by a single-use protective polyamide tube. A B-scan rate up to 5 Hz (200 A-lines/B-scan) was achieved. Three-dimensional photoacoustic and ultrasound images of the rectum from a SD rat were acquired in vivo. It suggests that this PAE system can be of great interest for clinical translation for a variety of endoscopic applications.

  13. Translating cell biology in vitro to immunity in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Marianne; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2004-07-01

    The elimination of pathogens and pathogen-infected cells initially rests on the rapid deployment of innate immune defences. Should these defences fail, it is the lymphocytes - T cells and B cells - with their antigen-specific receptors that must rise to the task of providing adaptive immunity. Technological advances are now allowing immunologists to correlate data obtained in vitro with in vivo functions. A better understanding of T-cell activation in vivo could lead to more effective strategies for the treatment and prevention of infectious and autoimmmune diseases.

  14. In-vivo examples of synthetic aperture vector flow imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Niels; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2007-01-01

    are processed, and movies of full vector flow images are generated. This paper presents still frames from different time instances of these movies. The movie from the femoral data tracks the accelerating velocity in the femoral artery during systole and a backwards flow at the end of the systole. A complex flow...... would be needed. Synthetic aperture vector flow imaging could potentially provide this. The purpose of this paper is to test the synthetic aperture vector flow imaging method on challenging in-vivo data. Two synthetic aperture in-vivo data sets are acquired using a commercial linear array transducer...

  15. Microscopia confocal in vivo na cistinose: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Gustavo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A cistinose é doença autossômica recessiva rara caracterizada pelo acúmulo do aminoácido cistina livre dentro dos lisossomos e geralmente é fatal na primeira década de vida na ausência de transplante renal. O presente estudo tem por objetivo relatar os achados da microscopia confocal in vivo em paciente adulto com cistinose infantil. O exame de microscopia confocal in vivo revelou que há diferenças quanto à intensidade de acometimento, tamanho e forma dos depósitos nas diversas camadas corneanas.

  16. In vivo potency revisited - Keep the target in sight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsson, Johan; Peletier, Lambertus A; Hjorth, Stephan

    2017-10-10

    Potency is a central parameter in pharmacological and biochemical sciences, as well as in drug discovery and development endeavors. It is however typically defined in terms only of ligand to target binding affinity also in in vivo experimentation, thus in a manner analogous to in in vitro studies. As in vivo potency is in fact a conglomerate of events involving ligand, target, and target-ligand complex processes, overlooking some of the fundamental differences between in vivo and in vitro may result in serious mispredictions of in vivo efficacious dose and exposure. The analysis presented in this paper compares potency measures derived from three model situations. Model A represents the closed in vitro system, defining target binding of a ligand when total target and ligand concentrations remain static and constant. Model B describes an open in vivo system with ligand input and clearance (Cl(L)), adding in parallel to the turnover (ksyn, kdeg) of the target. Model C further adds to the open in vivo system in Model B also the elimination of the target-ligand complex (ke(RL)) via a first-order process. We formulate corresponding equations of the equilibrium (steady-state) relationships between target and ligand, and complex and ligand for each of the three model systems and graphically illustrate the resulting simulations. These equilibrium relationships demonstrate the relative impact of target and target-ligand complex turnover, and are easier to interpret than the more commonly used ligand-, target- and complex concentration-time courses. A new potency expression, labeled L50, is then derived. L50 is the ligand concentration at half-maximal target and complex concentrations and is an amalgamation of target turnover, target-ligand binding and complex elimination parameters estimated from concentration-time data. L50 is then compared to the dissociation constant Kd (target-ligand binding affinity), the conventional Black & Leff potency estimate EC50, and the derived

  17. Probing the metabolic network in bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei using untargeted metabolomics with stable isotope labelled glucose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren J Creek

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics coupled with heavy-atom isotope-labelled glucose has been used to probe the metabolic pathways active in cultured bloodstream form trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma brucei, a parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Glucose enters many branches of metabolism beyond glycolysis, which has been widely held to be the sole route of glucose metabolism. Whilst pyruvate is the major end-product of glucose catabolism, its transamination product, alanine, is also produced in significant quantities. The oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway is operative, although the non-oxidative branch is not. Ribose 5-phosphate generated through this pathway distributes widely into nucleotide synthesis and other branches of metabolism. Acetate, derived from glucose, is found associated with a range of acetylated amino acids and, to a lesser extent, fatty acids; while labelled glycerol is found in many glycerophospholipids. Glucose also enters inositol and several sugar nucleotides that serve as precursors to macromolecule biosynthesis. Although a Krebs cycle is not operative, malate, fumarate and succinate, primarily labelled in three carbons, were present, indicating an origin from phosphoenolpyruvate via oxaloacetate. Interestingly, the enzyme responsible for conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to oxaloacetate, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, was shown to be essential to the bloodstream form trypanosomes, as demonstrated by the lethal phenotype induced by RNAi-mediated downregulation of its expression. In addition, glucose derivatives enter pyrimidine biosynthesis via oxaloacetate as a precursor to aspartate and orotate.

  18. Association between in vivo bone formation and ex vivo migratory capacity of human bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke K; Zaher, Walid; Larsen, Kenneth H

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is a clinical need for developing systemic transplantation protocols for use of human skeletal stem cells (also known bone marrow stromal stem cells) (hBMSC) in tissue regeneration. In systemic transplantation studies, only a limited number of hBMSC home to injured tissues...... vivo transwell migration and following intravenous injection, better in vivo homing ability to bone fracture when compared to LBF clones. Comparative microarray analysis of HBF versus LBF clones identified enrichment of gene categories of chemo-attraction, adhesion and migration associated genes. Among...

  19. in vivo antitrypanosomal evaluation of some medicinal plant extracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Morinda morindiodes root bark extract. Keywords: Antitrypanosomal, evaluation, medicinal plants, in vivo, Ogun. State, Nigeria. INTRODUCTION. Trypanosoma brucei brucei are unicellular parasites transmitted by the tse-tse fly. They are the causative agent of African Animal. Trypanosomosis (AAT) (Antia et al., 2009).

  20. In vivo tests of thermodynamic models of transcription repressor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tungtur, Sudheer; Skinner, Harlyn; Zhan, Hongli; Swint-Kruse, Liskin; Beckett, Dorothy

    2011-11-01

    One emphasis of the Gibbs Conference on Biothermodynamics is the value of thermodynamic measurements for understanding behaviors of biological systems. In this study, the correlation between thermodynamic measurements of in vitro DNA binding affinity with in vivo transcription repression was investigated for two transcription repressors. In the first system, which comprised an engineered LacI/GalR homolog, mutational changes altered the equilibrium constant for binding DNA. Changes correlated with altered repression, but estimates of in vivo repressor concentration suggest a ≥25-fold discrepancy with in vitro conditions. In the second system, changes in ligand binding to BirA altered dimerization and subsequent DNA occupancy. Again, these changes correlate with altered in vivo repression, but comparison with in vitro measurements reveals a ~10-fold discrepancy. Further analysis of each system suggests that the observed discrepancies between in vitro and in vivo results reflect the contributions of additional equilibria to the transcription repression process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison between in vitro and in vivo antibacterial activity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antimicrobial activity of the extracts of Curcuma zedoaria from Malaysia was compared using in vitro and in vivo systems. The comparison was performed against four bacterial strains including two gram negative strains (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and two gram positive strains (Bacillus cereus and ...

  2. In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy: basic methodology and clinical applications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, M. van der

    2010-01-01

    The clinical use of in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has been limited for a long time, mainly due to its low sensitivity. However, with the advent of clinical MR systems with higher magnetic field strengths such as 3 Tesla, the development of better coils, and the design of optimized

  3. Carbon Nanomaterials Interfacing with Neurons: An In vivo Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldrighi, Michele; Trusel, Massimo; Tonini, Raffaella; Giordani, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Developing new tools that outperform current state of the art technologies for imaging, drug delivery or electrical sensing in neuronal tissues is one of the great challenges in neurosciences. Investigations into the potential use of carbon nanomaterials for such applications started about two decades ago. Since then, numerous in vitro studies have examined interactions between these nanomaterials and neurons, either by evaluating their compatibility, as vectors for drug delivery, or for their potential use in electric activity sensing and manipulation. The results obtained indicate that carbon nanomaterials may be suitable for medical therapies. However, a relatively small number of in vivo studies have been carried out to date. In order to facilitate the transformation of carbon nanomaterial into practical neurobiomedical applications, it is essential to identify and highlight in the existing literature the strengths and weakness that different carbon nanomaterials have displayed when probed in vivo. Unfortunately the current literature is sometimes sparse and confusing. To offer a clearer picture of the in vivo studies on carbon nanomaterials in the central nervous system, we provide a systematic and critical review. Hereby we identify properties and behavior of carbon nanomaterials in vivo inside the neural tissues, and we examine key achievements and potentially problematic toxicological issues. PMID:27375413

  4. Gel Encapsulation of Glucose Nanosensors for Prolonged In Vivo Lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaconis, Mary K.; Clark, Heather A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Fluorescent glucose-sensitive nanosensors have previously been used in vivo to track glucose concentration changes in interstitial fluid. However, this technology was limited because of loss of fluorescence intensity due to particle diffusion from the injection site. In this study, we encapsulated the nanosensors into injectable gels to mitigate nanosensor migration in vivo. Methods Glucose-sensitive nanosensors were encapsulated in two different commercially available gelling agents: gel 1 and gel 2. Multiple formulations of each gel were assessed in vitro for their nanosensor encapsulation efficiency, permeability to glucose, and nanosensor retention over time. The optimal formulation for each gel, as determined from the in vitro assessment, was then tested in mice, and the lifetime of the encapsulated nanosensors was compared with controls of nanosensors without gel. Results Five gel formulations had encapsulation efficiencies of the nanosensors greater than 90%. Additionally, they retained up to 20% and 40% of the nanosensors over 24 h for gel 1 and gel 2, respectively. In vivo, both gels prevented diffusion of glucose nanosensors at least three times greater than the controls. Conclusions Encapsulating glucose nanosensors in two injectable gels prolonged nanosensor lifetime in vivo; however, the lifetime must still be increased further to be applicable for diabetes monitoring. PMID:23439160

  5. RNAi screening in Drosophila cells and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Stephanie E.

    2014-01-01

    Here, I discuss how RNAi screening can be used effectively to uncover gene function. Specifically, I discuss the types of high-throughput assays that can be done in Drosophila cells and in vivo, RNAi reagent design and available reagent collections, automated screen pipelines, analysis of screen results, and approaches to RNAi results verification. PMID:24576618

  6. In vivo study of human skin using pulsed terahertz radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickwell, E [Semiconductor Physics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Cole, B E [TeraView Ltd, Unit 302/4 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom); Fitzgerald, A J [TeraView Ltd, Unit 302/4 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom); Pepper, M [Semiconductor Physics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Wallace, V P [TeraView Ltd, Unit 302/4 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom)

    2004-05-07

    Studies in terahertz (THz) imaging have revealed a significant difference between skin cancer (basal cell carcinoma) and healthy tissue. Since water has strong absorptions at THz frequencies and tumours tend to have different water content from normal tissue, a likely contrast mechanism is variation in water content. Thus, we have previously devised a finite difference time-domain (FDTD) model which is able to closely simulate the interaction of THz radiation with water. In this work we investigate the interaction of THz radiation with normal human skin on the forearm and palm of the hand in vivo. We conduct the first ever systematic in vivo study of the response of THz radiation to normal skin. We take in vivo reflection measurements of normal skin on the forearm and palm of the hand of 20 volunteers. We compare individual examples of THz responses with the mean response for the areas of skin under investigation. Using the in vivo data, we demonstrate that the FDTD model can be applied to biological tissue. In particular, we successfully simulate the interaction of THz radiation with the volar forearm. Understanding the interaction of THz radiation with normal skin will form a step towards developing improved imaging algorithms for diagnostic detection of skin cancer and other tissue disorders using THz radiation.

  7. Borrelia burgdorferi adhesins identified using in vivo phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonara, Styliani; Chafel, Rebecca M; LaFrance, Michelle; Coburn, Jenifer

    2007-10-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, disseminates from the site of deposition by Ixodes ticks to cause systemic infection. Dissemination occurs through the circulation and through tissue matrices, but the B. burgdorferi molecules that mediate interactions with the endothelium in vivo have not yet been identified. In vivo selection of filamentous phage expressing B. burgdorferi protein fragments on the phage surface identified several new candidate adhesins, and verified the activity of one adhesin that had been previously characterized in vitro. P66, a B. burgdorferi ligand for beta(3)-chain integrins, OspC, a protein that is essential for the establishment of infection in mammals, and Vls, a protein that undergoes antigenic variation in the mammal, were all selected for binding to the murine endothelium in vivo. Additional B. burgdorferi proteins for which no functions have been identified, including all four members of the OspF family and BmpD, were identified as candidate adhesins. The use of in vivo phage display is one approach to the identification of adhesins in pathogenic bacteria that are not easily grown in the laboratory, or for which genetic manipulations are not straightforward.

  8. Aprendiendo sobre los seres vivos en su ambiente

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez, Alma Adrianna

    2003-01-01

    Les presentamos algunas reflexiones derivadas de la aplicación de una unidad didáctica en dos grupos de primaria con la intención de aportar posibilidades de trabajo en el aula y elementos de reflexión sobre la enseñanza y aprendizaje del modelo "ser vivo".

  9. Correlated responses in tissue weights measured in vivo by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to estimate correlated responses in lean, fat and bone weights in vivo in Dorset Down sheep selected for lean tissue growth. Over the period 1986-1992 inclusive, the lean tissue growth line had been selected using two economic indices for an increased aggregate breeding value incorporating ...

  10. Effects of temperature on the germination, sporulation, and in - vivo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of temperature on the germination, sporulation, and in - vivo infection of Sphaerotheca fuliginea (powdery mildew) on water melon ( Citrullus lanathus . L) ... Significant difference (P<0.05) was observed among the temperature levels on mycelium length with highest length observed at 20°C, but least was at 40°C.

  11. Quantification of Lung Metastases from In Vivo Mouse Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Joan; Erler, Janine T

    2016-01-01

    Cancer research has made significant progress in terms of understanding and targeting primary tumors; however, the challenge remains for the successful treatment of metastatic cancers. This highlights the importance to use in vivo models to study the metastatic process, as well as for preclinical...

  12. In vivo and Invitro antioxidant properties of methanol extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The in vivo and in vitro antioxidant properties of methanol extract of Streblus asper Lour (Family: Moraceae) (MESA) was evaluated. The in vitro antioxidant ... The phenolic content of the sample, determined using Folin-Ciocalteu reagent and was found to be 55.28±5.24 mg gallic acid equivalents (GA)/g dry weight. The total ...

  13. Superovulation Response and In vivo Embryo Production Potential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Holstein, respectively. And hence, Boran cows' response to superovulation and yield of better quality and number of embryo than their Boran*Holstein counterparts showed the high potential of the breed for in-vivo and in-vitro embyo production.

  14. Short Communication: In Vivo Trypanocidal Activity of Artemether ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parasitemia was then followed until death of the animals. The rate of increase of parasitemia and the average survival time was assessed and compared for each dosage group and the control. Artemether showed promising in vivo antitrypanosomal activity by decreasing the rate of increase in parasitemia and increasing ...

  15. Migration of dendritic cell based cancer vaccines: in vivo veritas?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adema, Gosse J.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Figdor, Carl G.

    2005-01-01

    Ex vivo generated cancer vaccines based on dendritic cells (DCs) are currently applied in the clinic. The migration of DCs from the tissues to the lymph nodes is tightly controlled and involves many different mediators and their receptors. A recent study demonstrated that the rate of migration of

  16. Radiolabelled GLP-1 analogues for in vivo targeting of insulinomas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brom, M.; Joosten, L.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Gotthardt, M.; Boerman, O.C.

    2012-01-01

    Internalizing agonists are usually selected for peptide receptor targeting. There is increasing evidence that non-internalizing receptor antagonists can be used for this purpose. We investigated whether the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) antagonist exendin(9-39) can be used for in vivo

  17. Determination of in vitro and in vivo production of polygalacturonase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    JASEM ISSN 1119-8362. All rights reserved. J. Appl. Sci. Environ. Manage. June, 2007. Vol. 11 (2) 99 - 103. Full-text Available Online at www.bioline.org.br/ja. Determination of in vitro and in vivo production of polygalacturonase (pg) by storage mold aspergillus niger v. Tieghem, during storage of rice (oryzae sativa l) seeds.

  18. Comparative activity of polyphenol oxidase produced In vivo by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ability to produce polyphenol oxidase in vivo by Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus seed-borne storage molds of rice (Oryzae sativa> L.) was investigated. Also, was the effect of temperature and pH on the activity of the above enzyme secreted by each of the above seed-borne storage molds of rice. The result of ...

  19. In vivo myomaker-mediated heterologous fusion and nuclear reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Yasuyuki; Vagnozzi, Ronald J; Millay, Douglas P

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge regarding cellular fusion and nuclear reprogramming may aid in cell therapy strategies for skeletal muscle diseases. An issue with cell therapy approaches to restore dystrophin expression in muscular dystrophy is obtaining a sufficient quantity of cells that normally fuse with muscle. Here we conferred fusogenic activity without transdifferentiation to multiple non-muscle cell types and tested dystrophin restoration in mouse models of muscular dystrophy. We previously demonstrated that myomaker, a skeletal muscle-specific transmembrane protein necessary for myoblast fusion, is sufficient to fuse 10T 1/2 fibroblasts to myoblasts in vitro. Whether myomaker-mediated heterologous fusion is functional in vivo and whether the newly introduced nonmuscle nuclei undergoes nuclear reprogramming has not been investigated. We showed that mesenchymal stromal cells, cortical bone stem cells, and tail-tip fibroblasts fuse to skeletal muscle when they express myomaker. These cells restored dystrophin expression in a fraction of dystrophin-deficient myotubes after fusion in vitro. However, dystrophin restoration was not detected in vivo although nuclear reprogramming of the muscle-specific myosin light chain promoter did occur. Despite the lack of detectable dystrophin reprogramming by immunostaining, this study indicated that myomaker could be used in nonmuscle cells to induce fusion with muscle in vivo, thereby providing a platform to deliver therapeutic material.-Mitani, Y., Vagnozzi, R. J., Millay, D. P. In vivo myomaker-mediated heterologous fusion and nuclear reprogramming. © FASEB.

  20. Variables influencing the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veijgen, N.K.; Masen, Marc Arthur; van der Heide, Emile

    2013-01-01

    In the past decades, skin friction research has focused on determining which variables are important to affect the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin. Until now, there is still limited knowledge on these variables. This study has used a large dataset to identify the effect of variables on

  1. In vitro and in vivo trypanocidal activity of Combretum racemosum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to determine the in vitro and in vivo trypanocidal activity of crude methanolic extract of Combretum racemosum leaves against Trypanosoma brucei brucei. The extract exhibited in vitro activity by immobilizing the trypanosomes and rendering them uninfective to mice at 125 to 0.2559 mg/ml.

  2. Invitro and in Vivo Trypanocidal Activitiy of Combretumracemosum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to determine the trypanocidal activity of crude methanolic extract of Combretumracemosun leaves against Trypanosomabruceibrucei both in vitro and in vivo. The extract exhibited in vitro activity against T. brucei by immobilizing the trypanosomes and rendering them uninfective to mice at ...

  3. In Vivo Antitrypanosomal Effects Of Some Ethnomedicinal Plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methanol extracts of different parts of each plant (stem barks and fruits) were obtained and evaluated for their in vivo antitrypanosomal activities against Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Phytochemical screening of the methanol extracts of each plant were performed by standard procedures. Methanol extracts of A. nilotica (stem ...

  4. Following protein association in vivo with fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Joachim D.

    2003-07-01

    The combination of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and two-photon excitation provides us with a powerful spectroscopic technique. Its submicron resolution and single molecule sensitivity make it an attractive technique for in vivo applications. Experiments have demonstrated that quantitative in vivo fluorescence fluctuation measurements are feasible, despite the presence of autofluorescence and the heterogeneity of the cellular environment. I will demonstrate that molecular brightness of proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a useful and robust parameter for in vivo studies. Knowledge of photon statistics is crucial for the interpretation of fluorescence fluctuation experiments. I will describe photon counting histogram (PCH) analysis, which determines the molecular brightness and complements autocorrelation analysis. Non-ideal detector effects and their influence on the photon statistics will be discussed. The goal of in vivo fluorescence fluctuation experiments is to address functional properties of biomolecules. We will focus on retinoid X receptor (RXR), a nuclear receptor, which is crucial for the regulation of gene expression. The fluorescence brightness of RXR tagged with EGFP will be used to probe the oligomerization state of RXR.

  5. In vivo Antimalarial Activity of Methanol and Water Extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the in vivo antimalarial effect of Eryngium thorifolium, an endemic plant in Turkey. Methods: The methanol and water extracts were prepared and phytochemical analysis conducted on the extracts. Twenty four healthy Balb/c male mice, divided into 4 groups (n = 6), were infected intravenously with ...

  6. Generation of Campylobacter jejuni genetic diversity in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de P.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Achterberg, R.P.; Putten, van J.P.M.; Schouls, L.M.; Duim, B.

    2002-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology studies suggest that horizontal genetic exchange is a major cause of pathogen biodiversity. We tested this concept for the bacterial enteropathogen Campylobacter jejuni by seeking direct in vivo evidence for the exchange of genetic material among Campylobacter strains. For

  7. Educating and training India's next generation of in vivo pharmacologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, David I

    2016-01-01

    The Indian Pharmaceutical Industry is undergoing rapid development and expansion. Critical to this process, and the future of drug discovery in India is the continued education and training of integrative or in vivo pharmacologists, equipped with the knowledge, skills and expertise to undertake studies using laboratory animals. Modern in vivo pharmacologists not only require manual or technical skills, but a much broader education including in animal welfare, ethics, the principles of the replacement, refinement and reduction of animals in research, and nonanimal alternative techniques. This education, training, and continued professional development throughout their careers can be provided, in part, through the use of online e-learning resources. While many excellent resources exist, they are hard to locate and not widely known to the community. To address this issue, Education and Training Resources in In vivo Sciences, a free website which provides access to free open access e-learning resources in in vivo pharmacology was developed. Use of this resource by researchers and educators will result in better-trained researchers and members of ethical review committees, which in turn will raise animal welfare standards, minimize the pain, suffering and distress of laboratory animals, and enhance scientific research.

  8. Detection of Oncogene-Induced Senescence In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Kwan-Hyuck; Ryeom, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence or OIS is defined as a permanent state of proliferative arrest resulting from an activating oncogenic-lesion. OIS has been suggested to function as a cancer cell intrinsic mechanism to restrain tumor growth and has been implicated as a key mechanism preventing the progression of certain premalignant lesions in genetically engineered mouse models of cancer. The senescent phenotype can be defined by two criteria that include cell cycle arrest and resistance to mitogens and oncogenic transformation. While the phenotype and properties of senescent cells in vitro are well described, the morphological characteristics defining senescence in vivo have been controversial with no specific marker that definitively proves a senescent state. Indeed, many of the published in vivo markers to identify and characterize senescence in an organism are unreliable and often times have been found to be nonspecific. However, the use of multiple markers is accepted as confirmation of senescence in vivo. Here, we describe protocols for some of the most commonly used indicators of senescence in oncogenic Kras-induced lung adenomas including the detection of senescence-associated beta-galactosidase, expression of the tumor suppressor p19 ARF , the presence of senescence-associated heterochromatin foci, and in vivo BrdU uptake to confirm cell cycle arrest.

  9. Coagulation Management in Jersey Calves: An ex vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröning, Sabine; Maas, Judith; van Geul, Svenja; Rossaint, Rolf; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Grottke, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Jersey calves are frequently used as an experimental animal model for in vivo testing of cardiac assist devices or orthopedic implants. In this ex vivo study, we analyzed the coagulation system of the Jersey calves and the potential of human-based coagulation management to circumvent perioperative bleeding complications during surgery. Experimental Procedure: Blood from 7 Jersey calves was subjected to standard laboratory tests and thromboelastometry analysis. An ex vivo model of dilutional coagulopathy was used to study the effects of fibrinogen or prothrombin complex concentrate supplementation. Fibrinolysis was induced with tissue plasminogen activator to identify potential therapeutic strategies involving tranexamic acid or aprotinin. Furthermore, anticoagulation strategies were evaluated by incubating the blood samples with dabigatran or rivaroxaban. Baseline values for thromboelastometry and standard laboratory parameters, including prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen, antithrombin III, and D-dimers, were established. Fifty percent diluted blood showed a statistically significant impairment of hemostasis. The parameters significantly improved after the administration of fibrinogen or prothrombin complex concentrate. Tranexamic acid and aprotinin ameliorated tissue plasminogen activator-induced fibrinolysis. Both dabigatran and rivaroxaban significantly prolonged the coagulation parameters. In this ex vivo study, coagulation factors, factor concentrate, antifibrinolytic reagents, and anticoagulants regularly used in the clinic positively impacted coagulation parameters in Jersey calf blood. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Paediatric laparoscopic hernia repair: Ex vivo skills in the reduced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With repeated attempts trainee's timings and accuracy improved until by the 10th repair they were no different from benchmark consultant scores. Conclusion: A simple, procedure specifi c ex-vivo training model has been evaluated for laparoscopic hernia training in paediatric surgery. The results suggest improvements in ...

  11. Tissue hypoxygenation activates the adrenomedullin system in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofbauer, K H; Jensen, B L; Kurtz, A

    2000-01-01

    Our study aimed to investigate the influence of tissue hypo-oxygenation on the adrenomedullin (ADM) system in vivo. For this purpose, male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to normobaric hypoxia (8% oxygen) or to functional anemia [0.1% carbon monoxide (CO)] or to cobalt chloride (60 mg/kg) for 6 ...

  12. In Vivo Imaging of Natural Killer Cell Trafficking in Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galli, Filippo; Rapisarda, Anna Serafina; Stabile, Helena; Malviya, Gaurav; Manni, Isabella; Bonanno, Elena; Piaggio, Giulia; Gismondi, Angela; Santoni, Angela; Signore, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells (NKs) are important effectors of the innate immune system, with marked antitumor activity. Imaging NK trafficking in vivo may be relevant to following up the efficacy of new therapeutic approaches aiming at increasing tumor-infiltrating NKs (TINKs). The specific aims of present

  13. Comparison of in vivo biocompatibilities between parylene-C and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Materials Science; Volume 36; Issue 6. Comparison of in vivo biocompatibilities between parylene-C and polydimethylsiloxane for implantable microelectronic devices. Dong Sup Lee Su Jin Kim Eun Bi Kwon Cheol Whee Park Su Min Jun Bumkyoo Choi Sae Woong Kim. Volume 36 Issue 6 November 2013 pp 1127-1132 ...

  14. Draft guidelines on in vivo conservation of animal genetic resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boettcher, P.; Martin, J.F.; Gandini, G.; Joshi, B.K.; Oldenbroek, J.K.; Sponenberg, P.

    2012-01-01

    These guidelines present the basic concepts involved in the establishment and implementation of in vivo conservation plans for animal genetic resources for food and agriculture. The guidelines are intended for use by policy makers in the management of animal genetic resources, managers of animal

  15. In vivo dosimetry: trends and prospects for brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kertzscher, Gustavo; Rosenfeld, A.; Beddar, S.

    2014-01-01

    The error types during brachytherapy (BT) treatments and their occurrence rates are not well known. The limited knowledge is partly attributed to the lack of independent verification systems of the treatment progression in the clinical workflow routine. Within the field of in vivo dosimetry (IVD...

  16. Deconvolution of In Vivo Ultrasound B-Mode Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Stage, Bjarne; Mathorne, Jan

    1993-01-01

    the transducer. Using pulse and covariance estimators makes the approach self-calibrating, as all parameters for the procedure are estimated from the patient under investigation. An example of use on a clinical, in-vivo image is given. A 2 × 2 cm region of the portal vein in a liver is deconvolved. An increase...

  17. In vivo Evaluation of Amoxicillin Trihydrate and Clarithromycin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate in vivo H. pylori clearance efficacy of formulated mucoadhesive microspheres of amoxicillin trihydrate and clarithromycin. Methods: Amoxicillin trihydrate and clarithromycin mucoadhesive microspheres were prepared by solvent evaporation method using Carbopol 974P, HPMC K4M and Eudragit RS ...

  18. In vitro and ex vivo corneal penetration and absorption models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Priyanka; Rupenthal, Ilva D

    2016-12-01

    Topical drug administration is the preferred route of drug delivery to the eye despite the poor bioavailability. To develop more efficient drug carriers, reliable in vitro or ex vivo models are required in the early stages of formulation development, with such methods being faster, cheaper, and more ethical alternatives to in vivo studies. In vitro cell culture models are increasingly being used for transcorneal penetration studies, with primary cell cultures and immortalized cell lines now giving way to the development of organotypic corneal constructs for studying ocular drug bioavailability. Artificially cultured human corneal equivalents are still in the early stages of development, but present tremendous potential for corneal penetration studies. Ex vivo models using excised animal tissue are also being used to study corneal penetration with promising results, although significant inter-species variations need to be considered. This review discusses the in vitro and ex vivo models currently being used to study corneal penetration and evaluates their advantages and limitations with a focus on diffusion cell assemblies. In addition to the tissue used, the diffusion cell set-up can significantly influence the penetration profile and should be cautiously adjusted to simulate clinical conditions.

  19. Children's Coping with "In Vivo" Peer Rejection: An Experimental Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijntjes, Albert; Stegge, Hedy; Terwogt, Mark Meerum; Kamphuis, Jan Henk; Telch, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    We examined children's behavioral coping in response to an "in vivo" peer rejection manipulation. Participants (N = 186) ranging between 10 and 13 years of age, played a computer game based on the television show "Survivor" and were randomized to either peer rejection (i.e., being voted out of the game) or non-rejection control. During a five-min.…

  20. Evaluation of in vivo techniques for the determination of apparent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three in vivo techniques were evaluated in terms of their suitability for determination of the apparent ileal amino acid digestibility (AID) of protein sources for piglets. The techniques were: ileo-rectal anastomosis (IRA), cannulation at the distal ileum and a slaughter technique. A standard diet and three diets in which 20% of ...

  1. In vivo hypoglycemic effect of methanolic fruit extract of Momordica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The first group received 125mg/kg, the second 375mg/kg and a third group 7mg/ kg of metformin. ... The maximum percentage reduction in FBG by both extracts occurred between 3 and 12 hours post dose. Conclusions: The methanolic fruit extract of M. charantia exhibits dose dependent hypoglycaemic activity in vivo.

  2. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of alginate and alginatechitosan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AL-CS) beads for oral application and to evaluate their in vitro characteristics and in vivo activities. Methods: AL and AL-CS beads were prepared using ionotropic gelation. The beads were evaluated for particle size, surface morphology, drug ...

  3. Analysis of the mutations inducedd by conazole fungicides in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mouse liver tumorigenic conazo1e fungicides triadimefon and propiconazo1e have previously been shown to be in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue" transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses, whereas the nontumorigenic conazo1e myc1obutani1 ...

  4. Examples of in-vivo blood vector velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Nielsen, Kristian R.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper examples of in-vivo blood vector velocity images of the carotid artery are presented. The transverse oscillation (TO) method for blood vector velocity estimation has been used to estimate the vector velocities and the method is first evaluated in a circulating flowrig where...

  5. Metabolic response to exogenous ethanol in yeast: An in vivo ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-08-02

    Aug 2, 2012 ... exogenous ethanol on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentative metabolism. ... Exogenous stress; in vivo NMR; metabolomic; Saccharomyces cerevisiae; STOCSY .... Proton decoupled 13C-NMR spectra of yeast medium during fermentation: (a) representative spectra at the beginning and (b) at the end ...

  6. Preparation, Characterisation and In vivo Evaluation of Bis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To fabricate biodegradable nanoparticle formulation of bis-demethoxy curcumin analogue (BDMCA), a novel curcumin analogue, and evaluate its in vitro and in vivo characteristics. Methods: Nanoparticle formulations were fabricated by a double emulsion solvent evaporation technique using polycaprolactone as ...

  7. On EPR detection of nitric oxide in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Faassen, E.E.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071100938

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO ) is a peculiar radical: Ground state is not paramagnetic (g = 0 since orbital and spin magnetic moments cancel); low reactivity with other molecules except superoxide (O2 ); thermodynamically unstable; dimerizes to N2O2; difficult to detect in-vivo.

  8. On-chip immobilization of planarians for in vivo imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Joseph P; Tamme, Mary B; Lind, Christine H; Collins, Eva-Maria S

    2014-09-17

    Planarians are an important model organism for regeneration and stem cell research. A complete understanding of stem cell and regeneration dynamics in these animals requires time-lapse imaging in vivo, which has been difficult to achieve due to a lack of tissue-specific markers and the strong negative phototaxis of planarians. We have developed the Planarian Immobilization Chip (PIC) for rapid, stable immobilization of planarians for in vivo imaging without injury or biochemical alteration. The chip is easy and inexpensive to fabricate, and worms can be mounted for and removed after imaging within minutes. We show that the PIC enables significantly higher-stability immobilization than can be achieved with standard techniques, allowing for imaging of planarians at sub-cellular resolution in vivo using brightfield and fluorescence microscopy. We validate the performance of the PIC by performing time-lapse imaging of planarian wound closure and sequential imaging over days of head regeneration. We further show that the device can be used to immobilize Hydra, another photophobic regenerative model organism. The simple fabrication, low cost, ease of use, and enhanced specimen stability of the PIC should enable its broad application to in vivo studies of stem cell and regeneration dynamics in planarians and Hydra.

  9. In Vivo Evaluation of Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Hansen, Peter Møller; Lange, Theis

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound in vivo imaging using synthetic aperture sequential beamformation (SASB) is compared with conventional imaging in a double blinded study using side-by-side comparisons. The objective is to evaluate if the image quality in terms of penetration depth, spatial resolution, contrast...

  10. Valproic acid modulates platelet and coagulation function ex vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bambakidis, Ted; Dekker, Simone E; Halaweish, Ihab

    2017-01-01

    : Trauma-induced coagulopathy is associated with adverse patient outcome. Animal models demonstrate that histone deacetylase inhibitors, such as valproic acid (VPA), improve survival following injury. While in-vivo data suggest that improved survival may in part be because of an attenuation...

  11. In vitro and in vivo metal ion release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S A; Farnsworth, L J; Merritt, K; Crowe, T D

    1988-04-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to study in vitro and in vivo metal ion release and the urine excretion of metal ions. Metal salts were injected and urine analyzed. Anodic potentials were applied to stainless steel and cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CCM) specimens to cause an acceleration of corrosion rates. Corrosion experiments were done in saline, 10% serum and in a subcutaneous space in hamsters. Corrosion rates were determined by measurements of weight loss and calculations of net charge transfer. Metal ion concentrations were determined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy, and were calculated from total charge using Faraday's law. The results with stainless steel showed that the weight loss and metal ion release from stainless steel in vitro and in vivo can be calculated using Faraday's Law, assuming release in proportion to alloy composition. The results with CCM indicated that release rates in vitro can be used to determine the proportionality of release in vivo. All the nickel and most of the cobalt was rapidly excreted, while less than 50% of the chromium was excreted. The excretion of metals following salt injection or in vivo corrosion were very similar.

  12. Development and evaluation of an in vivo assay in Caenorhabditis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We developed a fluorescence-based in vivo assay using transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans worms that express the green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of various CYP promoters. Using this assay, we found striking similarities between the worm CYPs and their human orthologs in their response to treatment ...

  13. Anatomical Region-Specific In Vivo Wireless Communication Channel Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Ali Fatih; Abbasi, Qammer H; Ankarali, Z Esat; Alomainy, Akram; Qaraqe, Khalid; Serpedin, Erchin; Arslan, Huseyin

    2017-09-01

    In vivo wireless body area networks and their associated technologies are shaping the future of healthcare by providing continuous health monitoring and noninvasive surgical capabilities, in addition to remote diagnostic and treatment of diseases. To fully exploit the potential of such devices, it is necessary to characterize the communication channel, which will help to build reliable and high-performance communication systems. This paper presents an in vivo wireless communication channel characterization for male torso both numerically and experimentally (on a human cadaver) considering various organs at 915 MHz and 2.4 GHz. A statistical path loss (PL) model is introduced, and the anatomical region-specific parameters are provided. It is found that the mean PL in decibel scale exhibits a linear decaying characteristic rather than an exponential decaying profile inside the body, and the power decay rate is approximately twice at 2.4 GHz as compared to 915 MHz. Moreover, the variance of shadowing increases significantly as the in vivo antenna is placed deeper inside the body since the main scatterers are present in the vicinity of the antenna. Multipath propagation characteristics are also investigated to facilitate proper waveform designs in the future wireless healthcare systems, and a root-mean-square delay spread of 2.76 ns is observed at 5 cm depth. Results show that the in vivo channel exhibit different characteristics than the classical communication channels, and location dependence is very critical for accurate, reliable, and energy-efficient link budget calculations.

  14. In vivo dermal absorption of pyrethroid pesticides in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential for exposure to pyrethroid pesticides has risen recently because of their increased use. The objective of this study was to examine the in vivo dermal absorption of bifenthrin, deltamethrin and permethrin in the rat. Hair on the dorsal side of anesthetized adult m...

  15. Gel encapsulation of glucose nanosensors for prolonged in vivo lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaconis, Mary K; Clark, Heather A

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent glucose-sensitive nanosensors have previously been used in vivo to track glucose concentration changes in interstitial fluid. However, this technology was limited because of loss of fluorescence intensity due to particle diffusion from the injection site. In this study, we encapsulated the nanosensors into injectable gels to mitigate nanosensor migration in vivo. Glucose-sensitive nanosensors were encapsulated in two different commercially available gelling agents: gel 1 and gel 2. Multiple formulations of each gel were assessed in vitro for their nanosensor encapsulation efficiency, permeability to glucose, and nanosensor retention over time. The optimal formulation for each gel, as determined from the in vitro assessment, was then tested in mice, and the lifetime of the encapsulated nanosensors was compared with controls of nanosensors without gel. Five gel formulations had encapsulation efficiencies of the nanosensors greater than 90%. Additionally, they retained up to 20% and 40% of the nanosensors over 24 h for gel 1 and gel 2, respectively. In vivo, both gels prevented diffusion of glucose nanosensors at least three times greater than the controls. Encapsulating glucose nanosensors in two injectable gels prolonged nanosensor lifetime in vivo; however, the lifetime must still be increased further to be applicable for diabetes monitoring. © 2013 Diabetes Technology Society.

  16. An in vivo mouse model of metastatic human thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lisa; Gaskins, Kelli; Yu, Zhiya; Xiong, Yin; Merino, Maria J; Kebebew, Electron

    2014-04-01

    Mouse models of metastatic human cancers are important tools in preclinical studies for testing new systematic therapies and studying effectors of cancer metastasis. The major drawbacks of current mouse models for metastatic thyroid cancer are that they have low metastasis rates and do not allow in vivo tumor detection. Here, we report and characterize an in vivo detectable metastasis mouse model of human thyroid cancer using multiple thyroid cancer cell lines. Human anaplastic thyroid cancer cell lines 8505C, C-643, SW-1736, and THJ-16T; follicular thyroid cancer cell lines FTC-133, FTC-236, and FTC-238; and Hürthle cell carcinoma cell line XTC-1 were transfected with a linearized pGL4.51[luc2/CMV/Neo] vector or transduced with lentivirus containing Luc2-eGFP reporter genes. The stably transfected cells were injected intravenously into NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice. Tumors were detected with an in vivo imaging system-Xenogen IVIS. Vemurafenib, a BRAF inhibitor, was used to treat lung metastases generated from 8505C-Luc2 cells with a BRAF(V600E) mutation to test the accuracy of the model to evaluate response to therapy. Intravenous injection of as few as 30,000 8505C-Luc2 cells produced lung metastases in 100% of the injected mice, and many of these mice also developed bone metastases at a later stage of the disease. Similarly, metastatic tumors also developed in all mice injected with C-643-Luc2, THJ-16T-Luc2, FTC-133-Luc2, FTC-236-Luc2, FTC-238-Luc2, and XTC-1-Luc2 cells. The metastases were easily detectable in vivo, and tumor progression could be dynamically and accurately followed and correlated with the actual tumor burden. Furthermore, disease progression could be easily controlled by adjusting the number of injected cells. The in vivo treatment of 8505C xenograft lung metastases with vemurafenib dramatically reduced the growth and signal intensity with good correlation with actual tumor burden. Herein we report an in vivo detectable mouse model

  17. The global regulatory system Csr senses glucose through the phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Morales, Deyanira; Bustamante, Víctor H

    2016-02-01

    A novel connection between two regulatory systems controlling crucial biological processes in bacteria, the carbon storage regulator (Csr) system and the glucose-specific phosphotransferase system (PTS), is reported by Leng et al. in this issue. This involves the interaction of unphosphorylated EIIA(Glc), a component of the glucose-specific PTS, with the CsrD protein, which accelerates the decay of the CsrB and CsrC small RNAs via RNase E in Escherichia coli. As unphosphorylated EIIA(G) (lc) is generated in the presence of glucose, the PTS thus acts as a sensor of glucose for the Csr system. Interestingly, another pathway can operate for communication between the Csr system and the glucose-specific PTS. The absence of glucose generates phosphorylated EIIA(Glc) , which activates the enzyme adenylate cyclase to produce cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) that, in turn, binds to the regulator cAMP receptor protein (CRP). Leng et al. show that the complex cAMP-CRP modestly reduces CsrB decay independently of CsrD. On the other hand, a previous study indicates that the complex cAMP-CRP positively regulates the transcription of CsrB and CsrC in Salmonella enterica. Therefore, EIIA(G) (lc) could work as a molecular switch that regulates the activity of the Csr system, in response to its phosphorylation state determined by the presence or absence of glucose, in order to control gene expression. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Activities of enzymes associated with phosphoenolpyruvate metabolism in the mudskippers, Boleophthalmus boddaerti and Periophthalmodon schlosseri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siau, H; Ip, Y K

    1987-01-01

    1. PK and LDH activities in the muscle of Periophthalmodon schlosseri and Boleophthalmus boddaerti were at least 100-fold higher than their respective activities in the liver. 2. The ratio of PK:PEPCK in liver of B. boddaerti was smaller than that of P. schlosseri. 3. PK:PEPCK ratios in both fishes were intermediate between those of aerobic and anaerobic organisms. 4. MDH activity was higher than other enzymes assayed in the liver of both fishes. 5. The ratios of LDH:MDH in the liver of both mudskippers were comparable to those of anaerobic organisms. 6. AST was at least eight times more active than ALT in the liver of both fishes. 7. In the muscle of these mudskippers, the aspartate content was significantly less than that of alanine. 8. Exposure of these fishes to various experimental conditions led to changes in specific activities of PEPCK, LDH, AST and ALT.

  19. Determination of optimal rhodamine fluorophore for in vivo optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, Michelle R; Ogawa, Mikako; Hama, Yukihiro; Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Regino, Celeste A S; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2008-08-01

    Optical imaging has the potential to improve the efficacy of surgical and endoscopic approaches to cancer treatment; however, the optimal type of fluorescent probe has not yet been established. It is well-known that rhodamine-core-derived fluorophores offer a combination of desirable properties such as good photostability, high extinction coefficient, and high fluorescence quantum yield. However, despite the ubiquitous use of rhodamine fluorophores for in vivo optical imaging, it remains to be determined if unique chemical properties among individual rhodamine core family members affect fluorophore parameters critical to in vivo optical imaging applications. These parameters include preserved fluorescence intensity in low pH environments, similar to that of the endolysosome; efficient fluorescence signal despite conformational changes to targeting proteins as may occur in harsh subcellular environments; persistence of fluorescence after cellular internalization; and sufficient signal-to-background ratios to permit the identification of fluorophore-targeted tumors. In the present study, we conjugated 4 common rhodamine-core based fluorescent dyes to a clinically feasible and quickly internalizing D-galactose receptor targeting reagent, galactosamine serum albumin (GmSA), and conducted a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments using a metastatic ovarian cancer mouse model to determine if differences in optical imaging properties exist among rhodamine fluorophores and if so, which rhodamine core possesses optimal characteristics for in vivo imaging applications. Herein, we demonstrate that the rhodamine-fluorophore, TAMRA, is the most robust of the 4 common rhodamine fluorophores for in vivo optical imaging of ovarian cancer metastases to the peritoneum.

  20. In vivo SPECT reporter gene imaging of regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Sharif-Paghaleh

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs were identified several years ago and are key in controlling autoimmune diseases and limiting immune responses to foreign antigens, including alloantigens. In vivo imaging techniques including intravital microscopy as well as whole body imaging using bioluminescence probes have contributed to the understanding of in vivo Treg function, their mechanisms of action and target cells. Imaging of the human sodium/iodide symporter via Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT has been used to image various cell types in vivo. It has several advantages over the aforementioned imaging techniques including high sensitivity, it allows non-invasive whole body studies of viable cell migration and localisation of cells over time and lastly it may offer the possibility to be translated to the clinic. This study addresses whether SPECT/CT imaging can be used to visualise the migratory pattern of Tregs in vivo. Treg lines derived from CD4(+CD25(+FoxP3(+ cells were retrovirally transduced with a construct encoding for the human Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS and the fluorescent protein mCherry and stimulated with autologous DCs. NIS expressing self-specific Tregs were specifically radiolabelled in vitro with Technetium-99m pertechnetate ((99mTcO(4(- and exposure of these cells to radioactivity did not affect cell viability, phenotype or function. In addition adoptively transferred Treg-NIS cells were imaged in vivo in C57BL/6 (BL/6 mice by SPECT/CT using (99mTcO(4(-. After 24 hours NIS expressing Tregs were observed in the spleen and their localisation was further confirmed by organ biodistribution studies and flow cytometry analysis. The data presented here suggests that SPECT/CT imaging can be utilised in preclinical imaging studies of adoptively transferred Tregs without affecting Treg function and viability thereby allowing longitudinal studies within disease models.

  1. VIVO Lab at the German National Library of Science and Technology: Review and Outlook

    OpenAIRE

    Walther, Tatiana; Blümel, Ina; Heller, Lambert

    2016-01-01

    This poster gives an overview about past, current and future activities of the VIVO Lab – a sub-group of the Open Science Lab at the German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB).  In the past there have been several corporate projects and implementations around VIVO, including the past corporate VIVO project – VIVO for the TIB, which was complemented with the additional features (VIVOPath and VIVO Deutsches Handbuch). The current subject area of the VIVO Lab covers, among other thi...

  2. ERK1/2 pathway is involved in renal gluconeogenesis inhibition under conditions of lowered NADPH oxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiarska, Katarzyna; Jarzyna, Robert; Dzik, Jolanta M; Jagielski, Adam K; Grabowski, Michal; Nowosielska, Agata; Focht, Dorota; Sierakowski, Bartosz

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the inhibition of renal gluconeogenesis occurring under conditions of lowered activity of NADPH oxidase (Nox), the enzyme considered to be one of the main sources of reactive oxygen species in kidneys. The in vitro experiments were performed on primary cultures of rat renal proximal tubules, with the use of apocynin, a selective Nox inhibitor, and TEMPOL (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl), a potent superoxide radical scavenger. In the in vivo experiments, Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats, a well established model of diabetes type 2, were treated with apocynin solution in drinking water. The main in vitro findings are the following: (1) both apocynin and TEMPOL attenuate the rate of gluconeogenesis, inhibiting the step catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), a key enzyme of the process; (2) in the presence of the above-noted compounds the expression of PEPCK and the phosphorylation of transcription factor CREB and ERK1/2 kinases are lowered; (3) both U0126 (MEK inhibitor) and 3-(2-aminoethyl)-5-((4-ethoxyphenyl)methylene)-2,4-thiazolidinedione (ERK inhibitor) diminish the rate of glucose synthesis via mechanisms similar to those of apocynin and TEMPOL. The observed apocynin in vivo effects include: (1) slight attenuation of hyperglycemia; (2) inhibition of renal gluconeogenesis; (3) a decrease in renal PEPCK activity and content. In view of the results summarized above, it can be concluded that: (1) the lowered activity of the ERK1/2 pathway is of importance for the inhibition of renal gluconeogenesis found under conditions of lowered superoxide radical production by Nox; (2) the mechanism of this phenomenon includes decreased PEPCK expression, resulting from diminished activity of transcription factor CREB; (3) apocynin-evoked inhibition of renal gluconeogenesis contributes to the hypoglycemic action of this compound observed in diabetic animals. Thus, the study has

  3. Objective human tooth colour measurements as a means of determining chronologic age in vivo and ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, N; Willems, G; Wood, R

    2009-12-01

    Colour is a subjective sensation and as such is difficult to use in a quantitative study. However a number of clinical studies on extracted teeth have shown a good correlation between tooth colour and age. The purpose of this study was to examine the usefulness of a specific spectrophotometer in determining tooth colour on extracted and non- extracted teeth and to look for a possible age relationship. There were two parts in this study. An ex vivo study concentrated on collected tooth material. Single rooted teeth were selected out of each of the 5- year-age groups (ages ranged from 15-89 years). Colour measurements were performed on the mesial and vestibular aspects of the roots as well on the mid-vestibular aspects of the enamel crown. An in vivo study concentrated on the use of this specific shade taking system in living patients (n=70). Statistical analysis of the results revealed regression formulas for both ex vivo and in vivo situations displaying adjusted R-squares between 0.48 and 0.56. It may be concluded that age related trends were found. Having its shortcomings, the shade taking system was found to perform well as a convenient adjunct to dental age estimation in both the living and the deceased.

  4. Ex-vivo assessment and non-invasive in vivo imaging of internal hemorrhages in Aga2/+ mutant mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermolayev, Vladimir [Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Building 56, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Cohrs, Christian M. [Institute for Experimental Genetics, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Mohajerani, Pouyan; Ale, Angelique [Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Building 56, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Hrabé de Angelis, Martin [Institute for Experimental Genetics, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Ntziachristos, Vasilis, E-mail: v.ntziachristos@tum.de [Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Building 56, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Aga2/+ mice, model for Osteogenesis imperfecta, have type I collagen mutation. ► Aga2/+ mice display both moderate and severe phenotypes lethal 6–11th postnatal. ► Internal hemorrhages studied in Aga2/+ vs. control mice at 6 and 9 days postnatal. ► Anatomical and functional findings in-vivo contrasted to the ex-vivo appearance. -- Abstract: Mutations in type I collagen genes (COL1A1/2) typically lead to Osteogenesis imperfecta, the most common heritable cause of skeletal fractures and bone deformation in humans. Heterozygous Col1a1{sup Aga2/+}, animals with a dominant mutation in the terminal C-propeptide domain of type I collagen develop typical skeletal hallmarks and internal hemorrhages starting from 6 day after birth. The disease progression for Aga2/+ mice, however, is not uniform differing between severe phenotype lethal at the 6–11th day of life, and moderate-to-severe one with survival to adulthood. Herein we investigated whether a new modality that combines X-ray computer tomography with fluorescence tomography in one hybrid system can be employed to study internal bleedings in relation to bone fractures and obtain insights into disease progression. The disease phenotype was characterized on Aga2/+ vs. wild type mice between 6 and 9 days postnatal. Anatomical and functional findings obtained in-vivo were contrasted to the ex-vivo appearance of the same tissues under cryo-slicing.

  5. IL-10 and toll-like receptor-4 polymorphisms and the in vivo and ex vivo response to endotoxin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, Emile F.; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van Voorden, Sjaak; Martina, Cerithsa A. E.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; le Cessie, Saskia; van Dissel, Jaap T.

    2005-01-01

    To determine to what extent lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-10 production capacity is determined by polymorphisms in toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and the IL-10 promoter region, we measured in vivo IL-10 and TNF-alpha production in patients undergoing elective cardiopulmonary bypass surgery, a major

  6. Diesel exhaust particulate induces pulmonary and systemic inflammation in rats without impairing endothelial function ex vivo or in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson Sarah

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhalation of diesel exhaust impairs vascular function in man, by a mechanism that has yet to be fully established. We hypothesised that pulmonary exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP would cause endothelial dysfunction in rats as a consequence of pulmonary and systemic inflammation. Methods Wistar rats were exposed to DEP (0.5 mg or saline vehicle by intratracheal instillation and hind-limb blood flow, blood pressure and heart rate were monitored in situ 6 or 24 h after exposure. Vascular function was tested by administration of the endothelium-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine (ACh and the endothelium-independent vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (SNP in vivo and ex vivo in isolated rings of thoracic aorta, femoral and mesenteric artery from DEP exposed rats. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and blood plasma were collected to assess pulmonary (cell differentials, protein levels & interleukin-6 (IL-6 and systemic (IL-6, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα and C-reactive protein (CRP inflammation, respectively. Results DEP instillation increased cell counts, total protein and IL-6 in BALF 6 h after exposure, while levels of IL-6 and TNFα were only raised in blood 24 h after DEP exposure. DEP had no effect on the increased hind-limb blood flow induced by ACh in vivo at 6 or 24 h. However, responses to SNP were impaired at both time points. In contrast, ex vivo responses to ACh and SNP were unaltered in arteries isolated from rats exposed to DEP. Conclusions Exposure of rats to DEP induces both pulmonary and systemic inflammation, but does not modify endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. Other mechanisms in vivo limit dilator responses to SNP and these require further investigation.

  7. In vitro - in vivo correlation: from theory to applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami, Jaber

    2006-01-01

    A key goal in pharmaceutical development of dosage forms is a good understanding of the in vitro and in vivo performance of the dosage forms. One of the challenges of biopharmaceutics research is correlating in vitro drug release information of various drug formulations to the in vivo drug profiles (IVIVC). Thus the need for a tool to reliably correlate in vitro and in vivo drug release data has exceedingly increased. Such a tool shortens the drug development period, economizes the resources and leads to improved product quality. Increased activity in developing IVIVCs indicates the value of IVIVCs to the pharmaceutical industry. IVIVC can be used in the development of new pharmaceuticals to reduce the number of human studies during the formulation development as the main objective of an IVIVC is to serve as a surrogate for in vivo bioavailability and to support biowaivers. It supports and/or validates the use of dissolution methods and specification settings. This is because the IVIVC includes in vivo relevance to in vitro dissolution specifications. It can also assist in quality control for certain scale-up and post-approval changes (SUPAC). With the proliferation of modified-release products, it becomes necessary to examine the concept of IVIVC in greater depth. Investigations of IVIVC are increasingly becoming an integral part of extended release drug development. There must be some in vitro means of assuring that each batch of the same product will perform identically in vivo. This review article represents the FDA guidance, development, evaluation, and validation of an IVIVC to grant biowaivers, and to set dissolution specifications for oral dosage forms, biopharmaceutics classification systems (BCS), BCS biowaivers, application of BCS in IVIVC development and concept of mapping. The importance of dissolution media and methodology and pharmacokinetic studies in the context of IVIVC has been highlighted. The review also covers the literature examples of IVIVCs

  8. In vivo oxidation in remelted highly cross-linked retrievals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, B H; Van Citters, D W; Currier, J H; Collier, J P

    2010-10-20

    Elimination of free radicals to prevent oxidation has played a major role in the development and product differentiation of the latest generation of highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene bearing materials. In the current study, we (1) examined oxidation in a series of retrieved remelted highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene bearings from a number of device manufacturers and (2) compared the retrieval results with findings for shelf-stored control specimens. The hypothesis was that radiation-cross-linked remelted ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene would maintain oxidative stability in vivo comparable with the stability during shelf storage and in published laboratory aging tests. Fifty remelted highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene acetabular liners and nineteen remelted highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene tibial inserts were received after retrieval from twenty-one surgeons from across the U.S. Thirty-two of the retrievals had been in vivo for two years or more. Each was measured for oxidation with use of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A control series of remelted highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene acetabular liners from three manufacturers was analyzed with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure free radical content and with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to measure oxidation initially and after eight to nine years of shelf storage in air. The never-implanted, shelf-aged controls had no measurable free-radical content initially or after eight to nine years of shelf storage. The never-implanted controls showed no increase in oxidation during shelf storage. Oxidation measurements showed measurable oxidation in 22% of the retrieved remelted highly cross-linked liners and inserts after an average of two years in vivo. Because never-implanted remelted highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight

  9. In Vivo Monitoring Program Manual, PNL-MA-574, Rev 5.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Timothy P.

    2011-09-12

    The following sections provide an overview of the administration for the In Vivo Monitoring Program (IVMP) for Hanford. This includes the organizational structure and program responsibilities; coordination of in vivo measurements; scheduling measurements; performing measurements; reporting results; and quality assurance.

  10. Norovirus Polymerase Fidelity Contributes to Viral Transmission In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arias Esteban, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Ghurburrun, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    Intrahost genetic diversity and replication error rates are intricately linked to RNA virus pathogenesis, with alterations in viral polymerase fidelity typically leading to attenuation during infections in vivo. We have previously shown that norovirus intrahost genetic diversity also influences...... viral pathogenesis using the murine norovirus model, as increasing viral mutation frequency using a mutagenic nucleoside resulted in clearance of a persistent infection in mice. Given the role of replication fidelity and genetic diversity in pathogenesis, we have now investigated whether polymerase...... fidelity can also impact virus transmission between susceptible hosts. We have identified a high-fidelity norovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase mutant (I391L) which displays delayed replication kinetics in vivo but not in cell culture. The I391L polymerase mutant also exhibited lower transmission rates...

  11. Near-infrared molecular probes for in vivo imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Bloch, Sharon; Akers, Walter; Achilefu, Samuel

    2012-04-01

    Cellular and tissue imaging in the near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths between 700 and 900 nm is advantageous for in vivo imaging because of the low absorption of biological molecules in this region. This unit presents protocols for small animal imaging using planar and fluorescence lifetime imaging techniques. Included is an overview of NIR fluorescence imaging of cells and small animals using NIR organic fluorophores, nanoparticles, and multimodal imaging probes. The development, advantages, and application of NIR fluorescent probes that have been used for in vivo imaging are also summarized. The use of NIR agents in conjunction with visible dyes and considerations in selecting imaging agents are discussed. We conclude with practical considerations for the use of these dyes in cell and small animal imaging applications.

  12. Fluorescence glucose detection: advances toward the ideal in vivo biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschou, Elizabeth A; Sharma, Bethel V; Deo, Sapna K; Daunert, Sylvia

    2004-09-01

    The importance of glucose monitoring for in vivo as well as for ex vivo applications has driven a vast number of scientific groups to pursue the development of an advanced glucose sensor. Such a sensor must be robust, versatile, and capable of the long-term, accurate and reproducible detection of glucose levels in various testing media. Among the different configurations and signal transduction mechanisms used, fluorescence-based glucose sensors constitute a growing class of glucose sensors represented by an increasing number of significant contributions to the field over the last few years. This manuscript reviews the progress in the development of fluorescence based glucose sensors resulting from the advances in the design of new receptor systems for glucose recognition and the utilization of new fluorescence transduction schemes.

  13. Highly Effective Gene Transfection In Vivo by Alkylated Polyethylenimine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Fortune

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We mechanistically explored the effect of increased hydrophobicity of the polycation on the efficacy and specificity of gene delivery in mice. N-Alkylated linear PEIs with varying alkyl chain lengths and extent of substitution were synthesized and characterized by biophysical methods. Their in vivo transfection efficiency, specificity, and biodistribution were investigated. N-Ethylation improves the in vivo efficacy of gene expression in the mouse lung 26-fold relative to the parent polycation and more than quadruples the ratio of expression in the lung to that in all other organs. N-Propyl-PEI was the best performer in the liver and heart (581- and 3.5-fold enhancements, resp. while N-octyl-PEI improved expression in the kidneys over the parent polymer 221-fold. As these enhancements in gene expression occur without changing the plasmid biodistribution, alkylation does not alter the cellular uptake but rather enhances transfection subsequent to cellular uptake.

  14. Norovirus Polymerase Fidelity Contributes to Viral Transmission In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arias Esteban, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Ghurburrun, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    Intrahost genetic diversity and replication error rates are intricately linked to RNA virus pathogenesis, with alterations in viral polymerase fidelity typically leading to attenuation during infections in vivo. We have previously shown that norovirus intrahost genetic diversity also influences v...... and that maintaining diversity is important for the establishment of infection. This work supports the hypothesis that the reduced polymerase fidelity of the pandemic GII.4 human norovirus isolates may contribute to their global dominance.......Intrahost genetic diversity and replication error rates are intricately linked to RNA virus pathogenesis, with alterations in viral polymerase fidelity typically leading to attenuation during infections in vivo. We have previously shown that norovirus intrahost genetic diversity also influences...... viral pathogenesis using the murine norovirus model, as increasing viral mutation frequency using a mutagenic nucleoside resulted in clearance of a persistent infection in mice. Given the role of replication fidelity and genetic diversity in pathogenesis, we have now investigated whether polymerase...

  15. Applications of nuclear technologies for in-vivo elemental analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohn, S.H.; Ellis, K.J.; Vartsky, D.; Wielopolski, L.

    1982-01-01

    Measurement facilities developed, to date, include a unique whole-body-counter, (WBC); a total-body neutron-activation facility (TBNAA); and a partial-body activation facility (PBNAA). A variation of the prompt-gamma neutron-activation technique for measuring total-body nitrogen was developed to study body composition of cancer patients and the effect of nutritional regimens on the composition. These new techniques provide data in numerous clinical studies not previously amenable to investigation. The development and perfection of these techniques provide unique applications of radiation and radioisotopes to the early diagnosis of certain diseases and the evaluation of therapeutic programs. The PBNAA technique has been developed and calibrated for in-vivo measurement of metals. Development has gone forward on prompt-gamma neutron activation for the measurement of cadmium, x-ray fluorescence (XRF) for measurement of iron. Other techniques are being investigated for in-vivo measurement of metals such as silicon and beryllium.

  16. Hybrid FMT-MRI applied to in vivo atherosclerosis imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baoqiang; Maafi, Foued; Berti, Romain; Pouliot, Philippe; Rhéaume, Eric; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Lesage, Frederic

    2014-05-01

    Combining Fluorescent Molecular Tomography (FMT) with anatomical imaging, e.g. MRI facilitates interpreting functional information. Furthermore, using a heterogeneous model for light propagation has been shown in simulations to be superior to homogeneous modeling to quantify fluorescence. Here, we present a combined FMT-MRI system and apply it to heart and aorta molecular imaging, a challenging area due to strong tissue heterogeneity and the presence of air-voids due to lungs. First investigating performance in a phantom and mouse corpse, the MRI-enabled heterogeneous models resulted in an improved quantification of fluorescence reconstructions. The system was then used in mice for in vivo atherosclerosis molecular imaging. Results show that, when using the heterogeneous model, reconstructions were in agreement with the ex vivo measurements. Therefore, the proposed system might serve as a powerful imaging tool for atherosclerosis in mice.

  17. Estimation of in-vivo pulses in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1994-01-01

    and the three-dimensional, attenuated ultrasound field for a concave transducer. Pulses are estimated from in-vivo liver data showing good resemblance to a pulse measured as the response from a planar reflector and then properly attenuated. The main application for the algorithm is to function......An algorithm for the estimation of one-dimensional in-vivo ultrasound pulses is derived. The routine estimates a set of ARMA parameters describing the pulse and uses data from a number of adjacent rf lines. Using multiple lines results in a decrease in variance on the estimated parameters...... and significantly reduces the risk of terminating the algorithm at a local minimum. Examples from use on synthetic data confirms the reduction in variance and increased chance of successful minimization termination. Simulations are also reported indicating the relation between the one-dimensional pulse...

  18. In Vivo Assessment of Muscle Contractility in Animal Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Shama R; Valencia, Ana P; Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Lovering, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    In patients with muscle injury or muscle disease, assessment of muscle damage is typically limited to clinical signs, such as tenderness, strength, range of motion, and more recently, imaging studies. Animal models provide unmitigated access to histological samples, which provide a "direct measure" of damage. However, even with unconstrained access to tissue morphology and biochemistry assays, the findings typically do not account for loss of muscle function. Thus, the most comprehensive measure of the overall health of the muscle is assessment of its primary function, which is to produce contractile force. The majority of animal models testing contractile force have been limited to the muscle groups moving the ankle, with advantages and disadvantages depending on the equipment. Here, we describe in vivo methods to measure torque, to produce a reliable muscle injury, and to follow muscle function within the same animal over time. We also describe in vivo methods to measure tension in the leg and thigh muscles.

  19. In Vivo Real Time Volumetric Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzari, Hamed; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Brandt, Andreas Hjelm

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic aperture (SA) imaging can be used to achieve real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging using 2-D array transducers. The sensitivity of SA imaging is improved by maximizing the acoustic output, but one must consider the limitations of an ultrasound system, both technical and biological....... This paper investigates the in vivo applicability and sensitivity of volumetric SA imaging. Utilizing the transmit events to generate a set of virtual point sources, a frame rate of 25 Hz for a 90° x 90° field-of-view was achieved. Data were obtained using a 3.5 MHz 32 x 32 elements 2-D phased array...... transducer connected to the experimental scanner (SARUS). Proper scaling is applied to the excitation signal such that intensity levels are in compliance with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations for in vivo ultrasound imaging. The measured Mechanical Index and spatial-peak- temporal...

  20. In vivo bioactivity of porous polyetheretherketone with a foamed surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieda, Ayato; Uemura, Naoya; Hashimoto, Yoshiya; Toda, Isumi; Baba, Shunsuke

    2017-03-31

    The in vivo bioactivity of porous polyetheretherketone (PEEK) with a foamed surface was evaluated using rabbit femoral bone. Cylindrical porous PEEK scaffolds, with pore diameter of 550 μm and porosity of 70%, were first prepared and immersed in 98% sulfuric acid, and then washed and immersed in 3 M potassium carbonate solution used as a foaming reagent. Numerous open pores of various sizes, as well as new functional groups, were visualized on the treated PEEK surface by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Micro computed tomography (micro-CT) showed that the volumetric density of treated PEEK was higher than that of bare PEEK at 8 weeks after surgery (pPEEK group. Our data indicate that surface-treated PEEK exhibited improved bioactivity in vivo.

  1. Photoacoustic microscopy of tyrosinase reporter gene in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumholz, Arie; Vanvickle-Chavez, Sarah J.; Yao, Junjie; Fleming, Timothy P.; Gillanders, William E.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-08-01

    Photoacoustic tomography is a hybrid modality based on optical absorption excitation and ultrasonic detection. It is sensitive to melanin, one of the primary absorbers in skin. For cells that do not naturally contain melanin, melanin production can be induced by introducing the gene for tyrosinase, the primary enzyme responsible for expression of melanin in melanogenic cells. Optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy was used in the ex vivo study reported here, where the signal from transfected cells increased by more than 10 times over wild-type cells. A subsequent in vivo experiment was conducted to demonstrate the capability of photoacoustic microscopy to spectrally differentiate between tyrosinase-catalyzed melanin and various other absorbers in tissue.

  2. Intermuscular force transmission between human plantarflexor muscles in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Schwartz, Sidse

    2010-01-01

    The exact mechanical function of synergist muscles within a human limb in vivo is not well described. Recent studies indicate the existence of a mechanical interaction between muscle actuators that may have functional significance and further play a role for injury mechanisms. The purpose...... of the present study was to investigate if intermuscular force transmission occurs within and between human plantarflexor muscles in vivo. Seven subjects performed four types of either active contractile tasks or passive joint manipulations: passive knee extension, voluntary isometric plantarflexion, voluntary...... task-induced tissue displacement (which is assumed to represent loading) for the plantarflexor muscles [MG, soleus (SOL), and flexor hallucis longus (FHL)]. Selective MG stimulation and passive knee extension resulted in displacement of both the MG and SOL muscles. Minimal displacement of the triceps...

  3. Ex vivo culture of patient tissue & examination of gene delivery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rajendran, Simon

    2012-01-31

    This video describes the use of patient tissue as an ex vivo model for the study of gene delivery. Fresh patient tissue obtained at the time of surgery is sliced and maintained in culture. The ex vivo model system allows for the physical delivery of genes into intact patient tissue and gene expression is analysed by bioluminescence imaging using the IVIS detection system. The bioluminescent detection system demonstrates rapid and accurate quantification of gene expression within individual slices without the need for tissue sacrifice. This slice tissue culture system may be used in a variety of tissue types including normal and malignant tissue and allows us to study the effects of the heterogeneous nature of intact tissue and the high degree of variability between individual patients. This model system could be used in certain situations as an alternative to animal models and as a complementary preclinical mode prior to entering clinical trial.

  4. Aminoacylation of hypomodified tRNAGlu in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Malene Kappen; Sørensen, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    has been shown to be important in the recognition of these tRNAs by their synthetases in vitro. Here, we have determined the aminoacylation level in vivo of tRNAGlu, tRNALys, and tRNA1GIn in Escherichia coli strains containing undermodified derivatives of mnm5s2U34. Lack of the 5-methylaminomethyl...... synthesis rate was the same in the wild-type and mutant strains. These results indicate that the mnm5U34 modification is not an important recognition element in vivo for the glutamyl-tRNA synthetase. In contrast, lack of the s2U34 modification reduced the efficiency of charging by at least 40...

  5. Susceptibility of anthocyanins to ex vivo degradation in human saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamonpatana, Kom; Giusti, M. Mónica; Chitchumroonchokchai, Chureeporn; MorenoCruz, Maria; Riedl, Ken M.; Kumar, Purnima; Failla, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    Some fruits and their anthocyanin-rich extracts have been reported to exhibit chemopreventive activity in the oral cavity. Insights regarding oral metabolism of anthocyanins remain limited. Anthocyanin-rich extracts from blueberry, chokeberry, black raspberry, red grape, and strawberry were incubated ex vivo with human saliva from 14 healthy subjects. All anthocyanins were partially degraded in saliva. Degradation of chokeberry anthocyanins in saliva was temperature dependent and decreased by heating saliva to 80 °C and after removal of cells. Glycosides of delphinidin and petunidin were more susceptible to degradation than those of cyanidin, pelargonidin, peonidin and malvidin in both intact and artificial saliva. Stability of di- and tri-saccharide conjugates of anthocyanidins slightly, but significantly, exceeded that of monosaccharide compounds. Ex vivo degradation of anthocyanins in saliva was significantly decreased after oral rinsing with antibacterial chlorhexidine. These results suggest that anthocyanin degradation in the mouth is structure-dependent and largely mediated by oral microbiota. PMID:22868153

  6. Applying the ARRIVE Guidelines to an In Vivo Database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha A Karp

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Animal Research: Reporting of In Vivo Experiments (ARRIVE guidelines were developed to address the lack of reproducibility in biomedical animal studies and improve the communication of research findings. While intended to guide the preparation of peer-reviewed manuscripts, the principles of transparent reporting are also fundamental for in vivo databases. Here, we describe the benefits and challenges of applying the guidelines for the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC, whose goal is to produce and phenotype 20,000 knockout mouse strains in a reproducible manner across ten research centres. In addition to ensuring the transparency and reproducibility of the IMPC, the solutions to the challenges of applying the ARRIVE guidelines in the context of IMPC will provide a resource to help guide similar initiatives in the future.

  7. Advanced automated gain adjustments for in-vivo ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moshavegh, Ramin; Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Martins, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Automatic gain adjustments are necessary on the state-of-the-art ultrasound scanners to obtain optimal scan quality, while reducing the unnecessary user interactions with the scanner. However, when large anechoic regions exist in the scan plane, the sudden and drastic variation of attenuations...... ultrasonic physical estimates such as scattering strength, focus gain, acoustic attenuation, and noise level to gain a more quantitative understanding of the scanned media and to provide an intuitive adjustment of gains on the scan. The proposed algorithm was applied to a set of 45 in-vivo movie sequences...... each containing 50 frames. The scans are acquired using a recently commercialized BK3000 ultrasound scanner (BK Ultrasound, Denmark). Matching pairs of in-vivo sequences, unprocessed and processed with the proposed method were visualized side by side and evaluated by 4 radiologists for image quality...

  8. Setup of IN VIVO Breast Cancer Models for Nanodrug Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schifter, Søren

    2013-01-01

    RNA/aptamer conjugates, or carriers such as liposome/chitosan/micelle spheres. As a first step towards testing of the efficacy of siRNA delivery in vivo via different conjugates and complexes, we aimed at developing a standardized breast cancer model system in mice. In this conception, a reporter gene is used...... for detection of the primary tumor and metastasis and the efficacy of siRNA delivery is measured by reporter gene-targeting siRNAs and in vivo imaging. The use of a uniform siRNA not affecting cellular processes would allow for standardized assessment of siRNA delivery to cancer cells without interferences via...... differential knockdown efficacies and the readout can directly be performed by quantitative imaging using a Caliper IVIS system. In one line of experiments, we engineered non-metastatic MCF-7 breast cancer cells to express the luminescent reporter firefly luciferase (Luc2) along with a pro-metastatic micro...

  9. RNA nanotechnology for computer design and in vivo computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Meikang; Khisamutdinov, Emil; Zhao, Zhengyi; Pan, Cheryl; Choi, Jeong-Woo; Leontis, Neocles B; Guo, Peixuan

    2013-10-13

    Molecular-scale computing has been explored since 1989 owing to the foreseeable limitation of Moore's law for silicon-based computation devices. With the potential of massive parallelism, low energy consumption and capability of working in vivo, molecular-scale computing promises a new computational paradigm. Inspired by the concepts from the electronic computer, DNA computing has realized basic Boolean functions and has progressed into multi-layered circuits. Recently, RNA nanotechnology has emerged as an alternative approach. Owing to the newly discovered thermodynamic stability of a special RNA motif (Shu et al. 2011 Nat. Nanotechnol. 6, 658-667 (doi:10.1038/nnano.2011.105)), RNA nanoparticles are emerging as another promising medium for nanodevice and nanomedicine as well as molecular-scale computing. Like DNA, RNA sequences can be designed to form desired secondary structures in a straightforward manner, but RNA is structurally more versatile and more thermodynamically stable owing to its non-canonical base-pairing, tertiary interactions and base-stacking property. A 90-nucleotide RNA can exhibit 4⁹⁰ nanostructures, and its loops and tertiary architecture can serve as a mounting dovetail that eliminates the need for external linking dowels. Its enzymatic and fluorogenic activity creates diversity in computational design. Varieties of small RNA can work cooperatively, synergistically or antagonistically to carry out computational logic circuits. The riboswitch and enzymatic ribozyme activities and its special in vivo attributes offer a great potential for in vivo computation. Unique features in transcription, termination, self-assembly, self-processing and acid resistance enable in vivo production of RNA nanoparticles that harbour various regulators for intracellular manipulation. With all these advantages, RNA computation is promising, but it is still in its infancy. Many challenges still exist. Collaborations between RNA nanotechnologists and computer

  10. Near-Infrared Fluorescent Nanoprobes for in Vivo Optical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai-Hoon Quek

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Near-infrared (NIR fluorescent probes offer advantages of high photon penetration, reduced light scattering and minimal autofluorescence from living tissues, rendering them valuable for noninvasive mapping of molecular events, assessment of therapeutic efficacy, and monitoring of disease progression in animal models. This review provides an overview of the recent development of the design and optical property of the different classes of NIR fluorescent nanoprobes associated with in vivo imaging applications.

  11. Near-Infrared Fluorescent Nanoprobes for in Vivo Optical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, Chai-Hoon; Leong, Kam W.

    2012-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes offer advantages of high photon penetration, reduced light scattering and minimal autofluorescence from living tissues, rendering them valuable for noninvasive mapping of molecular events, assessment of therapeutic efficacy, and monitoring of disease progression in animal models. This review provides an overview of the recent development of the design and optical property of the different classes of NIR fluorescent nanoprobes associated with in vivo imaging applications. PMID:28348298

  12. Targeting Promoter-Associated Noncoding RNA In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civenni, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    There are many classes of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), with wide-ranging functionalities (e.g., RNA editing, mediation of mRNA splicing, ribosomal function). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) are implicated in a wide variety of cellular processes, including the regulation of gene expression. Incorrect expression or mutation of lncRNAs has been reported to be associated with several disease conditions, such a malignant transformation in humans. Importantly, pivotal players in tumorigenesis and cancer progression, such as c-Myc, may be regulated by lncRNA at promoter level. The function of lncRNA can be reduced with antisense oligonucleotides that sequester or degrade mature lncRNAs. In alternative, lncRNA transcription can be blocked by small interference RNA (RNAi), which had acquired, recently, broad interested in clinical applications. In vivo-jetPEI™ is a linear polyethylenimine mediating nucleic acid (DNA, shRNA, siRNA, oligonucelotides) delivery with high efficiency. Different in vivo delivery routes have been validated: intravenous (IV), intraperitoneal (IP), intratumoral, subcutaneous, topical, and intrathecal. High levels of nucleic acid delivery are achieved into a broad range of tissues, such as lung, salivary glands, heart, spleen, liver, and prostate upon systemic administration. In addition, in vivo-jetPEI™ is also an efficient carrier for local gene and siRNA delivery such as intratumoral or topical application on the skin. After systemic injection, siRNA can be detected and the levels can be validated in target tissues by qRT-PCR. Targeting promoter-associated lncRNAs with siRNAs (small interfering RNAs) in vivo is becoming an exciting breakthrough for the treatment of human disease.

  13. In vivo super-resolution RESOLFT microscopy of Drosophila melanogaster.

    OpenAIRE

    Schnorrenberg, Sebastian; Grotjohann, Tim; Vorbrüggen, Gerd; Herzig, Alf; Hell, Stefan W.; Jakobs, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Despite remarkable developments in diffraction unlimited super-resolution microscopy, in vivo nanoscopy of tissues and model organisms is still not satisfactorily established and rarely realized. RESOLFT nanoscopy is particularly suited for live cell imaging because it requires relatively low light levels to overcome the diffraction barrier. Previously, we introduced the reversibly switchable fluorescent protein rsEGFP2, which facilitated fast RESOLFT nanoscopy (Grotjohann et al., 2012). In t...

  14. Myelin water fraction in human cervical spinal cord in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yijing; Alexander, Andrew L; Fleming, John O; Duncan, Ian D; Field, Aaron S

    2006-01-01

    The noninvasive discrimination of myelin disease from axonal loss and other pathologic confounds remains an unsolved problem in multiple sclerosis but may be possible through magnetic resonance quantitation of the intramyelinic water compartment. Technical challenges have limited the study of this approach in the spinal cord, a common site of involvement in multiple sclerosis. This technical note reports the test-retest reproducibility of a short T2-based estimate of myelin content in human spinal cord in vivo.

  15. Luminal leptin inhibits intestinal sugar absorption in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñigo, C; Patel, N; Kellett, G L; Barber, A; Lostao, M P

    2007-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that leptin inhibits galactose absorption in rat intestinal everted rings and that leptin receptors are present in the apical membrane of the enterocytes. This adipocyte-derived hormone is also secreted by gastric mucosal cells and is able to reach the intestinal lumen. The goal of the present study was to prove whether luminal leptin acts on intestinal sugar absorption in vivo both at low (basal state) and high sugar concentration (post-prandial state). In vivo intestinal sugar absorption in rat was measured with recirculating and single-pass perfusion systems. Sugar disappearance in the perfusate was measured by radioactivity and biochemical methods. Luminal leptin effect on intestinal absorption mediated by sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) as well as intestinal permeability (mannitol absorption) was determined. Luminal leptin inhibited intestinal sugar absorption at low galactose concentrations, which indicates that leptin regulates SGLT1 activity in vivo. The inhibition was reversed in the absence of hormone in the intestinal lumen, suggesting that it was produced by post-translational regulation processes. At high luminal glucose concentrations, leptin also inhibited the phloretin-insensitive component of sugar absorption mediated by SGLT1. There was no significant effect on the apical GLUT2 component of absorption. Leptin did not modify in vivo intestinal permeability determined with (14)C-mannitol. These observations support the view that gastric leptin exerts a regulatory role on intestinal sugar absorption in the postprandial state by modifying the active component of absorption.

  16. Hepatic Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Controls Pharmacokinetics of Vildagliptin In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Mitsutoshi; Fukami, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Miki; Fujii, Hideaki; Atsuda, Koichiro; Itoh, Tomoo; Fujiwara, Ryoichi

    2017-02-01

    The main route of elimination of vildagliptin, which is an inhibitor of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4), in humans is cyano group hydrolysis to produce a carboxylic acid metabolite M20.7. Our in vitro study previously demonstrated that DPP-4 itself greatly contributed to the hydrolysis of vildagliptin in mouse, rat, and human livers. To investigate whether hepatic DPP-4 contributes to the hydrolysis of vildagliptin in vivo, in the present study, we conducted in vivo pharmacokinetics studies of vildagliptin in mice coadministered with vildagliptin and sitagliptin, which is another DPP-4 inhibitor, and also in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) value of M20.7 in mice coadministered with vildagliptin and sitagliptin was significantly lower than that in mice administered vildagliptin alone (P < 0.01). Although plasma DPP-4 expression level was increased 1.9-fold, hepatic DPP-4 activity was decreased in STZ-induced diabetic mice. The AUC values of M20.7 in STZ-induced diabetic mice were lower than those in control mice (P < 0.01). Additionally, the AUC values of M20.7 significantly positively correlated with hepatic DPP-4 activities in the individual mice (Rs = 0.943, P < 0.05). These findings indicated that DPP-4 greatly contributed to the hydrolysis of vildagliptin in vivo and that not plasma, but hepatic DPP-4 controlled pharmacokinetics of vildagliptin. Furthermore, enzyme assays of 23 individual human liver samples showed that there was a 3.6-fold interindividual variability in vildagliptin-hydrolyzing activities. Predetermination of the interindividual variability of hepatic vildagliptin-hydrolyzing activity might be useful for the prediction of blood vildagliptin concentrations in vivo. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  17. Identification of Group A Streptococcus Antigenic Determinants Upregulated In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Salim, Kowthar Y.; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G.; Chang, Peter; Bast, Darrin J.; Handfield, Martin; Hillman, Jeffrey D.; de Azavedo, Joyce C. S.

    2005-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) causes a range of diseases in humans, from mild noninvasive infections to severe invasive infections. The molecular basis for the varying severity of disease remains unclear. We identified genes expressed during invasive disease using in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT), applied for the first time in a gram-positive organism. Convalescent-phase sera from patients with invasive disease were pooled, adsorbed against antigens derived from in vitro-grown GAS, an...

  18. Bacteria tracking by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Different non-invasive real-time imaging techniques have been developed over the last decades to study bacterial pathogenic mechanisms in mouse models by following infections over a time course. In vivo investigations of bacterial infections previously relied mostly on bioluminescence imaging (BLI), which is able to localize metabolically active bacteria, but provides no data on the status of the involved organs in the infected host organism. In this study we established an in vivo imaging platform by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for tracking bacteria in mouse models of infection to study infection biology of clinically relevant bacteria. Results We have developed a method to label Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria with iron oxide nano particles and detected and pursued these with MRI. The key step for successful labeling was to manipulate the bacterial surface charge by producing electro-competent cells enabling charge interactions between the iron particles and the cell wall. Different particle sizes and coatings were tested for their ability to attach to the cell wall and possible labeling mechanisms were elaborated by comparing Gram-positive and -negative bacterial characteristics. With 5-nm citrate-coated particles an iron load of 0.015 ± 0.002 pg Fe/bacterial cell was achieved for Staphylococcus aureus. In both a subcutaneous and a systemic infection model induced by iron-labeled S. aureus bacteria, high resolution MR images allowed for bacterial tracking and provided information on the morphology of organs and the inflammatory response. Conclusion Labeled with iron oxide particles, in vivo detection of small S. aureus colonies in infection models is feasible by MRI and provides a versatile tool to follow bacterial infections in vivo. The established cell labeling strategy can easily be transferred to other bacterial species and thus provides a conceptual advance in the field of molecular MRI. PMID:23714179

  19. In Vivo Detection of PARACEST Agents With Relaxation Correction

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Craig K.; Li, Alex X.; Suchý, Mojmír; Hudson, Robert H.E.; Menon, Ravi S.; Bartha, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Several pulse sequences have been used to detect paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST) contrast agents in animals to quantify the uptake over time following a bolus injection. The observed signal change is a combination of relaxation effects and PARACEST contrast. The purpose of the current study was to isolate the PARACEST effect from the changes in bulk water relaxation induced by the PARACEST agent in vivo for the fast low-angle shot pulse sequence. A fast low-angle...

  20. Effets anthelminthiques in vivo de la poudre de feuilles de ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Les effets anthelminthiques de la poudre de feuilles de Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloïdes et de Newbouldia laevis ont été évalués in vivo sur Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus colubriformis et Oesophagostomum columbianum chez les chevreaux Djallonké âgés de 4 à 5 mois. Les doses de 3,2 et 4,8 g/kg poids vif ont été ...

  1. In Vivo Diffuse Optical Tomography and Fluorescence Molecular Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingze Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse optical tomography (DOT and fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT are two attractive imaging techniques for in vivo physiological and psychological research. They have distinct advantages such as non-invasiveness, non-ionizing radiation, high sensitivity and longitudinal monitoring. This paper reviews the key components of DOT and FMT. Light propagation model, mathematical reconstruction algorithm, imaging instrumentation and medical applications are included. Future challenges and perspective on optical tomography are discussed.

  2. The measurement of oxygen in vivo using EPR techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swartz, Harold M. [Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Clarkson, Robert B. [College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The measurement of pO{sub 2} in vivo using EPR has some features which have already led to very useful applications and this approach is likely to have increasingly wide and effective use. It is based on the effect of oxygen on EPR spectra which provides a sensitive and accurate means to measure pO{sub 2} quantitatively. The development of oxygen-sensitive paramagnetic materials which are very stable, combined with instrumental developments, has been crucial to the in vivo applications of this technique. The physical basis and biological applications of in vivo EPR oximetry are reviewed, with particular emphasis on the use of EPR spectroscopy at 1 GHz using particulate paramagnetic materials for the repetitive and non-invasive measurement of pO{sub 2} in tissues. In vivo EPR has already produced some very useful results which have contributed significantly to solving important biological problems. The characteristics of EPR oximetry which appear to be especially useful are often complementary to existing techniques for measuring oxygen in tissues. These characteristics include the capability of making repeated measurements from the same site, high sensitivity to low levels of oxygen, and non-invasive options. The existing techniques are especially useful for studies in small animals, where the depth of measurements is not an overriding issue. In larger animals and potentially in human subjects, non-invasive techniques seem to be immediately applicable to study phenomena very near the surface (within 10 mm) while invasive techniques have some very promising uses. The clinical uses of EPR oximetry which seem especially promising and likely to be undertaken in the near future are long-term monitoring of the status and response to treatment of peripheral vascular disease and optimizing cancer therapy by enabling it to be modified on the basis of the pO{sub 2} measured in the tumour. (author)

  3. In Vivo Measurement of Drug Efficacy in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    ES) MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL 55 FRUIT ST BOSTON MA 02114-2621 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Page 2 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING...1220-1711) to Apple fluorescent protein (53BP1trunc- Apple ). Apple fluorescent protein was used for in vivo imaging due to its increased brightness over...lacks the known functional domains of 53BP1. Moreover, we show that 53BP1trunc- Apple localizes to sites of double-strand breaks with an antibody

  4. Simultaneous in vivo positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Catana, Ciprian; Procissi, Daniel; Wu, Yibao; Judenhofer, Martin S.; Qi, Jinyi; Pichler, Bernd J.; Jacobs, Russell E.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2008-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used in vivo imaging technologies with both clinical and biomedical research applications. The strengths of MRI include high-resolution, high-contrast morphologic imaging of soft tissues; the ability to image physiologic parameters such as diffusion and changes in oxygenation level resulting from neuronal stimulation; and the measurement of metabolites using chemical shift imaging. PET images the distribution o...

  5. In vivo induction of oocyte maturation and ovulation in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshinobu Tokumoto

    Full Text Available The maturation of fish oocytes is a well-characterized system induced by progestins via non-genomic actions. In a previous study, we demonstrated that diethylstilbestrol (DES, a non-steroidal estrogen, induces fish oocyte maturation via the membrane progestin receptor (mPR. Here, we attempted to evaluate the effect of DES as an environmental endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC upon fish oocyte maturation using live zebrafish. DES triggered oocyte maturation within several hours in vivo when administrated directly into the surrounding water. The natural teleost maturation-inducing hormone, 17alpha, 20beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17,20beta-DHP also induced oocyte maturation in vivo. Steroids such as testosterone, progesterone or 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone were also effective in vivo. Further studies indicated that externally applied 17,20beta-DHP even induced ovulation. In contrast to 17,20beta -DHP, DES induced maturation but not ovulation. Theoretically this assay system provides a means to distinguish pathways involved in the induction of ovulation, which are known to be induced by genomic actions from the pathway normally involved in the induction of oocyte maturation, a typical non-genomic action-dependent pathway. In summary, we have demonstrated the effect of EDCs on fish oocyte maturation in vivo. To address the effects, we have explored a conceptually new approach to distinguish between the genomic and non-genomic actions induced by steroids. The assay can be applied to screens of progestin-like effects upon oocyte maturation and ovulation for small molecules of pharmacological agents or EDCs.

  6. Study on advancement of in vivo counting using mathematical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinase, Sakae [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-05-01

    To obtain an assessment of the committed effective dose, individual monitoring for the estimation of intakes of radionuclides is required. For individual monitoring of exposure to intakes of radionuclides, direct measurement of radionuclides in the body - in vivo counting- is very useful. To advance in a precision in vivo counting which fulfills the requirements of ICRP 1990 recommendations, some problems, such as the investigation of uncertainties in estimates of body burdens by in vivo counting, and the selection of the way to improve the precision, have been studied. In the present study, a calibration technique for in vivo counting application using Monte Carlo simulation was developed. The advantage of the technique is that counting efficiency can be obtained for various shapes and sizes that are very difficult to change for phantoms. To validate the calibration technique, the response functions and counting efficiencies of a whole-body counter installed in JAERI were evaluated using the simulation and measurements. Consequently, the calculations are in good agreement with the measurements. The method for the determination of counting efficiency curves as a function of energy was developed using the present technique and a physiques correction equation was derived from the relationship between parameters of correction factor and counting efficiencies of the JAERI whole-body counter. The uncertainties in body burdens of {sup 137}Cs estimated with the JAERI whole-body counter were also investigated using the Monte Carlo simulation and measurements. It was found that the uncertainties of body burdens estimated with the whole-body counter are strongly dependent on various sources of uncertainty such as radioactivity distribution within the body and counting statistics. Furthermore, the evaluation method of the peak efficiencies of a Ge semi-conductor detector was developed by Monte Carlo simulation for optimum arrangement of Ge semi-conductor detectors for

  7. In vivo incorporation of cobalt into Propionibacterium shermanii superoxide dismutase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, B; Sehn, A P; Sette, M; Paci, M; Desideri, A; Rotilio, G

    1994-07-18

    Propionibacterium shermanii, an aerotolerant anaerobic bacterium, has already been shown to incorporate, depending on the metal supplementation to the medium, either iron or manganese or copper into the same superoxide dismutase protein. The in vivo incorporation of cobalt in the same superoxide dismutase was obtained in an iron-, manganese- and copper-depleted medium. The protein was isolated and characterized by NMR which offers the possibility to identify the amino acid residues at the active site exploiting isotropically shifted proton resonance.

  8. Ranking the in vivo toxicity of nanomaterials in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchio, G.; Galeone, A.; Malvindi, M. A.; Cingolani, R.; Pompa, P. P.

    2013-09-01

    In this work, we propose a quantitative assessment of nanoparticles toxicity in vivo. We show a quantitative ranking of several types of nanoparticles (AuNPs, AgNPs, cadmium-based QDs, cadmium-free QDs, and iron oxide NPs, with different coating and/or surface chemistries), providing a categorization of their toxicity outcomes. This strategy may offer an innovative high-throughput screening tool of nanomaterials, of potential and broad interest to the nanoscience community.

  9. Susceptibility of anthocyanins to ex vivo degradation in human saliva

    OpenAIRE

    Kamonpatana, Kom; Giusti, M. Mónica; Chitchumroonchokchai, Chureeporn; MorenoCruz, Maria; Riedl, Ken M.; Kumar, Purnima; Failla, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    Some fruits and their anthocyanin-rich extracts have been reported to exhibit chemopreventive activity in the oral cavity. Insights regarding oral metabolism of anthocyanins remain limited. Anthocyanin-rich extracts from blueberry, chokeberry, black raspberry, red grape, and strawberry were incubated ex vivo with human saliva from 14 healthy subjects. All anthocyanins were partially degraded in saliva. Degradation of chokeberry anthocyanins in saliva was temperature dependent and decreased by...

  10. Ranking the in vivo toxicity of nanomaterials in Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchio, G.; Galeone, A.; Malvindi, M. A. [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Center for Bio-Molecular Nanotechnologies-UniLe (Italy); Cingolani, R. [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Central Research Laboratories (Italy); Pompa, P. P., E-mail: pierpaolo.pompa@iit.it [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Center for Bio-Molecular Nanotechnologies-UniLe (Italy)

    2013-09-15

    In this work, we propose a quantitative assessment of nanoparticles toxicity in vivo. We show a quantitative ranking of several types of nanoparticles (AuNPs, AgNPs, cadmium-based QDs, cadmium-free QDs, and iron oxide NPs, with different coating and/or surface chemistries), providing a categorization of their toxicity outcomes. This strategy may offer an innovative high-throughput screening tool of nanomaterials, of potential and broad interest to the nanoscience community.

  11. Somatostatin analogues suppress the inflammatory reaction in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Karalis, K; Mastorakos, G.; Chrousos, G. P.; Tolis, G

    1994-01-01

    Somatostatin (Sms) and its agonist analogues inhibit the secretory activities of endocrine and neural cells. Recent studies have suggested that Sms has significant immunomodulatory properties. In this study, we examine the effects of two Sms octapeptide analogues on the inflammatory reaction in vivo. BIM 23014 (Somatulin) and Sandostatin were administered to male Sprague-Dawley rats subject to carrageenin-induced aseptic inflammation, at doses of 2-10 micrograms/rat, given either systemically...

  12. In vivo dosimetry by an aSi-based EPID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piermattei, Angelo; Fidanzio, Andrea; Stimato, Gerardina; Azario, Luigi; Grimaldi, Luca; D'Onofrio, Guido; Cilla, Savino; Balducci, Mario; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Di Napoli, Nicola; Cellini, Numa

    2006-11-01

    A method for the in vivo determination of the isocenter dose, Diso, and mid-plane dose, Dm, using the transmitted signal St measured by 25 central pixels of an aSi-based EPID is here reported. The method has been applied to check the conformal radiotherapy of pelvic tumors and supplies accurate in vivo dosimetry avoiding many of the disadvantages associated with the use of two diode detectors (at the entrance and exit of the patient) as their periodic recalibration and their positioning. Irradiating water-equivalent phantoms of different thicknesses, a set of correlation functions F(w, l) were obtained by the ratio between St and Dm as a function of the phantom thickness, w, for a different field width, l. For the in vivo determination of Diso and Dm values, the water-equivalent thickness of the patients (along the beam central axis) was evaluated by means of the treatment planning system that uses CT scans calibrated in terms of the electron densities. The Diso and Dm values experimentally determined were compared with the stated doses D(iso,TPS) and D(m,TPS), determined by the treatment planning system for ten pelvic treatments. In particular, for each treatment four fields were checked in six fractions. In these conditions the agreement between the in vivo dosimetry and stated doses at the isocenter point were within 3%. Comparing the 480 dose values obtained in this work with those obtained for 30 patients tested with a similar method, which made use of a small ion-chamber positioned on the EPIDs to obtain the transmitted signal, a similar agreement was observed. The method here proposed is very practical and can be applied in every treatment fraction, supplying useful information about eventual patient dose variations due to the incorrect application of the quality assurance program based on the check of patient setup, machine setting, and calculations.

  13. Noninvasive laser coagulation of the canine vas deferens, in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilip, Christopher M.; Ross, Ashley E.; Jarow, Jonathan P.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2010-02-01

    Development of a noninvasive vasectomy technique may eliminate male fear of complications (incision, bleeding, infection, and scrotal pain) and result in a more popular procedure. This study builds upon previously reported ex vivo tissue studies by exploring acute and short-term chronic in vivo canine studies. Isolation of the canine vas was achieved using a conventional vas ring clamp method. No perforation of the scrotal skin was necessary to occlude the vas. Laser radiation with a wavelength of 1075 nm, average power of 11.2 W, 500-ms pulse duration, 0.5 Hz pulse rate, and 3-mm-diameter spot was synchronized with cryogen spray cooling of the scrotal skin surface in a total of 8 dogs (n = 16 vasa) for a treatment time of 60 s. Burst pressure measurements were conducted at Days 0 and 21 (n = 8 vasa each day) to quantify the strength of vas closure. The vas was successfully thermally occluded in 15/16 (94%) procedures with 14/15 (93%) vas recording burst pressures above ejaculation pressure. One vas was not present, and another vas recorded a bursting pressure below ejaculation pressure. The coagulated vas bursting pressure averaged 283 +/- 34 mm Hg at Day 0 and 260 +/- 77 mm Hg at Day 21, significantly higher than reported vas ejaculation pressures of 136 +/- 29 mm Hg. Minor scrotal skin burns were observed during the recovery period. Noninvasive thermal occlusion of the vas is feasible in an in vivo canine model. Elimination of minor skin burns and longer term chronic in vivo canine studies are needed to confirm azospermia after vas occlusion without recanalization.

  14. Clonality of mouse and human cardiomyogenesis in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Hosoda, Toru; D'Amario, Domenico; Cabral-Da-Silva, Mauricio Castro; Zheng, Hanqiao; Padin-Iruegas, M. Elena; Ogorek, Barbara; Ferreira-Martins, João; Yasuzawa-Amano, Saori; Amano, Katsuya; Ide-Iwata, Noriko; Cheng, Wei; Rota, Marcello; Urbanek, Konrad; Kajstura, Jan; Anversa, Piero

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of the clonality of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) and myocyte turnover in vivo requires genetic tagging of the undifferentiated cells so that the clonal marker of individual mother cells is traced in the specialized progeny. CPC niches in the atria and apex of the mouse heart were infected with a lentivirus carrying EGFP, and the destiny of the tagged cells was determined 1–5 months later. A common integration site was identified in isolated CPCs, cardiomyocytes, endothelial cel...

  15. In vivo dosimetry with L-alpha-alanine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boey, R.; Van Der Velden, K. [Industriele Hogeschool van het Gemeenschapsonderwijs Limburg, Hasselt (Belgium); Schaeken, B. [Algemeen Ziekenhuis Middelheim, Antwerp (Belgium). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    1995-12-01

    When organic substances are irradiated, stable electrons can be formed. The concentration of these electrons is detected via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), a non-destructive form of dosimetry. L-alpha-alanine is extremely suited as a detector because of its high stability and high yield of unpaired electrons. With an EMS 104 spectrometer, we measure the peak-to-peak value of the first derivate of the resonance-spectrum. This value is proportional to the concentration of unpaired electrons and therefore with the absorbed dose. Prior to the in vivo measurements in teletherapy, a calibration curve had to be established. This clearly showed a linear relationship between the EPR-signal and the absorbed dose, except for very low dose where precision was low (20% 1 sd). This indicates that the background signal of the dosimeter is strongly orientation dependent. For this reason it was decided to use pre-irradiated detectors. A number of in vivo measurements has been performed. It was found that the error propagation plays a major role in the calculation of the measured absorbed dose, in the range 1 Gy-6 Gy. Contrary to in vivo measurements in brachytherapy, where higher doses are measured, large uncertainties (30% 1 sd) on the entry dose calculations were observed. For this reason, it is recommended to use a statistical method of reducing this standard deviation to an acceptable level. The proposed method, consisting of 2 detectors and the usage of weight coefficients on our standard deviations, gave promising results. However, theoretical calculations and in vivo measurements show that this method is still not satisfactory to reduce the uncertainty to an acceptable standard in clinical situations.

  16. In vivo metabolite compartmentalization probed using intracellular GdDTPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, David Alberg; Rowland, Ian

    Fast trans-membrane water exchange enables in- tracellular relaxation enhancement of water by contrast agents in the extracellular space. For me- tabolites not in fast exchange across membranes, intracellular metabolite relaxation enhancement will only occur if the contrast agent and metabolite...... are in the same compartment. Extracellular contrast has utilized electroporation methods to deliver GdDTPA into the cytosol of rat muscle in vivo in order to probe the intracellular compart- mentalization of MR-visible metabolites....

  17. Pharmacological Modulation of Hemodynamics in Adult Zebrafish In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Brönnimann

    Full Text Available Hemodynamic parameters in zebrafish receive increasing attention because of their important role in cardiovascular processes such as atherosclerosis, hematopoiesis, sprouting and intussusceptive angiogenesis. To study underlying mechanisms, the precise modulation of parameters like blood flow velocity or shear stress is centrally important. Questions related to blood flow have been addressed in the past in either embryonic or ex vivo-zebrafish models but little information is available for adult animals. Here we describe a pharmacological approach to modulate cardiac and hemodynamic parameters in adult zebrafish in vivo.Adult zebrafish were paralyzed and orally perfused with salt water. The drugs isoprenaline and sodium nitroprusside were directly applied with the perfusate, thus closely resembling the preferred method for drug delivery in zebrafish, namely within the water. Drug effects on the heart and on blood flow in the submental vein were studied using electrocardiograms, in vivo-microscopy and mathematical flow simulations.Under control conditions, heart rate, blood flow velocity and shear stress varied less than ± 5%. Maximal chronotropic effects of isoprenaline were achieved at a concentration of 50 μmol/L, where it increased the heart rate by 22.6 ± 1.3% (n = 4; p < 0.0001. Blood flow velocity and shear stress in the submental vein were not significantly increased. Sodium nitroprusside at 1 mmol/L did not alter the heart rate but increased blood flow velocity by 110.46 ± 19.64% (p = 0.01 and shear stress by 117.96 ± 23.65% (n = 9; p = 0.03.In this study, we demonstrate that cardiac and hemodynamic parameters in adult zebrafish can be efficiently modulated by isoprenaline and sodium nitroprusside. Together with the suitability of the zebrafish for in vivo-microscopy and genetic modifications, the methodology described permits studying biological processes that are dependent on hemodynamic alterations.

  18. Identification of Enterococcus faecalis antigens specifically expressed in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Seok-Woo Lee; Shet, Uttom K.; Sang-Won Park; Hyun-Pil Lim; Kwi-Dug Yun; Seong Soo Kang; Se Eun Kim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Molecular mechanism of the pathogenicity of Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis), a suspected endodontic pathogen, has not yet been adequately elucidated due to limited information on its virulence factors. Here we report the identification of in vivo expressed antigens of E. faecalis by using a novel immunoscreening technique called change-mediated antigen technology (CMAT) and an experimental animal model of endodontic infection. Materials and Methods Among 4,500 E. coli...

  19. Optimized isolation enables Ex vivo analysis of microglia from various central nervous system regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haas, Alexander H.; Boddeke, Hendricus W. G. M.; Brouwer, Nieske; Biber, Knut

    2007-01-01

    Ex vivo analysis is an accurate and convenient way to study in vivo microglia phenotype and function. However, current microglia isolation protocols for ex vivo analysis show many differences in isolation steps (perfusion, removal of meninges and blood vessels, mechanical dissociation, enzymatic

  20. Prototype to measure bracket debonding force in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssika Lagni Tonus

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Material biodegradation that occurs in the mouth may interfere in the bonding strength between the bracket and the enamel, causing lower bond strength values in vivo, in comparison with in vitro studies. Objective: To develop a prototype to measure bracket debonding force in vivo and to evaluate, in vitro, the bond strength obtained with the prototype. Methods: A original plier (3M Unitek was modified by adding one strain gauge directly connected to its claw. An electronic circuit performed the reading of the strain gauge, and the software installed in a computer recorded the values of the bracket debonding force, in kgf. Orthodontic brackets were bonded to the facial surface of 30 bovine incisors with adhesive materials. In Group 1 (n = 15, debonding was carried out with the prototype, while tensile bond strength testing was performed in Group 2 (n = 15. A universal testing machine was used for the second group. The adhesive remnant index (ARI was recorded. Results: According to Student’s t test (α = 0.05, Group 1 (2.96 MPa and Group 2 (3.08 MPa were not significantly different. ARI score of 3 was predominant in the two groups. Conclusion: The prototype proved to be reliable for obtaining in vivo bond strength values for orthodontic brackets.

  1. Optical imaging of structural and functional synaptic plasticity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtmaat, Anthony; Randall, Jerome; Cane, Michele

    2013-11-05

    The adult brain has long been viewed as a collection of neuronal networks that maintain a fixed configuration of synaptic connections. Brain plasticity and learning was thought to depend exclusively on changes in the gain and offset of these connections. Over the last 50 years, molecular and cellular studies of neuroplasticity have altered this view. Brain plasticity is now viewed as a continuum of structural changes that could vary from long-range axon growth to the twitching of dendritic spines and synaptic receptor composition dynamics. Plasticity proteins similar to those that drive neuronal development may underpin brain plasticity, and consequently could regulate adaptations to new experiences and learning. In vivo imaging has confirmed that neuronal plasticity in the adult brain involves subtle structural changes at synaptic connections, including synapse formation and pruning. Synaptic structural changes are associated with experience-dependent plasticity, learning, brain traumas and neurodegeneration. Owing to the expanding toolbox of in vivo imaging we have come to the brink of understanding the causal relationship between structural synaptic network dynamics and functional brain plasticity. This review summarizes the technical developments in the imaging of laboratory animals' brains in vivo and the insights they have provided into the mechanisms of brain plasticity and learning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Immunotherapy of Malignancy by in vivo Gene Transfer into Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plautz, Gregory E.; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Bei-Yue; Gao, Xiang; Huang, Leaf; Nabel, Gary J.

    1993-05-01

    The immune system confers protection against a variety of pathogens and contributes to the surveillance and destruction of neoplastic cells. Several cell types participate in the recognition and lysis of tumors, and appropriate immune stimulation provides therapeutic effects in malignancy. Foreign major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins also serve as a potent stimulus to the immune system. In this report, a foreign MHC gene was introduced directly into malignant tumors in vivo in an effort to stimulate tumor rejection. In contrast to previous attempts to induce tumor immunity by cell-mediated gene transfer, the recombinant gene was introduced directly into tumors in vivo. Expression of the murine class I H-2K^s gene within the CT26 mouse colon adenocarcinoma (H-2K^d) or the MCA 106 fibrosarcoma (H-2K^b) induced a cytotoxic T-cell response to H-2K^s and, more importantly, to other antigens present on unmodified tumor cells. This immune response attenuated tumor growth and caused complete tumor regression in many cases. Direct gene transfer in vivo can therefore induce cell-mediated immunity against specific gene products, which provides an immunotherapeutic effect for malignancy, and potentially can be applied to the treatment of cancer and infectious diseases in man.

  3. Organelle acidification negatively regulates vacuole membrane fusion in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desfougères, Yann; Vavassori, Stefano; Rompf, Maria; Gerasimaite, Ruta; Mayer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The V-ATPase is a proton pump consisting of a membrane-integral V0 sector and a peripheral V1 sector, which carries the ATPase activity. In vitro studies of yeast vacuole fusion and evidence from worms, flies, zebrafish and mice suggested that V0 interacts with the SNARE machinery for membrane fusion, that it promotes the induction of hemifusion and that this activity requires physical presence of V0 rather than its proton pump activity. A recent in vivo study in yeast has challenged these interpretations, concluding that fusion required solely lumenal acidification but not the V0 sector itself. Here, we identify the reasons for this discrepancy and reconcile it. We find that acute pharmacological or physiological inhibition of V-ATPase pump activity de-acidifies the vacuole lumen in living yeast cells within minutes. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that de-acidification induces vacuole fusion rather than inhibiting it. Cells expressing mutated V0 subunits that maintain vacuolar acidity were blocked in this fusion. Thus, proton pump activity of the V-ATPase negatively regulates vacuole fusion in vivo. Vacuole fusion in vivo does, however, require physical presence of a fusion-competent V0 sector. PMID:27363625

  4. Novel in vivo techniques to visualize kidney anatomy and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Kidokoro, Kengo; Riquier-Brison, Anne

    2015-07-01

    Intravital imaging using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become an increasingly popular and widely used experimental technique in kidney research over the past few years. MPM allows deep optical sectioning of the intact, living kidney tissue with submicron resolution, which is unparalleled among intravital imaging approaches. MPM has solved a long-standing critical technical barrier in renal research to study several complex and inaccessible cell types and anatomical structures in vivo in their native environment. Comprehensive and quantitative kidney structure and function MPM studies helped our better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the healthy and diseased kidney. This review summarizes recent in vivo MPM studies with a focus on the glomerulus and the filtration barrier, although select, glomerulus-related renal vascular and tubular functions are also mentioned. The latest applications of serial MPM of the same glomerulus in vivo, in the intact kidney over several days, during the progression of glomerular disease are discussed. This visual approach, in combination with genetically encoded fluorescent markers of cell lineage, has helped track the fate and function (e.g., cell calcium changes) of single podocytes during the development of glomerular pathologies, and provided visual proof for the highly dynamic, rather than static, nature of the glomerular environment. Future intravital imaging applications have the promise to further push the limits of optical microscopy, and to advance our understanding of the mechanisms of kidney injury. Also, MPM will help to study new mechanisms of tissue repair and regeneration, a cutting-edge area of kidney research.

  5. In Vivo Efficacy and Pharmacokinetics of Optimized Apidaecin Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Rico; Knappe, Daniel; Wende, Elisabeth; Ostorházi, Eszter; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2017-03-01

    Proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PrAMPs) represent promising alternative therapeutic options for the treatment of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. PrAMPs are predominantly active against Gram-negative bacteria by inhibiting protein expression via at least two different modes of action, i.e., blocking the ribosomal exit tunnel of 70S ribosomes (oncocin-type binding) or inhibiting the assembly of the 50S ribosomal subunit (apidaecin-type binding). The in vivo efficacy and favorable biodistribution of oncocins confirmed the therapeutic potential of short PrAMPs for the first time, whereas the in vivo evaluation of apidaecins is still limited despite the promising efficacy of apidaecin-analog Api88 in an intraperitoneal murine infection model. Here, the in vivo efficacy of apidaecin-analog Api137 was studied, which rescued all NMRI mice from a lethal intraperitoneal infection with E. coli ATCC 25922 when administered three times intraperitoneal at doses of 0.6 mg/kg starting one hour after infection. When Api88 and Api137 were administered intravenous or intraperitoneal at doses of 5 and 20 mg/kg, their plasma levels were similarly low (murine infection models and the fast clearance of Api88 and Api137 within 60 min after intravenous and 90 min after intraperitoneal injections indicate that

  6. Infrared neural stimulation of human spinal nerve roots in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayce, Jonathan M; Wells, Jonathon D; Malphrus, Jonathan D; Kao, Chris; Thomsen, Sharon; Tulipan, Noel B; Konrad, Peter E; Jansen, E Duco; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a neurostimulation modality that uses pulsed infrared light to evoke artifact-free, spatially precise neural activity with a noncontact interface; however, the technique has not been demonstrated in humans. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of INS in humans in vivo. The feasibility of INS in humans was assessed in patients ([Formula: see text]) undergoing selective dorsal root rhizotomy, where hyperactive dorsal roots, identified for transection, were stimulated in vivo with INS on two to three sites per nerve with electromyogram recordings acquired throughout the stimulation. The stimulated dorsal root was removed and histology was performed to determine thermal damage thresholds of INS. Threshold activation of human dorsal rootlets occurred in 63% of nerves for radiant exposures between 0.53 and [Formula: see text]. In all cases, only one or two monitored muscle groups were activated from INS stimulation of a hyperactive spinal root identified by electrical stimulation. Thermal damage was first noted at [Formula: see text] and a [Formula: see text] safety ratio was identified. These findings demonstrate the success of INS as a fresh approach for activating human nerves in vivo and providing the necessary safety data needed to pursue clinically driven therapeutic and diagnostic applications of INS in humans.

  7. Resurrection of DNA function in vivo from an extinct genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pask, Andrew J; Behringer, Richard R; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2008-05-21

    There is a burgeoning repository of information available from ancient DNA that can be used to understand how genomes have evolved and to determine the genetic features that defined a particular species. To assess the functional consequences of changes to a genome, a variety of methods are needed to examine extinct DNA function. We isolated a transcriptional enhancer element from the genome of an extinct marsupial, the Tasmanian tiger (Thylacinus cynocephalus or thylacine), obtained from 100 year-old ethanol-fixed tissues from museum collections. We then examined the function of the enhancer in vivo. Using a transgenic approach, it was possible to resurrect DNA function in transgenic mice. The results demonstrate that the thylacine Col2A1 enhancer directed chondrocyte-specific expression in this extinct mammalian species in the same way as its orthologue does in mice. While other studies have examined extinct coding DNA function in vitro, this is the first example of the restoration of extinct non-coding DNA and examination of its function in vivo. Our method using transgenesis can be used to explore the function of regulatory and protein-coding sequences obtained from any extinct species in an in vivo model system, providing important insights into gene evolution and diversity.

  8. In vivo enzyme activity in inborn errors of metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, G.N.; Walter, J.H.; Leonard, J.V.; Halliday, D. (Clinical Research Centre, Harrow (England))

    1990-08-01

    Low-dose continuous infusions of (2H5)phenylalanine, (1-13C)propionate, and (1-13C)leucine were used to quantitate phenylalanine hydroxylation in phenylketonuria (PKU, four subjects), propionate oxidation in methylmalonic acidaemia (MMA, four subjects), and propionic acidaemia (PA, four subjects) and leucine oxidation in maple syrup urine disease (MSUD, four subjects). In vivo enzyme activity in PKU, MMA, and PA subjects was similar to or in excess of that in adult controls (range of phenylalanine hydroxylation in PKU, 3.7 to 6.5 mumol/kg/h, control 3.2 to 7.9, n = 7; propionate oxidation in MMA, 15.2 to 64.8 mumol/kg/h, and in PA, 11.1 to 36.0, control 5.1 to 19.0, n = 5). By contrast, in vivo leucine oxidation was undetectable in three of the four MSUD subjects (less than 0.5 mumol/kg/h) and negligible in the remaining subject (2 mumol/kg/h, control 10.4 to 15.7, n = 6). These results suggest that significant substrate removal can be achieved in some inborn metabolic errors either through stimulation of residual enzyme activity in defective enzyme systems or by activation of alternate metabolic pathways. Both possibilities almost certainly depend on gross elevation of substrate concentrations. By contrast, only minimal in vivo oxidation of leucine appears possible in MSUD.

  9. Does oxidative stress shorten telomeres in vivo? A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Sophie; Stier, Antoine

    2017-12-01

    The length of telomeres, the protective caps of chromosomes, is increasingly used as a biomarker of individual health state because it has been shown to predict chances of survival in a range of endothermic species including humans. Oxidative stress is presumed to be a major cause of telomere shortening, but most evidence to date comes from in vitro cultured cells. The importance of oxidative stress as a determinant of telomere shortening in vivo remains less clear and has recently been questioned. We, therefore, reviewed correlative and experimental studies investigating the links between oxidative stress and telomere shortening in vivo While correlative studies provide equivocal support for a connection between oxidative stress and telomere attrition (10 of 18 studies), most experimental studies published so far (seven of eight studies) partially or fully support this hypothesis. Yet, this link seems to be tissue-dependent in some cases, or restricted to particular categories of individual (e.g. sex-dependent) in other cases. More experimental studies, especially those decreasing antioxidant protection or increasing pro-oxidant generation, are required to further our understanding of the importance of oxidative stress in determining telomere length in vivo Studies comparing growing versus adult individuals, or proliferative versus non-proliferative tissues would provide particularly important insights. © 2017 The Author(s).

  10. Resurrection of DNA function in vivo from an extinct genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Pask

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a burgeoning repository of information available from ancient DNA that can be used to understand how genomes have evolved and to determine the genetic features that defined a particular species. To assess the functional consequences of changes to a genome, a variety of methods are needed to examine extinct DNA function. We isolated a transcriptional enhancer element from the genome of an extinct marsupial, the Tasmanian tiger (Thylacinus cynocephalus or thylacine, obtained from 100 year-old ethanol-fixed tissues from museum collections. We then examined the function of the enhancer in vivo. Using a transgenic approach, it was possible to resurrect DNA function in transgenic mice. The results demonstrate that the thylacine Col2A1 enhancer directed chondrocyte-specific expression in this extinct mammalian species in the same way as its orthologue does in mice. While other studies have examined extinct coding DNA function in vitro, this is the first example of the restoration of extinct non-coding DNA and examination of its function in vivo. Our method using transgenesis can be used to explore the function of regulatory and protein-coding sequences obtained from any extinct species in an in vivo model system, providing important insights into gene evolution and diversity.

  11. Simultaneous in vivo positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; Procissi, Daniel; Wu, Yibao; Judenhofer, Martin S; Qi, Jinyi; Pichler, Bernd J; Jacobs, Russell E; Cherry, Simon R

    2008-03-11

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used in vivo imaging technologies with both clinical and biomedical research applications. The strengths of MRI include high-resolution, high-contrast morphologic imaging of soft tissues; the ability to image physiologic parameters such as diffusion and changes in oxygenation level resulting from neuronal stimulation; and the measurement of metabolites using chemical shift imaging. PET images the distribution of biologically targeted radiotracers with high sensitivity, but images generally lack anatomic context and are of lower spatial resolution. Integration of these technologies permits the acquisition of temporally correlated data showing the distribution of PET radiotracers and MRI contrast agents or MR-detectable metabolites, with registration to the underlying anatomy. An MRI-compatible PET scanner has been built for biomedical research applications that allows data from both modalities to be acquired simultaneously. Experiments demonstrate no effect of the MRI system on the spatial resolution of the PET system and PET scanner inside the MRI. The signal-to-noise ratio and uniformity of the MR images, with the exception of one particular pulse sequence, were little affected by the presence of the PET scanner. In vivo simultaneous PET and MRI studies were performed in mice. Proof-of-principle in vivo MR spectroscopy and functional MRI experiments were also demonstrated with the combined scanner.

  12. In vivo electroporation mediated gene delivery to the beating heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick L Ayuni

    Full Text Available Gene therapy may represent a promising alternative strategy for cardiac muscle regeneration. In vivo electroporation, a physical method of gene transfer, has recently evolved as an efficient method for gene transfer. In the current study, we investigated the efficiency and safety of a protocol involving in vivo electroporation for gene transfer to the beating heart. Adult male rats were anesthetised and the heart exposed through a left thoracotomy. Naked plasmid DNA was injected retrograde into the transiently occluded coronary sinus before the electric pulses were applied. Animals were sacrificed at specific time points and gene expression was detected. Results were compared to the group of animals where no electric pulses were applied. No post-procedure arrhythmia was observed. Left ventricular function was temporarily altered only in the group were high pulses were applied; CK-MB (Creatine kinase and TNT (Troponin T were also altered only in this group. Histology showed no signs of toxicity. Gene expression was highest at day one. Our results provide evidence that in vivo electroporation with an optimized protocol is a safe and effective tool for nonviral gene delivery to the beating heart. This method may be promising for clinical settings especially for perioperative gene delivery.

  13. Portable XRF Technology to Quantify Pb in Bone In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Aaron James; Weisskopf, Marc; Nie, Linda Huiling

    2014-01-01

    Lead is a ubiquitous toxicant. Bone lead has been established as an important biomarker for cumulative lead exposures and has been correlated with adverse health effects on many systems in the body. K-shell X-ray fluorescence (KXRF) is the standard method for measuring bone lead, but this approach has many difficulties that have limited the widespread use of this exposure assessment method. With recent advancements in X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technology, we have developed a portable system that can quantify lead in bone in vivo within 3 minutes. Our study investigated improvements to the system, four calibration methods, and system validation for in vivo measurements. Our main results show that the detection limit of the system is 2.9 ppm with 2 mm soft tissue thickness, the best calibration method for in vivo measurement is background subtraction, and there is strong correlation between KXRF and portable LXRF bone lead results. Our results indicate that the technology is ready to be used in large human population studies to investigate adverse health effects of lead exposure. The portability of the system and fast measurement time should allow for this technology to greatly advance the research on lead exposure and public/environmental health.

  14. In vivo multiphoton imaging of the eyelid skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Ana; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada; König, Karsten

    2017-02-01

    Multiphoton tomography (MPT) has become an important imaging method for non-invasive and high-resolution imaging of the skin in vivo. Due to the nonlinear excitation, by using near-infrared (NIR) light, 3D information is intrinsically provided. In combination with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), it is possible to obtain both structural and metabolic data. Human in vivo measurements are usually limited to easily accessible regions. However, often imaging of specific body parts such as the eyelid are of interest for cosmetic reasons. By using the clinically certified multiphoton imaging tomograph MPTflex this demand can be fulfilled. An articulated mirror arm and scan-detector head enable imaging at otherwise difficult-to-access areas. We show the characterization of the epidermal and upper dermal layers of the eyelid skin of human volunteers in vivo based on endogenous autofluorescence intensity, lifetime, and second-harmonic generation signals. Skin properties such as the epidermal thickness were also assessed. Furthermore, the influence of an anti-aging cream on the eyelid and forearm skin was investigated. Changes of the skin epidermis autofluorescence lifetime were observed after two-weeks long application of an anti-aging cream. The SHG-to-AF aging index of dermis (SAAID) increased during that time.

  15. Macrophages sustain HIV replication in vivo independently of T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Angela; Baker, Caroline; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann; Foster, John; Zakharova, Oksana; Wietgrefe, Stephen; Caro-Vegas, Carolina; Sharpe, Garrett; Haase, Ashley T.; Eron, Joseph J.; Garcia, J. Victor

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages have long been considered to contribute to HIV infection of the CNS; however, a recent study has contradicted this early work and suggests that myeloid cells are not an in vivo source of virus production. Here, we addressed the role of macrophages in HIV infection by first analyzing monocytes isolated from viremic patients and patients undergoing antiretroviral treatment. We were unable to find viral DNA or viral outgrowth in monocytes isolated from peripheral blood. To determine whether tissue macrophages are productively infected, we used 3 different but complementary humanized mouse models. Two of these models (bone marrow/liver/thymus [BLT] mice and T cell–only mice [ToM]) have been previously described, and the third model was generated by reconstituting immunodeficient mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells that were devoid of human T cells (myeloid-only mice [MoM]) to specifically evaluate HIV replication in this population. Using MoM, we demonstrated that macrophages can sustain HIV replication in the absence of T cells; HIV-infected macrophages are distributed in various tissues including the brain; replication-competent virus can be rescued ex vivo from infected macrophages; and infected macrophages can establish de novo infection. Together, these results demonstrate that macrophages represent a genuine target for HIV infection in vivo that can sustain and transmit infection. PMID:26950420

  16. In vivo ultrasonic detection of polyurea crosslinked silica aerogel implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, Firouzeh; Sebelik, Merry E; Meacham, Ryan; Boughter, John D; Challis, Mitchell J; Leventis, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Polyurea crosslinked silica aerogels are highly porous, lightweight, and mechanically strong materials with great potential for in vivo applications. Recent in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated the biocompatibility of this type of aerogel. The highly porous nature of aerogels allows for exceptional thermal, electric, and acoustic insulating capabilities that can be taken advantage of for non-invasive external imaging techniques. Sound-based detection of implants is a low cost, non-invasive, portable, and rapid technique that is routinely used and readily available in major clinics and hospitals. In this study the first in vivo ultrasound response of polyurea crosslinked silica aerogel implants was investigated by means of a GE Medical Systems LogiQe diagnostic ultrasound machine with a linear array probe. Aerogel samples were inserted subcutaneously and sub-muscularly in a) fresh animal model and b) cadaveric human model for analysis. For comparison, samples of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were also imaged under similar conditions as the aerogel samples. Polyurea crosslinked silica aerogel (X-Si aerogel) implants were easily identified when inserted in either of the regions in both fresh animal model and cadaveric model. The implant dimensions inferred from the images matched the actual size of the implants and no apparent damage was sustained by the X-Si aerogel implants as a result of the ultrasonic imaging process. The aerogel implants demonstrated hyperechoic behavior and significant posterior shadowing. Results obtained were compared with images acquired from the PDMS implants inserted at the same location.

  17. In vivo histamine voltammetry in the mouse premammillary nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaranayake, Srimal; Abdalla, Aya; Robke, Rhiannon; Wood, Kevin M; Zeqja, Anisa; Hashemi, Parastoo

    2015-06-07

    Histamine plays a major role in the mediation of allergic reactions such as peripheral inflammation. This classical monoamine is also a neurotransmitter involved in the central nervous system but its role in this context is poorly understood. Studying histamine neurotransmission is important due to its implications in many neurological disorders. The sensitivity, selectivity and high temporal resolution of fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) offer many advantages for studying electroactive neurotransmitters. Histamine has previously been studied with FSCV; however, the lack of a robust Faradaic electrochemical signal makes it difficult to selectively identify histamine in complex media, as found in vivo. In this work, we optimize an electrochemical waveform that provides a stimulation-locked and unique electrochemical signal towards histamine. We describe in vitro waveform optimization and a novel in vivo physiological model for stimulating histamine release in the mouse premammillary nucleus via stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle. We demonstrate that a robust signal can be used to effectively identify histamine and characterize its in vivo kinetics.

  18. Recruitment of murine neutrophils in vivo through endogenous sialidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Alan S; Sakarya, Serhan; Rifat, Salahaldin; Held, Thomas K; Drysdale, Beth-Ellen; Grange, Philippe A; Cassels, Frederick J; Wang, Lai-Xi; Stamatos, Nicholas; Farese, Ann; Casey, Daniel; Powell, Jan; Bhattacharjee, Apurba K; Kleinberg, Michael; Goldblum, Simeon E

    2003-02-07

    Upon activation with various noncytokine stimuli, polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) mobilize intracellular sialidase to the plasma membrane, where the sialidase releases sialic acid from the cell surface. This desialylation enhances PMN adherence, spreading, deformability, and motility, functions critical to diapedesis. We now have examined the role of sialidase activity in PMN adhesion to and migration across the endothelium in vivo. A polyclonal antibody prepared against Clostridium perfringens neuraminidase 1) detected surface expression of sialidase on human PMNs stimulated with IL-8 in vitro and on murine PMNs stimulated in vivo, but not on that of unstimulated cells, 2) recognized proteins in human PMN lysates and granule preparations that were not detected by preimmune antibody, 3) inhibited bacterial neuraminidase and human PMN sialidase activities in vitro, and 4) inhibited both pulmonary leukostasis in mice systemically infused with cobra venom factor and intrapulmonary transendothelial migration of PMNs into the bronchoalveolar compartment of mice intranasally challenged with interleukin-8. We conclude that the chemokine interleukin-8, like other PMN agonists, induces the translocation of sialidase to the PMN surface and that surface expression of this sialidase is a prerequisite to PMN recruitment in vivo. The ability of antibodies raised against a prokaryotic neuraminidase to recognize eukaryotic sialidase extends the concept of the neuraminidase superfamily to mammalian enzymes. Inhibition of mobilized endogenous sialidase may provide a novel strategy for limiting the inflammatory response.

  19. Biodegradable luminescent porous silicon nanoparticles for in vivo applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Ho; Gu, Luo; von Maltzahn, Geoffrey; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Sailor, Michael J.

    2009-04-01

    Nanomaterials that can circulate in the body hold great potential to diagnose and treat disease. For such applications, it is important that the nanomaterials be harmlessly eliminated from the body in a reasonable period of time after they carry out their diagnostic or therapeutic function. Despite efforts to improve their targeting efficiency, significant quantities of systemically administered nanomaterials are cleared by the mononuclear phagocytic system before finding their targets, increasing the likelihood of unintended acute or chronic toxicity. However, there has been little effort to engineer the self-destruction of errant nanoparticles into non-toxic, systemically eliminated products. Here, we present luminescent porous silicon nanoparticles (LPSiNPs) that can carry a drug payload and of which the intrinsic near-infrared photoluminescence enables monitoring of both accumulation and degradation in vivo. Furthermore, in contrast to most optically active nanomaterials (carbon nanotubes, gold nanoparticles and quantum dots), LPSiNPs self-destruct in a mouse model into renally cleared components in a relatively short period of time with no evidence of toxicity. As a preliminary in vivo application, we demonstrate tumour imaging using dextran-coated LPSiNPs (D-LPSiNPs). These results demonstrate a new type of multifunctional nanostructure with a low-toxicity degradation pathway for in vivo applications.

  20. Identification of Enterococcus faecalis antigens specifically expressed in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shet, Uttom K.; Park, Sang-Won; Lim, Hyun-Pil; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Kang, Seong Soo; Kim, Se Eun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Molecular mechanism of the pathogenicity of Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis), a suspected endodontic pathogen, has not yet been adequately elucidated due to limited information on its virulence factors. Here we report the identification of in vivo expressed antigens of E. faecalis by using a novel immunoscreening technique called change-mediated antigen technology (CMAT) and an experimental animal model of endodontic infection. Materials and Methods Among 4,500 E. coli recombinant clones screened, 19 positive clones reacted reproducibly with hyperimmune sera obtained from rabbits immunized with E. faecalis cells isolated from an experimental endodontic infection. DNA sequences from 16 of these in vivo-induced (IVI) genes were determined. Results Identified protein antigens of E. faecalis included enzymes involved in housekeeping functions, copper resistance protein, putative outer membrane proteins, and proteins of unknown function. Conclusions In vivo expressed antigens of E. faecalis could be identified by using a novel immune-screening technique CMAT and an experimental animal model of endodontic infection. Detailed analysis of these IVI genes will lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the endodontic infection of E. faecalis. PMID:26587417

  1. Sex differences in the pro-inflammatory cytokine response to endotoxin unfold in vivo but not ex vivo in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Alexander; Benson, Sven; Rebernik, Laura; Spreitzer, Ingo; Jäger, Marcus; Schedlowski, Manfred; Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Engler, Harald

    2017-07-01

    Clinical data indicate that inflammatory responses differ across sexes, but the mechanisms remain elusive. Herein, we assessed in vivo and ex vivo cytokine responses to bacterial endotoxin in healthy men and women to elucidate the role of systemic and cellular factors underlying sex differences in inflammatory responses. Participants received an i.v. injection of low-dose endotoxin (0.4 ng/kg body mass), and plasma TNF-α and IL-6 responses were analyzed over a period of 6 h. In parallel, ex vivo cytokine production was measured in endotoxin-stimulated blood samples obtained immediately before in vivo endotoxin administration. As glucocorticoids (GCs) play an important role in the negative feedback regulation of the inflammatory response, we additionally analyzed plasma cortisol concentrations and ex vivo GC sensitivity of cytokine production. Results revealed greater in vivo pro-inflammatory responses in women compared with men, with significantly higher increases in plasma TNF-α and IL-6 concentrations. In addition, the endotoxin-induced rise in plasma cortisol was more pronounced in women. In contrast, no sex differences in ex vivo cytokine production and GC sensitivity were observed. Together, these findings demonstrate major differences in in vivo and ex vivo responses to endotoxin and underscore the importance of systemic factors underlying sex differences in the inflammatory response.

  2. Glioma survival prediction with the combined analysis of in vivo 11C-MET-PET, ex vivo and patient features by supervised machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Laszlo; Poetsch, Nina; Grahovac, Marko; Schmidbauer, Victor; Woehrer, Adelheid; Preusser, Matthias; Mitterhauser, Markus; Kiesel, Barbara; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Beyer, Thomas; Hacker, Marcus; Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana

    2017-11-24

    Gliomas are the most common types of tumors in the brain. While the definite diagnosis is routinely made ex vivo by histopathologic and molecular examination, diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected glioma is mainly done by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Nevertheless, L-S-methyl-11C-methionine (11C-MET) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) holds a great potential in characterization of gliomas. The aim of this study was to establish machine learning (ML) driven survival models for glioma built on 11C-MET-PET, ex vivo and patient characteristics. Methods: 70 patients with a treatment naïve glioma, who had a positive 11C-MET-PET and histopathology-derived ex vivo feature extraction, such as World Health Organization (WHO) 2007 tumor grade, histology and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH1-R132H) mutation status were included. The 11C-MET-positive primary tumors were delineated semi-automatically on PET images followed by the feature extraction of tumor-to-background ratio based general and higher-order textural features by applying five different binning approaches. In vivo and ex vivo features, as well as patient characteristics (age, weight, height, body-mass-index, Karnofsky-score) were merged to characterize the tumors. Machine learning approaches were utilized to identify relevant in vivo, ex vivo and patient features and their relative weights for 36 months survival prediction. The resulting feature weights were used to establish three predictive models per binning configuration based on a combination of: in vivo/ex vivo and clinical patient information (M36IEP), in vivo and patient-only information (M36IP), and in vivo only (M36I). In addition a binning-independent ex vivo and patient-only (M36EP) model was created. The established models were validated in a Monte Carlo (MC) cross-validation scheme. Results: Most prominent ML-selected and -weighted features were patient and ex vivo based followed by in vivo features. The highest area under the curve

  3. Assessing ex vivo dental biofilms and in vivo composite restorations using cross-polarization optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R.; Aparicio, C.; Chityala, R.; Chen, R.; Fok, A.; Rudney, J.

    2012-01-01

    A cross-polarization 1310-nm optical coherence tomography system (CP-OCT), using a beam splitter based design, was used to assess ex vivo growth of complex multi-species dental biofilms. These biofilm microcosms were derived from plaque samples along the interface of composite or amalgam restoration in children with a history of early childhood caries. This paper presents a method of measuring the mean biofilm height of mature biofilms using CP-OCT. For our in vivo application, the novel swept source based CP-OCT intraoral probe (Santec Co. Komaki, Japan) dimensions and system image acquisition speed (20 image frames/second) allowed imaging pediatric subjects as young as 4 years old. The subsurface enamel under the interface of composite resin restorations of pediatric subjects were imaged using CP-OCT. Cavitated secondary caries is clearly evident from sound resin composite restorations.

  4. The CRISPR/Cas9 system: Their delivery, in vivo and ex vivo applications and clinical development by startups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minjung

    2017-07-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system was originally derived from the prokaryotic adaptive immune system mediated by Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas). The system has been successfully applied to genome editing in eukaryotes and has contributed to remarkable advances in the life sciences, in areas ranging from agriculture to genetic disease therapies. For efficient editing and extending the influence of this system, proper delivery of its components is crucial. Both viral and nonviral delivery methods are reviewed here, along with the advantages and disadvantages of each. In addition, we review ex vivo and in vivo CRISPR/Cas9 applications for disease therapies. Related remarkable studies are highlighted and relevant startup companies and their drug development pipelines are described. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:1035-1045, 2017. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  5. Fiber optic confocal microscope: In vivo precancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Kristen Dawn

    Cancer is a significant public health problem worldwide. Many cancers originate as precancerous lesions in the epithelium which, when removed in sufficient time, can prevent progression to cancer. However, current detection techniques are typically time-consuming and expensive, limiting their acceptance and accessibility. Optical techniques, such as confocal microscopy, have significant potential to provide clinicians with real-time, high-resolution images of cells and tissue without tissue removal. These images of cell morphology and tissue architecture can be used to characterize tissue and determine the presence or extent of precancer and cancer. This dissertation explores the instrumentation and application of fiber optic reflectance confocal microscopy for in vivo precancer detection. The first part of the dissertation presents in vivo imaging of suspicious lesions in the human uterine cervix and oral mucosa using a fiber bundle based confocal microscope with a complex glass miniature objective lens. Images are analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively to determine the potential of this technology in vivo. An analysis of nuclear density from images of 30 cervical epithelium sites shows differentiation between normal and precancerous sites. Similarly, images from 20 oral mucosa sites demonstrate changes in nuclear density and tissue architecture indicative of progression of precancer and cancer. In addition to this multi-fiber confocal microscope used with a glass objective lens for the clinical studies, imaging of tissue samples has been accomplished with the same confocal system using an injection molded plastic miniature objective lens demonstrating comparable optical quality for a significantly less expensive optical component. Finally, a benchtop prototype of a single fiber confocal microscope using a gimbaled two-axis MEMS scanner has been designed and constructed. Imaging of a resolution target and cellular samples demonstrates sufficient resolution and

  6. Gravitational physiology of human immune cells: a review of in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogoli, A.

    1996-01-01

    The study of the function of immune cells in microgravity has been studied for more than 20 years in several laboratories. It is clear today that the immune system is depressed in more than 50% of the astronauts during and after space flight and that the activation of T lymphocytes by mitogens in vitro changes dramatically. This article gives an overview of the gravitational studies conducted by our laboratory in Spacelab, in MIR station, in sounding rockets and on the ground in the clinostat and the centrifuge. Three experimental approaches are followed in our work: (i) Ex vivo studies are performed with blood samples drawn from astronauts; (ii) in vivo studies are based on the application of seven antigens to the skin of the astronauts; (iii) in vitro studies are carried out with immune cells purified from the blood of healthy donors (not astronauts). The data from our in vivo and ex vivo studies are in agreement with those of other laboratories and show that the immunological function is depressed in the majority of astronauts as a consequence of the stress of space flight rather than by a direct influence of gravity on the cell. Immune depression may become a critical hazard on long duration flights on space stations or to other planets. In vitro experiments show that cultures of free-floating lymphocytes and monocytes undergo a dramatic depression of activation by the mitogen concanavalin A, while activation is more than doubled when the cells are attached to microcarrier beads. Such effects may be attributed to both direct and indirect effects of gravitational unloading on basic biological mechanisms of the cell. While the in vitro data are very important to clarify certain aspects of the biological mechanism of T cells activation, they are not descriptive of the changes of the immunological function of the astronauts.

  7. Effective in vivo and ex vivo gene transfer to intestinal mucosa by VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasahara Noriyuki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene transfer to the gastrointestinal (GI mucosa is a therapeutic strategy which could prove particularly advantageous for treatment of various hereditary and acquired intestinal disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, GI infections, and cancer. Methods We evaluated vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein envelope (VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors (LV for efficacy of gene transfer to both murine rectosigmoid colon in vivo and human colon explants ex vivo. LV encoding beta-galactosidase (LV-β-Gal or firefly-luciferase (LV-fLuc reporter genes were administered by intrarectal instillation in mice, or applied topically for ex vivo transduction of human colorectal explant tissues from normal individuals. Macroscopic and histological evaluations were performed to assess any tissue damage or inflammation. Transduction efficiency and systemic biodistribution were evaluated by real-time quantitative PCR. LV-fLuc expression was evaluated by ex vivo bioluminescence imaging. LV-β-Gal expression and identity of transduced cell types were examined by histochemical and immunofluorescence staining. Results Imaging studies showed positive fLuc signals in murine distal colon; β-Gal-positive cells were found in both murine and human intestinal tissue. In the murine model, β-Gal-positive epithelial and lamina propria cells were found to express cytokeratin, CD45, and CD4. LV-transduced β-Gal-positive cells were also seen in human colorectal explants, consisting mainly of CD45, CD4, and CD11c-positive cells confined to the LP. Conclusions We have demonstrated the feasibility of LV-mediated gene transfer into colonic mucosa. We also identified differential patterns of mucosal gene transfer dependent on whether murine or human tissue was used. Within the limitations of the study, the LV did not appear to induce mucosal damage and were not distributed beyond the distal colon.

  8. Performance assessment of Pulse Wave Imaging using conventional ultrasound in canine aortas ex vivo and normal human arteries in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ronny X; Qaqish, William; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-09-01

    The propagation behavior of the arterial pulse wave may provide valuable diagnostic information for cardiovascular pathology. Pulse Wave Imaging (PWI) is a noninvasive, ultrasound imaging-based technique capable of mapping multiple wall motion waveforms along a short arterial segment over a single cardiac cycle, allowing for the regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) and propagation uniformity to be evaluated. The purpose of this study was to improve the clinical utility of PWI using a conventional ultrasound system. The tradeoff between PWI spatial and temporal resolution was evaluated using an ex vivo canine aorta (n = 2) setup to assess the effects of varying image acquisition and signal processing parameters on the measurement of the PWV and the pulse wave propagation uniformity r2. PWI was also performed on the carotid arteries and abdominal aortas of 10 healthy volunteers (24.8 ± 3.3 y.o.) to determine the waveform tracking feature that would yield the most precise PWV measurements and highest r2 values in vivo. The ex vivo results indicated that the highest precision for measuring PWVs ~ 2.5 - 3.5 m/s was achieved using 24-48 scan lines within a 38 mm image plane width (i.e. 0.63 - 1.26 lines/mm). The in vivo results indicated that tracking the 50% upstroke of the waveform would consistently yield the most precise PWV measurements and minimize the error in the propagation uniformity measurement. Such findings may help establish the optimal image acquisition and signal processing parameters that may improve the reliability of PWI as a clinical measurement tool.

  9. Performance assessment and optimization of Pulse Wave Imaging (PWI) in ex vivo canine aortas and in vivo normal human arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ronny X; Qaqish, William W; Shahmirzadi, Danial; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2012-01-01

    The amplitude, velocity, and morphology of the arterial pulse wave may all provide valuable diagnostic information for cardiovascular pathology. Pulse Wave Imaging (PWI) is an ultrasound-based method developed by our group to noninvasively visualize and map the spatio-temporal variations of the pulse wave-induced vessel wall motion. Because PWI is capable of acquiring multiple wall motion waveforms successively along an imaged arterial segment over a single cardiac cycle in vivo, the regional morphological changes, amplitudes, and velocity (i.e. pulse wave velocity, or PWV) of the pulse wave can all be evaluated. In this study, an ex vivo setup was used to assess the effects of varying PWI image acquisition variables (beam density/frame rate and scanning orientation) and signal processing methods (beam sweep compensation scheme and waveform feature tracking) on the PWV estimation in order to validate the optimal parameters. PWI was also performed on the carotid arteries and abdominal aortas of six healthy volunteers for identification of several salient features of the waveforms over the entire cardiac cycle that may aid in assessing the morphological changes of the pulse wave. The ex vivo results suggest that the PWI temporal resolution is more important for PWV estimation than the PWI spatial resolution, and also that the reverse scanning orientation (i.e. beam sweeping direction opposite the direction of fluid flow) is advantageous due to higher precision and less dependence on the frame rate. In the in vivo waveforms, the highest precision PWV measurements were obtained by tracking the 50% upstroke of the waveforms. Finally, the dicrotic notch, reflected wave, and several inflection points were qualitatively identified in the carotid and aortic anterior wall motion waveforms and shown in one representative subject.

  10. In vivo characterization of polymer based dental cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widiyanti P

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In vivo studies investigating the characterization of dental cements have been demonstrated. As few in vitro studies on this cement system have been performed. Previous researches in dental material has been standardized dental cement which fulfilled the physical and mechanical characteristic such as shear strength but were on in vitro condition, the animal model and clinical study of dental cement from laboratory has not been done yet. This research examined physical and mechanical characteristic in vivo using rabbit by making the caries (class III in anterior teeth especially in mesial or distal incisive, fulfilled the cavity by dental cement and analyzed the compressive strength, tensile strength, and microstructure using scanning electron microscope (SEM. Purpose: This study is aimed to describe the in vivo characterization of dental cements based on polymer (zinc phosphate cement, polycarboxylate, glass ionomer cement and zinc oxide eugenol. Methods: First, preparation was done on animal model’s teeth (6 rabbits, male, 5 months old. The cavity was made which involved the dentin. Then the cavity was filled with dental cement. After the filling procedure, the animal model should be kept until 21 days and than the compressive test, tensile test and microstructure was characterized. Compressive test and tensile test was analyzed using samples from extracted tooth and was measured with autograph. The microstructure test was measured using SEM. Results: The best compressive strength value was belongs to zinc phosphate cement which was 101.888 Mpa and the best tensile strength value was belongs to glass ionomer cement which was 6.555 Mpa. Conclusion: In conclusion, comparing with 3 others type of dental cements which are zinc phosphate, polycarboxylate and glass ionomer cement, zinc oxide eugenol cement has the worst for both physical and mechanical properties.Latar belakang: Studi in vivo meneliti karakterisasi secara in vivo dari

  11. In vivo measurements of bone-seeking radionuclides. Progress report, September 1, 1977--February 28, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, N.

    1978-11-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: estimation of the skeletal burden of bone-seeking radionuclides from in vivo scintillation measurements of their content in the skull; contribution from radionuclides in the thoracic skeleton to in vivo measurements of activity in the lung; design and optimization characterictics of in vivo detection system; development of a calibration phantom structure for determining activity deposited in the thoracic skeleton; computer assisted in vivo measurements of internally deposited radionuclides using dual-crystal scintillation detectors; low energy, photon-emitting nuclides; reference spectra library; and in vivo measurements of exposed individuals. (HLW)

  12. Vitrification of in vivo and in vitro produced ovine blastocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, S E; Zeng, S M; Yu, W L; Li, S J; Zhang, Z C; Chen, Y F

    2001-11-01

    Although cryopreservation of bovine embryo has made great progress in recent years, little achievement was obtained in ovine embryo freezing, especially in vitro produced embryos. However, a simple and efficient method for cryopreservation of sheep embryos will be important for application of ovine embryonic techniques such as in vitro fertilization, transgenic, cloning and etc. In this study ovine blastocysts, produced in vivo or in vitro, were cryopreserved by vitrification in EFS40 (40% ethylene glycol (EG), 18% ficoll and 0.5 M sucrose) or GFS40 (40% glycerol (GL), 18% ficoll and 0.5 Mol sucrose). In vitro produced, early blastocysts were directly plunged into liquid nitrogen (LN2) after preparation by one of the following procedures at 25 degrees C: (A) equilibration in EFS40 for 1 min; (B) equilibration in EFS40 for 2 min; (C) equilibration in EFS40 for 30 s following pretreatment in 10% EG for 5 min; (D) equilibration in EFS40 for 30 s following pretreatment in EFS20 for 2 min (E) equilibration in GFS30 for 30 s following pretreatment in 10% GL for 5 min. The survival rates observed after thawing and in vitro culture for 12 h were A 78.0% (39/50), B 50.0% (26/52), C 93.3% (70/75), D 92.0% (46/50) and E 68.0% (34/50). Survival rates were not significantly different for treatments C and D (p>0.05), but those for groups C and D were significantly higher than for A, B and E (pvitro culture, hatched blastocyst rates were A 28.0% (14/50), B 21.1% (11/52), C 49.3% (37/75), D 48.0% (24/50), E 32.0% (16/50) and control 54.0% (27/50). The hatching rates for groups A, B and E were significantly lower than the control (p0.05). The freezing procedures A, B and C were used to vitrify in vivo produced, early blastocysts recovered from superovulated ewes. The survival rates of frozen-thawed in vivo embryos were A 94.7% (72/76), B 75.0% (45/60) and C 96.4% (54/56) and for group B was significantly lower than for the other two treatment groups (p0.05). Frozen-thawed embryos

  13. The Response of RIF-1 Fibrosarcomas to the Vascular-Disrupting Agent ZD6126 Assessed by In Vivo and Ex Vivo1H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basetti Madhu

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The response of radiation-induced fibrosarcoma1 (RIF-1 tumors treated with the vascular-disrupting agent (VDA ZD6126 was assessed by in vivo and ex vivo1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS methods. Tumors treated with 200 mg/kg ZD6126 showed a significant reduction in total choline (tCho in vivo 24 hours after treatment, whereas control tumors showed a significant increase in tCho. This response was investigated further within both ex vivo unprocessed tumor tissues and tumor tissue metabolite extracts. Ex vivo high-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS and 1H MRS of metabolite extracts revealed a significant reduction in phosphocholine and glycerophosphocholine in biopsies of ZD6126-treated tumors, confirming in vivo tCho response. ZD6126-induced reduction in choline compounds is consistent with a reduction in cell membrane turnover associated with necrosis and cell death following disruption of the tumor vasculature. In vivo tumor tissue water diffusion and lactate measurements showed no significant changes in response to ZD6126. Spin-spin relaxation times (T2 of water and metabolites also remained unchanged. Noninvasive 1H MRS measurement of tCho in vivo provides a potential biomarker of tumor response to VDAs in RIF-1 tumors.

  14. TNF-alpha promoter, Nod2 and toll-like receptor-4 polymorphisms and the in vivo and ex vivo response to endotoxin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, Emile F.; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van Voorden, Sjaak; Martina, Cerithsa A. E.; le Cessie, Saskia; van Dissel, Jaap T.

    2004-01-01

    Humans exhibit substantial inter-individual differences in TNF-alpha production upon endotoxin stimulation. To determine to what extent the lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-alpha production capacity in vivo and ex vivo is determined by polymorphisms in toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), the TNF-alpha

  15. In vivo Degradation of Three-Dimensional Silk Fibroin Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongzhong; Rudym, Darya D.; Walsh, Ashley; Abrahamsen, Lauren; Kim, Hyeon-Joo; Kim, Hyun Suk; Kirker-Head, Carl; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional porous scaffolds prepared from regenerated silk fibroin using either an all aqueous process or a process involving an organic solvent, hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) have shown promise in cell culture and tissue engineering applications. However, their biocompatibility and in vivo degradation has not been fully established. The present study was conducted to systematically investigate how processing method (aqueous vs. organic solvent) and processing variables (silk fibroin concentration and pore size) affect the short-term (up to 2 months) and long-term (up to 1 year) in vivo behavior of the protein scaffolds in both nude and Lewis rats. The samples were analyzed by histology for scaffold morphological changes and tissue ingrowth, and by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry for immune responses. Throughout the period of implantation, all scaffolds were well-tolerated by the host animals and immune responses to the implants were mild. Most scaffolds prepared from the all aqueous process degraded to completion between two and six months, while those prepared from organic solvent (hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP)) process persisted beyond one year. Due to widespread cellular invasion throughout the scaffold, the degradation of aqueous-derived scaffolds appears to be more homogeneous than that of HFIP-derived scaffolds. In general and especially for the HFIP-derived scaffolds, a higher original silk fibroin concentration (e.g. 17%) and smaller pore size (e.g. 100–200 µm) resulted in lower levels of tissue ingrowth and slower degradation. These results demonstrate that the in vivo behavior of the three-dimensional silk fibroin scaffolds is related to the morphological and structural features that resulted from different scaffold preparation processes. The insights gained in this study can serve as a guide for processing scenarios to match desired morphological and structural features and degradation time with tissue-specific applications. PMID

  16. An ex vivo culture system to study thyroid development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmarcelle, Anne-Sophie; Villacorte, Mylah; Hick, Anne-Christine; Pierreux, Christophe E

    2014-06-06

    The thyroid is a bilobated endocrine gland localized at the base of the neck, producing the thyroid hormones T3, T4, and calcitonin. T3 and T4 are produced by differentiated thyrocytes, organized in closed spheres called follicles, while calcitonin is synthesized by C-cells, interspersed in between the follicles and a dense network of blood capillaries. Although adult thyroid architecture and functions have been extensively described and studied, the formation of the "angio-follicular" units, the distribution of C-cells in the parenchyma and the paracrine communications between epithelial and endothelial cells is far from being understood. This method describes the sequential steps of mouse embryonic thyroid anlagen dissection and its culture on semiporous filters or on microscopy plastic slides. Within a period of four days, this culture system faithfully recapitulates in vivo thyroid development. Indeed, (i) bilobation of the organ occurs (for e12.5 explants), (ii) thyrocytes precursors organize into follicles and polarize, (iii) thyrocytes and C-cells differentiate, and (iv) endothelial cells present in the microdissected tissue proliferate, migrate into the thyroid lobes, and closely associate with the epithelial cells, as they do in vivo. Thyroid tissues can be obtained from wild type, knockout or fluorescent transgenic embryos. Moreover, explants culture can be manipulated by addition of inhibitors, blocking antibodies, growth factors, or even cells or conditioned medium. Ex vivo development can be analyzed in real-time, or at any time of the culture by immunostaining and RT-qPCR. In conclusion, thyroid explant culture combined with downstream whole-mount or on sections imaging and gene expression profiling provides a powerful system for manipulating and studying morphogenetic and differentiation events of thyroid organogenesis.

  17. In Vivo Neuroimaging of Exosomes Using Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzer, Oshra; Perets, Nisim; Angel, Ariel; Motiei, Menachem; Sadan, Tamar; Yadid, Gal; Offen, Daniel; Popovtzer, Rachela

    2017-11-28

    Exosomes are emerging as effective therapeutic tools for various pathologies. These extracellular vesicles can bypass biological barriers, including the blood-brain barrier, and can serve as powerful drug and gene therapy transporters. However, the progress of therapy development is impeded by several challenges, including insufficient data on exosome trafficking and biodistribution and the difficulty to image deep brain structures in vivo. Herein, we established a method for noninvasive in vivo neuroimaging and tracking of exosomes, based on glucose-coated gold nanoparticle (GNP) labeling and computed tomography imaging. Labeling of exosomes with the GNPs was achieved directly, as opposed to the typical and less efficient indirect labeling mode through parent cells. On the mechanistic level, we found that the glucose-coated GNPs were uptaken into MSC-derived exosomes via an active, energy-dependent mechanism that is mediated by the glucose transporter GLUT-1 and involves endocytic proteins. Next, we determined optimal parameters of size and administration route; we demonstrated that 5 nm GNPs enabled improved exosome labeling and that intranasal, compared to intravenous, administration led to superior brain accumulation and thus enhanced in vivo neuroimaging. Furthermore, using a mouse model of focal brain ischemia, we noninvasively tracked intranasally administered GNP-labeled exosomes, which showed increased accumulation at the lesion site over 24 h, as compared to nonspecific migration and clearance from control brains over the same period. Thus, this exosome labeling technique can serve as a powerful diagnostic tool for various brain disorders and could potentially enhance exosome-based treatments for neuronal recovery.

  18. Recommendations for safety testing with the in vivo comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Marie Z

    2012-08-30

    While the in vivo comet assay increases its role in regulatory safety testing, deliberations about the interpretation of comet data continue. Concerns can arise regarding comet assay publications with limited data from non-blind testing of positive control compounds and using protocols (e.g. dose concentrations, sample times, and tissues) known to give an expected effect. There may be a tendency towards bias when the validation or interpretation of comet assay data is based on results generated by widely accepted but non-validated assays. The greatest advantages of the comet assay are its sensitivity and its ability to detect genotoxicity in tissues and at sample times that could not previously be evaluated. Guidelines for its use and interpretation in safety testing should take these factors into account. Guidelines should be derived from objective review of data generated by blind testing of unknown compounds dosed at non-toxic concentrations and evaluated in a true safety-testing environment, where the experimental design and conclusions must be defensible. However, positive in vivo comet findings with such compounds are rarely submitted to regulatory agencies and this data is typically unavailable for publication due to its proprietary nature. To enhance the development of guidelines for safety testing with the comet assay, and with the permission of several sponsors, this paper presents and discusses relevant data from multiple GLP comet studies conducted blind, with unknown pharmaceuticals and consumer products. Based on these data and the lessons we have learned through the course of conducting these studies, I suggest significant adjustments to the current conventions, and I provide recommendations for interpreting in vivo comet assay results in situations where risk must be evaluated in the absence of carcinogenicity or clinical data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Spectroscopic optical coherence tomography for ex vivo brain tumor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Marcel; Krug, Robin; Dillmann, Christopher; Gerling, Alexandra; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Welp, Hubert; Schmieder, Kirsten; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2017-02-01

    For neurosurgeries precise tumor resection is essential for the subsequent recovery of the patients since nearby healthy tissue that may be harmed has a huge impact on the life quality after the surgery. However, so far no satisfying methodology has been established to assist the surgeon during surgery to distinguish between healthy and tumor tissue. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) potentially enables non-contact in vivo image acquisition at penetration depths of 1-2 mm with a resolution of approximately 1-15 μm. To analyze the potential of OCT for distinction between brain tumors and healthy tissue, we used a commercially available Thorlabs Callisto system to measure healthy tissue and meningioma samples ex vivo. All samples were measured with the OCT system and three dimensional datasets were generated. Afterwards they were sent to the pathology for staining with hematoxylin and eosin and then investigated with a bright field microscope to verify the tissue type. This is the actual gold standard for ex vivo analysis. The images taken by the OCT system exhibit variations in the structure for different tissue types, but these variations may not be objectively evaluated from raw OCT images. Since an automated distinction between tumor and healthy tissue would be highly desirable to guide the surgeon, we applied Spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography to further enhance the differences between the tissue types. Pattern recognition and machine learning algorithms were applied to classify the derived spectroscopic information. Finally, the classification results are analyzed in comparison to the histological analysis of the samples.

  20. In vivo imaging of tumor vascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dawen; Stafford, Jason H.; Zhou, Heling; Thorpe, Philip E.

    2013-02-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS), normally restricted to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, becomes exposed on the outer surface of viable (non-apoptotic) endothelial cells in tumor blood vessels, probably in response to oxidative stresses present in the tumor microenvironment. In the present study, we optically imaged exposed PS on tumor vasculature in vivo using PGN635, a novel human monoclonal antibody that targets PS. PGN635 F(ab')2 was labeled with the near infrared (NIR) dye, IRDye 800CW. Human glioma U87 cells or breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were implanted subcutaneously or orthotopically into nude mice. When the tumors reached ~5 mm in diameter, 800CW- PGN635 was injected via a tail vein and in vivo dynamic NIR imaging was performed. For U87 gliomas, NIR imaging allowed clear detection of tumors as early as 4 h later, which improved over time to give a maximal tumor/normal ratio (TNR = 2.9 +/- 0.5) 24 h later. Similar results were observed for orthotopic MDA-MB-231 breast tumors. Localization of 800CW-PGN635 to tumors was antigen specific since 800CW-Aurexis, a control probe of irrelevant specificity, did not localize to the tumors, and pre-administration of unlabeled PGN635 blocked the uptake of 800CW-PGN635. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed that 800CW-PGN635 was binding to PS-positive tumor vascular endothelium. Our studies suggest that tumor vasculature can be successfully imaged in vivo to provide sensitive tumor detection.